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Sample records for neuromotor disease traumatic

  1. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: The unknown disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Munarriz, P M; Paredes, B; Alén, J F

    2017-04-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a neurodegenerative disease produced by accumulated minor traumatic brain injuries; no definitive premortem diagnosis and no treatments are available for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Risk factors associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy include playing contact sports, presence of the apolipoprotein E4, and old age. Although it shares certain histopathological findings with Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy has a more specific presentation (hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposited as neurofibrillary tangles, associated with neuropil threads and sometimes with beta-amyloid plaques). Its clinical presentation is insidious; patients show mild cognitive and emotional symptoms before progressing to parkinsonian motor signs and finally dementia. Results from new experimental diagnostic tools are promising, but these tools are not yet available. The mainstay of managing this disease is prevention and early detection of its first symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Attenuation of neuromotor deficits by natural antioxidants of Decalepis hamiltonii in transgenic Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, S R; Haddadi, M; Shivanandappa, T; Ramesh, S R

    2015-05-07

    Oxidative stress is believed to be a major factor for the onset of Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we have investigated oxidative status in transgenic Drosophila model of PD. Our results revealed elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in A30P and A53T α-synuclein PD model flies compared to control. We have demonstrated for the first time the ameliorating potential of natural antioxidants characterized from the roots of Dh in A30P and A53T α-synuclein PD model flies. Feeding of transgenic flies with aqueous Dh root extract for 21 days significantly improved their climbing ability and circadian rhythm of locomotor activity which was associated with reduction in levels of ROS and LPO and enhancement in the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Dh protected against paraquat (PQ) sensitivity in α-synuclein transgenic flies and delayed the onset of PD-like symptoms which appears to be mediated by suppression of oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Botulinum toxin type A potentiates the effect of neuromotor rehabilitation of Pisa syndrome in Parkinson disease: a placebo controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassorelli, C; De Icco, R; Alfonsi, E; Bartolo, M; Serrao, M; Avenali, M; De Paoli, I; Conte, C; Pozzi, N G; Bramanti, P; Nappi, G; Sandrini, G

    2014-11-01

    Pisa syndrome (PS) is a tonic lateral flexion of trunk that represents a disabling complication of advanced Parkinson disease (PD). Conventional rehabilitation treatment (CT) ameliorates axial posture and trunk mobility in PD patients, but the improvement tends to wane in 4-6 months. Botulin toxin (BT) may reduce muscle hyperactivity, therefore improving CT effectiveness. We evaluated whether the injection of incabotulinum toxin type A (iBTA) into the hyperactive trunk muscles might improve the effectiveness of rehabilitation in a group of PD patients with PS. Twenty-six PD patients were enrolled in a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Group A was treated with iBTA before undergoing CT (a 4-week intensive programme), while Group B received saline before the 4-week CT treatment. Patients were evaluated at baseline, at the end of the rehabilitative period, 3 and 6 months with kinematic analysis of movement, UPDRS, Functional Independence Measure and Visual Analog Scale for pain. At the end of the rehabilitation period, both groups improved significantly in terms of static postural alignment and of range of motion. Group A showed a significantly more marked reduction in pain score as compared with Group B and a more prolonged efficacy on several clinical and kinematic variables. Our preliminary data suggest that BT may be considered an important addition to the rehabilitation programme for PD subjects with PS for improving axial posture and trunk mobility, as well as for a better control of pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Is chronic traumatic encephalopathy a real disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has received widespread media attention and is treated in the lay press as an established disease, characterized by suicidality and progressive dementia. The extant literature on CTE is reviewed here. There currently are no controlled epidemiological data to suggest that retired athletes are at increased risk for dementia or that they exhibit any type of unique neuropathology. There remain no established clinical or pathological criteria for diagnosing CTE. Despite claims that CTE occurs frequently in retired National Football League (NFL) players, recent studies of NFL retirees report that they have an all-cause mortality rate that is approximately half of the expected rate, and even lower suicide rates. In addition, recent clinical studies of samples of cognitively impaired NFL retirees have failed to identify any unique clinical syndrome. Until further controlled studies are completed, it appears to be premature to consider CTE a verifiable disease.

  5. Biomechanics and developmental neuromotor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zernicke, R F; Schneider, K

    1993-08-01

    By applying the principles and methods of mechanics to the musculoskeletal system, new insights can be discovered about control of human limb dynamics both in adults and infants. Here, we first provide a basic primer about biomechanics--its historical context, terminology, and analytical techniques. Next we review research with animals and human adults that illustrates how limb dynamics provides a window for examining the physical mechanisms underlying neuromotor control. Finally, we elaborate on how our research group has adapted dynamics techniques to investigate how infants gain control of their limbs and learn to reach in the first year of life.

  6. Epidemiology of mild traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Raquel C.; Yaffe, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Every year an estimated 42 million people worldwide suffer a mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) or concussion. More severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a well-established risk factor for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Recently, large epidemiological studies have additionally identified MTBI as a risk factor for dementia. The role of MTBI in risk of PD or ALS is less well established. Repet...

  7. Chronic neurodegeneration after traumatic brain injury: Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or persistent neuroinflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faden, Alan I; Loane, David J

    2015-01-01

    It has long been suggested that prior traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases the subsequent incidence of chronic neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Among these, the association with Alzheimer disease has the strongest support. There is also a long-recognized association between repeated concussive insults and progressive cognitive decline or other neuropsychiatric abnormalities. The latter was first described in boxers as dementia pugilistica, and has received widespread recent attention in contact sports such as professional American football. The term chronic traumatic encephalopathy was coined to attempt to define a "specific" entity marked by neurobehavioral changes and the extensive deposition of phosphorylated tau protein. Nearly lost in the discussions of post-traumatic neurodegeneration after traumatic brain injury has been the role of sustained neuroinflammation, even though this association has been well established pathologically since the 1950s, and is strongly supported by subsequent preclinical and clinical studies. Manifested by extensive microglial and astroglial activation, such chronic traumatic brain inflammation may be the most important cause of post-traumatic neurodegeneration in terms of prevalence. Critically, emerging preclinical studies indicate that persistent neuroinflammation and associated neurodegeneration may be treatable long after the initiating insult(s).

  8. Post-traumatic stress disorder and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Donald; von Känel, Roland

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a first in a Series of two, we look at the evidence for an association of post-traumatic stress disorder with incident cardiovascular disease risk and the mechanisms that might cause this association, as well as the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder due to cardiovascular disease events and its associated prognostic risk. We discuss research done after the publication of previous relevant systematic reviews, and survey currently funded research from the two most active funders in the field: the National Institutes of Health and the US Veterans Administration. We conclude that post-traumatic stress disorder is a risk factor for incident cardiovascular disease, and a common psychiatric consequence of cardiovascular disease events that might worsen the prognosis of the cardiovascular disease. There are many candidate mechanisms for the link between post-traumatic stress disorder and cardiovascular disease, and several ongoing studies could soon point to the most important behavioural and physiological mechanisms to target in early phase intervention development. Similarly, targets are emerging for individual and environmental interventions that might offset the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder after cardiovascular disease events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Post-traumatic stress in Crohn's disease and its association with disease activity

    OpenAIRE

    C?mara, Rafael J A; Gander, Marie-Louise; Begr?, Stefan; von K?nel, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Objective Violence, accidents and natural disasters are known to cause post-traumatic stress, which is typically accompanied by fear, suffering and impaired quality of life. Similar to chronic diseases, such events preoccupy the patient over longer periods. We hypothesised that post-traumatic stress could also be caused by Crohn's disease (CD), and that CD specific post-traumatic stress could be associated with an increased risk of disease exacerbation. Methods A cohort of CD patients was obs...

  10. A Novel Tool for Evaluation of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Patients in the Emergency Department: Does Robotic Assessment of Neuromotor Performance Following Injury Predict the Presence of Postconcussion Symptoms at Follow-up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbian, Vignesh; Ratcliff, Jonathan J; Korfhagen, Joseph J; Hart, Kimberly W; Meunier, Jason M; Shaw, George J; Lindsell, Christopher J; Beyette, Fred R

    2016-04-01

    Postconcussion symptoms (PCS) are a common complication of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). Currently, there is no validated clinically available method to reliably predict at the time of injury who will subsequently develop PCS. The purpose of this study was to determine if PCS following mild TBI can be predicted during the initial presentation to an emergency department (ED) using a novel robotic-assisted assessment of neurologic function. All patients presenting to an urban ED with a chief complaint of head injury within the preceding 24 hours were screened for inclusion from March 2013 to April 2014. The enrollment criteria were as follows: 1) age of 18 years or greater, 2) ability and willingness to provide written informed consent, 3) blunt head trauma and clinical diagnosis of isolated mild TBI by the treating physician, and 4) blood alcohol level of metrics. At 3 weeks postinjury, participants were contacted via telephone to complete the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire to assess the presence of significant PCS. A total of 66 mild TBI patients were enrolled in the study with 42 of them completing both the ED assessment and the follow-up; 40 patients were included in the analyses. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the entire test battery was 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.54 to 0.90). The AUC for tests that primarily measure visuomotor and proprioceptive performance were 0.80 (95% CI = 0.65 to 0.95) and 0.71 (95% CI = 0.53 to 0.89), respectively. The robotic-assisted test battery has the ability to discriminate between subjects who developed PCS and those who did not. Additionally, poor visuomotor and proprioceptive performance were most strongly associated with subsequent PCS. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  11. College-age twins: university admission policies / twin research: birth weight and neuromotor performance; transfusion syndrome markers; vanishing twins and fetal sex determination; mz twin discordance for wilson's disease / media: big at birth; planned separation of conjoined twins; x factor twins; Cinema: the identical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Nancy L

    2014-12-01

    There is a lack of research findings addressing the unique college admissions issues faced by twins and other multiples. The advantages and disadvantage twins face, as reported by college administrators, twins and families are reviewed. Next, recent research addressing twins' birth weight and neuromotor performance, transfusion syndrome markers, the vanishing twin syndrome and monozygotic (MZ) twin discordance for Wilson's disease is described. News items concerning the birth of unusually large twins, the planned separation of conjoined twins, twin participants in the X Factor games and a film, The Identical, are also summarized.

  12. Low birthweight and neuromotor development: a population based, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfelt, K; Ellertsen, B; Markestad, T

    1996-05-01

    The aims of the study were to investigate: (a) the relationship between low birthweight (LBW) and pre-school neuromotor development; and (b) the predictive value of various pre-, peri-, and neonatal factors for neuromotor development in LBW pre-school children. A population based sample of 144 5-year-old LBW children (birthweight neuromotor development. We conclude that motor functions essential for daily activities are intact in most LBW preschoolers.

  13. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  14. Utilization of emergency services for non-traumatic dental disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Keith; Kunzel, Carol; Yoon, Richard K

    2013-01-01

    To identify and characterize children who utilize emergency dental services for non-traumatic dental disease. Caregivers of children under 12 years old who seek out emergency services for the treatment of non-traumatic dental disease will be surveyed regarding their child's current oral health status. Patient's clinical data will be obtained and they will be further followed for a period of 2 months to determine if they follow-up with recommendations for comprehensive dental care. One hundred and ninety-eight people participated in the study (97% response rate). Eighty-three percent of the children were diagnosed with dental caries. Seventy-four percent of patients of record presented with an emergency at least once before and 73% had a history of one or more broken appointments. Patients with a history of previous emergency visits (OR = 3.45, CI = 2.05, 5.81) or a history of missed appointments (OR = 2.21, CI = 1.42, 3.58) were significantly more likely to fail to return for comprehensive care (P dental services as their primary means for dental care.

  15. [The efficacy of music and music therapy in the neuromotor rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raglio, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    This article review includes the controlled and randomized controlled trials about the use of music and music therapy techniques in the neuromotor rehabilitation. The paper defines the music therapy and delineates the neuroscientific bases and rehabilitative potential of music and music therapy interventions. Significant results are present in the stroke and Parkinson's disease rehabilitation. The Author's conclusions suggest the need of more rigorous studies based on clear procedures and strong methodological research criteria.

  16. Recent developments in biofeedback for neuromotor rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jiping

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The original use of biofeedback to train single muscle activity in static positions or movement unrelated to function did not correlate well to motor function improvements in patients with central nervous system injuries. The concept of task-oriented repetitive training suggests that biofeedback therapy should be delivered during functionally related dynamic movement to optimize motor function improvement. Current, advanced technologies facilitate the design of novel biofeedback systems that possess diverse parameters, advanced cue display, and sophisticated control systems for use in task-oriented biofeedback. In light of these advancements, this article: (1 reviews early biofeedback studies and their conclusions; (2 presents recent developments in biofeedback technologies and their applications to task-oriented biofeedback interventions; and (3 discusses considerations regarding the therapeutic system design and the clinical application of task-oriented biofeedback therapy. This review should provide a framework to further broaden the application of task-oriented biofeedback therapy in neuromotor rehabilitation.

  17. Evaluation of child development: beyond the neuromotor aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Helena Eickmann

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: The pediatrician's role in the future will include both physical and mental health, recognizing that social development, resilience, and emotional maturity are as important as physical growth and neuromotor skills in a child's life course.

  18. Genetic Variation Underlying Traumatic Brain injury (TBI) and Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (LOAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0588 TITLE: Genetic variation underlying traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (LOAD...14 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (LOAD) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genetic variation underlying traumatic brain injury...accelerating individual’s memory decline and possibly accelerating LOAD like neuro-degeneration. In addition, genetic risk factors including non- coding and

  19. Evaluation of child development: beyond the neuromotor aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Helena Eickmann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To review the epidemiology and update the scientific knowledge on the problems of development and behavior in childhood, and the recommendations for the role of the pediatrician in identifying and managing delays and disturbances in child development and mental health. Sources: A search for relevant literature was performed in the PubMed and Scopus databases and publications of the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. Summary of the findings: With the decline in the incidence of communicable diseases in children, problems with development, behavior, and emotional regulation are increasingly becoming a part of the work of pediatricians, yet many are not trained and feel uncomfortable about this extension of their role. The available screening tools for child development and behavior are reviewed, and a ‘school readiness’ checklist is presented, together with recommendations on how the pediatrician can incorporate developmental surveillance into routine practice, aware of the need for children to acquire social, emotional, and cognitive skills so that they can develop their full potential. Conclusions: The pediatrician's role in the future will include both physical and mental health, recognizing that social development, resilience, and emotional maturity are as important as physical growth and neuromotor skills in a child's life course.

  20. Children's Neuromotor and Muscle-Functional Attributes - Outstanding Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotan, Raffy

    2016-05-01

    The current understanding of child-adult differences in muscular and neuromotor function will be reviewed while highlighting the gaps in our knowledge and raising research questions that could be addressed in the immediate or near future. Topics include muscle activation, muscle composition, strength attributes, strength- and aerobic-training, neuromotor development, where neuromuscular differences originate from, and the possible interrelationships between motor and cognitive function. The various differences will be discussed on their specific merits, but also as possible manifestations of a common underlying factor which, if true, could provide a more holistic view of child-adult functional differences.

  1. Aquatic intervention in children with neuro-motor impairments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Getz, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    The present thesis addresses the influence of aquatic interventions on motor performance of children with neuro-motor deficiencies in a functional context. The theoretical framework is based on a functional approach in compliance to the International Classification of Function and Disability (ICF).

  2. Effects of Cholinergic Perturbations on Neuromotor - Cognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    impairment of visual, cognitive and neuromotor abilities (Ketchum et al., 1973). Furthermore, CNS syndromes , including amnestic delirium, which are produced...intravenous teflon catheter inserted in the forearm for drawing blood samples. Task and physiological assessments were performed and a blood sample was...data for individual subjects were analyzed using both compartmental and non- compartmental methods. For the compartmental analysis, the initial

  3. Disruption of basal lamina components in neuromotor synapses of children with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

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    Karyn G Robinson

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is a static encephalopathy occurring when a lesion to the developing brain results in disordered movement and posture. Patients present with sometimes overlapping spastic, athetoid/dyskinetic, and ataxic symptoms. Spastic CP, which is characterized by stiff muscles, weakness, and poor motor control, accounts for ∼80% of cases. The detailed mechanisms leading to disordered movement in spastic CP are not completely understood, but clinical experience and recent studies suggest involvement of peripheral motor synapses. For example, it is recognized that CP patients have altered sensitivities to drugs that target neuromuscular junctions (NMJs, and protein localization studies suggest that NMJ microanatomy is disrupted in CP. Since CP originates during maturation, we hypothesized that NMJ disruption in spastic CP is associated with retention of an immature neuromotor phenotype later in life. Scoliosis patients with spastic CP or idiopathic disease were enrolled in a prospective, partially-blinded study to evaluate NMJ organization and neuromotor maturation. The localization of synaptic acetylcholine esterase (AChE relative to postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor (AChR, synaptic laminin β2, and presynaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2 appeared mismatched in the CP samples; whereas, no significant disruption was found between AChR and SV2. These data suggest that pre- and postsynaptic NMJ components in CP children were appropriately distributed even though AChE and laminin β2 within the synaptic basal lamina appeared disrupted. Follow up electron microscopy indicated that NMJs from CP patients appeared generally mature and similar to controls with some differences present, including deeper postsynaptic folds and reduced presynaptic mitochondria. Analysis of maturational markers, including myosin, syntrophin, myogenin, and AChR subunit expression, and telomere lengths, all indicated similar levels of motor maturation in the two groups

  4. DISTANT DAMAGES IN PATIENTS WITH TRAUMATIC DISEASE OF SPINAL CORD

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    O. I. Dulub

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Were marked 3 groups of patients with distant damages of spine: with develope of it at early time after vertebro-spinal cord trauma, posttraumatic distant myelopathy and posttraumatic syringogydromyelia. Develope of distant damage was in 54 patients and it was by high powerfulls traumatic action, ft connected to a hard prime damage of spinal cord (79.6% had a completely disturbance of spine cord conduction. Periods of improvement conductions changed for the worse. Confirmation of defeation and level of disturbance of spine cord conduction were done by MRI and different methods of electrophysiology. Medical support and surgical operations (decompressive and bypass operations guarantee the positive neurological results gettin almost patients.

  5. Aquatic intervention in children with neuro-motor impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Getz, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    The present thesis addresses the influence of aquatic interventions on motor performance of children with neuro-motor deficiencies in a functional context. The theoretical framework is based on a functional approach in compliance to the International Classification of Function and Disability (ICF). Chapter 2 addresses the relationship between motor performance in the aquatic environment setting as measured by the Aquatic Independence Measure (AIM) to motor performance on land as measured by t...

  6. Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy: Distinct but possibly overlapping disease entities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ryan C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Robson, Matthew J; Lee, John M; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) have long been recognized as sharing some similar neuropathological features, mainly the presence of neurofibrilary tangles and hyperphosphorylated tau, but have generally been described as distinct entities. Evidence indicates that neurotrauma increases the risk of developing dementia and accelerates the progression of disease. Findings are emerging that CTE and AD may be present in the same patients. This study presents a series of previously unpublished cases, with one case demonstrating possible neurotrauma-related AD, one pure CTE, and an example of a case exhibiting features of both AD and CTE. The future significance of this work lies not only in the confirmation of AD-CTE co-existence, but, more importantly, ways of generating a hypothesis about the possibility that CTE may accelerate AD development. Understanding the relationship between neurotrauma and neurodegenerative disease will help elucidate how distinct disease entities can co-exist in the same patient. It will ultimately require the use of pre-clinical animal models and repeat injury paradigms to investigate clinically relevant injury mechanisms. These models should produce a CTE-like phenotype that must be both neuropathologically and behaviourally similar to human disease. This case series and review of the literature presents a discussion of AD and CTE in the context of neurotrauma. It highlights recent work from repetitive neurotrauma models with an emphasis on those exhibiting a CTE-like phenotype. Potential mechanisms of interest shared amongst AD and CTE are briefly addressed and future experiments are advocated for to enhance understanding of CTE pathophysiology and the relationship between CTE and AD.

  7. Mild traumatic brain injury is associated with reduced cortical thickness in those at risk for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jasmeet P; Logue, Mark W; Sadeh, Naomi; Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Verfaellie, Mieke; Hayes, Scott M; Reagan, Andrew; Salat, David H; Wolf, Erika J; McGlinchey, Regina E; Milberg, William P; Stone, Annjanette; Schichman, Steven A; Miller, Mark W

    2017-03-01

    Moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury is one of the strongest environmental risk factors for the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as late-onset Alzheimer's disease, although it is unclear whether mild traumatic brain injury, or concussion, also confers risk. This study examined mild traumatic brain injury and genetic risk as predictors of reduced cortical thickness in brain regions previously associated with early Alzheimer's disease, and their relationship with episodic memory. Participants were 160 Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans between the ages of 19 and 58, many of whom carried mild traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder diagnoses. Whole-genome polygenic risk scores for the development of Alzheimer's disease were calculated using summary statistics from the largest Alzheimer's disease genome-wide association study to date. Results showed that mild traumatic brain injury moderated the relationship between genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease and cortical thickness, such that individuals with mild traumatic brain injury and high genetic risk showed reduced cortical thickness in Alzheimer's disease-vulnerable regions. Among males with mild traumatic brain injury, high genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease was associated with cortical thinning as a function of time since injury. A moderated mediation analysis showed that mild traumatic brain injury and high genetic risk indirectly influenced episodic memory performance through cortical thickness, suggesting that cortical thinning in Alzheimer's disease-vulnerable brain regions is a mechanism for reduced memory performance. Finally, analyses that examined the apolipoprotein E4 allele, post-traumatic stress disorder, and genetic risk for schizophrenia and depression confirmed the specificity of the Alzheimer's disease polygenic risk finding. These results provide evidence that mild traumatic brain injury is associated with greater neurodegeneration and reduced memory performance

  8. [Late-onset Neurodegenerative Diseases Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and Alzheimer's Disease Secondary to TBI (AD-TBI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahata, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Hajime; Mimura, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is associated with mild repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This long-term and progressive symptom due to TBI was initially called punch-drunk syndrome or dementia pugilistica, since it was believed to be associated with boxing. However, serial neuropathological studies of mild repetitive TBI in the last decade have revealed that CTE occurs not only in boxers but also in a wider population including American football players, wrestlers, and military personnel. CTE has gained large public interest owing to dramatic cases involving retired professional athletes wherein serious behavioral problems and tragic incidents were reported. Unlike mild repetitive TBI, a single episode of severe TBI can cause another type of late-onset neuropsychiatric disease including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several epidemiological studies have shown that a single episode of severe TBI is one of the major risk factors of AD. Pathologically, both AD and CTE are characterized by abnormal accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. However, recent neuropathological studies revealed that CTE demonstrates a unique pattern of tau pathology in neurons and astrocytes, and accumulation of other misfolded proteins such as TDP-43. Currently, no reliable biomarkers of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI are available, and a definitive diagnosis can be made only via postmortem neuropathological examination. Development in neuroimaging techniques such as tau and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging might not only enable early diagnosis of CTE, but also contribute to the interventions for prevention of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in the living brain of patients with TBI.

  9. Basic Motor Skills Instruction for Children with Neuromotor Delays: A Critical Review.

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    Horn, Eva M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper analyzes the methodology and effectiveness of the training approaches implemented in 28 empirical studies on basic motor skills instruction for children with neuromotor delays. For all types of training approaches (neuromotor interventions, sensory integration techniques, behavioral programing, and naturalistic programing), assessment…

  10. Neuropsychological assessment of patients with severe neuromotor and verbal disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbadini, M; Bonanni, R; Carlesimo, G A; Caltagirone, C

    2001-04-01

    In people with cerebral palsy, severe neuromotor disability and communication problems make standard neuropsychological tests impossible. Therefore, alternative methods and specific aids must be developed to allow patients to autonomously respond to the examiner's questions. In the present individuals and study, a neuropsychological evaluation was made of a group of eight individuals with cerebral palsy, and severe neuromotor and verbal disabilities, and a group of 19 normal subjects matched for mental age. The tests were administered using an autonomous selection method in which the patient selects the various responses through specific aids without the examiner's interference. Patients' group performances in visuo-spatial and memory tests were on average lower than the mean of the control group. In the verbal domain, patients' scores were comparable to those of normal children in all tests but one assessing the comprehension of syntactically complex sentences. An analysis of the patients' individual performances also revealed heterogeneous cognitive profiles: some patients presented a homogeneously distributed cognitive impairment and others a more selective one. This finding is particularly important for planning differentiated learning programmes, and identifying suitable communicative instruments in rehabilitative and educational settings.

  11. Quantitative assessment of neuromotor function in workers with current low exposure to mercury vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastensson, Gunilla; Lamoureux, Daniel; Sällsten, Gerd; Beuter, Anne; Barregård, Lars

    2008-07-01

    Evaluation of neuromotor function has been used in several epidemiological studies of workers with long-term exposure to mercury vapor (Hg 0). Some recent studies indicate adverse effects at relatively low exposure levels. In the present study, we used sensitive quantitative methods, developed specifically to detect subtle effects of exposure to toxins on motor function. After exclusion of individuals with neurological diseases or other conditions that may affect performance, 43 chloralkali workers with current low exposure to Hg 0, and 22 age-matched referents remained for further analysis. The median urinary mercury concentration in exposed workers was 5.9 microg/g (range 1.3-25) creatinine (microg/gC), while that in referents was 0.7 microg/gC (range 0.2-4.1). The mean exposure time was 15 years, and the median cumulative mercury index was 161 years x microg/gC in exposed workers. A eurythmokinesimeter (EKM) was used to quantify eye-hand coordination, and a diadochokinesimeter, to measure rapid alternating rotation of the forearms. In general, the differences in performance between the exposed workers and the referents were small. Age was associated with a decrease in speed, more tremor, and longer contact duration between the stylus and the metal targets in performance of rapid pointing movements. Smokers had significantly more tremor, and more contacts per event in the EKM test, than nonsmokers. Taking age, shift work, and smoking habits into account, no significant associations with current or cumulative mercury exposure were found for the majority of the outcome variables from the quantitative tests. In general, this study indicates no significant adverse effects of Hg 0 on neuromotor function at the exposure levels studied.

  12. Vascular damage: a persisting pathology common to Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzblau, Max; Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Gonzales-Portillo, Gabriel S; Diamandis, Theo; Borlongan, Mia C; Tajiri, Naoki; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2013-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) are both significant clinical problems characterized by debilitating symptoms with limited available treatments. Interestingly, both neurological diseases are characterized by neurovascular damage. This impaired brain vasculature correlates with the onset of dementia, a symptom associated with hippocampal degeneration seen in both diseases. We posit that vascular damage is a major pathological link between TBI and AD, in that TBI victims are predisposed to AD symptoms due to altered brain vasculature; vice versa, the progression of AD pathology may be accelerated by TBI especially when the brain insult worsens hippocampal degeneration. Our hypothesis is supported by recent data reporting expedited AD pathology in presymptomatic transgenic AD mice subjected to TBI. If our hypothesis is correct, treatments targeted at repairing the vasculature may prove effective at treating both diseases and preventing the evolution of AD symptoms in TBI victims. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Presenting as Alzheimer's Disease in a Retired Soccer Player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, Lea T; Anghinah, Renato; Nascimento, Camila Fernandes; Amaro, Edson; Leite, Renata P; Martin, Maria da Graça M; Naslavsky, Michel S; Takada, Leonel T; Filho, Wilson Jacob; Pasqualucci, Carlos A; Nitrini, Ricardo

    2016-07-29

    The relationship between soccer and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is not well established. We report clinicopathological correlations in an 83-year-old retired center-back soccer player, with no history of concussion, manifesting typical Alzheimer-type dementia. Examination revealed mixed pathology including widespread CTE, moderate Alzheimer's disease, hippocampal sclerosis, and TDP-43 proteinopathy. This case adds to a few CTE cases described in soccer players. Furthermore, it corroborates that CTE may present clinically as typical Alzheimer-type dementia. Further studies investigating the extent to which soccer is a risk for CTE are needed.

  14. Systematic review of the risk of Parkinson's disease after mild traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marras, Connie; Hincapié, Cesar A; Kristman, Vicki L

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence on the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and other databases were searched (1990-2012) with terms including "craniocerebral trauma" and "parkinsonian disorders." Reference lists......: The best available evidence argues against an important causal association between MTBI and PD. There are few high-quality studies on this topic. Prospective studies of long duration would address the limitations of recall of head injury and the possibility of reverse causation....

  15. The Effects of Creatine Supplementation and Physical Exercise on Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire Royes, Luiz Fernando; Cassol, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a devastating disease frequently followed by significant behavioral disabilities and long-term medical complications that include a wide range of behavioral and emotional problems. TBI is characterized by a combination of immediate mechanical dysfunction of brain tissue and secondary damage developed over a longer period of time following the injury. The early inflammatory response after tissue injury can be triggered by several factors such as extravasated blood products and reactive oxygen species (ROS). It is important to note that energy generation and mitochondrial function are closely related to and interconnected with delayed secondary manifestations of brain injury, including early neuromotor dysfunction, cognitive impairment and post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE). Given the extent of post-traumatic changes in neuronal function and the possibility of amplifying secondary cascades, different therapies designed to minimize damage and retain/restore cellular function after TBI are currently being studied. In this context, the present review covers the preclinical and clinical literature investigating the role of inflammation and free radicals in secondary damage generated by several models of TBI. Furthermore, the present review aims to discuss the role of creatine, a guanidine compound popularly used as a performance-enhancing supplement for high-intensity athletic performance, in secondary damage induced by TBI. In this narrative review, we also discuss the beneficial effect of exercise performed in animal models of TBI and how the results from animal studies can be applied to clinical settings.

  16. Effects of traumatic brain injury on reactive astrogliosis and seizures in mouse models of Alexander disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotrina, Maria Luisa; Chen, Michael; Han, Xiaoning; Iliff, Jeffrey; Ren, Zeguang; Sun, Wei; Hagemann, Tracy; Goldman, James; Messing, Albee; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-09-25

    Alexander disease (AxD) is the only known human pathology caused by mutations in an astrocyte-specific gene, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). These mutations result in abnormal GFAP accumulations that promote seizures, motor delays and, ultimately, death. The exact contribution of increased, abnormal levels of astrocytic mutant GFAP in the development and progression of the epileptic phenotype is not clear, and we addressed this question using two mouse models of AxD. Comparison of brain seizure activity spontaneously and after traumatic brain injury (TBI), an effective way to trigger seizures, revealed that abnormal GFAP accumulation contributes to anomalous brain activity (increased non-convulsive hyperactivity) but is not a risk factor for the development of epilepsy after TBI. These data highlight the need to further explore the complex and heterogeneous response of astrocytes towards injury and the involvement of GFAP in the progression of AxD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cortical correlates of neuromotor development in healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, M A; Ziemann, U; Bartko, J J; Denckla, M B; Barker, C A; Wassermann, E M

    2003-09-01

    To examine the relationship between acquisition of fine motor skills in childhood and development of the motor cortex. We measured finger tapping speed and mirror movements in 43 healthy right-handed subjects (6-26 years of age). While recording surface electromyographic activity from right and left first dorsal interosseus, we delivered focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the hand areas of each motor cortex. We measured motor evoked potential (MEP) threshold, and ipsilateral (iSP) and contralateral (CSP) silent periods. As children got older, finger speeds got faster, MEP threshold decreased, iSP duration increased and latency decreased. Finger tapping speed got faster as motor thresholds and iSP latency decreased, but was unrelated to CSP duration. In all subjects right hemisphere MEP thresholds were higher than those on the left and duration of right hemisphere CSP was longer than that on the left. Children under 10 years of age had higher left hand mirror movement scores, and fewer left hemisphere iSPs which were of longer duration. Maturation of finger tapping skills is closely related to developmental changes in the motor threshold and iSP latency. Studies are warranted to explore the relationship between these measures and other neuromotor skills in children with motor disorders. TMS can provide important insights into certain functional aspects of neurodevelopment in children.

  18. TDP-43 Proteinopathy and Motor Neuron Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C.; Gavett, Brandon E.; Stern, Robert A.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Cantu, Robert C.; Kowall, Neil W.; Perl, Daniel P.; Hedley-Whyte, E. Tessa; Price, Bruce; Sullivan, Chris; Morin, Peter; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Wulff, Megan; Budson, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that the incidence of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is increased in association with head injury. Repetitive head injury is also associated with the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a tauopathy characterized by neurofibrillary tangles throughout the brain in the relative absence of β-amyloid deposits. We examined 12 cases of CTE and, in 10, found a widespread TAR DNA-binding protein of approximately 43 kd (TDP-43) proteinopathy affecting the frontal and temporal cortices, medial temporal lobe, basal ganglia, diencephalon, and brainstem. Three athletes with CTE also developed a progressive motor neuron disease with profound weakness, atrophy, spasticity, and fasciculations several years before death. In these 3 cases, there were abundant TDP-43–positive inclusions and neurites in the spinal cord in addition to tau neurofibrillary changes, motor neuron loss, and corticospinal tract degeneration. The TDP-43 proteinopathy associated with CTE is similar to that found in frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 inclusions, in that widespread regions of the brain are affected. Akin to frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 inclusions, in some individuals with CTE, the TDP-43 proteinopathy extends to involve the spinal cord and is associated with motor neuron disease. This is the first pathological evidence that repetitive head trauma experienced in collision sports might be associated with the development of a motor neuron disease. PMID:20720505

  19. Tau prions from Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy patients propagate in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerman, Amanda L; Aoyagi, Atsushi; Patel, Smita; Kazmi, Sabeen A; Lobach, Iryna; Grinberg, Lea T; McKee, Ann C; Seeley, William W; Olson, Steven H; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2016-12-13

    Tau prions are thought to aggregate in the central nervous system, resulting in neurodegeneration. Among the tauopathies, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common, whereas argyrophilic grain disease (AGD), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), Pick's disease (PiD), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) are less prevalent. Brain extracts from deceased individuals with PiD, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by three-repeat (3R) tau prions, were used to infect HEK293T cells expressing 3R tau fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Extracts from AGD, CBD, and PSP patient samples, which contain four-repeat (4R) tau prions, were transmitted to HEK293 cells expressing 4R tau fused to YFP. These studies demonstrated that prion propagation in HEK cells requires isoform pairing between the infecting prion and the recipient substrate. Interestingly, tau aggregates in AD and CTE, containing both 3R and 4R isoforms, were unable to robustly infect either 3R- or 4R-expressing cells. However, AD and CTE prions were able to replicate in HEK293T cells expressing both 3R and 4R tau. Unexpectedly, increasing the level of 4R isoform expression alone supported the propagation of both AD and CTE prions. These results allowed us to determine the levels of tau prions in AD and CTE brain extracts.

  20. Tau prions from Alzheimer’s disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy patients propagate in cultured cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerman, Amanda L.; Aoyagi, Atsushi; Patel, Smita; Kazmi, Sabeen A.; Lobach, Iryna; Grinberg, Lea T.; McKee, Ann C.; Seeley, William W.; Olson, Steven H.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2016-01-01

    Tau prions are thought to aggregate in the central nervous system, resulting in neurodegeneration. Among the tauopathies, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common, whereas argyrophilic grain disease (AGD), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), Pick’s disease (PiD), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) are less prevalent. Brain extracts from deceased individuals with PiD, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by three-repeat (3R) tau prions, were used to infect HEK293T cells expressing 3R tau fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Extracts from AGD, CBD, and PSP patient samples, which contain four-repeat (4R) tau prions, were transmitted to HEK293 cells expressing 4R tau fused to YFP. These studies demonstrated that prion propagation in HEK cells requires isoform pairing between the infecting prion and the recipient substrate. Interestingly, tau aggregates in AD and CTE, containing both 3R and 4R isoforms, were unable to robustly infect either 3R- or 4R-expressing cells. However, AD and CTE prions were able to replicate in HEK293T cells expressing both 3R and 4R tau. Unexpectedly, increasing the level of 4R isoform expression alone supported the propagation of both AD and CTE prions. These results allowed us to determine the levels of tau prions in AD and CTE brain extracts. PMID:27911827

  1. Traumatic Pneumatocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Ching Yang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic pneumatocele is a rare complication of blunt chest trauma with uncertain pathogenesis. It occurs primarily in pediatric patients and is characterized by single or multiple pulmonary cystic lesions concomitant with other type of injuries of the lung parenchyma. Herein we present a case of traumatic pneumatocele in a 3-year-old boy, together with a brief review of the literature. This rare entity should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions complicating blunt chest trauma, especially in young adults. The disease generally has a benign and self-limiting course.

  2. Post-traumatic stress disorder and cardiometabolic disease: improving causal inference to inform practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenen, K C; Sumner, J A; Gilsanz, P; Glymour, M M; Ratanatharathorn, A; Rimm, E B; Roberts, A L; Winning, A; Kubzansky, L D

    2017-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been declared 'a life sentence' based on evidence that the disorder leads to a host of physical health problems. Some of the strongest empirical research - in terms of methodology and findings - has shown that PTSD predicts higher risk of cardiometabolic diseases, specifically cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Despite mounting evidence, PTSD is not currently acknowledged as a risk factor by cardiovascular or endocrinological medicine. This view is unlikely to change absent compelling evidence that PTSD causally contributes to cardiometabolic disease. This review suggests that with developments in methods for epidemiological research and the rapidly expanding knowledge of the behavioral and biological effects of PTSD the field is poised to provide more definitive answers to questions of causality. First, we discuss methods to improve causal inference using the observational data most often used in studies of PTSD and health, with particular reference to issues of temporality and confounding. Second, we consider recent work linking PTSD with specific behaviors and biological processes, and evaluate whether these may plausibly serve as mechanisms by which PTSD leads to cardiometabolic disease. Third, we evaluate how looking more comprehensively into the PTSD phenotype provides insight into whether specific aspects of PTSD phenomenology are particularly relevant to cardiometabolic disease. Finally, we discuss new areas of research that are feasible and could enhance understanding of the PTSD-cardiometabolic relationship, such as testing whether treatment of PTSD can halt or even reverse the cardiometabolic risk factors causally related to CVD and T2D.

  3. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Risk of Parkinson Disease: A Nationwide Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yee-Lam E; Bai, Ya-Mei; Hsu, Ju-Wei; Huang, Kai-Lin; Su, Tung-Ping; Li, Cheng-Ta; Lin, Wei-Chen; Pan, Tai-Long; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Chen, Mu-Hong

    2017-08-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested a relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and neurodegenerative disorder, such as Alzheimer disease. The association between PTSD and Parkinson disease (PD), however, remains unclear. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 7,280 subjects (1,456 patients aged ≥45 years with PTSD and 5,824 age-/sex-matched individuals without PTSD) were enrolled between 2002 and 2009 and followed to the end of 2011. Subjects who developed PD during the follow-up period were identified. An increased risk of developing PD was found in patients with PTSD (Wald χ(2) = 12.061, hazard ratio [HR]: 3.46, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.72-6.96) compared with individuals without PTSD, after adjusting for demographic data and medical and psychiatric comorbidities. The sensitivity tests after excluding the first year observation (Wald χ(2) = 7.948, HR: 3.01, 95% CI: 1.40-6.46) and the first 3-year observation (Wald χ(2) = 5.099, HR: 3.07, 95% CI: 1.16-8.15) were consistent. Patients with PTSD had an elevated risk of developing PD in later life. Further studies would be required to clarify the exact pathophysiology between PTSD and PD and to investigate whether the prompt intervention for PTSD may reduce this risk. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of post-traumatic stress disorder on HIV disease progression following hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Kathleen H; Clark, Rebecca A; Schmidt, Norine; Benight, Charles C; Kissinger, Patricia

    2009-10-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common psychological outcome of any disaster. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of PTSD on disease progression among HIV-infected persons in metropolitan New Orleans post-hurricane Katrina. One-year post-storm, a convenience sample of 145 HIV-infected patients who returned to care at the HIV Outpatient Program clinic in New Orleans were interviewed. Clinical factors pre and one and two years post-disaster were abstracted from medical records and compared by PTSD status. Of the 145 participants, 37.2% had PTSD. Those with PTSD were more likely than those without PTSD to have detectable plasma viral loads at both follow-up time points post-disaster and more likely to have CD4 cell counts <200/mm(3) two years post-disaster. They were also more likely to have had medication interruptions immediately post-disaster. Our findings corroborate the findings of others that PTSD accelerates HIV disease progression. Disaster planners should consider the special counseling and medication safeguards needs of HIV-infected persons.

  5. Changes in rates of arthroscopy due to degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Ville M; Sihvonen, Raine; Paloneva, Juha; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2016-02-01

    Knee arthroscopy is commonly performed to treat degenerative knee disease symptoms and traumatic meniscal tears. We evaluated whether the recent high-quality randomized control trials not favoring arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee disease affected the procedure incidence and trends in Finland and Sweden. We conducted a bi-national registry-based study including all adult (aged ≥18 years) inpatient and outpatient arthroscopic surgeries performed for degenerative knee disease (osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative meniscal tears) and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland between 1997 and 2012, and in Sweden between 2001 and 2012. In Finland, the annual number of operations was 16,389 in 1997, reached 20,432 in 2007, and declined to 15,018 in 2012. In Sweden, the number of operations was 9,944 in 2001, reached 11,711 in 2008, and declined to 8,114 in 2012. The knee arthroscopy incidence for OA was 124 per 10(5) person-years in 2012 in Finland and it was 51 in Sweden. The incidence of knee arthroscopies for meniscal tears coded as traumatic steadily increased in Finland from 64 per 10(5) person-years in 1997 to 97 per 10(5) person-years in 2012, but not in Sweden. The incidence of arthroscopies for degenerative knee disease declined after 2008 in both countries. Remarkably, the incidence of arthroscopy for degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears is 2 to 4 times higher in Finland than in Sweden. Efficient implementation of new high-quality evidence in clinical practice could reduce the number of ineffective surgeries.

  6. Neuromotor Rehabilitation and Cognitive Outcomes in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury through the Method BAPNE

    OpenAIRE

    Tripovic, Y.; Marchese, A.; Carratelli, D.; Naranjo, F.J. Romero

    2014-01-01

    After the acute phase of hospitalization, patients with severe brain injury, requiring interventions in health and social care in the long term: the work of rehabilitators is to facilitate the recovery of several disorders caused by trauma and involves all possible areas to return the patient to full functionality within the autonomy and satisfaction of basic needs, and psychological support they need.The recent use of body percussion through BAPNE method in neurorehabilitation offers the pos...

  7. Nerve tissue growth factors as markers of evaluation of neuro-genesis processes in traumatic spinal cord disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uljanov V.Yu.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: immunological differentiation effects regeneration of nerve tissue in the acute and early periods of traumatic spinal cord disease on the basis of assessment of the dynamics of content neurospecific proteins in serum affected. Material and Methods. Content of neurospecific proteins in the blood serum has been studied by enzyme immunoassay in 40 patients with spinal cord injuries. Results. Dynamics and quantitative changes in the content of chronometric neurospecific proteins in serum of patients in acute and early periods of traumatic spinal cord disease is characterized by two-phase increase in the concentration CNTF; monotonic increase in the content of NT-3 in all periods of observation; biphasic increase in the levels of NT-4 to 1-4th and 14-th day from the date of injury. Conclusion. Complex research of neurospecific levels of proteins in the serum allows one to evaluate selectively the individual components of the process of regeneration of nerve tissue in acute and early periods of traumatic spinal cord disease.

  8. Luteolin Reduces Alzheimer’s Disease Pathologies Induced by Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell Sawmiller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI occurs in response to an acute insult to the head and is recognized as a major risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Indeed, recent studies have suggested a pathological overlap between TBI and AD, with both conditions exhibiting amyloid-beta (Aβ deposits, tauopathy, and neuroinflammation. Additional studies involving animal models of AD indicate that some AD-related genotypic determinants may be critical factors enhancing temporal and phenotypic symptoms of TBI. Thus in the present study, we examined sub-acute effects of moderate TBI delivered by a gas-driven shock tube device in Aβ depositing Tg2576 mice. Three days later, significant increases in b-amyloid deposition, glycogen synthase-3 (GSK-3 activation, phospho-tau, and pro-inflammatory cytokines were observed. Importantly, peripheral treatment with the naturally occurring flavonoid, luteolin, significantly abolished these accelerated pathologies. This study lays the groundwork for a safe and natural compound that could prevent or treat TBI with minimal or no deleterious side effects in combat personnel and others at risk or who have experienced TBI.

  9. CCL11 is increased in the CNS in chronic traumatic encephalopathy but not in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Jonathan D; Stein, Thor D; Tripodis, Yorghos; Alvarez, Victor E; Huber, Bertrand R; Au, Rhoda; Kiernan, Patrick T; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Mez, Jesse; Solomon, Todd M; Alosco, Michael L; McKee, Ann C

    2017-01-01

    CCL11, a protein previously associated with age-associated cognitive decline, is observed to be increased in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) compared to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using a cohort of 23 deceased American football players with neuropathologically verified CTE, 50 subjects with neuropathologically diagnosed AD, and 18 non-athlete controls, CCL11 was measured with ELISA in the dorsolateral frontal cortex (DLFC) and CSF. CCL11 levels were significantly increased in the DLFC in subjects with CTE (fold change = 1.234, p American football (β = 0.426, p = 0.048) independent of age (β = -0.046, p = 0.824). Preliminary analyses of a subset of subjects with available post-mortem CSF showed a trend for increased CCL11 among individuals with CTE (p = 0.069) mirroring the increase in the DLFC. Furthermore, an association between CSF CCL11 levels and the number of years exposed to football (β = 0.685, p = 0.040) was observed independent of age (β = -0.103, p = 0.716). Finally, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis demonstrated CSF CCL11 accurately distinguished CTE subjects from non-athlete controls and AD subjects (AUC = 0.839, 95% CI 0.62-1.058, p = 0.028). Overall, the current findings provide preliminary evidence that CCL11 may be a novel target for future CTE biomarker studies.

  10. Evaluation of neuromotor function in infancy - A systematic review of available methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heineman, Kirsten R.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Objective: Neuromotor function in infancy can be evaluated in various ways. Assessment instruments are used for early detection of children with a high risk for developmental disorders. Early detection enables clinicians to provide intervention at a young age when plasticity of the nervous system is

  11. The neuromotor examination of the preschool child and its prognostic significance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadders-Algra, M

    2005-01-01

    The present paper reviews the methods available for neurological or neuromotor evaluation at preschool age. General textbooks on pediatric neurology describe the neurological examination at preschool age in terms of the assessment of the evaluation of cranial nerves, muscle tone, muscle power,

  12. Effectiveness of neuromotor task training for children with developmental coordination disorder : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, M.M.; Niemeijer, A.S.; Reynders, K.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Neuromotor Task Training (NTT), recently developed for the treatment of children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) by pediatric physical therapists in the Netherlands. NTT is a task-oriented treatment program based upon

  13. The Neuromotor Examination of the Preschool Child and Its Prognostic Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2005-01-01

    The present paper reviews the methods available for neurological or neuromotor evaluation at preschool age. General textbooks on pediatric neurology describe the neurological examination at preschool age in terms of the assessment of the evaluation of cranial nerves, muscle tone, muscle power, reflexes, and the presence of abnormal movements. They…

  14. Mercury and neuromotor function among children in a rural town in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlander, Johan; Huber, Stella Maria; Schomaker, Michael; Heumann, Christian; Schierl, Rudolf; Michalke, Bernhard; Jenni, Oskar G; Caflisch, Jon; Muñoz, Daniel Moraga; von Ehrenstein, Ondine S; Radon, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) exposure from artisanal gold mining has adverse effects on the neuromotor function in adults. However, few studies have examined this relationship in children. To investigate the impact of Hg exposure on children's neuromotor function. Cross-sectional data on Hg risk factors and demographics were collected from n = 288 children (response = 68.9%). Based on complete cases (CCs) (n = 130) and multiple imputations (n = 288), associations between fingernail Hg and four different neuromotor function components were calculated using multiple logistic regression adjusted for confounders. Of the children, 11.1, 14.9, 63.9, and 10.4% had pathologic pure motor skills, adaptive fine motor skills, adaptive gross motor skills, and static balance, respectively. No significant association between fingernail Hg and any neuromotor component was found. However, Hg burning in the household was significantly associated with children's pathologic pure motor skills (OR 3.07 95% CI 1.03-9.18). Elemental Hg exposure in the household might have adverse long-term effects on children's pure motor skills.

  15. Neuromotor Task Training for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder : a controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, A. S.; Smits-Engelsman, B. C. M.; Schoemaker, M. M.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate neuromotor task training (NTT), a recently developed child-centred and task-oriented treatment programme for children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). A treatment and a non-treatment control group of children with DCD were included. Children were

  16. Neuromotor task training for children with developmental coordination disorder: a controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, A.S.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Schoemaker, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate neuromotor task training (NTT), a recently developed child-centred and task-oriented treatment programme for children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). A treatment and a non-treatment control group of children with DCD were included. Children were

  17. Neurocognitive test profiles of extremely low birth weight five-year-old children differ according to neuromotor status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkman, Marit; Mikkola, Kaija; Ritari, Niina; Tommiska, Viena; Salokorpi, Teija; Haataja, Leena; Tammela, Outi; Pääkkönen, Leena; Olsén, Päivi; Fellman, Vineta

    2008-01-01

    The neurocognitive outcome of children born with extremely low birth weight (ELBW) is highly variable due to the complexity of morbidity. So far, no study has compared comprehensive neuropsychological test profiles in groups with different neuromotor status. In a national cohort of ELBW children neuropsychological test profiles were assessed in 4 groups defined according to a neurological examination at 5 years of age: normal neuromotor status (N = 56), motor coordination problems (N = 32), multiple subtle neuromotor signs including both motor coordination problems and deviant reflexes (N = 20), and spastic diplegia (N = 12). The neurocognitive assessment included a test of intelligence, the Wechsler Primary and Preschool Scale of Intelligence-Revised (WPPSI-R) and 14 subtests of attention and executive functions, verbal functions, manual motor functions, visuoconstructional functions and verbal learning (NEPSY). The children with normal neuromotor status performed within the average range; children with motor coordination problems had widespread impairment; and children with spastic diplegia and children with multiple minor neuromotor signs had uneven test profiles with stronger verbal results but weaknesses in attention and executive functions, and in manual motor and visuoconstructional tasks. In conclusion, very preterm children with neuromotor signs, including motor coordination problems, are at risk for neurocognitive impairment, in spite of average intelligence. More impaired children have more irregular test profiles. Follow-up and neuropsychological assessment of very preterm children with minor neuromotor signs are therefore indicated.

  18. Traumatic brain injury, paraquat exposure, and their relationship to Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-Chen; Bordelon, Yvette; Bronstein, Jeff; Ritz, Beate

    2012-11-13

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) increased risk of Parkinson disease (PD) in many but not all epidemiologic studies, giving rise to speculations about modifying factors. A recent animal study suggested that the combination of TBI with subthreshold paraquat exposure increases dopaminergic neurodegeneration. The objective of our study was to investigate PD risk due to both TBI and paraquat exposure in humans. From 2001 to 2011, we enrolled 357 incident idiopathic PD cases and 754 population controls in central California. Study participants were asked to report all head injuries with loss of consciousness for >5 minutes. Paraquat exposure was assessed via a validated geographic information system (GIS) based on records of pesticide applications to agricultural crops in California since 1974. This GIS tool assesses ambient pesticide exposure within 500 m of residences and workplaces. In logistic regression analyses, we observed a 2-fold increase in risk of PD for subjects who reported a TBI (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-3.14) and a weaker association for paraquat exposures (AOR 1.36, 95% CI 1.02-1.81). However, the risk of developing PD was 3-fold higher (AOR 3.01, 95% CI 1.51-6.01) in study participants with a TBI and exposure to paraquat than those exposed to neither risk factor. While TBI and paraquat exposure each increase the risk of PD moderately, exposure to both factors almost tripled PD risk. These environmental factors seem to act together to increase PD risk in a more than additive manner.

  19. The immunology of traumatic brain injury: a prime target for Alzheimer’s disease prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giunta Brian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A global health problem, traumatic brain injury (TBI is especially prevalent in the current era of ongoing world military conflicts. Its pathological hallmark is one or more primary injury foci, followed by a spread to initially normal brain areas via cascades of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines resulting in an amplification of the original tissue injury by microglia and other central nervous system immune cells. In some cases this may predispose individuals to later development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The inflammatory-based progression of TBI has been shown to be active in humans for up to 17 years post TBI. Unfortunately, all neuroprotective drug trials have failed, and specific treatments remain less than efficacious. These poor results might be explained by too much of a scientific focus on neurons without addressing the functions of microglia in the brain, which are at the center of proinflammatory cytokine generation. To address this issue, we provide a survey of the TBI-related brain immunological mechanisms that may promote progression to AD. We discuss these immune and microglia-based inflammatory mechanisms involved in the progression of post-trauma brain damage to AD. Flavonoid-based strategies to oppose the antigen-presenting cell-like inflammatory phenotype of microglia will also be reviewed. The goal is to provide a rationale for investigations of inflammatory response following TBI which may represent a pathological link to AD. In the end, a better understanding of neuroinflammation could open therapeutic avenues for abrogation of secondary cell death and behavioral symptoms that may mediate the progression of TBI to later AD.

  20. The impact of HIV status, HIV disease progression, and post-traumatic stress symptoms on the health-related quality of life of Rwandan women genocide survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Tracy L; Hoover, Donald R; Shi, Qiuhu; Cohen, Mardge H; Mutimura, Eugene; Adedimeji, Adebola A; Anastos, Kathryn

    2013-10-01

    We examined whether established associations between HIV disease and HIV disease progression on worse health-related quality of life (HQOL) were applicable to women with severe trauma histories, in this case Rwandan women genocide survivors, the majority of whom were HIV-infected. Additionally, this study attempted to clarify whether post-traumatic stress symptoms were uniquely associated with HQOL or confounded with depression. The Rwandan Women's Interassociation Study and Assessment was a longitudinal prospective study of HIV-infected and uninfected women. At study entry, 922 women (705 HIV+ and 217 HIV-) completed measures of symptoms of post-traumatic stress and HQOL as well as other demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics. Even after controlling for potential confounders and mediators, HIV+ women, in particular those with the lowest CD4 counts, scored significantly worse on HQOL and overall quality of life (QOL) than did HIV- women. Even after controlling for depression and HIV disease progression, women with more post-traumatic stress symptoms scored worse on HQOL and overall QOL than women with fewer post-traumatic stress symptoms. This study demonstrated that post-traumatic stress symptoms were independently associated with HQOL and overall QOL, independent of depression and other confounders or potential mediators. Future research should examine whether the long-term impact of treatment on physical and psychological symptoms of HIV and post-traumatic stress symptoms would generate improvement in HQOL.

  1. Mild hemolytic anemia, progressive neuromotor retardation and fatal outcome: a disorder of glycolysis, triose- phosphate isomerase deficiency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarper, Nazan; Zengin, Emine; Jakobs, Cornelis; Salomons, Gajja S; Mc Wamelink, Mirjam; Ralser, Markus; Kurt, Koray; Kara, Bülent

    2013-01-01

    A two-month-old male infant presented with jaundice, pallor, and hepatomegaly. The first child of non-consanguineous parents had also suffered from hemolytic anemia and neuromotor retardation and died at the age of 21 months...

  2. Tau Processing by Mural Cells in Traumatic Brain Injury and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    significantly alter the progress of any studies. As an alternative, we are also considering the option of purchasing these animals from a commercial ...traumatic brain injury in a mouse model produces learning and memory deficits accompanied by histological changes. J Neurotrauma 29:2761-73 (2012). [2

  3. Treinamento neuromotor no padrão de marcha e na mobilidade de tornozelos em idosos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Caroline de Lima

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analisar o efeito do treinamento neuromotor no padrão de marcha e a mobilidade de tornozelos em idosos. Métodos: Ensaio controlado não aleatorizado, de corte transversal, realizado em Rio Negrinho, Santa Catarina, no período de maio a setembro de 2015, com amostra de 26 idosas divididas em grupo controle (GC=15 e grupo treinamento neuromotor (GTN=11. A avaliação do padrão de marcha ocorreu através do Protocolo de Cerny e a mobilidade de tornozelos, através da goniometria. O GC realizou atividade física regular composta por aquecimento, exercícios de alongamento e fortalecimento muscular de grandes grupos musculares de membros e desaquecimento. O GTN recebeu treinamento neuromotor em forma de circuito composto por 10 estações, com aquecimento, treinamento neuromotor, desaquecimento e repetição do circuito em 3 vezes, com permanência de 1 minuto em cada estação e 30 segundos de intervalo entre elas, com progressão de dificuldade dos exercícios após a sexta semana. Ambos os grupos realizaram a atividade por 12 semanas (2 vezes semanais, com duração de 45 minutos. Análise ocorreu pelo teste t, adotando um nível de significância de p<0,05. Resultados: Houve melhora significativa em dorsiflexão de ambos os tornozelos (direito p=0,00 e esquerdo=0,02 e em ambos os grupos; já no padrão de marcha, não houve melhora significativa após treinamento neuromotor (velocidade p=0,55; tempo de deambulação p=0,6. Conclusão: O treinamento neuromotor beneficiou a manutenção do padrão de marcha (velocidade e tempo de deambulação e a mobilidade articular de tornozelos em idosas avaliadas.

  4. Childhood videotaped social and neuromotor precursors of schizophrenia: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Walker, Elaine; Ekstrøm, Morten

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined videotaped behaviors of children who developed schizophrenia as adults and of comparison subjects to disclose possible social and neuromotor deficits foreshadowing later development of schizophrenia. METHOD: In 1972, a sample of 265 11-13-year-old Danish children...... disorder. In 1991, adult psychiatric outcome data were obtained for 91.3% (N=242). This study systematically analyzed the videotapes to determine whether the children who developed schizophrenia as adults evidenced greater social and/or neuromotor deficits than children who did not develop a psychiatric...... disorder and children who developed other psychiatric disorders. RESULTS: The findings from this study suggest that the brief videotaped footage of children eating lunch was able to discriminate between the individuals who later developed schizophrenia and those who did not. Specifically...

  5. The Effect of Load Uncertainty and Foreperiod Regularity on Anticipatory and Compensatory Neuromotor Control in Catching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, William P; Hughes, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Muscle activation was measured using EMG in 28 males (n = 28) while participants caught visually identical balls of known and unknown weights (50, 1.32, 2.18, and 2.99 kg) under variable (1-10s) and constant (3s) foreperiods. EMG integrals were computed for three time intervals before the catch (anticipatory), and one after (compensatory). Load uncertainty caused the CNS to use an anticipatory strategy characterized by preparation to catch balls of an unknown weight by utilizing about 92% of the muscle activation used to catch the heaviest possible ball under the known weight condition. The CNS appeared to scale anticipatory muscle activation to afford an opportunity to catch a ball of an unknown weight between .50 and 2.99 kg. The constant 3s foreperiod, which permitted temporal anticipation, did not influence the anticipatory neuromotor strategy adopted by the CNS to cope with load uncertainty. Load uncertainty also altered compensatory neuromotor control in catching.

  6. “Soldier’s Heart”: A Genetic Basis for Elevated Cardiovascular Disease Risk Associated with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey B. Pollard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soldier’s Heart, is an American Civil War term linking post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD with increased propensity for cardiovascular disease (CVD. We have hypothesized that there might be a quantifiable genetic basis for this linkage. To test this hypothesis we identified a comprehensive set of candidate risk genes for PTSD, and tested whether any were also independent risk genes for CVD. A functional analysis algorithm was used to identify associated signaling networks.We identified 106 PTSD studies that report one or more polymorphic variants in 87 candidate genes in 83,463 subjects and controls. The top upstream drivers for these PTSD risk genes are predicted to be the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFA. We find that 37 of the PTSD candidate risk genes are also candidate independent risk genes for CVD. The association between PTSD and CVD is significant by Fisher’s Exact Test (P= 3*10-54. We also find 15 PTSD risk genes that are independently associated with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM; also significant by Fisher’s Exact Test (P= 1.8*10-16. Our findings offer quantitative evidence for a genetic link between post-traumatic stress and cardiovascular disease, Computationally, the common mechanism for this linkage between PTSD and CVD is innate immunity and NFκB-mediated inflammation.

  7. "Soldier's Heart": A Genetic Basis for Elevated Cardiovascular Disease Risk Associated with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Harvey B; Shivakumar, Chittari; Starr, Joshua; Eidelman, Ofer; Jacobowitz, David M; Dalgard, Clifton L; Srivastava, Meera; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    "Soldier's Heart," is an American Civil War term linking post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with increased propensity for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We have hypothesized that there might be a quantifiable genetic basis for this linkage. To test this hypothesis we identified a comprehensive set of candidate risk genes for PTSD, and tested whether any were also independent risk genes for CVD. A functional analysis algorithm was used to identify associated signaling networks. We identified 106 PTSD studies that report one or more polymorphic variants in 87 candidate genes in 83,463 subjects and controls. The top upstream drivers for these PTSD risk genes are predicted to be the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) and Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFA). We find that 37 of the PTSD candidate risk genes are also candidate independent risk genes for CVD. The association between PTSD and CVD is significant by Fisher's Exact Test (P = 3 × 10-54). We also find 15 PTSD risk genes that are independently associated with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM; also significant by Fisher's Exact Test (P = 1.8 × 10-16). Our findings offer quantitative evidence for a genetic link between post-traumatic stress and cardiovascular disease, Computationally, the common mechanism for this linkage between PTSD and CVD is innate immunity and NFκB-mediated inflammation.

  8. “Soldier's Heart”: A Genetic Basis for Elevated Cardiovascular Disease Risk Associated with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Harvey B.; Shivakumar, Chittari; Starr, Joshua; Eidelman, Ofer; Jacobowitz, David M.; Dalgard, Clifton L.; Srivastava, Meera; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    “Soldier's Heart,” is an American Civil War term linking post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with increased propensity for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We have hypothesized that there might be a quantifiable genetic basis for this linkage. To test this hypothesis we identified a comprehensive set of candidate risk genes for PTSD, and tested whether any were also independent risk genes for CVD. A functional analysis algorithm was used to identify associated signaling networks. We identified 106 PTSD studies that report one or more polymorphic variants in 87 candidate genes in 83,463 subjects and controls. The top upstream drivers for these PTSD risk genes are predicted to be the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) and Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFA). We find that 37 of the PTSD candidate risk genes are also candidate independent risk genes for CVD. The association between PTSD and CVD is significant by Fisher's Exact Test (P = 3 × 10−54). We also find 15 PTSD risk genes that are independently associated with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM; also significant by Fisher's Exact Test (P = 1.8 × 10−16). Our findings offer quantitative evidence for a genetic link between post-traumatic stress and cardiovascular disease, Computationally, the common mechanism for this linkage between PTSD and CVD is innate immunity and NFκB-mediated inflammation. PMID:27721742

  9. A case study of product usability of a pelvic device used by children with neuromotor impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu, Ana R.; Arezes, Pedro M.; Silva, Cláudia; Santos, Rubim

    2015-01-01

    On assistive technology targeted for people with activity limitations and participation, usability issues becomes an essential tool to ensure that the product has the appropriate ergonomics characteristics, in other words, ensure that it fits the specific user´s needs. The aim of this study was to analyze the usability of an adaptive seating device for children with neuromotor impairments, by using kinematic indicators of the reaching movement. The study sample consisted of 13 childr...

  10. Associação de retardo neuromotor e cromossomo 1qh +: registro de um caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salin Moyses Jorge

    1976-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores registram um caso de retardo neuromotor em paciente com cromossomo 1qh+. A análise cromossômica do paciente e três familiares revelou igualmente em todos, aumento do braço longo do cromossomo n.° 1. Entretanto, é considerada a possibilidade de que o quadro clínico do paciente seja subordinado também a outros fatores, não genéticos.

  11. Bed Rest and Intermittent Centrifugation Effects on Human Balance and Neuromotor Reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloski, William H; Reschke, Millard F; Feiveson, Alan H

    2017-09-01

    The effects of repeated centrifugation in association with head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest (BR) on the mediation of basic reflexes associated with the major postural muscles was investigated as a potential countermeasure for maintaining balance control and neuromotor reflex function. There were 15 male volunteers who were exposed to 21 d of 6° HDT-BR. Eight were treated with daily 1-h artificial gravity (AG) exposures aboard a short radius centrifuge that provided 1-g footward loading at heart level. The other seven served as HDT-BR control subjects. Balance control was assessed using a standard computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) protocol that was modified by adding low-frequency pitch-plane head movements. Neuromotor reflex function was assessed using tendon stretch reflexes (MSR) and functional stretch reflex (FSR) data collected from the triceps surae muscle group. CDP performance was degraded by HDT-BR in both groups (ranging from 24 to 26%), but was unaffected by AG. BR also degraded MSR and FSR functions in both groups, with increased peak reflex latencies between 1.5 and 1.95 ms, but AG maintained pre-BR latencies for the MSR subjects. AG exposure did not modify balance control from pre-BR responses, but did help prevent decrements in FSR latencies post-BR.Paloski WH, Reschke MF, Feiveson AH. Bed rest and intermittent centrifugation effects on human balance and neuromotor reflexes. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(9):812-818.

  12. Amputation - traumatic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000006.htm Amputation - traumatic To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Traumatic amputation is the loss of a body part, usually ...

  13. Systemic effects of zoledronic acid in children with traumatic femoral head avascular necrosis and Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Jesper; Briody, Julie; McQuade, Mary

    2009-01-01

    normal children and adolescents with femoral head AVN. Material and methods: 37 children (age 10.8+/-2.76 years) diagnosed with avascular necrosis AVN (Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE), N=20 or Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD), N=17) were treated with at least 12 months of ZA. Bone mineral......Background: Intravenous bisphosphonate therapy is associated with preservation of femoral head sphericity and congruence in 77% of children with traumatic avascular necrosis. The aim was to describe the systemic effects of intravenous zoledronic acid (ZA) on bone and mineral metabolism in otherwise....... Conclusion: We here report that ZA in otherwise healthy children with femoral head AVN increases BMD - most pronounced in the LCPD group - and reduces bone modeling and turnover. Further efficacy and safety data are required before this therapy can be widely recommended....

  14. Weight-based nutritional diagnosis of Mexican children and adolescents with neuromotor disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega-Sanchez Rodrigo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nutrition related problems are increasing worldwide but they have scarcely been evaluated in people with neuromotor disabilities, particularly in developing countries. In this study our aim was to describe the weight-based nutritional diagnoses of children and adolescents with neuromotor disabilities who attended a private rehabilitation center in Mexico City. Methods Data from the first visit’s clinical records of 410 patients who attended the Nutrition department at the Teleton Center for Children Rehabilitation, between 1999 and 2008, were analyzed. Sex, age, weight and height, length or segmental length data were collected and used to obtain the nutritional diagnosis based on international growth charts, as well as disability-specific charts. Weight for height was considered the main indicator. Results Cerebral palsy was the most frequent diagnosis, followed by spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, and Down’s syndrome. Children with cerebral palsy showed a higher risk of presenting low weight/undernutrition (LW/UN than children with other disabilities, which was three times higher in females. In contrast, children with spina bifida, particularly males, were more likely to be overweight/obese (OW/OB, especially after the age of 6 and even more after 11. Patients with muscular dystrophy showed a significantly lower risk of LW/UN than patients with other disabilities. In patients with Down’s syndrome neither LW/UN nor OW/OB were different between age and sex. Conclusions This is the first study that provides evidence of the nutritional situation of children and adolescents with neuromotor disabilities in Mexico, based on their weight status. Low weight and obesity affect a large number of these patients due to their disability, age and sex. Early nutritional diagnosis must be considered an essential component in the treatment of these patients to prevent obesity and malnutrition, and improve their quality of life.

  15. Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimers Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Alricsson M (2012) Physical exercise ameliorates deficits induced by traumatic brain injury. Acta Neurol Scand 125, 293-302. [19] Qu C, Mahmood A...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0582 TITLE: Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimer’s...COVERED 09/25/2012-09/24/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for

  16. Motor impairment after severe traumatic brain injury: A longitudinal multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, William C; Pickett, Treven C

    2007-01-01

    Neuromotor impairment is a common sequela of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) but has been understudied relative to neurocognitive outcomes. This multicenter cohort study describes the longitudinal course of neurological examination-based motor abnormalities after severe TBI. Subjects were enrolled from the four lead Department of Veterans Affairs and Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center sites. The study cohort consisted of 102 consecutive patients (active duty, veteran, or military dependent) with severe TBI who consented during acute rehabilitation for data collection and completed all follow-up evaluations. Paresis, ataxia, and postural instability measures showed a pattern of improvement over time, with the greatest improvement occurring between the inpatient (baseline) and 6-month follow-up assessments. Involuntary movement disorders were rare at all time points. Two years following acute rehabilitation, more than one-third of subjects continued to display a neuromotor abnormality on basic neurological examination. Persistence of tandem gait abnormality was particularly common.

  17. Effects of aquatic interventions in children with neuromotor impairments: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Miriam; Hutzler, Yeshayahu; Vermeer, Adri

    2006-11-01

    To determine the effectiveness of aquatic interventions in children with neuromotor impairments. A search of electronic databases that included MEDLINE, PubMed, ERIC, PsychLit, PEDro, Sport Discus, CINAHL and Cochrane between 1966 and January 2005 was conducted using the following keywords: 'hydrotherapy', 'aquatic therapy', 'water exercise', 'aquatics', 'adapted aquatics', 'aquatic exercise' and 'swimming'. An additional resource, the Aquatic Therapy Research Bibliography until 1999, was explored manually. Titles and abstracts were assessed manually according to the following inclusion criteria: (1) population (children with neuromotor or neuromuscular impairments), (2) intervention (aquatic programme). Articles were reviewed according to merit of design, population participants and outcome measures with respect to International Classification of Function and Disability terminology (changes in body function, activity level and participation). Eleven of the 173 articles that were retrieved met the inclusion criteria: one randomized control trial, two quasi-experimental studies, one cohort study, two case control studies and five case reports. Seven articles reported improvement in body functions, and seven articles reported improvement in activity level. Two of the four articles that investigated outcome measures regarding participation described positive effects while the findings of the other two revealed no change. None of the articles reported negative effects due to aquatic interventions. According to this review, there is a substantial lack of evidence-based research evaluating the specific effects of aquatic interventions in this population.

  18. Intra-individual stability of neuromotor tasks from 6 to 18 years: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenni, Oskar G; Chaouch, Aziz; Locatelli, Isabella; Thoeni, Ines; Diezi, Maja; Werner, Helene; Caflisch, Jon; Rousson, Valentin

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates the intra-individual stability of the speed of several motor tasks and the intensity of associated movements in 256 children (131 girls, 125 boys) from the Zurich generational study using the Zurich neuromotor assessment battery (ZNA) over a 12-year period from the age of 6 to 18 years. The stability was assessed by correlograms of standard deviation scores calculated from age- and gender-adjusted normative values and compared with standing height and full scale intelligence quotient (IQ). While motor tasks of hand, finger and foot (HFT) and contralateral associated movements (CAM) exhibited a moderate stability (summary measure as correlation coefficients between two measurements made 4 years apart: .61 and .60), other tasks (dynamic balance, static balance and pegboard) were only weakly stable (.46, .47 and .49). IQ and height were more stable than neuromotor components (.72 and .86). We conclude that the moderately stable HFT and CAM may reflect "motor traits", while the stability of the pegboard and balance tasks is weaker because these skills are more experience related and state-dependent. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Intensive neuromotor therapy with suit improves motor gross function in cerebral palsy: a Brazilian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tainá Ribas Mélo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is the most common disability in children caused by central nervous system lesion. The aim of the present study was to verify the intensive neuromotor therapy effects in children with CP, in a reference Brazilian centre. In this study, three years of medical records from a Brazilian reference Centre of Intensive Neuromotor Therapy (INMT which use the INMT protocol were analysed. The motor evaluation for each child was done by the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS and GMFM-88 by an experienced professional, before and after each INMT module. A total of 53 children between the ages of 1 and 15 years (age at treatment initiation, initial evaluation, with a mean age of 5.94±3.38 years, participated in the study. Participants performed between 1 and 10 INMT modules. There was no strong correlation between age and overall performance on the GMFM scale, but it was observed a strong negative correlation between the percentage of GMFM gains and the number of modules (r=-0.709; R2 = 0.50; p = 0.022, CI95%[0.014 - 0.026], suggesting that patients tend to present higher percentage gains in the first modules. Through an intra-module comparison, it was observed statistical difference in the total score in each of the modules.

  20. Quality of reaching and postural control in young preterm infants is related to neuromotor outcome at 6 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fallang, B; Oien, [No Value; Hellem, E; Saugstad, OD; Hadders-Algra, M

    A substantial proportion of the "apparently normal" preterm infants exhibit minor and moderate dysfunctions in neuromotor outcome as they grow older. Birth characteristics, minor abnormalities on the neonatal ultrasound scan of the brain, and motor milestones have only limited value in the early

  1. Identification of potential neuromotor mechanisms of manual therapy in patients with musculoskeletal disablement: rationale and description of a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulig Kornelia

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many health care practitioners use a variety of hands-on treatments to improve symptoms and disablement in patients with musculoskeletal pathology. Research to date indirectly suggests a potentially broad effect of manual therapy on the neuromotor processing of functional behavior within the supraspinal central nervous system (CNS in a manner that may be independent of modification at the level of local spinal circuits. However, the effect of treatment speed, as well as the specific mechanism and locus of CNS changes, remain unclear. Methods/Design We developed a placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the hypothesis that manual therapy procedures directed to the talocrural joint in individuals with post-acute ankle sprain induce a change in corticospinal excitability that is relevant to improve the performance of lower extremity functional behavior. Discussion This study is designed to identify potential neuromotor changes associated with manual therapy procedures directed to the appendicular skeleton, compare the relative effect of treatment speed on potential neuromotor effects of manual therapy procedures, and determine the behavioral relevance of potential neuromotor effects of manual therapy procedures. Trial Registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00847769.

  2. Quality of life after traumatic brain injury: the clinical use of the QOLIBRI, a novel disease-specific instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelle, Jean-Luc; Koskinen, Sanna; Hawthorne, Graeme; Sarajuuri, Jaana; Formisano, Rita; Von Wild, Klaus; Neugebauer, Edmund; Wilson, Lindsay; Gibbons, Henning; Powell, Jane; Bullinger, Monika; Höfer, Stefan; Maas, Andrew; Zitnay, George; Von Steinbuechel, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    To report the clinical use of the QOLIBRI, a disease-specific measure of health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The QOLIBRI, with 37 items in six scales (cognition, self, daily life and autonomy, social relationships, emotions and physical problems) was completed by 795 patients in six languages (Finnish, German, Italian, French, English and Dutch). QOLIBRI scores were examined by variables likely to be influenced by rehabilitation interventions and included socio-demographic, functional outcome, health status and mental health variables. The QOLIBRI was self-completed by 73% of participants and 27% completed it in interview. It was sensitive to areas of life amenable to intervention, such as accommodation, work participation, health status (including mental health) and functional outcome. The QOLIBRI provides information about patient's subjective perception of his/her HRQoL which supplements clinical measures and measures of functional outcome. It can be applied across different populations and cultures. It allows the identification of personal needs, the prioritization of therapeutic goals and the evaluation of individual progress. It may also be useful in clinical trials and in longitudinal studies of TBI recovery.

  3. CCL11 is increased in the CNS in chronic traumatic encephalopathy but not in Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Thor D.; Tripodis, Yorghos; Alvarez, Victor E.; Huber, Bertrand R.; Au, Rhoda; Kiernan, Patrick T.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Mez, Jesse; Solomon, Todd M.; Alosco, Michael L.; McKee, Ann C.

    2017-01-01

    CCL11, a protein previously associated with age-associated cognitive decline, is observed to be increased in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) compared to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Using a cohort of 23 deceased American football players with neuropathologically verified CTE, 50 subjects with neuropathologically diagnosed AD, and 18 non-athlete controls, CCL11 was measured with ELISA in the dorsolateral frontal cortex (DLFC) and CSF. CCL11 levels were significantly increased in the DLFC in subjects with CTE (fold change = 1.234, p American football (β = 0.426, p = 0.048) independent of age (β = -0.046, p = 0.824). Preliminary analyses of a subset of subjects with available post-mortem CSF showed a trend for increased CCL11 among individuals with CTE (p = 0.069) mirroring the increase in the DLFC. Furthermore, an association between CSF CCL11 levels and the number of years exposed to football (β = 0.685, p = 0.040) was observed independent of age (β = -0.103, p = 0.716). Finally, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis demonstrated CSF CCL11 accurately distinguished CTE subjects from non-athlete controls and AD subjects (AUC = 0.839, 95% CI 0.62–1.058, p = 0.028). Overall, the current findings provide preliminary evidence that CCL11 may be a novel target for future CTE biomarker studies. PMID:28950005

  4. The bidirectional gut-brain-microbiota axis as a potential nexus between traumatic brain injury, inflammation, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundman, Mark H; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Subbian, Vignesh; Chou, Ying-Hui

    2017-11-01

    As head injuries and their sequelae have become an increasingly salient matter of public health, experts in the field have made great progress elucidating the biological processes occurring within the brain at the moment of injury and throughout the recovery thereafter. Given the extraordinary rate at which our collective knowledge of neurotrauma has grown, new insights may be revealed by examining the existing literature across disciplines with a new perspective. This article will aim to expand the scope of this rapidly evolving field of research beyond the confines of the central nervous system (CNS). Specifically, we will examine the extent to which the bidirectional influence of the gut-brain axis modulates the complex biological processes occurring at the time of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and over the days, months, and years that follow. In addition to local enteric signals originating in the gut, it is well accepted that gastrointestinal (GI) physiology is highly regulated by innervation from the CNS. Conversely, emerging data suggests that the function and health of the CNS is modulated by the interaction between 1) neurotransmitters, immune signaling, hormones, and neuropeptides produced in the gut, 2) the composition of the gut microbiota, and 3) integrity of the intestinal wall serving as a barrier to the external environment. Specific to TBI, existing pre-clinical data indicates that head injuries can cause structural and functional damage to the GI tract, but research directly investigating the neuronal consequences of this intestinal damage is lacking. Despite this void, the proposed mechanisms emanating from a damaged gut are closely implicated in the inflammatory processes known to promote neuropathology in the brain following TBI, which suggests the gut-brain axis may be a therapeutic target to reduce the risk of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and other neurodegenerative diseases following TBI. To better appreciate how various peripheral

  5. The application of motor learning strategies within functionally based interventions for children with neuromotor conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Danielle; Wishart, Laurie; Missiuna, Cheryl; Wright, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    To identify and describe the application of 3 motor learning strategies (verbal instructions, practice, and verbal feedback) within 4 intervention approaches (cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance, neuromotor task training, family-centered functional therapy, and activity-focused motor interventions). A scoping review of the literature was conducted. Two themes characterizing the application of motor learning strategies within the approaches are identified and described. Application of a motor learning strategy can be a defining component of the intervention or a means of enhancing generalization and transfer of learning beyond the intervention. Often, insufficient information limits full understanding of strategy application within the approach. A greater understanding of the application, and perceived nonapplication, of motor learning strategies within intervention approaches has important clinical and research implications.

  6. O enfermeiro e a avaliaÃÃo do desenvolvimento neuromotor do lactente.

    OpenAIRE

    Polyana Candeia Maia

    2013-01-01

    A avaliaÃÃo do desenvolvimento infantil à necessÃria para que haja o monitoramento e o acompanhamento das mudanÃas ocorrentes na vida da crianÃa, buscando identificar as caracterÃsticas prÃprias e relacionÃ-las com os respectivos perÃodos de desenvolvimento do ser humano. O estudo objetivou avaliar o desenvolvimento neuromotor de crianÃas com idade de 2m15d a 12m15d. Estudo descritivo-exploratÃrio, transversal, com enfoque analÃtico, realizado em Centro de SaÃde da FamÃlia nos municÃpios de F...

  7. Identification of feeding and nutrition problems in young children with neuromotor involvement: a self-assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, A H; Deubler, D C

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide information needed to identify feeding and nutrition problems in children from birth to twenty-four months. Oral-motor and self-feeding skill development should be viewed within the framework of overall development and changing nutrition needs. Neuromotor dysfunction affects feeding and nutrition through changes in muscle tone, reflexes and the response to sensory stimulation. Nutrient compromises, including delays in texture progression, decreased fluid intake, and problems associated with self-feeding and food selection must be considered when assessing the nutrition/feeding needs of children. Successful completion of the self-assessment can be used to check the reader's basic understanding of the subject.

  8. Reduced Mid1 expression and delayed neuromotor development in daDREAM transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara eDierssen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator is a Ca2+-binding protein that binds DNA and represses transcription in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Previous work has shown a role for DREAM in cerebellar function regulating the expression of the sodium/calcium exchanger 3 (NCX3 in cerebellar granular neurons to control Ca2+ homeostasis and survival of these neurons. To achieve a global view of the genes regulated by DREAM in the cerebellum, we performed a genome-wide analysis in transgenic cerebellum expressing a Ca2+-insensitive/CREB-independent dominant active mutant DREAM (daDREAM. Here we show that DREAM regulates the expression of the midline 1 (Mid1 gene early after birth. As a consequence, daDREAM mice exhibit a significant shortening of the rostro-caudal axis of the cerebellum and a severe delay in neuromotor development early after birth. Our results indicate a role for DREAM in cerebellar function.

  9. Childhood videotaped social and neuromotor precursors of schizophrenia: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Walker, Elaine; Ekstrøm, Morten

    2004-01-01

    were filmed under standardized conditions while they were eating lunch. The examination was part of a larger study investigating early signs of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Many of the subjects had a parent with schizophrenia, leaving them at high risk for developing a schizophrenia spectrum...... disorder and children who developed other psychiatric disorders. RESULTS: The findings from this study suggest that the brief videotaped footage of children eating lunch was able to discriminate between the individuals who later developed schizophrenia and those who did not. Specifically...... disorder. In 1991, adult psychiatric outcome data were obtained for 91.3% (N=242). This study systematically analyzed the videotapes to determine whether the children who developed schizophrenia as adults evidenced greater social and/or neuromotor deficits than children who did not develop a psychiatric...

  10. Understanding the importance of natural neuromotor strategy in upper extremity neuroprosthetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Dominic E; Prost, Robert W; Guastello, Stephen J; Jeutter, Dean C

    2014-01-01

    A key challenge in upper extremity neuroprosthetics is variable levels of skill and inconsistent functional recovery. We examine the feasibility and benefits of using natural neuromotor strategies through the design and development of a proof-of-concept model for a feed-forward upper extremity neuroprosthetic controller. Developed using Artificial Neural Networks, the model is able to extract and classify neural correlates of movement intention from multiple brain regions that correspond to functional movements. This is unique compared to contemporary controllers that record from limited physiological sources or require learning of new strategies. Functional MRI (fMRI) data from healthy subjects (N = 13) were used to develop the model, and a separate group (N = 4) of subjects were used for validation. Results indicate that the model is able to accurately (81%) predict hand movement strictly from the neural correlates of movement intention. Information from this study is applicable to the development of upper extremity technology aided interventions.

  11. [Correlation between growth rate of corpus callosum and neuromotor development in preterm infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui-Ke; Sun, Jie; Hu, Li-Yan; Liu, Fang

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the growth rate of corpus callosum by cranial ultrasound in very low birth weight preterm infants and to provide a reference for early evaluation and improvement of brain development. A total of 120 preterm infants under 33 weeks' gestation were recruited and divided into 26-29(+6) weeks group (n=64) and 30-32(+6) weeks group (n=56) according to the gestational age. The growth rate of corpus callosum was compared between the two groups. The correlation between the corpus callosum length and the cerebellar vermis length and the relationship of the growth rate of corpus callosum with clinical factors and the neuromotor development were analyzed. The growth rate of corpus callosum in preterm infants declined since 2 weeks after birth. Compared with the 30-32(+6) weeks group, the 26-29(+6) weeks group had a significantly lower growth rate of corpus callosum at 3-4 weeks after birth, at 5-6 weeks after birth, and from 7 weeks after birth to 40 weeks of corrected gestational age. There was a positive linear correlation between the corpus callosum length and the cerebellar vermis length. Small-for-gestational age infants had a low growth rate of corpus callosum at 2 weeks after birth. The 12 preterm infants with severe abnormal intellectual development had a lower growth rate of corpus callosum compared with the 108 preterm infants with non-severe abnormal intellectual development at 3-6 weeks after birth. The 5 preterm infants with severe abnormal motor development had a significantly lower growth rate of corpus callosum compared with the 115 preterm infants with non-severe abnormal motor development at 3-6 weeks after birth. The decline of growth rate of corpus callosum in preterm infants at 2-6 weeks after birth can increase the risk of severe abnormal neuromotor development.

  12. Astrocytic Disruption in Traumatic Brain Injury and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    tau aggregation, increased amyloid burden, and reactive astrocytosis. Many of these pathologies overlap with those observed in Alzheimer’s disease...hypothesized that reactive astrocytosis underlie the shared pathway to neuronal pathologies seen in TBI and AD. To this end, our results show the expected...behavioral outcome from the blasted mice, however it is still too early in the study to make any concrete conclusions. We will continue our efforts

  13. Work-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other emotional diseases as consequence of traumatic events in public transportation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarner, Annika; Graessel, Elmar; Scholz, Johanna; Niedermeier, Alexander; Uter, Wolfgang; Drexler, Hans

    2015-07-01

    Drivers in public transportation are at risk of experiencing potential traumatic events such as accidents involving persons, collisions, or suicides. In this context, the question arises to what extent psychological traumatization and posttraumatic diseases occur. The aim of this systematic review was to describe the frequency and nature of work-related posttraumatic disorders, to analyze risk and prognostic factors after potentially traumatic events (accidents resulting in damage to property and/or in injury or death), and address sick leave after such events in the realm of public transportation, based on the available literature. Systematic review based on four databases (PubMed, PSYNDEX/MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, PILOTS) between 1980 and June 2013. We identified seven studies (four longitudinal, three cross-sectional) that examine employees after person under train (PUT) events. PTSD prevalences varied broadly between 0.7 and 17 %. The same applies to dysthymia/neurotic depression (1-26 %). However, similarly low prevalences of major depression (1.3-2.8 %) and panic disorder (0.5-1.3 %) have been observed. Risk factors of PTSD comprised individual, work-related, event-related, and prognostic aspects. Following the traumatic event, a total of 69-81 % of the drivers were absent, and if sick leave occurs, this was on average 3-19 days. It became evident that drivers in public transportation run a high risk of sick leave. It was also striking that despite the immense impact of PUT and high number of suicides, only an infinitesimal number of studies exists. Due to various differences (period of follow-up, instrument of measurement and study period), it turned out that the comparability of the results of the studies is limited. For various reasons, further research is urgently needed, as from an occupational health point of view the issue of posttraumatic diseases and implications for fitness for service should be addressed.

  14. Can cerebellar and brainstem apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values predict neuromotor outcome in term neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) treated with hypothermia?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gemma Arca-Díaz; Thomas J Re; Marie Drottar; Carmen Rosa Fortuno; Katyucia De Macedo-Rodrigues; Kiho Im; Josep Figueras-Aloy; Patricia Ellen Grant

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose To determine the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in specific infratentorial brain structures during the first week of life and its relation with neuromotor outcome for Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE...

  15. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Neuropathological Legacy of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jennifer; Johnson, Victoria E; Smith, Douglas H; Stewart, William

    2016-05-23

    Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy studies of nonboxers who were exposed to repetitive, mild traumatic brain injury, or to a single, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, has led to an awareness that it is exposure to traumatic brain injury that carries with it a risk of this neurodegenerative disease, not the sport or the circumstance in which the injury is sustained. Furthermore, the neuropathology of the neurodegeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury, now termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is acknowledged as being a complex, mixed, but distinctive pathology, the detail of which is reviewed in this article.

  16. Assessment of the relationship between level of neuromotor, body somatotype, physical fitness level and game skills at football players in U12 category.

    OpenAIRE

    Vytlačil, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Title: Assessment of the relationship between level of neuromotor, body somatotype, physical fitness level and game skills at football players in U12 category. Objectives: The aim is to determinate the relationships between levels of neuromotoric, body somatotype, overal physical fitness level and the individual playing skills at football players in the U12 age category. Methods: The main research method of our work was the observation method. The research were included soccer player (n = 40;...

  17. Associação de retardo neuromotor e cromossomo 1qh +: registro de um caso Significance of neuromotor retardation in association with chromosome 1qh+: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salin Moyses Jorge

    1976-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores registram um caso de retardo neuromotor em paciente com cromossomo 1qh+. A análise cromossômica do paciente e três familiares revelou igualmente em todos, aumento do braço longo do cromossomo n.° 1. Entretanto, é considerada a possibilidade de que o quadro clínico do paciente seja subordinado também a outros fatores, não genéticos.A case of neuromotor retardation in association with chromosome 1qh+ is reported. Chromosomes analysis of the patient and three relatives showed increased long arm of the n.° 1 chromosome, in all of them. However it is emphasized that the clinical feature could be secondary to various non genetics factors, also.

  18. Polypathology and dementia after brain trauma: Does brain injury trigger distinct neurodegenerative diseases, or should it be classified together as traumatic encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Patricia M.; Villapol, Sonia; Burns, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathological studies of human traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases have described amyloid plaques acutely after a single severe TBI, and tau pathology after repeat mild TBI (mTBI). This has helped drive the hypothesis that a single moderate to severe TBI increases the risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD), while mTBI increases the risk of developing chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In this review we critically assess this position—examining epidemiological and case-control human studies, neuropathological evidence, and preclinical studies. Epidemiological studies emphasize that TBI is associated with the increased risk of developing multiple types of dementia, not just AD-type dementia, and that TBI can also trigger other neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson’s disease. Further, human post-mortem studies on either single TBI and repeat mTBI can show combinations of amyloid, tau, TDP-43, and Lewy body pathology indicating that the neuropathology of TBI is best described as a ‘polypathology’. Preclinical studies confirm that multiple proteins associated with the development of neurodegenerative disease accumulate in the brain after TBI. The chronic sequelae of both single TBI and repeat mTBI share common neuropathological features and clinical symptoms of classically defined neurodegenerative disorders. However, while the spectrum of chronic cognitive and neurobehavioral disorders that occur following repeat mTBI are viewed as the symptoms of CTE, the spectrum of chronic cognitive and neurobehavioral symptoms that occur after a single TBI is considered to represent distinct neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. These data support the suggestion that the multiple manifestations of TBI-induced neurodegenerative disorders be classified together as traumatic encephalopathy or trauma-induced neurodegeneration, regardless of the nature or frequency of the precipitating TBI. PMID:26091850

  19. Polypathology and dementia after brain trauma: Does brain injury trigger distinct neurodegenerative diseases, or should they be classified together as traumatic encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Patricia M; Villapol, Sonia; Burns, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathological studies of human traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases have described amyloid plaques acutely after a single severe TBI, and tau pathology after repeat mild TBI (mTBI). This has helped drive the hypothesis that a single moderate to severe TBI increases the risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), while repeat mTBI increases the risk of developing chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In this review we critically assess this position-examining epidemiological and case control human studies, neuropathological evidence, and preclinical data. Epidemiological studies emphasize that TBI is associated with the increased risk of developing multiple types of dementia, not just AD-type dementia, and that TBI can also trigger other neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease. Further, human post-mortem studies on both single TBI and repeat mTBI can show combinations of amyloid, tau, TDP-43, and Lewy body pathology indicating that the neuropathology of TBI is best described as a 'polypathology'. Preclinical studies confirm that multiple proteins associated with the development of neurodegenerative disease accumulate in the brain after TBI. The chronic sequelae of both single TBI and repeat mTBI share common neuropathological features and clinical symptoms of classically defined neurodegenerative disorders. However, while the spectrum of chronic cognitive and neurobehavioral disorders that occur following repeat mTBI is viewed as the symptoms of CTE, the spectrum of chronic cognitive and neurobehavioral symptoms that occur after a single TBI is considered to represent distinct neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. These data support the suggestion that the multiple manifestations of TBI-induced neurodegenerative disorders be classified together as traumatic encephalopathy or trauma-induced neurodegeneration, regardless of the nature or frequency of the precipitating TBI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Air Medical Evacuations From the German North Sea Wind Farm Bard Offshore 1: Traumatic Injuries, Acute Diseases, and Rescue Process Times (2011-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethleff, Dirk; Weinrich, Nils; Kowald, Birgitt; Hory, Dorothea; Franz, Rüdiger; Nielsen, Maja Verena; Seide, Klaus; Jürgens, Christian; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose was 2-fold: 1) to show emergency-related traumatic injury and acute disease patterns and 2) to evaluate air rescue process times in a remotely located German offshore wind farm. Optimally, this will support methodologies to reduce offshore help time (time from the incoming emergency call until offshore arrival of the helicopter). The type and severity of traumatic injuries and acute diseases were retrospectively analyzed for 39 air medevacs from August 2011 to December 2013, and the process times of air rescue missions were evaluated in detail. Forty-nine percent of the medevacs were related to traumatic injuries, whereas 41% were associated with acute diseases and 10% remained unclear. Cardiovascular and gastrointestinal disorders accounted for 90% of internal medical cases. About 69% of the trauma was related to contusions, lacerations, and cuts. The main body regions injured were limbs (∼59%) and head (∼32%). The total rescue time until arrival at the destination facility averaged 175.3 minutes (standard deviation = 54.4 minutes). The mean helicopter offshore arrival time was 106.9 minutes (standard deviation = 57.4 minutes) after the incoming emergency call. In 64% of the medevacs, the helicopter arrived on scene within a help time of 90 minutes. A reduction of help time (≤ 60 minutes) for time-critical severe trauma and acute diseases may be anticipated through rapid and focused medical and logistic decision-making processes by the onshore dispatch center combined with professional, qualified, and well-trained flight and rescue personnel. Copyright © 2016 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Epigenetic Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Michael H; Moos, Walter H; Faller, Douglas V; Steliou, Kosta; Pinkert, Carl A

    2016-05-01

    Preclinical Research In this review, we discuss epigenetic-driven methods for treating neurodegenerative disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, focusing on carnitinoid antioxidant-histone deacetylase inhibitors that show an ability to reinvigorate synaptic plasticity and protect against neuromotor decline in vivo. Aging remains a major risk factor in patients who progress to dementia, a clinical syndrome typified by decreased mental capacity, including impairments in memory, language skills, and executive function. Energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction are viewed as determinants in the aging process that may afford therapeutic targets for a host of disease conditions, the brain being primary in such thinking. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a core feature in the pathophysiology of both Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and rare mitochondrial diseases. The potential of new therapies in this area extends to glaucoma and other ophthalmic disorders, migraine, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, systemic exertion intolerance disease, and chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment. An emerging and hopefully more promising approach to addressing these hard-to-treat diseases leverages their sensitivity to activation of master regulators of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes, antioxidant response elements, and mitophagy. Drug Dev Res 77 : 109-123, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Emergency total thyroidectomy due to non traumatic disease. Experience of a surgical unit and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Testini Mario

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory failure due to thyroid compression or invasion of the tracheal lumen is a surgical emergency requiring urgent management. The aim of this paper is to describe a series of six patients treated successfully in the emergency setting with total thyroidectomy due to ingravescent dyspnoea and asphyxia, as well as review related data reported in literature. Methods During 2005-2010, of 919 patients treated by total thyroidectomy at our Academic Hospital, 6 (0.7%; 4 females and 2 men, mean age: 68.7 years, range 42-81 years were treated in emergency. All the emergency operations were performed for life-threatening respiratory distress. The clinical picture at admission, clinical features, type of surgery, outcomes and complications are described. Mean duration of surgery was 146 minutes (range: 53-260. Results In 3/6 (50% a manubriotomy was necessary due to the extension of the mass into the upper mediastinum. In all cases total thyroidectomy was performed. In one case (16.7% a parathyroid gland transplantation and in another one (16.7% a tracheotomy was necessary due to a condition of tracheomalacia. Mean post-operative hospital stay was 6.5 days (range: 2-10 days. Histology revealed malignancy in 4/6 cases (66.7%, showing 3 primitive, and 1 secondary tumors. Morbidity consisted of 1 transient recurrent laryngeal palsy, 3 transient postoperative hypoparathyroidism, and 4 pleural effusions, treated by medical therapy in 3 and by drains in one. There was no mortality. Conclusion On the basis of our experience and of literature review, we strongly advocate elective surgery for patients with thyroid disease at the first signs of tracheal compression. When an acute airway distress appears, an emergency life-threatening total thyroidectomy is recommended in a high-volume centre.

  3. Assessing neuro-motor recovery in a stroke survivor with high-resolution EEG, robotics and Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comani, Silvia; Schinaia, Lorenzo; Tamburro, Gabriella; Velluto, Lucia; Sorbi, Sandro; Conforto, Silvia; Guarnieri, Biancamaria

    2015-01-01

    One post-stroke patient underwent neuro-motor rehabilitation of one upper limb with a novel system combining a passive robotic device, Virtual Reality training applications and high resolution electroencephalography (HR-EEG). The outcome of the clinical tests and the evaluation of the kinematic parameters recorded with the robotic device concurred to highlight an improved motor recovery of the impaired limb despite the age of the patient, his compromised motor function, and the start of rehabilitation at the 3rd week post stroke. The time frequency and functional source analysis of the HR-EEG signals permitted to quantify the functional changes occurring in the brain in association with the rehabilitation motor tasks, and to highlight the recovery of the neuro-motor function.

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF ADMINISTERING OXYTOCIN DURING BIRTH ON THE NEUROMOTOR DEVELOPMENT OF THE 0-5 YEAR-OLD-CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia Elena DIACONU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify new scientific data that will make possible a concrete assessment of the effects of oxytocin on the neuromotor development of newborns. Given the range of the proposed study, namely 0-5 years, one can identify research axioms dedicated to the prophylaxis sof retardation of neuromotor development. The research methods that will be used are: retrospective cohort study method - where patients (and newborns that will be administered syntheticoxytocin during labor induction, will be considered the exposed cohort, while the patients (and, therefore, the newborns that will not be administered oxytocin will represent the non-exposed cohort -, stratified and multiple variable analysis and the Batelle Developmental Inventory.

  5. Walk Ratio (Step Length/Cadence) as a Summary Index of Neuromotor Control of Gait: Application to Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Viviana; Perucca, Laura; Simone, Anna; Tesio, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    In healthy adults, the step length/cadence ratio [walk ratio (WR) in mm/(steps/min) and normalized for height] is known to be constant around 6.5 mm/(step/min). It is a speed-independent index of the overall neuromotor gait control, in as much as it reflects energy expenditure, balance, between-step variability, and attentional demand. The speed…

  6. Seasonal variations of neuromotor development by 14 months of age: Hamamatsu Birth Cohort for mothers and children (HBC Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji J Tsuchiya

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at investigating whether neuromotor development, from birth to 14 months of age, shows seasonal, cyclic patterns in association with months of birth. Study participants were 742 infants enrolled in the Hamamatsu Birth Cohort (HBC Study and followed-up from birth to the 14th month of age. Gross motor skills were assessed at the ages of 6, 10, and 14 months, using Mullen Scales of Early Learning. The score at each assessment was regressed onto a trigonometric function of months of birth, with an adjustment for potential confounders. Gross motor scores at the 6th and 10th months showed significant 1-year-cycle variations, peaking among March- and April-born infants, and among February-born infants, respectively. Changes in gross motor scores between the 10th and 14th months also showed a cyclic variation, peaking among July- and August-born infants. Due to this complementary effect, gross motor scores at the 14th month did not show seasonality. Neuromotor development showed cyclic seasonality during the first year of life. The effects brought about by month of birth disappeared around 1 year of age, and warmer months seemed to accelerate the neuromotor development.

  7. Muscles within muscles: the neuromotor control of intra-muscular segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, J B; Brown, J M

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to anatomically identify, and then determine the function of, individual segments within the human deltoid muscle. The anatomical structure of the deltoid was determined through dissection and/or observation of the shoulder girdles of 11 male cadavers (aged 65-84 years). These results indicate that the deltoid consists of seven anatomical segments (D1-D7) based upon the distinctive arrangement of each segment's origin and insertion. Radiographic analysis of a cadaveric shoulder joint suggested that only the postero-medial segment D7 has a line of action directed below the shoulder joint's axis of rotation. The functional role of each individual segment was then determined utilising an electromyographic (EMG) technique. Seven miniature (1 mm active plate; 7 mm interelectrode distance) bipolar surface electrodes were positioned over the proximal portion of each segment's muscle belly in 18 male and female subjects (18-30 years). EMG waveforms were then recorded during the production of rapid isometric shoulder abduction and adduction force impulses with the shoulder joint in 40 degrees of abduction in the plane of the scapula. Each subject randomly performed 15 abduction and 15 adduction isometric force impulses following a short familiarisation period. All subjects received visual feed back on the duration and amplitude of each isometric force impulse produced via a visual force-time display which compared subject performance to a criterion force-time curve. Movement time was 400 ms (time-to-peak isometric force) at an intensity level of 50% maximal voluntary contraction. Temporal and intensity analyses of the EMG waveforms, as well as temporal analysis of the isometric force impulses, revealed the neuromotor control strategies utilised by the CNS to control the activity of each muscle segment. The results showed that segmental neuromotor control strategies differ across the breadth of the muscle and that individual segments of the

  8. Associations of chronic stress burden, perceived stress, and traumatic stress with cardiovascular disease prevalence and risk factors in the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Linda C.; Roesch, Scott C.; Fortmann, Addie L.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Penedo, Frank J.; Perreira, Krista; Birnbaum-Weitzman, Orit; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Castañeda, Sheila F.; Talavera, Gregory A.; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Daviglus, Martha L.; Schneiderman, Neil; Isasi, Carmen R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The current study examined multiple stress indicators (chronic, perceived, traumatic) in relation to prevalent coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (i.e., diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, current smoking) in the multi-site Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study (2010–2011). Methods Participants were 5313 men and women, 18–74 years old, representing diverse Hispanic/Latino ethnic backgrounds, who underwent a comprehensive baseline clinical exam and sociocultural exam with measures of stress. Results Chronic stress burden was related to a higher prevalence of CHD after adjusting for sociodemographic, behavioral and biological risk factors [OR (95% CI) = 1.22, (1.10–1.36)] and related to stroke prevalence in the model adjusted for demographic and behavioral factors [OR (95% CI) = 1.26, (1.03–1.55∂)]. Chronic stress was also related to a higher prevalence of diabetes [OR=1.20, (1.11–1.31)] and hypertension [OR=1.10 (1.02–1.19)] in individuals free from CVD (N=4926). Perceived stress [OR=1.03 (1.01–1.05)] and traumatic stress [OR=1.15 (1.05–1.26)] were associated with a higher prevalence of smoking. Participants who reported a greater number of lifetime traumatic events also unexpectedly showed a lower prevalence of diabetes [OR=.89 (.83–.97)] and hypertension [OR=.88 (.82–.93)]. Effects were largely consistent across age and sex groups. Conclusions The study underscores the utility of examining multiple indicators of stress in relation to health, since the direction and consistency of associations may vary across distinct stress conceptualizations. In addition, the study suggests that chronic stress is related to higher CVD risk and prevalence in Hispanics/Latinos, the largest U.S. ethnic minority group. PMID:24979579

  9. Assessment of cardiorespiratory and neuromotor fitness in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Faiçal; Masmoudi, Kaouthar; Cairney, John; Hsairi, Ines; Triki, Chahinez; Moalla, Wassim

    2014-12-01

    The decreased participation in physical activity by children with probable developmental coordination disorder (pDCD) has raised concerns about their aerobic fitness and lung function levels. The purpose of the present study was to examine assessment of cardiorespiratory and neuromotor fitness, using laboratory-based tests during an incremental treadmill protocol in healthy children with and without pDCD. Twenty sex children ages 6-9 years took part in this study. Motor coordination was assessed using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC). All participants performed a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) on a cycle ergometer. Pulmonary function was assessed by spirometric measurements (forced vital capacity: FVC, forced expiratory volume in 1s: FEV1) and walking distance (6MWD) was assessed using the 6-min walking test. The children with pDCD had lower VO2max than children without pDCD (p children without pDCD than in children with the disorder (p children with pDCD had poorer performance on the 6MWD than children without pDCD (p children. Moreover, a significant correlation between VO2max and FEV1 (r = 0.668, p children with pDCD. Overall, the reduced aerobic capacity of DCD was associated with decreased of lung function, as well as an alteration of peripheral muscle responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neonatal Diagnostics: Towards Dynamic Growth Charts of Neuro-motor control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth B Torres

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Current rise of neurodevelopmental disorders, poses a critical need to detect risk early in order to rapidly intervene. One of the tools Pediatricians use to track development is the standard Growth Chart. The Growth Charts are somewhat limited in predicting possible neurodevelopmental issues. They rely on linear models and assumptions of normality for physical growth data —obscuring key statistical information about possible neurodevelopmental risk in growth data that actually has accelerated, non-linear rates-of-change and variability encompassing skewed distributions. Here we use new analytics to profile growth data from 36 newborn babies that were tracked longitudinally for 5 months. By switching to incremental (velocity-based growth charts and combining these dynamic changes with underlying fluctuations in motor performance—as they transition from spontaneous random noise to a systematic signal— we demonstrate a method to detect very early stunting in the development of voluntary neuro-motor control and to flag risk of neurodevelopmental derail.

  11. Early physiotherapy ad modum Vojta or Bobath in infants with suspected neuromotor disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Avignon, M; Norén, L; Arman, T

    1981-08-01

    Thirty children with early signs of cerebral neuromotor disturbances according to "Vojta criteria" were followed until the age of thirty-three months to six years. Twelve children were treated with early physiotherapy according to Bobath, ten children were treated according to Vojta and eight constituted a control group. The infants tended for early physical therapy were divided by random into two different groups. The neonatal risk factors, however, proved to be unevenly distributed among the infants in the Vojta- and the Bobath-treated groups - the latter being more heavily burdened in this respect. Vojta has claimed that his method of early physiotherapy is able to prevent the development of cerebral palsy (cp) of "uncomplicated" (but not of "complicated") type. At follow-up we found one child out of nine with "uncomplicated" cp in the Vojta group against three out of six in the Bobath- and two out of six in the control group. These differences, however, are not statistically significant. Further detailed studies with greater groups of children seem necessary to help us to clarify these problems. The psychological aspects of early physiotherapy should be thoroughly considered and this is particularly important in connection with the Vojta method.

  12. E2Rebot: A robotic platform for upper limb rehabilitation in patients with neuromotor disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Fraile

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of robotic platforms for neuro-rehabilitation may boost the neural plasticity process and improve motor recovery in patients with upper limb mobility impairment as a consequence of an acquired brain injury. A robotic platform for this aim must provide ergonomic and friendly design, human safety, intensive task-oriented therapy, and assistive forces. Its implementation is a complex process that involves new developments in the mechanical, electronics, and control fields. This article presents the end-effector rehabilitation robot, a 2-degree-of-freedom planar robotic platform for upper limb rehabilitation in patients with neuromotor disability after a stroke. We describe the ergonomic mechanical design, the system control architecture, and the rehabilitation therapies that can be performed. The impedance-based haptic controller implemented in end-effector rehabilitation robot uses the information provided by a JR3 force sensor to achieve an efficient and friendly patient–robot interaction. Two task-oriented therapy modes have been implemented based on the “assist as needed” paradigm. As a result, the amount of support provided by the robot adapts to the patient’s requirements, maintaining the therapy as intensive as possible without compromising the patient’s health and safety and promoting engagement.

  13. [Biomechanical correlations of lesions associated with traumatic diseases of the anterior cruciate ligament. Analysis with magnetic resonance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maria, M; Barbiera, F; Lo Casto, A; Iovane, A; Rossello, M; Sparacia, G; Lagalla, R

    1996-06-01

    To investigate the correlations between traumatic injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament and other ligamentous, meniscal and bone traumatic injuries, a series of 193 patients with anterior cruciate ligament injuries studied with MRI between January 1992 and December 1994, was retrospectively reviewed. MR results were compared with arthroscopic and/or surgical findings in most (181) patients; in the remaining 12 patients, clinical follow-up was performed. We used two 0.5 superconductive MR units, with dedicated coils and T1-weighted spin-echo and T2*-weighted gradient-echo sequences on the axial, sagittal and coronal planes. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries were associated with other ligamentous, meniscal and bone injuries in 78% of patients. The patients were classified in 5 groups depending on biomechanics and the association of injuries: -group I: isolated injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (41 patients), most frequently caused by forced extension stress associated with "kissing contusions" of the anterior portion of the lateral femoral condyle and of the lateral tibial plateau; this type of injury is less frequently caused by forced flexion stress associated with avulsion fracture of the tibial eminence; -group II: associated injury of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial compartment (62 patients), caused by forced flexion-external rotation stress (abduction, valgism and external rotation). The classic association of this mechanism was the injury of the anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and medial meniscus (O'Donoghue triad) (9 patients). Valgus stress and the pivot-shift phenomenon can impact the tibial and femoral articular surfaces, with consequent osteochondral contusion; -group III: associated injury of the anterior cruciate ligament and lateral compartment (26 patients), caused by forced flexion-internal rotation stress (adduction, varism and internal rotation). This mechanism can cause, as a typical bone lesion

  14. Post-traumatic neurodegeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Daniel H; Goldstein, Lee E; Kiernan, Patrick T; Stein, Thor D; McKee, Ann C

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity around the world. Concussive and subconcussive forms of closed-head injury due to impact or blast neurotrauma represent the most common types of TBI in civilian and military settings. It is becoming increasingly evident that TBI can lead to persistent, long-term debilitating effects, and in some cases, progressive neurodegeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The epidemiological literature suggests that a single moderate-to-severe TBI may be associated with accelerated neurodegeneration and increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or motor neuron disease. However, the pathologic phenotype of these post-traumatic neurodegenerations is largely unknown and there may be pathobiological differences between post-traumatic disease and the corresponding sporadic disorder. By contrast, the pathology of CTE is increasingly well known and is characterized by a distinctive pattern of progressive brain atrophy and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau neurofibrillary and glial tangles, dystrophic neurites, 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) neuronal and glial aggregates, microvasculopathy, myelinated axonopathy, neuroinflammation, and white matter degeneration. Clinically, CTE is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory deficits, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and most often progress slowly over decades. Although research on the long-term effects of TBI is advancing quickly, the incidence and prevalence of post-traumatic neurodegeneration and CTE are unknown. Critical knowledge gaps include elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms, identification of genetic risk factors, and clarification of relevant variables-including age at exposure to trauma, history of prior and subsequent head trauma, substance use, gender, stress, and comorbidities-all of which may contribute to risk profiles and the development of post-traumatic

  15. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Post-Traumatic Stress Physical Injury Families & Friendships Military Sexual Trauma Depression mild Traumatic Brain Injury Life Stress Health & ... Traumatic Stress Physical Injury Anxiety Health & Wellness Military Sexual Trauma Tobacco Community About Depression Life Stress Alcohol & Drugs ...

  16. Childhood Traumatic Grief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources for Educators Resources for Kids and Teens Childhood Traumatic Grief What is Childhood Traumatic Grief? Children grieve in their own way ... functioning, the child may have a condition called Childhood Traumatic Grief (CTG). Thinking about the person who ...

  17. Growth retardation, general hypotonia, and loss of acquired neuromotor skills in the infants of mothers with cobalamin deficiency and the possible role of succinyl-CoA and glycine in the pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicakci, Zafer

    2015-03-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl) deficiency can cause metabolic, hematological, and neurological abnormalities. Adequate levels of succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA) cannot be synthesized from methylmalonyl-CoA because of the decreased activity of the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase enzyme that uses Cbl as the cofactor. Succinyl-CoA synthesis deficiency leads to decreased heme synthesis and gluconeogenesis. The reason of growth retardation can be gluconeogenesis deficiency together with heme synthesis deficiency whereas the reason of the neurological abnormalities can be glycine increase in the tissue due to decreased heme synthesis. We present 7 infants diagnosed with severe nutritional Cbl deficiency and discuss the role of succinyl-CoA and glycine in the possible pathogenesis in this article. Patients brought to our clinic with a complaint of growth retardation and diagnosed with nutritional Cbl deficiency were included in the study. There were 5 females and 2 males. The mean age was 11 ± 2.30 (range 6-13) months. All patients had general muscular hypotonia and 4 had growth retardation. Neuromotor growth retardation was found in 4 of the children who had previously shown normal neuromotor development for age. The mean Cbl level was 83.8 ± 27.6 (45.6-114) pg/mL. The mean Cbl level of the mothers was 155 ± 56.6 (88-258) pg/mL. Six of the patients had anemia and 1 had thrombocytopenia. Mean corpuscular volume value was 91.5 ± 12.2 fL. Following treatment, the muscle tonus of the patients improved, the anemia and growth retardation decreased, and the lost neuromotor abilities were recovered. Severe nutritional Cbl deficiency is an important nutritional disease where complications can be prevented with early treatment. When evaluating the pathogenesis, it should be noted that nutritional Cbl deficiency is a succinyl-CoA synthesis deficiency.

  18. Influência do tempo de hospitalização sobre o desenvolvimento neuromotor de recém-nascidos pré-termo Influence of length of hospitalization on neuromotor development in premature newborn infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Giachetta

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a influência do tempo de hospitalização sobre o desenvolvimento neuromotor de recém-nascidos pré-termo (RNPT. Foi feito um estudo prospectivo com 67 RNPT de idade gestacional 34 dias. Na análise estatística considerou-se o nível de significância pThe purpose of this study was to assess the influence of the length of hospital stay on the neuromotor development of preterm newborns (PTNB. This prospective study was carried out with 67 PTNB (gestational age 34 days. In statistical analysis significance level was set at p<0.05. Median AIMS scores (possible range 0-21 were 7 in group A, 5 in group B; weak, significant correlations were found at both groups (r=0.32; r=0.34 between AIMS scores and HP. Results show that PTNB who stayed in hospital for more than 34 days showed developmental delay, suggesting that, without excluding other factors, the longer PTNB length of stay, the greater the motor impairment.

  19. Restoration of Thoracolumbar Spine Stability and Alignment in Elderly Patients Using Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery (MISS). A Safe and Feasible Option in Degenerative and Traumatic Spine Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, Giuseppe M V; Raudino, Giuseppe; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Alobaid, A Abdulrazzaq; Al-Mutair, A Abdulaziz; Naveen, Thomas; Certo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS), including percutaneous pedicle-screw fixation (PPSF), mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (m-open TLIF), vertebroplasty, and stentoplasty, allows the preservation of neurological function and the restoration of spine stability, while reducing associated risks and complications. This study aimed to analyze the safety and efficacy of MISS in elderly patients suffering from degenerative or traumatic thoracolumbar diseases. Forty-five patients (28 females), with a mean age of 73 years (range 65-89), suffering from osteoporotic vertebral fractures (24), degenerative spondylolisthesis (15), and lumbar canal stenosis with instability and/or de novo scoliosis (6) were included.Twenty-one patients underwent PPSF and m-open TLIF. The remaining patients received PPSF without interbody fusion, and in six of these fenestrated screws were used for vertebral body cement augmentation.Functional evaluation was obtained with a visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) pre- and postoperatively. Preoperative imaging included X-rays, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients were followed-up with X-rays, and a CT scan was also obtained at the last follow-up. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 59 months (mean 28 months). Follow-up CT scan documented intersomatic fusion in only 14 % of patients treated with m-open TLIF. Despite the high incidence of non-union, mean VAS and ODI scores showed a significant improvement, with a reduction of mean VAS from 9 to 4 and a reduction of mean ODI from 76.33 to 38.15 %. Only three patients developed postoperative complications. No patients showed neurological deficits.Minimally invasive spine surgery for degenerative and traumatic spinal diseases is a safe and effective treatment also in elderly patients.

  20. Forelimb muscle function in pig-nosed turtles, Carettochelys insculpta: testing neuromotor conservation between rowing and flapping in swimming turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Angela R V; Blob, Richard W

    2013-10-23

    Changes in muscle activation patterns can lead to new locomotor modes; however, neuromotor conservation-the evolution of new forms of locomotion through changes in structure without concurrent changes to underlying motor patterns-has been documented across diverse styles of locomotion. Animals that swim using appendages do so via rowing (anteroposterior oscilations) or flapping (dorsoventral oscilations). Yet few studies have compared motor patterns between these swimming modes. In swimming turtles, propulsion is generated exclusively by limbs. Kinematically, turtles swim using multiple styles of rowing (freshwater species), flapping (sea turtles) and a unique hybrid style with superficial similarity to flapping by sea turtles and characterized by increased dorsoventral motions of synchronously oscillated forelimbs that have been modified into flippers (Carettochelys insculpta). We compared forelimb motor patterns in four species of turtle (two rowers, Apalone ferox and Trachemys scripta; one flapper, Caretta caretta; and Carettochelys) and found that, despite kinematic differences, motor patterns were generally similar among species with a few notable exceptions: specifically, presence of variable bursts for pectoralis and triceps in Trachemys (though timing of the non-variable pectoralis burst was similar), and the timing of deltoideus activity in Carettochelys and Caretta compared with other taxa. The similarities in motor patterns we find for several muscles provide partial support for neuromotor conservation among turtles using diverse locomotor styles, but the differences implicate deltoideus as a prime contributor to flapping limb motions.

  1. Neuromotor performance, prematurity and low birth weight. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n1p73

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Alexandre Lopes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There seems to be consensus that intrauterine influences during human development have long-term implications. The hypothesis has been raised that alterations in an individual’s life cycle provoke lesions, some of them irreversible. The objectives of this study were: (1 to call attention to the problem of distance effects of neuromotor performance, prematurity and low birth weight in children and youngsters; (2 to present relevant aspects of the conceptual framework of fetal programming and its interpretive relevance for deficits in motor performance and coordination. A Pubmed database search was performed using different key words and their possible combinations. Cross-sectional, longitudinal and case-control studies evaluating motor performance and fetal programming were selected. Motor deficit levels ranged from 4% to 51% in the European population and from 4% to 56% in the North American population. A study involving the Australian population reported a motor coordination deficit of 9.5%. There is no absolute agreement regarding the extent, reversibility and significance of motor deficits in view of the wide variability in deficit levels. The mechanisms that will induce problems in the neuromotor development of children, youngsters and adults under adverse conditions of fetal development are unknown and cannot be compensated for by sensorimotor stimulation.

  2. Neuromotor performance, prematurity and low birth weight. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n1p73

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Alexandre Lopes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There seems to be consensus that intrauterine influences during human development have long-term implications. The hypothesis has been raised that alterations in an individual’s life cycle provoke lesions, some of them irreversible. The objectives of this study were: (1 to call attention to the problem of distance effects of neuromotor performance, prematurity and low birth weight in children and youngsters; (2 to present relevant aspects of the conceptual framework of fetal programming and its interpretive relevance for deficits in motor performance and coordination. A Pubmed database search was performed using different key words and their possible combinations. Cross-sectional, longitudinal and case-control studies evaluating motor performance and fetal programming were selected. Motor deficit levels ranged from 4% to 51% in the European population and from 4% to 56% in the North American population. A study involving the Australian population reported a motor coordination deficit of 9.5%. There is no absolute agreement regarding the extent, reversibility and significance of motor deficits in view of the wide variability in deficit levels. The mechanisms that will induce problems in the neuromotor development of children, youngsters and adults under adverse conditions of fetal development are unknown and cannot be compensated for by sensorimotor stimulation.

  3. Monitoring Neuro-Motor Recovery From Stroke With High-Resolution EEG, Robotics and Virtual Reality: A Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comani, Silvia; Velluto, Lucia; Schinaia, Lorenzo; Cerroni, Gianluigi; Serio, Antonio; Buzzelli, Sandro; Sorbi, Sandro; Guarnieri, Biancamaria

    2015-11-01

    A novel system for the neuro-motor rehabilitation of upper limbs was validated in three sub-acute post-stroke patients. The system permits synchronized cortical and kinematic measures by integrating high-resolution EEG, passive robotic device and Virtual Reality. The brain functional re-organization was monitored in association with motor patterns replicating activities of daily living (ADL). Patients underwent 13 rehabilitation sessions. At sessions 1, 7 and 13, clinical tests were administered to assess the level of motor impairment, and EEG was recorded during rehabilitation task execution. For each session and rehabilitation task, four kinematic indices of motor performance were calculated and compared with the outcome of clinical tests. Functional source maps were obtained from EEG data and projected on the real patients' anatomy (MRI data). Laterality indices were calculated for hemispheric dominance assessment. All patients showed increased participation in the rehabilitation process. Cortical activation changes during recovery were detected in relation to different motor patterns, hence verifying the system's suitability to add quantitative measures of motor performance and neural recovery to classical tests. We conclude that this system seems a promising tool for novel robot-based rehabilitation paradigms tailored to individual needs and neuro-motor responses of the patients.

  4. Traumatic callosotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Cukiert

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available In a 33 years-old epileptic woman with a traumatic impact to the vertex, clinical and radiological studies (skull X-R, CT and MRI disclosed an extensive, callosal section under the topography of the falx, associated to frontonasal contusions. There was a significant improvement in the epileptic syndrome. No interhemispheric disconnection syndrome could be determined, which is compatible with the posterior regions of the corpus callosum having been spared. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the most extensive callosal injury documented by MRI to date.

  5. Effectiveness of a school-based physical activity-related injury prevention program on risk behavior and neuromotor fitness a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collard, D.C.M.; Chinapaw, M.J.M.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; Bakker, I.; Mechelen, W. van

    2010-01-01

    Background: To investigate the effects of a school-based physical activity-related injury prevention program, called 'iPlay', on risk behavior and neuromotor fitness.Methods: In this cluster randomized controlled trial 40 primary schools throughout the Netherlands were randomly assigned in an

  6. The efficacy of two task-orientated interventions for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder : Neuromotor Task Training and Nintendo Wii Fit training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferguson, G. D.; Jelsma, D.; Jelsma, J.; Smits-Engelsman, B. C. M.

    Neuromotor Task Training (NTT) and Nintendo Wii Fit Training (Wii training) are both task-based interventions used to improve performance in children with motor coordination problems. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of these two interventions on the motor performance, isometric

  7. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Neuropathological Legacy of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jennifer; Johnson, Victoria E.; Smith, Douglas H.; Stewart, William

    2017-01-01

    Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy studies of non-boxers who were exposed to repetitive, mild traumatic brain injury, or to a single, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, has led to an awareness that it is exposure to traumatic brain injury that carries with it a risk of this neurodegenerative disease, not the sport or the circumstance in which the injury is sustained. Furthermore, the neuropathology of the neurodegeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury, now termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is acknowledged as being a complex, mixed, but distinctive pathology, the detail of which is reviewed in this article. PMID:26772317

  8. Reliability and Responsiveness of Upper Limb Motor Assessments for Children With Central Neuromotor Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Corinna N; Labruyère, Rob; van Hedel, Hubertus J A

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of upper limb rehabilitation, sound measures of upper limb function, capacity, and performance are paramount. This systematic review investigates reliability and responsiveness of upper limb measurement tools used in pediatric neurorehabilitation. A 2-tiered search was conducted up to July 2014. The first search identified upper limb motor assessments for 1- to 18-year-old children with neuromotor disorders. The second search examined the psychometric properties of the tools. Methodological quality was rated according to COSMIN guidelines, and results for each tool were assembled in a "best evidence synthesis." Furthermore, we delineated whether tools were unimanual or bimanual tests and if they measured recovery or did not distinguish between physiological and compensatory movements. The first search delivered 2546 hits. Of these, 110 articles on 51 upper limb assessment tools were included. The second search resulted in 58 studies on reliability, 11 on measurement error, and 10 on responsiveness. Best evidence synthesis revealed only 2 assessments with moderate positive evidence for reliability, whereas no evidence on measurement error and responsiveness was found. The Melbourne Assessment showed moderate positive evidence for interrater and a fair positive level of evidence for intrarater reliability. The Pediatric Motor Activity Log Revised revealed moderate positive evidence for test-retest reliability. There is a lack of high-quality studies about psychometric properties of upper limb measurement tools in children with neuromotor disorders. To date, upper limb rehabilitation trials in children and adolescents risk being biased by insensitive measurement tools lacking reliability. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Evolução do perfil neuromotor e capacidade funcional de mulheres fisicamente ativas de acordo com a idade cronológica Evolución del perfil neuromotor y la capacidad funcional de mujeres fisicamente activas de acuerdo con la edad cronológica Evolution of neuromotor profile and functional capacity of physically active women according to chronological age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Mahecha Matsudo

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS E OBJETIVO: Poucos estudos longitudinais têm sido feitos em mulheres fisicamente ativas para determinar o impacto do envelhecimento na aptidão física e capacidade funcional. O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar a evolução do perfil neuromotor e capacidade funcional de mulheres ativas no período de um ano, de acordo com a idade cronológica. MÉTODOS: A amostra foi composta por 117 mulheres de 50 a 79 anos de idade (: 65 ± 6,6 anos participantes de um programa de exercícios aeróbicos, duas vezes por semana, 50 minutos por sessão durante 5,4 ± 3,0 anos e divididas pela idade em: 50-59 (n: 23; 60-69 (n: 60; 70-79 (n: 34. Os testes neuromotores e de mobilidade incluíram: força muscular dos membros inferiores e superiores, agilidade, flexibilidade do tronco, velocidade de levantar-se da cadeira, equilíbrio estático, velocidade normal de andar e velocidade máxima de andar. Os resultados iniciais e nas duas avaliações seguintes, feitas a intervalos de seis meses, foram comparados usando ANOVA two way, com post-hoc Bonferroni. RESULTADOS: Em um ano não houve nenhuma alteração no desempenho neuromotor; já a velocidade de levantar da cadeira e a velocidade de andar evidenciaram diferenças significativas nos grupos de 50-59 e 60-69 anos, apresentando resultados 10-20% melhores; quanto à velocidade máxima de andar, houve melhora (8% nos grupos de 60 a 79 anos. CONCLUSÃO: A evolução da aptidão física e capacidade funcional teve comportamento similar, em mulheres fisicamente ativas, independentemente da idade cronológica. Essa evolução fortalece a hipótese de um efeito favorável da atividade física regular na promoção da saúde, estratégia fundamental do envelhecimento saudável.FUNDAMENTOS Y OBJETIVO: Pocos estudios longitudinales han sido realizados en mujeres físicamente activas para determinar el impacto del envejecimiento de la aptitud física y la capacidad funcional. El objetivo de este estudio fu

  10. Muscle power development during the first year of life predicts neuromotor behaviour at 7 years in preterm born high-risk infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsom, Janny F; de Groot, Laila; Bezemer, P Dick; Lafeber, Harry N; Fetter, Willem P F

    2002-07-01

    The aim of the study was to find if neurological function during the first year of life could predict neuromotor behaviour at 7 years of age in children born preterm with a high risk. A follow-up study of neuromotor behaviour in 52 children at a mean age of 3, 6, 12 months (corrected age) and 7 years was performed. All children were born with a gestational age less than 32 weeks and/or a birthweight under 1500 g and the infants were categorised according to their medical history in the three highest categories of the 'Neonatal Medical Index' (NMI, from category I to V, from few to serious complications). In addition, neonatal cerebral ultrasound abnormalities were used to divide the infants further into the different NMI categories. At 3 and 6 months, the relationship between active and passive muscle power was measured in shoulders, trunk and legs and (a)symmetry between right and left was noted. The results at 3 and 6 months were ranged from 1 for optimal to 5 for poor muscle power regulation. At 12 months of age, a neurological examination was done with special emphasis on the assessment of postural control, spontaneous motility, hand function and elicited infantile reactions with special attention to (a)symmetry. Outcome at 12 months was expressed as percentage of the optimal score on each subcategory. At 7 years, the motor behaviour study based on Touwen's examination for minor neurological dysfunction was performed. This investigation focuses on different functions, such as hand function, quality of walking, posture, passive muscle tone, coordination and diadochokinesis. The outcome was expressed as percentage of the optimal score on the combined subcategories. The best prediction of neuromotor behaviour at 7 years was assessed with stepwise linear multiple regression, using as potential predictors perinatal factors and outcome of motor behaviour at the corrected age of 3, 6 and 12 months. At 7 years none of the children scored 100% on the combined

  11. Traumatic events and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for in your child and how to take care of your child after a traumatic event. Get professional help if your child is not recovering. Kinds of Traumatic Events Your child could experience a one-time traumatic event or a repeated trauma that happens over and over again. Examples of ...

  12. Treadmill interventions with partial body weight support in children under six years of age at risk of neuromotor delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin-Gudiol, Marta; Mattern-Baxter, Katrin; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa Maria

    2011-12-07

    Delayed motor development may occur in children with Down syndrome, cerebral palsy or children born preterm, which in turn may limit the child's opportunities to explore the environment. Neurophysiologic and early intervention literature suggests that task-specific training facilitates motor development. Treadmill intervention is a good example of locomotor task-specific training. To assess the effectiveness of treadmill intervention on locomotor motor development in pre-ambulatory infants and children under six years of age who are at risk for neuromotor delay. In March 2011 we searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1948 to March Week 2, 2011), EMBASE (1980 to Week 11, 2011), PsycINFO (1887 to current), CINAHL (1937 to current), Science Citation Index (1970 to 19 March 2011), PEDro (until 7 March 2011), CPCI-S (1990 to 19 March 2011) and LILACS (until March 2011). We also searched ICTRP, ClinicalTrials.gov, mRCT and CenterWatch. We included randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials that evaluated the effect of treadmill intervention in children up to six years of age with delays in gait development or the attainment of independent walking or who were at risk of neuromotor delay. Four authors independently extracted the data using standardised forms. Outcome parameters were structured according to the "Body functions" and "Activity and Participation" components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, Children & Youth version (ICFCY), which was developed by the World Health Organization. We included five studies, which reported on treadmill intervention in 139 children. Of the 139 children, 73 were allocated to treadmill intervention groups, with the other children serving as controls. The studies varied in the type of population studied (children with Down syndrome, cerebral palsy or who were at risk for neuromotor delay); the type of comparison (for

  13. Effectiveness of a school-based physical activity-related injury prevention program on risk behavior and neuromotor fitness a cluster randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker Ingrid; Verhagen Evert ALM; Jm, Chinapaw Mai; Collard Dorine CM; van Mechelen Willem

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background To investigate the effects of a school-based physical activity-related injury prevention program, called 'iPlay', on risk behavior and neuromotor fitness. Methods In this cluster randomized controlled trial 40 primary schools throughout the Netherlands were randomly assigned in an intervention (n = 20) or control group (n = 20). The study includes 2,210 children aged 10-12 years. The iPlay-intervention takes one school year and consists of a teacher manual, informative new...

  14. Effects of basic developmental care on neonatal morbidity, neuromotor development, and growth at term age of infants who were born at <32 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Celeste M; Veen, Sylvia; Sprij, Arwen J; Le Cessie, Saskia; Wit, Jan M; Walther, Frans J

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of basic elements of developmental care (incubator covers and positioning aids) on days of respiratory support and intensive care, growth, and neuromotor development at term age in infants who were born at Neuromotor development was defined as definitely abnormal (presence of a neonatal neurologic syndrome, such as apathy or hyperexcitability, hypotonia or hypertonia, hyporeflexia or hyperreflexia, hypokinesia or hyperkinesia, or a hemisyndrome), mildly abnormal (presence of only part of such a syndrome), or normal. A total of 192 infants were included (developmental care: 98; control: 94). Thirteen infants (developmental care: 7; control: 6) were excluded according to protocol (admitted for less than or died within the first 5 days: n = 12; taken out at parents' request: n = 1), which left a total of 179 infants who met inclusion criteria. In-hospital mortality was 12 (13.2%) of 91 in the developmental care group and 8 (9.1%) of 88 in the control group. There was no significant difference in the number of days of respiratory support, number of intensive care days, short-term growth, or neuromotor developmental outcome at term age between the developmental care and control groups. Duration of the intervention, whether only during the intensive care period or until hospital discharge, had no significant effect on outcome. Providing basic developmental care in the NICU had no effect on short-term physical and neurologic outcomes in infants who were born at <32 weeks' gestation.

  15. Invasive Fungal Infections Secondary to Traumatic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronen, Ryan; Liang, Stephen Y; Bochicchio, Grant; Bochicchio, Kelly; Powderly, William G; Spec, Andrej

    2017-09-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is a rare but serious complication of traumatic injury. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology, natural history, mycology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes associated with post-traumatic IFI in military and civilian populations. The epidemiology of post-traumatic IFI is poorly characterized, but incidence appears to be rising. Patients often suffer from severe injuries and require extensive medical interventions. Fungi belonging to the order Mucorales are responsible for most post-traumatic IFI in both civilian and military populations. Risk factors differ between these cohorts but include specific injury patterns and comorbidities. Diagnosis of post-traumatic IFI typically follows positive laboratory results in the appropriate clinical context. The gold standard of treatment is surgical debridement in addition to systemic antifungal therapy. Patients with post-traumatic IFI may be at greater risk of amputation, delays in wound healing, hospital complications, and death as compared to trauma patients who do not develop IFI. More research is needed to understand the factors surrounding the development and management of post-traumatic IFI to reduce the significant morbidity and mortality associated with this disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Invasive Fungal Infections Secondary to Traumatic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Kronen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infection (IFI is a rare but serious complication of traumatic injury. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology, natural history, mycology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes associated with post-traumatic IFI in military and civilian populations. The epidemiology of post-traumatic IFI is poorly characterized, but incidence appears to be rising. Patients often suffer from severe injuries and require extensive medical interventions. Fungi belonging to the order Mucorales are responsible for most post-traumatic IFI in both civilian and military populations. Risk factors differ between these cohorts but include specific injury patterns and comorbidities. Diagnosis of post-traumatic IFI typically follows positive laboratory results in the appropriate clinical context. The gold standard of treatment is surgical debridement in addition to systemic antifungal therapy. Patients with post-traumatic IFI may be at greater risk of amputation, delays in wound healing, hospital complications, and death as compared to trauma patients who do not develop IFI. More research is needed to understand the factors surrounding the development and management of post-traumatic IFI to reduce the significant morbidity and mortality associated with this disease.

  17. Predictive factors for neuromotor abnormalities at the corrected age of 12 months in very low birth weight premature infants Fatores preditivos para anormalidades neuromotoras aos 12 meses de idade corrigida em prematuros de muito baixo peso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Reis de Mello

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increase in survival of premature newborns has sparked growing interest in the prediction of their long-term neurodevelopment. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incidence of neuromotor abnormalities at the corrected age of 12 months and to identify the predictive factors associated with altered neuromotor development in very low birth weight premature infants. METHOD: Cohort study. The sample included 100 premature infants. The outcome was neuromotor development at 12 months classified by Bayley Scale (PDI and neurological assessment (tonus, reflexes, posture. A multivariate logistic regression model was constructed. Neonatal variables and neuromotor abnormalities up to 6 months of corrected age were selected by bivariate analysis. RESULTS: Mean birth weight was 1126g (SD: 240. Abnormal neuromotor development was presented in 60 children at 12 months corrected age. CONCLUSION: According to the model, patients with a diagnosis including bronchopulmonary dysplasia, hypertonia of lower extremities, truncal hypotonia showed a 94.0% probability of neuromotor involvement at 12 months.INTRODUÇÃO: O aumento na sobrevida de recém-nascidos prematuros tem suscitado interesse crescente na predição do seu neurodesenvolvimento a longo prazo. OBJETIVO: Estimar a incidência de anormalidades neuromotoras aos 12 meses de idade corrigida e identificar os fatores associados ao desenvolvimento neuromotor alterado em prematuros de muito baixo peso. MÉTODO: Estudo de coorte. A amostra incluiu 100 crianças prematuras.O desfecho foi o desenvolvimento neuromotor aos 12 meses. Modelo de regressão logística multivariado foi construído. Variáveis neonatais e anormalidades neuromotoras até os 6 meses de idade corrigida foram selecionadas por análise bivariada. RESULTADOS: O peso de nascimento médio foi 1126g (DP:240. Aos 12 meses 60% das crianças apresentaram desenvolvimento neuromotor alterado. CONCLUSÃO: De acordo com o modelo, pacientes com diagn

  18. Traumatic brain injury accelerates amyloid-β deposition and impairs spatial learning in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido, Hajime; Kishimoto, Yasushi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Toyota, Yasunori; Ueno, Masaki; Kubota, Takashi; Kirino, Yutaka; Tamiya, Takashi

    2016-08-26

    Several pathological and epidemiological studies have demonstrated a possible relationship between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the exact contribution of TBI to AD onset and progression is unclear. Hence, we examined AD-related histopathological changes and cognitive impairment after TBI in triple transgenic (3×Tg)-AD model mice. Five- to seven-month-old 3×Tg-AD model mice were subjected to either TBI by the weight-drop method or a sham treatment. In the 3×Tg-AD mice subjected to TBI, the spatial learning was not significantly different 7 days after TBI compared to that of the sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice. However, 28 days after TBI, the 3×Tg-AD mice exhibited significantly lower spatial learning than the sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice. Correspondingly, while a few amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques were observed in both sham-treated and TBI-treated 3×Tg-AD mouse hippocampus 7 days after TBI, the Aβ deposition was significantly greater in 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after TBI. Thus, we demonstrated that TBI induced a significant increase in hippocampal Aβ deposition 28 days after TBI compared to that of the control animals, which was associated with worse spatial learning ability in 3×Tg-AD mice. The present study suggests that TBI could be a risk factor for accelerated AD progression, particularly when genetic and hereditary predispositions are involved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-concussion Syndrome: Treatment and Related Sequela for Persistent Symptomatic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramley, Harry; Hong, Justin; Zacko, Christopher; Royer, Christopher; Silvis, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Sport-related concussion typically resolves within a few weeks of the injury; however, persistent symptoms have been reported to occur in 10% to 15% of concussions. These ongoing symptoms can cause significant disability and be frustrating for the patient and family. In addition, factors other than brain injury can cause complications for these patients, such as adjustment disorder or exacerbation of preexisting conditions such as depression or migraine. Individuals with prolonged symptoms of concussion may be classified as having post-concussion syndrome. A careful and thoughtful evaluation is important, as the clinician must determine whether these prolonged symptoms reflect brain injury pathophysiology versus another process. Although there have been numerous studies on the acute management of concussion, much less is available on the treatment of persistent disease. This review will provide an evaluation approach for the patient with prolonged concussion symptoms and review recent literature on treatment strategies.

  20. Intra Articular Therapeutic Delivery for Post Traumatic Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    onset due to sports injuries or other factors could significantly benefit from the development of strategies to mitigate disease progression...combat-related cases, post-traumatic OA typically manifests less than 2 years after injury compared to post- traumatic OA resulting from sports ...impairment for nearly 27 million Americans at a cost of over $128 billion per year for the U.S. economy . Post-traumatic OA (PTOA) associated with combat

  1. Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John F...Include area code) October 2015 Annual Report 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy John...available, work will commence. Tau, genetics, susceptibility, MAPT, chronic traumatic encephalopathy , Alzheimer disease U U U U 1 USAMRMC Table of

  2. Technology to help persons with extensive neuro-motor impairment and lack of speech with their leisure occupation and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; D'Amico, Fiora; Addante, Luigi M; Ferlisi, Gabriele; Zullo, Valeria; Oliva, Doretta; Megna, Marisa

    2014-03-01

    These two studies were aimed at extending the assessment of technology-aided programs to enhance leisure occupation or communication with persons with extensive neuro-motor impairment and lack of speech. Specifically, Study I implemented the program for leisure occupation with two post-stroke patients. Study II implemented the program for communication with two persons affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In Study I, a computer system presented the participants with a variety of stimuli. The participants could select/access those stimuli by microswitch activation or could bypass them by abstaining from microswitch responses. In Study II, the participants used a computer-aided telephone system that allowed them to choose via microswitch activation the persons to call. On the computer screen, they also had words and phrases that they could activate during the calls to influence the conversation with the persons called. Data from both studies were largely positive. The post-stroke patients showed high levels of stimulus selection (access) and extended engagement. The patients with ALS were able to make phone calls and to select the words/phrases to influence the conversations. The relevance of technology-aided programs for leisure occupation and communication of persons with extensive multiple disabilities was discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Accuracy Improvement for Predicting Parkinson’s Disease Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrbakhsh Nilashi; Othman Ibrahim; Ali Ahani

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson?s disease (PD) is a member of a larger group of neuromotor diseases marked by the progressive death of dopamineproducing cells in the brain. Providing computational tools for Parkinson disease using a set of data that contains medical information is very desirable for alleviating the symptoms that can help the amount of people who want to discover the risk of disease at an early stage. This paper proposes a new hybrid intelligent system for the prediction of PD progression using noi...

  4. Imaging in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Teena; Raince, Avtar; Manning, Erin; Tsiouris, Apostolos John

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) can only be made pathologically, and there is no concordance of defined clinical criteria for premorbid diagnosis. The absence of established criteria and the insufficient imaging findings to detect this disease in a living athlete are of growing concern. The article is a review of the current literature on CTE. Databases searched include Medline, PubMed, JAMA evidence, and evidence-based medicine guidelines Cochrane Library, Hospital for Special Surgery, and Cornell Library databases. Clinical review. Level 4. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy cannot be diagnosed on imaging. Examples of imaging findings in common types of head trauma are discussed. Further study is necessary to correlate the clinical and imaging findings of repetitive head injuries with the pathologic diagnosis of CTE. © 2015 The Author(s).

  5. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stability of bimanual coordination in Parkinson's disease and cognitive modulation of intention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuze, RH

    2001-01-01

    The functional integrity of the bimanual neuro-motor system of Parkinson's disease (PD) subjects (stage II) compared to controls (2 X n = 16) was evaluated by measures of coordination stability of tapping in in-phase, anti-phase, and 90 degrees -phase. Recently, intentional influence was modeled as

  7. Military-related traumatic brain injury and neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C.; Robinson, Meghan E.

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) includes concussion, subconcussion, and most exposures to explosive blast from improvised explosive devices. mTBI is the most common traumatic brain injury affecting military personnel; however, it is the most difficult to diagnose and the least well understood. It is also recognized that some mTBIs have persistent, and sometimes progressive, long-term debilitating effects. Increasing evidence suggests that a single traumatic brain injury can produce long-term gray and white matter atrophy, precipitate or accelerate age-related neurodegeneration, and increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and motor neuron disease. In addition, repetitive mTBIs can provoke the development of a tauopathy, chronic traumatic encephalopathy. We found early changes of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in four young veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflict who were exposed to explosive blast and in another young veteran who was repetitively concussed. Four of the five veterans with early-stage chronic traumatic encephalopathy were also diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder. Advanced chronic traumatic encephalopathy has been found in veterans who experienced repetitive neurotrauma while in service and in others who were accomplished athletes. Clinically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory loss, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and progress slowly over decades. Pathologically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy produces atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, thalamus, and hypothalamus; septal abnormalities; and abnormal deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau as neurofibrillary tangles and disordered neurites throughout the brain. The incidence and prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the genetic risk factors critical to its development are currently unknown. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy has clinical and

  8. Effectiveness of a school-based physical activity-related injury prevention program on risk behavior and neuromotor fitness a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, Dorine Cm; Chinapaw, Mai Jm; Verhagen, Evert Alm; Bakker, Ingrid; van Mechelen, Willem

    2010-01-28

    To investigate the effects of a school-based physical activity-related injury prevention program, called 'iPlay', on risk behavior and neuromotor fitness. In this cluster randomized controlled trial 40 primary schools throughout the Netherlands were randomly assigned in an intervention (n = 20) or control group (n = 20). The study includes 2,210 children aged 10-12 years.The iPlay-intervention takes one school year and consists of a teacher manual, informative newsletters and posters, a website, and simple exercises to be carried out during physical education classes.Outcomes measures were self-reported injury preventing behavior, self-reported behavioral determinants (knowledge, attitude, social-influence, self-efficacy, and intention), and neuromotor fitness. The iPlay-program was not able to significantly improve injury-preventing behavior. The program did significantly improve knowledge and attitude, two determinants of behavior. The effect of the intervention-program on behavior appeared to be significantly mediated by knowledge and attitude. Improved scores on attitude, social norm, self-efficacy and intention were significantly related to changes in injury preventing behavior. Furthermore, iPlay resulted in small non-significant improvements in neuromotor fitness in favor of the intervention group. This cluster randomized controlled trial showed that the iPlay-program did significantly improved behavioral determinants. However, this effect on knowledge and attitude was not strong enough to improve injury preventing behavior. Furthermore, the results confirm the hypothetical model that injury preventing behavior is determined by intention, attitude, social norm and self-efficacy. ISRCTN78846684.

  9. Effectiveness of a school-based physical activity-related injury prevention program on risk behavior and neuromotor fitness a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakker Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effects of a school-based physical activity-related injury prevention program, called 'iPlay', on risk behavior and neuromotor fitness. Methods In this cluster randomized controlled trial 40 primary schools throughout the Netherlands were randomly assigned in an intervention (n = 20 or control group (n = 20. The study includes 2,210 children aged 10-12 years. The iPlay-intervention takes one school year and consists of a teacher manual, informative newsletters and posters, a website, and simple exercises to be carried out during physical education classes. Outcomes measures were self-reported injury preventing behavior, self-reported behavioral determinants (knowledge, attitude, social-influence, self-efficacy, and intention, and neuromotor fitness. Results The iPlay-program was not able to significantly improve injury-preventing behavior. The program did significantly improve knowledge and attitude, two determinants of behavior. The effect of the intervention-program on behavior appeared to be significantly mediated by knowledge and attitude. Improved scores on attitude, social norm, self-efficacy and intention were significantly related to changes in injury preventing behavior. Furthermore, iPlay resulted in small non-significant improvements in neuromotor fitness in favor of the intervention group. Conclusion This cluster randomized controlled trial showed that the iPlay-program did significantly improved behavioral determinants. However, this effect on knowledge and attitude was not strong enough to improve injury preventing behavior. Furthermore, the results confirm the hypothetical model that injury preventing behavior is determined by intention, attitude, social norm and self-efficacy. Trial number ISRCTN78846684

  10. Repercussões de fatores de risco biológicos no desenvolvimento neuromotor de lactentes do nascimento aos 2 meses de vida

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Joyce

    2009-01-01

    Os avanços tecnológicos têm permitido uma maior sobrevivência de recém nascidos de risco. No entanto, os fatores de risco biológicos aos quais essas crianças foram expostas fazem com que tenham maior chance de apresentar atraso no seu crescimento e desenvolvimento. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar as repercussões de fatores de risco biológicos no desenvolvimento neuromotor de lactentes do nascimento aos dois meses de vida. A população deste estudo foi representada por todas as crianças com...

  11. Sistema robótico multimodal para análisis y estudios en biomecánica, movimiento humano y control neuromotor

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Olaya, Andrés Felipe

    2008-01-01

    Actualmente existe una emergente necesidad en disponer de sistemas y plataformas que potencien estudios en diferentes ámbitos de investigación, que permitan establecer y configurar una serie de experimentos para explorar en aspectos relativos al movimiento humano, de control neuromotor o al análisis biomecánico, entre otros. La presente tesis doctoral abarca tres vertientes: científica, tecnológica y experimental. La componente tecnológica se refiere a la implementación física ...

  12. Secondary Traumatic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla Kahil

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic events do not only affect the person who was directly exposed to the incident, but they might also lead to some reactions on people with whom they interact. It is argued that, reactions given to a traumatic event by being exposed to the incident either primarily or secondarily, resemble each other. While in primary exposure the perceived threat is subjective, in secondary exposure the threat belongs to the person one interacts with. Secondary exposition to trauma may lead to re-experiencing, avoidance, and increased arousal symptoms as well as impairment in daily functioning. Briefly, secondary exposition to a traumatic incident induces parallel reactions as in those who are primarily exposed. In addition to these, taking specific precautions help decreasing the negative effects of secondary traumatic stress. This review focuses on the secondary traumatic stress and secondary traumatic stress disorder of workers who offer service in relief operations. For this aim, related theoretical concepts along with the literature studies are presented and information regarding ways of coping with the negative effects of secondary traumatization is discussed.

  13. The Cost of Treating Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Vanderploeg, 2009). Belanger et al believe that in the OEF/OIF population, even poor performance on neuropsychological 26 tests may be more associated...and may increase the risk for Alzheimer‟s disease and Parkinson ‟s disease as the person ages (Traumatic Brain Injury: Hope Through Research, 2002

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury and Personality Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Marc; McCabe, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and lifelong disability in the United States for individuals below the age of 45. Current estimates from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) indicate that at least 1.4 million Americans sustain a TBI annually. TBI affects 475,000 children under age 14 each year in the United States alone.…

  15. Exoskeleton Technology in Rehabilitation: Towards an EMG-Based Orthosis System for Upper Limb Neuromotor Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Manuel Vaca Benitez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rehabilitation of patients should not only be limited to the first phases during intense hospital care but also support and therapy should be guaranteed in later stages, especially during daily life activities if the patient’s state requires this. However, aid should only be given to the patient if needed and as much as it is required. To allow this, automatic self-initiated movement support and patient-cooperative control strategies have to be developed and integrated into assistive systems. In this work, we first give an overview of different kinds of neuromuscular diseases, review different forms of therapy, and explain possible fields of rehabilitation and benefits of robotic aided rehabilitation. Next, the mechanical design and control scheme of an upper limb orthosis for rehabilitation are presented. Two control models for the orthosis are explained which compute the triggering function and the level of assistance provided by the device. As input to the model fused sensor data from the orthosis and physiology data in terms of electromyography (EMG signals are used.

  16. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Known Causes, Unknown Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacono, Diego; Shively, Sharon B; Edlow, Brian L; Perl, Daniel P

    2017-05-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neuropathologic diagnosis typically made in human brains with a history of repetitive traumatic brain injury (rTBI). It remains unknown whether CTE occurs exclusively after rTBI, or whether a single TBI (sTBI) can cause CTE. Similarly, it is unclear whether impact (eg, motor vehicle accidents) and non-impact (eg, blasts) types of energy transfer trigger divergent or common pathologies. While it is established that a history of rTBI increases the risk of multiple neurodegenerative diseases (eg, dementia, parkinsonism, and CTE), the possible pathophysiologic and molecular mechanisms underlying these risks have yet to be elucidated. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Traumatic lumbar hernia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mayank Jayant Robin Kaushik

    2012-01-01

    ... missed.METHODS:Despite being operated for fracture of the femur after a road traffic accident,a50-year-old female patient remained undiagnosed with a right sided traumatic lumbar hernia for nearly six months...

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  19. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... com/home. Accessed Jan. 29, 2016. Concussion: Mayo's multidisciplinary approach. Mayo Clinic Neuroscience Update. 2013;10:2. ... al. Clinical appraisal of chronic traumatic encephalopathy: Current perspectives and future directions. Current Opinion in Neurology. 2011; ...

  20. Primary traumatic patellar dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Chun-Hao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute traumatic patellar dislocation is a common injury in the active and young adult populations. MRI of the knee is recommended in all patients who present with acute patellar dislocation. Numerous operative and non-operative methods have been described to treat the injuries; however, the ideal management of the acute traumatic patellar dislocation in young adults is still in debate. This article is intended to review the studies to the subjects of epidemiology, initial examination and management.

  1. Clinical and epidemiological profiles of non-traumatic myelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Non-traumatic myelopathies represent a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions. Few studies report clinical and epidemiological profiles regarding the experience of referral services. Objective To describe clinical characteristics of a non-traumatic myelopathy cohort. Method Epidemiological, clinical, and radiological variables from 166 charts of patients assisted between 2001 and 2012 were compiled. Results The most prevalent diagnosis was subacute combined degeneration (11.4%, followed by cervical spondylotic myelopathy (9.6%, demyelinating disease (9%, tropical spastic paraparesis (8.4% and hereditary spastic paraparesis (8.4%. Up to 20% of the patients presented non-traumatic myelopathy of undetermined etiology, despite the broad clinical, neuroimaging and laboratorial investigations. Conclusion Regardless an extensive evaluation, many patients with non-traumatic myelopathy of uncertain etiology. Compressive causes and nutritional deficiencies are important etiologies of non-traumatic myelopathies in our population.

  2. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IHaveAlz Overview What Is Dementia Types of Dementia Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Dementia with Lewy Bodies ... Center Alzheimer's Association Research Traumatic Brain Injury and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Awardees Year Researcher Study Name 2015 Jesse ...

  3. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Thor D; Alvarez, Victor E; McKee, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress implicated in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Nguyen, Linda; Bailes, Julian E; Lee, John M; Robson, Matthew J; Omalu, Bennet I; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L

    2016-03-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by neurofibrillary tau tangles following repetitive neurotrauma. The underlying mechanism linking traumatic brain injury to chronic traumatic encephalopathy has not been elucidated. The authors investigate the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress as a link between acute neurotrauma and chronic neurodegeneration. The authors used pharmacological, biochemical, and behavioral tools to assess the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in linking acute repetitive traumatic brain injury to the development of chronic neurodegeneration. Data from the authors' clinically relevant and validated rodent blast model were compared with those obtained from postmortem human chronic traumatic encephalopathy specimens from a National Football League player and World Wrestling Entertainment wrestler. The results demonstrated strong correlation of endoplasmic reticulum stress activation with subsequent tau hyperphosphorylation. Various endoplasmic reticulum stress markers were increased in human chronic traumatic encephalopathy specimens, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response was associated with an increase in the tau kinase, glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Docosahexaenoic acid, an endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor, improved cognitive performance in the rat model 3 weeks after repetitive blast exposure. The data showed that docosahexaenoic acid administration substantially reduced tau hyperphosphorylation (t = 4.111, p chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Docosahexaenoic acid therefore warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  5. Facilitating post traumatic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Helen

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst negative responses to traumatic injury have been well documented in the literature, there is a small but growing body of work that identifies posttraumatic growth as a salient feature of this experience. We contribute to this discourse by reporting on the experiences of 13 individuals who were traumatically injured, had undergone extensive rehabilitation and were discharged from formal care. All participants were injured through involvement in a motor vehicle accident, with the exception of one, who was injured through falling off the roof of a house. Methods In this qualitative study, we used an audio-taped in-depth interview with each participant as the means of data collection. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically to determine the participants' unique perspectives on the experience of recovery from traumatic injury. In reporting the findings, all participants' were given a pseudonym to assure their anonymity. Results Most participants indicated that their involvement in a traumatic occurrence was a springboard for growth that enabled them to develop new perspectives on life and living. Conclusion There are a number of contributions that health providers may make to the recovery of individuals who have been traumatically injured to assist them to develop new views of vulnerability and strength, make changes in relationships, and facilitate philosophical, physical and spiritual growth.

  6. What Is Child Traumatic Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awareness Sustainability Policy Issues What Is Child Traumatic Stress? Order NCTSN documents and other products where you ... these challenging times. Questions & Answers about Child Traumatic Stress Network experts answer questions about child trauma and ...

  7. Tau and Beta-Amyloid Deposition, Microhemorrhage and Brain Function after Traumatic Brain Injury in War Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Background: Studies suggest an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) after traumatic...traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) as a result of traumatic brain injury (TBI) sustained during military service. Greater understanding of the chronic ...brain injury (TBI). Greater understanding of the chronic effects of TBI may lead to new therapies. This proposal will add a TBI cohort, tau PET

  8. American College of Sports Medicine position stand. Quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and neuromotor fitness in apparently healthy adults: guidance for prescribing exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Carol Ewing; Blissmer, Bryan; Deschenes, Michael R; Franklin, Barry A; Lamonte, Michael J; Lee, I-Min; Nieman, David C; Swain, David P

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this Position Stand is to provide guidance to professionals who counsel and prescribe individualized exercise to apparently healthy adults of all ages. These recommendations also may apply to adults with certain chronic diseases or disabilities, when appropriately evaluated and advised by a health professional. This document supersedes the 1998 American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Position Stand, "The Recommended Quantity and Quality of Exercise for Developing and Maintaining Cardiorespiratory and Muscular Fitness, and Flexibility in Healthy Adults." The scientific evidence demonstrating the beneficial effects of exercise is indisputable, and the benefits of exercise far outweigh the risks in most adults. A program of regular exercise that includes cardiorespiratory, resistance, flexibility, and neuromotor exercise training beyond activities of daily living to improve and maintain physical fitness and health is essential for most adults. The ACSM recommends that most adults engage in moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise training for ≥30 min·d on ≥5 d·wk for a total of ≥150 min·wk, vigorous-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise training for ≥20 min·d on ≥3 d·wk (≥75 min·wk), or a combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity exercise to achieve a total energy expenditure of ≥500-1000 MET·min·wk. On 2-3 d·wk, adults should also perform resistance exercises for each of the major muscle groups, and neuromotor exercise involving balance, agility, and coordination. Crucial to maintaining joint range of movement, completing a series of flexibility exercises for each the major muscle-tendon groups (a total of 60 s per exercise) on ≥2 d·wk is recommended. The exercise program should be modified according to an individual's habitual physical activity, physical function, health status, exercise responses, and stated goals. Adults who are unable or unwilling to meet the exercise targets outlined here still can benefit

  9. Vicarious traumatization: concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Pamela Diane

    2011-12-01

    There is growing knowledge of the effects of stress on professionals, including various negative symptoms that may mirror the biopsychosocial effects exhibited by the victims of trauma. Multiple concepts including burn out, compassion fatigue, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and secondary traumatic stress, are terms that have been incorrectly interchanged with the term vicarious traumatization (VT). Clarity of vicarious victimization and understanding contributing factors is imperative in order to facilitate future research and implement timely and effective interventions, as well as sculpt evidence based practice. This concept anaylsis, complete with a concept map, discusses VT; related terminology; symptomology; prevention and relevant interventions; and discusses opportunities for personal/professional growth for nurses and especially forensic nurses working with victims of violence. © 2011 International Association of Forensic Nurses.

  10. Traumatic aortic ruptures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balm, R.; Hoornweg, L. L.

    2005-01-01

    Most patients with a traumatic aortic rupture (TAR) were involved in high velocity motor vehicle accidents. initial management of these patients should be according to the guidelines of the advanced trauma life support group (ATLS). Patients with a suspected TAR are preferably managed by controlled

  11. Transition after Traumatic Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban, Caelan

    2011-01-01

    Children experience grief when they suffer the loss of a close relationship. When that loss also traumatizes children, they experience additional emotional reactions. It is important that adults educate themselves and others who deal with children about typical, healthy grief reactions. Following a non-violent loss, the initial reactions of…

  12. The relevance of traumatic life events in schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis-Bogár, Krisztina; Perczel Forintos, Dóra

    2014-09-30

    The central goal of this manuscript was to review literature about the interconnections of traumatic life events and symptoms of schizophrenia spectrum of the last 15 years. First of all, the stress-diathesis model and the traumagenic neurodevelopmental model are shortly presented. Psychological effects of traumas and specific psychotic symptoms in connection with traumatic events are discussed. The course of the disease in patients affected by previous traumas and possible mediating factors are also addressed. Studies of both clinical and community samples are cited. It was also our aim to review literature about the neurobiological and neurocognitive processes in people affected by schizophrenia and/or traumatic life events. The role of prefrontal and medial temporal regions are explored with a special emphasis on contextual memory and hippocampal functioning. Finally, the possible effects of exploring traumatic life events on the treatment of schizophrenia are discussed.

  13. Traumatic oral mucosal lesions: a mini review and clinical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anura, Ariyawardana

    2014-06-01

    Oral mucosal lesions are a common occurrence and very often dentists are called upon to see such patients. Among many causes trauma is one of the leading for oral mucosal diseases. Oral traumatic lesions are diverse in which some present as acute lesions while the majority are chronic lesions. Clinical presentation of traumatic lesions vary significantly and most of the occasions the cause and the effect can be established with thorough history and clinical examination. Although, biopsy of such lesions are not required in most of the occasions some may warrant histological investigations to exclude conditions which clinically mimic traumatic lesions. This paper provides an overview of common and some rare traumatic conditions of the oral mucosa.

  14. Post-traumatic stress disorder vs traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bryant, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) often coexist because brain injuries are often sustained in traumatic experiences. This review outlines the significant overlap between PTSD and TBI by commencing with a critical outline of the overlapping symptoms and problems of differential diagnosis. The impact of TBI on PTSD is then described, with increasing evidence suggesting that mild TBI can increase risk for PTSD. Several explanations are offered for this enhanc...

  15. Quantifying the funding gap for management of traumatic brain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Trauma is an eminently preventable disease. However, prevention programs divert resources away from other priorities. Costing trauma related diseases helps policy makers to make decisions on re-source allocation. We used data from a prospective digital trauma registry to cost Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) at ...

  16. Medical interventions for traumatic hyphema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, Almutez; Savage, Howard I; Scherer, Roberta W; Goldberg, Morton F; Lindsley, Kristina

    2013-12-03

    Traumatic hyphema is the entry of blood into the anterior chamber (the space between the cornea and iris) subsequent to a blow or a projectile striking the eye. Hyphema uncommonly causes permanent loss of vision. Associated trauma (e.g. corneal staining, traumatic cataract, angle recession glaucoma, optic atrophy, etc.) may seriously affect vision. Such complications may lead to permanent impairment of vision. Patients with sickle cell trait/disease may be particularly susceptible to increases of elevated intraocular pressure. If rebleeding occurs, the rates and severity of complications increase. To assess the effectiveness of various medical interventions in the management of traumatic hyphema. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 8), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to August 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to August 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 30 August 2013. Two authors independently assessed the titles and abstracts of all reports identified by the electronic and manual searches. In this review, we included randomized and quasi-randomized trials that compared various medical interventions versus other medical interventions or control groups for the treatment of traumatic hyphema following closed globe trauma. We applied no restrictions regarding age, gender, severity of the closed globe trauma, or level of visual acuity at the time of enrolment. Two authors independently extracted the data for the primary and secondary outcomes. We entered and analyzed data using Review

  17. Post-traumatic syringomyelia

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal Amit; Shetty M; Pandit Lekha; Shetty Lathika; Srikrishna U

    2007-01-01

    Progressive post-traumatic cystic syringomyelia is an uncommon and increasingly recognized cause of morbidity following spinal cord injury. We hereby report a 35-year-old gentleman who sustained wedge compression fracture of L-1 vertebral body 15 years back and had complete paraplegia with bowel/bladder involvement. The neurological deficit recovered with minimal residual motor deficits and erectile dysfunction. He presented now with increasing neurological deficits associated with pain and p...

  18. Traumatic Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Miner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 48-year-old male with unknown past medical history presents as a trauma after being hit by a car traveling approximately 25 miles per hour. On initial presentation, the patient is confused, combative, and not answering questions appropriately. The patient is hypotensive with a blood pressure of 68/40 and a heart rate of 50 beats per minute, with oxygen saturation at 96% on room air. FAST scan is positive for fluid in Morrison’s pouch, splenorenal space, and pericardial space. Significant findings: The initial chest x-ray showed an abnormal superior mediastinal contour (blue line, suggestive of a possible aortic injury. The CT angiogram showed extensive circumferential irregularity and outpouching of the distal aortic arch (red arrows compatible with aortic transection. In addition, there was a circumferential intramural hematoma, which extended through the descending aorta to the proximal infrarenal abdominal aorta (green arrow. There was also an extensive surrounding mediastinal hematoma extending around the descending aorta and supraaortic branches (purple arrows. Discussion: Traumatic aortic injury is a life-threatening event. The incidence of blunt thoracic aortic injury is low, between 1 to 2 percent of those patients with blunt thoracic trauma.1 However, approximately 80% of patients with traumatic aortic injury die at the scene.2 Therefore it is imperative to diagnose traumatic aortic injury in a timely fashion. The diagnosis can be difficult due to the non-specific signs and symptoms and other distracting injuries. Clinical suspicion should be based on the mechanism of the injury and the hemodynamic status of the patient. In any patient with blunt or penetrating trauma to the chest that is hemodynamically unstable, traumatic aortic injury should be on the differential. Chest x-ray can be used as a screening tool. A normal chest x-ray has a negative predictive value of approximately 97%. CTA chest is the

  19. Non traumatic coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit C; Singhi, Pratibha D; Khandelwal, N; Ramesh, S

    2005-06-01

    To study the etiology and clinical profile of non-traumatic coma in children and to determine the clinical signs predictive of outcome. 100 consecutive cases of non-traumatic coma between 2 months to 12 years. Clinical signs studied were temperature, pulse, heart rate, blood pressure, coma severity by Glasgow coma scale (GCS), respiratory pattern, pupillary and corneal reflex, extra ocular movements, motor patterns, seizure types and fundus picture. These were recoded at admission and after 48 hours of hospital stay. Etiology of coma was determined on basis of clinical history, examination and relevant laboratory investigations by the treating physician. The outcome was recorded as survived or died, and among those who survived as normal, mild, moderate, or severe disability. Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were done to determine predictors of outcome. Etiology of coma in 60% cases was CNS infection (tubercular meningitis-19, encephalitis-18, bacterial meningitis-16, others-7); other causes were toxic-metabolic conditions (19%), status epilepticus (10%), intracranial bleed (7%), and miscellaneous (4%). 65 children survived, 11 were normal, 14 had mild disability, 21 had moderate disability and 14 were severely disabled and dependent. Survival was significantly better in patients with CNS infection (63%) as compared to those with toxic-metabolic causes (27%) and intracranial bleed (43%, P traumatic coma in childhood. Simple clinical signs were good predictors of outcome.

  20. Delayed neuromotor recovery and increased memory acquisition dysfunction following experimental brain trauma in mice lacking the DNA repair gene XPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasevic, Gregor; Laurer, Helmut L; Mattiasson, Gustav; van Steeg, Harry; Wieloch, Tadeusz; McIntosh, Tracy K

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice lacking the essential DNA repair gene xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA). As damage to DNA has been implicated in neuronal cell death in various models, the authors sought to elucidate whether the absence of an essential DNA repair factor would affect the outcome of TBI in an experimental setting. Thirty-seven adult mice of either wild-type (n = 18) or XPA-deficient ("knock-out" [n = 19]) genotype were subjected to controlled cortical impact experimental brain trauma, which produced a focal brain injury. Sham-injured mice of both genotypes were used as controls (9 in each group). The mice were subjected to neurobehavoral tests evaluating learning/acquisition (Morris water maze) and motor dysfunction (Rotarod and composite neuroscore test), pre- and postinjury up to 4 weeks. The mice were killed after 1 or 4 weeks, and cortical lesion volume, as well as hippocampal and thalamic cell loss, was evaluated. Hippocampal staining with doublecortin antibody was used to evaluate neurogenesis after the insult. Brain-injured XPA(-/-) mice exhibited delayed recovery from impairment in neurological motor function, as well as pronounced cognitive dysfunction in a spatial learning task (Morris water maze), compared with injured XPA(+/+) mice (p recovery after TBI, although they do not support the notion that this DNA repair deficiency results in increased cell or tissue death in the posttraumatic brain.

  1. Repetitive Head Impacts and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C; Alosco, Michael L; Huber, Bertrand R

    2016-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a distinctive neurodegenerative disease that occurs as a result of repetitive head impacts. CTE can only be diagnosed by postmortem neuropathologic examination of brain tissue. CTE is a unique disorder with a pathognomonic lesion that can be reliably distinguished from other neurodegenerative diseases. CTE is associated with violent behaviors, explosivity, loss of control, depression, suicide, memory loss and cognitive changes. There is increasing evidence that CTE affects amateur athletes as well as professional athletes and military veterans. CTE has become a major public health concern. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Hemosiderin-laden macrophages in the cerebrospinal fluid of a neonate after traumatic lumbar puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wusthoff, Courtney J; Abend, Nicholas S; Tennekoon, Gihan

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages in cerebrospinal fluid are described as indicators of pathology. We present findings from the lumbar puncture of a child without neurologic disease. Cerebrospinal fluid obtained after an initial, traumatic lumbar puncture attempt included a high proportion of macrophages, some containing erythrocyte fragments and hemosiderin. This suggests that although macrophages may indicate pathology, they can also accumulate after traumatic lumbar puncture.

  3. National Child Traumatic Stress Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NCTSN eBulletin Información en Español Topics What is Child Traumatic Stress Trauma Types Finding Help Trauma-Informed Screening & Assessment ... and Adolescent Trauma Education and online community. Understanding Child Traumatic Stress What it is. Why it matters. Information Resource ...

  4. Traumatic bone cyst, idiopathic origin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic bone cyst (TBC) is an uncommon non-epithelial lined cavity of the jaws. Traumatic bone cysts have been reported in the literature under a variety of names: solitary bone cyst, haemorrhagic bone cyst, extravasation cyst and simple bone cyst. The multitude of names applied to this lesion implies ...

  5. Post-traumatic syringomyelia.

    OpenAIRE

    浅野, 雅敏; アサノ, マサトシ

    1994-01-01

    Post-traumatic syringomyelia was previously thought to be an infrequent but serious sequel to spinal cord injury. Clinical and CT studies have shown an incidence of between 1% and 5%, but more recently MRI has suggested an incidence of up to 22%. Twenty spinal cords have been examined after death from two days to 43 years after injury. Four had syrinxes, 20% of the series, approaching the incidence found by MRI. The acute and chronic pathological changes after trauma are described. Post-traum...

  6. Traumatic shock: the fifth shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Maighdlin W; Watson, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Although, historically, shock associated with traumatic injury has been evaluated through knowledge of the 4 recognized shock patterns--cardiogenic, obstructive, distributive, and hypovolemic--many trauma practitioners view traumatic shock as a unique fifth shock pattern. Although secondary to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome triggered by endogenous danger signals, traumatic shock represents a unique pathological condition that begins with multiple, usually blunt, trauma and may conclude with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and death. While varying mechanisms of injury may lead to different presentations of shock and cardiovascular decompensation, a unifying theme of traumatic shock is an overwhelming inflammatory response driven by proinflammatory cytokines, and the downstream results of this cytokine storm including, but not limited to, acute respiratory distress syndrome, coagulopathy, sepsis, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Treatment is primarily supportive; however, research into novel therapeutics for traumatic shock is ongoing and promises some direction for future care.

  7. [Post-traumatic tics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, S; Chacón, J; Redondo, L; Navarro-Busto, C; Solana, B

    1996-10-01

    Secondary tics are those in which an aetiology justifying them can be found, as compared to idiopathic tics, which make up the majority, and the Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (SGT), which is, at the moment, of unknown origin. Of the possible aetiologies described as causing tics, craneo-encephalic trauma has been mentioned on very few occasions. We present a case of post-traumatic tics (verbal and neck) in a young man of 24, and review the published cases which can be considered to be of post-traumatic tics. We have found six cases of tics secondary to traumas, all craneo-encephalic, like ours (the one under study). The time interval between the blow and the appearance of the tic or tics varied between 2 weeks and 3 months. The absence of significant lesions seen in the complementary investigations make it impossible for us to discover the site of the lesion caused by the trauma. However, the presence in some cases of other tics before the trauma, and of family histories of tics, supports the idea of a genetic basis or predisposition to suffer this disorder.

  8. Traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blennow, Kaj; Brody, David L; Kochanek, Patrick M; Levin, Harvey; McKee, Ann; Ribbers, Gerard M; Yaffe, Kristine; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2016-11-17

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are clinically grouped by severity: mild, moderate and severe. Mild TBI (the least severe form) is synonymous with concussion and is typically caused by blunt non-penetrating head trauma. The trauma causes stretching and tearing of axons, which leads to diffuse axonal injury - the best-studied pathogenetic mechanism of this disorder. However, mild TBI is defined on clinical grounds and no well-validated imaging or fluid biomarkers to determine the presence of neuronal damage in patients with mild TBI is available. Most patients with mild TBI will recover quickly, but others report persistent symptoms, called post-concussive syndrome, the underlying pathophysiology of which is largely unknown. Repeated concussive and subconcussive head injuries have been linked to the neurodegenerative condition chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which has been reported post-mortem in contact sports athletes and soldiers exposed to blasts. Insights from severe injuries and CTE plausibly shed light on the underlying cellular and molecular processes involved in mild TBI. MRI techniques and blood tests for axonal proteins to identify and grade axonal injury, in addition to PET for tau pathology, show promise as tools to explore CTE pathophysiology in longitudinal clinical studies, and might be developed into diagnostic tools for CTE. Given that CTE is attributed to repeated head trauma, prevention might be possible through rule changes by sports organizations and legislators.

  9. Traumatic uveitis in the mid-Atlantic United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelhard SB

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie B Engelhard,1 James Patrie,2 John Prenshaw,1 Asima Bajwa,1 Rose Monahan,1 Ashvini K Reddy1 1Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct an in-depth analysis of traumatic uveitis in patients managed in a mid-Atlantic tertiary care center with the goal of better characterizing the clinical features and outcomes of this large and important subset of uveitis patients.Methods: This was a retrospective, observational study comparing traumatic uveitis patients with nontraumatic uveitis patients seen at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA, from 1984 to 2014.Results: Fifty-four traumatic uveitis patients (55 eyes were identified. The patient population was 70.4% male, 57.4% Caucasian, and 37.0% African American. Mean age at diagnosis was 31.2 years; mean duration of follow-up was 5.4 years; and mean number of visits to the clinic was 4. The most common treatment modality was local steroids (77.8%. Glaucoma was medically managed in eight patients (14.8%. Cataract surgery was performed in five patients (9.3%. Mean best-corrected visual acuity at baseline for traumatic uveitis patients was 0.33 logMAR (SD 0.42 at the initial visit and 0.16 logMAR (SD 0.33 at the final visit. Mean baseline intraocular pressure (IOP in the traumatic uveitis group was 15.5 mmHg (SD 7.4 at the initial visit and 14.6 mmHg (SD 4.0 at the final visit. Patients in the traumatic uveitis cohort tended to have better visual outcomes than those in the nontraumatic uveitis cohort.Conclusion: In our series, traumatic uveitis patients tended to be young and male and present with unilateral disease, all findings consistent with other reports. Despite relatively good visual outcomes, the traumatic uveitis patients still experienced a high burden of disease, measured both in the number of clinic visits and duration of follow-up. Due to the

  10. Risk of hospitalization with neurodegenerative disease after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury in the working-age population: A retrospective cohort study using the Finnish national health registries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Raj

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous epidemiological studies suggest that working-aged persons with a history of moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI may have an increased risk for developing neurodegenerative disease (NDD while persons with a history of mild TBI do not. In this comprehensive nationwide study in Finland, we assessed the risk of NDD and history of moderate-to-severe TBI in the working-age population.We performed a population-based follow-up study using the Finnish Care Register for Health Care to identify all persons between the ages of 18 and 65 years hospitalized during 1987-2014 due to TBI who did not have a baseline NDD diagnosis. We compared the risk of hospitalization with NDD between persons hospitalized due to moderate-to-severe TBI (intracranial lesions and persons hospitalized due to mild TBI (no intracranial lesions. Follow-up NDD diagnoses were recorded from 1 year following the TBI to the end of 2014. NDD diagnoses included dementia, Parkinson disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We used a Cox proportional hazards model, adjusting for age, sex, education, and socioeconomic group, to assess the association between TBI and NDD. In total, 19,936 and 20,703 persons with a history of moderate-to-severe TBI and mild TBI, respectively, were included. The overall time at risk was 453,079 person-years (median 10 years per person. In total, 3.5% (N = 696 persons in the moderate-to-severe TBI group developed NDD compared to 1.6% (N = 326 in the mild TBI group. After adjusting for covariates, moderate-to-severe TBI was associated with an increased risk for NDD, with a hazard ratio (HR of 1.8 (95% CI 1.6-2.1 compared to mild TBI. Of the NDD subtypes, only moderate-to-severe TBI was associated with an increased risk for dementia (HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.6-2.2. Yet, this large-scale epidemiological study does not prove that there is a causal relationship between moderate-to-severe TBI and NDD. Further, the Care Register for Health Care includes only

  11. Comparison of coronary artery calcification scores and National Cholesterol Education program guidelines for coronary heart disease risk assessment and treatment paradigms in individuals with chronic traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Jesse A; Hammond, Flora M; Barringer, Thomas A; Norton, H J; Goff, David C; Bockenek, William L; Scelza, William M

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) according to the National Cholesterol Educational Program (NCEP) guidelines and CT coronary artery calcium scores (CCS). Cross-sectional study of consecutive sample of males with SCI presenting to a single site for CHD risk assessment. Males age 45-70 with traumatic SCI (American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) A, B, and C) injured for at least 10 years with no prior history of clinical CHD. Medical history, blood-pressure, and fasting lipid panel were used to calculate risk for CHD with the use of the Framingham risk score (FRS). Risk and treatment eligibility status was assessed based on NCEP/FRS recommendations and by presence and amount of CCS. Percent agreement (PA) and kappa were calculated between the two algorithms. Spearman correlations were calculated between CCS and FRS and individual risk factors. A total of 38 men were assessed; 18 (47.4%) had CCS > 0. The PA between NCEP/FRS assessment and CCS was 18% with a kappa of -0.03. 11 (28.9%) had CCS > 100 or >75th percentile for their age, sex, and race, which might qualify them for lipid-lowering treatment. Only 26 were placed into the same treatment category by NCEP/FRS and CCS, for a PA of 68% with a kappa of 0.35. In all, 20 (52.6%) were eligible for lipid-lowering treatment by either NCEP/FRS (n=9) or CCS (n = 11). Seven subjects were above the treatment threshold based on CCS, but not NCEP/FRS and five subjects were above the NCEP/FRS threshold, but not CCS. Just four subjects were eligible by both algorithms. CCS only correlated with FRS (r = 0.508, P = 0.001) and age (r = 0.679, P < 0.001).

  12. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulle, Michael; Greenwald, Brian D

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE.

  13. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Saulle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE.

  14. Sleep and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Christian R

    2016-03-01

    Post-traumatic sleep-wake disturbances are frequent and often chronic complications after traumatic brain injury. The most prevalent sleep-wake disturbances are insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and pleiosomnia, (i.e., increased sleep need). These disturbances are probably of multifactorial origin, but direct traumatic damage to key brain structures in sleep-wake regulation is likely to contribute. Diagnosis and treatment consist of standard approaches, but because of misperception of sleep-wake behavior in trauma patients, subjective testing alone may not always suffice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Movement Disorders: Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazi, Apameh; Tator, Charles H; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela

    2016-05-01

    Association of repetitive brain trauma with progressive neurological deterioration has been described since the 1920s. Punch drunk syndrome and dementia pugilistica (DP) were introduced first to explain symptoms in boxers, and more recently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been used to describe a neurodegenerative disease in athletes and military personal with a history of multiple concussions. Although there are many similarities between DP and CTE, a number of key differences are apparent especially when comparing movement impairments. The aim of this review is to compare clinical and pathological aspects of DP and CTE with a focus on disorders of movement.

  16. intimate partner violence and post-traumatic stress disorder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    diseases, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It also affects the capacity of women to act as equal and ... particularly depression and substance abuse. One study found that 42.9% of. Bavanisha Vythilingum .... Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. (SSRIs) are a first-line medication treat- ment, both in ...

  17. Non Traumatic Intracranial Infections at the University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Non traumatic intracranial infections are a well recognized disease process encountered in neurosurgery and otolaryngology practices. In this case series study, we analyze the patients that presented with this condition to the neurosurgical unit of the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. Methods: ...

  18. Outcome of tube thoracostomy in paediatric non-traumatic pleural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Management of pleural fluid collection not due to trauma increases workload of the paediatric thoracic surgeons, while delay or inappropriate treatment worsens the prognosis of the disease. This study aimed at assessing the outcome of therapeutic tube thoracostomy in non-traumatic paediatric pleural fluid ...

  19. Neuroimaging assessment of early and late neurobiological sequelae of traumatic brain injury: implications for CTE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sundman, Mark; Doraiswamy, P Murali; Morey, Rajendra A

    2015-01-01

    .... Recent evidence indicates that the resultant chronic neurobiological sequelae following head trauma may, at least in part, contribute to a pathologically distinct disease known as Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE...

  20. Chronic neurodegenerative consequences of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Neelima B

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious public health concern and a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Each year, an estimated 1.7 million Americans sustain TBI of which ~52,000 people die, ~275,000 people are hospitalized and 1,365,000 people are treated as emergency outpatients. Currently there are ~5.3 million Americans living with TBI. TBI is more of a disease process than of an event that is associated with immediate and long-term sensomotor, psychological and cognitive impairments. TBI is the best known established epigenetic risk factor for later development of neurodegenerative diseases and dementia. People sustaining TBI are ~4 times more likely to develop dementia at a later stage than people without TBI. Single brain injury is linked to later development of symptoms resembling Alzheimer's disease while repetitive brain injuries are linked to later development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and/or Dementia Pugilistica (DP). Furthermore, genetic background of ß-amyloid precursor protein (APP), Apolipoprotein E (ApoE), presenilin (PS) and neprilysin (NEP) genes is associated with exacerbation of neurodegenerative process after TBI. This review encompasses acute effects and chronic neurodegenerative consequences after TBI.

  1. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: contributions from the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, David O; Robbins, Clifford A; Cantu, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive brain trauma (RBT). Initially described in boxers, CTE has now been found in other contact sport athletes with a history of RBT. In recent years, there has been tremendous media attention regarding CTE, primarily because of the deaths of high profile American football players who were found to have CTE upon neuropathological examination. However, the study of CTE remains in its infancy. This review focuses on research from the Centre for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy (CSTE) at Boston University. This study reviews the formation of the CSTE, major CSTE publications and current ongoing research projects at the CSTE. The neuropathology of CTE has been well-described. Current research focuses on: methods of diagnosing the disease during life (including the development of biomarkers), examination of CTE risk factors (including genetic susceptibility and head impact exposure variables); description of the clinical presentation of CTE; development of research diagnostic criteria for Traumatic Encephalopathy Syndrome; and assessment of mechanism and pathogenesis. Current research at the BU CSTE is aimed at increasing understanding of the long-term consequences of repetitive head impacts and attempting to begin to answer several of the unanswered questions regarding CTE.

  2. Post-traumatic syringomyelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Amit

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive post-traumatic cystic syringomyelia is an uncommon and increasingly recognized cause of morbidity following spinal cord injury. We hereby report a 35-year-old gentleman who sustained wedge compression fracture of L-1 vertebral body 15 years back and had complete paraplegia with bowel/bladder involvement. The neurological deficit recovered with minimal residual motor deficits and erectile dysfunction. He presented now with increasing neurological deficits associated with pain and paresthesia. The MRI spine showed a syrinx extending from the site of injury up to the medulla. He underwent a syringo-peritoneal shunt and at follow-up his pain and motor functions had improved but erectile dysfunction was persisting.

  3. Blunt traumatic diaphragmatic rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Nogueira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injury of the diaphragm ranges from 0.6 to 1.2% and rise up to 5%among patients who were victims of blunt trauma and underwent laparotomy.Clinical suspicion associated with radiological assessment contributes to earlydiagnosis. Isolated diaphragmatic injury has a good prognosis. Generallyworse outcomes are associated with other trauma injuries. Bilateral andright diaphragmatic lesions have worse prognosis. Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT scan of the chest and abdomen provides better diagnosticaccuracy using the possibility of image multiplanar reconstruction. Surgicalrepair via laparotomy and/ or thoracotomy in the acute phase of the injury hasa better outcome and avoids chronic complications of diaphragmatic hernia.The authors present the case of a young male patient, victim of blunt abdominaltrauma due to motor vehicle accident with rupture of the diaphragm, spleenand kidney injuries. The diagnosis was made by computed tomography of thethorax and abdomen and was confirmed during laparotomy.

  4. Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms form a traumatic and non-traumatic stress response dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Roger; Fergusson, David; Horwood, John

    2013-06-01

    This study aims to determine whether symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) form a latent dimension reflecting responsivity to life events and whether PTSD symptoms are specific to traumatic life events. A 30-year longitudinal study of a general population sample of 987 individuals were assessed for PTSD symptoms, exposure to adverse life events, and a variety of psychosocial measures. PTSD symptoms were tested using a confirmatory factor model and a range of fitted models were used to identify significant predictors of latent PTSD symptoms. The rate of DSM IV PTSD was 1.9%. However, subjects reported high rates of at least one significant traumatic or negative life event and PTSD symptoms. The PTSD symptoms conformed well to a single latent factor. There were strong linear associations between severity of PTSD symptoms and exposure to traumatic and non-traumatic life events. Factors contributing to latent PTSD symptoms were gender, childhood anxiety, neuroticism, self-esteem, and quality of parental care. Criteria for PTSD form an underlying dimension reflecting the individual's level of responsivity to traumatic and non-traumatic stressful life events. PTSD symptoms form a continuum of severity with minor stress symptoms at one end and severe PTSD at the other.

  5. Um estudo da mediação pedagógica em contexto domiciliar na afasia motora: o desenvolvimento da autonomia intelectual do deficiente neuromotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Carvalho Polonio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study, which covers language development in people with Ontogenetic Cerebral Dysmetria, aimed to identify educational activities which promote language development in people under such a condition who present motor aphasia. On the one hand, it is necessary to understand how language difficulties can harm the subject with physical neuromotor disabilities in their emotional, social and intellectual development. On the other hand, it is imperative to unveil alternative paths and special features which promote the development of people under the condition in focus. The analyses presented in this study have as theoretical basis the assumptions of historical-cultural psychology, particularly the understanding that language is an essential tool for intellectual development. In its methodology, the research included, in addition to a theoretical investigation, a case study on the conditions of language and development of an adult woman with ontogenetic cerebral dysmetria, a condition known as cerebral palsy, spastic quadriplegia and lack of speech. The case study intended to determine the impact of a stimulation program of expressive language, with augmentative and alternative high technology communication resources which were systematized to meet the needs of the research subject. The Augmentative and Alternative Communication resources are seen as an effective way to minimize the difficulties experienced by individuals with motor aphasia. As a result of the proposed interventions, it was possible to identify a more autonomous behavior of the subject in question regarding the use of written language, which is the communication channel used by her. Furthermore, the study revealed that the expansion of communication possibilities through the virtual writing system resized the social relations of the participant in this research.

  6. Traumatic Brain Injury Registry (TBI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — As the number of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) patients has grown, so has the need to track and monitor...

  7. Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Concussion Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury Past Issues / Summer 2015 ... have a concussion or more serious brain injury. Concussion Signs Observed Can't recall events prior to ...

  8. Traumatic thumb carpometacarpal joint dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, B; Verhofstad, M H J; Gosens, T

    2008-03-01

    Isolated traumatic dislocation of the thumb carpometacarpal joint, also called the trapeziometacarpal joint, is a rare injury. Controversy still exists concerning which ligaments are the true key stabilizers for the joint and therefore need to be damaged to result in dislocation, and optimal treatment strategies for thumb carpometacarpal joint dislocations are the subject of continuing debate. We give a review of the literature concerning traumatic dislocations of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb and propose a treatment algorithm.

  9. Initial Management of Traumatic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriendt, Nausikaa; de Rooster, Hilde

    2017-11-01

    When traumatic wounds are quickly and accurately treated, morbidity and costs can be significantly decreased. Several factors, such as time delay between injury and treatment, the degree of contamination, extension and depth of the wound, and the mechanism of injury, influence the treatment and prognosis and stress the importance of a patient-specific approach. Although all traumatic wounds are contaminated, antibiotic therapy is seldom required if correct wound management is installed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Traumatic spinal cord injuries--incidence, mechanisms and course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Ellen Merete; Rekand, Tiina; Gilhus, Nils Erik; Grønning, Marit

    2012-04-17

    The primary purpose of this article is to provide an overview of demography, neurological level of injury, extent of lesion, incidence, prevalence, injury mechanisms as well as lethality and causes of death associated with traumatic spinal cord injuries. A literature search was carried out in PubMed, with the search words "traumatic spinal cord injury"/"traumatic spinal cord injuries" together with "epidemiology", and "spinal cord injury"/"spinal cord injuries" together with "epidemiology". The reported annual incidence of traumatic spinal cord injuries varies from 2.3 per million in a study from Canada to 83 per million in Alaska. The prevalence is given as ranging from 236 per million in India to 1800 per million in the USA. The average age at the time of injury varies from 26.8 years in Turkey to 55.5 years in the USA. The ratio of men to women varies from 0.9 in Taiwan to 12.0 in Nigeria. The most frequent cause of injury is traffic accidents, followed by falls, violence and sports/leisure activity incidents. Patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries have a higher lethality than the normal population. The most frequent causes of death today are airway problems, heart disease and suicide. There are large geographical differences in reported incidence, prevalence and lethality. This is attributable to differences in definition, inclusion, classification and patient identification procedures in the various studies, together with geographical and cultural differences and differences in prehospital and hospital treatment.

  11. Traumatic spondyloptosis of L4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian-Hua; Tang, Xun; Xu, Yong-Qing; Zhu, Yue-Liang

    2010-08-01

    Case report of 2 patients with traumatic L4-L5 spondyloptosis. To report the diagnosis and treatment of the traumatic L4-L5 spondyloptosis. Traumatic L4-L5 spondylolisthesis is even rarer than traumatic L5-S1 spondylolisthesis. No case of traumatic L4-L5 spondyloptosis (anterolisthesis of Grade V) has been reported. The injury mechanism and surgery management merit more studies. Through the posterior approach, both of the 2 patients underwent the decompression and reduction with pedicle screws. One had the posterolateral fusion and the interbody fusion from L4-L5 whereas the other had the posterolateral fusion from L4-S1. Complete reduction and fusion were achieved. The neurologic symptoms improved after the surgery. At follow-ups of 1 year and 6.5 years, there was no further slippage of the vertebrae. They were satisfied with the treatment outcomes. Posterior decompression, reduction, internal fixation, and fusion is effective and dependable for traumatic L4-L5 spondyloptosis.

  12. Computational modelling of traumatic brain injury predicts the location of chronic traumatic encephalopathy pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajari, Mazdak; Hellyer, Peter J; Sharp, David J

    2017-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury can lead to the neurodegenerative disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy. This condition has a clear neuropathological definition but the relationship between the initial head impact and the pattern of progressive brain pathology is poorly understood. We test the hypothesis that mechanical strain and strain rate are greatest in sulci, where neuropathology is prominently seen in chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and whether human neuroimaging observations converge with computational predictions. Three distinct types of injury were simulated. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy can occur after sporting injuries, so we studied a helmet-to-helmet impact in an American football game. In addition, we investigated an occipital head impact due to a fall from ground level and a helmeted head impact in a road traffic accident involving a motorcycle and a car. A high fidelity 3D computational model of brain injury biomechanics was developed and the contours of strain and strain rate at the grey matter-white matter boundary were mapped. Diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities in a cohort of 97 traumatic brain injury patients were also mapped at the grey matter-white matter boundary. Fifty-one healthy subjects served as controls. The computational models predicted large strain most prominent at the depths of sulci. The volume fraction of sulcal regions exceeding brain injury thresholds were significantly larger than that of gyral regions. Strain and strain rates were highest for the road traffic accident and sporting injury. Strain was greater in the sulci for all injury types, but strain rate was greater only in the road traffic and sporting injuries. Diffusion tensor imaging showed converging imaging abnormalities within sulcal regions with a significant decrease in fractional anisotropy in the patient group compared to controls within the sulci. Our results show that brain tissue deformation induced by head impact loading is greatest in sulcal locations

  13. Traumatic Brain Injury and Delayed Sequelae: A Review - Traumatic Brain Injury and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Concussion are Precursors to Later-Onset Brain Disorders, Including Early-Onset Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Kiraly

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain injuries are too common. Most people are unaware of the incidence of and horrendous consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI. Research and the advent of sophisticated imaging have led to progression in the understanding of brain pathophysiology following TBI. Seminal evidence from animal and human experiments demonstrate links between TBI and the subsequent onset of premature, psychiatric syndromes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD. Objectives of this summary are, therefore, to instill appreciation regarding the importance of brain injury prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, and to increase awareness regarding the long-term delayed consequences following TBI.

  14. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a neurodegenerative consequence of repetitive traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Patrick T; Montenigro, Philip H; Solomon, Todd M; McKee, Ann C

    2015-02-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that develops as a result of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is characterized by a unique pattern of accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in neurons and astrocytes. The tau abnormalities begin focally and perivascularly at the depths of the cerebral sulci, spread to the superficial layers of the adjacent cortex, and eventually become widespread throughout the medial temporal lobes, diencephalon, and brainstem. Abnormalities in 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein are also found in most cases of CTE. To date, CTE can only be diagnosed by postmortem neuropathological examination, although there are many ongoing research studies examining imaging techniques and biomarkers that might prove to have diagnostic utility. Currently, the incidence and prevalence of CTE are unknown, although great strides are being made to better understand the clinical symptoms and signs of CTE. Further research is critically needed to better identify the genetic and environmental risk factors for CTE as well as potential rehabilitation and therapeutic strategies. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. [Post traumatic partial seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, P; Almárcegui, C; Pablo, M J; Peralta, P; Bernal, M; Valdizán, J R

    Post traumatic epilepsy represents 4% of the prevalence of the disorder and is one of the sequelas which is most difficult to prevent. Risk factors have been described to predict the appearance of seizures. A seven year old boy with a severe head injury was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit. On neuroimaging studies there were multiple foci of contusion, mainly in the left hemisphere, and blood in the III and IV ventricles and frontal horn of the left lateral ventricle. The patient had severe sequelae of head injury with a right spastic hemiplegia and hemiparesia with hypertony of the left side, together with complete blindness of both eyes due to bilateral atrophy of the optic nerve. Serial EEG were done, in which a recording showed alternating periods of hypervoltage grapho elements superimposed on a trace of very low voltage, with continuous activity of low voltage and low frequency. There were no grapho elements with acute morphology. However, the patient had a first partial seizure a year and a half after his head injury. On the EEG an epileptogenic focus was identified in the left hemisphere. Within two years of his head injury he had seven seizures. He had not received prophylactic antiepileptic treatment after the head injury. We report a case of epilepsy secondary to a head injury, in which the first seizure occurred one and a half years after injury. In view of the risk factors, we discuss whether prophylactic anti epileptic treatment might have been beneficial.

  16. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma/Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury : Current State and Emerging Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namas, R.; Ghuma, A.; Hermus, L.; Zamora, R.; Okonkwo, D. O.; Billiar, T. R.; Vodovotz, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury

  17. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Overview Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that's triggered by a terrifying event — either experiencing it or witnessing it. Symptoms may include flashbacks, ...

  18. Subthreshold Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eylem Ozten; Gokben Hizli Sayar

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder is a very broad category among mental disorders. Since its inclusion in DSM-III, the diagnostic criteria of post-traumatic stress disorder has undergone a number of changes...

  19. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as if it were happening again (flashbacks) Upsetting dreams or nightmares about the traumatic event Severe emotional ... aspects of the traumatic event through play Frightening dreams that may or may not include aspects of ...

  20. Mild traumatic brain injury: a risk factor for neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Recently, it has become clear that head trauma can lead to a progressive neurodegeneration known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Although the medical literature also implicates head trauma as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, these findings are predominantly based on clinical diagnostic criteria that lack specificity. The dementia that follows head injuries or repetitive mild trauma may be caused by chronic traumatic encephalopathy, alone or in conjunction with other neurodegenerations (for example, Alzheimer's disease). Prospective longitudinal studies of head-injured individuals, with neuropathological verification, will not only improve understanding of head trauma as a risk factor for dementia but will also enhance treatment and prevention of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20587081

  1. Traumatic and Non-traumatic Knee Complaints in General Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Kastelein, Marlous

    2013-01-01

    textabstractGeneral practitioners (GPs) are frequently consulted by patients with various types of knee complaints. The incidence of these knee complaints presented in Dutch general practice is about 13.7 per 1000 registered patients per year with a prevalence of 19.0 per 1000 patients per year. About 80% of these knee complaints are of non-­‐traumatic origin. The most common non-­‐traumatic diagnosis varies with age; adolescents and young adults suffer mostly from patellofemoral pain syndrom...

  2. Traumatic rupture of diaphragm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, R; Sabanathan, S; Mearns, A J; Choudhury, A K

    1995-11-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture remains a diagnostic challenge, and associated injuries determine the outcome in those diagnosed early, whereas that of latent cases is dependent on the consequence of the diaphragmatic rupture: namely, the diaphragmatic hernia. To analyze the clinical and radiologic features and the therapeutic implications, we reviewed 980 patients reported in the English-language literature. This injury affects predominantly males (male:female = 4:1) in the third decade of life, and is often caused by blunt trauma (75%). There were 1,000 injuries, of which 685 (68.5%) were left-sided, 242 (24.2%) right-sided, 15 (1.5%) bilateral, and 9 (0.9%) pericardial ruptures; 49 cases were unclassified. Chest (43.9%) and splenic (37.6%) trauma were the most common associated injuries. The diagnosis was made preoperatively in 43.5% of cases, whereas in 41.3% it was made at exploration or at autopsy and on the remaining 14.6% of the cases the diagnosis was delayed. The mortality was 17% in those in whom acute diagnosis was made, and the majority of the morbidity in the group that underwent operation was due to pulmonary complications. Uniform diagnosis depends on a high index of suspicion, careful scrutiny of the chest roentgenogram in patients with thoracoabdominal or polytrauma, and meticulous inspection of the diaphragm when operating for concurrent injuries. Repeated evaluation for days after injury is necessary to discern injury in patients not requiring laparotomy. Acute diaphragmatic injuries are best approached through the abdomen, as more than 89% of patients with this injury have an associated intraabdominal injury. Patients with diaphragmatic rupture presenting in the latent phase have adhesion between the herniated abdominal and intrathoracic organs, and thus the rupture is best approached via a thoracotomy.

  3. Knowledge of Traumatic Brain Injury among Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, William J.; Gallo, Adrienne B.; Sellers, Amanda L.; Mulrine, Jessica; MacNamara, Luciana; Abrahamson, Allison; Kneavel, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine knowledge of traumatic brain injury among educators. Few studies have examined knowledge of traumatic brain injury in this population and fewer still have included a substantial proportion of general education teachers. Examining knowledge of traumatic brain injury in educators is important as the vast…

  4. Traumatic Childhood Events and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Newschaffer, Craig J.; Berkowitz, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic childhood events are associated with a wide range of negative physical, psychological and adaptive outcomes over the life course and are one of the few identifiable causes of psychiatric illness. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be at increased risk for both encountering traumatic events and developing traumatic sequelae;…

  5. Clinical presentation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Baugh, Christine M.; Seichepine, Daniel R.; Montenigro, Philip H.; Riley, David O.; Fritts, Nathan G.; Stamm, Julie M.; Robbins, Clifford A.; McHale, Lisa; Simkin, Irene; Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Budson, Andrew E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Cantu, Robert C.; McKee, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to examine the clinical presentation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in neuropathologically confirmed cases. Methods: Thirty-six adult male subjects were selected from all cases of neuropathologically confirmed CTE at the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy brain bank. Subjects were all athletes, had no comorbid neurodegenerative or motor neuron disease, and had next-of-kin informants to provide retrospective reports of the subjects' histories and clinical presentations. These interviews were conducted blind to the subjects' neuropathologic findings. Results: A triad of cognitive, behavioral, and mood impairments was common overall, with cognitive deficits reported for almost all subjects. Three subjects were asymptomatic at the time of death. Consistent with earlier case reports of boxers, 2 relatively distinct clinical presentations emerged, with one group whose initial features developed at a younger age and involved behavioral and/or mood disturbance (n = 22), and another group whose initial presentation developed at an older age and involved cognitive impairment (n = 11). Conclusions: This suggests there are 2 major clinical presentations of CTE, one a behavior/mood variant and the other a cognitive variant. PMID:23966253

  6. Traumatic events and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Sudanese refugees reported the highest number of violent events experienced or witnessed ever and in the past one year. Witnessing of traumatic events, ever and in the past year, significantly predicted PTSD in surveyed population. Sex, age, education and occupation were also significantly associated with the ...

  7. Benefits and risks of anticoagulation resumption following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Liu, Xinggang; Baumgarten, Mona; Langenberg, Patricia; Rattinger, Gail B; Smith, Gordon S; Gambert, Steven R; Gottlieb, Stephen S; Zuckerman, Ilene H

    2014-08-01

    The increased risk of hemorrhage associated with anticoagulant therapy following traumatic brain injury creates a serious dilemma for medical management of older patients: Should anticoagulant therapy be resumed after traumatic brain injury, and if so, when? To estimate the risk of thrombotic and hemorrhagic events associated with warfarin therapy resumption following traumatic brain injury. Retrospective analysis of administrative claims data for Medicare beneficiaries aged at least 65 years hospitalized for traumatic brain injury during 2006 through 2009 who received warfarin in the month prior to injury (n = 10,782). Warfarin use in each 30-day period following discharge after hospitalization for traumatic brain injury. The primary outcomes were hemorrhagic and thrombotic events following discharge after hospitalization for traumatic brain injury. Hemorrhagic events were defined on inpatient claims using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes and included hemorrhagic stroke, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, adrenal hemorrhage, and other hemorrhage. Thrombotic events included ischemic stroke, pulmonary embolism, deep venous thrombosis, and myocardial infarction. A composite of hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke was a secondary outcome. Medicare beneficiaries with traumatic brain injury were predominantly female (64%) and white (92%), with a mean (SD) age of 81.3 (7.3) years, and 82% had atrial fibrillation. Over the 12 months following hospital discharge, 55% received warfarin during 1 or more 30-day periods. We examined the lagged effect of warfarin use on outcomes in the following period. Warfarin use in the prior period was associated with decreased risk of thrombotic events (relative risk [RR], 0.77 [95% CI, 0.67-0.88]) and increased risk of hemorrhagic events (RR, 1.51 [95% CI, 1.29-1.78]). Warfarin use in the prior period was associated with decreased risk of hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke (RR, 0.83 [95% CI, 0

  8. Management of partial traumatic hemipelvectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guodong; Zhou, Dongsheng; Shen, Wun-Jer; Xin, Maoyuan; He, Jiliang; Li, Qinghu; Tan, Guoqing

    2013-11-01

    Partial traumatic hemipelvectomy is a devastating condition. Although by definition the affected limb is not totally transected from the trunk because of retained soft tissue, the reported mortality rate is actually higher than in complete traumatic hemipelvectomy. Between January 2000 and December 2011, a total of 917 patients were admitted to the authors' institution for pelvic fracture. Seven of these patients met the criteria for partial traumatic hemipelvectomy. All 7 patients had multiple associated injuries and met the criteria for Baskett class IV hypovolemic shock on arrival at the emergency department. The amount of bleeding was the greatest issue, and control of hemorrhage and rapid blood transfusion were the initial goals. Abdominal aorta balloon occlusion, laparotomy and packing, and pelvic external fixation were useful to control bleeding. Two patients died during the initial resuscitation phase. Angiography (digital subtraction or computed tomographic) was performed in 4 patients but did not provide any treatment-altering information. Limb preservation was attempted in 2 patients; both of these patients eventually required hindquarter amputation. One patient died, and the second patient survived after a difficult postoperative course. The best results were obtained in 3 patients who underwent completion of the hindquarter amputation within 24 hours of trauma. All patients became wheelchair dependent, and no patient was able to return to work. Early completion of hindquarter amputation after hemorrhaging has been controlled is recommended in patients with partial traumatic hemipelvectomy. Angiography did not prove useful in decision making. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Acute traumatic abdominal wall hernia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. den Hartog (Dennis); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); P.P. Oprel (Pim); P. Patka (Peter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough blunt abdominal trauma is frequent, traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWH) are rare. We describe a large TAWH with associated intra-abdominal lesions that were caused by high-energy trauma. The diagnosis was missed by clinical examination but was subsequently revealed by a

  10. Hypopituitarism in Traumatic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    While hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was previously considered rare, it is now thought to be a major cause of treatable morbidity among TBI survivors. Consequently, recommendations for assessment of pituitary function and replacement in TBI were recently introduced. Given...

  11. The clinical spectrum of sport-related traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Barry D

    2013-04-01

    Acute and chronic sports-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are a substantial public health concern. Various types of acute TBI can occur in sport, but detection and management of cerebral concussion is of greatest importance as mismanagement of this syndrome can lead to persistent or chronic postconcussion syndrome (CPCS) or diffuse cerebral swelling. Chronic TBI encompasses a spectrum of disorders that are associated with long-term consequences of brain injury, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), dementia pugilistica, post-traumatic parkinsonism, post-traumatic dementia and CPCS. CTE is the prototype of chronic TBI, but can only be definitively diagnosed at autopsy as no reliable biomarkers of this disorder are available. Whether CTE shares neuropathological features with CPCS is unknown. Evidence suggests that participation in contact-collision sports may increase the risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease, but the data are conflicting. In this Review, the spectrum of acute and chronic sport-related TBI is discussed, highlighting how examination of athletes involved in high-impact sports has advanced our understanding of pathology of brain injury and enabled improvements in detection and diagnosis of sport-related TBI.

  12. Traumatic lesions of the gingiva: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Swati Y; Claman, Lewis J; Kalmar, John R; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2004-05-01

    The most recent classification of periodontal diseases includes a new section on traumatic gingival lesions. Traumatic lesions of the gingiva are thought to be highly prevalent, yet the periodontal literature contains few references on the topic. The purpose of this article is to present a broad spectrum of traumatic gingival lesions of iatrogenic, accidental, and factitious origin. Twelve clinical cases were selected to document chemical (due to aspirin, snuff, and peroxide), physical (due to malocclusion, flossing, removable partial denture, oral piercing, and self-inflicted trauma), and thermal (due to overheated ultrasonic scaler, hot food, and ice) injury to the gingiva. Chemical, physical, and thermal gingival injuries of iatrogenic, accidental, or factitious origin can have a variety of presentations with overlapping clinical features. Although the appearance and associated symptoms of a gingival lesion may be suggestive of a particular traumatic etiology, useful or confirmatory diagnostic information is often discovered through careful history-taking. The management of gingival injuries typically requires elimination of the insult and symptomatic therapy. If permanent gingival defects resulted from the injury, periodontal plastic surgery may be necessary. A variety of chemical, physical, and thermal injuries may involve the gingiva. Accidental and iatrogenic injuries are often acute and self-limiting, while factitious injuries tend to be more chronic in nature.

  13. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Impact on Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgano, Michael A; Cantu, Robert; Chin, Lawrence S

    2016-03-14

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a devastating neuropsychological condition afflicting a small percentage of athletes partaking in high-impact sports. The onset of symptoms lags years behind the inciting events. Repetitive minor head injuries are felt to be the main etiology behind CTE. Routine radiographic imaging generally is unremarkable in cases of CTE. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are advanced MRI-based sequences that have shown promise in detecting early radiographic findings that may be reflective of CTE. Progressive neuronal loss is the histopathological hallmark of this neurodegenerative disease. Strategizing earlier detection techniques is paramount in delivering optimal care to athletes afflicted with CTE.

  14. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis can be classified into fibrous, fibro-osseous and bony ankylosis. It is still a huge challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons due to the technical difficulty and high incidence of recurrence. The poor outcome of disease may be partially attributed to the limited understanding of its pathogenesis. The purpose of this article was to comprehensively review the literature and summarise results from both human and animal studies related to the genesis of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25189735

  15. Post-traumatic Acalculous Cholecystitis; a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Shojaee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Acalculous cholecystitis, is a rare disease with a high morbidity and mortality, which is developed due to various reasons, including trauma and burn. Its diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion and physical examination. Ultrasonography and computed tomography scan can help in this regard. This report presents a case of post-traumatic acalculous cholecystitis in a 75-year-old patient expressing its method of diagnosis, treatment and outcome.

  16. The value of the identification of predisposing factors for post-traumatic amnesia in management of mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotakopoulos, George; Makris, Demosthenes; Tsianaka, Eleni; Kotlia, Polikceni; Karakitsios, Paulos; Gatos, Charalabos; Tzannis, Alkiviadis; Fountas, Kostas

    2018-02-05

    To identify the risk factors for post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) and to document the incidence of PTA after mild traumatic brain injuries. This was a prospective study, affecting mild TBI (mTBI) (Glasgow Coma Scale 14-15) cases attending to the Emergency Department between January 2009 and April 2012 (40 months duration). Patients were divided into two groups (Group A: without PTA, and Group B: with PTA, and they were assessed according to the risk factors. A total of 1762 patients (males: 1002, 56.8%) were meeting study inclusion criteria [Group A: n = 1678 (83.8%), Group B: n = 84 (4.2%)]. Age, CT findings: (traumatic focal HCs in the frontal and temporal lobes or more diffuse punctate HCs, and skull base fractures), anticoagulation therapy and seizures were independent factors of PTA. There was no statistically significant correlation between PTA and sex, convexity fractures, stroke event, mechanism of mTBI (fall +/or beating), hypertension, coronary heart disease, chronic smokers and diabetes (p > 0.005). CT findings: (traumatic focal HCs in the frontal and temporal lobes or more diffuse punctate HCs and skull base fractures), age, seizures and anticoagulation/antiplatelet therapy, were independent factors of PTA and could be used as predictive factors after mTBI.

  17. Sequential pharmacotherapy with magnesium chloride and basic fibroblast growth factor after fluid percussion brain injury results in less neuromotor efficacy than that achieved with magnesium alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guluma, K Z; Saatman, K E; Brown, A; Raghupathi, R; McIntosh, T K

    1999-04-01

    Combinational pharmacotherapy with individually efficacious agents is a potential strategy for the treatment of traumatic central nervous system (CNS) injury. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) has been shown to be neuroprotective against excitotoxic, ischemic, and traumatic injury to the CNS, while acute posttraumatic treatment with magnesium (Mg2+) has been shown to decrease the motor and cognitive deficits following experimental brain injury. In this study, bFGF and Mg2+ were evaluated separately and in combination to assess their potential additive effects on posttraumatic neurological recovery and histological cell loss (lesion volume). Twenty minutes after fluid percussion (FP) brain injury of moderate severity (2.2-2.4 atm), anesthetized rats received a 15-min intravenous infusion of either 125 mumol of MgCl2 or vehicle, followed 5 min later by a 24-h constant intravenous infusion of either bFGF (16 micrograms/h) or vehicle. Injured animals had a significant motor deficit when compared to sham (uninjured) animals at both 48 h and 7 days postinjury. At 48 h postinjury, there were no significant differences among injured animals when compared by treatment. By 7 days postinjury, injured animals treated with MgCl2 alone displayed significantly improved motor function when compared to brain-injured, vehicle-treated animals (p < 0.05). Animals treated with either bFGF alone or a combination of MgCl2 and bFGF displayed no significant neurological improvement relative to vehicle-treated injured animals at 7 days. No effect of any drug treatment of combination was observed on the extent of the postinjury lesion volume in the injured cortex. These results suggest that caution must be exercised when combining "cocktails" of potentially neuroprotective compounds in the setting of traumatic brain injury.

  18. A relação entre posicionamento do prematuro no Método Mãe-Canguru e desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor precoce Relationship between positioning of premature infants in Kangaroo Mother Care and early neuromotor development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Barradas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar as posturas adotadas pelos prematuros em decúbito ventral (DV e lateral (DL no Método Mãe-Canguru, relacionando-as com o desenvolvimento neuromotor precoce da criança. MÉTODOS: Uma amostra de 80 bebês prematuros, nascidos no Instituto Materno-Infantil de Pernambuco e que permaneceram na Unidade Mãe-Canguru no período de julho a outubro de 2004, foi dividida em dois grupos. Um grupo de 40 bebês foi posicionado em DV, e o outro, também de 40 bebês, em DL. Ambas as amostras foram homogêneas entre si. Os bebês foram avaliados no dia da admissão na Unidade Mãe-Canguru e no dia da alta, através de uma avaliação biomecânica do posicionamento no canguru e do exame neurocomportamental de Dubowitz. A análise estatística dos resultados foi realizada pelo programa Epi-Info versão 6.04; o intervalo de confiança foi de 95%, sendo p significante quando apresentava valor inferior a 0,05. RESULTADOS: Os resultados da pesquisa demonstram que as amostram foram homogêneas entre si e que os bebês em DL assumiram uma postura de maior flexão, associada a um maior enrolamento do tronco. Além disso, esses bebês apresentaram evolução em 13 dos 16 itens avaliados no exame de Dubowitz, enquanto o grupo DV apresentou evolução em 5 dos 16 itens avaliados. CONCLUSÃO: Observou-se que a posição em DL trouxe maiores benefícios com relação ao desenvolvimento neuromotor precoce dos bebês que compuseram a amostra. Porém, a realização de novos estudos de acompanhamento a longo prazo é importante.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between prone and lateral positioning of preterm infants in Kangaroo Mother Care and early neuromotor development. METHODS: Eighty preterm infants born at Instituto Materno-Infantil de Pernambuco, Brazil, admitted to the Kangaroo Mother Care Unit between July and October 2004 were divided into two groups. Forty infants was placed in prone position (PP, while the remaining 40 children were

  19. The military's approach to traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Grimes, Jamie; Ecklund, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are common conditions. In Iraq and Afghanistan, explosive blast related TBI became prominent among US service members but the vast majority of TBI was still due to typical causes such as falls and sporting events. PTS has long been a focus of the US military mental health providers. Combat Stress Teams have been integral to forward deployed units since the beginning of the Global War on Terror. Military medical management of disease and injury follows standard of care clinical practice guidelines (CPG) established by civilian counterparts. However, when civilian CPGs do not exist or are not applicable to the military environment, new practice standards are created. Such is the case for mild TBI. In 2009, the VA-DoD CPG for management of mild TBI/concussion was published and a system-wide clinical care program for mild TBI/concussion was introduced. This was the first large scale effort on an entire medical care system to address all severities of TBI in a comprehensive organized way. In 2010, the VA-DoD CPG for management of PTSD was published. Nevertheless, both TBI and PTS are still incompletely understood. Investment in terms of money and effort has been committed by the DoD to their study. The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury are prominent examples of this effort. These are just beginnings, a work in progress ready to leverage advances made scientifically and always striving to provide the very best care to its military beneficiaries.

  20. The impact of occupational hazards and traumatic events among Belgian emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somville, Francis J; De Gucht, Véronique; Maes, Stan

    2016-04-27

    , confronted on a regular basis with significant, potentially traumatizing work related events. There is a higher perception of traumatic events in older Eps. We find out that 36 % of the EPs find dealing with sudden death of a young person and traumatic accident/disease involving a young person the most traumatic experience during their work activity. Three quarter of these EPs have children of their own. The results of the study show that frequency of exposure to traumatic (work) events contributes next to occurrence of situations that increase the risk of burnout to the explanation of variance in posttraumatic stress and psychological distress. The novelty of this study is that it explores the effect of specific determinants of PTSS, psychological distress, fatigue, somatic complaints and job satisfaction in Emergency Physicians. Especially occurrence of situations that increase the risk of burnout seems to have a major impact on all outcomes including job satisfaction, while occurrence of violence contributes especially to psychological distress and perceived fatigue. Lack of social support is a well-known predictor of occupational stress in emergency care workers. In contrast however, good social support of colleagues at work, as we found in our study, can facilitate the recovery process after confrontation with traumatic events and occupational hazards. Emergency Physicians are particularly vulnerable to post-traumatic stress and chronic stress consequences due to repetitive exposure to work related traumatic events. Training in dealing with violence and situations that can increase the risk of burnout can reduce detrimental consequences in emergency physicians. In addition, it is suggested that emergency units are screened systematically on determinants of burnout, in view of interventions. Finally, creating a supportive work environment and training the medical staff in supportive skills with backup by experts may also reduce adverse consequences of confrontation with

  1. Acute traumatic abdominal wall hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Hartog, Dennis; Tuinebreijer, Wim; Oprel, Pim; Patka, Peter

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough blunt abdominal trauma is frequent, traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWH) are rare. We describe a large TAWH with associated intra-abdominal lesions that were caused by high-energy trauma. The diagnosis was missed by clinical examination but was subsequently revealed by a computed tomography (CT) scan. Repair consisted of an open anatomical reconstruction of the abdominal wall layers with reinforcement by an intraperitoneal composite mesh. The patient recovered well and...

  2. The Pathogenesis of Traumatic Coagulopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    giving 96 © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland Anaesthesia 2015, 70 (Suppl. 1), 96–101 doi:10.1111/anae.12914 Report...The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland 97 Cap and Hunt | Pathogenesis of traumatic coagulopathy Anaesthesia 2015, 70 (Suppl. 1...PA release from the endothelium by 98 © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland Anaesthesia 2015, 70 (Suppl. 1), 96–101

  3. A critical review of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Grant L; Gardner, Andrew J; McCrory, Paul; Zafonte, Ross; Castellani, Rudy J

    2015-09-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been described in the literature as a neurodegenerative disease with: (i) localized neuronal and glial accumulations of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) involving perivascular areas of the cerebral cortex, sulcal depths, and with a preference for neurons within superficial cortical laminae; (ii) multifocal axonal varicosities and axonal loss involving deep cortex and subcortical white matter; (iii) relative absence of beta-amyloid deposits; (iv) TDP-43 immunoreactive inclusions and neurites; and (v) broad and diverse clinical features. Some of the pathological findings reported in the literature may be encountered with age and other neurodegenerative diseases. However, the focality of the p-tau cortical findings in particular, and the regional distribution, are believed to be unique to CTE. The described clinical features in recent cases are very similar to how depression manifests in middle-aged men and with frontotemporal dementia as the disease progresses. It has not been established that the described tau pathology, especially in small amounts, can cause complex changes in behavior such as depression, substance abuse, suicidality, personality changes, or cognitive impairment. Future studies will help determine the extent to which the neuropathology is causally related to the diverse clinical features. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Traumatic injuries in revue dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanke, Eileen M; Arendt, Michael; Mill, Helmgard; Koch, Franziska; Wanke, Alice; Groneberg, David A

    2014-03-01

    Revue productions are a combination of dancing and singing, musical and spoken sequences, and acrobatics, performed with or without a story line, and characterized by a versatility of dance styles and a high number of performances (over 250 in a 10-month season). The aim of this quantitative single cohort study is to evaluate work-related traumatic injuries in this dance genre. Data were obtained from work accident reports of the German Social Accident Insurance Institution for the public sector in Berlin (UKB) involving 440 revue dancers (183 males and 257 females). Analysis was conducted with Excel 2007 and PASW Statistics 18. One out of three female dancers and one out of two male dancers sustained an acute injury in the course of a theatrical season (0.22 injuries per 1,000 hours). The incidence rate was 0.44 for males and 0.31 for females, with the lower extremity as the most commonly injured body region, followed by the spine. Of all occupational accidents, 75.1% happened on stage, with 69% during performances. The dance partner and dance floor were the most common exogenous factors resulting in a traumatic injury. Of all traumatic injuries, 81.7% occurred in the first 3 hours after starting work. Gender specific differences could be observed. Due to the limited availability of comparable studies of other forms of professional dance, in this study revue dance is largely considered as an independent genre.

  5. Traumatic brain lesions in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nícollas Nunes Rabelo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The neonatal period is a highly vulnerable time for an infant. The high neonatal morbidity and mortality rates attest to the fragility of life during this period. The incidence of birth trauma is 0.8%, varying from 0.2-2 per 1,000 births. The aim of this study is to describe brain traumas, and their mechanism, anatomy considerations, and physiopathology of the newborn traumatic brain injury. Methods A literature review using the PubMed data base, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Direct, The Cochrane Database, Google Scholar, and clinical trials. Selected papers from 1922 to 2016 were studied. We selected 109 papers, through key-words, with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Discussion This paper discusses the risk factors for birth trauma, the anatomy of the occipito-anterior and vertex presentation, and traumatic brain lesions. Conclusion Birth-related traumatic brain injury may cause serious complications in newborn infants. Its successful management includes special training, teamwork, and an individual approach.

  6. An audit of traumatic nerve injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, G

    2009-07-01

    The impact of trauma in the Irish healthcare setting is considerable. We present the results of a retrospective assessment of referrals to a Neurophysiology department for suspected traumatic nerve injury. A broad range of traumatic neuropathies was demonstrated on testing, from numerous causes. We demonstrate an increased liklihood of traumatic nerve injury after fracture \\/ dislocation (p = 0.007). Our series demonstrates the need for clinicians to be aware of the possibility of nerve injury post trauma, especially after bony injury.

  7. Traumatic bone cyst mimicking radicular cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, Onur; Kose, Taha Emre; Cankaya, Abdulkadir Burak; Aybar, Buket

    2012-12-09

    Traumatic bone cysts were first defined by Lucas and Blum in 1929. It is classified as an intraosseous pseudocyst. They are asymptomatic and are usually seen during routine radiographical examination. According to the 2002 classification of the WHO, traumatic bone cysts are in miscellaneous lesions. This report describes a 16-year-old male patient who had a traumatic bone cyst that mimicked a radicular cyst.

  8. Traumatic hemipelvectomy (amputae: Report of one case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Errol U. Hutagalung

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic hemipelvectomy (amputae is a catastrophic injury resulting front violent shearing forces which avulsed the lower limb at the level sacroiliac joint and symphisis pubis. Patients surviving traumatic hemipelvectomy are rare. One case of a 25 months old girl surviving traumatic hemipelvectomy, is presented. This is the first case reported from Indonesia. (Med J Indones 2001; 10: 169-73Keywords: Colostomy, skin graft, traffic accident

  9. Traumatic grief and traumatic stress in survivors 12 years after the genocide in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutabaruka, Jean; Séjourné, Nathalène; Bui, Eric; Birmes, Philippe; Chabrol, Henri

    2012-10-01

    The relationship between exposure to traumatic events and traumatic grief and the role of mediating and moderating variables [peritraumatic distress, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and symptoms of depression] were studied in survivors of the genocide of Batutsi in Rwanda in 1994. One hundred and two survivors (70 women, mean age 45 ± 7.53 years) participated in this retrospective study. All of them had lost a member of their family. The severity of traumatic exposure (Comprehensive Trauma Inventory), peritraumatic distress (Peritraumatic Distress Inventory), current PTSD symptoms (PTSD Checklist), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory) and traumatic grief symptoms (Inventory of Traumatic Grief) was evaluated. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was then conducted to examine the relative contribution of each variable to the symptoms of traumatic grief. The severity of traumatic exposure was related to traumatic grief symptoms (B=0.06, R=0.6, R(2) =0.36 and ß=0.6, t=7.54, p=0.00). The Baron and Kenny procedure (1986) (including three separate regressions), along with the Sobel test, was used to test mediation effects. Peritraumatic distress and PTSD symptoms may be mediating variables between traumatic exposure and traumatic grief. Traumatic grief is a complex but assessable entity, where previous distress and suffering result from both psychological trauma and the loss of a loved one. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The influence of occupational debriefing on post-traumatic stress symptomatology in traumatized police officers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlier, I. V.; Voerman, A. E.; Gersons, B. P.

    2000-01-01

    Certain individuals, such as police officers, are exposed to traumatic events as part of their occupational roles. In an effort to prevent psychological illnesses, notably the post-traumatic stress disorder, from arising out of work-related traumatic incidents, psychological interventions have been

  11. A study of the traumatic bone cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kyung Ran; Park, Won Kyl; Ko, Jae Kyeung; Kim, Young Jin [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kyangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-15

    Traumatic bone cyst is a pathologic cavity that is not lined with epithelium. It is, therefore, not a true cyst. It may be a normal variant rather than a disease process. The etiology of the condition is unknown. This condition is occurred widely ranging ages(2 to 75 years), however, most are found during the second decade of life. Radiographically, this condition is radiolucent lesion with well-defined outline, scalloping of superior margins. Cyst enucleation and curettage is the treatment of choice. The authors compared and analyzed the clinicoradiologic features of the five cases of traumatic bone cyst, diagnosed at the Dental college hospital in Chosun University, Kwangju, Korea. The five cases were shown the followed results; 1. 3 cases occurred in second decade of life and no significant sex differences (M:F, 2:3) All cases occurred in mandible. 2. Two patients complained symptoms, but three cases had no symptom with encountering during routine examination. 3. In 3 of 5 cases, teeth vitality existed except one tooth and no checking of teeth vitality in two cases. 4. All cases didn't have any accurate trauma history, but one case was in orthodontic treatment, another case was postextraction site area. 5. Radiologically, 'scalloping appearance' were evident in all cases; in 3 cases, multilocular tendency and only one case seen intact mandibular canal image. 6. Histologically, all section showed bone trabeculae with ballistic activity, 2 cases showed no epithelial lining, and other 2 cases were seen inflammatory cell infiltration in edematous tissue. 7. Surgical intervention (curettage) was that treatment of choice.

  12. Traumatic brain injury complicated by environmental hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermstad Erik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature variations after traumatic brain injury are common and devastating. This has been shown most clearly with hypothermia, but the complications associated with hyperthermia in the setting of traumatic brain injury can be just as problematic. We present the case of a soldier with traumatic brain injury exposed to environmental temperatures of 115-120° F with a core temperature of over 108° F. The complications of his conditions are discussed as well as potential treatments for the deadly combination of traumatic brain injury and environmental hyperthermia.

  13. Defense Health: Coordinating Authority Needed for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    signs of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, or other manifestations of neurodegeneration, as well as epilepsy , in such members, in coordination...and the development of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and other neurodegenerative disorders, as well as epilepsy . 11. To develop and...Treatment of PTSD in OIF/OEF Veterans 1 Acupuncture as a Novel Technique for Treating Insomnia in the Outpatient Traumatic Brain Injury Population

  14. [Traumatic hip dislocations in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, K; Trigui, M; Gdoura, F; Elleuch, B; Zribi, M; Keskes, H

    2008-02-01

    Traumatic hip dislocation is a rare event in children. Appropriate management remains a subject of debate. The purpose of this study was to investigate the epidemiological, therapeutic features of this situation and the long-term outcome after treatment. This was a retrospective analysis of 15 traumatic hip dislocations collected over a period of 20 years in pediatric patients with at least two years follow-up. We searched for predisposing factors and factors affecting prognosis. The series included 11 boys and three girls, mean age eight years. Dislocation was posterior in 13 hips and anterior in two. Time to reduction was less than 3h in eight cases, 3-6h in five and greater than 6h in two. After reduction, traction was performed in nine children, for 20 days on average, followed in five cases by immobilization for 40 days on average. Five hips were immobilized directly after reduction. We identified two groups by age: group 1 with dislocations in children aged less than six years (seven children) were characterized by low-energy trauma. Dislocation was not associated with other lesions. Predisposing factors (overt ligament hyperlaxity, insufficient superolateral head cover, coax valga) were noted in six children. Reduction was simple. Later treatment consisted in immobilization with a pelvispedious cast for 30-45 days. Group 2 were dislocations in children aged over six years (seven children) victims of high-energy trauma. Associated injuries were frequent. Predisposing factors were not present. At mean 11 years follow-up, all hips are considered normal clinically. The radiograph was normal for 14 hips. In one case, there was a slight coax magna. In three patients, defective femoral head cover persisted. Coxa valga persisted in two patients. Traumatic dislocation of the hip joint is rare in very young children, but results from a minimally traumatic event. This suggests the presence of predisposing factors in this category of patients, particularly

  15. The neuropathology and neurobiology of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2012-12-06

    The acute and long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received increased attention in recent years. In this Review, we discuss the neuropathology and neural mechanisms associated with TBI, drawing on findings from sports-induced TBI in athletes, in whom acute TBI damages axons and elicits both regenerative and degenerative tissue responses in the brain and in whom repeated concussions may initiate a long-term neurodegenerative process called dementia pugilistica or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We also consider how the neuropathology and neurobiology of CTE in many ways resembles other neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease, particularly with respect to mismetabolism and aggregation of tau, β-amyloid, and TDP-43. Finally, we explore how translational research in animal models of acceleration/deceleration types of injury relevant for concussion together with clinical studies employing imaging and biochemical markers may further elucidate the neurobiology of TBI and CTE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical features of repetitive traumatic brain injury and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenigro, Philip H; Bernick, Charles; Cantu, Robert C

    2015-05-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a distinct pattern of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau). Thought to be caused by repetitive concussive and subconcussive injuries, CTE is considered largely preventable. The majority of neuropathologically confirmed cases have occurred in professional contact sport athletes (eg, boxing, football). A recent post-mortem case series has magnified concerns for the public's health following its identification in six high school level athletes. CTE is diagnosed with certainty only following a post-mortem autopsy. Efforts to define the etiology and clinical progression during life are ongoing. The goal of this article is to characterize the clinical concepts associated with short- and long-term effects of repetitive traumatic brain injury, with a special emphasis on new clinical diagnostic criteria for CTE. Utilizing these new diagnostic criteria, two cases of neuropathologically confirmed CTE, one in a professional football player and one in a professional boxer, are reported. Differences in cerebellar pathology in CTE confirmed cases in boxing and football are discussed. © 2015 International Society of Neuropathology.

  17. Exposure to war traumatic experiences, post-traumatic stress disorder and post-traumatic growth among nurses in Gaza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamia, N A; Thabet, A A M; Vostanis, P

    2015-12-01

    What is known on the subject? This study builds on existing research on war-related factors that may affect health-care staff by particularly focusing on trauma exposure in both professional and everyday life, as well as on correlates of later positive psychological changes. What this paper adds to existing knowledge? It shows that one in five nursing staff working in Gaza experienced post-traumatic stress symptoms within the clinical range, 2 years after an incursion on Gaza and after being exposed to substantial trauma during this period. Participants appeared to develop a variety of post-traumatic growth responses following trauma exposure. Although nurses experienced traumatic events both as civilians and in their health-care capacity, personal exposure was strongly associated with PTSD symptoms. What are the implications for practice? Support to nursing and other health-care professionals in war situations should entail different levels, remain available well after an acute conflict, and take into consideration both personal and practice-related traumatic events. Mental health nursing practitioners can play a pivotal role in this. To establish the association between war traumatic experiences, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and post-traumatic growth among nurses in the Gaza Strip, 2 years after an incursion on Gaza, and during a period of ongoing trauma exposure. This study builds on existing evidence by considering exposure to personal and work-related traumatic events, and on factors associated with later positive psychological adaptation. The sample consisted of 274 randomly selected nurses in Gaza who completed the Gaza Traumatic Events Checklist, PTSD Checklist, and Posttraumatic Growth Inventory. Of the nurses, 19.7% reported full PTSD. There was a significant relationship between traumatic events and PTSD scores; as well as between community-related traumatic events and post-traumatic growth. Participants reported a range of traumatic

  18. The neuropathology of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C; Stein, Thor D; Kiernan, Patrick T; Alvarez, Victor E

    2015-05-01

    Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Most instances of CTE occur in association with the play of sports, but CTE has also been reported in association with blast injuries and other neurotrauma. Symptoms of CTE include behavioral and mood changes, memory loss, cognitive impairment and dementia. Like many other neurodegenerative diseases, CTE is diagnosed with certainty only by neuropathological examination of brain tissue. CTE is a tauopathy characterized by the deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein as neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles and neurites in striking clusters around small blood vessels of the cortex, typically at the sulcal depths. Severely affected cases show p-tau pathology throughout the brain. Abnormalities in phosphorylated 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein are found in most cases of CTE; beta-amyloid is identified in 43%, associated with age. Given the importance of sports participation and physical exercise to physical and psychological health as well as disease resilience, it is critical to identify the genetic risk factors for CTE as well as to understand how other variables, such as stress, age at exposure, gender, substance abuse and other exposures, contribute to the development of CTE. © 2015 International Society of Neuropathology.

  19. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurodegenerative proteinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carmela Tartaglia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is described as a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease believed to result from multiple concussions. Traditionally, concussions were considered benign events and although most people recover fully, about 10% develop a post-concussive syndrome with persisting neurological, cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms. CTE was once thought to be unique to boxers, but it has now been observed in many different athletes having suffered multiple concussions as well as in military personal after repeated blast injuries. Much remains unknown about the development of CTE but its pathological substrate is usually tau, similar to that seen in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The aim of this perspective is to compare and contrast clinical and pathological CTE with the other neurodegenerative proteinopathies and highlight that there is an urgent need for understanding the relationship between concussion and the development of CTE as it may provide a window into the development of a proteinopathy and thus new avenues for treatment.

  20. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Javidi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Unexpected extreme sudden traumatic stressor may cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Important traumatic events include war, violent personal assault (e.g., sexual assault, and physical attack, being taken hostage or kidnapped, confinement as a prisoner of war, torture, terrorist attack, severe car accidents, and natural disasters. In childhood age sexual abuse or witnessing serious injuries or unexpected death of a beloved one are among important traumatic events. PTSD can be categorized into two types of acute and chronic PTSD: if symptoms persist for less than three months, it is termed “acute PTSD,” otherwise, it is called “chronic PTSD.” 60.7% of men and 51.2% of women would experience at least one potentially traumatic event in their lifetime. The lifetime prevalence of PTSD is significantly higher in women than men. Lifetime prevalence of PTSD varies from 0.3% in China to 6.1% in New Zealand. The prevalence of PTSD in crime victims are between 19% and 75%; rates as high as 80% have been reported following rape. The prevalence of PTSD among direct victims of disasters was reported to be 30%–40%; the rate in rescue workers was 10%–20%. The prevalence of PTSD among police, fire, and emergency service workers ranged from 6%–32%. An overall prevalence rate of 4% for the general population, the rate in rescue/recovery occupations ranged from 5% to 32%, with the highest rate reported in search and rescue personnel (25%, firefighters (21%, and workers with no prior training for facing disaster. War is one of the most intense stressors known to man. Armed forces have a higher prevalence of depression, anxiety disorders, alcohol abuse and PTSD. High-risk children who have been abused or experienced natural disasters may have an even higher prevalence of PTSD than adults. Female gender, previous psychiatric problem, intensity and nature of exposure to the traumatic event, and lack of social support are known risk factors for

  1. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidi, H; Yadollahie, M

    2012-01-01

    Unexpected extreme sudden traumatic stressor may cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Important traumatic events include war, violent personal assault (e.g., sexual assault, and physical attack), being taken hostage or kidnapped, confinement as a prisoner of war, torture, terrorist attack, severe car accidents, and natural disasters. In childhood age sexual abuse or witnessing serious injuries or unexpected death of a beloved one are among important traumatic events.PTSD can be categorized into two types of acute and chronic PTSD: if symptoms persist for less than three months, it is termed "acute PTSD," otherwise, it is called "chronic PTSD." 60.7% of men and 51.2% of women would experience at least one potentially traumatic event in their lifetime. The lifetime prevalence of PTSD is significantly higher in women than men. Lifetime prevalence of PTSD varies from 0.3% in China to 6.1% in New Zealand. The prevalence of PTSD in crime victims are between 19% and 75%; rates as high as 80% have been reported following rape. The prevalence of PTSD among direct victims of disasters was reported to be 30%-40%; the rate in rescue workers was 10%-20%. The prevalence of PTSD among police, fire, and emergency service workers ranged from 6%-32%. An overall prevalence rate of 4% for the general population, the rate in rescue/recovery occupations ranged from 5% to 32%, with the highest rate reported in search and rescue personnel (25%), firefighters (21%), and workers with no prior training for facing disaster. War is one of the most intense stressors known to man. Armed forces have a higher prevalence of depression, anxiety disorders, alcohol abuse and PTSD. High-risk children who have been abused or experienced natural disasters may have an even higher prevalence of PTSD than adults.Female gender, previous psychiatric problem, intensity and nature of exposure to the traumatic event, and lack of social support are known risk factors for work-related PTSD. Working with

  2. Secondary Traumatic Stress in Substance Abuse Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bride, Brian E.; Walls, Erin

    2006-01-01

    The terms secondary traumatic stress (STS), vicarious traumatization (VT), and compassion fatigue (CF) have all been used, sometimes interchangeably, to refer to the observation that those who provide clinical services to trauma survivors may themselves experience considerable emotional disruption, becoming indirect victims of the trauma.…

  3. The Effects of Traumatic and Abusive Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzeck, Tricia L.; Rokach, Ami; Chin, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to understand what constitutes a traumatic relationship experience for adults in abusive intimate relationships and what effects, losses, and coping strategies were the most salient for these participants. A total of 101 individuals (42 males, 59 females) who reported experiencing an abusive or traumatic relationship…

  4. Traumatic Bonding: Clinical Implications in Incest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deYoung, Mary; Lowry, Judith A.

    1992-01-01

    "Traumatic bonding" is defined as "the evolution of emotional dependency between...a child and an adult [in] a relationship characterized by periodic sexual abuse." Maintains that the concept holds promise for explaining confusing dynamics of incest. Demonstrates ways in which traumatic bonding can be applied to cases of incest…

  5. Disease: H00329 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available so recognized as an infrequent cause of non-gastrointestinal infections such as ocular infections, septicemia, meningitis, endocardit...is, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. Infectious disease

  6. Traumatic injuries of the hip.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marshall, Nina

    2009-11-01

    Traumatic lesions of the hip in athletes may be clinically challenging because of the overlap in clinical presentation due to differing pathologies and the presence of multiple injuries. Imaging of the hip in the athlete has undergone a recent resurgence of interest and understanding related to the increasing accessibility and use of hip arthroscopy, which expands the treatment options available for intra-articular pathology. MR imaging and MR arthrography have a unique role in diagnosis of these pathologies, guiding the surgeon, arthroscopist, and referring clinician in their management of bony and soft tissue injury.

  7. Traumatic olecranon bursitis. Radiologic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, M; Canoso, J J

    1982-01-01

    The affected elbow of 28 patients with traumatic olecranon bursitis was radiographically compared with the homologous elbow of 28 matched controls. Olecranon spurs, amorphous calcium deposits, or both, were present in 16 patients and 4 controls (p less than 0.01). Air was injected in the bursa in 12 additional patients. Nodules in the bursal floor were noted in 10, and the bursa was partially septated in 8. Olecranon spurs, present in 6 patients, corresponded to the insertion of the triceps tendon. With elbow flexion the bursa flattened and lengthened while the olecranon process glided distally beneath the bursal floor.

  8. Traumatic olecranon bursitis. Radiologic observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, M.; Canoso, J.J. (Radiology and Medical Services, Boston Veterans Administration Medical Center, MA, USA)

    1982-01-01

    The affected elbow of 28 patients with traumatic olecranon bursitis was radiographically compared with the homologous elbow of 28 matched controls. Olecranon spurs, amorphous calcium deposits, or both, were present in 16 patients and 4 controls (p<0.01). Air was injected in the bursa in 12 additional patients. Nodules in the bursal floor were noted in 10, and the bursa was partially septated in 8. Olecranon spurs, present in 6 patients, corresponded to the insertion of the triceps tendon. With elbow flexion the bursa flattened and lengthened while the olecranon process glided distally beneath the bursal floor.

  9. Linking traumatic brain injury to chronic traumatic encephalopathy: identification of potential mechanisms leading to neurofibrillary tangle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon Peter; Turner, Ryan Coddington; Logsdon, Aric Flint; Bailes, Julian Edwin; Huber, Jason Delwyn; Rosen, Charles Lee

    2014-07-01

    Significant attention has recently been drawn to the potential link between head trauma and the development of neurodegenerative disease, namely chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The acute neurotrauma associated with sports-related concussions in athletes and blast-induced traumatic brain injury in soldiers elevates the risk for future development of chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as CTE. CTE is a progressive disease distinguished by characteristic tau neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and, occasionally, transactive response DNA binding protein 43 (TDP43) oligomers, both of which have a predilection for perivascular and subcortical areas near reactive astrocytes and microglia. The disease is currently only diagnosed postmortem by neuropathological identification of NFTs. A recent workshop sponsored by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke emphasized the need for premortem diagnosis, to better understand disease pathophysiology and to develop targeted treatments. In order to accomplish this objective, it is necessary to discover the mechanistic link between acute neurotrauma and the development of chronic neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders such as CTE. In this review, we briefly summarize what is currently known about CTE development and pathophysiology, and subsequently discuss injury-induced pathways that warrant further investigation. Understanding the mechanistic link between acute brain injury and chronic neurodegeneration will facilitate the development of appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic options for CTE and other related disorders.

  10. Counseling athletes on the risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, Leah G; Kaufman, Marla S; Herring, Stanley A

    2014-09-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a rare progressive neurologic disorder that can manifest as a combination of cognitive, mood and behavioral, and neurologic symptoms. Despite clinically apparent symptoms, there is no imaging or other diagnostic test that can confirm diagnosis in living subjects. Diagnosis can only be confirmed postmortem by specific histopathologic features within the brain tissue identified on autopsy. CTE represents a unique tauopathy that is distinct from other neurodegenerative diseases. PubMed was searched from 1990 to 2013 for sport concussion and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Articles were also identified from bibliographies of recent reviews and consensus statements. Clinical review. Level 5. Although CTE is postulated to occur as a result of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury, the specific etiology and risk factors have not yet been elucidated, and postmortem diagnosis makes causality difficult to determine. When counseling athletes and families about the potential association of recurrent concussions and the development of CTE, discussion of proper management of concussion is cornerstone. Unfortunately, to date, there is no equipment that can prevent concussions; however, rule changes and legislation may decrease the risk. It is imperative that return to play is medically supervised by a provider trained in the management of concussion and begins only once symptoms have resolved. In addition, athletes with permanent symptoms should be retired from contact sport.

  11. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Athletes Involved with High-impact Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safinia, Cyrus; Bershad, Eric M; Clark, H Brent; SantaCruz, Karen; Alakbarova, Naila; Suarez, Jose I; Divani, Afshin A

    2016-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease occurring most commonly in athletes and is caused by repeated concussive or subconcussive blows to the head. The main purpose of this review is to evaluate the published literature on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in athletes participating in high-impact sports. In particular, we highlight the significance of concussive and subconcussive impacts in multiple sports, elucidate the differences between clinical/pathological features of CTE and related neurodegenerative diseases, and provide an explanation for the variation in clinical presentation between athletes of different sports. A review targeting relevant publications to CTE was performed. The PubMed/MEDLINE index was searched for keywords such as "chronic traumatic encephalopathy," "repetitive traumatic brain injury," "mild traumatic brain injury," and "concussion" from year 1924 through March 1, 2016. A consensus panel's recent identification of a pathognomonic pathology in CTE, characterized by an irregular distribution of phosphorylated tau deposits, is an important step in developing consensus diagnostic criteria and clinicopathological studies. After review of major clinical studies, evidence suggests that there are clear differences in neuropathological features, clinical progression, and manifestation of symptoms between CTE and other neurodegenerative diseases. The literature suggests boxers tend to have more severe symptoms than other athletes due to more frequent rotational and shearing impacts. Data regarding genetic predispositions of CTE have been inconsistent in part due to low subject populations. Positron emission tomography imaging involving tau-binding ligands has recently proven effective in differentiating CTE from control groups and other neurodegenerative diseases. Further longitudinal studies should be conducted to correlate the number of suffered concussive/subconcussive forces to the likelihood of developing

  12. The Impact of Traumatic Brain Injury on the Aging Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jacob S; Hobbs, Jonathan G; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has come to the forefront of both the scientific and popular culture. Specifically, sports-related concussions or mild TBI (mTBI) has become the center of scientific scrutiny with a large amount of research focusing on the long-term sequela of this type of injury. As the populace continues to age, the impact of TBI on the aging brain will become clearer. Currently, reports have come to light that link TBI to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, as well as certain psychiatric diseases. Whether these associations are causations, however, is yet to be determined. Other long-term sequelae, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), appear to be associated with repetitive injuries. Going forward, as we gain better understanding of the pathophysiological process involved in TBI and subclinical head traumas, and individual traits that influence susceptibility to neurocognitive diseases, a clearer, more comprehensive understanding of the connection between brain injury and resultant disease processes in the aging brain will become evident.

  13. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The cellular sequela to repetitive brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vile, Alexander R; Atkinson, Leigh

    2017-07-01

    This review aims to integrate current literature on the pathogenic mechanisms of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) to create a multifactorial understanding of the disease. CTE is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, classed as a tauopathy, although it appears the pathogenic mechanisms are more complex than this. It affects those with a history of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. Currently, there are no treatments for CTE and the disease can only be affirmatively diagnosed in post mortem. Understanding the pathogenesis of the disease will provide an avenue to explore possible treatment and diagnostic modalities. The pathological hallmarks of CTE have been well characterised and have been linked to the pathophysiologic mechanisms in this review. Human studies are limited due to ethical implications of exposing subjects to head trauma. Phosphorylation of tau, microglial activation, TAR DNA-binding protein 43 and diffuse axonal injury have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of CTE. The neuronal loss and axonal dysfunction mediated by these pathognomonic mechanisms lead to the broad psycho-cognitive symptoms seen in CTE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. BPSD following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghinah, Renato; Freire, Fabio Rios; Coelho, Fernanda; Lacerda, Juliana Rhein; Schmidt, Magali Taino; Calado, Vanessa Tomé Gonçalves; Ianof, Jéssica Natuline; Machado, Sergio; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Basile, Luis Fernando Hindi; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Amorim, Robson Luis

    2013-01-01

    Annually, 700,000 people are hospitalized with brain injury acquired after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Brazil. We aim to review the basic concepts related to TBI, and the most common Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) findings in moderate and severe TBI survivors. We also discussed our strategies used to manage such patients in the post-acute period. Fifteen TBI outpatients followed at the Center for Cognitive Rehabilitation Post-TBI of the Clinicas Hospital of the University of São Paulo were submitted to a neurological, neuropsychological, speech and occupational therapy evaluation, including the Mini-Mental State Examination. Rehabilitation strategies will then be developed, together with the interdisciplinary team, for each patient individually. Where necessary, the pharmacological approach will be adopted. Our study will discuss options of pharmacologic treatment choices for cognitive, behavioral, or affective disorders following TBI, providing relevant information related to a structured cognitive rehabilitation service and certainly will offer an alternative for patients and families afflicted by TBI. Traumatic brain injury can cause a variety of potentially disabling psychiatric symptoms and syndromes. Combined behavioral and pharmacological strategies, in the treatment of a set of highly challenging behavioral problems, appears to be essential for good patient recovery.

  15. BPSD following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Anghinah

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Annually, 700,000 people are hospitalized with brain injury acquired after traumatic brain injury (TBI in Brazil. Objective: We aim to review the basic concepts related to TBI, and the most common Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD findings in moderate and severe TBI survivors. We also discussed our strategies used to manage such patients in the post-acute period. Methods: Fifteen TBI outpatients followed at the Center for Cognitive Rehabilitation Post-TBI of the Clinicas Hospital of the University of São Paulo were submitted to a neurological, neuropsychological, speech and occupational therapy evaluation, including the Mini-Mental State Examination. Rehabilitation strategies will then be developed, together with the interdisciplinary team, for each patient individually. Where necessary, the pharmacological approach will be adopted. Results: Our study will discuss options of pharmacologic treatment choices for cognitive, behavioral, or affective disorders following TBI, providing relevant information related to a structured cognitive rehabilitation service and certainly will offer an alternative for patients and families afflicted by TBI. Conclusion: Traumatic brain injury can cause a variety of potentially disabling psychiatric symptoms and syndromes. Combined behavioral and pharmacological strategies, in the treatment of a set of highly challenging behavioral problems, appears to be essential for good patient recovery.

  16. Common Causes of Traumatic Ventriculitis in Free range and Intensively Managed Poultry in Zaria, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaltungo Bilkisu Yunusa

    Full Text Available The gizzard or ventriculus in birds is susceptible to mechanical damage or traumatic injuries referred to as traumatic ventriculitis when subjected to the causative agents. The condition affects both intensively and extensively managed birds. Palm kennel cake is commonly used as a chief source of protein and fat in poultry rations, most poultry that are kept intensively on deep litter system in the study area use wood shavings collected from carpentry workshops as litter material while poultry on extensive system of management have access to refuse dumps where sharp objects are commonly found. Traumatic ventriculitis can hardly be detected and managed clinically. From our clinical records, nails of various sizes, bolts and nuts, sharp objects like pieces of wood, palm kennel shells and wires of various sizes are the major causes of traumatic ventriculitis. Major causes of traumatic ventriculitis or hardware disease in poultry in the study areas are hereby discussed and three cases presented in chickens as case studies. Locally and manually compounded poultry feeds, access to refuse dumps, litter materials to be used in poultry houses and litters in poultry houses were renovation works had occurred should be screened for metallic and hard sharp objects to prevent or reduce risk of ingesting and the occurrence of hardware disease. [Vet. World 2011; 4(11.000: 511-514

  17. Traumatic brain injury, diabetic neuropathy and altered-psychiatric health: The fateful triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-El-Hassan, Hadi; Dia, Batoul; Choucair, Khalil; Eid, Stephanie A; Najdi, Farah; Baki, Lama; Talih, Farid; Eid, Assaad A; Kobeissy, Firas

    2017-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a detrimental medical condition particularly when accompanied by diabetes. There are several comorbidities going along with diabetes including, but not limited to, kidney failure, obesity, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, stroke, neuropathies and amputations. Unlike diabetes type 1, diabetes type 2 is more common in adults who simultaneously suffer from other comorbid conditions making them susceptible to repetitive fall incidents and sustaining head trauma. The resulting brain insult exacerbates current psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety, which, in turn, increases the risk of sustaining further brain traumas. The relationship between diabetes, traumatic brain injury and psychiatric health constitutes a triad forming a non-reversible vicious cycle. At the proteomic and psychiatric levels, cellular, molecular and behavioral alterations have been reported with the induction of non-traumatic brain injury in diabetic models such as stroke. However, research into traumatic brain injury has not been systematically investigated. Thus, in cases of diabetic neuropathy complicated with traumatic brain injury, utilizing fine structural and analytical techniques allows the identification of key biological markers that can then be used as innovative diagnostics as well as novel therapeutic targets in an attempt to treat diabetes and its sequelae especially those arising from repetitive mild brain trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury and Development of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Potential Role for Biomarkers in Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Turner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE upon autopsy in a growing number of athletes and soldiers alike has resulted in increased awareness, by both the scientific/medical and lay communities, of the potential for lasting effects of repetitive traumatic brain injury. While we have come to better understand the clinical presentation and underlying pathophysiology of CTE, the diagnosis of CTE remains autopsy-based, which prevents adequate monitoring and tracking of the disease. The lack of established biomarkers or imaging modalities for diagnostic and prognostic purposes also prevents the development and implementation of therapeutic protocols. In this work the clinical history and pathologic findings associated with CTE are reviewed as well as imaging modalities that have demonstrated some promise for future use in the diagnosis and/or tracking of CTE or repetitive brain injury. Biomarkers under investigation are also discussed with particular attention to the timing of release and potential utility in situations of repetitive traumatic brain injury. Further investigation into imaging modalities and biomarker elucidation for the diagnosis of CTE is clearly both needed as well as warranted.

  19. Psychiatric phenotypes in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahar, Ian; Alosco, Michael L; McKee, Ann C

    2017-09-06

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving cognitive, motor, and psychiatrically-relevant symptoms resulting from repetitive head impacts. Psychiatric phenotypes of CTE, including depression and suicidality, present particular challenges for CTE research, given that the diagnosis requires postmortem neuropathological examination. The pathognomonic lesion of CTE is the perivascular accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau (ptau) protein at the depths of cortical sulci. These lesions are found in the earliest disease stages, and with advancing pathological severity, ptau deposition occurs in widespread brain regions in a four-stage scheme of severity. We review the psychiatric phenotypes of individuals neuropathologically diagnosed with CTE, and suggest that earlier CTE stages hold particular interest for psychiatric CTE research. In the early CTE stages, there is ptau pathology in frontal cortex and axonal loss in the frontal white matter, followed by progressive ptau neurofibrillary degeneration in the amygdala and hippocampus. Neuropathological changes in the frontal and medial temporal lobes may underlie psychiatric phenotypes. Additional insight into the association between CTE pathology and psychiatric sequelae may come from advancements in in vivo methods of CTE detection. Further epidemiological, clinical, and postmortem studies are needed to validate the nature of psychiatric sequelae in CTE. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Clinical neurorestorative progress in traumatic brain injury

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    Huang H

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Huiling Huang,1 Lin Chen,2,3 Hongyun Huang4–61Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cerebral Vascular and Neurodegenerative Diseases, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital, Tianjin Neurosurgical Institute, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2Medical Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 3Tsinghua University Yuquan Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 4General Hospital of Chinese people's Armed Police Forces, 5Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 6Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability from trauma to the central nervous system. Besides the surgical interventions and symptomatic management, the conventional therapies for TBI and its sequelae are still limited. Recently emerging evidence suggests that some neurorestorative treatments appear to have a potential therapeutic role for TBI and improving the patient's quality of life. The current clinical neurorestorative strategies available in TBI include pharmacological treatments (recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, amantadine, lithium, and valproate, the neuromodulation treatments (repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and low-level laser therapy, cell transplantation (bone marrow stromal cells and umbilical cord stromal cells, and combined neurorehabilitation. In this review, we summarize the recent clinical neurorestorative progress in the management of neurodegeneration as well as cognitive and motor deficits after TBI; indeed further clinical trials are required to provide more robust evidence.Keywords: brain trauma, neurorestorative treatment, cell transplantation, clinical study

  1. Traumatic lesions of the posterior urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde-Ramos, L; Gómez-Illanes, R; Campos-Juanatey, F; Portillo-Martín, J A

    2016-11-01

    The posterior urethral lesions are associated with pelvis fractures in 5-10% of cases. The posterior urethra is attached to the pelvis bone by puboprostatic ligaments and the perineal membrane, which explains why disruption of the pelvic ring can injure the urethra at this level. To identify suspected cases of posterior urethral trauma and to perform the diagnosis and its immediate or deferred management. Search in PubMed of articles related to traumatic posterior urethral lesions, written in English or Spanish. We reviewed the relevant publications including literature reviews and chapters from books related to the topic. With patients with pelvis fractures, we must always rule out posterior urethral lesions. The diagnostic examination of choice is retrograde urethrography, which, along with the severity of the condition, will determine the management in the acute phase and whether the treatment will be performed immediately or deferred. Early diagnosis and proper acute management decrease the associated complications, such as strictures, urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Despite the classical association between posterior urethral lesions and pelvic fractures, the management of those lesions (whether immediate or deferred) remains controversial. Thanks to the growing interest in urethral disease, there are an increasing number of studies that help us achieve better management of these lesions. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Arthroscopic Treatment of Traumatic Hip Dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begly, John P; Robins, Bryan; Youm, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic hip dislocations are high-energy injuries that often result in considerable morbidity. Although appropriate management improves outcomes, associated hip pathology may complicate the recovery and lead to future disability and pain. Historically, open reduction has been the standard of care for treating hip dislocations that require surgical intervention. The use of hip arthroscopy to treat the sequelae and symptoms resulting from traumatic hip dislocations recently has increased, however. When used appropriately, hip arthroscopy is a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment option for intra-articular pathology secondary to traumatic hip dislocation.

  3. Health Status and Performance of United States Air Force Airmen Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    adrenal insufficiency, hypopituitarism, hypothyroidism , growth- hormone deficiency and posterior pituitary dysfunction [53, 54, 56-60]. Growth...central hypothyroidism which can result in fatigue, apathy, decreased strength and cognitive dysfunction, symptoms commonly observed in PTSD [54...Experimental traumatic brain injury in rats stimulates the expression, production and activity of Alzheimer’s disease beta- secretase (BACE-1). J

  4. Trends in Traumatic Brain Injury Research in School Psychology Journals 1985-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shannon M.; Canto, Angela I.

    2015-01-01

    Every year, approximately 2.4 million people experience a traumatic brain injury (TBI), and nearly half a million children receive emergency medical attention from hospital personnel due to a TBI in the United States (Centers for Disease Control, 2010; Coronado et al., 2014). It is imperative for key stakeholders, including school psychologists,…

  5. Acute non-traumatic hip pathology in children: incidence and presentation in family practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, M.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Schellevis, F.G.; Suijlekom-Smit, L.W.A.; Koes, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The differential diagnosis of children with acute non-traumatic hip pathology varies from quite harmless conditions such as transient synovitis of the hip to more severe problems like Perthes' disease, slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) and life-threatening conditions such as

  6. Witnessing traumatic events and post-traumatic stress disorder: insights from an animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Patki, Gaurav; Salvi, Ankita; Liu, Hesong; Salim, Samina

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly recognized that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be acquired vicariously from witnessing traumatic events. Recently, we published an animal model called the “Trauma witness model” (TWM) which mimics PTSD-like symptoms in rats from witnessing daily traumatic events (social defeat of cage mate) [15]. Our TWM does not result in any physical injury. This is a major procedural advantage over the typical intruder paradigm in which it is difficult to delineate th...

  7. Molecular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory, and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review, we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury, and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R.; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory, and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review, we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury, and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration. PMID:23847533

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Cognitive Dysfunction following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall Rae Walker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration.

  10. Suicide and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Grant L

    2016-01-01

    For nearly 80 years, suicidality was not considered to be a core clinical feature of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In recent years, suicide has been widely cited as being associated with CTE, and now depression has been proposed to be one of three core diagnostic features alongside cognitive impairment and anger control problems. This evolution of the clinical features has been reinforced by thousands of media stories reporting a connection between mental health problems in former athletes and military veterans, repetitive neurotrauma, and CTE. At present, the science underlying the causal assumption between repetitive neurotrauma, depression, suicide, and the neuropathology believed to be unique to CTE is inconclusive. Epidemiological evidence indicates that former National Football League players, for example, are at lower, not greater, risk for suicide than men in the general population. This article aims to discuss the critical issues and literature relating to these possible relationships.

  11. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Al Thani, Hassan; Zarour, Ahmad; Latifi, Rifat

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI) are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory.

  12. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman El-Menyar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory.

  13. Diffuse traumatic brain injury induces prolonged immune dysregulation and potentiates hyperalgesia following a peripheral immune challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Rachel K; Ellis, Gavin I; Harrison, Jordan L; Bachstetter, Adam D; Corder, Gregory F; Van Eldik, Linda J; Taylor, Bradley K; Marti, Francesc; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Nociceptive and neuropathic pain occurs as part of the disease process after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans. Central and peripheral inflammation, a major secondary injury process initiated by the traumatic brain injury event, has been implicated in the potentiation of peripheral nociceptive pain. We hypothesized that the inflammatory response to diffuse traumatic brain injury potentiates persistent pain through prolonged immune dysregulation. To test this, adult, male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to midline fluid percussion brain injury or to sham procedure. One cohort of mice was analyzed for inflammation-related cytokine levels in cortical biopsies and serum along an acute time course. In a second cohort, peripheral inflammation was induced seven days after surgery/injury with an intraplantar injection of carrageenan. This was followed by measurement of mechanical hyperalgesia, glial fibrillary acidic protein and Iba1 immunohistochemical analysis of neuroinflammation in the brain, and flow cytometric analysis of T-cell differentiation in mucosal lymph. Traumatic brain injury increased interleukin-6 and chemokine ligand 1 levels in the cortex and serum that peaked within 1-9 h and then resolved. Intraplantar carrageenan produced mechanical hyperalgesia that was potentiated by traumatic brain injury. Further, mucosal T cells from brain-injured mice showed a distinct deficiency in the ability to differentiate into inflammation-suppressing regulatory T cells (Tregs). We conclude that traumatic brain injury increased the inflammatory pain associated with cutaneous inflammation by contributing to systemic immune dysregulation. Regulatory T cells are immune suppressors and failure of T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells leads to unregulated cytokine production which may contribute to the potentiation of peripheral pain through the excitation of peripheral sensory neurons. In addition, regulatory T cells are identified as a potential target for

  14. EFFICACY OF VARIOUS METHODS OF NEUROMOTOR CORRECTIONAL TRAINING OF LOCOMOTIVE STEREOTYPE IN PATIENTS WITH SPASTIC DIPLEGIA FORM OF INFANTILE CEREBRAL PARALYSIS WITH THE MEANS OF «GRAVITON» DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Titarenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to compare efficacy of one course of reflex-lead device (RLD at standard regimen and at regimen of temporary aggravation of pathological placing of the lower extremities during the training of patients with spastic diplegia form of infantile cerebral paralysis. Patients and methods: children aged from 8 to 12 years old with moderate spastic diplegia were included into the study. The initial pattern of locomotion was characterized by cnemial flexion in the knee joints (n =61; among them 30 patients were applied correctional regimen of RLD, in 31 patient the severity of pathological placing of the lower extremities was increased by the means of traction of RLD. Results: after the treatment course (consisting of 20 sessions in RLD, ambulation of the patients in the group of correctional regimen of RLD (n =30 was characterized by the less diversity, while in the group of training aggravation of the pathological position of the lower extremities (n =31 more significant partial normalization of kinetic pattern of the articular angles in the lower extremities was observed. Conclusions: standard correctional regimen of RLD is an optimal method of neuromotor correctional training, while training aggravation of the severity of pathological positions of the lower extremities has better effects on modulation of locomotive stereotype and should be used in order to correction of ambulance in patients with independent ability to move.

  15. Fitness training for cardiorespiratory conditioning after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Leanne; Moseley, Anne M; Harmer, Alison R

    2017-12-29

    Reduced cardiorespiratory fitness (cardiorespiratory deconditioning) is a common consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Fitness training may be implemented to address this impairment. The primary objective of this updated review was to evaluate whether fitness training improves cardiorespiratory fitness in people who have sustained a TBI. The secondary objectives were to evaluate whether fitness training improves body function and structure (physical and cognitive impairments, psychological responses resulting from the injury), activity limitations and participation restrictions in people who have sustained a TBI as well as to evaluate its safety, acceptance, feasibility and suitability. We searched 10 electronic databases (the Cochrane Injuries Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Embase; PubMed (MEDLINE); CINAHL; AMED; SPORTDiscus; PsycINFO; PEDro and PsycBITE) and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for relevant trials. In addition we screened reference lists from systematic reviews related to the topic that we identified from our search, and from the included studies, and contacted trialists to identify further studies. The search was run in August 2017. Randomised controlled studies with TBI participants were eligible if they compared an exercise programme incorporating cardiorespiratory fitness training to usual care, a non-exercise intervention, or no intervention. Two authors independently screened the search results, extracted data and assessed bias. We contacted all trialists for additional information. We calculated mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for continuous data, and odds ratio with 95% CI for dichotomous data. We pooled data when there were sufficient studies with homogeneity. Two new studies incorporating 96 participants were identified in this update and were added to the six previously included studies. A total of

  16. Postpartum Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Traumatic Stress Disorder Bipolar Mood Disorders Postpartum Psychosis Social Support Online Training Tools for Mom Frequently Asked Questions Screening Recommendations Useful Links Media Family International Father’s Mental Health Day Dads for World Maternal Mental Health Day ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Traumatic Knee Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.G. Oei (Edwin)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTraumatic knee lesions are frequently encountered both in general practice and in the hospital setting. These injuries are often caused by sports and other physical activities and may lead to severe pain and disability.

  18. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overexcited. Trouble sleeping. Feeling detached from oneself or reality. Patients may also have feelings of shock, fear, ... It is not completely clear who has an increased risk of cancer-related post-traumatic stress . Certain ...

  19. Traumatic experiences of Kenyan secondary school students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Child and Adolescent Mental Health ... determinants of Trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Kenyan adolescents. ... in 66.7% of the subjects, followed by witnessing a violent crime and domestic violence; 23.2% ...

  20. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: historical origins and current perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenigro, Philip H; Corp, Daniel T; Stein, Thor D; Cantu, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease that is most often identified in postmortem autopsies of individuals exposed to repetitive head impacts, such as boxers and football players. The neuropathology of CTE is characterized by the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau protein in a pattern that is unique from that of other neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. The clinical features of CTE are often progressive, leading to dramatic changes in mood, behavior, and cognition, frequently resulting in debilitating dementia. In some cases, motor features, including parkinsonism, can also be present. In this review, the historical origins of CTE are revealed and an overview of the current state of knowledge of CTE is provided, including the neuropathology, clinical features, proposed clinical and pathological diagnostic criteria, potential in vivo biomarkers, known risk factors, and treatment options.

  1. Current Reconstruction Options for Traumatic Thumb Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David J; Venkatramani, Hari; Sabapathy, S Raja

    2016-12-01

    Traumatic loss of a thumb results in notable functional impairment. Multiple reconstructive procedures have been described to address these deficits. Compared with no reconstruction, any procedure is of benefit. However, each of the described methods offers subtle benefits and downsides and may be more applicable in certain situations. We present a review of current reconstructive options for traumatic thumb amputation in 2016. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dermal Coverage of Traumatic War Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    healing/non-healing of wound and donor site • Graft loss • Heterotrophic ossification • Infection • Scar contracture • Durability (i.e. abrasions/ injuries ...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0004 TITLE: "Dermal Coverage of Traumatic War Wounds ” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Leon Nesti CONTRACTING...REPORT DATE January 2017 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 31 Oct 2012- 30 Oct 2016 " Dermal Coverage of Traumatic War Wounds ” 5a

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury in the Elderly: Is it as Bad as we Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Calvin H K; Wong, Stephen K H; Wong, George K; Ng, Stephanie; Wang, Kevin K W; Lam, Ping Kuen; Poon, Wai Sang

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury in elderly patients is a neglected global disease burden. The main cause is fall, followed by motor vehicle accidents. This review article summarizes different aspects of geriatric traumatic brain injury, including epidemiology, pathology, and effects of comorbidities and pre-injury medications such as antiplatelets and anticoagulants. Functional outcome with or without surgical intervention, cognitive outcome, and psychiatric complications are discussed. Animal models are also reviewed in attempt to explain the relationship of aging and outcome, together with advances in stem cell research. Though elderly people in general did fare worse after traumatic brain injury, certain "younger elderly" people, aged 65-75 years, could have a comparable outcome to younger adults after minor to moderate head injury.

  4. Dietary fructose aggravates the pathobiology of traumatic brain injury by influencing energy homeostasis and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rahul; Noble, Emily; Vergnes, Laurent; Ying, Zhe; Reue, Karen; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    Fructose consumption has been on the rise for the last two decades and is starting to be recognized as being responsible for metabolic diseases. Metabolic disorders pose a particular threat for brain conditions characterized by energy dysfunction, such as traumatic brain injury. Traumatic brain injury patients experience sudden abnormalities in the control of brain metabolism and cognitive function, which may worsen the prospect of brain plasticity and function. The mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here we report that fructose consumption disrupts hippocampal energy homeostasis as evidenced by a decline in functional mitochondria bioenergetics (oxygen consumption rate and cytochrome C oxidase activity) and an aggravation of the effects of traumatic brain injury on molecular systems engaged in cell energy homeostasis (sirtuin 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha) and synaptic plasticity (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B, cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding, synaptophysin signaling). Fructose also worsened the effects of traumatic brain injury on spatial memory, which disruption was associated with a decrease in hippocampal insulin receptor signaling. Additionally, fructose consumption and traumatic brain injury promoted plasma membrane lipid peroxidation, measured by elevated protein and phenotypic expression of 4-hydroxynonenal. These data imply that high fructose consumption exacerbates the pathology of brain trauma by further disrupting energy metabolism and brain plasticity, highlighting the impact of diet on the resilience to neurological disorders. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Early Traumatic Stress Responses in Parents Following a Serious Illness in Their Child: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Claudia; Muscara, Frank; Anderson, Vicki A; McCarthy, Maria C

    2016-03-01

    A systematic review of the literature investigating the early traumatic stress responses in parents of children diagnosed with a serious illness/injury. A literature review was conducted (September 2013) using Medline, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases. Twenty-four studies related to parents of children hospitalized due to diagnosis of cancer, type 1 diabetes, meningococcal disease, trauma or serious injury, preterm birth and other serious illnesses requiring admission to intensive care were included. Parents were assessed for early traumatic stress symptoms within 3 months of their child's diagnosis/hospitalization. Prevalence rates of acute stress disorder in parents ranged from 12 to 63%. Prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder ranged from 8 to 68%. Variability was related to methodological factors including differences in study design, timing of assessments, measurement tools, and scoring protocols. Psychosocial factors rather than medical factors predicted parent distress. This review integrates and compares early traumatic reactions in parents with children suffering a range of serious illnesses. Findings suggest a high prevalence of acute and posttraumatic stress symptoms in parents. Methodological inconsistencies made comparison of early traumatic stress prevalence rates difficult. Risk factors associated with traumatic stress symptoms were identified.

  6. Successful Endoscopic Therapy of Traumatic Bile Leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Spinn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic bile leaks often result in high morbidity and prolonged hospital stay that requires multimodality management. Data on endoscopic management of traumatic bile leaks are scarce. Our study objective was to evaluate the efficacy of the endoscopic management of a traumatic bile leak. We performed a retrospective case review of patients who were referred for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP after traumatic bile duct injury secondary to blunt (motor vehicle accident or penetrating (gunshot trauma for management of bile leaks at our tertiary academic referral center. Fourteen patients underwent ERCP for the management of a traumatic bile leak over a 5-year period. The etiology included blunt trauma from motor vehicle accident in 8 patients, motorcycle accident in 3 patients and penetrating injury from a gunshot wound in 3 patients. Liver injuries were grade III in 1 patient, grade IV in 10 patients, and grade V in 3 patients. All patients were treated by biliary stent placement, and the outcome was successful in 14 of 14 cases (100%. The mean duration of follow-up was 85.6 days (range 54-175 days. There were no ERCP-related complications. In our case review, endoscopic management with endobiliary stent placement was found to be successful and resulted in resolution of the bile leak in all 14 patients. Based on our study results, ERCP should be considered as first-line therapy in the management of traumatic bile leaks.

  7. DISEASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi

    2015-01-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition...... of human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should...... not stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases...

  8. Post-traumatic amnesia predicts intelligence impairment following traumatic brain injury: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konigs, M.; de Kieviet, J.F.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Worldwide, millions of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) suffer from persistent and disabling intelligence impairment. Post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) duration is a promising predictor of intelligence following TBI. Objectives: To determine (1) the impact of TBI on intelligence

  9. Classroom Strategies for Teaching Veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinski, Jennifer Blevins

    2012-01-01

    Postsecondary institutions currently face the largest influx of veteran students since World War II. As the number of veteran students who may experience learning problems caused by Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and/or Traumatic Brain Injury continues to rise, the need for instructional strategies that address their needs increases. Educators may…

  10. Stress and Traumatic Stress: How Do Past Events Influence Current Traumatic Stress among Mothers Experiencing Homelessness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie K.; Hall, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the relationship between past traumatic events and the level of current traumatic stress among mothers experiencing homelessness. The data for this study were gathered from 75 homeless mothers between May 2006 and October 2006 using a cross-sectional survey design with purposive sampling. All mothers…

  11. Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias: Retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P.A. Sousa

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study classifies cases of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDH in patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of the Coimbra University Hospitals (HUC from 1990 to 2004. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 34 cases of TDH, studying anatomical location, place and time of diagnosis, complementary tests aiding diagnosis, herniated organs, associated traumatism, morbidity and mortality. Results: Twenty-eight male and six female patients with an average age of 40.5 years ± 20.5, average SAPS score 38.8. Average lenght of stay was 19.1 ± 13.6 days, all suffered from closed traumatism and were put on artificial ventilation. The left-side diaphragm was more frequently affected (94.1% then the right. Diagnosis in 19 cases was made up in the first six hours following the diagnosis of traumatism, in four cases within 12 hours and in the remaining cases between 48 hours and 16 years after traumatism. In 13 patients the diagnosis was established intra-operatively. The stomach was typically one of the herniated organs. The most frequently associated lesions at the thoracic level were pulmonary contusion, haemothorax and pneumothorax, and at the abdominal level, haemoperitoneum and splenic lesion. The rates for complications and mortality were 55.8% and 11.7% respectively. Conclusions: TDH mainly occurs on the left side through closed thoraco-abdominal trauma following road traffic accidents. This group of patients, on average younger than others admitted to ICU, presents a longer average hospitalisation period, but has lower rates of mortality and lower SAPS severity scores. The most commonly herniated organ was the stomach and the most frequently encountered lesions were cranial-encephalic, splenic and pleural traumatisms. Pre-operative diagnosis of diaphragmatic injuries is difficult and a high index of clinical suspicion is needed after thoracoabdominal trauma. This diagnosis should always be considered a possibility in

  12. Cardiac biomarkers and ultrasonography as tools in prediction and diagnosis of traumatic pericarditis in Egyptian buffaloes

    OpenAIRE

    Noura E. Attia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to evaluate the cardiac biomarkers and ultrasonography in prediction and early diagnosis of traumatic pericarditis (TP) in Egyptian buffaloes. Materials and Methods: A total number of 47 buffaloes were included in the study and divided into two groups: Healthy (n=10) and diseased groups (n=37). Diseased buffaloes were admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Zagazig University, Egypt, with a history of anorexia, sudden, and severe reduction of milk producti...

  13. Absence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in retired football players with multiple concussions and neurological symptomatology

    OpenAIRE

    Lili-Naz eHazrati; Maria Carmela Tartaglia; Phedias eDiamandis; Karen eDavis; Green, Robin E. A.; Richard eWennberg; Wong, Janice C; Leo eEzerins; Tator, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the term coined for the neurodegenerative disease often suspected in athletes with histories of repeated concussion and progressive dementia. Histologically, CTE is defined as a tauopathy with a distribution of tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles that is distinct from other tauopathies, and usually shows an absence of beta-amyloid deposits, in contrast to Alzheimer’s disease. Although the connection between repeated concussions and CTE-t...

  14. Absence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in retired football players with multiple concussions and neurological symptomatology

    OpenAIRE

    Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Tartaglia, Maria C.; Diamandis, Phedias; Karen D Davis; Green, Robin E.; Wennberg, Richard; Wong, Janice C; Ezerins, Leo; Tator, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the term coined for the neurodegenerative disease often suspected in athletes with histories of repeated concussion and progressive dementia. Histologically, CTE is defined as a tauopathy with a distribution of tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) that is distinct from other tauopathies, and usually shows an absence of beta-amyloid deposits, in contrast to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although the connection between repeated concussion...

  15. Chronic neck pain patients with traumatic or non-traumatic onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ris Hansen, Inge; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Boyle, Eleanor

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Patients with chronic neck pain can present with disability, low quality of life, psychological factors and clinical symptoms. It is unclear whether patients with a traumatic onset differ from those with a non-traumatic onset, by having more complex and severe symptoms....... The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical presentation of chronic neck pain patients with and without traumatic onset by examining cervical mobility, sensorimotor function, cervical muscle performance and pressure pain threshold in addition to the following self-reported characteristics......: quality of life, neck pain and function, kinesiophobia, depression, and pain bothersomeness. Methods This cross-sectional study included 200 participants with chronic neck pain: 120 with traumatic onset and 80 with non-traumatic onset. Participants were recruited from physiotherapy clinics in primary...

  16. The classic metaphyseal lesion and traumatic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Jonathan D; Wannemacher, Jacob; Adler, Brent H; Lindberg, Daniel M

    2016-07-01

    It is widely accepted that the classic metaphyseal lesion (CML) is a traumatic lesion, strongly associated with abuse in infants. Nevertheless, various non-traumatic origins for CMLs continue to be suggested in medical and legal settings. No studies to date systematically describe the association of CMLs with other traumatic injuries. The primary objective of this study is to examine the association of CMLs with other traumatic injuries in a large data set of children evaluated for physical abuse. This was a retrospectively planned secondary analysis of data from a prospective, observational study of children <120 months of age who underwent evaluation by a child abuse physician. For this secondary analysis, we identified all children ≤12 months of age with an identified CML and determined the number and type of additional injuries identified. Descriptive analysis was used to report frequency of additional traumatic injuries. Among 2,890 subjects, 119 (4.1%) were identified as having a CML. Of these, 100 (84.0%) had at least one additional (non-CML) fracture. Thirty-three (27.7%) had traumatic brain injury. Nearly half (43.7%) of children had cutaneous injuries. Oropharyngeal injuries were found in 12 (10.1%) children. Abdominal/thoracic injuries were also found in 12 (10.1%) children. In all, 95.8% of children with a CML had at least one additional injury; one in four children had three or more categories of injury. CMLs identified in young children are strongly associated with traumatic injuries. Identification of a CML in a young child should prompt a thorough evaluation for physical abuse.

  17. Massive transfusion in traumatic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, Jonathan; Wilcox, Susan R; Raja, Ali S

    2013-04-01

    Hemorrhage after trauma is a common cause of death in the United States and globally. The primary goals when managing traumatic shock are the restoration of oxygen delivery to end organs, maintenance of circulatory volume, and prevention of ongoing bleeding through source control and correction of coagulopathy. Achieving these goals may require massive transfusion of blood products. Although use of blood products may be lifesaving, dose-related adverse effects are well described. Complications of massive transfusion include interdependent derangements such as coagulopathy, hypothermia, acidosis, and electrolyte abnormalities, as well as infectious and immunomodulatory phenomena. This article explores the pathogenesis, implications, prevention, and treatment of these complications through the use of massive transfusion protocols. Particular attention is given to the optimal ratio of blood products transfused in large volume resuscitation and prevention of secondary coagulopathy. Observational data indicate that the development and use of a massive transfusion protocol may reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with large-volume resuscitation of patients with hemorrhagic shock. Such protocols should include a pre-defined ratio of packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, and platelets transfused; most commonly, the ratio used is 1:1:1. Additionally, such protocols should monitor for and correct hypothermia, hypofibrinogenemia, and electrolyte disturbances such as hypocalcemia and hyperkalemia. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, William; Mannix, Rebekah; Zafonte, Ross; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-10-27

    Recent case reports have described athletes previously exposed to repetitive head trauma while participating in contact sports who later in life developed mood disorders, headaches, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, difficulties with speech, and aggressive behavior. Postmortem discoveries show that some of these athletes have pathologic findings that are collectively termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Current hypotheses suggest that concussions or perhaps blows to the head that do not cause the signs and symptoms necessary for making the diagnosis of concussion, so-called subconcussive blows, cause both the clinical and pathologic findings. There are, however, some athletes who participate in contact sports who do not develop the findings ascribed to CTE. Furthermore, there are people who have headaches, mood disorders, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, and other clinical problems who have neither been exposed to repeated head trauma nor possessed the pathologic postmortem findings of those currently diagnosed with CTE. The current lack of prospective data and properly designed case-control studies limits the current understanding of CTE, leading to debate about the causes of the neuropathologic findings and the clinical observations. Given the potential for referral and recall bias in available studies, it remains unclear whether or not the pathologic findings made postmortem cause the presumed neurobehavioral sequela and whether the presumed risk factors, such as sports activity, cerebral concussions, and subconcussive blows, are solely causative of the clinical signs and symptoms. This article discusses the current evidence and the associated limitations. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Traumatic injuries of the diaphragm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokman Soyoral

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study, patient characteristics, diagnosisand treatment of patients with traumatic injury of thediaphragm, and the outcomes were evaluated.Materials and methods: Between 2002 and 2012, 19patients were treated for blunt and penetrating diaphragmaticinjury at the Thoracic Surgery Clinics of two teachinghospitals. The patients were evaluated retrospectively.Results: The etiology of trauma was traffic accidents in8 cases, falls from height in three, earthquake-relatedwounds in two, and stab wounds in six cases (SW. Themost frequent complaints and physical findings were dyspnea,chest pain, abdominal distension and the absenceof respiratory sounds. The most frequently encounteredfinding from the chest radiography was disappearance ofdiaphragmatic shadow, elevation of the diaphragm, andvisceral herniation to the thorax. All patients underwentsurgery. A left diaphragmatic rupture was diagnosed in13, and a right diaphragmatic rupture in 6 patients. Fourteenpatients had visceral herniation without strangulation.In fourteen patients, the diaphragmatic injury wasaccompanied by intra-abdominal organ injuries, lung injuriesand the other system injuries. In one case, cardiac injury,and in four cases, an isolated diaphragmatic rupturewas diagnosed. The most commonly associated organ indiaphragmatic injury was the stomach. In all cases, thediaphragm was repaired by two layers of non-absorbablesutures. The mortality was approximately 5.6%, dependingon associated injuries.Conclusion: The prognosis of the blunt and sharp diaphragmaticinjuries depends on the severity of the concomitantinjuries, and on the problems that may arise dueto delays.

  20. Risk factors of post-traumatic stress symptoms in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Hua; Kao, Chia-Chan; Wu, Shu-Fen; Hung, Shu-Ling; Yang, Hsing-Yu; Tung, Hong-Yi

    2017-10-01

    To determine the level of post-traumatic stress symptoms and to identify demographics, disease history and clinical symptoms that were associated with post-traumatic stress symptoms among patients with gynaecological, breast or colorectal cancer in Taiwan. Literature indicated that 7·3-35·2% of patients with cancer had experienced level of post-traumatic stress symptoms. However, the post-traumatic stress symptoms among patients with cancer in Taiwan was not documented. A cross-sectional study. A total of 347 participants recruited from two general hospitals in southern Taiwan. They completed the Chinese version of Davidson Trauma Scale and a profile describing their demographics and clinical symptoms. Disease history was collected from medical records. Approximately 21·6% of participants reported higher score on Chinese version of Davidson Trauma Scale (Mean ± SD = 22·85 ± 24·12). The top four scores on Chinese version of Davidson Trauma Scale were painful memories, insomnia, shortened lifespan and flashbacks. The risk factors of post-traumatic stress symptoms were suicidal intention (OR = 2·29, 95% CI = 1·86-2·82), chemotherapy (OR = 2·13, 1·18-3·84), metastasis (OR = 2·07, 1·29-3·34), cancer-specific symptoms (OR = 1·21, 1·15-1·27) and high education (OR = 1·75, 1·10-2·78). To prevent post-traumatic stress symptoms, patients with cancer should be routinely screened by psychiatrists for post-traumatic stress symptoms, for ongoing symptom control and suicidal intention. Patients with cancer who are at risk of suicidal behaviour should be enrolled in suicide prevention programmes. Nurses need to assess post-traumatic stress symptoms of patients with cancer, particularly those who with high education, suffered from complications of chemotherapy, metastasis and cancer-specific symptoms and suicidal intention. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To undertake an economic evaluation of the administration and monitoring costs of the two different forms of heparin in patients with unstable coronary artery disease (DCAD). Study design. Equivalent efficacy was found for low- molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and for unfraction- ated heparin (UFH) in the ...

  2. Traumatic brain injury-induced sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola-Saltzman M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mari Viola-Saltzman, Camelia Musleh Department of Neurology, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, USA Abstract: Sleep disturbances are frequently identified following traumatic brain injury, affecting 30%–70% of persons, and often occur after mild head injury. Insomnia, fatigue, and sleepiness are the most frequent sleep complaints after traumatic brain injury. Sleep apnea, narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias may also occur after a head injury. In addition, depression, anxiety, and pain are common brain injury comorbidities with significant influence on sleep quality. Two types of traumatic brain injury that may negatively impact sleep are acceleration/deceleration injuries causing generalized brain damage and contact injuries causing focal brain damage. Polysomnography, multiple sleep latency testing, and/or actigraphy may be utilized to diagnose sleep disorders after a head injury. Depending on the disorder, treatment may include the use of medications, positive airway pressure, and/or behavioral modifications. Unfortunately, the treatment of sleep disorders associated with traumatic brain injury may not improve neuropsychological function or sleepiness. Keywords: traumatic brain injury, insomnia, hypersomnia, sleep apnea, periodic limb movement disorder, fatigue

  3. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... events and children (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Post-Traumatic Stress ... stress disorder Traumatic events and children Related Health Topics Stress Veterans and Military Health National Institutes of ...

  4. Less invasive surgical treatment of traumatic thoracolumbar fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Less invasive surgical treatment of traumatic thoracolumbar fractures. In this thesis various strategies were employed to evaluate the posibilities of reducing the invasiveness of the surgical treatment of traumatic thoracolumbar fractures. A systematic review of the literature suggested that

  5. Prevalence and predictive factors of post-traumatic hypopituitarism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, M; Juul, A; Poulsgaard, L

    2007-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence and predictive factors of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI).......To estimate the prevalence and predictive factors of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI)....

  6. Profile and outcome of non-traumatic paraplegia in Kano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    traumatic paraplegia and the various etiologies associated with the condition. Materials and Methods: A review of the clinical and radiological presentations of adult patients presenting with non-traumatic paraplegia managed at the Aminu Kano ...

  7. Influence of post-traumatic stress disorder on neuroinflammation and cell proliferation in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A Acosta

    -term inflammation and suppressed cell proliferation may evolve into more severe neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders currently being recognized in traumatized TBI patients.

  8. Traces of Traumatizations in Narrative Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Loch

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic childhood experiences often lead to the development of dissociation as a defense mechanism, and subsequently to fragmented memories. In narrative interviews this fragmentation is traced in the expressive field of language. In this article a range of case studies are used to illustrate how dissociations, resulting from traumatic experiences in the past as well as the present, may express themselves and how we, as interviewers, can give support to the client in interview situations. Only by understanding the inconsistencies caused by these traumatic experiences, interviewees are able to tell their life histories beyond the collectively effective taboos. By becoming aware of these mechanisms, the researcher can steer clear of reproducing the socially relevant silencing effects, i.e. denial processes, within the context of social scientific research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0801544

  9. [Medicolegal assessment of post-traumatic vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thömke, F; Dieterich, M

    2011-12-01

    Post-traumatic vertigo refers to a group of different disorders which occur following trauma, mainly closed head injury and whiplash injury of the cervical spine. Aside from headaches, vertigo is the most common symptom in this group of patients. In general, there are two main groups of patients with post-traumatic vertigo: those with documented vestibular dysfunctions and those without. The most common post-traumatic vestibular disorders are benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo, labyrinthine concussion, canal dehiscence and otolithic lesions. Some of these disorders are characterized by spontaneous improvement or recovery over weeks or months and some may also be treated effectively. A number of patients, however, develop phobic postural vertigo requiring psychiatric or psychosomatic exploration.

  10. Traumatic white matter injury and toxic leukoencephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hasani, Omer Hussain; Smith, Colin

    2011-09-01

    White matter injury may be secondary to a range of neurodegenerative disorders, such as the common dementing disorders of the elderly, or may be a consequence of specific white matter disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and the rare leukodystrophies. This article will focus on two relatively common primary groups of disorders of the white matter, traumatic white matter injury and toxic leukoencephalopathies. Traumatic axonal injury may be focal or diffuse, and is associated with a clinical spectrum ranging from concussion through to coma and death. The molecular mechanisms underlying axonal degeneration secondary to traumatic axonal degeneration are being elucidated and may give an insight into potential therapeutic targets. Toxic leukoencephalopathy may be secondary to exposure to a wide range of compounds, including chemotherapeutic drugs. These toxins may produce white matter injury through a range of mechanisms, and the potential toxic effects of compounds need to be considered when assessing a patient with a nonspecific leukoencephalopathy.

  11. Fatigue in adults with traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollayeva, Tatyana; Kendzerska, Tetyana; Mollayeva, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS: The review will summarize the current knowledge in the field with the aim of increasing understanding and guiding future research on the associations between fatigue and clinically important factors, as well as the consequences of fatigue in traumatic brain injury. PROSPERO registry number: CRD......BACKGROUND: Despite strong indications that fatigue is the most common and debilitating symptom after traumatic brain injury, little is known about its frequency, natural history, or relation to other factors. The current protocol outlines a strategy for a systematic review that will identify......, assess, and critically appraise studies that assessed predictors for fatigue and the consequences of fatigue on at least two separate time points following traumatic brain injury. METHODS/DESIGN: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, and PsycINFO will be systematically...

  12. Perspective on Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury | Igun | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traumatic brain injury is an important aspect of paediatric trauma because of its contribution to mortality ant post trauma seqeulae. Management of traumatic brain injury remains a challenge to surgeons, especially in developing countries. This study aims to determine the pattern of traumatic brain injury among ...

  13. Secondary traumatization and attachment among wives of former POWs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahav, Yael; Kanat-Maymon, Yaniv; Solomon, Zahava

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the directionality of the association between post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and attachment insecurities across time among indirect trauma survivors. Wives of former prisoners of war (ex-POWs), with and without post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD...... that attachment anxiety might act as a risk factor for secondary traumatic reactions....

  14. Occurrence of delayed-onset post-traumatic stress disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utzon-Frank, Nicolai; Breinegaard, Nina; Bertelsen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops according to consensus criteria within the first 1-6 months after a horrifying traumatic event, but it is alleged that PTSD may develop later. The objective was to review the evidence addressing occurrence of PTSD with onset >6 months after a traumatic...

  15. A review of the history of traumatic stress studies in Japan: from traumatic neurosis to PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Toyomi; Wilson, John P

    2003-07-01

    Based on available literature, this review article investigates traumatic stress studies in Japan from the late 19th century to the present for English speaking audiences. First, traumatic neuroses of war victims, A-bomb survivors, and victims of work-related accidents are discussed. Second, traumatic stress studies of victims of other manmade disasters, such as the sarin gas attacks in Tokyo, domestic violence, and burn injuries. Third, psychological outcomes of natural disaster studies are discussed in relation to social support and help-seeking tendencies of Japan disaster victims.

  16. Childbirth and criteria for traumatic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorman, Rhonda J; Devilly, Grant J; Gamble, Jenny; Creedy, Debra K; Fenwick, Jennifer

    2014-02-01

    for some women childbirth is physically and psychologically traumatic and meets Criterion A1 (threat) and A2 (intense emotional response) for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition (DSM-IV).This study differentiates Criterion A1 and A2 to explore their individual relationship to prevalence rates for posttraumatic stress, each other, and associated factors for childbirth trauma. women were recruited at three hospitals from October 2008 to October 2009. Questionnaires were completed at recruitment and at 14 days post partum. women in the third trimester of pregnancy (n=890) were recruited by a research midwife while waiting for their antenatal clinic appointment. Participants were over 17 years of age, expected to give birth to a live infant, not undergoing psychological treatment, and able to complete questionnaires in English. this study found 14.3% of women met criteria for a traumatic childbirth. When the condition of A2 was removed, the prevalence rate doubled to 29.4%. Approximately half the women who perceived threat in childbirth did not have an intense negative emotional response. Predictors of finding childbirth traumatic were pre-existing psychiatric morbidity, being a first time mother and experiencing an emergency caesarean section. the fear response is an important diagnostic criterion for assessing psychologically traumatic childbirth. The identification of risk factors may inform maternity service delivery to prevent traumatic birth and postpartum approaches to care to address long-term negative consequences. prevention and treatment of traumatic childbirth are improved through knowledge of potential risk factors and understanding the woman's subjective experience. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The chronic and evolving neurological consequences of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lindsay; Stewart, William; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Horton, Lindsay; Menon, David K; Polinder, Suzanne

    2017-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have lifelong and dynamic effects on health and wellbeing. Research on the long-term consequences emphasises that, for many patients, TBI should be conceptualised as a chronic health condition. Evidence suggests that functional outcomes after TBI can show improvement or deterioration up to two decades after injury, and rates of all-cause mortality remain elevated for many years. Furthermore, TBI represents a risk factor for a variety of neurological illnesses, including epilepsy, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease. With respect to neurodegeneration after TBI, post-mortem studies on the long-term neuropathology after injury have identified complex persisting and evolving abnormalities best described as polypathology, which includes chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Despite growing awareness of the lifelong consequences of TBI, substantial gaps in research exist. Improvements are therefore needed in understanding chronic pathologies and their implications for survivors of TBI, which could inform long-term health management in this sizeable patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Traumatic lumbosacral dislocation - an underrated injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, S; Weise, K; Badke, A

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic lumbosacral dislocations are rare. We report two cases with initially missed posttraumatic lumbosacral dislocations. The reported cases and the review of the literature show that, especially, accident victims with multiple fractures of the lumbar transverses processes may require a CT scan to confirm fractures or dislocations of L5/S1. Follow-up examinations due to persisting pain after physiotherapy should include lateral X-rays of the lumbar spine of the patient standing. According to the literature and our experience, the treatment of traumatic lumbosacral dislocation usually consists of open reduction and postero-lateral or dorso-ventral fusion of the unstable segments.

  19. Traumatic brain injury in intoxicated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Jeff Dror; Marcoux, Judith; Golan, Eyal; Schapiro, Robert; Johnston, Karen M; Maleki, Mahammed; Khetarpal, Suneel; Jacques, Line

    2007-08-01

    We sought to evaluate the effect alcohol intoxication may have had in nonsurgically treated patients with severe traumatic brain injury. The Montreal General Hospital Traumatic Brain Injury Registry was used to identify all adult patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score toxic blood alcohol levels (BAL > or =21.7 mmol/L), 24 were alcohol negative (BAL Coma Scale score < or =8. Intoxicated patients had a mean delay of 151 minutes more in the insertion time of an intracranial pressure monitoring device, compared with alcohol-negative patients. Alcohol was a confounding factor in the treatment of some of our patients.

  20. [Traumatic enucleation. Accident or self-mutilation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straßburger, P; Váradi, G

    2013-05-01

    A 52-year-old woman was admitted for emergency treatment after traumatic enucleation. Because of the position of the avulsed eye and the acute mental condition of the patient a trauma caused by self-mutilation could not be excluded. There was even the suspicion of self-enucleation in a second case and in both cases a psychiatrist was consulted but ultimately a disastrous accident was clearly verified for both patients. Nevertheless, an interdisciplinary evaluation should be initiated in cases of patients with a suspicious traumatic injury as in cases of self-mutilation the danger of relapse is high in the first hours and weeks after the primary event.

  1. Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Traumatic Grief (BEP-TG) : toward integrated treatment of symptoms related to traumatic loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, Geert E; Kleber, Rolf J; de la Rie, Simone M; Bos, Jannetta B A; Gersons, Berthold P R; Boelen, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic events such as disasters, accidents, war, or criminal violence are often accompanied by the loss of loved ones, and may then give rise to traumatic grief. Traumatic grief refers to a clinical diagnosis of persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD) with comorbid (symptoms

  2. Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Traumatic Grief (BEP-TG): toward integrated treatment of symptoms related to traumatic loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, Geert E.; Kleber, Rolf J.; de la Rie, Simone M.; Bos, Jannetta B. A.; Gersons, Berthold P. R.; Boelen, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traumatic events such as disasters, accidents, war, or criminal violence are often accompanied by the loss of loved ones, and may then give rise to traumatic grief. Traumatic grief refers to a clinical diagnosis of persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD) with comorbid (symptoms

  3. Topical retapamulin in the management of infected traumatic skin lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribhi Shawar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ribhi Shawar1, Nicole Scangarella-Oman1, MaryBeth Dalessandro2, John Breton2, Monique Twynholm3, Gang Li4, Harmony Garges51Infectious Disease Center for Excellence in Drug Discovery, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, PA, USA; 2Anti-infectives Medicine Development Center, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, PA, USA; 3Infectious Diseases Medicine Development Centre Europe, GlaxoSmithKline, Greenford, Middlesex, UK; 4MDC BDS – Infectious Disease, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, PA, USA; 5Anti-infectives Medicine Development Center, GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC, USAAbstract: Retapamulin is a novel semisynthetic pleuromutilin antibiotic specifically designed for use as a topical agent. The unique mode of action by which retapamulin selectively inhibits bacterial protein synthesis differentiates it from other nonpleuromutilin antibacterial agents that target the ribosome or ribosomal factors, minimizing the potential for target-specific cross-resistance with other antibacterial classes in current use. In vitro studies show that retapamulin has high potency against the Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and coagulase-negative staphylococci commonly found in skin and skin-structure infections (SSSIs, including S. aureus strains with resistance to agents such as macrolides, fusidic acid, or mupirocin, and other less common organisms associated with SSSIs, anaerobes, and common respiratory tract pathogens. Clinical studies have shown that twice-daily topical retapamulin for 5 days is comparable to 10 days of oral cephalexin in the treatment of secondarily infected traumatic lesions. A 1% concentration of retapamulin ointment has been approved for clinical use as an easily applied treatment with a short, convenient dosing regimen for impetigo. Given the novel mode of action, low potential for cross-resistance with established antibacterial agents, and high in vitro potency against many bacterial pathogens

  4. The endocannabinoid system and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): From preclinical findings to innovative therapeutic approaches in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, Andrea; Schelling, Gustav; Campolongo, Patrizia

    2016-09-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric chronic disease developing in individuals after the experience of an intense and life-threatening traumatic event. The post-traumatic symptomatology encompasses alterations in memory processes, mood, anxiety and arousal. There is now consensus in considering the disease as an aberrant adaptation to traumatic stress. Pharmacological research, aimed at the discovery of new potential effective treatments, has lately directed its attention towards the "so-called" cognitive enhancers. This class of substances, by modulating cognitive processes involved in the development and/or persistence of the post-traumatic symptomatology, could be of great help in improving the outcome of psychotherapies and patients' prognosis. In this perspective, drugs acting on the endocannabinoid system are receiving great attention due to their dual ability to modulate memory processes on one hand, and to reduce anxiety and depression on the other. The purpose of the present review is to offer a thorough overview of both animal and human studies investigating the effects of cannabinoids on memory processes. First, we will briefly describe the characteristics of the endocannabinoid system and the most commonly used animal models of learning and memory. Then, studies investigating cannabinoid modulatory influences on memory consolidation, retrieval and extinction will be separately presented, and the potential benefits associated with each approach will be discussed. In the final section, we will review literature data reporting beneficial effects of cannabinoid drugs in PTSD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical subtypes of chronic traumatic encephalopathy: literature review and proposed research diagnostic criteria for traumatic encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenigro, Philip H; Baugh, Christine M; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Mez, Jesse; Budson, Andrew E; Au, Rhoda; Katz, Douglas I; Cantu, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The long-term consequences of repetitive head impacts have been described since the early 20th century. Terms such as punch drunk and dementia pugilistica were first used to describe the clinical syndromes experienced by boxers. A more generic designation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), has been employed since the mid-1900s and has been used in recent years to describe a neurodegenerative disease found not just in boxers but in American football players, other contact sport athletes, military veterans, and others with histories of repetitive brain trauma, including concussions and subconcussive trauma. This article reviews the literature of the clinical manifestations of CTE from 202 published cases. The clinical features include impairments in mood (for example, depression and hopelessness), behavior (for example, explosivity and violence), cognition (for example, impaired memory, executive functioning, attention, and dementia), and, less commonly, motor functioning (for example, parkinsonism, ataxia, and dysarthria). We present proposed research criteria for traumatic encephalopathy syndrome (TES) which consist of four variants or subtypes (TES behavioral/mood variant, TES cognitive variant, TES mixed variant, and TES dementia) as well as classifications of 'probable CTE' and 'possible CTE'. These proposed criteria are expected to be modified and updated as new research findings become available. They are not meant to be used for a clinical diagnosis. Rather, they should be viewed as research criteria that can be employed in studies of the underlying causes, risk factors, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of CTE and related disorders.

  6. Clinical subtypes of chronic traumatic encephalopathy: literature review and proposed research diagnostic criteria for traumatic encephalopathy syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The long-term consequences of repetitive head impacts have been described since the early 20th century. Terms such as punch drunk and dementia pugilistica were first used to describe the clinical syndromes experienced by boxers. A more generic designation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), has been employed since the mid-1900s and has been used in recent years to describe a neurodegenerative disease found not just in boxers but in American football players, other contact sport athletes, military veterans, and others with histories of repetitive brain trauma, including concussions and subconcussive trauma. This article reviews the literature of the clinical manifestations of CTE from 202 published cases. The clinical features include impairments in mood (for example, depression and hopelessness), behavior (for example, explosivity and violence), cognition (for example, impaired memory, executive functioning, attention, and dementia), and, less commonly, motor functioning (for example, parkinsonism, ataxia, and dysarthria). We present proposed research criteria for traumatic encephalopathy syndrome (TES) which consist of four variants or subtypes (TES behavioral/mood variant, TES cognitive variant, TES mixed variant, and TES dementia) as well as classifications of ‘probable CTE’ and ‘possible CTE’. These proposed criteria are expected to be modified and updated as new research findings become available. They are not meant to be used for a clinical diagnosis. Rather, they should be viewed as research criteria that can be employed in studies of the underlying causes, risk factors, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of CTE and related disorders. PMID:25580160

  7. Irreducible Traumatic Posterior Shoulder Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Collier

    2017-01-01

    coracoid, marked limitation of abduction, and complete absence of external rotation with a fixed internal rotation deformity.2 Lesions commonly associated with traumatic posterior subluxation/dislocation are the reverse Hill-Sachs,3 a posterior labral detachment, glenohumeral ligament lesions,4 rotator cuff tears or posterior bony fractures.1 In order to make an accurate diagnosis it is important to obtain adequate x-ray imaging, including a “Y” view.2 Anteroposterior x-rays may show widening of the glenohumeral joint resembling a “light bulb” shape of the humeral head. However, definitive diagnosis is made by the “Y” view which shows the humeral head displaced posteriorly and no longer covering the glenoid fossa6. Irreducible acute posterior dislocation of the shoulder is extremely rare5 and only one other case has been reported in the literature.7

  8. [Supporting a teenager confronted with a traumatic experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchin, Clara; Benoit de Coignac, Agathe; Moro, Marie Rose

    2015-01-01

    Everyone reacts differently to a traumatic event. There is a risk of underestimating a teenager's traumatic experience by considering only the usual post-traumatic stress diagnosis criteria. However, when the trauma has not been able to be sufficiently developed, the adolescent's suffering is revealed through their behaviour. The therapeutic support of the youngster and their family enables them to reposition the traumatic event within the continuity of their history and to relaunch a thought process, often frozen by the traumatic experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Considerations for Experimental Animal Models of Concussion, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy—These Matters Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Wojnarowicz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of concussion, traumatic brain injury (TBI, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE are widely available and routinely deployed in laboratories around the world. Effective animal modeling requires careful consideration of four basic principles. First, animal model use must be guided by clarity of definitions regarding the human disease or condition being modeled. Concussion, TBI, and CTE represent distinct clinical entities that require clear differentiation: concussion is a neurological syndrome, TBI is a neurological event, and CTE is a neurological disease. While these conditions are all associated with head injury, the pathophysiology, clinical course, and medical management of each are distinct. Investigators who use animal models of these conditions must take into account these clinical distinctions to avoid misinterpretation of results and category mistakes. Second, model selection must be grounded by clarity of purpose with respect to experimental questions and frame of reference of the investigation. Distinguishing injury context (“inputs” from injury consequences (“outputs” may be helpful during animal model selection, experimental design and execution, and interpretation of results. Vigilance is required to rout out, or rigorously control for, model artifacts with potential to interfere with primary endpoints. The widespread use of anesthetics in many animal models illustrates the many ways that model artifacts can confound preclinical results. Third, concordance between key features of the animal model and the human disease or condition being modeled is required to confirm model biofidelity. Fourth, experimental results observed in animals must be confirmed in human subjects for model validation. Adherence to these principles serves as a bulwark against flawed interpretation of results, study replication failure, and confusion in the field. Implementing these principles will advance basic science discovery and

  10. Considerations for Experimental Animal Models of Concussion, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy-These Matters Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnarowicz, Mark W; Fisher, Andrew M; Minaeva, Olga; Goldstein, Lee E

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of concussion, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) are widely available and routinely deployed in laboratories around the world. Effective animal modeling requires careful consideration of four basic principles. First, animal model use must be guided by clarity of definitions regarding the human disease or condition being modeled. Concussion, TBI, and CTE represent distinct clinical entities that require clear differentiation: concussion is a neurological syndrome, TBI is a neurological event, and CTE is a neurological disease. While these conditions are all associated with head injury, the pathophysiology, clinical course, and medical management of each are distinct. Investigators who use animal models of these conditions must take into account these clinical distinctions to avoid misinterpretation of results and category mistakes. Second, model selection must be grounded by clarity of purpose with respect to experimental questions and frame of reference of the investigation. Distinguishing injury context ("inputs") from injury consequences ("outputs") may be helpful during animal model selection, experimental design and execution, and interpretation of results. Vigilance is required to rout out, or rigorously control for, model artifacts with potential to interfere with primary endpoints. The widespread use of anesthetics in many animal models illustrates the many ways that model artifacts can confound preclinical results. Third, concordance between key features of the animal model and the human disease or condition being modeled is required to confirm model biofidelity. Fourth, experimental results observed in animals must be confirmed in human subjects for model validation. Adherence to these principles serves as a bulwark against flawed interpretation of results, study replication failure, and confusion in the field. Implementing these principles will advance basic science discovery and accelerate clinical

  11. Considerations for Experimental Animal Models of Concussion, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy—These Matters Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnarowicz, Mark W.; Fisher, Andrew M.; Minaeva, Olga; Goldstein, Lee E.

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of concussion, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) are widely available and routinely deployed in laboratories around the world. Effective animal modeling requires careful consideration of four basic principles. First, animal model use must be guided by clarity of definitions regarding the human disease or condition being modeled. Concussion, TBI, and CTE represent distinct clinical entities that require clear differentiation: concussion is a neurological syndrome, TBI is a neurological event, and CTE is a neurological disease. While these conditions are all associated with head injury, the pathophysiology, clinical course, and medical management of each are distinct. Investigators who use animal models of these conditions must take into account these clinical distinctions to avoid misinterpretation of results and category mistakes. Second, model selection must be grounded by clarity of purpose with respect to experimental questions and frame of reference of the investigation. Distinguishing injury context (“inputs”) from injury consequences (“outputs”) may be helpful during animal model selection, experimental design and execution, and interpretation of results. Vigilance is required to rout out, or rigorously control for, model artifacts with potential to interfere with primary endpoints. The widespread use of anesthetics in many animal models illustrates the many ways that model artifacts can confound preclinical results. Third, concordance between key features of the animal model and the human disease or condition being modeled is required to confirm model biofidelity. Fourth, experimental results observed in animals must be confirmed in human subjects for model validation. Adherence to these principles serves as a bulwark against flawed interpretation of results, study replication failure, and confusion in the field. Implementing these principles will advance basic science discovery and accelerate

  12. Traumatic stressor exposure and post-traumatic symptoms in homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Eve B; Garvert, Donn W; Macia, Kathryn S; Ruzek, Josef I; Burling, Thomas A

    2013-09-01

    To better understand potential risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and homelessness in veterans, we studied trauma exposure and responses in archival data on 115 homeless veterans. Rates of exposure to military and a variety of civilian high magnitude stressor (HMS) and persistent post-traumatic distress (PPD) events and symptoms of post-traumatic stress were assessed. The relationships between frequency of different trauma types and symptoms of post-traumatic stress were examined. Exposure to both HMS and PPD events were extremely high in this sample, with particularly high exposure to adult (82%) and childhood (62%) interpersonal violence HMS events and HMS events during military service (53%). Exposure to both military and civilian PPD events was associated with significantly higher levels of PTSD symptoms than exposure to no PPD events or only civilian PPD events, and almost all HMS event types were significantly correlated with both PTSD and dissociation symptoms. Post-traumatic symptoms and military and civilian traumatic stressors of all types should be assessed in homeless veterans because they may be contributing to poor social and occupational functioning. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. Assessment of Students with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesire, David J.; Buckley, Valerie A.; Canto, Angela I.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of brain injuries, as well as their impact on individuals who sustain them, has received growing attention from American media in recent years. This attention is likely the result of high profile individuals suffering brain injuries. Greater public awareness of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) has also been promoted by sources such as…

  14. Psychiatric sequelae of traumatic brain injury: Retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-23

    Dec 23, 2011 ... Objective: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a public health problem and is associated with many complications. However little is known about the psychiatric sequelae of TBI in Nigeria. This study described the pattern and determinants of psychiatric sequelae among subjects with TBI. Materials and Methods: ...

  15. Amnemonic traces: Traumatic after-effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potamianou, A

    2015-08-01

    Τhis article addresses the problem of amnemonic traces. The author considers various effects that traumatic experiences can have on the psychic apparatus and, more specifically, those that give rise to situations in which nothing is remembered and nothing is repeated by the patient. She presents data from the analyses of two patients and explores whether it might be possible to give a more accurate description of factors and processes that accelerate the fading of traumatic experiences from the memory network. As somatic disturbances, or illnesses, often accompany or follow traumatic upheavals, the author examines some examples of how somatic events can be viewed as linked to traumatic turmoil and understood as channels of expression of what remains silent in the mental realm. Some suggestions concerning prerequisites for analytic work with patients who confront the analyst with ruptures and erasures in mental functioning and with reductions in mental processing are discussed. How the analyst's psychic economy is involved while working with such patients is also considered. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  16. Predictors of tonic immobility during traumatic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Bados

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tonic immobility (TI is a possible reaction to danger that is facilitated by intense fear, physical restraint and perceived inability to escape. Other variables that could affect TI, such as the type and characteristics of traumatic events and personal characteristics have been little or no studied. The present study evaluated the power of these variables to predict TI in a sample of 273 college students who had experienced at least one traumatic event. Of the sample, 7.7% and 13.2% responded with TI according to the two stricter definitions adopted. Most of the variables were significantly associated with TI in univariate analyses. However, in a multiple regression analysis, only certain features of the events (occurrence of physical/sexual abuse, number of different types of events experienced and certain reactions to them (perception of how traumatic were the events, severe fear response were significant predictors of TI. Since these predictors explained only 25% of the variance, the influence of other variables -such as neuroticism, negative affectivity and perceived lack of personal control or resources to cope with traumatic events- should be investigated.

  17. Centralized rehabilitation after servere traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Liebach, Annette; Nordenbo, Annette Mosbæk

    2006-01-01

    in the prospective study, six died, and 92 (1.27 per 100,000 population per year) survived after a post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) period of at least 28 days. All 19 patients with PTA 7-27 days and 48% of survivors with PTA at least 4 weeks were discharged directly home. The incidence of patients vegetative at 1 month...

  18. Whiplash and post-traumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, JPC

    1998-01-01

    Purpose : This study examined the comorbidity of whiplash and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following motor vehicle accidents. A treatment strategy in cases with both disorders is proposed. Method: A review of the literature on psychological consequences of motor vehicle accidents and on

  19. Antifibrinolytic drugs for acute traumatic injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effect of antifibrinolytic drugs in patients with acute traumatic injury. Methods. The review authors conducted comprehen sive literature searches in January 2015. All randomised controlled trials comparing anti fibrinolytic agents (aprotinin, tranex amic acid. (TXA), epsilon aminocaproic acid and amino methylbenzoic acid) ...

  20. Functional MRI and Outcome in Traumatic Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacino, Joseph T.; Wu, Ona

    2013-01-01

    Advances in task-based functional MRI (fMRI), resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI), and arterial-spin labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI have occurred at a rapid pace in recent years. These techniques for measuring brain function have great potential to improve the accuracy of prognostication for civilian and military patients with traumatic coma. In addition, fMRI, rs-fMRI, and ASL have provided novel insights into the pathophysiology of traumatic disorders of consciousness, as well as mechanisms of recovery from coma. However, functional neuroimaging techniques have yet to achieve widespread clinical use as prognostic tests for patients with traumatic coma. Rather, a broad spectrum of methodological hurdles currently limits the feasibility of clinical implementation. In this review, we discuss the basic principles of fMRI, rs-fMRI and ASL and their potential applications as prognostic tools for patients with traumatic coma. We also discuss future strategies for overcoming the current barriers to clinical implementation. PMID:23881623

  1. [Psychotherapeutic treatment of traumatized refugees in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttche, M; Stammel, N; Knaevelsrud, C

    2016-11-01

    Traumatic experiences resulting from war and violence can lead to a broad spectrum of psychological and somatic stress responses. The psychological strain of traumatized refugees is frequently aggravated by specific post-migration stressors. The current healthcare provision in Germany is characterized by many restrictions. The different residence permits are associated with a limited access to medical and psychotherapeutic services. In addition, there are several barriers limiting access of this group of patients to the healthcare system (e. g. low level of training of mental healthcare staff, language barriers and lack of financing for interpreters). Empirical studies have shown that traumatized refugees profit from existing trauma-focused and evidence-based interventions. Treatment is associated with particular challenges and issues (e. g. use of interpreters, migration and culture-specific as well as legal aspects). Specialized treatment centers for traumatized refugees use a multidisciplinary treatment approach, which includes psychotherapeutic, medical and social work interventions as well as assistance with the residential status and integration programs.

  2. Severe traumatic brain injury managed with decompressive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-05-29

    May 29, 2012 ... had a residual left hemiparesis of grade 4/5. He is awaiting formal neuropsychological assessment. Discussion. Surgical decompression is an acceptable modality of treatment for traumatic malignant intracranial hypertension with or without associated haematoma. The benefit of this form of surgery in terms ...

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury: Nuclear Medicine Neuroimaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Catasús, Carlos A; Vállez Garcia, David; Le Riverend Morales, Eloísa; Galvizu Sánchez, Reinaldo; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; de Vries, Erik FJ; van Waarde, Aren; Leenders, Klaus L

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an up-to-date review of nuclear medicine neuroimaging in traumatic brain injury (TBI). 18F-FDG PET will remain a valuable tool in researching complex mechanisms associated with early metabolic dysfunction in TBI. Although evidence-based imaging studies are needed, 18F-FDG PET

  4. TRAUMATIC INJURIES TO THE TEETII OF CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLASSIFICATION OF TRAUMATIC DENTAL. INJURIES. In recent years a system developed by J. O. Andreasen has been introduced into general use. The classification is based on grouping the injuries into two types of traumata i.e. those involving hard dental tissues and those a1iectlng periodontal tissues. Besides ...

  5. Narrative Language in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Andrea; Galetto, Valentina; Zampieri, Elisa; Vorano, Lorenza; Zettin, Marina; Carlomagno, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI) often show impaired linguistic and/or narrative abilities. The present study aimed to document the features of narrative discourse impairment in a group of adults with TBI. 14 severe TBI non-aphasic speakers (GCS less than 8) in the phase of neurological stability and 14 neurologically intact participants…

  6. Endovascular management of traumatic thoracic aortic transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmat, Atasha; Tan, Lenny; Caleb, Michael George; Lee, Chuen-Neng; Robless, Peter Ashley

    2009-10-01

    The conventional treatment of traumatic thoracic aortic transection is open surgical repair but it is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients with multiple injuries. We reviewed our experience of endovascular repair of traumatic thoracic aortic transection. Between March 2002 and December 2007, 7 patients (male 6, female 1; mean age 40 years) with multiple injuries secondary to blunt trauma underwent endovascular stenting. One patient required adjunctive surgery to facilitate endovascular stenting. Mean intensive care unit stay was 8.6 days (range, 3-16 days). Arterial access in all patients was obtained by femoral cut-down. The mean operating time was 122 min. Technical success was achieved in all cases. There was no mortality. One patient suffered a right parietal stroke, but none developed procedure-related paralysis. The mean follow-up period was 18.6 months (range, 6-48 months). There was no evidence of endoleak, stent migration, or late pseudoaneurysm formation on follow-up computed tomography. Endovascular stents can be used to treat traumatic thoracic aortic transection, with low rates of morbidity and mortality. Although early and midterm results are promising, the long-term durability of endovascular stenting for traumatic thoracic aortic transection remains unknown.

  7. The electrocardiogram in traumatic right atrial rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhuisen, DJ; van den Berg, MP

    1999-01-01

    We:report the case of a previously healthy 20-year-old man who had a traumatic rupture of the right atrium. On admission an electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded which is highly remarkable and, retrospectively, suggestive for the diagnosis. The patient died soon after the EGG, and the diagnosis was

  8. Burnout, vicarious traumatization and its prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pross, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies on burnout and vicarious traumatization are reviewed and summarized with a list of signs and symptoms. From the author's own observations two histories of caregivers working with torture survivors are described which exemplify the risk,implications and consequences of secondary trauma. Contributing factors in the social and political framework in which caregivers operate are analyzed and possible means of prevention suggested, particularly focussing on the conflict of roles when providing evaluations on trauma victims for health and immigration authorities. Caregivers working with victims of violence carry a high risk of suffering from burnout and vicarious traumatization unless preventive factors are considered such as: self care, solid professional training in psychotherapy, therapeutic self-awareness, regular self-examination by collegial and external supervision, limiting caseload, continuing professional education and learning about new concepts in trauma, occasional research sabbaticals, keeping a balance between empathy and a proper professional distance to clients, protecting oneself against being mislead by clients with fictitious PTSD. An institutional setting should be provided in which the roles of therapists and evaluators are separated. Important factors for burnout and vicarious traumatization are the lack of social recognition for caregivers and the financial and legal outsider status of many centers. Therefore politicians and social insurance carriers should be urged to integrate facilities for traumatized refugees into the general health care system and centers should work on more alliances with the medical mainstream and academic medicine.

  9. Post-traumatic Growth in Breast Cancer Patients: A Qualitative Phenomenological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahele Fallah

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies about cancer-related trauma have shown that psychological reactions to the disease are not exclusively negative but most patients also report positive experiences. These positive perceptions are also called post-traumatic growth and benefit patients psychologically, spiritually, and physically. Therefore,we have conducted a study about how women with breast cancer perceive posttraumatic growth and the recognition of its dimensions in Iran.Methods: This qualitative study was conducted by using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. A total of 23 women with breast cancer who met the inclusion criteria were selected after which patients completed a researcher-generated open-ended questionnaire. Data were analyzed according to the guidelines for the Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis and Smith method.Results: Participants’ perceptions in this study about post-traumatic growth included three themes: spiritual growth, appreciation of life, and increased personal strengths.Conclusion: Themes found in this study conformed to dimensions according to the Tedeschi and Calhoun theory of post-traumatic growth. However, relations with others were not found in the present study. We propose that interventions should be designed and implemented in order to facilitate and enhance post-traumatic growth.

  10. [Transforming growth factor beta1/Smad3 signal transduction pathway and post-traumatic scar formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rong; Cen, Ying

    2012-03-01

    To summarize the recent progress in related research on transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1)/Smad3 signal transduction pathway and post-traumatic scar formation. Recent related literature at home and abroad on TGF-beta1/Smad3 signal transduction pathway and post-traumatic scar formation was reviewed and summarized. TGF-beta1 is an important influence factor of fibrotic diseases, and it plays biological effects by TGF-beta1/ Smad3 signal transduction pathway. The pathway is regulated by many factors and has crosstalk with other signal pathways at cellular and molecular levels. The pathway is involved in the early post-traumatic inflammatory response, wound healing, and late pathological scar formation. Intervening the transduction pathway at the molecular level can influence the process of fibrosis and extracellular matrix deposition. TGF-beta1/Smad3 signal transduction pathway is an important way to affect post-traumatic scar formation and extracellular matrix deposition. The further study on the pathway will provide a theoretical basis for promotion of wound healing, as well as prevention and treatment of pathological scar formation.

  11. Childhood Traumatic Experiences, Anxiety, and Depression Levels in Fibromyalgia and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Korhan; Erol, Almıla

    2014-12-01

    The close relationship between chronic pain, anxiety, depression, and childhood traumatic experiences is well known. The aim of this study is to investigate childhood traumatic experiences, anxiety, and depression levels in patients with fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis, which are diseases that cause chronic pain. A total of 30 patients with fibromyalgia, 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and 30 healthy controls, matched with patients with respect to gender, age, and education, were included in the study (90 participants in total). All participants were given a form for sociodemographic characteristics, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD). Patients were also asked to complete a numeric pain scale (NPS). Patients with fibromyalgia reported significantly higher scores for CTQ emotional abuse and HAD depression compared with healthy controls. Patients with fibromyalgia reported significantly higher scores for HAD anxiety than both healthy controls and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis reported significantly higher scores for CTQ emotional abuse and HAD depression compared with healthy controls. Pain scores of patients with fibromyalgia were higher than in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Participants who had scores over the threshold on HAD anxiety and depression had significantly higher scores on CTQ sexual abuse. Both patients with fibromyalgia and patients with rheumatoid arthritis have high levels of childhood traumatic experiences and depression. Patients with pain-related disorders should be examined for childhood traumatic experiences, anxiety, and depression for better treatment outcomes.

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury and NADPH Oxidase: A Deep Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Angeloni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI represents one of the major causes of mortality and disability in the world. TBI is characterized by primary damage resulting from the mechanical forces applied to the head as a direct result of the trauma and by the subsequent secondary injury due to a complex cascade of biochemical events that eventually lead to neuronal cell death. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the genesis of the delayed harmful effects contributing to permanent damage. NADPH oxidases (Nox, ubiquitary membrane multisubunit enzymes whose unique function is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, have been shown to be a major source of ROS in the brain and to be involved in several neurological diseases. Emerging evidence demonstrates that Nox is upregulated after TBI, suggesting Nox critical role in the onset and development of this pathology. In this review, we summarize the current evidence about the role of Nox enzymes in the pathophysiology of TBI.

  13. Traumatic Penile Injury: From Circumcision Injury to Penile Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Heon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of external genitalia trauma is diverse according to the nature of trauma and injured anatomic site. The classification of trauma is important to establish a strategy of treatment; however, to date there has been less effort to make a classification for trauma of external genitalia. The classification of external trauma in male could be established by the nature of injury mechanism or anatomic site: accidental versus self-mutilation injury and penis versus penis plus scrotum or perineum. Accidental injury covers large portion of external genitalia trauma because of high prevalence and severity of this disease. The aim of this study is to summarize the mechanism and treatment of the traumatic injury of penis. This study is the first review describing the issue.

  14. [Practical experience of complex rehabilitation in traumatic defeat of peroneal nerve and vessels

    OpenAIRE

    Balash, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses and analyzes the importance of a comprehensive restorative treatment in traumatic lesions of the peroneal nerve after surgery neurolaw and overlay aneuretinae seam. The object of study is the patient Vyacheslav M., male, 62 years old. His diagnosis was a degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine. Dynamic monitoring of neurological disorders and the recovery ability of the body proceeds in different periods, starting from February 2014. The lea...

  15. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Where Are We and Where Are We Going?

    OpenAIRE

    Mez, Jesse; Stern, Robert A.; McKee, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE, previously called punch drunk and dementia pugilistica) has a rich history in the medical literature in association with boxing, but has only recently been recognized with other contact sports, such as football and ice hockey, as well as with military blast injuries. CTE is thought to be a neurodegenerative disease associated with repeated concussive and subconcussive blows to the head. There is characteristic gross and microscopic pathology found in the...

  16. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Contact Sports: A Systematic Review of All Reported Pathological Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Maroon, Joseph C.; Robert Winkelman; Jeffrey Bost; Austin Amos; Christina Mathyssek; Vincent Miele

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with head trauma. Although initially believed to affect only boxers, the at-risk population has expanded to encompass a much wider demographic, including American football players, hockey players, wrestlers, and military veterans. This expansion has garnered considerable media attention and public concern for the potential neurodegenerative effects of head trauma. The main aim of this systematic review is to give...

  17. Infantile refsum disease with enamel defects: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dorothy; Greenhill, William; Wilson, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to present the case of a 15-year-old female diagnosed with infantile Refsum disease (IRD) that presented with generalized enamel defects in the primary and permanent dentition. IRD is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder characterized by aberrant peroxisome function. IRD patients present with multiple clinical manifestations, including: retinitis pigmentosa; nystagmus; sensorineural hearing loss; mental and developmental delays; neuromotor defects; and cerebral ataxia. Craniofacial abnormalities reported include: high forehead; hypoplastic supraorbital ridges; epicanthal folds; midface hypoplasia; and large anterior fontanelle. At present, there is only one known report of dental anomaly associated with this syndrome. This represents the first known reported case in the pediatric dental literature.

  18. Research Gaps and Controversies in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asken, Breton M; Sullan, Molly J; DeKosky, Steven T; Jaffee, Michael S; Bauer, Russell M

    2017-10-01

    Scientific and lay interest in negative outcomes associated with exposure to repetitive brain trauma (RBT) continues to strengthen. Concerns about the association between RBT and dementia began more than a century ago, but have resurfaced in the last decade with the more recently described chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a tauopathy associated with RBT that has become inextricably linked to conversations about sport-related concussion and mild traumatic brain injury. Accordingly, specific populations such as collision sport athletes and certain military personnel are of particular interest owing to their unique exposure to RBT. The gaps and controversies in our understanding of the epidemiologic factors, mechanism, and clinicopathological correlates of CTE reflect the current reliance on postmortem case series investigations. This review discusses the state of the science of CTE and raises considerations for researching and interpreting cognitive changes in members of at-risk populations. The recent development of pathological diagnostic criteria for CTE represented an important step for differentiating CTE from other neurodegenerative diseases. By comparison, defining the clinical syndrome(s) associated with CTE and the necessary and sufficient symptoms needed for its diagnosis lags behind. The absence of validated in vivo biomarkers of pathological characteristics of CTE and longitudinal tracking with neuropsychological evaluation remains a significant hurdle. Attribution of candidate symptoms in retired athletes to CTE is complicated by the presence of multiple premorbid and comorbid factors affecting cognitive reserve that influence normal or expected cognitive functioning. This is a critical issue in appropriately defining reference groups for normative comparisons. Available data, while limited and complicated by selection bias, indicate that exposure to RBT represents the greatest risk factor for CTE pathological

  19. Clinical appraisal of chronic traumatic encephalopathy: current perspectives and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavett, Brandon E; Cantu, Robert C; Shenton, Martha; Lin, Alexander P; Nowinski, Christopher J; McKee, Ann C; Stern, Robert A

    2011-12-01

    There are currently no consensus-based clinical diagnostic criteria for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). This review provides an update on recent literature pertaining to clinically relevant procedures that--presently or in the future--may be useful for the in-vivo detection, characterization, and/or prediction of CTE. Preliminary evidence about the clinical manifestations of CTE has been accumulating via post-mortem medical record review and interviews of friends or family members of individuals with neuropathologically documented CTE. This evidence suggests that CTE is manifested clinically by changes in cognition (especially memory and executive functioning, with dementia later in the disease course), mood (especially, depression, apathy, and suicidality), personality and behavior (especially poor impulse control and behavioral disinhibition), and movement (including parkinsonism and signs of motor neuron disease). At the present time, evidence regarding CTE has not been confirmed in a prospective study of a cohort at risk for CTE. On the basis of recent research in the fields of dementia and traumatic brain injury, several in-vivo procedures (including neurological examination, neuropsychological assessment, neuroimaging techniques, and blood and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers) each have the potential to contribute unique information about the manifestations of CTE, including clinical and preclinical stages. More research is needed to develop a set of consensus diagnostic criteria that provide a reliable and valid indicator of neuropathologically verified CTE. Until such criteria are developed, the clinical assessment of CTE should be informed by modern research that is of relevance to traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Neurological diseases and pain

    OpenAIRE

    Borsook, David

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequentl...

  1. [Dupuytren disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Pablo; Román, Javier A; Vergara, Jorge

    2012-09-01

    Dupuytren disease (DD) is a connective tissue disorder that consists in fibromatosis of the palmar and digital fascia (in form of nodules or flanges) that leads to the development of flexion contractures of the palm and fingers. The little and ring finger are particularly affected. The disease can limit hand function, reducing the quality of life. The disease can have a traumatic origin and is also associated with conditions such as diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, dyslipidemia, epilepsy and AIDS, among others. However, none of these conditions can fully explain the genesis of DD. A hereditary component is described in 40% of patients and is attributed to an autosomal dominant gene of variable penetrance, probably related to collagen synthesis. However there are also spontaneous and recessive inheritance cases. The diagnosis is clinical and based on physical examination. Treatment ranges from observation or use of injectable collagenase to the surgical option in cases with significant functional limitations.

  2. Traumatic stress, oxidative stress and post-traumatic stress disorder: neurodegeneration and the accelerated-aging hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M W; Sadeh, N

    2014-11-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with elevated risk for a variety of age-related diseases and neurodegeneration. In this paper, we review evidence relevant to the hypothesis that chronic PTSD constitutes a form of persistent life stress that potentiates oxidative stress (OXS) and accelerates cellular aging. We provide an overview of empirical studies that have examined the effects of psychological stress on OXS, discuss the stress-perpetuating characteristics of PTSD, and then identify mechanisms by which PTSD might promote OXS and accelerated aging. We review studies on OXS-related genes and the role that they may have in moderating the effects of PTSD on neural integrity and conclude with a discussion of directions for future research on antioxidant treatments and biomarkers of accelerated aging in PTSD.

  3. Neurobehavioral protection by the neuronal calcium channel blocker ziconotide in a model of traumatic diffuse brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, R F; Verweij, B H; Muizelaar, J P

    2000-11-01

    Abnormal accumulation of intracellular calcium following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is thought to contribute to a cascade of cellular events that lead to neuropathological conditions. Therefore, the possibility that specific calcium channel antagonists might exert neuroprotective effects in TBI has been of interest. The focus of this study was to examine whether Ziconotide produces such neuroprotective effects. The authors report that the acceleration-deceleration model of TBI developed by Marmarou, et al., induces a long-lasting deficit of neuromotor and behavioral function. The voltage-sensitive calcium channel blocker Ziconotide (also known as SNX-111 and CI-1009) exerts neuroprotective effects in this model of diffuse brain injury (DBI) in rats. The dose and time of injection of Ziconotide chosen for the present study was based on the authors' previous biochemical studies of mitochondria. Rats were trained in a series of motor and memory tasks, following which they were subjected to DBI using the Marmarou, et al., model. At 3, 5, and 24 hours, all rats were injected with 2 mg/kg Ziconotide for a total cumulative dose of 6 mg/kg Ziconotide. Control brain-injured animals were injected with an equal volume of saline vehicle at each of these time points. The rats were tested for motor and cognitive performance at 1, 3, 7,14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 days postinjury. Saline-treated rats displayed severe motor and cognitive deficits after DBI. Compared with saline-treated control animals, rats treated with Ziconotide displayed better motor performance during inclined plane, beam balance, and beam walk tests; improved memory while in the radial arm maze; and improved learning while in the Morris water maze. These results demonstrated that the acceleration-deceleration model, which had been developed by Marmarou, et al., induces severe motor and cognitive deficits. We also demonstrated that Ziconotide exhibits substantial neuroprotective activity in this model of TBI

  4. Previous physical exercise alters the hepatic profile of oxidative-inflammatory status and limits the secondary brain damage induced by severe traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Mauro Robson Torres; Ferreira, Ana Paula de Oliveira; Busanello, Guilherme Lago; da Silva, Luís Roberto Hart; da Silveira Junior, Mauro Eduardo Porto; Fiorin, Fernando da Silva; Arrifano, Gabriela; Crespo-López, Maria Elena; Barcelos, Rômulo Pillon; Cuevas, María J; Bresciani, Guilherme; González-Gallego, Javier; Fighera, Michele Rechia; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire

    2017-09-01

    An early inflammatory response and oxidative stress are implicated in the signal transduction that alters both hepatic redox status and mitochondrial function after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Peripheral oxidative/inflammatory responses contribute to neuronal dysfunction after TBI Exercise training alters the profile of oxidative-inflammatory status in liver and protects against acute hyperglycaemia and a cerebral inflammatory response after TBI. Approaches such as exercise training, which attenuates neuronal damage after TBI, may have therapeutic potential through modulation of responses by metabolic organs. The vulnerability of the body to oxidative/inflammatory in TBI is significantly enhanced in sedentary compared to physically active counterparts. Although systemic responses have been described after traumatic brain injury (TBI), little is known regarding potential interactions between brain and peripheral organs after neuronal injury. Accordingly, we aimed to investigate whether a peripheral oxidative/inflammatory response contributes to neuronal dysfunction after TBI, as well as the prophylactic role of exercise training. Animals were submitted to fluid percussion injury after 6 weeks of swimming training. Previous exercise training increased mRNA expression of X receptor alpha and ATP-binding cassette transporter, and decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 expression per se in liver. Interestingly, exercise training protected against hepatic inflammation (COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-6), oxidative stress (decreases in non-protein sulfhydryl and glutathione, as well as increases in 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate oxidation and protein carbonyl), which altered hepatic redox status (increases in myeloperoxidase and superoxide dismutase activity, as well as inhibition of catalase activity) mitochondrial function (decreases in methyl-tetrazolium and Δψ, as well as

  5. [Magneto-encephalographic (MEG) brain recordings during traumatic memory recall in women with post-traumatic stress disorder: A pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottraux, J; Lecaignard, F; Yao, S-N; De Mey-Guillard, C; Haour, F; Delpuech, C; Servan-Schreiber, D

    2015-06-01

    The experiment studied the effects of a short duration exposure to traumatic memories using magneto-encephalography (MEG). Nine right-handed DSM-4 PTSD patients were recruited from a unit for anxiety disorders and an organisation supporting victims of violence. In order to have a homogeneous sample, we included only women who suffered from civilian PTSD. Exclusion criteria were co-morbid major medical illness, metallic dental prostheses that would interfere in the magnetic measurement, and current drug treatment. All participants were free from neurological disease and had normal hearing. They signed a written informed consent form. An ethics committee accepted the study. A tape-recorded voice administered a script-driven imagery. The patients had to imagine, successively, a neutral image, a traumatic memory and rest, while MEG measured brain activities across delta, theta, alpha and beta bands. Each condition lasted three minutes. Heart rate (HR), anxiety and the vividness of mental images were recorded at the end of each phase. MEG power analysis was carried out with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) 8. The signals were averaged for each of the three conditions of threeminutes duration. The dependent variable was a subtracted value: (trauma - rest) - (neutral - rest). The significance threshold was set at Pmemories. Our MEG results are in keeping with previous neuro-imagery studies showing decreased activities in the insula and Broca area during PTSD symptom provocation. However, we did not replicate the activation in the amygdala and the cingulate and prefrontal cortex found in some studies. Moreover, the within-group design, the small sample, and the inclusion of only female patients with milder dissociative symptoms limit our conclusions. The MEG protocol we used may also explain some partial discrepancies with previous MEG studies. However, our aim was to provoke a specific autobiographic recall of a traumatic event unfolding several sequential mental

  6. Neurotherapy of Traumatic Brain Injury/Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms in Vietnam Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David V; Esty, Mary Lee

    2015-10-01

    Previous report suggested the beneficial effects of an adaptation of the Flexyx Neurotherapy System (FNS) for the amelioration of mixed traumatic brain injury/post-traumatic stress symptoms in veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. As a novel variant of electroencephalograph biofeedback, FNS falls within the bioenergy domain of complementary and alternative medicine. Rather than learning voluntary control over the production/inhibition of brain wave patterns, FNS involves offsetting stimulation of brain wave activity by means of an external energy source, specifically, the conduction of electromagnetic energy stimulation via the connecting electroencephalograph cables. Essentially, these procedures subliminally induce strategic distortion of ongoing brain wave activity to presumably facilitate resetting of more adaptive patterns of activity. Reported herein are two cases of Vietnam veterans with mixed traumatic brain injury/post-traumatic stress symptoms, each treated with FNS for 25 sessions. Comparisons of pre- and post-treatment questionnaire assessments revealed notable decreases for all symptoms, suggesting improvements across the broad domains of cognition, pain, sleep, fatigue, and mood/emotion, including post-traumatic stress symptoms, as well as for overall activity levels. Findings suggest FNS treatment may be of potential benefit for the partial amelioration of symptoms, even in some individuals for whom symptoms have been present for decades. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  7. Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Traumatic Grief (BEP-TG): toward integrated treatment of symptoms related to traumatic loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Geert E.; Kleber, Rolf J.; de la Rie, Simone M.; Bos, Jannetta B. A.; Gersons, Berthold P. R.; Boelen, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Traumatic events such as disasters, accidents, war, or criminal violence are often accompanied by the loss of loved ones, and may then give rise to traumatic grief. Traumatic grief refers to a clinical diagnosis of persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD) with comorbid (symptoms of) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or major depressive disorder (MDD) following confrontation with a traumatic loss. Trauma survivors, who are frequently from different cultural backgrounds, have often experienced multiple losses and ambiguous loss (missing family members or friends). Current evidence-based treatments for PTSD do not focus on traumatic grief. Objective To develop a treatment for traumatic grief combining treatment interventions for PTSD and PCBD that may accommodate cultural aspects of grief. Method To provide a rationale for treatment, we propose a cognitive stress model of traumatic grief. Based on this model and on existing evidence-based treatments for PTSD and complicated grief, we developed Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Traumatic Grief (BEP-TG) for the treatment of patients with traumatic grief. The treatment is presented along with a case vignette. Results Processes contributing to traumatic grief include inadequately integrating the memory of the traumatic loss, negative appraisal of the traumatic loss, sensitivity to matching triggers and new stressors, and attempting to avoid distress. BEP-TG targets these processes. The BEP-TG protocol consists of five parts with proven effectiveness in the treatment of PCBD, PTSD, and MDD: information and motivation, grief-focused exposure, memorabilia and writing assignments, finding meaning and activation, and a farewell ritual. Conclusion Tailored to fit the needs of trauma survivors, BEP-TG can be used to address traumatic grief symptoms related to multiple losses and ambiguous loss, as well as cultural aspects of bereavement through its different components. PMID:26154434

  8. Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Traumatic Grief (BEP-TG): toward integrated treatment of symptoms related to traumatic loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Geert E; Kleber, Rolf J; de la Rie, Simone M; Bos, Jannetta B A; Gersons, Berthold P R; Boelen, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic events such as disasters, accidents, war, or criminal violence are often accompanied by the loss of loved ones, and may then give rise to traumatic grief. Traumatic grief refers to a clinical diagnosis of persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD) with comorbid (symptoms of) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or major depressive disorder (MDD) following confrontation with a traumatic loss. Trauma survivors, who are frequently from different cultural backgrounds, have often experienced multiple losses and ambiguous loss (missing family members or friends). Current evidence-based treatments for PTSD do not focus on traumatic grief. To develop a treatment for traumatic grief combining treatment interventions for PTSD and PCBD that may accommodate cultural aspects of grief. To provide a rationale for treatment, we propose a cognitive stress model of traumatic grief. Based on this model and on existing evidence-based treatments for PTSD and complicated grief, we developed Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Traumatic Grief (BEP-TG) for the treatment of patients with traumatic grief. The treatment is presented along with a case vignette. Processes contributing to traumatic grief include inadequately integrating the memory of the traumatic loss, negative appraisal of the traumatic loss, sensitivity to matching triggers and new stressors, and attempting to avoid distress. BEP-TG targets these processes. The BEP-TG protocol consists of five parts with proven effectiveness in the treatment of PCBD, PTSD, and MDD: information and motivation, grief-focused exposure, memorabilia and writing assignments, finding meaning and activation, and a farewell ritual. Tailored to fit the needs of trauma survivors, BEP-TG can be used to address traumatic grief symptoms related to multiple losses and ambiguous loss, as well as cultural aspects of bereavement through its different components.

  9. Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Traumatic Grief (BEP-TG: toward integrated treatment of symptoms related to traumatic loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert E. Smid

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic events such as disasters, accidents, war, or criminal violence are often accompanied by the loss of loved ones, and may then give rise to traumatic grief. Traumatic grief refers to a clinical diagnosis of persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD with comorbid (symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and/or major depressive disorder (MDD following confrontation with a traumatic loss. Trauma survivors, who are frequently from different cultural backgrounds, have often experienced multiple losses and ambiguous loss (missing family members or friends. Current evidence-based treatments for PTSD do not focus on traumatic grief. Objective: To develop a treatment for traumatic grief combining treatment interventions for PTSD and PCBD that may accommodate cultural aspects of grief. Method: To provide a rationale for treatment, we propose a cognitive stress model of traumatic grief. Based on this model and on existing evidence-based treatments for PTSD and complicated grief, we developed Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Traumatic Grief (BEP-TG for the treatment of patients with traumatic grief. The treatment is presented along with a case vignette. Results: Processes contributing to traumatic grief include inadequately integrating the memory of the traumatic loss, negative appraisal of the traumatic loss, sensitivity to matching triggers and new stressors, and attempting to avoid distress. BEP-TG targets these processes. The BEP-TG protocol consists of five parts with proven effectiveness in the treatment of PCBD, PTSD, and MDD: information and motivation, grief-focused exposure, memorabilia and writing assignments, finding meaning and activation, and a farewell ritual. Conclusion: Tailored to fit the needs of trauma survivors, BEP-TG can be used to address traumatic grief symptoms related to multiple losses and ambiguous loss, as well as cultural aspects of bereavement through its different components.

  10. Traumatic lumbar hernia: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torer, Nurkan; Yildirim, Sedat; Tarim, Akin; Colakoglu, Tamer; Moray, Gokhan

    2008-12-01

    Traumatic lumbar hernias are very rare. Here, we present a case of secondary lumbar hernia. A 44-year-old man sustained a crushing injury. On admission, ecchymotic, fluctuating swelling was present on his left flank with normal vital signs. Subcutaneous intestinal segments were revealed at his left flank on abdominal CT. Emergency laparotomy revealed a 10-cm defect on the left postero-lateral abdominal wall. The splenic flexure was herniated through the defect. Herniated segments was reduced, the defect was repaired with a polypropylene mesh graft. There was also a serosal tear and an ischemic area 3mm wide on the splenic flexure and was repaired primarily. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Most traumatic lumbar hernias are caused by blunt trauma. Trauma that causes abdominal wall disruption also may cause intraabdominal organ injury. Abdominal CT is useful in the diagnosis and allows for diagnosis of coexisting organ injury. Emergency laparotomy should be performed to repair possible coexisting injuries.

  11. Trauma and traumatic neurosis: Freud's concepts revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepf, Siegfried; Zepf, Florian D

    2008-04-01

    The authors examine Freud 's concepts of 'trauma', 'protective shield against stimuli ' and 'traumatic neurosis' in the light of recent findings. 'Protective shield against stimuli' is regarded as a biological concept which appears in mental life as the striving to avoid unpleasant affects. 'Trauma' is a twofold concept in that it relates to mental experience and links an external event with the specific after-effects on an individual 's psychic reality. A distinction needs to be made between mentally destructive trauma and affective trauma. A destructive trauma does not break through the protective shield but does breach the pleasure-unpleasure principle, so that in the course of its subsequent mastery it leads to a traumatic neurosis. An affective trauma can be warded off under the rule of the pleasure-unpleasure principle and leads to a psychoneurosis.

  12. Bilateral traumatic expulsive aniridia after phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltra, Erica Z; Chow, Clement C; Lunde, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral traumatic expulsive aniridia after uneventful phacoemulsification through small clear corneal incisions. Phacoemulsification was performed 8 and 13 months prior to the trauma in the left and right eyes, respectively. In both eyes, the intraocular lens and capsular bag were undisturbed after trauma. After resolution of hyphema, transient elevated intraocular pressure, and anterior chamber inflammation, best corrected visual acuity returned to 20/25 in each eye 6 months later. Self-sealing clear corneal wounds likely serve as a decompression valve during blunt trauma, thus preventing devastating intraocular damage and globe rupture. The intraocular lens may absorb the external force, therefore preventing damage to the capsular bag and zonules as well as preventing prolapse of posterior structures. A review of previously reported cases of traumatic aniridia is also presented.

  13. Personalities of adults with traumatic childhood separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Johanna C; Westen, Drew; Levendosky, Alytia A

    2011-12-01

    This study examined personality characteristics and identified personality subtypes of adults with childhood histories of traumatic separations from a parent. Previous work from attachment theory and developmental psychopathology suggests that distinct developmental trajectories might lead to different styles of personality adaptation after an attachment disruption. design: Randomly selected psychologists and psychiatrists provided data on 203 adults with histories of traumatic separations using a personality pathology instrument designed for use by clinically experienced observers, the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure (SWAP-II). Using a Q-factor analysis, 5 distinct personality subtypes were identified: internalizing/avoidant, psychopathic, emotionally dysregulated, hostile/paranoid, and resilient. Initial support for the validity of the subtypes was established, based on Axis I and Axis II pathology, adaptive functioning, developmental history, and family history variables. Both therapeutic interventions and case formulation might be strengthened by considering an individual's personality features and match to one of the identified subtypes. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Forensic Pathology of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnie, J W

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury constitutes a significant proportion of cases requiring forensic examination, and it encompasses (1) blunt, nonmissile head injury, especially involving motor vehicle accidents, and (2) penetrating, missile injury produced by a range of high- and lower-velocity projectiles. This review examines the complex pathophysiology and biomechanics of both types of neurotrauma and assesses the macroscopic and histologic features of component lesions, which may be used to determine the cause and manner of death resulting from an intentional assault or accident. Estimation of the survival time postinjury by pathologic examination is also important where malicious head injury is suspected, in an attempt to ascertain a time at which the traumatic event might have been committed, thereby evaluating the authenticity of statements made by the alleged perpetrator. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Traumatic knee extension deficit (the locked knee)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmark, I C; Neergaard, K; Krogsgaard, M R

    2007-01-01

    In the present study we investigated the validity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy in knees with acute, traumatic extension deficit (the "locked knee"), and evaluated whether arthroscopy of knees with no mechanical pathology could be avoided by MRI evaluation. The study consisted...... of 50 patients who had an acute, traumatic extension deficit of the knee. All patients were submitted to MRI prior to arthroscopy. Following MRI and surgery, standardized forms were filled out, attempting to objectify the findings. The orthopaedic surgeon was not aware of the MRI result prior to surgery......, the following results were calculated for the overall appearance of a lesion able to cause locking: Positive predictive value = 0.85, negative predictive value = 0.77, sensitivity = 0.95, specificity = 0.53. Two knees were erroneously evaluated with no mechanical locking at MRI (one bucket-handle lesion and one...

  16. Levator surgery in post traumatic ptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betharia S

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of levator resection in a large series of traumatic ptosis are reported. The various important points in the assessment of a case of traumatic ptosis alongwith the problems in the surgery are highlighted. The skin approach levator resection was the method of choice in these cases The guidelines regarding the amount of levator resection and the placement of the lid margin in relation to the limbus on the operation table are given. Overcorrection does not seem to be a major problem if the average waiting period before the surgery is of 6 months duration. It is better to err on an overcorrection side as recessing the levator is easier than resection of levator for under correction.

  17. Cognitive retraining in traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diya Nangia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is often associated with cognitive impairments. The psychological sequelae of cognitive deficits and emotional problems contribute significantly to the disability in the patient and to the distress of the family. The study aimed to develop a cognitive retraining programme to enhance cognitive functioning in TBI. 25 years old male presenting with history of left temporal hemorrhagic contusion with cerebral edema underwent 2 months of a cognitive retaining programme, addressing executive functions impairment. A single case experimental design with pre- and post-assessment was adopted to evaluate changes in the patient in response to the intervention. Improvements were found in cognitive functioning, and in symptom reduction and behaviour. The 2 months hospital based cognitive retraining programme was found to be efficacious in ameliorating symptoms and improving cognitive, social and occupational functioning post traumatic brain injury.

  18. Reducing Secondary Insults in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    persons, and leaves 99,000 persons permanently disabled [1]. The total cost for treatment and rehabilitation of patients with brain injuries is...registry based or retrospective or include only secondary insults that occur in the intensive care unit ( ICU ) setting. Most prior investigations have...in the surgical and neurosurgical ICU diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury requiring a diagnostic procedure were eligible for the study. The study

  19. Paclitaxel improves outcome from traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, Donna J.; Garwin, Gregory G.; Cline, Marcella M.; Richards, Todd L.; Yarnykh, Vasily; Mourad, Pierre D.; Ho, Rodney J.Y.; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic interventions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) hold promise to improve outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine if the microtubule stabilizing therapeutic paclitaxel used for more than 20 years in chemotherapy would improve outcome after TBI. We assessed neurological outcome in mice that received direct application of paclitaxel to brain injury from controlled cortical impact (CCI). Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess injury-related morphological changes. Ca...

  20. The hidden price of repeated traumatic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy-Gigi, Einat; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2014-07-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated reduced hippocampal volume in trauma-exposed individuals without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the implications of such a deficit in this non-clinical population are still unclear. Animal and human models of PTSD suggest that hippocampal deficit may result in impaired learning and use of associations between contextual information and aversive events. Previous study has shown that individuals with PTSD have a selective impairment in reversing the negative outcome of context-related information. The aim of this study was to test whether non-PTSD individuals who are repeatedly exposed to traumatic events display similar impairment. To that end, we compared the performance of active-duty firefighters who are frequently exposed to traumatic events as part of their occupational routine and civilian matched-controls with no history of trauma-exposure. We used a novel cue-context reversal paradigm, which separately evaluates reversal of negative and positive outcomes of cue and context-related information. As predicted, we found that while both trauma-exposed firefighters and unexposed matched-controls were able to acquire and retain stimulus-outcome associations, firefighters struggled to learn that a previously negative context is later associated with a positive outcome. This impairment did not correlate with levels of PTSD, anxiety or depressive symptoms. The results suggest that similar to individuals with PTSD, highly exposed individuals fail to associate traumatic outcomes with their appropriate context. This impairment may reflect a possible hidden price of repeated traumatic exposure, which is not necessarily associated with PTSD diagnosis, and may affect the way highly exposed individuals interpret and react to their environment.

  1. Traumatic experiences, alexithymia, and posttraumatic symptomatology

    OpenAIRE

    Eichhorn, Svenja; Brähler, Elmar; Franz, Matthias; Friedrich, Michael; Glaesmer, Heide

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies have established an association between number of traumatic experiences and alexithymia. The present study examines this relationship in a large-scale representative sample of the German general population (N=2,507) and explores the potential mediating effects of posttraumatic symptomatology, particularly avoidance/numbing. Methods: Alexithymia was assessed with the German version of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20). Posttraumatic symptomatology was operat...

  2. Traumatic avulsion of extraocular muscles: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilza Minguini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We described the clinical, surgical details and results (motor and sensory of the retrieving procedure of traumatically avulsed muscles in three patients with no previous history of strabismus or diplopia seen in the Department of Ophthalmology, State University of Campinas, Brazil. The slipped muscle portion was reinserted at the original insertion and under the remaining stump, which was sutured over the reinserted muscle. For all three cases there was recovery of single binocular vision and stereopsis.

  3. Traumatic fistula:the case for reparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arletty Pinel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available As a conflict strategy, women are often sexually assaulted using sticks, guns, branches of trees and bottles. Women’s genitals are deliberately destroyed, some permanently. Traumatic fistula often results. As with victims of torture and other grave human rights abuses, there exists an obligation to restore the women to health as far as possible and to provide reparation for their violations.

  4. Paternal mental health following perceived traumatic childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Christian; Sharman, Rachael; Reed, Rachel

    2016-10-01

    the objective behind the current study was to explore the experiences and perceptions of fathers after childbirth trauma, an area of minimal research. This is part two of a two-part series conducted in 2014 researching the mental health of fathers after experiencing a perceived traumatic childbirth. qualitative methodology using semi-structured interviews and reporting of qualitative questions administered in part one's online survey (Inglis, 2014). interviews conducted face-to-face at an Australian University or on Skype. sixty-nine responded to the online qualitative questions and of these seven were interviewed. thematic analysis of verbal and written qualitative responses. thematic analysis of qualitative survey data and interviews found a global theme 'standing on the sideline' which encompassed two major themes of witnessing trauma: unknown territory, and the aftermath: dealing with it, and respective subthemes. according to the perceptions and experiences of the fathers, there was a significant lack of communication between birthing teams and fathers, and fathers experienced a sense of marginalisation before, during, and after the traumatic childbirth. The findings of this study suggest that these factors contributed to the perception of trauma in the current sample. Whilst many fathers reported the negative impact of the traumatic birth on themselves and their relationships, some reported post-traumatic growth from the experience and others identified friends and family as a valuable source of support. improved communication between midwifery staff and fathers before, during and after childbirth may reduce the rates of paternal postpartum mental health difficulties and experiences of trauma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gene Therapy for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0498 TITLE: Gene Therapy for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven C...COVERED 30Sept 2014 - 29 Sept 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Gene Therapy for Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis 5b. GRANT NUMBER...the research. 1. KEYWORDS: Provide a brief list of keywords (limit to 20 words). Osteoarthritis (OA) is a

  6. Advanced monitoring in traumatic brain injury: microdialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, KLH; Young, AMH; Hutchinson, PJ

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: Here, we review the present state-of-the-art of microdialysis for monitoring patients with severe traumatic brain injury, highlighting the newest developments. Microdialysis has evolved in neurocritical care to become an established bedside monitoring modality that can reveal unique information on brain chemistry. Recent findings: A major advance is recent consensus guidelines for microdialysis use and interpretation. Other advances include insight obtained from microdi...

  7. Closed traumatic rupture of finger flexor pulleys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, W H; Kuzma, G R; Bynum, D K

    1994-09-01

    Nine patients are described with closed traumatic rupture of the digital flexor pulley system. All presented with significant flexion contractures of the proximal interphalangeal joint and bow-stringing of the flexor tendons. In seven patients, the pathology was verified at surgery and pulley reconstruction provided a good result. The diagnoses in the other patients, treated conservatively, were verified by tenogram and magnetic resonance imaging.

  8. Traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Roberto Polydoro Rosa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The shoulder is the most unstable joint in the human body. Traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder is a common condition, which, especially in young patients, is associated with high recurrence rates. The effectiveness of non-surgical treatments when compared to surgical ones is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to review the literature for current concepts and updates regarding the treatment of this condition.

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury and Sleep Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Viola-Saltzman, Mari; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is common following traumatic brain injury (TBI), affecting 30–70% of individuals, many occurring after mild injuries. Insomnia, fatigue and sleepiness are the most frequent post-TBI sleep complaints with narcolepsy (with or without cataplexy), sleep apnea (obstructive and/or central), periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias occurring less commonly. In addition, depression, anxiety and pain are common TBI co-morbidities with substantial influence on sleep quality. T...

  10. Imaging Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Biomedical Engineering Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Paul; Tuyl, John Van; Engel, Robin

    2016-01-01

    A disease initially associated with boxers ninety years ago, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is now recognized as a significant risk to boxers, American football players, ice hockey players, military personnel or anyone to whom recurrent head injuries are a distinct possibility. Diagnosis is currently confirmed at autopsy, although CTE's presumed sufferers have symptoms of depression, suicidal thoughts, mood and personality changes, and loss of memory. CTE sufferers also complain of losing cognitive ability, dysfunction in everyday activities, inability to keep regular employment, violent tendencies and marital strife. Dementia may develop over the long term. Unfortunately, there is no clear consensus in regards to pathology, with both number and severity of head injuries being linked to disease progression. Despite the slow advancement of this disease, there are no clinical methods to diagnose or monitor prognosis in presumed patients, limiting clinicians' efforts to symptom management. The lack of diagnostic tools fuels the need for biomedical engineers to develop techniques for in vivo detection of CTE. This review examines efforts made with various magnetic resonance and nuclear imaging techniques, with a view towards improving the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic imaging for CTE.

  11. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: the dangers of getting "dinged".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhan, Shaheen E; Kirchgessner, Annette

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a form of neurodegeneration that results from repetitive brain trauma. Not surprisingly, CTE has been linked to participation in contact sports such as boxing, hockey and American football. In American football getting "dinged" equates to moments of dizziness, confusion, or grogginess that can follow a blow to the head. There are approximately 100,000 to 300,000 concussive episodes occurring in the game of American football alone each year. It is believed that repetitive brain trauma, with or possibly without symptomatic concussion, sets off a cascade of events that result in neurodegenerative changes highlighted by accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau and neuronal TAR DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43). Symptoms of CTE may begin years or decades later and include a progressive decline of memory, as well as depression, poor impulse control, suicidal behavior, and, eventually, dementia similar to Alzheimer's disease. In some individuals, CTE is also associated with motor neuron disease similar to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Given the millions of athletes participating in contact sports that involve repetitive brain trauma, CTE represents an important public health issue. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the etiology of CTE. It is now known that those instances of mild concussion or "dings" that we may have previously not noticed could very well be causing progressive neurodegenerative damage to a player's brain. In the future, focused and intensive study of the risk factors could potentially uncover methods to prevent and treat this disease.

  12. Our traumatic neurosis and its brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, A

    2001-12-01

    During the nineteenth century, physicians either discovered or invented a variety of clinical autobiography called "traumatic memory." Freud produced two versions of this memory, the final version in the 1920s. A revolutionary nosology (DSM-III), adopted in 1980, promised to extirpate Freud and the concept of neurosis from American psychiatry. However, it made a tacit exception for Freud's concept of traumatic neurosis, renaming it "postraumatic stress disorder." The following decades have been a period of intense clinical and scientific interest in this disorder. An influential research program has investigated traumatic neurosis and its brain through variations in cortisol excretion. I describe the history of this program, and examine its distinctive knowledge product. its running narrative of its achievements. The narrative's structure is analyzed and found to resemble a crossword puzzle constructed from heterogenous kinds of inference, recalling The Interpretation of Dreams. My conclusion is that, far from extirpating Freud's neurosis, biological research has secured a place for it in today's post-Freudian psychiatry.

  13. Hormonal therapy in traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Parker E; Patil, Arun A; Chamczuk, Andrea J; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injuries are major health problems and the underlying pathophysiological events and treatment strategies are currently under investigation. In this article, we critically reviewed the literature investigating the effects of estrogen, progesterone, and human chorionic gonadotropin on spinal cord damage or preservation following traumatic spinal cord injury. The National Library of Medicine database was searched through December 2016 using PubMed for articles addressing the clinical relevance of the hormones to improve neural structural integrity following traumatic spinal cord injury. It was found that each of these hormones, through varied mechanisms, could serve to reduce the harmful effects associated with spinal cord injury, and could aid in restoring some function to the injured spinal cord in the animal models. The most striking effects were seen in the reduction of inflammation commonly linked to injury of the central nervous system. The effects of human chorionic gonadotropin administration following spinal cord injury have received far less attention than those of either estrogen or progesterone, and additional inquiry could be of general benefit. In this article, we discussed the outstanding questions and suggested future directions for further investigation.

  14. Diabetes Insipidus after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capatina, Cristina; Paluzzi, Alessandro; Mitchell, Rosalid; Karavitaki, Niki

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many age groups. Neuroendocrine dysfunction has been recognized as a consequence of TBI and consists of both anterior and posterior pituitary insufficiency; water and electrolyte abnormalities (diabetes insipidus (DI) and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH)) are amongst the most challenging sequelae. The acute head trauma can lead (directly or indirectly) to dysfunction of the hypothalamic neurons secreting antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or of the posterior pituitary gland causing post-traumatic DI (PTDI). PTDI is usually diagnosed in the first days after the trauma presenting with hypotonic polyuria. Frequently, the poor general status of most patients prevents adequate fluid intake to compensate the losses and severe dehydration and hypernatremia occur. Management consists of careful monitoring of fluid balance and hormonal replacement. PTDI is associated with high mortality, particularly when presenting very early following the injury. In many surviving patients, the PTDI is transient, lasting a few days to a few weeks and in a minority of cases, it is permanent requiring management similar to that offered to patients with non-traumatic central DI. PMID:26239685

  15. Traumatic atlantoaxial dislocation with Hangman fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Saad B; Martinez, Maximilian; Shah, Neel P; Vives, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Traumatic bilateral-atlantoaxial dislocations are rare injuries. Hangman fractures, conversely, represent 4% to 7% of all cervical fractures and frequently involve a combination C1-C2 fracture pattern. Presently, there is no report in the English literature of a traumatic C2-spondylolisthesis associated with a C1-C2 rotatory dislocation. This injury complex cannot be cataloged using current classification schemes and no established treatment recommendations exist. To report a unique case of a Hangman fracture associated with bilateral C1-C2 rotatory-dislocation, which does not fit into existing classification systems, and discuss our treatment approach. A clinical case report and review of the literature. Chart review and analysis of relevant literature. There were no study-specific conflicts of interest. A 26-year-old man sustained a traumatic C2-spondylolisthesis along with C1-C2 rotatory subluxation in an automobile collision. The patient was originally placed in a halo crown and vest and then taken for an open reduction and stabilization through a posterior approach for persistent C1-C2 subluxation. The patient is currently 16 months postoperative and back to work as a plumber. The injury complex encountered cannot be described using the available classification systems. Our treatment included initial stabilization with halo placement, followed by a posterior C1, C2, and C3 segmental reduction and fixation resulting in radiographic fusion and a good clinical outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Catecholamines and cognition after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Peter O; Mehta, Mitul A; Sharp, David J

    2016-09-01

    Cognitive problems are one of the main causes of ongoing disability after traumatic brain injury. The heterogeneity of the injuries sustained and the variability of the resulting cognitive deficits makes treating these problems difficult. Identifying the underlying pathology allows a targeted treatment approach aimed at cognitive enhancement. For example, damage to neuromodulatory neurotransmitter systems is common after traumatic brain injury and is an important cause of cognitive impairment. Here, we discuss the evidence implicating disruption of the catecholamines (dopamine and noradrenaline) and review the efficacy of catecholaminergic drugs in treating post-traumatic brain injury cognitive impairments. The response to these therapies is often variable, a likely consequence of the heterogeneous patterns of injury as well as a non-linear relationship between catecholamine levels and cognitive functions. This individual variability means that measuring the structure and function of a person's catecholaminergic systems is likely to allow more refined therapy. Advanced structural and molecular imaging techniques offer the potential to identify disruption to the catecholaminergic systems and to provide a direct measure of catecholamine levels. In addition, measures of structural and functional connectivity can be used to identify common patterns of injury and to measure the functioning of brain 'networks' that are important for normal cognitive functioning. As the catecholamine systems modulate these cognitive networks, these measures could potentially be used to stratify treatment selection and monitor response to treatment in a more sophisticated manner. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  17. A case report of Traumatic Asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic asphyxia is a condition presenting with cervicofacial cyanosis and edema, subconjunctival hemorrhage, and petechial hemorrhages of the face, neck, and upper chest that occurs due to a compressive force to the thoracoabdominal region.In this case report a 52 years old lady who was brought to the mortuary because of death due to traumatic asphyxia as a result of being stampeded by her own cows upon her chest was discussed. Congestion on both the conjunctiva, cyanosis on chin and adjacent upper left side of neck found with a well demarcated area observed between the cyanosed area over face and the normal area of neck. Hematoma was present in the chin and the adjacent neck region.Apart from quickly eliminating organ pathologies and initiation of supportive therapy in a case of traumatic asphyxia, possibility of formation of hematoma in neck after few hours of getting injured should also be considered, as this type of hematoma may contribute to the cause of death.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i3.12777 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol-10, No-3, 51-55

  18. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Rewar S; Mirdha D; Rewar P

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex mental disorder with psychological and emotional components, caused by exposure to single or repeated extreme traumatic events found in war, terrorist attacks, natural or man-caused disasters, and by violent personal assaults and accidents. In recent years, armed conflicts in the Middle East have resulted in high rates of exposure to traumatic events. Despite the increasing demand of mental health care provision, ongoing violence limits conve...

  19. Traumatic Facial Diplegia and Horner Syndrome: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jonathan; Toaff, Jacob S; Margalit, Nevo; Salame, Khalil

    2007-08-01

    Traumatic facial diplegia is an uncommon pathology, and is usually associated with bitemporal bone fractures. Traumatic Horner syndrome is mostly associated with carotid artery dissection. We present a case with traumatic facial diplegia and a unilateral Horner syndrome where the mechanisms of injury were unusual. The patient had developed his neurological deficits 9 days following trauma. We discuss the mechanisms of the facial palsy and Horner syndrome and the importance of their diagnosis.

  20. Witnessing traumatic events causes severe behavioral impairments in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Patki, Gaurav; Solanki, Naimesh; Salim, Samina

    2014-01-01

    Witnessing a traumatic event but not directly experiencing it can be psychologically quite damaging. In North America alone, ~30% of individuals who witness a traumatic event develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While effects of direct trauma are evident, consequences of indirect or secondary trauma are often ignored. Also unclear is the role of social support in the consequences of these experiences. The social defeat paradigm, which involves aggressive encounters by a large Long–E...

  1. Vicarious traumatization, secondary traumatic stress, and burnout in sexual assault and domestic violence agency staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Stephanie; Jenkins, Sharon Rae

    2003-02-01

    This study investigated three occupational hazards of therapy with trauma victims: vicarious trauma and secondary traumatic stress (or "compassion fatigue"), which describe therapists' adverse reactions to clients' traumatic material, and burnout, a stress response experienced in many emotionally demanding "people work" jobs. Among 101 trauma counselors, client exposure workload and being paid as a staff member (vs. volunteer) were related to burnout sub-scales, but not as expected to overall burnout or vicarious trauma, secondary traumatic stress, or general distress. More educated counselors and those seeing more clients reported less vicarious trauma. Younger counselors and those with more trauma counseling experience reported more emotional exhaustion. Findings have implications for training, treatment, and agency support systems.

  2. Feedback Error Learning in neuromotor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Abraham K.

    This thesis is concerned with adaptive human motor control. Adaptation is a highly desirable characteristic of any biological system. Failure is an undesirable, yet very real, characteristic of the human motor control systems. Variability is a ubiquitous observation in human movements that has no direct analogue in the design and analysis of robotic control algorithms. This thesis attempts to link these three aspects of motor control under the constraints of a biologically inspired control framework termed Feedback Error Learning (FEL). Utilizing nonlinear and adaptive control methods we prove conditions for which the FEL framework is stable and successful learning can occur. Utilizing singular perturbation methods, we derive conditions for which the system is guaranteed to fail. Variability is analyzed using Ito Calculus and stochastic Lyapunov functionals where signal dependent noise, a commonly observed phenomenon, enters in the learning algorithm. We also show how signal dependent noise might benefit biological control systems despite the inherent variability introduced into the motor control loops. Lastly, we investigate a force tracking control task, where subjects are asked to track a time-varying plant. Using basic control and system identification techniques, we probe the human motor learning system and extract learning rates with respect to the FEL model.

  3. [The features of diagnosis and treatment of traumatic and non-traumatic pulmonary bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielyan, Sh N; Abakumov, M M; Tarabrin, E A; Kokov, L S; Gasanov, A M; Wilk, A P; Saprin, A A

    2017-01-01

    To analyze an efficacy of differentiated approach for pulmonary bleeding of different etiology and severity. The study included 134 cases of pulmonary bleeding for the period 2006-2015 including 53 patients with traumatic and 81 with non-traumatic etiology. Men/women ratio was 2.7:1, mean age was 43 years. Comparative retrospective analysis of X-ray and CT data in diagnosis of bleeding source was performed. Bronchoscopy was used to confirm these data. There were 43 endovascular examinations including 40 cases of bronchial arteriography (BAG). X-ray and CT-signs of bleeding source were detected more often in case of traumatic pulmonary bleeding (62.3% and 93%) compared with non-traumatic (27.2 and 54%; p<0.05). Bronchoscopy revealed ongoing pulmonary bleeding in 40 (30%) patients, completed - in 94 (70%) patients. Indirect angiographic signs were the most frequent for pulmonary bleeding origin: hypervascularization (32.6%), bronchial-pulmonary shunts (23.2%) and bronchial artery dilatation (20.9%). 17 patients with ongoing bleeding underwent bronchial obstruction with adequate hemostasis in all cases. Endovascular interventions included bronchial arteries embolization (EBA) (33), occlusion of intercostal arteries (3) and segmental branches of low-lobar pulmonary artery (1), aortic stenting (1). Early efficacy of EBA was 97% with 2 month recurrence of pulmonary bleeding near 12.5%. Ongoing traumatic pulmonary bleeding was an indication for emergency thoracotomy in 18.9% compared with 12.3% for non-traumatic bleeding when surgery was made after endoscopic and endovascular hemostasis. Differentiated approach depending on etiology and severity of pulmonary bleeding improves outcomes and reduces the number of operations for ongoing severe bleeding.

  4. What is the Relationship of Traumatic Brain Injury to Dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Mario F

    2017-01-01

    There is a long history linking traumatic brain injury (TBI) with the development of dementia. Despite significant reservations, such as recall bias or concluding causality for TBI, a summary of recent research points to several conclusions on the TBI-dementia relationship. 1) Increasing severity of a single moderate-to-severe TBI increases the risk of subsequent Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common type of dementia. 2) Repetitive, often subconcussive, mild TBIs increases the risk for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative neuropathology. 3) TBI may be a risk factor for other neurodegenerative disorders that can be associated with dementia. 4) TBI appears to lower the age of onset of TBI-related neurocognitive syndromes, potentially adding "TBI cognitive-behavioral features". The literature further indicates several specific risk factors for TBI-associated dementia: 5) any blast or blunt physical force to the head as long as there is violent head displacement; 6) decreased cognitive and/or neuronal reserve and the related variable of older age at TBI; and 7) the presence of apolipoprotein E ɛ4 alleles, a genetic risk factor for AD. Finally, there are neuropathological features relating TBI with neurocognitive syndromes: 8) acute TBI results in amyloid pathology and other neurodegenerative proteinopathies; 9) CTE shares features with neurodegenerative dementias; and 10) TBI results in white matter tract and neural network disruptions. Although further research is needed, these ten findings suggest that dose-dependent effects of violent head displacement in vulnerable brains predispose to dementia; among several potential mechanisms is the propagation of abnormal proteins along damaged white matter networks.

  5. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy pathology in a neurodegenerative disorders brain bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, Kevin F; Ross, Owen A; Cormier, Kerry A; Walton, Ronald L; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Johnston, Amelia E; DeSaro, Pamela; Boylan, Kevin B; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Rademakers, Rosa; Boeve, Bradley F; McKee, Ann C; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-12-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder linked to repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) and characterized by deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau at the depths of sulci. We sought to determine the presence of CTE pathology in a brain bank for neurodegenerative disorders for individuals with and without a history of contact sports participation. Available medical records of 1721 men were reviewed for evidence of past history of injury or participation in contact sports. Subsequently, cerebral cortical samples were processed for tau immunohistochemistry in cases with a documented history of sports exposure as well as age- and disease-matched men and women without such exposure. For cases with available frozen tissue, genetic analysis was performed for variants in APOE, MAPT, and TMEM106B. Immunohistochemistry revealed 21 of 66 former athletes had cortical tau pathology consistent with CTE. CTE pathology was not detected in 198 individuals without exposure to contact sports, including 33 individuals with documented single-incident TBI sustained from falls, motor vehicle accidents, domestic violence, or assaults. Among those exposed to contact sports, those with CTE pathology did not differ from those without CTE pathology with respect to noted clinicopathologic features. There were no significant differences in genetic variants for those with CTE pathology, but we observed a slight increase in MAPT H1 haplotype, and there tended to be fewer homozygous carriers of the protective TMEM106B rs3173615 minor allele in those with sports exposure and CTE pathology compared to those without CTE pathology. In conclusion, this study has identified a small, yet significant, subset of individuals with neurodegenerative disorders and concomitant CTE pathology. CTE pathology was only detected in individuals with documented participation in contact sports. Exposure to contact sports was the greatest risk factor for CTE pathology. Future

  6. Traumatic brain injury in mice and pentadecapeptide BPC 157 effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Mario; Jandric, Ivan; Marovic, Anton; Gjurasin, Miroslav; Perovic, Darko; Radic, Bozo; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Kolenc, Danijela; Brcic, Luka; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2010-02-25

    Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, an anti-ulcer peptide, efficient in inflammatory bowel disease trials (PL 14736), no toxicity reported, improved muscle crush injury. After an induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice by a falling weight, BPC 157 regimens (10.0microg, 10.0ng/kgi.p.) demonstrated a marked attenuation of damage with an improved early outcome and a minimal postponed mortality throughout a 24h post-injury period. Ultimately, the traumatic lesions (subarachnoidal and intraventricular haemorrhage, brain laceration, haemorrhagic laceration) were less intense and consecutive brain edema had considerably improved. Given prophylactically (30 min before TBI) the improved conscious/unconscious/death ratio in TBI-mice was after force impulses of 0.068 Ns, 0.093 Ns, 0.113 Ns, 0.130 Ns, 0.145 Ns, and 0.159 Ns. Counteraction (with a reduction of unconsciousness, lower mortality) with both microg- and ng-regimens included the force impulses of 0.068-0.145 Ns. A higher regimen presented effectiveness also against the maximal force impulse (0.159 Ns). Furthermore, BPC 157 application immediately prior to injury was beneficial in mice subjected to force impulses of 0.093 Ns-TBI. For a more severe force impulse (0.130 Ns, 0.145 Ns, or 0159 Ns), the time-relation to improve the conscious/unconscious/death ratio was: 5 min (0.130 Ns-TBI), 20 min (0.145 Ns-TBI) or 30 min (0.159 Ns-TBI). Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dementia resulting from traumatic brain injury: what is the pathology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Sharon; Scher, Ann I; Perl, Daniel P; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2012-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the earliest illnesses described in human history and remains a major source of morbidity and mortality in the modern era. It is estimated that 2% of the US population lives with long-term disabilities due to a prior TBI, and incidence and prevalence rates are even higher in developing countries. One of the most feared long-term consequences of TBIs is dementia, as multiple epidemiologic studies show that experiencing a TBI in early or midlife is associated with an increased risk of dementia in late life. The best data indicate that moderate and severe TBIs increase risk of dementia between 2- and 4-fold. It is less clear whether mild TBIs such as brief concussions result in increased dementia risk, in part because mild head injuries are often not well documented and retrospective studies have recall bias. However, it has been observed for many years that multiple mild TBIs as experienced by professional boxers are associated with a high risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a type of dementia with distinctive clinical and pathologic features. The recent recognition that CTE is common in retired professional football and hockey players has rekindled interest in this condition, as has the recognition that military personnel also experience high rates of mild TBIs and may have a similar syndrome. It is presently unknown whether dementia in TBI survivors is pathophysiologically similar to Alzheimer disease, CTE, or some other entity. Such information is critical for developing preventive and treatment strategies for a common cause of acquired dementia. Herein, we will review the epidemiologic data linking TBI and dementia, existing clinical and pathologic data, and will identify areas where future research is needed.

  8. The effects of clopidogrel on elderly traumatic brain injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David K; Lurie, Fedor; Wong, Linda L

    2008-12-01

    Patients are living longer with cardiovascular disease managed with antiplatelet drugs. These seniors are asked to be more physically active and are prone to falls or injuries. Few have studied the mortality or morbidity from anticoagulants in patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBI). With the increasing use of clopidogrel in the elderly, studies on the consequences of TBI are warranted. This is a retrospective case-controlled study using a trauma data registry of 3,817 closed head trauma cases (2001-2005). Patients with preinjury use of clopidogrel, aspirin or warfarin, and evidence of traumatic intracranial bleeding were identified (n = 131). These were compared with a frequency-matched control group (n = 178) with similar age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale, and Injury Severity Scores. Main outcome measure included mortality, hospital or intensive care unit duration, and discharge disposition. Of 131 patients on anticoagulants, patients on clopidogrel (n = 21) were more likely to die (OR = 14.7; 95% CI: 2.3-93.6) and be discharged to an inpatient long-term facility (OR = 3.25; 95%CI: 1.06-9.96). Length of hospital stay and intensive care unit stay were not different from control. Mortality in aspirin patients (n = 90) and warfarin patients (n = 20) did not differ from control. Warfarin patients had increased hospital and ICU stay (10.6 and 5.3 days) when compared with the control (4.7 and 0.9 days, respectively). TBI patients on clopidogrel may have increased long-term disability and fatal consequences when compared with patients who are not on these drugs or on other anticoagulants. Patients on clopidogrel should be advised of safety when engaging in potentially dangerous activities to avoid the consequences of TBI.

  9. [Prognosis in pediatric traumatic brain injury. A dynamic cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Solís, María G; Villa-Manzano, Alberto I; Sánchez-Mosco, Dalia I; Vargas-Lares, José de Jesús; Plascencia-Fernández, Irma

    2013-01-01

    traumatic brain injury is a main cause of hospital admission and death in children. Our objective was to identify prognostic factors of pediatric traumatic brain injury. this was a dynamic cohort study of traumatic brain injury with 6 months follow-up. The exposition was: mild or moderate/severe traumatic brain injury, searching for prognosis (morbidity-mortality and decreased Glasgow scale). Relative risk and logistic regression was estimated for prognostic factors. we evaluated 440 patients with mild traumatic brain injury and 98 with moderate/severe traumatic brain injury. Morbidity for mild traumatic brain injury was 1 %; for moderate/severe traumatic brain injury, 5 %. There were no deaths. Prognostic factors for moderate/severe traumatic brain injury were associated injuries (RR = 133), fractures (RR = 60), street accidents (RR = 17), night time accidents (RR = 2.3) and weekend accidents (RR = 2). Decreased Glasgow scale was found in 9 %, having as prognostic factors: visible injuries (RR = 3), grown-up supervision (RR = 2.5) and time of progress (RR = 1.6). there should be a prognosis established based on kinetic energy of the injury and not only with Glasgow Scale.

  10. Transcatheter device closure of a traumatic ventricular septal defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Kasem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A traumatic ventricular septal defect (VSD resulting from blunt chest injury is a very rare event in children. The clinical symptoms and timing of presentation are variable, so diagnosis and management of traumatic VSD may be challenging. Decision to close the traumatic VSD is usually based on a combination of severity of heart failure symptoms, hemodynamics, and defect size. We present a case of a 7-year-old boy who was run over by a truck and presented with head and liver injury initially. He was subsequently found to have a traumatic VSD. The VSD was closed percutaneously.

  11. Client-centred therapy, post-traumatic stress disorder and post-traumatic growth: theoretical perspectives and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Stephen

    2004-03-01

    In practice it is not unusual for client-centred therapists to work with people who have experienced traumatic events. However, client-centred therapy is not usually considered within texts on traumatic stress and questions have been raised over the appropriateness of client-centred therapy with trauma survivors. The present study shows how, although he was writing well before the introduction of the term 'post-traumatic stress disorder', Carl Rogers provided a theory of therapy and personality that contains an account of threat-related psychological processes largely consistent with contemporary trauma theory. Rogers' theory provides the conceptual underpinnings to the client-centred and experiential ways of working with traumatized people. Furthermore, Rogers' theory provides an understanding of post-traumatic growth processes, and encourages therapists to adopt a more positive psychological perspective to their understanding of how people adjust to traumatic events.

  12. [Non-traumatic vitreous hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conart, J-B; Berrod, J-P

    2016-02-01

    Spontaneous vitreous hemorrhage is a serious disease whose incidence is 7 per 100,000 people per year. Posterior vitreous detachment with or without retinal tear, diabetic retinopathy, vascular proliferation after retinal vein occlusion, age-related macular degeneration and Terson's syndrome are the most common causes. Repeated ultrasonography may ignore a retinal tear or detachment and delay vitrectomy that is the only treatment for serious forms. The occurrence of retinal tear or detachment is a surgical emergency as well as rubeosis or diabetic tractional retinal detachment involving the macula. Intravitreal injection of antiangiogenic agents are helpful in clearing the vitreous cavity, facilitating laser photocoagulation and reducing the risks of bleeding during preretinal neovascular membranes dissection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Post-traumatic stress symptoms and post-traumatic growth in 223 childhood cancer survivors: predictive risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eTremolada

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With modern therapies and supportive care, survival rates of childhood cancer have increased considerably. However, there are long-term psychological sequelae of these treatments that may not manifest until pediatric survivors are into adulthood. The prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD in young adult survivors of childhood cancer ranges from 6.2% to 22%; associated risk factors are young age at the assessment, female gender, low education level and some disease-related factors. The aim of this study was to investigate, in adolescent and young adult (AYA survivors of childhood cancer, the incidence and severity of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS, and to identify the risk factors and the associated post-traumatic growth (PTG index.Participants were 223 AYA cancer survivors recruited during follow-up visits in the Oncohematology Clinic of the Department of Child and Woman’s Health, University of Padua. Data were collected from self-report questionnaires on PTSS incidence, PTG mean score, perceived social support, and medical and socio-demographic factors. Ex-patients’ mean age at the assessment was 19.33 years (SD = 3.01, 15-25, 123 males and 100 females, with a mean of years off-therapy of 9.64 (SD=4.17. Most (52.5% had survived an hematological disorder and 47.5% a solid tumor when they were aged, on average, 8.02 years (SD=4.40.The main results indicated a moderate presence of clinical (≥9 symptoms: 9.4% and sub-clinical PTSS (6-8 symptoms: 11.2%, with the avoidance criterion most often encountered. Re-experience symptoms and PTG mean score were significantly associated (r=0.24 p=0.0001. A hierarchical regression model (R2 = 0.08; F = 1.46; p = 0.05 identified female gender (β = 0.16; p = 0.05 and less perceived social support (β = -0.43; p = 0.05 as risk factors to developing PTSS. Another hierarchical regression model assessed the possible predictors of the PTG total score (R2 = 0.36; F = 9.1; p = 0.0001, with

  14. Post-traumatic Stress Symptoms and Post-traumatic Growth in 223 Childhood Cancer Survivors: Predictive Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremolada, Marta; Bonichini, Sabrina; Basso, Giuseppe; Pillon, Marta

    2016-01-01

    With modern therapies and supportive care, survival rates of childhood cancer have increased considerably. However, there are long-term psychological sequelae of these treatments that may not manifest until pediatric survivors are into adulthood. The prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder in young adult survivors of childhood cancer ranges from 6.2 to 22%; associated risk factors are young age at the assessment, female gender, low education level, and some disease-related factors. The aim of this study was to investigate, in adolescent and young adult (AYA) survivors of childhood cancer, the incidence and severity of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSSs), and to identify the risk factors and the associated post-traumatic growth (PTG) index. Participants were 223 AYA cancer survivors recruited during follow-up visits in the Oncohematology Clinic of the Department of Child and Woman's Health, University of Padua. Data were collected from self-report questionnaires on PTSS incidence, PTG mean score, perceived social support, and medical and socio-demographic factors. Ex-patients' mean age at the assessment was 19.33 years (SD = 3.01, 15-25), 123 males and 100 females, with a mean of years off-therapy of 9.64 (SD = 4.17). Most (52.5%) had survived an hematological disorder and 47.5% a solid tumor when they were aged, on average, 8.02 years (SD = 4.40). The main results indicated a moderate presence of clinical (≥9 symptoms: 9.4%) and sub-clinical PTSS (6-8 symptoms: 11.2%), with the avoidance criterion most often encountered. Re-experience symptoms and PTG mean score were significantly associated (r = 0.24; p = 0.0001). A hierarchical regression model (R (2) = 0.08; F = 1.46; p = 0.05) identified female gender (β = 0.16; p = 0.05) and less perceived social support (β = -0.43; p = 0.05) as risk factors to developing PTSS. Another hierarchical regression model assessed the possible predictors of the PTG total score (R (2) = 0.36; F = 9.1; p = 0.0001), with

  15. A case of perforating injury of eyeball and traumatic cataract caused by acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Perforating globe injury is the leading cause of monocular blindness and vision loss. A 58-year-old male was injured by acupuncture needle during acupuncture treatment for his cerebral infarction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of perforating injury of the eyeball and traumatic cataract caused by acupuncture. The patient was hospitalized due to diagnosis of perforating ocular injury, traumatic cataract, and corneal and iris perforating injury. Moreover, he had to accept treatments of phacoemulsification, anterior vitrectomy along with intraocular lens implantation in the sulcus to improve his visual acuity. As acupuncture therapy has been widely performed for various diseases and achieved highly approval, the aim of this report is to remind acupuncturists operating accurately to avoid unnecessary injury during the treatment process, or the cure can also become the weapon.

  16. Summary of the findings of the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, J.; Cancelliere, C.; Cassidy, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis (ICoMP) formed to update the original WHO Task Force results. This summary review highlights important clinical findings from the full ICoMP results including the current evidence on the course and prognosis of recovery after MTBI in diverse patient populations (e.g., adults......, athletes and children) and injury environments (e.g., motor vehicle collisions) as well as on the risk of long-term outcomes after MTBI, such as Parkinson's disease and dementia. Additional clinical areas of interest in MTBI are also discussed including the similarities between MTBI and other traumatic...... injuries and the risk of Second Impact Syndrome after sport concussion. Clinicians can use this information to help inform patients on the likely course of recovery after MTBI/concussion and guide better decision-making in the care of these patients....

  17. Bilateral spontaneous non-traumatic rupture of the Achilles tendon: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widdowson David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present an interesting case of spontaneous non-traumatic bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendons, which is a rare condition. Delayed or missed diagnosis of Achilles tendon ruptures by primary treating physicians is relatively common. Case report A 78-year-old Caucasian woman presented with spontaneous non-traumatic bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendons. Her symptoms started two days after she took ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily for a urinary tract infection and prednisolone 30 mg once daily for chronic obstructive airway disease. Conclusion This case report aims to increase the awareness of this rare condition, which should be borne in mind with regard to patients who are on steroid therapy and are concurrently started on fluoroquinolones.

  18. Self-reported potentially traumatic life events and symptoms of post-traumatic stress and dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Doris; Gustafsson, Per E; Svedin, Carl Göran

    2010-01-01

    To investigate single potentially traumatic events and cumulative effects of these events based on the reported symptoms of post-traumatic stress and dissociation. An additional goal was to evaluate the psychometric properties of Life Incidence of Traumatic Events-Student scale (LITE-S). 400 adolescents from the normative population answered the questionnaire Life Incidence of Traumatic Experiences (LITE-S) together with Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC), Dissociation-Questionnaire-Sweden (Dis-Q-Sweden) and Adolescent-Dissociative Experience Scale (A-DES). The single self-reported traumas, and the cumulative self-reported traumas and their effects on post-traumatic stress disorder and dissociative symptoms scales were examined. The psychometric properties of LITE-S were first investigated through calculating, test-retest reliability by Pearson correlation for the total scale and by Cohen's kappa item per item. Self-reported symptoms were related to both the cumulative traumas and exposure to some single traumas, such as seeing somebody get hurt, having parents destroy things or hurting each other, being whipped or hit, or even being made to carry out some kind of sexual act. Interpersonal events were consistently more strongly related to symptoms across the TSCC clinical scales. Finally, test-retest reliability as found to be for the total scale r=0.76 and kappa item per item ranging between k=0.33 and 0.86. The cumulative effects of potentially traumatic events on adolescents are significant, and interpersonal traumas results in more self-reported symptoms of post-traumatic stress and dissociation than non-interpersonal. LITE has satisfactory psychometric properties concerning reliability. The results underline the importance in clinical practice of taking into consideration how many potentially traumatic events an adolescent has experienced before, seeking help on specific occasion. This knowledge can help the clinician to understand better the breadth

  19. Traumatic diseases of parotid gland and sequalae. Review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The two cases managed in our centre were due to assault from broken bottles and road traffic accident respectively and both were managed by conservative methods. The first patient was a case of sialocele following the injury, which resolved within 3 weeks after the cyst formation with reduction in food intake, aspirations ...

  20. Cells, Biomarkers, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Evidence for Peripheral Involvement in a Central Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Naval Health Research Center Cells, Biomarkers and Post -traumatic Stress Disorder: Evidence for Peripheral Involvement in A Central Disease ...factor- 1; TBI, traumatic brain injury; TNF, tumor necrosis factor. Naval Health Research Center, San Diego, California, USA Abstract Post -traumatic...microglia in comparison with those with spleens (Ajmo et al. 2008). After an ischemic stroke was induced, the rats with spleens showed more CNS tissue

  1. Outcome of tube thoracostomy in paediatric non-traumatic pleural fluid collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyo E Ekpe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Management of pleural fluid collection not due to trauma increases workload of the paediatric thoracic surgeons, while delay or inappropriate treatment worsens the prognosis of the disease. This study aimed at assessing the outcome of therapeutic tube thoracostomy in non-traumatic paediatric pleural fluid collections and identifying factors responsible for treatment failure with tube thoracostomy. Design: Prospective analysis of socio-demographic characteristics, clinical features, clinical diagnosis, radiological diagnosis, and bacteriological diagnosis including bacteria cultured with sensitivity pattern, also treatment offered including tube thoracostomy with duration of tube thoracostomy and length of hospitalisation, indication for additional surgical procedure with type, and outcome of treatment of 30 paediatric patients with non-traumatic pleural fluid collection. Results: Thirty paediatric patients with various causes of non-traumatic pleural fluid collection in 34 pleural spaces were analysed. Their ages ranged between six months and 16 years (mean = 6.5 years and M:F ratio of 2:1. Pleural effusion and empyema thoracis accounted for 46% and 40% with staphylococcus aureus and streptococcus pneumoniae cultured in 10% each and a high negative culture rate of 46%, which was higher with age. The parents of 40% of the patients belonged to social class 3. Success rate of tube thoracostomy was 86% in unilateral cases, 50% in bilateral cases and 81% in all cases. Alternative treatment with thoracotomy and decortications gave a success rate of 100%. Conclusion: Thoracotomy with decortication is superior to tube thoracostomy in paediatric non-traumatic pleural fluid collection and should be chosen as the primary treatment option when there is bilateral disease, chronicity, loculated effusion, thickened pleural membranes or trapped lung.

  2. The pathophysiology underlying repetitive mild traumatic brain injury in a novel mouse model of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraglia, Anthony L; Plog, Benjamin A; Dayawansa, Samantha; Dashnaw, Matthew L; Czerniecka, Katarzyna; Walker, Corey T; Chen, Michael; Hyrien, Ollivier; Iliff, Jeffrey J; Deane, Rashid; Huang, Jason H; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    An animal model of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is essential for further understanding the pathophysiological link between repetitive head injury and the development of chronic neurodegenerative disease. We previously described a model of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in mice that encapsulates the neurobehavioral spectrum characteristic of patients with CTE. We aimed to study the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this animal model. Our previously described model allows for controlled, closed head impacts to unanesthetized mice. Briefly, 12-week-old mice were divided into three groups: Control, single, and repetitive mTBI. Repetitive mTBI mice received six concussive impacts daily, for 7 days. Mice were then subsequently sacrificed for macro- and micro-histopathologic analysis at 7 days, 1 month, and 6 months after the last TBI received. Brain sections were immunostained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) for astrocytes, CD68 for activated microglia, and AT8 for phosphorylated tau protein. Brains from single and repetitive mTBI mice lacked macroscopic tissue damage at all time-points. Single mTBI resulted in an acute rea ctive astrocytosis at 7 days and increased phospho-tau immunoreactivity that was present acutely and at 1 month, but was not persistent at 6 months. Repetitive mTBI resulted in a more marked neuroinflammatory response, with persistent and widespread astrogliosis and microglial activation, as well as significantly elevated phospho-tau immunoreactivity to 6-months. The neuropathological findings in this new model of repetitive mTBI resemble some of the histopathological hallmarks of CTE, including increased astrogliosis, microglial activation, and hyperphosphorylated tau protein accumulation.

  3. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as a potential treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder associated with traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eve, David J; Steele, Martin R; Sanberg, Paul R; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) describes the presence of physical damage to the brain as a consequence of an insult and frequently possesses psychological and neurological symptoms depending on the severity of the injury. The recent increased military presence of US troops in Iraq and Afghanistan has coincided with greater use of improvised exploding devices, resulting in many returning soldiers suffering from some degree of TBI. A biphasic response is observed which is first directly injury-related, and second due to hypoxia, increased oxidative stress, and inflammation. A proportion of the returning soldiers also suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and in some cases, this may be a consequence of TBI. Effective treatments are still being identified, and a possible therapeutic candidate is hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). Some clinical trials have been performed which suggest benefits with regard to survival and disease severity of TBI and/or PTSD, while several other studies do not see any improvement compared to a possibly poorly controlled sham. HBOT has been shown to reduce apoptosis, upregulate growth factors, promote antioxidant levels, and inhibit inflammatory cytokines in animal models, and hence, it is likely that HBOT could be advantageous in treating at least the secondary phase of TBI and PTSD. There is some evidence of a putative prophylactic or preconditioning benefit of HBOT exposure in animal models of brain injury, and the optimal time frame for treatment is yet to be determined. HBOT has potential side effects such as acute cerebral toxicity and more reactive oxygen species with long-term use, and therefore, optimizing exposure duration to maximize the reward and decrease the detrimental effects of HBOT is necessary. This review provides a summary of the current understanding of HBOT as well as suggests future directions including prophylactic use and chronic treatment. PMID:27799776

  4. The Characteristics of Emotional Response of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Post-traumatic Growth among Chinese Adults Exposed to an Explosion Incident

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Chuguang; Han, Jin; Zhang, Yuqing; Hannak, Walter; Liu, Zhengkui

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and post-traumatic growth (PTG) are two different outcomes that may occur after experiencing traumatic events. Meanwhile, the traumatic exposure level and emotion response played an important role in the process. The present study first evaluated the relationship between PTSD, PTG, and traumatic exposure level and then compared the characteristics of emotional response through response time of the affective priming paradigm. Methods For...

  5. Beta-amyloid deposition in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Thor D; Montenigro, Philip H; Alvarez, Victor E; Xia, Weiming; Crary, John F; Tripodis, Yorghos; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Mez, Jesse; Solomon, Todd; Meng, Gaoyuan; Kubilus, Caroline A; Cormier, Kerry A; Meng, Steven; Babcock, Katharine; Kiernan, Patrick; Murphy, Lauren; Nowinski, Christopher J; Martin, Brett; Dixon, Diane; Stern, Robert A; Cantu, Robert C; Kowall, Neil W; McKee, Ann C

    2015-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is defined pathologically by the abnormal accumulation of tau in a unique pattern that is distinct from other tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although trauma has been suggested to increase amyloid β peptide (Aβ) levels, the extent of Aβ deposition in CTE has not been thoroughly characterized. We studied a heterogeneous cohort of deceased athletes and military veterans with neuropathologically diagnosed CTE (n = 114, mean age at death = 60) to test the hypothesis that Aβ deposition is altered in CTE and associated with more severe pathology and worse clinical outcomes. We found that Aβ deposition, either as diffuse or neuritic plaques, was present in 52 % of CTE subjects. Moreover, Aβ deposition in CTE occurred at an accelerated rate and with altered dynamics in CTE compared to a normal aging population (OR = 3.8, p < 0.001). We also found a clear pathological and clinical dichotomy between those CTE cases with Aβ plaques and those without. Aβ deposition was significantly associated with the presence of the APOE ε4 allele (p = 0.035), older age at symptom onset (p < 0.001), and older age at death (p < 0.001). In addition, when controlling for age, neuritic plaques were significantly associated with increased CTE tauopathy stage (β = 2.43, p = 0.018), co-morbid Lewy body disease (OR = 5.01, p = 0.009), and dementia (OR = 4.45, p = 0.012). A subset of subjects met the diagnostic criteria for both CTE and AD, and in these subjects both Aβ plaques and total levels of Aβ1-40 were increased at the depths of the cortical sulcus compared to the gyral crests. Overall, these findings suggest that Aβ deposition is altered and accelerated in a cohort of CTE subjects compared to normal aging and that Aβ is associated with both pathological and clinical progression of CTE independent of age.

  6. FACTORS RELATED TO NURSE’S COMPASSION SATISFACTION, BURNOUT, AND SECONDARY TRAUMATIC STRESS IN PEDIATRIC CARE UNIT RSUP DR. SARDJITO YOGYAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Aprilina Andriani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pediatric nurses are susceptive with stress related to their work. It happens because they take care children who experience the disease and emotional and psychological pressure, so it can make the risk of negative symptoms related with compassion satisfaction, burnout, secondary traumatic stress. Compassion satisfaction, burnout, secondary traumatic stress has an impact not only for them, but also for the quality of treatment. Objective: To identify related factors to nurse’s compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress in pediatric care unit. Methods: This study was a descriptive analytic study with cross sectional design. The sample of this study was 107 pediatric nurses of RSUP Dr. Sardjito Yogyakarta. The sampling techniques used proportional random sampling. The data were collected from February-March 2017 using the professional quality of life questionnaire fifth version. The data analyzes used were chi-square, mann-whitney, and ordinal regression. Results: 44.9% nurses had a moderate compassion satisfaction, 52,3% nurses had a moderate burnout, and 43% had a moderate secondary traumatic stress. The work unit had p 0.05, which indicated that these factors had no correlation to compassion satisfaction, burnout, secondary traumatic stress. Conclusion: The work unit was the only related factor to the nurse’s secondary traumatic stress in the pediatric care unit and there were no factors related to compassion satisfaction and burnout.

  7. [Pseudo-dementia conversion and post-traumatic stress disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montefiore, D; Mallet, L; Lévy, R; Allilaire, J-F; Pélissolo, A

    2007-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often associated with other psychiatric syndromes. However, studies exploring conversion and PTSD comorbidity are scarce. This paper reports the case of a 45 year-old patient without medical or psychiatric history. In 2003, he suddenly started suffering from amnesia and symptoms of delirium: he was at his office with a cup of coffee but he did not remember why. Aphasia, trembling, behavioural disorders appeared over the next hours and days. Numerous neurological examinations and laboratory tests (including cerebral imagery) were performed without evidence of any physical disease. Three psychiatric examinations were also negative, even if a possible psychogenic origin was hypothesized. Neurological or psychiatric diagnoses were discussed but without definitive conclusion. One year later, the symptoms were unchanged until the patient watched a movie ("Mystic River") that described the story of a man with sexual abuse in childhood. He suddenly remembered that he lived the same experience when he was 8 years old. At the end of the movie, his wife surprisingly noticed that he was walking and speaking normally. All the neurological symptoms disappeared. Unfortunately, symptoms of a severe PTSD appeared, as well as a major depressive disorder. The patient and his parents remembered that he had been more irritable, depressed and anxious at school and during the night, between 8 and 13 years of age, with a possible PTSD during this period. He always refused to talk with his parents about the traumatic event. When he was 13, the family moved house, the patient seemed to forget everything and the symptoms disappeared. About thirty years later, the symptoms were similar with the reexperien of the traumatic event through unwanted recollections, distressing images, nightmares, or flashbacks. He had also symptoms of hyperarousal with physiological manifestations, such as irritability, insomnia, impaired concentration, hypervigilance, and

  8. Witnessing traumatic events and post-traumatic stress disorder: Insights from an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Gaurav; Salvi, Ankita; Liu, Hesong; Salim, Samina

    2015-07-23

    It is becoming increasingly recognized that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be acquired vicariously from witnessing traumatic events. Recently, we published an animal model called the "Trauma witness model" (TWM) which mimics PTSD-like symptoms in rats from witnessing daily traumatic events (social defeat of cage mate) [14]. Our TWM does not result in any physical injury. This is a major procedural advantage over the typical intruder paradigm in which it is difficult to delineate the inflammatory response of tissue injury and the response elicited from emotional distress. Using TWM paradigm, we examined behavioral and cognitive effects in rats [14] however, the long-term persistence of PTSD-like symptoms or a time-course of these events (anxiety and depression-like behaviors and cognitive deficits) and the contribution of olfactory and auditory stress vs visual reinforcement were not examined. This study demonstrates that some of the features of PTSD-like symptoms in rats are reversible after a significant time lapse of the witnessing of traumatic events. We also have established that witnessing is critical to the PTSD-like phenotype and cannot be acquired solely due to auditory or olfactory stresses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Post-traumatic growth among the UK veterans following treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Dominic; Palmer, E; Lock, R; Busuttil, W

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine levels of post-traumatic growth (PTG) in a sample of the UK veterans who had received treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The study followed-up 149 UK veterans after they had completed standardised treatment for PTSD provided by Combat Stress. Data had previously been collected on a range of mental health outcomes before treatment, and then repeated 6 months after the end of treatment. For the current study, participants completed the post-traumatic growth inventory (PTGI) measure. Analysis was conducted to explore levels of PTG and whether there were any relationships between pretreatment and post-treatment ratings of mental health and PTG. The mean score on the PTGI was 32.6. Evidence of a treatment effect on levels of PTG was observed. There appeared to be a relationship between improvements in symptoms of PTSD and depression and higher levels of PTG. This study observed the presence of PTG following exposure to traumatic events within a sample of the UK veterans following their treatment for PTSD. PTG scores were moderately low in comparison to similar studies in the USA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Secondary traumatization in pediatric healthcare providers: compassion fatigue, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadors, Patrick; Lamson, Angela; Swanson, Mel; White, Mark; Sira, Natalia

    The primary aim for this research was to explore the overlap and differences between the concepts related to secondary traumatization: posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), secondary traumatic stress (STS), compassion fatigue (CF), and burnout (BRN). A secondary aim for this research was to examine the impact of secondary traumatization and some of the personal and professional elements that affect how pediatric healthcare providers experience PTSD, STS, CF, and BRN. An online survey was sent via e-mail to numerous list serves for healthcare providers who had worked on PICU, NICU, or PEDS units within the last year. The analyses revealed that a significant overlap existed between the terms of STS, PTSD, BRN, CS, and CF for PICU, NICU, and PEDS providers. However, a hierarchical linear regression revealed a significant amount of unique contributions to the variance in CF based on each of the measured concepts. Despite previous literature that indicates that the terms STS and CF can be used interchangeably, the two most prominent measures utilized in the assessment of CF and STS are actually capturing at least some unique elements. Given these results, future researchers should examine and conceptualize the difference in etiology, prevalence, symptoms, and treatment efficacy for CF and STS as separate but related entities and then return their focus to understanding secondary traumatization in healthcare providers.

  11. Neurodegeneration after mild and repetitive traumatic brain injury: Chronic traumatic encepalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanescu Ioana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE. Although research on the long-term effects of TBI is advancing quickly, the incidence and prevalence of post-traumatic neurodegeneration and CTE are unknown. The incidence and prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the genetic risk factors critical to its development are currently under research. CTE can be diagnosed only by post mortem neuropathological examination of the brain. Great efforts are being made to better understand the clinical signs and symptoms of CTE, obtained in most cases retrospectively from families of affected persons.Patients with CTE are described as having behavioral, mood, cognitive and motor impairments, occurring after a long latency from the traumatic events. Recent pathogenetic studies have provided new insights to CTE mechanisms, offering important clues in understanding neurodegenerative process and relations between physical factors and pathologic protein deposition. Further research is needed to better identify the genetic and environmental risk factors for CTE, as well as rehabilitation and treatment strategies.

  12. Factors associated with traumatic symptoms and internalizing problems among adolescents who experienced a traumatic event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deković, M.; Koning, I.M.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; Buist, K.L.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify factors that are related to the traumatic symptoms and problem behavior among adolescents who experienced the New Years fire in 2001 in Volendam, The Netherlands. Three groups of factors were considered: pre-trauma (personality and coping), traumarelated

  13. The relationship between neuroticism, pre-traumatic stress, and post-traumatic stress: A prospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, I.M.; van den Hout, M.; Kindt, M.

    2003-01-01

    The personality trait of Neuroticism has been repeatedly associated with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the nature of this relationship is unclear. There are at least two possible interpretations: neuroticism might be a risk factor for PTSD symptoms, or, alternatively,

  14. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: A paradigm in search of evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Rudy J

    2015-06-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been in the medical literature since the 1920s. It is characterized clinically by diverse neuropsychiatric symptoms, and pathologically by variable degrees of phosphorylated tau accumulation in the brain. The evolving paradigm for the pathogenesis of CTE suggests that concussion or subconcussion from athletic participation initiates a cascade of pathologic events, encompassing neuroinflammation and protein templating with trans-synaptic neurotoxicity. The end result is neurologic and neurobehavioral deterioration, often with self-harm. Although these concepts warrant further investigation, the available evidence permits no conclusions as regards the pathogenesis of the reported findings. Investigations into the role of premorbid or co-morbid neurodegenerative diseases has been limited to date, and in-depth genetic analyses have not been performed. The role of concussion or subconcussion if any, whether and how the condition progresses over time, the extent of phosphorylated tau in clinically normal athletes, the role of phosphorylated tau as a toxic species versus an inert disease response, and whether protein templating has any in vivo relevance remain to be elucidated.

  15. Inflammation in joint injury and post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberthal, J; Sambamurthy, N; Scanzello, C R

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is a variable feature of osteoarthritis (OA), associated with joint symptoms and progression of disease. Signs of inflammation can be observed in joint fluids and tissues from patients with joint injuries at risk for development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Furthermore, inflammatory mechanisms are hypothesized to contribute to the risk of OA development and progression after injury. Animal models of PTOA have been instrumental in understanding factors and mechanisms involved in chronic progressive cartilage degradation observed after a predisposing injury. Specific aspects of inflammation observed in humans, including cytokine and chemokine production, synovial reaction, cellular infiltration and inflammatory pathway activation, are also observed in models of PTOA. Many of these models are now being utilized to understand the impact of post-injury inflammatory response on PTOA development and progression, including risk of progressive cartilage degeneration and development of chronic symptoms post-injury. As evidenced from these models, a vigorous inflammatory response occurs very early after joint injury but is then sustained at a lower level at the later phases. This early inflammatory response contributes to the development of PTOA features including cartilage erosion and is potentially modifiable, but specific mediators may also play a role in tissue repair. Although the optimal approach and timing of anti-inflammatory interventions after joint injury are yet to be determined, this body of work should provide hope for the future of disease modification tin PTOA. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. [Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: an old acquaintance in athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijverberg, E G B; Pijnenburg, A C M; Scheltens, P; Pijnenburg, Y A L

    2017-01-01

    - Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by repetitive head injuries like those seen in sports such as boxing, American football and soccer.- The clinical features of CTE are a range of cognitive, psychiatric and motor symptoms, and histopathology involves deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau protein and the presence of TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) with relatively little beta-amyloid.- CTE is difficult to differentiate clinically from Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and psychiatric disorders because of the major symptom overlap between these conditions.- The most important risk factors for developing CTE are the cumulative effect of repetitive head injuries, with or without clinical symptoms, and the duration of exposure to the repetitive injuries (the sporting career).- There is no treatment for CTE at present and the strategy must be primarily geared to prevention.- In view of the large number of people, including those in the Netherlands, who take part in sports in which head injuries may occur, research into CTE is of major societal importance.

  17. Resilience and vulnerability among refugee children of traumatized and non-traumatized parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daud Atia

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to explore resilience among refugee children whose parents had been traumatized and were suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. Methods The study comprised 80 refugee children (40 boys and 40 girls, age range 6–17 yrs, divided into two groups. The test group consisted of 40 refugee children whose parents had been tortured in Iraq before coming to Sweden. In accordance with DSM-IV criteria, these children were further divided in two sub-groups, those who were assessed as having PTSD-related symptoms (n = 31 and those who did not have PTSD-related symptoms (n = 9. The comparison group consisted of 40 children from Egypt, Syria and Morocco whose parents had not been tortured. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, 3rd edn. (WISC-III, Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents- Revised (DICA-R, Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms checklist (PTSS, "I Think I am" (ITIA and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ were used to assess IQ; PTSD-related symptoms; self-esteem; possible resilience and vulnerability. Results Children without PTSD/PTSS in the traumatized parents group had more favorable values (ITIA and SDQ with respect to total scores, emotionality, relation to family, peer relations and prosocial behavior than the children in the same group with PTSD/PTSS and these values were similar to those the children in the comparison group (the non-traumatized parents group. The children in the non-traumatized parents group scored significantly higher on the IQ test than the children with traumatized parents, both the children with PTSD-related symptoms and those without PTSD-related symptoms. Conclusion Adequate emotional expression, supportive family relations, good peer relations, and prosociality constituted the main indicators of resilience. Further investigation is needed to explore the possible effects of these factors and the effects of IQ. The findings of this study are

  18. Demograpics of Patients Admitted with Traumatic Intracranial Bleeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 51 patients with traumatic intracranial bleeds were recruited in the study with a male: female ratio of 24:1. Results: The ... of the population. Specific interventions by policy makers and clinicians, based on findings of patient demographics can help prevent some of these preventable causes of traumatic brain injury.

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Post-traumatic stress disorder, survivor guilt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-01-17

    Jan 17, 2006 ... Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that may develop after exposure to a terrifying event/ordeal in which grave physical harm occurred or was threatened. Traumatic events that can trigger PTSD include personal assaults such as rape or mugging, natural or human-caused disasters ...

  20. Antifibrinolytic drugs for acute traumatic injury | McCaul | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antifibrinolytic drugs for acute traumatic injury. ... risk of adverse events. TXA should be administered as early as possible, and within 3 hours of injury. There is still uncertainty with regard to the effect of TXA on patients with traumatic brain injury; however, ongoing randomised controlled trials should shed more light on this.

  1. 45 CFR 1308.16 - Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... does not include children with brain injuries that are congenital or degenerative or caused by birth... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury. 1308... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.16 Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury. A...

  2. Patterns of Traumatic Intracranial Bleeds at Kenyatta National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Valued eMachines Customer

    Incidence of hospital treated traumatic brain injury in an. Australian Community. Aust NZJ Public Health 1998; 22: 419-23. 6. John B. Jr, W. Allen Hauser. The epidemiology of Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review. Epilepsia, 2003; 44: 2-10. 7. Kraus JF, Black MA, Hessol N, et al. The incidence of acute brain injury and serious.

  3. Demograpics of Patients Admitted with Traumatic Intracranial Bleeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    Epilepsia. 2003; 10: 2-10. 2. Thompson DO, Hurtado TR, Liao MM et al. Validation of the Simplified Motor Score in the. Out of Hospital Setting for the Prediction of Outcomes After Traumatic Brain Injury. Ann. Emerg Med. 2011(11); 58(5): 417-25. 3. Lee B, Newberg A. Neuroimaging in traumatic brain imaging. NeuroRx. 2005 ...

  4. Late post-traumatic spinal stenotic progressive myelo-radiculopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma R

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of late progressive myelo-radiculopathy associated with severe canal stenosis secondary to post-traumatic hypertrophy of thoracic laminae and ossification of spinal ligaments viz. ligamentum flavum and posterior longitudinal ligament in the absence of developmental spinal stenosis or post-traumatic deformity, is presented with a brief critical review of the relevant literature.

  5. Traumatic stress and psychopathology: experiences of a trauma clinic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Medication was prescribed for. 66.4% of the sample, with a further 5.9% hospitalised. Conclusion: Not all individuals exposed to trauma develop PTSD, with mood disorders possibly being more common. Keywords: Traumatic stress; Post traumatic stress disorder; refugees; complex trauma; Major Depression; xenophobia.

  6. CASE REPORT CASE CASE Post-traumatic cholesteatoma … a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post-traumatic cholesteatomas are well recognised albeit rare late complications of temporal bone injuries. They were first described in. German literature by doctors reviewing World War I blast victims,1 with the first definitive series by Eckel in 1966.2 He described three cases of post-traumatic cholesteatomas and made ...

  7. The Traumatic Experiences and Psychological Health of women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the traumatic experiences and psychological health of women working in male-dominated professions. Their reported traumatic experiences and psychological health were compared with those of women working in female-dominated professions and men in male dominated processions. Samples of ...

  8. Visual Outcome Of Traumatic Cataract Surgery In Ibadan, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To review the visual outcome of traumatic cataracts operated at the University College Hospital, Ibadanwith the view to making recommendations for improved outcome. All patients operated at the University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria between May 1999 and April 2004with traumatic cataractwere reviewed ...

  9. Wrist stability after experimental traumatic triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Bo; Jensen, Steen Lund; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in stability of the wrist after experimental traumatic triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions.......The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in stability of the wrist after experimental traumatic triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions....

  10. Post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in a psychiatric population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a diagnostic category used to describe symptoms arising from emotionally traumatic experience(s). Research suggests that PTSD may be under- diagnosed when trauma is not the presenting problem or when not the focus of clinical intervention. There is a dearth of South ...

  11. Post traumatic stress disorder: undiagnosed cases in a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common, debilitating anxiety disorder characterized by emotional and physical symptoms that may occur after exposure to a severely traumatic event. Since it occurs commonly as a comorbid diagnosis with other mood- and anxiety disorders, we postulated that this ...

  12. Part I--Evaluation of pediatric post-traumatic headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchefsky, Elana; Dubrovsky, Alexander Sasha; Friedman, Debbie; Shevell, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Brain injury is one of the most common injuries in the pediatric age group, and post-traumatic headache is one of the most common symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury in children. This is an expert opinion-based two-part review on pediatric post-traumatic headaches. Part I will focus on an overview and approach to the evaluation of post-traumatic headache. Part II will focus on the medical management of post-traumatic headache. Relevant articles were reviewed, and an algorithm is proposed. We review the epidemiology, classification, pathophysiology, and clinical approach to evaluating patients with post-traumatic headache. A comprehensive history and physical examination are fundamental to identifying the headache type(s). Identifying the precise headache phenotype is important to help guide treatment. Most of the post-traumatic headaches are migraine or tension type, but occipital neuralgia, cervicogenic headache, and medication overuse headache also occur. Postconcussive signs often resolve within 1 month, and individuals whose signs persist longer may benefit from an interprofessional approach. Rigorous evaluation and diagnosis are vital to treating post-traumatic headaches effectively. A multifaceted approach is needed to address all the possible contributing factors to the headaches and any comorbid conditions that may delay recovery or alter treatment choices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Traumatic abdominal wall hernia secondary to motorcycle handle bar injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Jamabo

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: We recommend a high level of clinical suspicion for traumatic abdominal wall herniation in all patients with traumatic abdominal wall injuries. It is instructive that the area be explored with primary repair of the hernia and other tissue planes of the abdominal wall.

  14. Imagery Rescripting of Early Traumatic Memories in Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Jennifer; Clark, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Negative self-images appear to play a role in the maintenance of social phobia and research suggests they are often linked to earlier memories of socially traumatic events. Imagery rescripting is a clinical intervention that aims to update such unpleasant or traumatic memories, and is increasingly being incorporated in cognitive behavioral therapy…

  15. Nonoperative treatment of acute traumatic spinal injuries: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traumatic spinal injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is no agreed method of care. Neurological recovery in complete injury has been dismal. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the neurological recovery at discharge in traumatic spinal injury patients ...

  16. Posterior instrumentation for spinal injuries and non-traumatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The purpose of the report is to show potential of the operative treatment with instrumentation for correction of traumatic and non-traumatic spinal deformities. Methods: Between 2001 and 2005 total of 95 patients with spinal disorders were operated on, including 50 surgeries facilitated with posterior ...

  17. Post traumatic stress disorder symptoms in a psychiatric population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-05-12

    May 12, 2006 ... Introduction. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder currently defined by the coexistence of three clusters of symptoms, persisting for one month in survivors of a serious traumatic event .These clusters are: • Intrusive cluster - Intrusions can take the form of repeated, unwanted and ...

  18. Post traumatic stress disorder and resilience in veterans who served ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post traumatic stress disorder and resilience in veterans who served in the South African border war. ... An anonymous, internet-based questionnaire was used to obtain information on demography, combat exposure, drug and alcohol use, traumatic events in later life, and recourse to medication and counselling. The Impact ...

  19. Assessment of Cerebral Hemodynamics in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    haemorrhage, and 6 with subarach- noid hemorrhage from ruptured aneurysm . There were 4 cases of cerebral contusions and a single case of traumatic...B. Goldstein, 2003: Significance of Intracranial Pressure Pulse Morphology in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury. IEEE, 2491-2494. Anile, C., H. D

  20. Nonoperative treatment of acute traumatic spinal injuries: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-17

    Apr 17, 2014 ... Background: Traumatic spinal injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is no agreed method of care. Neurological recovery in complete injury has been dismal. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the neurological recovery at discharge in traumatic spinal.

  1. Non-traumatic injury profile of amateur cyclists

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Non-traumatic bicycle injuries are common. However, research available on non-traumatic injuries in amateur cyclists is more than a decade old, and most of the research on this topic has been done in Europe and America on professional cyclists in multi-day cycling events. An understanding of the common ...

  2. [Facilitating role of traumatic experiences in art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerevich, József

    2017-04-01

    Traumatic experiences can not only have unfavourable consequences, they can also contribute, with a kind of creative twist, to the development of the person affected by the trauma. The artistic responses to traumas can be examined on the basis of the different types of trauma. This study reports on an investigation focusing on six types of trauma: emotional deprivation/neglect; near-death experience; becoming the victim of violence; war; accident/sickness and emotional frustration. Examples taken from the history of art indicate that works of art can draw attention to the traumatic experiences of the artists with frequently repeated motifs and portrayal techniques (sun, mother image, objects referring to the person lost, motifs of violence or symbols of violence, artistic manifestations of an exaggerated self-image, surreal visions, dry irony, substituting other objects for the beloved person), or a sudden change of style and subject that can express a heightened interest in human suffering (Lovis Corinth). An emphasis placed on self-portrayal can indicate the artist's increased self-examination, in cases of sickness, or continuous monitoring of the state of mind (Frida Kahlo, Otto Dix, Lovis Corinth, Edvard Munch). In some cases artistic activity can help to work through the trauma (Hans Bellmer, Oskar Kokoschka, Max Ernst, René Magritte), in other cases it is not able to prevent the development of psychological/psychiatric consequences of the trauma (Artemisia Gentileschi, Edvard Munch, Lajos Gulácsy). Traumas can be the sources of motivation and provide themes for works of art; and, although not in all cases, artistic creativity can contribute to effectively working through traumatic experiences. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(17): 668-677.

  3. Blastocystosis in post-traumatic splenectomized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasartova, Djursun; Gureser, A Semra; Zorlu, Musa; Turegun-Atasoy, Buse; Taylan-Ozkan, Aysegul; Dolapci, Mete

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and significance of intestinal protozoa, specially Blastocystis spp., and to perform PCR-based subtype classification for understanding the importance of Blastocystis spp. in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal disorders in post-traumatic splenectomized patients. A total of 60 stool samples were obtained from 30 post-traumatic splenectomized patients and 30 healthy controls. Wet mounts, trichrome and Kinyoun acid-fast stained slides were prepared from the stool specimens. PCR was used for detecting the presence of Giardia spp., Entamoeba spp., Dientamoeba fragilis, Cryptosporidium spp., Blastocystis spp. Genotyping was realized by using Blastocystis hominis STS primers. In both study groups, any helminth eggs and other protozoa except Blastocystis spp. were not detected by microscopy and PCR, and also bacterial cultures were negative. Only stool microscopy was positive for Blastocystis spp. in 30% (9 of 30) of splenectomized patients and in 13% (4/30) of healthy controls. PCR for Blastocystis spp. was positive in 40% (12 of 30), B. hominis genotypes were 20% (6/30): STS1 in 10% (3/30) and STS3 in 10% (3/30) of splenectomized patients. In healthy controls Blastocystis spp. was 13% (4/30) by PCR and genotypes of B. hominis was not detected. The difference between the prevalence of Blastocystis spp. infection in splenectomized patients and control groups was statistically significant (p=0.020). Abdominal pain was the most frequent gastrointestinal symptom (p=0.019) among splenectomized patients positive for Blastocystis spp. In post-traumatic healthy splenectomized patients, Blastocystis spp. were found to be the most prevalent protozoa and may be responsible for the gastrointestinal disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Epidemiology of Traumatic Injuries in the Northeast Region of Haiti: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluisio, Adam R; De Wulf, Annelies; Louis, Ambert; Bloem, Christina

    2015-12-01

    week (R(^2)=0.01). Traumatic injuries are a common emergent presentation in the Northeast region of Haiti with characteristics similar to other LMIC. Documentation and associated data to adequately characterize the burden of disease in this region are lacking. Road traffic accidents are the predominate mechanism of injury, suggesting that interventions addressing prevention and treatment of this common occurrence may provide public health benefits in this setting.

  5. Disease: H00336 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f gas in the affected tissue and is associated with trauma. Infectious disease Clostridium perfringens [GN:c...675 (description) Sasaki T, Nanjo H, Takahashi M, Sugiyama T, Ono I, Masuda H Non-traumatic gas gangrene in the abdomen: report of six autopsy cases. J Gastroenterol 35:382-90 (2000) ...

  6. Post-traumatic contrast enhancing brain lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Jung; Kim, Hyun Sook; Jeong, Min Sun; Kim, Deok Ryeong; Cho, Young Kwon; Choi, Yun Sun [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Only a few studies have been reported on the MR contrast enhancement and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) findings of the post-traumatic lesion of the brain. We report a case of the venous ischemia in the left frontal lobe observed in the MRI obtained one day after the incidence of trauma. Considering the presented slight increase in the ADC, the vasogenic edema was thought to be the major mechanism of the venous ischemia and excitotoxic injury. In spite of a slight increase in the ADC, the hyperintensity in the diffusion weighted imaging and contrast-enhanced areas eventually changed into hemorrhagic lesions.

  7. Surviving severe traumatic brain injury in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Poulsen, Ingrid; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify all hospitalized patients surviving severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Denmark and to compare these patients to TBI patients admitted to highly specialized rehabilitation (HS-rehabilitation). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients surviving severe TBI were identified from...... severe TBI were admitted to HS-rehabilitation. Female sex, older age, and non-working status pre-injury were independent predictors of no HS-rehabilitation among patients surviving severe TBI. CONCLUSION: The incidence rate of hospitalized patients surviving severe TBI was stable in Denmark...

  8. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the availability cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen

    2014-09-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in sports has been known for > 85 years, and has experienced a resurgence of interest over the past decade, both in the media and in the scientific community. However, there appears to be a disconnection between the public's perception of CTE and the currently available scientific data. The cognitive bias known as the "availability cascade" has been suggested as a reason to explain this rift in knowledge. This review summarizes and updates the history of CTE in sports, discusses recent epidemiological and autopsy studies, summarizes the evidence base related to CTE in sports, and offers recommendations for future directions.

  9. Psychiatric sequelae of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprakash Chaudhury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost half of the people suffering traumatic brain injury (TBI may later be diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. The literature (PubMed, IndMed of past 30 years on psychiatric disturbances associated with TBI is reviewed. The authors highlight the close link between head injury and psychiatry and provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk-factors, and mechanisms of psychiatric sequelae including, cognitive deficits, substance abuse, psychoses, mood disorders, suicide, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, post-concussion syndrome, and personality changes following head injury. The various psychiatric sequelae are briefly discussed.

  10. Traumatic dislocation of the first carpometacarpal joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Chadd K; Weaver, Kevin R

    2014-12-01

    We present a case report and review of the literature of traumatic dislocation of the carpometacarpal joint of the left thumb without associated fracture. The injury was sustained while skiing, and after emergency department diagnosis, the dislocation was reduced and the joint stabilized with a splint. The patient was discharged with close follow-up with a hand surgeon for definitive surgical fixation. Carpometacarpal joint dislocations of the thumb are exceedingly rare injuries and require appropriate diagnosis and treatment to minimize the morbidity and loss of function that can occur with these injuries.

  11. [Traumatized relatives of intensive care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niecke, A; Schneider, G; Hartog, C S; Michels, G

    2017-10-01

    Relatives are not only visitors in the intensive care unit, but provide support and care for patients at the end of life, and serve as an important source of information for clinicians. They are confronted, often unexpectedly and unprepared, with life-threatening illness, death and dying and life-threatening decisions to limit therapy. Thus, they are often substantially burdened themselves and are in need of support. It is undisputed that communication with relatives can have an adaptive or also traumatic influence on the experience gained.

  12. Bleaching of the discolored traumatized tooth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jon E.; Kopperud, Siemen E.; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the treatment of discolored traumatized teeth, most of them being non-vital and subsequently, endodontically treated. Tooth bleaching based upon hydrogen peroxide as the active agent, applied directly or produced in a chemical reaction from sodium perborate or carbamide...... peroxide, must be regarded as the treatment of choice, alone or preceding a prosthetic restoration. More than 90% immediate success has been reported for intracoronal bleaching of non-vital teeth, but in a period of 1–8 years after treatment, 10–40% of the initially successfully treated teeth needed...

  13. Acute Management of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Michael A; Crandall, Marie L; Patel, Mayur B

    2017-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in patients with trauma. Management strategies must focus on preventing secondary injury by avoiding hypotension and hypoxia and maintaining appropriate cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), which is a surrogate for cerebral blood flow. CPP can be maintained by increasing mean arterial pressure, decreasing intracranial pressure, or both. The goal should be euvolemia and avoidance of hypotension. Other factors that deserve important consideration in the acute management of patients with TBI are venous thromboembolism, stress ulcer, and seizure prophylaxis, as well as nutritional and metabolic optimization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Radiographic analysis of traumatized primary teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Torriani, Dione Dias; Baldisseira, Elaine de Fatima Zanchin; Moura, Sílvia Aparecida Ximenes; Ferro, Renata da Luz; Goettems, Marília Leão

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the frequency of radiographic findings in primary teeth, as well as their supporting tissues, following dental trauma, and the occurrence of sequelae according to the trauma type.One radiograph was taken soon after the trauma, and two follow-up radiographs, with approximately sixmonth intervals between each, were taken of 116 traumatized teeth from 65 patients at the Pelotas DentistrySchool in Pelotas, Santa Catarina, Brazil. One hundred and ninety-five radiograph...

  15. Nonsurgical interventions after mild traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygren-de Boussard, Catharina; Holm, Lena W; Cancelliere, Carol

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence regarding the impact of nonsurgical interventions on persistent symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and other databases were searched (2001-2012) with terms including "rehabilitation." Inclusion criteria were...... original, peer-reviewed research published in English and other languages. References were also identified from the bibliographies of eligible articles. STUDY SELECTION: Controlled trials and cohort and case-control studies were selected according to predefined criteria. Studies had to have a minimum of 30...

  16. Surgical management of traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Vidgeon, Steven; Strong, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECT: Mass lesions from traumatic brain injury (TBI) often require surgical evacuation as a life-saving measure and to improve outcomes, but optimal timing and surgical technique, including decompressive craniectomy, have not been fully defined. The authors compared neurosurgical approaches...... enrolled in the Co-Operative Studies on Brain Injury Depolarizations (COSBID) at King's College Hospital (KCH, n = 27) and Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU, n = 24) from July 2004 to March 2010. Subdural electrode strips were placed at the time of surgery for subsequent electrocorticographic...

  17. Traumatic injuries: imaging of head injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besenski, N. [Croatian Institute for Brain Research, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2002-06-01

    Due to the forces of acceleration, linear translation, as well as rotational and angular acceleration, the brain undergoes deformation and distortion depending on the site of impact of traumatizing force direction, severity of the traumatizing force, and tissue resistance of the brain. Linear translation of accereration in a closed-head injury can run along the shorter diameter of the skull in latero-lateral direction causing mostly extra-axial lesions (subdural hematoma,epidural hematoma, subarachnoidal hemorrhage) or quite pronounced coup and countercoup contusions. Contusions are considerably less frequently present in medial or paramedial centroaxial blows (fronto-occipital or occipito-frontal). The centroaxial blows produce a different pattern of lesions mostly in the deep structures, causing in some cases a special category of the brain injury, the diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The brain stem can also be damaged, but it is damaged more often in patients who have suffered centroaxial traumatic force direction. Computed tomography and MRI are the most common techniques in patients who have suffered brain injury. Computed tomography is currently the first imaging technique to be used after head injury, in those settings where CT is available. Using CT, scalp, bone, extra-axial hematomas, and parenchymal injury can be demonstrated. Computed tomography is rapid and easily performed also in monitored patients. It is the most relevant imaging procedure for surgical lesions. Computed tomography is a suitable method to follow the dynamics of lesion development giving an insight into the corresponding pathological development of the brain injury. Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive for all posttraumatic lesions except skull fractures and subarachnoidal hemorrhage, but scanning time is longer, and the problem with the monitoring of patients outside the MRI field is present. If CT does not demonstrate pathology as can adequately be explained to account for

  18. Comorbidity/Overlapping between ADHD and PTSD in Relation to IQ among Children of Traumatized/Non-Traumatized Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Atia; Rydelius, Per-Anders

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study explores the comorbidity between symptoms of ADHD and PTSD in relation to IQ among refugee children of traumatized parents (TP) and non-traumatized parents (NTP). Method: The study compares 80 refugee children, 40 with TP with 40 with NTP. ADHD and PTSD are assessed using DICA. Children's cognitive functions are measured by…

  19. The role of psychological symptoms and social group memberships in the development of post-traumatic stress after traumatic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Janelle M; Williams, W Huw; Jetten, Jolanda; Haslam, S Alexander; Harris, Adrian; Gleibs, Ilka H

    2012-11-01

    The costs associated with traumatic injury are often exacerbated by the development of post-traumatic stress symptoms. However, it is unclear what decreases the development of post-traumatic symptoms over time. The aim of the present research was to examine the role of psychological symptoms and social group memberships in reducing the development of post-traumatic stress symptoms after orthopaedic injuries (OIs) and acquired brain injuries (ABIs). A longitudinal prospective study assessed self-reported general health symptoms, social group memberships, and post-traumatic stress symptoms among participants with mild or moderate ABI (n= 62) or upper limb OI (n= 31) at 2 weeks (T1) and 3 months (T2) after injury. Hierarchical regressions revealed that having fewer T1 general health symptoms predicted lower levels of T2 post-traumatic stress symptoms after OI but forming more new group memberships at T1 predicted lower levels of T2 post-traumatic stress symptoms after ABI. A focus on acquiring group memberships may be particularly important in reducing the development of post-traumatic stress symptoms after injuries, such as ABI, which result in long-term life changes. ©2012 The British Psychological Society.

  20. Longitudinal changes of telomere length and epigenetic age related to traumatic stress and post-traumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Marco P.; van Mierlo, Hans C.; Rutten, Bart P. F.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; De Witte, Lot; Geuze, Elbert; Horvath, Steve; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Vinkers, Christiaan H.; Broen, Jasper C. A.; Vermetten, Eric

    Several studies have reported an association between traumatic stress and telomere length suggesting that traumatic stress has an impact on ageing at the cellular level. A newly derived tool provides an additional means to investigate cellular ageing by estimating epigenetic age based on DNA