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Sample records for neuromuscular diseases causing

  1. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  2. [Respiratory treatments in neuromuscular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Cols Roig, M; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sardon Prado, O; Asensio de la Cruz, O; Torrent Vernetta, A

    2014-10-01

    In a previous article, a review was presented of the respiratory pathophysiology of the patient with neuromuscular disease, as well as their clinical evaluation and the major complications causing pulmonary deterioration. This article presents the respiratory treatments required to preserve lung function in neuromuscular disease as long as possible, as well as in special situations (respiratory infections, spinal curvature surgery, etc.). Special emphasis is made on the use of non-invasive ventilation, which is changing the natural history of many of these diseases. The increase in survival and life expectancy of these children means that they can continue their clinical care in adult units. The transition from pediatric care must be an active, timely and progressive process. It may be slightly stressful for the patient before the adaptation to this new environment, with multidisciplinary care always being maintained. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Neuromuscular disease classification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Aurora; Acha, Begoña; Montero-Sánchez, Adoración; Rivas, Eloy; Escudero, Luis M.; Serrano, Carmen

    2013-06-01

    Diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is based on subjective visual assessment of biopsies from patients by the pathologist specialist. A system for objective analysis and classification of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through muscle biopsy images of fluorescence microscopy is presented. The procedure starts with an accurate segmentation of the muscle fibers using mathematical morphology and a watershed transform. A feature extraction step is carried out in two parts: 24 features that pathologists take into account to diagnose the diseases and 58 structural features that the human eye cannot see, based on the assumption that the biopsy is considered as a graph, where the nodes are represented by each fiber, and two nodes are connected if two fibers are adjacent. A feature selection using sequential forward selection and sequential backward selection methods, a classification using a Fuzzy ARTMAP neural network, and a study of grading the severity are performed on these two sets of features. A database consisting of 91 images was used: 71 images for the training step and 20 as the test. A classification error of 0% was obtained. It is concluded that the addition of features undetectable by the human visual inspection improves the categorization of atrophic patterns.

  4. Learn About Neuromuscular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause weakness and degeneration of the skeletal muscles. Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) Bethlem CMD Fukuyama ... Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis Hypokalemic periodic paralysis Myotonia ... muscular dystrophy Vocal cord and pharyngeal distal myopathy Welander distal ...

  5. Neuromuscular diseases: Diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, P; Servais, L; Vialle, R

    2018-02-01

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMDs) affect the peripheral nervous system, which includes the motor neurons and sensory neurons; the muscle itself; or the neuromuscular junction. Thus, the term NMDs encompasses a vast array of different syndromes. Some of these syndromes are of direct relevance to paediatric orthopaedic surgeons, either because the presenting manifestation is a functional sign (e.g., toe-walking) or deformity (e.g., pes cavus or scoliosis) suggesting a need for orthopaedic attention or because orthopaedic abnormalities requiring treatment develop during the course of a known NMD. The main NMDs relevant to the orthopaedic surgeon are infantile spinal muscular atrophy (a motor neuron disease), peripheral neuropathies (chiefly, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease), congenital muscular dystrophies, progressive muscular dystrophies, and Steinert myotonic dystrophy (or myotonic dystrophy type 1). Muscle weakness is a symptom shared by all these conditions. The paediatric orthopaedic surgeon must be familiar, not only with the musculoskeletal system, but also with many other domains (particularly respiratory and cardiac function and nutrition) that may interfere with the treatment and require preoperative management. Good knowledge of the natural history of each NMD is essential to ensure optimal timing of the therapeutic interventions, which must be performed under the best possible conditions in these usually frail patients. Timing is particularly crucial for the treatment of spinal deformities due to paraspinal muscle hypotonia during growth: depending on the disease and natural history, the treatment may involve non-operative methods or growing rods, followed by spinal fusion. A multidisciplinary approach is always required. Finally, the survival gains achieved in recent years increasingly require attention to preparing for adult life, to orthopaedic problems requiring treatment before the patient leaves the paediatric environment, and to the transition towards the

  6. Motor neuron, nerve, and neuromuscular junction disease.

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    Finsterer, Josef; Papić, Lea; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2011-10-01

    The aim is to review the most relevant findings published during the last year concerning clinical, genetic, pathogenic, and therapeutic advances in motor neuron disease, neuropathies, and neuromuscular junction disorders. Studies on animal and cell models have improved the understanding of how mutated survival motor neuron protein in spinal muscular atrophy governs the pathogenetic processes. New phenotypes of SOD1 mutations have been described. Moreover, animal models enhanced the insight into the pathogenetic background of sporadic and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Novel treatment options for motor neuron disease have been described in humans and animal models. Considerable progress has been achieved also in elucidating the genetic background of many forms of inherited neuropathies and high clinical and genetic heterogeneity has been demonstrated. Mutations in MuSK and GFTP1 have been shown to cause new types of congenital myasthenic syndromes. A third type of autoantibodies (Lrp4) has been detected to cause myasthenia gravis. Advances in the clinical and genetic characterization of motor neuron diseases, neuropathies, and neuromuscular transmission defects have important implications on the fundamental understanding, diagnosis, and management of these disorders. Identification of crucial steps of the pathogenetic process may provide the basis for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  7. Protein defects in neuromuscular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vainzof M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetically determined progressive disorders of the muscle with a primary or predominant involvement of the pelvic or shoulder girdle musculature. The clinical course is highly variable, ranging from severe congenital forms with rapid progression to milder forms with later onset and a slower course. In recent years, several proteins from the sarcolemmal muscle membrane (dystrophin, sarcoglycans, dysferlin, caveolin-3, from the extracellular matrix (alpha2-laminin, collagen VI, from the sarcomere (telethonin, myotilin, titin, nebulin, from the muscle cytosol (calpain 3, TRIM32, from the nucleus (emerin, lamin A/C, survival motor neuron protein, and from the glycosylation pathway (fukutin, fukutin-related protein have been identified. Mutations in their respective genes are responsible for different forms of neuromuscular diseases. Protein analysis using Western blotting or immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies is of the utmost importance for the differential diagnosis and elucidation of the physiopathology of each genetic disorder involved. Recent molecular studies have shown clinical inter- and intra-familial variability in several genetic disorders highlighting the importance of other factors in determining phenotypic expression and the role of possible modifying genes and protein interactions. Developmental studies can help elucidate the mechanism of normal muscle formation and thus muscle regeneration. In the last fifteen years, our research has focused on muscle protein expression, localization and possible interactions in patients affected by different forms of muscular dystrophies. The main objective of this review is to summarize the most recent findings in the field and our own contribution.

  8. Palliative care in neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, Marianne; Oliver, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness. Neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) are characterized by progressive muscle weakness, leading to pronounced and incapacitating

  9. Computed tomography of skeletal muscles in neuromuscular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiek, S.O.; Kuether, G.; Muenchen Univ.

    1985-01-01

    CT-documentation of skeletal muscular lesions caused by neuromuscular diseases implies an essential contribution to conventional techniques in the macroscopic field. Size, distribution and degree of lesions as well as compensatory mechanisms are proved thereby. We report about the different effects on muscle appearance referring to 106 patients of our own experience in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, polyradiculitis, polyneuropathy as well as peripheral traumatic nerve lesions. (orig.) [de

  10. Computed tomography of skeletal muscles in neuromuscular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodiek, S.O.; Kuether, G.

    1985-06-01

    CT-documentation of skeletal muscular lesions caused by neuromuscular diseases implies an essential contribution to conventional techniques in the macroscopic field. Size, distribution and degree of lesions as well as compensatory mechanisms are proved thereby. We report about the different effects on muscle appearance referring to 106 patients of our own experience in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, polyradiculitis, polyneuropathy as well as peripheral traumatic nerve lesions.

  11. Neuromuscular diseases after cardiac transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateen, Farrah J.; van de Beek, Diederik; Kremers, Walter K.; Daly, Richard C.; Edwards, Brooks S.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.; Wijdicks, Eelco F. M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac transplantation is a therapeutic option in end-stage heart failure. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) disease is known to occur in cardiac transplant recipients but has not been fully characterized. METHODS: This retrospective cohort review reports the PNS-related concerns of 313

  12. [Neuromuscular disease: respiratory clinical assessment and follow-up].

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    Martínez Carrasco, C; Villa Asensi, J R; Luna Paredes, M C; Osona Rodríguez de Torres, F B; Peña Zarza, J A; Larramona Carrera, H; Costa Colomer, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease are an important group at risk of frequently suffering acute or chronic respiratory failure, which is their main cause of death. They require follow-up by a pediatric respiratory medicine specialist from birth or diagnosis in order to confirm the diagnosis and treat any respiratory complications within a multidisciplinary context. The ventilatory support and the cough assistance have improved the quality of life and long-term survival for many of these patients. In this paper, the authors review the pathophysiology, respiratory function evaluation, sleep disorders, and the most frequent respiratory complications in neuromuscular diseases. The various treatments used, from a respiratory medicine point of view, will be analyzed in a next paper. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Recent advances in antisense oligonucleotide therapy in genetic neuromuscular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Verma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic neuromuscular diseases are caused by defective expression of nuclear or mitochondrial genes. Mutant genes may reduce expression of wild-type proteins, and strategies to activate expression of the wild-type proteins might provide therapeutic benefits. Also, a toxic mutant protein may cause cell death, and strategies that reduce mutant gene expression may provide therapeutic benefit. Synthetic antisense oligonucleotide (ASO can recognize cellular RNA and control gene expression. In recent years, advances in ASO chemistry, creation of designer ASO molecules to enhance their safety and target delivery, and scientific controlled clinical trials to ascertain their therapeutic safety and efficacy have led to an era of plausible application of ASO technology to treat currently incurable neuromuscular diseases. Over the past 1 year, for the first time, the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved two ASO therapies in genetic neuromuscular diseases. This overview summarizes the recent advances in ASO technology, evolution and use of synthetic ASOs as a therapeutic platform, and the mechanism of ASO action by exon-skipping in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and exon-inclusion in spinal muscular atrophy, with comments on their advantages and limitations.

  14. Recent achievements in restorative neurology: Progressive neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrijevic, M.R.; Kakulas, B.A.; Vrbova, G.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 27 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Computed Tomography of Muscles in Neuromuscular Disease; Mapping the Genes for Muscular Dystrophy; Trophic Factors and Motor Neuron Development; Size of Motor Units and Firing Rate in Muscular Dystrophy; Restorative Possibilities in Relation to the Pathology of Progressive Neuromuscular Disease; and An Approach to the Pathogenesis of some Congenital Myopathies

  15. Genetics of Pediatric-Onset Motor Neuron and Neuromuscular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy; Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease; Muscular Dystrophy; Spinal Muscular Atrophy With Respiratory Distress 1; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Motor Neuron Disease; Neuromuscular Disease; Peroneal Muscular Atrophy; Fragile X Syndrome

  16. Assessment of Motor Units in Neuromuscular Disease.

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    Henderson, Robert D; McCombe, Pamela A

    2017-01-01

    The motor unit comprises the anterior horn cell, its axon, and the muscle fibers that it innervates. Although the true number of motor units is unknown, the number of motor units appears to vary greatly between different muscles and between different individuals. Assessment of the number and function of motor units is needed in diseases of the anterior horn cell and other motor nerve disorders. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the most important disease of anterior horn cells. The need for an effective biomarker for assessing disease progression and for use in clinical trials in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has stimulated the study of methods to measure the number of motor units. Since 1970 a number of different methods, including the incremental, F-wave, multipoint, and statistical methods, have been developed but none has achieved widespread applicability. Two methods (MUNIX and the multipoint incremental method) are in current use across multiple centres and are discussed in detail in this review, together with other recently published methods. Imaging with magnetic resonance and ultrasound is increasingly being applied to this area. Motor unit number estimates have also been applied to other neuromuscular diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy, compression neuropathies, and prior poliomyelitis. The need for an objective measure for the assessment of motor units remains tantalizingly close but unfulfilled in 2016.

  17. Neuromuscular dentistry: Occlusal diseases and posture.

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    Khan, Mohd Toseef; Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Zahid, Syed Naved; Chaudhary, Prabhat K

    2013-01-01

    Neuromuscular dentistry has been a controversial topic in the field of dentistry and still remains debatable. The issue of good occlusion and sound health has been repeatedly discussed. Sometimes we get complains of sensitive teeth and sometimes of tired facial muscles on getting up in the morning. Owing to the intimate relation of masticatory apparatus with the cranium and cervico-scapular muscular system, the disorders in any system, draw attention from concerned clinicians involved in management, to develop an integrated treatment protocol for the suffering patients. There may be patients reporting to the dental clinics after an occlusal restoration or extraction, having pain in or around the temporomandibular joint, headache or neck pain. Although their esthetic demands must not be undermined during the course of treatment plan, whenever dental treatment of any sort is planned, occlusion/bite should be given prime importance. Very few dentist are able to diagnose the occlusal disease and of those who diagnose many people resort to aggressive treatment modalities. This paper aims to report the signs of occlusal disease, and discuss their association with TMDs and posture.

  18. Clinical applications of immunoglobulin in neuromuscular diseases: focus on inflammatory myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Victor Sgobbi de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, an increasing number of neuromuscular diseases have been recognized either to be caused primarily by autoimmune mechanisms, or to have important autoimmune components. The involved pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical manifestations have been better recognized and many of these disorders are potentially treatable by immunosuppression or by immunomodulation with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg. IVIg has been tried in a variety of immune-mediated neurological diseases, being target of widespread use in central and peripheral nervous systems diseases. Objective To give an overview of the main topics regarding the mechanism of action and different therapeutic uses of IVIg in neurological practice, mainly in neuromuscular diseases.

  19. Diverticular Disease of the Colon: Neuromuscular Function Abnormalities.

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    Bassotti, Gabrio; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Bernardini, Nunzia; Dore, Maria P

    2016-10-01

    Colonic diverticular disease is a frequent finding in daily clinical practice. However, its pathophysiological mechanisms are largely unknown. This condition is likely the result of several concomitant factors occurring together to cause anatomic and functional abnormalities, leading as a result to the outpouching of the colonic mucosa. A pivotal role seems to be played by an abnormal colonic neuromuscular function, as shown repeatedly in these patients, and by an altered visceral perception. There is recent evidence that these abnormalities might be related to the derangement of the enteric innervation, to an abnormal distribution of mucosal neuropeptides, and to low-grade mucosal inflammation. The latter might be responsible for the development of visceral hypersensitivity, often causing abdominal pain in a subset of these patients.

  20. New techniques in the tissue diagnosis of gastrointestinal neuromuscular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles H Knowles; Joanne E Martin

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuromuscular diseases are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders of children and adults in which symptoms are presumed or proven to arise as a result of neuromuscular (including interstitial cell of Cajal) dysfunction. Common to most of these diseases are symptoms of impaired motor activity which manifest as slowed or obstructed transit with or without evidence of transient or persistent radiological visceral dilatation. A variety of histopathological techniques and allied investigations are being increasingly applied to tissue biopsies from such patients. This review outlines some of the more recent advances in this field, particularly in the most contentious area of small bowel disease manifesting as intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

  1. Neuromuscular exercise as treatment of degenerative knee disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Ewa M.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is recommended as first-line treatment of degenerative knee disease. Our hypothesis is that neuromuscular exercise is feasible and at least as effective as tradionally used strength or aerobic training, but aims to more closely target the sensorimotor deficiencies and functional...... instability associated with the degenerative knee disease than traditionally used training methods.SUMMARY FOR TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGECurrent data suggests that the effect from neuromuscular exercise on pain and function is comparable to the effects seen from other forms of exercise....

  2. Diagnostic value of CT scanning in neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulcke, J.A.L.; Leuven Univ.; Herpels, V.

    1983-01-01

    The diagnosis of myopathies has become easier since the CT technique is available. In this article the possibilities of CT for diagnostic procedures of neuromuscular diseases are pointed out. Density measurements increase differentiation of atrophy or hypertrophy of muscles as well as other pathological changes. (orig.)

  3. Imaging of respiratory muscles in neuromuscular disease: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlaar, L; Ciet, P; van der Ploeg, A T; Brusse, E; van der Beek, N A M E; Wielopolski, P A; de Bruijne, M; Tiddens, H A W M; van Doorn, P A

    2018-03-01

    Respiratory muscle weakness frequently occurs in patients with neuromuscular disease. Measuring respiratory function with standard pulmonary function tests provides information about the contribution of all respiratory muscles, the lungs and airways. Imaging potentially enables the study of different respiratory muscles, including the diaphragm, separately. In this review, we provide an overview of imaging techniques used to study respiratory muscles in neuromuscular disease. We identified 26 studies which included a total of 573 patients with neuromuscular disease. Imaging of respiratory muscles was divided into static and dynamic techniques. Static techniques comprise chest radiography, B-mode (brightness mode) ultrasound, CT and MRI, and are used to assess the position and thickness of the diaphragm and the other respiratory muscles. Dynamic techniques include fluoroscopy, M-mode (motion mode) ultrasound and MRI, used to assess diaphragm motion in one or more directions. We discuss how these imaging techniques relate with spirometric values and whether these can be used to study the contribution of the different respiratory muscles in patients with neuromuscular disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The rapid evolution of molecular genetic diagnostics in neuromuscular diseases.

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    Volk, Alexander E; Kubisch, Christian

    2017-10-01

    The development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS) has revolutionized molecular genetic diagnostics in monogenic disorders. The present review gives a brief overview of different MPS-based approaches used in clinical diagnostics of neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) and highlights their advantages and limitations. MPS-based approaches like gene panel sequencing, (whole) exome sequencing, (whole) genome sequencing, and RNA sequencing have been used to identify the genetic cause in NMDs. Although gene panel sequencing has evolved as a standard test for heterogeneous diseases, it is still debated, mainly because of financial issues and unsolved problems of variant interpretation, whether genome sequencing (and to a lesser extent also exome sequencing) of single patients can already be regarded as routine diagnostics. However, it has been shown that the inclusion of parents and additional family members often leads to a substantial increase in the diagnostic yield in exome-wide/genome-wide MPS approaches. In addition, MPS-based RNA sequencing just enters the research and diagnostic scene. Next-generation sequencing increasingly enables the detection of the genetic cause in highly heterogeneous diseases like NMDs in an efficient and affordable way. Gene panel sequencing and family-based exome sequencing have been proven as potent and cost-efficient diagnostic tools. Although clinical validation and interpretation of genome sequencing is still challenging, diagnostic RNA sequencing represents a promising tool to bypass some hurdles of diagnostics using genomic DNA.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schalke, B.C.G.; Rohkamm, R.; Kaiser, W.

    1990-01-01

    In the last few years imaging procedures became also important in the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases. We examined more than 150 patients with different neuromuscular diseases with MRI. Conventional diagnostic procedures like EMG, muscle biopsy can not be replaced by imaging procedures. MRI gives the chance to get additional diagnostic informations. It is possible to determine exact distribution and intensity of pathological changes in the muscle. Inflammatory muscle diseases can be differrentiated by T1/T2 values from atrophic/dystrophic diseases. The resolving power is very high and allows the exact detection of affected areas even in a single muscle. This can help to reduce false negative muscle biopsies. This is very useful in children and young adults. MRI can be used for the early detection of genetic myopathies and neuropathies. MRI allows to examine all muscles, including the heart, bone artefacts are absent. Heart muscle involvement in neuromuscular diseases can directly be shown by this method without any risk for the patient. In addition P-spectroscopy can be done for better understanding of pathogenesis, especially if the exact distribution of pathological changes is known. (author)

  6. The role of patient advocacy organisations in neuromuscular disease R&D - The case of the Dutch neuromuscular disease association VSN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, W.P.C.; Broekgaarden, R.

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates to what extent patient advocacy organisations play a role in influencing R&D and policymaking for rare neuromuscular diseases. The Dutch neuromuscular disease organisation VSN is studied in depth. A brief history of the VSN is sketched along with the international

  7. Ketogenic Diet in Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Damiani, Ernesto; Bosco, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of data demonstrate the utility of ketogenic diets in a variety of metabolic diseases as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. In regard to neurological disorders, ketogenic diet is recognized as an effective treatment for pharmacoresistant epilepsy but emerging data suggests that ketogenic diet could be also useful in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer, Parkinson's disease, and some mitochondriopathies. Although these diseases have different pathogenesis and features, there are some common mechanisms that could explain the effects of ketogenic diets. These mechanisms are to provide an efficient source of energy for the treatment of certain types of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by focal brain hypometabolism; to decrease the oxidative damage associated with various kinds of metabolic stress; to increase the mitochondrial biogenesis pathways; and to take advantage of the capacity of ketones to bypass the defect in complex I activity implicated in some neurological diseases. These mechanisms will be discussed in this review. PMID:25101284

  8. Neuromuscular rate of force development deficit in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Kelley G; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; LeDoux, Mark S; Schilling, Brian K

    2017-06-01

    Bradykinesia and reduced neuromuscular force exist in Parkinson disease. The interpolated twitch technique has been used to evaluate central versus peripheral manifestations of neuromuscular strength in healthy, aging, and athletic populations, as well as moderate to advanced Parkinson disease, but this method has not been used in mild Parkinson disease. This study aimed to evaluate quadriceps femoris rate of force development and quantify potential central and peripheral activation deficits in individuals with Parkinson disease. Nine persons with mild Parkinson Disease (Hoehn & Yahr≤2, Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale total score=mean 19.1 (SD 5.0)) and eight age-matched controls were recruited in a cross-sectional investigation. Quadriceps femoris voluntary and stimulated maximal force and rate of force development were evaluated using the interpolated twitch technique. Thirteen participants satisfactorily completed the protocol. Individuals with early Parkinson disease (n=7) had significantly slower voluntary rate of force development (p=0.008; d=1.97) and rate of force development ratio (p=0.004; d=2.18) than controls (n=6). No significant differences were found between groups for all other variables. Persons with mild-to-moderate Parkinson disease display disparities in rate of force development, even without deficits in maximal force. The inability to produce force at a rate comparable to controls is likely a downstream effect of central dysfunction of the motor pathway in Parkinson disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Diagnostics of neuromuscular diseases with the aid of computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, M de; Verbeeten, Jr, B J

    1988-06-04

    In this article the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases with the aid of computerized tomography is treated. Computerized tomography of skeletal muscles give no information which is pathognomonic for particular diseases. But the technique can be used in the following aspects: to choose a muscle for a biopsy; when it is not possible to examine the function of a muscle, a CT scan can visualize morphological deviations; in the differentiation of muscle hypertrophy and pseudo-hypertrophy. For some cases as Becker-type muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral dystrophy and Kugelberg-Welander type spinal muscular atrophy computerized tomography gives characteristic images. 10 refs.; 6 figs.

  10. Diagnostics of neuromuscular diseases with the aid of computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, M. de; Verbeeten, B.J. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In this article the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases with the aid of computerized tomography is treated. Computerized tomography of skeletal muscles give no information which is pathognomonic for particular diseases. But the technique can be used in the following aspects: to choose a muscle for a biopsy; when it is not possible to examine the function of a muscle, a CT scan can visualize morphological deviations; in the differentiation of muscle hypertrophy and pseudo-hypertrophy. For some cases as Becker-type muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral dystrophy and Kugelberg-Welander type spinal muscular atrophy computerized tomography gives characteristic images. 10 refs.; 6 figs

  11. Radioimmunoassay of serum myoglobin in neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askmark, H; Osterman, P O; Roxin, L E; Venge, P [University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1981-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay of serum myoglobin was performed in 85 patients with muscular symptoms. Elevated levels were found in 93% of patients with myogenic myopathy, in 54% with myasthenia gravis and in 50% with neurogenic myopathy. All 11 patients with polymyositis had elevated myoglobin concentrations. In six of seven patients with polymyositis, who were followed up with repeated determinations, a clear relationship between myoglobin levels and clinical course was found. In general serum myoglobin seemed to be a more sensitive indicator of muscle disease than creatine kinase.

  12. Radioimmunoassay of serum myoglobin in neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askmark, H.; Osterman, P.O.; Roxin, L.-E.; Venge, P.

    1981-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay of serum myoglobin was performed in 85 patients with muscular symptoms. Elevated levels were found in 93% of patients with myogenic myopathy, in 54% with myasthenia gravis and in 50% with neurogenic myopathy. All 11 patients with polymyositis had elevated myoglobin concentrations. In six of seven patients with polymyositis, who were followed up with repeated determinations, a clear relationship between myoglobin levels and clinical course was found. In general serum myoglobin seemed to be a more sensitive indicator of muscle disease than creatine kinase. (author)

  13. [Six-minute walk test in children with neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Anleu, Israel Didier; Baños-Mejía, Benjamín Omar; Galicia-Amor, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Background: neuromuscular diseases affect the motor unit. When they evolve, respiratory complications are common; the six-minute walk test plays an important role in the assessment of functional capacity. Methods: prospective, transversal, descriptive and observational study. We studied seven children with a variety of neuromuscular diseases and spontaneous ambulation. We tested their lung function, and administered a six-minute walk test and a test of respiratory muscle strength to these children. Results: the age was 9.8 ± 2.4 years. All patients were males. Forced vital capacity decreased in three patients (42.8 %), forced expiratory volume during the first second (2.04 ± 1.4 L) and peak expiratory flow (4.33 ± 3.3 L/s) were normal. The maximum strength of respiratory muscles was less than 60 % of predicted values. The distance covered in the six-minute walk test was lower when compared with healthy controls (29.9 %). Conclusions: the six-minute walk test can be a useful tool in early stages of this disease, since it is easy to perform and well tolerated by the patients.

  14. Fatigue in neuromuscular disorders: Focus on Guillain-Barré syndrome and Pompe disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. de Vries (Juna); M.L.C. Hagemans (Marloes); J.B.J. Bussmann (Hans); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractFatigue accounts for an important part of the burden experienced by patients with neuromuscular disorders. Substantial high prevalence rates of fatigue are reported in a wide range of neuromuscular disorders, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome and Pompe disease. Fatigue can be subdivided

  15. Management of Cardiac Involvement Associated With Neuromuscular Diseases: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, Brian; Mahle, William T; Auerbach, Scott; Clemens, Paula; Domenighetti, Andrea A; Jefferies, John L; Judge, Daniel P; Lal, Ashwin K; Markham, Larry W; Parks, W James; Tsuda, Takeshi; Wang, Paul J; Yoo, Shi-Joon

    2017-09-26

    For many neuromuscular diseases (NMDs), cardiac disease represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The management of cardiac disease in NMDs is made challenging by the broad clinical heterogeneity that exists among many NMDs and by limited knowledge about disease-specific cardiovascular pathogenesis and course-modifying interventions. The overlay of compromise in peripheral muscle function and other organ systems, such as the lungs, also makes the simple application of endorsed adult or pediatric heart failure guidelines to the NMD population problematic. In this statement, we provide background on several NMDs in which there is cardiac involvement, highlighting unique features of NMD-associated myocardial disease that require clinicians to tailor their approach to prevention and treatment of heart failure. Undoubtedly, further investigations are required to best inform future guidelines on NMD-specific cardiovascular health risks, treatments, and outcomes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Neuromuscular complications of thyrotoxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Annie W C

    2007-11-01

    Thyroid hormones exert multiple effects on the neuromuscular system and the brain, with the most important being their role in stimulating the development and differentiation of the neuromuscular system and brain in foetal and neonatal life. In the presence of hyperthyroidism, muscular and neurological symptoms may be the presenting clinical features of the disease. The frequency and severity of neuromuscular complications vary considerably and are probably related to the degree of hyperthyroidism, although in some patients the neuromuscular dysfunction is caused by associated disorders rather than by hyperthyroidism per se. This update focuses on the most common neurological and muscular disorders that occur in patients with thyrotoxicosis. It is beyond the scope of this paper to discuss thyroid eye disease and cardiac complications, in themselves separate complications of specific myocytes.

  17. Sugammadex, a Neuromuscular Blockade Reversal Agent, Causes Neuronal Apoptosis in Primary Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanca, José M.; Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Granell, Manuel V.; Aldasoro, Martin; Garcia, Alma; Iradi, Antonio; Obrador, Elena; Mauricio, Maria Dolores; Vila, Jose; Gil-Bisquert, Anna; Valles, Soraya L.

    2013-01-01

    Sugammadex, a γ-cyclodextrin that encapsulates selectively steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents, such as rocuronium or vecuronium, has changed the face of clinical neuromuscular pharmacology. Sugammadex allows a rapid reversal of muscle paralysis. Sugammadex appears to be safe and well tolerated. Its blood-brain barrier penetration is poor (Sugammadex in neurons in primary culture. Here we show that clinically relevant sugammadex concentrations cause apoptotic/necrosis neuron death in primary cultures. Studies on the underlying mechanism revealed that sugammadex-induced activation of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis associates with depletion of neuronal cholesterol levels. Furthermore SUG increase CytC, AIF, Smac/Diablo and CASP-3 protein expression in cells in culture. Potential association of SUG-induced alteration in cholesterol homeostasis with oxidative stress and apoptosis activation occurs. Furthermore, resistance/sensitivity to oxidative stress differs between neuronal cell types. PMID:23983586

  18. Risk of Unsuccessful Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure in Heterogeneous Neuromuscular Diseases: A Retrospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Nanaura, Hitoki; Kinugawa, Kaoru; Uchihara, Yuto; Ohara, Hiroya; Eura, Nobuyuki; Syobatake, Ryogo; Sawa, Nobuhiro; Takao, Kiriyama; Sugie, Kazuma; Ueno, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    If invasive ventilation can be avoided by performing noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF), the disease can be effectively managed. It is important to clarify the characteristics of patients with neuromuscular diseases in whom initial NIV is likely to be unsuccessful. We studied 27 patients in stable neuromuscular condition who initially received NIV to manage fatal ARF to identify differences in factors immediately before the onset of ARF a...

  19. Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Neuromuscular Disease: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboussouan, Loutfi S; Mireles-Cabodevila, Eduardo

    2017-10-01

    Normal sleep-related rapid eye movement sleep atonia, reduced lung volumes, reduced chemosensitivity, and impaired airway dilator activity become significant vulnerabilities in the setting of neuromuscular disease. In that context, the compounding effects of respiratory muscle weakness and disease-specific features that promote upper airway collapse or cause dilated cardiomyopathy contribute to various sleep-disordered breathing events. The reduction in lung volumes with neuromuscular disease is further compromised by sleep and the supine position, exaggerating the tendency for upper airway collapse and desaturation with sleep-disordered breathing events. The most commonly identified events are diaphragmatic/pseudo-central, due to a decrease in the rib cage contribution to the tidal volume during phasic rapid eye movement sleep. Obstructive and central sleep apneas are also common. Noninvasive ventilation can improve survival and quality of sleep but should be used with caution in the context of dilated cardiomyopathy or significant bulbar symptoms. Noninvasive ventilation can also trigger sleep-disordered breathing events, including ineffective triggering, autotriggering, central sleep apnea, and glottic closure, which compromise the potential benefits of the intervention by increasing arousals, reducing adherence, and impairing sleep architecture. Polysomnography plays an important diagnostic and therapeutic role by correctly categorizing sleep-disordered events, identifying sleep-disordered breathing triggered by noninvasive ventilation, and improving noninvasive ventilation settings. Optimal management may require dedicated hypoventilation protocols and a technical staff well versed in the identification and troubleshooting of respiratory events. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of ventilators for mouthpiece ventilation in neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khirani, Sonia; Ramirez, Adriana; Delord, Vincent; Leroux, Karl; Lofaso, Frédéric; Hautot, Solène; Toussaint, Michel; Orlikowski, David; Louis, Bruno; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2014-09-01

    Daytime mouthpiece ventilation is a useful adjunct to nocturnal noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in patients with neuromuscular disease. The aims of the study were to analyze the practice of mouthpiece ventilation and to evaluate the performance of ventilators for mouthpiece ventilation. Practice of mouthpiece ventilation was assessed by a questionnaire, and the performance of 6 home ventilators with mouthpiece ventilation was assessed in a bench test using 24 different conditions per ventilator: 3 mouthpieces, a child and an adult patient profile, and 4 ventilatory modes. Questionnaires were obtained from 30 subjects (mean age 33 ± 11 y) using NIV for 12 ± 7 y. Fifteen subjects used NIV for > 20 h/day, and 11 were totally ventilator-dependent. The subject-reported benefits of mouthpiece ventilation were a reduction in dyspnea (73%) and fatigue (93%) and an improvement in speech (43%) and eating (27%). The bench study showed that none of the ventilators, even those with mouthpiece ventilation software, were able to deliver mouthpiece ventilation without alarms and/or autotriggering in each condition. Alarms and/or ineffective triggering or autotriggering were observed in 135 of the 198 conditions. The occurrence of alarms was more common with a large mouthpiece without a filter compared to a small mouthpiece with a filter (P ventilator. Subjects are satisfied with mouthpiece ventilation. Alarms are common with home ventilators, although less common in those with mouthpiece ventilation software. Improvements in home ventilators are needed to facilitate the expansion of mouthpiece ventilation. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  1. Computed tomography of the skeletal muscles in neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Hideo; Takahashi, Mitsugi; Habara, Shinji; Nagai, Yoshinao; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scans of the shoulder girdle, upper arm, waist, pelvic girdle, thigh, and lower leg were obtained in a total of 21 patients with neuromuscular diseases, including 10 with Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD), 3 with Fukushima type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), 3 with Werdnig-Hoffmann's disease (WH), 3 with autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy in childhood (childhood MC), one with nemaline myopathy (NM), and one with myositis ossificans circumscripta (MOC). Age-dependent changes in CT findings were examined in the 10 DMD patients ranging in age from 3 to 15 years. Each muscle of the shoulder girdle and upper arm was seen as a low density area on CT in patients 9 years of age when the arms are difficult to elevate. Changes in the m. quadriceps femoris occurring in all the patients were visible earlist on CT, followed by those in the m. gluteus maximus, m. gastrocnemius, and m. soleus. CT scans of the thigh was thus considered most useful in diagnosing DMD. CT scans of the lower leg showed low density areas in the m. gastrocnemius and m. soleus in both WH and FCMD patients, while a low density area seen in the m. gluteus maximum on CT was restricted to FCMD patients. This suggests the potential of CT in the differentiation of WH from FCMD. In patients with childhood ARMD, there were various CT findings including normal and extremely low density areas. CT findings in NM patients were similar to those in DMD patients. High density areas were seen along the fascia of the trunk in MOC patients. (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Biochemistry of Neuromuscular Diseases: A Course for Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlendieck, Kay

    2002-01-01

    This article outlines an undergraduate course focusing on supramolecular membrane protein complexes involved in the molecular pathogenesis of neuromuscular disorders. The emphasis of this course is to introduce students to the key elements involved in the ion regulation and membrane stabilization during muscle contraction and the role of these…

  3. Neuromuscular disease and respiratory physiology in children: putting lung function into perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauroux, Brigitte; Khirani, Sonia

    2014-08-01

    Neuromuscular diseases represent a heterogeneous group of disorders of the muscle, nerve or neuromuscular junction. The respiratory muscles are rarely spared in neuromuscular diseases even if the type of muscle involvement, severity and time course greatly varies among the different diseases. Diagnosis of respiratory muscle weakness is crucial because of the importance of respiratory morbidity and mortality. Presently, routine respiratory evaluation is based on non-invasive volitional tests, such as the measurement of lung volumes, spirometry and the maximal static pressures, which may be difficult or impossible to obtain in some young children. Other tools or parameters are thus needed to assess the respiratory muscle weakness and its consequences in young children. The measurement of oesogastric pressures can be helpful as they allow the diagnosis and quantification of paradoxical breathing, as well as the assessment of the strength of the inspiratory and expiratory muscles by means of the oesophageal pressure during a maximal sniff and of the gastric pressure during a maximal cough. Sleep assessment should also be part of the respiratory evaluation of children with neuromuscular disease with at least the recording of nocturnal gas exchange if polysomnography is not possible or unavailable. This improvement in the assessment of respiratory muscle performance may increase our understanding of the respiratory pathophysiology of the different neuromuscular diseases, improve patient care, and guide research and innovative therapies by identifying and validating respiratory parameters. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  4. The extremity function index (EFI), a disability severity measure for neuromuscular diseases : psychometric evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Isaac; Wynia, Klaske; Drost, Gea; Almansa, Josué; Kuks, Joannes

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To adapt and to combine the self-report Upper Extremity Functional Index and Lower Extremity Function Scale, for the assessment of disability severity in patients with a neuromuscular disease and to examine its psychometric properties in order to make it suitable for indicating disease

  5. Feeding and Swallowing Disorders in Pediatric Neuromuscular Diseases: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Engel-Hoek, Lenie; de Groot, Imelda J M; de Swart, Bert J M; Erasmus, Corrie E

    2015-11-20

    Feeding and swallowing problems in infants and children have a great impact on health and wellbeing. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of recognized feeding and swallowing problems in different groups of children with neuromuscular diseases, based on relevant literature and expert opinion, and to propose recommendations for the assessment and treatment of these problems. Almost all pediatric neuromuscular diseases are accompanied by feeding and swallowing problems during the different phases of deglutition, problems that give rise to a wide variety of signs and symptoms, which emphasizes the importance of a comprehensive feeding and swallowing assessment by a speech and language therapist.

  6. Dysarthria and dysphagia are highly prevalent among various types of neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuijt, Simone; Kalf, Johanna G.; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Drost, Gea; Hendricks, Henk T.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with a neuromuscular disease (NMD) can present with dysarthria and/or dysphagia. Literature regarding prevalence rates of dysarthria and dysphagia is scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence rates, severity and co-presence of dysarthria and dysphagia in adult

  7. Dysarthria and dysphagia are highly prevalent among various types of neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuijt, S.; Kalf, J.G.; Swart, B.J. de; Drost, G.; Hendricks, H.T.; Geurts, A.C.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with a neuromuscular disease (NMD) can present with dysarthria and/or dysphagia. Literature regarding prevalence rates of dysarthria and dysphagia is scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence rates, severity and co-presence of dysarthria and dysphagia in adult

  8. How Persons with a Neuromuscular Disease Perceive Employment Participation : A Qualitative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baziel van Engelen; Yvonne Heerkens; Josephine Engels; Astrid Kinébanian; Ton Satink; Marie-Antoinette van Minis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A qualitative study was carried out to understand how people with a slow progressive adult type neuromuscular disease (NMD) perceive employment participation. Methods 16 paid employed persons with NMD were interviewed in open, in-depth interviews. Data were analyzed using the constant

  9. Long Term Follow-up of Ventilated Patients with Thoracic Restriction and Neuromuscular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Brooks

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the long term effects of home mechanical ventilation (HMV on pulmonary function, nighttime gas exchange, daytime arterial blood gases, sleep architecture and functional exercise capacity (6 min walk. Patients with respiratory failure attributable to thoracic restrictive disease (TRD (kyphoscoliosis or neuromuscular disease (NMD were assessed, ventilated, trained and followed in a dedicated unit for the care of patients requiring long term ventilation.

  10. Noninvasive Respiratory Management of Patients With Neuromuscular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, John R

    2017-08-01

    This review article describes definitive noninvasive respiratory management of respiratory muscle dysfunction to eliminate need to resort to tracheotomy. In 2010 clinicians from 22 centers in 18 countries reported 1,623 spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA1), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis users of noninvasive ventilatory support (NVS) of whom 760 required it continuously (CNVS). The CNVS sustained their lives by over 3,000 patient-years without resort to indwelling tracheostomy tubes. These centers have now extubated at least 74 consecutive ventilator unweanable patients with DMD, over 95% of CNVS-dependent patients with SMA1, and hundreds of others with advanced neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) without resort to tracheotomy. Two centers reported a 99% success rate at extubating 258 ventilator unweanable patients without resort to tracheotomy. Patients with myopathic or lower motor neuron disorders can be managed noninvasively by up to CNVS, indefinitely, despite having little or no measurable vital capacity, with the use of physical medicine respiratory muscle aids. Ventilator-dependent patients can be decannulated of their tracheostomy tubes.

  11. Maximum inspiratory pressure as a clinically meaningful trial endpoint for neuromuscular diseases: A comprehensive review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Schoser; Fong, E. (Edward); Geberhiwot, T. (Tarekegn); Hughes, D. (Derralynn); Kissel, J.T. (John T.); Madathil, S.C. (Shyam C.); Orlikowski, D. (David); Polkey, M.I. (Michael I.); M. Roberts (Mark); H.A.W.M. Tiddens (Harm); Young, P. (Peter)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractRespiratory muscle strength is a proven predictor of long-term outcome of neuromuscular disease (NMD), including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and spinal muscular atrophy. Maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), a sensitive measure of respiratory muscle

  12. Risk of Unsuccessful Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure in Heterogeneous Neuromuscular Diseases: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Nanaura, Hitoki; Kinugawa, Kaoru; Uchihara, Yuto; Ohara, Hiroya; Eura, Nobuyuki; Syobatake, Ryogo; Sawa, Nobuhiro; Takao, Kiriyama; Sugie, Kazuma; Ueno, Satoshi

    2017-02-20

    If invasive ventilation can be avoided by performing noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF), the disease can be effectively managed. It is important to clarify the characteristics of patients with neuromuscular diseases in whom initial NIV is likely to be unsuccessful. We studied 27 patients in stable neuromuscular condition who initially received NIV to manage fatal ARF to identify differences in factors immediately before the onset of ARF among patients who receive continuous NIV support, patients who are switched from NIV to invasive ventilation, and patients in whom NIV is discontinued. Endpoints were evaluated 24 and 72 hours after the initiation of NIV. After 24 hours, all but 1 patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) received continuous NIV support. 72 hours later, 5 patients were switched from NIV to invasive ventilation, and 5 patients continued to receive NIV support. 72 hours after the initiation of NIV, the proportion of patients with a diagnosis of ALS differed significantly among the three groups (P=0.039). NIV may be attempted to manage acute fatal respiratory failure associated with neuromuscular diseases, but clinicians should carefully manage the clinical course in patients with ALS.

  13. Risk of unsuccessful noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure in heterogeneous neuromuscular diseases: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kataoka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available If invasive ventilation can be avoided by performing noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF, the disease can be effectively managed. It is important to clarify the characteristics of patients with neuromuscular diseases in whom initial NIV is likely to be unsuccessful. We studied 27 patients in stable neuromuscular condition who initially received NIV to manage fatal ARF to identify differences in factors immediately before the onset of ARF among patients who receive continuous NIV support, patients who are switched from NIV to invasive ventilation, and patients in whom NIV is discontinued. Endpoints were evaluated 24 and 72 hours after the initiation of NIV. After 24 hours, all but 1 patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS received continuous NIV support. 72 hours later, 5 patients were switched from NIV to invasive ventilation, and 5 patients continued to receive NIV support. 72 hours after the initiation of NIV, the proportion of patients with a diagnosis of ALS differed significantly among the three groups (P=0.039. NIV may be attempted to manage acute fatal respiratory failure associated with neuromuscular diseases, but clinicians should carefully manage the clinical course in patients with ALS.

  14. Therapeutic efficacy of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and electromyographic biofeedback on Alzheimer's disease patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi; Lin, Xiang; Lin, Xiao-Juan; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Zhi-Kai; Lin, Zhao-Min; Chen, Jian-Hao

    2017-09-01

    To study the therapeutic effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and electromyographic biofeedback (EMG-biofeedback) therapy in improving swallowing function of Alzheimer's disease patients with dysphagia.A series of 103 Alzheimer's disease patients with dysphagia were divided into 2 groups, among which the control group (n = 50) received swallowing function training and the treatment group (n = 53) received neuromuscular electrical stimulation plus EMG-biofeedback therapy. The mini-mental state scale score was performed in all patients along the treatment period. Twelve weeks after the treatment, the swallowing function was assessed by the water swallow test. The nutritional status was evaluated by Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) as well as the levels of hemoglobin and serum albumin. The frequency and course of aspiration pneumonia were also recorded.No significant difference on mini-mental state scale score was noted between 2 groups. More improvement of swallowing function, better nutritional status, and less frequency and shorter course of aspiration pneumonia were presented in treatment group when compared with the control group.Neuromuscular electrical stimulation and EMG-biofeedback treatment can improve swallowing function in patients with Alzheimer's disease and significantly reduce the incidence of adverse outcomes. Thus, they should be promoted in clinical practice.

  15. Neuromuscular disease mimicking myasthenia gravis in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background : Nemaline rod disease is a congenital myopathy, presentation of which may mimic myasthenia gravis. Methods : We report a suspected case of nemaline rod disease in a female adolescent who presented with features similar to myasthenia gravis but failed to respond effectively to its conventional management ...

  16. Role of non-invasive ventilation in difficult-to-wean children with acute neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, V G; Nair, M P; Bataclan, F

    2004-05-01

    Weaning from mechanical ventilation in children could be time-consuming and on many occasions, leads to reintubation with its associate complications. We report two children with acute neuromuscular disease, in whom bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) as a mode of non-invasive ventilation was successfully used to wean the child from ventilators and prevented the need for tracheostomy. Despite the limited number of studies published in the literature suggesting BiPAP as a mode of weaning from mechanical ventilation, the technique when applied correctly seems to be safe and effective in weaning and avoiding tracheostomy.

  17. Impact of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on functional capacity of patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxo, Renata Spósito; Xavier, Vivian Bertoni; Miorin, Luiz Antônio; Magalhães, Andrea Olivares; Sens, Yvoty Alves Dos Santos; Alves, Vera Lúcia Dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Literature shows that patients undergoing hemodialysis present poor physical conditioning and low tolerance to exercise. They may also suffer from respiratory dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on pulmonary function and functional capacity of patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis. Forty adult patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis were prospectively studied and randomized into two groups (control n = 20 and treatment n = 20). The treatment group underwent bilateral femoral quadriceps muscles electrical stimulation for 30 minutes during hemodialysis, three times per week, for two months. The patients were evaluated by pulmonary function test, maximum respiratory pressures, maximum one-repetition test, and six-minute walk test (6MWT), before and after the treatment protocol. The treatment group presented increased maximum inspiratory (MIP) (p = 0.02) and expiratory pressures (MEP) (p grupos (controle n = 20 e tratamento n = 20). O grupo tratamento realizou protocolo com estimulação elétrica neuromuscular em quadríceps femoral por 30 minutos durante a hemodiálise, três vezes por semana, durante dois meses. Todos pacientes realizaram espirometria, pressões respiratórias máximas, teste de uma repetição máxima e teste da caminhada dos seis minutos (TC6), antes e após o período de acompanhamento. O grupo tratamento apresentou aumento da pressão inspiratória máxima com p = 0,02 na comparação entre grupos e p grupo de tratamento com p grupo controle. A estimulação elétrica neuromuscular teve impacto positivo sobre a função pulmonar e a capacidade funcional levando ao melhor desempenho físico em pacientes em hemodiálise.

  18. Doenças neuromusculares Neuromuscular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umbertina C. Reed

    2002-08-01

    differential diagnosis among the main neuromuscular disorders in children, that include the diseases affecting the motor unity, i.e. spinal motor neurons, peripheral nerves, neuromuscular junction and muscular fibers. Sources: the review of the clinical aspects that should be considered for a prompt differential diagnosis among several neuromuscular disorders as well as between those and the main causes of secondary muscular hypotonia due to central nervous system or systemic disturbances is based on the clinical experience acquired along the last 12 years in following-up children with Neuromuscular Disorders attended at the outpatient Service of Neuromuscular Disorders at the Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo. In addition, it is based on Medline and on the review of the most recent numbers of Neuromuscular Disorders, the official journal of the World Muscle Society. Summary of the findings: most of neuromuscular disorders are genetic conditions in children and the most common of them are X-linked Progressive Muscular Dystrophy of Duchenne, Spinal Muscular Atrophy, Congenital Muscular Dystrophy, Myotonic Dystrophy and Congenital Myopathies. Conclusions: due to the phenomenal development in human molecular genetics the pathogenesis of several neuromuscular disorders in children has been clarified over the last decade. Nowadays many new diagnostic methods, including techniques of fetal diagnosis, and a more objective genotype-phenotype correlation as well as classification are available.

  19. MRI in neuromuscular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischmann, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are caused by damage of the skeletal muscles or supplying nerves, in many cases due to a genetic defect, resulting in progressive disability, loss of ambulation and often a reduced life expectancy. Previously only supportive care and steroids were available as treatments, but several novel therapies are under development or in clinical trial phase. Muscle imaging can detect specific patterns of involvement and facilitate diagnosis and guide genetic testing. Quantitative MRT can be used to monitor disease progression either to monitor treatment or as a surrogate parameter for clinical trails. Novel imaging sequences can provide insights into disease pathology and muscle metabolism. (orig.)

  20. Management of neuromuscular diseases and spinal muscular atrophy in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monges, S; Rosa, A L

    2017-09-01

    Latin America (LA) has a population of ~645 million people distributed over 33 countries with marked political, cultural and economic differences. In LA, patients with inherited neuromuscular diseases (NMDs) often do not have access to specialized medical centers and many of them go undiagnosed. General management and care of spinal muscular dystrophy (SMA) patients in the region varies due to heterogeneous health care. An active generation of young clinical neurologists is being trained for the specialized care of SMA and other neuromuscular (NM) patients, both in the private and public sectors. The Euro-Latin-American Summer School of Myology (EVELAM) as well as efforts of professionals at large public centers in the major cities of LA have a leading role in this development. Different regional academic-scientific organizations as well as the expanding number of telethon centers and the creation of parent organizations, mostly concerning SMA, all together are contributing to the increased quality of the management of NMD patients. Over the past years, academic and clinical research, as well as the establishment of qualified centers for the molecular testing of NMD are pushing forward the creation of patient registries and the development of specific clinical trials, with Argentina and Brazil having a major role in this field. Nevertheless, increased awareness and further training of specialized health professionals are necessary to reach patients that are currently lacking care throughout the region.

  1. Injection of a soluble fragment of neural agrin (NT-1654 considerably improves the muscle pathology caused by the disassembly of the neuromuscular junction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hettwer

    Full Text Available Treatment of neuromuscular diseases is still an unsolved problem. Evidence over the last years strongly indicates the involvement of malformation and dysfunction of neuromuscular junctions in the development of such medical conditions. Stabilization of NMJs thus seems to be a promising approach to attenuate the disease progression of muscle wasting diseases. An important pathway for the formation and maintenance of NMJs is the agrin/Lrp4/MuSK pathway. Here we demonstrate that the agrin biologic NT-1654 is capable of activating the agrin/Lrp4/MuSK system in vivo, leading to an almost full reversal of the sarcopenia-like phenotype in neurotrypsin-overexpressing (SARCO mice. We also show that injection of NT-1654 accelerates muscle re-innervation after nerve crush. This report demonstrates that a systemically administered agrin fragment has the potential to counteract the symptoms of neuromuscular disorders.

  2. Employment status of patients with neuromuscular diseases in relation to personal factors, fatigue and health status : A secondary analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rob Oostendorp; Peter Huijbregts; Marie-Antoinette Minis; Joke Kalkman; Baziel Engelen; Reinier Akkermans; Gijs Bleijenberg; Josephine Engels

    2010-01-01

    To determine the number of employed people in a group of patients with neuromuscular diseases and in 3 separate subgroups (facioscapulo-humeral dystrophy, hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, and myotonic dystrophy) to investigate any differences in employment status between the patient groups,

  3. Employment status of patients with neuromuscular diseases in relation to personal factors, fatigue and health status: a secondary analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minis, M.A.H; Kalkman, J.S.; Akkermans, R.P.; Engels, J.A.; Huijbregts, P.A.; Bleijenberg, G.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the number of employed people in a group of patients with neuromuscular diseases and in 3 separate subgroups (facioscapulo-humeral dystrophy, hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, and myotonic dystrophy) to investigate any differences in employment status between the

  4. [Analysis of 14 individuals who requested predictive genetic testing for hereditary neuromuscular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kunihiro; Tamai, Mariko; Kubota, Takeo; Kawame, Hiroshi; Amano, Naoji; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu

    2002-02-01

    Predictive genetic testing for hereditary neuromuscular diseases is a delicate issue for individuals at risk and their families, as well as for medical staff because these diseases are often late-onset and intractable. Therefore careful pre- and post-test genetic counseling and psychosocial support should be provided along with such genetic testing. The Division of Clinical and Molecular Genetics was established at our hospital in May 1996 to provide skilled professional genetic counseling. Since its establishment, 14 individuals have visited our clinic to request predictive genetic testing for hereditary neuromuscular diseases (4 for myotonic dystrophy, 6 for spinocerebellar ataxia, 3 for Huntington's disease, and 1 for Alzheimer's disease). The main reasons for considering testing were to remove uncertainty about the genetic status and to plan for the future. Nine of 14 individuals requested testing for making decisions about a forthcoming marriage or pregnancy (family planning). Other reasons raised by the individuals included career or financial planning, planning for their own health care, and knowing the risk for their children. At the first genetic counseling session, all of the individuals expressed hopes of not being a gene carrier and of escaping from fear of disease, and seemed not to be mentally well prepared for an increased-risk result. To date, 7 of the 14 individuals have received genetic testing and only one, who underwent predictive genetic testing for spinocerebellar ataxia, was given an increased-risk result. The seven individuals including the one with an increased-risk result, have coped well with their new knowledge about their genetic status after the testing results were disclosed. None of them has expressed regret. In pre-test genetic counseling sessions, we consider it quite important not only to determine the psychological status of the individual, but also to make the individual try to anticipate the changes in his/her life upon

  5. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation improves exercise tolerance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with better preserved fat-free mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Maris Nápolis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation increases exercise tolerance in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients. However, it is conceivable that its benefits are more prominent in patients with better-preserved peripheral muscle function and structure. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of high-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation in COPD patients with better-preserved peripheral muscle function. Design: Prospective and cross-over study. METHODS: Thirty COPD patients were randomly assigned to either home-based, high-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation or sham stimulation for six weeks. The training intensity was adjusted according to each subject's tolerance. Fat-free mass, isometric strength, six-minute walking distance and time to exercise intolerance (Tlim were assessed. RESULTS: Thirteen (46.4% patients responded to high-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation; that is, they had a post/pre Δ Tlim >10% after stimulation (unimproved after sham stimulation. Responders had a higher baseline fat-free mass and six-minute walking distance than their seventeen (53.6% non-responding counterparts. Responders trained at higher stimulation intensities; their mean amplitude of stimulation during training was significantly related to their fat-free mass (r = 0.65; p<0.01. Logistic regression revealed that fat-free mass was the single independent predictor of Tlim improvement (odds ratio [95% CI] = 1.15 [1.04-1.26]; p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that high-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation improved the exercise capacity of COPD patients with better-preserved fat-free mass because they tolerated higher training stimulus levels. These data suggest that early training with high-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation before tissue wasting begins might enhance exercise tolerance in patients with less advanced COPD.

  6. Prenatal molecular diagnosis of inherited neuromuscular diseases: Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy type 1 and spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Gabriella; Ruggiero, Raffaella; Savarese, Maria; Savarese, Giovanni; Tremolaterra, Maria Roberta; Salvatore, Francesco; Carsana, Antonella

    2013-12-01

    Neuromuscular disease is a broad term that encompasses many diseases that either directly, via an intrinsic muscle disorder, or indirectly, via a nerve disorder, impairs muscle function. Here we report the experience of our group in the counselling and molecular prenatal diagnosis of three inherited neuromuscular diseases, i.e., Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD), myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). We performed a total of 83 DMD/BMD, 15 DM1 and 54 SMA prenatal diagnoses using a combination of technologies for either direct or linkage diagnosis. We identified 16, 5 and 10 affected foetuses, respectively. The improvement of analytical procedures in recent years has increased the mutation detection rate and reduced the analytical time. Due to the complexity of the experimental procedures and the high, specific professional expertise required for both laboratory activities and the related counselling, these types of analyses should be preferentially performed in reference molecular diagnostic centres.

  7. Cross‐disease comparison of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy reveals conservation of selective vulnerability but differential neuromuscular junction pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijssen, Jik; Frost‐Nylen, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular junctions are primary pathological targets in the lethal motor neuron diseases spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Synaptic pathology and denervation of target muscle fibers has been reported prior to the appearance of clinical symptoms in mouse models of both diseases, suggesting that neuromuscular junctions are highly vulnerable from the very early stages, and are a key target for therapeutic intervention. Here we examined neuromuscular pathology longitudinally in three clinically relevant muscle groups in mouse models of ALS and SMA in order to assess their relative vulnerabilities. We show for the first time that neuromuscular junctions of the extraocular muscles (responsible for the control of eye movement) were resistant to degeneration in endstage SMA mice, as well as in late symptomatic ALS mice. Tongue muscle neuromuscular junctions were also spared in both animal models. Conversely, neuromuscular junctions of the lumbrical muscles of the hind‐paw were vulnerable in both SMA and ALS, with a loss of neuronal innervation and shrinkage of motor endplates in both diseases. Thus, the pattern of selective vulnerability was conserved across these two models of motor neuron disease. However, the first evidence of neuromuscular pathology occurred at different timepoints of disease progression, with much earlier evidence of presynaptic involvement in ALS, progressing to changes on the postsynaptic side. Conversely, in SMA changes appeared concomitantly at the neuromuscular junction, suggesting that mechanisms of neuromuscular disruption are distinct in these diseases. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1424–1442, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26502195

  8. Symptoms and Causes of Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symptoms & Causes of Celiac Disease What are the symptoms of celiac disease? Most people with celiac disease have one or ... the rash and no other symptoms. Why are celiac disease symptoms so varied? Symptoms of celiac disease vary from ...

  9. Five-Year Follow-Up and Outcomes of Noninvasive Ventilation in Subjects With Neuromuscular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Mi Ri; Choi, Won Ah; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jang Woo; Kim, Eun Young; Kang, Seong-Woong

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the 5-year outcomes of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) application in different neuromuscular disease (NMD) groups. We categorized 180 subjects who had initiated NIV between March 2001 and August 2009 into 4 groups and followed them for > 5 y. The NIV maintenance rate and average duration, applying time, and forced vital capacity (FVC) were investigated at the time NIV was initiated and 5 y after NIV initiation in each group. In subjects with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)-congenital myopathy, the 5-year subjects who continued to use NIV over time were 22.5%, 89.4%, and 91.3%, respectively, and the average NIV maintenance durations were 21.53 ± 19.26 months, 55.22 ± 11.47 months, and 57.48 ± 8.34 months, respectively ( P NIV was tolerated long-term without significant increases in daily application time for most subjects with NMD. However, in individuals with ALS, development of severe bulbar symptoms can risk maintaining NIV. Copyright © 2018 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  10. Home monitoring of daytime mouthpiece ventilation effectiveness in patients with neuromuscular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Julie; Leroux, Karl; Orlikowski, David; Prigent, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Mouthpiece ventilation (MPV) allows patients with neuromuscular disease to receive daytime support from a portable ventilator, which they can disconnect at will, for example, for speaking, eating, swallowing, and coughing. However, MPV carries a risk of underventilation. Our purpose here was to evaluate the effectiveness of daytime MPV under real-life conditions. Eight wheelchair-bound patients who used MPV underwent daytime polygraphy at home with recordings of airflow, mouthpiece pressure, thoracic and abdominal movements, peripheral capillary oxygen saturation (SpO2), and transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PtcCO2). Times and durations of tasks and activities were recorded. The Apnea–Hypopnea Index (AHI) was computed. Patient–ventilator disconnections ≥3 minutes and episodes of hypoventilation defined as PtcCO2>45 mmHg were counted. Patient–ventilator asynchrony events were analyzed. The AHI was >5 hour−1 in two patients. Another patient experienced unexplained 3% drops in arterial oxygen saturations at a frequency of 70 hour−1. Patient–ventilator disconnections ≥3 minutes occurred in seven of eight patients and were consistently associated with decreases in SpO2 and ≥5-mmHg increases in PtcCO2; PtcCO2 rose above 45 mmHg in two patients during these disconnections. The most common type of patient–ventilator asynchrony was ineffective effort. This study confirms that MPV can be effective as long as the patient remains connected to the mouthpiece. However, transient arterial oxygen desaturation and hypercapnia due to disconnection from the ventilator may occur, without inducing unpleasant sensations in the patients. Therefore, an external warning system based on a minimal acceptable value of minute ventilation would probably be useful. PMID:26703922

  11. "Hospital at home" for neuromuscular disease patients with respiratory tract infection: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Andrea; Savoia, Francesca; Pipitone, Emanuela; Nordio, Beatrice; Gallina, Giulia; Paladini, Luciana; Concas, Alessandra; Arcaro, Giovanna; Gallan, Federico; Pegoraro, Elena

    2013-12-01

    The "hospital-at-home" model may provide adequate care without an adverse effect on clinical outcome, and is generally well received by users. Our objective was to compare hospital-at-home and in-patient hospital care for neuromuscular disease (NMD) patients with respiratory tract infections. We conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial in a university teaching hospital offering secondary care service to a population of approximately 500,000. We recruited selected NMD patients with respiratory tract infection for whom hospital admission had been recommended after medical assessment. Hospital-at-home was provided as an alternative to in-patient admission. The main outcome measures were need for hospitalization, treatment failure, time to recovery, death during the first 3 months following exacerbation, and cost of patient care. Among 59 consecutive NMD patients eligible for the study, 53 met the criteria for hospital-at-home. Twenty-six subjects were randomized to home care and 27 to hospital care. No significant differences were found in treatment failure (8/26 vs 13/27, P = .19), time to recovery (8.9 ± 4.6 vs 9 ± 8.9 d, P = .21), or mortality at 3 months (3/26 vs 4/27 deaths, P = .42) between the groups. Hospital-at-home failure was independently correlated with type of NMD (P = .004) with an odds ratio of failure of 17.3 (95% CI 2.1 to infinity) for subjects with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The total and daily direct cost of patient healthcare was significantly lower for the subjects who were successfully treated at home, compared to the hospitalized individuals. Hospital-at-home is an effective alternative to hospital admission for selected NMD patients with respiratory tract infections.

  12. Sonographically guided percutaneous muscle biopsy in diagnosis of neuromuscular disease: a useful alternative to open surgical biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Paul J; Gorman, Grainne M; Hardiman, Orla M; Farrell, Michael J; Logan, P Mark

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of sonographically guided percutaneous muscle biopsy in the investigation of neuromuscular disorders. Sonographically guided percutaneous needle biopsy of skeletal muscle was performed with a 14-gauge core biopsy system in 40 patients over a 24-month period. Patients were referred from the Department of Neurology under investigation for neuromuscular disorders. Sonography was used to find suitable tissue and to avoid major vascular structures. A local anesthetic was applied below skin only. A 3- to 4-mm incision was made. Three 14-gauge samples were obtained from each patient. All samples were placed on saline-dampened gauze and sent for neuropathologic analysis. As a control, we retrospectively assessed results of the 40 most recent muscle samples acquired via open surgical biopsy. With the use of sonography, 32 (80%) of 40 patients had a histologic diagnosis made via percutaneous needle biopsy. This included 26 (93%) of 28 patients with acute muscular disease and 6 (50%) of 12 patients with chronic disease. In the surgical group (all acute disease), 38 (95%) of 40 patients had diagnostic tissue attained. Sonographically guided percutaneous 14-gauge core skeletal muscle biopsy is a useful procedure, facilitating diagnosis in acute muscular disease. It provides results comparable with those of open surgical biopsy in acute muscular disease. It may also be used in chronic muscular disease but repeated or open biopsy may be needed.

  13. Attitudes and expectations of patients with neuromuscular diseases about their participation in a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, M; Herson, A; Michon, C C; Hogrel, J Y; Doppler, V; Laloui, K; Herson, S; Payan, C; Eymard, B; Laforêt, P

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to gain a better understanding of the psychological impact of participating in a clinical trial for patients with Pompe disease (Acid Maltase Deficiency). Attitudes and expectations of adult patients with neuromuscular diseases regarding medical trials are as yet unreported. In order to learn about the psychological consequences of participating in a clinical trial, we conducted a prospective assessment of patients with late-onset Pompe Disease, a rare genetic condition, for which no treatment had been available before. This psychological study was carried out as an ancillary study to the randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial described elsewhere (van der Ploeg et al., 2010). We assessed patients (n=8) at inclusion, and at 12 and 18 months for six psychological dimensions: depression (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI), hopelessness (Beck Hopelessness Scale, BHS), anxiety (STAI A-B), quality of life (Whoqol-26), social adjustment (S.A.S-self-report) and locus of control (IPC Levenson). We produced a self-administered questionnaire in order to assess the attitudes, motivations and expectations of patients during the trial. At 12 months, mean social adjustment (SAS-SR, P=0.02) had improved, and at 18 months mean depression score had improved as well (BDI, P=0.03). The quality of life of patients (Whoqol-26) remained unchanged. Throughout the study, patients were more likely to have an internal locus of control than an external one (IPC Levenson). The self-administered questionnaire showed that patients' expectations were disproportionate compared to the medical information they had received starting the trial. For all patients, the first motivation for being enrolled in a clinical trial was "to help research", for half of them the motivation was to "improve their health". Whether patients believed to be part of one group or another (placebo or treatment) depended on their subjective perception of improvement during the trial. Given the small

  14. Efficacy and safety of sugammadex in the reversal of deep neuromuscular blockade induced by rocuronium in patients with end-stage renal disease: A comparative prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Camila M; Tardelli, Maria A; Tedesco, Helio; Garcia, Natalia N; Caparros, Mario P; Alvarez-Gomez, Jose A; de Oliveira Junior, Itamar S

    2015-10-01

    Renal failure affects the pharmacology of nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers making recovery of neuromuscular function unpredictable. Sugammadex antagonises rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade by encapsulating rocuronium, creating a stable complex molecule that is mainly excreted by the kidneys. Previous studies suggest that sugammadex is effective in reversing moderate neuromuscular block in the presence of renal failure, but no data are available regarding reversal of profound neuromuscular block in patients with renal failure. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of sugammadex in reversing profound neuromuscular block induced by rocuronium in patients with end-stage renal disease and those with normal renal function. A prospective clinical trial. Two university hospitals, from 1 October 2011 to 31 January 2012. Forty patients undergoing kidney transplant: 20 with renal failure [creatinine clearance (ClCr) 90 ml min). Neuromuscular monitoring was performed by acceleromyography and train-of-four (TOF) stimulation. Profound neuromuscular block (posttetanic count, one to three responses) was maintained during surgery. Sugammadex 4 mg kg was administered on completion of skin closure. Recovery of the TOF ratio to 0.9 was recorded. Monitoring of neuromuscular function continued in the postanesthesia care unit for a further 2 h. The efficacy of sugammadex was evaluated by the time taken for the TOF ratio to recover to 0.9. The safety of sugammadex was assessed by monitoring for recurrence of neuromuscular block every 15 min for 2 h. Secondary variables were time to recovery of TOF ratio to 0.7 and 0.8. After sugammadex administration, the mean time for recovery of the TOF ratio to 0.9 was prolonged in the renal failure group (5.6 ± 3.6 min) compared with the control group (2.7 ± 1.3 min, P = 0.003). No adverse events or evidence of recurrence of neuromuscular block were observed. In patients with

  15. Facilitators and Barriers to Noninvasive Ventilation Adherence in Youth with Nocturnal Hypoventilation Secondary to Obesity or Neuromuscular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Jonathan; Rohde, Kristina; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Buchholz, Annick; Katz, Sherri Lynne

    2015-12-15

    Many youth struggle with adherence to bilevel noninvasive ventilation (NIV), often shortly after initiation of treatment. Anecdotal evidence suggests youths with comorbid obesity struggle with adherence while youths with comorbid neuromuscular disease demonstrate better adherence rates. The objective of this study was to explore factors relating to bilevel NIV adherence, and to compare these between youths with underlying obesity or neuromuscular disease. An exploratory qualitative approach was used to examine youth and caregivers' experiences with and perceptions of bilevel NIV. Semi-structured interviews (n = 16) of caregivers and youths were conducted. Youths 12 years and older with nocturnal hypoventilation diagnosed on polysomnography and managed with bilevel NIV, with either concurrent obesity or neuromuscular disease were included. Thematic analysis of interview data was conducted using qualitative analysis software. Factors associated with positive bilevel NIV adherence included previous encouraging experiences with therapy; subjective symptom improvement; familiarity with medical treatments; understanding of nocturnal hypoventilation and its consequences; family and health-care team support; and early adaptation to treatments. Factors associated with poor bilevel NIV adherence included previous negative experiences with therapy, negative attitude towards therapy; difficulty adapting; perceived lack of support from family or health-care team; fear/embarrassment regarding treatment; caregivers not being health-minded; technical issues; side effects; and a lack of subjective symptom improvement. The dimensions which most affect adherence to bilevel NIV are those which contribute to youths' conception of feeling "well" or "unwell." Adherence to treatment may hinge largely on the way in which NIV is initially experienced and framed. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1355. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  16. Neuromuscular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Multiple sclerosis Myasthenia ...

  17. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ulcer. How do H. pylori cause a peptic ulcer and peptic ulcer disease? H. pylori are spiral-shaped bacteria that ... peptic ulcer. How do tumors from ZES cause peptic ulcers? Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is a rare disorder that ...

  18. BIOLOGY OF SOME NEUROMUSCULAR DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerta Vrbova

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand and possibly interfere/ treat neuromuscular disorders it is important to analyze the biological events that may be causing the disability. We illustrate such attempts on two examples of genetically determined neuromuscular diseases: 1 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, and 2 Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA.DMD is an x-linked hereditary muscle disease that leads to progressive muscle weakness. The altered gene in DMD affects dystrophin, a muscle membrane associated proteine. Attempts were made to replace the deficient or missing gene/ protein into muscles of Duchenne children. Two main strategies were explored: 1 Myoblast and stem cell transfer and 2 Gene delivery. The possible use of methods other than the introduction of the missing gene for dystrophin into muscle fibres are based on the knowledge about the adaptive potential of muscle to different functional demands and the ability of the muscle to express a new set of genes in response to such stimuli. Stretch or overload is now known to lead to changes of gene expression in normal muscle, and the success of muscle stretch in the management of Duchenne boys is most likely to be due to such adaptive changes. Electrical stimulation of muscles is also a powerful stimulus for inducing the expression of new genes and this method too has produced beneficial effects on the progress of the disease in mice and men.SMA is a heterogeneous group of hereditary neuromuscular disorders where the loss of lower motoneurones leads to progressive weakness and muscle atrophy. The disease subdivides into 3 forms according to the severity of the symptoms and age of onset. All three forms of SMA have been mapped to chromosome 5q11.2-13.2. Clinical features of all these forms of SMA include hypotonia shortly after birth, symmetrical muscle weakness and atrophy, finger tremor, areflexia or hyporeflexia and later contractures. In patients with SMA 1 and 2 the development of all parts of the motor

  19. Insuficiência respiratória crônica nas doenças neuromusculares: diagnóstico e tratamento Chronic respiratory failure in patients with neuromuscular diseases: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilma Aparecida Paschoal

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available As doenças neuromusculares prejudicam a renovação do ar alveolar e, por esta razão, produzem insuficiência respiratória crônica. A instalação da insuficiência respiratória pode acontecer de modo agudo, como nos traumas, ou ser lenta ou rapidamente progressiva, como na esclerose lateral amiotrófica, distrofias musculares, doença da placa mioneural, etc. O comprometimento da musculatura respiratória prejudica também a eficiência da tosse e, no estado atual da terapêutica disponível no Brasil para estes doentes, pode-se dizer que a morbimortalidade nestes indivíduos está mais associada ao fato de que eles tossem mal do que de que ventilam mal. Nesta revisão, uma breve compilação histórica procura mostrar a evolução das órteses e próteses respiratórias, desde o final do século XIX até agora, com o objetivo de apresentar as opções de máquinas disponíveis para o suporte e substituição da ventilação nas doenças neuromusculares. Além disso, são enfatizados os elementos fundamentais para o diagnóstico da hipoventilação alveolar e da falência do mecanismo protetor da tosse: história clínica, determinação do pico de fluxo da tosse, medida da pressão expiratória máxima e da pressão inspiratória máxima, espirometria em dois decúbitos (sentado e supino, oximetria de pulso, capnografia e polissonografia. São apresentados os valores limites disponíveis na literatura tanto para a indicação do suporte noturno da ventilação como para a extensão do suporte para o período diurno. As manobras para incremento da eficiência da tosse são aqui também discutidas, assim como o momento adequado para sua introdução.Neuromuscular diseases affect alveolar air exchange and therefore cause chronic respiratory failure. The onset of respiratory failure can be acute, as in traumas, or progressive (slow or rapid, as in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, muscular dystrophies, diseases of the myoneural junction, etc

  20. Classification of employment factors according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in patients with neuromuscular diseases: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minis, M.A.H; Heerkens, Y.H.; Engels, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: A systematic evaluation of the literature to identify health and contextual factors associated with employment in patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMD) and to perform a best evidence synthesis, taking into account the design of studies, methodological quality and the statistical

  1. Acute Neuromuscular Adaptations in the Postural Control of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease after Perturbed Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian F. Pasluosta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease (PD present motor impairments reflected in the dynamics of the center of pressure (CoP adjustments during quiet standing. One method to study the dynamics of CoP adjustments is the entropic half-life (EnHL, which measures the short-term correlations of a time series at different time scales. Changes in the EnHL of CoP time series suggest neuromuscular adaptations in the control of posture. In this study, we sought to investigate the immediate changes in the EnHL of CoP adjustments of patients with PD during one session of perturbed (experimental group and unperturbed treadmill walking (control group. A total of 39 patients with PD participated in this study. The experimental group (n = 19 walked on a treadmill providing small tilting of the treadmill platform. The control group (n = 20 walked without perturbations. Each participant performed 5-min practice followed by three 5-min training blocks of walking with or without perturbation (with 3-min resting in between. Quiet standing CoP data was collected for 30 s at pre-training, after each training block, immediately post-training, and after 10 min retention. The EnHL was computed on the original and surrogates (phase-randomized CoP signals in the medio-lateral (ML and anterior–posterior (AP directions. Data was analyzed using four-way mixed ANOVA. Increased EnHL values were observed for both groups (Time effect, p < 0.001 as the intervention progressed, suggesting neuromuscular adaptations in the control of posture. The EnHL of surrogate signals were significantly lower than for original signals (p < 0.001, confirming that these adaptations come from non-random control processes. There was no Group effect (p = 0.622, however by analyzing the significant Group by Direction by Time interaction (p < 0.05, a more pronounced effect in the ML direction of the perturbed group was observed. Altogether, our findings show that treadmill walking decreases

  2. Standardized analysis and sharing of genome-phenome data for neuromuscular and rare disease research through the RD-Connect platform

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Rachel; Beltran, Sergi; Papakonstantinou, Anastasios; Cañada, Andrés; Fernández, Jose Maria; Thompson, Mark; Kaliyaperumal, Rajaram; Lair, Séverine; Sernadela, Pedro; Girdea, Marta; Brudno, Michael; Blavier, André; Lochmüller, Hanns; Roos, Andreas; Straub, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: RD-Connect (rd-connect.eu) is an EU-funded project building an integrated platform to narrow the gaps in rare disease research, where patient populations, clinical expertise and research communities are small in number and highly fragmented. Guided by the needs of rare disease researchers and with neuromuscular and neurodegenerative researchers as its original collaborators, the RD-Connect platform securely integrates multiple types of omics data (genomics, proteomics and transcript...

  3. The undesirable effects of neuromuscular blocking drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudius, C; Garvey, L H; Viby-Mogensen, J

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular blocking drugs are designed to bind to the nicotinic receptor at the neuromuscular junction. However, they also interact with other acetylcholine receptors in the body. Binding to these receptors causes adverse effects that vary with the specificity for the cholinergic receptor...... in question. Moreover, all neuromuscular blocking drugs may cause hypersensitivity reactions. Often the symptoms are mild and self-limiting but massive histamine release can cause systematic reactions with circulatory and respiratory symptoms and signs. At the end of anaesthesia, no residual effect...... of a neuromuscular blocking drug should be present. However, the huge variability in response to neuromuscular blocking drugs makes it impossible to predict which patient will suffer postoperative residual curarization. This article discusses the undesirable effects of the currently available neuromuscular blocking...

  4. The effect of ventilatory muscle training on respiratory function and capacity in ambulatory and bed-ridden patients with neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, D; Meiner, Z

    1993-08-01

    Most patients with neuromuscular disease develop muscle weakness, including the ventilatory muscles leading to respiratory difficulty and, at times, respiratory insufficiency. We studied the effect of ventilatory muscle training on the ventilatory function and capacity of patients with various types of neuromuscular disease. The ambulatory patients were divided into three major groups. Group I (n = 6) patients with motor neuron disease (MND), such as amyotrophic latera sclerosis; Group II (n = 11) patients with myoneural junction disease (MNJ), such as myasthenia gravis and: Group III (n = 7) patients with muscle diseases such as progressive muscular disease. Patients were evaluated for their neuromuscular diagnosis and status of the disease. A complete physical examination and the various neuromuscular tests were performed. A complete respiratory evaluation was applied: pulmonary function tests (PFT), maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP). Patients then started ventilatory muscle training by resistive breathing, as a prophylactic treatment, for 10 min, three times daily, with a resistance which would induce fatigue. All tests were repeated every six weeks, and the results were as follow: forced vital capacity (FVC) changed from 38.8 +/- 12.3 to 53.2 +/- 9.6% (NS) of predicted value in group I, from 49.8 +/- 8.7 to 66.1 +/- 7.5% (p < 0.002) in group II, and from 47.0 +/- 7.5 to 53.3 +/- 7.6% (p < 0.04) in group III. Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was 34.8 +/- 11.0, 46.3 +/- 5, and 45.1 +/- 9% for the three groups, respectively, and did not change with training.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation versus traditional therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease and oropharyngeal dysphagia: effects on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijnen, B J; Speyer, R; Baijens, L W J; Bogaardt, H C A

    2012-09-01

    This study compares the effects of traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment with those of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) as adjunct to therapy on the quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease and oropharyngeal dysphagia. Eighty-eight patients were randomized over three treatment groups. Traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment and traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment combined with NMES at sensor or motor level stimulation were compared. At three times (pretreatment, post-treatment, and 3 months following treatment), two quality-of-life questionnaires (SWAL-QOL and MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory) and a single-item Dysphagia Severity Scale were scored. The Functional Oral Intake Scale was used to assess the dietary intake. After therapy, all groups showed significant improvement on the Dysphagia Severity Scale and restricted positive effects on quality of life. Minimal group differences were found. These effects remained unchanged 3 months following treatment. No significant correlations were found between dietary intake and quality of life. Logopedic dysphagia treatment results in a restricted increased quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease. In this randomized controlled trial, all groups showed significant therapy effects on the Dysphagia Severity Scale and restricted improvements on the SWAL-QOL and the MDADI. However, only slight nonsignificant differences between groups were found.

  6. Preliminary clinical experience using the method of 31P MR spectroscopy in investigations of neuromuscular diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, M.; Horska, A.; Grosmanova, A.; Urban, P.; Suchanek, M.; Jirasek, A.

    1990-01-01

    31 P MR spectroscopy was used to investigate neuromuscular diseases of various origin in 35 patients, mostly children. In devising the procedure of MR examination and of evaluation of results, pattern recognition analysis was used. According to the results of 31 P MR spectroscopy, the patients can be divided into three groups. Group A comprises patients with severe muscular lesions such as Duchenne dystrophy. The second, B group is characterized by milder atrophic changes of muscle fibres. The third group comprises dubious cases. The 31 P MRS method was also used for investigating the development of the disease in time - a decrease in parameter P CR /P i (P CR is an indicator of phosphocreatinine and P i an indicator of inorganic phosphate) corresponds to a deterioration of the clinical condition of patients from group one. In group B fairly stable values of the parameter were observed. An increase in P CR /P i was also observed during administration of Prednisone in a patient with child polymyositis. 3 figs., 3 tabs., 23 refs

  7. Influência da procainamida sobre o bloqueio neuromuscular produzido pelo rocurônio e investigação sobre o mecanismo de ação da procainamida na junção neuromuscular Influencia de la procainamida sobre el bloqueo neuromuscular producido por el rocuronio e investigación sobre el mecanismo de acción de la procainamida en la junción neuromuscular Influence of procainamide on the neuromuscular blockade caused by rocuronium and investigation on the mechanism of action of procainamide on the neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalita Duque Martins

    2007-02-01

    : It has already been proved that procainamide potentiates the neuromuscular blockade of d-tubocurarine; however, the mechanism of this potentiation is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of procainamide on the neuromuscular blockade produced by rocuronium and investigate the mechanisms of this interaction. METHODS: Fifteen rats (250 to 300 g were used in the preparation described by Bülbring. They were divided in three groups (n = 5 each: procainamide - 20 µg.mL-1 (Group I; rocuronium - 4 µg.mL-1 (Group II; and rocuronium - 4 µg.mL-1 and procainamide - 20 µg.mL-1 (Group III. The following parameters were evaluated: 1 amplitude of muscle contractions under indirect stimulation, before and after the administration of the drugs; 2 miniature end plate potentials (MEPPs; and 3 the efficacy of 4-aminopyridine in reverting the muscular blockade. The mechanism of the interaction was studied in Biventer cervicis (n = 5 and in the denervated rat diaphragm (n = 5, observing the influence of procainamide in the response to acetylcholine. RESULTS: Procainamide alone did not change the neuromuscular responses. Group III presented a 68.6% ± 7.1% blockade, which represented a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0067 when compared with Group II (10.4% ± 4.5%, which was reverted by 4-aminopiridine. Procainamide increased the frequency of the MEPP, followed by a blockade that was reverted by 4-aminopiridine. In Biventer cervicis, procainamide increased the contraction in response to acetylcholine, which was not observed in the denervated diaphragm. CONCLUSIONS: Procainamide potentiated the blockade caused by rocuronium. The changes observed with MEPP and Biventer cervicis identified pre-synaptic action. The antagonism of 4-aminopiridine on the blockade of the MEPP suggested receptor desensitization by procainamide.

  8. Root cause of waterborne diseases in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashml, H.N.; Ghumman, A.R.; Malik, N.E.

    2005-01-01

    The waterborne diseases are increasing rapidly at an alarming rate in Pakistan due to poor sanitation and unsafe drinking water supplies. This study shows that about 25 percent of all the illnesses in Lahore are due to severe cases of waterborne diseases. Unhygienic sanitation system is the root cause for this scenario. Drinking water, samples were collected from different zones of the city to find out the root cause of waterborne diseases. The samples from the distribution system serving 'Kachi Abbadies' (Underdeveloped areas) were much more contaminated, may be due to non-chlorination as compared to the water which is regularly chlorinated in posh areas of the city. Contribution of soakage pits in groundwater contamination is more significant at shallow depths. From the laboratory results it is clear that water distribution in underdeveloped areas of the city is highly contaminated and ground water available at shallow depth is also infected by microbial activities. Data collected from the different hospitals to investigate the problem shows that waterborne diseases vary their trend seasonally. Here in Pakistan, rainy season (July-August) reveals maximum number of cases of waterborne diseases. Proper sanitation and water supply systems are more essential to control the influence of waterborne diseases within the country. It is strongly recommended that reputable ways of communications are urgently required to highlight the diseases related to unsafe drinking water. (author)

  9. Chilli anthracnose disease caused by Colletotrichum species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Po Po; Prihastuti, Haryudian; Phoulivong, Sitthisack; Taylor, Paul W J; Hyde, Kevin D

    2008-10-01

    Anthracnose disease is one of the major economic constraints to chilli production worldwide, especially in tropical and subtropical regions. Accurate taxonomic information is necessary for effective disease control management. In the Colletotrichum patho-system, different Colletotrichum species can be associated with anthracnose of the same host. Little information is known concerning the interactions of the species associated with the chilli anthracnose although several Colletotrichum species have been reported as causal agents of chilli anthracnose disease worldwide. The ambiguous taxonomic status of Colletotrichum species has resulted in inaccurate identification which may cause practical problems in plant breeding and disease management. Although the management and control of anthracnose disease are still being extensively researched, commercial cultivars of Capsicum annuum that are resistant to the pathogens that cause chilli anthracnose have not yet been developed. This paper reviews the causal agents of chilli anthracnose, the disease cycle, conventional methods in identification of the pathogen and molecular approaches that have been used for the identification of Colletotrichum species. Pathogenetic variation and population structure of the causal agents of chilli anthracnose along with the current taxonomic status of Colletotrichum species are discussed. Future developments leading to the disease management strategies are suggested.

  10. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Versus Traditional Therapy in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease and Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: Effects on Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Heijnen, B. J.; Speyer, R.; Baijens, L. W. J.; Bogaardt, H. C. A.

    2011-01-01

    This study compares the effects of traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment with those of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) as adjunct to therapy on the quality of life in patients with Parkinson’s disease and oropharyngeal dysphagia. Eighty-eight patients were randomized over three treatment groups. Traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment and traditional logopedic dysphagia treatment combined with NMES at sensor or motor level stimulation were compared. At three times (pretreatm...

  11. Invasive Disease Caused by Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-12

    Dr. Elizabeth Briere discusses Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae which causes a variety of infections in children and adults.  Created: 11/12/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/17/2015.

  12. Endocrine causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Laura; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-10-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing, becoming a substantial public health burden. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of disorders, from simple conditions such as steatosis to severe manifestations such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. The relationship of NAFLD with metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes is well described and related to insulin resistance, with NAFLD being recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD may also coincide with endocrine diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency or hypercortisolism. It is therefore essential to remember, when discovering altered liver enzymes or hepatic steatosis on radiological exams, that endocrine diseases can cause NAFLD. Indeed, the overall prognosis of NAFLD may be modified by treatment of the underlying endocrine pathology. In this review, we will discuss endocrine diseases that can cause NALFD. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms will be presented and specific treatments will be reviewed.

  13. Clinical strategies for complete denture rehabilitation in a patient with Parkinson disease and reduced neuromuscular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B

    2015-01-01

    The dentist has a large role in geriatric health care for the ever increasing elder population with associated physical and neurological disorders. The Parkinson disease is progressive neurological disorder with resting tremor, bradykinesia, akinesia, and postural instability. The psychological components of disease include depression, anxiety, and cognitive deficiency. Poor oral hygiene, increased susceptibility for dental caries, and periodontal diseases predispose them to early edentulism. The number of Parkinson affected patients visiting dental clinic seeking complete denture is growing. This case report explains the steps involved in the complete denture rehabilitation of Parkinson patient. The effective prosthesis will help in alleviating functional, aesthetic, and psychological disabilities of the patient.

  14. Clinical Strategies for Complete Denture Rehabilitation in a Patient with Parkinson Disease and Reduced Neuromuscular Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satheesh B. Haralur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dentist has a large role in geriatric health care for the ever increasing elder population with associated physical and neurological disorders. The Parkinson disease is progressive neurological disorder with resting tremor, bradykinesia, akinesia, and postural instability. The psychological components of disease include depression, anxiety, and cognitive deficiency. Poor oral hygiene, increased susceptibility for dental caries, and periodontal diseases predispose them to early edentulism. The number of Parkinson affected patients visiting dental clinic seeking complete denture is growing. This case report explains the steps involved in the complete denture rehabilitation of Parkinson patient. The effective prosthesis will help in alleviating functional, aesthetic, and psychological disabilities of the patient.

  15. [Epidemiology and causes of Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, C M; Klein, C

    2017-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and has a growing socioeconomic impact due to demographic changes in the industrial nations. There are several forms of PD, a fraction of which (parkinsonism including three autosomal dominantly (SNCA, LRRK2, VPS35) and three autosomal recessively inherited ones (Parkin, PINK1, DJ-1). In addition, there are a plethora of genes causing atypical forms of parkinsonism. In contrast, idiopathic PD is of a multifactorial nature. Genome-wide association studies have established a total of 26 genetic loci for this form of the disease; however, for most of these loci the underlying functional genetic variants have not yet been identified and the respective disease mechanisms remain unresolved. Furthermore, there are a number of environmental and life style factors that are associated with idiopathic PD. Exposure to pesticides and possibly a history of head trauma represent genuine risk factors. Other PD-associated factors, such as smoking and intake of coffee and alcohol may not represent risk factors per se and the cause-effect relationship has not yet been elucidated for most of these factors. A patient with a positive family history and/or an early age of disease onset should undergo counseling with respect to a possible monogenic form of the disease. Disease prediction based on genetic, environmental and life style factors is not yet possible for idiopathic PD and potential gene-specific therapies are currently in the development or early testing phase.

  16. Single-Cell Analysis of SMN Reveals Its Broader Role in Neuromuscular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Rodriguez-Muela

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism underlying selective motor neuron (MN death remains an essential question in the MN disease field. The MN disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is attributable to reduced levels of the ubiquitous protein SMN. Here, we report that SMN levels are widely variable in MNs within a single genetic background and that this heterogeneity is seen not only in SMA MNs but also in MNs derived from controls and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS patients. Furthermore, cells with low SMN are more susceptible to cell death. These findings raise the important clinical implication that some SMN-elevating therapeutics might be effective in MN diseases besides SMA. Supporting this, we found that increasing SMN across all MN populations using an Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor promotes survival in both SMA and ALS-derived MNs. Altogether, our work demonstrates that examination of human neurons at the single-cell level can reveal alternative strategies to be explored in the treatment of degenerative diseases.

  17. Acute cerebellar dysfunction with neuromuscular manifestations after scorpionism presumably caused by Tityus obscurus in Santarém, Pará / Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrez, Pasesa P Q; Quiroga, Mariana M M; Abati, Paulo A M; Mascheretti, Melissa; Costa, Walter Silva; Campos, Luciana P; França, Francisco O S

    2015-03-01

    Scorpionism is a public health problem in many tropical countries, especially in North Africa, South India, Latin America and the Middle East. In Brazil, patients with severe scorpion envenoming have mainly cardiovascular events, including acute heart failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome and shock, death is rare. We described 58 accidents presumably caused by Tityus obscurus in Brazilian Amazonia. Patients reported a sensation of "electric shocks" which could last hours. The vast majority of patients presented a clinical picture compatible with acute cerebellar dysfunction, beginning minutes and lasting up to 2 days after the accident. They presented cerebellar ataxia, dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetry, dysarthria, dyslalia, nausea and vomiting. Besides, some patients presented myoclonus and fasciculation which can also be attributed to cerebellar dysfunction or maybe the result of direct action on skeletal muscle. Two patients had evidence of intense rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury. The clinical picture in this scorpion envenoming is mainly characterized by an acute dysfunction of cerebellar activities and abnormal neuromuscular manifestations and in some cases muscle injury which are not described in any other region of the world. This work presents clinical, epidemiologic, laboratory and treatment aspects of this unmatched scorpion envenoming in the state of Pará, northern Brazil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hand function with touch screen technology in children with normal hand formation, congenital differences, and neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, David H; Bohn, Deborah K; Agel, Julie; Lindstrom, Katy A; Cronquist, Sara M; Van Heest, Ann E

    2015-05-01

    To measure and compare hand function for children with normal hand development, congenital hand differences (CHD), and neuromuscular disease (NMD) using a function test with touch screen technology designed as an iPhone application. We measured touch screen hand function in 201 children including 113 with normal hand formation, 43 with CHD, and 45 with NMD. The touch screen test was developed on the iOS platform using an Apple iPhone 4. We measured 4 tasks: touching dots on a 3 × 4 grid, dragging shapes, use of the touch screen camera, and typing a line of text. The test takes 60 to 120 seconds and includes a pretest to familiarize the subject with the format. Each task is timed independently and the overall time is recorded. Children with normal hand development took less time to complete all 4 subtests with increasing age. When comparing children with normal hand development with those with CHD or NMD, in children aged less than 5 years we saw minimal differences; those aged 5 to 6 years with CHD took significantly longer total time; those aged 7 to 8 years with NMD took significantly longer total time; those aged 9 to 11 years with CHD took significantly longer total time; and those aged 12 years and older with NMD took significantly longer total time. Touch screen technology has becoming increasingly relevant to hand function in modern society. This study provides standardized age norms and shows that our test discriminates between normal hand development and that in children with CHD or NMD. Diagnostic III. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. How we developed, at the Centre/Institute for Neuromuscular Diseases, differential diagnostics of Spinal Muscle Atrophies / Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (SMA/ALS) and tried to influence the development of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jušić, Anica

    2014-10-01

    In our research, we placed the emphasis on delimiting fatal diseases against those that have some similar symptoms, but can be improved, even completely cured. More often we succeeded in differentiating the local compressive factor. In our search for early symptoms, we also found physiological, although quite unusual EMG phenomena. High amplitude neural potentials confirmed the malignant disease diagnosis. The spinal angiography discovered arterial pathology, while CT demonstrated localised hydromyelia. Amyotrophic syndromes caused by chronic led intoxications represented a separate group. Patients would recover significantly on d-penicillamine. We applied it successfully in amyotrophic syndromes with laboratory confirmed copper metabolism disorders. A very significant therapeutic effect was obtained in a patient with SMA without similar laboratory, even in recidivism. Exceptionally, we were able to achieve significant remission with corticosteroids, too. The remaining patients, differentiated as certainly fatal, represented a separate group. We tried to elaborate the special psychosocial and ethical problems connected with its outcome in "round table discussions". The first one was in 1989, at the workshop with King Engel, and the second in 1990, on the Fourth Yugoslav Symposium on Neuromuscular Diseases. In 1990, I visited Cicely Saunders and the St. Christopher's hospice in London, and in 1994 I started to organised hospice movement in Croatia.

  20. Genetic dysfunction of MT-ATP6 causes axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pitceathly, Robert D S

    2012-09-11

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder, affecting 1 in 2,500 individuals. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are not generally considered within the differential diagnosis of patients with uncomplicated inherited neuropathy, despite the essential requirement of ATP for axonal function. We identified the mtDNA mutation m.9185T>C in MT-ATP6, encoding the ATP6 subunit of the mitochondrial ATP synthase (OXPHOS complex V), at homoplasmic levels in a family with mitochondrial disease in whom a severe motor axonal neuropathy was a striking feature. This led us to hypothesize that mutations in the 2 mtDNA complex V subunit encoding genes, MT-ATP6 and MT-ATP8, might be an unrecognized cause of isolated axonal CMT and distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN).

  1. Occupational disease caused by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluepfel, H.U.

    1983-01-01

    The study investigates the course of the disease of persons whose occupational exposure to radiation had resulted in impairment of their professional ability and entitled them to damages under the current regulations. 35 receivers of damages were found who by answering the question form and partly giving permission to study their file at the insurance institution under the conditions of data protection made is possible to carry through this investigation. 14 receivers of damages were occupied in the technical industry, 21 in the sector of medicine. The radiation disease acknowledged as professional concerned in 30 cases the skin, in two cases the lungs and in one case each the haematopoietic system, the eyes and the pelvic organs. In 8 indemnified, acute radiation exposure had caused the disease, in 25 the time of exposure had ranged from one year to several decades. The investigation describes when and under what professional circumstances the radiation exposure took place, the course of the disease, what kind of diagnostic and therapeutical measures were carried through and what personal and professional consequences the indemnified sustained. It gives suggestions to set up a future, more effective documentation system on the basis of the experience gathered on the occasion of this investigation with the currently valid registration system, which is unsuitable for further scientific studies, and with the currently practised methods of after-care. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Duplication in the microtubule-actin cross-linking factor 1 gene causes a novel neuromuscular condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise H; Mosbech, Mai-Britt; Færgeman, Nils J

    2014-01-01

    Spectrins and plakins are important communicators linking cytoskeletal components to each other and to cellular junctions. Microtubule-actin cross-linking factor 1 (MACF1) belongs to the spectraplakin family and is involved in control of microtubule dynamics. Complete knock out of MACF1 in mice...... muscles and diminished motor skills, with heterogeneous presentation among the affected family members. To corroborate these findings we used RNA interference to knock down the VAB-10 locus containing the MACF1 homologue in C. elegans, and we could show that this also causes movement disturbances...

  3. Corals diseases are a major cause of coral death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corals, like humans, are susceptible to diseases. Some coral diseases are associated with pathogenic bacteria; however, the causes of most remain unknown. Some diseases trigger rapid and extensive mortality, while others slowly cause localized color changes or injure coral tiss...

  4. Effects of shared medical appointments on quality of life and cost-effectiveness for patients with a chronic neuromuscular disease. Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Wilt Gert-Jan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared medical appointments are a series of one-to-one doctor-patient contacts, in presence of a group of 6-10 fellow patients. This group visits substitute the annual control visits of patients with the neurologist. The same items attended to in a one-to- one appointment are addressed. The possible advantages of a shared medical appointment could be an added value to the present management of neuromuscular patients. The currently problem-focused one-to-one out-patient visits often leave little time for the patient's psychosocial needs, patient education, and patient empowerment. Methods/design A randomized, prospective controlled study (RCT with a follow up of 6 months will be conducted to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of shared medical appointments compared to usual care for 300 neuromuscular patients and their partners at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center. Every included patient will be randomly allocated to one of the two study arms. This study has been reviewed and approved by the medical ethics committee of the region Arnhem-Nijmegen, the Netherlands. The primary outcome measure is quality of life as measured by the EQ-5D, SF-36 and the Individualized neuromuscular Quality of Life Questionnaire. The primary analysis will be an intention-to-treat analysis on the area under the curve of the quality of life scores. A linear mixed model will be used with random factor group and fixed factors treatment, baseline score and type of neuromuscular disease. For the economic evaluation an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted from a societal perspective, relating differences in costs to difference in health outcome. Results are expected in 2012. Discussion This study will be the first randomized controlled trial which evaluates the effect of shared medical appointments versus usual care for neuromuscular patients. This will enable to determine if there is additional value of shared

  5. A painless and constraint-free method to estimate viscoelastic passive dynamics of limbs' joints to support diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venture, Gentiane; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Yamane, Katsu; Hirashima, Masaya

    2007-01-01

    Though seldom identified, the human joints dynamics is important in the fields of medical robotics and medical research. We present a general solution to estimate in-vivo and simultaneously the passive dynamics of the human limbs' joints. It is based on the use of the multi-body description of the human body and its kinematics and dynamics computations. The linear passive joint dynamics of the shoulders and the elbows: stiffness, viscosity and friction, is estimated simultaneously using the linear least squares method. Acquisition of movements is achieved with an optical motion capture studio on one examinee during the clinical diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases. Experimental results are given and discussed.

  6. Rare Cause of Pleuropnemonia: Tularemia Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agca, Meltem; Duman, Dildar; Sulu, Ebru; Ozbaki, Fatma; Barkay, Orcun; Ozturk, Derya; Yarkin, Tulay

    2017-09-01

    Tularemia is a zoonotic infection which is caused by gram negative coccobacilli, Francisella tularensis. The disease occurs after contact with blood and body fluids of infected animals, bites and ingestion of infected food and water. Although it commonly presents with skin lesions, there may also be serious organ involvements. A55-year woman was consulted for presumptive diagnosis of tuberculosis. Multiple lymphadenopathy in right cervical area was present on physical examination. Pleural effusion on left side was detected with computed tomography. In detailed history, knowledge of a family member with the diagnosis of tularemia was obtained. Both of them had the history of contact with infected animals. Diagnosis of tularemia was confirmed with microagglutination test. With this patient who was initially presumptively diagnosed as tuberculosis, we aim to draw attention to diagnosis of tularemia in the presence of pleuropnemonia and peripheral lymphadenopathy and emphasize importance of detailed patient history.

  7. Genetics and Neuromuscular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing that reveals a young child’s genet- ic destiny may affect relationships within the family or may ... linked inheritance don’t apply at all. An embryo receives its mitochondria from the mother’s egg cell, ...

  8. A flexible electrode array for muscle impedance measurements in the mouse hind limb: A tool to speed research in neuromuscular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J; Rutkove, S B

    2013-01-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a bioelectrical impedance technique focused on the assessment of neuromuscular diseases using tetrapolar surface arrays. Recently, we have shown that reproducible and sensitive EIM measurements can be made on the gastrocnemius muscle of the mouse hind limb and that these are sensitive to disease alterations. A dedicated array would help speed data acquisition and provide additional sensitivity to disease-induced alterations. A flexible electrode array was developed with electrode sizes of 1mm × 1mm by Parlex, Inc. Tetrapolar electrode sets were arranged both parallel to (longitudinal) and orthogonally to (transverse) the major muscle fiber direction of the gastrocnemius muscle. Measurements were made with a dedicated EIM system. A total of 11 healthy animals and 7 animals with spinal muscular atrophy (a form of motor neuron disease) were evaluated after the fur was completely removed with a depilatory agent from the hind limb. Standard electrophysiologic testing (compound motor action potential amplitude and motor unit number estimation) was also performed. The flexible electrode array demonstrated high repeatability in both the longitudinal and transverse directions in the healthy and diseased animals (with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.94 and 0.89, respectively, for phase angle measured transversely). In addition, differences between healthy and diseased animals were identifiable. For example, the 50 kHz transverse phase angle was higher in the healthy as compared to the SMA animals (16.8° ± 0.5 vs. 14.3° ± 0.7, respectively) at 21 weeks of age (p = 0.01). Differences in anisotropy were also identifiable. Correlations to several standard neurophysiologic parameters also appeared promising. This novel flexible tetrapolar electrode array can be used on the mouse hind limb and provides multidirectional data that can be used to assess muscle health. This technique has the potential of finding widespread use in

  9. A flexible electrode array for muscle impedance measurements in the mouse hind limb: A tool to speed research in neuromuscular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Rutkove, S. B.

    2013-04-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a bioelectrical impedance technique focused on the assessment of neuromuscular diseases using tetrapolar surface arrays. Recently, we have shown that reproducible and sensitive EIM measurements can be made on the gastrocnemius muscle of the mouse hind limb and that these are sensitive to disease alterations. A dedicated array would help speed data acquisition and provide additional sensitivity to disease-induced alterations. A flexible electrode array was developed with electrode sizes of 1mm × 1mm by Parlex, Inc. Tetrapolar electrode sets were arranged both parallel to (longitudinal) and orthogonally to (transverse) the major muscle fiber direction of the gastrocnemius muscle. Measurements were made with a dedicated EIM system. A total of 11 healthy animals and 7 animals with spinal muscular atrophy (a form of motor neuron disease) were evaluated after the fur was completely removed with a depilatory agent from the hind limb. Standard electrophysiologic testing (compound motor action potential amplitude and motor unit number estimation) was also performed. The flexible electrode array demonstrated high repeatability in both the longitudinal and transverse directions in the healthy and diseased animals (with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.94 and 0.89, respectively, for phase angle measured transversely). In addition, differences between healthy and diseased animals were identifiable. For example, the 50 kHz transverse phase angle was higher in the healthy as compared to the SMA animals (16.8° ± 0.5 vs. 14.3° ± 0.7, respectively) at 21 weeks of age (p = 0.01). Differences in anisotropy were also identifiable. Correlations to several standard neurophysiologic parameters also appeared promising. This novel flexible tetrapolar electrode array can be used on the mouse hind limb and provides multidirectional data that can be used to assess muscle health. This technique has the potential of finding widespread use in

  10. Neuromuscular control and ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Gregory M; Kaminski, Thomas W; Douex, Al T

    2009-04-01

    Lateral ankle sprains (LAS) are common injuries in athletics and daily activity. Although most are resolved with conservative treatment, others develop chronic ankle instability (AI)-a condition associated with persistent pain, weakness, and instability-both mechanical (such as ligamentous laxity) and functional (neuromuscular impairment with or without mechanical laxity). The predominant theory in AI is one of articular deafferentation from the injury, affecting closed-loop (feedback/reflexive) neuromuscular control, but recent research has called that theory into question. A considerable amount of attention has been directed toward understanding the underlying causes of this pathology; however, little is known concerning the neuromuscular mechanisms behind the development of AI. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available literature on neuromuscular control in uninjured individuals and individuals with AI. Based on available research and reasonable speculation, it seems that open-loop (feedforward/anticipatory) neuromuscular control may be more important for the maintenance of dynamic joint stability than closed-loop control systems that rely primarily on proprioception. Therefore, incorporating perturbation activities into patient rehabilitation schemes may be of some benefit in enhancing these open-loop control mechanisms. Despite the amount of research conducted in this area, analysis of individuals with AI during dynamic conditions is limited. Future work should aim to evaluate dynamic perturbations in individuals with AI, as well as subjects who have a history of at least one LAS and never experienced recurrent symptoms. These potential findings may help elucidate some compensatory mechanisms, or more appropriate neuromuscular control strategies after an LAS event, thus laying the groundwork for future intervention studies that can attempt to reduce the incidence and severity of acute and chronic lateral ankle injury.

  11. Report by the Spanish Foundation for the Brain on the social impact of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, A; Esteban, J; Paradas, C

    A thorough knowledge of the socioeconomic scope of neuromuscular disease is essential for managing resources and raising social awareness. Our group reviewed current data on the epidemiology, mortality and dependence rates, and socioeconomic impact of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and neuromuscular diseases in Spain. We also recorded how neurological care for these patients is organised. Neuromuscular disorders are a very heterogeneous group of diseases, and some are very rare. These disorders account for between 2.8% and 18% of the total motives for a neurological consultation. In Spain, prevalence and incidence figures for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are similar to those in other countries; however, figures for patients with other neuromuscular diseases are not known. Since the diseases are chronic, progressive, and debilitating, they cause considerable disability and dependence, which in turn directly affects healthcare and social costs associated with the disease. The costs generated by one patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or Duchenne disease have been calculated at about 50 000 euros per year. Neuromuscular disease shows aetiological, diagnostic, and prognostic complexity, and it requires multidisciplinary management. Follow-up for these patients should be entrusted to specialised units. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Objective neuromuscular monitoring of neuromuscular blockade in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderström, C M; Eskildsen, K Z; Gätke, M R

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuromuscular blocking agents are commonly used during general anaesthesia but can lead to postoperative residual neuromuscular blockade and associated morbidity. With appropriate objective neuromuscular monitoring (objNMM) residual blockade can be avoided. In this survey, we investig...

  13. [Visceral diseases as cause of lumbar syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilscher, H; Bogner, G; Landsiedl, F

    1977-01-01

    30 patients with hepatitis, 50 patients with gynecological diseases, and 100 with urological diseases were investigated with regards to lumbago to find out whether there is a correlation between the internal disease and the signs of low back pain. The patients were compared with a control group of 33 healthy people. The vertebral localisation of the pain and its radiation were investigated and discussed in certain diseases as well as any correlation between lumbago and average age. The various possibilities of pain radiation are described and the importance of the vertebral column as secondary seat of low back pain is pointed out.

  14. [The hip joint in neuromuscular disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobl, W M

    2009-07-01

    Physiologic motor and biomechanical parameters are prerequisites for normal hip development and hip function. Disorders of muscle activity and lack of weight bearing due to neuromuscular diseases may cause clinical symptoms such as an unstable hip or reduced range of motion. Disability and handicap because of pain, hip dislocation, osteoarthritis, gait disorders, or problems in seating and positioning are dependent on the severity of the disease, the time of occurrence, and the means of prevention and treatment. Preservation of pain-free and stable hip joints should be gained by balancing muscular forces and by preventing progressive dislocation. Most important is the exact indication of therapeutic options such as movement and standing therapy as well as drugs and surgery.

  15. Neuromuscular complications of immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Noah A; Trevino, Christopher R; Waheed, Waqar; Sobhani, Fatemeh; Landry, Kara K; Thomas, Alissa A; Hehir, Mike

    2018-01-17

    Immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICPI) therapy unleashes the body's natural immune system to fight cancer. ICPIs improve overall cancer survival, however, the unbridling of the immune system may induce a variety of immune-related adverse events. Neuromuscular immune complications are rare but they can be severe. Myasthenia gravis and inflammatory neuropathy are the most common neuromuscular adverse events but a variety of others including inflammatory myopathy are reported. The pathophysiologic mechanism of these autoimmune disorders may differ from that of non-ICPI-related immune diseases. Accordingly, while the optimal treatment for ICPI-related neuromuscular disorders generally follows a traditional paradigm, there are important novel considerations in selecting appropriate immunosuppressive therapy. This review presents 2 new cases, a summary of neuromuscular ICPI complications, and an approach to the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. Muscle Nerve, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Castleman's Disease: An Interesting Cause of Hematuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolofari, Sotonye Karl; Chow, Wai-Man; Hussain, Basharat

    2015-03-01

    Castleman's disease is a rare benign lymphoproliferative disorder, characterized by benign growths of the lymph node tissue. It is associated with a number of malignancies, including Kaposi sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkins lymphoma, and POEMS syndrome. This report describes the case of a 38 year old gentleman, presenting with painless hematuria. Initial investigations, including flexible cystoscopy were unremarkable. However, subsequent imaging including CT Urogram and MR pelvis revealed multiple prevesical lesions. Histology obtained from excision biopsy revealed histological features consistent with Castleman's disease. In this report we discuss the nature, presentation and treatment modalities of this rare condition.

  17. Sugammadex: A Review of Neuromuscular Blockade Reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Gillian M

    2016-07-01

    Sugammadex (Bridion(®)) is a modified γ-cyclodextrin that reverses the effect of the steroidal nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents rocuronium and vecuronium. Intravenous sugammadex resulted in rapid, predictable recovery from moderate and deep neuromuscular blockade in patients undergoing surgery who received rocuronium or vecuronium. Recovery from moderate neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 2 mg/kg than with neostigmine, and recovery from deep neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 4 mg/kg than with neostigmine or spontaneous recovery. In addition, recovery from neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster when sugammadex 16 mg/kg was administered 3 min after rocuronium than when patients spontaneously recovered from succinylcholine. Sugammadex also demonstrated efficacy in various special patient populations, including patients with pulmonary disease, cardiac disease, hepatic dysfunction or myasthenia gravis and morbidly obese patients. Intravenous sugammadex was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, sugammadex is an important option for the rapid reversal of rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade.

  18. TEACHING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NORRIS, JEANNE E.; STEINHAUS, ARTHUR H.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO FIND OUT WHETHER (1) THE METHODS FOR ATTAINING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION THAT HAVE PROVED FRUITFUL IN THE ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLINIC CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ADAPTED TO THE TEACHER-CLASS RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLASSROOM AND GYMNASIUM, AND (2) NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION CAN BE TAUGHT SUCCESSFULLY BY AN APPROPRIATELY TRAINED…

  19. MRI in neuromuscular disorders; MRT bei neuromuskulaeren Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischmann, Arne [Klinik St. Anna, Luzern (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Fischer, Dirk [Kantonsspital Bruderholz (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Neuromuscular disorders are caused by damage of the skeletal muscles or supplying nerves, in many cases due to a genetic defect, resulting in progressive disability, loss of ambulation and often a reduced life expectancy. Previously only supportive care and steroids were available as treatments, but several novel therapies are under development or in clinical trial phase. Muscle imaging can detect specific patterns of involvement and facilitate diagnosis and guide genetic testing. Quantitative MRT can be used to monitor disease progression either to monitor treatment or as a surrogate parameter for clinical trails. Novel imaging sequences can provide insights into disease pathology and muscle metabolism. (orig.)

  20. Pathogen Causing Disease of Diagnosis PCR Tecnology

    OpenAIRE

    SEVİNDİK, Emre; KIR, A. Çağrı; BAŞKEMER, Kadir; UZUN, Veysel

    2013-01-01

    Polimerase chain reaction (PCR) with which, the development of recombinant DNA tecnology, a technique commonly used in field of moleculer biology and genetic. Duplication of the target DNA is provided with this technique without the need for cloning. Some fungus species, bacteria, viruses constitutent an important group of pathogenicity in human, animals and plants. There are routinely applied types of PCR in the detection of pathogens infections diseases. These Nested- PCR, Real- Time PCR, M...

  1. Autosomal-dominant non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism presenting with neuromuscular symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgadi, Aziz; Arvidsson, C-G; Janson, Annika; Marcus, Claude; Costagliola, Sabine; Norgren, Svante

    2005-08-01

    Neuromuscular presentations are common in thyroid disease, although the mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we investigated the pathogenesis in a boy with autosomal-dominant hyperthyroidism presenting with neuromuscular symptoms. The TSHr gene was investigated by direct sequencing. Functional properties of the mutant TSHr were investigated during transient expression in COS-7 cells. Family members were investigated by clinical and biochemical examinations. Sequence analysis revealed a previously reported heterozygous missense mutation Glycine 431 for Serine in the first transmembrane segment, leading to an increased specific constitutive activity. Three additional affected family members carried the same mutation. There was no indication of autoimmune disorder. All symptoms disappeared upon treatment with thacapzol and L-thyroxine and subsequent subtotal thyroidectomy. The data imply that neuromuscular symptoms can be caused by excessive thyroid hormone levels rather than by autoimmunity.

  2. Acrolein Can Cause Cardiovascular Disease: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Robert J; Johnson, Giffe T; Coyle, Jayme P; Harbison, Raymond D

    2017-07-01

    Acrolein is a highly reactive unsaturated aldehyde that is formed during the burning of gasoline and diesel fuels, cigarettes, woods and plastics. In addition, acrolein is generated during the cooking or frying of food with fats or oils. Acrolein is also used in the synthesis of many organic chemicals and as a biocide in agricultural and industrial water supply systems. The total emissions of acrolein in the United States from all sources are estimated to be 62,660 tons/year. Acrolein is classified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a high-priority air and water toxicant. Acrolein can exert toxic effects following inhalation, ingestion, and dermal exposures that are dose dependent. Cardiovascular tissues are particularly sensitive to the toxic effects of acrolein based primarily on in vitro and in vivo studies. Acrolein can generate free oxygen radical stress in the heart, decrease endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation and nitric oxide formation, form cytoplasmic and nuclear protein adducts with myocyte and vascular endothelial cell proteins and cause vasospasm. In this manner, chronic exposure to acrolein can cause myocyte dysfunction, myocyte necrosis and apoptosis and ultimately lead to cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure. Epidemiological studies of acrolein exposure and toxicity should be developed and treatment strategies devised that prevent or significantly limit acrolein cardiovascular toxicity.

  3. [A brief history of the natural causes of human disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips-Castro, Walter

    2015-01-01

    In the study of the causes of disease that have arisen during the development of humankind, one can distinguish three major perspectives: the natural, the supernatural, and the artificial. In this paper we distinguish the rational natural causes of disease from the irrational natural causes. Within the natural and rational causal approaches of disease, we can highlight the Egyptian theory of putrid intestinal materials called "wechdu", the humoral theory, the atomistic theory, the contagious theory, the cellular theory, the molecular (genetic) theory, and the ecogenetic theory. Regarding the irrational, esoteric, and mystic causal approaches to disease, we highlight the astrological, the alchemical, the iatrochemical, the iatromechanical, and others (irritability, solidism, brownism, and mesmerism).

  4. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Kathryn Bambino; Chi Zhang; Christine Austin; Chitra Amarasiriwardena; Manish Arora; Jaime Chu; Kirsten C. Sadler

    2018-01-01

    The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD) incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined...

  5. Gumboro Disease Outbreaks Cause High Mortality Rates in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infectious bursal disease is a disease of economic importance which affects all types of chickens and causes variable mortality. To establish the importance of this disease in the indigenous chickens in Kenya a comparative study of natural outbreaks in flocks of layers, broilers and indigenous chickens was done. Thirty nine ...

  6. Identification of Changing Lower Limb Neuromuscular Activation in Parkinson’s Disease during Treadmill Gait with and without Levodopa Using a Nonlinear Analysis Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Pourmoghaddam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of electromyographic (EMG data is a cornerstone of research related to motor control in Parkinson’s disease. Nonlinear EMG analysis tools have shown to be valuable, but analysis is often complex and interpretation of the data may be difficult. A previously introduced algorithm (SYNERGOS that provides a single index value based on simultaneous multiple muscle activations (MMA has been shown to be effective in detecting changes in EMG activation due to modifications of walking speeds in healthy adults. In this study, we investigated if SYNERGOS detects MMA changes associated with both different walking speeds and levodopa intake. Nine male Parkinsonian patients walked on a treadmill with increasing speed while on or off medication. We collected EMG data and computed SYNERGOS indices and employed a restricted maximum likelihood linear mixed model to the values. SYNERGOS was sensitive to neuromuscular modifications due to both alterations of gait speed and intake of levodopa. We believe that the current experiment provides evidence for the potential value of SYNERGOS as a nonlinear tool in clinical settings, by providing a single value index of MMA. This could help clinicians to evaluate the efficacy of interventions and treatments in Parkinson’s disease in a simple manner.

  7. Celiac disease: A missed cause of metabolic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Celiac disease (CD is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease. The symptoms of CD are varied and atypical, with many patients having no gastrointestinal symptoms. Metabolic bone disease (MBD is a less recognized manifestation of CD associated with spectrum of musculoskeletal signs and symptoms, viz. bone pains, proximal muscle weakness, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fracture. We here report five patients who presented with severe MBD as the only manifestation of CD. Materials and Methods: Records of 825 patients of CD diagnosed during 2002-2010 were retrospectively analyzed for clinical features, risk factors, signs, biochemical, and radiological parameters. Results: We were able to identify five patients (0.6% of CD who had monosymptomatic presentation with musculoskeletal symptoms and signs in the form of bone pains, proximal myopathy, and fragility fractures without any gastrointestinal manifestation. All the five patients had severe MBD in the form of osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fragility fractures. Four of the five patients had additional risk factors such as antiepileptic drugs, chronic alcohol consumption, malnutrition, and associated vitamin D deficiency which might have contributed to the severity of MBD. Conclusion: Severe metabolic disease as the only presentation of CD is rare. Patients show significant improvement in clinical, biochemical, and radiological parameters with gluten-free diet, calcium, and vitamin D supplementation. CD should be looked for routinely in patients presenting with unexplained MBD.

  8. T2-Weighted Dixon Turbo Spin Echo for Accelerated Simultaneous Grading of Whole-Body Skeletal Muscle Fat Infiltration and Edema in Patients With Neuromuscular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaeger, Sarah; Klupp, Elisabeth; Weidlich, Dominik; Cervantes, Barbara; Foreman, Sarah C; Deschauer, Marcus; Schoser, Benedikt; Katemann, Christoph; Kooijman, Hendrik; Rummeny, Ernst J; Zimmer, Claus; Kirschke, Jan S; Karampinos, Dimitrios C

    2018-04-02

    The assessment of fatty infiltration and edema in the musculature of patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMDs) typically requires the separate performance of T1-weighted and fat-suppressed T2-weighted sequences. T2-weighted Dixon turbo spin echo (TSE) enables the generation of T2-weighted fat- and water-separated images, which can be used to assess both pathologies simultaneously. The present study examines the diagnostic performance of T2-weighted Dixon TSE compared with the standard sequences in 10 patients with NMDs and 10 healthy subjects. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging was performed including T1-weighted Dixon fast field echo, T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery, and T2-weighted Dixon TSE. Fatty infiltration and intramuscular edema were rated by 2 radiologists using visual semiquantitative rating scales. To assess intermethod and interrater agreement, weighted Cohen's κ coefficients were calculated. The ratings of fatty infiltration showed high intermethod and high interrater agreement (T1-weighted Dixon fast field echo vs T2-weighted Dixon TSE fat image). The evaluation of edematous changes showed high intermethod and good interrater agreement (T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery vs T2-weighted Dixon TSE water image). T2-weighted Dixon TSE imaging is an alternative for accelerated simultaneous grading of whole-body skeletal muscle fat infiltration and edema in patients with NMDs.

  9. Hereditary Causes of Kidney Stones and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, Vidar O.; Goldfarb, David S.; Lieske, John C.; Beara-Lasic, Lada; Anglani, Franca; Milliner, Dawn S.; Palsson, Runolfur

    2013-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) and primary hyperoxaluria (PH) are rare but important causes of severe kidney stone disease and/or chronic kidney disease in children. Recurrent kidney stone disease and nephrocalcinosis, particularly in pre-pubertal children, should alert the physician to the possibility of an inborn error of metabolism as the underlying cause. Unfortunately, the lack of recognition and knowledge of the five disorders has frequently resulted in an unacceptable delay in diagnosis and treatment, sometimes with grave consequences. A high index of suspicion coupled with early diagnosis may reduce or even prevent the serious long-term complications of these diseases. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of patients with APRT deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, FHHNC and PH with emphasis on childhood manifestations. PMID:23334384

  10. Diseases caused by poxvirus - orf and milker's nodules: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R.C.S. Barraviera

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Sheep and cattle parapoxviruses cause in human beings diseases of very similar aspect, named orf and milker's nodules, respectively. These infections are generically called farmyard pox. In the present article, we show the epidemiological, clinical, and histopathological aspects, as well as the treatment of these two viral diseases that are very similar, being differentiated only by their epidemiological aspects.

  11. Hydatid disease: A rare cause of fracture nonunion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Aggarwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is an infrequent parasitic infestation caused by cestode, most commonly, Echinococcus granulosus. Bone involvement is distinctly uncommon. We would like to share our experience of a rare case of hydatid disease of femur in a 24-year-old male who presented with nonunion of subtrochanteric fracture. Histopathology showed typical lamellated wall and dagger-shaped hooklets. In view of its rarity, hydatid disease often remains an unsuspected infection of the bone.

  12. Computed tomography (CT) in neuromuscular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, M.; Ambler, Z.

    1997-01-01

    For 24 patients with confirmed neuromuscular disorders, the clinical picture of the disease was complemented with CT examination. It is concluded, in accordance with the literature, that CT has a supplementary value as regards the extent and degree of disorder of the affected muscle groups. The basic pathological picture includes muscular atrophies, dystrophies, hypertrophies, and their combinations. The CT images are non-specific for the individual neuromuscular disorders and are of minor importance in the diagnostic process. 1 tab., 7 figs., 6 refs

  13. Research highlights of partial neuromuscular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng ZHANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the latest progression on neuromuscular disorders for clinicians, this review screened and systemized the papers on neuromuscular disorders which were collected by PubMed from January 2013 to February 2014. This review also introduced the clinical diagnosis and treatment hightlights on glycogen storage disease type Ⅱ (GSD Ⅱ, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. The important references will be useful for clinicians. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.004

  14. Validation of the individualised neuromuscular quality of life for the USA with comparison of the impact of muscle disease on those living in USA versus UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadjadi Reza

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Individualised Neuromuscular Quality of Life (INQoL questionnaire is a published muscle disease specific measure of QoL that has been validated using both qualitative and quantitative methods in a United Kingdom population of adults with muscle disease. If INQoL is to be used in other countries it needs to be linguistically and culturally validated for those countries. It may be important to understand any cultural differences in how patients rate their QoL when applying QoL measures in multi-national clinical trials. Methods We conducted a postal survey of QoL issues in US adults with muscle disease using an agreed translation, from UK to US English, of the same questionnaire as was used in the original construction of INQoL. This questionnaire included an opportunity for free text comments on any aspects of QoL that might not have been covered by the questionnaire. We examined the responses using both quantitative and qualitative approaches. The frequency of the responses in US versus UK populations was compared using appropriate correlation tests and Rasch analysis. A phenomenological approach was used to guide the qualitative analysis and facilitate the exploration of patients' perceptions and experiences. Results The US survey received 333 responses which were compared with 251 UK survey responses. We found that INQoL domains covered all the issues raised by US subjects with no additional domains required. The experiences of those with muscle disease were remarkably similar in the US and UK but there were differences related to the impact of muscle disease on relationships and on employment which was greater for those living in the United States. The greater impact on employment was associated with a higher importance rating given to employment in the US. This may reflect the lower level of financial support for those who are unemployed, and the loss of employment related health benefits. Conclusions INQoL is

  15. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Bambino

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined the contribution of iAs to FLD using zebrafish and tested the interaction with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease (ALD. We report that zebrafish exposed to iAs throughout development developed specific phenotypes beginning at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf, including the development of FLD in over 50% of larvae by 5 dpf. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of livers from larvae exposed to either iAs or ethanol revealed the oxidative stress response and the unfolded protein response (UPR caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress as common pathways in both these models of FLD, suggesting that they target similar cellular processes. This was confirmed by our finding that arsenic is synthetically lethal with both ethanol and a well-characterized ER-stress-inducing agent (tunicamycin, suggesting that these exposures work together through UPR activation to cause iAs toxicity. Most significantly, combined exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of iAs and ethanol potentiated the expression of UPR-associated genes, cooperated to induce FLD, reduced the expression of as3mt, which encodes an arsenic-metabolizing enzyme, and significantly increased the concentration of iAs in the liver. This demonstrates that iAs exposure is sufficient to cause FLD and that low doses of iAs can potentiate the effects of ethanol to cause liver disease. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper.

  16. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambino, Kathryn; Zhang, Chi; Austin, Christine; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Arora, Manish; Chu, Jaime; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2018-02-26

    The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD) incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined the contribution of iAs to FLD using zebrafish and tested the interaction with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We report that zebrafish exposed to iAs throughout development developed specific phenotypes beginning at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), including the development of FLD in over 50% of larvae by 5 dpf. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of livers from larvae exposed to either iAs or ethanol revealed the oxidative stress response and the unfolded protein response (UPR) caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as common pathways in both these models of FLD, suggesting that they target similar cellular processes. This was confirmed by our finding that arsenic is synthetically lethal with both ethanol and a well-characterized ER-stress-inducing agent (tunicamycin), suggesting that these exposures work together through UPR activation to cause iAs toxicity. Most significantly, combined exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of iAs and ethanol potentiated the expression of UPR-associated genes, cooperated to induce FLD, reduced the expression of as3mt , which encodes an arsenic-metabolizing enzyme, and significantly increased the concentration of iAs in the liver. This demonstrates that iAs exposure is sufficient to cause FLD and that low doses of iAs can potentiate the effects of ethanol to cause liver disease.This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Austin, Christine; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Arora, Manish

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD) incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined the contribution of iAs to FLD using zebrafish and tested the interaction with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We report that zebrafish exposed to iAs throughout development developed specific phenotypes beginning at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), including the development of FLD in over 50% of larvae by 5 dpf. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of livers from larvae exposed to either iAs or ethanol revealed the oxidative stress response and the unfolded protein response (UPR) caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as common pathways in both these models of FLD, suggesting that they target similar cellular processes. This was confirmed by our finding that arsenic is synthetically lethal with both ethanol and a well-characterized ER-stress-inducing agent (tunicamycin), suggesting that these exposures work together through UPR activation to cause iAs toxicity. Most significantly, combined exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of iAs and ethanol potentiated the expression of UPR-associated genes, cooperated to induce FLD, reduced the expression of as3mt, which encodes an arsenic-metabolizing enzyme, and significantly increased the concentration of iAs in the liver. This demonstrates that iAs exposure is sufficient to cause FLD and that low doses of iAs can potentiate the effects of ethanol to cause liver disease. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. PMID:29361514

  18. Cause-Specific Mortality Among Spouses of Parkinson Disease Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malene; Hansen, Jonni; Ritz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caring for a chronically ill spouse is stressful, but the health effects of caregiving are not fully understood. We studied the effect on mortality of being married to a person with Parkinson disease. METHODS: All patients in Denmark with a first-time hospitalization for Parkinson...... disease between 1986 and 2009 were identified, and each case was matched to five population controls. We further identified all spouses of those with Parkinson disease (n = 8,515) and also the spouses of controls (n = 43,432). All spouses were followed in nationwide registries until 2011. RESULTS: Among...... men, being married to a Parkinson disease patient was associated with a slightly higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 1.06 [95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.11]). Mortality was particularly high for death due to external causes (1.42 [1.09-1.84]) including suicide (1.89 [1...

  19. Lipoprotein (a) as a cause of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Langsted, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Human epidemiologic and genetic evidence using the Mendelian randomization approach in large-scale studies now strongly supports that elevated lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is a causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease, that is, for myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic stenosis, and aortic valve...... with very high concentrations to reduce cardiovascular disease are awaited. Recent genetic evidence documents elevated Lp(a) as a cause of myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic stenosis, and aortic valve stenosis....

  20. Dental erosion caused by gastroesophageal reflux disease: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cengiz, Seda; Cengiz, M ?nan?; Sara?, Y ?inasi

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Chronic regurgitation of gastric acids in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease may cause dental erosion, which can lead in combination with attrition or bruxism to extensive loss of coronal tooth tissue. Case presentation This clinical report describes treatment of severe tooth wear of a gastroesophageal reflux disease patient who is 54-year-old Turkish male patient. After his medical treatment, severe tooth wear, bruxism and decreased vertical dimensions were determined...

  1. Will chronic e-cigarette use cause lung disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Rowell, Temperance R.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tobacco smoking is a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the lung, tobacco smoking increases the risk of lung cancer, and also causes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which encompasses both emphysema and chronic bronchitis. E-cigarettes (E-Cigs), or electronic nicotine delivery systems, were developed over a decade ago and are designed to deliver nicotine without combusting tobacco. Although tobacco smoking has declined since the 1950s, E-Cig ...

  2. Spontaneous expulsive suprachoroidal hemorrhage caused by decompensated liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnagopal Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Expulsive suprachoroidal hemorrhage can be surgical or spontaneous. Spontaneous expulsive suprachoroidal hemorrhage (SESCH is a rare entity. Most of the reported cases of SESCH were caused by a combination of corneal pathology and glaucoma. We are reporting a rare presentation of SESCH with no pre-existing glaucoma or corneal pathology and caused by massive intra- and peri-ocular hemorrhage due to decompensated liver disease.

  3. Application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the lower limb skeletal muscles in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Barbara Kucio

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing physical activity is a widely-known method of rehabilitation of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, what kind of procedure is to be applied if a patient suffers from advanced heart or respiratory failure, cannot undertake physical exercise due to locomotor system disorders or is currently undergoing respiratorotherapy? Recent research shows that neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the lower limb skeletal muscles (NMES may comprise an alternative to physical training in patients with CHF and COPD. The aim of this study is to summarize the current state of knowledge on the use of NMES in cardiac rehabilitation of patients with CHF and pulmonary rehabilitation of patients with COPD. As demonstrated in recent research on the topic, NMES – due to forcing the muscles to activate – increases exercise tolerance, muscle mass and endurance in patients with CHF and COPD. The beneficial effect of NMES on blood circulation in the muscles, aerobic enzymes activity, functioning of the vascular endothelium, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines concentration and increased quality of life has also been presented. It is to be accentuated that NMES treatment, due to lesser physical exertion and, in turn, a decreased feeling of dyspnea are more comfortable for the patient than traditional physical training. Moreover, NMES treatment, after foregoing training, can be applied at home. Potential side effects include transient muscle pain and minor skin damage due to improper positioning of the electrodes. To summarize, NMES treatment is well received by CHF and COPD patients and brings about increased exercise tolerance, as well as better quality of life. Devices used for NMES therapy, due to progressive miniaturization, are easily accessible and relatively inexpensive.

  4. Lack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Frank W.; Roberts, Christian K.; Laye, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases are major killers in the modern era. Physical inactivity is a primary cause of most chronic diseases. The initial third of the article considers: activity and prevention definitions; historical evidence showing physical inactivity is detrimental to health and normal organ functional capacities; cause vs. treatment; physical activity and inactivity mechanisms differ; gene-environment interaction [including aerobic training adaptations, personalized medicine, and co-twin physical activity]; and specificity of adaptations to type of training. Next, physical activity/exercise is examined as primary prevention against 35 chronic conditions [Accelerated biological aging/premature death, low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, hypertension, stroke, congestive heart failure, endothelial dysfunction, arterial dyslipidemia, hemostasis, deep vein thrombosis, cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, balance, bone fracture/falls, rheumatoid arthritis, colon cancer, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, polycystic ovary syndrome, erectile dysfunction, pain, diverticulitis, constipation, and gallbladder diseases]. The article ends with consideration of deterioration of risk factors in longer-term sedentary groups; clinical consequences of inactive childhood/adolescence; and public policy. In summary, the body rapidly maladapts to insufficient physical activity, and if continued, results in substantial decreases in both total and quality years of life. Taken together, conclusive evidence exists that physical inactivity is one important cause of most chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity primarily prevents, or delays, chronic diseases, implying that chronic disease need not be an inevitable outcome during life

  5. Synaptic defects in the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen K Y Ling

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a major genetic cause of death in childhood characterized by marked muscle weakness. To investigate mechanisms underlying motor impairment in SMA, we examined the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry governing hindlimb ambulatory behavior in SMA model mice (SMNΔ7. In the neuromuscular circuitry, we found that nearly all neuromuscular junctions (NMJs in hindlimb muscles of SMNΔ7 mice remained fully innervated at the disease end stage and were capable of eliciting muscle contraction, despite a modest reduction in quantal content. In the spinal circuitry, we observed a ∼28% loss of synapses onto spinal motoneurons in the lateral column of lumbar segments 3-5, and a significant reduction in proprioceptive sensory neurons, which may contribute to the 50% reduction in vesicular glutamate transporter 1(VGLUT1-positive synapses onto SMNΔ7 motoneurons. In addition, there was an increase in the association of activated microglia with SMNΔ7 motoneurons. Together, our results present a novel concept that synaptic defects occur at multiple levels of the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in SMNΔ7 mice, and that proprioceptive spinal synapses could be a potential target for SMA therapy.

  6. Chilli anthracnose disease caused by Colletotrichum species§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Po Po; Prihastuti, Haryudian; Phoulivong, Sitthisack; Taylor, Paul W.J.; Hyde, Kevin D.

    2008-01-01

    Anthracnose disease is one of the major economic constraints to chilli production worldwide, especially in tropical and subtropical regions. Accurate taxonomic information is necessary for effective disease control management. In the Colletotrichum patho-system, different Colletotrichum species can be associated with anthracnose of the same host. Little information is known concerning the interactions of the species associated with the chilli anthracnose although several Colletotrichum species have been reported as causal agents of chilli anthracnose disease worldwide. The ambiguous taxonomic status of Colletotrichum species has resulted in inaccurate identification which may cause practical problems in plant breeding and disease management. Although the management and control of anthracnose disease are still being extensively researched, commercial cultivars of Capsicum annuum that are resistant to the pathogens that cause chilli anthracnose have not yet been developed. This paper reviews the causal agents of chilli anthracnose, the disease cycle, conventional methods in identification of the pathogen and molecular approaches that have been used for the identification of Colletotrichum species. Pathogenetic variation and population structure of the causal agents of chilli anthracnose along with the current taxonomic status of Colletotrichum species are discussed. Future developments leading to the disease management strategies are suggested. PMID:18837103

  7. Dracunculus medinensis (Guinea worm disease): a rare cause of calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gospos, C.

    1980-01-01

    Tangled whorly calcifications were seen in the abdominal subcutaneous tissues of a negro patient from Africa. The differential diagnosis of such calcifications - rarely observed in Europe - includes a variety of parasites. In this patient, Dracunculus medinensis (guinea worm disease) was the cause.

  8. Colletotrichum species causing anthracnose disease of chili in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diao, Y.-Z.; Zhang, C.; Liu, F.; Wang, W.-Z.; Liu, L.; Cai, L.; Liu, X.-L.

    2017-01-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum species is a serious disease of more than 30 plant genera. Several Colletotrichum species have been reported to infect chili in different countries. Although China is the largest chiliproducing country, little is known about the species that have been infecting

  9. Chemical control of blossom blight disease of sarpagandha caused ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... Chemical control of blossom blight disease of sarpagandha caused by Colletotrichum capsici. R. S. Shukla, Abdul-Khaliq and M. Alam*. Department of Plant Pathology, Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Council of Scientific and Industrial. Research, P. O. CIMAP, Lucknow–226 015, India.

  10. Danon’s disease as a cause of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Leontyeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common inherited disease of the myocardium. The causes of the disease are heterogeneous; its primary form results from mutations in the genes encoding cardiac sarcomeric proteins; its secondary (metabolic and syndromic forms develop due to mutations in the genes encoding non-sarcomeric proteins. Glycogenosis is the most common cause of the metabolic ones of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Danon’s disease (lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2-cardiomyopathy is a form of glycogenosis and it is characterized by a typical triad: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, mental retardation, and skeletal myopathy. The disease occurs with mutations in the LAMP2 gene; X-linked dominant inheritance. LAMP2-cardiomyopathy does not virtually differ in its clinical manifestations from the severe form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which results from mutations in the sarcomeric protein genes. The disease is characterized by a poor progressive course with the high probability of causing sudden death or with the progression of severe heart failure. Implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator is a main method to prevent sudden cardiac death. 

  11. FUNCTIONS OF A NEUROMUSCULAR CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Zidar

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Main functions of a neuromuscular (NM centre are making diagnosis, treatment and counselling. Some other functions, e. g. forming a register and epidemiological endeavours, could be added. All these activities are expected to be achieved by multidisciplinary approach with the idea that members use the same guidelines and share the same knowledge.NM diseases affect lower levels of the nervous system that is motor units (motor cells in the brainstem and spinal cord, nerve roots, cranial and peripheral nerves, neuromuscular junction, and muscles. There are many such diseases; a few are more common others are rare.Rational approach in making a diagnosis can be divided into several steps. The process begins with a person with clinical symptoms and signs which raise the suspicion of NM disease. The first step is the description of the predominant pattern of muscular wasting and weakness (e. g. limb-girdle, distal, ocular, facio-scapulo-humeral. Each of these syndromes require a differential diagnosis within the motor unit territory what is achieved by means of EMG and muscle biopsy. The latter is even more important to define the nature of the abnormality. Disease nature can also be determined biochemically and, as NM disorders are commonly genetically determined, at the molecular genetic level. Treatment modalities include drugs (causative and symptomatic and other measures such as promoting and maintaining good general health, preventing skeletal deformities, physiotherapy, orthoses, surgery, and prevention of respiratory and cardiac functions. Counselling is mainly by social workers that focus on the practical aspects of coping with illness and disability and by genetic counsellors who gave advise on family planning.

  12. Diagnostics of vascular diseases as a cause for acute abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juchems, M.S.; Aschoff, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Vascular pathologies are rare causes of an acute abdomen. If the cause is a vascular disease a rapid diagnosis is desired as vascular pathologies are associated with high mortality. A differentiation must be made between arterial and venous diseases. An occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery is the most common reason for acute mesenteric ischemia but intra-abdominal arterial bleeding is also of great importance. Venous pathologies include thrombotic occlusion of the portal vein, the mesenteric vein and the vena cava. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) is predestined for the diagnostics of vascular diseases of the abdomen. Using multiphasic contrast protocols enables reliable imaging of the arterial and venous vessel tree and detection of disorders with high sensitivity and specificity. Although conventional angiography has been almost completely replaced by MDCT as a diagnostic tool, it is still of high importance for minimally invasive interventions, for example in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.) [de

  13. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described.

  14. Dmdmdx/Largemyd: a new mouse model of neuromuscular diseases useful for studying physiopathological mechanisms and testing therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana C. M. Martins

    2013-09-01

    Although muscular dystrophies are among the most common human genetic disorders, there are few treatment options available. Animal models have become increasingly important for testing new therapies prior to entering human clinical trials. The Dmdmdx mouse is the most widely used animal model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, presenting the same molecular and protein defect as seen in humans with the disease. However, this mouse is not useful for clinical trials because of its very mild phenotype. The mouse model for congenital myodystrophy type 1D, Largemyd, harbors a mutation in the glycosyltransferase Large gene and displays a severe phenotype. To help elucidate the role of the proteins dystrophin and LARGE in the organization of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in muscle sarcolemma, we generated double-mutant mice for the dystrophin and LARGE proteins. The new Dmdmdx/Largemyd mouse model is viable and shows a severe phenotype that is associated with the lack of dystrophin in muscle. We tested the usefulness of our new mouse model for cell therapy by systemically injecting them with normal murine mesenchymal adipose stem cells (mASCs. We verified that the mASCs were hosted in the dystrophic muscle. The new mouse model has proven to be very useful for the study of several other therapies, because injected cells can be screened both through DNA and protein analysis. Study of its substantial muscle weakness will also be very informative in the evaluation of functional benefits of these therapies.

  15. Elevated Plasma Cardiac Troponin T Levels Caused by Skeletal Muscle Damage in Pompe Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wens, Stephan C A; Schaaf, Gerben J; Michels, Michelle; Kruijshaar, Michelle E; van Gestel, Tom J M; In 't Groen, Stijn; Pijnenburg, Joon; Dekkers, Dick H W; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Verdijk, Lex B; Brusse, Esther; van Schaik, Ron H N; van der Ploeg, Ans T; van Doorn, Pieter A; Pijnappel, W W M Pim

    2016-02-01

    Elevated plasma cardiac troponin T (cTnT) levels in patients with neuromuscular disorders may erroneously lead to the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction or myocardial injury. In 122 patients with Pompe disease, the relationship between cTnT, cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase (CK), CK-myocardial band levels, and skeletal muscle damage was assessed. ECG and echocardiography were used to evaluate possible cardiac disease. Patients were divided into classic infantile, childhood-onset, and adult-onset patients. cTnT levels were elevated in 82% of patients (median 27 ng/L, normal values normal in all patients, whereas CK-myocardial band levels were increased in 59% of patients. cTnT levels correlated with CK levels in all 3 subgroups (Pmass index measured with echocardiography was normal in all the 3 subgroups. cTnT mRNA expression in skeletal muscle was not detectable in controls but was strongly induced in patients with Pompe disease. cTnT protein was identified by mass spectrometry in patient-derived skeletal muscle tissue. Elevated plasma cTnT levels in patients with Pompe disease are associated with skeletal muscle damage, rather than acute myocardial injury. Increased cTnT levels in Pompe disease and likely other neuromuscular disorders should be interpreted with caution to avoid unnecessary cardiac interventions. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Controlling disease and creating disparities: a fundamental cause perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Jo C; Link, Bruce G

    2005-10-01

    The United States and other developed countries experienced enormous improvements in population health during the 20th century. In the context of this dramatic positive change, health disparities by race and socioeconomic status emerged for several potent killers. Any explanation for current health disparities must take these changing patterns into account. Any explanation that ignores large improvements in population health and fails to account for the emergence of disparities for specific diseases is an inadequate explanation of current disparities. We argue that genetic explanations and some prominent social causation explanations are incompatible with these facts. We propose that the theory of "fundamental causes" can account for both vast improvements in population health and the creation of large socioeconomic and racial disparities in mortality for specific causes of death over time. Specifically, we argue that it is our enormously expanded capacity to control disease and death in combination with existing social and economic inequalities that create health disparities by race and socioeconomic status: When we develop the ability to control disease and death, the benefits of this new-found ability are distributed according to resources of knowledge, money, power, prestige, and beneficial social connections. We present data on changing mortality patterns by race and socioeconomic status for two types of diseases: those for which our capacity to prevent death has increased significantly and those for which we remain largely unable to prevent death. Time trends in mortality patterns are consistent with the fundamental cause explanation.

  17. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  18. [Characteristics of neuromuscular scoliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzier, M; Groß, C; Zahn, R K; Pumberger, M; Strube, P

    2016-06-01

    Usually, neuromuscular scolioses become clinically symptomatic relatively early and are rapidly progressive even after the end of growth. Without sufficient treatment they lead to a severe reduction of quality of life, to a loss of the ability of walking, standing or sitting as well as to an impairment of the cardiopulmonary system resulting in an increased mortality. Therefore, an intensive interdisciplinary treatment by physio- and ergotherapists, internists, pediatricians, orthotists, and orthopedists is indispensable. In contrast to idiopathic scoliosis the treatment of patients with neuromuscular scoliosis with orthosis is controversially discussed, whereas physiotherapy is established and essential to prevent contractures and to maintain the residual sensorimotor function.Frequently, the surgical treatment of the scoliosis is indicated. It should be noted that only long-segment posterior correction and fusion of the whole deformity leads to a significant improvement of the quality of life as well as to a prevention of a progression of the scoliosis and the development of junctional problems. The surgical intervention is usually performed before the end of growth. A prolonged delay of surgical intervention does not result in an increased height but only in a deformity progression and is therefore not justifiable. In early onset neuromuscular scolioses guided-growth implants are used to guarantee the adequat development. Because of the high complication rates, further optimization of these implant systems with regard to efficiency and safety have to be addressed in future research.

  19. Update on chancroid: an important cause of genital ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, C

    1996-08-01

    Chancroid is a major cause of genital ulcer disease worldwide, and occurred at epidemic rates in the United States in the late 1980s. Though the recent epidemic in the U.S. appears to be waning, a number of areas continue to report significant numbers of cases. Chancroid is a particular concern, because, like other diseases that cause genital ulceration, it is associated with an increased risk for transmission or acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Recent studies have advanced the understanding of chancroid epidemiology, and new diagnostic tests may improve the ability to recognize and appropriately treat chancroid. Increased awareness of chancroid, with appropriate treatment for suspected lesions, along with public health efforts to implement prevention in high-risk populations, will be critical to prevent ongoing transmission of chancroid, and potentially ongoing transmission of HIV.

  20. Does radioiodine cause the ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, I.R.

    1993-01-01

    This editorial briefly reviews studies which might answer the question as to whether radioiodine treatment causes the ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease. However, the data do not allow any conclusion one way or the other. Other possible causal factors are discussed. Further studies are required to define whether treatment of hyperthyroidism aggravates the ophthalmopathy and whether one thereby is worse than the others and by how much. (UK)

  1. The unresolved puzzle why alanine extensions cause disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Reno; Liebold, Jens; Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2013-08-01

    The prospective increase in life expectancy will be accompanied by a rise in the number of elderly people who suffer from ill health caused by old age. Many diseases caused by aging are protein misfolding diseases. The molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders receive constant scientific interest. In addition to old age, mutations also cause congenital protein misfolding disorders. Chorea Huntington, one of the most well-known examples, is caused by triplet extensions that can lead to more than 100 glutamines in the N-terminal region of huntingtin, accompanied by huntingtin aggregation. So far, nine disease-associated triplet extensions have also been described for alanine codons. The extensions lead primarily to skeletal malformations. Eight of these proteins represent transcription factors, while the nuclear poly-adenylate binding protein 1, PABPN1, is an RNA binding protein. Additional alanines in PABPN1 lead to the disease oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). The alanine extension affects the N-terminal domain of the protein, which has been shown to lack tertiary contacts. Biochemical analyses of the N-terminal domain revealed an alanine-dependent fibril formation. However, fibril formation of full-length protein did not recapitulate the findings of the N-terminal domain. Fibril formation of intact PABPN1 was independent of the alanine segment, and the fibrils displayed biochemical properties that were completely different from those of the N-terminal domain. Although intranuclear inclusions have been shown to represent the histochemical hallmark of OPMD, their role in pathogenesis is currently unclear. Several cell culture and animal models have been generated to study the molecular processes involved in OPMD. These studies revealed a number of promising future therapeutic strategies that could one day improve the quality of life for the patients.

  2. Vascular pathology: Cause or effect in Alzheimer disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius-Pérez, S; Tormos, A M; Pérez, S; Taléns-Visconti, R

    2018-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the main cortical neurodegenerative disease. The incidence of this disease increases with age, causing significant medical, social and economic problems, especially in countries with ageing populations. This review aims to highlight existing evidence of how vascular dysfunction may contribute to cognitive impairment in AD, as well as the therapeutic possibilities that might arise from this evidence. The vascular hypothesis emerged as an alternative to the amyloid cascade hypothesis as an explanation for the pathophysiology of AD. This hypothesis locates blood vessels as the origin for a variety of pathogenic pathways that lead to neuronal damage and dementia. Destruction of the organisation of the blood brain barrier, decreased cerebral blood flow, and the establishment of an inflammatory context would thus be responsible for any subsequent neuronal damage since these factors promote aggregation of β-amyloid peptide in the brain. The link between neurodegeneration and vascular dysfunction pathways has provided new drug targets and therapeutic approaches that will add to the treatments for AD. It is difficult to determine whether the vascular component in AD is the cause or the effect of the disease, but there is no doubt that vascular pathology has an important relationship with AD. Vascular dysfunction is likely to act synergistically with neurodegenerative changes in a cycle that exacerbates the cognitive impairment found in AD. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of a Disease on Cocoa Caused by Fusariumin Sulawesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ade Rosmana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A disease presumed to be caused by Fusarium was observed in cocoa open fields with few or without shade trees. Within the population of cocoa trees in the field, some trees had died, some had yellowing leaves and dieback, and the others were apparently healthy. In order to demonstrate Fusarium species as the causal pathogen and to obtain information concerning the incidence of the disease, its distribution and its impact on sustainability of cocoa, isolation of the pathogen, inoculation of cocoa seedlings with isolates and a survey of disease has been conducted. Fusarium was isolated from roots and branches, and inoculated onto cocoa seedlings (one month old via soil. Symptoms appeared within 3-4 weeks after infection. These symptoms consisted of yellowing of leaves beginning from the bottom until the leaves falldown, and browning internal of vascular tissue. Darkened vascular traces in the petiole characteristic of vascularstreak dieback infection were absent. The occurrence of Fusarium in the field was characterized by the absence of obvious signs of fungal infestation on root of infected trees, yellowing of leaves on twigs, dieback, and tree mortality in severe infestations. Disease incidence could reach 77% and in this situation it was difficult for trees recover from heavy infections or to be regenerated in the farm. The study proves that Fusarium is a pathogen causing dieback and the disease is called as Fusarium vascular dieback (FVD. Its development is apparently enhanced by dry conditions in the field. Key words: Fusarium sp., vascular disease, dieback, FVD, Theobroma cacao L.

  4. Documentation of Occupational Accidents and Diseases caused by Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehringer, F.; Seitz, G.

    2004-01-01

    . One of the major goals of the institutions for statutory accident insurance is the prevention of occupational diseases. To perform a successful prevention work it is necessary not only to count the number of accidents or diseases in the various working fields but to look for details of the conditions of work and the human response to those conditions. The institutions for statutory accident insurance have engaged the institution for statutory accident insurance in the precision engineering and electrical industry to carry out documentation, in form of a data bank, for all cases of occupational diseases which could be caused by ionising radiation. Those are not only the cases which are accepted as occupational disease but also the cases where a suspicion of an occupational disease is announced but finally rejected. At the moment about 1700 cases are included in the data bank. For preserving the anonymity information to name and residence are deleted. Various data to one single case are linked by a case-specific key-number. Information to occupation and field of working, to details of a possible exposure to ionising radiation like kind of radiation, time and duration of radiation, exposure of the whole body or of parts of the body and whole body or organ doses are collected. Additional information refers to medical aspects like diagnosis and date of diagnosis. (Author)

  5. Can we control all-cause meningococcal disease in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadarangani, M; Pollard, A J

    2016-12-01

    Invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis is potentially devastating, with a case fatality rate of 5-15% and high rates of significant sequelae among survivors after septicaemia or meningitis. Capsular group C (MenC) conjugate vaccines have been highly successful in achieving control of MenC disease across Europe, and some countries have also introduced quadrivalent MenACWY conjugate vaccines to reduce disease caused by groups A, W and Y in addition to C. These vaccines putatively elicit protective levels of bactericidal antibodies in all age groups, induce immunologic memory and reduce nasopharyngeal carriage, thereby leading to herd protection. Protein-based meningococcal vaccines based on subcapsular components, and designed primarily to target capsular group B (MenB) disease, have recently been licensed. These vaccines are highly immunogenic in infants and adolescents, inducing bactericidal antibodies against strains expressing high levels of vaccine antigens which are identical to the variants present in the vaccines. Effectiveness of these vaccines at a population level will be determined by whether vaccine-induced antibodies provide cross-protection against variants of the vaccine antigens present on the surface of the diverse collection of circulating invasive strains. The level of serum bactericidal activity induced against strains also seems to depend on the level of expression of the vaccine antigens. The duration of protection and the impact on carriage of meningococci will have a major bearing on the overall effectiveness of the programme. In September 2015 the UK became the first country to introduce the multicomponent meningococcal serogroup B vaccine (4CMenB) into a national routine immunization schedule, and data on the effectiveness of this programme are anticipated in the next few years. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pelvic Hydatid Disease: CT and MRI Findings Causing Sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Kocaoglu, Murat; Bulakbasi, Nail; Yildirim, Duzgun [Gulhane Military Medical School, Department of Radiology, 06018, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2007-12-15

    Pelvic masses, especially hydatid disease, rarely present with sciatica. We present the computed tomography (CT) and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 49-year-old female patient with presacral hydatid disease, who was evaluated for her sciatica. We also want to emphasize the importance of assessing the pelvis of patients with symptoms and clinical findings that are inconsistent and that cannot be satisfactorily explained by the spinal imaging findings. isc herniation in the lumbar spine is a well-known etiology of back pains and sciatica, but whenever disc herniation of the lumbar spine is excluded by the employed imaging modalities, then the pelvis should be examined for other possible etiologies of nerve compression. We describe here a patient, who was complaining of sciatica, with no abnormal findings in her lumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The cause of her sciatica was found to be associated with a pelvic hydatid cyst compressing the lumbosacral nerve plexus. In conclusion, if no pathology is evident for the lumbar discal structures, in connection with the cause of sciatica and lumbar back pains, then the pelvis should also be examined for the possible etiologies of compression of the lumbosacral nerve plexus. Whenever a multiseptated cyst is come across in a patient of an endemic origin with a positive history for hydatid disease like surgery, indicating recurrence, hydatid cyst is the most likely diagnosis.

  7. Pelvic Hydatid Disease: CT and MRI Findings Causing Sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Kocaoglu, Murat; Bulakbasi, Nail; Yildirim, Duzgun

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic masses, especially hydatid disease, rarely present with sciatica. We present the computed tomography (CT) and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 49-year-old female patient with presacral hydatid disease, who was evaluated for her sciatica. We also want to emphasize the importance of assessing the pelvis of patients with symptoms and clinical findings that are inconsistent and that cannot be satisfactorily explained by the spinal imaging findings. isc herniation in the lumbar spine is a well-known etiology of back pains and sciatica, but whenever disc herniation of the lumbar spine is excluded by the employed imaging modalities, then the pelvis should be examined for other possible etiologies of nerve compression. We describe here a patient, who was complaining of sciatica, with no abnormal findings in her lumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The cause of her sciatica was found to be associated with a pelvic hydatid cyst compressing the lumbosacral nerve plexus. In conclusion, if no pathology is evident for the lumbar discal structures, in connection with the cause of sciatica and lumbar back pains, then the pelvis should also be examined for the possible etiologies of compression of the lumbosacral nerve plexus. Whenever a multiseptated cyst is come across in a patient of an endemic origin with a positive history for hydatid disease like surgery, indicating recurrence, hydatid cyst is the most likely diagnosis

  8. ENPP1 Mutation Causes Recessive Cole Disease by Altering Melanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourabi, Marwa; Liew, Mei Shan; Lim, Shawn; H'mida-Ben Brahim, Dorra; Boussofara, Lobna; Dai, Liang; Wong, Pui Mun; Foo, Jia Nee; Sriha, Badreddine; Robinson, Kim Samirah; Denil, Simon; Common, John Ea; Mamaï, Ons; Ben Khalifa, Youcef; Bollen, Mathieu; Liu, Jianjun; Denguezli, Mohamed; Bonnard, Carine; Saad, Ali; Reversade, Bruno

    2018-02-01

    Cole disease is a genodermatosis of pigmentation following a strict dominant mode of inheritance. In this study, we investigated eight patients affected with an overlapping genodermatosis after recessive inheritance. The patients presented with hypo- and hyperpigmented macules over the body, resembling dyschromatosis universalis hereditaria in addition to punctuate palmoplantar keratosis. By homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing, a biallelic p.Cys120Arg mutation in ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1) was identified in all patients. We found that this mutation, like those causing dominant Cole disease, impairs homodimerization of the ENPP1 enzyme that is mediated by its two somatomedin-B-like domains. Histological analysis revealed structural and molecular changes in affected skin that were likely to originate from defective melanocytes because keratinocytes do not express ENPP1. Consistently, RNA-sequencing analysis of patient-derived primary melanocytes revealed alterations in melanocyte development and in pigmentation signaling pathways. We therefore conclude that germline ENPP1 cysteine-specific mutations, primarily affecting the melanocyte lineage, cause a clinical spectrum of dyschromatosis, in which the p.Cys120Arg allele represents a recessive and more severe form of Cole disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Colletotrichum species causing anthracnose disease of chili in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Y-Z; Zhang, C; Liu, F; Wang, W-Z; Liu, L; Cai, L; Liu, X-L

    2017-06-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum species is a serious disease of more than 30 plant genera. Several Colletotrichum species have been reported to infect chili in different countries. Although China is the largest chili-producing country, little is known about the species that have been infecting chili locally. Therefore, we collected samples of diseased chili from 29 provinces of China, from which 1285 strains were isolated. The morphological characters of all strains were observed and compared, and multi-locus phylogenetic analyses (ITS, ACT , CAL , CHS-1 , GAPDH , TUB2 , and HIS3 ) were performed on selected representative strains. Fifteen Colletotrichum species were identified, with C. fioriniae , C. fructicola , C. gloeosporioides , C. scovillei , and C. truncatum being prevalent. Three new species, C. conoides , C. grossum , and C. liaoningense , were recognised and described in this paper. Colletotrichum aenigma , C. cliviae , C. endophytica , C. hymenocallidis , C. incanum , C. karstii , and C. viniferum were reported for the first time from chili. Pathogenicity of all species isolated from chili was confirmed, except for C. endophytica . The current study improves the understanding of species causing anthracnose on chili and provides useful information for the effective control of the disease in China.

  10. DIAGNOSIS OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Expanding the cause of hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekic, Sandra; Popovic, Vera

    2017-06-01

    Hypopituitarism is defined as one or more pituitary hormone deficits due to a lesion in the hypothalamic-pituitary region. By far, the most common cause of hypopituitarism associated with a sellar mass is a pituitary adenoma. A high index of suspicion is required for diagnosing hypopituitarism in several other conditions such as other massess in the sellar and parasellar region, brain damage caused by radiation and by traumatic brain injury, vascular lesions, infiltrative/immunological/inflammatory diseases (lymphocytic hypophysitis, sarcoidosis and hemochromatosis), infectious diseases and genetic disorders. Hypopituitarism may be permanent and progressive with sequential pattern of hormone deficiencies (radiation-induced hypopituitarism) or transient after traumatic brain injury with possible recovery occurring years from the initial event. In recent years, there is increased reporting of less common and less reported causes of hypopituitarism with its delayed diagnosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the published data and to allow earlier identification of populations at risk of hypopituitarism as optimal hormonal replacement may significantly improve their quality of life and life expectancy. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  11. The role of proprioception and neuromuscular stability in carpal instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagert, E; Lluch, A; Rein, S

    2016-01-01

    Carpal stability has traditionally been defined as dependent on the articular congruity of joint surfaces, the static stability maintained by intact ligaments, and the dynamic stability caused by muscle contractions resulting in a compression of joint surfaces. In the past decade, a fourth factor in carpal stability has been proposed, involving the neuromuscular and proprioceptive control of joints. The proprioception of the wrist originates from afferent signals elicited by sensory end organs (mechanoreceptors) in ligaments and joint capsules that elicit spinal reflexes for immediate joint stability, as well as higher order neuromuscular influx to the cerebellum and sensorimotor cortices for planning and executing joint control. The aim of this review is to provide an understanding of the role of proprioception and neuromuscular control in carpal instabilities by delineating the sensory innervation and the neuromuscular control of the carpus, as well as descriptions of clinical applications of proprioception in carpal instabilities. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Exercise Therapy in Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy and Other Neuromuscular Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlqvist, Julia Rebecka; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    There is no curative treatment for most neuromuscular disorders. Exercise, as a treatment for these diseases, has therefore received growing attention. When executed properly, exercise can maintain and improve health and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes. In persons...... in patients with neuromuscular diseases associated with weakness and wasting. We review studies that have investigated different types of exercise in both myopathies and motor neuron diseases, with particular emphasis on training of persons affected by spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Finally, we provide...

  13. Seeking environmental causes of neurodegenerative disease and envisioning primary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Peter S; Palmer, Valerie S; Kisby, Glen E

    2016-09-01

    Pathological changes of the aging brain are expressed in a range of neurodegenerative disorders that will impact increasing numbers of people across the globe. Research on the causes of these disorders has focused heavily on genetics, and strategies for prevention envision drug-induced slowing or arresting disease advance before its clinical appearance. We discuss a strategic shift that seeks to identify the environmental causes or contributions to neurodegeneration, and the vision of primary disease prevention by removing or controlling exposure to culpable agents. The plausibility of this approach is illustrated by the prototypical neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC). This often-familial long-latency disease, once thought to be an inherited genetic disorder but now known to have a predominant or exclusive environmental origin, is in the process of disappearing from the three heavily affected populations, namely Chamorros of Guam and Rota, Japanese residents of Kii Peninsula, Honshu, and Auyu and Jaqai linguistic groups on the island of New Guinea in West Papua, Indonesia. Exposure via traditional food and/or medicine (the only common exposure in all three geographic isolates) to one or more neurotoxins in seed of cycad plants is the most plausible if yet unproven etiology. Neurotoxin dosage and/or subject age at exposure might explain the stratified epidemic of neurodegenerative disease on Guam in which high-incidence ALS peaked and declined before that of PD, only to be replaced today by a dementing disorder comparable to Alzheimer's disease. Exposure to the Guam environment is also linked to the delayed development of ALS among a subset of Chamorro and non-Chamorro Gulf War/Era veterans, a summary of which is reported here for the first time. Lessons learned from this study and from 65 years of research on ALS-PDC include the exceptional value of initial, field-based informal investigation of

  14. Will chronic e-cigarette use cause lung disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Temperance R; Tarran, Robert

    2015-12-15

    Chronic tobacco smoking is a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the lung, tobacco smoking increases the risk of lung cancer, and also causes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which encompasses both emphysema and chronic bronchitis. E-cigarettes (E-Cigs), or electronic nicotine delivery systems, were developed over a decade ago and are designed to deliver nicotine without combusting tobacco. Although tobacco smoking has declined since the 1950s, E-Cig usage has increased, attracting both former tobacco smokers and never smokers. E-Cig liquids (e-liquids) contain nicotine in a glycerol/propylene glycol vehicle with flavorings, which are vaporized and inhaled. To date, neither E-Cig devices, nor e-liquids, are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA has proposed a deeming rule, which aims to initiate legislation to regulate E-Cigs, but the timeline to take effect is uncertain. Proponents of E-Cigs say that they are safe and should not be regulated. Opposition is varied, with some opponents proposing that E-Cig usage will introduce a new generation to nicotine addiction, reversing the decline seen with tobacco smoking, or that E-Cigs generally may not be safe and will trigger diseases like tobacco. In this review, we shall discuss what is known about the effects of E-Cigs on the mammalian lung and isolated lung cells in vitro. We hope that collating this data will help illustrate gaps in the knowledge of this burgeoning field, directing researchers toward answering whether or not E-Cigs are capable of causing disease. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Survival, Quality of Life and Effects of Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Adults with Pompe Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Güngör, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPompe disease, or glycogen storage disorder type II, is a rare inherited metabolic disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase. This results in accumulation of glycogen in cells throughout the body, particularly muscle cells. The disease presents with (progressive) muscle weakness and can hence be categorized as a lysosomal storage disorder, a glycogen storage disorder and also a neuromuscular disorder. Pompe disease was the first neuromuscular disorde...

  16. Neuromuscular prehabilitation to prevent osteoarthritis after a traumatic joint injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Adam S; Shull, Pete B; Fredericson, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) is a process resulting from direct forces applied to a joint that cause injury and degenerative changes. An estimated 12% of all symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip, knee, and ankle can be attributed to a post-traumatic cause. Neuromuscular prehabilitation is the process of improving neuromuscular function to prevent development of PTOA after an initial traumatic joint injury. Prehabilitation strategies include restoration of normative movement patterns that have been altered as the result of traumatic injury, along with neuromuscular exercises and gait retraining to prevent the development of OA after an injury occurs. A review of the current literature shows that no studies have been performed to evaluate methods of neuromuscular prehabilitation to prevent PTOA after a joint injury. Instead, current research has focused on management strategies after knee injuries, the value of exercise in the management of OA, and neuromuscular exercises after total knee arthroplasty. Recent work in gait retraining that alters knee joint loading holds promise for preventing the development of PTOA after joint trauma. Future research should evaluate methods of neuromuscular prehabilitation strategies in relationship to the outcome of PTOA after joint injury. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Remnant cholesterol as a cause of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on remnant cholesterol as a causal risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD), on its definition, measurement, atherogenicity, and levels in high risk patient groups; in addition, present and future pharmacological approaches to lowering remnant cholesterol levels...... are considered. Observational studies show association between elevated levels of remnant cholesterol and increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even when remnant cholesterol levels are defined, measured, or calculated in different ways. In-vitro and animal studies also support the contention that elevated...... levels of remnant cholesterol may cause atherosclerosis same way as elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, by cholesterol accumulation in the arterial wall. Genetic studies of variants associated with elevated remnant cholesterol levels show that an increment of 1mmol/L (39mg...

  18. A Novel Virus Causes Scale Drop Disease in Lates calcarifer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ad de Groof

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available From 1992 onwards, outbreaks of a previously unknown illness have been reported in Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer kept in maricultures in Southeast Asia. The most striking symptom of this emerging disease is the loss of scales. It was referred to as scale drop syndrome, but the etiology remained enigmatic. By using a next-generation virus discovery technique, VIDISCA-454, sequences of an unknown virus were detected in serum of diseased fish. The near complete genome sequence of the virus was determined, which shows a unique genome organization, and low levels of identity to known members of the Iridoviridae. Based on homology of a series of putatively encoded proteins, the virus is a novel member of the Megalocytivirus genus of the Iridoviridae family. The virus was isolated and propagated in cell culture, where it caused a cytopathogenic effect in infected Asian seabass kidney and brain cells. Electron microscopy revealed icosahedral virions of about 140 nm, characteristic for the Iridoviridae. In vitro cultured virus induced scale drop syndrome in Asian seabass in vivo and the virus could be reisolated from these infected fish. These findings show that the virus is the causative agent for the scale drop syndrome, as each of Koch's postulates is fulfilled. We have named the virus Scale Drop Disease Virus. Vaccines prepared from BEI- and formalin inactivated virus, as well as from E. coli produced major capsid protein provide efficacious protection against scale drop disease.

  19. Low-density lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ference, Brian A.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Graham, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Aims To appraise the clinical and genetic evidence that low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Methods and results We assessed whether the association between LDL and ASCVD fulfils the criteria for causality by evaluating the totality of evidence from...... proportional to the absolute reduction in LDL-C and the cumulative duration of exposure to lower LDL-C, provided that the achieved reduction in LDL-C is concordant with the reduction in LDL particle number and that there are no competing deleterious off-target effects. Conclusion Consistent evidence from...

  20. The superior vena cava syndrome caused by malignant disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eren, Suat; Karaman, Adem; Okur, Adnan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction by malignant diseases is either by direct invasion and compression or by tumour thrombus of the SVC. Whatever is its cause, obstruction of the SVC causes elevated pressure in the veins draining into the SVC and increased or reversed blood flow through collateral vessels. Severity of the syndrome depends on the collateral vascular system development. Therefore, imaging of the collateral veins with variable location and connection is important in determining the extension and management of the disease. Our aims are to describe collateral vessels of the superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) related with the malignant diseases and to assess the ability of multi-detector row CT with multiplanar and 3D volume rendering techniques in determining and describing collateral circulations. Materials and methods: We present CT angiography findings of seven patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung (n = 2), squamous cell carcinoma of the lung (n = 3), Hodgkin disease of the thorax (n = 1), and squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus (n = 1). The patients received contrast-enhanced CT scans of the chest and abdomen on a multi-detector row CT during breath holding at suspended inspiration. Results: CT images revealed the cause and level of the SVC obstruction in all patients with axial and multiplanar reconstructed images. The SVC showed total obstruction in five patients and partial obstruction in two patients. The most common experienced collateral vessels were azygos vein (6), intercostal veins (6), mediastinal veins (6), paravertebral veins (5), hemiazygos vein (5), thoracoepigastric vein (5), internal mammary vein (5), thoracoacromioclavicular venous plexus (5), and anterior chest wall veins (5). While one case showed the portal-systemic shunt, V. cordis media and sinus coronarius with phrenic veins were enlarged in two cases, and the left adrenal vein was enlarged in a patient. In one case, the azygos vein with reversed

  1. The superior vena cava syndrome caused by malignant disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eren, Suat [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)]. E-mail: suateren@atauni.edu.tr; Karaman, Adem [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Okur, Adnan [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey)

    2006-07-15

    Objective: The superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction by malignant diseases is either by direct invasion and compression or by tumour thrombus of the SVC. Whatever is its cause, obstruction of the SVC causes elevated pressure in the veins draining into the SVC and increased or reversed blood flow through collateral vessels. Severity of the syndrome depends on the collateral vascular system development. Therefore, imaging of the collateral veins with variable location and connection is important in determining the extension and management of the disease. Our aims are to describe collateral vessels of the superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) related with the malignant diseases and to assess the ability of multi-detector row CT with multiplanar and 3D volume rendering techniques in determining and describing collateral circulations. Materials and methods: We present CT angiography findings of seven patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung (n = 2), squamous cell carcinoma of the lung (n = 3), Hodgkin disease of the thorax (n = 1), and squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus (n = 1). The patients received contrast-enhanced CT scans of the chest and abdomen on a multi-detector row CT during breath holding at suspended inspiration. Results: CT images revealed the cause and level of the SVC obstruction in all patients with axial and multiplanar reconstructed images. The SVC showed total obstruction in five patients and partial obstruction in two patients. The most common experienced collateral vessels were azygos vein (6), intercostal veins (6), mediastinal veins (6), paravertebral veins (5), hemiazygos vein (5), thoracoepigastric vein (5), internal mammary vein (5), thoracoacromioclavicular venous plexus (5), and anterior chest wall veins (5). While one case showed the portal-systemic shunt, V. cordis media and sinus coronarius with phrenic veins were enlarged in two cases, and the left adrenal vein was enlarged in a patient. In one case, the azygos vein with reversed

  2. The relative frequency of common neuromuscular diagnoses in a reference center

    OpenAIRE

    Cotta, Ana; Paim, Júlia Filardi; Carvalho, Elmano; da-Cunha-Júnior, Antonio Lopes; Navarro, Monica M.; Valicek, Jaquelin; Menezes, Miriam Melo; Nunes, Simone Vilela; Xavier-Neto, Rafael; Baptista Junior, Sidney; Lima, Luciano Romero; Takata, Reinaldo Issao; Vargas, Antonio Pedro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The diagnostic procedure in neuromuscular patients is complex. Knowledge of the relative frequency of neuromuscular diseases within the investigated population is important to allow the neurologist to perform the most appropriate diagnostic tests. Objective: To report the relative frequency of common neuromuscular diagnoses in a reference center. Methods: A 17-year chart review of patients with suspicion of myopathy. Results: Among 3,412 examinations, 1,603 (46.98%) yielded confir...

  3. Adult Scheuermann’s disease as cause of mechanic dorsalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.P. Cantatore

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Scheuermann’s disease (SD or vertebral osteochondrosis is the most frequent cause of non postural kyphosis and one of more frequent cause of adolescent’s dorsalgia. The criteria for the diagnosis are: more than 5° of wedging of at least three adjacent vertebrae at the apex of the kyphosis; a toracic kyphosis of more than 45° of Cobb’s degree; Schmorl’s nodes and endplates irregularities. In addition to classic SD, there are radiological alterations that remain asintomatic for a long time to reveal in adult age: in that case it speaks of adult Scheuermann’s disease (ASD. We considered the diagnosis of patients came from April 2006 to April 2007 on Day Hospital in our Clinic. ASD was diagnosed, besides, in 10 of these patients. 7 patients had previous diagnosis such as: dorsal Spondiloarthrosis (4 subjects; Osteoporosis with vertebral fractures (3 subjects. All these diagnosis was not confirmed by us. In case of chronic dorsalgia of adult, ASD is rarely considered as differential diagnosis. Besides, the vertebral dorsalgia, even in absence of red flags as fever, astenia, ipersedimetry, functional loss and aching spinal processes to tapping, could hide a serious scene that lead us to be careful in the differential diagnosis, because of similar radiological pictures of the MSA to other pathology as spondylodiscitis, primitive or metastasic spinal tumors, and brittleness vertebral fractures

  4. Unstable mutations: cause of some neurological hereditary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuenca Berger, P.; Morales Montero, F.

    1999-01-01

    Unstable mutations or amplification of triplets constitute a kind of genetic alteration discovered during the last decade. They had been found inside or near genes important for the normal neurological function of the human being. In some cases, the presence of the amplification causes the inactivation of the gene or the synthesis of a new product which functions different from the original protein. Some common characteristics of diseases caused by the amplification of triplets are that it affects the nervous system and are degenerative in nature. The expression of the manifestations varies according to age. Most of them show genetic anticipation in which the severity of the manifestations increases with each generation and appear at an earlier age. In most cases, the severity of the symptoms is correlated positively to the size of the amplification. The diagnosis of an affected individual in a family may indicate the presence of an altered gene in other relatives. These relatives may not present evident signs of the illness either because it is of late onset or because they carry premutations. The molecular diagnosis of these mutations is important to estimate the risk of developing the disease and/or of transmitting the illness to the descendants and to eliminate the fears of healthy relatives who have inherited normal copies of the gene. (Author) [es

  5. Neuromuscular Junction Impairment in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Reassessing the Role of Acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanari, Maria-Letizia; García-Ayllón, María-Salud; Ciura, Sorana; Sáez-Valero, Javier; Kabashi, Edor

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a highly debilitating disease caused by progressive degeneration of motorneurons (MNs). Due to the wide variety of genes and mutations identified in ALS, a highly varied etiology could ultimately converge to produce similar clinical symptoms. A major hypothesis in ALS research is the "distal axonopathy" with pathological changes occurring at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), at very early stages of the disease, prior to MNs degeneration and onset of clinical symptoms. The NMJ is a highly specialized cholinergic synapse, allowing signaling between muscle and nerve necessary for skeletal muscle function. This nerve-muscle contact is characterized by the clustering of the collagen-tailed form of acetylcholinesterase (ColQ-AChE), together with other components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and specific key molecules in the NMJ formation. Interestingly, in addition to their cholinergic role AChE is thought to play several "non-classical" roles that do not require catalytic function, most prominent among these is the facilitation of neurite growth, NMJ formation and survival. In all this context, abnormalities of AChE content have been found in plasma of ALS patients, in which AChE changes may reflect the neuromuscular disruption. We review these findings and particularly the evidences of changes of AChE at neuromuscular synapse in the pre-symptomatic stages of ALS.

  6. Dental erosion caused by gastroesophageal reflux disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Seda; Cengiz, M Inanç; Saraç, Y Sinasi

    2009-07-22

    Chronic regurgitation of gastric acids in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease may cause dental erosion, which can lead in combination with attrition or bruxism to extensive loss of coronal tooth tissue. This clinical report describes treatment of severe tooth wear of a gastroesophageal reflux disease patient who is 54-year-old Turkish male patient. After his medical treatment, severe tooth wear, bruxism and decreased vertical dimensions were determined. The vertical dimension was re-established and maxillary and mandibular anterior and posterior teeth were prepared for metal-ceramic restorations. Metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures were fabricated as full mouth restorations for both maxillary and mandibular arches because of splinting all teeth. And then maxillary stabilization splint was fabricated for his bruxism history. Significant loss of coronal tooth structure must taken into consideration. Gastroesophageal reflux disease by itself or in combination with attrition, abrasion or bruxism may be responsible for the loss. An extensive diagnostic evaluation is essential for the medical and dental effects of the problem.

  7. Diseases causing acute renal failure in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, G.; Hussain, K.; Rehman, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study was done to evaluate frequency of acute renal failure ( ARF ), its causes and out come of the patients. Study Design: Descriptive analytic study Place and Duration of Study: March to Dec 2007 at Combined Military Hospital Lahore. Patients and Methods: All patients, admitted in different wards of the hospital, who developed acute renal failure (doubling of serum creatinine measured on two occasions 12 hours apart), were included in this study. Results: A total of 39 patients were included in the study. Males were 19 (48.71%) and 20 (51.28%) were female. Mean age of patients was 40.2 years (SD=18.0). The major cause was acute Gastroenteritis seen in 23 (58.97%) cases. Others developed ARF due to, Abruptio Placentae 5 (12.82%), Postoperative 5 (12.82%), Eclampsia 3 (7.69%) and Drug induced 3 (7.69%) . Oliguric phase developed in 28 (71.79%) patients and lasted for 8.45 +- 4.16 days. Of these 17 (60.71%) patients had acute gastroenteritis. Conclusion: Gastroenteritis is the most common and important cause of ARF though gynaecological and surgical etiologies must be kept in mind. It is evident that the gynaecological and surgical patients need critical peri-partum and peri-operative monitoring to prevent development of ARF. Early institution of therapy will prevent subsequent morbidity associated with this disease. (author)

  8. Mutations that Cause Human Disease: A Computational/Experimental Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beernink, P; Barsky, D; Pesavento, B

    2006-01-11

    International genome sequencing projects have produced billions of nucleotides (letters) of DNA sequence data, including the complete genome sequences of 74 organisms. These genome sequences have created many new scientific opportunities, including the ability to identify sequence variations among individuals within a species. These genetic differences, which are known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are particularly important in understanding the genetic basis for disease susceptibility. Since the report of the complete human genome sequence, over two million human SNPs have been identified, including a large-scale comparison of an entire chromosome from twenty individuals. Of the protein coding SNPs (cSNPs), approximately half leads to a single amino acid change in the encoded protein (non-synonymous coding SNPs). Most of these changes are functionally silent, while the remainder negatively impact the protein and sometimes cause human disease. To date, over 550 SNPs have been found to cause single locus (monogenic) diseases and many others have been associated with polygenic diseases. SNPs have been linked to specific human diseases, including late-onset Parkinson disease, autism, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. The ability to predict accurately the effects of these SNPs on protein function would represent a major advance toward understanding these diseases. To date several attempts have been made toward predicting the effects of such mutations. The most successful of these is a computational approach called ''Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant'' (SIFT). This method uses sequence conservation among many similar proteins to predict which residues in a protein are functionally important. However, this method suffers from several limitations. First, a query sequence must have a sufficient number of relatives to infer sequence conservation. Second, this method does not make use of or provide any information on protein structure, which

  9. Hypothyroidism caused by 131I treatment for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Shouzhen; Lin Xiangtong; He Wanting; Zhang Kaili; Zhang Jinming; Kuai Dayu

    1991-01-01

    The refollow-up has been carried out in hypothyroidism caused by 131 I treatment for Graves disease. The serum HS-TSH(IRMA), FT3, TSH(RIA), TT3, TT4, FT4I, MCA, TGA, Cholesterol and Triglyceride has been measured in 26 patient after 131 I treatment for 9.5 years in average. At the same time TRH stimulation test was also performed, and the clinical symptoms and signs assessed. The results showed that TSH is the most sensitive criterion for hypothyroidism, followed by Cholesterol and FT 4 I. The occurence of hypothyroidism may be related to the presence of thyroid antibody as demonstrated by the elevation of serum MCA, TGA. Therefore measurement of serum TSH, FT 4 I and Cholesterol during long term follow-up is beneficial for early diagnosis of hypothyroidism and evaluating the effect of substitution treatment

  10. Hypoxemia in patients with COPD: cause, effects, and disease progression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, Brian D

    2012-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death and disability internationally. Alveolar hypoxia and consequent hypoxemia increase in prevalence as disease severity increases. Ventilation\\/perfusion mismatch resulting from progressive airflow limitation and emphysema is the key driver of this hypoxia, which may be exacerbated by sleep and exercise. Uncorrected chronic hypoxemia is associated with the development of adverse sequelae of COPD, including pulmonary hypertension, secondary polycythemia, systemic inflammation, and skeletal muscle dysfunction. A combination of these factors leads to diminished quality of life, reduced exercise tolerance, increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity, and greater risk of death. Concomitant sleep-disordered breathing may place a small but significant subset of COPD patients at increased risk of these complications. Long-term oxygen therapy has been shown to improve pulmonary hemodynamics, reduce erythrocytosis, and improve survival in selected patients with severe hypoxemic respiratory failure. However, the optimal treatment for patients with exertional oxyhemoglobin desaturation, isolated nocturnal hypoxemia, or mild-to-moderate resting daytime hypoxemia remains uncertain.

  11. Pheromones cause disease: the exocrinology of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, B

    2000-03-01

    The aetiology of anorexia nervosa is exocrinological. This notion is supported by physical evidence in animal models with directly comparable symptomatology. Anorexia nervosa (AN) syndrome would be a puberty delay caused by reception and autoreception of conspecific pheromone emissions: a pheromone-induced puberty delay (PIPD). As such, it would be amenable to medical treatment drawing from forty years of research in animals. This hypothesis is testable. For instance, since food ad libitum is a prerequisite for PIPD, occasional supervised fasting in healthy peripuberal subjects should prevent AN. Besides, tolerating an untestable thought disease (1,2) with symptoms of a curable well-understood animal condition would be anti-scientific and perpetuates medical disaster. Even their endocrinologies are identical. Pheromone feedback tunes animal appetites and immunity to available resources and prospects. In addition to timing puberty, pheromones regulate fertility. Pheromones will probably be implicated in the aetiology of the psychiatric and autoimmune diseases. This is the second in a series of twelve papers to explore this contention systematically. (c) 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  12. Does Anxiety Cause Freezing of Gait in Parkinson's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehgoetz Martens, Kaylena A.; Ellard, Colin G.; Almeida, Quincy J.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly experience freezing of gait under time constraints, in narrow spaces, and in the dark. One commonality between these different situations is that they may all provoke anxiety, yet anxiety has never been directly examined as a cause of FOG. In this study, virtual reality was used to induce anxiety and evaluate whether it directly causes FOG. Fourteen patients with PD and freezing of gait (Freezers) and 17 PD without freezing of gait (Non-Freezers) were instructed to walk in two virtual environments: (i) across a plank that was located on the ground (LOW), (ii) across a plank above a deep pit (HIGH). Multiple synchronized motion capture cameras updated participants' movement through the virtual environment in real-time, while their gait was recorded. Anxiety levels were evaluated after each trial using self-assessment manikins. Freezers performed the experiment on two separate occasions (in their ON and OFF state). Freezers reported higher levels of anxiety compared to Non-Freezers (panxiety when walking across the HIGH plank compared to the LOW (panxiety is an important mechanism underlying freezing of gait and supports the notion that the limbic system may have a profound contribution to freezing in PD. PMID:25250691

  13. Does anxiety cause freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaylena A Ehgoetz Martens

    Full Text Available Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD commonly experience freezing of gait under time constraints, in narrow spaces, and in the dark. One commonality between these different situations is that they may all provoke anxiety, yet anxiety has never been directly examined as a cause of FOG. In this study, virtual reality was used to induce anxiety and evaluate whether it directly causes FOG. Fourteen patients with PD and freezing of gait (Freezers and 17 PD without freezing of gait (Non-Freezers were instructed to walk in two virtual environments: (i across a plank that was located on the ground (LOW, (ii across a plank above a deep pit (HIGH. Multiple synchronized motion capture cameras updated participants' movement through the virtual environment in real-time, while their gait was recorded. Anxiety levels were evaluated after each trial using self-assessment manikins. Freezers performed the experiment on two separate occasions (in their ON and OFF state. Freezers reported higher levels of anxiety compared to Non-Freezers (p < 0.001 and all patients reported greater levels of anxiety when walking across the HIGH plank compared to the LOW (p < 0.001. Freezers experienced significantly more freezing of gait episodes (p = 0.013 and spent a significantly greater percentage of each trial frozen (p = 0.005 when crossing the HIGH plank. This finding was even more pronounced when comparing Freezers in their OFF state. Freezers also had greater step length variability in the HIGH compared to the LOW condition, while the step length variability in Non-Freezers did not change. In conclusion, this was the first study to directly compare freezing of gait in anxious and non-anxious situations. These results present strong evidence that anxiety is an important mechanism underlying freezing of gait and supports the notion that the limbic system may have a profound contribution to freezing in PD.

  14. A rare cause of acute flaccid paralysis: Human coronaviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Turgay, Cokyaman; Emine, Tekin; Ozlem, Koken; Muhammet, S. Paksu; Haydar, A. Tasdemir

    2015-01-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a life-threatening clinical entity characterized by weakness in the whole body muscles often accompanied by respiratory and bulbar paralysis. The most common cause is Gullian-Barre syndrome, but infections, spinal cord diseases, neuromuscular diseases such as myasthenia gravis, drugs and toxins, periodic hypokalemic paralysis, electrolyte disturbances, and botulism should be considered as in the differential diagnosis. Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) cause common ...

  15. Mycoplasma genitalium: An Emerging Cause of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L. Haggerty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma genitalium is a sexually transmitted pathogen that is increasingly identified among women with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID. Although Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae frequently cause PID, up to 70% of cases have an unidentified etiology. This paper summarizes evidence linking M. genitalium to PID and its long-term reproductive sequelae. Several PCR studies have demonstrated that M. genitalium is associated with PID, independent of gonococcal and chlamydial infection. Most have been cross-sectional, although one prospective investigation suggested that M. genitalium was associated with over a thirteenfold risk of endometritis. Further, a nested case-control posttermination study demonstrated a sixfold increased risk of PID among M. genitalium positive patients. Whether or not M. genitalium upper genital tract infection results in long-term reproductive morbidity is unclear, although tubal factor infertility patients have been found to have elevated M. genitalium antibodies. Several lines of evidence suggest that M. genitalium is likely resistant to many frequently used PID treatment regimens. Correspondingly, M. genitalium has been associated with treatment failure following cefoxitin and doxycycline treatment for clinically suspected PID. Collectively, strong evidence suggests that M. genitalium is associated with PID. Further study of M. genitalium upper genital tract infection diagnosis, treatment and long-term sequelae is warranted.

  16. Refractory Cushing's disease caused by multinodular ACTH-cell hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeever, P E; Koppelman, M C; Metcalf, D; Quindlen, E; Kornblith, P L; Strott, C A; Howard, R; Smith, B H

    1982-09-01

    A patient with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism, unresponsive to resection of nodules in the anterior lobe, is described. Histochemical stains of the nodules showed multiple, focal, cellular expansions of the fibrovascular stroma. Transitions between normal and expanded adenohypophysial acini were present. Immunoperoxidase stains for ACTH and other pituitary hormones revealed that these multiple foci contained an excess of ACTH-positive cells. Less than 10% of the cells in these foci were negative for ACTH and positive for other hormones. Serial sections showed that these foci of predominantly ACTH-producing acini were not connected. Clinical, morphological, and immunohistochemical data indicated that ACTH-cell hyperplasia caused Crushing's disease in this patient. Pathologic study of individual cases should concentrate on determining whether hyperplasia or adenoma exist at the time of surgical exploration of the pituitary gland, since this determination is important to proper treatment. Tentative criteria to recognize ACTH-cell hyperplasia are: 1. Multiple foci of ACTH laden cells. 2. A minor subpopulation of cells of alternate hormone series. 3. Expansion without destruction of acini in the adenohypophysis.

  17. Neurologic and neuromuscular functional disorders of the pharynx and esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuttge-Hannig, A.; Hannig, C.

    2007-01-01

    Neurologic swallowing disorders are an increasing diagnostic problem in our overaged population. Undiagnosed chronic aspiration pneumonia is the cause of death in 20-40% of all inhabitants of nursing homes. In neurologic diseases of the pharynx, the physiologic interaction of pharyngeal contraction, closure of the pharynx, and esophageal motility are frequently disturbed. This may be due to cortical, bulbar, or cerebellar brain damage of ischemic or traumatic origin. Furthermore diseases or peripheral nerves, muscles, and synapses cause disturbances. The most life-threatening complication of these disturbances is tracheal aspiration, which requires an iso-osmolar contrast medium for imaging studies that cause no or minimal pulmonary problems. Utilizing fast dynamic documentation we can analyze the swallowing act in 35 images within the passage time of 0.7 s. This requires digital frame sequences from 15-50 images/s, which can be provided by DSI or videofluoroscopy. Neurologic and neuromuscular patterns are demonstrated with and without tracheal aspiration. The differentiation of aspiration in a so-called pre-, intra-, and postdeglutitive form is possible. We distinguish four grades of severity of aspiration, which is also of great clinical impact for the differential rehabilitation therapy. The efficiency of the rehabilitation protocol can be assessed by the dynamic swallowing studies. (orig.) [de

  18. Historical perspectives on music as a cause of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennaway, James

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between music and medicine is generally understood in the benign context of music therapy, but, as this chapter shows, there is a long parallel history of medical theories that suggest that music can cause real physical and mental illness. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the idea of music as an expression of universal harmony was challenged by a more mechanistic model of nervous stimulation. By the 1790s, there was a substantial discourse on the dangers of musical overstimulation to health in medicine, literature, and etiquette books. During the nineteenth century, the sense of music as a pathogenic stimulant gained in influence. It was often linked to fears about sexuality, female gynecological health, and theories of hypnosis and degeneration. In the twentieth century, the debate on the medical perils of the wrong kinds of music became overtly politicized in Germany and the Soviet Union. Likewise, the opponents of jazz, particularly in the United States, often turned to medicine to fend off its supposed social, moral, and physical consequences. The Cold War saw an extensive discourse on the idea of musical "brainwashing," that rumbled on into the 1990s. Today, regular media panics about pathological music are mirrored by alarming evidence of the deliberate use of music to harm listeners in the context of the so-called War on Terror. Can music make you ill? Music therapy is a common if perhaps rather neglected part of medicine, but its diametric opposite, the notion that music might lead to real mental and physical illness, may seem improbable. In fact, over the last two hundred years, there have been many times when as much was written about the medical dangers of music as about its potential benefits. Since the eighteenth century, fears about music's effects on the nerves and the mind have created a remarkably extensive discourse on pathological music based on a view of both music and the causation of disease as matters of

  19. Causes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) Spinal-Bulbar ...

  20. Chemotherapy Side Effects: A Cause of Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can chemotherapy side effects increase the risk of heart disease? Answers from Timothy J. Moynihan, M.D. Chemotherapy side effects may increase the risk of heart disease, including weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy) and ...

  1. Cholesteryl ester storage disease: a rare and possibly treatable cause of premature vascular disease and cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Tim

    2013-11-01

    Cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by a variety of mutations of the LIPA gene. These cause reduced activity of lysosomal acid lipase, which results in accumulation of cholesteryl esters in lysosomes. If enzyme activity is very low/absent, presentation is in infancy with failure to thrive, malabsorption, hepatosplenomegaly and rapid early death (Wolman disease). With higher but still low enzyme activity, presentation is later in life with hepatic fibrosis, dyslipidaemia and early atherosclerosis.Identification of this rare disorder is difficult as it is essential to assay leucocyte acid phosphatase activity. An assay using specific inhibitors has now been developed that facilitates measurement in dried blood spots. Treatment of CESD has until now been limited to management of the dyslipidaemia, but this does not influence the liver effects. A new enzyme replacement therapy (Sebelipase) has now been developed that could change treatment options for the future.

  2. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis causes Crohn's disease in some inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Saleh A; Sagramsingh, Sudesh R; Naser, Abed S; Thanigachalam, Saisathya

    2014-06-21

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory condition that plagues millions all over the world. This debilitating bowel disease can start in early childhood and continue into late adulthood. Signs and symptoms are usually many and multiple tests are often required for the diagnosis and confirmation of this disease. However, little is still understood about the cause(s) of CD. As a result, several theories have been proposed over the years. One theory in particular is that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is intimately linked to the etiology of CD. This fastidious bacterium also known to cause Johne's disease in cattle has infected the intestines of animals for years. It is believed that due to the thick, waxy cell wall of MAP it is able to survive the process of pasteurization as well as chemical processes seen in irrigation purification systems. Subsequently meat, dairy products and water serve as key vehicles in the transmission of MAP infection to humans (from farm to fork) who have a genetic predisposition, thus leading to the development of CD. The challenges faced in culturing this bacterium from CD are many. Examples include its extreme slow growth, lack of cell wall, low abundance, and its mycobactin dependency. In this review article, data from 60 studies showing the detection and isolation of MAP by PCR and culture techniques have been reviewed. Although this review may not be 100% comprehensive of all studies, clearly the majority of the studies overwhelmingly and definitively support the role of MAP in at least 30%-50% of CD patients. It is very possible that lack of detection of MAP from some CD patients may be due to the absence of MAP role in these patients. The latter statement is conditional on utilization of methodology appropriate for detection of human MAP strains. Ultimately, stratification of CD and inflammatory bowel disease patients for the presence or absence of MAP is necessary for appropriate and effective

  3. Neuromuscular Manifestations of West Nile Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arturo eLeis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common neuromuscular manifestation of West Nile virus (WNV infection is a poliomyelitis syndrome with asymmetric paralysis variably involving one (monoparesis to four limbs (quadriparesis, with or without brainstem involvement and respiratory failure. This syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis may occur without overt fever or meningoencephalitis. Although involvement of anterior horn cells in the spinal cord and motor neurons in the brainstem are the major sites of pathology responsible for neuromuscular signs, inflammation also may involve skeletal or cardiac muscle (myositis, myocarditis, motor axons (polyradiculitis, peripheral nerve (Guillain-Barré syndrome, brachial plexopathy. In addition, involvement of spinal sympathetic neurons and ganglia provides a plausible explanation for autonomic instability seen in some patients. Many patients also experience prolonged subjective generalized weakness and disabling fatigue. Despite recent evidence that WNV may persist long term in the central nervous system or periphery in animals, the evidence in humans is controversial. WNV persistence would be of great concern in immunosuppressed patients or in those with prolonged or recurrent symptoms. Support for the contention that WNV can lead to autoimmune disease arises from reports of patients presenting with various neuromuscular diseases that presumably involve autoimmune mechanisms (GBS, other demyelinating neu¬ropathies, myasthenia gravis, brachial plexopathies, stiff-person syndrome, and delayed or recurrent symptoms. Although there is no specific treatment or vaccine currently approved in humans, and the standard remains supportive care, drugs that can alter the cascade of immunobiochemical events leading to neuronal death may be potentially useful (high-dose corticosteroids, interferon preparations, and intravenous immune globulin containing WNV-specific antibodies. Human experience with these agents seems promising based on anecdotal

  4. Inflorescence rot disease of date palm caused by Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Date palm is one of the important income sources for many farmers in different parts of several countries, including Iraq, Iran, Saudi Arabia, North Africa etc. Inflorescence rot is a serious disease of date palm which limits its yield. The identification of the causal organism is a key step to tackling this disease, and such studies ...

  5. a potential cause of cardiovascular diseases in chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) has been identified as one of the risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Although FGF-23 is necessary for the maintenance of phosphate balance, it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of left ventricular ...

  6. An Unusual Cause of Postaural Swelling: Kimura’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purodha Prasad

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Kimura’s disease (KD is an allergic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology endemic in Orientals. Kimura’s disease was first mentioned by Kimm and Szeto in China in 1937. Kimura’s disease is commonly encountered in Asia and is mostly reported in Japan, China, Singapore and Honkong. However, only a few cases have been reported in the Indian subcontinent. Case Report: A case of Kimura’s disease in a young male managed by surgery is reported in addition to a literature review. Conclusion: Diagnosis is made on the basis of histopathological analysis, clinical presentation, and laboratory investigations. Long term follow-up is required as Kimura’s disease is prone for recurrence.

  7. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  8. Primary coenzyme Q deficiency in Pdss2 mutant mice causes isolated renal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Peng

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q (CoQ is an essential electron carrier in the respiratory chain whose deficiency has been implicated in a wide variety of human mitochondrial disease manifestations. Its multi-step biosynthesis involves production of polyisoprenoid diphosphate in a reaction that requires the enzymes be encoded by PDSS1 and PDSS2. Homozygous mutations in either of these genes, in humans, lead to severe neuromuscular disease, with nephrotic syndrome seen in PDSS2 deficiency. We now show that a presumed autoimmune kidney disease in mice with the missense Pdss2(kd/kd genotype can be attributed to a mitochondrial CoQ biosynthetic defect. Levels of CoQ9 and CoQ10 in kidney homogenates from B6.Pdss2(kd/kd mutants were significantly lower than those in B6 control mice. Disease manifestations originate specifically in glomerular podocytes, as renal disease is seen in Podocin/cre,Pdss2(loxP/loxP knockout mice but not in conditional knockouts targeted to renal tubular epithelium, monocytes, or hepatocytes. Liver-conditional B6.Alb/cre,Pdss2(loxP/loxP knockout mice have no overt disease despite demonstration that their livers have undetectable CoQ9 levels, impaired respiratory capacity, and significantly altered intermediary metabolism as evidenced by transcriptional profiling and amino acid quantitation. These data suggest that disease manifestations of CoQ deficiency relate to tissue-specific respiratory capacity thresholds, with glomerular podocytes displaying the greatest sensitivity to Pdss2 impairment.

  9. Kimura's Disease: A Rare Cause of Postauricular Swelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Kumar Das

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Kimura’s Disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder of lymph node which is very rare in Indian population. Case Report A 15 year old boy with multiple postauricular swelling for 18 months presenting in OPD and diagnosed having eosinophilia. Then excision biopsy was taken, which indicates Kimura’s Disease. Patient was treated with high dose of corticosteroid. Conclusion Kimura’s disease, though rare should be kept in mind for treating a patient with lymphadenopathy with eosinophilia or high IgE level, because it can spare the patient unnecessary invasive procedure.

  10. Oxidative Stress in Kidney Diseases: The Cause or the Consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krata, Natalia; Zagożdżon, Radosław; Foroncewicz, Bartosz; Mucha, Krzysztof

    2018-06-01

    Exaggerated oxidative stress (OS) is usually considered as a disturbance in regular function of an organism. The excessive levels of OS mediators may lead to major damage within the organism's cells and tissues. Therefore, the OS-associated biomarkers may be considered as new diagnostic tools of various diseases. In nephrology, researchers are looking for alternative methods replacing the renal biopsy in patients with suspicion of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Currently, CKD is a frequent health problem in world population, which can lead to progressive loss of kidney function and eventually to end-stage renal disease. The course of CKD depends on the primary disease. It is assumed that one of the factors influencing the course of CKD might be OS. In the current work, we review whether monitoring the OS-associated biomarkers in nephrology patients can support the decision-making process regarding diagnosis, prognostication and treatment initiation.

  11. Acute neuromuscular weakness associated with dengue infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmanjit Singh Hira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue infections may present with neurological complications. Whether these are due to neuromuscular disease or electrolyte imbalance is unclear. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight patients of dengue fever required hospitalization during epidemic in year 2010. Twelve of them presented with acute neuromuscular weakness. We enrolled them for study. Diagnosis of dengue infection based on clinical profile of patients, positive serum IgM ELISA, NS1 antigen, and sero-typing. Complete hemogram, kidney and liver functions, serum electrolytes, and creatine phosphokinase (CPK were tested. In addition, two patients underwent nerve conduction velocity (NCV test and electromyography. Results: Twelve patients were included in the present study. Their age was between 18 and 34 years. Fever, myalgia, and motor weakness of limbs were most common presenting symptoms. Motor weakness developed on 2 nd to 4 th day of illness in 11 of 12 patients. In one patient, it developed on 10 th day of illness. Ten of 12 showed hypokalemia. One was of Guillain-Barré syndrome and other suffered from myositis; they underwent NCV and electromyography. Serum CPK and SGOT raised in 8 out of 12 patients. CPK of patient of myositis was 5098 IU. All of 12 patients had thrombocytopenia. WBC was in normal range. Dengue virus was isolated in three patients, and it was of serotype 1. CSF was normal in all. Within 24 hours, those with hypokalemia recovered by potassium correction. Conclusions: It was concluded that the dengue virus infection led to acute neuromuscular weakness because of hypokalemia, myositis, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. It was suggested to look for presence of hypokalemia in such patients.

  12. Chilli anthracnose disease caused by Colletotrichum species§

    OpenAIRE

    Than, Po Po; Prihastuti, Haryudian; Phoulivong, Sitthisack; Taylor, Paul W.J.; Hyde, Kevin D.

    2008-01-01

    Anthracnose disease is one of the major economic constraints to chilli production worldwide, especially in tropical and subtropical regions. Accurate taxonomic information is necessary for effective disease control management. In the Colletotrichum patho-system, different Colletotrichum species can be associated with anthracnose of the same host. Little information is known concerning the interactions of the species associated with the chilli anthracnose although several Colletotrichum specie...

  13. Diagnosis and management of adult hereditary cardio-neuromuscular disorders: A model for the multidisciplinary care of complex genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, R Brian; Vincenti, Margherita Guzzi; Winborn, Kathleen; Casey, Anne; Stitziel, Nathan O; Connolly, Anne M; Mann, Douglas L

    2017-01-01

    Genetic disorders that disrupt the structure and function of the cardiovascular system and the peripheral nervous system are common enough to be encountered in routine cardiovascular practice. Although often these patients are diagnosed in childhood and come to the cardiologist fully characterized, some patients with hereditary neuromuscular disease may not manifest until adulthood and will present initially to the adult cardiologist for an evaluation of an abnormal ECG, unexplained syncope, LV hypertrophy, and or a dilated cardiomyopathy of unknown cause. Cardiologists are often ill-equipped to manage these patients due to lack of training and exposure as well as the complete absence of practice guidelines to aid in the diagnosis and management of these disorders. Here, we review three key neuromuscular diseases that affect the cardiovascular system in adults (myotonic dystrophy type 1, Friedreich ataxia, and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy), with an emphasis on their clinical presentation, genetic and molecular pathogenesis, and recent important research on medical and interventional treatments. We also advocate the development of interdisciplinary cardio-neuromuscular clinics to optimize the care for these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Principal disease or cause of death in nonsacrifice Segment III beagles receiving gamma radiation during development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, L.; Kitchen, D.N.; Benjamin, S.A.; Stephens, L.C.; Hargis, A.M.; Lovering, S.L.; Lee, A.C.; Brewster, R.D.; Brooks, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    Epilepsy, hypothyroidism and neoplasia rank as the three leading causes of death in nonsacrifice Segment III beagles. Chronic renal disease is a fourth major disease entity occurring with increasing frequency in the experimental population. These four major diseases accounted for 57% of the deaths in 1979. Of the four leading causes of death, neoplasia alone can be related to the history of radiation exposure

  15. Elevated Remnant Cholesterol Causes Both Low-Grade Inflammation and Ischemic Heart Disease, Whereas Elevated Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Causes Ischemic Heart Disease Without Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Benn, Marianne; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Elevated nonfasting remnant cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol are causally associated with ischemic heart disease (IHD), but whether elevated nonfasting remnant cholesterol and LDL cholesterol both cause low-grade inflammation is currently unknown....

  16. An unusual cause of cervical lymphadenopathy: Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Uluğ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease (KFD, also known as histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, is an uncommon clinical and pathologicalself-limited feature of benign prognosis that may mimic many other diseases diagnosed chiefly in youngadults. The etiology of the disease is unknown although several investigators postulate viral, parasitic and autoimmuneetiologies. The most common symptoms are cervical lymphadenopathy and fever. Diagnosis is usually rendered withexcisional biopsy of lymph nodes and through histopathological findings. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs areused for the treatment. In this report, two cases of KFD without any associated infectious and/or non-infectious conditionswere presented. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2012; 2(1: 21-25

  17. Vocational perspectives and neuromuscular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andries, F.; Wevers, C. W.; Wintzen, A. R.; Busch, H. F.; Höweler, C. J.; de Jager, A. E.; Padberg, G. W.; de Visser, M.; Wokke, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    The present study analyses the actual occupational situation, vocational handicaps and past labour career of a group of about 1000 Dutch patients suffering from a neuromuscular disorder (NMD). On the basis of the likelihood of a substantial employment history and sufficient numbers of patients, four

  18. Vocational perspectives and neuromuscular disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andries, F; Wevers, CWJ; Wintzen, AR; Busch, HFM; Howeler, CJ; deJager, AEJ; Padberg, GW; deVisser, M; Wokke, JHJ

    The present study analyses the actual occupational situation, vocational handicaps and past labour career of a group of about 1000 Dutch patients suffering from a neuromuscular disorder (NMD). On the basis of the likelihood of a substantial employment history and sufficient numbers of patients, four

  19. Metabolic effects of obesity causing disease in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Pamela; Levitt Katz, Lorraine E

    2011-02-01

    Childhood obesity is rising to epidemic proportions throughout the world, and much emphasis has been placed on the long-term consequences that can result later, in adulthood. This article reviews the metabolic consequences of obesity that can manifest as disease during the childhood years. Obese children suffer from many disease processes once thought to affect only adults. They can have type 2 diabetes mellitus, and potentially early β cell failure with rapid progression to an insulin requirement. There is a high prevalence of fatty liver disease in obese children, and complications such as steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis can develop during childhood. Visceral fat has been shown to have many different properties than subcutaneous fat, and children with central adiposity can develop the metabolic syndrome with insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Hyperandrogenism, sleep disturbances, and many types of orthopedic complications can also develop in young children. Physicians should not only warn obese children and their families about the long-term consequences of obesity for which they are at risk in adulthood, they should also screen for the many diseases that may already be present.

  20. Modelling studies on neurodegenerative disease-causing triplet ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abbreviations used: DM, dystrophia myotonica; FraX, fragile X syndrome; HD, Huntington disease; rms, root mean square. ... Further, at high salt condition, Greek key type quadruplex ..... tetrads at 30° twist and 3⋅4 Å rise (as observed in fiber.

  1. A Novel Virus Causes Scale Drop Disease in Lates calcarifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groof, A.; Guelen, L.; Deijs, M.; Wal, van der Y.; Miyata, M.; Ng, K.S.; Grinsven, van L.; Simmelink, B.; Biermann, Y.; Grisez, L.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Ronde, de A.; Chang, S.F.; Schrier, C.; Hoek, L.

    2015-01-01

    From 1992 onwards, outbreaks of a previously unknown illness have been reported in Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer) kept in maricultures in Southeast Asia. The most striking symptom of this emerging disease is the loss of scales. It was referred to as scale drop syndrome, but the etiology remained

  2. Prevalence And Disabilities Caused By Guinea-Worm Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey was carried out in 2001 to ascertain the status of Guinea worm disease infection among farm households in Ebonyi Local Government Area (LGA) of Ebonyi State. A total of 3,777 respondents were randomly sampled from 15 communities that comprised the LGA. The sample respondents were clinically examined ...

  3. How reflux causes symptoms: reflux perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenborg, Pim W.; Bredenoord, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    In gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms arise due to reflux of gastric content into the oesophagus. However, the relation between magnitude and onset of reflux and symptom generation in GERD patients is far from simple; gastroesophageal reflux occurs several times a day in everyone and

  4. Waterborne Exophiala species causing disease in cold-blooded animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoog, G.S.; Vicente, V.A.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Harrak, M.J.; Badali, H.; Seyedmousavi, S.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of mesophilic waterborne species of the black yeast genus Exophiala (Chaetothyriales) belong to a single clade judging from SSU rDNA data. Most taxa are also found to cause cutaneous or disseminated infections in cold-blooded, water animals, occasionally reaching epidemic proportions.

  5. Waterborne Exophiala species causing disease in cold-blooded animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoog, G.S.; Vicente, V.A.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Harrak, M.J.; Badali, H.; Seyedmousavi, S.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of mesophilic waterborne species of the black yeast genus Exophiala (Chaetothyriales) belong to a single clade judging from SSU rDNA data. Most taxa are also found to cause cutaneous or disseminated infections in cold-blooded, water animals, occasionally reaching epidemic proportions.

  6. Gender Differentials and Disease-Specific Cause of Infant Mortality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    causes of infant mortality in an urban hospital in Ghana and gender differences in the burden of infant mortality. Births and deaths data at the hospital .... intended to assess the picture of infant mortality in Ghana as presented in the WHO and ..... Central Intelligence Agency: World Fact Book-Ghana. (2008): Rank order-Infant ...

  7. A sodium-channel mutation causes isolated cardiac conduction disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, HL; Bink-Boelkens, MTE; Bezzina, CR; Viswanathan, PC; Beaufort-Krol, GCM; van Tintelen, PJ; van den Berg, MP; Wilde, AAM; Balser, [No Value

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders slow the heart rhythm and cause disability in millions of people worldwide. Inherited mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding the human cardiac sodium (Na+) channel, have been associated with rapid heart rhythms that occur suddenly and are life-threatening(1-3); however, a

  8. A sodium-channel mutation causes isolated cardiac conduction disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H. L.; Bink-Boelkens, M. T.; Bezzina, C. R.; Viswanathan, P. C.; Beaufort-Krol, G. C.; van Tintelen, P. J.; van den Berg, M. P.; Wilde, A. A.; Balser, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders slow the heart rhythm and cause disability in millions of people worldwide. Inherited mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding the human cardiac sodium (Na+) channel, have been associated with rapid heart rhythms that occur suddenly and are life-threatening; however, a

  9. The glucocerobrosidase E326K variant predisposes to Parkinson's disease, but does not cause Gaucher's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Raquel; Mencacci, Niccolo E; Angeli, Aikaterini V; Shoai, Maryam; Deas, Emma; Houlden, Henry; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralynn; Cox, Timothy M; Deegan, Patrick; Schapira, Anthony H; Lees, Andrew J; Limousin, Patricia; Jarman, Paul R; Bhatia, Kailash P; Wood, Nicholas W; Hardy, John; Foltynie, Tom

    2013-02-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the acid beta-glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) gene, responsible for the recessive lysosomal storage disorder, Gaucher's disease (GD), are the strongest known risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD). Our aim was to assess the contribution of GBA1 mutations in a series of early-onset PD. One hundred and eighty-five PD patients (with an onset age of ≤50) and 283 age-matched controls were screened for GBA1 mutations by Sanger sequencing. We show that the frequency of GBA1 mutations is much higher in this patient series than in typical late-onset patient cohorts. Furthermore, our results reveal that the most prevalent PD-associated GBA1 mutation is E326K, a variant that does not, when homozygous, cause GD. Our results confirm recent reports that the mutation, E326K, predisposes to PD and suggest that, in addition to reduced GBA1 activity, other molecular mechanisms may contribute to the development of the disease. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorders Society.

  10. Autoantibodies to neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels: from neuromuscular to neuropsychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar eMartinez-Martinez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes of voltage-gated ion channels and ligand-gated receptor channels caused by mutation or autoimmune attack are the cause of so-called channelopathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. We present the pathophysiology of channelopathies of the neuromuscular junction in terms of loss-of-function and gain-of-function principles. Autoantibodies generally have reduced access to the CNS, but in some cases this is enough to cause disease. A review is provided of recent findings implicating autoantibodies against ligand–activated receptor channels and potassium channels in psychiatric and neurological disorders, including schizophrenia and limbic encephalitis. The emergence of channelopathy-related neuropsychiatric disorders has implications for research and practice.

  11. Involuntary movements in the elderly. Parkinson's disease and other causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J Q

    1986-03-01

    Dyskinesia is usually lifelong and progressive; therefore, physicians generally see the disorder in elderly patients. Medical treatment must be carefully selected on the basis of the cause of the dyskinesia. Parkinsonian dyskinesia is well controlled by drug therapy. However, patients can become less responsive to a drug after years of use and may experience unwelcome side effects. Cerebellar tremor is extremely disabling because it worsens with activity, but no satisfactory therapy is available. Senile, essential, and familial tremors are also intensified by action, but they can often be suppressed with a mild tranquilizer or a beta blocker. Drug treatment of blepharospasm and spastic dysphonia has been disappointing: Facial or laryngeal surgery is sometimes required. Tardive dyskinesia is caused by neuroleptic drugs, so the only therapy for the disorder is withdrawal of the offending drug.

  12. Important causes of chronic kidney disease in South Africa | Moosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In hypertensive patients without chronic kidney disease (CKD) the goal is to keep blood pressure (BP) at ≤140/90 mmHg. When CKD is present, especially where there is proteinuria of ≥0.5 g/day, the goal is a BP of ≤130/80 mmHg. Lifestyle measures are mandatory, especially limitation of salt intake, ingestion of ...

  13. Ribbing disease: Uncommon cause of a common symptom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Patnecha, Manish; Kumar, Praveen; Gadodia, Ankur; Subbarao, Kiran; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2011-01-01

    Ribbing disease is a rare form of sclerosing dysplasia characterized by benign endosteal and periosteal bone growth confined to the diaphyses of the long bones, usually the tibiae and femora. It occurs after puberty and is more commonly seen in women. The most common presenting symptom is pain that is usually self-limited; however, progression is known. The etiology and optimal treatment for the disease are as yet undefined. We present here the case of a 31-year-old woman with clinical, radiological and bone scan manifestations of Ribbing disease corroborated by bone biopsy. Radiographs demonstrated cortical thickening of the diaphyses of both tibiae. 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone scan revealed intense irregular uptake in diaphyseal region of both tibiae. Magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical thickening with bone marrow edema in bilateral tibial diaphysis with minimal adjacent soft tissue edema. Bone biopsy revealed predominantly dense lamellar bone with irregular sized and spaced haversian systems. Serum and urine markers of bone metabolism were within normal limits. The patient was treated with analgesics, and had partial relief from pain. Medullary rimming is the next treatment option in case pain progresses. This report emphasizes the role of bone scan in the diagnosis of this rare condition

  14. Biological Control of Plant Disease Caused by Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwidodo Arwiyanto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial diseases in plants are difficult to control. The emphasis is on preventing the spread of the bacteria rather than curing the diseased plant. Integrated management measures for bacterial plant pathogens should be applied for successfull control. Biological control is one of the control measures viz. through the use of microorganisms to suppress the growth and development of bacterial plant pathogen and ultimately reduce the possibility of disease onset. The study of biological control of bacterial plant pathogen was just began compared with of fungal plant pathogen. The ecological nature of diverse bacterial plant pathogens has led scientists to apply different approach in the investigation of its biological control. The complex process of entrance to its host plant for certain soil-borne bacterial plant pathogens need special techniques and combination of more than one biological control agent. Problem and progress in controlling bacterial plant pathogens biologically will be discussed in more detail in the paper and some commercial products of biological control agents (biopesticides will be introduced.     Penyakit tumbuhan karena bakteri sulit dikendalikan. Penekanan pengendalian adalah pada pencegahan penyebaran bakteri patogen dan bukan pada penyembuhan tanaman yang sudah sakit. Untuk suksesnya pengendalian bakteri patogen tumbuhan diperlukan cara pengelolaan yang terpadu. Pengendalian secara biologi merupakan salah satu cara pengendalian dengan menggunakan mikroorganisme untuk menekan pertumbuhan dan perkembangan bakteri patogen tumbuhan dengan tujuan akhir menurunkan kemungkinan timbulnya penyakit. Sifat ekologi bakteri patogen tumbuhan yang berbeda-beda mengharuskan pendekatan yang berbeda pula dalam pengendaliannya secara biologi. Masalah dan perkembangan dalam pengendalian bakteri patogen tumbuhan secara biologi didiskusikan secara detail dalam makalah ini.

  15. Effectiveness of Neuromuscular Training Based on the Neuromuscular Risk Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Timothy E; Ford, Kevin R; Xu, Yingying Y; Khoury, Jane; Myer, Gregory D

    2017-07-01

    The effects of targeted neuromuscular training (TNMT) on movement biomechanics associated with the risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are currently unknown. Purpose/Hypotheses: To determine the effectiveness of TNMT specifically designed to increase trunk control and hip strength. The hypotheses were that (1) TNMT would decrease biomechanical and neuromuscular factors related to an increased ACL injury risk and (2) TNMT would decrease these biomechanical and neuromuscular factors to a greater extent in athletes identified as being at a high risk for future ACL injuries. Controlled laboratory study. Female athletes who participated in jumping, cutting, and pivoting sports underwent 3-dimensional biomechanical testing before the season and after completing TNMT. During testing, athletes performed 3 different types of tasks: (1) drop vertical jump, (2) single-leg drop, and (3) single-leg cross drop. Analysis of covariance was used to examine the treatment effects of TNMT designed to enhance core and hip strength on biomechanical and neuromuscular characteristics. Differences were also evaluated by risk profile. Differences were considered statistically significant at P risk before the intervention (risk profile III) had a more significant treatment effect of TNMT than low-risk groups (risk profiles I and II). TNMT significantly improved proximal biomechanics, including increased hip external rotation moments and moment impulses, increased peak trunk flexion, and decreased peak trunk extension. TNMT that focuses exclusively on proximal leg and trunk risk factors is not, however, adequate to induce significant changes in frontal-plane knee loading. Biomechanical changes varied across the risk profile groups, with higher risk groups exhibiting greater improvements in their biomechanics.

  16. Fibroblast growth factor 10 haploinsufficiency causes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klar, Joakim; Blomstrand, Peter; Brunmark, Charlott; Badhai, Jitendra; Håkansson, Hanna Falk; Brange, Charlotte Sollie; Bergendal, Birgitta; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-10-01

    Genetic factors influencing lung function may predispose to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) signalling pathway is critical for lung development and lung epithelial renewal. The hypothesis behind this study was that constitutive FGF10 insufficiency may lead to pulmonary disorder. Therefore investigation of the pulmonary functions of patients heterozygous for loss of function mutations in the FGF10 gene was performed. The spirometric measures of lung function from patients and non-carrier siblings were compared and both groups were related to matched reference data for normal human lung function. The patients show a significant decrease in lung function parameters when compared to control values. The average FEV1/IVC quota (FEV1%) for the patients is 0.65 (80% of predicted) and reversibility test using Terbutalin resulted in a 3.7% increase in FEV1. Patients with FGF10 haploinsufficiency have lung function parameters indicating COPD. A modest response to Terbutalin confirms an irreversible obstructive lung disease. These findings support the idea that genetic variants affecting the FGF10 signalling pathway are important determinants of lung function that may ultimately contribute to COPD. Specifically, the results show that FGF10 haploinsufficiency affects lung function measures providing a model for a dosage sensitive effect of FGF10 in the development of COPD.

  17. Inflammatory spine disease as a cause of back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlossbauer, T.; Panteleon, A.; Becker-Gaab, C.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the role of inflammatory spine disease in patients with chronic back pain. The contribution of imaging modalities for the diagnostic evaluation of back pain is discussed. A systematic literature search based on the classification of seronegative spondyloarthropathies and rheumatoid arthritis was performed. The results of this search and the experiences in a large collective of rheumatological patients are analyzed. The prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (1-2%) is comparable to that of spondyloarthropathies (1.9%). The etiology of these entities is not fully elucidated. Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used for early detection and surveillance of therapy with TNF-α antagonists. Bone marrow edema, which is only detectable with MRI, represents an early sign of inflammation. Therapy with TNF-α antagonists is based on clinical and laboratory criteria, and signs of inflammation in MRI. MRI is useful for assessment of the effectiveness of anti-inflammatory therapy. (orig.) [de

  18. Environmental chemicals and autoimmune disease: cause and effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Evelyn V.

    2002-01-01

    Many important clues have been provided by the relationship of certain medications to lupus and other autoimmune syndromes. These are temporary conditions that resolve when the medication is removed. There are now over 70 such medications which have been reported related to these autoimmune conditions. Interest continues to grow in the potential for environmental substances to cause these syndromes. Among those under suspicion are hydrazines, tartrazines, hair dyes, trichloroethylene, industrial emissions and hazardous wastes. Other possible associations include silica, mercury, cadmium, gold and L canavanine. Two recognised outbreaks include 'toxic oil syndrome' related to contaminated rape seed oil in Spain in 1981 and exposure to a contaminated environmental substance associated with an autoimmune attack on muscle tissue in 1989. Recently, there have been proposals made for the definition and identification of environmentally associated immune disorders. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has also provided recent publications for other environmentally related problems. All these aspects will be presented and reviewed in detail

  19. Detection of Secondary Causes and Coexisting Diseases in Hypertensive Patients: OSA and PA Are the Common Causes Associated with Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Nanfang; Yao, Xiaoguang; Chang, Guijuan; Zhang, Delian; Heizhati, Mulalibieke; Wang, Menghui; Luo, Qin; Kong, Jianqiong

    2017-01-01

    Since the control rate of blood pressure is lower in mainland China, the aim of this study is to investigate the proportion of secondary causes and coexisting diseases of hypertension in hypertensive patients. Data on consecutive patients with hypertension who visited the Hypertension Center. Diseases were detected using an established strict screening protocol. Detection rate of secondary causes and coexisting diseases of hypertension was 39.5% among 3003 hypertensive patients. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was the most common, accounting for 24.7% of patients, followed by primary aldosteronism (PA) (5.8%) and PA + OSA (4.9%). Endocrine hypertension accounted for 12.1% of patients, including 10.7% of patients with PA, 1.1% with hypothyroidism, 0.1% with pheochromocytoma, 0.1% with Cushing's syndrome, and 0.1% with hyperthyroidism, respectively. Those who smoke, those who are obese, and those who have diabetes accounted for 31.3%, 27.5%, and 16.6% of total patients, respectively. There were overlapping conditions in secondary causes and coexisting diseases of hypertension. OSA was the most common in each age- and BMI-stratified group. Findings from the current study suggest an increasing frequency of secondary forms of hypertension, highlighting the burden of OSA and PA in hypertensive patients.

  20. Detection of Secondary Causes and Coexisting Diseases in Hypertensive Patients: OSA and PA Are the Common Causes Associated with Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Since the control rate of blood pressure is lower in mainland China, the aim of this study is to investigate the proportion of secondary causes and coexisting diseases of hypertension in hypertensive patients. Methods. Data on consecutive patients with hypertension who visited the Hypertension Center. Diseases were detected using an established strict screening protocol. Results. Detection rate of secondary causes and coexisting diseases of hypertension was 39.5% among 3003 hypertensive patients. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA was the most common, accounting for 24.7% of patients, followed by primary aldosteronism (PA (5.8% and PA + OSA (4.9%. Endocrine hypertension accounted for 12.1% of patients, including 10.7% of patients with PA, 1.1% with hypothyroidism, 0.1% with pheochromocytoma, 0.1% with Cushing’s syndrome, and 0.1% with hyperthyroidism, respectively. Those who smoke, those who are obese, and those who have diabetes accounted for 31.3%, 27.5%, and 16.6% of total patients, respectively. There were overlapping conditions in secondary causes and coexisting diseases of hypertension. OSA was the most common in each age- and BMI-stratified group. Conclusion. Findings from the current study suggest an increasing frequency of secondary forms of hypertension, highlighting the burden of OSA and PA in hypertensive patients.

  1. Mapping global potential risk of mango sudden decline disease caused by fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango Sudden Decline (MSD), sometimes referred to as mango wilt, is an important disease of mango caused by one of the most significant fungal species causing disease in woody plants, Ceratocystis fimbriata. This species is mainly disseminated by the mango bark beetle, Hypocryphalus mangiferae (Steb...

  2. Neuromuscular Activity of Micrurus laticollaris (Squamata: Elapidae Venom in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Carbajal-Saucedo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have examined the neuromuscular activity of Micrurus laticollaris (Mexican coral snake venom (MLV in vertebrate isolated nerve-muscle preparations. In chick biventer cervicis preparations, the MLV induced an irreversible concentration- and time-dependent (1–30 µg/mL neuromuscular blockade, with 50% blockade occurring between 8 and 30 min. Muscle contractures evoked by exogenous acetylcholine were completely abolished by MLV, whereas those of KCl were also significantly altered (86% ± 11%, 53% ± 11%, 89% ± 5% and 89% ± 7% for one, three, 10 and 30 µg of venom/mL, respectively; n = 4; p < 0.05. In mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations, MLV (1–10 µg/mL promoted a slight increase in the amplitude of twitch-tension (3 µg/mL, followed by neuromuscular blockade (n = 4; the highest concentration caused complete inhibition of the twitches (time for 50% blockade = 26 ± 3 min, without exhibiting a previous neuromuscular facilitation. The venom (3 µg/mL induced a biphasic modulation in the frequency of miniature end-plate potentials (MEPPs/min, causing a significant increase after 15 min, followed by a decrease after 60 min (from 17 ± 1.4 (basal to 28 ± 2.5 (t15 and 12 ± 2 (t60. The membrane resting potential of mouse diaphragm preparations pre-exposed or not to d-tubocurarine (5 µg/mL was also significantly less negative with MLV (10 µg/mL. Together, these results indicate that M. laticollaris venom induces neuromuscular blockade by a combination of pre- and post-synaptic activities.

  3. Psychological disorders in gastrointestinal disease: epiphenomenon, cause or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Eric; Rezaie, Ali; Riddle, Mark; Pimentel, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Psychological disorders have been associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) for decades in the absence of other objective etiology. However, such associations are also evident in other chronic diseases with more clearly defined pathogenesis such as ulcerative colitis. In this study, we examined the prevalence and severity of psychological disorders among IBS and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients relative to healthy controls. A review was conducted of English-language literature to identify case-control studies reporting the prevalence of depression or anxiety in IBS and UC populations relative to healthy controls. Our primary endpoint was the pooled prevalence or average score of depression or anxiety in an IBS or UC population relative to healthy control. Seven case-control studies evaluating IBS and three evaluating UC were included. All IBS and UC studies reported excess prevalence and severity of depression as well as anxiety, relative to healthy controls. The prevalence of depression in excess of healthy controls was 39% in UC case-control trials and 33% in IBS studies, and excess anxiety was present in UC (42%) and IBS (19%) case-control trials as well. Anxiety and depression scores were higher (representing more severe symptoms) in both UC and IBS patients compared to healthy controls. Anxiety and depressive disorders are associated with both IBS and UC. The non-specific association between these psychological and gastrointestinal disorders could suggest that chronic gastrointestinal illness might affect psychosocial behavior.

  4. Dengue-associated neuromuscular complications

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindra Kumar Garg; Hardeep Singh Malhotra; Amita Jain; Kiran Preet Malhotra

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is associated with many neurological dysfunctions. Up to 4% of dengue patients may develop neuromuscular complications. Muscle involvement can manifest with myalgias, myositis, rhabdomyolysis and hypokalemic paralysis. Diffuse myalgia is the most characteristic neurological symptom of dengue fever. Dengue-associated myositis can be of varying severity ranging from self-limiting muscle involvement to severe dengue myositis. Dengue-associated hypokalemic paralysis often has a rapidly evo...

  5. Modelling the economic impact of three lameness causing diseases using herd and cow level evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettema, Jehan Frans; Østergaard, Søren; Kristensen, Anders Ringgaard

    2010-01-01

    Diseases to the cow's hoof, interdigital skin and legs are highly prevalent and of large economic impact in modern dairy farming. In order to support farmer's decisions on preventing and treating lameness and its underlying causes, decision support models can be used to predict the economic...... horn diseases. Secondly, the existing simulation model was set-up inwaythat it uses hyper-distributions describing diseases risk of the three lameness causing diseases. By combining information on herd level risk factors with prevalence of lameness or prevalence of underlying diseases among cows...

  6. Acute myeloid leukaemia as a cause of acute ischaemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haelst, P.L.; Schot, Bart; Hoendermis, E.S.; van den Berg, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is almost invariably the result of atherosclerotic degeneration of the coronary arteries. However, other causes of ischaemic heart disease should always be considered. Here we describe two patients with a classic presentation of ischaemic heart disease resulting from acute

  7. Mitochondrial DNA triplication and punctual mutations in patients with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna, E-mail: emna.mkaouar@gmail.com [Département des Sciences de la Vie, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax (Tunisia); Felhi, Rahma; Tabebi, Mouna [Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire Humaine, Faculté de Médecine de Sfax, Université de Sfax (Tunisia); Alila-Fersi, Olfa; Chamkha, Imen [Département des Sciences de la Vie, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax (Tunisia); Maalej, Marwa; Ammar, Marwa [Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire Humaine, Faculté de Médecine de Sfax, Université de Sfax (Tunisia); Kammoun, Fatma [Service de pédiatrie, C.H.U. Hedi Chaker de Sfax (Tunisia); Keskes, Leila [Laboratoire de Génétique Moléculaire Humaine, Faculté de Médecine de Sfax, Université de Sfax (Tunisia); Hachicha, Mongia [Service de pédiatrie, C.H.U. Hedi Chaker de Sfax (Tunisia); Fakhfakh, Faiza, E-mail: faiza.fakhfakh02@gmail.com [Département des Sciences de la Vie, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax (Tunisia)

    2016-04-29

    Mitochondrial diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders caused by the impairment of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system which have been associated with various mutations of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear gene mutations. The clinical phenotypes are very diverse and the spectrum is still expanding. As brain and muscle are highly dependent on OXPHOS, consequently, neurological disorders and myopathy are common features of mtDNA mutations. Mutations in mtDNA can be classified into three categories: large-scale rearrangements, point mutations in tRNA or rRNA genes and point mutations in protein coding genes. In the present report, we screened mitochondrial genes of complex I, III, IV and V in 2 patients with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorders. The results showed the presence the pathogenic heteroplasmic m.9157G>A variation (A211T) in the MT-ATP6 gene in the first patient. We also reported the first case of triplication of 9 bp in the mitochondrial NC7 region in Africa and Tunisia, in association with the novel m.14924T>C in the MT-CYB gene in the second patient with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorder. - Highlights: • We reported 2 patients with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorders. • The heteroplasmic MT-ATP6 9157G>A variation was reported. • A triplication of 9 bp in the mitochondrial NC7 region was detected. • The m.14924T>C transition (S60P) in the MT-CYB gene was found.

  8. Verifax: Biometric instruments measuring neuromuscular disorders/performance impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, George W.; Shrairman, Ruth; Landau, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    VeriFax, founded in 1990 by Dr. Ruth Shrairman and Mr. Alex Landau, began operations with the aim of developing a biometric tool for the verification of signatures from a distance. In the course of developing this VeriFax Autograph technology, two other related applications for the technologies under development at VeriFax became apparent. The first application was in the use of biometric measurements as clinical monitoring tools for physicians investigating neuromuscular diseases (embodied in VeriFax's Neuroskill technology). The second application was to evaluate persons with critical skills (e.g., airline pilots, bus drivers) for physical and mental performance impairments caused by stress, physiological disorders, alcohol, drug abuse, etc. (represented by VeriFax's Impairoscope prototype instrument). This last application raised the possibility of using a space-qualified Impairoscope variant to evaluate astronaut performance with respect to the impacts of stress, fatigue, excessive workload, build-up of toxic chemicals within the space habitat, etc. The three applications of VeriFax's patented technology are accomplished by application-specific modifications of the customized VeriFax software. Strong commercial market potentials exist for all three VeriFax technology applications, and market progress will be presented in more detail below.

  9. Celiac disease causing severe osteomalacia: an association still present in Morocco!

    OpenAIRE

    Tahiri, Latifa; Azzouzi, Hamida; Squalli, Ghita; Abourazzak, Fatimazahra; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a malabsorption syndrome caused by hypersensitivity to gliadin fraction of gluten. CD can manifest with classic symptoms; however, significant myopathy and multiple fractures are rarely the predominant presentation of untreated celiac disease. Osteomalacia complicating celiac disease had become more and more rare. We describe here a case of osteomalacia secondary to a longstanding untreated celiac disease. This patient complained about progressive bone and muscular pain, ...

  10. Prediction of disease causing non-synonymous SNPs by the Artificial Neural Network Predictor NetDiseaseSNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Bo Johansen

    Full Text Available We have developed a sequence conservation-based artificial neural network predictor called NetDiseaseSNP which classifies nsSNPs as disease-causing or neutral. Our method uses the excellent alignment generation algorithm of SIFT to identify related sequences and a combination of 31 features assessing sequence conservation and the predicted surface accessibility to produce a single score which can be used to rank nsSNPs based on their potential to cause disease. NetDiseaseSNP classifies successfully disease-causing and neutral mutations. In addition, we show that NetDiseaseSNP discriminates cancer driver and passenger mutations satisfactorily. Our method outperforms other state-of-the-art methods on several disease/neutral datasets as well as on cancer driver/passenger mutation datasets and can thus be used to pinpoint and prioritize plausible disease candidates among nsSNPs for further investigation. NetDiseaseSNP is publicly available as an online tool as well as a web service: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetDiseaseSNP.

  11. Identification and Simulation as Tools for Measurement of Neuromuscular Properties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kearney, R

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative, objective methods for the evaluation of neuromuscular properties are required for the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders and the evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment and rehabilitation...

  12. Prediction of Disease Causing Non-Synonymous SNPs by the Artificial Neural Network Predictor NetDiseaseSNP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Morten Bo; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria; Brunak, Søren

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a sequence conservation-based artificial neural network predictor called NetDiseaseSNP which classifies nsSNPs as disease-causing or neutral. Our method uses the excellent alignment generation algorithm of SIFT to identify related sequences and a combination of 31 features...

  13. Absenteeism due to Functional Limitations Caused by Seven Common Chronic Diseases in US Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Tam D; Wei, Feifei; Beverly, Claudia J

    2015-07-01

    The study examined the relationship between functional limitation due to chronic diseases and absenteeism among full-time workers. The studied chronic diseases include arthritis/rheumatism, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, lung disease, and stroke. We analyzed data from the 2011 to 2013 National Health Interview Survey. Economic impact was determined by workdays lost and lost income. Increase in absenteeism was observed for each studied condition. Employees with multiple conditions also saw increase absenteeism. Employers lose 28.2 million workdays annually ($4.95 billion in lost income) due to functional limitation caused by chronic diseases. The results show a burden on society due to functional limitation caused by studied chronic diseases. Employers should look into implementing intervention/prevention programs, such as the Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs, to help reduce the cost associated with absenteeism.

  14. Efficacy and safety of sugammadex versus neostigmine in reversing neuromuscular blockade in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hristovska, Ana-Marija; Duch, Patricia; Allingstrup, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    , and undesirable autonomic responses. Sugammadex is a selective relaxant-binding agent specifically developed for rapid reversal of non-depolarizing neuromuscular blockade induced by rocuronium. Its potential clinical benefits include fast and predictable reversal of any degree of block, increased patient safety......, reduced incidence of residual block on recovery, and more efficient use of healthcare resources. OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this review was to compare the efficacy and safety of sugammadex versus neostigmine in reversing neuromuscular blockade caused by non-depolarizing neuromuscular agents......-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents for an elective in-patient or day-case surgical procedure. We included all trials comparing sugammadex versus neostigmine that reported recovery times or adverse events. We included any dose of sugammadex and neostigmine and any time point of study drug administration. DATA...

  15. Changes in muscle strength in elderly women after proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation based training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivã Bernardo da Silva

    Full Text Available Introduction Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF can be used to improve the quality of life of both healthy and diseased subjects, including the elderly, who suffer muscular weakness due to aging, leading to an impairment in functional capacity. Objective Verify the effectiveness of PNF as a tool for functional conditioning. Materials and methods We evaluated a total of ten elderly women aged 60–70 years, clinically healthy and physically active. They had the force of motion of hip flexion with knee extension analyzed by an analog dynamometer. They were then randomly and equally divided into experimental (EG and control group (CG. The GC was instructed to continue with their normal activities while the GE held 15 training sessions in the lower limb (LL based on the diagonal D1 and D2. Finally, a new collection wrench the two groups was performed and the data compared. Results There was a significant increase in the average strength of GE, on the order of 31% (p 0.05. Discussion : The results confirm that the FNP through initial work of readjustment and proprioceptive neuromuscular activation, and after that, conditioning of the muscle fibers (mainly resistive is capable of amplifying the force developed by the muscle. Conclusion The PNF was effective as training to gain muscle strength, should be better analyzed as a tool fitness, not to cause health risks, have low cost and easy application.

  16. Neuromuscular Control and Coordination during Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li

    2004-01-01

    The neuromuscular control aspect of cycling has been investigated through the effects of modifying posture and cadence. These studies show that changing posture has a more profound influence on neuromuscular coordination than does changing slope. Most of the changes with standing posture occur late in the downstroke: increased ankle and knee joint…

  17. Kinship and interaction in neuromuscular pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiere, Sjouke

    2006-01-01

    The background of this thesis is presented in the introductory chapters and stafts with a brief history of neuromuscular relaxants. It is followed by a short description of the neuromuscular physiology and pharmacology in chapters 2 and 3, respectively. In chapter 4 the aim of the thesis is

  18. Genetic defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease maps on chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St. George-Hyslop, P.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Polinsky, R.J.; Haines, J.L.; Nee, L.; Watkins, P.C.; Myers, R.H.; Feldman, R.G.; Pollen, D.; Drachman, D.; Growdon, J.

    1987-02-20

    Alzheimer's disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Several families have been described in which Alzheimer's disease is caused by an autosomal dominant gene defect. The chromosomal location of this defective gene has been discovered by using genetic linkage to DNA markers on chromosome 21. The localization on chromosome 21 provides an explanation for the occurrence of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in Down syndrome. Isolation and characterization of the gene at this locus may yield new insights into the nature of the defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease and possibly, into the etiology of all forms of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Sleep duration and ischemic heart disease and all-cause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Anne Helene; Hansen, Åse Marie; Holtermann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to examine if sleep duration is a risk indicator for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and all-cause mortality, and how perceived stress during work and leisure time and use of tranquilizers/hypnotics modifies the association.......This prospective study aimed to examine if sleep duration is a risk indicator for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and all-cause mortality, and how perceived stress during work and leisure time and use of tranquilizers/hypnotics modifies the association....

  20. Ileitis caused by Yersinia enterocolitica - X-ray differential diagnosis of Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingg, G.; Hering, L.; Tanneberger, D.

    1981-01-01

    The article gives a brief description of the characteristic features of the clinical and roentgenological course and the various stages of enteritis caused by Yersinia. Basing on three cases of ileitis caused by Yersinia, the far-reaching similarity with the early changes and even the advanced stages of Crohn's diseases are demonstrated. Attention is drawn to the possibilities of differentiating between the two disease patterns. (orig.) [de

  1. Ileitis caused by Yersinia enterocolitica - X-ray differential diagnosis of Crohn's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingg, G.; Hering, L.; Tanneberger, D.

    1981-12-01

    The article gives a brief description of the characteristic features of the clinical and roentgenological course and the various stages of enteritis caused by Yersinia. Basing on three cases of ileitis caused by Yersinia, the far-reaching similarity with the early changes and even the advanced stages of Crohn's diseases are demonstrated. Attention is drawn to the possibilities of differentiating between the two disease patterns.

  2. Modelling the economic impact of three lameness causing diseases using herd and cow level evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettema, Jehan; Østergaard, Søren; Kristensen, Anders Ringgaard

    2010-06-01

    Diseases to the cow's hoof, interdigital skin and legs are highly prevalent and of large economic impact in modern dairy farming. In order to support farmer's decisions on preventing and treating lameness and its underlying causes, decision support models can be used to predict the economic profitability of such actions. An existing approach of modelling lameness as one health disorder in a dynamic, stochastic and mechanistic simulation model has been improved in two ways. First of all, three underlying diseases causing lameness were modelled: digital dermatitis, interdigital hyperplasia and claw horn diseases. Secondly, the existing simulation model was set-up in way that it uses hyper-distributions describing diseases risk of the three lameness causing diseases. By combining information on herd level risk factors with prevalence of lameness or prevalence of underlying diseases among cows, marginal posterior probability distributions for disease prevalence in the specific herd are created in a Bayesian network. Random draws from these distributions are used by the simulation model to describe disease risk. Hereby field data on prevalence is used systematically and uncertainty around herd specific risk is represented. Besides the fact that estimated profitability of halving disease risk depended on the hyper-distributions used, the estimates differed for herds with different levels of diseases risk and reproductive efficiency. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. First report of laurel wilt disease caused by Raffaelea lauricola on pondspice in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Hughes; J.A. Smith; A.E. Mayfield III; M.C. Minno; K. Shin

    2011-01-01

    Laurel wilt is a fungal vascular disease of redbay (Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng) and other plants in the family Lauraceae in the southeastern United States (1). The disease is caused by Raffaelea lauricola T. C. Harr., Fraedrich & Aghayeva, which is vectored by the exotic redbay ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus...

  4. Apple Replant Disease: Role of microbial ecology in cause and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Apple replant disease (ARD) has been reported from all major fruit-growing regions of the world, and is often caused by a consortium of biological agents. Development of non-fumigant alternatives for the control of this disease has been hindered by the absence of consensus concerning the etiology...

  5. First report of mango malformation disease caused by Fusarium pseudocircinatum in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) malformation disease (MMD) is one of the most important diseases affecting this crop worldwide, causing severe economic loss due to reduction of yield. Subsequent to the first report in India in 1891 (3), MMD has spread worldwide to most mango-growing regions. Several spe...

  6. Milk and dairy consumption and risk of cardiovascular diseases and all-cause mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Jing; Astrup, Arne; Lovegrove, Julie A.; Gijsbers, Lieke; Givens, David I.; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S.

    2017-01-01

    With a growing number of prospective cohort studies, an updated dose–response meta-analysis of milk and dairy products with all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease (CHD) or cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been conducted. PubMed, Embase and Scopus were searched for articles published up to

  7. Annual all-cause mortality rate for patients with diabetic kidney disease in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Gary Ang

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Our study estimated the annual all-cause mortality rate for Singaporean patients with diabetic kidney disease by CKD stages and identified predictors of all-cause mortality. This study has affirmed the poor prognosis of these patients and an urgency to intervene early so as to retard the progression to later stages of CKD.

  8. 31P-MR-spectroscopy of the skeletal muscles under load: demonstration of normal energy metabolism compared to different neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, W.; Traeber, F.; Kuhl, C.K.; Keller, E.; Rink, H.; Schild, H.H.; Karitzky, J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: 31 P-MR spectroscopy of skeletal muscle under ecercise was used to obtain the range of normal variation and comparison was made for different neuromascular diseases. Methods: 41 examinations of 24 volunteers and 41 investigations in 35 patients were performed on 1.5 T MR systems (Gyroscan S15 und S15/ACSII, Philips). Localised 31 P-MR spectra of the calf muscle were obtained in time series with a resolution of 12 s. Results: Two types of muscle energy metabolism were identified from the pattern of spectroscopic time course in volunteers: While the first group was characterised by a remarkable decline to lower pH values during exercise, the second group showed only small pH shifts (minimum pH: 6.48±0.13 vs 6.87±0.07, p -6 ) although comparable workload conditions were maintained. The pH-values correlated well with blood lactate analysis. Patients with metabolic disorders and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) showed decreased resting values of PCr/(PCr+P i ) and increased pH levels during exercise. PCr recovery was significantly delayed (0.31 vs 0.65 min -1 , p i ), altered pH time courses, and decreased PCr recovery seem to be helpful indicators for diagnosis of metabolic muscle disorders. (orig./MG) [de

  9. A rare cause of hematemesis in newborn: fibrocystic breast disease of mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Hatice Tatar; Eras, Zeynep; Erdeve, Omer; Dilmen, Ugur

    2013-08-01

    Hematemesis in a healthy newborn is most often caused by swallowed maternal blood. Maternal blood due to fibrocystic breast disease in human milk has not previously been reported in the literature. We report here a newborn case with hematemesis in which the mother had fibrocystic breast disease, and we want to emphasize this rare entity. Physicians should be aware of this rare condition, and fibrocystic breast disease of the mother should be included in the differential diagnosis of newborns with hematemesis.

  10. Evaluation of sugarcane introgression lines for resistance to brown rust disease caused by Puccinia melanocephala

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Wen-Feng, Li; Ying-Kun, Huang; Xin, Lu; Zhi-Ming, Luo; Jiong, Yin; Hong-Li, Shan; Rong-Yue, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Sugarcane brown rust disease caused by Puccinia melanocephala is one of the important fungal diseases affecting sugarcane yield around the world. Cultivar resistance is the most appropriate control method for this disease. In this study, 62 introgression lines chosen from the crossing Saccharum officinarum L. cv. Ludashi x Erianthus rockii Yunnan 95-19 were evaluated for brown rust resistance using artificial inoculation. More than 30% of the introgression lines were identified as resistant. ...

  11. Learning disabilities in neuromuscular disorders: a springboard for adult life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrea, Guja; Battini, Roberta; Lenzi, Sara; Frosini, Silvia; Bonetti, Silvia; Moretti, Elena; Perazza, Silvia; Santorelli, Filippo M; Pecini, Chiara

    2016-10-01

    Although the presence of cognitive deficits in Duchenne muscular dystrophy or myotonic dystrophy DM1 is well established in view of brain-specific expression of affected muscle proteins, in other neuromuscular disorders, such as congenital myopathies and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies, cognitive profiles are poorly defined. Also, there are limited characterization of the cognitive profile of children with congenital muscular dystrophies, notwithstanding the presence of cerebral abnormality in some forms, and in spinal muscular atrophies, with the exception of distal spinal muscular atrophy (such as the DYN1CH1- associated form). Starting from the Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which may be considered a kind of paradigm for the co-occurrence of learning disabilities in the contest of a progressive muscular involvement, the findings of neuropsychological (or cognitive) dysfunctions in several forms of neuromuscular diseases will be examined and reviewed.

  12. Novel missense mutations in PNPLA2 causing late onset and clinical heterogeneity of neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy in three siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaglia, Sara; Tasca, Elisabetta; Angelini, Corrado; Moro, Laura; Tavian, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy (NLSD-M) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by an abnormal accumulation of triacylglycerol into cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs). NLSD-M patients are mainly affected by progressive myopathy, cardiomyopathy and hepatomegaly. Mutations in the PNPLA2 gene cause variable phenotypes of NLSD-M. PNPLA2 codes for adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), an enzyme that hydrolyses fatty acids from triacylglycerol. This report outlines the clinical and genetic findings in a NLSD-M Italian family with three affected members. In our patients, we identified two novel PNPLA2 missense mutations (p.L56R and p.I193F). Functional data analysis demonstrated that these mutations caused the production of ATGL proteins able to bind to LDs, but with decreased lipase activity. The oldest brother, at the age of 38, had weakness and atrophy of the right upper arm and kyphosis. Now he is 61 years old and is unable to raise arms in the horizontal position. The second brother, from the age of 44, had exercise intolerance, cramps and pain in lower limbs. He is currently 50 years old and has an asymmetric distal amyotrophy. One of the two sisters, 58 years old, presents the same PNPLA2 mutations, but she is still oligo-symptomatic on neuromuscular examination with slight triceps muscle involvement. She suffered from diabetes and liver steatosis. This NLSD-M family shows a wide range of intra-familial phenotypic variability in subjects carrying the same mutations, both in terms of target-organs and in terms of rate of disease progression. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Addison's Disease Caused by Tuberculosis with Atypical Hyperpigmentation and Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikawa, Hiroki; Takemoto, Yasuhiko; Kainuma, Shigeto; Umeda, Sakurako; Makuuchi, Ayako; Fukumoto, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Masanori; Kinuhata, Shigeki; Isaka, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Kamata, Noriko; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Hiura, Yoshikazu; Morimura, Mina; Shuto, Taichi

    2017-01-01

    We herein report a case of Addison's disease caused by tuberculosis characterized by atypical hyperpigmentation, noted as exacerbation of the pigmentation of freckles and the occurrence of new freckles, that was diagnosed in the presence of active pulmonary tuberculosis. The clinical condition of the patient was markedly ameliorated by the administration of hydrocortisone and anti-tuberculosis agents. When exacerbation of the pigmentation of the freckles and/or the occurrence of new freckles are noted, Addison's disease should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis. In addition, the presence of active tuberculosis needs to be assumed whenever we treat patients with Addison's disease caused by tuberculosis, despite its rarity.

  14. Mood and anxiety disorders in women with treated hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy caused by Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunevicius, Robertas; Velickiene, Dzilda; Prange, Arthur J

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in women with treated hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease and to compare them with the prevalence of such findings in women without past or present thyroid disease. Thirty inpatient women with treated hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy caused by Graves' disease and 45 women hospitalized for treatment of gynecologic disorders such as abnormal vaginal bleeding, benign tumors or infertility were evaluated for the prevalence of mood and anxiety diagnoses using a standard Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and for mood and anxiety ratings using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). At the time of assessment, it was discovered that 14 of 30 women with treated hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease were still hyperthyroid, while 16 women were euthyroid. Significantly greater prevalence of social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, major depression and total mood and anxiety disorders, as well as higher symptom scores on the POMS, was found in hyperthyroid women with Graves' disease in comparison with the control group. A prevalence of total anxiety disorder, as well as history of mania or hypomania and lifetime bipolar disorder, but not lifetime unipolar depression, was more frequent in both the euthyroid and the hyperthyroid subgroups of study women in comparison with the control group. These results confirm a high prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in women with treated hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy caused by Graves' disease. Hyperthyroidism plays a major role in psychiatric morbidity in Graves' disease.

  15. KMeyeDB: a graphical database of mutations in genes that cause eye diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Takashi; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Mitsuyama, Susumu; Ohno-Nakamura, Saho; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Minoshima, Shinsei

    2010-06-01

    KMeyeDB (http://mutview.dmb.med.keio.ac.jp/) is a database of human gene mutations that cause eye diseases. We have substantially enriched the amount of data in the database, which now contains information about the mutations of 167 human genes causing eye-related diseases including retinitis pigmentosa, cone-rod dystrophy, night blindness, Oguchi disease, Stargardt disease, macular degeneration, Leber congenital amaurosis, corneal dystrophy, cataract, glaucoma, retinoblastoma, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, and Usher syndrome. KMeyeDB is operated using the database software MutationView, which deals with various characters of mutations, gene structure, protein functional domains, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers, as well as clinical data for each case. Users can access the database using an ordinary Internet browser with smooth user-interface, without user registration. The results are displayed on the graphical windows together with statistical calculations. All mutations and associated data have been collected from published articles. Careful data analysis with KMeyeDB revealed many interesting features regarding the mutations in 167 genes that cause 326 different types of eye diseases. Some genes are involved in multiple types of eye diseases, whereas several eye diseases are caused by different mutations in one gene.

  16. Screening for late-onset Pompe disease in western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Julie Schjødtz; Pedersen, E G; Gaist, D

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD) is a rare autosomal recessively inherited metabolic myopathy caused by reduced activity of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-glucosidase. In a previous screening study at two large neuromuscular university clinics in Denmark, three patients with LOPD were...

  17. [Disease burden caused by violence in the Chinese population, in 1990 and 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L; Gao, X; Jin, Y; Ye, P P; Er, Y L; Deng, X; Wang, Y; Duan, L L

    2017-10-10

    Objective: To analyze the disease burden of violence in the Chinese population, in 1990 and 2013. Methods: Indicators including mortality rate, years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLL), years lived with disability (YLD), and disability-adjusted of life years (DALY) related to violence, were extracted from the Global Burden of Disease 2013 and used to describe the burden of disease caused by violence in the Chinese population. Data related to corresponding parameters on disease burden of violence in 1990 and 2013 were described. Results: In 2013, a total of 20 500 people died of violent events, with the death rate as 1.44 per 100 000, in China. DALY caused by violence was 1.08 million person years in 2013. DALY caused by sharp violence was 0.47 million person years, with 0.09 million person years lost due to firearm violence. Disease burden caused by violence appeared higher in males than in females. When comparing with data from the 1990s, reductions were seen by 67.35 % on the standardized death rate of violence, by 68.07 % on the DALY attributable to violence, and by 70.47 % on the standardized DALY rate attributable to violence, respectively, in 2013. Disease burden of violence among young adults and elderly was among the highest. When comparing with data from the 1990, DALY in 2013 decreased among all the age groups except for the 70-year-old showed an increase of 9.36 % . The standardized DALY rate in 2013 showed a declining trend in all the age groups, mostly in the 0-4-year-old group. The standardized DALY rates caused by sharp violence or firearm decreased by75.11 % and 83.20 % in the 0-4-year-old group. Conclusion: In recent years, the disease burden caused by violence showed a decreasing trend but appeared higher in males however with the increase of DALY in the elder population.

  18. Diseases of comfort: primary cause of death in the 22nd century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bernard C K; Hunter, David J; Tsou, Walter; Sainsbury, Peter

    2005-12-01

    The world has started to feel the impact of a global chronic disease epidemic, which is putting pressure on our health care systems. If uncurbed, a new generation of "diseases of comfort" (such as those chronic diseases caused by obesity and physical inactivity) will become a major public health problem in this and the next century. To describe the concept, causes, and prevention and control strategies of diseases of comfort. Brokered by a senior research scientist specialised in knowledge translation, a chair, a president, and a past president of national public health associations contributed their views on the subject. Diseases of comfort have emerged as a price of living in a modern society. It is inevitable that these diseases will become more common and more disabling if human "progress" and civilisation continue toward better (more comfortable) living, without necessarily considering their effects on health. Modern technology must be combined with education, legislation, intersectoral action, and community involvement to create built and social environments that encourage, and make easy, walking, physical activity, and nutritious food choices, to reduce the health damaging effects of modern society for all citizens and not only the few. Public health needs to be more passionate about the health issues caused by human progress and adopt a health promotion stance, challenging the assumptions behind the notion of social "progress" that is giving rise to the burden of chronic disease and developing the skills to create more health promoting societies in which individual health thrives.

  19. Fatty replacement of lower paraspinal muscles: normal and neuromuscular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hader, H.; Gadoth, N.; Heifetz, H.

    1983-01-01

    The physiologic replacement of the lower paraspinal muscles by fat was evaluated in 157 patients undergoing computed tomography for reasons unrelated to abnormalities of the locomotor system. Five patients with neuromuscular disorders were similarly evaluated. The changes were graded according to severity at three spinal levels: lower thoracic-upper lumbar, midlumbar, and lumbosacral. The results were analyzed in relation to age and gender. It was found that fatty replacement of paraspinal muscles is a normal age-progressive phenomenon most prominent in females. It progresses down the spine, being most advanced in the lumbosacral region. The severest changes in the five patients with neuromuscular disorders (three with poliomyelitis and two with progressive muscular dystrophy) consisted of complete muscle group replacement by fat. In postpoliomyelitis atrophy, the distribution was typically asymmetric and sometimes lacked clinical correlation. In muscular dystrophy, fatty replacement was symmetric, showing relative sparing of the psoas and multifidus muscles. In patients with neuromuscular diseases, computed tomography of muscles may be helpful in planning a better rehabilitation regimen

  20. Fatty replacement of lower paraspinal muscles: normal and neuromuscular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hader, H.; Gadoth, N.; Heifetz, H.

    1983-11-01

    The physiologic replacement of the lower paraspinal muscles by fat was evaluated in 157 patients undergoing computed tomography for reasons unrelated to abnormalities of the locomotor system. Five patients with neuromuscular disorders were similarly evaluated. The changes were graded according to severity at three spinal levels: lower thoracic-upper lumbar, midlumbar, and lumbosacral. The results were analyzed in relation to age and gender. It was found that fatty replacement of paraspinal muscles is a normal age-progressive phenomenon most prominent in females. It progresses down the spine, being most advanced in the lumbosacral region. The severest changes in the five patients with neuromuscular disorders (three with poliomyelitis and two with progressive muscular dystrophy) consisted of complete muscle group replacement by fat. In postpoliomyelitis atrophy, the distribution was typically asymmetric and sometimes lacked clinical correlation. In muscular dystrophy, fatty replacement was symmetric, showing relative sparing of the psoas and multifidus muscles. In patients with neuromuscular diseases, computed tomography of muscles may be helpful in planning a better rehabilitation regimen.

  1. Bilateral neuromuscular and force differences during a plyometric task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Nick B; Scurr, Joanna C

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare the bilateral neuromuscular and force contribution during a plyometric bounce drop jump task and to assess the affects of nonsimultaneous foot placement. Sixteen male participants performed bounce drop jumps from a height of 0.4 m. Mean peak electromyography activity of the soleus, medial, and lateral gastrocnemius of both legs was recorded from each phase of the drop jump and normalized to a reference dynamic muscle action. Resultant ground reaction force, ground contact time, and duration of the drop jumps were recorded from each leg. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to compare bilateral electromyographic activity, resultant peak ground reaction force, and contact duration. Pearson's correlations (r) ascertained relationships between normalized electromyographic activity and contact time. Significant differences were shown between left and right triceps surae normalized electromyography during precontact and contact40ms (p 0.01). Significant differences were found between normalized soleus electromyography and both gastrocnemii for both legs during precontact (p 0.01). Weak relationships were found between normalized electromyographic activity and nonsimultaneous foot contact (r < 0.2). This study showed differences between left and right triceps surae in neuromuscular strategies engaged in the early stages of a drop jump task. Differences in contact time initiation were present; however, they are not significant enough to cause neuromuscular differences in the plantar flexor muscles.

  2. Pregnancy and Childbirth with Neuromuscular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... better not teach,’” Wiparina said. She got a job in marketing instead. Wiparina married her college sweetheart, a tire store man- ager, ... pregnancy. • It should not be prescribed to pregnant women with myasthenia ... pressure and fluid retention (pre-eclampsia) or the convulsions or coma that ...

  3. Elevated C-reactive protein, depression, somatic diseases, and all-cause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Orsted, David Dynnes; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated levels of plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) have been associated with many diseases including depression, but it remains unclear whether this association is causal. We tested the hypothesis that CRP is causally associated with depression, and compared these results to those...... for cancer, ischemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and all-cause mortality. METHODS: We performed prospective and instrumental variable analyses using plasma CRP levels and four CRP genotypes on 78,809 randomly selected 20- to 100-year-old men and women from the Danish general...... population. End points included hospitalization or death with depression and somatic diseases, prescription antidepressant medication use, and all-cause mortality. RESULTS: A doubling in plasma CRP yielded an observed odds ratio (OR) of 1.28 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23-1.33) for hospitalization...

  4. Taxonomy of Fungi Causing Mucormycosis and Entomophthoramycosis (Zygomycosis) and Nomenclature of the Disease: Molecular Mycologic Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis confirmed the phylum Zygomycota to be polyphyletic, and the taxa conventionally classified in Zygomycota are now distributed among the new phylum Glomeromycota and 4 subphyla incertae sedis (uncertain placement). Because the nomenclature of the disease zygomycosis was based on the phylum Zygomycota (Zygomycetes) in which the etiologic agents had been classified, the new classification profoundly affects the name of the disease. Zygomycosis was originally described as a convenient and inclusive name for 2 clinicopathologically different diseases, mucormycosis caused by members of Mucorales and entomophthoramycosis caused by species in the order Entomophthorales of Zygomycota. Without revision of original definition, the name “zygomycosis,” however, has more often been used as a synonym only for mucormycosis. This article reviews the progress and changes in taxonomy and nomenclature of Zygomycota and the disease zygomycosis. The article also reiterates the reasons why the classic names “mucormycosis” and “entomophthoramycosis” are more appropriate than “zygomycosis.” PMID:22247451

  5. Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Left Ventricular Cardiomyopathy: Is it the Result or Cause of Disease Progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adusumalli, Srinath; Mazurek, Jeremy A

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to define pulmonary hypertension in the setting of left heart disease (PH-LHD), discuss its epidemiology and pathophysiology, and highlight the cause and effect relationship it has with disease progression in the setting of cardiomyopathy. Both pulmonary hypertension (PH) and heart failure are becoming increasingly common. As such, PH-LHD is now the most common form of PH. The pathophysiology of the condition relates to backward transmission of elevated left ventricular filling pressures into the pulmonary circulation and, ultimately, right ventricular (RV) strain/dysfunction. It is evident that these pathophysiologic processes are both the effect and cause of left heart disease progression. In this review, we describe the complex relationship between disease progression in left ventricular cardiomyopathy and PH-LHD. Clinicians and researchers should take note of the importance of PH-LHD and RV dysfunction to appropriately risk stratify patients and develop therapies for the condition.

  6. Disease patterns and causes of death of hospitalized HIV-positive adults in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewden, Charlotte; Drabo, Youssoufou J; Zannou, Djimon M

    2014-01-01

    %) and cerebral toxoplasmosis (10%). Overall, 315 (38%) patients died during hospitalization and the underlying cause of death was AIDS (63%), non-AIDS-defining infections (26%), other diseases (7%) and non-specific illness or unknown cause (4%). Among them, the most frequent fatal diseases were: tuberculosis (36......%), cerebral toxoplasmosis (10%), cryptococcosis (9%) and sepsis (7%). Older age, clinical WHO stage 3 and 4, low CD4 count, and AIDS-defining infectious diagnoses were associated with hospital fatality. CONCLUSIONS: AIDS-defining conditions, primarily tuberculosis, and bacterial infections were the most...

  7. Integrated sequence analysis pipeline provides one-stop solution for identifying disease-causing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Wienker, Thomas F; Musante, Luciana; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Kahrizi, Kimia; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, H Hilger

    2014-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing has greatly accelerated the search for disease-causing defects, but even for experts the data analysis can be a major challenge. To facilitate the data processing in a clinical setting, we have developed a novel medical resequencing analysis pipeline (MERAP). MERAP assesses the quality of sequencing, and has optimized capacity for calling variants, including single-nucleotide variants, insertions and deletions, copy-number variation, and other structural variants. MERAP identifies polymorphic and known causal variants by filtering against public domain databases, and flags nonsynonymous and splice-site changes. MERAP uses a logistic model to estimate the causal likelihood of a given missense variant. MERAP considers the relevant information such as phenotype and interaction with known disease-causing genes. MERAP compares favorably with GATK, one of the widely used tools, because of its higher sensitivity for detecting indels, its easy installation, and its economical use of computational resources. Upon testing more than 1,200 individuals with mutations in known and novel disease genes, MERAP proved highly reliable, as illustrated here for five families with disease-causing variants. We believe that the clinical implementation of MERAP will expedite the diagnostic process of many disease-causing defects. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  8. Deep Neuromuscular Blockade Improves Laparoscopic Surgical Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Herring, W Joseph; Blobner, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sustained deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) during laparoscopic surgery may facilitate optimal surgical conditions. This exploratory study assessed whether deep NMB improves surgical conditions and, in doing so, allows use of lower insufflation pressures during laparoscopic cholecys...

  9. The Disease Caused by Zika Virus: Current Clinical and Epidemiological Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.K. Duda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the topical issue of today — the disease caused by Zika virus. The etiology and pathogenesis of the disease were described, attention is paid to the examination of a patient with suspected Zika virus. Laboratory tests available in the Synevo laboratory are listed. Recommendations for the treatment are given taking into account the fact that today the causal antiviral treatment is not developed.

  10. Pain trajectory and exercise-induced pain flares during 8 weeks of neuromuscular exercise in individuals with knee and hip pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, L F; Roos, E M; Bøgesvang, S J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients considering or engaged in exercise as treatment may expect or experience transient increases in joint pain, causing fear of exercise and influencing compliance. This study investigated the pain trajectory during an 8-week neuromuscular exercise (NEMEX) program together with ac...... to educate and balance patient expectation when starting supervised neuromuscular exercise....

  11. Echinococcal disease of the bone: An unusual cause of a pathological fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Goodier

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is caused by the larva of the tapeworm, Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multiloccularis and is endemic in many rural areas of Southern Africa. Echinococcosis of the bone is an unusual manifestation of echinococcal disease and a rare cause of a lytic lesion of bone. This report describes a 30-yr old female who presented with an Echinococcal cyst of the right radius complicated by a pathological fracture.

  12. Neuromuscular control of prey capture in frogs.

    OpenAIRE

    Nishikawa, K C

    1999-01-01

    While retaining a feeding apparatus that is surprisingly conservative morphologically, frogs as a group exhibit great variability in the biomechanics of tongue protraction during prey capture, which in turn is related to differences in neuromuscular control. In this paper, I address the following three questions. (1) How do frog tongues differ biomechanically? (2) What anatomical and physiological differences are responsible? (3) How is biomechanics related to mechanisms of neuromuscular cont...

  13. Myocardial performance and perfusion during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease caused by Kawasaki disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paridon, S.M.; Ross, R.D.; Kuhns, L.R.; Pinsky, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    For a study of the natural history of coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease and their effect on myocardial blood flow reserve with exercise, five such patients underwent exercise testing on a bicycle. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute ventilation, and electrocardiograms were monitored continuously. Thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed for all patients. One patient stopped exercise before exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve but had no evidence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities. Four patients terminated exercise because of exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve; one had normal cardiovascular reserve and thallium scintiscans, but the remaining patients had diminished cardiovascular reserve. Thallium scintigrams showed myocardial ischemia in two and infarction in one. No patient had exercise-induced electrocardiographic changes. These results indicate that patients with residual coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease frequently have reduced cardiovascular reserve during exercise. The addition of thallium scintigraphy and metabolic measurements to exercise testing improved the detection of exercise-induced abnormalities of myocardial perfusion

  14. Neuromuscular blockade in the elderly patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee LA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Luis A Lee, Vassilis Athanassoglou, Jaideep J Pandit Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK Abstract: Neuromuscular blockade is a desirable or even essential component of general anesthesia for major surgical operations. As the population continues to age, and more operations are conducted in the elderly, due consideration must be given to neuromuscular blockade in these patients to avoid possible complications. This review considers the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of neuromuscular blockade that may be altered in the elderly. Compartment distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs may vary due to age-related changes in physiology, altering the duration of action with a need for reduced dosage (eg, aminosteroids. Other drugs (atracurium, cisatracurium have more reliable duration of action and should perhaps be considered for use in the elderly. The range of interpatient variability that neuromuscular blocking drugs may exhibit is then considered and drugs with a narrower range, such as cisatracurium, may produce more predictable, and inherently safer, outcomes. Ultimately, appropriate neuromuscular monitoring should be used to guide the administration of muscle relaxants so that the risk of residual neuromuscular blockade postoperatively can be minimized. The reliability of various monitoring is considered. This paper concludes with a review of the various reversal agents, namely, anticholinesterase drugs and sugammadex, and the alterations in dosing of these that should be considered for the elderly patient. Keywords: anesthesia, elderly, drugs, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics 

  15. First Report of Oryctes rhinoceros nudivirus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Causing Severe Disease in Allomyrina dichotoma in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seokhyun; Park, Kwan-Ho; Nam, Sung-Hee; Kwak, Kyu-Won; Choi, Ji-Young

    2015-01-01

    Oryctes rhinoceros nudivirus (OrNV) has been known to cause severe disease in coconut palm rhinoceros beetle, Oryctes rhinoceros, in Southeastern Asia and is used as a biological control to reduce the pest population. Here, we report for the first time that the OrNV may have landed on Korea and may be the major pathogen for diseased larvae of Korean horn beetle, Allomyrina dichotoma. After peroral inoculation, over 60% of infected larvae perished in 6?wk. This viral disease spreads very fast ...

  16. [Anaemia as a cause of haemodynamic angina in a patient with chronic ischaemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguéns Blanco, I; Bravo Amaro, M

    2014-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity and one of the primary causes of morbidity in Spain. The variability in the clinical presentation of this condition at both primary care and emergency services level requires a careful history and a thorough physical examination. In the case presented, the main symptoms of angina and dyspnea reported in the anamnesis, and the obvious pallor in the physical examination, were the key data to identify anaemia as a cause of angina. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Lost life years due to premature mortality caused by diseases of the respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniecka-Bryła, Irena; Paciej-Gołębiowska, Paulina; Dziankowska-Zaborszczyk, Elżbieta; Bryła, Marek

    2018-06-04

    In Poland, as in most other European countries, diseases of the respiratory system are the 4th leading cause of mortality; they are responsible for about 8% of all deaths in the European Union (EU) annually. To assess the socio-economic aspects of mortality, it has become increasingly common to apply potential measures rather than conventionally used ratios. The aim of this study was to analyze years of life lost due to premature deaths caused by diseases of the respiratory system in Poland from 1999 to 2013. The study was based on a dataset of 5,606,516 records, obtained from the death certificates of Polish residents who died between 1999 and 2013. The information on deaths caused by diseases of the respiratory system, i.e., coded as J00-J99 according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th revision (ICD-10), was analyzed. The Standard Expected Years of Life Lost (SEYLL) indicator was used in the study. In the years 1999-2013, the Polish population suffered 280,519 deaths caused by diseases of the respiratory system (4.69% of all deaths). In the period analyzed, a gradual decrease in the standardized death rate was observed - from 46.31 per 100,000 inhabitants in 1999 to 41.02 in 2013. The dominant causes of death were influenza and pneumonia (J09-J18) and chronic lower respiratory diseases (J40-J47). Diseases of the respiratory system were the cause of 4,474,548.92 lost life years. The Standard Expected Years of Life Lost per person (SEYLLp) was 104.72 per 10,000 males and 52.85 per 10,000 females. The Standard Expected Years of Life Lost per death (SEYLLd) for people who died due to diseases of the respiratory system was 17.54 years of life on average for men and 13.65 years on average for women. The use of the SEYLL indicator provided significant information on premature mortality due to diseases of the respiratory system, indicating the fact that they play a large role in the health status of the Polish

  18. Complete staghorn calculus in polycystic kidney disease: infection is still the cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiguo; Xu, Jing; Ye, Chaoyang; Chen, Dongping; Mei, Changlin

    2013-08-01

    Kidney stones in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease are common, regarded as the consequence of the combination of anatomic abnormality and metabolic risk factors. However, complete staghorn calculus is rare in polycystic kidney disease and predicts a gloomy prognosis of kidney. For general population, recent data showed metabolic factors were the dominant causes for staghorn calculus, but for polycystic kidney disease patients, the cause for staghorn calculus remained elusive. We report a case of complete staghorm calculus in a polycystic kidney disease patient induced by repeatedly urinary tract infections. This 37-year-old autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease female with positive family history was admitted in this hospital for repeatedly upper urinary tract infection for 3 years. CT scan revealed the existence of a complete staghorn calculus in her right kidney, while there was no kidney stone 3 years before, and the urinary stone component analysis showed the composition of calculus was magnesium ammonium phosphate. UTI is an important complication for polycystic kidney disease and will facilitate the formation of staghorn calculi. As staghorn calculi are associated with kidney fibrosis and high long-term renal deterioration rate, prompt control of urinary tract infection in polycystic kidney disease patient will be beneficial in preventing staghorn calculus formation.

  19. A novel sponge disease caused by a consortium of micro-organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Michael; Bulling, Mark; Cerrano, Carlo

    2015-09-01

    In healthy sponges, microbes have been shown to account for up to 40 % of tissues. The majority of these are thought to originate from survivors evading digestion and immune responses of the sponge and growing and residing in the microenvironments of the mesophyll. Although a large percentage of these microbes are likely commensals, they may also include potentially pathogenic agents, which under specific conditions, such as temperature stress, may cause disease. Here we report a novel disease (sponge necrosis syndrome) that is severely affecting populations of the sponge Callyspongia ( Euplacella) aff biru. Both ITS fungal and 16S rDNA bacterial diversities were assessed in healthy and diseased individuals, highlighting six potential primary causal agents for this new disease: two bacteria, a Rhodobacteraceae sp. and a cyanobacterium, Hormoscilla spongeliae (formally identified as Oscillatoria spongeliae), and four fungi, a Ascomycota sp., a Pleosporales sp., a Rhabdocline sp., and a Clasosporium sp. Furthermore, histological analysis showed the dominance of fungal hyphae rather than bacteria throughout the disease lesion, which was absent or rare in healthy tissues. Inoculation trails showed that only a combination of one bacterium and one fungus could replicate the disease, fulfilling Henle-Koch's postulates and showing that this sponge disease is caused by a poly-microbial consortium.

  20. Stem cell route to neuromuscular therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Terence A

    2003-02-01

    As applied to skeletal muscle, stem cell therapy is a reincarnation of myoblast transfer therapy that has resulted from recent advances in the cell biology of skeletal muscle. Both strategies envisage the reconstruction of damaged muscle from its precursors, but stem cell therapy employs precursors that are earlier in the developmental hierarchy. It is founded on demonstrations of apparently multipotential cells in a wide variety of tissues that can assume, among others, a myogenic phenotype. The main demonstrated advantage of such cells is that they are capable of colonizing many tissues, including skeletal and cardiac muscle via the blood vascular system, thereby providing the potential for a body-wide distribution of myogenic progenitors. From a practical viewpoint, the chief disadvantage is that such colonization has been many orders of magnitude too inefficient to be useful. Proposals for overcoming this drawback are the subject of much speculation but, so far, relatively little experimentation. This review attempts to give some perspective to the status of the stem cell as a therapeutic instrument for neuromuscular disease and to identify issues that need to be addressed for application of this technology.

  1. Global, Regional, and National Burden of Cardiovascular Diseases for 10 Causes, 1990 to 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roth, Gregory A; Johnson, Catherine; Abajobir, Amanuel

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The burden of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) remains unclear in many regions of the world. OBJECTIVES: The GBD (Global Burden of Disease) 2015 study integrated data on disease incidence, prevalence, and mortality to produce consistent, up-to-date estimates for cardiovascular burden......-income countries. Ischemic heart disease was the leading cause of CVD health lost globally, as well as in each world region, followed by stroke. As SDI increased beyond 0.25, the highest CVD mortality shifted from women to men. CVD mortality decreased sharply for both sexes in countries with an SDI >0...... be used to guide policymakers who are focused on reducing the overall burden of noncommunicable disease and achieving specific global health targets for CVD....

  2. [Moyamoya disease as a rare cause of ischaemic stroke--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kułakowska, Alina; Kapica-Topczewska, Katarzyna; Borowik, Helena; Drozdowski, Wiesław

    2009-10-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare, progressive disease of the vessels diagnosed according to characteristic abnormalities of brain arteries in the angiography. The incidence of moyamoya disease in Europe is lower than in Asia and its clinical course in European population is probably different from Asiatic (older age of onset and rare incidence of hemorrhagic strokes). Two young patients were diagnosed as moyamoya disease on the basis of clinical symptoms (ischaemic stroke) and results of brain vessels' angiography, which documented an occlusion of both internal carotid arteries above branching-off the ocular arteries in the first patient and stenosis of distal internal carotid arteries and proximal medial and anterior cerebral arteries in the second one. Both patients are under control of the Neurological Outpatient Department and their neurological state is stable. Despite that moyamoya disease is a rare cause of ischaemic stroke, it should be always considered as one of etiologic factors, especially in young patients.

  3. Celiac disease causing severe osteomalacia: an association still present in Morocco!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, Latifa; Azzouzi, Hamida; Squalli, Ghita; Abourazzak, Fatimazahra; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a malabsorption syndrome caused by hypersensitivity to gliadin fraction of gluten. CD can manifest with classic symptoms; however, significant myopathy and multiple fractures are rarely the predominant presentation of untreated celiac disease. Osteomalacia complicating celiac disease had become more and more rare. We describe here a case of osteomalacia secondary to a longstanding untreated celiac disease. This patient complained about progressive bone and muscular pain, weakness, fractures and skeletal deformities. Radiological and laboratory findings were all in favor of severe osteomalacia. Improvement of patient's weakness and laboratory abnormalities was obvious after treatment with gluten free diet, vitamin D, calcium and iron. This case affirms that chronic untreated celiac disease, can lead to an important bone loss and irreversible complications like skeletal deformities.

  4. The suggestion of common cause of disease, characteristics of human body, and medical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Jun Cho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives & Methods: This suggestion was attempted to be elevated the recognition of common characteristics in disease. So, we performed to analyze the correlation of common cause of disease, characteristics of human body, and medical treatment. And the results are as follows. Results: 1. The cause of disease is consist of genetic factor, aging, habit, food of not good in health, weather, environment, deficit of the physical activity, stress and so on. 2. Generally, human has common and individual weakness. Individual weakness is appeared similar to the occurrence of volcano and lapse. 3. The correlation of disease and medical treatments is possible to explain using the quotation of the law of motion made by Isaac Newton, the great physicist. 4. When the process of the medical treatment was not progressed, the prognosis is determined by the correlation of the homeostasis(H' in human body and the homeostasis(H of disease. 5. The prognosis of disease is determined by the relationship between the energy of disease(F and medical treatment(F'. 6. The exact diagnosis is possible to predict the treatment sequence, and the facts that homeostasis in human body and disease, relationship between the energy of disease(F and medical treatment(F', action and reaction are important to determine the prognosis. 7. The careful observation of improving response and worsening action of disease becomes available for exact prognosis. Conclusion: The above described contents may be useful in clinical studies, and the concrete clinical reports about this will be made afterward.

  5. Features of 5'-splice-site efficiency derived from disease-causing mutations and comparative genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Xavier; Olson, Andrew J; Rao, Atmakuri R

    2008-01-01

    Many human diseases, including Fanconi anemia, hemophilia B, neurofibromatosis, and phenylketonuria, can be caused by 5'-splice-site (5'ss) mutations that are not predicted to disrupt splicing, according to position weight matrices. By using comparative genomics, we identify pairwise dependencies...

  6. S-phase-dependent cell cycle disturbances caused by Aleutian mink disease parvovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Alexandersen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    We examined replication of the autonomous parovirus Aleutian mink disease parovirus (ADV) in relation to cell cycle progression of permissive Crandell feline kidney (CRFK) cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that ADV caused a composite, binary pattern of cell cycle arrest. ADV-induced cell cyc...

  7. Influenza A (H10N7) Virus Causes Respiratory Tract Disease in Harbor Seals and Ferrets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brand, Judith M A; Wohlsein, Peter; Herfst, Sander; Bodewes, Rogier; Pfankuche, Vanessa M; van de Bildt, Marco W G; Seehusen, Frauke; Puff, Christina; Richard, Mathilde; Siebert, Ursula; Lehnert, Kristina; Bestebroer, Theo; Lexmond, Pascal; Fouchier, Ron A M; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Herbst, Werner; Koopmans, Marion; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses sporadically cross the species barrier to mammals, including humans, in which they may cause epidemic disease. Recently such an epidemic occurred due to the emergence of avian influenza virus of the subtype H10N7 (Seal/H10N7) in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina). This epidemic

  8. An emergent disease causes directional changes in forest species composition in coastal California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaret Metz; Kerri Frangioso; Allison Wickland; Ross Meentemeyer; David Rizzo

    2012-01-01

    Non-native forest pathogens can cause dramatic and long-lasting changes to the composition of forests, and these changes may have cascading impacts on community interactions and ecosystem functioning. Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of the emergent forest disease sudden oak death (SOD), has a wide host range, but mortality is concentrated in...

  9. Loss of stability and hydrophobicity of presenilin 1 mutations causing Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somavarapu, Arun Kumar; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 200 mutations in the gene coding for presenilin 1 (PSEN1) cause early-onset Alzheimer's Disease, yet the molecular mechanism remains obscure. As a meta-analysis, we compiled available clinical and biochemical data for PSEN1 variants and correlated these to chemical properties of the mutant...

  10. Chewing betel quid and the risk of metabolic disease, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tomohide; Hara, Kazuo; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Betel nut (Areca nut) is the fruit of the Areca catechu tree. Approximately 700 million individuals regularly chew betel nut (or betel quid) worldwide and it is a known risk factor for oral cancer and esophageal cancer. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the influence of chewing betel quid on metabolic diseases, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. We searched Medline, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Science Direct for pertinent articles (including the references) published between 1951 and 2013. The adjusted relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval were calculated using the random effect model. Sex was used as an independent category for comparison. Of 580 potentially relevant studies, 17 studies from Asia (5 cohort studies and 12 case-control studies) covering 388,134 subjects (range: 94 to 97,244) were selected. Seven studies (N = 121,585) showed significant dose-response relationships between betel quid consumption and the risk of events. According to pooled analysis, the adjusted RR of betel quid chewers vs. non-chewers was 1.47 (PBetel quid chewing is associated with an increased risk of metabolic disease, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. Thus, in addition to preventing oral cancer, stopping betel quid use could be a valuable public health measure for metabolic diseases that are showing a rapid increase in South-East Asia and the Western Pacific.

  11. Public funding for medical research in relation to the burden of disease caused by cardiovascular diseases and neoplasms in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krone, Manuel; Dufner, Vera; Wagner, Martin; Gelbrich, Götz; Ertl, Georg; Heuschmann, Peter U

    2018-04-13

    Public funding for medical research in Germany is primarily provided by the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). The aim of this study was to analyze the amount of national public funding for medical research on predominant causes of death in Germany, cardiovascular diseases and neoplasms, in relation to the burden of these diseases in Germany. Three evaluators categorized medical research projects funded by the DFG or BMBF between 2010 and 2012 into the categories "Diseases of the circulatory system" (with subgroups "Ischemic heart diseases", "Heart failure" and "Cerebrovascular diseases") and "Neoplasms". The total amount of public funding by the national agencies was analyzed in relation to the burden of disease for the respective disease condition. Information on national public funding for medical research of 2091 million euros was available; of those, 246.8 million euros (11.8%) were categorized being spent for research on "Neoplasms", 118.4 million euros (5.7%) for research on "Diseases of the circulatory system". This results in 362.08 euros per case of death, 16.58 euros per year of life lost (YLL) and 16.04 euros per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) for "Neoplasms" and in 113.44 euros per case of death, 8.05 euros per YLL and 7.17 euros per DALY for "Diseases of the circulatory system". In Germany, research on cardiovascular diseases receives a lower share of national public funding for medical research compared to oncological research. These results are comparable to other European countries.

  12. COMPOSITE PEPTIDE COMPOUNDS FOR DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF DISEASES CAUSED BY PRION PROTEINS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention relates to diseases caused by prion proteins, Novel composite peptide compounds are disclosed which comprise two or more peptides or peptide fragments optionally linked to a backbone and the peptides or peptide fragments are spatially positioned relative to each other so tha....... Other uses of the composite peptide compounds are also disclosed, such as use in diagnostic assays, production of antibodies and uses as vaccine immunogens for the prophylactic protection and therapeutic treatment of subjects against transmissible prion disease.......The present invention relates to diseases caused by prion proteins, Novel composite peptide compounds are disclosed which comprise two or more peptides or peptide fragments optionally linked to a backbone and the peptides or peptide fragments are spatially positioned relative to each other so...

  13. Kufs disease, the major adult form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, caused by mutations in CLN6.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Arsov, Todor

    2011-05-13

    The molecular basis of Kufs disease is unknown, whereas a series of genes accounting for most of the childhood-onset forms of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) have been identified. Diagnosis of Kufs disease is difficult because the characteristic lipopigment is largely confined to neurons and can require a brain biopsy or autopsy for final diagnosis. We mapped four families with Kufs disease for whom there was good evidence of autosomal-recessive inheritance and found two peaks on chromosome 15. Three of the families were affected by Kufs type A disease and presented with progressive myoclonus epilepsy, and one was affected by type B (presenting with dementia and motor system dysfunction). Sequencing of a candidate gene in one peak shared by all four families identified no mutations, but sequencing of CLN6, found in the second peak and shared by only the three families affected by Kufs type A disease, revealed pathogenic mutations in all three families. We subsequently sequenced CLN6 in eight other families, three of which were affected by recessive Kufs type A disease. Mutations in both CLN6 alleles were found in the three type A cases and in one family affected by unclassified Kufs disease. Mutations in CLN6 are the major cause of recessive Kufs type A disease. The phenotypic differences between variant late-infantile NCL, previously found to be caused by CLN6, and Kufs type A disease are striking; there is a much later age at onset and lack of visual involvement in the latter. Sequencing of CLN6 will provide a simple diagnostic strategy in this disorder, in which definitive identification usually requires invasive biopsy.

  14. Intercontinental spread of a genetically distinctive complex of clones of Neisseria meningitidis causing epidemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caugant, D A; Frøholm, L O; Bøvre, K; Holten, E; Frasch, C E; Mocca, L F; Zollinger, W D; Selander, R K

    1986-07-01

    Strains of Neisseria meningitidis responsible for an epidemic of meningococcal disease occurring in Norway since the mid-1970s and for recent increases in the incidence of disease in several other parts of Europe have been identified by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis as members of a distinctive group of 22 closely related clones (the ET-5 complex). Clones of this complex have also colonized South Africa, Chile, Cuba, and Florida, where they have been identified as the causative agents of recent outbreaks of meningococcal disease. There is strong circumstantial evidence that outbreaks of disease occurring in Miami in 1981 and 1982 were caused in large part by bacteria that reached Florida via human immigrants from Cuba.

  15. Traffic air pollution and mortality from cardiovascular disease and all causes: a Danish cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Jensen, Steen Solvang; Ketzel, Matthias; Sørensen, Mette; Hansen, Johnni; Loft, Steffen; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim

    2012-09-05

    Traffic air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular mortality, which might be due to co-exposure to road traffic noise. Further, personal and lifestyle characteristics might modify any association. We followed up 52 061 participants in a Danish cohort for mortality in the nationwide Register of Causes of Death, from enrollment in 1993-1997 through 2009, and traced their residential addresses from 1971 onwards in the Central Population Registry. We used dispersion-modelled concentration of nitrogen dioxide (NO₂) since 1971 as indicator of traffic air pollution and used Cox regression models to estimate mortality rate ratios (MRRs) with adjustment for potential confounders. Mean levels of NO₂ at the residence since 1971 were significantly associated with mortality from cardiovascular disease (MRR, 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-1.51, per doubling of NO₂ concentration) and all causes (MRR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.04-1.23, per doubling of NO₂ concentration) after adjustment for potential confounders. For participants who ate fruit and vegetables per day, the MRR was 1.45 (95% CI, 1.13-1.87) for mortality from cardiovascular disease and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.11-1.42) for mortality from all causes. Traffic air pollution is associated with mortality from cardiovascular diseases and all causes, after adjustment for traffic noise. The association was strongest for people with a low fruit and vegetable intake.

  16. Alterations and diseases of the gastrointestinal tract caused by old age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayerl, F.

    1981-01-01

    The dissertation reviews the publications on 'The gastrointestinal tract in old age' since 1941. As in the 1941 publication by Heinrich, particular interest is taken in diagnostic radiology. The lower age limit of the cases described was set at 55 to 60 years. Oesophageal changes ranged from functional disturbances (e.g. atonia, changes in peristalsis, or dilatation) to chronic inflammation, displacement caused by the surrounding organs, and tumours (mainly carcinoma). Formation of diverticula takes an intermediate position. Of the gastric and duodenal changes, hiatal hermia and chronic atrophic gastritis were the most frequent. Ulcers caused by old age differ from 'common' ulcers in some respects, and the symptoms may be confused with those of gastric carcinoma. Early gastric carcinoma is another disease whose incidence increases with age. Thoracic and spinal changes may cause impressions on the stomach. The effects of old age on the time of passage of contrast media, on gastric tone, and on the shape of the stomach remain unclear. Changes caused by old age in the small and large intestine range from formation of diverticula and vascular diseases (e.g. ischaemic colitis and obstruction of the mesenteric vessels) to the frequent carcinoma of the large intestine and rectum. According to this study it has to be supposed that the degenerative atrophic processes of aging and previous diseases occurring increasingly in old age, favour the provocation of ratrogenic injuries. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Analysis of complications in thyroid arterial embolization for hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Bulang; Zhao Wei; Huang Jianqiang; Xiang Shutian; Li Liyuan; Li Minghua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate complications and causes of thyroid arterial embolization for hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease had been treated through transcathter arterial embolization with mid-term follow up. The thyroid angiography, interventional treatment, complications and causes were investigated. Results Followed up for over one year (12-24 months), mid-term rate of efficiency was 78.6% with recurrent rate of one year being 14.2%. Two patients (7.1%) had brain infarction with one partially recovered after proper therapy and the other died due to subsequent hyperthyroidism crisis. One case had temporary hypothyroidism, and another hypoparathyroidism but no permanent hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism occurred. One patient suffered relatively severe post-embolization syndrome. All the other complications disappeared after proper treatment. Followed up for more than a year, no other complications occurred. Conclusion: Misembolization due to regurgitation of embolized agent is one of the most important factors leading to complications of arterial embolization for Graves' disease. In order to reduce complications and improve therapeutic efficacy, it is essential to superselectively catheterize the thyroid, avoid dangerous anastomose, prevent regurgitation misembolization and strictly operate under fluoroscopy. (authors)

  18. How the factoid of wind turbines causing 'vibroacoustic disease' came to be 'irrefutably demonstrated'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Simon; St George, Alexis

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, claims have proliferated in cyberspace that wind turbines cause a large variety of symptoms and diseases. One of these, "vibroacoustic disease" (VAD) is frequently mentioned. The aim of this study is to examine the quality of the evidence on how VAD came to be associated with wind turbine exposure by wind farm opponents. Searches of the web (Google advanced) and major research databases for papers on VAD and wind turbines. Self-citation analysis of research papers on VAD. Google returned 24,700 hits for VAD and wind turbines. Thirty-five research papers on VAD were found, none reporting any association between VAD and wind turbines. Of the 35 papers, 34 had a first author from a single Portuguese research group. Seventy-four per cent of citations to these papers were self-citations by the group. Median self-citation rates in science are around 7%. Two unpublished case reports presented at conferences were found asserting that VAD was "irrefutably demonstrated" to be caused by wind turbines. The quality of these reports was abject. VAD has received virtually no scientific recognition beyond the group who coined and promoted the concept. There is no evidence of even rudimentary quality that vibroacoustic disease is associated with or caused by wind turbines. The claim that wind turbines cause VAD is a factoid that has gone 'viral' in cyberspace and may be contributing to nocebo effects among those living near turbines. © 2013 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2013 Public Health Association of Australia.

  19. Causes of Death Data in the Global Burden of Disease Estimates for Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Iversen, Helle K; Mensah, George A; Feigin, Valery L; Sposato, Luciano A; Naghavi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Stroke mortality estimates in the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study are based on routine mortality statistics and redistribution of ill-defined codes that cannot be a cause of death, the so-called 'garbage codes' (GCs). This study describes the contribution of these codes to stroke mortality estimates. All available mortality data were compiled and non-specific cause codes were redistributed based on literature review and statistical methods. Ill-defined codes were redistributed to their specific cause of disease by age, sex, country and year. The reassignment was done based on the International Classification of Diseases and the pathology behind each code by checking multiple causes of death and literature review. Unspecified stroke and primary and secondary hypertension are leading contributing 'GCs' to stroke mortality estimates for hemorrhagic stroke (HS) and ischemic stroke (IS). There were marked differences in the fraction of death assigned to IS and HS for unspecified stroke and hypertension between GBD regions and between age groups. A large proportion of stroke fatalities are derived from the redistribution of 'unspecified stroke' and 'hypertension' with marked regional differences. Future advancements in stroke certification, data collections and statistical analyses may improve the estimation of the global stroke burden. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Is there any relationship between orthotic usage and functional activities in children with neuromuscular disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemdaroğlu, İpek; Gür, Gozde; Bek, Nilgün; Yilmaz, Öznur T; Yakut, Yavuz; Uygur, Fatma; Karaduman, Ayşe

    2014-02-01

    Contractures of Achilles tendons and gastrocnemius muscle deteriorate the performance in daily living activities of patients with neuromuscular diseases. Ankle-foot orthoses help to prevent the progression of deformities and to obtain optimal position of the joints to support standing and walking. To investigate the relationship between orthotic usage and functional activities in pediatric patients with different neuromuscular diseases. Retrospective study. A total of 127 subjects' physical assessment forms were analyzed. Functional level, type of orthoses, falling frequencies, ankle joint range of motion, and timed performance tests were examined in two consecutive dates with an interval of 3 months. A total of 91 patients were using orthoses while 36 patients were not within assessment dates. A total of 64 of 91 (70.3%) patients were diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A total of 81 (89.0%) subjects were using plastic ankle-foot orthoses for positioning at nights and 10 (11%) were using different types of the orthoses (knee-ankle-foot orthoses, dynamic ankle-foot orthoses, and so on) for gait in the study group. Night ankle-foot orthoses were not found to be effective directly on functional performance in children with neuromuscular diseases, although they protect ankle from contractures and may help to correct gait and balance. This retrospective study shows that the positive effects of using an ankle-foot orthosis at night are not reflected in the functional performance of children with neuromuscular diseases. This may be due to the progressive deteriorating nature of the disease.

  1. Opinions in Denmark on the causes of peptic ulcer disease. A survey among Danish physicians and patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A H; Gjørup, T; Andersen, I B

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate opinions among Danish patients and physicians on causes of peptic ulcer disease. Fifty-nine patients with an ulcer history and 77 physicians with a special interest in gastroenterology participated. They were given a questionnaire listing 16 possible causes...... of peptic ulcer and indicated for each whether they believed it was a contributory cause of the disease. The patients stated 0-10 causes each (median, 4), and the physicians 3-12 causes (median, 6) (p ... stated more causes than did their male colleagues (p peptic ulcer disease, whereas only around 40% believed that coffee/tea, alcohol, smoking, side effects...

  2. Non-melanoma skin cancer and risk of Alzheimer's disease and all-cause dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrun A J Schmidt

    Full Text Available Cancer patients may be at decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease. This hypothesis is best developed for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC, but supportive epidemiological data are sparse. We therefore conducted a nationwide cohort study of the association between NMSC and Alzheimer's disease (main outcome and all-cause dementia. Using Danish medical databases, we identified adults diagnosed with NMSC between 1 January 1980 and 30 November 2013 (n = 216,221 and a comparison cohort of five individuals matched to each NMSC patient by sex and birth year (n = 1,081,097. We followed individuals from the time of diagnosis, or corresponding date for matched comparators, until a dementia diagnosis, death, emigration, or 30 November 2013, whichever came first. We used stratified Cox regression adjusted for comorbidities to compute hazard ratios (HRs associating NMSC with dementia. We computed cumulative risks of dementia, treating death as a competing risk. NMSC was associated with a HR of 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92-0.98 for Alzheimer's disease and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.90-0.94 for all-cause dementia. HRs were similar for basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma, the two most common forms of NMSC. Estimates of risk reduction were more pronounced in the beginning of follow-up, reaching null after 5-10 years. At the end of follow-up (34 years, cumulative risk of Alzheimer's disease was 4.6% (95% CI: 4.4%-4.8% among patients with NMSC vs. 4.7% (95% CI: 4.6%-4.9% in the comparison cohort. In conclusion, NMSC was associated with 2%-10% reductions in relative risks of Alzheimer's disease and all-cause dementia. However, these small inverse associations may have been caused by ascertainment bias due to decreased awareness of NMSC tumors in persons with undiagnosed early cognitive impairment or by confounding from a more neuroprotective lifestyle among persons with NMSC.

  3. Cerebrovascular and hypertensive diseases as multiple causes of death in Brazil from 2004 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villela, P B; Klein, C H; Oliveira, G M M

    2018-06-02

    The proportion of deaths attributed to hypertensive diseases (HYPDs) was only 50% of that registered for cerebrovascular diseases (CBVDs) in 2013 in Brazil. This article aims to evaluate mortality related to HYPDs and CBVDs as multiple causes of death, in Brazil from 2004 to 2013. Analysis of historical series of secondary data obtained from Brazilian official registries. Data about the deaths were obtained from the Mortality Information System of the Brazilian Ministry of Health, available on the DATASUS website. CBVDs and HYPDs were evaluated according to their mentions as the underlying cause of death or entry in any line of the death certificates (DCs), according to their International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision codes. When CBVDs were the underlying causes of death, HYPDs were mentioned in 40.9% of the DCs. When HYPDs were the underlying causes of death, CBVDs were mentioned in only 5.0%. When CBVDs were mentioned without HYPDs, they were selected as the underlying cause of death 74.4% of the time. When HYPDs were mentioned in DCs without CBVDs, HYPDs were selected 30.0% of the time. In 2004, the frequency of any mention of HYPDs relative to the frequency of HYPDs cited as underlying causes increased fourfold and was followed by a plateau until 2013. In contrast, the frequency of any mention of CBVDs relative to the frequency of CBVDs as underlying causes decreased in the same period. Because this study was based on DC records, it was limited by the way these documents were completed, which may have included lack of record of the causes related to the sequence that culminated in death. When deaths related to HYPDs were evaluated as multiple causes of death, they were mentioned up to four times more often than when they were selected as underlying causes of death. This reinforces the need for better control of hypertension to prevent deaths. Copyright © 2018 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by

  4. How Do the Virulence Factors of Shigella Work Together to Cause Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattock, Emily; Blocker, Ariel J

    2017-01-01

    Shigella is the major cause of bacillary dysentery world-wide. It is divided into four species, named S. flexneri, S. sonnei, S. dysenteriae , and S. boydii , which are distinct genomically and in their ability to cause disease. Shigellosis, the clinical presentation of Shigella infection, is characterized by watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever. Shigella 's ability to cause disease has been attributed to virulence factors, which are encoded on chromosomal pathogenicity islands and the virulence plasmid. However, information on these virulence factors is not often brought together to create a detailed picture of infection, and how this translates into shigellosis symptoms. Firstly, Shigella secretes virulence factors that induce severe inflammation and mediate enterotoxic effects on the colon, producing the classic watery diarrhea seen early in infection. Secondly, Shigella injects virulence effectors into epithelial cells via its Type III Secretion System to subvert the host cell structure and function. This allows invasion of epithelial cells, establishing a replicative niche, and causes erratic destruction of the colonic epithelium. Thirdly, Shigella produces effectors to down-regulate inflammation and the innate immune response. This promotes infection and limits the adaptive immune response, causing the host to remain partially susceptible to re-infection. Combinations of these virulence factors may contribute to the different symptoms and infection capabilities of the diverse Shigella species, in addition to distinct transmission patterns. Further investigation of the dominant species causing disease, using whole-genome sequencing and genotyping, will allow comparison and identification of crucial virulence factors and may contribute to the production of a pan- Shigella vaccine.

  5. Hyposplenism as a cause of pneumococcal meningoencephalitis in an adult patient with coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Caraceni

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coeliac disease can be associated with hyposplenism and splenic atrophy, which may increase the patient’s risk for fatal infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae or Pneumococcus. It is general opinion that many more patients with coeliac disease have died from hyposplenism-related infections than those reported in literature. Case report: A 62-year-old woman with recently diagnosed coeliac disease was hospitalized with high fever, disorientation, and nuchal rigidity. Cerebral computed tomography was negative. Laboratory tests showed an elevated leukocyte count and very high levels of C reactive protein. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contained an increased number of mononuclear cells associated with a low glucose level and high protein concentrations. The CSF culture was positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Neurological conditions rapidly deteriorated with the onset of coma, and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed initial signs of encephalitis extending above and below the tentorium. Abdominal ultrasonography disclosed splenic hypotrophy that raised the suspicion of hyposplenism. The diagnosis of hyposplenism was confirmed by demonstration of Howell-Jolly bodies in a peripheral blood smear. Discussion: This is the first reported case of pneumococcal meningoencephalitis caused by splenic hypofunction in a patient with coeliac disease. When coeliac disease is diagnosed with a marked delay in an elderly patient, spleen function should always be assessed. If impaired, the patient should undergo vaccination with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine to prevent pneumococcal infections.

  6. Identification of a New Cotton Disease Caused by an Atypical Cotton Leafroll Dwarf Virus in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrofoglio, Yamila C; Delfosse, Verónica C; Casse, María F; Hopp, Horacio E; Kresic, Iván Bonacic; Distéfano, Ana J

    2017-03-01

    An outbreak of a new disease occurred in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fields in northwest Argentina starting in the 2009-10 growing season and is still spreading steadily. The characteristic symptoms of the disease included slight leaf rolling and a bushy phenotype in the upper part of the plant. In this study, we determined the complete nucleotide sequences of two independent virus genomes isolated from cotton blue disease (CBD)-resistant and -susceptible cotton varieties. This virus genome comprised 5,866 nucleotides with an organization similar to that of the genus Polerovirus and was closely related to cotton leafroll dwarf virus, with protein identity ranging from 88 to 98%. The virus was subsequently transmitted to a CBD-resistant cotton variety using Aphis gossypii and symptoms were successfully reproduced. To study the persistence of the virus, we analyzed symptomatic plants from CBD-resistant varieties from different cotton-growing fields between 2013 and 2015 and showed the presence of the same virus strain. In addition, a constructed full-length infectious cDNA clone from the virus caused disease symptoms in systemic leaves of CBD-resistant cotton plants. Altogether, the new leafroll disease in CBD-resistant cotton plants is caused by an atypical cotton leafroll dwarf virus.

  7. Vitamin D status and incident cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Pisinger, Charlotta

    2013-01-01

    Low vitamin D status has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality primarily in selected groups, smaller studies, or with self-reported vitamin D intake. We investigated the association of serum vitamin D status with the incidence of a registry-based diagnosis of ischemic...... heart disease (IHD), stroke, and all-cause mortality in a large sample of the general population. A total of 9,146 individuals from the two population-based studies, Monica10 and Inter99, were included. Measurements of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D at baseline were carried out using the IDS ISYS immunoassay...

  8. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E

    OpenAIRE

    Usman, Adiyyatu Sa?idu; Mustaffa, Rapiaah; Ramli, Noraida; Diggi, Sirajo A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Maternal allo-antibody production is stimulated when fetal red blood cells are positive for an antigen absent on the mother′s red cells. The maternal IgG antibodies produced will pass through the placenta and attack fetal red cells carrying the corresponding antigen. Allo-immune hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E rarely occurs. Case summary: We report two cases of anti-E hemolytic diseases in neonates. One of the neonates had severe hemolysis presenting wit...

  9. Spot Anthracnose Disease Caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides on Tulip Tree in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Okryun; Choi, Okhee; Kwak, Youn-Sig; Kim, Jinwoo; Kwon, Jin-Hyeuk

    2012-03-01

    The tulip tree (Liriodendron chinense) has been widely cultivated in Korea as a street or garden tree for its large flowers, which have a superficial resemblance to tulips. Occurrence of anthracnose disease on the leaves of tulip trees growing on the campus of Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Korea, has been observed. Based on mycological characteristics, pathogenicity, and internal transcribed spacer sequence, the causal fungus was identified as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. This is the first report on anthracnose disease caused by C. gloeosporioides on tulip trees in Korea.

  10. Calcaneal Insufficiency Fracture Secondary to Celiac Disease-Induced Osteomalacia: A Rare Cause of Heel Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Ozkan; Kilicaslan, Omer Faruk; Ozyurek, Selahattin; Ince, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of plantar heel pain; however, a broad spectrum of disorders may also present with plantar heel pain. A detailed history, physical examination, laboratory testing, and imaging studies may be necessary to reach an accurate diagnosis. Herein, the clinical presentation of a 33-year-old woman with calcaneal insufficiency fracture secondary to celiac disease-induced osteomalacia is presented, and its diagnosis and treatment are discussed. Calcaneal insufficiency fractures should be kept in mind in a patient with celiac disease that presents with heel pain. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case study. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. Association of Kidney Disease Measures with Cause-Specific Mortality: The Korean Heart Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yejin Mok

    Full Text Available The link of low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and high proteinuria to cardiovascular disease (CVD mortality is well known. However, its link to mortality due to other causes is less clear.We studied 367,932 adults (20-93 years old in the Korean Heart Study (baseline between 1996-2004 and follow-up until 2011 and assessed the associations of creatinine-based eGFR and dipstick proteinuria with mortality due to CVD (1,608 cases, cancer (4,035 cases, and other (non-CVD/non-cancer causes (3,152 cases after adjusting for potential confounders.Although cancer was overall the most common cause of mortality, in participants with chronic kidney disease (CKD, non-CVD/non-cancer mortality accounted for approximately half of cause of death (47.0%for eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2 and 54.3% for proteinuria ≥1+. Lower eGFR (<60 vs. ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m2 was significantly associated with mortality due to CVD (adjusted hazard ratio 1.49 [95% CI, 1.24-1.78] and non-CVD/non-cancer causes (1.78 [1.54-2.05]. The risk of cancer mortality only reached significance at eGFR <45 ml/min/1.73 m2 when eGFR 45-59 ml/min/1.73 m2 was set as a reference (1.62 [1.10-2.39]. High proteinuria (dipstick ≥1+ vs. negative/trace was consistently associated with mortality due to CVD (1.93 [1.66-2.25], cancer (1.49 [1.32-1.68], and other causes (2.19 [1.96-2.45]. Examining finer mortality causes, low eGFR and high proteinuria were commonly associated with mortality due to coronary heart disease, any infectious disease, diabetes, and renal failure. In addition, proteinuria was also related to death from stroke, cancers of stomach, liver, pancreas, and lung, myeloma, pneumonia, and viral hepatitis.Low eGFR was associated with CVD and non-CVD/non-cancer mortality, whereas higher proteinuria was consistently related to mortality due to CVD, cancer, and other causes. These findings suggest the need for multidisciplinary prevention and management strategies in individuals with CKD

  12. Neuromuscular activity of Bothrops fonsecai snake venom in vertebrate preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Carla T; Giaretta, Vânia MA; Prudêncio, Luiz S; Toledo, Edvana O; da Silva, Igor RF; Collaço, Rita CO; Barbosa, Ana M; Hyslop, Stephen; Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa; Cogo, José C

    2014-01-01

    The neuromuscular activity of venom from Bothrops fonsecai, a lancehead endemic to southeastern Brazil, was investigated. Chick biventer cervicis (CBC) and mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND) preparations were used for myographic recordings and mouse diaphragm muscle was used for membrane resting potential (RP) and miniature end-plate potential (MEPP) recordings. Creatine kinase release and muscle damage were also assessed. In CBC, venom (40, 80 and 160μg/ml) produced concentration- and time-dependent neuromuscular blockade (50% blockade in 85±9 min and 73±8 min with 80 and 160μg/ml, respectively) and attenuated the contractures to 110μM ACh (78–100% inhibition) and 40mM KCl (45–90% inhibition). The venom-induced decrease in twitch-tension in curarized, directly-stimulated preparations was similar to that in indirectly stimulated preparations. Venom (100 and 200μg/ml) also caused blockade in PND preparations (50% blockade in 94±13 min and 49±8 min with 100 and 200μg/ml, respectively) but did not alter the RP or MEPP amplitude. In CBC, venom caused creatine kinase release and myonecrosis. The venom-induced decrease in twitch-tension and in the contractures to ACh and K+ were abolished by preincubating venom with commercial antivenom. These findings indicate that Bothrops fonsecai venom interferes with neuromuscular transmission essentially through postsynaptic muscle damage that affects responses to ACh and KCl. These actions are effectively prevented by commercial antivenom. PMID:25028603

  13. Intrauterine neuromuscular blockade in fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, S Z; Huang, F Y; Lin, S Y; Wang, Y P; Hsieh, F J

    1990-03-01

    Antenatal intrauterine fetal therapy has now become the target of numerous invasive diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers. Fetal motion during intrauterine fetal therapy not only makes these procedures technically more difficult but also increases the likelihood of trauma to the umbilical vessels and the fetus. Combination of high doses of sedatives, tranquilizers, and narcotics rarely results in adequate suppression of fetal movement. Such medication puts the mother at risk of respiratory depression, regurgitation and aspiration. The use of pancuronium or atracurium to temporarily arrest fetal movement in ten fetus is reported. After an initial ultrasound assessment of fetal lie, placental location, and umbilical cord insertion site, the fetal weight was calculated by the ultrasound parameters of biparietal diameter and abdominal circumference. Under ultrasound guidance, we injected pancuronium 0.15 mg/kg or atracurium 1.0 mg/kg using a 23-gauge spinal needle into the fetal gluteal muscle. Short-term paralysis of the fetus was induced in all cases. Fetal movement stopped by sonographic observation within 5.8 +/- 2.3 min in the pancuronium group and 4.7 +/- 1.8 min in the atracurium group. Fetal movements returned both to maternal sensation or ultrasonic observation by 92 +/- 23 min in the first group and 36 +/- 11 min in the second group. No adverse effect of the relaxant has been observed in any of the mothers. There was no evidence of local soft tissue, nerve or muscle damage at the site of injection on initial examination of the neonates after delivery. The use of neuromuscular relaxant in fetus was a safe and useful method.

  14. Association of coffee consumption with all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junxiu; Sui, Xuemei; Lavie, Carl J; Hebert, James R; Earnest, Conrad P; Zhang, Jiajia; Blair, Steven N

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the association between coffee consumption and mortality from all causes and from cardiovascular disease. Data from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study representing 43,727 participants with 699,632 person-years of follow-up were included. Baseline data were collected by an in-person interview on the basis of standardized questionnaires and a medical examination, including fasting blood chemistry analysis, anthropometry, blood pressure, electrocardiography, and a maximal graded exercise test, between February 3, 1971, and December 30, 2002. Cox regression analysis was used to quantify the association between coffee consumption and all-cause and cause-specific mortality. During the 17-year median follow-up, 2512 deaths occurred (804 [32%] due to cardiovascular disease). In multivariate analyses, coffee intake was positively associated with all-cause mortality in men. Men who drank more than 28 cups of coffee per week had higher all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.21; 95% CI, 1.04-1.40). However, after stratification based on age, younger (coffee consumption (>28 cups per week) and all-cause mortality after adjusting for potential confounders and fitness level (HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.30-1.87 for men; and HR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.26-3.59 for women). In this large cohort, a positive association between coffee consumption and all-cause mortality was observed in men and in men and women younger than 55 years. On the basis of these findings, it seems appropriate to suggest that younger people avoid heavy coffee consumption (ie, averaging >4 cups per day). However, this finding should be assessed in future studies of other populations. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prolongation of rapacuronium neuromuscular blockade by clindamycin and magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Paul A; Rasul, Mazhar

    2002-01-01

    We report a prolonged neuromuscular block with the nondepolarizing muscle relaxant rapacuronium in the presence of clindamycin. Even when using "short-acting" muscle relaxants, the anesthesiologist must routinely monitor the neuromuscular function.

  16. Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980-2015 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Haidong; Naghavi, Mohsen; Allen, Christine; Barber, Ryan M.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Carter, Austin; Casey, Daniel C.; Charlson, Fiona J.; Chen, Alan Zian; Coates, Matthew M.; Coggeshall, Megan; Dandona, Lalit; Dicker, Daniel J.; Erskine, Holly E.; Ferrari, Alize J.; Fitzmaurice, Christina; Foreman, Kyle; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.; Fraser, Maya S.; Pullman, Nancy; Gething, Peter W.; Goldberg, Ellen M.; Graetz, Nicholas; Haagsma, Juanita A.; Hay, Simon I.; Huynh, Chantal; Johnson, Catherine; Kassebaum, Nicholas J.; Kinfu, Yohannes; Kulikoff, Xie Rachel; Kutz, Michael; Kyu, Hmwe H.; Larson, Heidi J.; Leung, Janni; Liang, Xiaofeng; Lim, Stephen S.; Lind, Margaret; Lozano, Rafael; Marquez, Neal; Mensah, George A.; Mikesell, Joe; Mokdad, Ali H.; Mooney, Meghan D.; Nguyen, Grant; Nsoesie, Elaine; Pigott, David M.; Amare, Azmeraw T.; Hoek, Hans W.; Singh, Abhishek; Tura, Abera Kenay

    2016-01-01

    Background Improving survival and extending the longevity of life for all populations requires timely, robust evidence on local mortality levels and trends. The Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study (GBD 2015) provides a comprehensive assessment of all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes

  17. Neuroleptics as therapeutic compounds stabilizing neuromuscular transmission in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Shunmoogum A; Aggad, Dina; Martinez, Jose; Tremblay, Elsa; Petrillo, Janet; Armstrong, Gary Ab; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Maios, Claudia; Liao, Meijiang; Ciura, Sorana; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Rafuse, Victor; Ichida, Justin; Zinman, Lorne; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Kabashi, Edor; Robitaille, Richard; Korngut, Lawrence; Parker, J Alexander; Drapeau, Pierre

    2017-11-16

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing, fatal disorder with no effective treatment. We used simple genetic models of ALS to screen phenotypically for potential therapeutic compounds. We screened libraries of compounds in C. elegans, validated hits in zebrafish, and tested the most potent molecule in mice and in a small clinical trial. We identified a class of neuroleptics that restored motility in C. elegans and in zebrafish, and the most potent was pimozide, which blocked T-type Ca2+ channels in these simple models and stabilized neuromuscular transmission in zebrafish and enhanced it in mice. Finally, a short randomized controlled trial of sporadic ALS subjects demonstrated stabilization of motility and evidence of target engagement at the neuromuscular junction. Simple genetic models are, thus, useful in identifying promising compounds for the treatment of ALS, such as neuroleptics, which may stabilize neuromuscular transmission and prolong survival in this disease.

  18. The role of positive selection in determining the molecular cause of species differences in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foord Steven M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Related species, such as humans and chimpanzees, often experience the same disease with varying degrees of pathology, as seen in the cases of Alzheimer's disease, or differing symptomatology as in AIDS. Furthermore, certain diseases such as schizophrenia, epithelial cancers and autoimmune disorders are far more frequent in humans than in other species for reasons not associated with lifestyle. Genes that have undergone positive selection during species evolution are indicative of functional adaptations that drive species differences. Thus we investigate whether biomedical disease differences between species can be attributed to positively selected genes. Results We identified genes that putatively underwent positive selection during the evolution of humans and four mammals which are often used to model human diseases (mouse, rat, chimpanzee and dog. We show that genes predicted to have been subject to positive selection pressure during human evolution are implicated in diseases such as epithelial cancers, schizophrenia, autoimmune diseases and Alzheimer's disease, all of which differ in prevalence and symptomatology between humans and their mammalian relatives. In agreement with previous studies, the chimpanzee lineage was found to have more genes under positive selection than any of the other lineages. In addition, we found new evidence to support the hypothesis that genes that have undergone positive selection tend to interact with each other. This is the first such evidence to be detected widely among mammalian genes and may be important in identifying molecular pathways causative of species differences. Conclusion Our dataset of genes predicted to have been subject to positive selection in five species serves as an informative resource that can be consulted prior to selecting appropriate animal models during drug target validation. We conclude that studying the evolution of functional and biomedical disease differences

  19. Assessing the burden of medical impoverishment by cause: a systematic breakdown by disease in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verguet, Stéphane; Memirie, Solomon Tessema; Norheim, Ole Frithjof

    2016-10-21

    Out-of-pocket (OOP) medical expenses often lead to catastrophic expenditure and impoverishment in low- and middle-income countries. Yet, there has been no systematic examination of which specific diseases and conditions (e.g., tuberculosis, cardiovascular disease) drive medical impoverishment, defined as OOP direct medical costs pushing households into poverty. We used a cost and epidemiological model to propose an assessment of the burden of medical impoverishment in Ethiopia, i.e., the number of households crossing a poverty line due to excessive OOP direct medical expenses. We utilized disease-specific mortality estimates from the Global Burden of Disease study, epidemiological and cost inputs from surveys, and secondary data from the literature to produce a count of poverty cases due to OOP direct medical costs per specific condition. In Ethiopia, in 2013, and among 20 leading causes of mortality, we estimated the burden of impoverishment due to OOP direct medical costs to be of about 350,000 poverty cases. The top three causes of medical impoverishment were diarrhea, lower respiratory infections, and road injury, accounting for 75 % of all poverty cases. We present a preliminary attempt for the estimation of the burden of medical impoverishment by cause for high mortality conditions. In Ethiopia, medical impoverishment was notably associated with illness occurrence and health services utilization. Although currently used estimates are sensitive to health services utilization, a systematic breakdown of impoverishment due to OOP direct medical costs by cause can provide important information for the promotion of financial risk protection and equity, and subsequent design of health policies toward universal health coverage, reduction of direct OOP payments, and poverty alleviation.

  20. Dehydration as a Cause of Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of Fructokinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    hyperfiltration and albuminuria in humans and laboratory animals (2- 4). In this study we sought to examine the role of vasopressin in our heat stress...and Use of Laboratory Animals . The animal protocol was approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee of the University of Colorado. Biochemical...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Our studies evaluate how recurrent dehydration can cause chronic kidney disease, an important question for the

  1. The causes of skin damage and leg ulceration in chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip Coleridge

    2006-09-01

    Chronic venous disease with skin changes of the leg is a common condition affecting up to 1 in 20 people in westernized countries. The causes of this problem are not fully understood, although research in recent years has revealed a number of important mechanisms that contribute to the disease process. Patients with chronic venous disease suffer persistently raised pressures in their deep and superficial veins in the lower limb. Leucocytes become "trapped" in the circulation of the leg during periods of venous hyper-tension produced by sitting or standing. Studies of the plasma levels of neutrophil granule enzymes shows that these are increased during periods of venous hypertension, suggesting that this causes activation of the neutrophils. Investigation of the leucocyte surface ligands CD11b and CD62L shows that the more activated neutrophils and monocytes are sequestered during venous hypertension. Measurement of plasma levels of the soluble parts of the endothelial adhesion molecules VCAM, ICAM, and ELAM show that these are all elevated in patients with chronic venous disease compared to controls. Following 30 minutes of venous hypertension produced by standing, these levels are further increased. These data suggest that venous hypertension causes neutrophil and monocyte activation, which in turn causes injury to the endothelium. Chronic injury to the endothelium leads to a chronic inflammatory condition of the skin that we know clinically as lipodermatosclerosis. This is mediated by perivascular inflammatory cells, principally macrophages, in the skin microcirculation. These stimulate fibroblasts in the skin leading to tissue remodeling and laying down of fibrous tissue. Vascular endothelial growth factor stimulates proliferation of capillaries within the skin. Skin in this state has the potential to ulcerate in response to minor injury.

  2. Does radioiodine cause the ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease; Editorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDougall, I.R. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Medical Center)

    1993-02-01

    This editorial briefly reviews studies which might answer the question as to whether radioiodine treatment causes the ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease. However, the data do not allow any conclusion one way or the other. Other possible causal factors are discussed. Further studies are required to define whether treatment of hyperthyroidism aggravates the ophthalmopathy and whether one thereby is worse than the others and by how much. (UK).

  3. Pinpointing Synaptic Loss Caused by Alzheimer?s Disease with fMRI

    OpenAIRE

    Brickman, Adam M.; Small, Scott A.; Fleisher, Adam

    2009-01-01

    During its earliest stage, before cell loss and independent of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, Alzheimer's disease (AD) causes synaptic loss affecting the basal functional properties of neurons. In principle, synaptic loss can be detected by measuring AD-induced changes in basal function, or by measuring stimulus-evoked responses on top of basal changes. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is sensitive to both basal changes and evoked-responses, and there are therefore t...

  4. Clinical features of neuromuscular disorders in patients with N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Totzeck

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular junction disorders affect the pre- or postsynaptic nerve to muscle transmission due to autoimmune antibodies. Members of the group like myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton syndrome have pathophysiologically distinct characteristics. However, in practice, distinction may be difficult. We present a series of three patients with a myasthenic syndrome, dropped-head syndrome, bulbar and respiratory muscle weakness and positive testing for anti-N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies. In two cases anti-acetylcholin receptor antibodies were elevated, anti-P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were negative. All patients initially responded to pyridostigmine with a non-response in the course of the disease. While one patient recovered well after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins, 3,4-diaminopyridine, steroids and later on immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil, a second died after restriction of treatment due to unfavorable cancer diagnosis, the third patient declined treatment. Although new antibodies causing neuromuscular disorders were discovered, clinical distinction has not yet been made. Our patients showed features of pre- and postsynaptic myasthenic syndrome as well as severe dropped-head syndrome and bulbar and axial muscle weakness, but only anti-N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were positive. When administered, one patient benefited from 3,4-diaminopyridine. We suggest that this overlap-syndrome should be considered especially in patients with assumed seronegative myasthenia gravis and lack of improvement under standard therapy.

  5. Fluoride Exposure in Early Life as the Possible Root Cause of Disease In Later Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Tetsuo; Rawls, H Ralph

    2018-05-15

    Fluoride, one of the most celebrated ingredients for the prevention of dental caries in the 20th century, has also been controversial for its use in dentifrices and other applications. In the current review, we have concentrated primarily on early-life exposure to fluoride and how it may affect the various organs. The most recent controversial aspects of fluoride are related to toxicity of the developing brain and how it may possibly result in the decrease of intelligence quotient (IQ), autism, and calcification of the pineal gland. In addition, it has been reported to have possible effects on bone and thyroid glands. If nutritional stress is applied during a critical period of growth and development, the organ(s) and/or body will never recover once they pass through the critical period. For example, if animals are force-fed during experiments, they will simply get fat but never reach the normal size. Although early-life fluoride exposure causing fluorosis is well reported in the literature, the dental profession considers it primarily as an esthetic rather than a serious systemic problem. In the current review, we wanted to raise the possibility of future disease as a result of early-life exposure to fluoride. It is not currently known how fluoride will become a cause of future disease. Studies of other nutritional factors have shown that the effects of early nutritional stress are a cause of disease in later life.

  6. Successful therapy for protein-losing enteropathy caused by chronic neuronopathic Gaucher disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Mhanni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease (OMIM #230800 is caused by β-glucosidase deficiency and primarily involves the mononuclear phagocyte system (also called Reticuloendothelial System or Macrophage System. The disease is classified into three main phenotypes based on the presence or absence of neurological manifestations: non-neuronopathic (type 1, acute neuronopathic (type 2 and chronic neuronopathic (type 3. Typical manifestations include hepatosplenomegaly, skeletal deformities, hematological abnormalities, interstitial lung fibrosis and neurodegeneration in neuronopathic cases. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy with resultant protein losing enteropathy (PLE has only been rarely described. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy may lead to intestinal lymphatic obstruction and secondary lymphangiectasia resulting in chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain and weight loss. Fecal protein loss with secondary hypoalbuminemia can be significant. We report a male with Chronic Neuronopathic Gaucher disease (GD (homozygous for c.1448T>C (NM_000157.3 GBA mutation who at 16 years of age developed intractable abdominal pain, diarrhea and weight loss. This was caused by PLE secondary to intestinal lymphangiectasia caused by calcified mesenteric lymphadenopathy despite prior long term enzyme replacement therapy (ERT and/or substrate reduction therapy (SRT. His older similarly affected sister who had been receiving treatment with ERT and/or SRT remains stable on these treatments with no evidence of mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Medical management with total parenteral nutrition, daily medium chain triglyceride-oil (MCT supplementation, low dose oral budesonide, continued oral SRT and an increased dose of parenteral ERT has stabilized his condition with resolution of the gastrointestinal symptoms and appropriate weight gain.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome as a novel cause for Ménière's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Meiho; Kabaya, Kayoko

    2013-10-01

    Several recent reports have described the relation between sleep disorders and inner ear function. There are also many reports that insomnia is observed in Ménière's patients. However, the possibility that obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) might affect Ménière's disease or other neurotological consequences was not noticed, until studies using polysomnography for these patients. OSAS may cause not only vestibular but also auditory dysfunction. Several reports suggest that insufficient supply of blood via the vertebral basilar artery, which supplies the inner ear, may cause hydropic distension of the endolymphatic system and lead to Ménière's disease. However, few people noticed that in OSAS this insufficient supply might be exacerbated in the night while patients are sleeping. Even more, we should note that Ménière's patients may not only suffer from insomnia, but also that the impaired sleep might be caused by OSAS. Physicians routinely prescribe benzodiazepines or other drugs that have hypnotic, muscle relaxing, antianxiety, and anticonvulsant properties for insomnia, but these properties may have the effect of aggravating OSAS symptoms. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective therapy used worldwide for the treatment of OSAS. CPAP or surgeries for OSAS may also be useful as one aspect of treatment for Ménière's disease patients with OSAS.

  8. Does infectious disease cause global variation in the frequency of intrastate armed conflict and civil war?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letendre, Kenneth; Fincher, Corey L; Thornhill, Randy

    2010-08-01

    Geographic and cross-national variation in the frequency of intrastate armed conflict and civil war is a subject of great interest. Previous theory on this variation has focused on the influence on human behaviour of climate, resource competition, national wealth, and cultural characteristics. We present the parasite-stress model of intrastate conflict, which unites previous work on the correlates of intrastate conflict by linking frequency of the outbreak of such conflict, including civil war, to the intensity of infectious disease across countries of the world. High intensity of infectious disease leads to the emergence of xenophobic and ethnocentric cultural norms. These cultures suffer greater poverty and deprivation due to the morbidity and mortality caused by disease, and as a result of decreased investment in public health and welfare. Resource competition among xenophobic and ethnocentric groups within a nation leads to increased frequency of civil war. We present support for the parasite-stress model with regression analyses. We find support for a direct effect of infectious disease on intrastate armed conflict, and support for an indirect effect of infectious disease on the incidence of civil war via its negative effect on national wealth. We consider the entanglements of feedback of conflict into further reduced wealth and increased incidence of disease, and discuss implications for international warfare and global patterns of wealth and imperialism.

  9. Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease caused by uromodulin mutations: seek and you will find.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffler, Gabriele; Zitt, Emanuel; Sprenger-Mähr, Hannelore; Nagel, Mato; Lhotta, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Uromodulin (UMOD)-associated kidney disease belongs to the group of autosomal dominant interstitial kidney diseases and is caused by mutations in the UMOD gene. Affected patients present with hyperuricemia, gout, and progressive renal failure. The disease is thought to be very rare but is probably underdiagnosed. Two index patients from two families with tubulointerstitial nephropathy and hyperuricemia were examined, including blood and urine chemistry, ultrasound, and mutation analysis of the UMOD gene. In addition, other available family members were studied. In a 46-year-old female patient with a fractional excretion of uric acid of 3 %, analysis of the UMOD gene revealed a p.W202S missense mutation. The same mutation was found in her 72-year-old father, who suffers from gout and end-stage renal disease. The second index patient was a 47-year-old female with chronic kidney disease and gout for more than 10 years. Her fractional uric acid excretion was 3.5 %. Genetic analysis identified a novel p.H250Q UMOD mutation that was also present in her 12-year-old son, who had normal renal function and uric acid levels. In patients suffering from chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, hyperuricemia, and a low fractional excretion of uric acid mutation, analysis of the UMOD gene should be performed to diagnose UMOD-associated kidney disease.

  10. Causes and risk factors of falls in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzińska, Monika; Bukowczan, Sylwia; Banaszkiewicz, Krzysztof; Stozek, Joanna; Zajdel, Katarzyna; Szczudlik, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Falls are a common and serious problem among Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. However, knowledge about the causes and risk factors of falls is limited. There have been a few attempts to classify the causes of falls. The classification suggested by Olanow seems to be the most comprehensive one. The aim of this study was to analyze retrospectively the causes of falls and risk factors of falls in PD patients. One hundred and four patients with moderately advanced PD were included in the study. The patients were asked to describe the circumstances and consequences of falls which occurred during 12 months preceding the examination. The falls were classified according to the Olanow classification of causes of falls. Fifty-two patients (50%) reported at least one fall during the previous year with a mean number of 1.5 falls per year. The most common causes of falls were environmental factors, sudden falls and postural instability. There were no falls caused by severe dyskinesia, drugs or cardiovascular disorders. The only independent risk factors of the recurrent falls identified in this study were UPDRS part II score (OR 1.17, 95% CI: 1.02-1.37) and Mini Mental State Examination score (OR 0.85, 95% CI: 0.72-0.99). Considering these results we may be able to prevent most falls by means of the education of patients about environmental factors and using adequate rehabilitation techniques concentrating on postural stability and gait.

  11. Disruption of the Hepcidin/Ferroportin Regulatory System Causes Pulmonary Iron Overload and Restrictive Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Neves

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that pulmonary iron accumulation is implicated in a spectrum of chronic lung diseases. However, the mechanism(s involved in pulmonary iron deposition and its role in the in vivo pathogenesis of lung diseases remains unknown. Here we show that a point mutation in the murine ferroportin gene, which causes hereditary hemochromatosis type 4 (Slc40a1C326S, increases iron levels in alveolar macrophages, epithelial cells lining the conducting airways and lung parenchyma, and in vascular smooth muscle cells. Pulmonary iron overload is associated with oxidative stress, restrictive lung disease with decreased total lung capacity and reduced blood oxygen saturation in homozygous Slc40a1C326S/C326S mice compared to wild-type controls. These findings implicate iron in lung pathology, which is so far not considered a classical iron-related disorder.

  12. First report of Oryctes rhinoceros nudivirus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) causing severe disease in Allomyrina dichotoma in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seokhyun; Park, Kwan-Ho; Nam, Sung-Hee; Kwak, Kyu-Won; Choi, Ji-Young

    2015-01-01

    Oryctes rhinoceros nudivirus (OrNV) has been known to cause severe disease in coconut palm rhinoceros beetle, Oryctes rhinoceros, in Southeastern Asia and is used as a biological control to reduce the pest population. Here, we report for the first time that the OrNV may have landed on Korea and may be the major pathogen for diseased larvae of Korean horn beetle, Allomyrina dichotoma. After peroral inoculation, over 60% of infected larvae perished in 6 wk. This viral disease spreads very fast in several locations throughout Korea. This threat not only makes economic loss of local farms rearing A. dichotoma larvae but also may disturb the ecosystem by transmitting to wild A. dichotoma. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  13. EYS Mutations Causing Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa: Changes of Retinal Structure and Function with Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. McGuigan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the EYS (eyes shut homolog gene are a common cause of autosomal recessive (ar retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Without a mammalian model of human EYS disease, there is limited understanding of details of disease expression and rates of progression of the retinal degeneration. We studied clinically and with chromatic static perimetry, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT, and en face autofluoresence imaging, a cohort of 15 patients (ages 12–51 at first visit, some of whom had longitudinal data of function and structure. Rod sensitivity was able to be measured by chromatic perimetry in most patients at their earliest visits and some patients retained patchy rod function into the fifth decade of life. As expected from RP, cone sensitivity persisted after rod function was no longer measurable. The photoreceptor nuclear layer of the central retina was abnormal except at the fovea in most patients at first visit. Perifoveal disease measured over a period of years indicated that photoreceptor structural loss was followed by dysmorphology of the inner retina and loss of retinal pigment epithelial integrity. Although there could be variability in severity, preliminary analyses of the rates of vision loss suggested that EYS is a more rapidly progressive disease than other ciliopathies causing arRP, such as USH2A and MAK.

  14. Epidemiology and Control of Strawberry Bacterial Angular Leaf Spot Disease Caused by Xanthomonas fragariae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Ran Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Strawberry bacterial angular leaf spot (ALS disease, caused by Xanthomonas fragariae has become increasingly problematic in the strawberry agro-industry. ALS causes small angular water-soaked lesions to develop on the abaxial leaf surface. Studies reported optimum temperature conditions for X. fragariae are 20°C and the pathogen suffers mortality above 32°C. However, at the nursery stage, disease symptoms have been observed under high temperature conditions. In the present study, results showed X. fragariae transmission was via infected maternal plants, precipitation, and sprinkler irrigation systems. Systemic infections were detected using X. fragariae specific primers 245A/B and 295A/B, where 300-bp and 615-bp were respectively amplified. During the nursery stage (from May to August, the pathogen was PCR detected only in maternal plants, but not in soil or irrigation water through the nursery stage. During the cultivation period, from September to March, the pathogen was detected in maternal plants, progeny, and soil, but not in water. Additionally, un-infected plants, when planted with infected plants were positive for X. fragariae via PCR at the late cultivation stage. Chemical control for X. fragariae with oxolinic acid showed 87% control effects against the disease during the nursery period, in contrast to validamycin-A, which exhibited increased efficacy against the disease during the cultivation stage (control effect 95%. To our knowledge, this is the first epidemiological study of X. fragariae in Korean strawberry fields.

  15. How tobacco smoke causes disease: the biology and behavioral basis for smoking-attributable disease : a report of the Surgeon General

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2010-01-01

    .... This report specifically reviews the evidence on the potential mechanisms by which smoking causes diseases and considers whether a mechanism is likely to be operative in the production of human disease by tobacco smoke...

  16. Altered knee joint neuromuscular control during landing from a jump in 10-15year old children with Generalised Joint Hypermobility. A substudy of the CHAMPS-study Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Tina; Wedderkopp, Niels; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch

    2015-01-01

    Generalised Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is considered an intrinsic risk factor for knee injuries. Knee neuromuscular control during landing may be altered in GJH due to reduced passive stability. The aim was to identify differences in knee neuromuscular control during landing of the Single...... than controls, all significant findings. Although the groups performed equally in SLHD, GJH had a Gastrocnemius Medialis dominated neuromuscular strategy before landing, plausibly caused by reduced Semitendinosus activity. Reduced Semitendinosus activity was seen in GJH after landing...

  17. A mouse model for studying viscerotropic disease caused by yellow fever virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn C Meier

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne yellow fever virus (YFV causes highly lethal, viscerotropic disease in humans and non-human primates. Despite the availability of efficacious live-attenuated vaccine strains, 17D-204 and 17DD, derived by serial passage of pathogenic YFV strain Asibi, YFV continues to pose a significant threat to human health. Neither the disease caused by wild-type YFV, nor the molecular determinants of vaccine attenuation and immunogenicity, have been well characterized, in large part due to the lack of a small animal model for viscerotropic YFV infection. Here, we describe a small animal model for wild-type YFV that manifests clinical disease representative of that seen in primates without adaptation of the virus to the host, which was required for the current hamster YF model. Investigation of the role of type I interferon (IFN-alpha/beta in protection of mice from viscerotropic YFV infection revealed that mice deficient in the IFN-alpha/beta receptor (A129 or the STAT1 signaling molecule (STAT129 were highly susceptible to infection and disease, succumbing within 6-7 days. Importantly, these animals developed viscerotropic disease reminiscent of human YF, instead of the encephalitic signs typically observed in mice. Rapid viremic dissemination and extensive replication in visceral organs, spleen and liver, was associated with severe pathologies in these tissues and dramatically elevated MCP-1 and IL-6 levels, suggestive of a cytokine storm. In striking contrast, infection of A129 and STAT129 mice with the 17D-204 vaccine virus was subclinical, similar to immunization in humans. Although, like wild-type YFV, 17D-204 virus amplified within regional lymph nodes and seeded a serum viremia in A129 mice, infection of visceral organs was rarely established and rapidly cleared, possibly by type II IFN-dependent mechanisms. The ability to establish systemic infection and cause viscerotropic disease in A129 mice correlated with infectivity for A129

  18. A mouse model for studying viscerotropic disease caused by yellow fever virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Kathryn C; Gardner, Christina L; Khoretonenko, Mikhail V; Klimstra, William B; Ryman, Kate D

    2009-10-01

    Mosquito-borne yellow fever virus (YFV) causes highly lethal, viscerotropic disease in humans and non-human primates. Despite the availability of efficacious live-attenuated vaccine strains, 17D-204 and 17DD, derived by serial passage of pathogenic YFV strain Asibi, YFV continues to pose a significant threat to human health. Neither the disease caused by wild-type YFV, nor the molecular determinants of vaccine attenuation and immunogenicity, have been well characterized, in large part due to the lack of a small animal model for viscerotropic YFV infection. Here, we describe a small animal model for wild-type YFV that manifests clinical disease representative of that seen in primates without adaptation of the virus to the host, which was required for the current hamster YF model. Investigation of the role of type I interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) in protection of mice from viscerotropic YFV infection revealed that mice deficient in the IFN-alpha/beta receptor (A129) or the STAT1 signaling molecule (STAT129) were highly susceptible to infection and disease, succumbing within 6-7 days. Importantly, these animals developed viscerotropic disease reminiscent of human YF, instead of the encephalitic signs typically observed in mice. Rapid viremic dissemination and extensive replication in visceral organs, spleen and liver, was associated with severe pathologies in these tissues and dramatically elevated MCP-1 and IL-6 levels, suggestive of a cytokine storm. In striking contrast, infection of A129 and STAT129 mice with the 17D-204 vaccine virus was subclinical, similar to immunization in humans. Although, like wild-type YFV, 17D-204 virus amplified within regional lymph nodes and seeded a serum viremia in A129 mice, infection of visceral organs was rarely established and rapidly cleared, possibly by type II IFN-dependent mechanisms. The ability to establish systemic infection and cause viscerotropic disease in A129 mice correlated with infectivity for A129-derived, but not WT

  19. Socioeconomic inequalities in cause-specific mortality after disability retirement due to different diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polvinen, A; Laaksonen, M; Gould, R; Lahelma, E; Leinonen, T; Martikainen, P

    2015-03-01

    Socioeconomic inequalities in both disability retirement and mortality are large. The aim of this study was to examine socioeconomic differences in cause-specific mortality after disability retirement due to different diseases. We used administrative register data from various sources linked together by Statistics Finland and included an 11% sample of the Finnish population between the years 1987 and 2007. The data also include an 80% oversample of the deceased during the follow-up. The study included men and women aged 30-64 years at baseline and those who turned 30 during the follow-up. We used Cox regression analysis to examine socioeconomic differences in mortality after disability retirement. Socioeconomic differences in mortality after disability retirement were smaller than in the population in general. However, manual workers had a higher risk of mortality than upper non-manual employees after disability retirement due to mental disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and among men also diseases of the nervous system. After all-cause disability retirement, manual workers ran a higher risk of cardiovascular and alcohol-related death. However, among men who retired due to mental disorders or cardiovascular diseases, differences in social class were found for all causes of death examined. For women, an opposite socioeconomic gradient in mortality after disability retirement from neoplasms was found. Conclusions: The disability retirement process leads to smaller socioeconomic differences in mortality compared with those generally found in the population. This suggests that the disability retirement system is likely to accurately identify chronic health problems with regard to socioeconomic status. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  20. Possibility of biological control of primocane fruiting raspberry disease caused by Fusarium sambucinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shternshis, Margarita V; Belyaev, Anatoly A; Matchenko, Nina S; Shpatova, Tatyana V; Lelyak, Anastasya A

    2015-10-01

    Biological control agents are a promising alternative to chemical pesticides for plant disease suppression. The main advantage of the natural biocontrol agents, such as antagonistic bacteria compared with chemicals, includes environmental pollution prevention and a decrease of chemical residues in fruits. This study is aimed to evaluate the impact of three Bacillus strains on disease of primocane fruiting raspberry canes caused by Fusarium sambucinum under controlled infection load and uncontrolled environmental factors. Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens were used for biocontrol of plant disease in 2013 and 2014 which differed by environmental conditions. The test suspensions were 10(5) CFU/ml for each bacterial strain. To estimate the effect of biological agents on Fusarium disease, canes were cut at the end of vegetation, and the area of outer and internal lesions was measured. In addition to antagonistic effect, the strains revealed the ability to induce plant resistance comparable with chitosan-based formulation. Under variable ways of cane treatment by bacterial strains, the more effective were B. subtilis and B. licheniformis demonstrating dual biocontrol effect. However, environmental factors were shown to impact the strain biocontrol ability; changes in air temperature and humidity led to the enhanced activity of B. amyloliquefaciens. For the first time, the possibility of replacing chemicals with environmentally benign biological agents for ecologically safe control of the raspberry primocane fruiting disease was shown.

  1. An overall estimation of losses caused by diseases in the Brazilian fish farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares-Dias, Marcos; Martins, Maurício Laterça

    2017-12-01

    Parasitic and infectious diseases are common in finfish, but are difficult to accurately estimate the economic impacts on the production in a country with large dimensions like Brazil. The aim of this study was to estimate the costs caused by economic losses of finfish due to mortality by diseases in Brazil. A model for estimating the costs related to parasitic and bacterial diseases in farmed fish and an estimative of these economic impacts are presented. We used official data of production and mortality of finfish for rough estimation of economic losses. The losses herein presented are related to direct and indirect economic costs for freshwater farmed fish, which were estimated in US$ 84 million per year. Finally, it was possible to establish by the first time an estimative of overall losses in finfish production in Brazil using data available from production. Therefore, this current estimative must help researchers and policy makers to approximate the economic costs of diseases for fish farming industry, as well as for developing of public policies on the control measures of diseases and priority research lines.

  2. COPA mutations impair ER-Golgi transport causing hereditary autoimmune-mediated lung disease and arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkin, Levi B.; Jessen, Birthe; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Vece, Timothy; Jan, Max; Sha, Youbao; Thamsen, Maike; Santos-Cortez, Regie L. P.; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Gambin, Tomasz; Forbes, Lisa; Law, Christopher S.; Stray-Petersen, Asbjørg; Cheng, Mickie H.; Mace, Emily M.; Anderson, Mark S.; Liu, Dongfang; Tang, Ling Fung; Nicholas, Sarah K.; Nahmod, Karen; Makedonas, George; Canter, Debra; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Hicks, John; Jones, Kirk D.; Penney, Samantha; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Rosenblum, Michael D.; Dell, Sharon D.; Waterfield, Michael R.; Papa, Feroz R.; Muzny, Donna M.; Zaitlen, Noah; Leal, Suzanne M.; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Boerwinkle, Eric; Eissa, N. Tony; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Orange, Jordan S.; Shum, Anthony K.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in genomics have allowed unbiased genetic studies of human disease with unexpected insights into the molecular mechanisms of cellular immunity and autoimmunity1. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) and targeted sequencing in patients with an apparent Mendelian syndrome of autoimmune disease characterized by high-titer autoantibodies, inflammatory arthritis and interstitial lung disease (ILD). In five families, we identified four unique deleterious variants in the Coatomer subunit alpha (COPA) gene all located within the same functional domain. We hypothesized that mutant COPA leads to a defect in intracellular transport mediated by coat protein complex I (COPI)2–4. We show that COPA variants impair binding of proteins targeted for retrograde Golgi to ER transport and demonstrate that expression of mutant COPA leads to ER stress and the upregulation of Th17 priming cytokines. Consistent with this pattern of cytokine expression, patients demonstrated a significant skewing of CD4+ T cells toward a T helper 17 (Th17) phenotype, an effector T cell population implicated in autoimmunity5,6. Our findings uncover an unexpected molecular link between a vesicular transport protein and a syndrome of autoimmunity manifested by lung and joint disease. These findings provide a unique opportunity to understand how alterations in cellular homeostasis caused by a defect in the intracellular trafficking pathway leads to the generation of human autoimmune disease. PMID:25894502

  3. [Disease burden caused by suicide in the Chinese population, in 1990 and 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X; Wang, L H; Jin, Y; Ye, P P; Yang, L; Er, Y L; Deng, X; Wang, Y; Duan, L L

    2017-10-10

    Objective: To provide basic suicide prevention strategy through analyzing the disease burden of suicide in the Chinese population, in 1990 and 2013. Methods: Indicators including mortality rate, years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLL), years lived with disability (YLD), and disability-adjusted of life years (DALY) on suicide, were from the results of Global Burden of Disease 2013 and used to describe the burden of disease caused by suicide in Chinese population. Data described the disease burden of suicide in China by comparing the corresponding parameters in 1990 and 2013. Results: In 2013, the standard mortality on suicide was 9.08 per 100 000, and 73.39 per 100 000 in the 80 and above year-old, with the highest rates on DALY and YLL seen in the 75-79-year-old. Each parameter related to suicide burden in males appeared higher than that in females. Compare to data in the 1990s, these parameters declined in 2013, especially seen in females. The rate of YLLs/YLDs on suicide was 90.03 in 2013, 89.83 in males and 89.00 in females. Conclusion: The disease burden of suicide decreased sharply between 1990 and 2013 but was still a serious issue in the elderly that called for more attention.

  4. Dysfunction of the neuromuscular junction in spinal muscular atrophy types 2 and 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadman, Renske I; Vrancken, Alexander F J E; van den Berg, Leonard H; van der Pol, W Ludo

    2012-11-13

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is pathologically characterized by degeneration of anterior horn cells. Recent observations in animal models of SMA and muscle tissue from patients with SMA suggest additional abnormalities in the development and maturation of the neuromuscular junction. We therefore evaluated neuromuscular junction function in SMA with repetitive nerve stimulation. In this case-control study, repetitive nerve stimulation was performed in 35 patients with SMA types 2, 3, and 4, 20 healthy controls, and 5 controls with motor neuron disease. Pathologic decremental responses (>10%) during 3-Hz repetitive nerve stimulation were observed in 17 of 35 patients (49%) with SMA types 2 and 3, but not in healthy controls or controls with motor neuron disease. None of the patients or controls had an abnormal incremental response of >60%. The presence of an abnormal decremental response was not specific for the type of SMA, nor was it associated with compound muscle action potential amplitude, clinical scores, or disease duration. Two of 4 patients with SMA type 3 who tried pyridostigmine reported increased stamina. These data suggest dysfunction of the neuromuscular junction in patients with SMA types 2 and 3. Therefore, drugs that facilitate neuromuscular transmission are candidate drugs for evaluation in carefully designed, placebo-controlled, clinical trials.

  5. Chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology in Sri Lanka: Are leptospirosis and Hantaviral infection likely causes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Chandika Damesh; Sarathkumara, Yomani Dilukshi

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology (CKDu) has been a severe burden and a public health crisis in Sri Lanka over the past two decades. Many studies have established hypotheses to identify potential risk factors although causative agents, risk factors and etiology of this disease are still uncertain. Several studies have postulated that fungal and bacterial nephrotoxins are a possible etiological factor; however, the precise link between hypothesized risk factors and the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease has yet to be proven in prior studies. Leptospirosis and Hantavirus infections are important zoonotic diseases that are naturally maintained and transmitted via infected rodent populations and which present similar clinical and epidemiological features. Both infections are known to be a cause of acute kidney damage that can proceed into chronic renal failure. Several studies have reported presence of both infections in Sri Lanka. Therefore, we hypothesized that pathogenic Leptospira or Hantavirus are possible causative agents of acute kidney damage which eventually progresses to chronic kidney disease in Sri Lanka. The proposed hypothesis will be evaluated by means of an observational study design. Past infection will be assessed by a cross-sectional study to detect the presence of IgG antibodies with further confirmatory testing among chronic kidney disease patients and individuals from the community in selected endemic areas compared to low prevalence areas. Identification of possible risk factors for these infections will be followed by a case-control study and causality will be further determined with a cohort study. If the current hypothesis is true, affected communities will be subjected for medical interventions related to the disease for patient management while considering supportive therapies. Furthermore and possibly enhance their preventive and control measures to improve vector control to decrease the risk of infection. Copyright © 2016

  6. Causes of death in a contemporary adult congenital heart disease cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Christopher; Moore, Benjamin M; Kotchetkova, Irina; Cordina, Rachael L; Celermajer, David S

    2018-04-17

    The life expectancy of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) has significantly improved with advances in their paediatric medical care. Mortality patterns are changing as a result. Our study aims to describe survival and causes of death in a contemporary cohort of adult patients with CHD. We reviewed 3068 patients in our adult CHD database (age ≥16 years, seen at least once in our centre between 2000 and 2015), and documented the number and causes of death, via Australia's National Death Index. Survival and mortality patterns were analysed by complexity of CHD and by underlying congenital diagnosis. Our cohort comprised 3068 adult patients (53% male). The distribution of patients (per the Bethesda classification) was 47% simple, 34% moderate and 18% complex (1% not classifiable). Over a median follow-up of 6.2 years (IQR 3.5-10.4), 341 patients (11%) died with an incidence of 0.4 deaths/100 patient years (py). Survival was significantly worse with increasing complexity of CHD (pdeaths/100 py with a median age of death 70 years, and in the complex group was 1.0 death/100 py with a median age of death 34 years. Overall, non-cardiac causes of death outnumbered cardiac causes, at 54% and 46%, respectively. The leading single cause of death was heart failure (17%), followed by malignancy (13%). Simple adult CHD patients mostly died due to non-cardiac causes such as malignancy. Perioperative mortality only accounted for 5% of deaths. Premature death is common in adults with CHD. Although heart failure remains the most common cause of death, in the contemporary era in a specialist CHD centre, non-cardiac related deaths outnumber cardiac deaths, particularly in those with simple CHD lesions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Miscellaneous neurologic or neuromuscular disorders in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Monica

    2011-12-01

    NMD is an important cause of morbidity in horses. Signs of dysfunction could be variable depending on the specific area affected. NM disease can go unrecognized if a thorough evaluation is not performed in diseased horses. Electrodiagnostic testing is an area that has the potential to document and improve our understanding of NM disease yet is uncommonly performed. Keeping an open and observant mind will enhance our ability to search and find answers.

  8. Evaluation of bakanae disease progression caused by Fusarium fujikuroi in Oryza sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In Sun; Kang, Woo-Ri; Hwang, Duk-Ju; Bae, Shin-Chul; Yun, Sung-Hwan; Ahn, Il-Pyung

    2013-12-01

    Bakanae disease caused by Fusarium fujikuroi is an important fungal disease in rice. Among the seven strains isolated from symptomatic rice grains in this study, one strain, FfB14, triggered severe root growth inhibition and decay in the crown and root of rice seedlings. The remaining six strains caused typical Bakanae symptoms such as etiolation and abnormal succulent rice growth. To reveal the relationship between mycelial growth in the infected tissues and Bakanae disease progression, we have established a reliable quantification method using real time PCR that employs a primer pair and dual-labeled probe specific to a unigene encoding F. fujikuroi PNG1 (FfPNG1), which is located upstream of the fumonisin biosynthesis gene cluster. Plotting the crossing point (CP) values from the infected tissue DNAs on a standard curve revealed the active fungal growth of FfB14 in the root and crown of rice seedlings, while the growth rate of FfB20 in rice was more than 4 times lower than FfB14. Massive infective mycelial growth of FfB14 was evident in rice stems and crown; however, FfB20 did not exhibit vigorous growth. Our quantitative evaluation system is applicable for the identification of fungal virulence factors other than gibberellin.

  9. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiyyatu Sa′idu Usman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Maternal allo-antibody production is stimulated when fetal red blood cells are positive for an antigen absent on the mother′s red cells. The maternal IgG antibodies produced will pass through the placenta and attack fetal red cells carrying the corresponding antigen. Allo-immune hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-E rarely occurs. Case summary: We report two cases of anti-E hemolytic diseases in neonates. One of the neonates had severe hemolysis presenting with severe anemia, thrombocytopenia, and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, while the other had moderate anemia and unconjugated hyperbilrubinemia. Although both the neonates were treated by phototherapy and intravenous immunoglobulin, one of them received double volume exchange transfusion. Conclusion: There appeared to be an increase in the occurrence of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by Rh antibodies other than anti-D. In this case report, both patients presented with anemia and hyperbilirubinemia but were successfully treated, with a favorable outcome.

  10. Structural consequences of amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Kazuki; Saito, Seiji; Sugawara, Kanako; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2008-08-01

    To determine the structural changes in the alpha-subunit of beta-hexosaminidase due to amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease, we built structural models of mutant alpha-subunits resulting from 33 missense mutations (24 infantile and 9 late-onset), and analyzed the influence of each amino acid replacement on the structure by calculating the number of atoms affected and determining the solvent-accessible surface area of the corresponding amino acid residue in the wild-type alpha-subunit. In the infantile Tay-Sachs group, the number of atoms influenced by a mutation was generally larger than that in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group in both the main chain and the side chain, and residues associated with the mutations found in the infantile Tay-Sachs group tended to be less solvent-accessible than those in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group. Furthermore, color imaging determined the distribution and degree of the structural changes caused by representative amino acid substitutions, and that there were also differences between the infantile and late-onset Tay-Sachs disease groups. Structural study is useful for elucidating the basis of Tay-Sachs disease.

  11. Structure and Dynamics of RNA Repeat Expansions That Cause Huntington's Disease and Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan L; VanEtten, Damian M; Fountain, Matthew A; Yildirim, Ilyas; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-07-11

    RNA repeat expansions cause a host of incurable, genetically defined diseases. The most common class of RNA repeats consists of trinucleotide repeats. These long, repeating transcripts fold into hairpins containing 1 × 1 internal loops that can mediate disease via a variety of mechanism(s) in which RNA is the central player. Two of these disorders are Huntington's disease and myotonic dystrophy type 1, which are caused by r(CAG) and r(CUG) repeats, respectively. We report the structures of two RNA constructs containing three copies of a r(CAG) [r(3×CAG)] or r(CUG) [r(3×CUG)] motif that were modeled with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics. The 1 × 1 internal loops of r(3×CAG) are stabilized by one-hydrogen bond (cis Watson-Crick/Watson-Crick) AA pairs, while those of r(3×CUG) prefer one- or two-hydrogen bond (cis Watson-Crick/Watson-Crick) UU pairs. Assigned chemical shifts for the residues depended on the identity of neighbors or next nearest neighbors. Additional insights into the dynamics of these RNA constructs were gained by molecular dynamics simulations and a discrete path sampling method. Results indicate that the global structures of the RNA are A-form and that the loop regions are dynamic. The results will be useful for understanding the dynamic trajectory of these RNA repeats but also may aid in the development of therapeutics.

  12. Thiopurines, a previously unrecognised cause for fatigue in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thomas W T; Iser, John H; Sparrow, Miles P; Newnham, Evan D; Headon, Belinda J; Gibson, Peter R

    2009-09-01

    Active inflammatory bowel disease, anaemia, iron deficiency and depression, alone or in combination, are known contributing factors of fatigue in inflammatory bowel disease. However, in some patients, fatigue cannot be attributed to known causes. Thiopurines are not a recognized cause. To describe the clinical scenario of a series of patients where thiopurines were the likely cause of fatigue. The clinical scenario of 5 patients was examined with specific reference to the temporal association of thiopurine therapy with fatigue, the effect of its withdrawal and rechallenge, and drug specificity. The onset of severe fatigue was related to the introduction of azathioprine or 6-mercaptopurine, rapid relief was experienced on its withdrawal in all patients, and fatigue rapidly occurred on rechallenge. The speed of onset was rapid in two patients and in the context of gradual withdrawal of moderate steroid dose, but recurred rapidly on rechallenge when not on steroids. Marked fatigue is a previously unrecognized adverse effect of thiopurines. It does not appear to be drug-specific. Its onset might be masked by concurrent steroid therapy.

  13. Traffic air pollution and mortality from cardiovascular disease and all causes: a Danish cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raaschou-Nielsen Ole

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traffic air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular mortality, which might be due to co-exposure to road traffic noise. Further, personal and lifestyle characteristics might modify any association. Methods We followed up 52 061 participants in a Danish cohort for mortality in the nationwide Register of Causes of Death, from enrollment in 1993–1997 through 2009, and traced their residential addresses from 1971 onwards in the Central Population Registry. We used dispersion-modelled concentration of nitrogen dioxide (NO2 since 1971 as indicator of traffic air pollution and used Cox regression models to estimate mortality rate ratios (MRRs with adjustment for potential confounders. Results Mean levels of NO2 at the residence since 1971 were significantly associated with mortality from cardiovascular disease (MRR, 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06–1.51, per doubling of NO2 concentration and all causes (MRR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.04–1.23, per doubling of NO2 concentration after adjustment for potential confounders. For participants who ate  Conclusions Traffic air pollution is associated with mortality from cardiovascular diseases and all causes, after adjustment for traffic noise. The association was strongest for people with a low fruit and vegetable intake.

  14. Citrus leprosis virus N: A New Dichorhavirus Causing Citrus Leprosis Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-González, Pedro Luis; Chabi-Jesus, Camila; Guerra-Peraza, Orlene; Tassi, Aline Daniele; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Harakava, Ricardo; Salaroli, Renato Barbosa; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana

    2017-08-01

    Citrus leprosis (CL) is a viral disease endemic to the Western Hemisphere that produces local necrotic and chlorotic lesions on leaves, branches, and fruit and causes serious yield reduction in citrus orchards. Samples of sweet orange (Citrus × sinensis) trees showing CL symptoms were collected during a survey in noncommercial citrus areas in the southeast region of Brazil in 2013 to 2016. Transmission electron microscopy analyses of foliar lesions confirmed the presence of rod-like viral particles commonly associated with CL in the nucleus and cytoplasm of infected cells. However, every attempt to identify these particles by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction tests failed, even though all described primers for the detection of known CL-causing cileviruses and dichorhaviruses were used. Next-generation sequencing of total RNA extracts from three symptomatic samples revealed the genome of distinct, although highly related (>92% nucleotide sequence identity), viruses whose genetic organization is similar to that of dichorhaviruses. The genome sequence of these viruses showed trees and those used for the transmission of one of the characterized isolates to Arabidopsis plants were anatomically recognized as Brevipalpus phoenicis sensu stricto. Molecular and biological features indicate that the identified viruses belong to a new species of CL-associated dichorhavirus, which we propose to call Citrus leprosis N dichorhavirus. Our results, while emphasizing the increasing diversity of viruses causing CL disease, lead to a reevaluation of the nomenclature of those viruses assigned to the genus Dichorhavirus. In this regard, a comprehensive discussion is presented.

  15. GOLGA2, encoding a master regulator of golgi apparatus, is mutated in a patient with a neuromuscular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamseldin, Hanan E; Bennett, Alexis H; Alfadhel, Majid; Gupta, Vandana; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2016-02-01

    Golgi apparatus (GA) is a membrane-bound organelle that serves a multitude of critical cellular functions including protein secretion and sorting, and cellular polarity. Many Mendelian diseases are caused by mutations in genes encoding various components of GA. GOLGA2 encodes GM130, a necessary component for the assembly of GA as a single complex, and its deficiency has been found to result in severe cellular phenotypes. We describe the first human patient with a homozygous apparently loss of function mutation in GOLGA2. The phenotype is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by developmental delay, seizures, progressive microcephaly, and muscular dystrophy. Knockdown of golga2 in zebrafish resulted in severe skeletal muscle disorganization and microcephaly recapitulating loss of function human phenotype. Our data suggest an important developmental role of GM130 in humans and zebrafish.

  16. Sugammadex Improves Neuromuscular Function in Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-23

    Feb 23, 2018 ... aminoglycosides), history of allergy to neuromuscular blocking agents, opioids or other drugs, and alcohol and drug dependence. Patients were divided into two ... titration microcalorimetry investigated the likelihood of the formation of complexes between sugammadex and other steroidal and nonsteroidal ...

  17. Neuromuscular transmission: new concepts and agents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, H.D. de

    2009-01-01

    Sugammadex is the first selective relaxant binding agent which was originally designed to reverse the steroidal NMB drug rocuronium. The results of recent studies demonstrate that sugammadex is effective for reversal of rocuronium and vecuronium-induced neuromuscular block without apparent

  18. The Glucocerobrosidase E326K Variant Predisposes to Parkinson’s Disease, But Does Not Cause Gaucher’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Aikaterini V.; Shoai, Maryam; Deas, Emma; Houlden, Henry; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralynn; Cox, Timothy M.; Deegan, Patrick; Schapira, Anthony H.; Lees, Andrew J.; Limousin, Patricia; Jarman, Paul R.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Hardy, John; Foltynie, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Background Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the acid beta-glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) gene, responsible for the recessive lysosomal storage disorder, Gaucher’s disease (GD), are the strongest known risk factor for Parkinson’s disease (PD). Our aim was to assess the contribution of GBA1 mutations in a series of early-onset PD. Methods One hundred and eighty-five PD patients (with an onset age of ≤50) and 283 age-matched controls were screened for GBA1 mutations by Sanger sequencing. Results We show that the frequency of GBA1 mutations is much higher in this patient series than in typical late-onset patient cohorts. Furthermore, our results reveal that the most prevalent PD-associated GBA1 mutation is E326K, a variant that does not, when homozygous, cause GD. Conclusions Our results confirm recent reports that the mutation, E326K, predisposes to PD and suggest that, in addition to reduced GBA1 activity, other molecular mechanisms may contribute to the development of the disease. PMID:23225227

  19. Opinions in Denmark on the causes of peptic ulcer disease. A survey among Danish physicians and patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A H; Gjørup, T; Andersen, I B

    1994-01-01

    of medicine, and working conditions played a causal role. Around 95% of the physicians indicated that medical drugs and smoking were contributory causes of peptic ulcer disease, and around 80% that alcohol and psychologic factors were so. Only 30-40% of the physicians believed that coffee/tea, food habits...... stated more causes than did their male colleagues (p smoking, side effects......, infection, and working conditions could play a causal role in ulcer disease. It is concluded that the opinion on causal agents in peptic ulcer disease differ considerably among both patients and physicians. Opinions on causes of diseases may influence the way we treat and advise our patients, and attempts...

  20. The Role of Neuromuscular Changes in Aging and Knee Osteoarthritis on Dynamic Postural Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Judit; Carpenter, Mark G.; Garland, S. Jayne; Hunt, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joint condition, with 30% of those over the age of 75 exhibiting severe radiographic disease. Nearly 50% of those with knee OA have experienced a fall in the past year. Falls are a considerable public health concern, with a high risk of serious injury and a significant socioeconomic impact. The ability to defend against a fall relies on adequate dynamic postural control, and alterations in dynamic postural control are seen with normal aging. Neuromuscular changes associated with aging may be responsible for some of these alterations in dynamic postural control. Even greater neuromuscular deficits, which may impact dynamic postural control and the ability to defend against a fall, are seen in people with knee OA. There is little evidence to date on how knee OA affects the ability to respond to and defend against falls and the neuromuscular changes that contribute to balance deficits. As a result, this review will: summarize the key characteristics of postural responses to an external perturbation, highlight the changes in dynamic postural control seen with normal aging, review the neuromuscular changes associated with aging that have known and possible effects on dynamic postural control, and summarize the neuromuscular changes and balance problems in knee OA. Future research to better understand the role of neuromuscular changes in knee OA and their effect on dynamic postural control will be suggested. Such an understanding is critical to the successful creation and implementation of fall prevention and treatment programs, in order to reduce the excessive risk of falling in knee OA. PMID:23696951

  1. Causes and timing of end-stage renal disease after living kidney donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matas, Arthur J; Berglund, Danielle M; Vock, David M; Ibrahim, Hassan N

    2018-05-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a risk after kidney donation. We sought, in a large cohort of kidney donors, to determine the causes of donor ESRD, the interval from donation to ESRD, the role of the donor/recipient relationship, and the trajectory of the estimated GFR (eGFR) from donation to ESRD. From 1/1/1963 thru 12/31/2015, 4030 individuals underwent living donor nephrectomy at our center, as well as ascertainment of ESRD status. Of these, 39 developed ESRD (mean age ± standard deviation [SD] at ESRD, 62.4 ± 14.1 years; mean interval between donation and ESRD, 27.1 ± 9.8 years). Donors developing ESRD were more likely to be male, as well as smokers, and younger at donation, and to have donated to a first-degree relative. Of donors with a known cause of ESRD (n = 25), 48% was due to diabetes and/or hypertension; only 2 from a disease that would have affected 1 kidney (cancer). Of those 25 with an ascertainable ESRD cause, 4 shared a similar etiology of ESRD with their recipient. Almost universally, thechange of eGFR over time was stable, until new-onset disease (kidney or systemic). Knowledge of factors contributing to ESRD after living kidney donation can improve donor selection and counseling, as well as long-term postdonation care. © 2018 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  2. Agrarian diet and diseases of affluence – Do evolutionary novel dietary lectins cause leptin resistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jönsson Tommy

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The global pattern of varying prevalence of diseases of affluence, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, suggests that some environmental factor specific to agrarian societies could initiate these diseases. Presentation of the hypothesis We propose that a cereal-based diet could be such an environmental factor. Through previous studies in archaeology and molecular evolution we conclude that humans and the human leptin system are not specifically adapted to a cereal-based diet, and that leptin resistance associated with diseases of affluence could be a sign of insufficient adaptation to such a diet. We further propose lectins as a cereal constituent with sufficient properties to cause leptin resistance, either through effects on metabolism central to the proper functions of the leptin system, and/or directly through binding to human leptin or human leptin receptor, thereby affecting the function. Testing the hypothesis Dietary interventions should compare effects of agrarian and non-agrarian diets on incidence of diseases of affluence, related risk factors and leptin resistance. A non-significant (p = 0.10 increase of cardiovascular mortality was noted in patients advised to eat more whole-grain cereals. Our lab conducted a study on 24 domestic pigs in which a cereal-free hunter-gatherer diet promoted significantly higher insulin sensitivity, lower diastolic blood pressure and lower C-reactive protein as compared to a cereal-based swine feed. Testing should also evaluate the effects of grass lectins on the leptin system in vivo by diet interventions, and in vitro in various leptin and leptin receptor models. Our group currently conducts such studies. Implications of the hypothesis If an agrarian diet initiates diseases of affluence it should be possible to identify the responsible constituents and modify or remove them so as to make an agrarian diet healthier.

  3. Effects of aquatic balance training and detraining on neuromuscular performance and balance in healthy middle aged male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abbasi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since disorders in neuromuscular performance and imbalance are the main cause of fallingamong the middle aged, their aspects including rehabilitation of balance are the main concern theresearchers attend to them. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of eight weeks aquaticbalance training (ABT and detraining on neuromuscular performance and balance in healthy middle agedmale.Materials and Methods: Thirty adult male subjects were randomized into two groups of ABT and control(n=15 per group. Berg balance scale, Timed Up and Go and 5-Chair stand tests, as they are indicators ofbalance and neuromuscular performance in older subjects, were taken as pretest and post-test and after four,six, and eight weeks of detraining as well. The ABT consisted of the sessions that lasted one hour, threetimes a week, for eight weeks.Results: Results showed that neuromuscular performance and balance improved significantly in ABTgroup (P 0.05.Conclusion: ABT can affect neuromuscular performance and balance in healthy middle aged male, andreduce the probability of falling among them. Moreover, the effects of these training are persistent afterdetraining periods. Hence, ABT can be recommended as an effective neuromuscular and balance training inhealthy middle aged male

  4. [A case of liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium nucleatum in a patient with recurrent periodontal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Hwan; Yoon, Hee Jung; Park, Chan Woong; Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Min Kyung; Kim, Ki Bang; Na, Dong Jib; Kim, Ji Myung

    2011-01-01

    Fusobacteria are anaerobic gram-negative, non-spore forming bacilli found in normal flora of the oral cavity, urogenital tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Fusobacterium nucleatum has been seldom reported as a cause of liver abscess, particularly in immunocompetent hosts. A 55-year-old man with frequent periodontal disease visited our hospital with intermittent fever and headache for 2 months. Abdominal CT scan revealed an 8.2 × 6 cm mass in the right hepatic lobe with central low density. Abscess culture revealed F. nucleatum as the causative organism. Percutaneous abscess drainage and intravenous administration of antibiotics for 4 weeks improved symptoms and decreased the abscess size. We report a rare case of liver abscess due to F. nucleatum in an immunocompetent man with periodontal disease.

  5. Mushroom tumor: a new disease on Flammulina velutipes caused by Ochrobactrum pseudogrignonense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhipeng; Peng, Weihong; He, Xiaolan; Wang, Bo; Gan, Bingcheng; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Mushroom tumor on Flammulina velutipes has become the main disease during the off-season cultivation of F. velutipes while the causal organism has remained unknown. The present study was aimed at identifying the pathogen confirming its pathogenisity following Koch's Postulates, characterizing it using morphological, physiological, biochemical and molecular features, and studying its current distribution. We determined that mushroom tumor is a new bacterial infection disease caused by Ochrobactrum pseudogrignonense. It produces tumor-like structures on the surface of the substrate, and inhibits the formation of primordia and fruiting of F. velutipes. The molecular studies showed that this new pathogen is closely related to Ochrobactrum based on 16S rRNA sequences. This is the first time that Ochrobactrum has been shown to be a pathogen of a mushroom. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Onychomadesis outbreak in Valencia, Spain associated with hand, foot, and mouth disease caused by enteroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davia, Javier López; Bel, Pablo Hernández; Ninet, Violeta Zaragoza; Bracho, María Alma; González-Candelas, Fernando; Salazar, Antonio; Gobernado, Miguel; Bosch, Isabel Febrer

    2011-01-01

    This report evaluates the June 2008 onychomadesis outbreak in Valencia, Spain. The study sample consisted of 221 onychomadesis cases and 77 nonaffected individuals who lived close to those affected. We collected data on dietary variables, hygiene products, and individual pathological histories. Feces and blood specimens were collected from 44 cases and 24 controls to evaluate exposure to infectious agents. Pathological background data revealed a high frequency (61%) of hand, foot, and mouth disease among the onychomadesis cases. Coxsackievirus A10 was the most commonly detected enterovirus in both case and control groups (49%). Other enteroviruses such as coxsackieviruses A5, A6, A16, B1, and B3; echoviruses 3, 4, and 9; and enterovirus 71 were present in low frequencies in the case and control groups (3-9%). The 2008 onychomadesis outbreak in the metropolitan area of Valencia was associated with an outbreak of hand, foot, and mouth disease primarily caused by coxsackievirus A10. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Increased all-cause mortality with psychotropic medication in Parkinson's disease and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rune; Baandrup, Lone; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Use of medication and polypharmacy is common as the population ages and its disease burden increases. We evaluated the association of antidepressants, benzodiazepines, antipsychotics and combinations of psychotropic drugs with all-cause mortality in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD...... of psychotropic medication in PD patients and controls. Hazard ratios were as follows for the medication types: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin-noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors, PD HR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.04-1.36; Control HR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.64-1.91; benzodiazepines, PD HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.......20-1.76; Control HR = 2.00, 95% CI 1.66-2.43; and combinations of these drugs compared with non-medicated PD patients and controls. Discontinuation of medication was associated with decreased mortality in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The use of psychotropic medication in the elderly is associated with increased...

  8. Occupational heavy lifting and risk of ischemic heart disease and all-cause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christina Bjørk; Eriksen, Louise; Tolstrup, Janne S

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Occupational heavy lifting is known to impose a high cardiovascular strain, but the risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) from occupational heavy lifting is unknown. The objective was to investigate the association between occupational heavy lifting and risk of IHD and all...... cardiovascular disease at baseline. Conventional risk factors for the outcomes IHD and all-cause mortality were controlled for in Cox analyses. RESULTS: Among men, heavy lifting was associated with increased risk for IHD (hazard ratio (HR): 1.52, 95 % Confidence interval (95 % CI): 1.15, 2.02), while a decreased...... risk was associated with occupational (HR: 0.50, 95 % CI: 0.37, 0.68) and leisure time (HR: 0.73, 95 % CI: 0.56, 0.95) physical activity. Referencing men with high occupational physical activity and no heavy lifting, men with high occupational physical activity and heavy lifting did not have...

  9. A de novo SOX10 mutation causing severe type 4 Waardenburg syndrome without Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznajer, Yves; Coldéa, Cristina; Meire, Françoise; Delpierre, Isabelle; Sekhara, Tayeb; Touraine, Renaud L

    2008-04-15

    Type 4 Waardenburg syndrome represents a well define entity caused by neural crest derivatives anomalies (melanocytes, intrinsic ganglion cells, central, autonomous and peripheral nervous systems) leading, with variable expressivity, to pigmentary anomalies, deafness, mental retardation, peripheral neuropathy, and Hirschsprung disease. Autosomal dominant mode of inheritance is prevalent when Sox10 gene mutation is identified. We report the natural history of a child who presented with synophrys, vivid blue eye, deafness, bilateral complete semicircular canals agenesis with mental retardation, subtle signs for peripheral neuropathy and lack of Hirschsprung disease. SOX10 gene sequencing identified "de novo" splice site mutation (c.698-2A > C). The present phenotype and the genotype findings underline the wide spectrum of SOX10 gene implication in unusual type 4 Waardenburg syndrome patient. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Anti-Mur as the most likely cause of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtary, Sara; Gikas, Anastasia; Glader, Bertil; Andrews, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Although rare in the United States, anti-Mur is relatively common in Southeast Asia and has been reported to have clinical significance in Chinese and Taiwanese populations. The infant was full term and the second child of a Chinese mother and Vietnamese father, presenting with jaundice. He was clinically diagnosed with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia. The direct antiglobulin test indicated that the infant's red blood cells were coated only with anti-IgG. Anti-Mur was identified in the maternal serum and the neonate's plasma. The father was found to be positive for the Mur antigen. The cause of the infant's hemolytic anemia was determined to be most likely anti-Mur. Since anti-Mur is implicated in causing hemolytic disease of the newborn, it is important to recognize this antibody more commonly found in Asian patients in the United States as the Mur+ phenotype has a higher prevalence in this population. © 2016 AABB.

  11. Effect of gamma radiation treatment on some fungi causing storage diseases of banana fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Ashmawi, A.M.M.

    1982-01-01

    Banana is one of the most popular fruits in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. in recent years, the quality of egyptian banana markedly declined. A major factor contributing to this decline is the development of fruit rot, which is the most widely occurring disease either in the field or in storage. Different fungi attack banana fruits causing considerable losses. Most of the fungi responsible for post harvest rots of banana are usually carried from the field, on the surface of the fruit itself or in injured and rotting fruits causing severe rats during storage. These rots make the fruits difficult to handle and undesirable to the consumers. Botryodiplodia theobromae is known to be the most important pathogen responsible for the infection in storage

  12. [Causes of lymphocytic meningitis in people with HIV admitted to the Infectious Disease department of Conakry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traoré, F A; Cissoko, Y; Tounkara, T M; Sako, F B; Mouelle, A D; Kpami, D O; Traoré, M; Doumbouya, M

    2015-01-01

    The advent of HIV infection has significantly changed the distribution of the causes of lymphocytic meningitis. The objective of this study was to identify these causes among persons with HIV hospitalized in the infectious disease department of the CHU of Conakry. This retrospective study examined hospital records of patients with HIV infection admitted for lymphocytic meningitis over a 10-year period. Of the 8649 hospitalizations in the department during the study period, 3167 patients had HIV infection, and 85 of the latter were diagnosed with lymphocytic meningitis. Slightly more than half were male (sex ratio M/F = 1.1). Their mean age was 32 years. Of these 85 patients, 73 were positive for HIV-1 only and 12 for HIV1+2. A CD4 count was performed only in 13/85 patients and averaged 140 cells/mm3. The main causes associated with lymphocytic meningitis were cryptococcosis (58%), toxoplasmosis (5%), and tuberculosis (2%). Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Hæmophilus influenzae were also identified in 16% of cases. In 18% of cases no microbe was identified. The overall lethality rate was 68%; it reached 100% for tuberculous meningitis and for the cases without any identified cause and was 75%-76% for the patients with toxoplasmosis and cryptococcosis. The survival rate was 100% for all bacterial causes. A cause for lymphocytic meningitis was identified in more than 81% of the patients in our series, and the most common microbe was Cryptococcus neoformans. A better microbiological technical platform and improved accessibility to treatment would enable us to provide more relevant results and treatment.

  13. [Occupational diseases caused by ionizing radiation in Poland, 1971-2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyńska, Urszula; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila

    2008-01-01

    The whole spectrum of disorders of the hematopoietic tissue, eye and skin induced by ionizing radiation covers complex pathologies termed as a postirradiation syndrome, as well as various malignancies. The aim of this work is to present the data on incidence of occupational diseases with ionizing radiation as a causative agent. The work is based on the data compiled from "Occupational Diseases Reporting Forms" for the years 1971-2006 collected in the Central Register of Occupational Diseases. The incidence of certified occupational diseases with ionizing radiation as a causative agent is expressed in absolute numbers and the rate per 100 000 employees. The data comprise information on disease entities, gender, age, exposure duration and the branch of national economy. In total, 599 diseases (0.2% of all occupational diseases) were diagnosed as those induced by ionizong radiation. Annual incidence rates per 100,000 employees fell within the range of 0.0-0.7. Miners formed the major (51.9%) occupational group affected by ionizing radiation. They were followed by health care (34.3%) and construction (6.4%) workers. Cancers made over 50% of pathologies located at 28 sites. These included cancers of lung (59.2%), skin (10.0%) and hematopoietic tissue (8.7%). Almost all (99.35) diseases recorded in the mining industry were cancers. Non-cancer diseases were more frequent in health care workers, among them postradiation cataract occupied the first place. A great deal of reported cancer sites give rise to controversy in terms of the cause-effect association with ionizing radiation exposure and also due to incomplete data on exposure level. Postradiation cancers among health care workers have not been registered over recent years, which means that occupational exposure surveillance carried out for many years proves to be effective. Distant effects of exposure to ionizing radiation, revealed in workers of no longer existing uranium mine, appeared to be a particular problem

  14. Occupational Diseases Caused by Ionizing Radiation in Poland, 1971-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilczynska, U.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.

    2008-01-01

    The whole spectrum of disorders of the hematopoietic tissue, eye and skin induced by ionizing radiation covers complex pathologies termed as a postirradiation syndrome, as well as various malignancies. The aim of this work is to present the data on incidence of occupational diseases with ionizing radiation as a causative agent. The work is based on the data compiled from 'Occupational Diseases Reporting Forms' for the years 1971-2006 collected in the Central Register of Occupational Diseases. The incidence of certified occupational diseases with ionizing radiation as a causative agent is expressed in absolute numbers and the rate per 100 000 employees. The data comprise information on disease entities, gender, age, exposure duration and the branch of national economy. In total, 599 diseases (0.2% of all occupational diseases) were diagnosed as those induced by ionizing radiation. Annual incidence rates per 100 000 employees fell within the range of 0.0-0.7. Miners formed the major (51.9%) occupational group affected by ionizing radiation. They were followed by health care (34.3%) and construction (6.4%) workers. Cancers made over 50% of pathologies located at 28 sites. These included cancers of lung (59.2%), skin (10.0%) and hematopoietic tissue (8.7%). Almost all (99.35) diseases recorded in the mining industry were cancers. Non-cancer diseases were more frequent in health care workers, among them postradiation cataract occupied the first place. A great deal of reported cancer sites give rise to controversy in terms of the cause-effect association with ionizing radiation exposure and also due to incomplete data on exposure duration. Postradiation cancers among health care workers have not been registered over recent years, which means that occupational exposure surveillance carried out for many years proves to be effective. Distant effects of exposure to ionizing radiation, revealed in workers of no longer existing uranium mine, appeared to be a particular problem

  15. Network analysis of differential expression for the identification of disease-causing genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Nitsch

    Full Text Available Genetic studies (in particular linkage and association studies identify chromosomal regions involved in a disease or phenotype of interest, but those regions often contain many candidate genes, only a few of which can be followed-up for biological validation. Recently, computational methods to identify (prioritize the most promising candidates within a region have been proposed, but they are usually not applicable to cases where little is known about the phenotype (no or few confirmed disease genes, fragmentary understanding of the biological cascades involved. We seek to overcome this limitation by replacing knowledge about the biological process by experimental data on differential gene expression between affected and healthy individuals. Considering the problem from the perspective of a gene/protein network, we assess a candidate gene by considering the level of differential expression in its neighborhood under the assumption that strong candidates will tend to be surrounded by differentially expressed neighbors. We define a notion of soft neighborhood where each gene is given a contributing weight, which decreases with the distance from the candidate gene on the protein network. To account for multiple paths between genes, we define the distance using the Laplacian exponential diffusion kernel. We score candidates by aggregating the differential expression of neighbors weighted as a function of distance. Through a randomization procedure, we rank candidates by p-values. We illustrate our approach on four monogenic diseases and successfully prioritize the known disease causing genes.

  16. Recent Trends in Control Methods for Bacterial Wilt Diseases Caused by Ralstonia solanacearum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliar; Nion, Yanetri Asi; Toyota, Koki

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have described the development of control methods against bacterial wilt diseases caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. This review focused on recent advances in control measures, such as biological, physical, chemical, cultural, and integral measures, as well as biocontrol efficacy and suppression mechanisms. Biological control agents (BCAs) have been dominated by bacteria (90%) and fungi (10%). Avirulent strains of R. solanacearum, Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., and Streptomyces spp. are well-known BCAs. New or uncommon BCAs have also been identified such as Acinetobacter sp., Burkholderia sp., and Paenibacillus sp. Inoculation methods for BCAs affect biocontrol efficacy, such as pouring or drenching soil, dipping of roots, and seed coatings. The amendment of different organic matter, such as plant residue, animal waste, and simple organic compounds, have frequently been reported to suppress bacterial wilt diseases. The combined application of BCAs and their substrates was shown to more effectively suppress bacterial wilt in the tomato. Suppression mechanisms are typically attributed to the antibacterial metabolites produced by BCAs or those present in natural products; however, the number of studies related to host resistance to the pathogen is increasing. Enhanced/modified soil microbial communities are also indirectly involved in disease suppression. New promising types of control measures include biological soil disinfection using substrates that release volatile compounds. This review described recent advances in different control measures. We focused on the importance of integrated pest management (IPM) for bacterial wilt diseases. PMID:25762345

  17. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis caused by primary Epstein-Barr virus in patient with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdis, Francesco; Tacci, Sara; Messina, Federico; Varcada, Massimo

    2013-11-27

    We present a case of a 19-year-old man with a 6-year history of Crohn's disease (CD), previously treated with 6-mercaptopurine, who was admitted to our department for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and subsequently developed a hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). HLH is a rare disease which causes phagocytosis of all bone marrow derived cells. It can be a primary form as a autosomic recessive disease, or a secondary form associated with a variety of infections; EBV is the most common, the one with poorer prognosis. The incidence of lymphoproliferative disorders was increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treated with thiopurines. Specific EBV-related clinical and virological management should be considered when treating a patient with IBD with immunosuppressive therapy. Moreover EBV infection in immunosuppressed patient can occur with more aggressive forms such as encephalitis and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Our case confirms what is described in the literature; patients with IBD, particularly patients with CD receiving thiopurine therapy, who present 5 d of fever and cervical lymphadenopathy or previous evidence of lymphopenia should be screened for HLH.

  18. Effect of Selenium Supplementation on Recurrent Hyperthyroidism Caused by Graves' Disease: A Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Wang, B; Chen, S R; Hou, X; Wang, X F; Zhao, S H; Song, J Q; Wang, Y G

    2016-09-01

    The effect of selenium supplementation on recurrent hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease is unclear. Our study aimed to assess the efficacy of selenium supplementation therapy on recurrent Graves' disease. Forty-one patients with recurrent Graves' disease were enrolled in this study. All patients received the routine treatment using methimazole (MMI), while patients allocated to the selenium group received additional selenium therapy for 6 months. The influence of selenium supplementation on the concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-TSH-receptor antibodies (TRAb), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) were assessed. The remission rate was also compared between 2 groups. There was no obvious difference in the demographic data and the levels of serum FT4, FT3, TSH, and TRAb between the 2 groups at baseline. Both FT4 and FT3 decreased more at 2 months in the selenium group than the controls, while the TSH level increased more in patients receiving selenium supplementation (pGraves' disease. Randomized trials with large number of participants are needed to validate the finding above. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. A long-lasting pandemic: diseases caused by dust containing silica: Italy within the international context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, F; Baldasseroni, A

    2005-01-01

    Diseases caused by dust containing silica represent an exemplary case study in the field of work-related diseases and in the history of the discovery of chronic industrial disease and its relationship to industrial society. Both dust and steam are indissolubly linked to the Industrial Revolution which everywhere was expected to replace slaves with masses of proletarians alike lesser gods. The identification of different nosological entities of dust-related diseases, the discovery that the most harmful dust particles in gold mines were invisible, insurance compensation and the development of the silicosis threshold limit value were all subjects of intense political negotiation that accompanied, with the connivance of doctors and scientists, a compromise between the health of workers and the economic health of industry. The preference for damage compensation (insurance system) over risk prevention (industrial hygienic measures) was also asserted and maintained in post-war Italy. Decline and modification of silicosis in Italy proceeded at the same rate as the introduction and subsequent application of more effective preventative legislation, especially with the protest movements of the working class at the end of the 1960s, together with the elimination of entire sectors of industrial activities, first those specialising in extraction and then the metallurgy.

  20. PRKAR1A mutation causing pituitary-dependent Cushing disease in a patient with Carney complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Florian W; Winhofer, Yvonne; Iacovazzo, Donato; Korbonits, Márta; Wolfsberger, Stefan; Knosp, Engelbert; Trautinger, Franz; Höftberger, Romana; Krebs, Michael; Luger, Anton; Gessl, Alois

    2017-08-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is an autosomal dominant condition caused, in most cases, by an inactivating mutation of the PRKAR1A gene, which encodes for the type 1 alpha regulatory subunit of protein kinase A. CNC is characterized by the occurrence of endocrine overactivity, myxomas and typical skin manifestations. Cushing syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is the most frequent endocrine disease observed in CNC. Here, we describe the first case of a patient with CNC and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing disease due to a pituitary corticotroph adenoma. Loss-of-heterozygosity analysis of the pituitary tumour revealed loss of the wild-type copy of PRKAR1A , suggesting a role of this gene in the pituitary adenoma development. PRKAR1A loss-of-function mutations can rarely lead to ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas in CNC patients. Pituitary-dependent disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Cushing syndrome in CNC patients. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  1. Changes in insulin and insulin signaling in Alzheimer’s disease: cause or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Molly; Macauley, Shannon L.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD), although the causal relationship remains poorly understood. Alterations in insulin signaling (IS) are reported in the AD brain. Moreover, oligomers/fibrils of amyloid-β (Aβ) can lead to neuronal insulin resistance and intranasal insulin is being explored as a potential therapy for AD. Conversely, elevated insulin levels (ins) are found in AD patients and high insulin has been reported to increase Aβ levels and tau phosphorylation, which could exacerbate AD pathology. Herein, we explore whether changes in ins and IS are a cause or consequence of AD. PMID:27432942

  2. Causes of Death Data in the Global Burden of Disease Estimates for Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Iversen, Helle K

    2015-01-01

    on the International Classification of Diseases and the pathology behind each code by checking multiple causes of death and literature review. RESULTS: Unspecified stroke and primary and secondary hypertension are leading contributing 'GCs' to stroke mortality estimates for hemorrhagic stroke (HS) and ischemic stroke...... (IS). There were marked differences in the fraction of death assigned to IS and HS for unspecified stroke and hypertension between GBD regions and between age groups. CONCLUSIONS: A large proportion of stroke fatalities are derived from the redistribution of 'unspecified stroke' and 'hypertension...

  3. A novel Enterovirus 96 circulating in China causes hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Sun, Yisuo; Ma, Jinmin; Zhou, Shuru; Fang, Wei; Ye, Jiawei; Tan, Limei; Ji, Jingkai; Luo, Dan; Li, Liqiang; Li, Jiandong; Fang, Chunxiao; Pei, Na; Shi, Shuo; Liu, Xin; Jiang, Hui; Gong, Sitang; Xu, Xun

    2017-06-01

    Enterovirus 96 (EV-96) is a recently described member of the species Enterovirus C and is associated with paralysis and myelitis. In this study, using metagenomic sequencing, we identified a new enterovirus 96 strain (EV-96-SZ/GD/CHN/2014) as the sole pathogen causing hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). A genomic comparison showed that EV-96-SZ/GD/CHN/2014 is most similar to the EV-96-05517 strain (85% identity), which has also been detected in Guangdong Province. This is the first time that metagenomic sequencing has been used to identify an EV-96 strain shown to be associated with HFMD.

  4. Intensity versus duration of cycling, impact on all-cause and coronary heart disease mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnohr, Peter; Marott, Jacob L; Jensen, Jan S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Current recommendations prescribe that every adult should accumulate 30¿minutes or more of moderate physical activity in leisure time, preferably every day of the week. The optimal intensity, duration, and frequency still have to be established. The aim of this study was to examine......: Our findings indicate that the relative intensity, and not the duration of cycling, is of more importance in relation to all-cause and coronary heart disease mortality. Thus our general recommendations to all adults would be that brisk cycling is preferable to slow....

  5. Do musculoskeletal degenerative diseases affect mortality and cause of death after 10 years in Japan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Masaki; Hasegawa, Yukiharu; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Sadao; Suzuki, Koji; Imagama, Shiro

    2011-03-01

    There are several reports from Europe and the United States on mortality from musculoskeletal degenerative diseases; however, no reports have been published from Japan. This study is the first that has examined whether musculoskeletal degenerative diseases affect life prognosis in Japan. As many as 944 persons who were 60 years of age and older and who underwent one or more musculoskeletal checkups (knee, lower back, and bone mineral density examination) were enrolled. Survival and death after 10 years were examined. For each knee, lower back, and bone mineral density examination, subjects were divided into normal and abnormal groups. For each of the examinations (knee, lower back, or bone mineral density), 10-year mortality was compared between the two groups. Also, causes of death were examined after 10 years. As many as 805 subjects survived and 125 died. For those with and without osteoarthritis of the knee, mortality after 10 years was 17 and 10%, respectively. For those with and without lower back abnormalities, mortality after 10 years was 12 and 14%, respectively. For those with or without low bone mineral density, mortality after 10 years was 17 and 10%, respectively. Multivariate analysis adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, and lifestyle revealed that odds ratio of death after 10 years was 2.32 and 2.33 in the presence of osteoarthritis of the knee and a low bone mineral density, respectively, and thus the risk of death after 10 years was significantly high. With regard to the cause of death, cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases were most frequently evident in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Musculoskeletal degenerative diseases influence mortality after 10 years.

  6. Xanthomonas euvesicatoria Causes Bacterial Spot Disease on Pepper Plant in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Seong Kyeon

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, bacterial spot-causing xanthomonads (BSX were reclassified into 4 species—Xanthomonas euvesicatoria, X. vesicatoria, X. perforans, and X. gardneri. Bacterial spot disease on pepper plant in Korea is known to be caused by both X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria and X. vesicatoria. Here, we reidentified the pathogen causing bacterial spots on pepper plant based on the new classification. Accordingly, 72 pathogenic isolates were obtained from the lesions on pepper plants at 42 different locations. All isolates were negative for pectolytic activity. Five isolates were positive for amylolytic activity. All of the Korean pepper isolates had a 32 kDa-protein unique to X. euvesicatoria and had the same band pattern of the rpoB gene as that of X. euvesicatoria and X. perforans as indicated by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. A phylogenetic tree of 16S rDNA sequences showed that all of the Korean pepper plant isolates fit into the same group as did all the reference strains of X. euvesicatoria and X. perforans. A phylogenetic tree of the nucleotide sequences of 3 housekeeping genes—gapA, gyrB, and lepA showed that all of the Korean pepper plant isolates fit into the same group as did all of the references strains of X. euvesicatoria. Based on the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, we identified the pathogen as X. euvesicatoria. Neither X. vesicatoria, the known pathogen of pepper bacterial spot, nor X. perforans, the known pathogen of tomato plant, was isolated. Thus, we suggest that the pathogen causing bacterial spot disease of pepper plants in Korea is X. euvesicatoria.

  7. Association of TSH Elevation with All-Cause Mortality in Elderly Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Hsing Chuang

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a widespread condition in the global population and is more common in the elderly. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH level increases with aging, and hypothyroidism is highly prevalent in CKD patients. However, the relationship between low thyroid function and mortality in CKD patients is unclear. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective cohort study to examine the relationship between TSH elevation and all-cause mortality in elderly patients with CKD. This retrospective cohort study included individuals ≥65 years old with CKD (n = 23,786 in Taipei City. Health examination data from 2005 to 2010 were provided by the Taipei Databank for Public Health Analysis. Subjects were categorized according to thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH level as follows: low normal (0.34disease (coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, cerebral vascular disease, history of cancer, and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Our results showed that compared to the reference group (middle normal TSH, the risk of all-cause mortality was increased in the elevated I group (hazard ratio [HR], 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.45 and elevated II group (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.00-1.69. We found a significant association between TSH elevation and all-cause mortality in this cohort of elderly persons with CKD. However, determining the benefit of treatment for moderately elevated TSH level (5.2-10 mIU/L in elderly patients with CKD will require a

  8. Estimating the global burden of thalassogenic diseases: human infectious diseases caused by wastewater pollution of the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, Hillel

    2003-06-01

    This paper presents a preliminary attempt at obtaining an order-of-magnitude estimate of the global burden of disease (GBD) of human infectious diseases associated with swimming/bathing in coastal waters polluted by wastewater, and eating raw or lightly steamed filter-feeding shellfish harvested from such waters. Such diseases will be termed thalassogenic--caused by the sea. Until recently these human health effects have been viewed primarily as local phenomena, not generally included in the world agenda of marine scientists dealing with global marine pollution problems. The massive global scale of the problem can be visualized when one considers that the wastewater and human body wastes of a significant portion of the world's population who reside along the coastline or in the vicinity of the sea are discharged daily, directly or indirectly, into the marine coastal waters, much of it with little or no treatment. Every cubic metre of raw domestic wastewater discharged into the sea can carry millions of infectious doses of pathogenic microorganisms. It is estimated that globally, foreign and local tourists together spend some 2 billion man-days annually at coastal recreational resorts and many are often exposed there to coastal waters polluted by wastewater. Annually some 800 million meals of potentially contaminated filter-feeding shellfish/bivalves and other sea foods, harvested in polluted waters are consumed, much of it raw or lightly steamed. A number of scientific studies have shown that swimmers swallow significant amounts of polluted seawater and can become ill with gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases from the pathogens they ingest. Based on risk assessments from the World Health Organization (WHO) and academic research sources the present study has made an estimate that globally, each year, there are in excess of 120 million cases of gastrointestinal disease and in excess of 50 million cases of more severe respiratory diseases caused by swimming and

  9. T₂ mapping provides multiple approaches for the characterization of muscle involvement in neuromuscular diseases: a cross-sectional study of lower leg muscles in 5-15-year-old boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpan, Ishu; Forbes, Sean C; Lott, Donovan J; Senesac, Claudia R; Daniels, Michael J; Triplett, William T; Deol, Jasjit K; Sweeney, H Lee; Walter, Glenn A; Vandenborne, Krista

    2013-03-01

    Skeletal muscles of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) show enhanced susceptibility to damage and progressive lipid infiltration, which contribute to an increase in the MR proton transverse relaxation time (T₂). Therefore, the examination of T₂ changes in individual muscles may be useful for the monitoring of disease progression in DMD. In this study, we used the mean T₂, percentage of elevated pixels and T₂ heterogeneity to assess changes in the composition of dystrophic muscles. In addition, we used fat saturation to distinguish T₂ changes caused by edema and inflammation from fat infiltration in muscles. Thirty subjects with DMD and 15 age-matched controls underwent T₂ -weighted imaging of their lower leg using a 3-T MR system. T₂ maps were developed and four lower leg muscles were manually traced (soleus, medial gastrocnemius, peroneal and tibialis anterior). The mean T₂ of the traced regions of interest, width of the T₂ histograms and percentage of elevated pixels were calculated. We found that, even in young children with DMD, lower leg muscles showed elevated mean T₂, were more heterogeneous and had a greater percentage of elevated pixels than in controls. T₂ measures decreased with fat saturation, but were still higher (P muscles than in controls. Further, T₂ measures showed positive correlations with timed functional tests (r = 0.23-0.79). The elevated T₂ measures with and without fat saturation at all ages of DMD examined (5-15 years) compared with unaffected controls indicate that the dystrophic muscles have increased regions of damage, edema and fat infiltration. This study shows that T₂ mapping provides multiple approaches that can be used effectively to characterize muscle tissue in children with DMD, even in the early stages of the disease. Therefore, T₂ mapping may prove to be clinically useful in the monitoring of muscle changes caused by the disease process or by therapeutic interventions in DMD

  10. Managing scab diseases of potato and radish caused by Streptomyces spp. using Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BAC03 and other biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptomyces spp. cause scab disease in plants like potato and radish. To seek effective control methods of this disease, biologically based materials were examined on their efficacies for disease control. In greenhouse or growth chamber tests, potting soil was infested with Streptomyces scabies (10...

  11. Identification and Chacterization of new strains of Enterobacter spp. causing Mulberry (Morus alba) wilt disease in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new mulberry wilt disease (MWD) was recently identified in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China. Typical symptoms of the disease are dark brown discolorations in vascular tissues, leaf wilt, defoliation, and tree decline. Unlike the bacterial wilt disease caused by Ralstonia solanacearum, the leaf w...

  12. Sugammadex as a reversal agent for neuromuscular block: an evidence-based review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Stefan Josef; Fink, Heidrun

    2013-01-01

    Sugammadex is the first clinical representative of a new class of drugs called selective relaxant binding agents. It has revolutionized the way anesthesiologists think about drug reversal. Sugammadex selectively binds rocuronium or vecuronium, thereby reversing their neuromuscular blocking action. Due to its 1:1 binding of rocuronium or vecuronium, it is able to reverse any depth of neuromuscular block. So far, it has been approved for use in adult patients and for pediatric patients over 2 years. Since its approval in Europe, Japan, and Australia, further insight on its use in special patient populations and specific diseases have become available. Due to its pharmacodynamic profile, sugammadex, in combination with rocuronium, may have the potential to displace succinylcholine as the “gold standard” muscle relaxant for rapid sequence induction. The use of rocuronium or vecuronium, with the potential of reverse of their action with sugammadex, seems to be safe in patients with impaired neuromuscular transmission, ie, neuromuscular diseases, including myasthenia gravis. Data from long-term use of sugammadex is not yet available. Evidence suggesting an economic advantage of using sugammadex and justifying its relatively high cost for an anesthesia-related drug, is missing. PMID:24098155

  13. Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980–2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Haidong; Naghavi, Mohsen; Allen, Christine; Barber, R.M.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Carter, Austin; Casey, Daniel C.; Charlson, Fiona J.; Chen, Alan Z.; Coates, M.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background
    Improving survival and extending the longevity of life for all populations requires timely, robust evidence on local mortality levels and trends. The Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study (GBD 2015) provides a comprehensive assessment of all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 249

  14. Global, regional, and national age-sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990-2013 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naghavi, Mohsen; Wang, Haidong; Lozano, Rafael; Davis, Adrian; Liang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Maigeng; Vollset, Stein Emil; Ozgoren, Ayse Abbasoglu; Abdalla, Safa; Abd-Allah, Foad; Aziz, Muna I. Abdel; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Aboyans, Victor; Abraham, Biju; Abraham, Jerry P.; Abuabara, Katrina E.; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen M. E.; Achoki, Tom; Adelekan, Ademola; Ademi, Zanfi Na; Adofo, Koranteng; Adou, Arsene Kouablan; Adsuar, Jose C.; Aernlov, Johan; Agardh, Emilie Elisabet; Akena, Dickens; Al Khabouri, Mazin J.; Alasfoor, Deena; Albittar, Mohammed; Alegretti, Miguel Angel; Aleman, Alicia V.; Alemu, Zewdie Aderaw; Alfonso-Cristancho, Rafael; Alhabib, Samia; Ali, Mohammed K.; Ali, Raghib; Alla, Francois; Al Lami, Faris; Allebeck, Peter; AlMazroa, Mohammad A.; Salman, Rustam Al-Shahi; Alsharif, Ubai; Alvarez, Elena; Alviz-Guzman, Nelson; Amankwaa, Adansi A.; Amare, Azmeraw T.; Ameli, Omid; Hoek, Hans W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Up-to-date evidence on levels and trends for age-sex-specifi c all-cause and cause-specifi c mortality is essential for the formation of global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) we estimated yearly deaths for 188 countries

  15. Estimating neuromuscular stimulation within the human torso with Taser stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongyu; Webster, John G

    2007-11-07

    Designers of electromuscular incapacitation devices need to know efficacy. Which areas of nerve and muscle are stimulated and are these areas adequate to cause incapacitation? This paper focuses on efficacy, which used a torso-sized finite element model with a mesh of about 5 mm. To estimate the neuromuscular regions stimulated by the Taser X26, calculations of electric current density and field strength values with 1 A inserted into the torso using the Utah 3D mesh were made. Field-times-duration values for given Taser stimulation were calculated. Then the region where the motor nerve was stimulated by the Taser was estimated by using a field-times-duration threshold from Reilly (1998 'Applied Bioelectricity: From Electrical Stimulation to Electropathology ' (New York: Springer)). Neuromuscular stimulation occurred up to about 19 cm away from the darts and included the spinal cord. The current density at the heart for dart separation less than 10 cm was smaller than for larger dart separation. Users of finite element computer models will find information for torso models and their creation, meshing and operation.

  16. Clinical characteristics of chronic kidney disease of nontraditional causes in Salvadoran farming communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M; Almaguer, Miguel; Alfonso, Pedro; Bayarre, Héctor D; Leiva, Irma M; Smith, Magaly J; Cubias, Ricardo A; Torres, Carlos G; Almendárez, Walter O; Cubias, Francisco R; Morales, Fabrizio E; Magaña, Salvador; Amaya, Juan C; Perdomo, Edgard; Ventura, Mercedes C; Villatoro, Juan F; Vela, Xavier F; Zelaya, Susana M; Granados, Delmy V; Vela, Eduardo; Orellana, Patricia; Hevia, Reynaldo; Fuentes, E Jackeline; Mañalich, Reinaldo; Bacallao, Raymed; Ugarte, Mario; Arias, María I; Chávez, Jackelin; Flores, Nelson E; Aparicio, Claudia E

    2014-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a serious health problem in El Salvador. Since the 1990s, there has been an increase in cases unassociated with traditional risk factors. It is the second leading cause of death in men aged >18 years. In 2009, it was the first cause of in-hospital death for men and the fifth for women. The disease has not been thoroughly studied. Characterize clinical manifestations (including extrarenal) and pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease of nontraditional causes in Salvadoran farming communities. A descriptive clinical study was carried out in 46 participants (36 men, 10 women), identified through chronic kidney disease population screening of 5018 persons. Inclusion criteria were age 18-59 years; chronic kidney disease at stages 2, 3a and 3b, or at 3a and 3b with diabetes or hypertension and without proteinuria; normal fundoscopic exam; no structural abnormalities on renal ultrasound; and HIV-negative. Examinations included social determinants; psychological assessment; clinical exam of organs and systems; hematological and biochemical parameters in blood and urine; urine sediment analysis; markers of renal damage; glomerular and tubular function; and liver, pancreas and lung functions. Renal, prostate and gynecological ultrasound; and Doppler echocardiography and peripheral vascular and renal Doppler ultrasound were performed. Patient distribution by chronic kidney disease stages: 2 (32.6%), 3a (23.9%), 3b (43.5%). Poverty was the leading social determinant observed. Risk factor prevalence: agrochemical exposure (95.7%), agricultural work (78.3%), male sex (78.3%), profuse sweating during work (76.3%), malaria (43.5%), NSAID use (41.3%), hypertension (36.9%), diabetes (4.3%). General symptoms: arthralgia (54.3%), asthenia (52.2%), cramps (45.7%), fainting (30.4). Renal symptoms: nycturia (65.2%), dysuria (39.1%), foamy urine (63%). Markers of renal damage: macroalbuminuria (80.4%), ß2 microglobulin (78.2%), NGAL (26.1%). Renal function

  17. Human pathogen shown to cause disease in the threatened eklhorn coral Acropora palmata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Patterson Sutherland

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are in severe decline. Infections by the human pathogen Serratia marcescens have contributed to precipitous losses in the common Caribbean elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, culminating in its listing under the United States Endangered Species Act. During a 2003 outbreak of this coral disease, called acroporid serratiosis (APS, a unique strain of the pathogen, Serratia marcescens strain PDR60, was identified from diseased A. palmata, human wastewater, the non-host coral Siderastrea siderea and the corallivorous snail Coralliophila abbreviata. In order to examine humans as a source and other marine invertebrates as vectors and/or reservoirs of the APS pathogen, challenge experiments were conducted with A. palmata maintained in closed aquaria to determine infectivity of strain PDR60 from reef and wastewater sources. Strain PDR60 from wastewater and diseased A. palmata caused disease signs in elkhorn coral in as little as four and five days, respectively, demonstrating that wastewater is a definitive source of APS and identifying human strain PDR60 as a coral pathogen through fulfillment of Koch's postulates. A. palmata inoculated with strain PDR60 from C. abbreviata showed limited virulence, with one of three inoculated fragments developing APS signs within 13 days. Strain PDR60 from non-host coral S. siderea showed a delayed pathogenic effect, with disease signs developing within an average of 20 days. These results suggest that C. abbreviata and non-host corals may function as reservoirs or vectors of the APS pathogen. Our results provide the first example of a marine "reverse zoonosis" involving the transmission of a human pathogen (S. marcescens to a marine invertebrate (A. palmata. These findings underscore the interaction between public health practices and environmental health indices such as coral reef survival.

  18. Human pathogen shown to cause disease in the threatened eklhorn coral Acropora palmata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kathryn Patterson; Shaban, Sameera; Joyner, Jessica L; Porter, James W; Lipp, Erin K

    2011-01-01

    Coral reefs are in severe decline. Infections by the human pathogen Serratia marcescens have contributed to precipitous losses in the common Caribbean elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, culminating in its listing under the United States Endangered Species Act. During a 2003 outbreak of this coral disease, called acroporid serratiosis (APS), a unique strain of the pathogen, Serratia marcescens strain PDR60, was identified from diseased A. palmata, human wastewater, the non-host coral Siderastrea siderea and the corallivorous snail Coralliophila abbreviata. In order to examine humans as a source and other marine invertebrates as vectors and/or reservoirs of the APS pathogen, challenge experiments were conducted with A. palmata maintained in closed aquaria to determine infectivity of strain PDR60 from reef and wastewater sources. Strain PDR60 from wastewater and diseased A. palmata caused disease signs in elkhorn coral in as little as four and five days, respectively, demonstrating that wastewater is a definitive source of APS and identifying human strain PDR60 as a coral pathogen through fulfillment of Koch's postulates. A. palmata inoculated with strain PDR60 from C. abbreviata showed limited virulence, with one of three inoculated fragments developing APS signs within 13 days. Strain PDR60 from non-host coral S. siderea showed a delayed pathogenic effect, with disease signs developing within an average of 20 days. These results suggest that C. abbreviata and non-host corals may function as reservoirs or vectors of the APS pathogen. Our results provide the first example of a marine "reverse zoonosis" involving the transmission of a human pathogen (S. marcescens) to a marine invertebrate (A. palmata). These findings underscore the interaction between public health practices and environmental health indices such as coral reef survival.

  19. Clinical Features of Pregnancy-associated Retinal and Choroidal Diseases Causing Acute Visual Disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Joo; Park, Kyu Hyung; Woo, Se Joon

    2017-08-01

    To report clinical features of patients with retinal and choroidal diseases presenting with acute visual disturbance during pregnancy. In this retrospective case series, patients who developed acute visual loss during pregnancy (including puerperium) and visited a tertiary hospital from July 2007 to June 2015, were recruited by searching electronic medical records. Patients were categorized according to the cause of visual loss. Clinical features and required diagnostic modalities were analyzed in the retinal and choroidal disease group. Acute visual loss occurred in 147 patients; 49 (38.9%) were classified into the retinal and choroidal group. The diagnoses included central serous chorioretinopathy (22.4%), hypertensive retinopathy with or without pre-eclampsia (22.4%), retinal tear with or without retinal detachment (18.4%), diabetic retinopathy progression (10.2%), Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (4.1%), retinal artery occlusion (4.1%), multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (4.1%), and others (14.3%). Visual symptoms first appeared at gestational age 25.9 ± 10.3 weeks. The initial best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.27 ± 0.39 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR); the final BCVA after delivery improved to 0.13 ± 0.35 logMAR. Serious visual deterioration (BCVA worth than 20 / 200) developed in two patients. Differential diagnoses were established with characteristic fundus and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography findings in all cases. In pregnant women with acute visual loss, retinal and choroidal diseases are common and could be vision threatening. Physicians should be aware of pregnancy-associated retinal and choroidal diseases and their clinical features. The differential diagnosis can be established with non-invasive techniques. © 2017 The Korean Ophthalmological Society

  20. Retinoschisislike alterations in the mouse eye caused by gene targeting of the Norrie disease gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruether, K; van de Pol, D; Jaissle, G; Berger, W; Tornow, R P; Zrenner, E

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the retinal function and morphology of mice carrying a replacement mutation in exon 2 of the Norrie disease gene. Recently, Norrie disease mutant mice have been generated using gene targeting technology. The mutation removes the 56 N-terminal amino acids of the Norrie gene product. Ganzfeld electroretinograms (ERGs) were obtained in five animals hemizygous or homozygous for the mutant gene and in three female animals heterozygous for the mutant gene. As controls, three males carrying the wild-type gene were examined. Electroretinogram testing included rod a- and b-wave V-log I functions, oscillatory potentials, and cone responses. The fundus morphology has been visualized by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Rod and cone ERG responses and fundus morphology were not significantly different among female heterozygotes and wild-type mice. In contrast, the hemizygous mice displayed a severe loss of ERG b-wave, leading to a negatively shaped scotopic ERG and a marked reduction of oscillatory potentials. The a-wave was normal at low intensities, and only with brighter flashes was there a moderate amplitude loss. Cone amplitudes were barely recordable in the gene-targeted males. Ophthalmoscopy revealed snowflakelike vitreal changes, retinoschisis, and pigment epithelium irregularities in hemizygotes and homozygotes, but no changes in female heterozygotes. The negatively shaped scotopic ERG in male mice with a Norrie disease gene mutation probably was caused by retinoschisis. Pigment epithelial changes and degenerations of the outer retina are relatively mild. These findings may be a clue to the embryonal retinoschisislike pathogenesis of Norrie disease in humans or it may indicate a different expression of the Norrie disease gene defect in mice compared to that in humans.

  1. Waldmann's disease: a rare cause of protein losing enteropathy in an adult patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Martins

    Full Text Available Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia or Waldmann's disease is an uncommon cause of protein losing enteropathy with an unknown etiology and is usually diagnosed during childhood. It is characterized by dilation and leakage of intestinal lymph vessels leading to hypoalbuminemia, hypogammaglobulinemia and lymphopenia. Differential diagnosis should include erosive and non-erosive gastrointestinal disorders, conditions involving mesenteric lymphatic obstruction and cardiovascular disorders that increase central venous pressure. Since there are no accurate serological or radiological available tests, enteroscopy with histopathological examination based on intestinal biopsy specimens is currently the gold standard diagnostic modality of intestinal lymphangiectasia. We report a rare case of a primary intestinal lymphangiectasia in a 60-year-old Caucasian female who presented with asymptomatic hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. After the diagnosis of a protein losing enteropathy, the patient underwent an enteroscopy and biopsies were taken, whose histological examination confirmed dilated intestinal lymphatics with broadened villi of the small bowel. Secondary causes of intestinal lymphangiectasia were excluded and the diagnosis of Waldmann's disease was recorded. The patient was put on a high-protein and low-fat diet with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation with improvement.

  2. Clinical application of multifocal visual evoked potentials in children with epilepsy caused by intracranial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, Eiichi; Kim, Yeong-Jin; Kawasaki, Kensuke; Yoshii, Toshiaki; Hara, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether visual field defects could be objectively evaluated using multifocal visual evoked potential (m-VEP) in two children with epilepsy caused by intracranial disease in whom it was difficult to measure the visual field. To determine normal waves in m-VEP, recording was performed using a visual evoked response imaging system (VERIS) Junior Science program (Mayo, Aichi, Japan) in 20 healthy children (20 eyes) peak latency and amplitude were used for assessment. In the two children with epilepsy, m-VEPs were recorded, and compared with the results of static perimetry or the lesions observed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In the 20 healthy children, there was no significant difference in the peak latency or amplitude among 4 quadrants by one-way analysis of variance. m-VEP in the children with epilepsy showed abnormal waves, corresponding to the visual field defects in the static perimetry or the lesions observed by MRI. Objective evaluation of visual field defects using m-VEP may be useful in children with epilepsy caused by intracranial disease in whom kinetic/static perimetry as a subjective examination is difficult. (author)

  3. Lahore general hospital protocol for treatment of neovascular glaucoma caused by retinal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaqan, H.A.; Haider, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy of LGH (Lahore General Hospital) protocol for treatment of neovascular glaucoma caused by retinal diseases. Material and Methods: This case series was performed on 9 consecutive eyes of nine patients with uncontrolled neovascular glaucoma at Department of Ophthalmology, Unit II, Lahore General Hospital/PGMI, Lahore. All nine patients completed six months follow up. Among them 6 patients were having PDR (proliferative diabetic retinopathy) and 3 patients having CRVO (central retinal vein occlusion). LGH protocol for treatment of neovascular glaucoma was: To give intravitreal injection of avastin and then PRP (Pan Retinal Photocoagulation) or Trabeculectomy with MMC (Mitomycin C), if PRP and intravitreal avastin fails to control the intra ocular-pressure (IOP). Results: Three patients had IOP control after intravitreal injection of avastin and PRP, 5 patients had uncontrolled IOP after intravitreal avastin and two sessions of PRP, so they under went trabeculectomy with MMC. One patient had uncontrolled IOP despite of full treatment protocol. All other 8 patients IOP remained stable for six months. Conclusion: Significant decrease in intraocular pressure was achieved after observing LGH protocol for treatment of NVG (Neovascular Glaucoma) caused by retinal diseases. (author)

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of metabolite disorder in orange trees caused by citrus sudden death disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestes, Rosilene A; Colnago, Luiz A; Forato, Lucimara A; Carrilho, Emanuel; Bassanezi, Renato B; Wulff, Nelson A

    2009-01-01

    Citrus sudden death (CSD) is a new disease of sweet orange and mandarin trees grafted on Rangpur lime and Citrus volkameriana rootstocks. It was first seen in Brazil in 1999, and has since been detected in more than four million trees. The CSD causal agent is unknown and the current hypothesis involves a virus similar to Citrus tristeza virus or a new virus named Citrus sudden death-associated virus. CSD symptoms include generalized foliar discoloration, defoliation and root death, and, in most cases, it can cause tree death. One of the unique characteristics of CSD disease is the presence of a yellow stain in the rootstock bark near the bud union. This region also undergoes profound anatomical changes. In this study, we analyse the metabolic disorder caused by CSD in the bark of sweet orange grafted on Rangpur lime by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging. The imaging results show the presence of a large amount of non-functional phloem in the rootstock bark of affected plants. The spectroscopic analysis shows a high content of triacylglyceride and sucrose, which may be related to phloem blockage close to the bud union. We also propose that, without knowing the causal CSD agent, the determination of oil content in rootstock bark by low-resolution NMR can be used as a complementary method for CSD diagnosis, screening about 300 samples per hour.

  5. The Nature and Causes of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Historical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Peter W Warren

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is the currently favoured name for the diseases formerly known as emphysema and bronchitis. COPD has been recognized for more than 200 years. Its cardinal symptoms are cough, phlegm and dyspnea, and its pathology is characterized by enlarged airspaces and obstructed airways. In the 19th century, the diagnosis of COPD depended on its symptoms and signs of a hyperinflated chest, and reduced expiratory breath sounds. The airflow obstruction evident on spirometry was identified in that century, but did not enter into clinical practice. Bronchitis, and the mechanical forces required to overcome its obstruction, was believed to be responsible for emphysema, although the inflammation present was recognized. The causes of bronchitis, and hence emphysema, included atmospheric and domestic air pollution, as well as dusty occupations. Cigarette smoking only became recognized as the dominant cause in the 20th century. The lessons learned of the risks for COPD in 19th-century Britain are very pertinent to the world today.

  6. Two parvoviruses that cause different diseases in mink have different transcription patterns: Transcription analysis of mink enteritis virus and Aleutian mink disease parvovirus the same cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, T.; Oleksiewicz, M.; Bloom, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    The two parvoviruses of mink cause very different diseases, Mink enteritis virus (MEV) is associated with rapid, high-level viral replication and acute disease, In contrast, infection with Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) is associated with persistent, low-level viral replication and chronic...

  7. Motor neuron apoptosis and neuromuscular junction perturbation are prominent features in a Drosophila model of Fus-mediated ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Backgound Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of motor function. Several ALS genes have been identified as their mutations can lead to familial ALS, including the recently reported RNA-binding protein fused in sarcoma (Fus). However, it is not clear how mutations of Fus lead to motor neuron degeneration in ALS. In this study, we present a Drosophila model to examine the toxicity of Fus, its Drosophila orthologue Cabeza (Caz), and the ALS-related Fus mutants. Results Our results show that the expression of wild-type Fus/Caz or FusR521G induced progressive toxicity in multiple tissues of the transgenic flies in a dose- and age-dependent manner. The expression of Fus, Caz, or FusR521G in motor neurons significantly impaired the locomotive ability of fly larvae and adults. The presynaptic structures in neuromuscular junctions were disrupted and motor neurons in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) were disorganized and underwent apoptosis. Surprisingly, the interruption of Fus nuclear localization by either deleting its nuclear localization sequence (NLS) or adding a nuclear export signal (NES) blocked Fus toxicity. Moreover, we discovered that the loss of caz in Drosophila led to severe growth defects in the eyes and VNCs, caused locomotive disability and NMJ disruption, but did not induce apoptotic cell death. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the overexpression of Fus/Caz causes in vivo toxicity by disrupting neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and inducing apoptosis in motor neurons. In addition, the nuclear localization of Fus is essential for Fus to induce toxicity. Our findings also suggest that Fus overexpression and gene deletion can cause similar degenerative phenotypes but the underlying mechanisms are likely different. PMID:22443542

  8. Motor neuron apoptosis and neuromuscular junction perturbation are prominent features in a Drosophila model of Fus-mediated ALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Ruohan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgound Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of motor function. Several ALS genes have been identified as their mutations can lead to familial ALS, including the recently reported RNA-binding protein fused in sarcoma (Fus. However, it is not clear how mutations of Fus lead to motor neuron degeneration in ALS. In this study, we present a Drosophila model to examine the toxicity of Fus, its Drosophila orthologue Cabeza (Caz, and the ALS-related Fus mutants. Results Our results show that the expression of wild-type Fus/Caz or FusR521G induced progressive toxicity in multiple tissues of the transgenic flies in a dose- and age-dependent manner. The expression of Fus, Caz, or FusR521G in motor neurons significantly impaired the locomotive ability of fly larvae and adults. The presynaptic structures in neuromuscular junctions were disrupted and motor neurons in the ventral nerve cord (VNC were disorganized and underwent apoptosis. Surprisingly, the interruption of Fus nuclear localization by either deleting its nuclear localization sequence (NLS or adding a nuclear export signal (NES blocked Fus toxicity. Moreover, we discovered that the loss of caz in Drosophila led to severe growth defects in the eyes and VNCs, caused locomotive disability and NMJ disruption, but did not induce apoptotic cell death. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the overexpression of Fus/Caz causes in vivo toxicity by disrupting neuromuscular junctions (NMJs and inducing apoptosis in motor neurons. In addition, the nuclear localization of Fus is essential for Fus to induce toxicity. Our findings also suggest that Fus overexpression and gene deletion can cause similar degenerative phenotypes but the underlying mechanisms are likely different.

  9. Impact of a hospital-level intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting on leading causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samarrai, Teeb; Madsen, Ann; Zimmerman, Regina; Maduro, Gil; Li, Wenhui; Greene, Carolyn; Begier, Elizabeth

    2013-05-16

    The quality of cause-of-death reporting on death certificates affects the usefulness of vital statistics for public health action. Heart disease deaths are overreported in the United States. We evaluated the impact of an intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting on other leading causes of death. A multicomponent intervention comprising training and communication with hospital staff was implemented during July through December 2009 at 8 New York City hospitals reporting excessive heart disease deaths. We compared crude, age-adjusted, and race/ethnicity-adjusted proportions of leading, underlying causes of death reported during death certification by intervention and nonintervention hospitals during preintervention (January-June 2009) and postintervention (January-June 2010) periods. We also examined trends in leading causes of death for 2000 through 2010. At intervention hospitals, heart disease deaths declined by 54% postintervention; other leading causes of death (ie, malignant neoplasms, influenza and pneumonia, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic lower respiratory diseases) increased by 48% to 232%. Leading causes of death at nonintervention hospitals changed by 6% or less. In the preintervention period, differences in leading causes of death between intervention and nonintervention hospitals persisted after controlling for race/ethnicity and age; in the postintervention period, age accounted for most differences observed between intervention and nonintervention hospitals. Postintervention, malignant neoplasms became the leading cause of premature death (ie, deaths among patients aged 35-74 y) at intervention hospitals. A hospital-level intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting led to substantial changes to other leading causes of death, changing the leading cause of premature death. Heart disease overreporting is likely obscuring the true levels of cause-specific mortality.

  10. ALS5/SPG11/ KIAA1840 mutations cause autosomal recessive axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecchiani, Celeste; Pedace, Lucia; Lo Giudice, Temistocle; Casella, Antonella; Mearini, Marzia; Gaudiello, Fabrizio; Pedroso, José L.; Terracciano, Chiara; Caltagirone, Carlo; Massa, Roberto; St George-Hyslop, Peter H.; Barsottini, Orlando G. P.; Kawarai, Toshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease is a group of hereditary peripheral neuropathies that share clinical characteristics of progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, distal sensory loss, as well as diminished tendon reflexes. Hundreds of causative DNA changes have been found, but much of the genetic basis of the disease is still unexplained. Mutations in the ALS5/SPG11/ KIAA1840 gene are a frequent cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and peripheral axonal neuropathy, and account for ∼40% of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The overlap of axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease with both diseases, as well as the common autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of thin corpus callosum and axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease in three related patients, prompted us to analyse the ALS5/SPG11/ KIAA1840 gene in affected individuals with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease. We investigated 28 unrelated families with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease defined by clinical, electrophysiological, as well as pathological evaluation. Besides, we screened for all the known genes related to axonal autosomal recessive Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2A2/HMSN2A2/ MFN2 , CMT2B1/ LMNA , CMT2B2/ MED25 , CMT2B5/ NEFL , ARCMT2F/dHMN2B/ HSPB1 , CMT2K/ GDAP1 , CMT2P/ LRSAM1 , CMT2R/ TRIM2 , CMT2S/ IGHMBP2 , CMT2T/ HSJ1 , CMTRID/ COX6A1 , ARAN-NM/ HINT and GAN/ GAN ), for the genes related to autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and axonal peripheral neuropathy (SPG7/ PGN , SPG15/ ZFYVE26, SPG21/ ACP33 , SPG35/ FA2H , SPG46/ GBA2 , SPG55/ C12orf65 and SPG56/ CYP2U1 ), as well as for the causative gene of peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum ( SLC12A6 ) . Mitochondrial disorders related to Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 2 were also excluded by sequencing POLG and

  11. ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 mutations cause autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecchiani, Celeste; Pedace, Lucia; Lo Giudice, Temistocle; Casella, Antonella; Mearini, Marzia; Gaudiello, Fabrizio; Pedroso, José L; Terracciano, Chiara; Caltagirone, Carlo; Massa, Roberto; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Barsottini, Orlando G P; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Orlacchio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a group of hereditary peripheral neuropathies that share clinical characteristics of progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, distal sensory loss, as well as diminished tendon reflexes. Hundreds of causative DNA changes have been found, but much of the genetic basis of the disease is still unexplained. Mutations in the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene are a frequent cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and peripheral axonal neuropathy, and account for ∼ 40% of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The overlap of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with both diseases, as well as the common autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of thin corpus callosum and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in three related patients, prompted us to analyse the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene in affected individuals with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. We investigated 28 unrelated families with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease defined by clinical, electrophysiological, as well as pathological evaluation. Besides, we screened for all the known genes related to axonal autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2A2/HMSN2A2/MFN2, CMT2B1/LMNA, CMT2B2/MED25, CMT2B5/NEFL, ARCMT2F/dHMN2B/HSPB1, CMT2K/GDAP1, CMT2P/LRSAM1, CMT2R/TRIM2, CMT2S/IGHMBP2, CMT2T/HSJ1, CMTRID/COX6A1, ARAN-NM/HINT and GAN/GAN), for the genes related to autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and axonal peripheral neuropathy (SPG7/PGN, SPG15/ZFYVE26, SPG21/ACP33, SPG35/FA2H, SPG46/GBA2, SPG55/C12orf65 and SPG56/CYP2U1), as well as for the causative gene of peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (SLC12A6). Mitochondrial disorders related to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 were also excluded by sequencing POLG and TYMP genes. An additional locus for autosomal recessive Charcot

  12. Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rule out conditions such as asthma , cystic fibrosis , acid reflux, heart disease, neuromuscular disease, and immune deficiency. Various ... a lung infection. Acid-blocking medicines can prevent acid reflux, which can lead to aspiration. Lung Transplant A ...

  13. [Neurophysiology of systemic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarian, S

    2004-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases represent a varied and challenging group of disorders. Neuromuscular structures are highly susceptible targets for damage. In this review, the neurophysiological explorations of the neuromuscular complications are examined with particular attention to the peripheral nerve system. The most common presentations are sensorimotor polyneuropathy, mononeuritis multiplex, distal symmetric neuropathy, compression neuropathy and trigeminal sensory neuropathy.

  14. Splicing Analysis of Exonic OCRL Mutations Causing Lowe Syndrome or Dent-2 Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Suarez-Artiles

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the OCRL gene are associated with both Lowe syndrome and Dent-2 disease. Patients with Lowe syndrome present congenital cataracts, mental disabilities and a renal proximal tubulopathy, whereas patients with Dent-2 disease exhibit similar proximal tubule dysfunction but only mild, or no additional clinical defects. It is not yet understood why some OCRL mutations cause the phenotype of Lowe syndrome, while others develop the milder phenotype of Dent-2 disease. Our goal was to gain new insights into the consequences of OCRL exonic mutations on pre-mRNA splicing. Using predictive bioinformatics tools, we selected thirteen missense mutations and one synonymous mutation based on their potential effects on splicing regulatory elements or splice sites. These mutations were analyzed in a minigene splicing assay. Results of the RNA analysis showed that three presumed missense mutations caused alterations in pre-mRNA splicing. Mutation c.741G>T; p.(Trp247Cys generated splicing silencer sequences and disrupted splicing enhancer motifs that resulted in skipping of exon 9, while mutations c.2581G>A; p.(Ala861Thr and c.2581G>C; p.(Ala861Pro abolished a 5′ splice site leading to skipping of exon 23. Mutation c.741G>T represents the first OCRL exonic variant outside the conserved splice site dinucleotides that results in alteration of pre-mRNA splicing. Our results highlight the importance of evaluating the effects of OCRL exonic mutations at the mRNA level.

  15. Synergistic interaction and mode of action of Citrus hystrix essential oil against bacteria causing periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsariya, Karn; Phanthong, Phanida; Bunyapraphatsara, Nuntavan; Srisukh, Vimol; Chomnawang, Mullika Traidej

    2014-03-01

    Citrus hystrix de Candolle (Rutaceae), an edible plant regularly used as a food ingredient, possesses antibacterial activity, but there is no current data on the activity against bacteria causing periodontal diseases. C. hystrix essential oil from leaves and peel were investigated for antibiofilm formation and mode of action against bacteria causing periodontal diseases. In vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm formation activities were determined by broth microdilution and time kill assay. Mode of action of essential oil was observed by SEM and the active component was identified by bioautography and GC/MS. C. hystrix leaves oil exhibited antibacterial activity at the MICs of 1.06 mg/mL for P. gingivalis and S. mutans and 2.12 mg/mL for S. sanguinis. Leaf oil at 4.25 mg/mL showed antibiofilm formation activity with 99% inhibition. The lethal effects on P. gingivalis were observed within 2 and 4 h after treated with 4 × MIC and 2 × MIC, respectively. S. sanguinis and S. mutans were completely killed within 4 and 8 h after exposed to 4 × MIC and 2 × MIC of oil. MICs of tested strains showed 4 times reduction suggesting synergistic interaction of oil and chlorhexidine. Bacterial outer membrane was disrupted after treatment with leaves oil. Additionally, citronellal was identified as the major active compound of C. hystrix oil. C. hystrix leaf oil could be used as a natural active compound or in combination with chlorhexidine in mouthwash preparations to prevent the growth of bacteria associated with periodontal diseases and biofilm formation.

  16. Comparative analyses of Legionella species identifies genetic features of strains causing Legionnaires' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Valero, Laura; Rusniok, Christophe; Rolando, Monica; Neou, Mario; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Demirtas, Jasmin; Rouy, Zoe; Moore, Robert J; Chen, Honglei; Petty, Nicola K; Jarraud, Sophie; Etienne, Jerome; Steinert, Michael; Heuner, Klaus; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Médigue, Claudine; Glöckner, Gernot; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The genus Legionella comprises over 60 species. However, L. pneumophila and L. longbeachae alone cause over 95% of Legionnaires’ disease. To identify the genetic bases underlying the different capacities to cause disease we sequenced and compared the genomes of L. micdadei, L. hackeliae and L. fallonii (LLAP10), which are all rarely isolated from humans. We show that these Legionella species possess different virulence capacities in amoeba and macrophages, correlating with their occurrence in humans. Our comparative analysis of 11 Legionella genomes belonging to five species reveals highly heterogeneous genome content with over 60% representing species-specific genes; these comprise a complete prophage in L. micdadei, the first ever identified in a Legionella genome. Mobile elements are abundant in Legionella genomes; many encode type IV secretion systems for conjugative transfer, pointing to their importance for adaptation of the genus. The Dot/Icm secretion system is conserved, although the core set of substrates is small, as only 24 out of over 300 described Dot/Icm effector genes are present in all Legionella species. We also identified new eukaryotic motifs including thaumatin, synaptobrevin or clathrin/coatomer adaptine like domains. Legionella genomes are highly dynamic due to a large mobilome mainly comprising type IV secretion systems, while a minority of core substrates is shared among the diverse species. Eukaryotic like proteins and motifs remain a hallmark of the genus Legionella. Key factors such as proteins involved in oxygen binding, iron storage, host membrane transport and certain Dot/Icm substrates are specific features of disease-related strains.

  17. Neuropsychological Testing and Machine Learning Distinguish Alzheimer’s Disease from Other Causes for Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Hildebrandt

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With promising results in recent treatment trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD, it becomes increasingly important to distinguish AD at early stages from other causes for cognitive impairment. However, existing diagnostic methods are either invasive (lumbar punctures, PET or inaccurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. This study investigates the potential of neuropsychological testing (NPT to specifically identify those patients with possible AD among a sample of 158 patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI or dementia for various causes. Patients were divided into an early stage and a late stage group according to their Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE score and labeled as AD or non-AD patients based on a post-mortem validated threshold of the ratio between total tau and beta amyloid in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF; Total tau/Aβ(1–42 ratio, TB ratio. All patients completed the established Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease—Neuropsychological Assessment Battery (CERAD-NAB test battery and two additional newly-developed neuropsychological tests (recollection and verbal comprehension that aimed at carving out specific Alzheimer-typical deficits. Based on these test results, an underlying AD (pathologically increased TB ratio was predicted with a machine learning algorithm. To this end, the algorithm was trained in each case on all patients except the one to predict (leave-one-out validation. In the total group, 82% of the patients could be correctly identified as AD or non-AD. In the early group with small general cognitive impairment, classification accuracy was increased to 89%. NPT thus seems to be capable of discriminating between AD patients and patients with cognitive impairment due to other neurodegenerative or vascular causes with a high accuracy, and may be used for screening in clinical routine and drug studies, especially in the early course of this disease.

  18. Opinions in Denmark on the causes of peptic ulcer disease. A survey among Danish physicians and patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A H; Gjørup, T; Andersen, I B

    1994-01-01

    stated more causes than did their male colleagues (p stress, were contributory causes of peptic ulcer disease, whereas only around 40% believed that coffee/tea, alcohol, smoking, side effects...... of medicine, and working conditions played a causal role. Around 95% of the physicians indicated that medical drugs and smoking were contributory causes of peptic ulcer disease, and around 80% that alcohol and psychologic factors were so. Only 30-40% of the physicians believed that coffee/tea, food habits......, infection, and working conditions could play a causal role in ulcer disease. It is concluded that the opinion on causal agents in peptic ulcer disease differ considerably among both patients and physicians. Opinions on causes of diseases may influence the way we treat and advise our patients, and attempts...

  19. IS RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE STILL THE MOST COMMON CAUSE OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION IN INDIA?

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    Lokanath S

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The past decade has witnessed an extraordinary growth in the knowledge regarding atrial fibrillation. It is a heterogeneous rhythm that appears with several conditions and crosses the path of almost all clinicians. It is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia and the third leading cause of death due to cardiovascular diseases. The incidence of atrial fibrillation approximately doubles with each decade of adult life and ranges from 2 or 3 new cases per 1000 population per year between the ages of 55 and 64 years to 35 new cases per 1000 population per year between the ages of 85 and 94 years. Although, the vast majority of patients with atrial fibrillation are relatively asymptomatic, patients can have profoundly limiting symptoms. The initial presentation of atrial fibrillation maybe an embolic complication or exacerbation of heart failure, but most patients complain of palpitations, chest pain, dyspnoea, fatigue, lightheadedness or syncope. For patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation lasting many weeks, initial therapy maybe anticoagulation and rate control while the long-term goal is to restore sinus rhythm. When cardioversion is contemplated and the duration of atrial fibrillation is unknown or exceeds 48 hours, patients who do not require long-term anticoagulation may benefit from short-term anticoagulation. If rate control offers inadequate symptomatic relief, restoration of sinus rhythm becomes a clear long-term goal. Early cardioversion may be necessary, if atrial fibrillation causes hypotension or worsening heart failure. Experimental studies have explored the mechanisms of the onset and maintenance of the arrhythmia; drugs have been tailored to specific cardiac ion channels; non-pharmacologic therapies have been introduced that are designed to control or prevent atrial fibrillation; and data have emerged that demonstrate a genetic predisposition in some patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS It is a prospective

  20. Cacao Phylloplane: The First Battlefield against Moniliophthora perniciosa, Which Causes Witches' Broom Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, D S M; Gramacho, K P; Cardoso, T H S; Micheli, F; Alvim, F C; Pirovani, C P

    2017-07-01

    The phylloplane is the first contact surface between Theobroma cacao and the fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa, which causes witches' broom disease (WBD). We evaluated the index of short glandular trichomes (SGT) in the cacao phylloplane and the effect of irrigation on the disease index of cacao genotypes with or without resistance to WBD, and identified proteins present in the phylloplane. The resistant genotype CCN51 and susceptible Catongo presented a mean index of 1,600 and 700 SGT cm -2 , respectively. The disease index in plants under drip irrigation was reduced by approximately 30% compared with plants under sprinkler irrigation prior to inoculation. Leaf water wash (LWW) of the cacao inhibited the germination of spores by up to 98%. Proteins from the LWW of CCN51 were analyzed by two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by tandem mass spectrometry. The gel showed 71 spots and identified a total of 42 proteins (28 from the plant and 14 from bacteria). Proteins related to defense and synthesis of defense metabolites and involved in nucleic acid metabolism were identified. The results support the hypothesis that the proteins and water-soluble compounds secreted to the cacao phylloplane participate in the defense against pathogens. They also suggest that SGT can contribute to the resistance of cacao.

  1. Snake fungal disease caused by Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola in a free-ranging mud snake (Farancia abacura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Lisa A; Fenton, Heather; Gonyor-McGuire, Jessica; Moore, Matthew; Yabsley, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Snake fungal disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by the fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola leading to severe dermatitis and facial disfiguration in numerous free-ranging and captive snakes. A free-ranging mud snake (Farancia abacura) from Bulloch County, Georgia, was presented for autopsy because of facial swelling and emaciation. Extensive ulceration of the skin, which was especially severe on the head, and retained shed were noted on external examination. Microscopic examination revealed severe heterophilic dermatitis with intralesional fungal hyphae and arthroconidia consistent with O. ophiodiicola A skin sample incubated on Sabouraud dextrose agar yielded a white-to-tan powdery fungal culture that was confirmed to be O. ophiodiicola by polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis. Heavy infestation with adult tapeworms (Ophiotaenia faranciae) was present within the intestine. Various bacterial and fungal species, interpreted to either be secondary invaders or postmortem contaminants, were associated with oral lesions. Although the role of these other organisms in the overall health of this individual is not known, factors such as concurrent infections or immunosuppression should be considered in order to better understand the overall manifestation of snake fungal disease, which remains poorly characterized in its host range and geographic distribution. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Pneumococcal serotypes and serogroups causing invasive disease in Pakistan, 2005-2013.

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    Sadia Shakoor

    Full Text Available While pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have been implemented in most countries worldwide, use in Asia has lagged in part because of a lack of data on the amount of disease that is vaccine preventable in the region. We describe pneumococcal serotypes elicited from 111 episodes of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD from 2005 to 2013 among children and adults in Pakistan. Seventy-three percent (n = 81 of 111 IPD episodes were cases of meningitis (n = 76 in children 0-15 years and n = 5 among adults. Serotypes were determined by target amplification of DNA extracted from pneumococcal isolates (n = 52 or CSF specimens (n = 59. Serogroup 18 was the most common serogroup causing meningitis in children <5 years, accounting for 21% of cases (n = 13. The 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV 10 or PCV10- related serotypes were found in 61% (n = 47 of childhood (age 0-15 years meningitis episodes. PCV-13 increased this coverage to 63% (one additional serotype 19A; n = 48. Our data indicate that use of PCVs would prevent a large proportion of serious pneumococcal disease.

  3. Arthropod borne disease: the leading cause of fever in pregnancy on the Thai-Burmese border.

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    Rose McGready

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Fever in pregnancy is dangerous for both mother and foetus. In the 1980's malaria was the leading cause of death in pregnant women in refugee camps on the Thai-Burmese border. Artemisinin combination therapy has significantly reduced the incidence of malaria in the population. The remaining causes of fever in pregnancy are not well documented.Pregnant women attending antenatal care, where weekly screening for malaria is routine, were invited to have a comprehensive clinical and laboratory screen if they had fever. Women were admitted to hospital, treated and followed up weekly until delivery. A convalescent serum was collected on day 21. Delivery outcomes were recorded.Febrile episodes (n = 438 occurred in 5.0% (409/8,117 of pregnant women attending antenatal clinics from 7-Jan-2004 to 17-May-2006. The main cause was malaria in 55.5% (227/409. A cohort of 203 (49.6% of 409 women had detailed fever investigations and follow up. Arthropod-borne (malaria, rickettsial infections, and dengue and zoonotic disease (leptospirosis accounted for nearly half of all febrile illnesses, 47.3% (96/203. Coinfection was observed in 3.9% (8/203 of women, mostly malaria and rickettsia. Pyelonephritis, 19.7% (40/203, was also a common cause of fever. Once malaria, pyelonephritis and acute respiratory illness are excluded by microscopy and/or clinical findings, one-third of the remaining febrile infections will be caused by rickettsia or leptospirosis. Scrub and murine typhus were associated with poor pregnancy outcomes including stillbirth and low birth weight. One woman died (no positive laboratory tests.Malaria remains the leading cause of fever in pregnancy on the Thai-Burmese border. Scrub and murine typhus were also important causes of fever associated with poor pregnancy outcomes. Febrile pregnant women on the Thai-Burmese border who do not have malaria, pyelonephritis or respiratory tract infection should be treated with azithromycin, effective for typhus

  4. Dysphagia Causes Symptom Fluctuations after Oral L-DOPA Treatment in a Patient with Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiromasa; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Sato, Masako; Furusawa, Yoshihiko; Murata, Miho

    2018-01-01

    The causes of "delayed-on" and "no-on" phenomena in Parkinson disease (PD) are thought to have some impact on the progress of L-DOPA from the time of ingestion until it reaches the brain and is converted to dopamine. Dysphagia can cause fluctuating symptom expression in L-DOPA therapy for PD. A 69-year-old man with PD presented with "delayed-on" and "no-on" phenomena. The patient developed a gait disorder at age 60 years, and he began coughing on his food during breakfast at age 64 years. Even though he was independent in daily life, he could not eat because of dysphagia in an "off" state. Videofluoroscopic examination of swallowing in an "off" state revealed bradykinesia of the tongue and the retention of tablets in the epiglottic vallecula. We trained him to keep his tongue in strong contact with the upper incisors before swallowing. After rehabilitation of dysphagia, the frequency of "delayed-on" and "no-on" phenomena decreased, and his peak L-DOPA plasma concentration was elevated. Additionally, transdermal rotigotine (RTG) was initiated at a maintenance dose of 9.0 mg. The patient reported improvement in swallowing, and the frequency of "no-on" phenomena decreased. In PD patients, the "no-on" phenomenon can be caused by posterior contractile dysfunction of the tongue, and it can be improved with training of the tongue and transdermal RTG administration.

  5. Differential Activation of Human Keratinocytes by Leishmania Species Causing Localized or Disseminated Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorza, Breanna M; Wacker, Mark A; Messingham, Kelly; Kim, Peter; Klingelhutz, Aloysius; Fairley, Janet; Wilson, Mary E

    2017-10-01

    All Leishmania species parasites are introduced into mammalian skin through a sand fly bite, but different species cause distinct clinical outcomes. Mouse studies suggest that early responses are critical determinants of subsequent adaptive immunity in leishmaniasis, yet few studies address the role of keratinocytes, the most abundant cell in the epidermis. We hypothesized that Leishmania infection causes keratinocytes to produce immunomodulatory factors that influence the outcome of infection. Incubation of primary or immortalized human keratinocytes with Leishmania infantum or Leishmania major, which cause visceral or cutaneous leishmaniasis, respectively, elicited dramatically different responses. Keratinocytes incubated with L. infantum significantly increased expression of proinflammatory genes for IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor, and IL-1B, whereas keratinocytes exposed to several L. major isolates did not. Furthermore, keratinocyte-monocyte co-incubation studies across a 4 µM semipermeable membrane suggested that L. infantum-exposed keratinocytes release soluble factors that enhance monocyte control of intracellular L. infantum replication (P Leishmania species that may affect the course of disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Computed tomography findings of hepatic veno-occlusive disease caused by Sedum aizoon with histopathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, H.; Chen, H. Z., E-mail: chenhz@enzemed.com; Zhu, J. S. [Department of Infectious Diseases, Taizhou Hospital Affiliated to Wenzhou Medical College, Linhai (China); Ruan, B. [State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Disease, the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Z. Q. [Department of Infectious Disease, Xianju Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xianju (China); Lin, X.; Gan, M. F. [Department of Infectious Diseases, Taizhou Hospital Affiliated to Wenzhou Medical College, Linhai (China)

    2015-11-23

    This study investigated the value of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis and treatment of hepatic veno-occlusive disease (HVOD) caused by Sedum aizoon (SA). The clinical manifestations, treatment results, imaging findings, and histological findings of the liver were analyzed in 39 patients with HVOD caused by SA. Hepatomegaly, liver dysfunction, abdominal effusion, and geographic density changes on liver CT scans were found in all 39 patients. The pathological findings of histological liver examination included swelling and point-like necrosis of liver cells, significant expansion and congestion of the sinuses, endothelial swelling, and wall thickening with incomplete lumen occlusion of small liver vessels. CT geographic density changes were confirmed by histological examination of the liver in 18 patients. Sixteen patients with small amounts of ascites that started within 4 weeks of treatment recovered completely or significantly improved after symptomatic and supportive treatment. However, only 43.75% of the patients with larger amounts of ascites improved following symptomatic and supportive treatment. In conclusion, liver CT examination is a valuable, safe, and noninvasive tool for the diagnosis of HVOD caused by SA. In selected cases, liver CT examination may replace liver biopsy and histological analysis.

  7. Hyperthyroidism in cats: what's causing this epidemic of thyroid disease and can we prevent it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Since first being reported in the late 1970s, there has been a dramatic increase in the prevalence of hyperthyroidism in cats. It is now recognized worldwide as the most common feline endocrine disorder. Hyperthyroidism is an important cause of morbidity in cats older than 10 years of age. It is estimated that over 10% of all senior cats will develop the disorder. Despite its frequency, the underlying cause(s) of this common disease is/are not known, and no one has suggested a means to prevent the disorder. Because of the multiple risk factors that have been described for feline hyperthyroidism, it is likely that more than one factor is involved in its pathogenesis. Continuous, lifelong exposure to environmental thyroid disruptor chemicals or goitrogens in food or water, acting together in an additive or synergistic manner, may first lead to euthyroid goiter and then to autonomous adenomatous hyperplasia, thyroid adenoma and hyperthyroidism. This review draws on published research studies to summarize the available evidence about the risk factors for feline hyperthyroidism. Based on the known goitrogens that may be present in the cat's food, drinking water or environment, it proposes measures that cat owners can implement that might prevent, or reduce the prevalence of, thyroid tumors and hyperthyroidism in their cats.

  8. Descriptive epidemiology of chronic liver disease in northeastern Italy: an analysis of multiple causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedeli, Ugo; Schievano, Elena; Lisiero, Manola; Avossa, Francesco; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Saugo, Mario

    2013-10-10

    The analysis of multiple causes of death data has been applied in the United States to examine the population burden of chronic liver disease (CLD) and to assess time trends of alcohol-related and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related CLD mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the mortality for CLD by etiology in the Veneto Region (northeastern Italy). Using the 2008-2010 regional archive of mortality, all causes registered on death certificates were extracted and different descriptive epidemiological measures were computed for HCV-related, alcohol-related, and overall CLD-related mortality. The crude mortality rate of all CLD was close to 40 per 100,000 residents. In middle ages (35 to 74 years) CLD was mentioned in about 10% and 6% of all deaths in males and females, respectively. Etiology was unspecified in about half of CLD deaths. In females and males, respectively, HCV was mentioned in 44% and 21% and alcohol in 11% and 26% of overall CLD deaths. A bimodal distribution with age was observed for HCV-related proportional mortality among females, reflecting the available seroprevalence data. Multiple causes of death analyses can provide useful insights into the burden of CLD mortality according to etiology among different population subgroups.

  9. Neuromuscular blockade in children Bloqueadores neuromusculares em crianças

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    João Fernando Lourenço de Almeida

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs have been widely used to control patients who need to be immobilized for some kind of medical intervention, such as an invasive procedure or synchronism with mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this monograph is to review the pharmacology of the NMBAs, to compare the main differences between the neuromuscular junction in neonates, infants, toddlers and adults, and moreover to discuss their indications in critically ill pediatric patients. Continuous improvement of knowledge about NMBAs pharmacology, adverse effects, and the many other remaining unanswered questions about neuromuscular junction and neuromuscular blockade in children is essential for the correct use of these drugs. Therefore, the indication of these agents in pediatrics is determined with extreme judiciousness. Computorized (Medline 1990-2000 and active search of articles were the mechanisms used in this review.Os bloqueadores neuromusculares têm sido amplamente utilizados para controlar pacientes que necessitem imobilidade para algum tipo de intervenção médica, desde a realização de procedimentos invasivos até a obtenção de sincronismo com a ventilação mecânica. O objetivo básico desta monografia é revisar a farmacologia dos principais bloqueadores neuromusculares, analisar as diferenças existentes na junção neuromuscular de neonatos, lactentes, pré-escolares e adultos, além de discutir suas indicações em pacientes criticamente enfermos internados em unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica. Revisão computadorizada da literatura (Medline 1990-2000 associado a busca ativa de artigos compuseram o mecanismo de busca dos dados desta revisão.

  10. Ascertainment bias causes false signal of anticipation in genetic prion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minikel, Eric Vallabh; Zerr, Inga; Collins, Steven J; Ponto, Claudia; Boyd, Alison; Klug, Genevieve; Karch, André; Kenny, Joanna; Collinge, John; Takada, Leonel T; Forner, Sven; Fong, Jamie C; Mead, Simon; Geschwind, Michael D

    2014-10-02

    Anticipation is the phenomenon whereby age of onset in genetic disease decreases in successive generations. Three independent reports have claimed anticipation in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) caused by the c.598G > A mutation in PRNP encoding a p.Glu200Lys (E200K) substitution in the prion protein. If confirmed, this finding would carry clear implications for genetic counseling. We analyzed pedigrees with this mutation from four prion centers worldwide (n = 217 individuals with the mutation) to analyze age of onset and death in affected and censored individuals. We show through simulation that selective ascertainment of individuals whose onset falls within the historical window since the mutation's 1989 discovery is sufficient to create robust false signals both of anticipation and of heritability of age of onset. In our data set, the number of years of anticipation observed depends upon how strictly the data are limited by the ascertainment window. Among individuals whose disease was directly observed at a study center, a 28-year difference between parent and child age of onset is observed (p = 0.002), but including individuals ascertained retrospectively through family history reduces this figure to 7 years (p = 0.005). Applying survival analysis to the most thoroughly ascertained subset of data eliminates the signal of anticipation. Moreover, even non-CJD deaths exhibit 16 years anticipation (p = 0.002), indicating that ascertainment bias can entirely explain observed anticipation. We suggest that reports of anticipation in genetic prion disease are driven entirely by ascertainment bias. Guidelines for future studies claiming statistical evidence for anticipation are suggested. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Is there a relationship between periodontal disease and causes of death? A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natto, Zuhair S; Aladmawy, Majdi; Alasqah, Mohammed; Papas, Athena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether there is any correlation between periodontal disease and mortality contributing factors, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus in the elderly population. A dental evaluation was performed by a single examiner at Tufts University dental clinics for 284 patients. Periodontal assessments were performed by probing with a manual UNC-15 periodontal probe to measure pocket depth and clinical attachment level (CAL) at 6 sites. Causes of death abstracted from death certificate. Statistical analysis involved ANOVA, chi-square and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The demographics of the population sample indicated that, most were females (except for diabetes mellitus), white, married, completed 13 years of education and were 83 years old on average. CAL (continuous or dichotomous) and marital status attained statistical significance (p<0.05) in contingency table analysis (Chi-square for independence). Individuals with increased CAL were 2.16 times more likely (OR=2.16, 95% CI=1.47-3.17) to die due to CVD and this effect persisted even after control for age, marital status, gender, race, years of education (OR=2.03, 95% CI=1.35-3.03). CAL (continuous or dichotomous) was much higher among those who died due to diabetes mellitus or out of state of Massachusetts. However, these results were not statistically significant. The same pattern was observed with pocket depth (continuous or dichotomous), but these results were not statistically significant either. CAL seems to be more sensitive to chronic diseases than pocket depth. Among those conditions, cardiovascular disease has the strongest effect.

  12. Intestinal Microbiota and Celiac Disease: Cause, Consequence or Co-Evolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Carmen Cenit

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that the intestinal microbiota plays a role in the initiation and perpetuation of intestinal inflammation in numerous chronic conditions. Most studies report intestinal dysbiosis in celiac disease (CD patients, untreated and treated with a gluten-free diet (GFD, compared to healthy controls. CD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms are also known to have a different microbiota compared to patients with dermatitis herpetiformis and controls, suggesting that the microbiota is involved in disease manifestation. Furthermore, a dysbiotic microbiota seems to be associated with persistent gastrointestinal symptoms in treated CD patients, suggesting its pathogenic implication in these particular cases. GFD per se influences gut microbiota composition, and thus constitutes an inevitable confounding factor in studies conducted in CD patients. To improve our understanding of whether intestinal dysbiosis is the cause or consequence of disease, prospective studies in healthy infants at family risk of CD are underway. These studies have revealed that the CD host genotype selects for the early colonizers of the infant’s gut, which together with environmental factors (e.g., breast-feeding, antibiotics, etc. could influence the development of oral tolerance to gluten. Indeed, some CD genes and/or their altered expression play a role in bacterial colonization and sensing. In turn, intestinal dysbiosis could promote an abnormal response to gluten or other environmental CD-promoting factors (e.g., infections in predisposed individuals. Here, we review the current knowledge of host-microbe interactions and how host genetics/epigenetics and environmental factors shape gut microbiota and may influence disease risk. We also summarize the current knowledge about the potential mechanisms of action of the intestinal microbiota and specific components that affect CD pathogenesis.

  13. Influenza A (H10N7 Virus Causes Respiratory Tract Disease in Harbor Seals and Ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith M A van den Brand

    Full Text Available Avian influenza viruses sporadically cross the species barrier to mammals, including humans, in which they may cause epidemic disease. Recently such an epidemic occurred due to the emergence of avian influenza virus of the subtype H10N7 (Seal/H10N7 in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina. This epidemic caused high mortality in seals along the north-west coast of Europe and represented a potential risk for human health. To characterize the spectrum of lesions and to identify the target cells and viral distribution, findings in 16 harbor seals spontaneously infected with Seal/H10N7 are described. The seals had respiratory tract inflammation extending from the nasal cavity to bronchi associated with intralesional virus antigen in respiratory epithelial cells. Virus infection was restricted to the respiratory tract. The fatal outcome of the viral infection in seals was most likely caused by secondary bacterial infections. To investigate the pathogenic potential of H10N7 infection for humans, we inoculated the seal virus intratracheally into six ferrets and performed pathological and virological analyses at 3 and 7 days post inoculation. These experimentally inoculated ferrets displayed mild clinical signs, virus excretion from the pharynx and respiratory tract inflammation extending from bronchi to alveoli that was associated with virus antigen expression exclusively in the respiratory epithelium. Virus was isolated only from the respiratory tract. In conclusion, Seal/H10N7 infection in naturally infected harbor seals and experimentally infected ferrets shows that respiratory epithelial cells are the permissive cells for viral replication. Fatal outcome in seals was caused by secondary bacterial pneumonia similar to that in fatal human cases during influenza pandemics. Productive infection of ferrets indicates that seal/H10N7 may possess a zoonotic potential. This outbreak of LPAI from wild birds to seals demonstrates the risk of such occasions for mammals

  14. Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation During Hemodialysis on Peripheral Muscle Strength and Exercise Capacity: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Ana Karla; Mello, Carolina Luana; Dal Pont, Tarcila; Hizume Kunzler, Deborah; Martins, Daniel Fernandes; Bobinski, Franciane; Pereira Yamaguti, Wellington; Paulin, Elaine

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation of high and low frequency and intensity, performed during hemodialysis, on physical function and inflammation markers in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Randomized clinical trial. Hemodialysis clinic. Patients with CKD (N=51) were randomized into blocks of 4 using opaque sealed envelopes. They were divided into a group of high frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation and a group of low frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation. The high frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group was submitted to neuromuscular electrical stimulation at a frequency of 50Hz and a medium intensity of 72.90mA, and the low frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group used a frequency of 5Hz and a medium intensity of 13.85mA, 3 times per week for 1 hour, during 12 sessions. Peripheral muscle strength, exercise capacity, levels of muscle trophism marker (insulin growth factor 1) and levels of proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor α) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin 10) cytokines. The high frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group showed a significant increase in right peripheral muscle strength (155.35±65.32Nm initial vs 161.60±68.73Nm final; P=.01) and left peripheral muscle strength (156.60±66.51Nm initial vs 164.10±69.76Nm final; P=.02) after the training, which did not occur in the low frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group for both right muscle strength (109.40±32.08Nm initial vs 112.65±38.44Nm final; P=.50) and left muscle strength (113.65±37.79Nm initial vs 116.15±43.01Nm final; P=.61). The 6-minute walk test distance (6MWTD) increased in both groups: high frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group (435.55±95.81m initial vs 457.25±90.64m final; P=.02) and low frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group (403.80

  15. Neuromuscular Exercise Post Partial Medial Meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of a 12-week, home-based, physiotherapist-guided neuromuscular exercise program on the knee adduction moment (an indicator of mediolateral knee load distribution) in people with a medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy within the past 3-12 months. METHODS......: An assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial including people aged 30-50 years with no to mild pain following medial arthroscopic partial meniscectomy was conducted. Participants were randomly allocated to either a 12-week neuromuscular exercise program that targeted neutral lower limb alignment...... or a control group with no exercise. The exercise program included eight individual sessions with one of seven physiotherapists in private clinics, together with home exercises. Primary outcomes were the peak external knee adduction moment during normal pace walking and during a one-leg sit-to-stand. Secondary...

  16. Limitations and consequences caused by work-related diseases in the worker’s lives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Caroline Rodrigues

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the impacts of work-related diseases in the worker’s lives, as well as analyze the contributions of studies to the nursing science, especially in the area of occupational health nursing. It is an integrative review with the following guiding question: What are the limitations and consequences caused by cumulative trauma disorders (CTD in the worker’s lives reported in the nursing scientific production during the last five years (2006 to 2010. The descriptors used were: Cumulative Trauma Disorders and Occupational Health. We selected 14 articles and these were grouped according to common purposes, main limitations and consequences of CTD, and relevant information to contributions of studies in the area of Occupational Health Nursing. We concluded that the scientific production on this subject brings few effective contributions, and that further studies are needed to subsidize care strategies aimed at promoting health and quality of life of these workers.

  17. Staphylococcus cohnii as a cause of multiple brain abscesses in Weber-Christian disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Yonemura, Kiminobu; Sugimoto, Ryoko; Tokunaga, Makoto; Uchino, Makoto

    2005-11-15

    We report a patient with multiple brain abscesses due to Staphylococcus cohnii. While these brain abscesses markedly responded to the antibiotics, this patient was subsequently suffered from subcutaneous inflammatory nodules in the adipose tissue, which diagnosed him as having Weber-Christian disease (WCD). This is the first report that subcutaneous inflammatory nodules in the adipose tissue, which lead the diagnosis of WCD, followed multiple brain abscesses. To our knowledge, S. cohnii has not yet been reported to cause multiple brain abscesses in humans. Although the etiology of WCD is unknown, an immune mechanism has been implicated in the pathogenesis. Therefore, we should notice that patients with WCD could be immunocompromised hosts with a higher risk to suffer from severe opportunistic infections.

  18. Review of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of common primary psychiatric causes of cutaneous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krooks, J A; Weatherall, A G; Holland, P J

    2018-06-01

    Approximately half of all patients presenting to dermatologists exhibit signs and symptoms of psychiatric conditions that are either primary or secondary to cutaneous disease. Because patients typically resist psychiatric consult, dermatologists often are on the front line in evaluating and treating these patients. Accordingly, distinguishing the specific underlying or resulting psychiatric condition is essential for effective treatment. The etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and first-line treatment of specific primary psychiatric causes of dermatologic conditions, including delusional infestation, Morgellons syndrome, olfactory reference syndrome, body dysmorphic disorder, excoriation disorder, trichotillomania, and dermatitis artefacta are discussed here, followed by a discussion of the recommended treatment approach with an overview of the different first-line therapies discussed in this review, specifically cognitive behavioral therapy, atypical antipsychotics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants. Included is a guide for dermatologists to use while prescribing these medications.

  19. Cyclical Patterns of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease Caused by Enterovirus A71 in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    NikNadia, NMN; Sam, I-Ching; Rampal, Sanjay; WanNorAmalina, WMZ; NurAtifah, Ghazali; Verasahib, Khebir; Ong, Chia Ching; MohdAdib, MohdAidinniza; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) is an important emerging pathogen causing large epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in children. In Malaysia, since the first EV-A71 epidemic in 1997, recurrent cyclical epidemics have occurred every 2–3 years for reasons that remain unclear. We hypothesize that this cyclical pattern is due to changes in population immunity in children (measured as seroprevalence). Neutralizing antibody titers against EV-A71 were measured in 2,141 residual serum samples collected from children ≤12 years old between 1995 and 2012 to determine the seroprevalence of EV-A71. Reported national HFMD incidence was highest in children Malaysia is mainly due to the fall of population immunity accompanying the accumulation of susceptible children between epidemics. This study will impact the future planning, timing and target populations for vaccine programs. PMID:27010319

  20. Myeloproliferative Disease: An Unusual Cause of Raynaud’s Phenomenon and Digital Ischaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Beynon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 59-year-old female who presented with ischaemic digits, preceded by a 6-month history of Raynaud’s phenomenon affecting her fingers and toes. There were no clinical or laboratory features of primary vasculitis or connective tissue disease, Doppler imaging was normal, and bloods were unremarkable aside from a platelet count of 786 × 109/L (150–400 and white cells of 16 × 109/L (4–11. In view of the thrombocytosis a JAK2 mutation assay was requested which confirmed a JAK2 V617F mutation, suggesting essential thrombocytosis (ET as the cause. She received treatment with hydroxycarbamide which normalised her platelet count and led to a complete resolution of her Raynaud’s symptoms. Raynaud’s phenomenon is a rare manifestation of ET. Myeloproliferative disorders such as ET should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Raynaud’s phenomenon and vasculitis.

  1. Cause, care, cure: research priorities for Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolee, Paul; Hillier, Loretta M; Cook, Sheila; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2011-12-01

    Part of Ontario's strategy on Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD) was to develop research priorities and recommend strategies for building research capacity. The process to achieve these objectives included an environmental scan, key informant interviews, surveys, and a consensus workshop; this process involved over 100 researchers, clinicians, persons with early dementia, and family caregivers. This article describes the process undertaken, key issues identified, and recommendations for research priorities and for building research capacity; and provides a strategic direction for dementia research in Ontario that is relevant for other jurisdictions. ADRD research in all aspects is required to advance knowledge of ADRD cause, care, and cure; gaps currently exist in understanding effective approaches to care and knowledge transfer. Capacity for high-calibre research hinges on maintaining attractive career paths for researchers, solid infrastructures, and strong partnerships. For research to inform policy and practice, better mechanisms are needed for knowledge exchange.

  2. Girl with idiopathic childhood hypercalcemia reveals new disease-causing CYP24A1 mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens Otto Broby; Sauer, Sabrina; Beck, Bodo

    2018-01-01

    of a 21 months old girl initially hospitalized due to excessive consumption of water and behavioral difficulties. Blood tests showed hypercalcemia, borderline high vitamin-D levels, and renal ultrasound revealed medullary nephrocalcinosis. An abnormality within the vitamin-D metabolism was suspected......CONTEXT: Idiopathic Infantile Hypercalcemia (IHH) was associated with vitamin-D supplementation in the 1950's. 50 years later mutations in the CYP241A gene, involved in the degradation of vitamin-D, have been identified as being a part of the etiology. CASE DESCRIPTION: We hereby report a case...... and genetic testing was performed. This revealed the patient to be compound heterozygous for a common (p.E143del) and a novel (likely) disease-causing mutation (p.H83D) in the CYP24A1 gene. The hypercalcemia normalized after calcium depleted diet and discontinuation of vitamin-D supplementation. CONCLUSIONS...

  3. IGF1 as predictor of all cause mortality and cardiovascular disease in an elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Raymond, Ilan; Kistorp, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IGF1 is believed to influence ageing and development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) through complex mechanisms. Reduced IGF1 levels might be causally associated with conditions accompanying ageing including development of CVD. However, in animal models reduced GH-IGF1 signalling...... increases lifespan. Reduced IGF1 activity might also be associated with longevity in humans. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to investigate if plasma IGF1 levels were associated with all cause mortality, and the development of chronic heart failure (CHF) and a major CV event. PATIENTS AND DESIGN: A population...... systolic function and without prevalent CVD. Outcomes were ascertained after 5 years using hospital discharge diagnoses. RESULTS: Adjustment for risk factors IGF1 values in the fourth quartile versus values below the fourth quartile was associated with increased mortality (n=103), hazard ratio (HR) 1...

  4. Irradiation damage to the gonads caused by radiotherapy of benign diseases. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassenstein, E.; Nuesslin, F.

    1976-01-01

    The irradiation damage to the gonads caused by the radiotherapy of parotiditis and mastitis and of cheloids was determined partially under different irradiation methods. The measurements were carried out with LiF dosimeters in the Alderson phantom with a tube tension of 250 kV for the inflammatory diseases and 55 kV for the cheloids. The gonad dose measured at the surface was within the range of hundreths of permille for the parotiditis, for the mastitis it was between tenths of permille and 2 0 / 00 depending on the therapy method. The gonad dose of the cheloid irradiations showed a clear relation to the distance between radiation source and gonads. The importance of radiation protection is emphasized. (orig.) [de

  5. New Rust Disease of Korean Willow (Salix koreensis) Caused by Melampsora yezoensis, Unrecorded Pathogen in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yeo Hong; Ahn, Geum Ran; Yoon, Seong Kwon; Kim, Hoo Hyun; Son, Seung Yeol; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-12-01

    During the growing season of 2015, leaf specimens with yellow rust spots were collected from Salix koreensis Andersson, known as Korean willow, in riverine areas in Cheonan, Korea. The fungus on S. koreensis was identified as the rust species, Melampsora yezoensis , based on the morphology of urediniospores observed by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the molecular properties of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region. Pathogenicity tests confirmed that the urediniospores are the causal agent of the rust symptoms on the leaves and young stems of S. koreensis . Here, we report a new rust disease of S. koreensis caused by the rust fungus, M. yezoensis , a previously unrecorded rust pathogen in Korea.

  6. Conservative management of neuromuscular scoliosis: personal experience and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwicki, Tomasz; Jozwiak, Marek

    2008-01-01

    The principles of conservative management of neuromuscular scoliosis in childhood and adolescence are presented. Analysis of personal experience and literature review. The topic is discussed separately for patients with flaccid or spastic paresis. These demonstrate that conservative management might be proposed for patients with neuromuscular scoliosis in many clinical situations. In spastic disorders, it maintains the symmetry around the hip joints. Bracing is technically difficult and often is not tolerated well by cerebral palsy children. In patients with flaccid paresis, the fitting and the use of brace is easier than in spastic patients. The flexibility of the spinal curvature is more important. Functional benefits of conservative management of neuromuscular scoliosis comprise stable sitting, easier use of upper limbs, discharge of the abdomen from the collapsing trunk, increased diaphragm excursion, and, not always, prevention of curve progression. Specific natural history and multiple medical problems associated with the disease make the treatment of children with neuromuscular scoliosis an extremely complex issue, best addressed when a team approach is applied. Continuously improving techniques of conservative management, comprising bracing and physiotherapy, together with correctly timed surgery incorporated in the process of rehabilitation, provide the optimal care for patients.

  7. The relative frequency of common neuromuscular diagnoses in a reference center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotta, Ana; Paim, Júlia Filardi; Carvalho, Elmano; da-Cunha-Júnior, Antonio Lopes; Navarro, Monica M; Valicek, Jaquelin; Menezes, Miriam Melo; Nunes, Simone Vilela; Xavier-Neto, Rafael; Baptista, Sidney; Lima, Luciano Romero; Takata, Reinaldo Issao; Vargas, Antonio Pedro

    2017-11-01

    The diagnostic procedure in neuromuscular patients is complex. Knowledge of the relative frequency of neuromuscular diseases within the investigated population is important to allow the neurologist to perform the most appropriate diagnostic tests. To report the relative frequency of common neuromuscular diagnoses in a reference center. A 17-year chart review of patients with suspicion of myopathy. Among 3,412 examinations, 1,603 (46.98%) yielded confirmatory results: 782 (48.78%) underwent molecular studies, and 821 (51.21%) had muscle biopsies. The most frequent diagnoses were: dystrophinopathy 460 (28.70%), mitochondriopathy 330 (20.59%), spinal muscular atrophy 158 (9.86%), limb girdle muscular dystrophy 157 (9.79%), Steinert myotonic dystrophy 138 (8.61%), facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 99 (6.17%), and other diagnoses 261 (16.28%). Using the presently-available diagnostic techniques in this service, a specific limb girdle muscular dystrophy subtype diagnosis was reached in 61% of the patients. A neuromuscular-appropriate diagnosis is important for genetic counseling, rehabilitation orientation, and early treatment of respiratory and cardiac complications.

  8. The relative frequency of common neuromuscular diagnoses in a reference center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cotta

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The diagnostic procedure in neuromuscular patients is complex. Knowledge of the relative frequency of neuromuscular diseases within the investigated population is important to allow the neurologist to perform the most appropriate diagnostic tests. Objective: To report the relative frequency of common neuromuscular diagnoses in a reference center. Methods: A 17-year chart review of patients with suspicion of myopathy. Results: Among 3,412 examinations, 1,603 (46.98% yielded confirmatory results: 782 (48.78% underwent molecular studies, and 821 (51.21% had muscle biopsies. The most frequent diagnoses were: dystrophinopathy 460 (28.70%, mitochondriopathy 330 (20.59%, spinal muscular atrophy 158 (9.86%, limb girdle muscular dystrophy 157 (9.79%, Steinert myotonic dystrophy 138 (8.61%, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 99 (6.17%, and other diagnoses 261 (16.28%. Conclusion: Using the presently-available diagnostic techniques in this service, a specific limb girdle muscular dystrophy subtype diagnosis was reached in 61% of the patients. A neuromuscular-appropriate diagnosis is important for genetic counseling, rehabilitation orientation, and early treatment of respiratory and cardiac complications.

  9. Effect of a neuromuscular training program on the kinetics and kinematics of jumping tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Jonathan D; Limpisvasti, Orr

    2008-06-01

    Altered motor control strategies are a proposed cause of the female athlete's increased risk for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury. Injury prevention programs have shown promising results in decreasing the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury. To evaluate the effect of the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic Modified Neuromuscular Training Program on the biomechanics of select jumping tasks in the female collegiate athlete. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty female National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I soccer and basketball players performed vertical jump, hopping tests, and 2 jumping tasks (drop jump and stop jump). All subjects completed a 6-week neuromuscular training program with core strengthening and plyometric training. Three-dimensional motion analysis and force plate data were used to compare the kinetics and kinematics of jumping tasks before and after training. Dynamic knee valgus moment during the stance phase of stop jump tasks decreased after completion of the neuromuscular training program (P = .04), but differences were not observed for the drop jump. Initial knee flexion (P = .003) and maximum knee flexion (P = .006) angles increased during the stance phase of drop jumps after training, but differences were not observed for the stop jump. The athletes showed improved performance in vertical jump (P training program improved select athletic performance measures and changed movement patterns during jumping tasks in the subject population. The use of this neuromuscular training program could potentially modify the collegiate athlete's motion strategies, improve performance, and lower the athlete's risk for injury.

  10. Activation of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase by self-DNA causes autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daxing; Li, Tuo; Li, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Xiang; Li, Quan-Zhen; Wight-Carter, Mary; Chen, Zhijian J

    2015-10-20

    TREX1 is an exonuclease that digests DNA in the cytoplasm. Loss-of-function mutations of TREX1 are linked to Aicardi-Goutieres Syndrome (AGS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in humans. Trex1(-/-) mice exhibit autoimmune and inflammatory phenotypes that are associated with elevated expression of interferon (IFN)-induced genes (ISGs). Cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor that activates the IFN pathway. Upon binding to DNA, cGAS is activated to catalyze the synthesis of cGAMP, which functions as a second messenger that binds and activates the adaptor protein STING to induce IFNs and other cytokines. Here we show that genetic ablation of cGas in Trex1(-/-) mice eliminated all detectable pathological and molecular phenotypes, including ISG induction, autoantibody production, aberrant T-cell activation, and lethality. Even deletion of just one allele of cGas largely rescued the phenotypes of Trex1(-/-) mice. Similarly, deletion of cGas in mice lacking DNaseII, a lysosomal enzyme that digests DNA, rescued the lethal autoimmune phenotypes of the DNaseII(-/-) mice. Through quantitative mass spectrometry, we found that cGAMP accumulated in mouse tissues deficient in Trex1 or DNaseII and that this accumulation was dependent on cGAS. These results demonstrate that cGAS activation causes the autoimmune diseases in Trex1(-/-) and DNaseII(-/-) mice and suggest that inhibition of cGAS may lead to prevention and treatment of some human autoimmune diseases caused by self-DNA.

  11. Disorders in melanopsin effect of pupil constriction as a risk factor causing eye diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Kaptsov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Risks of eye damage and eyesight deterioration to a great extent depend on how efficient a biomechanical eye system is under energy-saving lighting conditions. The system's efficiency is determined by its adequacy in managing pupils and ciliary muscle. We analyzed mathematical models describing changes in pupil's diameter which were determined by light-technical parameters of illumination environment (luminance level and brightness. We highlighted the importance of ganglionic cells and the role they play in managing pupil's diameter (miosis when they are exposed to blue light within 480 nm spectrum. Basing on the assessment of a pupil's constriction under exposure to various light stimuli (blue, red, and green ones we worked out a melanopsin effect concept of a pupil's retention at miosis and showed that it could be a diagnostic sign of some diseases (age-related direct retinopathy, pancreatic diabetes under exposure to a blue light impulse with a certain wave length. Under exposure to blue light within 480 nm spectrum ganglionic cells form a managing signal for a sphincter muscle of a pupil and ciliary muscle which provides accommodation (as per Helmholtz and regulates aqueous humor flow in ciliary channel. All modern energy-saving light sources have a low energy level at wave length equal to 480 nm due to gap in their spectrum in comparison with sunlight spectrum with the same light temperature and luminance level. Inadequate management of pupil's diameter under artificial lighting conditions leads to melanopsin effect disorders and causes disharmony in managing aqueous humor outflow. All the above-stated factors under long-term visual load cause eye diseases risks in modern illumination environment. We detected that contemporary mathematic models describing pupil's diameter fluctuations needed to be refined allowing for new knowledge on functional peculiarities of retina cells and energy-saving light sources spectrum.

  12. Diagnostic histochemistry and clinical-pathological testings as molecular pathways to pathogenesis and treatment of the ageing neuromuscular system: a personal view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, W King

    2015-04-01

    Ageing of the neuromuscular system in elderhood ingravescently contributes to slowness, weakness, falling and death, often accompanied by numbness and pain. This article is to put in perspective examples from a half-century of personal and team neuromuscular histochemical-pathological and clinical-pathological research, including a number of lucky and instructive accomplishments identifying new treatments and new diseases. A major focus currently is on some important, still enigmatic, aspects of the ageing neuromuscular system. It is also includes some of the newest references of others on various closely-related aspects of this ageing system. The article may help guide others in their molecular-based endeavors to identify paths leading to discovering new treatments and new pathogenic aspects. These are certainly needed - our ageing and unsteady constituents are steadily increasing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Characterization of a novel Canine distemper virus causing disease in wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Jenny P; Miller, Debra L; Riley, Matthew C; Anis, Eman; Wilkes, Rebecca P

    2016-09-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a common cause of a multisystemic disease in both domestic dogs and wildlife species, including raccoons and foxes. Outbreaks of CDV in domestic dogs in eastern Tennessee have occurred since 2012, and it was determined that these outbreaks resulted from a novel genotype of CDV. We hypothesized that this virus is also infecting area wildlife and may be a source of the virus for these outbreaks in dogs. From 2013 to 2014, autopsies were performed and tissues collected from raccoons (Procyon lotor; n = 50) and gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus; n = 8) for CDV testing. A real-time reverse transcription PCR was used to document the presence of CDV in tissue samples, and a portion of the virus was subsequently sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. A high percentage of wildlife, both with (86%) and without (55%) clinical signs, tested positive for CDV, with the majority (77%) testing positive for the novel genotype. Microscopic findings, including syncytia in the lungs and viral inclusion bodies in urothelium, astrocytes, neurons, and bronchiolar epithelium, were also consistent with canine distemper. Minimal inflammation in the central nervous system of affected animals was indicative of the acute neurologic form of the disease. Pneumonia and parasitism were also commonly found in CDV-infected animals. Based on these results, CDV appears to be prevalent in eastern Tennessee wildlife. Subclinical or clinically recovered shedders are a potential source of this novel genotype for domestic dogs, and this genotype is genetically distinct from vaccine strains. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vickers, I

    2011-05-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was included in the routine infant immunization schedule in Ireland in September 2008. We determined the serotype of 977 S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease between 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, assessed for the presence of the recently described serotype 6C and determined the susceptibility of isolates during 2007-2008 to penicillin and cefotaxime. Serotype 14 was the most common serotype during both periods and 7·7% of isolates previously typed as serotype 6A were serotype 6C. During 2000-2002 and 2007-2008, PCV7 could potentially have prevented 85% and 74% of invasive pneumococcal disease in the target population (i.e. children aged <2 years), respectively. The level of penicillin non-susceptibility was 17% in 2007-2008. Ongoing surveillance of serotypes is required to determine the impact of PCV7 in the Irish population and to assess the potential of new vaccines with expanded valency.

  15. Coxiella burnetii as a possible cause of autoimmune liver disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaech Chloe

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Q fever is a zoonotic infection that may cause severe hepatitis. Q-fever hepatitis has not yet been associated with autoimmune hepatitis and/or primary biliary cirrhosis. Case presentation We describe a 39-year-old man of Sri Lankan origin with chronic Q-fever hepatitis who developed autoantibodies compatible with autoimmune hepatitis/primary biliary cirrhosis overlap syndrome. Ursodeoxycholic acid in addition to antibiotic therapy markedly improved hepatic enzyme levels suggesting that autoimmunity, potentially triggered by the underlying infection, was involved in the pathogenesis of liver damage. Conclusion We suggest that Coxiella burnetii might trigger autoimmune liver disease. Patients with Q-fever hepatitis who respond poorly to antibiotics should be investigated for serological evidence of autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis or overlap syndrome, as these patients could benefit from adjunctive therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid. Conversely, C. burnetii serology might be necessary in patients with autoimmune liver disease in order to exclude underlying Coxiella infection.

  16. Colonization of fish skin is vital for Vibrio anguillarum to cause disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Barbara; Chen, Chang; Milton, Debra L

    2010-02-01

    Vibrio anguillarum causes a fatal haemorrhagic septicaemia in marine fish. During initial stages of infection, host surfaces are colonized; however, few virulence factors required for colonization of the host are identified. In this study, in vivo bioluminescent imaging was used to analyse directly the colonization of the whole rainbow trout animal by V. anguillarum. The wild type rapidly colonized both the skin and the intestines by 24 h; however, the bacterial numbers on the skin were significantly higher than in the intestines indicating that skin colonization may be important for disease to occur. Mutants defective for the anguibactin iron uptake system, exopolysaccharide transport, or Hfq, an RNA chaperone, were attenuated for virulence, did not colonize the skin, and penetrated skin mucus less efficiently than the wild type. These mutants, however, did colonize the intestines and were as resistant to 2% bile salts as is the wild type. Moreover, exopolysaccharide mutants were significantly more sensitive to lysozyme and antimicrobial peptides, while the Hfq and anguibactin mutants were sensitive to lysozyme compared with the wild type. Vibrio anguillarum encodes several mechanisms to protect against antimicrobial components of skin mucus enabling an amazingly abundant growth on the skin enhancing its disease opportunities. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Characterization of two Turkish beta-hexosaminidase mutations causing Tay-Sachs disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkara, Hatice Asuman; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2003-04-01

    Two homoallelic mutations have recently been identified in the alpha-subunit of hexosaminidase A (EC 3.2.1.52) causing the infantile form of Tay-Sachs disease in Turkish patients. Both of these mutations, a 12 bp deletion (1096-1107 or 1098-1108 or 1099-1109) in exon 10 and a point mutation (G1362 to A, Gly454 to Asp) in exon 12, are located in the catalytic domain of the hexosaminidase alpha-chain. In order to determine whether these mutations affect the function of the catalytic domain or result in an instable protein, both mutant cDNAs were overexpressed in COS-1 cells. As judged by Western blotting, transfections of wild-type cDNA produced pro-alpha-chain and mature alpha-chain in parallel with a fivefold increase in cellular hexosaminidase activity using the synthetic substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-N-acetylglucosamine 6-sulfate (MUGS). However, both mutants produced only pro-alpha-chains, although no mature form or detectable hexosaminidase activity towards two different synthetic substrates was observed. These data are consistent with the biochemical phenotype of infantile Tay-Sachs disease. We conclude that the overexpressed mutant pro-alpha-chains were misfolded and could not undergo further proteolytic processing to the active form of the enzyme in the lysosome.

  18. Bleeding points in cerebral hemorrhage caused by Moyamoya disease in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Sakurai, Yoshiharu; Shimizu, Yukihiko; Ogawa, Akira; Komatsu, Shinro.

    1983-01-01

    Even before the introduction of CT we reported that the intracranial hemorrhage in Moyamoya disease was not subarachnoid hemorrhage but intraventricular hemorrhage and that the bleeding point was the paraventricular subependymal region of lateral ventricles; these findings were based on our experience with three Moyamoya cases in which ventricular hemorrhage occurred and pseudoaneurysms were revealed in the territory of the posterior choroidal artery. Twelve cases with intracranial hemorrhage caused by Moyamoya disease have now been studied by CT in order to determine (1) whether the hemorrhage is subarachnoid or intraventricular, and (2) where the bleeding point is. In the results for the eight cases for which the CT scan was performed within one day after the onset, intraventricular hemorrhage was shown in all cases. The bleeding point was examined in twelve cases; in four cases it was recognized by initial CT only, but if five cases in which ventricular hemorrhage only appeared in the initial CT,follow-up plain and contrast-enhanced CT were necessary. In a total of nine cases, then, bleeding points were recognized. In one case putaminal hemorrhage penetrated into the lateral ventricle, while in eight cases the intracerebral hematoma was located in the paraventricular region of the lateral ventricle, such as at the head of the caudate nucleus or the thalamus. In some cases, small subependymal hematoma projected into the lateral ventricle. In cases with symptoms of intracranial hemorrhage at the onset, the bleeding points were at the paraventricular parenchyma of the lateral ventricle in almost all cases. (author)

  19. Two α1-Globin Gene Point Mutations Causing Severe Hb H Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hua; Huang, Lv-Yin; Zhen, Li; Jiang, Fan; Li, Dong-Zhi

    Hb H disease is generally a moderate form of α-thalassemia (α-thal) that rarely requires regular blood transfusions. In this study, two Chinese families with members carrying transfusion-dependent Hb H disease were investigated for rare mutations on the α-globin genes (HBA1, HBA2). In one family, Hb Zürich-Albisrieden [α59(E8)Gly→Arg; HBA1: c.178G>C] in combination with the Southeast Asian (- - SEA ) deletion was the defect responsible for the severe phenotype. In another family, a novel hemoglobin (Hb) variant named Hb Sichuan (HBA1: c.393_394insT), causes α-thal and a severe phenotype when associated with the - - SEA deletion. As these two HBA1 mutations can present as continuous blood transfusion-dependent α-thal, it is important to take this point into account for detecting the carriers, especially in couples in which one partner is already a known α 0 -thal carrier.

  20. Schizophrenia: A Pathogenetic Autoimmune Disease Caused by Viruses and Pathogens and Dependent on Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Carter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many genes have been implicated in schizophrenia as have viral prenatal or adult infections and toxoplasmosis or Lyme disease. Several autoantigens also target key pathology-related proteins. These factors are interrelated. Susceptibility genes encode for proteins homologous to those of the pathogens while the autoantigens are homologous to pathogens' proteins, suggesting that the risk-promoting effects of genes and risk factors are conditional upon each other, and dependent upon protein matching between pathogen and susceptibility gene products. Pathogens' proteins may act as dummy ligands, decoy receptors, or via interactome interference. Many such proteins are immunogenic suggesting that antibody mediated knockdown of multiple schizophrenia gene products could contribute to the disease, explaining the immune activation in the brain and lymphocytes in schizophrenia, and the preponderance of immune-related gene variants in the schizophrenia genome. Schizophrenia may thus be a “pathogenetic” autoimmune disorder, caused by pathogens, genes, and the immune system acting together, and perhaps preventable by pathogen elimination, or curable by the removal of culpable antibodies and antigens.

  1. Abnormal metabolism of glycogen phosphate as a cause for Lafora disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Girard, Jean Marie; Segvich, Dyann; Meyer, Catalina; Turnbull, Julie; Zhao, Xiaochu; Minassian, Berge A; Depaoli-Roach, Anna A; Roach, Peter J

    2008-12-05

    Lafora disease is a progressive myoclonus epilepsy with onset in the teenage years followed by neurodegeneration and death within 10 years. A characteristic is the widespread formation of poorly branched, insoluble glycogen-like polymers (polyglucosan) known as Lafora bodies, which accumulate in neurons, muscle, liver, and other tissues. Approximately half of the cases of Lafora disease result from mutations in the EPM2A gene, which encodes laforin, a member of the dual specificity protein phosphatase family that is able to release the small amount of covalent phosphate normally present in glycogen. In studies of Epm2a(-/-) mice that lack laforin, we observed a progressive change in the properties and structure of glycogen that paralleled the formation of Lafora bodies. At three months, glycogen metabolism remained essentially normal, even though the phosphorylation of glycogen has increased 4-fold and causes altered physical properties of the polysaccharide. By 9 months, the glycogen has overaccumulated by 3-fold, has become somewhat more phosphorylated, but, more notably, is now poorly branched, is insoluble in water, and has acquired an abnormal morphology visible by electron microscopy. These glycogen molecules have a tendency to aggregate and can be recovered in the pellet after low speed centrifugation of tissue extracts. The aggregation requires the phosphorylation of glycogen. The aggregrated glycogen sequesters glycogen synthase but not other glycogen metabolizing enzymes. We propose that laforin functions to suppress excessive glycogen phosphorylation and is an essential component of the metabolism of normally structured glycogen.

  2. Is Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Caused by Wood Smoke a Different Phenotype or a Different Entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Duque, Carlos A; García-Rodriguez, María Carmen; González-García, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    Around 40% of the world's population continue using solid fuel, including wood, for cooking or heating their homes. Chronic exposure to wood smoke is a risk factor for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In some regions of the world, this can be a more important cause of COPD than exposure to tobacco smoke from cigarettes. Significant differences between COPD associated with wood smoke (W-COPD) and that caused by smoking (S-COPD) have led some authors to suggest that W-COPD should be considered a new COPD phenotype. We present a review of the differences between W-COPD and S-COPD. On the premise that wood smoke and tobacco smoke are not the same and the physiopathological mechanisms they induce may differ, we have analyzed whether W-COPD can be considered as another COPD phenotype or a distinct nosological entity. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and overall and Cause-specific Mortality: A Prospective Study of 50000 Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Khademi, Hooman; Poutschi, Hossein; Khoshnia, Masoud; Norouzi, Alireza; Amiriani, Taghi; Sohrabpour, Amir Ali; Aliasgari, Ali; Jafari, Elham; Semnani, Shahryar; Abnet, Christian C.; Pharaoh, Paul D.; Brennan, Paul; Kamangar, Farin; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Only a few studies in Western countries have investigated the association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and mortality at the general population level and they have shown mixed results. This study investigated the association between GERD symptoms and overall and cause-specific mortality in a large prospective population-based study in Golestan Province, Iran. METHODS Baseline data on frequency, onset time, and patient-perceived severity of GERD symptoms were available for 50001 participants in the Golestan Cohort Study (GCS). We identified 3107 deaths (including 1146 circulatory and 470 cancer-related) with an average follow-up of 6.4 years and calculated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for multiple potential confounders. RESULTS Severe daily symptoms (defined as symptoms interfering with daily work or causing nighttime awakenings on a daily bases, reported by 4.3% of participants) were associated with cancer mortality (HR 1.48, 95% CI: 1.04-2.05). This increase was too small to noticeably affect overall mortality. Mortality was not associated with onset time or frequency of GERD and was not increased with mild to moderate symptoms. CONCLUSION We have observed an association with GERD and increased cancer mortality in a small group of individuals that had severe symptoms. Most patients with mild to moderate GERD can be re-assured that their symptoms are not associated with increased mortality. PMID:24872865

  4. Health risk factors in lead polluted environment causing isthemic health disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khnwal, S.; Rahman, K.U.

    2008-01-01

    Faisalabad is third most populous and industrial city, known as Manchester of Pakistan. Most of the people working in the industries of this city are exposed to highly polluted and toxic environment. Lead is a natural metal found in the environment and its contamination exceeds the range of normal limits by human activities causing a lot of health hazardous. An effort is made to assess the association of anemia and cholesterol with the development IHD among industrial workers who are exposed to the lead polluted environment. For this purpose the study was conducted during a period of one year (2006-7) and the respondents were the patients from industrial area coming to the hospitals visiting at DHQ Hospital Faisalabad. Only those patients were selected for this study who were diagnosed with clinical symptoms of lead toxicity. The demographic features of the respondents regarding their age, gender, marital status, family size, education, income, duration on job, working place and nature of work were considered. The data of this study was categorical nature and this measures the association among exposure to the environment with lead toxicity and causative risk factors i.e., cholesterol level, Hb level (anemia) causing ischemic heart disease (IHD) were studied. (author)

  5. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn caused by anti-Lan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Sarah; Squires, Jerry E

    2014-05-01

    Antibodies to the high-incidence red blood cell (RBC) antigen Lan (Langereis) are typically immunoglobulin G and have been shown to fix complement and cause hemolysis of Lan antigen-positive RBCs. Only three cases of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) have been reported involving anti-Lan and all have been characterized as "mild." A 26-year-old Hispanic female presented in her fifth pregnancy for routine obstetric care. Due to progressively rising anti-Lan titers, middle cerebral artery (MCA) Dopplers were performed. At 32 weeks of gestation, the antibody titer had reached 128; the MCA Doppler indicated that fetal anemia was severe. An intrauterine transfusion with Lan antigen-negative RBCs was performed and a viable infant was delivered 25 days later. Three cases of HDFN associated with anti-Lan have been previously reported. While these cases have been associated with somewhat variable serologic findings, none have resulted in fetal demise or severe symptomatology requiring pre- or postnatal intervention other than routine phototherapy. The current report, however, suggests that in some instances anti-Lan can result in a more severe form of HDFN requiring more aggressive prenatal therapy. In spite of previous case reports suggesting that anti-Lan is associated with relatively mild HDFN, this case suggests that in some instances, this antibody can cause severe HDFN requiring prenatal intervention. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  6. Enterovirus genotypes causing hand foot and mouth disease in Shanghai, China: a molecular epidemiological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Menghua; Su, Liyun; Cao, Lingfeng; Zhong, Huaqing; Dong, Niuniu; Xu, Jin

    2013-10-22

    A rapid expansion of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) outbreaks has occurred and caused deaths in China in recent years, but little is known about the other etiologic agents except enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A 16 (CA16). The objective of this study is to determine the genotype compositions of enterovirus causing HFMD in Shanghai and identify any associations between enterovirus types and clinical manifestations. Stool specimens were collected from patients hospitalized for treatment of HFMD, from May 2010 to April 2011. Enterovirus was detected by reverse transcription PCR and directly genotyped by sequencing the PCR products. Phylogenetic analysis was based on the VP1 partial gene. Of 290 specimens, 277 (95.5%) tested positive for enterovirus. The major genotypes were EV71 (63.8%), CA10 (9.0%), CA6 (8.3%), CA16 (6.9%), CA12 (2.4%), and CA4 (1.4%). The EV71 strains belonged to the C4a subtype and CA16 belonged to the B subtype. CA6 was closely related to strains detected in Japan, Taiwan and China, and CA10, CA12 and CA4 were phylogenetically similar to other strains circulating in China. Mean hospital stays and the prevalence of complications in patients with EV71 infection were higher than those in patients in CA6, CA10 or CA16 infection (P treatment of HFMD patients.

  7. Performance-based regulation: enterprise responsibility for reducing death, injury, and disease caused by consumer products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Stephen D

    2009-12-01

    This article offers a bold new idea for confronting the staggering level of death, injury, and disease caused by five consumer products: cigarettes, alcohol, guns, junk food, and motor vehicles. Business leaders try to frame these negative outcomes as "collateral damage" that is someone else's problem. That framing not only is morally objectionable but also overlooks the possibility that, with proper prodding, industry could substantially lessen these public health disasters. I seek to reframe the public perception of who is responsible and propose to deploy a promising approach called "performance-based regulation" to combat the problem. Performance-based regulation would impose on manufacturers a legal obligation to reduce the negative social costs of their products. Rather than involving them in litigation or forcing them to operate differently (as "command-and-control" regimes do), performance-based regulation allows the firms to determine how best to decrease bad public health consequences. Like other public health strategies, performance-based regulation focuses on those who are far more likely than individual consumers to achieve real gains. Analogous to a tax on causing harm that exceeds a threshold level, performance-based regulation seeks to harness private initiative in pursuit of the public good.

  8. A Case of Frequent Arousal Following Nocturnal Dyspnea Caused by Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Wui Yoon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common disorder that is associated with many esophageal syndromes and complications. Most cases of reflux event occur during the day, but reflux during sleep can cause not only esophageal problems, but also sleep problems, such as arousal and poor sleep quality. We report the case of a 17-year-old man who had been referred to us with frequent arousal following sudden dyspnea. On polysomnography, no respiratory disturbances and periodic limb movements were found during the sleep study, but frequent events of arousal were reported (arousal index: 12.3/h. On a 24-hr esophageal pH monitoring test, his DeMeester score was 176.43 and the total reflux time was 1120.9 min (76.9%, indicating the presence of significant acid reflux. After treatment with a proton-pump inhibitor, the arousals following nocturnal dyspnea and fatigue in the morning disappeared in the patient. GERD should be considered as a cause of spontaneous arousal or awakening not accompanying respiratory disturbances.

  9. Alu-mediated large deletion of the CDSN gene as a cause of peeling skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, T; Matsuda, Y; Muraoka, M; Toma, T; Takehara, K; Fujimoto, M; Yachie, A

    2014-10-01

    Peeling skin disease (PSD) is an autosomal recessive skin disorder caused by mutations in CDSN and is characterized by superficial peeling of the upper epidermis. Corneodesmosin (CDSN) is a major component of corneodesmosomes that plays an important role in maintaining epidermis integrity. Herein, we report a patient with PSD caused by a novel homozygous large deletion in the 6p21.3 region encompassing the CDSN gene, which abrogates CDSN expression. Several genes including C6orf15, PSORS1C1, PSORS1C2, CCHCR1, and TCF19 were also deleted, however, the patient showed only clinical features typical of PSD. The deletion size was 59.1 kb. Analysis of the sequence surrounding the breakpoint showed that both telomeric and centromeric breakpoints existed within Alu-S sequences that were oriented in opposite directions. These results suggest an Alu-mediated recombination event as the mechanism underlying the deletion in our patient. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Does Ureaplasma spp. cause chronic lung disease of prematurity: Ask the audience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Nicola C.; Nuttall, Diane; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2009-01-01

    Ureaplasma has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of both preterm labour and neonatal morbidity, particularly chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD), but despite numerous studies, reviews and meta-analyses, its exact role remains unclear. Many papers call for a definitive randomised control trial to determine if eradication of pulmonary Ureaplasma decreases the rates of CLD but few address in detail the obstacles to an adequately powered clinical trial. We review the evidence for Ureaplasma as a causative agent in CLD, asking why a randomised control trial has not been performed. We surveyed the opinions of senior neonatologists in the UK on whether they felt that there was sufficient evidence for Ureaplasma either causing or not causing CLD and whether a definitive trial was needed, as well as their views on the design of such a trial. Additionally, we ascertained current practice with respect to Ureaplasma detection in preterm neonates in the UK. There is clear support for an adequately powered randomised controlled clinical trial by senior neonatologists in the UK. There are no reasons why a definitive trial cannot be conducted especially as the appropriate samples, and methods to culture or identify the organism by PCR are already available. PMID:19144476

  11. Biocontrol potential of Trichoderma harzianum in controlling wilt disease of pistachio caused by Verticillium dahliae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotoohiyan Zeinab

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Verticillium wilt caused by Verticillium dahliae, is one of the most devastating diseases in pistachio orchards in the world including Iran. In search for an effective non-chemical strategy for the management of this disease, we evaluated the biocontrol potential of Trichoderma harzianum isolates obtained from the rhizosphere of healthy pistachio trees in different locations of the Kerman province of Iran against V. dahliae under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. Dual culture tests in the laboratory were conducted in a completely randomized design using 72 T. harzianum isolates. Twenty isolates showed the highest in vitro antagonistic activity. The results indicated that all 20 isolates were capable of inhibiting the mycelial growth of V. dahliae significantly. Among them, isolates Tr8 and Tr19 were the most effective by 88.89% and 85.12% inhibition, respectively. Extracted cell free metabolites of all effective isolates also inhibited the growth of V. dahliae in the culture medium significantly. According to the results, isolates Tr4 and Tr6 inhibited fungal pathogen growth by 94.94% and 88.15% respectively, through production of non-volatile metabolites. In the evaluation of volatile metabolites, isolates Tr5 and Tr4 were the most effective by 26.27% and 24.49% growth inhibition, respectively. Based on the results of the in vitro experiments, the five most effective isolates were selected for evaluation under greenhouse conditions for their biocontrol potential in controlling Verticillium wilt of pistachio. Results of the greenhouse, (in vivo experiments were positive and indicated that the occurrence of wilt disease in plants treated with the antagonists alone or in combination with pathogenic fungus was lower than in plants inoculated with pathogen alone. The overall results of this study suggest that Trichoderma fungal antagonist may be an effective biocontrol agent for the control of Verticillium wilt of pistachio.

  12. Effects of habitual coffee consumption on cardiometabolic disease, cardiovascular health, and all-cause mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, James H; Bhatti, Salman K; Patil, Harshal R; DiNicolantonio, James J; Lucan, Sean C; Lavie, Carl J

    2013-09-17

    Coffee, after water, is the most widely consumed beverage in the United States, and is the principal source of caffeine intake among adults. The biological effects of coffee may be substantial and are not limited to the actions of caffeine. Coffee is a complex beverage containing hundreds of biologically active compounds, and the health effects of chronic coffee intake are wide ranging. From a cardiovascular (CV) standpoint, coffee consumption may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, as well as other conditions associated with CV risk such as obesity and depression; but it may adversely affect lipid profiles depending on how the beverage is prepared. Regardless, a growing body of data suggests that habitual coffee consumption is neutral to beneficial regarding the risks of a variety of adverse CV outcomes including coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and stroke. Moreover, large epidemiological studies suggest that regular coffee drinkers have reduced risks of mortality, both CV and all-cause. The potential benefits also include protection against neurodegenerative diseases, improved asthma control, and lower risk of select gastrointestinal diseases. A daily intake of ∼2 to 3 cups of coffee appears to be safe and is associated with neutral to beneficial effects for most of the studied health outcomes. However, most of the data on coffee's health effects are based on observational data, with very few randomized, controlled studies, and association does not prove causation. Additionally, the possible advantages of regular coffee consumption have to be weighed against potential risks (which are mostly related to its high caffeine content) including anxiety, insomnia, tremulousness, and palpitations, as well as bone loss and possibly increased risk of fractures. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Primary and Secondary Yield Losses Caused by Pests and Diseases: Assessment and Modeling in Coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda, Rolando; Avelino, Jacques; Gary, Christian; Tixier, Philippe; Lechevallier, Esther; Allinne, Clémentine

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of crop yield losses is needed for the improvement of production systems that contribute to the incomes of rural families and food security worldwide. However, efforts to quantify yield losses and identify their causes are still limited, especially for perennial crops. Our objectives were to quantify primary yield losses (incurred in the current year of production) and secondary yield losses (resulting from negative impacts of the previous year) of coffee due to pests and diseases, and to identify the most important predictors of coffee yields and yield losses. We established an experimental coffee parcel with full-sun exposure that consisted of six treatments, which were defined as different sequences of pesticide applications. The trial lasted three years (2013-2015) and yield components, dead productive branches, and foliar pests and diseases were assessed as predictors of yield. First, we calculated yield losses by comparing actual yields of specific treatments with the estimated attainable yield obtained in plots which always had chemical protection. Second, we used structural equation modeling to identify the most important predictors. Results showed that pests and diseases led to high primary yield losses (26%) and even higher secondary yield losses (38%). We identified the fruiting nodes and the dead productive branches as the most important and useful predictors of yields and yield losses. These predictors could be added in existing mechanistic models of coffee, or can be used to develop new linear mixed models to estimate yield losses. Estimated yield losses can then be related to production factors to identify corrective actions that farmers can implement to reduce losses. The experimental and modeling approaches of this study could also be applied in other perennial crops to assess yield losses.

  14. Somatic USP8 Gene Mutations Are a Common Cause of Pediatric Cushing Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucz, Fabio R; Tirosh, Amit; Tatsi, Christina; Berthon, Annabel; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Settas, Nikolaos; Angelousi, Anna; Correa, Ricardo; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Chittiboina, Prashant; Quezado, Martha; Pankratz, Nathan; Lane, John; Dimopoulos, Aggeliki; Mills, James L; Lodish, Maya; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2017-08-01

    Somatic mutations in the ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8) gene have been recently identified as the most common genetic alteration in patients with Cushing disease (CD). However, the frequency of these mutations in the pediatric population has not been extensively assessed. We investigated the status of the USP8 gene at the somatic level in a cohort of pediatric patients with corticotroph adenomas. The USP8 gene was fully sequenced in both germline and tumor DNA samples from 42 pediatric patients with CD. Clinical, biochemical, and imaging data were compared between patients with and without somatic USP8 mutations. Five different USP8 mutations (three missense, one frameshift, and one in-frame deletion) were identified in 13 patients (31%), all of them located in exon 14 at the previously described mutational hotspot, affecting the 14-3-3 binding motif of the protein. Patients with somatic mutations were older at disease presentation [mean 5.1 ± 2.1 standard deviation (SD) vs 13.1 ± 3.6 years, P = 0.03]. Levels of urinary free cortisol, midnight serum cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone, as well as tumor size and frequency of invasion of the cavernous sinus, were not significantly different between the two groups. However, patients harboring somatic USP8 mutations had a higher likelihood of recurrence compared with patients without mutations (46.2% vs 10.3%, P = 0.009). Somatic USP8 gene mutations are a common cause of pediatric CD. Patients harboring a somatic mutation had a higher likelihood of tumor recurrence, highlighting the potential importance of this molecular defect for the disease prognosis and the development of targeted therapeutic options. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  15. Linking global climate and temperature variability to widespread amphibian declines putatively caused by disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Jason R; Raffel, Thomas R

    2010-05-04

    The role of global climate change in the decline of biodiversity and the emergence of infectious diseases remains controversial, and the effect of climatic variability, in particular, has largely been ignored. For instance, it was recently revealed that the proposed link between climate change and widespread amphibian declines, putatively caused by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), was tenuous because it was based on a temporally confounded correlation. Here we provide temporally unconfounded evidence that global El Niño climatic events drive widespread amphibian losses in genus Atelopus via increased regional temperature variability, which can reduce amphibian defenses against pathogens. Of 26 climate variables tested, only factors associated with temperature variability could account for the spatiotemporal patterns of declines thought to be associated with Bd. Climatic predictors of declines became significant only after controlling for a pattern consistent with epidemic spread (by temporally detrending the data). This presumed spread accounted for 59% of the temporal variation in amphibian losses, whereas El Niño accounted for 59% of the remaining variation. Hence, we could account for 83% of the variation in declines with these two variables alone. Given that global climate change seems to increase temperature variability, extreme climatic events, and the strength of Central Pacific El Niño episodes, climate change might exacerbate worldwide enigmatic declines of amphibians, presumably by increasing susceptibility to disease. These results suggest that changes to temperature variability associated with climate change might be as significant to biodiversity losses and disease emergence as changes to mean temperature.

  16. Dysphagia Causes Symptom Fluctuations after Oral L-DOPA Treatment in a Patient with Parkinson Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromasa Sato

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The causes of “delayed-on” and “no-on” phenomena in Parkinson disease (PD are thought to have some impact on the progress of L-DOPA from the time of ingestion until it reaches the brain and is converted to dopamine. Dysphagia can cause fluctuating symptom expression in L-DOPA therapy for PD. Case Description: A 69-year-old man with PD presented with “delayed-on” and “no-on” phenomena. The patient developed a gait disorder at age 60 years, and he began coughing on his food during breakfast at age 64 years. Even though he was independent in daily life, he could not eat because of dysphagia in an “off” state. Videofluoroscopic examination of swallowing in an “off” state revealed bradykinesia of the tongue and the retention of tablets in the epiglottic vallecula. We trained him to keep his tongue in strong contact with the upper incisors before swallowing. After rehabilitation of dysphagia, the frequency of “delayed-on” and “no-on” phenomena decreased, and his peak L-DOPA plasma concentration was elevated. Additionally, transdermal rotigotine (RTG was initiated at a maintenance dose of 9.0 mg. The patient reported improvement in swallowing, and the frequency of “no-on” phenomena decreased. Conclusion: In PD patients, the “no-on” phenomenon can be caused by posterior contractile dysfunction of the tongue, and it can be improved with training of the tongue and transdermal RTG administration.

  17. Improving Neuromuscular Monitoring and Reducing Residual Neuromuscular Blockade With E-Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Louis Demant; Mathiesen, Ole; Hägi-Pedersen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    neuromuscular blockade in surgical patients at 6 Danish teaching hospitals. METHODS: In this interrupted time series study, we are collecting data repeatedly, in consecutive 3-week periods, before and after the intervention, and we will analyze the effect using segmented regression analysis. Anesthesia...... and an increased risk of respiratory complications. Use of an objective neuromuscular monitoring device may prevent residual block. Despite this, many anesthetists refrain from using the device. Efforts to increase the use of objective monitoring are time consuming and require the presence of expert personnel...... practice, and patient outcomes. The primary outcome is use of neuromuscular monitoring in patients according to the type of muscle relaxant received. Secondary outcomes include last recorded train-of-four value, administration of reversal agents, and time to discharge from the postanesthesia care unit...

  18. Ação neuro-muscular do veneno crotálico: dados preliminares Neuromuscular action of crotalid venom: preliminar data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dorvalina Silva

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Estudamos 6 pacientes, 2 cães e um coelho com intoxicação crotálica. Avaliamos a condução nervosa periférica sensitiva e motora, a transmissão neuromuscular e eletromiografias. As biópsias de músculo foram processadas por histoquímica. Os 6 pacientes apresentaram mononeuropatia sensitiva no nervo periférico adjacente ao local da inoculação do veneno e encontramos evidências histoquímicas de miopatia mitocondrial. Os defeitos da transmissão neuromuscular foram mínimos. A maioria dos autores admite que veneno crotálico determina síndrome miastênica. Nossos achados indicam que ptose palpebral, facies miastênico e fraqueza muscular observados após acidente crotálico, correspondem provavelmente a miopatia mitocondrial, muitas vezes transitória e reversível.We studied 6 patients and 2 dogs that have been bitten by South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus and one rabbit inoculated with crotalid venom. We analized sensory and motor peripheral nerve conduction, repetitive stimulation for studying neuromuscular transmission and electromyographies. Muscle biopsies were processed by histochemistry. All patients had peripheral mononeuropathy of the closest sensitive nerve to the area of snakebite. The neuromuscular transmission alterations were minimal. Muscle histochemistry of 4 patients, 2 dogs and 1 rabbit showed findings of mitochondrial myopathy. The majority of authors admit that crotalid venom causes myastenic syndrome. Our findings suggest that palpebral ptosis, myastenic facies and muscular weakness observed after crotalid poisoning are, probably, due to transient and reversible mitochondrial myopathy. As far as we know, this is the first report on the ability of the venom of this rattlesnake to cause local sensitive mononeuropathy and the first muscle histochemistry showing mitochondrial myopathy in humans poisoned by crotalid venom.

  19. Mucor rot - An emerging postharvest disease of mandarin fruit caused by Mucor piriformis and other Mucor spp. in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, an emerging, undescribed postharvest fruit rot disease was observed on mandarin fruit after extended storage in California. We collected decayed mandarin fruit from three citrus packinghouses in the Central Valley of California in 2015 and identified this disease as Mucor rot caused...

  20. Improving Neuromuscular Monitoring and Reducing Residual Neuromuscular Blockade With E-Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Louis Demant; Mathiesen, Ole; Hägi-Pedersen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Muscle relaxants facilitate endotracheal intubation under general anesthesia and improve surgical conditions. Residual neuromuscular blockade occurs when the patient is still partially paralyzed when awakened after surgery. The condition is associated with subjective discomfort and an......-learning module can increase anesthetists' use of neuromuscular monitoring. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02925143; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02925143 (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6s50iTV2x)....