WorldWideScience

Sample records for neuromagnetic source imaging

  1. Neuromagnetic source reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, P.S.; Mosher, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In neuromagnetic source reconstruction, a functional map of neural activity is constructed from noninvasive magnetoencephalographic (MEG) measurements. The overall reconstruction problem is under-determined, so some form of source modeling must be applied. We review the two main classes of reconstruction techniques-parametric current dipole models and nonparametric distributed source reconstructions. Current dipole reconstructions use a physically plausible source model, but are limited to cases in which the neural currents are expected to be highly sparse and localized. Distributed source reconstructions can be applied to a wider variety of cases, but must incorporate an implicit source, model in order to arrive at a single reconstruction. We examine distributed source reconstruction in a Bayesian framework to highlight the implicit nonphysical Gaussian assumptions of minimum norm based reconstruction algorithms. We conclude with a brief discussion of alternative non-Gaussian approachs.

  2. Neuromagnetic Source Analysis Using Magnetic Resonance Images for the Construction of Source and Volume Conductor Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lütkenhöner, Bernd; Menninghaus, Elisabeth; Steinsträter, Olaf; Wienbruch, Christian; Gißler, Hans Martin; Elbert, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    Sources of the somatosensory evoked fields (SEF) for one subject were estimated using constraints from the magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the same subject. A realistic volume conductor model was shaped corresponding to the inside of the skull. Sources were restricted to a dipole patch riding on the surface of the cortex, reconstructed from the individual MRI. Such a patch can be considered as a uniformly activated cortical area giving rise to distributed currents which flow perpendicular ...

  3. Accumulated Source Imaging of Brain Activity with Both Low and High-Frequency Neuromagnetic Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eXiang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed the importance of high-frequency brain signals (>70 Hz. One challenge of high-frequency signal analysis is that the size of time-frequency representation of high-frequency brain signals could be larger than 1 terabytes (TB, which is beyond the upper limits of a typical computer workstation’s memory (<196 GB. The aim of the present study is to develop a new method to provide greater sensitivity in detecting high-frequency magnetoencephalography (MEG signals in a single automated and versatile interface, rather than the more traditional, time-intensive visual inspection methods, which may take up to several days. To address the aim, we developed a new method, accumulated source imaging, defined as the volumetric summation of source activity over a period of time. This method analyzes signals in both low- (1~70 Hz and high-frequency (70~200 Hz ranges at source levels. To extract meaningful information from MEG signals at sensor space, the signals were decomposed to channel-cross-channel matrix (CxC representing the spatiotemporal patterns of every possible sensor-pair. A new algorithm was developed and tested by calculating the optimal CxC and source location-orientation weights for volumetric source imaging, thereby minimizing multi-source interference and reducing computational cost. The new method was implemented in C/C++ and tested with MEG data recorded from clinical epilepsy patients. The results of experimental data demonstrated that accumulated source imaging could effectively summarize and visualize MEG recordings within 12.7 hours by using approximately 10 GB of computer memory. In contrast to the conventional method of visually identifying multi-frequency epileptic activities that traditionally took 2-3 days and used 1-2 TB storage, the new approach can quantify epileptic abnormalities in both low- and high-frequency ranges at source levels, using much less time and computer memory.

  4. Quantitative performance assessments for neuromagnetic imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Ryo; Hiyama, Ei; Matsumoto, Takuya; Sekihara, Kensuke

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a Monte-Carlo simulation method to assess the performance of neuromagnetic imaging systems using two kinds of performance metrics: A-prime metric and spatial resolution. We compute these performance metrics for virtual sensor systems having 80, 160, 320, and 640 sensors, and discuss how the system performance is improved, depending on the number of sensors. We also compute these metrics for existing whole-head MEG systems, MEGvision™ (Yokogawa Electric Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) that uses axial-gradiometer sensors, and TRIUX™ (Elekta Corporate, Stockholm, Sweden) that uses planar-gradiometer and magnetometer sensors. We discuss performance comparisons between these significantly different systems.

  5. Overlay of neuromagnetic current-density images and morphological MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Manfred; Wischmann, Hans-Aloys; Doessel, Olaf

    1992-09-01

    Neuromagnetic imaging is a relatively new diagnostic tool for examination of electric activities in the nervous system. It is based on the noninvasive detection of extremely weak magnetic fields around the human body with superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detectors. `Equivalent current dipoles' and linear estimation reconstructions of current distributions both with spherical volume conductor models are used to localize the neural activity. For practical use in medical diagnosis a combination of the abstract neuromagnetic images with magnetic resonance (MR)- or computer tomography (CT)-images is required in order to match the functional activity with anatomy and morphology. The neuromagnetic images can be overlayed onto three-dimensional morphological images with spatially arbitrarily selectable slices. The matching of both imaging modalities is discussed. Based on the detection of auditory evoked magnetic fields, neuromagnetic images are reconstructed with linear estimation theory algorithms. The MR images are used as a-priori information of the volume conductor geometry and they allow an attachment of functional and morphological properties.

  6. Influence of head models on neuromagnetic fields and inverse source localizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schimpf Paul H

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The magnetoencephalograms (MEGs are mainly due to the source currents. However, there is a significant contribution to MEGs from the volume currents. The structure of the anatomical surfaces, e.g., gray and white matter, could severely influence the flow of volume currents in a head model. This, in turn, will also influence the MEGs and the inverse source localizations. This was examined in detail with three different human head models. Methods Three finite element head models constructed from segmented MR images of an adult male subject were used for this study. These models were: (1 Model 1: full model with eleven tissues that included detailed structure of the scalp, hard and soft skull bone, CSF, gray and white matter and other prominent tissues, (2 the Model 2 was derived from the Model 1 in which the conductivity of gray matter was set equal to the white matter, i.e., a ten tissuetype model, (3 the Model 3 consisted of scalp, hard skull bone, CSF, gray and white matter, i.e., a five tissue-type model. The lead fields and MEGs due to dipolar sources in the motor cortex were computed for all three models. The dipolar sources were oriented normal to the cortical surface and had a dipole moment of 100 μA meter. The inverse source localizations were performed with an exhaustive search pattern in the motor cortex area. A set of 100 trial inverse runs was made covering the 3 cm cube motor cortex area in a random fashion. The Model 1 was used as a reference model. Results The reference model (Model 1, as expected, performed best in localizing the sources in the motor cortex area. The Model 3 performed the worst. The mean source localization errors (MLEs of the Model 3 were larger than the Model 1 or 2. The contour plots of the magnetic fields on top of the head were also different for all three models. The magnetic fields due to source currents were larger in magnitude as compared to the magnetic fields of volume currents

  7. Algorithms for biomagnetic source imaging with prior anatomical and physiological information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughett, Paul William [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

    1995-12-01

    This dissertation derives a new method for estimating current source amplitudes in the brain and heart from external magnetic field measurements and prior knowledge about the probable source positions and amplitudes. The minimum mean square error estimator for the linear inverse problem with statistical prior information was derived and is called the optimal constrained linear inverse method (OCLIM). OCLIM includes as special cases the Shim-Cho weighted pseudoinverse and Wiener estimators but allows more general priors and thus reduces the reconstruction error. Efficient algorithms were developed to compute the OCLIM estimate for instantaneous or time series data. The method was tested in a simulated neuromagnetic imaging problem with five simultaneously active sources on a grid of 387 possible source locations; all five sources were resolved, even though the true sources were not exactly at the modeled source positions and the true source statistics differed from the assumed statistics.

  8. Spatial Heterogeneity of Cortical Excitability in Migraine Revealed by Multifrequency Neuromagnetic Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jing; Leiken, Kimberly; Degrauw, Xinyao; Kay, Benjamin; Fujiwara, Hisako; Rose, Douglas F; Allen, Janelle R; Kacperski, Joanne E; O'Brien, Hope L; Kabbouche, Marielle A; Powers, Scott W; Hershey, Andrew D

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the spatial heterogeneity of cortical excitability in adolescents with migraine, magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings at a sampling rate of 6,000 Hz were obtained from 35 adolescents with an acute migraine and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy control participants during an auditory-motor task. Neuromagnetic activation from low- to high-frequency ranges (5-1,000 Hz) was measured at sensor and source levels. The heterogeneity of cortical excitability was quantified within each functional modality (auditory vs motor) and hemispherical lateralization. MEG data showed that high-frequency, not low-frequency neuromagnetic signals, showed heterogeneous cortical activation in migraine subjects compared with control participants (P signals in a frequency range of 5 to 1,000 Hz. The characteristics of the location and degree of cortical excitability may be critical for spatially targeted treatment for migraine. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Conductive neuromagnetic fields in the lumbar spinal canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Senichi; Kawabata, Shigenori; Tomizawa, Shoji; Tomori, Masaki; Sakaki, Kyohei; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Sekihara, Kensuke; Sato, Tomoya; Adachi, Yoshiaki; Okawa, Atsushi

    2012-08-01

    To measure neuromagnetic evoked fields in the lumbar spinal canal. Using a newly developed superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) fluxmeter, neuromagnetic fields of 5 healthy male volunteers were measured at the surface of the lower back after stimulation of the tibial nerves at the ankles. For validation, we inserted a catheter-type electrode percutaneously in the lumbar epidural space in 2 of the subjects and measured cauda equina action potentials after tibial nerve stimulation. Neuromagnetic fields propagating from the intervertebral foramina into the spinal canal were measured, and the latencies of the magnetic fields corresponded largely with those of the cauda equina action potentials. We successfully measured ascending neuromagnetic fields originating at the nerve root and the cauda equina with high spatial resolution. Future studies will determine whether neuromagnetic field measurement of the lumbar spine can be a useful diagnostic method for the identification of the disordered site in spinal nerves. We successfully measured neuromagnetic fields in the lumbar spinal canal, which have previously been difficult to verify. Future studies will determine whether neuromagnetic field measurement of the lumbar spine can be a useful diagnostic method for identifying disorders of spinal nerves. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Perceptual Factors in Workload: A Neuromagnetic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-13

    progress, advancing methods of modeling field sources and enhacing techniques of data analysis, and conducting research designed to identify regions of the...the occipital and parietal regions. The subject lay prone on a bed and looked through an aperture down into a mirror which reflected the image on the...of the grating matched the background luminance of the screen. The gratings were generated using an Inisfree Picasso Image Generator driven by a PDP

  11. Neuromagnetic Investigations of Cortical Regions Underlying Short-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-18

    NO. Bolling AFB, DC 20332-6558 ELEMENT N NO. . I 11. TITLE (Include Securt Clasification ) Neuromagnetic Investigations of Cortical Regions Underlying...memory). 9.3 Method Four right-handed adult volunteers (2 males and 2 females) served as subjects after providing informed consent. All of the studies

  12. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  13. Localization bias and spatial resolution of adaptive and non-adaptive spatial filters for MEG source reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Sekihara, Kensuke; Sahani, Maneesh; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the location bias and the spatial resolution in the reconstruction of a single dipole source by various spatial filtering techniques used for neuromagnetic imaging. We first analyze the location bias for several representative adaptive and non-adaptive spatial filters using their resolution kernels. This analysis theoretically validates previously reported empirical findings that standardized low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) has no location bias. We als...

  14. Attention, Imagery and Memory: A Neuromagnetic Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-14

    Salustri, Ph.D., Istituto di Elettronica dello Stato Solido (CNR), Rome, Italy (Physics) David Travis, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, NYU. Tomoyo Yamamoto...dello Stato Solido (CNR), via Cineto Romano 42, 1- 00156 Rome, Italy. We thank Arthur Robinson and John P. Snyder for advice about azimuthal equal...overlapping temporally, which originate at multiple "Permanent address: Istituto di Elettronica dello Stto Solido sources in occipital and parietal

  15. Neuromagnetic Indication of Dysfunctional Emotion Regulation in Affective Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Pietrek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunctional emotion regulation is often reported in affective disorders, but it is unclear whether this dysfunction concerns initial processing of emotional input or regulation of resulting emotion. The present study addressed these aspects in 27 depressive and 15 borderline personality disorder patients and 28 healthy controls who were instructed to either passively view unpleasant and neutral pictures or downregulate emotional responses by reappraisal, while neuromagnetic brain activity was measured. All three groups showed more early response to unpleasant than to neutral pictures, whereas patients failed to show subsequent activity suppression under instructions to down-regulate. This deficient emotion regulation was evident primarily in those subjects reporting high childhood adversity. Results support intact emotional input processing but impaired emotion regulation in affective disorders and indicate a moderating influence of early life stress.

  16. Neuromagnetic correlates of voice pitch, vowel type, and speaker size in auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andermann, Martin; Patterson, Roy D; Vogt, Carolin; Winterstetter, Lisa; Rupp, André

    2017-09-01

    Vowel recognition is largely immune to differences in speaker size despite the waveform differences associated with variation in speaker size. This has led to the suggestion that voice pitch and mean formant frequency (MFF) are extracted early in the hierarchy of hearing/speech processing and used to normalize the internal representation of vowel sounds. This paper presents a magnetoencephalographic (MEG) experiment designed to locate and compare neuromagnetic activity associated with voice pitch, MFF and vowel type in human auditory cortex. Sequences of six sustained vowels were used to contrast changes in the three components of vowel perception, and MEG responses to the changes were recorded from 25 participants. A staged procedure was employed to fit the MEG data with a source model having one bilateral pair of dipoles for each component of vowel perception. This dipole model showed that the activity associated with the three perceptual changes was functionally separable; the pitch source was located in Heschl's gyrus (bilaterally), while the vowel-type and formant-frequency sources were located (bilaterally) just behind Heschl's gyrus in planum temporale. The results confirm that vowel normalization begins in auditory cortex at an early point in the hierarchy of speech processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A modality-specific neuromagnetic P3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, E.R.; Lewine, J.D.; Oakley, M.T.; Roeder, S.B.; Arthur, D.L.; Aine, C.J.; George, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Several studies indicate that in cases of psychopathology and alcoholism the amplitude and/or latency of endogenous, scalp-recorded P3 potentials elicited by rare events are abnormal. The P3 complex may normally be a valuable index of the brain's work-load and identification of the neural generator(s) of this late positive component would thus provide valuable insight into the substrates of both normal and abnormal information processes. Okada and his colleagues have recorded magnetic field correlates of P3 potentials evoked by visual and auditory stimuli. Data from a mapping study of a visually evoked magnetic P3 were consistent with a hippocampal source, but attempts to localize the generator(s) of the auditory magnetic P3 were unsuccessful. In an effort to independently confirm, extend, and clarify these results, the surface topographies of magnetic P3-like complexes evoked during the performance of auditory and visual detection tasks were examined. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Source-space ICA for MEG source imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonmohamadi, Yaqub; Jones, Richard D

    2016-02-01

    One of the most widely used approaches in electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography (MEG) source imaging is application of an inverse technique (such as dipole modelling or sLORETA) on the component extracted by independent component analysis (ICA) (sensor-space ICA + inverse technique). The advantage of this approach over an inverse technique alone is that it can identify and localize multiple concurrent sources. Among inverse techniques, the minimum-variance beamformers offer a high spatial resolution. However, in order to have both high spatial resolution of beamformer and be able to take on multiple concurrent sources, sensor-space ICA + beamformer is not an ideal combination. We propose source-space ICA for MEG as a powerful alternative approach which can provide the high spatial resolution of the beamformer and handle multiple concurrent sources. The concept of source-space ICA for MEG is to apply the beamformer first and then singular value decomposition + ICA. In this paper we have compared source-space ICA with sensor-space ICA both in simulation and real MEG. The simulations included two challenging scenarios of correlated/concurrent cluster sources. Source-space ICA provided superior performance in spatial reconstruction of source maps, even though both techniques performed equally from a temporal perspective. Real MEG from two healthy subjects with visual stimuli were also used to compare performance of sensor-space ICA and source-space ICA. We have also proposed a new variant of minimum-variance beamformer called weight-normalized linearly-constrained minimum-variance with orthonormal lead-field. As sensor-space ICA-based source reconstruction is popular in EEG and MEG imaging, and given that source-space ICA has superior spatial performance, it is expected that source-space ICA will supersede its predecessor in many applications.

  19. DEIMOS – an Open Source Image Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Blazek

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The DEIMOS (DatabasE of Images: Open Source is created as an open-source database of images and videos for testing, verification and comparing of various image and/or video processing techniques such as enhancing, compression and reconstruction. The main advantage of DEIMOS is its orientation to various application fields – multimedia, television, security, assistive technology, biomedicine, astronomy etc. The DEIMOS is/will be created gradually step-by-step based upon the contributions of team members. The paper is describing basic parameters of DEIMOS database including application examples.

  20. Coded source imaging simulation with visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Sheng [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, IHIP, Peking University, Yiheyuan Lu 5, Beijing 100871 (China); Zou Yubin, E-mail: zouyubin@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, IHIP, Peking University, Yiheyuan Lu 5, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang Xueshuang; Lu Yuanrong; Guo Zhiyu [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, IHIP, Peking University, Yiheyuan Lu 5, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-09-21

    A coded source could increase the neutron flux with high L/D ratio. It may benefit a neutron imaging system with low yield neutron source. Visible light CSI experiments were carried out to test the physical design and reconstruction algorithm. We used a non-mosaic Modified Uniformly Redundant Array (MURA) mask to project the shadow of black/white samples on a screen. A cooled-CCD camera was used to record the image on the screen. Different mask sizes and amplification factors were tested. The correlation, Wiener filter deconvolution and Richardson-Lucy maximum likelihood iteration algorithm were employed to reconstruct the object imaging from the original projection. The results show that CSI can benefit the low flux neutron imaging with high background noise.

  1. Time Reversal Imaging of the Tsunami Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossen, M. Jakir; Cummins, Phil R.; Roberts, Stephen G.; Allgeyer, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we apply time reversal imaging (TRI) to the problem of reconstructing the initial sea surface displacement that generates a tsunami. We discuss theoretical considerations in the application of TRI to the tsunami problem, including time reversibility and reciprocity of the shallow-water equations. Several numerical experiments are conducted to establish the efficacy of TRI in the tsunami context. TRI is applied to observations of the tsunami generated by the Tohoku earthquake on March 11, 2011, for which an unprecedented number of high-quality observations are available. Finally, we compare the findings of the TRI results with other, more conventional methods of source inversion. Results indicate that TRI is effective for imaging a tsunami source when a sufficient number of observations are available. Because it involves fewer assumptions about the nature of the tsunami source, in particular those regarding source location and fault geometry, we believe that TRI has the potential to improve our understanding of tsunami generation—for example, through detection of non-seismic components of the tsunami source.

  2. XNAT Central: Open sourcing imaging research data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Rick; Horton, William; Olsen, Timothy; McKay, Michael; Archie, Kevin A; Marcus, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    XNAT Central is a publicly accessible medical imaging data repository based on the XNAT open-source imaging informatics platform. It hosts a wide variety of research imaging data sets. The primary motivation for creating XNAT Central was to provide a central repository to host and provide access to a wide variety of neuroimaging data. In this capacity, XNAT Central hosts a number of data sets from research labs and investigative efforts from around the world, including the OASIS Brains imaging studies, the NUSDAST study of schizophrenia, and more. Over time, XNAT Central has expanded to include imaging data from many different fields of research, including oncology, orthopedics, cardiology, and animal studies, but continues to emphasize neuroimaging data. Through the use of XNAT's DICOM metadata extraction capabilities, XNAT Central provides a searchable repository of imaging data that can be referenced by groups, labs, or individuals working in many different areas of research. The future development of XNAT Central will be geared towards greater ease of use as a reference library of heterogeneous neuroimaging data and associated synthetic data. It will also become a tool for making data available supporting published research and academic articles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Frequency and phase synchronization in neuromagnetic cortical responses to flickering-color stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timashev, S. F.; Polyakov, Yu. S.; Yulmetyev, R. M.; Demin, S. A.; Panischev, O. Yu.; Shimojo, S.; Bhattacharya, J.

    2010-03-01

    In our earlier study dealing with the analysis of neuromagnetic responses (magnetoencephalograms—MEG) to flickering-color stimuli for a group of control human subjects (9 volunteers) and a patient with photosensitive epilepsy (a 12-year old girl), it was shown that Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) was able to identify specific differences in the responses of each organism. The high specificity of individual MEG responses manifested itself in the values of FNS parameters for both chaotic and resonant components of the original signal. The present study applies the FNS cross-correlation function to the analysis of correlations between the MEG responses simultaneously measured at spatially separated points of the human cortex processing the red-blue flickering color stimulus. It is shown that the cross-correlations for control (healthy) subjects are characterized by frequency and phase synchronization at different points of the cortex, with the dynamics of neuromagnetic responses being determined by the low-frequency processes that correspond to normal physiological rhythms. But for the patient, the frequency and phase synchronization breaks down, which is associated with the suppression of cortical regulatory functions when the flickering-color stimulus is applied, and higher frequencies start playing the dominating role. This suggests that the disruption of correlations in the MEG responses is the indicator of pathological changes leading to photosensitive epilepsy, which can be used for developing a method of diagnosing the disease based on the analysis with the FNS cross-correlation function.

  4. Different source image fusion based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao; Piao, Yan

    2016-03-01

    The fusion technology of video image is to make the video obtained by different image sensors complementary to each other by some technical means, so as to obtain the video information which is rich in information and suitable for the human eye system. Infrared cameras in harsh environments such as when smoke, fog and low light situations penetrating power, but the ability to obtain the details of the image is poor, does not meet the human visual system. Single visible light imaging can be rich in detail, high resolution images and for the visual system, but the visible image easily affected by the external environment. Infrared image and visible image fusion process involved in the video image fusion algorithm complexity and high calculation capacity, have occupied more memory resources, high clock rate requirements, such as software, c ++, c, etc. to achieve more, but based on Hardware platform less. In this paper, based on the imaging characteristics of infrared images and visible light images, the software and hardware are combined to obtain the registration parameters through software matlab, and the gray level weighted average method is used to implement the hardware platform. Information fusion, and finally the fusion image can achieve the goal of effectively improving the acquisition of information to increase the amount of information in the image.

  5. Investigation of noise sources in upconversion based infrared hyperspectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Louis Martinus; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Beato, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Noise sources in infrared hyperspectral imaging based on nonlinear frequency upconversion are investigated. The effects on the spectral and spatial content of the images are evaluated and methods of combating them are suggested.......Noise sources in infrared hyperspectral imaging based on nonlinear frequency upconversion are investigated. The effects on the spectral and spatial content of the images are evaluated and methods of combating them are suggested....

  6. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulp, Thomas Jan [Livermore, CA; Kliner, Dahv A. V. [San Ramon, CA; Sommers, Ricky [Oakley, CA; Goers, Uta-Barbara [Campbell, NY; Armstrong, Karla M [Livermore, CA

    2006-12-19

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  7. Neuromagnetic brain activity associated with anticipatory postural adjustments for bimanual load lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tommy H B; Sowman, Paul F; Brock, Jon; Johnson, Blake W

    2013-02-01

    During bimanual load lifting, the brain must anticipate the effects of unloading upon the load-bearing arm. Little is currently known about the neural networks that coordinate these anticipatory postural adjustments. We measured neuromagnetic brain activity with whole-head magnetoencephalography while participants performed a bimanual load-lifting task. Anticipatory adjustments were associated with reduction in biceps brachii muscle activity of the load-bearing arm and pre-movement desynchronization of the cortical beta rhythm. Beamforming analyses localized anticipatory brain activity to the precentral gyrus, basal ganglia, supplementary motor area, and thalamus, contralateral to the load-bearing arm. To our knowledge this is the first human neuroimaging study to directly investigate anticipatory postural adjustments and to explicitly partition the anticipatory and volitional aspects of brain activity in bimanual load lifting. These data contribute to our understanding of the neural systems supporting anticipatory postural adjustments in healthy adults. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The masking effect in foreign speech sounds perception revealed by neuromagnetic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, S; Gunji, A; Yabe, H; Yamada, R A; Oiwa, S; Kubo, R; Kakigi, R

    2000-11-27

    The backward masking effect on non-native consonants by a following vowel was examined using neuromagnetic responses to synthesized speech sounds. Native speakers of Japanese were presented with sequences of frequent (85%) and infrequent (15%) speech sounds (/ra/ and /la/ respectively, no /l/ /r/ contrast in Japanese language). The duration of the stimuli was 110 ms in a short session and 150 ms in a long session. In the short session, the stimuli were terminated in the course of the transition from the consonant to the vowel to diminish the masking effect from the vowel part. A distinct magnetic counterpart of mismatch negativity (MMNm) was observed for the short session, whereas a smaller MMNm was observed for the long session.

  9. Common source identification of images in large databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gisolf, F.; Barens, P.; Snel, E.; Malgoezar, A.; Vos, M.; Mieremet, A.; Geradts, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Photo-response non-uniformity noise patterns are a robust way to identify the source of an image. However, identifying a common source of images in a large database may be impractical due to long computation times. In this paper a solution for large volume digital camera identification is proposed,

  10. Endogenous neuromagnetic activity for mental hierarchy of timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Takako; Zendel, Benjamin Rich; Ross, Bernhard

    2010-03-03

    The frontal-striatal circuits, the cerebellum, and motor cortices play crucial roles in processing timing information on second to millisecond scales. However, little is known about the physiological mechanism underlying human's preference to robustly encode a sequence of time intervals into a mental hierarchy of temporal units called meter. This is especially salient in music: temporal patterns are typically interpreted as integer multiples of a basic unit (i.e., the beat) and accommodated into a global context such as march or waltz. With magnetoencephalography and spatial-filtering source analysis, we demonstrated that the time courses of neural activities index a subjectively induced meter context. Auditory evoked responses from hippocampus, basal ganglia, and auditory and association cortices showed a significant contrast between march and waltz metric conditions during listening to identical click stimuli. Specifically, the right hippocampus was activated differentially at 80 ms to the march downbeat (the count one) and approximately 250 ms to the waltz downbeat. In contrast, basal ganglia showed a larger 80 ms peak for march downbeat than waltz. The metric contrast was also expressed in long-latency responses in the right temporal lobe. These findings suggest that anticipatory processes in the hippocampal memory system and temporal computation mechanism in the basal ganglia circuits facilitate endogenous activities in auditory and association cortices through feedback loops. The close interaction of auditory, motor, and limbic systems suggests a distributed network for metric organization in temporal processing and its relevance for musical behavior.

  11. Global Neuromagnetic Cortical Fields Have Non-Zero Velocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Alexander

    Full Text Available Globally coherent patterns of phase can be obscured by analysis techniques that aggregate brain activity measures across-trials, whether prior to source localization or for estimating inter-areal coherence. We analyzed, at single-trial level, whole head MEG recorded during an observer-triggered apparent motion task. Episodes of globally coherent activity occurred in the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands of the signal in the form of large-scale waves, which propagated with a variety of velocities. Their mean speed at each frequency band was proportional to temporal frequency, giving a range of 0.06 to 4.0 m/s, from delta to beta. The wave peaks moved over the entire measurement array, during both ongoing activity and task-relevant intervals; direction of motion was more predictable during the latter. A large proportion of the cortical signal, measurable at the scalp, exists as large-scale coherent motion. We argue that the distribution of observable phase velocities in MEG is dominated by spatial filtering considerations in combination with group velocity of cortical activity. Traveling waves may index processes involved in global coordination of cortical activity.

  12. Neuromagnetic brain responses to words from semantic sub- and supercategories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rockstroh Brigitte

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We explored spatio-temporal patterns of cortical activity evoked by written words from super-ordinate and sub-ordinate semantic categories and hoped to find a differential cortical and/or temporal distribution of the brain response depending on the level of the categories. Twenty-three subjects saw 360 words belonging to six sub-ordinate categories (mammals, birds, fish, fruit, flowers, trees within two super-ordinate categories (fauna, flora. Visually evoked magnetic fields were determined from whole-head (148-sensor magnetoencephalography and analyzed in the source space (Minimum Norm Estimate. Results Activity (MNE amplitudes 100–150 ms after stimulus onset in the left occipito-temporal area distinguished super-ordinate categories, while later activity (300–550 ms in the left temporal area distinguished the six sub-ordinate categories. Conclusion Our results document temporally and spatially distinct processing and representation of words according to their categorical information. If further studies can rule out possible confounds then our results may help constructing a theory about the internal structure of entries in the mental lexicon and its access.

  13. Coherent Lensless imaging with Ultra-Broadband Light Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eikema K. S. E.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a method for efficient lensless imaging using ultra-broadband light sources. By using a pair of time-delayed, coherent pulses in a Fourier-transform scheme, spectrally resolved diffraction patterns are obtained throughout the entire spectrum of the incident light source. We perform a proof-of-principle experiment using an octave-spanning visible light source, and obtain images of a holographic test sample with near-diffraction limited resolution. Our approach provides a promising route towards efficient high-resolution imaging using table-top high-harmonic soft-X-ray sources.

  14. Electrical source imaging of sleep spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Felice, Alessandra; Arcaro, Chiara; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Fiaschi, Antonio; Manganotti, Paolo

    2014-07-01

    To identify and compare cortical source generators of slow and fast sleep spindles in healthy subjects, electroencephalographic (EEG) signals were obtained from 256 channels, and sources on neuroanatomical Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) space estimated with low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography analysis (LORETA). Spindle activity was recorded in 18 healthy volunteers during daytime napping. Because of lack of sleep or excessive artifacts, data from 13 subjects were analyzed off-line. Spindles were visually scored, marked, and bandpass filtered (slow 10-12 Hz or fast 12-14 Hz). EEG was segmented on the marker, and segments separately averaged. LORETA projected cortical sources on the MNI brain. Maximal intra- and inter-individual intensities were compared using the Wilcoxon test (P generators were consistently identified in frontal lobes, with additional sources in parietal and limbic lobes in half cases. Fast spindles had multiple temporo-parietal sources, with an inconstant frontal source. Inter-individual (P = 0.44), and intra-individual (P = 0.09 slow and P = 0.10 fast spindles) source intensities were comparable. Slow spindles sources were preferentially concentrated over frontal cortices in comparison with fast spindles (P = 0.0009). Our results demonstrate multiple, synchronous, and equipotent spindles cortical generators in healthy subjects, with more anterior generators for slow spindles.

  15. Phase-sensitive swept source OCT imaging of the human retina with a VCSEL light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, WooJhon; Potsaid, Benjamin; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Baumann, Bernhard; Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Liu, Jonathan J.; Lu, Chen D.; Cable, Alex E.; Huang, David; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the challenges in achieving high phase stability, Doppler swept source / Fourier domain OCT has advantages of less fringe washout and faster imaging speeds compared to spectral / Fourier domain detection. This manuscript demonstrates swept source OCT with a VCSEL light source at 400kHz sweep rate for phase-sensitive Doppler imaging, measuring pulsatile total retinal blood flow with high sensitivity and phase stability. A robust, simple, and computationally efficient phase stabilization approach for phase-sensitive swept source imaging is also presented. PMID:23381430

  16. Transmission Imaging in Lymphoscintigraphy with a 153Gd Flood Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFilippo, Frank P; Brunken, Richard C; Neumann, Donald R

    2015-12-01

    Lymphoscintigraphy uses intradermal or interstitial injections of (99m)Tc-labeled tracers to produce images of focal lymph nodes. Because there is little or no anatomic information in the (99m)Tc images, a (57)Co flood source is sometimes used to provide transmission data along with the emission data. The anatomic shadow from the transmission scan generally improves interpretation and surgical planning. However, the (57)Co transmission photons contribute to background on the (99m)Tc images, reducing contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). SNR is related to lesion detection, and some lymph nodes that would be detected in an emission-only scan might not be detected if acquired with a (57)Co flood source. An alternative to a (57)Co flood source is a (153)Gd flood source, which has primary photon emissions well below the (99m)Tc emission window, allowing the shadow to be acquired in a separate transmission window. Significantly smaller crosstalk from (153)Gd should improve SNR and therefore would be expected to improve lymph node detection. We hypothesized that the use of a (153)Gd flood source would reduce background and improve SNR for these studies. Phantom studies simulating lymphoscintigraphy were performed to compare performance with a (153)Gd flood source, a (57)Co flood source, and no flood source. SNR in the (99m)Tc emission images was measured using a water phantom to simulate patient body and point sources of various activities to simulate nodes and injection site. The encouraging phantom studies prompted use of the (153)Gd flood source in routine clinical breast lymphoscintigraphy, melanoma lymphoscintigraphy, and lymphedema studies. Because emission and transmission data were acquired in separate energy windows, fused planar images of emission and transmission data were available to the physician. SNR was highest with no flood source and was lowest with the (57)Co flood source by a significant margin. SNR with the (153)Gd flood source was similar to that

  17. Dirichlet Methods for Bayesian Source Detection in Radio Astronomy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, A. M.

    2014-02-01

    The sheer volume of data to be produced by the next generation of radio telescopes - exabytes of data on hundreds of millions of objects - makes automated methods for the detection of astronomical objects ("sources") essential. Of particular importance are low surface brightness objects, which are not well found by current automated methods. This thesis explores Bayesian methods for source detection that use Dirichlet or multinomial models for pixel intensity distributions in discretised radio astronomy images. A novel image discretisation method that incorporates uncertainty about how the image should be discretised is developed. Latent Dirichlet allocation - a method originally developed for inferring latent topics in document collections - is used to estimate source and background distributions in radio astronomy images. A new Dirichlet-multinomial ratio, indicating how well a region conforms to a well-specified model of background versus a loosely-specified model of foreground, is derived. Finally, latent Dirichlet allocation and the Dirichlet-multinomial ratio are combined for source detection in astronomical images. The methods developed in this thesis perform source detection well in comparison to two widely-used source detection packages and, importantly, find dim sources not well found by other algorithms.

  18. Multimodal Source Imaging: Basic Methods, Signal Processing Techniques, and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huiskamp, G.; Oostendorp, T.F.; Munck, J.C. de

    2016-01-01

    Multimodal source imaging is an emerging field in biomedical engineering. Its central goal is to combine different imaging modalities in a single model or data representation, such that the combination provides an enhanced insight into the underlying physiological organ, compared to each modality

  19. Hubble Space Telescope imaging of compact steep spectrum radio sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deVries, WH; ODea, CP; Baum, SA; Sparks, WB; Biretta, J; deKoff, S; Golombek, D; Lehnert, MD; Macchetto, F; McCarthy, P; Miley, GK

    We present Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 images taken through a broad red filter (F702W) of 30 Third Cambridge Catalog compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio sources. We have overlaid radio maps taken from the literature on the optical images to determine the radio-optical alignment and to study detailed

  20. Analyzing huge pathology images with open source software

    OpenAIRE

    Deroulers, Christophe; Ameisen, David; Badoual, Mathilde; Gerin, Chloé; Granier, Alexandre; Lartaud, Marc

    2013-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: Digital pathology images are increasingly used both for diagnosis and research, because slide scanners are nowadays broadly available and because the quantitative study of these images yields new insights in systems biology. However, such virtual slides build up a technical challenge since the images occupy often several gigabytes and cannot be fully opened in a computer¿s memory. Moreover, there is no standard format. Therefore, most common open source too...

  1. Sparse Source EEG Imaging with the Variational Garrote

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Stahlhut, Carsten; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2013-01-01

    EEG imaging, the estimation of the cortical source distribution from scalp electrode measurements, poses an extremely ill-posed inverse problem. Recent work by Delorme et al. (2012) supports the hypothesis that distributed source solutions are sparse. We show that direct search for sparse solutions...

  2. Imaging acoustic sources moving at high-speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodony, Daniel; Papanicolaou, George

    2006-11-01

    In the quantification of the noise radiated by a turbulent flow the source motion is important. It is well known that moving acoustic sources radiate sound preferrentially in the direction of motion in a phenomenon termed `convective amplification.' Modern acoustic theories have utilized this behavior in their predictions. In the inverse problem the imaging of noise sources, by techniques such as beam forming, the source motion is not explicitly taken into account. In this talk we consider the imaging of acoustic sources moving at speeds on the order of the the ambient speed of sound, as typical of high-speed jets, for which the D"oppler shift approximation is not appropriate. An analysis will be presented that can be used to estimate the source motion based on the radiated acoustic field.

  3. Neuromagnetic Vistas into Typical and Atypical Development of Frontal Lobe Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Margot J.; Doesburg, Sam M.; Pang, Elizabeth W.

    2014-01-01

    The frontal lobes are involved in many higher-order cognitive functions such as social cognition executive functions and language and speech. These functions are complex and follow a prolonged developmental course from childhood through to early adulthood. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is ideal for the study of development of these functions, due to its combination of temporal and spatial resolution which allows the determination of age-related changes in both neural timing and location. There are several challenges for MEG developmental studies: to design tasks appropriate to capture the neurodevelopmental trajectory of these cognitive functions, and to develop appropriate analysis strategies to capture various aspects of neuromagnetic frontal lobe activity. Here, we review our MEG research on social and executive functions, and speech in typically developing children and in two clinical groups – children with autism spectrum disorder and children born very preterm. The studies include facial emotional processing, inhibition, visual short-term memory, speech production, and resting-state networks. We present data from event-related analyses as well as on oscillations and connectivity analyses and review their contributions to understanding frontal lobe cognitive development. We also discuss the challenges of testing young children in the MEG and the development of age-appropriate technologies and paradigms. PMID:24994980

  4. Neuromagnetic vistas into typical and atypical development of frontal lobe functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot J Taylor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The frontal lobes are involved in many higher-order cognitive functions such as social cognition executive functions and language and speech. These functions are complex and follow a prolonged developmental course from childhood through to early adulthood. Magnetoencephalography (MEG is ideal for the study of development of these functions, due to its combination of temporal and spatial resolution which allows the determination of age-related changes in both neural timing and location. There are several challenges for MEG developmental studies: to design tasks appropriate to capture the neurodevelopmental trajectory of these cognitive functions, and to develop appropriate analysis strategies to capture various aspects of neuromagnetic frontal lobe activity. Here, we review our MEG research on social and executive functions, and speech in typically developing children and in two clinical groups – children with ASD and children born very preterm. The studies include facial emotional processing, inhibition, visual short-term memory, speech production and resting-state networks. We present data from event-related analyses as well as on oscillations and connectivity analyses and review their contributions to understanding frontal lobe cognitive development. We also discuss the challenges of testing young children in the MEG and the development of age-appropriate technologies and paradigms.

  5. Investigating neuromagnetic brain responses against chromatic flickering stimuli by wavelet entropies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Bhagat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photosensitive epilepsy is a type of reflexive epilepsy triggered by various visual stimuli including colourful ones. Despite the ubiquitous presence of colorful displays, brain responses against different colour combinations are not properly studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we studied the photosensitivity of the human brain against three types of chromatic flickering stimuli by recording neuromagnetic brain responses (magnetoencephalogram, MEG from nine adult controls, an unmedicated patient, a medicated patient, and two controls age-matched with patients. Dynamical complexities of MEG signals were investigated by a family of wavelet entropies. Wavelet entropy is a newly proposed measure to characterize large scale brain responses, which quantifies the degree of order/disorder associated with a multi-frequency signal response. In particular, we found that as compared to the unmedicated patient, controls showed significantly larger wavelet entropy values. We also found that Renyi entropy is the most powerful feature for the participant classification. Finally, we also demonstrated the effect of combinational chromatic sensitivity on the underlying order/disorder in MEG signals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that when perturbed by potentially epileptic-triggering stimulus, healthy human brain manages to maintain a non-deterministic, possibly nonlinear state, with high degree of disorder, but an epileptic brain represents a highly ordered state which making it prone to hyper-excitation. Further, certain colour combination was found to be more threatening than other combinations.

  6. Analyzing huge pathology images with open source software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroulers, Christophe; Ameisen, David; Badoual, Mathilde; Gerin, Chloé; Granier, Alexandre; Lartaud, Marc

    2013-06-06

    Digital pathology images are increasingly used both for diagnosis and research, because slide scanners are nowadays broadly available and because the quantitative study of these images yields new insights in systems biology. However, such virtual slides build up a technical challenge since the images occupy often several gigabytes and cannot be fully opened in a computer's memory. Moreover, there is no standard format. Therefore, most common open source tools such as ImageJ fail at treating them, and the others require expensive hardware while still being prohibitively slow. We have developed several cross-platform open source software tools to overcome these limitations. The NDPITools provide a way to transform microscopy images initially in the loosely supported NDPI format into one or several standard TIFF files, and to create mosaics (division of huge images into small ones, with or without overlap) in various TIFF and JPEG formats. They can be driven through ImageJ plugins. The LargeTIFFTools achieve similar functionality for huge TIFF images which do not fit into RAM. We test the performance of these tools on several digital slides and compare them, when applicable, to standard software. A statistical study of the cells in a tissue sample from an oligodendroglioma was performed on an average laptop computer to demonstrate the efficiency of the tools. Our open source software enables dealing with huge images with standard software on average computers. They are cross-platform, independent of proprietary libraries and very modular, allowing them to be used in other open source projects. They have excellent performance in terms of execution speed and RAM requirements. They open promising perspectives both to the clinician who wants to study a single slide and to the research team or data centre who do image analysis of many slides on a computer cluster. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here

  7. Scanning Reduction Strategy in MEG/EEG Beamformer Source Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hee Hong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MEG/EEG beamformer source imaging is a promising approach which can easily address spatiotemporal multi-dipole problems without a priori information on the number of sources and is robust to noise. Despite such promise, beamformer generally has weakness which is degrading localization performance for correlated sources and is requiring of dense scanning for covering all possible interesting (entire source areas. Wide source space scanning yields all interesting area images, and it results in lengthy computation time. Therefore, an efficient source space scanning strategy would be beneficial in achieving accelerated beamformer source imaging. We propose a new strategy in computing beamformer to reduce scanning points and still maintain effective accuracy (good spatial resolution. This new strategy uses the distribution of correlation values between measurements and lead-field vectors. Scanning source points are chosen yielding higher RMS correlations than the predetermined correlation thresholds. We discuss how correlation thresholds depend on SNR and verify the feasibility and efficacy of our proposed strategy to improve the beamformer through numerical and empirical experiments. Our proposed strategy could in time accelerate the conventional beamformer up to over 40% without sacrificing spatial accuracy.

  8. Influential sources affecting Bangkok adolescent body image perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thianthai, Chulanee

    2006-01-01

    The study of body image-related problems in non-Western countries is still very limited. Thus, this study aims to identify the main influential sources and show how they affect the body image perceptions of Bangkok adolescents. The researcher recruited 400 Thai male and female adolescents in Bangkok, attending high school to freshmen level, ranging from 16-19 years, to participate in this study. Survey questionnaires were distributed to every student and follow-up interviews conducted with 40 students. The findings showed that there are eight main influential sources respectively ranked from the most influential to the least influential: magazines, television, peer group, familial, fashion trend, the opposite gender, self-realization and health knowledge. Similar to those studies conducted in Western countries, more than half of the total percentage was the influence of mass media and peer groups. Bangkok adolescents also internalized Western ideal beauty through these mass media channels. Alike studies conducted in the West, there was similarities in the process of how these influential sources affect Bangkok adolescent body image perception, with the exception of familial source. In conclusion, taking the approach of identifying the main influential sources and understanding how they affect adolescent body image perceptions can help prevent adolescents from having unhealthy views and taking risky measures toward their bodies. More studies conducted in non-Western countries are needed in order to build a cultural sensitive program, catered to the body image problems occurring in adolescents within that particular society.

  9. Center determination for trailed sources in astronomical observation images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jun Ju; Hu, Shao Ming; Chen, Xu; Guo, Di Fu

    2014-11-01

    Images with trailed sources can be obtained when observing near-Earth objects, such as small astroids, space debris, major planets and their satellites, no matter the telescopes track on sidereal speed or the speed of target. The low centering accuracy of these trailed sources is one of the most important sources of the astrometric uncertainty, but how to determine the central positions of the trailed sources accurately remains a significant challenge to image processing techniques, especially in the study of faint or fast moving objects. According to the conditions of one-meter telescope at Weihai Observatory of Shandong University, moment and point-spread-function (PSF) fitting were chosen to develop the image processing pipeline for space debris. The principles and the implementations of both two methods are introduced in this paper. And some simulated images containing trailed sources are analyzed with each technique. The results show that two methods are comparable to obtain the accurate central positions of trailed sources when the signal to noise (SNR) is high. But moment tends to fail for the objects with low SNR. Compared with moment, PSF fitting seems to be more robust and versatile. However, PSF fitting is quite time-consuming. Therefore, if there are enough bright stars in the field, or the high astronometric accuracy is not necessary, moment is competent. Otherwise, the combination of moment and PSF fitting is recommended.

  10. Photoacoustic imaging driven by an interstitial irradiation source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Mitcham

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic (PA imaging has shown tremendous promise in providing valuable diagnostic and therapy-monitoring information in select clinical procedures. Many of these pursued applications, however, have been relatively superficial due to difficulties with delivering light deep into tissue. To address this limitation, this work investigates generating a PA image using an interstitial irradiation source with a clinical ultrasound (US system, which was shown to yield improved PA signal quality at distances beyond 13 mm and to provide improved spectral fidelity. Additionally, interstitially driven multi-wavelength PA imaging was able to provide accurate spectra of gold nanoshells and deoxyhemoglobin in excised prostate and liver tissue, respectively, and allowed for clear visualization of a wire at 7 cm in excised liver. This work demonstrates the potential of using a local irradiation source to extend the depth capabilities of future PA imaging techniques for minimally invasive interventional radiology procedures.

  11. Stellar Source Selections for Image Validation of Earth Observation Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwoong Yu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A method of stellar source selection for validating the quality of image is investigated for a low Earth orbit optical remote sensing satellite. Image performance of the optical payload needs to be validated after its launch into orbit. The stellar sources are ideal source points that can be used to validate the quality of optical images. For the image validation, stellar sources should be the brightest as possible in the charge-coupled device dynamic range. The time delayed and integration technique, which is used to observe the ground, is also performed to observe the selected stars. The relations between the incident radiance at aperture and V magnitude of a star are established using Gunn & Stryker's star catalogue of spectrum. Applying this result, an appropriate image performance index is determined, and suitable stars and areas of the sky scene are selected for the optical payload on a remote sensing satellite to observe. The result of this research can be utilized to validate the quality of optical payload of a satellite in orbit.

  12. Source parameter imaging from areomagnetic data of the basement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Source parameter imaging from areomagnetic data of the basement rocks in part of the middle Benue trough, Nigeria. GC Onyedim, EA Ariyibi, MO Awoyemi, JB Arubayi, OM Afolabi. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Mining and Geology Vol. 42 (2) 2006: pp. 165-173. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  13. Virtual ultrasound sources in high-resolution ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    beamforming procedure for 3D ultrasound imaging. The position of the virtual source, and the created waveform are investigated with simulation, and with pulse-echo measurements. There is good agreement between the estimated wavefront and the theoretically tted one. Several examples of the use of virtual...

  14. Rotating Modulation Imager for the Orphan Source Search Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Mathematica, Maple, or Mathcad , although the processing time for several of the functions can be computationally expensive. For this research, an...137 5.3.1 System Design Enhancements and Optimization .............................. 137 5.3.2 Imaging with RMC arrays ...151 vi LIST OF FIGURES Figure 2-1. The RMC process is illustrated for a far field source as the masks are

  15. The VTTVIS line imaging spectrometer - principles, error sources, and calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, R.N.

    2002-01-01

    work describing the basic principles, potential error sources, and/or adjustment and calibration procedures. This report fulfils the need for such documentationwith special focus on the system at KVL. The PGP based system has several severe error sources, which should be removed prior any analysis....... Most of the random noise sources can be minimised by carefully selecting high-grade components especially withconcern to the camera. Systematic error sources like CCD fixed pattern noise (FPN), CCD photoresponse nonuniformity (PRNU), CCD charge transfer efficiency (CTE), slit width variations, changes...... in off-axis transmission efficiencies, diffractionefficiencies, and image distortion have a significant impact on the instrument performance. Procedures removing or minimising these systematic error sources are developed and described for the system build at KVL but can be generalised to other PGP...

  16. Reliable estimation of virtual source position for SAFT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hsiung; Chang, Young-Fo; Ma, Yushieh; Shung, K K

    2013-02-01

    The synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), employing a scanned focused transducer as a virtual source, is commonly used to image flaws in immersion testing. The position of a virtual source is estimated from rays emitted from the rim of a focused transducer. However, it is often found that the virtual source position cannot be uniquely determined because of severe focal spot aberration at the focal zone. Based on an analysis of the energy radiated from the focused transducer and the refracted energy varied with the incident angle of ultrasound, we propose that paraxial rays emitted from the focused transducer are the best for estimating the position of a virtual source for incorporation into SAFT. This study results also shows that by using this simple virtual source position estimation for SAFT, the axial resolution and SNR of the reconstructed image can be greatly improved. This new approach minimizes the effect of such factors as refraction at high-velocity-contrast interfaces, distance of the transducer to the couplant-specimen interface, and the focal length of a focused transducer, which may cause focal spot aberration resulting in decreased sensitivity in SAFT imaging.

  17. Neuromagnetic brain activities associated with perceptual categorization and sound-content incongruency: a comparison between monosyllabic words and pitch names

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Gia eTsai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In human cultures, the perceptual categorization of musical pitches relies on pitch-naming systems. A sung pitch name concurrently holds the information of fundamental frequency and pitch name. These two aspects may be either congruent or incongruent with regard to pitch categorization. The present study aimed to compare the neuromagnetic responses to musical and verbal stimuli for congruency judgments, for example a congruent pair for the pitch C4 sung with the pitch name do in a C-major context (the pitch-semantic task or for the meaning of a word to match the speaker’s identity (the voice-semantic task. Both the behavioral data and neuromagnetic data showed that congruency detection of the speaker’s identity and word meaning was slower than that of the pitch and pitch name. Congruency effects of musical stimuli revealed that pitch categorization and semantic processing of pitch information were associated with P2m and N400m, respectively. For verbal stimuli, P2m and N400m did not show any congruency effect. In both the pitch-semantic task and the voice-semantic task, we found that incongruent stimuli evoked stronger slow waves with the latency of 500-600 ms than congruent stimuli. These findings shed new light on the neural mechanisms underlying pitch-naming processes.

  18. Neuromagnetic brain activities associated with perceptual categorization and sound-content incongruency: a comparison between monosyllabic words and pitch names

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chen-Gia; Chen, Chien-Chung; Wen, Ya-Chien; Chou, Tai-Li

    2015-01-01

    In human cultures, the perceptual categorization of musical pitches relies on pitch-naming systems. A sung pitch name concurrently holds the information of fundamental frequency and pitch name. These two aspects may be either congruent or incongruent with regard to pitch categorization. The present study aimed to compare the neuromagnetic responses to musical and verbal stimuli for congruency judgments, for example a congruent pair for the pitch C4 sung with the pitch name do in a C-major context (the pitch-semantic task) or for the meaning of a word to match the speaker’s identity (the voice-semantic task). Both the behavioral data and neuromagnetic data showed that congruency detection of the speaker’s identity and word meaning was slower than that of the pitch and pitch name. Congruency effects of musical stimuli revealed that pitch categorization and semantic processing of pitch information were associated with P2m and N400m, respectively. For verbal stimuli, P2m and N400m did not show any congruency effect. In both the pitch-semantic task and the voice-semantic task, we found that incongruent stimuli evoked stronger slow waves with the latency of 500–600 ms than congruent stimuli. These findings shed new light on the neural mechanisms underlying pitch-naming processes. PMID:26347638

  19. -Norm Regularization in Volumetric Imaging of Cardiac Current Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Rahimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in computer vision have substantially improved our ability to analyze the structure and mechanics of the heart. In comparison, our ability to observe and analyze cardiac electrical activities is much limited. The progress to computationally reconstruct cardiac current sources from noninvasive voltage data sensed on the body surface has been hindered by the ill-posedness and the lack of a unique solution of the reconstruction problem. Common L2- and L1-norm regularizations tend to produce a solution that is either too diffused or too scattered to reflect the complex spatial structure of current source distribution in the heart. In this work, we propose a general regularization with Lp-norm ( constraint to bridge the gap and balance between an overly smeared and overly focal solution in cardiac source reconstruction. In a set of phantom experiments, we demonstrate the superiority of the proposed Lp-norm method over its L1 and L2 counterparts in imaging cardiac current sources with increasing extents. Through computer-simulated and real-data experiments, we further demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method in imaging the complex structure of excitation wavefront, as well as current sources distributed along the postinfarction scar border. This ability to preserve the spatial structure of source distribution is important for revealing the potential disruption to the normal heart excitation.

  20. Light source design for spectral tuning in biomedical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Chandrajit; Schlangen, Sebastian; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    We propose an architecture with a remote phosphor-based modular and compact light-emitting diode (LED) light source in a noncontact dermoscope prototype for skin cancer screening. The spectrum and color temperature of the output light can easily and significantly be changed depending on spectral absorption characteristics of the tissues being imaged. The new system has several advantages compared to state-of-the-art phosphor converted ultrabright white LEDs, used in a wide range of medical imaging devices, which have a fixed spectrum and color temperature at a given operating point. In particular, the system can more easily be adapted to the requirements originating from different tissues in the human body, which have wavelength-dependent absorption and reflectivity. This leads to improved contrast for different kinds of imaged tissue components. The concept of such a lighting architecture can be vastly utilized in many other medical imaging devices including endoscopic systems.

  1. Introducing djatoka: a reuse friendly, open source JPEG image server

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chute, Ryan M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Van De Sompel, Herbert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The ISO-standardized JPEG 2000 image format has started to attract significant attention. Support for the format is emerging in major consumer applications, and the cultural heritage community seriously considers it a viable format for digital preservation. So far, only commercial image servers with JPEG 2000 support have been available. They come with significant license fees and typically provide the customers with limited extensibility capabilities. Here, we introduce djatoka, an open source JPEG 2000 image server with an attractive basic feature set, and extensibility under control of the community of implementers. We describe djatoka, and point at demonstrations that feature digitized images of marvelous historical manuscripts from the collections of the British Library and the University of Ghent. We also caIl upon the community to engage in further development of djatoka.

  2. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Avi C.; Campbell, Malachy T.; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R.; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. PMID:27141917

  3. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Avi C; Campbell, Malachy T; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. Multi-rate, real time image compression for images dominated by point sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, A. Kris; Budge, Scott E.; Harris, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    An image compression system recently developed for compression of digital images dominated by point sources is presented. Encoding consists of minimum-mean removal, vector quantization, adaptive threshold truncation, and modified Huffman encoding. Simulations are presented showing that the peaks corresponding to point sources can be transmitted losslessly for low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and high point source densities while maintaining a reduced output bit rate. Encoding and decoding hardware has been built and tested which processes 552,960 12-bit pixels per second at compression rates of 10:1 and 4:1. Simulation results are presented for the 10:1 case only.

  5. Distributed computing in image analysis using open source frameworks and application to image sharpness assessment of histological whole slide images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbe, Norman; Hufnagl, Peter; Schlüns, Karsten

    2011-03-30

    Automated image analysis on virtual slides is evolving rapidly and will play an important role in the future of digital pathology. Due to the image size, the computational cost of processing whole slide images (WSIs) in full resolution is immense. Moreover, image analysis requires well focused images in high magnification. We present a system that merges virtual microscopy techniques, open source image analysis software, and distributed parallel processing. We have integrated the parallel processing framework JPPF, so batch processing can be performed distributed and in parallel. All resulting meta data and image data are collected and merged. As an example the system is applied to the specific task of image sharpness assessment. ImageJ is an open source image editing and processing framework developed at the NIH having a large user community that contributes image processing algorithms wrapped as plug-ins in a wide field of life science applications. We developed an ImageJ plug-in that supports both basic interactive virtual microscope and batch processing functionality. For the application of sharpness inspection we employ an approach with non-overlapping tiles. Compute nodes retrieve image tiles of moderate size from the streaming server and compute the focus measure. Each tile is divided into small sub images to calculate an edge based sharpness criterion which is used for classification. The results are aggregated in a sharpness map. Based on the system we calculate a sharpness measure and classify virtual slides into one of the following categories - excellent, okay, review and defective. Generating a scaled sharpness map enables the user to evaluate sharpness of WSIs and shows overall quality at a glance thus reducing tedious assessment work. Using sharpness assessment as an example, the introduced system can be used to process, analyze and parallelize analysis of whole slide images based on open source software.

  6. Energy-selective neutron transmission imaging at a pulsed source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockelmann, W.; Frei, G.; Lehmann, E. H.; Vontobel, P.; Santisteban, J. R.

    2007-08-01

    Energy-selective neutron radiography experiments were carried out at the ISIS pulsed spallation source. This neutron transmission imaging technique combines the hardware used for conventional neutron radiography with the Bragg edge transmission features of time-of-flight methods. The main component of the energy-selective radiography set-up was a gated image-intensified CCD camera that viewed a neutron sensitive scintillation screen via a mirror. Energy resolution was obtained via synchronization of the light-intensifier with the pulse structure of the neutron source. It is demonstrated that contrast enhancement of materials can be straightforwardly achieved, and that microstructural features in metal samples can be directly visualized with high spatial resolution by taking advantage of the Bragg edges in the energy dependent neutron cross sections.

  7. Combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutsouris, Georgios I; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    A combined model for room acoustic predictions is developed, aiming to treat both diffuse and specular reflections in a unified way. Two established methods are incorporated: acoustical radiosity, accounting for the diffuse part, and the image source method, accounting for the specular part....... The model is based on conservation of acoustical energy. Losses are taken into account by the energy absorption coefficient, and the diffuse reflections are controlled via the scattering coefficient, which defines the portion of energy that has been diffusely reflected. The way the model is formulated...... allows for a dynamic control of the image source production, so that no fixed maximum reflection order is required. The model is optimized for energy impulse response predictions in arbitrary polyhedral rooms. The predictions are validated by comparison with published measured data for a real music...

  8. Distributed Source Coding Techniques for Lossless Compression of Hyperspectral Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barni Mauro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of distributed source coding (DSC theory to remote sensing image compression. Although DSC exhibits a significant potential in many application fields, up till now the results obtained on real signals fall short of the theoretical bounds, and often impose additional system-level constraints. The objective of this paper is to assess the potential of DSC for lossless image compression carried out onboard a remote platform. We first provide a brief overview of DSC of correlated information sources. We then focus on onboard lossless image compression, and apply DSC techniques in order to reduce the complexity of the onboard encoder, at the expense of the decoder's, by exploiting the correlation of different bands of a hyperspectral dataset. Specifically, we propose two different compression schemes, one based on powerful binary error-correcting codes employed as source codes, and one based on simpler multilevel coset codes. The performance of both schemes is evaluated on a few AVIRIS scenes, and is compared with other state-of-the-art 2D and 3D coders. Both schemes turn out to achieve competitive compression performance, and one of them also has reduced complexity. Based on these results, we highlight the main issues that are still to be solved to further improve the performance of DSC-based remote sensing systems.

  9. Accommodating multiple illumination sources in an imaging colorimetry environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Kenneth W., Jr.; Goddard, James S., Jr.; Hunt, Martin A.; Hylton, Kathy W.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Simpson, Marc L.; Richards, Roger K.; Treece, Dale A.

    2000-03-01

    Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been developing a method for measuring color quality in textile products using a tri-stimulus color camera system. Initial results of the Imaging Tristimulus Colorimeter (ITC) were reported during 1999. These results showed that the projection onto convex sets (POCS) approach to color estimation could be applied to complex printed patterns on textile products with high accuracy and repeatability. Image-based color sensors used for on-line measurement are not colorimetric by nature and require a non-linear transformation of the component colors based on the spectral properties of the incident illumination, imaging sensor, and the actual textile color. Our earlier work reports these results for a broad-band, smoothly varying D65 standard illuminant. To move the measurement to the on-line environment with continuously manufactured textile webs, the illumination source becomes problematic. The spectral content of these light sources varies substantially from the D65 standard illuminant and can greatly impact the measurement performance of the POCS system. Although absolute color measurements are difficult to make under different illumination, referential measurements to monitor color drift provide a useful indication of product quality. Modifications to the ITC system have been implemented to enable the study of different light sources. These results and the subsequent analysis of relative color measurements will be reported for textile products.

  10. Gadgetron: an open source framework for medical image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Michael Schacht; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2013-06-01

    This work presents a new open source framework for medical image reconstruction called the "Gadgetron." The framework implements a flexible system for creating streaming data processing pipelines where data pass through a series of modules or "Gadgets" from raw data to reconstructed images. The data processing pipeline is configured dynamically at run-time based on an extensible markup language configuration description. The framework promotes reuse and sharing of reconstruction modules and new Gadgets can be added to the Gadgetron framework through a plugin-like architecture without recompiling the basic framework infrastructure. Gadgets are typically implemented in C/C++, but the framework includes wrapper Gadgets that allow the user to implement new modules in the Python scripting language for rapid prototyping. In addition to the streaming framework infrastructure, the Gadgetron comes with a set of dedicated toolboxes in shared libraries for medical image reconstruction. This includes generic toolboxes for data-parallel (e.g., GPU-based) execution of compute-intensive components. The basic framework architecture is independent of medical imaging modality, but this article focuses on its application to Cartesian and non-Cartesian parallel magnetic resonance imaging. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Open-source software platform for medical image segmentation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namías, R.; D'Amato, J. P.; del Fresno, M.

    2017-11-01

    Segmenting 2D and 3D images is a crucial and challenging problem in medical image analysis. Although several image segmentation algorithms have been proposed for different applications, no universal method currently exists. Moreover, their use is usually limited when detection of complex and multiple adjacent objects of interest is needed. In addition, the continually increasing volumes of medical imaging scans require more efficient segmentation software design and highly usable applications. In this context, we present an extension of our previous segmentation framework which allows the combination of existing explicit deformable models in an efficient and transparent way, handling simultaneously different segmentation strategies and interacting with a graphic user interface (GUI). We present the object-oriented design and the general architecture which consist of two layers: the GUI at the top layer, and the processing core filters at the bottom layer. We apply the framework for segmenting different real-case medical image scenarios on public available datasets including bladder and prostate segmentation from 2D MRI, and heart segmentation in 3D CT. Our experiments on these concrete problems show that this framework facilitates complex and multi-object segmentation goals while providing a fast prototyping open-source segmentation tool.

  12. Soft x-ray imaging with incoherent sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, P.; Torrisi, A.; Ayele, M.; Bartnik, A.; Czwartos, J.; Wegrzyński, Ł.; Fok, T.; Parkman, T.; Vondrová, Š.; Turnová, J.; Odstrcil, M.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we present experimental, compact desk-top SXR microscope, the EUV microscope which is at this stage a technology demonstrator, and finally, the SXR contact microscope. The systems are based on laser-plasma EUV and SXR sources, employing a double stream gas puff target. The EUV and SXR full field microscopes, operating at 13.8 nm and 2.88 nm wavelengths, respectively, are capable of imaging nanostructures with a sub-50 nm spatial resolution with relatively short (seconds) exposure times. The SXR contact microscope operates in the "water-window" spectral range, to produce an imprint of the internal structure of the sample in a thin layer of SXR light sensitive photoresist. Applications of such desk-top EUV and SXR microscopes for studies of variety of different samples - test objects for resolution assessment and other objects such as carbon membranes, DNA plasmid samples, organic and inorganic thin layers, diatoms, algae and carcinoma cells, are also presented. Details about the sources, the microscopes as well as the imaging results for various objects will be presented and discussed. The development of such compact imaging systems may be important to the new research related to biological, material science and nanotechnology applications.

  13. Cell structure imaging with bright and homogeneous nanometric light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Ono, Atsushi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Shen, Lin; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terekawa, Susumu

    2017-04-01

    Label-free optical nano-imaging of dendritic structures and intracellular granules in biological cells is demonstrated using a bright and homogeneous nanometric light source. The optical nanometric light source is excited using a focused electron beam. A zinc oxide (ZnO) luminescent thin film was fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) to produce the nanoscale light source. The ZnO film formed by ALD emitted the bright, homogeneous light, unlike that deposited by another method. The dendritic structures of label-free macrophage receptor with collagenous structure-expressing CHO cells were clearly visualized below the diffraction limit. The inner fiber structure was observed with 120 nm spatial resolution. Because the bright homogeneous emission from the ZnO film suppresses the background noise, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the imaging results was greater than 10. The ALD method helps achieve an electron beam excitation assisted microscope with high spatial resolution and high SNR. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Open source database of images DEIMOS: extension for large-scale subjective image quality assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vítek, Stanislav

    2014-09-01

    DEIMOS (Database of Images: Open Source) is an open-source database of images and video sequences for testing, verification and comparison of various image and/or video processing techniques such as compression, reconstruction and enhancement. This paper deals with extension of the database allowing performing large-scale web-based subjective image quality assessment. Extension implements both administrative and client interface. The proposed system is aimed mainly at mobile communication devices, taking into account advantages of HTML5 technology; it means that participants don't need to install any application and assessment could be performed using web browser. The assessment campaign administrator can select images from the large database and then apply rules defined by various test procedure recommendations. The standard test procedures may be fully customized and saved as a template. Alternatively the administrator can define a custom test, using images from the pool and other components, such as evaluating forms and ongoing questionnaires. Image sequence is delivered to the online client, e.g. smartphone or tablet, as a fully automated assessment sequence or viewer can decide on timing of the assessment if required. Environmental data and viewing conditions (e.g. illumination, vibrations, GPS coordinates, etc.), may be collected and subsequently analyzed.

  15. An Image Matching Algorithm Integrating Global SRTM and Image Segmentation for Multi-Source Satellite Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Ling

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel image matching method for multi-source satellite images, which integrates global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM data and image segmentation to achieve robust and numerous correspondences. This method first generates the epipolar lines as a geometric constraint assisted by global SRTM data, after which the seed points are selected and matched. To produce more reliable matching results, a region segmentation-based matching propagation is proposed in this paper, whereby the region segmentations are extracted by image segmentation and are considered to be a spatial constraint. Moreover, a similarity measure integrating Distance, Angle and Normalized Cross-Correlation (DANCC, which considers geometric similarity and radiometric similarity, is introduced to find the optimal correspondences. Experiments using typical satellite images acquired from Resources Satellite-3 (ZY-3, Mapping Satellite-1, SPOT-5 and Google Earth demonstrated that the proposed method is able to produce reliable and accurate matching results.

  16. Harmonic source wavefront aberration correction for ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianis, Scott W.; von Ramm, Olaf T.

    2011-01-01

    A method is proposed which uses a lower-frequency transmit to create a known harmonic acoustical source in tissue suitable for wavefront correction without a priori assumptions of the target or requiring a transponder. The measurement and imaging steps of this method were implemented on the Duke phased array system with a two-dimensional (2-D) array. The method was tested with multiple electronic aberrators [0.39π to 1.16π radians root-mean-square (rms) at 4.17 MHz] and with a physical aberrator 0.17π radians rms at 4.17 MHz) in a variety of imaging situations. Corrections were quantified in terms of peak beam amplitude compared to the unaberrated case, with restoration between 0.6 and 36.6 dB of peak amplitude with a single correction. Standard phantom images before and after correction were obtained and showed both visible improvement and 14 dB contrast improvement after correction. This method, when combined with previous phase correction methods, may be an important step that leads to improved clinical images. PMID:21303031

  17. Use of a reference source in probability imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aime, C; Aristidi, E; Lantéri, H; Ricort, G

    1993-05-20

    We describe the relations between the statistics of the speckled image I(x) that is produced by an astronomical object at the focus of a telescope and the statistics of the point-source speckle pattern S(x) that is obtained under comparable conditions of turbulence. We show that the characteristic function (CF) of I(x) can be written as a central slice of a higher-order CF of S(x); as a consequence, probability density functions (PDF's) of I(x) and S(x) are related to one another by means of projections. An illustration, consisting of one-dimensional scans obtained with the European Southern Observatory's slit-scanning infrared specklograph, is made for real data. It is shown how the onefold and twofold PDF's of a double star can be synthesized from the twofold and the threefold PDF's of the reference source.

  18. Multi-point sources and imaging compound infrared target simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rui; Xu, Rui; Wang, Hongjie; Wang, Xin; Wu, Di; Li, Zhuo

    2014-11-01

    Infrared target simulator is an important unit in guidance hardware-in-the-loop simulation systems. It is used to simulate the radiation and motion characteristics of target, decoy and background. This paper proposed a multi-channel IR target simulator. It could generate one IR point target, two pairs of IR decoys and background respectively in the same field of view of the seeker's optical system simultaneously. An IR imaging fiber bundle as the focal plane of the projection optical system was used to compound the target, decoys and background. The compound scene was projected to the seeker by the projection optical system. In IR imaging channel, IR scene was generated by an optical film chip as a visible to thermal transducer which was placed in a vacuum cell. The simulated temperature range of IR scene could be from room temperature to 430K.The thin film transducer had 512×512 pixels. Its frame rate could reach to 100Hz. Light sources with high equivalent black body temperature were adopted in IR target and decoy channels. The size and the radiation intensity of the IR point target and decoys could be controlled by pin holes and attenuators. The point target and decoys driven by high precise motors could travel through the whole instantaneous field of view of the seeker's optical system. Two pairs of decoys could move away from the center to the edge of the instantaneous field of view. The highest simulated black body temperature of the point source was 1200K.

  19. HST Imaging of the (Almost) Dark ALFALFA Source AGC 229385

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunker, Samantha; Salzer, John Joseph; McQuinn, Kristen B.; Janowiecki, Steven; Leisman, Luke; Rhode, Katherine L.; Adams, Elizabeth A.; Cannon, John M.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2017-06-01

    We present deep HST imaging photometry of the extreme galaxy AGC 229385. This system was first discovered as an HI source in the ALFALFA all-sky HI survey. It was cataloged as an (almost) dark galaxy because it did not exhibit any obvious optical counterpart in the available wide-field survey data (e.g., SDSS). Deep optical imaging with the WIYN 3.5-m telescope revealed an ultra-low surface brightness stellar component located at the center of the HI detection. With a peak central surface brightness of 26.4 mag/sq. arcsec in g and very blue colors (g-r = -0.1), the stellar component to this gas-rich system is quite enigmatic. We have used our HST images to produce a deep CMD of the resolved stellar population present in AGC 229385. We clearly detect a red-giant branch and use it to infer a distance of 5.50 ± 0.23 Mpc. The CMD is dominated by older stars, contrary to expectations given the blue optical colors obtained from our ground-based photometry. Our new distance is substantially lower than earlier estimates, and shows that AGC 229385 is an extreme dwarf galaxy with one of the highest MHI/L ratios known.

  20. High-Resolution Infrared Imaging of Young Outflow-Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preibisch, Thomas; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd

    For a better understanding of the mechanisms by which jets and outflows from young stellar objects are generated accelerated and collimated it is essential to look as close as possible to their launching point at the disk/star boundary. High-spatial resolution is therefore of crucial importance for further progress in this field. In this contribution we present recent results from our near-infrared bispectrum speckle interferometry studies of several outflow sources. With a spatial resolution of up to 0.055'' our images have the highest spatial resolution achieved so far for these objects and exhibit previously unseen complex structures. Our results include the identification of two distinct bipolar outflow systems originating simultaneously from the protostar S140 IRS1 the detection of an episodic precessing jet from S140 IRS3 and the discovery of a micro-jet from one of the embedded sources in Mon R2 IRS3. We will also discuss the relation of the observed circumstellar structures to the jets and outflows from the young stellar objects

  1. Uncertainty in Earthquake Source Imaging Due to Variations in Source Time Function and Earth Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Razafindrakoto, H. N. T.

    2014-03-25

    One way to improve the accuracy and reliability of kinematic earthquake source imaging is to investigate the origin of uncertainty and to minimize their effects. The difficulties in kinematic source inversion arise from the nonlinearity of the problem, nonunique choices in the parameterization, and observational errors. We analyze particularly the uncertainty related to the choice of the source time function (STF) and the variability in Earth structure. We consider a synthetic data set generated from a spontaneous dynamic rupture calculation. Using Bayesian inference, we map the solution space of peak slip rate, rupture time, and rise time to characterize the kinematic rupture in terms of posterior density functions. Our test to investigate the effect of the choice of STF reveals that all three tested STFs (isosceles triangle, regularized Yoffe with acceleration time of 0.1 and 0.3 s) retrieve the patch of high slip and slip rate around the hypocenter. However, the use of an isosceles triangle as STF artificially accelerates the rupture to propagate faster than the target solution. It additionally generates an artificial linear correlation between rupture onset time and rise time. These appear to compensate for the dynamic source effects that are not included in the symmetric triangular STF. The exact rise time for the tested STFs is difficult to resolve due to the small amount of radiated seismic moment in the tail of STF. To highlight the effect of Earth structure variability, we perform inversions including the uncertainty in the wavespeed only, and variability in both wavespeed and layer depth. We find that little difference is noticeable between the resulting rupture model uncertainties from these two parameterizations. Both significantly broaden the posterior densities and cause faster rupture propagation particularly near the hypocenter due to the major velocity change at the depth where the fault is located.

  2. Cortical sources of Vernier acuity in the human visual system: An EEG-source imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chuan; Kim, Yee-Joon; Verghese, Preeti

    2017-06-01

    Vernier acuity determines the relative position of visual features with a precision better than the sampling resolution of cone receptors in the retina. Because Vernier displacement is thought to be mediated by orientation-tuned mechanisms, Vernier acuity is presumed to be processed in striate visual cortex (V1). However, there is considerable evidence suggesting that Vernier acuity is dependent not only on structures in V1 but also on processing in extrastriate cortical regions. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging-informed electroencephalogram source imaging to localize the cortical sources of Vernier acuity in observers with normal vision. We measured suprathreshold and near-threshold responses to Vernier onset/offset stimuli at different stages of the visual cortical hierarchy, including V1, hV4, lateral occipital cortex (LOC), and middle temporal cortex (hMT+). These responses were compared with responses to grating on/off stimuli, as well as to stimuli that control for lateral motion in the Vernier task. Our results show that all visual cortical regions of interest (ROIs) responded to both suprathreshold Vernier and grating stimuli. However, thresholds for Vernier displacement (Vernier acuity) were lowest in V1 and LOC compared with hV4 and hMT+, whereas all visual ROIs had identical thresholds for spatial frequency (grating acuity) and for relative motion. The cortical selectivity of sensitivity to Vernier displacement provides strong evidence that LOC, in addition to V1, is involved in Vernier acuity processing. The robust activation of LOC might be related to the sensitivity to the relative position of features, which is common to Vernier displacement and to some kinds of texture segmentation.

  3. Effect of epilepsy magnetic source imaging on intracranial electrode placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Robert C.; Razdan, Shantanu N.; Limdi, Nita; Elgavish, Rotem A.; Killen, Jeff; Blount, Jeffrey; Burneo, Jorge G.; Ver Hoef, Lawrence; Paige, Lebron; Faught, Edward; Kankirawatana, Pongkiat; Bartolucci, Al; Riley, Kristen; Kuzniecky, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Objective Intracranial electroencephalography (ICEEG) with chronically implanted electrodes is a costly invasive diagnostic procedure that remains necessary for a large proportion of patients who undergo evaluation for epilepsy surgery. This study was designed to evaluate whether magnetic source imaging (MSI), a non-invasive test based on magnetoencephalography source localization, can supplement ICEEG by affecting electrode placement to improve sampling of the seizure onset zone(s). Methods Of 298 consecutive epilepsy surgery candidates (between 2001-2006) 160 cases were prospectively enrolled on the basis of insufficient localization from seizure monitoring and MRI results. Prior to presenting MSI results, decisions were made as to whether to proceed with ICEEG, and if so, where to place electrodes such that the hypothetical seizure onset zone would be sampled. MSI results were then provided with allowance of changes to the original plan. Results MSI indicated additional electrode coverage in 18 of 77 (23%) ICEEG cases. In 39% percent (95% CI: 16.4, 61.4) seizure onset ICEEG patterns involved the additional electrodes indicated by MSI. Sixty-two patients underwent surgical resection based on ICEEG recording of seizures. Highly localized MSI was significantly associated with seizure-free outcome (mean=3.4 years, minimum > 1 year) for the entire surgical population (n=62). Interpretation MSI spike localization increases the chance that the seizure onset zone is sampled when patients undergo ICEEG for presurgical epilepsy evaluations. The clinical impact of this effect–-improving diagnostic yield of ICEEG–-should be considered in surgery candidates that do not have satisfactory indication of epilepsy localization from seizure semiology, EEG, and MRI. PMID:19557860

  4. Computer vision for detecting and quantifying gamma-ray sources in coded-aperture images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaich, P.C.; Clark, G.A.; Sengupta, S.K.; Ziock, K.P.

    1994-11-02

    The authors report the development of an automatic image analysis system that detects gamma-ray source regions in images obtained from a coded aperture, gamma-ray imager. The number of gamma sources in the image is not known prior to analysis. The system counts the number (K) of gamma sources detected in the image and estimates the lower bound for the probability that the number of sources in the image is K. The system consists of a two-stage pattern classification scheme in which the Probabilistic Neural Network is used in the supervised learning mode. The algorithms were developed and tested using real gamma-ray images from controlled experiments in which the number and location of depleted uranium source disks in the scene are known.

  5. Microseismic imaging using a source-independent full-waveform inversion method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2016-09-06

    Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate microseismic and image microseismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, waveform inversion of microseismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source location (space) and function (time). We develop a source independent FWI of microseismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with the observed and modeled data to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for source wavelet in z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also the angle gather is calculated to see if the velocity model is correct. By inverting for all the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for part of the SEG overthrust model.

  6. Localization bias and spatial resolution of adaptive and non-adaptive spatial filters for MEG source reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekihara, Kensuke; Sahani, Maneesh; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2005-05-01

    This paper discusses the location bias and the spatial resolution in the reconstruction of a single dipole source by various spatial filtering techniques used for neuromagnetic imaging. We first analyze the location bias for several representative adaptive and non-adaptive spatial filters using their resolution kernels. This analysis theoretically validates previously reported empirical findings that standardized low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) has no location bias. We also find that the minimum-variance spatial filter does exhibit bias in the reconstructed location of a single source, but that this bias is eliminated by using the normalized lead field. We then focus on the comparison of sLORETA and the lead-field normalized minimum-variance spatial filter, and analyze the effect of noise on source location bias. We find that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the measurements determines whether the sLORETA reconstruction has source location bias, while the lead-field normalized minimum-variance spatial filter has no location bias even in the presence of noise. Finally, we compare the spatial resolution for sLORETA and the minimum-variance filter, and show that the minimum-variance filter attains much higher resolution than sLORETA does. The results of these analyses are validated by numerical experiments as well as by reconstructions based on two sets of evoked magnetic responses.

  7. OpenSourcePACS: an extensible infrastructure for medical image management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Alex A T; Morioka, Craig; Dionisio, John David N; Johnson, David B; Sinha, Usha; Ardekani, Siamak; Taira, Ricky K; Aberle, Denise R; El-Saden, Suzie; Kangarloo, Hooshang

    2007-01-01

    The development of comprehensive picture archive and communication systems (PACS) has mainly been limited to proprietary developments by vendors, though a number of freely available software projects have addressed specific image management tasks. The openSourcePACS project aims to provide an open source, common foundation upon which not only can a basic PACS be readily implemented, but to also support the evolution of new PACS functionality through the development of novel imaging applications and services. openSourcePACS consists of four main software modules: 1) image order entry, which enables the ordering and tracking of structured image requisitions; 2) an agent-based image server framework that coordinates distributed image services including routing, image processing, and querying beyond the present digital image and communications in medicine (DICOM) capabilities; 3) an image viewer, supporting standard display and image manipulation tools, DICOM presentation states, and structured reporting; and 4) reporting and result dissemination, supplying web-based widgets for creating integrated reports. All components are implemented using Java to encourage cross-platform deployment. To demonstrate the usage of openSourcePACS, a preliminary application supporting primary care/specialist communication was developed and is described herein. Ultimately, the goal of openSourcePACS is to promote the wide-scale development and usage of PACS and imaging applications within academic and research communities.

  8. Dual-gamma-source CT imaging system: Feasibility study with simulation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wi, Sun Hee; Lim, Sun Ho; Cho, Seung Ryong [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Our study demonstrated the feasibility of proposed CT imaging protocol and iterative reconstruction algorithm in both simulation and experimental studies. Polychromatic X-ray tube is used for imaging source of conventional CT system. However, conventional detector technique does not provide the capability to distinguish incident x-rays between different energy bins. Therefore, current reconstruction algorithms assumed and employed the mean values of the incident x-rays to reconstruct the 3D CT image. This assumption caused three main problems: formation of beam hardening, accuracy of quantitative CT imaging, and degradation of contrast, particularly for soft tissue. First, beam hardening causes cupping artifacts which can be observed as dark shades at the center of a CT image. Second, quantitative CT image refers to 3D image reconstructed by absolute value and conversion to Hounsfield units (HU). Quantitative CT is the active research field for normalized CT images and more accurate diagnosis. However, there are some limitations and difficulties to generate the quantitative CT image directly using polychromatic energy source. Third, polychromatic x-ray makes Compton scattering dominant and degrades the contrast of the soft tissue in CT images. To solve these problems, the use of monochromatic x-ray source is inevitable. We proposed a CT imaging protocol using multi-gamma-sources. We accordingly developed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm and validated it through both numerical and experimental studies. Our preliminary study demonstrated a feasibility of using multi-gamma-sources for CT imaging. The developed reconstruction approach would find applications in a high-resolution imaging with a large-focal-spot x-ray source or in a fast-scan x-ray CT imaging.

  9. Gadgetron: An Open Source Framework for Medical Image Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Schacht; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2013-01-01

    with a set of dedicated toolboxes in shared libraries for medical image reconstruction. This includes generic toolboxes for data-parallel (e.g., GPU-based) execution of compute-intensive components. The basic framework architecture is independent of medical imaging modality, but this article focuses on its...

  10. Advanced Calibration Source for Planetary and Earth Observing Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiometric calibration is critical to many NASA activities.  At NASA SSC, imaging cameras have been used in-situ to monitor propulsion test stand...

  11. Vector Velocity Imaging Using Cross-Correlation and Virtual Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    . Using the RASMUS experimental ultrasound scanner, measurements have been carried out in a water tank using a 7~MHz transducer. A 6~mm tube contained the flow and a Danfoss, MAG~3000, magnetic flow meter measured the volume flow. The tube has a parabolic flow profile with a peak velocity of 0.29~m...... estimations of the vector velocities of a larger region by combining the estimations along several scan lines. In combination with a B-mode image, the vector velocities are displayed as an image of the investigated region with a color indicating the magnitude, and arrows showing the direction of the flow....../s. During the experiments fixed beam-to-flow angles at $\\{60^{\\circ}, 75^{\\circ}, 90^{\\circ}\\}$ have been applied. The images are obtained using a pulse repetition frequency of 15~kHz, and the images contain 33~lines with 60~emissions for each line. Corresponding to the three fixed beam-to-flow angles...

  12. A Latent Source Model for Patch-Based Image Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, George H; Shah, Devavrat; Golland, Polina

    2015-10-01

    Despite the popularity and empirical success of patch-based nearest-neighbor and weighted majority voting approaches to medical image segmentation, there has been no theoretical development on when, why, and how well these nonparametric methods work. We bridge this gap by providing a theoretical performance guarantee for nearest-neighbor and weighted majority voting segmentation under a new probabilistic model for patch-based image segmentation. Our analysis relies on a new local property for how similar nearby patches are, and fuses existing lines of work on modeling natural imagery patches and theory for nonparametric classification. We use the model to derive a new patch-based segmentation algorithm that iterates between inferring local label patches and merging these local segmentations to produce a globally consistent image segmentation. Many existing patch-based algorithms arise as special cases of the new algorithm.

  13. Quantitative phase imaging of living cells with a swept laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shichao; Zhu, Yizheng

    2016-03-01

    Digital holographic phase microscopy is a well-established quantitative phase imaging technique. However, interference artifacts from inside the system, typically induced by elements whose optical thickness are within the source coherence length, limit the imaging quality as well as sensitivity. In this paper, a swept laser source based technique is presented. Spectra acquired at a number of wavelengths, after Fourier Transform, can be used to identify the sources of the interference artifacts. With proper tuning of the optical pathlength difference between sample and reference arms, it is possible to avoid these artifacts and achieve sensitivity below 0.3nm. Performance of the proposed technique is examined in live cell imaging.

  14. Description and validation of a combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    to model both specular and diffuse reflections with complex-valued acoustical descriptions of the surfaces. This paper mainly describes the combination of the two models and the implementation of the angle dependent surface descriptions both in the image source model and in acoustical radiosity......A model that combines image source modelling and acoustical radiosity with complex boundary con- ditions, thus including phase shifts on reflection, has been developed. The model is denoted Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Model (PARISM). It has been developed in order to be able...

  15. Diagnostic Value of Dual-Source Computerized Tomography Combined with Perfusion Imaging for Peripheral Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xijin; Wang, Shanshan; Jiang, Xingyue; Zhang, Lin; Xu, Wenjian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism has become the third most common cardiovascular disease, which can seriously harm human health. Objectives To investigate the diagnostic value of dual-source computerized tomography (CT) and perfusion imaging for peripheral pulmonary embolism. Patients and Methods Thirty-two patients with suspected pulmonary embolism underwent dual-source CT exams. To compare the ability of pulmonary embolism detection software (PED) with CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in determining the presence, numbers, and locations of pulmonary emboli, the subsequent images were reviewed by two radiologists using both imaging modalities. Also, the diagnostic consistency between PED and CTPA images and dual-energy pulmonary perfusion imaging (DEPI) for segmental pulmonary embolism was compared. Results CTPA images revealed 50 (7.81%) segmental and 56 (4.38%) sub-segmental pulmonary embolisms, while the PED images showed 68 (10.63%) segmental and 94 (7.34%) sub-segmental pulmonary embolisms. Thus, the detection rate on PED images for peripheral pulmonary embolism was significantly higher than that of the CTPA images (P pulmonary embolism between PED and CTPA and DEPI (kappa = 0.85). The sensitivity and specificity of DEPI images for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism were 91.7% and 97.5%, respectively. Conclusion PED software of dual-source CT combined with perfusion imaging can significantly improve the detection rate of peripheral pulmonary embolism. PMID:27703656

  16. Electroencephalographic source imaging: a prospective study of 152 operated epileptic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodbeck, Verena; Spinelli, Laurent; Lascano, Agustina M.; Wissmeier, Michael; Vargas, Maria-Isabel; Vulliemoz, Serge; Pollo, Claudio; Schaller, Karl; Michel, Christoph M.

    2011-01-01

    Electroencephalography is mandatory to determine the epilepsy syndrome. However, for the precise localization of the irritative zone in patients with focal epilepsy, costly and sometimes cumbersome imaging techniques are used. Recent small studies using electric source imaging suggest that electroencephalography itself could be used to localize the focus. However, a large prospective validation study is missing. This study presents a cohort of 152 operated patients where electric source imaging was applied as part of the pre-surgical work-up allowing a comparison with the results from other methods. Patients (n = 152) with >1 year postoperative follow-up were studied prospectively. The sensitivity and specificity of each imaging method was defined by comparing the localization of the source maximum with the resected zone and surgical outcome. Electric source imaging had a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 88% if the electroencephalogram was recorded with a large number of electrodes (128–256 channels) and the individual magnetic resonance image was used as head model. These values compared favourably with those of structural magnetic resonance imaging (76% sensitivity, 53% specificity), positron emission tomography (69% sensitivity, 44% specificity) and ictal/interictal single-photon emission-computed tomography (58% sensitivity, 47% specificity). The sensitivity and specificity of electric source imaging decreased to 57% and 59%, respectively, with low number of electrodes (<32 channels) and a template head model. This study demonstrated the validity and clinical utility of electric source imaging in a large prospective study. Given the low cost and high flexibility of electroencephalographic systems even with high channel counts, we conclude that electric source imaging is a highly valuable tool in pre-surgical epilepsy evaluation. PMID:21975586

  17. Source camera identification for low resolution heavily compressed images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alles, E.J.; Geradts, Z.J.M.H.; Veenman, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to exploit photo response non-uniformity (PRNU) to identify the source camera of heavily JPEG compressed digital photographs of resolution 640 times 480 pixels. Similarly to research reported previously, we extract the PRNU patterns from both reference and

  18. EEG source imaging assists decoding in a face recognition task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rasmus S.; Eliasen, Anders U.; Pedersen, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    and rather strong a priori information must be invoked. Recent work by Edelman et al. (2016) has demonstrated that introduction of a spatially focal source space representation can improve decoding of motor imagery. In this work we explore the generality of Edelman et al. hypothesis by considering decoding...

  19. Neuromagnetic Representation of Musical Register Information in HumaN Auditory Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andermann, M.; Van Dinther, C.H.B.A.; Patterson, R.D.; Rupp, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pulse-resonance sounds like vowels or instrumental tones contain acoustic information about the physical size of the sound source (pulse rate) and body resonators (resonance scale). Previous research has revealed correlates of these variables in humans using functional neuroimaging. Here, we report

  20. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaki Hatsui

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors.

  1. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    OpenAIRE

    Takaki Hatsui; Heinz Graafsma

    2015-01-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivit...

  2. Registration and Fusion of Multiple Source Remotely Sensed Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoigne, Jacqueline

    2004-01-01

    Earth and Space Science often involve the comparison, fusion, and integration of multiple types of remotely sensed data at various temporal, radiometric, and spatial resolutions. Results of this integration may be utilized for global change analysis, global coverage of an area at multiple resolutions, map updating or validation of new instruments, as well as integration of data provided by multiple instruments carried on multiple platforms, e.g. in spacecraft constellations or fleets of planetary rovers. Our focus is on developing methods to perform fast, accurate and automatic image registration and fusion. General methods for automatic image registration are being reviewed and evaluated. Various choices for feature extraction, feature matching and similarity measurements are being compared, including wavelet-based algorithms, mutual information and statistically robust techniques. Our work also involves studies related to image fusion and investigates dimension reduction and co-kriging for application-dependent fusion. All methods are being tested using several multi-sensor datasets, acquired at EOS Core Sites, and including multiple sensors such as IKONOS, Landsat-7/ETM+, EO1/ALI and Hyperion, MODIS, and SeaWIFS instruments. Issues related to the coregistration of data from the same platform (i.e., AIRS and MODIS from Aqua) or from several platforms of the A-train (i.e., MLS, HIRDLS, OMI from Aura with AIRS and MODIS from Terra and Aqua) will also be considered.

  3. Near diffraction limited coherent diffractive imaging with tabletop soft x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandberg, Richard L; Raymondson, Daisy A; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Paul, Ariel; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C [Department of Physics and JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Schlotter, William F [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, SLAC, Menlo Park, California (United States); Raines, Kevin; Miao Jianwei, E-mail: richard.sandberg@colorado.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy and California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Tabletop coherent x-ray sources hold great promise for practical nanoscale imaging, in particular when coupled with diffractive imaging techniques. In initial work, we demonstrated lensless diffraction imaging using a tabletop high harmonic generation (HHG) source at 29 nm, achieving resolutions {approx} 200 nm. In recent work, we significantly enhanced our diffractive imaging resolution by implementing a new high numerical aperture (up to NA=0.6) scheme and field curvature correction where we achieved sub-100 nm resolution. Here we report the first demonstration of Fourier transform holography (FTH) with a tabletop SXR source, to acquire images with a resolution {approx} 90 nm. The resolution can be refined by applying phase retrieval. Additionally, we show initial results from FTH with 13.5 nm HHG radiation and demonstrate {approx} 180 nm resolution.

  4. Micro-seismic Imaging Using a Source Independent Waveform Inversion Method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2016-04-18

    Micro-seismology is attracting more and more attention in the exploration seismology community. The main goal in micro-seismic imaging is to find the source location and the ignition time in order to track the fracture expansion, which will help engineers monitor the reservoirs. Conventional imaging methods work fine in this field but there are many limitations such as manual picking, incorrect migration velocity and low signal to noise ratio (S/N). In traditional surface survey imaging, full waveform inversion (FWI) is widely used. The FWI method updates the velocity model by minimizing the misfit between the observed data and the predicted data. Using FWI to locate and image microseismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. Use the FWI technique, and overcomes the difficulties of manual pickings and incorrect velocity model for migration. However, the technique of waveform inversion of micro-seismic events faces its own problems. There is significant nonlinearity due to the unknown source location (space) and function (time). We have developed a source independent FWI of micro-seismic events to simultaneously invert for the source image, source function and velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with the observed and modeled data to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. To examine the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model the extended image for source wavelet in z-axis is extracted. Also the angle gather is calculated to check the applicability of the migration velocity. By inverting for the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model simultaneously, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity in the synthetic experiments with both parts of the Marmousi and the SEG

  5. A novel method for detecting light source for digital images forensic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A. K.; Mitra, S. K.; Agrawal, R.

    2011-06-01

    Manipulation in image has been in practice since centuries. These manipulated images are intended to alter facts — facts of ethics, morality, politics, sex, celebrity or chaos. Image forensic science is used to detect these manipulations in a digital image. There are several standard ways to analyze an image for manipulation. Each one has some limitation. Also very rarely any method tried to capitalize on the way image was taken by the camera. We propose a new method that is based on light and its shade as light and shade are the fundamental input resources that may carry all the information of the image. The proposed method measures the direction of light source and uses the light based technique for identification of any intentional partial manipulation in the said digital image. The method is tested for known manipulated images to correctly identify the light sources. The light source of an image is measured in terms of angle. The experimental results show the robustness of the methodology.

  6. Soft x-ray nanoscale imaging using highly brilliant laboratory sources and new detector concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, H.; Braenzel, J.; Dehlinger, A.; Jung, R.; Luebcke, A.; Regehly, M.; Ritter, S.; Tuemmler, J.; Schnuerer, M.; Seim, C.

    2017-05-01

    In this contribution, we report about nanoscale imaging using a laser produced plasma source based laboratory transmission X-ray microscope (LTXM) in the water window. The highly brilliant soft X-ray radiation of the LTXM is provided by a laser-produced nitrogen plasma source focused by a multilayer condenser mirror to the sample. An objective zone plate maps the magnified image of the sample on the super resolution camera. This camera employs a deep cooled soft-X-ray CCD imaging sensor sandwiched with a xy piezo stage to allow subpixel displacements of the detector. The camera is read out using a very low noise electronics platform, also directing low µm shifts of the sensor between subsequent image acquisitions. Finally an algorithm computes a high resolution image from the individual shifted low-resolution image frames.

  7. Diffraction-Enhanced Computed Tomographic Imaging of Growing Piglet Joints by Using a Synchrotron Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Glendon W; Belev, George S; Chapman, L Dean; Wiebe, Sheldon P; Cooper, David M; Wong, Adelaine Tf; Rosenberg, Alan M

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and test a new technology for imaging growing joints by means of diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) combined with CT and using a synchrotron radiation source. DEI-CT images of an explanted 4-wk-old piglet stifle joint were acquired by using a 40-keV beam. The series of scanned slices was later 'stitched' together, forming a 3D dataset. High-resolution DEI-CT images demonstrated fine detail within all joint structures and tissues. Striking detail of vasculature traversing between bone and cartilage, a characteristic of growing but not mature joints, was demonstrated. This report documents for the first time that DEI combined with CT and a synchrotron radiation source can generate more detailed images of intact, growing joints than can currently available conventional imaging modalities.

  8. Point-source localization in blurred images by a frequency-domain eigenvector-based method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsay, M; Jeffs, B D

    1995-01-01

    We address the problem of resolving and localizing blurred point sources in intensity images. Telescopic star-field images blurred by atmospheric turbulence or optical aberrations are typical examples of this class of images, a new approach to image restoration is introduced, which is a generalization of 2-D sensor array processing techniques originating from the field of direction of arrival estimation (DOA). It is shown that in the frequency domain, blurred point source images can be modeled with a structure analogous to the response of linear sensor arrays to coherent signal sources. Thus, the problem may be cast into the form of DOA estimation, and eigenvector based subspace decomposition algorithms, such as MUSIC, may be adapted to search for these point sources. For deterministic point images the signal subspace is degenerate, with rank one, so rank enhancement techniques are required before MUSIC or related algorithms may be used. The presence of blur prohibits the use of existing rank enhancement methods. A generalized array smoothing method is introduced for rank enhancement in the presence of blur, and to regularize the ill posed nature of the image restoration. The new algorithm achieves inter-pixel super-resolution and is computationally efficient. Examples of star image deblurring using the algorithm are presented.

  9. Resistivity imaging with controlled-source electromagnetic data : Depth and data weighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plessix, R.E.; Mulder, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss some computational aspects of resistivity imaging by inversion of offshore controlled-source electromagnetic data. We adopt the classic approach to imaging by formulating it as an inverse problem. A weighted least-squares functional measures the misfit between synthetic and observed data.

  10. Use of single- and multi-source image fusion for statistical decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the use of single- and multi-source image fusion for statistical decision-making. On the basis of usability and loss functions, two image fusion procedures are formulated. For each of these, an optimality criterion is defined. First, attention focuses on fusion of different

  11. Large seismic source imaging from old analogue seismograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Bento; Buforn, Elisa; Borges, José; Bezzeghoud, Mourad

    2017-04-01

    In this work we present a procedure to recover the ground motions by a proper digital structure, from old seismograms in analogue physical support (paper or microfilm) to study the source rupture process, by application of modern finite source inversion tools. Despite the quality that the analog data and the digitizing technologies available may have, recover the ground motions with the accurate metrics from old seismograms, is often an intricate procedure. Frequently the general parameters of the analogue instruments response that allow recover the shape of the ground motions (free periods and damping) are known, but the magnification that allow recover the metric of these motions is dubious. It is in these situations that the procedure applies. The procedure is based on assign of the moment magnitude value to the integral of the apparent Source Time Function (STF), estimated by deconvolution of a synthetic elementary seismogram from the related observed seismogram, corrected with an instrument response affected by improper magnification. Two delicate issues in the process are 1) the calculus of the synthetic elementary seismograms that must consider later phases if applied to large earthquakes (the portions of signal should be 3 or 4 times larger than the rupture time) and 2) the deconvolution to calculate the apparent STF. In present version of the procedure was used the Direct Solution Method to compute the elementary seismograms and the deconvolution was processed in time domain by an iterative algorithm that allow constrains the STF to stay positive and time limited. The method was examined using synthetic data to test the accuracy and robustness. Finally, a set of 17 real old analog seismograms from the Santa Maria (Azores) 1939 earthquake (Mw=7.1) was used in order to recover the waveforms in the required digital structure, from which by inversion allows compute the finite source rupture model (slip distribution). Acknowledgements: This work is co

  12. Free and open source software for the manipulation of digital images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Robert W

    2009-06-01

    Free and open source software is a type of software that is nearly as powerful as commercial software but is freely downloadable. This software can do almost everything that the expensive programs can. GIMP (gnu image manipulation program) is the free program that is comparable to Photoshop, and versions are available for Windows, Macintosh, and Linux platforms. This article briefly describes how GIMP can be installed and used to manipulate radiology images. It is no longer necessary to budget large amounts of money for high-quality software to achieve the goals of image processing and document creation because free and open source software is available for the user to download at will.

  13. Hard X-Ray Flare Source Sizes Measured with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Pernak, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of 18 double hard X-ray sources seen at energies above 25 keV are analyzed to determine the spatial extent of the most compact structures evident in each case. The following four image reconstruction algorithms were used: Clean, Pixon, and two routines using visibilities maximum entropy and forward fit (VFF). All have been adapted for this study to optimize their ability to provide reliable estimates of the sizes of the more compact sources. The source fluxes, sizes, and morphologies obtained with each method are cross-correlated and the similarities and disagreements are discussed. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the major axes of the sources with assumed elliptical Gaussian shapes are generally well correlated between the four image reconstruction routines and vary between the RHESSI resolution limit of approximately 2" up to approximately 20" with most below 10". The FWHM of the minor axes are generally at or just above the RHESSI limit and hence should be considered as unresolved in most cases. The orientation angles of the elliptical sources are also well correlated. These results suggest that the elongated sources are generally aligned along a flare ribbon with the minor axis perpendicular to the ribbon. This is verified for the one flare in our list with coincident Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) images. There is evidence for significant extra flux in many of the flares in addition to the two identified compact sources, thus rendering the VFF assumption of just two Gaussians inadequate. A more realistic approximation in many cases would be of two line sources with unresolved widths. Recommendations are given for optimizing the RHESSI imaging reconstruction process to ensure that the finest possible details of the source morphology become evident and that reliable estimates can be made of the source dimensions.

  14. AUTOMATED MULTI-SOURCE REMOTE SENSING IMAGE REGISTRATION BASED ON PHASE CONGRUENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ye

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Automated registration of multi-source remote sensing data, e.g., optical, SAR, LiDAR data, could be difficult due to their heterogeneity. This paper proposes a method based on the concept of phase congruency, a measure of feature significance robust to change in illumination and contrast. We first calculate the phase congruencies respectively for the input image and the reference image to reduce local illumination and contrast difference caused by the heterogeneity or radiometric variation. Minimum moment of phase congruency is used to select feature points in the input image, followed by a normalized cross correlation to determine their correspondences in the reference image. Prior georeferencing information and image pyramid guide the above matching process, which is then refined by means of least squares matching (LSM method. The proposed method uses random sample consensus (RANSAC to remove the large correspondence errors caused by e.g., shadow and shielding. Finally, image registration is achieved by determining a projective transformation between the two images based on the final set of correspondences. The proposed method is evaluated with multi-source remote sensing images, including optical images, SAR images and LiDAR data. The registration quality is evaluated by using manually collected check points. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and can achieve a registration accuracy which can be comparable to that produced by manual registration.

  15. Multi-source remote sensing image fusion method based on sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianchuan; Gao, Guanyin

    2014-11-01

    To improve the quality of the fused image, we propose a remote sensing image fusion method based on sparse representation. In the method, first, the source images are divided into patches and each patch is represented with sparse coefficients using an overcomplete dictionary. Second, the larger value of sparse coefficients of panchromatic (Pan) image is set to 0. Third, Then the coefficients of panchromatic (Pan) and multispectral (MS) image are combined with the linear weighted averaging fusion rule. Finally, the fused image is reconstructed from the combined sparse coefficients and the dictionary. The proposed method is compared with intensity-hue-saturation (IHS), Brovey transform (Brovey), discrete wavelet transform (DWT), principal component analysis (PCA) and fast discrete curvelet transform (FDCT) methods on several pairs of multifocus images. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach performs better in both subjective and objective qualities.

  16. An update on carbon nanotube-enabled X-ray sources for biomedical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puett, Connor; Inscoe, Christina; Hartman, Allison; Calliste, Jabari; Franceschi, Dora K; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Lee, Yueh Z

    2018-01-01

    A new imaging technology has emerged that uses carbon nanotubes (CNT) as the electron emitter (cathode) for the X-ray tube. Since the performance of the CNT cathode is controlled by simple voltage manipulation, CNT-enabled X-ray sources are ideal for the repetitive imaging steps needed to capture three-dimensional information. As such, they have allowed the development of a gated micro-computed tomography (CT) scanner for small animal research as well as stationary tomosynthesis, an experimental technology for large field-of-view human imaging. The small animal CT can acquire images at specific points in the respiratory and cardiac cycles. Longitudinal imaging therefore becomes possible and has been applied to many research questions, ranging from tumor response to the noninvasive assessment of cardiac output. Digital tomosynthesis (DT) is a low-dose and low-cost human imaging tool that captures some depth information. Known as three-dimensional mammography, DT is now used clinically for breast imaging. However, the resolution of currently-approved DT is limited by the need to swing the X-ray source through space to collect a series of projection views. An array of fixed and distributed CNT-enabled sources provides the solution and has been used to construct stationary DT devices for breast, lung, and dental imaging. To date, over 100 patients have been imaged on Institutional Review Board-approved study protocols. Early experience is promising, showing an excellent conspicuity of soft-tissue features, while also highlighting technical and post-acquisition processing limitations that are guiding continued research and development. Additionally, CNT-enabled sources are being tested in miniature X-ray tubes that are capable of generating adequate photon energies and tube currents for clinical imaging. Although there are many potential applications for these small field-of-view devices, initial experience has been with an X-ray source that can be inserted into the

  17. Optimal Magnetic Sensor Vests for Cardiac Source Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Lau

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetocardiography (MCG non-invasively provides functional information about the heart. New room-temperature magnetic field sensors, specifically magnetoresistive and optically pumped magnetometers, have reached sensitivities in the ultra-low range of cardiac fields while allowing for free placement around the human torso. Our aim is to optimize positions and orientations of such magnetic sensors in a vest-like arrangement for robust reconstruction of the electric current distributions in the heart. We optimized a set of 32 sensors on the surface of a torso model with respect to a 13-dipole cardiac source model under noise-free conditions. The reconstruction robustness was estimated by the condition of the lead field matrix. Optimization improved the condition of the lead field matrix by approximately two orders of magnitude compared to a regular array at the front of the torso. Optimized setups exhibited distributions of sensors over the whole torso with denser sampling above the heart at the front and back of the torso. Sensors close to the heart were arranged predominantly tangential to the body surface. The optimized sensor setup could facilitate the definition of a standard for sensor placement in MCG and the development of a wearable MCG vest for clinical diagnostics.

  18. Progress toward the development and testing of source reconstruction methods for NIF neutron imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, E N; Grim, G P; Wilde, C; Wilson, D C; Morgan, G; Wilke, M; Tregillis, I; Merrill, F; Clark, D; Finch, J; Fittinghoff, D; Bower, D

    2010-10-01

    Development of analysis techniques for neutron imaging at the National Ignition Facility is an important and difficult task for the detailed understanding of high-neutron yield inertial confinement fusion implosions. Once developed, these methods must provide accurate images of the hot and cold fuels so that information about the implosion, such as symmetry and areal density, can be extracted. One method under development involves the numerical inversion of the pinhole image using knowledge of neutron transport through the pinhole aperture from Monte Carlo simulations. In this article we present results of source reconstructions based on simulated images that test the methods effectiveness with regard to pinhole misalignment.

  19. Fiji: an open-source platform for biological-image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindelin, Johannes; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Frise, Erwin; Kaynig, Verena; Longair, Mark; Pietzsch, Tobias; Preibisch, Stephan; Rueden, Curtis; Saalfeld, Stephan; Schmid, Benjamin; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; White, Daniel James; Hartenstein, Volker; Eliceiri, Kevin; Tomancak, Pavel; Cardona, Albert

    2012-06-28

    Fiji is a distribution of the popular open-source software ImageJ focused on biological-image analysis. Fiji uses modern software engineering practices to combine powerful software libraries with a broad range of scripting languages to enable rapid prototyping of image-processing algorithms. Fiji facilitates the transformation of new algorithms into ImageJ plugins that can be shared with end users through an integrated update system. We propose Fiji as a platform for productive collaboration between computer science and biology research communities.

  20. HST Imaging of the Eye of Horus, a Double Source Plane Gravitational Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kenneth

    2017-08-01

    Double source plane (DSP) gravitational lenses are extremely rare alignments of a massive lens galaxy with two background sources at distinct redshifts. The presence of two source planes provides important constraints on cosmology and galaxy structure beyond that of typical lens systems by breaking degeneracies between parameters that vary with source redshift. While these systems are extremely valuable, only a handful are known. We have discovered the first DSP lens, the Eye of Horus, in the Hyper Suprime-Cam survey and have confirmed both source redshifts with follow-up spectroscopy, making this the only known DSP lens with both source redshifts measured. Furthermore, the brightest image of the most distant source (S2) is split into a pair of images by a mass component that is undetected in our ground-based data, suggesting the presence of a satellite or line-of-sight galaxy causing this splitting. In order to better understand this system and use it for cosmology and galaxy studies, we must construct an accurate lens model, accounting for the lensing effects of both the main lens galaxy and the intermediate source. Only with deep, high-resolution imaging from HST/ACS can we accurately model this system. Our proposed multiband imaging will clearly separate out the two sources by their distinct colors, allowing us to use their extended surface brightness distributions as constraints on our lens model. These data may also reveal the satellite galaxy responsible for the splitting of the brightest image of S2. With these observations, we will be able to take full advantage of the wealth of information provided by this system.

  1. Nonlinear imaging condition and the effect of source illumination : Imaging fractures as nonwelded interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minato, S.; Ghose, R.

    2015-01-01

    Fluid flow through a fractured reservoir is often controlled by the large fractures. Seismically imaging these large fractures has the potential to illuminate their hydraulic properties.We derived a nonlinear imaging condition considering a medium containing nonwelded interfaces such as fractures

  2. Effects of Age-Related Hearing Loss and Background Noise on Neuromagnetic Activityfrom Auditory Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude eAlain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is often accompanied by hearing loss, which impacts how sounds are processed and represented along the ascending auditory pathways and within the auditory cortices. Here, we assess the impact of mild binaural hearing loss on the older adults’ ability to both process complex sounds embedded in noise and segregate a mistuned harmonic in an otherwise periodic stimulus. We measured auditory evoked fields (AEFs using magnetoencephalography while participants were presented with complex tones that had either all harmonics in tune or had the third harmonic mistuned by 4 or 16% of its original value. The tones (75 dB sound pressure level, SPL were presented without, with low (45 dBA, SPL or with moderate (65 dBA SPL Gaussian noise. For each participant, we modeled the AEFs with a pair of dipoles in the superior temporal plane. We then examined the effects of hearing loss and noise on the amplitude and latency of the resulting source waveforms. In the present study, results revealed that similar noise-induced increases in N1m were present in older adults with and without hearing loss. Our results also showed that the P1m amplitude was larger in the hearing impaired than normal-hearing adults. In addition, the object-related negativity (ORN elicited by the mistuned harmonic was larger in hearing impaired listeners. The enhanced P1m and ORN amplitude in the hearing impaired older adults suggests that hearing loss increased neural excitability in auditory cortices, which could be related to deficits in inhibitory control.

  3. Disordered semantic representation in schizophrenic temporal cortex revealed by neuromagnetic response patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silberman Yaron

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loosening of associations and thought disruption are key features of schizophrenic psychopathology. Alterations in neural networks underlying this basic abnormality have not yet been sufficiently identified. Previously, we demonstrated that spatio-temporal clustering of magnetic brain responses to pictorial stimuli map categorical representations in temporal cortex. This result has opened the possibility to quantify associative strength within and across semantic categories in schizophrenic patients. We hypothesized that in contrast to controls, schizophrenic patients exhibit disordered representations of semantic categories. Methods The spatio-temporal clusters of brain magnetic activities elicited by object pictures related to super-ordinate (flowers, animals, furniture, clothes and base-level (e.g. tulip, rose, orchid, sunflower categories were analysed in the source space for the time epochs 170–210 and 210–450 ms following stimulus onset and were compared between 10 schizophrenic patients and 10 control subjects. Results Spatio-temporal correlations of responses elicited by base-level concepts and the difference of within vs. across super-ordinate categories were distinctly lower in patients than in controls. Additionally, in contrast to the well-defined categorical representation in control subjects, unsupervised clustering indicated poorly defined representation of semantic categories in patients. Within the patient group, distinctiveness of categorical representation in the temporal cortex was positively related to negative symptoms and tended to be inversely related to positive symptoms. Conclusion Schizophrenic patients show a less organized representation of semantic categories in clusters of magnetic brain responses than healthy adults. This atypical neural network architecture may be a correlate of loosening of associations, promoting positive symptoms.

  4. Deconvolution by finite-size-source effects of x-ray phase-contrast images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Caro, Liberato; Scattarella, Francesco; Tangaro, Sabina; Pelliccia, Daniele; Giannini, Cinzia; Bottigli, Ubaldo; Bellotti, Roberto [Istituto di Cristallografia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IC-CNR), via Amendola 122/O, I-70125 Bari (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy) and Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Universita degli Studi di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); School of Physics, Monash University, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Istituto di Cristallografia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IC-CNR), via Amendola 122/O, I-70125 Bari (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Siena, via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy) and Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Universita degli Studi di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: In the hard x-ray region, the cross sections for the phase shift of low-Z elements are about 1000 times larger than the absorption ones. As a consequence, phase contrast is detectable even when absorption contrast is minimal or absent. Therefore, phase-contrast imaging could become a valid alternative to absorption contrast without delivering high dose to tissue/human body parts. Methods: To enhance the quality of phase-contrast images without increasing the dose, a possible approach could be the partial deconvolution of the finite source size effects by experimental phase-contrast images. The deconvolution procedure, the authors propose, employs the acquisition of two images on a suitable well-known test sample, one in contact and the other in phase-contrast conditions. Both acquired images are used along with a simulated phase-contrast image (obtained from the test sample in ideal conditions of pointlike source illumination) to correctly retrieve the experimental source distribution function. This information allows a generic experimental phase-contrast image, acquired in the same conditions, to be partially deconvolved by finite source size effects. Results: The performed experimental tests indicate that deconvolved images are equivalent to those which would be obtained with a source 40% smaller than the actual size. In turn, this finding is equivalent to an increase of the ''effective'' lateral spatial coherence length. The corresponding quality improvement of the phase-contrast imaging is directly deducible by the presence of many Fresnel fringes, much better visible with respect to the original experimental phase-contrast images. Conclusions: The use of a test standard sample, always possible in every experimental setup, to partially deconvolve the finite-size-source blurring effects shows that higher quality phase-contrast images could be readily available, making easier diagnoses and tissue/sample analyses. The method could give

  5. Dummy source digitization algorithm for reconstruction of flexible brachytherapy catheters with biplane images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pálvölgyi, Jenö

    2014-03-01

    The traditional brachytherapy catheter reconstruction with biplane images is based on digitizing radio-opaque markers with a pointing device on a film or on a screen. An algorithm to automate digitization of radio-opaque marker coordinates on biplane images is presented. To obtain the marker coordinates in a proper sequence, instead of usual pair of reconstruction images, series of images were taken with insertion of radio-opaque markers consecutively into the catheters. The images were pre-processed to suppress the shield of anatomic structures. The determination of the marker coordinates is based on the detection of characteristic high gradient variation in pre-processed image profiles. The method was tested with six endometrial insertions performed with Simon-Norman catheters using our version of Heyman packing. 28 catheters of six treatment fractions were digitized, typically 10 markers per catheter. To obtain the marker coordinates, adjustment of two threshold levels on the pre-processed images were needed. The coordinates of the radio-opaque markers on the biplane projection images were obtained without positive or negative artefact. THE DUMMY SOURCE COORDINATES ON THE BIPLANE IMAGES WERE DIGITIZED IN A PROPER SEQUENCE: from the catheters' tip towards the end of the catheters. After the three-dimensional reconstruction of the catheters from the digitized coordinates, the geometry file was imported by the brachytherapy planning system for dose calculation. The method has the advantage to eliminate manual digitization of the dummy sources.

  6. Time Reversal Migration for Passive Sources Using a Maximum Variance Imaging Condition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H.

    2017-05-26

    The conventional time-reversal imaging approach for micro-seismic or passive source location is based on focusing the back-propagated wavefields from each recorded trace in a source image. It suffers from strong background noise and limited acquisition aperture, which may create unexpected artifacts and cause error in the source location. To overcome such a problem, we propose a new imaging condition for microseismic imaging, which is based on comparing the amplitude variance in certain windows, and use it to suppress the artifacts as well as find the right location for passive sources. Instead of simply searching for the maximum energy point in the back-propagated wavefield, we calculate the amplitude variances over a window moving in both space and time axis to create a highly resolved passive event image. The variance operation has negligible cost compared with the forward/backward modeling operations, which reveals that the maximum variance imaging condition is efficient and effective. We test our approach numerically on a simple three-layer model and on a piece of the Marmousi model as well, both of which have shown reasonably good results.

  7. IQM: an extensible and portable open source application for image and signal analysis in Java.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Kainz

    Full Text Available Image and signal analysis applications are substantial in scientific research. Both open source and commercial packages provide a wide range of functions for image and signal analysis, which are sometimes supported very well by the communities in the corresponding fields. Commercial software packages have the major drawback of being expensive and having undisclosed source code, which hampers extending the functionality if there is no plugin interface or similar option available. However, both variants cannot cover all possible use cases and sometimes custom developments are unavoidable, requiring open source applications. In this paper we describe IQM, a completely free, portable and open source (GNU GPLv3 image and signal analysis application written in pure Java. IQM does not depend on any natively installed libraries and is therefore runnable out-of-the-box. Currently, a continuously growing repertoire of 50 image and 16 signal analysis algorithms is provided. The modular functional architecture based on the three-tier model is described along the most important functionality. Extensibility is achieved using operator plugins, and the development of more complex workflows is provided by a Groovy script interface to the JVM. We demonstrate IQM's image and signal processing capabilities in a proof-of-principle analysis and provide example implementations to illustrate the plugin framework and the scripting interface. IQM integrates with the popular ImageJ image processing software and is aiming at complementing functionality rather than competing with existing open source software. Machine learning can be integrated into more complex algorithms via the WEKA software package as well, enabling the development of transparent and robust methods for image and signal analysis.

  8. IQM: an extensible and portable open source application for image and signal analysis in Java.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, Philipp; Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, Michael; Ahammer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Image and signal analysis applications are substantial in scientific research. Both open source and commercial packages provide a wide range of functions for image and signal analysis, which are sometimes supported very well by the communities in the corresponding fields. Commercial software packages have the major drawback of being expensive and having undisclosed source code, which hampers extending the functionality if there is no plugin interface or similar option available. However, both variants cannot cover all possible use cases and sometimes custom developments are unavoidable, requiring open source applications. In this paper we describe IQM, a completely free, portable and open source (GNU GPLv3) image and signal analysis application written in pure Java. IQM does not depend on any natively installed libraries and is therefore runnable out-of-the-box. Currently, a continuously growing repertoire of 50 image and 16 signal analysis algorithms is provided. The modular functional architecture based on the three-tier model is described along the most important functionality. Extensibility is achieved using operator plugins, and the development of more complex workflows is provided by a Groovy script interface to the JVM. We demonstrate IQM's image and signal processing capabilities in a proof-of-principle analysis and provide example implementations to illustrate the plugin framework and the scripting interface. IQM integrates with the popular ImageJ image processing software and is aiming at complementing functionality rather than competing with existing open source software. Machine learning can be integrated into more complex algorithms via the WEKA software package as well, enabling the development of transparent and robust methods for image and signal analysis.

  9. Line x-ray source for diffraction enhanced imaging in clinical and industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqin

    Mammography is one type of imaging modalities that uses a low-dose x-ray or other radiation sources for examination of breasts. It plays a central role in early detection of breast cancers. The material similarity of tumor-cell and health cell, breast implants surgery and other factors, make the breast cancers hard to visualize and detect. Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), first proposed and investigated by D. Chapman is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using monochromatic x-rays from a synchrotron source, which produced images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. It shows dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging when applied to the same phantom. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also on the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. This imaging method may improve image quality of mammography, other medical applications, industrial radiography for non-destructive testing and x-ray computed tomography. However, the size, and cost, of a synchrotron source limits the application of the new modality to be applicable at clinical levels. This research investigates the feasibility of a designed line x-ray source to produce intensity compatible to synchrotron sources. It is composed of a 2-cm in length tungsten filament, installed on a carbon steel filament cup (backing plate), as the cathode and a stationary oxygen-free copper anode with molybdenum coating on the front surface serves as the target. Characteristic properties of the line x-ray source were computationally studied and the prototype was experimentally investigated. SIMIION code was used to computationally study the electron trajectories emanating from the filament towards the molybdenum target. A Faraday cup on the prototype device, proof-of-principle, was used to measure the distribution of electrons on the target, which compares favorably to computational results. The intensities of characteristic x-ray for molybdenum

  10. Computed tomography image source identification by discriminating CT-scanner image reconstruction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Y; Coatrieux, G; Shu, H Z

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we focus on the identification of the Computed Tomography (CT) scanner that has produced a CT image. To do so, we propose to discriminate CT-Scanner systems based on their reconstruction process, the footprint or the signature of which can be established based on the way they modify the intrinsic sensor noise of X-ray detectors. After having analyzed how the sensor noise is modified in the reconstruction process, we define a set of image features so as to serve as CT acquisition system footprint. These features are used to train a SVM based classifier. Experiments conducted on images issued from 15 different CT-Scanner models of 4 distinct manufacturers show it is possible to identify the origin of one CT image with high accuracy.

  11. Nanoscale Imaging Using Coherent and Incoherent Laboratory Based Soft X-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, H.; Dehlinger, A.; Janulewicz, K. A.; Jung, R.; Legall, H.; Pratsch, C.; Seim, C.; Tümmler, J.

    Nanoscale imaging of biological samples in the lab as well as mask inspection in extreme ultraviolet lithography near the production line with sub 30 nm resolution require high spectral brightness soft x-ray sources. Laser produced plasma (LPP) sources and plasma based X-ray lasers (XRL) emit soft X-ray radiation in the wavelength region of interest between 2 and 20 nm. Whereas LPP sources easily can be tuned to the so called water window (2.2-4.4 nm) the output of an XRL is restricted to relatively few fixed wavelengths in the extreme ultraviolet range. However due to the relatively high degree of coherence the XRL is well suited also for nanoscale imaging using coherent techniques like coherent diffraction imaging or Fourier transform holography.

  12. Description of fiber optical parametric oscillators as laser sources applied to cellular imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Goulart-Pailo, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    The integration of lasers has advanced imaging and quantitative analysis in the study of biological problems. In this document we describe a class of light sources known as fiber optical parametric oscillators (FOPO). The wavelength tunability of the FOPO system is a fundamental feature for the cellular imaging techniques in perspective. The FOPO converts the wave frequency provided by the pump into two other wave frequencies as its output. The difference between two waves frequencies produce...

  13. Spatial-phase-shift imaging interferometry using a spectrally modulated white light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epshtein, Shlomi; Harris, Alon; Yaacobovitz, Igor; Locketz, Garrett; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Arieli, Yoel

    2014-12-15

    An extension of the white light spatial-phase-shift (WLSPS) for object surface measurements is described. Using WLSPS, surface measurements can be obtained from any real object image without the need of a reference beam, thus achieving inherent vibration cancellation. The surface topography is obtained by acquiring multiple images of an object illuminated by a spectrally modulated white light source and using an appropriate algorithm. The modulation of the light source obviates the need for the continuous phase delay to obtain the interferograms.

  14. Resolution-enhanced integral imaging display using a dense point light source array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi; Wang, Anting; Ma, Xiaohui; Ma, Fenghua; Ming, Hai

    2017-11-01

    A scheme for the resolution enhancement of a dense point light source integral imaging display is proposed. The proposed method uses 9 light emitting diodes (LEDs), a collimating lens and a lens array to generate 4 times more point light sources than elemental lenses constituting the lens array. In consequence, the resolution of the 3D images is enhanced up to 4 times. The viewing angle keeps the same and no crosstalk appears. The principle of the proposed method is described and verified experimentally.

  15. Electro-Optic Swept Source Based on AOTF for Wavenumber-Linear Interferometric Sensing and Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga-Hee Han

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a novel electro-optic swept source for wavenumber-linear interferometric sensing and imaging applications. The electro-optic swept source based on an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF provides high environmental stability and arbitrary drive function sweeping because the electro-optic wavelength selection does not depend on a mechanical moving component to tune the output lasing wavelength. We show improved stability of the suggested electro-optic swept source, compared to a conventional swept source based on a fiber Fabry–Perot tunable filter (FFP-TF. Various types of wavelength sweeping are demonstrated by applying the programmed drive function to the applied radio frequency (RF of the AOTF. We demonstrated improved image quality of optical coherence tomography (OCT by using the wavenumber-linear drive function of a simple triangular signal, which has a high wavenumber-linearity with an R-square value of 0.99991.

  16. Curved crystal x-ray optics for monochromatic imaging with a clinical source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingölbali, Ayhan; MacDonald, C A

    2009-04-01

    Monochromatic x-ray imaging has been shown to increase contrast and reduce dose relative to conventional broadband imaging. However, clinical sources with very narrow energy bandwidth tend to have limited intensity and field of view. In this study, focused fan beam monochromatic radiation was obtained using doubly curved monochromator crystals. While these optics have been in use for microanalysis at synchrotron facilities for some time, this work is the first investigation of the potential application of curved crystal optics to clinical sources for medical imaging. The optics could be used with a variety of clinical sources for monochromatic slot scan imaging. The intensity was assessed and the resolution of the focused beam was measured using a knife-edge technique. A simulation model was developed and comparisons to the measured resolution were performed to verify the accuracy of the simulation to predict resolution for different conventional sources. A simple geometrical calculation was also developed. The measured, simulated, and calculated resolutions agreed well. Adequate resolution and intensity for mammography were predicted for appropriate source/optic combinations.

  17. Free and open-source software application for the evaluation of coronary computed tomography angiography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadlich, Marcelo Souza; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes; Feijóo, Raúl A; Azevedo, Clerio F; Tura, Bernardo Rangel; Ziemer, Paulo Gustavo Portela; Blanco, Pablo Javier; Pina, Gustavo; Meira, Márcio; Souza e Silva, Nelson Albuquerque de

    2012-10-01

    The standardization of images used in Medicine in 1993 was performed using the DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) standard. Several tests use this standard and it is increasingly necessary to design software applications capable of handling this type of image; however, these software applications are not usually free and open-source, and this fact hinders their adjustment to most diverse interests. To develop and validate a free and open-source software application capable of handling DICOM coronary computed tomography angiography images. We developed and tested the ImageLab software in the evaluation of 100 tests randomly selected from a database. We carried out 600 tests divided between two observers using ImageLab and another software sold with Philips Brilliance computed tomography appliances in the evaluation of coronary lesions and plaques around the left main coronary artery (LMCA) and the anterior descending artery (ADA). To evaluate intraobserver, interobserver and intersoftware agreements, we used simple and kappa statistics agreements. The agreements observed between software applications were generally classified as substantial or almost perfect in most comparisons. The ImageLab software agreed with the Philips software in the evaluation of coronary computed tomography angiography tests, especially in patients without lesions, with lesions 70% in the ADA was lower, but this is also observed when the anatomical reference standard is used.

  18. Ictal source imaging and electroclinical correlation in self-limited epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alving, Jørgen; Fabricius, Martin; Rosenzweig, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To elucidate the localization of ictal EEG activity, and correlate it to semiological features in self-limited epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (formerly called "benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes"). METHODS: We have performed ictal electric source imaging, and we analysed...

  19. Probabilistic M/EEG source imaging from sparse spatio-temporal event structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Attias, Hagai T.; Wipf, David

    While MEG and EEG source imaging methods have to tackle a severely ill-posed problem their success can be stated as their ability to constrain the solutions using appropriate priors. In this paper we propose a hierarchical Bayesian model facilitating spatio-temporal patterns through the use of both...

  20. Subarcminute Resolution Imaging of Radio Sources at 74 MHz with the Very Large Array

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kassim, N. E; Perley, R. A; Erickson, W. C; Dwarakanath, K. S

    1993-01-01

    .... Although the system is of low efficiency, it works well for imaging strong sources (S ̃ > 20O Jy) on long baselines (> 5 km) since self-calibration has sufficient signal to noise to remove phase errors on the short time scales...

  1. Current use of imaging and electromagnetic source localization procedures in epilepsy surgery centers across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouthaan, Brian E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413967794; Rados, Matea|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413970485; Barsi, Péter; Boon, Paul; Carmichael, David W; Carrette, Evelien; Craiu, Dana; Cross, J Helen; Diehl, Beate; Dimova, Petia; Fabo, Daniel; Francione, Stefano; Gaskin, Vladislav; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Grigoreva, Elena; Guekht, Alla; Hirsch, Edouard; Hecimovic, Hrvoje; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Jung, Julien; Kalviainen, Reetta; Kelemen, Anna; Kimiskidis, Vasilios; Kobulashvili, Teia; Krsek, Pavel; Kuchukhidze, Giorgi; Larsson, Pål G; Leitinger, Markus; Lossius, Morten I; Luzin, Roman; Malmgren, Kristina; Mameniskiene, Ruta; Marusic, Petr; Metin, Baris; Özkara, Cigdem; Pecina, Hrvoje; Quesada, Carlos M; Rugg-Gunn, Fergus; Rydenhag, Bertil; Ryvlin, Philippe; Scholly, Julia; Seeck, Margitta; Staack, Anke M; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Stepanov, Valentin; Tarta-Arsene, Oana; Trinka, Eugen; Uzan, Mustafa; Vogt, Viola L; Vos, Sjoerd B; Vulliémoz, Serge; Huiskamp, Geertjan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074463640; Leijten, Frans S S|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/152243054; Van Eijsden, Pieter; Braun, Kees P J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/207237239

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In 2014 the European Union-funded E-PILEPSY project was launched to improve awareness of, and accessibility to, epilepsy surgery across Europe. We aimed to investigate the current use of neuroimaging, electromagnetic source localization, and imaging postprocessing procedures in

  2. Auralizations with loudspeaker arrays from a phased combination of the image source method and acoustical radiosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2017-01-01

    In order to create a simulation tool that is well-suited for small rooms with low diffusion and highly absorbing ceilings, a new room acoustic simulation tool has been developed that combines a phased version of the image source with acoustical radiosity and that considers the angle dependence of...

  3. Spatio-Temporal Error Sources Analysis and Accuracy Improvement in Landsat 8 Image Ground Displacement Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ding

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Because of the advantages of low cost, large coverage and short revisit cycle, Landsat 8 images have been widely applied to monitor earth surface movements. However, there are few systematic studies considering the error source characteristics or the improvement of the deformation field accuracy obtained by Landsat 8 image. In this study, we utilize the 2013 Mw 7.7 Balochistan, Pakistan earthquake to analyze error spatio-temporal characteristics and elaborate how to mitigate error sources in the deformation field extracted from multi-temporal Landsat 8 images. We found that the stripe artifacts and the topographic shadowing artifacts are two major error components in the deformation field, which currently lack overall understanding and an effective mitigation strategy. For the stripe artifacts, we propose a small spatial baseline (<200 m method to avoid the stripe artifacts effect on the deformation field. We also propose a small radiometric baseline method to reduce the topographic shadowing artifacts and radiometric decorrelation noises. Those performances and accuracy evaluation show that these two methods are effective in improving the precision of deformation field. This study provides the possibility to detect subtle ground movement with higher precision caused by earthquake, melting glaciers, landslides, etc., with Landsat 8 images. It is also a good reference for error source analysis and corrections in deformation field extracted from other optical satellite images.

  4. Light source depth estimation in porcine skin using spatially resolved diffuse imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Kieran A; Ruddy, Bryan P; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    We present an inexpensive imaging system for measuring the diffuse surface radiance profile produced by a light source within a turbid medium. The diffusion model of light propagation in multiple scattering media is used to estimate the optical properties of a sample and subsequently approximate the depth of an optical source. The system is shown to accurately estimate the relative changes in source depth in a homogeneous phantom. The absolute depth estimate may be improved with a better estimate of the optical parameters. Preliminary tests on a porcine skin sample show that the simple model can be used to roughly track the relative changes in the depth of a source in a layered medium. However, a rigorous model of the layered geometry may be required to more accurately localize a source, particularly near interfaces between tissue layers.

  5. Demonstration of acoustic source localization in air using single pixel compressive imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jeffrey S.; Rohde, Charles A.; Guild, Matthew D.; Naify, Christina J.; Martin, Theodore P.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2017-12-01

    Acoustic source localization often relies on large sensor arrays that can be electronically complex and have large data storage requirements to process element level data. Recently, the concept of a single-pixel-imager has garnered interest in the electromagnetics literature due to its ability to form high quality images with a single receiver paired with shaped aperture screens that allow for the collection of spatially orthogonal measurements. Here, we present a method for creating an acoustic analog to the single-pixel-imager found in electromagnetics for the purpose of source localization. Additionally, diffraction is considered to account for screen openings comparable to the acoustic wavelength. A diffraction model is presented and incorporated into the single pixel framework. In this paper, we explore the possibility of applying single pixel localization to acoustic measurements. The method is experimentally validated with laboratory measurements made in an air waveguide.

  6. Cortical Dipole Imaging for Multiple Signal Sources Considering Time-Varying Non-Uniform Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Junichi; Watanabe, Yoshiki

    Cortical dipole imaging is one of the spatial enhancement techniques from the scalp electroencephalogram. We investigated the dipole imaging for multiple signal sources under time-varying non-uniform noise conditions. The effects of incorporating statistical information of noise into the spatiotemporal inverse filter were examined by computer simulations and experimental studies in three sphere volume conductor model. The parametric projection filter that incorporated with noise covariance was applied to the inverse problem of EEG measurements. The noise covariance matrix was estimated by applying independent component analysis to the scalp potentials. The spatial filter was expanded to apply to the time-varying non-uniform noise conditions such as eye blink artifact. Moreover, multiple dipole distributions were introduced to extract and to visualize individual signal sources. The proposed imaging technique was applied to human experimental data of visual evoked potentials. We obtained reasonable results that coincide to physiological knowledge.

  7. Source-Search Sensitivity of a Large-Area, Coded-Aperture, Gamma-Ray Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziock, K P; Collins, J W; Craig, W W; Fabris, L; Lanza, R C; Gallagher, S; Horn, B P; Madden, N W; Smith, E; Woodring, M L

    2004-10-27

    We have recently completed a large-area, coded-aperture, gamma-ray imager for use in searching for radiation sources. The instrument was constructed to verify that weak point sources can be detected at considerable distances if one uses imaging to overcome fluctuations in the natural background. The instrument uses a rank-19, one-dimensional coded aperture to cast shadow patterns onto a 0.57 m{sup 2} NaI(Tl) detector composed of 57 individual cubes each 10 cm on a side. These are arranged in a 19 x 3 array. The mask is composed of four-centimeter thick, one-meter high, 10-cm wide lead blocks. The instrument is mounted in the back of a small truck from which images are obtained as one drives through a region. Results of first measurements obtained with the system are presented.

  8. Compact x-ray sources for mammographic applications: Monte Carlo simulations of image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva, P.; Golosio, B.; Stumbo, S.; Bravin, A.; Tomassini, P. [Struttura Dipartimentale di Matematica e Fisica dell' Universita degli Studi di Sassari and Sezione INFN, Cagliari 07100 (Italy); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble (France); INFN, Section of Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2009-11-15

    Thomson scattering x-ray sources can provide spectral distributions that are ideally suited for mammography with sufficient fluence rates. In this article, the authors investigate the effects of different spectral distributions on the image quality in simulated images of a breast mammographic phantom containing details of different compositions and thicknesses. They simulated monochromatic, quasimonochromatic, and polychromatic x-ray sources in order to define the energy for maximum figure of merit (signal-difference-to-noise ratio squared/mean glandular dose), the effect of an energy spread, and the effect of the presence of higher-order harmonics. The advantages of these sources with respect to conventional polychromatic sources as a function of phantom and detail thickness were also investigated. The results show that the energy for the figure of merit peak is between 16 and 27.4 keV, depending on the phantom thickness and detail composition and thickness. An energy spread of about 1 keV standard deviation, easily achievable with compact x-ray sources, does not appreciably affect the image quality.

  9. Spectro-refractometry of individual microscopic objects using swept-source quantitative phase imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Hwang; Jang, Jaeduck; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-11-05

    We present a novel spectroscopic quantitative phase imaging technique with a wavelength swept-source, referred to as swept-source diffraction phase microscopy (ssDPM), for quantifying the optical dispersion of microscopic individual samples. Employing the swept-source and the principle of common-path interferometry, ssDPM measures the multispectral full-field quantitative phase imaging and spectroscopic microrefractometry of transparent microscopic samples in the visible spectrum with a wavelength range of 450-750 nm and a spectral resolution of less than 8 nm. With unprecedented precision and sensitivity, we demonstrate the quantitative spectroscopic microrefractometry of individual polystyrene beads, 30% bovine serum albumin solution, and healthy human red blood cells.

  10. Fundus image diagnostic agreement in uveitis utilizing free and open source software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Jane; Honda, Andrea F; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Samson, C Michael; Kedhar, Sanjay; Mauro, John; Francis, Jasmine; Badamo, Jason; Diaz, Vicente A; Kempen, John H; Latkany, Paul A

    2013-08-01

    To assess the adequacy of image agreement regarding uveitis based on color fundus and fluorescein angiography images alone, and to use free and open source applications to conduct an image agreement study. Cross-sectional agreement study. Baseline fundus and fluorescein images of patients with panuveitis, posterior, or intermediate uveitis enrolled in the Multi-center Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) trial. Three fellowship-trained specialists in uveitis independently reviewed patient images using ClearCanvas™ and responded using Epi Info™. The diagnoses of the 3 reviewers were compared with the MUST clinician as a gold standard. A rank transformation adjusted for the possible variation in number of responses per patient. Chance-corrected interobserver agreement among the 3 reviewers was estimated with the ι coefficient. Confidence interval (CI) and SE were bootstrapped. Agreement between the diagnoses of the respondents and the baseline MUST clinician's diagnosis was poor across all diagnostic categories, ι = 0.09 (95% CI, 0.07-0.11). The agreement among respondents alone also was poor, ι = 0.11 ± 0.02 (95% CI, 0.08-0.13). The specialists requested more patient historical and clinical information to make a diagnosis on all patients. The role in distinguishing the multiple conditions in uveitis appears to be limited when based on fundus imaging alone. Future studies should investigate different categories of clinical data to supplement image data. Freely available applications have excellent utility in ophthalmic imaging agreement studies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Development and evaluation of QSPECT open-source software for the iterative reconstruction of SPECT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudos, George K; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Zotos, Panteleimon; Tsougos, Ioannis; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2010-06-01

    In this study open-source software (QSPECT) suitable for the iterative reconstruction of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data is presented. QSPECT implements maximum likelihood expectation maximization and ordered subsets expectation maximization algorithms in a user-friendly graphical interface. The software functionality is described and validation results are presented. Maximum likelihood expectation maximization and ordered subsets expectation maximization algorithms are implemented in C++. The Qt toolkit, a standard C++ framework for developing high-performance cross-platform applications, has been used for the graphical user interface development. QSPECT is tested using original projection data from two clinical SPECT systems: (i) APEX SPX-6/6HR and (ii) Millennium MG. Phantom experiments were carried out to evaluate the quality of reconstructed images in terms of (i) spatial resolution, (ii) sensitivity to activity variations, and (iii) the presence of scatter media. A cardiac phantom was used to simulate a normal and abnormal scenario. Finally, clinical cardiac SPECT images were reconstructed. In all cases, QSPECT results were compared with the clinical systems reconstruction software that uses the standard filtered backprojection algorithm. The reconstructed images show that QSPECT, when compared with standard clinical reconstruction, provides images with higher contrast, reduced background, and better separation of small sources located in small distances. In addition, reconstruction with QSPECT provides more quantitative images, and reduces the background created by scatter media. Finally, the phantom and clinical cardiac images are reconstructed with similar quality. QSPECT is a freely distributed, open-source standalone application that provides real-time, high-quality SPECT images. The software can be further modified to improve reconstruction algorithms, and include more correction techniques, such as, scatter and attenuation

  12. High-Resolution, Quantitative, and Three-Dimensional Coherent Diffractive Imaging with a Tabletop EUV Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanblatt, Elisabeth Rose

    Imaging is a critical tool used across a broad range of applications in science, technology, medicine, and manufacturing. Microscopy, the type of imaging which allows us to access the elusive yet rich world of what is smaller than we can naturally see--makes it possible to observe and design the nano-world of biological, material, and nanofabricated systems. In this thesis, I describe the development of a new type of microscopy that combines two powerful tools: coherent extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light sources produced by high harmonic generation, and ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging. This microscope produces high-resolution, chemically-specific, phase- and amplitude-contrast images with large fields of view on the order of hundreds of microns, while preserving a high spatial resolution on the scale of tens of nanometers. Recently, we extended this new tabletop microscopy technique to image reflective samples, periodic samples, and to image dynamic nano-scale elastic and thermal processes. I will discuss these advances and in particular demonstrate two new capabilities: first, a new imaging technique with high compositionally- and morphologically-sensitive quantitative information, capable of imaging reactions and diffusion at a buried interface. This capability will open up a new, exquisitely sensitive layer-by-layer imaging that has many applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology, including surface and materials science and metrology. Secondly, I will demonstrate imaging of a thick sample in three dimensions. By accounting for diffraction within a thick sample, it is possible to obtain high-resolution three-dimensional images of biological and meta-material samples non-invasively, and without the use of staining or labeling.

  13. Estimates of Imaging Times for Conventional and Synchrotron X-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kinney, J

    2003-01-01

    The following notes are to be taken as estimates of the time requirements for imaging NIF targets in three-dimensions with absorption contrast. The estimates ignore target geometry and detector inefficiency, and focus only on the statistical question of detecting compositional (structural) differences between adjacent volume elements in the presence of noise. The basic equations, from the classic reference by Grodzins, consider imaging times in terms of the required number of photons necessary to provide an image with given resolution and noise. The time estimates, therefore, have been based on the calculated x-ray fluxes from the proposed Advanced Light Source (ALS) imaging beamline, and from the calculated flux for a tungsten anode x-ray generator operated in a point focus mode.

  14. Simulation of an IXS imaging analyzer with an extended scattering source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvorov, Alexey [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source II; Cai, Yong Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source II

    2016-09-15

    A concept of an inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) spectrograph with an imaging analyzer was proposed recently and discussed in a number of publications (see e.g. Ref.1). The imaging analyzer as proposed combines x-ray lenses with highly dispersive crystal optics. It allows conversion of the x-ray energy spectrum into a spatial image with very high energy resolution. However, the presented theoretical analysis of the spectrograph did not take into account details of the scattered radiation source, i.e. sample, and its impact on the spectrograph performance. Using numerical simulations we investigated the influence of the finite sample thickness, the scattering angle and the incident energy detuning on the analyzer image and the ultimate resolution.

  15. X-ray reflectivity imager with 15 W power X-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinxing; Sakurai, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    X-ray reflectivity is usually used for the routine analysis of layered structures of uniform thin films. So far, the technique has some limitations in the application to more practical inhomogeneous/patterned samples. X-ray reflectivity imaging is recently developed technique and can give the reconstructed image from many X-ray reflection projections. The present article gives the instrumental details of the compact X-ray reflectivity imager. Though the power of X-ray source is only 15 W, it works well. The calibration of the system has been discussed, because it is particularly important for the present grazing incidence geometry. We also give a visualization example of the buried interface, physical meaning of the reconstructed image, and discussions about possibilities for improvement.

  16. Imaging Seismic Source Variations Using Back-Projection Methods at El Tatio Geyser Field, Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, C. L.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    During October 2012, 51 geophones and 6 broadband seismometers were deployed in an ~50x50m region surrounding a periodically erupting columnar geyser in the El Tatio Geyser Field, Chile. The dense array served as the seismic framework for a collaborative project to study the mechanics of complex hydrothermal systems. Contemporaneously, complementary geophysical measurements (including down-hole temperature and pressure, discharge rates, thermal imaging, water chemistry, and video) were also collected. Located on the western flanks of the Andes Mountains at an elevation of 4200m, El Tatio is the third largest geyser field in the world. Its non-pristine condition makes it an ideal location to perform minutely invasive geophysical studies. The El Jefe Geyser was chosen for its easily accessible conduit and extremely periodic eruption cycle (~120s). During approximately 2 weeks of continuous recording, we recorded ~2500 nighttime eruptions which lack cultural noise from tourism. With ample data, we aim to study how the source varies spatially and temporally during each phase of the geyser's eruption cycle. We are developing a new back-projection processing technique to improve source imaging for diffuse signals. Our method was previously applied to the Sierra Negra Volcano system, which also exhibits repeating harmonic and diffuse seismic sources. We back-project correlated seismic signals from the receivers back to their sources, assuming linear source to receiver paths and a known velocity model (obtained from ambient noise tomography). We apply polarization filters to isolate individual and concurrent geyser energy associated with P and S phases. We generate 4D, time-lapsed images of the geyser source field that illustrate how the source distribution changes through the eruption cycle. We compare images for pre-eruption, co-eruption, post-eruption and quiescent periods. We use our images to assess eruption mechanics in the system (i.e. top-down vs. bottom-up) and

  17. Observation of image pair creation and annihilation from superluminal scattering sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, Matteo; Spalding, Gabriel C; Warburton, Ryan; Lyons, Ashley; Aniculaesei, Constantin; Richards, Joseph M; Leach, Jonathan; Henderson, Robert; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    The invariance of the speed of light is one of the foundational pillars of our current understanding of the universe. It implies a series of consequences related to our perception of simultaneity and, ultimately, of time itself. Whereas these consequences are experimentally well studied in the case of subluminal motion, the kinematics of superluminal motion lack direct evidence or even a clear experimental approach. We investigate kinematic effects associated with the superluminal motion of a light source. By using high-temporal-resolution imaging techniques, we directly demonstrate that if the source approaches an observer at superluminal speeds, the temporal ordering of events is inverted and its image appears to propagate backward. Moreover, for a source changing its speed and crossing the interface between subluminal and superluminal propagation regions, we observe image pair annihilation and creation, depending on the crossing direction. These results are very general and show that, regardless of the emitter speed, it is not possible to unambiguously determine the kinematics of an event from imaging and time-resolved measurements alone. This has implications not only for light, but also, for example, for sound and other wave phenomena.

  18. Contrast improvement for swept source optical coherence tomography image of sub-surface tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyu; Liang, Shanshan; Zhang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Swept source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) is an attractive biological imaging technology due to its advantages of simple setup and high imaging speed. As the light intensity attenuated rapidly in high scattering biological tissues, the contrast of OCT image will drop with depth. In this paper a new method was introduced to compensate the attenuation of imaging contrast in SSOCT. The interference signal was divided into two channels of analog to digital converter (ADC) with a splitting ratio of 1:5. The higher level signal in one channel was used to reconstruct deeper structure of tissue and the lower level signal in the other channel was used to reconstruct surface structure of tissue. Lowfrequency signals in one channel were filtered by a high pass filter and then combined with the signal in the other channel to obtain a high contrast image in both surface and deep area of tissue. Human finger and porcine airway imaging obtained with the system show that the contrast of SSOCT images can be improved in deeper region of tissue.

  19. THE Q/U IMAGING EXPERIMENT: POLARIZATION MEASUREMENTS OF RADIO SOURCES AT 43 AND 95 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffenberger, K. M. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, P.O. Box 3064350, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States); Araujo, D.; Zwart, J. T. L. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bischoff, C.; Buder, I. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y.; Hasegawa, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd M/C 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kusaka, A. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Monsalve, R. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 781 E. Terrace Road, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Næss, S. K. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Newburgh, L. B. [Dunlap Institute, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Reeves, R. [CePIA, Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción (Chile); Ruud, T. M.; Eriksen, H. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K.; Gaier, T. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dickinson, C. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gundersen, J. O., E-mail: huffenbe@physics.fsu.edu [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

    2015-06-10

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the cosmic microwave background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, >40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are ∼480 such sources within QUIET’s four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30–40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At signal-to-noise ratio > 3 significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only 1.3 ± 1.1 detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements >1 Jy, the polarization fractions are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10%–20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models—ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency—are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.

  20. Spectral-domain and swept-source OCT imaging of asteroid hyalosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasil, Tarek; Adhi, Mehreen; Liu, Jonathan J; Fujimoto, James G; Duker, Jay S; Baumal, Caroline R

    2014-01-01

    A 72-year-old man with diabetes was referred to the retina clinic for diabetic retinopathy. Detailed funduscopic examination of the left eye was limited by prominent asteroid hyalosis. Spectral-domain (SD) and swept-source (SS) optical coherence tomography (OCT) were utilized to examine the vitreous, vitreoretinal interface, and the morphology of the retina. Asteroid hyalosis induced artifacts of the OCT images, which resolved when the appropriate imaging protocols were applied. SS-OCT may show superior diagnostic and preoperative capabilities when compared to SD-OCT in the settings of asteroid hyalosis-induced media opacity.

  1. The Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Mengning; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Montanez, Paul A.; Hayes, Matt; Milathianaki, Despina; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Schafer, Donald W.; Guillet, Serge; Busse, Armin; Bergan, Robert; Olson, William; Fox, Kay; Stewart, Nathaniel; Curtis, Robin; Miahnahri, Alireza Alan; Boutet, Sébastien, E-mail: sboutet@slac.stanford.edu [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Description of the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Recent scientific highlights illustrate the femtosecond crystallography, high power density and extreme matter capabilities of the CXI instrument. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument specializes in hard X-ray, in-vacuum, high power density experiments in all areas of science. Two main sample chambers, one containing a 100 nm focus and one a 1 µm focus, are available, each with multiple diagnostics, sample injection, pump–probe and detector capabilities. The flexibility of CXI has enabled it to host a diverse range of experiments, from biological to extreme matter.

  2. Ion pinhole imaging diagnostics on fast ion source in femtosecond laser plasma of cluster targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Sergey; Pikuz, Sergey; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana; Fukuda, Yuji; Skobelev, Igor; Zhvaniya, Irina; Varzar, Sergey; Kando, Masaki; Kodama, Ryousuke

    2017-07-10

    The spatial configuration of the ion source generated under femtosecond laser interaction with clusters is investigated. While intense laser pulses (36 fs, 60 mJ, intensity of 4 × 1017 W/cm2) propagated in CO2 cluster (~0.22 μm in diameter) media, the shape of the obtained plasma ion source was registered for the first time by means of pinhole imaging method. The remarkable decrease in fast ion yield in the vicinity of the assumed best laser focus near the gas cluster jet axis is observed. Such observed anisotropy of the ion source is suggested to originate from the influence of the laser prepulse destroying clusters in advance to the arrival of the main pulse. The assumption is confirmed by optical shadowgraphy images of the plasma channel and is important for further development of an efficient laser-plasma-based fast ion source. Following the observed geometry of the ion source, the laser intensity limit allowing to accelerate ions to ~100 keV energy range was estimated.

  3. Development and validation of a combined phased acoustical radiosity and image source model for predicting sound fields in rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2015-01-01

    A model, combining acoustical radiosity and the image source method, including phase shifts on reflection, has been developed. The model is denoted Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Method (PARISM), and it has been developed in order to be able to model both specular and diffuse reflec...

  4. An open-source solution for advanced imaging flow cytometry data analysis using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Holger; Rees, Paul; Blasi, Thomas; Kamentsky, Lee; Hung, Jane; Dao, David; Carpenter, Anne E; Filby, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Imaging flow cytometry (IFC) enables the high throughput collection of morphological and spatial information from hundreds of thousands of single cells. This high content, information rich image data can in theory resolve important biological differences among complex, often heterogeneous biological samples. However, data analysis is often performed in a highly manual and subjective manner using very limited image analysis techniques in combination with conventional flow cytometry gating strategies. This approach is not scalable to the hundreds of available image-based features per cell and thus makes use of only a fraction of the spatial and morphometric information. As a result, the quality, reproducibility and rigour of results are limited by the skill, experience and ingenuity of the data analyst. Here, we describe a pipeline using open-source software that leverages the rich information in digital imagery using machine learning algorithms. Compensated and corrected raw image files (.rif) data files from an imaging flow cytometer (the proprietary .cif file format) are imported into the open-source software CellProfiler, where an image processing pipeline identifies cells and subcellular compartments allowing hundreds of morphological features to be measured. This high-dimensional data can then be analysed using cutting-edge machine learning and clustering approaches using "user-friendly" platforms such as CellProfiler Analyst. Researchers can train an automated cell classifier to recognize different cell types, cell cycle phases, drug treatment/control conditions, etc., using supervised machine learning. This workflow should enable the scientific community to leverage the full analytical power of IFC-derived data sets. It will help to reveal otherwise unappreciated populations of cells based on features that may be hidden to the human eye that include subtle measured differences in label free detection channels such as bright-field and dark-field imagery

  5. Imaging of Scattered Wavefields in Passive and Controlled-source Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2015-12-01

    Seismic waves are used to study the Earth, exploit its hydrocarbon resources, and understand its hazards. Extracting information from seismic waves about the Earth’s subsurface, however, is becoming more challenging as our questions become more complex and our demands for higher resolution increase. This dissertation introduces two new methods that use scattered waves for improving the resolution of subsurface images: natural migration of passive seismic data and convergent full-waveform inversion. In the first part of this dissertation, I describe a method where the recorded seismic data are used to image subsurface heterogeneities like fault planes. This method, denoted as natural migration of backscattered surface waves, provides higher resolution images for near-surface faults that is complementary to surface-wave tomography images. Our proposed method differ from contemporary methods in that it does not (1) require a velocity model of the earth, (2) assumes weak scattering, or (3) have a high computational cost. This method is applied to ambient noise recorded by the US-Array to map regional faults across the American continent. Natural migration can be formulated as a least-squares inversion to furtherer enhance the resolution and the quality of the fault images. This inversion is applied to ambient noise recorded in Long Beach, California to reveal a matrix of shallow subsurface faults. The second part of this dissertation describes a convergent full waveform inversion method for controlled source data. A controlled source excites waves that scatter from subsurface reflectors. The scattered waves are recorded by a large array of geophones. These recorded waves can be inverted for a high-resolution image of the subsurface by FWI, which is typically convergent for transmitted arrivals but often does not converge for deep reflected events. I propose a preconditioning approach that extends the ability of FWI to image deep parts of the velocity model, which

  6. Sources of errors in spatial frequency domain imaging of scattering media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Brandes, Arnd; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2014-07-01

    Knowledge of the impact of potential sources of error in spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) is essential for the quantitative characterization of absorption and scattering in tissue and other turbid media. We theoretically investigate the error in the derived absorption and scattering parameter, subject to typical experimental and theoretical sources of errors. This provides a guideline to properly assess the significance of various parameters related to the measurement and the theoretical evaluation of spatial frequency domain reflectance data. At the same time, this study serves as a reference to estimate the overall precision of derived optical parameters of semi-infinite scattering media using SFDI.

  7. Time domain localization technique with sparsity constraint for imaging acoustic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padois, Thomas; Doutres, Olivier; Sgard, Franck; Berry, Alain

    2017-09-01

    This paper addresses source localization technique in time domain for broadband acoustic sources. The objective is to accurately and quickly detect the position and amplitude of noise sources in workplaces in order to propose adequate noise control options and prevent workers hearing loss or safety risk. First, the generalized cross correlation associated with a spherical microphone array is used to generate an initial noise source map. Then a linear inverse problem is defined to improve this initial map. Commonly, the linear inverse problem is solved with an l2 -regularization. In this study, two sparsity constraints are used to solve the inverse problem, the orthogonal matching pursuit and the truncated Newton interior-point method. Synthetic data are used to highlight the performances of the technique. High resolution imaging is achieved for various acoustic sources configurations. Moreover, the amplitudes of the acoustic sources are correctly estimated. A comparison of computation times shows that the technique is compatible with quasi real-time generation of noise source maps. Finally, the technique is tested with real data.

  8. Low-complexity and error-resilient hyperspectral image compression based on distributed source coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrardo, A.; Barni, M.; Bertoli, A.; Garzelli, A.; Magli, E.; Nencini, F.; Penna, B.; Vitulli, R.

    2008-10-01

    In this paper we propose a lossless compression algorithm for hyperspectral images based on distributed source coding; this algorithm represents a significant improvement over our prior work on the same topic, and has been developed during a project funded by ESA-ESTEC. In particular, the algorithm achieves good compression performance with very low complexity; moreover, it also features a very good degree of error resilience. These features are obtained taking inspiration from distributed source coding, and particularly employing coset codes and CRC-based decoding. As the CRC can be used to decode blocks using a reference different from that used to compress the image, this yields error resilience. In particular, if a block is lost, decoding using the closest collocated block in the second previous band is successful about 70% of the times.

  9. Dual-source computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain: feasibility and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schertler, Thomas; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Seifert, Burkhardt [University of Zurich, Department of Biostatistics, Zurich (Switzerland); Flohr, Thomas G. [Computed Tomography CTE PA, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and image quality of dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA) in patients with acute chest pain for the assessment of the lung, thoracic aorta, and for pulmonary and coronary arteries. Sixty consecutive patients (32 female, 28 male, mean age 58.1{+-}16.3 years) with acute chest pain underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated DSCTA without prior beta-blocker administration. Vessel attenuation of different thoracic vascular territories was measured, and image quality was semi-quantitatively analyzed by two independent readers. Image quality of the thoracic aorta was diagnostic in all 60 patients, image quality of pulmonary arteries was diagnostic in 59, and image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 58 patients. Pairwise intraindividual comparisons of attenuation values were small and ranged between 1{+-}6 HU comparing right and left coronary artery and 56{+-}9 HU comparing the pulmonary trunk and left ventricle. Mean attenuation was 291{+-}65 HU in the ascending aorta, 334{+-}93 HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 285{+-}66 HU and 268{+-}67 HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. DSCTA is feasible and provides diagnostic image quality of the thoracic aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.)

  10. [Conception and data transfer analysis of an open-source digital image archive designed for radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichgräber, U K M; Lehmkuhl, L; Harderer, A; Emmel, D; Ehrenstein, T; Ricke, J; Felix, R

    2003-07-01

    Implementation of a self-designed, web-based digital image archive incorporating the existing DICOM infrastructure to assure distribution of digital pictures and reports and to optimize work flow. Assessment after three years. Open-source software was used to guarantee highest reliability and cost effectiveness. In view of rapidly increasing capacity and decreasing costs of hard discs (HDs), HDs were preferred over slower and expensive magneto-optical disk (MOD) or tape storage systems. The number of installed servers increased from one to 12. By installing HDs with increased capacities, the number of servers should be kept constant. Entry and access of data were analyzed over two 4-month periods (after 1.5 and 2 years of continuous operations). Our digital image archive was found to be very reliable, cost effective and suitable for its designated tasks. As judged from the measured access volume, the average utilization of the system increased by 160 %. In the period from January to April 2002, the users accessed 239.8 gigabyte of the stored 873.7 gigabyte image data (27 %). The volume of the stored data added 20%, mainly due to an increase in cross-section imaging. The challenge of developing a digital image archive with limited financial resources resulted in a practicable and expandable solution. The utilization, number of active users and volume of transferred data have increased significantly. Our concept of utilizing HDs for image storage proved to be successful.

  11. Improvement of the imaging of moving acoustic sources by the knowledge of their motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, J.

    1981-03-01

    An analytical and experimental study is presented showing that, due to a more precise definition of nonstationary noises of a certain class, and to the preprocessing of microphone signals (termed 'coherent dedopplerization'), one can obtain acoustic imaging for sources whose velocity is greater than may be processed by conventional methods without the generation of blurrs of the same order as the antenna field. A useful application of these techniques would be to two-dimensional antennas.

  12. Tunable Ultrafast Photon Source and Imaging System for Studying Carrier Dynamics in Graphene Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-23

    and phonons in graphene through a combination of two optical techniques – tunable wavelength ultrafast optical spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy ...Fig 2. The set up for Raman spectroscopy showing the NIR CCD camera (BaySpec) in the bottom left corner. purchased from BaySpec using... Tunable ultrafast photon source and imaging system for studying carrier dynamics in graphene devices This project enabled the acquisition of a

  13. Brain Source Imaging in Preclinical Rat Models of Focal Epilepsy using High-Resolution EEG Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jihye; Deshmukh, Abhay; Song, Yinchen; Riera, Jorge

    2015-06-06

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) has been traditionally used to determine which brain regions are the most likely candidates for resection in patients with focal epilepsy. This methodology relies on the assumption that seizures originate from the same regions of the brain from which interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) emerge. Preclinical models are very useful to find correlates between IED locations and the actual regions underlying seizure initiation in focal epilepsy. Rats have been commonly used in preclinical studies of epilepsy; hence, there exist a large variety of models for focal epilepsy in this particular species. However, it is challenging to record multichannel EEG and to perform brain source imaging in such a small animal. To overcome this issue, we combine a patented-technology to obtain 32-channel EEG recordings from rodents and an MRI probabilistic atlas for brain anatomical structures in Wistar rats to perform brain source imaging. In this video, we introduce the procedures to acquire multichannel EEG from Wistar rats with focal cortical dysplasia, and describe the steps both to define the volume conductor model from the MRI atlas and to uniquely determine the IEDs. Finally, we validate the whole methodology by obtaining brain source images of IEDs and compare them with those obtained at different time frames during the seizure onset.

  14. Low-Complexity Compression Algorithm for Hyperspectral Images Based on Distributed Source Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjian Nian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A low-complexity compression algorithm for hyperspectral images based on distributed source coding (DSC is proposed in this paper. The proposed distributed compression algorithm can realize both lossless and lossy compression, which is implemented by performing scalar quantization strategy on the original hyperspectral images followed by distributed lossless compression. Multilinear regression model is introduced for distributed lossless compression in order to improve the quality of side information. Optimal quantized step is determined according to the restriction of the correct DSC decoding, which makes the proposed algorithm achieve near lossless compression. Moreover, an effective rate distortion algorithm is introduced for the proposed algorithm to achieve low bit rate. Experimental results show that the compression performance of the proposed algorithm is competitive with that of the state-of-the-art compression algorithms for hyperspectral images.

  15. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by energy dispersive x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, R.; Mascali, D.; Biri, S.; Caliri, C.; Castro, G.; Galatà, A.; Gammino, S.; Neri, L.; Pálinkás, J.; Romano, F. P.; Torrisi, G.

    2017-07-01

    Pinhole and CCD based quasi-optical x-ray imaging technique was applied to investigate the plasma of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). Spectrally integrated and energy resolved images were taken from an axial perspective. The comparison of integrated images taken of argon plasma highlights the structural changes affected by some ECRIS setting parameters, like strength of the axial magnetic confinement, RF frequency and microwave power. Photon counting analysis gives precise intensity distribution of the x-ray emitted by the argon plasma and by the plasma chamber walls. This advanced technique points out that the spatial positions of the electron losses are strongly determined by the kinetic energy of the electrons themselves to be lost and also shows evidences how strongly the plasma distribution is affected by slight changes in the RF frequency.

  16. Fast X-ray imaging at beamline I13L at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fanis, A.; Pešić, Z. D.; Wagner, U.; Rau, C.

    2013-03-01

    The imaging branch of the dual-branch beamline I13L at Diamond Light Source has been operational since April 2012. This branch is dedicated to hard X-ray imaging (in-line phase contrast radiography and tomography, and full-field microscopy), with energies in the ranges 6-30keV. At present we aim to achieve spatial resolution of the order of 1 μm over a field of view of l-20mm2. This branch aims to excel at imaging experiment of fast dynamic processes, where it is of interest to have short exposure times and high frame rates. To accommodate for this, we prepared for the beamline to operate with "pink" beam to provide higher flux, an efficient detection system, and rapid data acquisition, transfer, and saving to storage. This contributed paper describes the present situation and illustrate the author's goal for the mid-future.

  17. High-resolution x-ray imaging for microbiology at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, B.; Kemner, K. M.; Maser, J.; Schneegurt, M. A.; Cai, Z.; Ilinski, P. P.; Kulpa, C. F.; Legnini, D. G.; Nealson, K. H.; Pratt, S. T.; Rodrigues, W.; Tischler, M. L.; Yun, W.

    1999-11-02

    Exciting new applications of high-resolution x-ray imaging have emerged recently due to major advances in high-brilliance synchrotrons sources and high-performance zone plate optics. Imaging with submicron resolution is now routine with hard x-rays: the authors have demonstrated 150 run in the 6--10 keV range with x-ray microscopes at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), a third-generation synchrotrons radiation facility. This has fueled interest in using x-ray imaging in applications ranging from the biomedical, environmental, and materials science fields to the microelectronics industry. One important application they have pursued at the APS is a study of the microbiology of bacteria and their associated extracellular material (biofilms) using fluorescence microanalysis. No microscopy techniques were previously available with sufficient resolution to study live bacteria ({approx}1 {micro}m x 4 {micro}m in size) and biofilms in their natural hydrated state with better than part-per-million elemental sensitivity and the capability of determining g chemical speciation. In vivo x-ray imaging minimizes artifacts due to sample fixation, drying, and staining. This provides key insights into the transport of metal contaminants by bacteria in the environment and potential new designs for remediation and sequestration strategies.

  18. Comparison of Open Source Compression Algorithms on Vhr Remote Sensing Images for Efficient Storage Hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoguz, A.; Bozkurt, S.; Gozutok, A. A.; Alp, G.; Turan, E. G.; Bogaz, M.; Kent, S.

    2016-06-01

    High resolution level in satellite imagery came with its fundamental problem as big amount of telemetry data which is to be stored after the downlink operation. Moreover, later the post-processing and image enhancement steps after the image is acquired, the file sizes increase even more and then it gets a lot harder to store and consume much more time to transmit the data from one source to another; hence, it should be taken into account that to save even more space with file compression of the raw and various levels of processed data is a necessity for archiving stations to save more space. Lossless data compression algorithms that will be examined in this study aim to provide compression without any loss of data holding spectral information. Within this objective, well-known open source programs supporting related compression algorithms have been implemented on processed GeoTIFF images of Airbus Defence & Spaces SPOT 6 & 7 satellites having 1.5 m. of GSD, which were acquired and stored by ITU Center for Satellite Communications and Remote Sensing (ITU CSCRS), with the algorithms Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW), Lempel-Ziv-Markov chain Algorithm (LZMA & LZMA2), Lempel-Ziv-Oberhumer (LZO), Deflate & Deflate 64, Prediction by Partial Matching (PPMd or PPM2), Burrows-Wheeler Transform (BWT) in order to observe compression performances of these algorithms over sample datasets in terms of how much of the image data can be compressed by ensuring lossless compression.

  19. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wei [BME Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G., E-mail: brankov@iit.edu [ECE Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα{sub 1} line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

  20. Testing a high-power LED based light source for hyperspectral imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomkaew, Phiwat; Mayes, Sam A.; Rich, Thomas C.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2017-02-01

    Our lab has worked to develop high-speed hyperspectral imaging systems that scan the fluorescence excitation spectrum for biomedical imaging applications. Hyperspectral imaging can be used in remote sensing, medical imaging, reaction analysis, and other applications. Here, we describe the development of a hyperspectral imaging system that comprised an inverted Nikon Eclipse microscope, sCMOS camera, and a custom light source that utilized a series of high-power LEDs. LED selection was performed to achieve wavelengths of 350-590 nm. To reduce scattering, LEDs with low viewing angles were selected. LEDs were surface-mount soldered and powered by an RCD. We utilized 3D printed mounting brackets to assemble all circuit components. Spectraradiometric calibration was performed using a spectrometer (QE65000, Ocean Optics) and integrating sphere (FOIS-1, Ocean Optics). Optical output and LED driving current were measured over a range of illumination intensities. A normalization algorithm was used to calibrate and optimize the intensity of the light source. The highest illumination power was at 375 nm (3300 mW/cm2), while the lowest illumination power was at 515, 525, and 590 nm (5200 mW/cm2). Comparing the intensities supplied by each LED to the intensities measured at the microscope stage, we found there was a great loss in power output. Future work will focus on using two of the same LEDs to double the power and finding more LED and/or laser diodes and chips around the range. This custom hyperspectral imaging system could be used for the detection of cancer and the identification of biomolecules.

  1. Low-dose 4D cardiac imaging in small animals using dual source micro-CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, M.; Clark, D. P.; Badea, C. T.

    2018-01-01

    Micro-CT is widely used in preclinical studies, generating substantial interest in extending its capabilities in functional imaging applications such as blood perfusion and cardiac function. However, imaging cardiac structure and function in mice is challenging due to their small size and rapid heart rate. To overcome these challenges, we propose and compare improvements on two strategies for cardiac gating in dual-source, preclinical micro-CT: fast prospective gating (PG) and uncorrelated retrospective gating (RG). These sampling strategies combined with a sophisticated iterative image reconstruction algorithm provide faster acquisitions and high image quality in low-dose 4D (i.e. 3D  +  Time) cardiac micro-CT. Fast PG is performed under continuous subject rotation which results in interleaved projection angles between cardiac phases. Thus, fast PG provides a well-sampled temporal average image for use as a prior in iterative reconstruction. Uncorrelated RG incorporates random delays during sampling to prevent correlations between heart rate and sampling rate. We have performed both simulations and animal studies to validate these new sampling protocols. Sampling times for 1000 projections using fast PG and RG were 2 and 3 min, respectively, and the total dose was 170 mGy each. Reconstructions were performed using a 4D iterative reconstruction technique based on the split Bregman method. To examine undersampling robustness, subsets of 500 and 250 projections were also used for reconstruction. Both sampling strategies in conjunction with our iterative reconstruction method are capable of resolving cardiac phases and provide high image quality. In general, for equal numbers of projections, fast PG shows fewer errors than RG and is more robust to undersampling. Our results indicate that only 1000-projection based reconstruction with fast PG satisfies a 5% error criterion in left ventricular volume estimation. These methods promise low-dose imaging with a

  2. Imaging of noncarious cervical lesions by means of a fast swept source optical coherence tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Eniko T.; Marcauteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Duma, Virgil Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2014-01-01

    Non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL) are defined as the loss of tooth substance at the cemento-enamel junction and are caused by abrasion, erosion and/or occlusal overload. In this paper we proved that our fast swept source OCT system is a valuable tool to track the evolution of NCCL lesions in time. On several extracted bicuspids, four levels of NCCL were artificially created. After every level of induced lesion, OCT scanning was performed. B scans were acquired and 3D reconstructions were generated. The swept source OCT instrument used in this study has a central wavelength of 1050 nm, a sweeping range of 106 nm (measured at 10 dB), an average output power of 16 mW and a sweeping rate of 100 kHz. A depth resolution determined by the swept source of 12 μm in air was experimentally obtained. NCCL were measured on the B-scans as 2D images and 3D reconstructions (volumes). For quantitative evaluations of volumes, the Image J software was used. By calculating the areas of the amount of lost tissue corresponding to each difference of Bscans, the final volumes of NCCL were obtained. This swept source OCT method allows the dynamic diagnosis of NCCL in time.

  3. The first VLBI image of an infrared-faint radio source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Tingay, S.; Mao, M. Y.; Phillips, C. J.; Hotan, A. W.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We investigate the joint evolution of active galactic nuclei and star formation in the Universe. Aims: In the 1.4 GHz survey with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the Chandra Deep Field South and the European Large Area ISO Survey - S1 we have identified a class of objects which are strong in the radio but have no detectable infrared and optical counterparts. This class has been called Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS. 53 sources out of 2002 have been classified as IFRS. It is not known what these objects are. Methods: To address the many possible explanations as to what the nature of these objects is we have observed four sources with the Australian Long Baseline Array. Results: We have detected and imaged one of the four sources observed. Assuming that the source is at a high redshift, we find its properties in agreement with properties of Compact Steep Spectrum sources. However, due to the lack of optical and infrared data the constraints are not particularly strong.

  4. Design of Programmable LED Controller with a Variable Current Source for 3D Image Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ryang Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional fluorescent light sources, as well as incandescent light sources are gradually being replaced by Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs for reducing power consumption in the image display area for multimedia application. An LED light source requires a controller with a low-power operation. In this paper, a low-power technique using adiabatic operation is applied for the implementation of LED controller with a stable constant-current, a low-power and low-heat function. From the simulation result, the power consumption of the proposed LED controller using adiabatic operation was reduced to about 87% in comparison with conventional operation with a constant VDD. The proposed circuit is expected to be an alternative LED controller which is sensitive to external conditions such as heat.

  5. Development of advanced signal processing and source imaging methods for superparamagnetic relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Anderson, Bill; Huang, Charles W; Kunde, Gerd J; Vreeland, Erika C; Huang, Jeffrey W; Matlashov, Andrei N; Karaulanov, Todor; Nettles, Christopher P; Gomez, Andrew; Minser, Kayla; Weldon, Caroline; Paciotti, Giulio; Harsh, Michael; Lee, Roland R; Flynn, Edward R

    2017-02-07

    Superparamagnetic relaxometry (SPMR) is a highly sensitive technique for the in vivo detection of tumor cells and may improve early stage detection of cancers. SPMR employs superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION). After a brief magnetizing pulse is used to align the SPION, SPMR measures the time decay of SPION using super-conducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors. Substantial research has been carried out in developing the SQUID hardware and in improving the properties of the SPION. However, little research has been done in the pre-processing of sensor signals and post-processing source modeling in SPMR. In the present study, we illustrate new pre-processing tools that were developed to: (1) remove trials contaminated with artifacts, (2) evaluate and ensure that a single decay process associated with bounded SPION exists in the data, (3) automatically detect and correct flux jumps, and (4) accurately fit the sensor signals with different decay models. Furthermore, we developed an automated approach based on multi-start dipole imaging technique to obtain the locations and magnitudes of multiple magnetic sources, without initial guesses from the users. A regularization process was implemented to solve the ambiguity issue related to the SPMR source variables. A procedure based on reduced chi-square cost-function was introduced to objectively obtain the adequate number of dipoles that describe the data. The new pre-processing tools and multi-start source imaging approach have been successfully evaluated using phantom data. In conclusion, these tools and multi-start source modeling approach substantially enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in detecting and localizing sources from the SPMR signals. Furthermore, multi-start approach with regularization provided robust and accurate solutions for a poor SNR condition similar to the SPMR detection sensitivity in the order of 1000 cells. We believe such algorithms will help establishing the industrial

  6. Complete Implementation of the Green's Function Based Time Reverse Imaging and Sensitivity Analysis of Reversed Time Tsunami Source Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossen, M. J.; Cummins, P. R.; Satake, K.

    2017-10-01

    In recent studies, the Time Reverse Imaging (TRI) method has been implemented in tsunami science to estimate tsunami source models. A TRI algorithm called Green's Function Based Time Reverse Imaging (GFTRI) was previously developed to reconstruct the source model by using source inversion as a guide to appropriately scale time-reversed images of the tsunami source. In this article, we consider a more complete approach to source inversion using reversed time images of the tsunami source by considering cross correlations among Green's functions. As a consequence, the performance of the method improves significantly. We tested this new algorithm using data from the 2011 Japan tsunami. Our results show that the method is capable of extracting more details of the source and providing excellent waveform fits at all stations, including those not used in the source imaging. We have also studied the sensitivity analysis of reversed time tsunami source inversion and found that the method is less sensitive to the number of stations, once a minimum number of stations is utilized. Moreover, this new approach is able to estimate the tsunami source with reasonable accuracy using data available soon after an earthquake, which indicates that it has potential to be used in both near- and far-field tsunami forecasting.

  7. DeepInfer: Open-Source Deep Learning Deployment Toolkit for Image-Guided Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Pesteie, Mehran; Hetherington, Jorden; Behringer, Peter A; Kapur, Tina; Wells, William M; Rohling, Robert; Fedorov, Andriy; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2017-02-11

    Deep learning models have outperformed some of the previous state-of-the-art approaches in medical image analysis. Instead of using hand-engineered features, deep models attempt to automatically extract hierarchical representations at multiple levels of abstraction from the data. Therefore, deep models are usually considered to be more flexible and robust solutions for image analysis problems compared to conventional computer vision models. They have demonstrated significant improvements in computer-aided diagnosis and automatic medical image analysis applied to such tasks as image segmentation, classification and registration. However, deploying deep learning models often has a steep learning curve and requires detailed knowledge of various software packages. Thus, many deep models have not been integrated into the clinical research workflows causing a gap between the state-of-the-art machine learning in medical applications and evaluation in clinical research procedures. In this paper, we propose "DeepInfer" - an open-source toolkit for developing and deploying deep learning models within the 3D Slicer medical image analysis platform. Utilizing a repository of task-specific models, DeepInfer allows clinical researchers and biomedical engineers to deploy a trained model selected from the public registry, and apply it to new data without the need for software development or configuration. As two practical use cases, we demonstrate the application of DeepInfer in prostate segmentation for targeted MRI-guided biopsy and identification of the target plane in 3D ultrasound for spinal injections.

  8. DeepInfer: open-source deep learning deployment toolkit for image-guided therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Pesteie, Mehran; Hetherington, Jorden; Behringer, Peter A.; Kapur, Tina; Wells, William M.; Rohling, Robert; Fedorov, Andriy; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2017-03-01

    Deep learning models have outperformed some of the previous state-of-the-art approaches in medical image analysis. Instead of using hand-engineered features, deep models attempt to automatically extract hierarchical representations at multiple levels of abstraction from the data. Therefore, deep models are usually considered to be more flexible and robust solutions for image analysis problems compared to conventional computer vision models. They have demonstrated significant improvements in computer-aided diagnosis and automatic medical image analysis applied to such tasks as image segmentation, classification and registration. However, deploying deep learning models often has a steep learning curve and requires detailed knowledge of various software packages. Thus, many deep models have not been integrated into the clinical research work ows causing a gap between the state-of-the-art machine learning in medical applications and evaluation in clinical research procedures. In this paper, we propose "DeepInfer" - an open-source toolkit for developing and deploying deep learning models within the 3D Slicer medical image analysis platform. Utilizing a repository of task-specific models, DeepInfer allows clinical researchers and biomedical engineers to deploy a trained model selected from the public registry, and apply it to new data without the need for software development or configuration. As two practical use cases, we demonstrate the application of DeepInfer in prostate segmentation for targeted MRI-guided biopsy and identification of the target plane in 3D ultrasound for spinal injections.

  9. Multiple source positions in time-domain optical brain imaging: a novel approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, Oliver; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Walter, Alfred; Macdonald, Rainer

    2013-06-01

    Multi-source operation in time-domain optical brain imaging often relies on the use of piezomechanical fiber switches which limit the speed when recording dynamic processes. The concept presented in this work overcomes this limitation by multiplexing on the nanosecond and microsecond time scales. In particular, the source positions were encoded by different delays on the nanosecond time scale. Multiplexing of wavelengths on the microsecond time scale (e.g. within 100 μs) was achieved by burst-mode operation of picosecond diode lasers in combination with addressing of different memory blocks in time-correlated single photon counting by means of routing inputs. This concept was implemented for 4 detectors and 5 source optodes yielding 12 measurement channels per hemisphere. In order to largely equalize the count rates for all source-detector pairs with minimal overall losses, a setup was developed that enabled the freely adjustable distribution of laser power to the various source optodes. It was based on polarization splitters and motorized broadband polarization rotators. The method was successfully demonstrated in an in vivo experiment employing two different types of motor activation of the brain.

  10. Two dimensional imaging of the virtual source of a supersonic beam: helium at 125 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, S D; Bracco, G; Kaltenbacher, T; Holst, B

    2014-01-09

    Here we present the first two-dimensional images of the virtual source of a supersonic helium expansion. The images were obtained using a free-standing Fresnel zone plate with an outermost zone width of 50 nm as imaging lens and a beam cooled to around 125 K. The nozzle diameter was 10 μm. The virtual source diameter was found to increase with stagnation pressure from 140 ± 30 μm at po = 21 bar up to 270 ± 25 μm at po = 101 bar. The experimental results are compared to a theoretical model based on the solution of the Boltzmann equation by the method of moments. The quantum mechanical cross sections used in the model have been calculated for the Lennard-Jones (LJ) and the Hurly-Moldover (HM) potentials. By using a scaling of the perpendicular temperature that parametrizes the perpendicular velocity distribution based on a continuum expansion approach, the LJ potential shows a good overall agreement with the experiment. However, at higher pressures the data points lie in between the two theoretical curves and the slope of the trend is more similar to the HM curve. Real gas corrections to enthalpy are considered but they affect the results less than the experimental errors.

  11. Anser EMT: the first open-source electromagnetic tracking platform for image-guided interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Herman Alexander; Franz, Alfred Michael; O'Donoghue, Kilian; Seitel, Alexander; Trauzettel, Fabian; Maier-Hein, Lena; Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig

    2017-06-01

    Electromagnetic tracking is the gold standard for instrument tracking and navigation in the clinical setting without line of sight. Whilst clinical platforms exist for interventional bronchoscopy and neurosurgical navigation, the limited flexibility and high costs of electromagnetic tracking (EMT) systems for research investigations mitigate against a better understanding of the technology's characterisation and limitations. The Anser project provides an open-source implementation for EMT with particular application to image-guided interventions. This work provides implementation schematics for our previously reported EMT system which relies on low-cost acquisition and demodulation techniques using both National Instruments and Arduino hardware alongside MATLAB support code. The system performance is objectively compared to other commercial tracking platforms using the Hummel assessment protocol. Positional accuracy of 1.14 mm and angular rotation accuracy of [Formula: see text] are reported. Like other EMT platforms, Anser is susceptible to tracking errors due to eddy current and ferromagnetic distortion. The system is compatible with commercially available EMT sensors as well as the Open Network Interface for image-guided therapy (OpenIGTLink) for easy communication with visualisation and medical imaging toolkits such as MITK and 3D Slicer. By providing an open-source platform for research investigations, we believe that novel and collaborative approaches can overcome the limitations of current EMT technology.

  12. The image-guided surgery toolkit IGSTK: an open source C++ software toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enquobahrie, Andinet; Cheng, Patrick; Gary, Kevin; Ibanez, Luis; Gobbi, David; Lindseth, Frank; Yaniv, Ziv; Aylward, Stephen; Jomier, Julien; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the image-guided surgery toolkit (IGSTK). IGSTK is an open source C++ software library that provides the basic components needed to develop image-guided surgery applications. It is intended for fast prototyping and development of image-guided surgery applications. The toolkit was developed through a collaboration between academic and industry partners. Because IGSTK was designed for safety-critical applications, the development team has adopted lightweight software processes that emphasizes safety and robustness while, at the same time, supporting geographically separated developers. A software process that is philosophically similar to agile software methods was adopted emphasizing iterative, incremental, and test-driven development principles. The guiding principle in the architecture design of IGSTK is patient safety. The IGSTK team implemented a component-based architecture and used state machine software design methodologies to improve the reliability and safety of the components. Every IGSTK component has a well-defined set of features that are governed by state machines. The state machine ensures that the component is always in a valid state and that all state transitions are valid and meaningful. Realizing that the continued success and viability of an open source toolkit depends on a strong user community, the IGSTK team is following several key strategies to build an active user community. These include maintaining a users and developers' mailing list, providing documentation (application programming interface reference document and book), presenting demonstration applications, and delivering tutorial sessions at relevant scientific conferences.

  13. Open Source High Content Analysis Utilizing Automated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sean C.; Alibhai, Dominic; West, Lucien; Kumar, Sunil; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Garcia, Edwin; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Thinon, Emmanuelle; da Paola, Vincenzo; Murray, Edward J.; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A. A.; Tate, Edward W.; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.

    2017-01-01

    We present an open source high content analysis instrument utilizing automated fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for assaying protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based readouts of fixed or live cells in multiwell plates. This provides a means to screen for cell signaling processes read out using intramolecular FRET biosensors or intermolecular FRET of protein interactions such as oligomerization or heterodimerization, which can be used to identify binding partners. We describe here the functionality of this automated multiwell plate FLIM instrumentation and present exemplar data from our studies of HIV Gag protein oligomerization and a time course of a FRET biosensor in live cells. A detailed description of the practical implementation is then provided with reference to a list of hardware components and a description of the open source data acquisition software written in µManager. The application of FLIMfit, an open source MATLAB-based client for the OMERO platform, to analyze arrays of multiwell plate FLIM data is also presented. The protocols for imaging fixed and live cells are outlined and a demonstration of an automated multiwell plate FLIM experiment using cells expressing fluorescent protein-based FRET constructs is presented. This is complemented by a walk-through of the data analysis for this specific FLIM FRET data set. PMID:28190060

  14. Open Source High Content Analysis Utilizing Automated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görlitz, Frederik; Kelly, Douglas J; Warren, Sean C; Alibhai, Dominic; West, Lucien; Kumar, Sunil; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Garcia, Edwin; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Serwa, Remigiusz A; Thinon, Emmanuelle; da Paola, Vincenzo; Murray, Edward J; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A A; Tate, Edward W; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M W

    2017-01-18

    We present an open source high content analysis instrument utilizing automated fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for assaying protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based readouts of fixed or live cells in multiwell plates. This provides a means to screen for cell signaling processes read out using intramolecular FRET biosensors or intermolecular FRET of protein interactions such as oligomerization or heterodimerization, which can be used to identify binding partners. We describe here the functionality of this automated multiwell plate FLIM instrumentation and present exemplar data from our studies of HIV Gag protein oligomerization and a time course of a FRET biosensor in live cells. A detailed description of the practical implementation is then provided with reference to a list of hardware components and a description of the open source data acquisition software written in µManager. The application of FLIMfit, an open source MATLAB-based client for the OMERO platform, to analyze arrays of multiwell plate FLIM data is also presented. The protocols for imaging fixed and live cells are outlined and a demonstration of an automated multiwell plate FLIM experiment using cells expressing fluorescent protein-based FRET constructs is presented. This is complemented by a walk-through of the data analysis for this specific FLIM FRET data set.

  15. Hydrogeophysical imaging of deposit heterogeneity and groundwater chemistry changes during DNAPL source zone bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J. E.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Wealthall, G. P.; Loke, M. H.; Dearden, R.; Wilson, R.; Allen, D.; Ogilvy, R. D.

    2010-10-01

    Robust characterization and monitoring of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones is essential for designing effective remediation strategies, and for assessing the efficacy of treatment. In this study high-resolution cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was evaluated as a means of monitoring a field-scale in-situ bioremediation experiment, in which emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) electron donor was injected into a trichloroethene source zone. Baseline ERT scans delineated the geometry of the interface between the contaminated alluvial aquifer and the underlying mudstone bedrock, and also the extent of drilling-induced physical heterogeneity. Time-lapse ERT images revealed major preferential flow pathways in the source and plume zones, which were corroborated by multiple lines of evidence, including geochemical monitoring and hydraulic testing using high density multilevel sampler arrays within the geophysical imaging planes. These pathways were shown to control the spatial distribution of the injected EVO, and a bicarbonate buffer introduced into the cell for pH control. Resistivity signatures were observed within the preferential flow pathways that were consistent with elevated chloride levels, providing tentative evidence from ERT of the biodegradation of chlorinated solvents.

  16. Crystal and source characterization for the Crystal Backlighter Imager capability at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauland, C. M.; Hall, G. N.; Buscho, J. G.; Hibbard, R.; McCarville, T. J.; Lowe-Webb, R.; Ayers, S. L.; Kalantar, D.; Kohut, T.; Kemp, G. E.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Landen, O. L.; Brewster, T. N.; Piston, K.

    2017-10-01

    The Crystal Backlighter Imager (CBI) is a very narrow bandwidth ( 10 eV) x-ray radiography system that uses Bragg reflection from a spherically-curved crystal at near normal incidence. This diagnostic has the capability to image late in an ICF implosion because it only requires the brightness of the backlighter to be larger than the capsule self-emission in that narrow bandwidth. While the limited bandwidth is advantageous for this reason, it also requires that the effective energy of the backlighter atomic line is known to 1 eV accuracy for proper crystal alignment. Any Doppler shift in the line energy must be understood for the imaging system to work. The work presented details characterization experiments done at the Jupiter Laser Facility with a Si (8 6 2) crystal that will be used with a Selenium backlighter in the NIF CBI diagnostic. We used the spherically-bent crystals to image a small ( 200 µm) He α source generated by the Janus laser on a Se foil. Scanning Bragg angles over multiple shots allowed us to map out the spectral line intensity distribution for optimal alignment in NIF. A subsequent Doppler shift measurement using CBI on NIF will also be presented with complementary HYDRA modeling for both experiments. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by General Atomics under Contract DE-NA0001808.

  17. Point Light Source Position Estimation From RGB-D Images by Learning Surface Attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoglu, Sezer; Liu, Yang; Gevers, Theo; Smeulders, Arnold W M

    2017-11-01

    Light source position (LSP) estimation is a difficult yet an important problem in computer vision. A common approach for estimating the LSP assumes Lambert's law. However, in real-world scenes, Lambert's law does not hold for all different types of surfaces. Instead of assuming all that surfaces follow Lambert's law, our approach classifies image surface segments based on their photometric and geometric surface attributes (i.e. glossy, matte, curved, and so on) and assigns weights to image surface segments based on their suitability for LSP estimation. In addition, we propose the use of the estimated camera pose to globally constrain LSP for RGB-D video sequences. Experiments on Boom and a newly collected RGB-D video data sets show that the state-of-the-art methods are outperformed by the proposed method. The results demonstrate that weighting image surface segments based on their attributes outperform the state-of-the-art methods in which the image surface segments are considered to equally contribute. In particular, by using the proposed surface weighting, the angular error for LSP estimation is reduced from 12.6° to 8.2° and 24.6° to 4.8° for Boom and RGB-D video data sets, respectively. Moreover, using the camera pose to globally constrain LSP provides higher accuracy (4.8°) compared with using single frames (8.5°).

  18. OPEN SOURCE IMAGE-PROCESSING TOOLS FOR LOW-COST UAV-BASED LANDSLIDE INVESTIGATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Niethammer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the application of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs has become more common and the availability of lightweight digital cameras has enabled UAV-systems to represent affordable and practical remote sensing platforms, allowing flexible and high- resolution remote sensing investigations. In the course of numerous UAV-based remote sensing campaigns significant numbers of airborne photographs of two different landslides have been acquired. These images were used for ortho-mosaic and digital terrain model (DTM generation, thus allowing for high-resolution landslide monitoring. Several new open source image- and DTM- processing tools are now providing a complete remote sensing working cycle with the use of no commercial hard- or software.

  19. Design and evaluation of an imaging spectrophotometer incorporating a uniform light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S D; Brown, R B; Crowe, T G

    2012-03-01

    Accounting for light that is diffusely scattered from a surface is one of the practical challenges in reflectance measurement. Integrating spheres are commonly used for this purpose in point measurements of reflectance and transmittance. This solution is not directly applicable to a spectral imaging application for which diffuse reflectance measurements are desired. In this paper, an imaging spectrophotometer design is presented that employs a uniform light source to provide diffuse illumination. This creates the inverse measurement geometry to the directional illumination/diffuse reflectance mode typically used for point measurements. The final system had a spectral range between 400 and 1000 nm with a 5.2 nm resolution, a field of view of approximately 0.5 m by 0.5 m, and millimeter spatial resolution. Testing results indicate illumination uniformity typically exceeding 95% and reflectance precision better than 1.7%.

  20. Programmable Spectral Source and Design Tool for 3D Imaging Using Complementary Bandpass Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahinian, Hrayr Karnig (Inventor); Shearn, Michael J. (Inventor); Bae, Youngsam (Inventor); Korniski, Ronald J. (Inventor); Fritz, Eric W. (Inventor); Ream, Allen (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An endoscopic illumination system for illuminating a subject for stereoscopic image capture, includes a light source which outputs light; a first complementary multiband bandpass filter (CMBF) and a second CMBF, the first and second CMBFs being situated in first and second light paths, respectively, where the first CMBF and the second CMBF filter the light incident thereupon to output filtered light; and a camera which captures video images of the subject and generates corresponding video information, the camera receiving light reflected from the subject and passing through a pupil CMBF pair and a detection lens. The pupil CMBF includes a first pupil CMBF and a second pupil CMBF, the first pupil CMBF being identical to the first CMBF and the second pupil CMBF being identical to the second CMBF, and the detection lens includes one unpartitioned section that covers both the first pupil CMBF and the second pupil CMBF.

  1. OnEarth: An Open Source Solution for Efficiently Serving High-Resolution Mapped Image Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C. K.; Plesea, L.; Hall, J. R.; Roberts, J. T.; Cechini, M. F.; Schmaltz, J. E.; Alarcon, C.; Huang, T.; McGann, J. M.; Chang, G.; Boller, R. A.; Ilavajhala, S.; Murphy, K. J.; Bingham, A. W.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation introduces OnEarth, a server side software package originally developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), that facilitates network-based, minimum-latency geolocated image access independent of image size or spatial resolution. The key component in this package is the Meta Raster Format (MRF), a specialized raster file extension to the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) consisting of an internal indexed pyramid of image tiles. Imagery to be served is converted to the MRF format and made accessible online via an expandable set of server modules handling requests in several common protocols, including the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) compliant Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) as well as Tiled WMS and Keyhole Markup Language (KML). OnEarth has recently transitioned to open source status and is maintained and actively developed as part of GIBS (Global Imagery Browse Services), a collaborative project between JPL and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The primary function of GIBS is to enhance and streamline the data discovery process and to support near real-time (NRT) applications via the expeditious ingestion and serving of full-resolution imagery representing science products from across the NASA Earth Science spectrum. Open source software solutions are leveraged where possible in order to utilize existing available technologies, reduce development time, and enlist wider community participation. We will discuss some of the factors and decision points in transitioning OnEarth to a suitable open source paradigm, including repository and licensing agreement decision points, institutional hurdles, and perceived benefits. We will also provide examples illustrating how OnEarth is integrated within GIBS and other applications.

  2. Evaluating laser-driven Bremsstrahlung radiation sources for imaging and analysis of nuclear waste packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Christopher P., E-mail: cj0810@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Brenner, Ceri M. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Stitt, Camilla A. [Interface Analysis Centre, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Armstrong, Chris; Rusby, Dean R. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Mirfayzi, Seyed R. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Wilson, Lucy A. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Alejo, Aarón; Ahmed, Hamad [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Allott, Ric [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Butler, Nicholas M.H. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Clarke, Robert J.; Haddock, David; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Higginson, Adam [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Murphy, Christopher [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Notley, Margaret [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Paraskevoulakos, Charilaos [Interface Analysis Centre, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Jowsey, John [Ground Floor North B582, Sellafield Ltd, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • X-ray generation was achieved via laser interaction with a tantalum thin foil target. • Picosecond X-ray pulse from a sub-mm spot generated high resolution images. • MeV X-ray emission is possible, permitting analysis of full scale waste containers. • In parallel neutron emission of 10{sup 7}–10{sup 9} neutrons per steradian per pulse was attained. • Development of a 10 Hz diode pumped laser system for waste monitoring is envisioned. - Abstract: A small scale sample nuclear waste package, consisting of a 28 mm diameter uranium penny encased in grout, was imaged by absorption contrast radiography using a single pulse exposure from an X-ray source driven by a high-power laser. The Vulcan laser was used to deliver a focused pulse of photons to a tantalum foil, in order to generate a bright burst of highly penetrating X-rays (with energy >500 keV), with a source size of <0.5 mm. BAS-TR and BAS-SR image plates were used for image capture, alongside a newly developed Thalium doped Caesium Iodide scintillator-based detector coupled to CCD chips. The uranium penny was clearly resolved to sub-mm accuracy over a 30 cm{sup 2} scan area from a single shot acquisition. In addition, neutron generation was demonstrated in situ with the X-ray beam, with a single shot, thus demonstrating the potential for multi-modal criticality testing of waste materials. This feasibility study successfully demonstrated non-destructive radiography of encapsulated, high density, nuclear material. With recent developments of high-power laser systems, to 10 Hz operation, a laser-driven multi-modal beamline for waste monitoring applications is envisioned.

  3. Open Source software and social networks: disruptive alternatives for medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman; Rosset, Antoine; Heuberger, Joris

    2011-05-01

    In recent decades several major changes in computer and communication technology have pushed the limits of imaging informatics and PACS beyond the traditional system architecture providing new perspectives and innovative approach to a traditionally conservative medical community. Disruptive technologies such as the world-wide-web, wireless networking, Open Source software and recent emergence of cyber communities and social networks have imposed an accelerated pace and major quantum leaps in the progress of computer and technology infrastructure applicable to medical imaging applications. This paper reviews the impact and potential benefits of two major trends in consumer market software development and how they will influence the future of medical imaging informatics. Open Source software is emerging as an attractive and cost effective alternative to traditional commercial software developments and collaborative social networks provide a new model of communication that is better suited to the needs of the medical community. Evidence shows that successful Open Source software tools have penetrated the medical market and have proven to be more robust and cost effective than their commercial counterparts. Developed by developers that are themselves part of the user community, these tools are usually better adapted to the user's need and are more robust than traditional software programs being developed and tested by a large number of contributing users. This context allows a much faster and more appropriate development and evolution of the software platforms. Similarly, communication technology has opened up to the general public in a way that has changed the social behavior and habits adding a new dimension to the way people communicate and interact with each other. The new paradigms have also slowly penetrated the professional market and ultimately the medical community. Secure social networks allowing groups of people to easily communicate and exchange information

  4. Auralisations with loudspeaker arrays from a phased combination of the image source method and acoustical radiosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy

    2017-01-01

    In order to create a simulation tool that is well-suited for small rooms with low diffusion and highly absorbing ceilings, a new room acoustic simulation tool has been developed that combines a phased version of the image source with acoustical radiosity and that considers the angle dependence...... with PARISM are described and compared to implementations of auralisations with another geometrical acoustic simulation tool, i.e. ODEON and the LoRA toolbox that applies Ambisonics to ODEON simulations. In opposition to the LoRA toolbox, higher order Ambisonics are also applied to the late part of the PARISM...

  5. Defining the Velocity Field of Root Cells in Arabidopsis Seedlings Using Open Source Image Processing Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Amy E.; Higgins, Brad R.; Guy, Tracy; Durham Brooks, Tessa; Wentworth, Christopher D.

    2011-11-01

    The velocity field for cells in a growing root is a function of a cell's position with respect to the root apex and time. For many species of plant this function has the same general sigmoid shape described by a modified logistics curve. In this investigation we obtain microscopic images of Arabidopsis seedling roots over a 20 minute period of time, measure the velocity field for root cells using an application developed with the open source mathematics application Octave, and test whether the velocity field can be described by the modified logistics function. We find support for describing the velocity field by the modified logistics function.

  6. A combination of the acoustic radiosity and the image source method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutsouris, Georgios I.; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2012-01-01

    A combined model for room acoustic predictions is developed, aiming to treat both diffuse and specular reflections in a unified way. Two established methods are incorporated: acoustical radiosity, accounting for the diffuse part, and the image source method, accounting for the specular part....... The model is based on conservation of acoustical energy. Losses are taken into account by the energy absorption coefficient, and the diffuse reflections are controlled via the scattering coefficient, which defines the portion of energy that has been diffusely reflected. The way the model is formulated...

  7. Comparing a phased combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method with other simulation tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2015-01-01

    A phased combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method (PARISM) has been developed in order to be able to model both specular and diffuse reflections with angle-dependent and complex-valued acoustical descriptions of the surfaces. It is of great interest to model both specular...... and diffuse reflections when simulating the acoustics of small rooms with non-diffuse sound fields, since scattering from walls add to the diffuseness in the room. This room type is often seen in class rooms and offices, as they are often small rectangular rooms with most of the absorption placed...

  8. Evaluating laser-driven Bremsstrahlung radiation sources for imaging and analysis of nuclear waste packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher P; Brenner, Ceri M; Stitt, Camilla A; Armstrong, Chris; Rusby, Dean R; Mirfayzi, Seyed R; Wilson, Lucy A; Alejo, Aarón; Ahmed, Hamad; Allott, Ric; Butler, Nicholas M H; Clarke, Robert J; Haddock, David; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Higginson, Adam; Murphy, Christopher; Notley, Margaret; Paraskevoulakos, Charilaos; Jowsey, John; McKenna, Paul; Neely, David; Kar, Satya; Scott, Thomas B

    2016-11-15

    A small scale sample nuclear waste package, consisting of a 28mm diameter uranium penny encased in grout, was imaged by absorption contrast radiography using a single pulse exposure from an X-ray source driven by a high-power laser. The Vulcan laser was used to deliver a focused pulse of photons to a tantalum foil, in order to generate a bright burst of highly penetrating X-rays (with energy >500keV), with a source size of waste materials. This feasibility study successfully demonstrated non-destructive radiography of encapsulated, high density, nuclear material. With recent developments of high-power laser systems, to 10Hz operation, a laser-driven multi-modal beamline for waste monitoring applications is envisioned. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Imaging the Sources and Full Extent of the Sodium Tail of the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Wilson, Jody; Mendillo, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Observations of sodium emission from Mercury can be used to describe the spatial and temporal patterns of sources and sinks in the planet s surface-boundary-exosphere. We report on new data sets that provide the highest spatial resolution of source regions at polar latitudes, as well as the extraordinary length of a tail of escaping Na atoms. The tail s extent of approx.1.5 degrees (nearly 1400 Mercury radii) is driven by radiation pressure effects upon Na atoms sputtered from the surface in the previous approx.5 hours. Wide-angle filtered-imaging instruments are thus capable of studying the time history of sputtering processes of sodium and other species at Mercury from ground-based observatories in concert with upcoming satellite missions to the planet. Plasma tails produced by photo-ionization of Na and other gases in Mercury s neutral tails may be observable by in-situ instruments.

  10. MULTI-SOURCE HIERARCHICAL CONDITIONAL RANDOM FIELD MODEL FOR FEATURE FUSION OF REMOTE SENSING IMAGES AND LIDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Feature fusion of remote sensing images and LiDAR points cloud data, which have strong complementarity, can effectively play the advantages of multi-class features to provide more reliable information support for the remote sensing applications, such as object classification and recognition. In this paper, we introduce a novel multi-source hierarchical conditional random field (MSHCRF model to fuse features extracted from remote sensing images and LiDAR data for image classification. Firstly, typical features are selected to obtain the interest regions from multi-source data, then MSHCRF model is constructed to exploit up the features, category compatibility of images and the category consistency of multi-source data based on the regions, and the outputs of the model represents the optimal results of the image classification. Competitive results demonstrate the precision and robustness of the proposed method.

  11. Beamlines of the biomedical imaging and therapy facility at the Canadian light source – part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wysokinski, Tomasz W., E-mail: bmit@lightsource.ca [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Chapman, Dean [Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Adams, Gregg [Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Renier, Michel [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Suortti, Pekka [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland); Thomlinson, William [Department of Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-03-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility provides synchrotron-specific imaging and radiation therapy capabilities [1–4]. We describe here the Insertion Device (ID) beamline 05ID-2 with the beam terminated in the SOE-1 (Secondary Optical Enclosure) experimental hutch. This endstation is designed for imaging and therapy research primarily in animals ranging in size from mice to humans to horses, as well as tissue specimens including plants. Core research programs include human and animal reproduction, cancer imaging and therapy, spinal cord injury and repair, cardiovascular and lung imaging and disease, bone and cartilage growth and deterioration, mammography, developmental biology, gene expression research as well as the introduction of new imaging methods. The source for the ID beamline is a multi-pole superconducting 4.3 T wiggler [5]. The high field gives a critical energy over 20 keV. The high critical energy presents shielding challenges and great care must be taken to assess shielding requirements [6–9]. The optics in the POE-1 and POE-3 hutches [4,10] prepare a monochromatic beam that is 22 cm wide in the last experimental hutch SOE-1. The double crystal bent-Laue or Bragg monochromator, or the single-crystal K-edge subtraction (KES) monochromator provide an energy range appropriate for imaging studies in animals (20–100+ keV). SOE-1 (excluding the basement structure 4 m below the experimental floor) is 6 m wide, 5 m tall and 10 m long with a removable back wall to accommodate installation and removal of the Large Animal Positioning System (LAPS) capable of positioning and manipulating animals as large as a horse [11]. This end-station also includes a unique detector positioner with a vertical travel range of 4.9 m which is required for the KES imaging angle range of +12.3° to –7.3°. The detector positioner also includes moveable shielding integrated with the safety shutters. An update on the status of the other two end-stations at BMIT

  12. Beamlines of the biomedical imaging and therapy facility at the Canadian light source - part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokinski, Tomasz W.; Chapman, Dean; Adams, Gregg; Renier, Michel; Suortti, Pekka; Thomlinson, William

    2015-03-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility provides synchrotron-specific imaging and radiation therapy capabilities [1-4]. We describe here the Insertion Device (ID) beamline 05ID-2 with the beam terminated in the SOE-1 (Secondary Optical Enclosure) experimental hutch. This endstation is designed for imaging and therapy research primarily in animals ranging in size from mice to humans to horses, as well as tissue specimens including plants. Core research programs include human and animal reproduction, cancer imaging and therapy, spinal cord injury and repair, cardiovascular and lung imaging and disease, bone and cartilage growth and deterioration, mammography, developmental biology, gene expression research as well as the introduction of new imaging methods. The source for the ID beamline is a multi-pole superconducting 4.3 T wiggler [5]. The high field gives a critical energy over 20 keV. The high critical energy presents shielding challenges and great care must be taken to assess shielding requirements [6-9]. The optics in the POE-1 and POE-3 hutches [4,10] prepare a monochromatic beam that is 22 cm wide in the last experimental hutch SOE-1. The double crystal bent-Laue or Bragg monochromator, or the single-crystal K-edge subtraction (KES) monochromator provide an energy range appropriate for imaging studies in animals (20-100+ keV). SOE-1 (excluding the basement structure 4 m below the experimental floor) is 6 m wide, 5 m tall and 10 m long with a removable back wall to accommodate installation and removal of the Large Animal Positioning System (LAPS) capable of positioning and manipulating animals as large as a horse [11]. This end-station also includes a unique detector positioner with a vertical travel range of 4.9 m which is required for the KES imaging angle range of +12.3° to -7.3°. The detector positioner also includes moveable shielding integrated with the safety shutters. An update on the status of the other two end-stations at BMIT, described

  13. Electrical source imaging of interictal spikes using multiple sparse volumetric priors for presurgical epileptogenic focus localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Strobbe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical source imaging of interictal spikes observed in EEG recordings of patients with refractory epilepsy provides useful information to localize the epileptogenic focus during the presurgical evaluation. However, the selection of the time points or time epochs of the spikes in order to estimate the origin of the activity remains a challenge. In this study, we consider a Bayesian EEG source imaging technique for distributed sources, i.e. the multiple volumetric sparse priors (MSVP approach. The approach allows to estimate the time courses of the intensity of the sources corresponding with a specific time epoch of the spike. Based on presurgical averaged interictal spikes in six patients who were successfully treated with surgery, we estimated the time courses of the source intensities for three different time epochs: (i an epoch starting 50 ms before the spike peak and ending at 50% of the spike peak during the rising phase of the spike, (ii an epoch starting 50 ms before the spike peak and ending at the spike peak and (iii an epoch containing the full spike time period starting 50 ms before the spike peak and ending 230 ms after the spike peak. To identify the primary source of the spike activity, the source with the maximum energy from 50 ms before the spike peak till 50% of the spike peak was subsequently selected for each of the time windows. For comparison, the activity at the spike peaks and at 50% of the peaks was localized using the LORETA inversion technique and an ECD approach. Both patient-specific spherical forward models and patient-specific 5-layered finite difference models were considered to evaluate the influence of the forward model. Based on the resected zones in each of the patients, extracted from post-operative MR images, we compared the distances to the resection border of the estimated activity. Using the spherical models, the distances to the resection border for the MSVP approach and each of the different time

  14. Design, development and first experiments on the X-ray imaging beamline at Indus-2 synchrotron source RRCAT, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, A K; Singh, B; Kashyap, Y S; Shukla, M; Sarkar, P S; Sinha, Amar

    2015-11-01

    A full-field hard X-ray imaging beamline (BL-4) was designed, developed, installed and commissioned recently at the Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source at RRCAT, Indore, India. The bending-magnet beamline is operated in monochromatic and white beam mode. A variety of imaging techniques are implemented such as high-resolution radiography, propagation- and analyzer-based phase contrast imaging, real-time imaging, absorption and phase contrast tomography etc. First experiments on propagation-based phase contrast imaging and micro-tomography are reported.

  15. Imaging of SO2 emissions from anthropogenic sources as part of AROMAT campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenot, H. H.; Merlaud, A.; Meier, A.; Ruhtz, T.; Van Roozendael, M.; Stebel, K.; Constantin, D.; Belegante, L.; Dekemper, E.; Theys, N.; Campion, R.; Schuettemeyer, D.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents field campaign measurements of SO2 emissions from pollution source in Romania. Three types of instruments (SO2 camera, whisk and push broom imager) proceeded ground-based and airborne data acquisition as part of the AROMAT ESA project (monitoring of SO2 plume from a large thermoelectric plant). The SO2 camera used is an imaging system composed of two UV cameras (synchronised in space and time) allowing fast acquisitions of intensity. Each camera is equipped with the same lens and a specific narrow band-pass filter (one at the wavelength at which SO2 absorbs and one at an off-band wavelength). The combination of two UV cameras provides a 2D image of the integrated content of SO2. The Small Whisk broom Imager for trace gases monitoriNG (SWING) used in this study and developed at the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA), is based on a compact ultra-violet visible spectrometer and a scanning mirror. The Airborne imaging instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution (AirMAP) constructed at the Institute of Environmental Physics of the University of Bremen (IUP), performed SO2 measurements in the UV-visible spectral range. Both whisk and push broom scanner use the DOAS technique, that is based on the relationship between the quantity of light absorbed and the number of SO2 molecules in the light path. SWING and AirMAP instruments provide scans of SO2 column density. Quantification of 2D field contents and fluxes of anthropogenic SO2 emissions from Turceni power station (Romania) are shown. Preparatory results from data acquisition in the harbour of Antwerp (monitoring of SO2 emissions from refinery and chemical industry) are also presented.

  16. [Imaging Blood Flow and Pulsation of Retinal Vessels with Full-Field Swept-Source OCT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahr, H; Hillmann, D; Hain, C; Pfäffle, C; Sudkamp, H; Franke, G; Koch, P; Hüttmann, G

    2016-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses interference to image the retina with high axial resolution. In the last 25 years, new technologies have permitted a steady increase in imaging speed, which made it possible to enlarge the imaged field and to avoid motion artefacts. The speed and precision of retinal imaging is now limited by photodamage of the retina caused by the focused OCT beam and by the speed of the scanning mechanics. Full-field swept-source (FF-SS)-OCT decreases irradiance on the retina and dispenses moving parts by using a camera to acquire the full volume of the retina in parallel. Here we show that FF-SS-OCT is rapid and precise enough to image pulsation in the retina induced by the heart beat. Series of OCT volumes 1.8 × 0.7 mm wide and 1.8 mm deep were recorded in young volunteers over a few cycles of the heart beat. Morphology of the retinal vessels, blood flow and tissue motion as caused by vessel pulsation were calculated from the OCT data. FF-SS-OCT was able to visualise the main structures of the neuronal retina, including vessels and small capillaries and without any motion artefacts. Information on three different dynamic processes was obtained from only one recorded series of OCT volumes: pulsation of blood flow and blood pressure in retinal vessels as well as pulsation of the choroid. Delays between arterial and venous pulse and delay between pulsation in retinal and choroidal vessels were calculated. With a time resolution of 0.5 ms, FF-SS-OCT is able to visualise previously unmeasurably fast changes in the retina, including the propagation of pulse waves. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. The Medical Imaging Interaction Toolkit: challenges and advances : 10 years of open-source development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolden, Marco; Zelzer, Sascha; Seitel, Alexander; Wald, Diana; Müller, Michael; Franz, Alfred M; Maleike, Daniel; Fangerau, Markus; Baumhauer, Matthias; Maier-Hein, Lena; Maier-Hein, Klaus H; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Wolf, Ivo

    2013-07-01

    The Medical Imaging Interaction Toolkit (MITK) has been available as open-source software for almost 10 years now. In this period the requirements of software systems in the medical image processing domain have become increasingly complex. The aim of this paper is to show how MITK evolved into a software system that is able to cover all steps of a clinical workflow including data retrieval, image analysis, diagnosis, treatment planning, intervention support, and treatment control. MITK provides modularization and extensibility on different levels. In addition to the original toolkit, a module system, micro services for small, system-wide features, a service-oriented architecture based on the Open Services Gateway initiative (OSGi) standard, and an extensible and configurable application framework allow MITK to be used, extended and deployed as needed. A refined software process was implemented to deliver high-quality software, ease the fulfillment of regulatory requirements, and enable teamwork in mixed-competence teams. MITK has been applied by a worldwide community and integrated into a variety of solutions, either at the toolkit level or as an application framework with custom extensions. The MITK Workbench has been released as a highly extensible and customizable end-user application. Optional support for tool tracking, image-guided therapy, diffusion imaging as well as various external packages (e.g. CTK, DCMTK, OpenCV, SOFA, Python) is available. MITK has also been used in several FDA/CE-certified applications, which demonstrates the high-quality software and rigorous development process. MITK provides a versatile platform with a high degree of modularization and interoperability and is well suited to meet the challenging tasks of today's and tomorrow's clinically motivated research.

  18. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  19. Exploring three faint source detections methods for aperture synthesis radio images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peracaula, M.; Torrent, A.; Masias, M.; Lladó, X.; Freixenet, J.; Martí, J.; Sánchez-Sutil, J. R.; Muñoz-Arjonilla, A. J.; Paredes, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Wide-field radio interferometric images often contain a large population of faint compact sources. Due to their low intensity/noise ratio, these objects can be easily missed by automated detection methods, which have been classically based on thresholding techniques after local noise estimation. The aim of this paper is to present and analyse the performance of several alternative or complementary techniques to thresholding. We compare three different algorithms to increase the detection rate of faint objects. The first technique consists of combining wavelet decomposition with local thresholding. The second technique is based on the structural behaviour of the neighbourhood of each pixel. Finally, the third algorithm uses local features extracted from a bank of filters and a boosting classifier to perform the detections. The methods' performances are evaluated using simulations and radio mosaics from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We show that the new methods perform better than well-known state of the art methods such as SEXTRACTOR, SAD and DUCHAMP at detecting faint sources of radio interferometric images.

  20. The effect of graphite sources on preparation of Photoluminescent graphene nano-sheets for biomedical imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Moasses Ghafary

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Graphene as two-dimensional (2D materials have attracted wide attention in different fields such as biomedical imaging. Ultra-small graphene nano-sheets (UGNSs have been designated as low dimensional graphene sheets with lateral dimensions less than few nanometres (≤ 500 nm in one, two or few layers. Several studies have proven that the process of acidic exfoliation and oxidation is one of the most effective methods to synthesize low dimensional graphene sheets. The band gap of graphene can be changed through changing the reaction temperature resulting in different photoluminescent colors. The aim of our study is synthesis of multi-color photoluminescent UGNSs for biomedical imaging.Materials and Methods: Two different UGNSs were synthesized from two different graphite sources via acidic treatment with a mixture of sulfuric and nitric acids. The prepared UGNSs were characterized by UV-Vis, photoluminescent, Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The photoluminescence colors of the prepared UGNSs were detected under excitation wavelength of 470 nm using optical filters.Results: The results showed that the graphite primary source is a determinant factor in the synthesis of different UGNSs. While altering reaction temperature didn't significantly change the emission wavelengths; however it affected their photoluminescent emission intensity.Conclusion: Overall, nontoxic UGNSs synthesized by simple acidic treatment of graphite with different photoluminescent colors (green, yellow and red can be a promising fluorescent probe for bioimaging.

  1. Improvement of dem Generation from Aster Images Using Satellite Jitter Estimation and Open Source Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girod, L.; Nuth, C.; Kääb, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) system embarked on the Terra (EOS AM-1) satellite has been a source of stereoscopic images covering the whole globe at a 15m resolution at a consistent quality for over 15 years. The potential of this data in terms of geomorphological analysis and change detection in three dimensions is unrivaled and needs to be exploited. However, the quality of the DEMs and ortho-images currently delivered by NASA (ASTER DMO products) is often of insufficient quality for a number of applications such as mountain glacier mass balance. For this study, the use of Ground Control Points (GCPs) or of other ground truth was rejected due to the global "big data" type of processing that we hope to perform on the ASTER archive. We have therefore developed a tool to compute Rational Polynomial Coefficient (RPC) models from the ASTER metadata and a method improving the quality of the matching by identifying and correcting jitter induced cross-track parallax errors. Our method outputs more accurate DEMs with less unmatched areas and reduced overall noise. The algorithms were implemented in the open source photogrammetric library and software suite MicMac.

  2. Near infrared spectral imaging of explosives using a tunable laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klunder, G L; Margalith, E; Nguyen, L K

    2010-03-26

    Diffuse reflectance near infrared hyperspectral imaging is an important analytical tool for a wide variety of industries, including agriculture consumer products, chemical and pharmaceutical development and production. Using this technique as a method for the standoff detection of explosive particles is presented and discussed. The detection of the particles is based on the diffuse reflectance of light from the particle in the near infrared wavelength range where CH, NH, OH vibrational overtones and combination bands are prominent. The imaging system is a NIR focal plane array camera with a tunable OPO/laser system as the illumination source. The OPO is programmed to scan over a wide spectral range in the NIR and the camera is synchronized to record the light reflected from the target for each wavelength. The spectral resolution of this system is significantly higher than that of hyperspectral systems that incorporate filters or dispersive elements. The data acquisition is very fast and the entire hyperspectral cube can be collected in seconds. A comparison of data collected with the OPO system to data obtained with a broadband light source with LCTF filters is presented.

  3. An Adaptive Source-Channel Coding with Feedback for Progressive Transmission of Medical Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Lung Lo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel adaptive source-channel coding with feedback for progressive transmission of medical images is proposed here. In the source coding part, the transmission starts from the region of interest (RoI. The parity length in the channel code varies with respect to both the proximity of the image subblock to the RoI and the channel noise, which is iteratively estimated in the receiver. The overall transmitted data can be controlled by the user (clinician. In the case of medical data transmission, it is vital to keep the distortion level under control as in most of the cases certain clinically important regions have to be transmitted without any visible error. The proposed system significantly reduces the transmission time and error. Moreover, the system is very user friendly since the selection of the RoI, its size, overall code rate, and a number of test features such as noise level can be set by the users in both ends. A MATLAB-based TCP/IP connection has been established to demonstrate the proposed interactive and adaptive progressive transmission system. The proposed system is simulated for both binary symmetric channel (BSC and Rayleigh channel. The experimental results verify the effectiveness of the design.

  4. Characterization of sildenafil citrate tablets of different sources by near infrared chemical imaging and chemometric tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Guilherme P; Lozano, Valeria A; Rocha, Werickson F C; Romão, Wanderson; Ortiz, Rafael S; Poppi, Ronei J

    2013-11-01

    The chemical imaging technique by near infrared spectroscopy was applied for characterization of formulations in tablets of sildenafil citrate of six different sources. Five formulations were provided by Brazilian Federal Police and correspond to several trademarks of prohibited marketing and one was an authentic sample of Viagra. In a first step of the study, multivariate curve resolution was properly chosen for the estimation of the distribution map of concentration of the active ingredient in tablets of different sources, where the chemical composition of all excipients constituents was not truly known. In such cases, it is very difficult to establish an appropriate calibration technique, so that only the information of sildenafil is considered independently of the excipients. This determination was possible only by reaching the second-order advantage, where the analyte quantification can be performed in the presence of unknown interferences. In a second step, the normalized histograms of images from active ingredient were grouped according to their similarities by hierarchical cluster analysis. Finally it was possible to recognize the patterns of distribution maps of concentration of sildenafil citrate, distinguishing the true formulation of Viagra. This concept can be used to improve the knowledge of industrial products and processes, as well as, for characterization of counterfeit drugs. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Detection of Point Sources on Two-Dimensional Images Based on Peaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Barreiro

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the detection of point sources in two-dimensional astronomical images. The detection scheme we propose is based on peak statistics. We discuss the example of the detection of far galaxies in cosmic microwave background experiments throughout the paper, although the method we present is totally general and can be used in many other fields of data analysis. We consider sources with a Gaussian profile—that is, a fair approximation of the profile of a point source convolved with the detector beam in microwave experiments—on a background modeled by a homogeneous and isotropic Gaussian random field characterized by a scale-free power spectrum. Point sources are enhanced with respect to the background by means of linear filters. After filtering, we identify local maxima and apply our detection scheme, a Neyman-Pearson detector that defines our region of acceptance based on the a priori pdf of the sources and the ratio of number densities. We study the different performances of some linear filters that have been used in this context in the literature: the Mexican hat wavelet, the matched filter, and the scale-adaptive filter. We consider as well an extension to two dimensions of the biparametric scale-adaptive filter (BSAF. The BSAF depends on two parameters which are determined by maximizing the number density of real detections while fixing the number density of spurious detections. For our detection criterion the BSAF outperforms the other filters in the interesting case of white noise.

  6. Land use mapping from CBERS-2 images with open source tools by applying different classification algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhouse-García, Antonio J.; Rangel-Peraza, Jesús Gabriel; Bustos-Terrones, Yaneth; García-Ferrer, Alfonso; Mesas-Carrascosa, Francisco J.

    2016-02-01

    Land cover classification is often based on different characteristics between their classes, but with great homogeneity within each one of them. This cover is obtained through field work or by mean of processing satellite images. Field work involves high costs; therefore, digital image processing techniques have become an important alternative to perform this task. However, in some developing countries and particularly in Casacoima municipality in Venezuela, there is a lack of geographic information systems due to the lack of updated information and high costs in software license acquisition. This research proposes a low cost methodology to develop thematic mapping of local land use and types of coverage in areas with scarce resources. Thematic mapping was developed from CBERS-2 images and spatial information available on the network using open source tools. The supervised classification method per pixel and per region was applied using different classification algorithms and comparing them among themselves. Classification method per pixel was based on Maxver algorithms (maximum likelihood) and Euclidean distance (minimum distance), while per region classification was based on the Bhattacharya algorithm. Satisfactory results were obtained from per region classification, where overall reliability of 83.93% and kappa index of 0.81% were observed. Maxver algorithm showed a reliability value of 73.36% and kappa index 0.69%, while Euclidean distance obtained values of 67.17% and 0.61% for reliability and kappa index, respectively. It was demonstrated that the proposed methodology was very useful in cartographic processing and updating, which in turn serve as a support to develop management plans and land management. Hence, open source tools showed to be an economically viable alternative not only for forestry organizations, but for the general public, allowing them to develop projects in economically depressed and/or environmentally threatened areas.

  7. Wetland Detection from Multi-sources Remote Sensing Images Based on Probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Kai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel wetland detection approach for multi-sources remote sensing images was proposed, which based on the probabilistic latent semantic analysis (pLSA. Firstly, spectral, texture, and subclass of wetland were extracted from high-resolution remote sensing image, and land surface temperature and soil moisture of wetland were derived from corresponding multispectral remote sensing image. The feature space of wetland scene was hence formed. Then, wetland scene was represented as a combination of several latent semantics using pLSA, and the feature space of the wetland scene was further described by weight vector of latent semantics. Finally, supporting vector machine (SVM classifier was applied to detect the wetland scene. Experiments indicated that the adoption of pLSA is able to map the high-dimensional feature space of wetland to low-dimensional latent semantic space. Besides, the addition of subclass and quantitative environment features is able to characterize wetland feature space more effectively and improve the detection accuracy significantly.

  8. Combined electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging and electrical source imaging improves localization of pediatric focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Maria; Tierney, Tim M; Perani, Suejen; Shamshiri, Elhum A; St Pier, Kelly; Wilkinson, Charlotte; Konn, Daniel; Vulliemoz, Serge; Grouiller, Frédéric; Lemieux, Louis; Pressler, Ronit M; Clark, Christopher A; Cross, J Helen; Carmichael, David W

    2017-08-01

    Surgical treatment in epilepsy is effective if the epileptogenic zone (EZ) can be correctly localized and characterized. Here we use simultaneous electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) data to derive EEG-fMRI and electrical source imaging (ESI) maps. Their yield and their individual and combined ability to (1) localize the EZ and (2) predict seizure outcome were then evaluated. Fifty-three children with drug-resistant epilepsy underwent EEG-fMRI. Interictal discharges were mapped using both EEG-fMRI hemodynamic responses and ESI. A single localization was derived from each individual test (EEG-fMRI global maxima [GM]/ESI maximum) and from the combination of both maps (EEG-fMRI/ESI spatial intersection). To determine the localization accuracy and its predictive performance, the individual and combined test localizations were compared to the presumed EZ and to the postsurgical outcome. Fifty-two of 53 patients had significant maps: 47 of 53 for EEG-fMRI, 44 of 53 for ESI, and 34 of 53 for both. The EZ was well characterized in 29 patients; 26 had an EEG-fMRI GM localization that was correct in 11, 22 patients had ESI localization that was correct in 17, and 12 patients had combined EEG-fMRI and ESI that was correct in 11. Seizure outcome following resection was correctly predicted by EEG-fMRI GM in 8 of 20 patients, and by the ESI maximum in 13 of 16. The combined EEG-fMRI/ESI region entirely predicted outcome in 9 of 9 patients, including 3 with no lesion visible on MRI. EEG-fMRI combined with ESI provides a simple unbiased localization that may predict surgery better than each individual test, including in MRI-negative patients. Ann Neurol 2017;82:278-287. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  9. Progressive Image Transmission Based on Joint Source-Channel Decoding Using Adaptive Sum-Product Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Daut

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A joint source-channel decoding method is designed to accelerate the iterative log-domain sum-product decoding procedure of LDPC codes as well as to improve the reconstructed image quality. Error resilience modes are used in the JPEG2000 source codec making it possible to provide useful source decoded information to the channel decoder. After each iteration, a tentative decoding is made and the channel decoded bits are then sent to the JPEG2000 decoder. The positions of bits belonging to error-free coding passes are then fed back to the channel decoder. The log-likelihood ratios (LLRs of these bits are then modified by a weighting factor for the next iteration. By observing the statistics of the decoding procedure, the weighting factor is designed as a function of the channel condition. Results show that the proposed joint decoding methods can greatly reduce the number of iterations, and thereby reduce the decoding delay considerably. At the same time, this method always outperforms the nonsource controlled decoding method by up to 3 dB in terms of PSNR.

  10. Progressive Image Transmission Based on Joint Source-Channel Decoding Using Adaptive Sum-Product Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Weiliang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A joint source-channel decoding method is designed to accelerate the iterative log-domain sum-product decoding procedure of LDPC codes as well as to improve the reconstructed image quality. Error resilience modes are used in the JPEG2000 source codec making it possible to provide useful source decoded information to the channel decoder. After each iteration, a tentative decoding is made and the channel decoded bits are then sent to the JPEG2000 decoder. The positions of bits belonging to error-free coding passes are then fed back to the channel decoder. The log-likelihood ratios (LLRs of these bits are then modified by a weighting factor for the next iteration. By observing the statistics of the decoding procedure, the weighting factor is designed as a function of the channel condition. Results show that the proposed joint decoding methods can greatly reduce the number of iterations, and thereby reduce the decoding delay considerably. At the same time, this method always outperforms the nonsource controlled decoding method by up to 3 dB in terms of PSNR.

  11. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Sources Fondation Pablo Iglesias. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Archives privées de Manuel ArijaArchives extérieuresArchives FNJS de EspañaPrensa Archives Générales de l’Administration. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Opposition au franquismeSig. 653 Sig TOP 82/68.103-68.602.Índice de las cartas colectivas, Relaciones, Cartas al Ministro de Información de Marzo de 1965. c.662. Sources cinématographiques Filmothèque Nationale d’Espagne.NO.DO. N° 1157C. 08/03/1965.aguirre Javier, Blanco vertical....

  12. Clinical application of spatiotemporal distributed source analysis in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoaki eTanaka

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG, which acquires neuromagnetic fields in the brain, is a useful diagnostic tool in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. Previous studies have shown that MEG affects the planning intracranial EEG placement and correlates with surgical outcomes by using a single dipole model. Spatiotemporal source analysis using distributed source models is an advanced method for analyzing MEG, and has been recently introduced for analyzing epileptic spikes. It has advantages over the conventional single dipole analysis for obtaining accurate sources and understanding the propagation of epileptic spikes. In this article, we review the source analysis methods, describe the techniques of the distributed source analysis, interpretation of source distribution maps, and discuss the benefits and feasibility of this method in evaluation of epilepsy.

  13. Simultaneous multimodal ophthalmic imaging using swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Joseph D.; El-Haddad, Mohamed T.; Bozic, Ivan; Tye, Logan A.; Majeau, Lucas; Godbout, Nicolas; Rollins, Andrew M.; Boudoux, Caroline; Joos, Karen M.; Patel, Shriji N.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) benefits diagnostic imaging and therapeutic guidance by allowing for high-speed en face imaging of retinal structures. When combined with optical coherence tomography (OCT), SLO enables real-time aiming and retinal tracking and provides complementary information for post-acquisition volumetric co-registration, bulk motion compensation, and averaging. However, multimodality SLO-OCT systems generally require dedicated light sources, scanners, relay optics, detectors, and additional digitization and synchronization electronics, which increase system complexity. Here, we present a multimodal ophthalmic imaging system using swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography (SS-SESLO-OCT) for in vivo human retinal imaging. SESLO reduces the complexity of en face imaging systems by multiplexing spatial positions as a function of wavelength. SESLO image quality benefited from single-mode illumination and multimode collection through a prototype double-clad fiber coupler, which optimized scattered light throughput and reduce speckle contrast while maintaining lateral resolution. Using a shared 1060 nm swept-source, shared scanner and imaging optics, and a shared dual-channel high-speed digitizer, we acquired inherently co-registered en face retinal images and OCT cross-sections simultaneously at 200 frames-per-second. PMID:28101411

  14. Simulations of imaging extended sources using the GMRT and the U-GMRT. Implications to observing strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Deepak Kumar; Kale, Ruta

    2017-11-01

    Astrophysical sources such as radio halos and relics in galaxy clusters, supernova remnants and radio galaxies have angular sizes from a few to several 10s of arcminutes. In radio interferometric imaging of such sources, the largest angular size of the source that can be imaged is limited by the shortest projected baseline towards the source. It is essential to determine the limitations of the recovery of the extended features on various angular scales in order to interpret the radio image. We simulated observations of a model extended source of Gaussian shape with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) using Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA). The recovery in flux density and in morphology of the model source was quantified in a variety of observing cases with changing source properties and the uv-coverage. If 𝜃 l a r is the largest angular scale sampled in an observation with the GMRT, then > 80 % recovery of a source of size 0.3 × 𝜃 l a r is possible. The upgraded GMRT (U-GMRT) providing 200 MHz instantaneous bandwidth between 300 - 500 MHz will allow a factor of two better recovery of a source of size 𝜃 l a r as compared to the GMRT at 300 MHz with 33 MHz bandwidth. We provide quantitative estimates for the improvement in extended source recovery in observations at low elevations and long durations. The presented simulations can be carried out for future radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) for optimisation of observing strategies to image extended radio sources.

  15. Low Dose X-Ray Sources and High Quantum Efficiency Sensors: The Next Challenge in Dental Digital Imaging?

    OpenAIRE

    Mistry, Arnav R.; Daniel Uzbelger Feldman; Jie Yang; Eric Ryterski

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s). The major challenge encountered to decrease the milliamperes (mA) level in X-ray imaging systems is the quantum noise phenomena. This investigation evaluated dose exposure and image resolution of a low dose X-ray imaging (LDXI) prototype comprising a low mA X-ray source and a novel microlens-based sensor relative to current imaging technologies. Study Design. A LDXI in static (group 1) and dynamic (group 2) modes was compared to medical fluoroscopy (group 3), digital intraoral r...

  16. Imaging the site of the Source Physics Experiment using seismic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzel, E.; Mellors, R. J.; Pitarka, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is a series of precisely designed explosions recorded by a dense network of seismometers. Its purpose is to obtain a physics-based understanding of how seismic waves are created at and scattered near the source. In order to separate source-specific effects from those due to geological heterogeneity, we need a precise picture of the subsurface. In this study, we are using several methods of seismic interferometry to obtain highly detailed images of the SPE site. Coda wave interferometry (CI) uses the diffuse coda from earthquakes or explosions as a source of coherent energy. Ambient noise correlation (ANC) uses the energy of the ambient background field. In each technique, the data recorded at one seismometer are correlated with the data recorded at another to obtain an estimate of the Green's function (GF) between the two. More than 150 instruments were deployed around the site, predominantly along 5 lines extending radially outward from the shot point. Most of those are located within 2 km. We used the records of one of the SPE shots as an energy source for the CI technique and 3 months of high gain continuous data for ANC. Each technique has advantages over the other. CI is very fast (only a few minutes of data are needed, compared to the weeks to years of continuous data often required for ANC), and the GF obtained has the same frequency content as the original shot (while the spectrum of ANC is determined by the natural background noise). Using CI on the SPE data, we obtain very good quality estimate of the GF to very high frequency. The key disadvantages of CI are that we can only correlate energy propagating radially outward and the source point itself is hidden. ANC requires more data and processing time, but allows us to estimate the GF between any two of the seismometers. By combining the two techniques, we obtain a very sharp image of seismic velocity and attenuation in the upper several kilometers beneath the site

  17. X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

    1999-05-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

  18. Low Dose X-Ray Sources and High Quantum Efficiency Sensors: The Next Challenge in Dental Digital Imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnav R. Mistry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s. The major challenge encountered to decrease the milliamperes (mA level in X-ray imaging systems is the quantum noise phenomena. This investigation evaluated dose exposure and image resolution of a low dose X-ray imaging (LDXI prototype comprising a low mA X-ray source and a novel microlens-based sensor relative to current imaging technologies. Study Design. A LDXI in static (group 1 and dynamic (group 2 modes was compared to medical fluoroscopy (group 3, digital intraoral radiography (group 4, and CBCT scan (group 5 using a dental phantom. Results. The Mann-Whitney test showed no statistical significance (α=0.01 in dose exposure between groups 1 and 3 and 1 and 4 and timing exposure (seconds between groups 1 and 5 and 2 and 3. Image resolution test showed group 1 > group 4 > group 2 > group 3 > group 5. Conclusions. The LDXI proved the concept for obtaining a high definition image resolution for static and dynamic radiography at lower or similar dose exposure and smaller pixel size, respectively, when compared to current imaging technologies. Lower mA at the X-ray source and high QE at the detector level principles with microlens could be applied to current imaging technologies to considerably reduce dose exposure without compromising image resolution in the near future.

  19. Implementation of an imaging spectrometer for localization and identification of radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, H., E-mail: hermine.lemaire@cea.fr [CEA, LIST, Gif-sur-Yvette, F-91191 (France); Khalil, R. Abou; Amgarou, K. [CANBERRA, 1 rue des hérons, Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, F-78182 (France); Angélique, J.-C. [LPC, 6 boulevard du Maréchal Juin, Caen Cedex F-14050 (France); Bonnet, F. [CANBERRA, 10 route de Vauzelles, Loches, F-37600 (France); De Toro, D. [CANBERRA, 1 rue des hérons, Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, F-78182 (France); Carrel, F. [CEA, LIST, Gif-sur-Yvette, F-91191 (France); Giarmana, O. [CANBERRA, 10 route de Vauzelles, Loches, F-37600 (France); Gmar, M. [CEA, LIST, Gif-sur-Yvette, F-91191 (France); Menaa, N. [CANBERRA, 1 rue des hérons, Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, F-78182 (France); Menesguen, Y.; Normand, S. [CEA, LIST, Gif-sur-Yvette, F-91191 (France); Patoz, A. [CANBERRA, 10 route de Vauzelles, Loches, F-37600 (France); Schoepff, V. [CEA, LIST, Gif-sur-Yvette, F-91191 (France); Talent, P. [CANBERRA, 10 route de Vauzelles, Loches, F-37600 (France); Timi, T. [CANBERRA, 1 rue des hérons, Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, F-78182 (France)

    2014-11-01

    Spatial localization of radioactive sources is currently a main issue interesting nuclear industry as well as homeland security applications and can be achieved using gamma cameras. For several years, CEA LIST has been designing a new system, called GAMPIX, with improved sensitivity, portability and ease of use. The main remaining limitation of this system is the lack of spectrometric information, preventing the identification of radioactive materials. This article describes the development of an imaging spectrometer based on the GAMPIX technology. Experimental tests have been carried out according to both spectrometric methods enabled by the pixelated Timepix chip used in the GAMPIX gamma camera. The first method is based on the size of the impacts produced by a gamma-ray energy deposition in the detection matrix. The second one uses the Time over Threshold (ToT) mode of the Timepix chip and deals with time spent by pulses generated by charge preamplifiers over a user-specified threshold. Both energy resolution and sensitivity studies demonstrated the superiority of the ToT approach which will consequently be further explored. Energy calibration, tests of different pixel sizes for the Timepix chip and use of the Medipix3 chip are future milestones to improve performances of the newly implemented imaging spectrometer.

  20. 3D printing of intracranial artery stenosis based on the source images of magnetic resonance angiograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Hai; Liu, Jia; Li, Ming-Li; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Chen, Jie; Wu, Jian-Huang

    2014-08-01

    Three dimensional (3D) printing techniques for brain diseases have not been widely studied. We attempted to 'print' the segments of intracranial arteries based on magnetic resonance imaging. Three dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was performed on two patients with middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis. Using scale-adaptive vascular modeling, 3D vascular models were constructed from the MRA source images. The magnified (ten times) regions of interest (ROI) of the stenotic segments were selected and fabricated by a 3D printer with a resolution of 30 µm. A survey to 8 clinicians was performed to evaluate the accuracy of 3D printing results as compared with MRA findings (4 grades, grade 1: consistent with MRA and provide additional visual information; grade 2: consistent with MRA; grade 3: not consistent with MRA; grade 4: not consistent with MRA and provide probable misleading information). If a 3D printing vessel segment was ideally matched to the MRA findings (grade 2 or 1), a successful 3D printing was defined. Seven responders marked "grade 1" to 3D printing results, while one marked "grade 4". Therefore, 87.5% of the clinicians considered the 3D printing were successful. Our pilot study confirms the feasibility of using 3D printing technique in the research field of intracranial artery diseases. Further investigations are warranted to optimize this technique and translate it into clinical practice.

  1. Profile of new green fluorescent protein transgenic Jinhua pigs as an imaging source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Hirao, Atsushi; Azuma, Sadahiro; Otake, Masayoshi; Shibata, Masatoshi; Tsuchiya, Seiko; Enosawa, Shin; Takeuchi, Koichi; Konno, Kenjiro; Hakamata, Yoji; Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Wakai, Takuya; Ookawara, Shigeo; Tanaka, Hozumi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Murakami, Takashi

    2009-09-01

    Animal imaging sources have become an indispensable material for biological sciences. Specifically, gene-encoded biological probes serve as stable and high-performance tools to visualize cellular fate in living animals. We use a somatic cell cloning technique to create new green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Jinhua pigs with a miniature body size, and characterized the expression profile in various tissues/organs and ex vivo culture conditions. The born GFP-transgenic pig demonstrate an organ/tissue-dependent expression pattern. Strong GFP expression is observed in the skeletal muscle, pancreas, heart, and kidney. Regarding cellular levels, bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells, hepatocytes, and islet cells of the pancreas also show sufficient expression with the unique pattern. Moreover, the cloned pigs demonstrate normal growth and fertility, and the introduced GFP gene is stably transmitted to pigs in subsequent generations. The new GFP-expressing Jinhua pigs may be used as new cellular/tissue light resources for biological imaging in preclinical research fields such as tissue engineering, experimental regenerative medicine, and transplantation.

  2. Imaging the redshifted 21 cm pattern around the first sources during the cosmic dawn using the SKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghara, Raghunath; Choudhury, T. Roy; Datta, Kanan K.; Choudhuri, Samir

    2017-01-01

    Understanding properties of the first sources in the Universe using the redshifted H I 21 cm signal is one of the major aims of present and upcoming low-frequency experiments. We investigate the possibility of imaging the redshifted 21 cm pattern around the first sources during the cosmic dawn using the SKA1-low. We model the H I 21 cm image maps, appropriate for the SKA1-low, around the first sources consisting of stars and X-ray sources within galaxies. In addition to the system noise, we also account for the astrophysical foregrounds by adding them to the signal maps. We find that after subtracting the foregrounds using a polynomial fit and suppressing the noise by smoothing the maps over 10-30 arcmin angular scale, the isolated sources at z ˜ 15 are detectable with the ˜4σ-9σ confidence level in 2000 h of observation with the SKA1-low. Although the 21 cm profiles around the sources get altered because of the Gaussian smoothing, the images can still be used to extract some of the source properties. We account for overlaps in the patterns of the individual sources by generating realistic H I 21 cm maps of the cosmic dawn that are based on N-body simulations and a one-dimensional radiative transfer code. We find that these sources should be detectable in the SKA1-low images at z = 15 with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of ˜14(4) in 2000 (200) h of observations. One possible observational strategy thus could be to observe multiple fields for shorter observation times, identify fields with SNR ≳ 3 and observe these fields for much longer duration. Such observations are expected to be useful in constraining the parameters related to the first sources.

  3. Adenosine-induced stress myocardial perfusion imaging using dual-source cardiac computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankstein, Ron; Shturman, Leon D; Rogers, Ian S; Rocha-Filho, Jose A; Okada, David R; Sarwar, Ammar; Soni, Anand V; Bezerra, Hiram; Ghoshhajra, Brian B; Petranovic, Milena; Loureiro, Ricardo; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Gewirtz, Henry; Hoffmann, Udo; Mamuya, Wilfred S; Brady, Thomas J; Cury, Ricardo C

    2009-09-15

    This study sought to determine the feasibility of performing a comprehensive cardiac computed tomographic (CT) examination incorporating stress and rest myocardial perfusion imaging together with coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). Although cardiac CT can identify coronary stenosis, very little data exist on the ability to detect stress-induced myocardial perfusion defects in humans. Thirty-four patients who had a nuclear stress test and invasive angiography were included in the study. Dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) was performed as follows: 1) stress CT: contrast-enhanced scan during adenosine infusion; 2) rest CT: contrast-enhanced scan using prospective triggering; and 3) delayed scan: acquired 7 min after rest CT. Images for CTA, computed tomography perfusion (CTP), and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were each read by 2 independent blinded readers. The DSCT protocol was successfully completed for 33 of 34 subjects (average age 61.4 +/- 10.7 years; 82% male; body mass index 30.4 +/- 5 kg/m(2)) with an average radiation dose of 12.7 mSv. On a per-vessel basis, CTP alone had a sensitivity of 79% and a specificity of 80% for the detection of stenosis > or =50%, whereas SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging had a sensitivity of 67% and a specificity of 83%. For the detection of vessels with > or =50% stenosis with a corresponding SPECT perfusion abnormality, CTP had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 74%. The CTA during adenosine infusion had a per-vessel sensitivity of 96%, specificity of 73%, and negative predictive value of 98% for the detection of stenosis > or =70%. Adenosine stress CT can identify stress-induced myocardial perfusion defects with diagnostic accuracy comparable to SPECT, with similar radiation dose and with the advantage of providing information on coronary stenosis.

  4. Combined Source-Channel Coding of Images under Power and Bandwidth Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fossorier Marc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a framework for combined source-channel coding for a power and bandwidth constrained noisy channel. The framework is applied to progressive image transmission using constant envelope -ary phase shift key ( -PSK signaling over an additive white Gaussian noise channel. First, the framework is developed for uncoded -PSK signaling (with . Then, it is extended to include coded -PSK modulation using trellis coded modulation (TCM. An adaptive TCM system is also presented. Simulation results show that, depending on the constellation size, coded -PSK signaling performs 3.1 to 5.2 dB better than uncoded -PSK signaling. Finally, the performance of our combined source-channel coding scheme is investigated from the channel capacity point of view. Our framework is further extended to include powerful channel codes like turbo and low-density parity-check (LDPC codes. With these powerful codes, our proposed scheme performs about one dB away from the capacity-achieving SNR value of the QPSK channel.

  5. Combined Source-Channel Coding of Images under Power and Bandwidth Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Fossorier

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a framework for combined source-channel coding for a power and bandwidth constrained noisy channel. The framework is applied to progressive image transmission using constant envelope M-ary phase shift key (M-PSK signaling over an additive white Gaussian noise channel. First, the framework is developed for uncoded M-PSK signaling (with M=2k. Then, it is extended to include coded M-PSK modulation using trellis coded modulation (TCM. An adaptive TCM system is also presented. Simulation results show that, depending on the constellation size, coded M-PSK signaling performs 3.1 to 5.2 dB better than uncoded M-PSK signaling. Finally, the performance of our combined source-channel coding scheme is investigated from the channel capacity point of view. Our framework is further extended to include powerful channel codes like turbo and low-density parity-check (LDPC codes. With these powerful codes, our proposed scheme performs about one dB away from the capacity-achieving SNR value of the QPSK channel.

  6. Prediction of the acoustical performance of enclosures using a hybrid statistical energy analysis: image source model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgard, Franck; Nelisse, Hugues; Atalla, Noureddine; Amedin, Celse Kafui; Oddo, Remy

    2010-02-01

    Enclosures are commonly used to reduce the sound exposure of workers to the noise radiated by machinery. Some acoustic predictive tools ranging from simple analytical tools to sophisticated numerical deterministic models are available to estimate the enclosure acoustical performance. However, simple analytical models are usually valid in limited frequency ranges because of underlying assumptions whereas numerical models are commonly limited to low frequencies. This paper presents a general and simple model for predicting the acoustic performance of large free-standing enclosures which is capable of taking into account the complexity of the enclosure configuration and covering a large frequency range. It is based on the statistical energy analysis (SEA) framework. The sound field inside the enclosure is calculated using the method of image sources. Sound transmission across the various elements of the enclosure is considered in the SEA formalism. The model is evaluated by comparison with existing methods and experimental results. The effect of several parameters such as enclosure geometry, panel materials, presence of noise control treatments, location of the source inside the enclosure, and presence of an opening has been investigated. The comparisons between the model and the experimental results show a good agreement for most of the tested configurations.

  7. Spectral imaging and passive sampling to investigate particle sources in urban desert regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jeff; Casuccio, Gary

    2014-07-01

    Two types of electron microscopy analyses were employed along with geographic information system (GIS) mapping to investigate potential sources of PM2.5 and PM10 (airborne particulate matter smaller than 2.5 and 10 μm, respectively) in two urbanized desert areas known to exhibit PM excursions. Integrated spectral imaging maps were obtained from scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) analyses of 13 filters collected in Imperial Valley, California. Seven were from 24 h PM10 Federal Reference Method (FRM) samplers and six were from PM2.5 FRM samplers. This technique enabled extraction of information from particles collected on complex filter matrices, and indicated that all samples exhibited substantial proportions of crustal particles. Six Imperial PM2.5 and PM10 filters selected from unusually high-PM days exhibited more large particles (2.5-15 and 10-30 μm, respectively) than did filters from low-PM days, and were more consistent with soils analyzed from the region. High winds were present on three of the six high-PM days. One of the high-PM2.5 filters also exhibited substantial fine carbonaceous soot PM, suggesting significant contributions from a combustion source. Computer-controlled SEM/EDS (CCSEM/EDS) was conducted on PM collected with UNC Passive samplers from Phoenix, Arizona. The passive samplers showed good agreement with co-located FRM PM10 and PM2.5 measurements (μg m(-3)), and also enabled detailed individual particle analysis. The CCSEM/EDS data revealed mostly crustal particles in both the Phoenix fine and coarse PM10 fractions. GIS maps of multiple dust-related parameters confirm that both Imperial Valley and Phoenix possess favorable conditions for airborne crustal PM from natural and anthropogenic sources.

  8. Simulation-Based Validation for Four-Dimensional Multi-Channel Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Witte, Russell S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI), which has application to the heart and brain, exploits the acoustoelectric (AE) effect and Ohm's law to detect and map an electrical current distribution. In this study, we describe 4-D UCSDI simulations of a dipole field for comparison and validation with bench-top experiments. The simulations consider the properties of the ultrasound pulse as it passes through a conductive medium, the electric field of the injected dipole, and the lead field of the detectors. In the simulation, the lead fields of detectors and electric field of the dipole were calculated by the finite element (FE) method, and the convolution and correlation in the computation of the detected AE voltage signal were accelerated using 3-D fast Fourier transforms. In the bench-top experiment, an electric dipole was produced in a bath of 0.9% NaCl solution containing two electrodes, which injected an ac pulse (200 Hz, 3 cycles) ranging from 0 to 140 mA. Stimulating and recording electrodes were placed in a custom electrode chamber made on a rapid prototype printer. Each electrode could be positioned anywhere on an x-y grid (5 mm spacing) and individually adjusted in the depth direction for precise control of the geometry of the current sources and detecting electrodes. A 1-MHz ultrasound beam was pulsed and focused through a plastic film to modulate the current distribution inside the saline-filled tank. AE signals were simultaneously detected at a sampling frequency of 15 MHz on multiple recording electrodes. A single recording electrode is sufficient to form volume images of the current flow and electric potentials. The AE potential is sensitive to the distance from the dipole, but is less sensitive to the angle between the detector and the dipole. Multi-channel UCSDI potentially improves 4-D mapping of bioelectric sources in the body at high spatial resolution, which is especially important for diagnosing and guiding treatment of cardiac and

  9. A Search to Uncover the Infrared Excess (IRXS) Sources in the Spitzer Enhanced Imaging Products (SEIP) Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Jamie Lynn; Duranko, Gary; Gorjian, Varoujan; Lineberger, Howard; Orr, Laura; Adewole, Ayomikun; Bradford, Eric; Douglas, Alea; Kohl, Steven; Larson, Lillia; Lascola, Gus; Orr, Quinton; Scott, Mekai; Walston, Joseph; Wang, Xian

    2018-01-01

    The Spitzer Enhanced Imaging Products catalog (SEIP) is a collection of nearly 42 million point sources obtained by the Spitzer Space Telescope during its 5+ year cryogenic mission. Strasburger et al (2014) isolated sources with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) >10 in five infrared (IR) wavelength channels (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8 and 24 microns) to begin a search for sources with infrared excess (IRXS). They found 76 objects that were never catalogued before. Based on this success, we intend to dig deeper into the catalog in an attempt to find more IRXS sources, specifically by lowering the SNR on the 3.6, 4.5, and 24 micron channels. The ultimate goal is to use this large sample to seek rare astrophysical sources that are transitional in nature and evolutionarily very important.Our filtering of the database at SNR > 5 yielded 461,000 sources. This was further evaluated and reduced to only the most interesting based on source location on a [3.6]-[4.5] vs [4.5]-[24] color-color diagram. We chose a sample of 985 extreme IRXS sources for further inspection. All of these candidate sources were visually inspected and cross-referenced against known sources in existing databases, resulting in a list of highly reliable IRXS sources.These sources will prove important in the study of galaxy and stellar evolution, and will serve as a starting point for further investigation.

  10. Global VLBI Observations of Weak Extragalactic Radio Sources: Imaging Candidates to Align the VLBI and Gaia Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourda, Geraldine; Collioud, Arnaud; Charlot, Patrick; Porcas, Richard; Garrington, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The space astrometry mission Gaia will construct a dense optical QSO-based celestial reference frame. For consistency between optical and radio positions, it will be important to align the Gaia and VLBI frames (International Celestial Reference Frame) with the highest accuracy. In this respect, it is found that only 10% of the ICRF sources are suitable to establish this link (70 sources), either because most of the ICRF sources are not bright enough at optical wavelengths or because they show extended radio emission which precludes reaching the highest astrometric accuracy. In order to improve the situation, we initiated a multi-step VLBI observational project, dedicated to finding additional suitable radio sources for aligning the two frames. The sample consists of about 450 optically-bright radio sources, typically 20 times weaker than the ICRF sources, which have been selected by cross-correlating optical and radio catalogs. The initial observations, aimed at checking whether these sources are detectable with VLBI, and conducted with the European VLBI Network (EVN) in 2007, showed an excellent 90% detection rate. This paper reports on global VLBI observations carried out in March 2008 to image 105 from the 398 previously detected sources. All sources were successfully imaged, revealing compact VLBI structure for about half of them, which is very promising for the future.

  11. LINKS: learning-based multi-source IntegratioN frameworK for Segmentation of infant brain images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Feng; Li, Gang; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-03-01

    Segmentation of infant brain MR images is challenging due to insufficient image quality, severe partial volume effect, and ongoing maturation and myelination processes. In the first year of life, the image contrast between white and gray matters of the infant brain undergoes dramatic changes. In particular, the image contrast is inverted around 6-8months of age, and the white and gray matter tissues are isointense in both T1- and T2-weighted MR images and thus exhibit the extremely low tissue contrast, which poses significant challenges for automated segmentation. Most previous studies used multi-atlas label fusion strategy, which has the limitation of equally treating the different available image modalities and is often computationally expensive. To cope with these limitations, in this paper, we propose a novel learning-based multi-source integration framework for segmentation of infant brain images. Specifically, we employ the random forest technique to effectively integrate features from multi-source images together for tissue segmentation. Here, the multi-source images include initially only the multi-modality (T1, T2 and FA) images and later also the iteratively estimated and refined tissue probability maps of gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Experimental results on 119 infants show that the proposed method achieves better performance than other state-of-the-art automated segmentation methods. Further validation was performed on the MICCAI grand challenge and the proposed method was ranked top among all competing methods. Moreover, to alleviate the possible anatomical errors, our method can also be combined with an anatomically-constrained multi-atlas labeling approach for further improving the segmentation accuracy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Archives Archivo Histórico del Estado de Jalisco Fondo Gobernación, Asunto Pasaportes y Salvoconductos : G-8-877/9773-9775 G-8-878/9774, 9776, 9777 et 9781 G-8-879/9782-9788 G-8-880/9789-9798 G-8-881-882/9803 G-8-882/9804-9805 G-8-883/9806-9811 G-8-884/9813 G-8-885/9817-9820 G-8-886/9822-9825 G-8-887/9826-9830 G-8-888/9835 G-8-889-890/9837 G-8-889/9839 Sources imprimées Livres et chroniques O’Farrill Romulo, (2004) Reseña histórica estadística y comercial de México y sus estados, directorio g...

  13. Comparison between Widefield En Face Swept-Source OCT and Conventional Multimodal Imaging for the Detection of Reticular Pseudodrusen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Karen B; Legarreta, Andrew D; Feuer, William J; Gregori, Giovanni; Cheng, Qianqian; Legarreta, John E; Durbin, Mary K; Stetson, Paul F; Kubach, Sophie; Rosenfeld, Philip J

    2017-02-01

    The ability to detect reticular pseudodrusen (RPD)/subretinal drusenoid deposits (SDDs) using 12×12-mm widefield en face swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) imaging was compared with conventional multimodal imaging (color, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and infrared reflectance [IR] imaging) in eyes with nonexudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Cross-sectional study. Patients with nonexudative AMD were prospectively enrolled in an SS-OCT imaging study at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. On the same day, all participants underwent color, FAF, and IR fundus imaging, as well as imaging with a prototype Zeiss 100 kHz SS-OCT instrument (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc, Dublin, CA). Two masked graders assessed the presence, absence, or uncertainty of RPD/SDDs on conventional multimodal images and separately on 4 different SS-OCT en face images derived from the same volumetric dataset. The results from grading the conventional images and the SS-OCT en face images were compared. Agreement in the detection of RPD/SDDs using different imaging modalities. A total of 307 eyes (209 patients) were graded for the presence or absence of RPD/SDDs. The agreement between SS-OCT and multimodal imaging was 83%. The difference in RPD/SDD detection with either image modality was not statistically significant (P = 0.21). The sensitivity of SS-OCT in RPD/SDD detection was 83%, and when using conventional imaging, the sensitivity was 75%. When using SS-OCT imaging alone, 10% of RPD/SDD cases would be missed, and when using conventional imaging alone, 14% of RPD/SDD cases would be missed. The presence of RPD/SDD was confirmed retrospectively in 48 of 52 cases once the overall grading was unmasked and the graders reevaluated the conventional multimodal images and the widefield SS-OCT en face images. All 4 imaging modalities used together provided the best strategy for the detection of RPD/SDDs. However, when using widefield en face SS-OCT slab imaging alone, the detection

  14. Elemental sensitivity in soft x-ray imaging with a laser-plasma source and a color center detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari, F; Valentini, G; Vozzi, C; Benedetti, E; Cabanillas-Gonzalez, J; Faenov, A; Gasilov, S; Pikuz, T; Poletto, L; Sansone, G; Villoresi, P; Nisoli, M; De Silvestri, S; Stagira, S

    2007-09-01

    Elemental sensitivity in soft x-ray imaging of thin foils with known thickness is observed using an ultrafast laser-plasma source and a LiF crystal as detector. Measurements are well reproduced by a simple theoretical model. This technique can be exploited for high spatial resolution, wide field of view imaging in the soft x-ray region, and it is suitable for the characterization of thin objects with thicknesses ranging from hundreds down to tens of nanometers.

  15. Robust Bayesian super-resolution approach via sparsity enforcing a priori for near-field aeroacoustic source imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ning; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali; Picheral, José

    2013-09-01

    Near-field aeroacoustic imaging has been the focus of great attentions of researchers and engineers in aeroacoustic source localization and power estimation for decades. Recently the deconvolution and regularization methods have greatly improved spatial resolution of the beamforming methods. But neither are they robust to background noises in the low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) situation, nor do they provide a wide dynamic range of power estimation. In this paper, we first propose an improved forward model of aeroacoustic power propagation, in which, we consider background noises and forward model uncertainty for the robustness. To solve the inverse problem, we then propose a robust Bayesian super-resolution approach via sparsity enforcing a priori. The sparse prior of source powers can be modeled by double exponential distribution, which can improve the spatial resolution and promote wide dynamic range of source powers. Both the hyperparameters and source powers can be alternatively estimated by the Bayesian inference approach based on the joint Maximum A Priori optimization. Finally our Bayesian approach is compared with some of the state-of-the-art methods on simulated, real and hybrid data. The main advantages of our approach are of robustness to noise, a wide dynamic range, super spatial resolution, and non-necessity for prior knowledge of the source number or SNR. It is feasible to apply it for aeroacoustic imaging with the 2D non-uniform microphone array in wind tunnel tests, especially for near-field monopole and extended source imaging.

  16. Beamline Design and Instrumentation for the Imaging and Coherence Beamline I13L at the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, U. H.; Pešić, Z. D.; De Fanis, A.; Rau, C.

    2013-03-01

    I13L is a 250 m long hard x-ray beamline (6 keV to 35 keV) at the Diamond Light Source. The beamline comprises of two independent experimental endstations: one for imaging in direct space using x-ray microscopy and one for imaging in reciprocal space using coherent diffraction based imaging techniques. In this paper we will discuss the fundamental design concepts of the beamline and explain their implications for the civil engineering of the endstation building and the beamline instrumentation. For the latter this paper will focus on the beamline mirror systems and monochromators.

  17. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference newborn-internal electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pafundi, Deanna; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Rajon, Didier [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Jokisch, Derek [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Francis Marion University, Florence, SC (United States)], E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu

    2010-04-07

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of newborn skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida newborn hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 3309-33), the newborn skeletal tissue model of Pafundi et al (2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 4497-531) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow (surrogate tissue for hematopoietic stem cells), shallow marrow (surrogate tissue for osteoprogenitor cells) and unossified cartilage (surrogate tissue for chondrocytes). Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following source tissues: active marrow, trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), cortical bone (surfaces and volumes) and cartilage. Transport results are reported as specific absorbed fractions according to the MIRD schema and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with bone-specific values reported in both tabular and graphic format as electronic annexes (supplementary data). The method utilized in this work uniquely includes (1) explicit accounting for the finite size and shape of newborn ossification centers (spongiosa regions), (2) explicit accounting for active and shallow marrow dose from electron emissions in cortical bone as well as sites of unossified cartilage, (3) proper accounting of the distribution of trabecular and cortical volumes and surfaces in the newborn skeleton when considering mineral bone sources and (4) explicit consideration of the marrow cellularity changes for active marrow self-irradiation as applicable to radionuclide therapy of diseased marrow in the newborn child.

  18. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference newborn—internal electron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafundi, Deanna; Rajon, Didier; Jokisch, Derek; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of newborn skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida newborn hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 3309-33), the newborn skeletal tissue model of Pafundi et al (2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 4497-531) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow (surrogate tissue for hematopoietic stem cells), shallow marrow (surrogate tissue for osteoprogenitor cells) and unossified cartilage (surrogate tissue for chondrocytes). Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following source tissues: active marrow, trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), cortical bone (surfaces and volumes) and cartilage. Transport results are reported as specific absorbed fractions according to the MIRD schema and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with bone-specific values reported in both tabular and graphic format as electronic annexes (supplementary data). The method utilized in this work uniquely includes (1) explicit accounting for the finite size and shape of newborn ossification centers (spongiosa regions), (2) explicit accounting for active and shallow marrow dose from electron emissions in cortical bone as well as sites of unossified cartilage, (3) proper accounting of the distribution of trabecular and cortical volumes and surfaces in the newborn skeleton when considering mineral bone sources and (4) explicit consideration of the marrow cellularity changes for active marrow self-irradiation as applicable to radionuclide therapy of diseased marrow in the newborn child.

  19. Enhanced Vitreous Imaging in Healthy Eyes Using Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jonathan J.; Witkin, Andre J.; Adhi, Mehreen; Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Kraus, Martin F.; Dhalla, Al-Hafeez; Lu, Chen D.; Hornegger, Joachim; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe enhanced vitreous imaging for visualization of anatomic features and microstructures within the posterior vitreous and vitreoretinal interface in healthy eyes using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). The study hypothesis was that long-wavelength, high-speed, volumetric SS-OCT with software registration motion correction and vitreous window display or high-dynamic-range (HDR) display improves detection sensitivity of posterior vitreous and vitreoretinal features compared to standard OCT logarithmic scale display. Design Observational prospective cross-sectional study. Methods Multiple wide-field three-dimensional SS-OCT scans (500×500A-scans over 12×12 mm2) were obtained using a prototype instrument in 22 eyes of 22 healthy volunteers. A registration motion-correction algorithm was applied to compensate motion and generate a single volumetric dataset. Each volumetric dataset was displayed in three forms: (1) standard logarithmic scale display, enhanced vitreous imaging using (2) vitreous window display and (3) HDR display. Each dataset was reviewed independently by three readers to identify features of the posterior vitreous and vitreoretinal interface. Detection sensitivities for these features were measured for each display method. Results Features observed included the bursa premacularis (BPM), area of Martegiani, Cloquet's/BPM septum, Bergmeister papilla, posterior cortical vitreous (hyaloid) detachment, papillomacular hyaloid detachment, hyaloid attachment to retinal vessel(s), and granular opacities within vitreous cortex, Cloquet's canal, and BPM. The detection sensitivity for these features was 75.0% (95%CI: 67.8%–81.1%) using standard logarithmic scale display, 80.6% (95%CI: 73.8%–86.0%) using HDR display, and 91.9% (95%CI: 86.6%–95.2%) using vitreous window display. Conclusions SS-OCT provides non-invasive, volumetric and measurable in vivo visualization of the anatomic microstructural features of the posterior

  20. Enhanced vitreous imaging in healthy eyes using swept source optical coherence tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Liu

    Full Text Available To describe enhanced vitreous imaging for visualization of anatomic features and microstructures within the posterior vitreous and vitreoretinal interface in healthy eyes using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT. The study hypothesis was that long-wavelength, high-speed, volumetric SS-OCT with software registration motion correction and vitreous window display or high-dynamic-range (HDR display improves detection sensitivity of posterior vitreous and vitreoretinal features compared to standard OCT logarithmic scale display.Observational prospective cross-sectional study.Multiple wide-field three-dimensional SS-OCT scans (500×500A-scans over 12×12 mm2 were obtained using a prototype instrument in 22 eyes of 22 healthy volunteers. A registration motion-correction algorithm was applied to compensate motion and generate a single volumetric dataset. Each volumetric dataset was displayed in three forms: (1 standard logarithmic scale display, enhanced vitreous imaging using (2 vitreous window display and (3 HDR display. Each dataset was reviewed independently by three readers to identify features of the posterior vitreous and vitreoretinal interface. Detection sensitivities for these features were measured for each display method.Features observed included the bursa premacularis (BPM, area of Martegiani, Cloquet's/BPM septum, Bergmeister papilla, posterior cortical vitreous (hyaloid detachment, papillomacular hyaloid detachment, hyaloid attachment to retinal vessel(s, and granular opacities within vitreous cortex, Cloquet's canal, and BPM. The detection sensitivity for these features was 75.0% (95%CI: 67.8%-81.1% using standard logarithmic scale display, 80.6% (95%CI: 73.8%-86.0% using HDR display, and 91.9% (95%CI: 86.6%-95.2% using vitreous window display.SS-OCT provides non-invasive, volumetric and measurable in vivo visualization of the anatomic microstructural features of the posterior vitreous and vitreoretinal interface. The

  1. Searching for Conservation Laws in Brain Dynamics—BOLD Flux and Source Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning U. Voss

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD imaging is the most important noninvasive tool to map human brain function. It relies on local blood-flow changes controlled by neurovascular coupling effects, usually in response to some cognitive or perceptual task. In this contribution we ask if the spatiotemporal dynamics of the BOLD signal can be modeled by a conservation law. In analogy to the description of physical laws, which often can be derived from some underlying conservation law, identification of conservation laws in the brain could lead to new models for the functional organization of the brain. Our model is independent of the nature of the conservation law, but we discuss possible hints and motivations for conservation laws. For example, globally limited blood supply and local competition between brain regions for blood might restrict the large scale BOLD signal in certain ways that could be observable. One proposed selective pressure for the evolution of such conservation laws is the closed volume of the skull limiting the expansion of brain tissue by increases in blood volume. These ideas are demonstrated on a mental motor imagery fMRI experiment, in which functional brain activation was mapped in a group of volunteers imagining themselves swimming. In order to search for local conservation laws during this complex cognitive process, we derived maps of quantities resulting from spatial interaction of the BOLD amplitudes. Specifically, we mapped fluxes and sources of the BOLD signal, terms that would appear in a description by a continuity equation. Whereas we cannot present final answers with the particular analysis of this particular experiment, some results seem to be non-trivial. For example, we found that during task the group BOLD flux covered more widespread regions than identified by conventional BOLD mapping and was always increasing during task. It is our hope that these results motivate more work towards the search for conservation

  2. Low cost and open source multi-fluorescence imaging system for teaching and research in biology and bioengineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Nuñez

    Full Text Available The advent of easy-to-use open source microcontrollers, off-the-shelf electronics and customizable manufacturing technologies has facilitated the development of inexpensive scientific devices and laboratory equipment. In this study, we describe an imaging system that integrates low-cost and open-source hardware, software and genetic resources. The multi-fluorescence imaging system consists of readily available 470 nm LEDs, a Raspberry Pi camera and a set of filters made with low cost acrylics. This device allows imaging in scales ranging from single colonies to entire plates. We developed a set of genetic components (e.g. promoters, coding sequences, terminators and vectors following the standard framework of Golden Gate, which allowed the fabrication of genetic constructs in a combinatorial, low cost and robust manner. In order to provide simultaneous imaging of multiple wavelength signals, we screened a series of long stokes shift fluorescent proteins that could be combined with cyan/green fluorescent proteins. We found CyOFP1, mBeRFP and sfGFP to be the most compatible set for 3-channel fluorescent imaging. We developed open source Python code to operate the hardware to run time-lapse experiments with automated control of illumination and camera and a Python module to analyze data and extract meaningful biological information. To demonstrate the potential application of this integral system, we tested its performance on a diverse range of imaging assays often used in disciplines such as microbial ecology, microbiology and synthetic biology. We also assessed its potential use in a high school environment to teach biology, hardware design, optics, and programming. Together, these results demonstrate the successful integration of open source hardware, software, genetic resources and customizable manufacturing to obtain a powerful, low cost and robust system for education, scientific research and bioengineering. All the resources developed here

  3. Low cost and open source multi-fluorescence imaging system for teaching and research in biology and bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Isaac; Matute, Tamara; Herrera, Roberto; Keymer, Juan; Marzullo, Timothy; Rudge, Timothy; Federici, Fernán

    2017-01-01

    The advent of easy-to-use open source microcontrollers, off-the-shelf electronics and customizable manufacturing technologies has facilitated the development of inexpensive scientific devices and laboratory equipment. In this study, we describe an imaging system that integrates low-cost and open-source hardware, software and genetic resources. The multi-fluorescence imaging system consists of readily available 470 nm LEDs, a Raspberry Pi camera and a set of filters made with low cost acrylics. This device allows imaging in scales ranging from single colonies to entire plates. We developed a set of genetic components (e.g. promoters, coding sequences, terminators) and vectors following the standard framework of Golden Gate, which allowed the fabrication of genetic constructs in a combinatorial, low cost and robust manner. In order to provide simultaneous imaging of multiple wavelength signals, we screened a series of long stokes shift fluorescent proteins that could be combined with cyan/green fluorescent proteins. We found CyOFP1, mBeRFP and sfGFP to be the most compatible set for 3-channel fluorescent imaging. We developed open source Python code to operate the hardware to run time-lapse experiments with automated control of illumination and camera and a Python module to analyze data and extract meaningful biological information. To demonstrate the potential application of this integral system, we tested its performance on a diverse range of imaging assays often used in disciplines such as microbial ecology, microbiology and synthetic biology. We also assessed its potential use in a high school environment to teach biology, hardware design, optics, and programming. Together, these results demonstrate the successful integration of open source hardware, software, genetic resources and customizable manufacturing to obtain a powerful, low cost and robust system for education, scientific research and bioengineering. All the resources developed here are available under

  4. Experimental Component Characterization, Monte-Carlo-Based Image Generation and Source Reconstruction for the Neutron Imaging System of the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, C A; Moran, M J

    2007-08-21

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is one of seven ignition target diagnostics under development for the National Ignition Facility. The NIS is required to record hot-spot (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (6-10 MeV) images with a resolution of 10 microns and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 10 at the 20% contour. The NIS is a valuable diagnostic since the downscattered neutrons reveal the spatial distribution of the cold fuel during an ignition attempt, providing important information in the case of a failed implosion. The present study explores the parameter space of several line-of-sight (LOS) configurations that could serve as the basis for the final design. Six commercially available organic scintillators were experimentally characterized for their light emission decay profile and neutron sensitivity. The samples showed a long lived decay component that makes direct recording of a downscattered image impossible. The two best candidates for the NIS detector material are: EJ232 (BC422) plastic fibers or capillaries filled with EJ399B. A Monte Carlo-based end-to-end model of the NIS was developed to study the imaging capabilities of several LOS configurations and verify that the recovered sources meet the design requirements. The model includes accurate neutron source distributions, aperture geometries (square pinhole, triangular wedge, mini-penumbral, annular and penumbral), their point spread functions, and a pixelated scintillator detector. The modeling results show that a useful downscattered image can be obtained by recording the primary peak and the downscattered images, and then subtracting a decayed version of the former from the latter. The difference images need to be deconvolved in order to obtain accurate source distributions. The images are processed using a frequency-space modified-regularization algorithm and low-pass filtering. The resolution and SNR of these sources are quantified by using two surrogate sources. The simulations show that all LOS

  5. Development of an Open Source Image-Based Flow Modeling Software - SimVascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updegrove, Adam; Merkow, Jameson; Schiavazzi, Daniele; Wilson, Nathan; Marsden, Alison; Shadden, Shawn

    2014-11-01

    SimVascular (www.simvascular.org) is currently the only comprehensive software package that provides a complete pipeline from medical image data segmentation to patient specific blood flow simulation. This software and its derivatives have been used in hundreds of conference abstracts and peer-reviewed journal articles, as well as the foundation of medical startups. SimVascular was initially released in August 2007, yet major challenges and deterrents for new adopters were the requirement of licensing three expensive commercial libraries utilized by the software, a complicated build process, and a lack of documentation, support and organized maintenance. In the past year, the SimVascular team has made significant progress to integrate open source alternatives for the linear solver, solid modeling, and mesh generation commercial libraries required by the original public release. In addition, the build system, available distributions, and graphical user interface have been significantly enhanced. Finally, the software has been updated to enable users to directly run simulations using models and boundary condition values, included in the Vascular Model Repository (vascularmodel.org). In this presentation we will briefly overview the capabilities of the new SimVascular 2.0 release. National Science Foundation.

  6. Measuring the acoustoelectric interaction constant using ultrasound current source density imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Olafsson, Ragnar; Ingram, Pier; Wang, Zhaohui; Witte, Russell

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI) exploits the acoustoelectric (AE) effect, an interaction between ultrasound pressure and electrical resistivity, to map electrical conduction in the heart. The conversion efficiency for UCSDI is determined by the AE interaction constant K, a fundamental property of all materials; K directly affects the magnitude of the detected voltage signal in UCSDI. This paper describes a technique for measuring K in biological tissue, and reports its value for the first time in cadaver hearts. A custom chamber was designed and fabricated to control the geometry for estimating K, which was measured in different ionic salt solutions and seven cadaver rabbit hearts. We found K to be strongly dependent on concentration for the divalent salt CuSO4, but not for the monovalent salt NaCl, consistent with their different chemical properties. In the rabbit heart, K was determined to be 0.041±0.012%/MPa, similar to the measurement of K in physiological saline (0.034±0.003%/MPa). This study provides a baseline estimate of K for modeling and experimental studies that involve UCSDI to map cardiac conduction and reentry currents associated with arrhythmias.

  7. Flaw Imaging Technique for Plate-Like Structures Using Scanning Laser Source Actuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changgil Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the longitudinal, shear, and surface waves have been very widely used as ultrasonic wave-based exploration methods to identify internal defects of host structures. In this context, a noncontact nondestructive testing (NDT method is proposed to detect the damage of plate-like structures and to identify the location of the damage. To achieve this goal, a scanning laser source actuation technique is utilized to generate a guided wave and scans a specific area to find damage location more precisely. The ND:YAG pulsed laser is used to generate Lamb wave and a piezoelectric sensor is installed to measure the structural responses. The measured responses are analyzed using 3-dimensional Fourier transformation (3D FT. The damage-sensitive features are extracted by wavenumber filtering based on the 3D FT. Then, flaw imaging techniques of a plate-like structure are conducted using the damage-sensitive features. Finally, the plates with notches are investigated to verify the effectiveness and the robustness of the proposed NDT approach.

  8. Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging in live rabbit hearts using clinical intracardiac catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian

    Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging (UCSDI) is a noninvasive modality for mapping electrical activities in the body (brain and heart) in 4-dimensions (space + time). Conventional cardiac mapping technologies for guiding the radiofrequency ablation procedure for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias have certain limitations. UCSDI can potentially overcome these limitations and enhance the electrophysiology mapping of the heart. UCSDI exploits the acoustoelectric (AE) effect, an interaction between ultrasound pressure and electrical resistivity. When an ultrasound beam intersects a current path in a material, the local resistivity of the material is modulated by the ultrasonic pressure, and a change in voltage signal can be detected based on Ohm's Law. The degree of modulation is determined by the AE interaction constant K. K is a fundamental property of any type of material, and directly affects the amplitude of the AE signal detected in UCSDI. UCSDI requires detecting a small AE signal associated with electrocardiogram. So sensitivity becomes a major challenge for transferring UCSDI to the clinic. This dissertation will determine the limits of sensitivity and resolution for UCSDI, balancing the tradeoff between them by finding the optimal parameters for electrical cardiac mapping, and finally test the optimized system in a realistic setting. This work begins by describing a technique for measuring K, the AE interaction constant, in ionic solution and biological tissue, and reporting the value of K in excised rabbit cardiac tissue for the first time. K was found to be strongly dependent on concentration for the divalent salt CuSO4, but not for the monovalent salt NaCl, consistent with their different chemical properties. In the rabbit heart tissue, K was determined to be 0.041 +/- 0.012 %/MPa, similar to the measurement of K in physiologic saline: 0.034 +/- 0.003 %/MPa. Next, this dissertation investigates the sensitivity limit of UCSDI by quantifying the relation

  9. CT-angiography source images indicate less fatal outcome despite coma of patients in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pallesen, Lars P.; Khomenko, Andrei; Dzialowski, Imanuel; Barlinn, Jessica; Barlinn, Kristian; Zerna, Charlotte; van der Hoeven, Erik J R J; Algra, Ale|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07483472X; Kapelle, L. Jaap; Michel, Patrik; Bodechtel, Ulf; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Schonewille, Wouter; Puetz, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Background: Coma is associated with poor outcome in patients with basilar artery occlusion. Aims: We sought to assess whether the posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score and the Pons-Midbrain Index applied to CT angiography source images predict the outcome of comatose patients

  10. [Clinical application of high-pitch excretory phase images during dual-source CT urography with stellar photon detector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Xue, Hua-dan; Jin, Zheng-yu; Wang, Xuan; Chen, Yu; He, Yong-lan; Zhang, Da-ming; Zhu, Liang; Wang, Yun; Qi, Bing; Xu, Kai; Wang, Ming

    2014-10-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the clinical feasibility of high-pitch excretory phase images during dual-source CT urography with Stellar photon detector. Totally 100 patients received dual-source CT high-pitch urinary excretory phase scanning with Stellar photon detector [80 kV, ref.92 mAs, CARE Dose 4D and CARE kV, pitch of 3.0, filter back projection reconstruction algorithm (FBP)] (group A). Another 100 patients received dual-source CT high-pitch urinary excretory phase scanning with common detector(100 kV, ref.140 mAs, CARE Dose 4D, pitch of 3.0, FBP) (group B). Quantitative measurement of CT value of urinary segments (Hounsfield units), image noise (Hounsfield units), and effective radiation dose (millisievert) were compared using independent-samples t test between two groups. Urinary system subjective opacification scores were compared using Mann-Whitney U test between two groups. There was no significant difference in subjective opacification score of intrarenal collecting system and ureters between two groups (all P>0.05). The group A images yielded significantly higher CT values of all urinary segments (all P0.05). The effective radiation dose of group A (1.1 mSv) was significantly lower than that of group B (3.79 mSv) (Pexcretory phase dual-source CT urography with Stellar photon detector is feasible, with acceptable image noise and lower radiation dose.

  11. Rapid Automatic Lighting Control of a Mixed Light Source for Image Acquisition using Derivative Optimum Search Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim HyungTae

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic lighting (auto-lighting is a function that maximizes the image quality of a vision inspection system by adjusting the light intensity and color.In most inspection systems, a single color light source is used, and an equal step search is employed to determine the maximum image quality. However, when a mixed light source is used, the number of iterations becomes large, and therefore, a rapid search method must be applied to reduce their number. Derivative optimum search methods follow the tangential direction of a function and are usually faster than other methods. In this study, multi-dimensional forms of derivative optimum search methods are applied to obtain the maximum image quality considering a mixed-light source. The auto-lighting algorithms were derived from the steepest descent and conjugate gradient methods, which have N-size inputs of driving voltage and one output of image quality. Experiments in which the proposed algorithm was applied to semiconductor patterns showed that a reduced number of iterations is required to determine the locally maximized image quality.

  12. MULTIMODALITY IMAGING OF TORPEDO MACULOPATHY WITH SWEPT-SOURCE, EN FACE OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY AND OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastefanou, Vasilios P; Vázquez-Alfageme, Clara; Keane, Pearse A; Sagoo, Mandeep S

    2016-10-19

    Multimodality image analysis of two cases of torpedo maculopathy. Imaging with fundus photography, autofluorescence (AF), swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT), en face OCT, and OCT angiography. The basal diameter of the torpedo lesions was 1 mm × 2 mm. One case had a satellite lesion. Autofluorescence indicated variable loss of signal. Swept-source OCT and en face OCT demonstrated fundus excavation, attenuation of nuclear layers and disruption of the outer plexiform layer, loss of photoreceptors and a subretinal cleft. In one case, Sattler layer appeared extended at the cleft. Optical coherence tomography angiography indicated loss of flow in deep retinal vessels and increased flow in choroidal vessels surrounding the cleft. Multimodal imaging findings of torpedo maculopathy include disruption of the deep retinal capillary network, expansion of Sattler layer, and increased signal around the subretinal cleft.

  13. Simultaneous usage of pinhole and penumbral apertures for imaging small scale neutron sources from inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, N; Volegov, P; Danly, C R; Grim, G P; Merrill, F E; Wilde, C H

    2012-10-01

    Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to understand the basic principles of creating self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic capsules. The neutron imaging diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by observing neutron images in two different energy bands for primary (13-17 MeV) and down-scattered (6-12 MeV) neutrons. From this, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. These experiments provide small sources with high yield neutron flux. An aperture design that includes an array of pinholes and penumbral apertures has provided the opportunity to image the same source with two different techniques. This allows for an evaluation of these different aperture designs and reconstruction algorithms.

  14. Accuracy assessment for the radiometric calibration of imaging sensors using preflight techniques relying on the sun as a source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, K.; Czapla-Myers, J.; Kuester, M.; Anderson, N.

    2008-08-01

    The Remote Sensing Group (RSG) at the University of Arizona has performed high-accuracy radiometric calibration in the laboratory for more than 20 years in support of vicarious calibration of space-borne and airborne imaging sensors. Typical laboratory calibration relies on lamp-based sources which, while convenient to operate and control, do not simulate the solar spectrum that is the basic energy source for many of the imaging systems. Using the sun as a source for preflight radiometric calibration reduces uncertainties caused by the spectral mismatch between the preflight and inflight calibration, especially in the case in which a solar diffuser is the inflight calibration method. Difficulties in using the sun include varying atmospheric conditions, changing solar angle during the day and with season, and ensuring traceability to national standards. This paper presents several approaches using the sun as a radiometric calibration source coupled with the expected traceable accuracies for each method. The methods include direct viewing of the solar disk with the sensor of interest, illumination of the sensor's inflight solar diffuser by the sun, and illumination of an external diffuser that is imaged by the sensor. The results of the error analysis show that it is feasible to achieve preflight calibration using the sun as a source at the same level of uncertainty as those of lamp-based approaches. The error analysis is evaluated and compared to solar-radiation-based calibrations of one of RSG's laboratory-grade radiometers.

  15. An open-source software tool for the generation of relaxation time maps in magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühne Titus

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In magnetic resonance (MR imaging, T1, T2 and T2* relaxation times represent characteristic tissue properties that can be quantified with the help of specific imaging strategies. While there are basic software tools for specific pulse sequences, until now there is no universal software program available to automate pixel-wise mapping of relaxation times from various types of images or MR systems. Such a software program would allow researchers to test and compare new imaging strategies and thus would significantly facilitate research in the area of quantitative tissue characterization. Results After defining requirements for a universal MR mapping tool, a software program named MRmap was created using a high-level graphics language. Additional features include a manual registration tool for source images with motion artifacts and a tabular DICOM viewer to examine pulse sequence parameters. MRmap was successfully tested on three different computer platforms with image data from three different MR system manufacturers and five different sorts of pulse sequences: multi-image inversion recovery T1; Look-Locker/TOMROP T1; modified Look-Locker (MOLLI T1; single-echo T2/T2*; and multi-echo T2/T2*. Computing times varied between 2 and 113 seconds. Estimates of relaxation times compared favorably to those obtained from non-automated curve fitting. Completed maps were exported in DICOM format and could be read in standard software packages used for analysis of clinical and research MR data. Conclusions MRmap is a flexible cross-platform research tool that enables accurate mapping of relaxation times from various pulse sequences. The software allows researchers to optimize quantitative MR strategies in a manufacturer-independent fashion. The program and its source code were made available as open-source software on the internet.

  16. Dual-source dual-energy CT angiography with virtual non-enhanced images and iodine map for active gastrointestinal bleeding: Image quality, radiation dose and diagnostic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hao, E-mail: sunhao_robert@126.com [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan No. 1, Wangfujing Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Hou, Xin-Yi, E-mail: hxy_pumc@126.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Xue, Hua-Dan, E-mail: bjdanna95@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan No. 1, Wangfujing Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Li, Xiao-Guang, E-mail: xglee88@126.com [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan No. 1, Wangfujing Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Jin, Zheng-Yu, E-mail: zhengyu_jin@126.com [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan No. 1, Wangfujing Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Qian, Jia-Ming, E-mail: qjiaming57@gmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Yu, Jian-Chun, E-mail: yu-jch@163.com [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Zhu, Hua-Dong, E-mail: huadongzhu@hotmail.com [Department of Emergency, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • GIB is a common gastrointestinal emergency with a high mortality rate. • Detection and localization of GIB source are important for imaging modality. • DSDECTA using a dual-phase scan protocol is clinically feasible. • DSDECTA with VNE and iodine map images can diagnose the active GIB source accurately. • DSDECTA can reduce radiation dose compared with conventional CT examination in GIB. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the clinical feasibility of dual-source dual-energy CT angiography (DSDECTA) with virtual non-enhanced images and iodine map for active gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). Methods: From June 2010 to December 2012, 112 consecutive patients with clinical signs of active GIB underwent DSDECTA with true non-enhanced (TNE), arterial phase with single-source mode, and portal-venous phase with dual-energy mode (100 kVp/230 mAs and Sn 140 kVp/178 mAs). Virtual non-enhanced CT (VNE) image sets and iodine map were reformatted from ‘Liver VNC’ software. The mean CT number, noise, signal to noise ratio (SNR), image quality and radiation dose were compared between TNE and VNE image sets. Two radiologists, blinded to clinical data, interpreted images from DSDECTA with TNE (protocol 1), and DSDECTA with VNE and iodine map (protocol 2) respectively, with discordant interpretation resolved by consensus. The standards of reference included digital subtraction angiography, endoscopy, surgery, or final pathology reports. Receiver–operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was undertaken and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated for CT protocols 1 and 2, respectively. Results: There was no significant difference in mean CT numbers of all organs (including liver, pancreas, spleen, kidney, abdominal aorta, and psoas muscle) (P > 0.05). Lower noise and higher SNR were found on VNE images than TNE images (P < 0.05). Image quality of VNE was lower than that of TNE without significant difference (P > 0.05). The active GIB source was identified

  17. Exogenous contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging: an investigation into the underlying sources of contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunlade, Olumide; Beard, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Thermoacoustic imaging at microwave excitation frequencies is limited by the low differential contrast exhibited by high water content tissues. To overcome this, exogenous thermoacoustic contrast agents based on gadolinium compounds, iron oxide, and single wall carbon nanotubes have previously been suggested and investigated. However, these previous studies did not fully characterize the electric, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of these agents thus precluding identification of the underlying sources of contrast. To address this, measurements of the complex permittivity, complex permeability, DC conductivity, and Grüneisen parameter have been made. These measurements allowed the origins of the contrast provided by each substance to be identified. The electric and magnetic properties of the contrast agents were characterized at 3 GHz using two rectangular waveguide cavities. The DC conductivity was measured separately using a conductivity meter. Thermoacoustic signals were then acquired and compared to those generated in water. Finally, 3D electromagnetic simulations were used to decouple the different contributions to the absorbed power density. It was found that the gadolinium compounds provided appreciable electric contrast but not originating from the gadolinium itself. The contrast was either due to dissociation of the gadolinium salt which increased ionic conductivity or its nondissociated polar fraction which increased dielectric polarization loss or a combination of both. In addition, very high concentrations were required to achieve appreciable contrast, to the extent that the Grüneisen parameter increased significantly and became a source of contrast. Iron oxide particles were found to produce low but measurable dielectric contrast due to dielectric polarization loss, but this is attributed to the coating of the particles not the iron oxide. Single wall carbon nanotubes did not provide measurable contrast of any type. It is concluded that

  18. Exogenous contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging: An investigation into the underlying sources of contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogunlade, Olumide, E-mail: o.ogunlade@ucl.ac.uk; Beard, Paul [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Thermoacoustic imaging at microwave excitation frequencies is limited by the low differential contrast exhibited by high water content tissues. To overcome this, exogenous thermoacoustic contrast agents based on gadolinium compounds, iron oxide, and single wall carbon nanotubes have previously been suggested and investigated. However, these previous studies did not fully characterize the electric, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of these agents thus precluding identification of the underlying sources of contrast. To address this, measurements of the complex permittivity, complex permeability, DC conductivity, and Grüneisen parameter have been made. These measurements allowed the origins of the contrast provided by each substance to be identified. Methods: The electric and magnetic properties of the contrast agents were characterized at 3 GHz using two rectangular waveguide cavities. The DC conductivity was measured separately using a conductivity meter. Thermoacoustic signals were then acquired and compared to those generated in water. Finally, 3D electromagnetic simulations were used to decouple the different contributions to the absorbed power density. Results: It was found that the gadolinium compounds provided appreciable electric contrast but not originating from the gadolinium itself. The contrast was either due to dissociation of the gadolinium salt which increased ionic conductivity or its nondissociated polar fraction which increased dielectric polarization loss or a combination of both. In addition, very high concentrations were required to achieve appreciable contrast, to the extent that the Grüneisen parameter increased significantly and became a source of contrast. Iron oxide particles were found to produce low but measurable dielectric contrast due to dielectric polarization loss, but this is attributed to the coating of the particles not the iron oxide. Single wall carbon nanotubes did not provide measurable contrast of any type

  19. Implementation of improved interactive image analysis at the Advanced Photon Source (APC) linac.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, N.

    1998-09-11

    An image-analysis system, based on commercially available data visualization software (IDL [1]), allows convenient interaction with image data while still providing calculated beam parameters at a rate of up to 2 Hz. Image data are transferred from the IOC to the workstation via EPICS [2] channel access. A custom EPICS record was created in order to overcome the channel access limit of 16k bytes per array. The user can conveniently calibrate optical transition radiation (OTR) and fluorescent screens, capture background images, acquire and average a series of images, and specify several other filtering and viewing options. The images can be saved in either IDL format or APS-standard format (SDDS [3]), allowing for rapid postprocessing of image data by numerous other software tools.

  20. A game-based platform for crowd-sourcing biomedical image diagnosis and standardized remote training and education of diagnosticians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Steve; Woo, Minjae; Chandramouli, Krithika; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, crowd-sourcing complex image analysis tasks to a human crowd has emerged as an alternative to energy-inefficient and difficult-to-implement computational approaches. Following this trend, we have developed a mathematical framework for statistically combining human crowd-sourcing of biomedical image analysis and diagnosis through games. Using a web-based smart game (BioGames), we demonstrated this platform's effectiveness for telediagnosis of malaria from microscopic images of individual red blood cells (RBCs). After public release in early 2012 (http://biogames.ee.ucla.edu), more than 3000 gamers (experts and non-experts) used this BioGames platform to diagnose over 2800 distinct RBC images, marking them as positive (infected) or negative (non-infected). Furthermore, we asked expert diagnosticians to tag the same set of cells with labels of positive, negative, or questionable (insufficient information for a reliable diagnosis) and statistically combined their decisions to generate a gold standard malaria image library. Our framework utilized minimally trained gamers' diagnoses to generate a set of statistical labels with an accuracy that is within 98% of our gold standard image library, demonstrating the "wisdom of the crowd". Using the same image library, we have recently launched a web-based malaria training and educational game allowing diagnosticians to compare their performance with their peers. After diagnosing a set of ~500 cells per game, diagnosticians can compare their quantified scores against a leaderboard and view their misdiagnosed cells. Using this platform, we aim to expand our gold standard library with new RBC images and provide a quantified digital tool for measuring and improving diagnostician training globally.

  1. A microwave imaging-based technique to localize an in-body RF source for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Rohit; Johansson, Anders J; Gustafsson, Mats; Tufvesson, Fredrik

    2015-05-01

    In some biomedical applications such as wireless capsule endoscopy, the localization of an in-body radio-frequency (RF) source is important for the positioning of any abnormality inside the gastrointestinal tract. With knowledge of the location, therapeutic operations can be performed precisely at the position of the abnormality. Electrical properties (relative permittivity and conductivity) of the tissues and their distribution are utilized to estimate the position. This paper presents a method for the localization of an in-body RF source based on microwave imaging. The electrical properties of the tissues and their distribution at 403.5 MHz are found from microwave imaging and the position of an RF source is then estimated based on the image. The method is applied on synthetic noisy data, obtained after the addition of white Gaussian noise to simulated data of a simple circular phantom, and a realistic phantom in a 2-D case. The root-mean-square of the error distance between the actual and the estimated position is found to be within 10 and 4 mm for the circular and the realistic phantom, respectively, showing the capability of the proposed algorithm to work with a good accuracy even in the presence of noise for the localization of the in-body RF source.

  2. Magnetic source imaging for the surgical evaluation of electroencephalography-confirmed secondary bilateral synchrony in intractable epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Edward F; Nagarajan, Srikantan S; Mantle, Mary; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Kirsch, Heidi E

    2009-12-01

    Routine scalp electroencephalography (EEG) cannot always distinguish whether generalized epileptiform discharges are the result of primary bilateral synchrony or secondary bilateral synchrony (SBS) from a focal origin; this is an important distinction because the latter may be amenable to resection. Whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) has superior spatial resolution compared with traditional EEG, and can potentially elucidate seizure foci in challenging epilepsy cases in which patients are undergoing evaluation for surgery. Sixteen patients with medically intractable epilepsy in whom SBS was suspected were referred for magnetic source (MS) imaging. All patients had bilateral, synchronous, widespread, and most often generalized spike-wave discharges on scalp EEG studies, plus some other clinical (for example, seizure semiology) or MR imaging feature (for example, focal lesion) suggesting focal onset and hence possible surgical candidacy. The MS imaging modality is the combination of whole-head MEG and parametric reconstruction of corresponding electrical brain sources. An MEG and simultaneous EEG studies were recorded with a 275-channel whole-head system. Single-equivalent current dipoles were estimated from the MEG data, and dipole locations and orientations were superimposed on patients' MR images. The MS imaging studies revealed focal dipole clusters in 12 (75%) of the 16 patients, of which a single dipole cluster was identified in 7 patients (44%). Patient age, seizure type, duration of disease, video-EEG telemetry, and MR imaging results were analyzed to determine factors predictive of having clusters revealed on MS imaging. Of these factors, only focal MR imaging anatomical abnormalities were associated with dipole clusters (chi-square test, p = 0.03). Selective resections (including the dipole cluster) in 7 (87%) of 8 patients resulted in seizure-free or rare seizure outcomes (Engel Classes I and II). Magnetic source imaging may provide noninvasive

  3. SPLASSH: Open source software for camera-based high-speed, multispectral in-vivo optical image acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ryan; Bouchard, Matthew B; Hillman, Elizabeth M C

    2010-08-02

    Camera-based in-vivo optical imaging can provide detailed images of living tissue that reveal structure, function, and disease. High-speed, high resolution imaging can reveal dynamic events such as changes in blood flow and responses to stimulation. Despite these benefits, commercially available scientific cameras rarely include software that is suitable for in-vivo imaging applications, making this highly versatile form of optical imaging challenging and time-consuming to implement. To address this issue, we have developed a novel, open-source software package to control high-speed, multispectral optical imaging systems. The software integrates a number of modular functions through a custom graphical user interface (GUI) and provides extensive control over a wide range of inexpensive IEEE 1394 Firewire cameras. Multispectral illumination can be incorporated through the use of off-the-shelf light emitting diodes which the software synchronizes to image acquisition via a programmed microcontroller, allowing arbitrary high-speed illumination sequences. The complete software suite is available for free download. Here we describe the software's framework and provide details to guide users with development of this and similar software.

  4. Development of CD3 cell quantitation algorithms for renal allograft biopsy rejection assessment utilizing open source image analysis software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Andres; Smith, Geoffrey H; Kong, Jun; Rogers, Thomas E; Ellis, Carla L; Farris, Alton B Brad

    2017-11-08

    Renal allograft rejection diagnosis depends on assessment of parameters such as interstitial inflammation; however, studies have shown interobserver variability regarding interstitial inflammation assessment. Since automated image analysis quantitation can be reproducible, we devised customized analysis methods for CD3+ T-cell staining density as a measure of rejection severity and compared them with established commercial methods along with visual assessment. Renal biopsy CD3 immunohistochemistry slides (n = 45), including renal allografts with various degrees of acute cellular rejection (ACR) were scanned for whole slide images (WSIs). Inflammation was quantitated in the WSIs using pathologist visual assessment, commercial algorithms (Aperio nuclear algorithm for CD3+ cells/mm(2) and Aperio positive pixel count algorithm), and customized open source algorithms developed in ImageJ with thresholding/positive pixel counting (custom CD3+%) and identification of pixels fulfilling "maxima" criteria for CD3 expression (custom CD3+ cells/mm(2)). Based on visual inspections of "markup" images, CD3 quantitation algorithms produced adequate accuracy. Additionally, CD3 quantitation algorithms correlated between each other and also with visual assessment in a statistically significant manner (r = 0.44 to 0.94, p = 0.003 to CD3-stained slides using various open source image analysis algorithms presents salient correlations with established methods of CD3 quantitation. These analysis techniques are promising and highly customizable, providing a form of on-slide "flow cytometry" that can facilitate additional diagnostic accuracy in tissue-based assessments.

  5. Imaging the Parasinus Region with a Third-Generation Dual-Source CT and the Effect of Tin Filtration on Image Quality and Radiation Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lell, M M; May, M S; Brand, M; Eller, A; Buder, T; Hofmann, E; Uder, M; Wuest, W

    2015-07-01

    CT is the imaging technique of choice in the evaluation of midface trauma or inflammatory disease. We performed a systematic evaluation of scan protocols to optimize image quality and radiation exposure on third-generation dual-source CT. CT protocols with different tube voltage (70-150 kV), current (25-300 reference mAs), prefiltration, pitch value, and rotation time were systematically evaluated. All images were reconstructed with iterative reconstruction (Advanced Modeled Iterative Reconstruction, level 2). To individually compare results with otherwise identical factors, we obtained all scans on a frozen human head. Conebeam CT was performed for image quality and dose comparison with multidetector row CT. Delineation of important anatomic structures and incidental pathologic conditions in the cadaver head was evaluated. One hundred kilovolts with tin prefiltration demonstrated the best compromise between dose and image quality. The most dose-effective combination for trauma imaging was Sn100 kV/250 mAs (volume CT dose index, 2.02 mGy), and for preoperative sinus surgery planning, Sn100 kV/150 mAs (volume CT dose index, 1.22 mGy). "Sn" indicates an additional prefiltration of the x-ray beam with a tin filter to constrict the energy spectrum. Exclusion of sinonasal disease was possible with even a lower dose by using Sn100 kV/25 mAs (volume CT dose index, 0.2 mGy). High image quality at very low dose levels can be achieved by using a Sn100-kV protocol with iterative reconstruction. The effective dose is comparable with that of conventional radiography, and the high image quality at even lower radiation exposure favors multidetector row CT over conebeam CT. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  6. Performance comparison between 8- and 14-bit-depth imaging in polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Recently the effects of reduced bit-depth acquisition on swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) image quality have been evaluated by using simulations and empirical studies, showing that image acquisition at 8-bit depth allows high system sensitivity with only a minimal drop in the signal-to-noise ratio compared to higher bit-depth systems. However, in these studies the 8-bit data is actually 12- or 14-bit ADC data numerically truncated to 8 bits. In practice, a native 8-bit ADC c...

  7. Imaging many-body Coulomb interactions and ultrafast photoionization and diffraction with cold atom electron and ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Robert; Speirs, Rory; Murphy, Dene; Torrance, Joshua; Thompson, Daniel; Sparkes, Benjamin; McCulloch, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The CAEIS cold-atom electron/ion source, based on photoionisation of laser cooled atoms, provides a powerful tool for investigating fundamental physical processes. The very low temperature of the ions has allowed us to image intra-beam Coulomb effects with unprecedented detail. With ultrafast laser excitation and streak detection we can probe competing ionization processes, particularly via Rydberg states, including sequential excitation, multiphoton excitation, resonance-enhanced multiphoton excitation and two-color multiphoton excitation. Knowledge from these studies has enabled ultrafast single-shot diffractive electron imaging with atomic resolution using a CAEIS.

  8. Image reconstruction of mMR PET data using the open source software STIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, Pawel [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Thielemans, Kris [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Burgos, Ninon [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Manber, Richard [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Jiao, Jieqing [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Barnes, Anna [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Atkinson, David [Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Arridge, Simon R [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Hutton, Brian F [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Ourselin, Sébastien [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Dementia Research Centre, University College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-29

    Simultaneous PET and MR acquisitions have now become possible with the new hybrid Biograph Molecular MR (mMR) scanner from Siemens. The purpose of this work is to create a platform for mMR 3D and 4D PET image reconstruction which would be freely accessible to the community as well as fully adjustable in order to obtain optimal images for a given research task in PET imaging. The proposed platform is envisaged to prove useful in developing novel and robust image bio-markers which could then be adapted for use on the mMR scanner.

  9. High pitch, low voltage dual source CT pulmonary angiography: assessment of image quality and diagnostic acceptability with hybrid iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Patrick D; Liang, T; Homiedan, M; Louis, L J; O'Connell, T W; Krzymyk, Karl; Nicolaou, S; Mayo, J R

    2015-04-01

    Increased use of CT Pulmonary angiography in suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) has driven research to minimize radiation dose while maintaining image quality and diagnostic accuracy. Following institutional review board approval, we performed a retrospective comparison study in patients with suspected PE. Patients were scanned using an ultra high pitch dual source technique (pitch = 2.6) using 120 kV (SVCTPA) (n = 54) or 100 kV (RV-CTPA) (n = 52). SV-CTPA images were reconstructed using filtered back projection (SV-wFBP) and RV-CTPA images were reconstructed using both FBP (RV-wFBP) and Iterative Reconstruction (RV-IR). Comparison of radiation dose, diagnostic ability, subjective image noise, quality, and sharpness, diagnostic agreement, signal to noise (SNR) and contrast to noise ratios (CNR) were performed. Mean effective dose was 2.56 ± 0.19 mSv for the RV protocol compared to 5.36 ± 0.60 mSv for the SV. The RV-CTPA protocol resulted in a mean DLP reduction of 52 % and mean CTDI reduction of 51 %. Pulmonary artery SNR and CNR were significantly higher on RV-IR images than SV-wFBP (p = 0.007, p = 0.003). Mean subjective image noise, quality and sharpness scores did not differ significantly between the SV-wFBP and RVIR images (p > 0.05). Subjective quality scores were significantly better for the RV-IR group compared to the RV-wFBP group (p perfect (κ = 0.891, p pitch dual source CTPA examinations acquired using a reduced voltage resulting in higher mean pulmonary artery SNR and CNR when compared to both RV-wFBP and SV-CTPA.

  10. Volitional Control of Neuromagnetic Coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Sacchet

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Coherence of neural activity between circumscribed brain regions has been implicated as an indicator of intracerebral communication in various cognitive processes. While neural activity can be volitionally controlled with neurofeedback, the volitional control of coherence has not yet been explored. Learned volitional control of coherence could elucidate mechanisms of associations between cortical areas and its cognitive correlates and may have clinical implications. Neural coherence may also provide a signal for brain-computer interfaces (BCI. In the present study we used the Weighted Overlapping Segment Averaging (WOSA method to assess coherence between bilateral magnetoencephalograph (MEG sensors during voluntary digit movement as a basis for BCI control. Participants controlled an onscreen cursor, with a success rate of 124 of 180 (68.9%, sign-test p < 0.001 and 84 out of 100 (84%, sign-test p < 0.001. The present findings suggest that neural coherence may be volitionally controlled and may have specific behavioral correlates.

  11. Performance comparison between 8- and 14-bit-depth imaging in polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K; Matcher, Stephen J

    2011-03-04

    Recently the effects of reduced bit-depth acquisition on swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) image quality have been evaluated by using simulations and empirical studies, showing that image acquisition at 8-bit depth allows high system sensitivity with only a minimal drop in the signal-to-noise ratio compared to higher bit-depth systems. However, in these studies the 8-bit data is actually 12- or 14-bit ADC data numerically truncated to 8 bits. In practice, a native 8-bit ADC could actually possess a true bit resolution lower than this due to the electronic jitter in the converter etc. We compare true 8- and 14-bit-depth imaging of SS-OCT and polarization-sensitive SS-OCT (PS-SS-OCT) by using two hardware-synchronized high-speed data acquisition (DAQ) boards. The two DAQ boards read exactly the same imaging data for comparison. The measured system sensitivity at 8-bit depth is comparable to that for 14-bit acquisition when using the more sensitive of the available full analog input voltage ranges of the ADC. Ex-vivo structural and birefringence images of equine tendon indicate no significant differences between images acquired by the two DAQ boards suggesting that 8-bit DAQ boards can be employed to increase imaging speeds and reduce storage in clinical SS-OCT/PS-SS-OCT systems. One possible disadvantage is a reduced imaging dynamic range which can manifest itself as an increase in image artifacts due to strong Fresnel reflection.

  12. New open source medical imaging tools released by CERN and University of Bath collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Rassat, KT group

    2016-01-01

    New toolbox has applications in medical imaging and cancer diagnosis.   3D X-ray imaging of a patient’s lungs and thorax. The TIGRE toolbox provides a high resolution image with only 1/30th of the radiation for the patient. (Image: Ander Biguri) CERN and the University of Bath have released a new toolbox for fast, accurate 3D X-ray image reconstruction with applications in medical imaging and cancer diagnosis. The software offers a very simple and affordable way to improve imaging and potentially reduce radiation doses for patients. The toolbox is based on Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), a type of scanning process that takes a series of 2D X-ray pictures and that then processes them into a 3D image. As part of the collaborative project between CERN and the University of Bath, Ander Biguri, a PhD student at Bath, has reviewed a broad range of published CBCT algorithms and adapted them to be faster. Ander Biguri modified the algorithms to run on a laptop fitted with a GPU &ndash...

  13. Mobile real-time EEG imaging Bayesian inference with sparse, temporally smooth source priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Hansen, Sofie Therese; Stahlhut, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    and well-being, and in clinical settings were patients may need imaging under quasi-natural conditions. Challenges related to the ill-posed nature of the EEG imaging problem escalate in mobile real-time systems and new algorithms and the use of meta-data may be necessary to succeed. Based on recent work...

  14. Automatic Matching of Multi-Source Satellite Images: A Case Study on ZY-1-02C and ETM+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The ever-growing number of applications for satellites is being compromised by their poor direct positioning precision. Existing orthoimages, such as enhanced thematic mapper (ETM+ orthoimages, can provide georeferences or improve the geo-referencing accuracy of satellite images, such ZY-1-02C images that have unsatisfactory positioning precision, thus enhancing their processing efficiency and application. In this paper, a feasible image matching approach using multi-source satellite images is proposed on the basis of an experiment carried out with ZY-1-02C Level 1 images and ETM+ orthoimages. The proposed approach overcame differences in rotation angle, scale, and translation between images. The rotation and scale variances were evaluated on the basis of rational polynomial coefficients. The translation vectors were generated after blocking the overall phase correlation. Then, normalized cross-correlation and least-squares matching were applied for matching. Finally, the gross errors of the corresponding points were eliminated by local statistic vectors in a TIN structure. Experimental results showed a matching precision of less than two pixels (root-mean-square error, and comparison results indicated that the proposed method outperforms Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT, Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF, and Affine-Scale Invariant Feature Transform (A-SIFT in terms of reliability and efficiency.

  15. Characterization of continuous and pulsed emission modes of a hybrid micro focus x-ray source for medical imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wong, Molly D.; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Zheng, Bin [Center for Biomedical Engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Rong, John X. [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Wu, Xizeng [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Liu, Hong, E-mail: liu@ou.edu [Center for Biomedical Engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterize a micro focus x-ray tube that can operate in both continuous and pulsed emission modes. The micro focus x-ray source (Model L9181-06, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) has a varying focal spot size ranging from 16 µm to 50 µm as the source output power changes from 10 to 39 W. We measured the source output, beam quality, focal spot sizes, kV accuracy, spectra shapes and spatial resolution. Source output was measured using an ionization chamber for various tube voltages (kVs) with varying current (µA) and distances. The beam quality was measured in terms of half value layer (HVL), kV accuracy was measured with a non-invasive kV meter, and the spectra was measured using a compact integrated spectrometer system. The focal spot sizes were measured using a slit method with a CCD detector with a pixel pitch of 22 µm. The spatial resolution was quantitatively measured using the slit method with a CMOS flat panel detector with a 50 µm pixel pitch, and compared to the qualitative results obtained by imaging a contrast bar pattern. The focal spot sizes in the vertical direction were smaller than that of the horizontal direction, the impact of which was visible when comparing the spatial resolution values. Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam quality, spectra shape and spatial resolution effects. There were no significantly large differences, thus providing the motivation for future studies to design and develop stable and robust cone beam imaging systems for various diagnostic applications. - Highlights: • A micro focus x-ray source that operates in both continuous and pulse emission modes was quantitatively characterized. • The source output, beam quality, focal spot measurements, kV accuracy, spectra analyses and spatial resolution were measured. • Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam

  16. High-resolution MEG source imaging approach to accurately localize Broca's area in patients with brain tumor or epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Charles W; Huang, Ming-Xiong; Ji, Zhengwei; Swan, Ashley Robb; Angeles, Anne Marie; Song, Tao; Huang, Jeffrey W; Lee, Roland R

    2016-05-01

    Localizing expressive language function has been challenging using the conventional magnetoencephalography (MEG) source modeling methods. The present MEG study presents a new accurate and precise approach in localizing the language areas using a high-resolution MEG source imaging method. In 32 patients with brain tumors and/or epilepsies, an object-naming task was used to evoke MEG responses. Our Fast-VESTAL source imaging method was then applied to the MEG data in order to localize the brain areas evoked by the object-naming task. The Fast-VESTAL results showed that Broca's area was accurately localized to the pars opercularis (BA 44) and/or the pars triangularis (BA 45) in all patients. Fast-VESTAL also accurately localized Wernicke's area to the posterior aspect of the superior temporal gyri in BA 22, as well as several additional brain areas. Furthermore, we found that the latency of the main peak of the response in Wernicke's area was significantly earlier than that of Broca's area. In all patients, Fast-VESTAL analysis established accurate and precise localizations of Broca's area, as well as other language areas. The responses in Wernicke's area were also shown to significantly precede those of Broca's area. The present study demonstrates that using Fast-VESTAL, MEG can serve as an accurate and reliable functional imaging tool for presurgical mapping of language functions in patients with brain tumors and/or epilepsies. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. CT-angiography source images indicate less fatal outcome despite coma of patients in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallesen, Lars P; Khomenko, Andrei; Dzialowski, Imanuel; Barlinn, Jessica; Barlinn, Kristian; Zerna, Charlotte; van der Hoeven, Erik Jrj; Algra, Ale; Kapelle, L Jaap; Michel, Patrik; Bodechtel, Ulf; Demchuk, Andrew M; Schonewille, Wouter; Puetz, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Background Coma is associated with poor outcome in patients with basilar artery occlusion. Aims We sought to assess whether the posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score and the Pons-Midbrain Index applied to CT angiography source images predict the outcome of comatose patients in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study. Methods Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study was a prospective, observational registry of patients with acute basilar artery occlusion with 48 recruiting centers worldwide. We applied posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score and Pons-Midbrain Index to CT angiography source images of Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study patients who presented with coma. We calculated adjusted risk ratios to assess the association of dichotomized posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score (≥8 vs. patients in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study registry, CT angiography source images were available for review in 158 patients. Among these, 78 patients (49%) presented with coma. Compared to non-comatose patients, comatose patients were more likely to die (risk ratios 2.34; CI 95% 1.56-3.52) and less likely to have a favourable outcome (risk ratios 0.44; CI 95% 0.24-0.80). Among comatose patients, a Pons-Midbrain Index patients with basilar artery occlusion, the extent of brainstem ischemia appears to be related to mortality but not to favourable outcome.

  18. Ultra-high performance mirror systems for the imaging and coherence beamline I13 at the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, U. H.; Alcock, S.; Ludbrook, G.; Wiatryzk, J.; Rau, C.

    2012-05-01

    I13L is a 250m long hard x-ray beamline (6 keV to 35 keV) currently under construction at the Diamond Light Source. The beamline comprises of two independent experimental endstations: one for imaging in direct space using x-ray microscopy and one for imaging in reciprocal space using coherent diffraction based imaging techniques. To minimise the impact of thermal fluctuations and vibrations onto the beamline performance, we are developing a new generation of ultra-stable beamline instrumentation with highly repeatable adjustment mechanisms using low thermal expansion materials like granite and large piezo-driven flexure stages. For minimising the beam distortion we use very high quality optical components like large ion-beam polished mirrors. In this paper we present the first metrology results on a newly designed mirror system following this design philosophy.

  19. Jenkins-CI, an Open-Source Continuous Integration System, as a Scientific Data and Image-Processing Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutsatsos, Ioannis K; Hossain, Imtiaz; Agarinis, Claudia; Harbinski, Fred; Abraham, Yann; Dobler, Luc; Zhang, Xian; Wilson, Christopher J; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Holway, Nicholas; Tallarico, John; Parker, Christian N

    2017-03-01

    High-throughput screening generates large volumes of heterogeneous data that require a diverse set of computational tools for management, processing, and analysis. Building integrated, scalable, and robust computational workflows for such applications is challenging but highly valuable. Scientific data integration and pipelining facilitate standardized data processing, collaboration, and reuse of best practices. We describe how Jenkins-CI, an "off-the-shelf," open-source, continuous integration system, is used to build pipelines for processing images and associated data from high-content screening (HCS). Jenkins-CI provides numerous plugins for standard compute tasks, and its design allows the quick integration of external scientific applications. Using Jenkins-CI, we integrated CellProfiler, an open-source image-processing platform, with various HCS utilities and a high-performance Linux cluster. The platform is web-accessible, facilitates access and sharing of high-performance compute resources, and automates previously cumbersome data and image-processing tasks. Imaging pipelines developed using the desktop CellProfiler client can be managed and shared through a centralized Jenkins-CI repository. Pipelines and managed data are annotated to facilitate collaboration and reuse. Limitations with Jenkins-CI (primarily around the user interface) were addressed through the selection of helper plugins from the Jenkins-CI community.

  20. Jenkins-CI, an Open-Source Continuous Integration System, as a Scientific Data and Image-Processing Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutsatsos, Ioannis K.; Hossain, Imtiaz; Agarinis, Claudia; Harbinski, Fred; Abraham, Yann; Dobler, Luc; Zhang, Xian; Wilson, Christopher J.; Jenkins, Jeremy L.; Holway, Nicholas; Tallarico, John; Parker, Christian N.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screening generates large volumes of heterogeneous data that require a diverse set of computational tools for management, processing, and analysis. Building integrated, scalable, and robust computational workflows for such applications is challenging but highly valuable. Scientific data integration and pipelining facilitate standardized data processing, collaboration, and reuse of best practices. We describe how Jenkins-CI, an “off-the-shelf,” open-source, continuous integration system, is used to build pipelines for processing images and associated data from high-content screening (HCS). Jenkins-CI provides numerous plugins for standard compute tasks, and its design allows the quick integration of external scientific applications. Using Jenkins-CI, we integrated CellProfiler, an open-source image-processing platform, with various HCS utilities and a high-performance Linux cluster. The platform is web-accessible, facilitates access and sharing of high-performance compute resources, and automates previously cumbersome data and image-processing tasks. Imaging pipelines developed using the desktop CellProfiler client can be managed and shared through a centralized Jenkins-CI repository. Pipelines and managed data are annotated to facilitate collaboration and reuse. Limitations with Jenkins-CI (primarily around the user interface) were addressed through the selection of helper plugins from the Jenkins-CI community. PMID:27899692

  1. Body Image as a Source of Shame: A New Measure for the Assessment of the Multifaceted Nature of Body Image Shame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Cristiana; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Ferreira, Cláudia; Batista, Diana

    2015-01-01

    distinguishes between women with higher and normative levels of disordered eating behaviours. Body image shame, as assessed by the BISS, contributes to a better understanding of eating psychopathology with findings suggesting that the association between external shame and eating psychopathology fully depends on the extent to which one's body image becomes the source of shame, with the consequent activation of defensive attitudes and behaviours. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. SU-E-J-42: Customized Deformable Image Registration Using Open-Source Software SlicerRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaitan, J Cifuentes; Chin, L; Pignol, J [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kirby, N; Pouliot, J [UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lasso, A; Pinter, C; Fichtinger, G [Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: SlicerRT is a flexible platform that allows the user to incorporate the necessary images registration and processing tools to improve clinical workflow. This work validates the accuracy and the versatility of the deformable image registration algorithm of the free open-source software SlicerRT using a deformable physical pelvic phantom versus available commercial image fusion algorithms. Methods: Optical camera images of nonradiopaque markers implanted in an anatomical pelvic phantom were used to measure the ground-truth deformation and evaluate the theoretical deformations for several DIR algorithms. To perform the registration, full and empty bladder computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were obtained and used as fixed and moving images, respectively. The DIR module, found in SlicerRT, used a B-spline deformable image registration with multiple optimization parameters that allowed customization of the registration including a regularization term that controlled the amount of local voxel displacement. The virtual deformation field at the center of the phantom was obtained and compared to the experimental ground-truth values. The parameters of SlicerRT were then varied to improve spatial accuracy. To quantify image similarity, the mean absolute difference (MAD) parameter using Hounsfield units was calculated. In addition, the Dice coefficient of the contoured rectum was evaluated to validate the strength of the algorithm to transfer anatomical contours. Results: Overall, SlicerRT achieved one of the lowest MAD values across the algorithm spectrum, but slightly smaller mean spatial errors in comparison to MIM software (MIM). On the other hand, SlicerRT created higher mean spatial errors than Velocity Medical Solutions (VEL), although obtaining an improvement on the DICE to 0.91. The large spatial errors were attributed to the poor contrast in the prostate bladder interface of the phantom. Conclusion: Based phantom validation, SlicerRT is capable of

  3. Imaging collector channel entrance with a new intraocular micro-probe swept-source optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Chen; Chen, Xiaoya; Li, Meng; Shi, Yan; Wang, Huaizhou; Wang, Ruikang; Wang, Ningli

    2017-09-01

    To describe the use of a newly developed side-viewing catheter probe to provide the cross-sectional images of collector channel entrance (CCE), achieved by swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). A side-viewing SS-OCT catheter probe was developed that has a core probe diameter of 0.15 mm and an outer diameter of 0.25 mm, for the purpose of imaging CCEs within eye globe. Cadaver eyes harvested from swine and human were used to demonstrate its feasibility. For porcine eyes, the probe imaged the CCE by accessing the region of the aqueous plexus (AP) as well as along the inner wall (IW) of the trabecular meshwork (TM). For human eyes, the CCE images were captured by placing the probe within the lumen of the Schlemm's canal (SC) and along its IW. With the optical coherence tomography (OCT) catheter probe, the CCE is well delineated as optically empty areas within the highly scattering sclera. In porcine eyes, images captured in the region of the AP demonstrate a large cavity with delicate tissue strands around the probe. The CCE can be identified at the outer margin of the AP. When imaged along the IW, the TM is discernable but difficult to be distinguished from the AP. In the human limbal regions, when placed within the lumen of the SC, the catheter probe fully occupies the potential space. TM is highly compact. The CCE can be identified at the outer wall of the SC. When imaged along the IW of TM, the SC and CCE can be identified. The intraocular SS-OCT catheter probe is feasible to provide the CCE images, indicating useful clinical applications to assist glaucoma surgery. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation of short-term source and item memory for negative pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Karen J; Mather, Mara; Johnson, Marcia K; Raye, Carol L; Greene, Erich J

    2006-10-02

    We investigated the hypothesis that arousal recruits attention to item information, thereby disrupting working memory processes that help bind items to context. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared brain activity when participants remembered negative or neutral picture-location conjunctions (source memory) versus pictures only. Behaviorally, negative trials showed disruption of short-term source, but not picture, memory; long-term picture recognition memory was better for negative than for neutral pictures. Activity in areas involved in working memory and feature integration (precentral gyrus and its intersect with superior temporal gyrus) was attenuated on negative compared with neutral source trials relative to picture-only trials. Visual processing areas (middle occipital and lingual gyri) showed greater activity for negative than for neutral trials, especially on picture-only trials.

  5. Development of Realistic Head Models for Electromagnetic Source Imaging of the Human Brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akalin, Z

    2001-01-01

    ... images is performed Then triangular, quadratic meshes are formed for the interfaces of the tissues, Thus, realistic meshes, representing scalp, skull, CSF, brain and eye tissues, are formed, At least...

  6. Functional magnetic resonance imaging study of external source memory and its relation to cognitive insight in non-clinical subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchy, Lisa; Hawco, Colin; Bodnar, Michael; Izadi, Sarah; Dell'Elce, Jennifer; Messina, Katrina; Lepage, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Previous research has linked cognitive insight (a measure of self-reflectiveness and self-certainty) in psychosis with neurocognitive and neuroanatomical disturbances in the fronto-hippocampal neural network. The authors' goal was to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates of cognitive insight during an external source memory paradigm in non-clinical subjects. At encoding, 24 non-clinical subjects travelled through a virtual city where they came across 20 separate people, each paired with a unique object in a distinct location. fMRI data were then acquired while participants viewed images of the city, and completed source recognition memory judgments of where and with whom objects were seen, which is known to involve prefrontal cortex. Cognitive insight was assessed with the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale. External source memory was associated with neural activity in a widespread network consisting of frontal cortex, including ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), temporal and occipital cortices. Activation in VLPFC correlated with higher self-reflectiveness and activation in midbrain correlated with lower self-certainty during source memory attributions. Neither self-reflectiveness nor self-certainty significantly correlated with source memory accuracy. By means of virtual reality and in the context of an external source memory paradigm, the study identified a preliminary functional neural basis for cognitive insight in the VLPFC in healthy people that accords with our fronto-hippocampal theoretical model as well as recent neuroimaging data in people with psychosis. The results may facilitate the understanding of the role of neural mechanisms in psychotic disorders associated with cognitive insight distortions. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  7. Processing digital images and calculation of beam emittance (pepper-pot method for the Krion source)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, V. S.; Donets, E. E.; Nyukhalova, E. V.; Kaminsky, A. K.; Sedykh, S. N.; Tuzikov, A. V.; Philippov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Programs for the pre-processing of photographs of beam images on the mask based on Wolfram Mathematica and Origin software are described. Angles of rotation around the axis and in the vertical plane are taken into account in the generation of the file with image coordinates. Results of the emittance calculation by the Pep_emit program written in Visual Basic using the generated file in the test mode are presented.

  8. Evaluation of the middle and inner ear structures: comparison of hybrid rendering, virtual endoscopy and axial 2D source images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seemann, M.D. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Seemann, O. [Department of Psychiatry, Klinikum Innenstadt, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Bonel, H.; Allen, C.M.; Reiser, M.F. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Suckfuell, M.; Naumann, A. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Englmeier, K.H. [Department of Medical Informatics and Health System Research, GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Recent developments in 3D reconstructions can enhance the quality and diagnostic value of axial 2D image data sets with direct benefits for clinical practice. To show the possible advantages of a hybrid rendering method [color-coded 3D shaded-surface display (SSD)- and volume rendering method] with the possibility of virtual endoscopy we have specifically highlighted the use in relation to the middle and inner ear structures. We examined 12 patients with both normal findings and postoperative changes, using image data sets from high-resolution spiral computed tomography (HRSCT). The middle and inner ear was segmented using an interactive threshold interval density volume-growing method and visualized with a color-coded SSD rendering method. The temporal bone was visualized using a transparent volume rendering method. The 3D- and virtual reconstructions were compared with the axial 2D source images. The evaluated middle and inner ear structures could be seen in their complete form and correct topographical relationship, and the 3D- and virtual reconstructions indicated an improved representation and spatial orientation of these structures. A hybrid and virtual endoscopic method could add information and improve the value of imaging in the diagnosis and management of patients with middle or inner ear diseases making the understanding and interpretation of axial 2D CT image data sets easier. The introduction of an improved rendering algorithm aids radiological diagnostics, medical education, surgical planning, surgical training, and postoperative assessment. (orig.)

  9. Quantitative Image Feature Engine (QIFE): an Open-Source, Modular Engine for 3D Quantitative Feature Extraction from Volumetric Medical Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echegaray, Sebastian; Bakr, Shaimaa; Rubin, Daniel L; Napel, Sandy

    2017-10-06

    The aim of this study was to develop an open-source, modular, locally run or server-based system for 3D radiomics feature computation that can be used on any computer system and included in existing workflows for understanding associations and building predictive models between image features and clinical data, such as survival. The QIFE exploits various levels of parallelization for use on multiprocessor systems. It consists of a managing framework and four stages: input, pre-processing, feature computation, and output. Each stage contains one or more swappable components, allowing run-time customization. We benchmarked the engine using various levels of parallelization on a cohort of CT scans presenting 108 lung tumors. Two versions of the QIFE have been released: (1) the open-source MATLAB code posted to Github, (2) a compiled version loaded in a Docker container, posted to DockerHub, which can be easily deployed on any computer. The QIFE processed 108 objects (tumors) in 2:12 (h/mm) using 1 core, and 1:04 (h/mm) hours using four cores with object-level parallelization. We developed the Quantitative Image Feature Engine (QIFE), an open-source feature-extraction framework that focuses on modularity, standards, parallelism, provenance, and integration. Researchers can easily integrate it with their existing segmentation and imaging workflows by creating input and output components that implement their existing interfaces. Computational efficiency can be improved by parallelizing execution at the cost of memory usage. Different parallelization levels provide different trade-offs, and the optimal setting will depend on the size and composition of the dataset to be processed.

  10. WE-D-204-06: An Open Source ImageJ CatPhan Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, G [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The CatPhan is a popular QA device for assessing CT image quality. There are a number of software options which perform analysis of the CatPhan. However, there is often little ability for the user to adjust the analysis if it isn’t running properly, and these are all expensive options. An open source tool is an effective solution. Methods: To use the software, the user imports the CT as an image sequence in ImageJ. The user then scrolls to the slice with the lateral dots. The user then runs the plugin. If tolerance constraints are not already created, the user is prompted to enter them or to use generic tolerances. Upon completion of the analysis, the plugin calls pdfLaTex to compile the pdf report. There is a csv version of the report as well. A log of the results from all CatPhan scans is kept as a csv file. The user can use this to baseline the machine. Results: The tool is capable of detecting the orientation of the phantom. If the CatPhan was scanned backwards, one can simply flip the stack of images horizontally and proceed with the analysis. The analysis includes Sensitometry (estimating the effective beam energy), HU values and linearity, Low Contrast Visibility (using LDPE & Polystyrene), Contrast Scale, Geometric Accuracy, Slice Thickness Accuracy, Spatial resolution (giving the MTF using the line pairs as well as the point spread function), CNR, Low Contrast Detectability (including the raw data), Uniformity (including the Cupping Effect). Conclusion: This is a robust tool that analyzes more components of the CatPhan than other software options (with the exception of ImageOwl). It produces an elegant pdf and keeps a log of analyses for long-term tracking of the system. Because it is open source, users are able to customize any component of it.

  11. Widely tunable, high peak power ultrafast laser sources in biological imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julien

    2017-02-01

    Widely tunable ultrafast lasers have enabled a large number of biological imaging techniques including point scanning multiphoton excited fluorescence (MPEF), SHG/THG and stimulated Raman imaging. Tunable ultrafast lasers offer spectral agility, covering the entire relative transparency window in live tissue (700-1300nnm) and flexibility with multi-color, synchronized outputs to support sophisticated label free techniques (e.g. stimulated Raman modalities). More recently newly available high peak power lasers based on Ytterbium technology drive advances in two-photon light-sheet, 3 photon excited fluorescence and holographic patterning for optogenetics photo-stimulation. These laser platforms offer a unique blend of compactness, ease of use and cost efficiency, and ideally complement tunable platforms typically based on Ti:Sapphire and IR optical parametric oscillators (OPO). We present various types of ultrafast laser architectures, link their optical characteristics to key bio-imaging requirements, and present relevant examples and images illustrating their impact in biological science. In particular we review the use of ultrafast lasers in optogenetics and fast in-vivo Calcium imaging deep in mouse brain.

  12. Detection of potential mosquito breeding sites based on community sourced geotagged images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ankit; Chaudhuri, Usashi; Chaudhuri, Subhasis; Seetharaman, Guna

    2014-06-01

    Various initiatives have been taken all over the world to involve the citizens in the collection and reporting of data to make better and informed data-driven decisions. Our work shows how the geotagged images collected through the general population can be used to combat Malaria and Dengue by identifying and visualizing localities that contain potential mosquito breeding sites. Our method first employs image quality assessment on the client side to reject the images with distortions like blur and artifacts. Each geotagged image received on the server is converted into a feature vector using the bag of visual words model. We train an SVM classifier on a histogram-based feature vector obtained after the vector quantization of SIFT features to discriminate images containing either a small stagnant water body like puddle, or open containers and tires, bushes etc. from those that contain flowing water, manicured lawns, tires attached to a vehicle etc. A geographical heat map is generated by assigning a specific location a probability value of it being a potential mosquito breeding ground of mosquito using feature level fusion or the max approach presented in the paper. The heat map thus generated can be used by concerned health authorities to take appropriate action and to promote civic awareness.

  13. Beamlines of the biomedical imaging and therapy facility at the Canadian light source-Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wysokinski, Tomasz W. [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)], E-mail: tomasz.wysokinski@lightsource.ca; Chapman, Dean [Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Adams, Gregg [Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Renier, Michel [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Suortti, Pekka [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki (Finland); Thomlinson, William [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2007-11-11

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) Facility will provide synchrotron-specific imaging and therapy capabilities. This paper describes one of the BMIT beamlines: the bend magnet (BM) beamline 05B1-1. It plays a complementary role to the insertion device (ID) beamline 051D-2 and allows either monochromatic or filtered white beam to be used in the experimental hutch. The monochromatic spectral range will span 8-40 keV, and the beam is more than 200 mm wide in the experimental hutch for imaging studies of small and medium-size animals (up to sheep size). The experimental hutch will have a positioning system that will allow imaging (computed tomography and planar imaging) as well as radiation therapy applications with both filtered white and monochromatic X-ray beams and will handle subjects up to 120 kg. Several different focal plane detectors (cameras) will be available with resolutions ranging from 10 to 150 {mu}m.

  14. Locating non-volcanic tremor along the San Andreas Fault using a multiple array source imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, T.; Haberland, C.H.; Fuis, G.S.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Shelly, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    Non-volcanic tremor (NVT) has been observed at several subduction zones and at the San Andreas Fault (SAF). Tremor locations are commonly derived by cross-correlating envelope-transformed seismic traces in combination with source-scanning techniques. Recently, they have also been located by using relative relocations with master events, that is low-frequency earthquakes that are part of the tremor; locations are derived by conventional traveltime-based methods. Here we present a method to locate the sources of NVT using an imaging approach for multiple array data. The performance of the method is checked with synthetic tests and the relocation of earthquakes. We also applied the method to tremor occurring near Cholame, California. A set of small-aperture arrays (i.e. an array consisting of arrays) installed around Cholame provided the data set for this study. We observed several tremor episodes and located tremor sources in the vicinity of SAF. During individual tremor episodes, we observed a systematic change of source location, indicating rapid migration of the tremor source along SAF. ?? 2010 The Authors Geophysical Journal International ?? 2010 RAS.

  15. Development and Evaluation of an Open-Source Software Package “CGITA” for Quantifying Tumor Heterogeneity with Molecular Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Dean Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The quantification of tumor heterogeneity with molecular images, by analyzing the local or global variation in the spatial arrangements of pixel intensity with texture analysis, possesses a great clinical potential for treatment planning and prognosis. To address the lack of available software for computing the tumor heterogeneity on the public domain, we develop a software package, namely, Chang-Gung Image Texture Analysis (CGITA toolbox, and provide it to the research community as a free, open-source project. Methods. With a user-friendly graphical interface, CGITA provides users with an easy way to compute more than seventy heterogeneity indices. To test and demonstrate the usefulness of CGITA, we used a small cohort of eighteen locally advanced oral cavity (ORC cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapies. Results. In our case study of ORC data, we found that more than ten of the current implemented heterogeneity indices outperformed SUVmean for outcome prediction in the ROC analysis with a higher area under curve (AUC. Heterogeneity indices provide a better area under the curve up to 0.9 than the SUVmean and TLG (0.6 and 0.52, resp.. Conclusions. CGITA is a free and open-source software package to quantify tumor heterogeneity from molecular images. CGITA is available for free for academic use at http://code.google.com/p/cgita.

  16. Development and evaluation of an open-source software package "CGITA" for quantifying tumor heterogeneity with molecular images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu-Hua Dean; Lin, Chien-Yu; Shih, Meng-Jung; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ho, Tsung-Ying; Liao, Chun-Ta; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of tumor heterogeneity with molecular images, by analyzing the local or global variation in the spatial arrangements of pixel intensity with texture analysis, possesses a great clinical potential for treatment planning and prognosis. To address the lack of available software for computing the tumor heterogeneity on the public domain, we develop a software package, namely, Chang-Gung Image Texture Analysis (CGITA) toolbox, and provide it to the research community as a free, open-source project. With a user-friendly graphical interface, CGITA provides users with an easy way to compute more than seventy heterogeneity indices. To test and demonstrate the usefulness of CGITA, we used a small cohort of eighteen locally advanced oral cavity (ORC) cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapies. In our case study of ORC data, we found that more than ten of the current implemented heterogeneity indices outperformed SUVmean for outcome prediction in the ROC analysis with a higher area under curve (AUC). Heterogeneity indices provide a better area under the curve up to 0.9 than the SUVmean and TLG (0.6 and 0.52, resp.). CGITA is a free and open-source software package to quantify tumor heterogeneity from molecular images. CGITA is available for free for academic use at http://code.google.com/p/cgita.

  17. Advances of dual source, dual-energy imaging in postmortem CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Anders [Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, University of Linkoeping, 58185 Linkoeping (Sweden)], E-mail: anders.persson@cmiv.liu.se; Jackowski, Christian [Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, University of Linkoeping, 58185 Linkoeping (Sweden); Center for Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Buehlstr. 20, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Engstroem, Elias; Zachrisson, Helene [Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, University of Linkoeping, 58185 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2008-12-15

    This paper focuses on the use of multi-detector row dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in the evaluation of postmortal examinations. The use of dual energy moves postmortem CT to an entirely new dimension of diagnostic sensitivity where contrast in the image is not merely limited to X-ray attenuation differences, but may include elements of functional and tissue characterization. This additional information may be used to improve the benefit postmortem imaging can provide to supplement and simplify the conventional autopsy.

  18. MIA - A free and open source software for gray scale medical image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollny, Gert; Kellman, Peter; Ledesma-Carbayo, María-Jesus; Skinner, Matthew M; Hublin, Jean-Jaques; Hierl, Thomas

    2013-10-11

    Gray scale images make the bulk of data in bio-medical image analysis, and hence, the main focus of many image processing tasks lies in the processing of these monochrome images. With ever improving acquisition devices, spatial and temporal image resolution increases, and data sets become very large.Various image processing frameworks exists that make the development of new algorithms easy by using high level programming languages or visual programming. These frameworks are also accessable to researchers that have no background or little in software development because they take care of otherwise complex tasks. Specifically, the management of working memory is taken care of automatically, usually at the price of requiring more it. As a result, processing large data sets with these tools becomes increasingly difficult on work station class computers.One alternative to using these high level processing tools is the development of new algorithms in a languages like C++, that gives the developer full control over how memory is handled, but the resulting workflow for the prototyping of new algorithms is rather time intensive, and also not appropriate for a researcher with little or no knowledge in software development.Another alternative is in using command line tools that run image processing tasks, use the hard disk to store intermediate results, and provide automation by using shell scripts. Although not as convenient as, e.g. visual programming, this approach is still accessable to researchers without a background in computer science. However, only few tools exist that provide this kind of processing interface, they are usually quite task specific, and don't provide an clear approach when one wants to shape a new command line tool from a prototype shell script. The proposed framework, MIA, provides a combination of command line tools, plug-ins, and libraries that make it possible to run image processing tasks interactively in a command shell and to prototype by

  19. Effect of spatial coherence of LED sources on image resolution in holographic displays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pourreza Ghoushchi, Vahid; Aas, Mehdi; Ulusoy, Erdem; Ürey, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    Holographic Displays (HDs) provide 3D images with all natural depth cues via computer generated holograms (CGHs) implemented on spatial light modulators (SLMs). HDs are coherent light processing systems based on interference and diffraction, thus they generally use laser light. However, laser

  20. Computed Tomography Angiography with a 192-slice Dual-source Computed Tomography System: Improvements in Image Quality and Radiation Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip V M Linsen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to compare image quality, radiation dose, and the influence of the heart rate on image quality of high-pitch spiral coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA using 128-slice (second generation dual-source CT (DSCT and a 192-slice DSCT (third generation scanner. Materials and Methods: Two consecutive cohorts of fifty patients underwent CCTA by high-pitch spiral scan mode using 128 or 192-slice DSCT. The 192-slice DSCT system has a more powerful roentgen tube (2 × 120 kW that allows CCTA acquisition at lower tube voltages, wider longitudinal coverage for faster table speed (732 m/s, and the use of iterative reconstruction. Objective image quality was measured as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR. Subjective image quality was evaluated using a Likert scale. Results: While the effective dose was lower with 192-slice DSCT (1.2 ± 0.5 vs. 0.6 ± 0.3 mSv; P < 0.001, the SNR (18.9 ± 4.3 vs. 11.0 ± 2.9; P < 0.001 and CNR (23.5 ± 4.8 vs. 14.3 ± 4.1; P < 0.001 were superior to 128-slice DSCT. Although patients scanned with 192-slice DSCT had a faster heart rate (59 ± 7 vs. 56 ± 6; P = 0.045, subjective image quality was scored higher (4.2 ± 0.8 vs. 3.0 ± 0.7; P < 0.001 compared to 128-slice DSCT. Conclusions: High-pitch spiral CCTA by 192-slice DSCT provides better image quality, despite a higher average heart rate, at lower radiation doses compared to 128-slice DSCT.

  1. Electromagnetic diagnostics of ECR-Ion Sources plasmas: optical/X-ray imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Altana, C.; Caliri, C.; Mazzaglia, M.; Romano, F. P.; Leone, F.; Musumarra, A.; Naselli, E.; Reitano, R.; Torrisi, G.; Celona, L.; Cosentino, L. G.; Giarrusso, M.; Gammino, S.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetoplasmas in ECR-Ion Sources are excited from gaseous elements or vapours by microwaves in the range 2.45–28 GHz via Electron Cyclotron Resonance. A B-minimum, magnetohydrodynamic stable configuration is used for trapping the plasma. The values of plasma density, temperature and confinement times are typically ne= 1011‑1013 cm‑3, 01 eVSilicon Drift detectors with high energy resolution of 125 eV at 5.9 keV have been used for the characterization of plasma emission at 02magnetic field profile (they are critical for high-power proton sources).

  2. MSiReader v1.0: Evolving Open-Source Mass Spectrometry Imaging Software for Targeted and Untargeted Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhart, Mark T; Nazari, Milad; Garrard, Kenneth P; Muddiman, David C

    2018-01-01

    A major update to the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) software MSiReader is presented, offering a multitude of newly added features critical to MSI analyses. MSiReader is a free, open-source, and vendor-neutral software written in the MATLAB platform and is capable of analyzing most common MSI data formats. A standalone version of the software, which does not require a MATLAB license, is also distributed. The newly incorporated data analysis features expand the utility of MSiReader beyond simple visualization of molecular distributions. The MSiQuantification tool allows researchers to calculate absolute concentrations from quantification MSI experiments exclusively through MSiReader software, significantly reducing data analysis time. An image overlay feature allows the incorporation of complementary imaging modalities to be displayed with the MSI data. A polarity filter has also been incorporated into the data loading step, allowing the facile analysis of polarity switching experiments without the need for data parsing prior to loading the data file into MSiReader. A quality assurance feature to generate a mass measurement accuracy (MMA) heatmap for an analyte of interest has also been added to allow for the investigation of MMA across the imaging experiment. Most importantly, as new features have been added performance has not degraded, in fact it has been dramatically improved. These new tools and the improvements to the performance in MSiReader v1.0 enable the MSI community to evaluate their data in greater depth and in less time. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Characterization of a neutron sensitive MCP/Timepix detector for quantitative image analysis at a pulsed neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Minniti, Triestino; Kockelmann, Winfried; Dalgliesh, Robert; Burca, Genoveva; Tremsin, Anton S.

    2017-07-01

    The uncertainties and the stability of a neutron sensitive MCP/Timepix detector when operating in the event timing mode for quantitative image analysis at a pulsed neutron source were investigated. The dominant component to the uncertainty arises from the counting statistics. The contribution of the overlap correction to the uncertainty was concluded to be negligible from considerations based on the error propagation even if a pixel occupation probability is more than 50%. We, additionally, have taken into account the multiple counting effect in consideration of the counting statistics. Furthermore, the detection efficiency of this detector system changes under relatively high neutron fluxes due to the ageing effects of current Microchannel Plates. Since this efficiency change is position-dependent, it induces a memory image. The memory effect can be significantly reduced with correction procedures using the rate equations describing the permanent gain degradation and the scrubbing effect on the inner surfaces of the MCP pores.

  4. MEG-EEG Information Fusion and Electromagnetic Source Imaging: From Theory to Clinical Application in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rasheda Arman; Zerouali, Younes; Hedrich, Tanguy; Heers, Marcel; Kobayashi, Eliane; Lina, Jean-Marc; Grova, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and quantitatively assess whether fusion of EEG and MEG (MEEG) data within the maximum entropy on the mean (MEM) framework increases the spatial accuracy of source localization, by yielding better recovery of the spatial extent and propagation pathway of the underlying generators of inter-ictal epileptic discharges (IEDs). The key element in this study is the integration of the complementary information from EEG and MEG data within the MEM framework. MEEG was compared with EEG and MEG when localizing single transient IEDs. The fusion approach was evaluated using realistic simulation models involving one or two spatially extended sources mimicking propagation patterns of IEDs. We also assessed the impact of the number of EEG electrodes required for an efficient EEG-MEG fusion. MEM was compared with minimum norm estimate, dynamic statistical parametric mapping, and standardized low-resolution electromagnetic tomography. The fusion approach was finally assessed on real epileptic data recorded from two patients showing IEDs simultaneously in EEG and MEG. Overall the localization of MEEG data using MEM provided better recovery of the source spatial extent, more sensitivity to the source depth and more accurate detection of the onset and propagation of IEDs than EEG or MEG alone. MEM was more accurate than the other methods. MEEG proved more robust than EEG and MEG for single IED localization in low signal-to-noise ratio conditions. We also showed that only few EEG electrodes are required to bring additional relevant information to MEG during MEM fusion.

  5. Artificial lateral-line system for imaging dipole sources using Beamforming techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dagamseh, A.M.K.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    In nature, fish have the ability to localize prey, school, navigate, etc. using the lateral-line organ [1]. Here we present the use of biomimetic artificial hair-based flow-sensors arranged as lateral-line system in combination with beamforming techniques for dipole source localization in air.

  6. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  7. Dynamic imaging of coherent sources reveals different network connectivity underlying the generation and perpetuation of epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Elshoff

    Full Text Available The concept of focal epilepsies includes a seizure origin in brain regions with hyper synchronous activity (epileptogenic zone and seizure onset zone and a complex epileptic network of different brain areas involved in the generation, propagation, and modulation of seizures. The purpose of this work was to study functional and effective connectivity between regions involved in networks of epileptic seizures. The beginning and middle part of focal seizures from ictal surface EEG data were analyzed using dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS, an inverse solution in the frequency domain which describes neuronal networks and coherences of oscillatory brain activities. The information flow (effective connectivity between coherent sources was investigated using the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC method. In 8/11 patients, the first and second source of epileptic activity as found by DICS were concordant with the operative resection site; these patients became seizure free after epilepsy surgery. In the remaining 3 patients, the results of DICS / RPDC calculations and the resection site were discordant; these patients had a poorer post-operative outcome. The first sources as found by DICS were located predominantly in cortical structures; subsequent sources included some subcortical structures: thalamus, Nucl. Subthalamicus and cerebellum. DICS seems to be a powerful tool to define the seizure onset zone and the epileptic networks involved. Seizure generation seems to be related to the propagation of epileptic activity from the primary source in the seizure onset zone, and maintenance of seizures is attributed to the perpetuation of epileptic activity between nodes in the epileptic network. Despite of these promising results, this proof of principle study needs further confirmation prior to the use of the described methods in the clinical praxis.

  8. Dynamic Imaging of Coherent Sources Reveals Different Network Connectivity Underlying the Generation and Perpetuation of Epileptic Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Deuschl, Günther; Stephani, Ulrich; Raethjen, Jan; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The concept of focal epilepsies includes a seizure origin in brain regions with hyper synchronous activity (epileptogenic zone and seizure onset zone) and a complex epileptic network of different brain areas involved in the generation, propagation, and modulation of seizures. The purpose of this work was to study functional and effective connectivity between regions involved in networks of epileptic seizures. The beginning and middle part of focal seizures from ictal surface EEG data were analyzed using dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS), an inverse solution in the frequency domain which describes neuronal networks and coherences of oscillatory brain activities. The information flow (effective connectivity) between coherent sources was investigated using the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC) method. In 8/11 patients, the first and second source of epileptic activity as found by DICS were concordant with the operative resection site; these patients became seizure free after epilepsy surgery. In the remaining 3 patients, the results of DICS / RPDC calculations and the resection site were discordant; these patients had a poorer post-operative outcome. The first sources as found by DICS were located predominantly in cortical structures; subsequent sources included some subcortical structures: thalamus, Nucl. Subthalamicus and cerebellum. DICS seems to be a powerful tool to define the seizure onset zone and the epileptic networks involved. Seizure generation seems to be related to the propagation of epileptic activity from the primary source in the seizure onset zone, and maintenance of seizures is attributed to the perpetuation of epileptic activity between nodes in the epileptic network. Despite of these promising results, this proof of principle study needs further confirmation prior to the use of the described methods in the clinical praxis. PMID:24194931

  9. The effect of graphite sources on preparation of Photoluminescent graphene nano-sheets for biomedical imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Soroush Moasses Ghafary; Shadie Hatamie; Maryam Nikkhah; Saman Hosseinkhani

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Graphene as two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted wide attention in different fields such as biomedical imaging. Ultra-small graphene nano-sheets (UGNSs) have been designated as low dimensional graphene sheets with lateral dimensions less than few nanometres (≤ 500 nm) in one, two or few layers. Several studies have proven that the process of acidic exfoliation and oxidation is one of the most effective methods to synthesize low dimensional graphene sheets. The band gap ...

  10. Exogenous contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging: an investigation into the underlying sources of contrast.

    OpenAIRE

    Ogunlade, O.; Beard, P

    2015-01-01

    Thermoacoustic imaging at microwave excitation frequencies is limited by the low differential contrast exhibited by high water content tissues. To overcome this, exogenous thermoacoustic contrast agents based on gadolinium compounds, iron oxide, and single wall carbon nanotubes have previously been suggested and investigated. However, these previous studies did not fully characterize the electric, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of these agents thus precluding identification of the und...

  11. Terahertz sources

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shumyatsky, Pavel; Alfano, Robert R

    2011-01-01

    We present an overview and history of terahertz (THz) sources for readers of the biomedical and optical community for applications in physics, biology, chemistry, medicine, imaging, and spectroscopy...

  12. SeeStar: an open-source, low-cost imaging system for subsea observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazenave, F.; Kecy, C. D.; Haddock, S.

    2016-02-01

    Scientists and engineers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have collaborated to develop SeeStar, a modular, light weight, self-contained, low-cost subsea imaging system for short- to long-term monitoring of marine ecosystems. SeeStar is composed of separate camera, battery, and LED lighting modules. Two versions of the system exist: one rated to 300 meters depth, the other rated to 1500 meters. Users can download plans and instructions from an online repository and build the system using low-cost off-the-shelf components. The system utilizes an easily programmable Arduino based controller, and the widely distributed GoPro camera. The system can be deployed in a variety of scenarios taking still images and video and can be operated either autonomously or tethered on a range of platforms, including ROVs, AUVs, landers, piers, and moorings. Several Seestar systems have been built and used for scientific studies and engineering tests. The long-term goal of this project is to have a widely distributed marine imaging network across thousands of locations, to develop baselines of biological information.

  13. Absorption and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging in Paleontology Using Laboratory and Synchrotron Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidola, Pidassa; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pacheco, Mírian L A F; Soriano, Carmen; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) is commonly used for imaging of samples in biomedical or materials science research. Owing to the ability to visualize a sample in a nondestructive way, X-ray μCT is perfectly suited to inspect fossilized specimens, which are mostly unique or rare. In certain regions of the world where important sedimentation events occurred in the Precambrian geological time, several fossilized animals are studied to understand questions related to their origin, environment, and life evolution. This article demonstrates the advantages of applying absorption and phase-contrast CT on the enigmatic fossil Corumbella werneri, one of the oldest known animals capable of building hard parts, originally discovered in Corumbá (Brazil). Different tomographic setups were tested to visualize the fossilized inner structures: a commercial laboratory-based μCT device, two synchrotron-based imaging setups using conventional absorption and propagation-based phase contrast, and a commercial X-ray microscope with a lens-coupled detector system, dedicated for radiography and tomography. Based on our results we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging setups for paleontological studies.

  14. Absorption and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging in Paleontology Using Laboratory and Synchrotron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidola, Pidassa; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pacheco, Mirian L.A.F.; Soriano, Carmen; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) is commonly used for imaging of samples in biomedical or materials science research. Owing to the ability to visualize a sample in a nondestructive way, X-ray CT is perfectly suited to inspect fossilized specimens, which are mostly unique or rare. In certain regions of the world where important sedimentation events occurred in the Precambrian geological time, several fossilized animals are studied to understand questions related to their origin, environment, and life evolution. This article demonstrates the advantages of applying absorption and phase-contrast CT on the enigmatic fossil Corumbella werneri, one of the oldest known animals capable of building hard parts, originally discovered in Corumba (Brazil). Different tomographic setups were tested to visualize the fossilized inner structures: a commercial laboratory-based CT device, two synchrotron-based imaging setups using conventional absorption and propagation-based phase contrast, and a commercial X-ray microscope with a lens-coupled detector system, dedicated for radiography and tomography. Based on our results we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging setups for paleontological studies.

  15. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Yueh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Tse; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Chang, Chia-Seng; Hwang, Ing-Shouh, E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wei-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å){sup −1} were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage.

  16. Image Quality of Coronary Arteries on Non-electrocardiography-gated High-Pitch Dual-Source Computed Tomography in Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanie, Yuichiro; Sato, Shuhei; Tada, Akihiro; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate image quality of coronary artery imaging on non-electrocardiography (ECG)-gated high-pitch dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) and to assess factors affecting image quality. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 142 children with CHD who underwent non-ECG-gated high-pitch DSCT. The subjective image quality of the proximal coronary segments was graded using a five-point scale. A score coronary segments in children with CHD. Lower body weight was a factor that led to poorer image quality of the coronary arteries.

  17. Evidence for gas and magmatic sources beneath the Yellowstone volcanic field from seismic tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husen, Stephan; Smith, Robert B.; Waite, Gregory P.

    2004-03-01

    The 3-D P-wave velocity and P- to S-wave velocity ratio structure of the Yellowstone volcanic field, Wyoming, has been determined from local earthquake tomography using new data from the permanent Yellowstone seismic network. We selected 3374 local earthquakes between 1995 and 2001 to invert for the 3-D P-wave velocity ( Vp) and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio ( Vp/ Vs) structure. Vp anomalies of small size (15×15 km) are reliably imaged in the northwestern part of the model outside the Yellowstone caldera; inside the caldera only Vp anomalies of large size extending over several grid nodes are reliably imaged. The Vp/ Vs solution is generally poorer due to the low number of S-P arrival times. Only the northwestern part of the model is resolved with confidence; the Vp/ Vs solution also suffers from strong vertical and horizontal velocity smearing. The tomographic images confirm the existence of a low Vp-body beneath the Yellowstone caldera at depths greater than 8 km, possibly representing hot, crystallizing magma. The most striking result of our study is a volume of anomalously low Vp and Vp/ Vs in the northwestern part of the Yellowstone volcanic field at shallow depths of <2.0 km. Theoretical calculations of changes in P- to S-wave velocity ratios indicate that these anomalies can be interpreted as porous, gas-filled rock. The close spatial correlation of the observed anomalies and the occurrence of the largest earthquake swarm in historic time in Yellowstone, 1985, suggest that the gas may have originated as part of magmatic fluids released by crystallization of magma beneath the Yellowstone caldera.

  18. Retinal image smear as a source of information about magnitude of eye movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, L; Holtzman, J D

    1978-11-01

    A number of experiments were conducted to determine to what extent retinal image smearing during saccades provides information about the eye movement magnitude to the perceptual system. The technique involved obtaining measures of perceived movement when the total visual field was displaced in conjunction with saccadic eye movements. Trials with normal retinal smear were compared with trials on which smearing was greatly reduced or eliminated. The results are interpreted as showing that the absence of normal retinal smear during a saccade increases the uncertainty in the information available to the perceptual system and that this uncertainty results in a tendency to perceive smaller than veridical amounts of movement.

  19. XDesign: an open-source software package for designing X-ray imaging phantoms and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Daniel J; Gürsoy, Dogˇa

    2017-03-01

    The development of new methods or utilization of current X-ray computed tomography methods is impeded by the substantial amount of expertise required to design an X-ray computed tomography experiment from beginning to end. In an attempt to make material models, data acquisition schemes and reconstruction algorithms more accessible to researchers lacking expertise in some of these areas, a software package is described here which can generate complex simulated phantoms and quantitatively evaluate new or existing data acquisition schemes and image reconstruction algorithms for targeted applications.

  20. Smartphones Get Emotional: Mind Reading Images and Reconstructing the Neural Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Michael Kai; Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz

    2011-01-01

    Combining a 14 channel neuroheadset with a smartphone to capture and process brain imaging data, we demonstrate the ability to distinguish among emotional responses re ected in dierent scalp potentials when viewing pleasant and unpleasant pictures compared to neutral content. Clustering independent...... but may also provide an intuitive interface for interacting with a 3D rendered model of brain activity. Integrating a wireless EEG set with a smartphone thus offers completely new opportunities for modeling the mental state of users as well as providing a basis for novel bio-feedback applications....

  1. Open source deformable image registration system for treatment planning and recurrence CT scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukauskaite, Ruta; Brink, Carsten; Hansen, Christian Rønn

    2016-01-01

    CT) images of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients was evaluated. PATIENTS AND MATERIALS: Twenty patients treated with definitive IMRT for HNSCC in 2010-2012 were included. For each patient, a pCT and an rCT scan were used. Median interval between the scans was 8.5 months. One observer...... on pCT. DSC for DIR varied between 0.58 and 0.79 for soft tissues and was 0.79 or higher for bony structures, and correlated with the volumes of ROIs (r = 0.5, p CT scans is feasible...

  2. Efficient modeling of flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments for vibroacoustic finite element analysis. Finite size correction by image sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimonti, L.; Atalla, N.

    2017-02-01

    This work is concerned with the hybrid finite element-transfer matrix methodology recently proposed by the authors. The main assumption behind this hybrid method consists in neglecting the actual finite lateral extent of the acoustic treatment. Although a substantial increase of the computational efficiency can be achieved, the effect of the reflected field (i.e. finite size effects) may be sometimes important, preventing the hybrid model from giving quantitative meaningful results. For this reason, a correction to account for wave reflections at the lateral boundaries of the acoustic treatment is sought. It is shown in the present paper that the image source method can be successfully employed to retrieve such finite size effects. Indeed, such methodology is known to be effective when the response of the system is a smooth function of the frequency, like in the case of highly dissipative acoustic treatments. The main concern of this paper is to assess accuracy and feasibility of the image source method in the context of acoustic treatments modeling. Numerical examples show that the performance of the standard hybrid model can be substantially improved by the proposed correction without deteriorating excessively the computational efficiency.

  3. EcoIP: An Open Source Image Analysis Toolkit to Identify Different Stages of Plant Phenology for Multiple Species with Pan-Tilt-Zoom Cameras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granados, Joel; Bonnet, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Because of the increased number of cameras employed in environmental sensing and the tremendous image output they produce, we have created a flexible, open-source software solution called EcoIP to help automatically determine different phenophases for different species from digital image sequence...

  4. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult female—internal electron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Shannon E.; DeWeese, Lindsay S.; Maynard, Matthew R.; Rajon, Didier A.; Wayson, Michael B.; Marshall, Emily L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2016-12-01

    An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for internal electron sources was created for the ICRP-defined reference adult female. Many previous skeletal dosimetry models, which are still employed in commonly used internal dosimetry software, do not properly account for electron escape from trabecular spongiosa, electron cross-fire from cortical bone, and the impact of marrow cellularity on active marrow self-irradiation. Furthermore, these existing models do not employ the current ICRP definition of a 50 µm bone endosteum (or shallow marrow). Each of these limitations was addressed in the present study. Electron transport was completed to determine specific absorbed fractions to both active and shallow marrow of the skeletal regions of the University of Florida reference adult female. The skeletal macrostructure and microstructure were modeled separately. The bone macrostructure was based on the whole-body hybrid computational phantom of the UF series of reference models, while the bone microstructure was derived from microCT images of skeletal region samples taken from a 45 years-old female cadaver. The active and shallow marrow are typically adopted as surrogate tissue regions for the hematopoietic stem cells and osteoprogenitor cells, respectively. Source tissues included active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone surfaces, cortical bone volume, and cortical bone surfaces. Marrow cellularity was varied from 10 to 100 percent for active marrow self-irradiation. All other sources were run at the defined ICRP Publication 70 cellularity for each bone site. A total of 33 discrete electron energies, ranging from 1 keV to 10 MeV, were either simulated or analytically modeled. The method of combining skeletal macrostructure and microstructure absorbed fractions assessed using MCNPX electron transport was found to yield results similar to those determined with the PIRT model applied to the UF adult male skeletal dosimetry model. Calculated

  5. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult female-internal electron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Shannon E; DeWeese, Lindsay S; Maynard, Matthew R; Rajon, Didier A; Wayson, Michael B; Marshall, Emily L; Bolch, Wesley E

    2016-12-21

    An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for internal electron sources was created for the ICRP-defined reference adult female. Many previous skeletal dosimetry models, which are still employed in commonly used internal dosimetry software, do not properly account for electron escape from trabecular spongiosa, electron cross-fire from cortical bone, and the impact of marrow cellularity on active marrow self-irradiation. Furthermore, these existing models do not employ the current ICRP definition of a 50 µm bone endosteum (or shallow marrow). Each of these limitations was addressed in the present study. Electron transport was completed to determine specific absorbed fractions to both active and shallow marrow of the skeletal regions of the University of Florida reference adult female. The skeletal macrostructure and microstructure were modeled separately. The bone macrostructure was based on the whole-body hybrid computational phantom of the UF series of reference models, while the bone microstructure was derived from microCT images of skeletal region samples taken from a 45 years-old female cadaver. The active and shallow marrow are typically adopted as surrogate tissue regions for the hematopoietic stem cells and osteoprogenitor cells, respectively. Source tissues included active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone surfaces, cortical bone volume, and cortical bone surfaces. Marrow cellularity was varied from 10 to 100 percent for active marrow self-irradiation. All other sources were run at the defined ICRP Publication 70 cellularity for each bone site. A total of 33 discrete electron energies, ranging from 1 keV to 10 MeV, were either simulated or analytically modeled. The method of combining skeletal macrostructure and microstructure absorbed fractions assessed using MCNPX electron transport was found to yield results similar to those determined with the PIRT model applied to the UF adult male skeletal dosimetry model. Calculated

  6. AN OPEN SOURCE LOW-COST AUTOMATIC SYSTEM FOR IMAGE-BASED 3D DIGITIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Menna

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available 3D digitization of heritage artefacts, reverse engineering of industrial components or rapid prototyping-driven design are key topics today. Indeed, millions of archaeological finds all over the world need to be surveyed in 3D either to allow convenient investigations by researchers or because they are inaccessible to visitors and scientists or, unfortunately, because they are seriously endangered by wars and terrorist attacks. On the other hand, in case of industrial and design components there is often the need of deformation analyses or physical replicas starting from reality-based 3D digitisations. The paper is aligned with these needs and presents the realization of the ORION (arduinO Raspberry pI rOtating table for image based 3D recostructioN prototype system, with its hardware and software components, providing critical insights about its modular design. ORION is an image-based 3D reconstruction system based on automated photogrammetric acquisitions and processing. The system is being developed under a collaborative educational project between FBK Trento, the University of Trento and internship programs with high school in the Trentino province (Italy.

  7. An Open Source Low-Cost Automatic System for Image-Based 3d Digitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menna, F.; Nocerino, E.; Morabito, D.; Farella, E. M.; Perini, M.; Remondino, F.

    2017-11-01

    3D digitization of heritage artefacts, reverse engineering of industrial components or rapid prototyping-driven design are key topics today. Indeed, millions of archaeological finds all over the world need to be surveyed in 3D either to allow convenient investigations by researchers or because they are inaccessible to visitors and scientists or, unfortunately, because they are seriously endangered by wars and terrorist attacks. On the other hand, in case of industrial and design components there is often the need of deformation analyses or physical replicas starting from reality-based 3D digitisations. The paper is aligned with these needs and presents the realization of the ORION (arduinO Raspberry pI rOtating table for image based 3D recostructioN) prototype system, with its hardware and software components, providing critical insights about its modular design. ORION is an image-based 3D reconstruction system based on automated photogrammetric acquisitions and processing. The system is being developed under a collaborative educational project between FBK Trento, the University of Trento and internship programs with high school in the Trentino province (Italy).

  8. An integrated system for clinical treatment verification of HDR prostate brachytherapy combining source tracking with pretreatment imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ryan L; Hanlon, Max; Panettieri, Vanessa; Millar, Jeremy L; Matheson, Bronwyn; Haworth, Annette; Franich, Rick D

    2017-09-22

    High-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy treatment is usually delivered in one or a few large dose fractions. Poor execution of a planned treatment could have significant clinical impact, as high doses are delivered in seconds, and mistakes in an individual fraction cannot be easily rectified. Given that most potential errors in HDR brachytherapy ultimately lead to a geographical miss, a more direct approach to verification of correct treatment delivery is to directly monitor the position of the source throughout the treatment. In this work, we report on the clinical implementation of our treatment verification system that uniquely combines the 2D source-tracking capability with 2D pretreatment imaging, using a single flat panel detector (FPD). The clinical brachytherapy treatment couch was modified to allow integration of the FPD into the couch. This enabled the patient to be set up in the brachytherapy bunker in a position that closely matched that at treatment planning imaging. An anteroposterior image was acquired of the patient immediately before treatment delivery and was assessed by the Radiation Oncologist online, to reestablish the positions of the catheters relative to the prostate. Assessment of catheter positions was performed in the left-right and superior-inferior directions along the entire catheter length and throughout the treatment volume. Source tracking was then performed during treatment delivery, and the measured position of the source dwells were directly compared to the treatment plan for verification. The treatment verification system was integrated into the clinical environment without significant change to workflow. Two patient cases are presented in this work to provide clinical examples of this system, which is now in routine use for all patient treatments in our clinic. The catheter positions were visualized relative to the prostate, immediately before treatment delivery. For one of the patient cases presented in this work, they

  9. Web-based spatial analysis with the ILWIS open source GIS software and satellite images from GEONETCast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, R.; Maathuis, B.; Mannaerts, C.; Foerster, T.; Schaeffer, B.; Wytzisk, A.

    2009-12-01

    This paper involves easy accessible integrated web-based analysis of satellite images with a plug-in based open source software. The paper is targeted to both users and developers of geospatial software. Guided by a use case scenario, we describe the ILWIS software and its toolbox to access satellite images through the GEONETCast broadcasting system. The last two decades have shown a major shift from stand-alone software systems to networked ones, often client/server applications using distributed geo-(web-)services. This allows organisations to combine without much effort their own data with remotely available data and processing functionality. Key to this integrated spatial data analysis is a low-cost access to data from within a user-friendly and flexible software. Web-based open source software solutions are more often a powerful option for developing countries. The Integrated Land and Water Information System (ILWIS) is a PC-based GIS & Remote Sensing software, comprising a complete package of image processing, spatial analysis and digital mapping and was developed as commercial software from the early nineties onwards. Recent project efforts have migrated ILWIS into a modular, plug-in-based open source software, and provide web-service support for OGC-based web mapping and processing. The core objective of the ILWIS Open source project is to provide a maintainable framework for researchers and software developers to implement training components, scientific toolboxes and (web-) services. The latest plug-ins have been developed for multi-criteria decision making, water resources analysis and spatial statistics analysis. The development of this framework is done since 2007 in the context of 52°North, which is an open initiative that advances the development of cutting edge open source geospatial software, using the GPL license. GEONETCast, as part of the emerging Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), puts essential environmental data at the

  10. AROSICS: An Automated and Robust Open-Source Image Co-Registration Software for Multi-Sensor Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Scheffler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Geospatial co-registration is a mandatory prerequisite when dealing with remote sensing data. Inter- or intra-sensoral misregistration will negatively affect any subsequent image analysis, specifically when processing multi-sensoral or multi-temporal data. In recent decades, many algorithms have been developed to enable manual, semi- or fully automatic displacement correction. Especially in the context of big data processing and the development of automated processing chains that aim to be applicable to different remote sensing systems, there is a strong need for efficient, accurate and generally usable co-registration. Here, we present AROSICS (Automated and Robust Open-Source Image Co-Registration Software, a Python-based open-source software including an easy-to-use user interface for automatic detection and correction of sub-pixel misalignments between various remote sensing datasets. It is independent of spatial or spectral characteristics and robust against high degrees of cloud coverage and spectral and temporal land cover dynamics. The co-registration is based on phase correlation for sub-pixel shift estimation in the frequency domain utilizing the Fourier shift theorem in a moving-window manner. A dense grid of spatial shift vectors can be created and automatically filtered by combining various validation and quality estimation metrics. Additionally, the software supports the masking of, e.g., clouds and cloud shadows to exclude such areas from spatial shift detection. The software has been tested on more than 9000 satellite images acquired by different sensors. The results are evaluated exemplarily for two inter-sensoral and two intra-sensoral use cases and show registration results in the sub-pixel range with root mean square error fits around 0.3 pixels and better.

  11. Improvement of Attenuation Correction in Time-of-Flight PET/MR Imaging with a Positron-Emitting Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollet, Pieter; Keereman, Vincent; Bini, Jason; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Fayad, Zahi A.; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative PET imaging relies on accurate attenuation correction. Recently, there has been growing interest in combining state-of-the-art PET systems with MR imaging in a sequential or fully integrated setup. As CT becomes unavailable for these systems, an alternative approach to the CT-based reconstruction of attenuation coefficients (μ values) at 511 keV must be found. Deriving μ values directly from MR images is difficult because MR signals are related to the proton density and relaxation properties of tissue. Therefore, most research groups focus on segmentation or atlas registration techniques. Although studies have shown that these methods provide viable solutions in particular applications, some major drawbacks limit their use in whole-body PET/MR. Previously, we used an annulus-shaped PET transmission source inside the field of view of a PET scanner to measure attenuation coefficients at 511 keV. In this work, we describe the use of this method in studies of patients with the sequential time-of-flight (TOF) PET/MR scanner installed at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. Methods Five human PET/MR and CT datasets were acquired. The transmission-based attenuation correction method was compared with conventional CT-based attenuation correction and the 3-segment, MR-based attenuation correction available on the TOF PET/MR imaging scanner. Results The transmission-based method overcame most problems related to the MR-based technique, such as truncation artifacts of the arms, segmentation artifacts in the lungs, and imaging of cortical bone. Additionally, the TOF capabilities of the PET detectors allowed the simultaneous acquisition of transmission and emission data. Compared with the MR-based approach, the transmission-based method provided average improvements in PET quantification of 6.4%, 2.4%, and 18.7% in volumes of interest inside the lung, soft tissue, and bone tissue, respectively. Conclusion In conclusion, a transmission

  12. Imaging of physiological responses to photostimulation in human photoreceptors with full-field swept-source OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmann, Dierck; Spahr, Hendrik; Pfäffle, Clara; Sudkamp, Helge M.; Franke, Gesa L.; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2017-02-01

    The non-invasive measurement of cellular physiological responses to photostimulation in living retina may have significant clinical value and give new insight into the vision process. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been reported to detect suitable intrinsic optical signals (IOS) in retinal photoreceptor layers upon their stimulation. Commonly, changes in backscattering intensity were observed ex vivo and immobilized animals in vivo. However, in humans measurements were time-consuming and cumbersome. Promising results were achieved when observing phase signals to detect intrinsic optical signals. But to achieve sufficient phase stability to image an entire area of photoreceptors turned out to be challenging. Here, we report full-field swept-source OCT to be sufficiently stable to detect the phase signals after projecting a stimulation image onto the living human retina. We extracted time-courses and signal dependencies from the measured datasets. For long stimuli, we were even able to assign responses to single cones. This functional imaging of photoreceptor activity could potentially be used to detect loss of photoreceptor function prior to visible morphological changes, which is associated with numerous retinal diseases.

  13. Imaging spatial and temporal seismic source variations at Sierra Negra Volcano, Galapagos Islands using back-projection methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, C. L.; Lawrence, J. F.; Ebinger, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging spatial and temporal seismic source variations at Sierra Negra Volcano, Galapagos Islands using back-projection methods Cyndi Kelly1, Jesse F. Lawrence1, Cindy Ebinger2 1Stanford University, Department of Geophysics, 397 Panama Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA 2University of Rochester, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, 227 Hutchison Hall, Rochester, NY 14627, USA Low-magnitude seismic signals generated by processes that characterize volcanic and hydrothermal systems and their plumbing networks are difficult to observe remotely. Seismic records from these systems tend to be extremely 'noisy', making it difficult to resolve 3D subsurface structures using traditional seismic methods. Easily identifiable high-amplitude bursts within the noise that might be suitable for use with traditional seismic methods (i.e. eruptions) tend to occur relatively infrequently compared to the length of an entire eruptive cycle. Furthermore, while these impulsive events might help constrain the dynamics of a particular eruption, they shed little insight into the mechanisms that occur throughout an entire eruption sequence. It has been shown, however, that the much more abundant low-amplitude seismic 'noise' in these records (i.e. volcanic or geyser 'tremor') actually represents a series of overlapping low-magnitude displacements that can be directly linked to magma, fluid, and volatile movement at depth. This 'noisy' data therefore likely contains valuable information about the processes occurring in the volcanic or hydrothermal system before, during and after eruption events. In this study, we present a new method to comprehensively study how the seismic source distribution of all events - including micro-events - evolves during different phases of the eruption sequence of Sierra Negra Volcano in the Galapagos Islands. We apply a back-projection search algorithm to image sources of seismic 'noise' at Sierra Negra Volcano during a proposed intrusion event. By analyzing

  14. Adenosine stress high-pitch 128-slice dual-source myocardial computed tomography perfusion for imaging of reversible myocardial ischemia: comparison with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuchtner, Gudrun; Goetti, Robert; Plass, André; Wieser, Monika; Scheffel, Hans; Wyss, Christophe; Stolzmann, Paul; Donati, Olivio; Schnabl, Johannes; Falk, Volkmar; Alkadhi, Hatem; Leschka, Sebastian; Cury, Ricardo C

    2011-09-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) enables accurate anatomic evaluation of coronary artery stenosis but lacks information about hemodynamic significance. The aim of this study was to evaluate 128-slice myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging with adenosine stress using a high-pitch mode, in comparison with cardiac MRI (CMR). Thirty-nine patients with intermediate to high coronary risk profile underwent adenosine stress 128-slice dual source CTP (128×0.6 mm, 0.28 seconds). Among those, 30 patients (64 ± 10 years, 6% women) also underwent adenosine stress CMR (1.5T). The 2-step CTP protocol consisted of (1) adenosine stress-CTP using a high-pitch factor (3.4) ECG-synchronized spiral mode and (2) rest-CTP/coronary-CTA using either high-pitch (heart rate 63 bpm). Results were compared with CMR and with invasive angiography in 25 patients. The performance of stress-CTP for detection of myocardial perfusion defects compared with CMR was sensitivity, 96%; specificity, 88%; positive predictive value (PPV), 93%; negative predictive value (NPV), 94% (per vessel); and sensitivity, 78%; specificity, 87%; PPV, 83%; NPV, 84% (per segment). The accuracy of stress-CTP for imaging of reversible ischemia compared with CMR was sensitivity, 95%; specificity, 96%; PPV, 95%; and NPV, 96% (per vessel). In 25 patients who underwent invasive angiography, the accuracy of CTA for detection of stenosis >70% was (per segment): sensitivity, 96%; specificity, 88%; PPV, 67%; and NPV, 98.9%. The accuracy improved from 84% to 95% after adding stress CTP to CTA. Radiation exposure of the entire stress/rest CT protocol was only 2.5 mSv. Adenosine-induced stress 128-slice dual-source high-pitch myocardial CTP allows for simultaneously assessment of reversible myocardial ischemia and coronary stenosis, with good diagnostic accuracy as compared with CMR and invasive angiography, at a very low radiation exposure.

  15. Lasers As Particle Accelerators In Medicine: From Laser-Driven Protons To Imaging With Thomson Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Babzien, M.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Yakimenko, V.; Dover, N. P.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Najmudin, Z.; Shkolnikov, P.; Williams, O.; Rosenzweig, J.; Oliva, P.; Carpinelli, M.; Golosio, B.; Delogu, P.; Stefanini, A.; Endrizzi, M.

    2011-06-01

    We report our recent progress using a high-power, picosecond CO2 laser for Thomson scattering and ion acceleration experiments. These experiments capitalize on certain advantages of long-wavelength CO2 lasers, such as their high number of photons per energy unit and beneficial wavelength- scaling of the electrons' ponderomotive energy and critical plasma frequency. High X-ray fluxes produced in the interactions of the counter-propagating laser- and electron-beams for obtaining single-shot, high-contrast images of biological objects. The laser, focused on a hydrogen jet, generated a monoenergetic proton beam via the radiation-pressure mechanism. The energy of protons produced by this method scales linearly with the laser's intensity. We present a plan for scaling the process into the range of 100-MeV proton energy via upgrading the CO2 laser. This development will enable an advance to the laser-driven proton cancer therapy.

  16. Recent wetland land loss due to hurricanes: improved estimates based upon multiple source images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranenburg, Christine J.; Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Barras, John A.; Brock, John C.; Wang, Ping; Rosati, Julie D.; Roberts, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a moderate resolution 30-m fractional water map of the Chenier Plain for 2003, 2006 and 2009 by using information contained in high-resolution satellite imagery of a subset of the study area. Indices and transforms pertaining to vegetation and water were created using the high-resolution imagery, and a threshold was applied to obtain a categorical land/water map. The high-resolution data was used to train a decision-tree classifier to estimate percent water in a lower resolution (Landsat) image. Two new water indices based on the tasseled cap transformation were proposed for IKONOS imagery in wetland environments and more than 700 input parameter combinations were considered for each Landsat image classified. Final selection and thresholding of the resulting percent water maps involved over 5,000 unambiguous classified random points using corresponding 1-m resolution aerial photographs, and a statistical optimization procedure to determine the threshold at which the maximum Kappa coefficient occurs. Each selected dataset has a Kappa coefficient, percent correctly classified (PCC) water, land and total greater than 90%. An accuracy assessment using 1,000 independent random points was performed. Using the validation points, the PCC values decreased to around 90%. The time series change analysis indicated that due to Hurricane Rita, the study area lost 6.5% of marsh area, and transient changes were less than 3% for either land or water. Hurricane Ike resulted in an additional 8% land loss, although not enough time has passed to discriminate between persistent and transient changes.

  17. A sparsity-based iterative algorithm for reconstruction of micro-CT images from highly undersampled projection datasets obtained with a synchrotron X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melli, S. Ali; Wahid, Khan A.; Babyn, Paul; Cooper, David M. L.; Gopi, Varun P.

    2016-12-01

    Synchrotron X-ray Micro Computed Tomography (Micro-CT) is an imaging technique which is increasingly used for non-invasive in vivo preclinical imaging. However, it often requires a large number of projections from many different angles to reconstruct high-quality images leading to significantly high radiation doses and long scan times. To utilize this imaging technique further for in vivo imaging, we need to design reconstruction algorithms that reduce the radiation dose and scan time without reduction of reconstructed image quality. This research is focused on using a combination of gradient-based Douglas-Rachford splitting and discrete wavelet packet shrinkage image denoising methods to design an algorithm for reconstruction of large-scale reduced-view synchrotron Micro-CT images with acceptable quality metrics. These quality metrics are computed by comparing the reconstructed images with a high-dose reference image reconstructed from 1800 equally spaced projections spanning 180°. Visual and quantitative-based performance assessment of a synthetic head phantom and a femoral cortical bone sample imaged in the biomedical imaging and therapy bending magnet beamline at the Canadian Light Source demonstrates that the proposed algorithm is superior to the existing reconstruction algorithms. Using the proposed reconstruction algorithm to reduce the number of projections in synchrotron Micro-CT is an effective way to reduce the overall radiation dose and scan time which improves in vivo imaging protocols.

  18. High resolution imaging of massive young stellar objects and a sample of molecular outflow sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maud, Luke Thomas

    2013-09-01

    This thesis contains a study of millimetre wavelength observations of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) both via interferometric and single dish observations. First, the high angular resolution observations ( up to ∼0.1") from a variety of interferometers of the MYSO, S140 IRS1, are presented. This source is one of only two prototypes that have ionised equatorial emission from a radiatively driven disc wind. The observations confirm that IRS1 has a dusty disc at a position angle compatible with that of the disc wind emission, and confirms the disc wind nature for the first time. Secondly, the observations of S140 IRS1 are modelled using a 2D axisymmetric radiative transfer code. Extensive models producing synthetic data at millimetre wavelengths were developed. These models show that on the largest scales, typically accessible with single dish observations or compact interferometric configurations, the spectral energy distribution is relatively unchanged by the addition of a compact dust disc. However, a disc is required to match the interferometric visibilities at the smaller scales. The position angle of the disc is well constrained via a newly developed 2D visibility fitting method. The models however, are degenerate and there are a range of realistic best fitting discs. The third section presents the single dish observations of the core material traced by C18O around 99 MYSOs and compact HII regions from the RMS survey. A method to calculate the core masses and velocity extent is reported. The method is accurate and robust, and can be applied to any molecular line emission. An updated distance limited sample contains 87 sources and is complete to 1000 L⊙. It is a representative sample of MYSOs and HII regions. All of the cores harbour at least one massive protostar. Finally, methodologies to establish outflow parameters via 12CO (3-2) and 13CO (3-2) data are investigated. Multiple techniques are trialed for a well studied test! source, IRAS 20126

  19. Adenosine-stress dynamic myocardial perfusion imaging with second-generation dual-source CT: comparison with conventional catheter coronary angiography and SPECT nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yining; Qin, Ling; Shi, Ximin; Zeng, Yong; Jing, Hongli; Schoepf, U Joseph; Jin, Zhengyu

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the feasibility of adenosine-stress dynamic myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with 128-MDCT dual-source CT for detecting myocardial ischemia in comparison with conventional catheter coronary angiography and nuclear MPI. Thirty patients (21 men and nine women; mean [± SD] age, 59.2 ± 7.6 years) prospectively underwent a combined stress CT perfusion and CT angiography (CTA) examination. Complete time-attenuation curves of the myocardium were acquired with prospectively ECG-triggered axial images at two alternating positions. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was quantified according to dynamic CT perfusion, and MBF values of normal and abnormal segments were compared. Findings on CT perfusion were compared with those for stress and rest SPECT. Perfusion defects according to CT were correlated to flow-obstructing stenosis detected on CTA and catheter coronary angiography. On stress CT perfusion, 19 patients (63%) and 83 of 504 segments (16%) had perfusion abnormalities. There was a significant difference in MBF values between normal (142.9 ± 30.6 mL/100 mL/min) and hypoperfused (90.0 ± 22.8 mL/100 mL/min) segments (p stress CT perfusion detects myocardial perfusion defects in good correlation with nuclear MPI. CT perfusion combined with CTA improves the diagnostic accuracy for identifying flow-obstructing stenosis compared with CTA alone.

  20. MSiReader v1.0: Evolving Open-Source Mass Spectrometry Imaging Software for Targeted and Untargeted Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhart, Mark T.; Nazari, Milad; Garrard, Kenneth P.; Muddiman, David C.

    2017-09-01

    A major update to the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) software MSiReader is presented, offering a multitude of newly added features critical to MSI analyses. MSiReader is a free, open-source, and vendor-neutral software written in the MATLAB platform and is capable of analyzing most common MSI data formats. A standalone version of the software, which does not require a MATLAB license, is also distributed. The newly incorporated data analysis features expand the utility of MSiReader beyond simple visualization of molecular distributions. The MSiQuantification tool allows researchers to calculate absolute concentrations from quantification MSI experiments exclusively through MSiReader software, significantly reducing data analysis time. An image overlay feature allows the incorporation of complementary imaging modalities to be displayed with the MSI data. A polarity filter has also been incorporated into the data loading step, allowing the facile analysis of polarity switching experiments without the need for data parsing prior to loading the data file into MSiReader. A quality assurance feature to generate a mass measurement accuracy (MMA) heatmap for an analyte of interest has also been added to allow for the investigation of MMA across the imaging experiment. Most importantly, as new features have been added performance has not degraded, in fact it has been dramatically improved. These new tools and the improvements to the performance in MSiReader v1.0 enable the MSI community to evaluate their data in greater depth and in less time. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. MSiReader v1.0: Evolving Open-Source Mass Spectrometry Imaging Software for Targeted and Untargeted Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhart, Mark T.; Nazari, Milad; Garrard, Kenneth P.; Muddiman, David C.

    2018-01-01

    A major update to the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) software MSiReader is presented, offering a multitude of newly added features critical to MSI analyses. MSiReader is a free, open-source, and vendor-neutral software written in the MATLAB platform and is capable of analyzing most common MSI data formats. A standalone version of the software, which does not require a MATLAB license, is also distributed. The newly incorporated data analysis features expand the utility of MSiReader beyond simple visualization of molecular distributions. The MSiQuantification tool allows researchers to calculate absolute concentrations from quantification MSI experiments exclusively through MSiReader software, significantly reducing data analysis time. An image overlay feature allows the incorporation of complementary imaging modalities to be displayed with the MSI data. A polarity filter has also been incorporated into the data loading step, allowing the facile analysis of polarity switching experiments without the need for data parsing prior to loading the data file into MSiReader. A quality assurance feature to generate a mass measurement accuracy (MMA) heatmap for an analyte of interest has also been added to allow for the investigation of MMA across the imaging experiment. Most importantly, as new features have been added performance has not degraded, in fact it has been dramatically improved. These new tools and the improvements to the performance in MSiReader v1.0 enable the MSI community to evaluate their data in greater depth and in less time. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Distributed Medical Image Analysis and Diagnosis through Crowd-Sourced Games: A Malaria Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavandadi, Sam; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Feng, Steve; Yu, Frank; Sikora, Uzair; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Padmanabhan, Swati; Nielsen, Karin; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    In this work we investigate whether the innate visual recognition and learning capabilities of untrained humans can be used in conducting reliable microscopic analysis of biomedical samples toward diagnosis. For this purpose, we designed entertaining digital games that are interfaced with artificial learning and processing back-ends to demonstrate that in the case of binary medical diagnostics decisions (e.g., infected vs. uninfected), with the use of crowd-sourced games it is possible to approach the accuracy of medical experts in making such diagnoses. Specifically, using non-expert gamers we report diagnosis of malaria infected red blood cells with an accuracy that is within 1.25% of the diagnostics decisions made by a trained medical professional. PMID:22606353

  3. Distributed medical image analysis and diagnosis through crowd-sourced games: a malaria case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Mavandadi

    Full Text Available In this work we investigate whether the innate visual recognition and learning capabilities of untrained humans can be used in conducting reliable microscopic analysis of biomedical samples toward diagnosis. For this purpose, we designed entertaining digital games that are interfaced with artificial learning and processing back-ends to demonstrate that in the case of binary medical diagnostics decisions (e.g., infected vs. uninfected, with the use of crowd-sourced games it is possible to approach the accuracy of medical experts in making such diagnoses. Specifically, using non-expert gamers we report diagnosis of malaria infected red blood cells with an accuracy that is within 1.25% of the diagnostics decisions made by a trained medical professional.

  4. 3D nanoscale imaging of biological samples with laboratory-based soft X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehlinger, Aurélie; Blechschmidt, Anne; Grötzsch, Daniel; Jung, Robert; Kanngießer, Birgit; Seim, Christian; Stiel, Holger

    2015-09-01

    In microscopy, where the theoretical resolution limit depends on the wavelength of the probing light, radiation in the soft X-ray regime can be used to analyze samples that cannot be resolved with visible light microscopes. In the case of soft X-ray microscopy in the water-window, the energy range of the radiation lies between the absorption edges of carbon (at 284 eV, 4.36 nm) and oxygen (543 eV, 2.34 nm). As a result, carbon-based structures, such as biological samples, posses a strong absorption, whereas e.g. water is more transparent to this radiation. Microscopy in the water-window, therefore, allows the structural investigation of aqueous samples with resolutions of a few tens of nanometers and a penetration depth of up to 10μm. The development of highly brilliant laser-produced plasma-sources has enabled the transfer of Xray microscopy, that was formerly bound to synchrotron sources, to the laboratory, which opens the access of this method to a broader scientific community. The Laboratory Transmission X-ray Microscope at the Berlin Laboratory for innovative X-ray technologies (BLiX) runs with a laser produced nitrogen plasma that emits radiation in the soft X-ray regime. The mentioned high penetration depth can be exploited to analyze biological samples in their natural state and with several projection angles. The obtained tomogram is the key to a more precise and global analysis of samples originating from various fields of life science.

  5. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological samples using a betatron x-ray source generated in a laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaulagain, U.; Bohacek, K.; Kozlova, M.; Nejdl, J.; Krus, M.; Horny, V.; Mahieu, B.; Ta-Phuoc, K.

    2017-05-01

    In a plasma wakefield accelerator, an intense laser pulse propagates in an under-dense plasma that drives a relativistic plasma wave in which electrons can be injected and accelerated to relativistic energies within a short distance. These accelerated electrons undergo betatron oscillation and emit a collimated X-ray beam along the direction of electron velocity. This X-ray source is characterised with a source size of the order of a micrometer, a pulse duration of the order of femtosecond, and with a high spectral brightness. This novel X-ray source provides an excellent imaging tool to achieve unprecedented high-resolution image through phase contrast imaging. The phase contrast technique has the potential to reveal structures which are invisible with the conventional absorption imaging. In the X-ray phase contrast imaging, the image contrast is obtained thanks to phase shifts induced on the X-rays passing through the sample. It involves the real part of refractive index of the object. Here we present high-resolution phase contrast X-ray images of two biological samples using laser-driven Betatron X-ray source.

  6. First application of liquid-metal-jet sources for small-animal imaging: high-resolution CT and phase-contrast tumor demarcation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Daniel H; Lundström, Ulf; Westermark, Ulrica K; Arsenian Henriksson, Marie; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M

    2013-02-01

    Small-animal studies require images with high spatial resolution and high contrast due to the small scale of the structures. X-ray imaging systems for small animals are often limited by the microfocus source. Here, the authors investigate the applicability of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for such high-resolution small-animal imaging, both in tomography based on absorption and in soft-tissue tumor imaging based on in-line phase contrast. The experimental arrangement consists of a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, the small-animal object on a rotating stage, and an imaging detector. The source-to-object and object-to-detector distances are adjusted for the preferred contrast mechanism. Two different liquid-metal-jet sources are used, one circulating a Ga∕In∕Sn alloy and the other an In∕Ga alloy for higher penetration through thick tissue. Both sources are operated at 40-50 W electron-beam power with ∼7 μm x-ray spots, providing high spatial resolution in absorption imaging and high spatial coherence for the phase-contrast imaging. High-resolution absorption imaging is demonstrated on mice with CT, showing 50 μm bone details in the reconstructed slices. High-resolution phase-contrast soft-tissue imaging shows clear demarcation of mm-sized tumors at much lower dose than is required in absorption. This is the first application of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for whole-body small-animal x-ray imaging. In absorption, the method allows high-resolution tomographic skeletal imaging with potential for significantly shorter exposure times due to the power scalability of liquid-metal-jet sources. In phase contrast, the authors use a simple in-line arrangement to show distinct tumor demarcation of few-mm-sized tumors. This is, to their knowledge, the first small-animal tumor visualization with a laboratory phase-contrast system.

  7. Using Near-IR Imaging to Probe Accretion-Disk Physics in Powerful Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekemoer, Anton; O'Dea, Chris; Baum, Stefi

    1999-08-01

    An intriguing question in the study of powerful radio galaxies concerns the reason for their wide diversity of properties: is this related predominantly to external environmental effects, or to intrinsic differences in their central engines and accretion processes? We propose to address this question by using the 2.1m + ONIS to obtain J, H and K imaging of two samples of FR I and FR II radio galaxies, to measure the luminosity and colors of warm circumnuclear dust and determine the near- IR structure and environment of the surrounding host galaxies. The dust absorbs radiation from the AGN and re-radiates it in the near-IR, which can thus be used as a diagnostic of the AGN radiant energy output. This will be compared with the AGN kinetic energy output in the form of radio jets. Our two samples are statistically well-matched in both radio power and redshift space, allowing us to carry out statistical comparisons between AGN properties such as the radiant / kinetic energy conversion, as well as large-scale host galaxy properties. This will indicate whether differences between these classes of active galaxies are related primarily to the central engine, or instead dominated by the large-scale properties of the host galaxy and its environment.

  8. RecutClub.com: An open source, whole slide image-based pathology education system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Christensen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our institution's pathology unknown conferences provide educational cases for our residents. However, the cases have not been previously available digitally, have not been collated for postconference review, and were not accessible to a wider audience. Our objective was to create an inexpensive whole slide image (WSI education suite to address these limitations and improve the education of pathology trainees. Materials and Methods: We surveyed residents regarding their preference between four unique WSI systems. We then scanned weekly unknown conference cases and study set cases and uploaded them to our custom built WSI viewer located at RecutClub.com. We measured site utilization and conference participation. Results: Residents preferred our OpenLayers WSI implementation to Ventana Virtuoso, Google Maps API, and OpenSlide. Over 16 months, we uploaded 1366 cases from 77 conferences and ten study sets, occupying 793.5 GB of cloud storage. Based on resident evaluations, the interface was easy to use and demonstrated minimal latency. Residents are able to review cases from home and from their mobile devices. Worldwide, 955 unique IP addresses from 52 countries have viewed cases in our site. Conclusions: We implemented a low-cost, publicly available repository of WSI slides for resident education. Our trainees are very satisfied with the freedom to preview either the glass slides or WSI and review the WSI postconference. Both local users and worldwide users actively and repeatedly view cases in our study set.

  9. Application of full range swept source optical coherence tomography for imaging of the anterior eye segment in patients with type I Boston Keratoprosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Raju; Cortes, Dennis; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Mannis, Mark J.; Werner, John S.

    2013-03-01

    We present a high-speed complex conjugate resolved 1 μm swept source optical coherence tomography [SS-OCT] system using coherence revival of the light source for clinical imaging of the anterior segment of the eye. High-speed of 100,000 A-scans/sec and 1 μm imaging window of OCT permits dense 3D imaging of the anterior segment, minimizing the influence of motion artifacts and deep penetration of images for topographic analysis. The swept laser performance with internal clocking was adapted to achieve extended imaging depth requirements. The feasibility of our instrument for visualization of the anterior segment of patients with the Boston Keratoprosthesis (KPro) was discussed. The relations between of the KPro and the surrounding tissue were also demonstrated.

  10. Modular multimodal swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography scan-head for surgical microscope-integrated and slit-lamp imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Joseph D.; Li, Jianwei D.; El-Haddad, Mohamed T.; Joos, Karen M.; Patel, Shriji N.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2017-02-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) enable noninvasive in vivo diagnostic imaging and provide complementary en face and depth-resolved visualization of ophthalmic structures, respectively. We previously demonstrated concurrent multimodal swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and OCT (SS-SESLO-OCT) at 1060 nm using a swept-source and double clad fiber coupler. Here, we present system enhancements and novel designs for a modular SS-SESLO-OCT scan-head that can be coupled to ophthalmic surgical microscope-integrated and slit-lamp imaging optics. Multimodal SS-SESLO-OCT was demonstrated using a custom-built swept-source OCT engine with a 200 kHz 1060 nm source that was optically buffered for concurrent SESLO and OCT imaging at 100% duty cycle and 400 kHz sweep-rate. A shared optical relay and fast-axis galvanometer ensured inherent co-registration between SESLO and OCT field-of-views and concurrent acquisition of an en face SESLO image with each OCT cross-section. SESLO and OCT frames were acquired at 200 fps with 2560 x 2000 pix. (spectral x lateral). We show in vivo human ophthalmic imaging data using surgical microscope-integrated and slit-lamp imaging relays to demonstrate the utility of our SS-SESLO-OCT design. Our self-contained modular scan-head can be used for either intraoperative guidance or clinical diagnostics and reduces the complexity, cost, and maintenance required for clinical translation of these technologies. We believe concurrent multimodal SS-SESLO-OCT may benefit 1) intraoperative imaging by allowing for real-time surgical feedback, instrument tracking, and overlays of computationally extracted image-based surrogate biomarkers of disease, and 2) slit-lamp imaging by enabling aiming, image registration, and multi-field mosaicking.

  11. Dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, Christopher P.J.

    2013-02-05

    A dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources includes a detector arrangement consists of three detectors downstream from the object under observation. The latter detector, which operates as a beam monitor, is an integrating detector that monitors the total beam power arriving at its surface. The first detector and the middle detector each include an integrating detector surrounding a foil. The foils of these two detectors are made of the same atomic material, but each foil is a different isotope, e.g., the first foil may comprise U235 and second foil may comprise U238. The integrating detectors surrounding these pieces of foil measure the total power scattered from the foil and can be similar in composition to the final beam monitor. Non-resonant photons will, after calibration, scatter equally from both foils.

  12. Crack Mapping on Shear-critical Reinforced Concrete Beams using an Open Source Digital Image Correlation Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny Suryanto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Three reinforced concrete beams, one with no shear reinforcement and two others with shear reinforcement ratios of 0.4% and 1.1%, were tested to investigate the influence of stirrup spacing on the mode of failure, overall strength and ductility. The results show that the beam reinforced with closely-spaced shear reinforcement failed in a ductile manner, whereas the other two beams with large stirrup spacing and no stirrup exhibited only a small measure of ductility and failed in a brittle manner. The importance of the provisions of maximum spacing is highlighted to ensure adequate anchorage for the stirrups and prevent a premature shear failure to occur. The application of a non-contact monitoring system employing the open source digital image correlation software Ncorr, an ordinary digital camera and a smartphone is demonstrated to provide a visualization of the cracking process throughout the load history.

  13. The 1946 Unimak Tsunami Earthquake Area: revised tectonic structure in reprocessed seismic images and a suspect near field tsunami source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John J.; von Huene, Roland E.; Ryan, Holly F.

    2014-01-01

    In 1946 at Unimak Pass, Alaska, a tsunami destroyed the lighthouse at Scotch Cap, Unimak Island, took 159 lives on the Hawaiian Islands, damaged island coastal facilities across the south Pacific, and destroyed a hut in Antarctica. The tsunami magnitude of 9.3 is comparable to the magnitude 9.1 tsunami that devastated the Tohoku coast of Japan in 2011. Both causative earthquake epicenters occurred in shallow reaches of the subduction zone. Contractile tectonism along the Alaska margin presumably generated the far-field tsunami by producing a seafloor elevation change. However, the Scotch Cap lighthouse was destroyed by a near-field tsunami that was probably generated by a coeval large undersea landslide, yet bathymetric surveys showed no fresh large landslide scar. We investigated this problem by reprocessing five seismic lines, presented here as high-resolution graphic images, both uninterpreted and interpreted, and available for the reader to download. In addition, the processed seismic data for each line are available for download as seismic industry-standard SEG-Y files. One line, processed through prestack depth migration, crosses a 10 × 15 kilometer and 800-meter-high hill presumed previously to be basement, but that instead is composed of stratified rock superimposed on the slope sediment. This image and multibeam bathymetry illustrate a slide block that could have sourced the 1946 near-field tsunami because it is positioned within a distance determined by the time between earthquake shaking and the tsunami arrival at Scotch Cap and is consistent with the local extent of high runup of 42 meters along the adjacent Alaskan coast. The Unimak/Scotch Cap margin is structurally similar to the 2011 Tohoku tsunamigenic margin where a large landslide at the trench, coeval with the Tohoku earthquake, has been documented. Further study can improve our understanding of tsunami sources along Alaska’s erosional margins.

  14. Cascade of neural events leading from error commission to subsequent awareness revealed using EEG source imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Dhar

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to shed light on the respective contributions of three important action monitoring brain regions (i.e. cingulate cortex, insula, and orbitofrontal cortex during the conscious detection of response errors. To this end, fourteen healthy adults performed a speeded Go/Nogo task comprising Nogo trials of varying levels of difficulty, designed to elicit aware and unaware errors. Error awareness was indicated by participants with a second key press after the target key press. Meanwhile, electromyogram (EMG from the response hand was recorded in addition to high-density scalp electroencephalogram (EEG. In the EMG-locked grand averages, aware errors clearly elicited an error-related negativity (ERN reflecting error detection, and a later error positivity (Pe reflecting conscious error awareness. However, no Pe was recorded after unaware errors or hits. These results are in line with previous studies suggesting that error awareness is associated with generation of the Pe. Source localisation results confirmed that the posterior cingulate motor area was the main generator of the ERN. However, inverse solution results also point to the involvement of the left posterior insula during the time interval of the Pe, and hence error awareness. Moreover, consecutive to this insular activity, the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC was activated in response to aware and unaware errors but not in response to hits, consistent with the implication of this area in the evaluation of the value of an error. These results reveal a precise sequence of activations in these three non-overlapping brain regions following error commission, enabling a progressive differentiation between aware and unaware errors as a function of time elapsed, thanks to the involvement first of interoceptive or proprioceptive processes (left insula, later leading to the detection of a breach in the prepotent response mode (right OFC.

  15. Swept source optical coherence tomography for in vivo imaging and vibrometry in the apex of the mouse cochlea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Yoon [E.L. Ginzton Laboratory and Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Raphael, Patrick D.; Oghalai, John S. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Ellerbee, Audrey K. [E.L. Ginzton Laboratory and Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Applegate, Brian E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Cochlear amplification has been most commonly investigated by measuring the vibrations of the basilar membrane in animal models. Several different techniques have been used for measuring these vibrations such as laser Doppler vibrometry, miniature pressure sensors, low coherence interferometry, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). We have built a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system, which is similar to SD-OCT in that it is capable of performing both imaging and vibration measurements within the mouse cochlea in vivo without having to open the bone. In vivo 3D images of a mouse cochlea were obtained, and the basilar membrane, tectorial membrane, Reissner’s membrane, tunnel of Corti, and reticular lamina could all be resolved. We measured vibrations of multiple structures within the mouse cochlea to sound stimuli. As well, we measured the radial deflections of the reticular lamina and tectorial membrane to estimate the displacement of the outer hair cell stereocilia. These measurements have the potential to more clearly define the mechanisms underlying the linear and non-linear processes within the mammalian cochlea.

  16. Imaging of the elbow in children with wrist fracture: an unnecessary source of radiation and use of resources?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golding, Lauren P. [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Radiology, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Triad Radiology Associates, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Yasin, Yousef; Singh, Jasmeet; Anthony, Evelyn [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Radiology, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Gyr, Bettina M. [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Gardner, Alison [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Anecdotally accepted practice for evaluation of children with clinically suspected or radiographically proven wrist fracture in many urgent care and primary care settings is concurrent imaging of the forearm and elbow, despite the lack of evidence to support additional images. These additional radiographs may be an unnecessary source of radiation and use of health care resources. Our study assesses the necessity of additional radiographs of the forearm and elbow in children with wrist injury. We reviewed electronic medical records of children 17 and younger in whom wrist fracture was diagnosed in the emergency department. We identified the frequency with which additional radiographs of the proximal forearm and distal humerus demonstrated another site of acute injury. We identified 214 children with wrist fracture. Of those, 129 received additional radiographs of the elbow. Physical examination findings proximal to the wrist were documented in only 16 (12%) of these 129 children. A second injury proximal to the wrist fracture was present in 4 (3%) of these 129 children, all of whom exhibited physical examination findings at the elbow. No fractures were documented in children with a negative physical examination of the elbow. Although elbow fractures occasionally complicate distal forearm fractures in children, our findings indicate that a careful physical evaluation of the elbow is sufficient to guide further radiographic investigation. Routine radiographs of both the wrist and elbow in children with distal forearm fracture appear to be unnecessary when an appropriate physical examination is performed. (orig.)

  17. Risk stratification using line source attenuation correction with rest/stress Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardestani, Afrooz; Ahlberg, Alan W; Katten, Deborah M; Santilli, Krista; Polk, Donna M; Bateman, Timothy M; Heller, Gary V

    2014-02-01

    Although line source attenuation correction (AC) in SPECT MPI studies improves diagnostic accuracy, its prognostic value is less understood. Consecutive patients (n = 6,513) who underwent rest/stress AC ECG-gated SPECT MPI were followed for cardiac death or non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI). A 17-segment model and AC summed stress score (SSS) were used to classify images. Of the 6,513 patients, cardiac death or non-fatal MI occurred in 267 (4.1%), over 2.0 ± 1.4 years. The AC-SSS in patients with a cardiac event (5.6 ± 7.8) was significantly higher than in those without (1.9 ± 4.6, P 8 with annualized cardiac event rates of 1.1%, 3.2%, and 8.5%, respectively (P 8 emerged as independent predictors of cardiac events (P stress ECG-gated SPECT MPI with line source AC provides highly effective and incremental risk stratification for future cardiac events.

  18. SimVascular 2.0: an Integrated Open Source Pipeline for Image-Based Cardiovascular Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Hongzhi; Merkow, Jameson; Updegrove, Adam; Schiavazzi, Daniele; Wilson, Nathan; Shadden, Shawn; Marsden, Alison

    2015-11-01

    SimVascular (www.simvascular.org) is currently the only fully open source software package that provides a complete pipeline from medical image based modeling to patient specific blood flow simulation and analysis. It was initially released in 2007 and has contributed to numerous advances in fundamental hemodynamics research, surgical planning, and medical device design. However, early versions had several major barriers preventing wider adoption by new users, large-scale application in clinical and research studies, and educational access. In the past years, SimVascular 2.0 has made significant progress by integrating open source alternatives for the expensive commercial libraries previously required for anatomic modeling, mesh generation and the linear solver. In addition, it simplified the across-platform compilation process, improved the graphical user interface and launched a comprehensive documentation website. Many enhancements and new features have been incorporated for the whole pipeline, such as 3-D segmentation, Boolean operation for discrete triangulated surfaces, and multi-scale coupling for closed loop boundary conditions. In this presentation we will briefly overview the modeling/simulation pipeline and advances of the new SimVascular 2.0.

  19. Stress and rest dynamic myocardial perfusion imaging by evaluation of complete time-attenuation curves with dual-source CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kheng-Thye; Chua, Kia-Chong; Klotz, Ernst; Panknin, Christoph

    2010-08-01

    This study sought to describe a protocol for myocardial perfusion imaging using dipyridamole stress, with 128-slice dual-source computed tomography (CT), and to assess the ability of CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to detect abnormal flow reserve and infarction in comparison with nuclear MPI (NMPI). CT MPI has not been previously described with the 128-slice dual-source CT scanner, or with the complete evaluation of dynamic time-attenuation curves of the myocardium. Thirty-five patients underwent a stress CT MPI protocol. Complete time-attenuation curves of the myocardium were acquired using a novel scan mode, which acquires prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered axial images at 2 rapidly alternating positions. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) values of fixed and reversible defects obtained were compared between rest and stress. Findings on CT MPI were correlated to NMPI. Perfusion defects detected on CT were correlated to coronary stenoses detected on CT angiography (CTA) and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). There was a 1.5-fold difference between stress (1.21 +/- 0.31 cc/cc/min) and rest (0.82 +/- 0.22 cc/cc/min) MBF in normal tissue. In reversible defects, MBF was 0.65 +/- 0.21 cc/cc/min and 0.63 +/- 0.18 cc/cc/min at stress and rest, respectively. In fixed defects, the MBF was 0.57 +/- 0.22 cc/cc/min at stress and 0.54 +/- 0.23 cc/cc/min at rest. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of CT MPI for identifying segments with perfusion defects was 0.83, 0.78, 0.79, and 0.82, respectively. ICA results were available for 30 patients. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of CT MPI compared with ICA were 0.95, 0.65, 0.78, and 0.79, respectively. The radiation dose for CT MPI was 9.15 +/- 1.32 mSv for the stress scan and 9.09 +/- 1.40 mSv for the rest scan. Vasodilator-stress CT MPI may be feasible in human subjects at a radiation dose similar to NMPI. It identifies areas of abnormal flow reserve

  20. Validating Non-invasive EEG Source Imaging Using Optimal Electrode Configurations on a Representative Rat Head Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Hernández, Pedro A; Bae, Jihye; Song, Yinchen; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Aubert-Vázquez, Eduardo; Riera, Jorge J

    2016-03-30

    The curtain of technical limitations impeding rat multichannel non-invasive electroencephalography (EEG) has risen. Given the importance of this preclinical model, development and validation of EEG source imaging (ESI) is essential. We investigate the validity of well-known human ESI methodologies in rats which individual tissue geometries have been approximated by those extracted from an MRI template, leading also to imprecision in electrode localizations. With the half and fifth sensitivity volumes we determine both the theoretical minimum electrode separation for non-redundant scalp EEG measurements and the electrode sensitivity resolution, which vary over the scalp because of the head geometry. According to our results, electrodes should be at least ~3 to 3.5 mm apart for an optimal configuration. The sensitivity resolution is generally worse for electrodes at the boundaries of the scalp measured region, though, by analogy with human montages, concentrates the sensitivity enough to localize sources. Cramér-Rao lower bounds of source localization errors indicate it is theoretically possible to achieve ESI accuracy at the level of anatomical structures, such as the stimulus-specific somatosensory areas, using the template. More validation for this approximation is provided through the comparison between the template and the individual lead field matrices, for several rats. Finally, using well-accepted inverse methods, we demonstrate that somatosensory ESI is not only expected but also allows exploring unknown phenomena related to global sensory integration. Inheriting the advantages and pitfalls of human ESI, rat ESI will boost the understanding of brain pathophysiological mechanisms and the evaluation of ESI methodologies, new pharmacological treatments and ESI-based biomarkers.

  1. Effects of the source, surface, and sensor couplings and colorimetric of laser speckle pattern on the performance of optical imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwiesh, M.; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.; El-Ghandour, Hatem; Aly, Hussein A.; Mokhtar, A. M.

    2011-03-01

    Optical imaging systems are widely used in different applications include tracking for portable scanners; input pointing devices for laptop computers, cell phones, and cameras, fingerprint-identification scanners, optical navigation for target tracking, and in optical computer mouse. We presented an experimental work to measure and analyze the laser speckle pattern (LSP) produced from different optical sources (i.e. various color LEDs, 3 mW diode laser, and 10mW He-Ne laser) with different produced operating surfaces (Gabor hologram diffusers), and how they affects the performance of the optical imaging systems; speckle size and signal-to-noise ratio (signal is represented by the patches of the speckles that contain or carry information, and noise is represented by the whole remaining part of the selected image). The theoretical and experimental studies of the colorimetry (color correction is done in the color images captured by the optical imaging system to produce realistic color images which contains most of the information in the image by selecting suitable gray scale which contains most of the informative data in the image, this is done by calculating the accurate Red-Green-Blue (RGB) color components making use of the measured spectrum for light sources, and color matching functions of International Telecommunication Organization (ITU-R709) for CRT phosphorus, Tirinton-SONY Model ) for the used optical sources are investigated and introduced to present the relations between the signal-to-noise ratios with different diffusers for each light source. The source surface coupling has been discussed and concludes that the performance of the optical imaging system for certain source varies from worst to best based on the operating surface. The sensor /surface coupling has been studied and discussed for the case of He-Ne laser and concludes the speckle size is ranged from 4.59 to 4.62 μm, which are slightly different or approximately the same for all produced

  2. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2014-02-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ∼ 1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction.

  3. The application of a compact multispectral imaging system with integrated excitation source to in vivo monitoring of fluorescence during topical photodynamic therapy of superficial skin cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, J; Nadeau, V; Ferguson, J; Moseley, H; Ibbotson, S; Allen, J W; Sibbett, W; Padgett, M

    2001-03-01

    A novel, compact and low-cost multispectral fluorescence imaging system with an integrated excitation light source is described. Data are presented demonstrating the application of this method to in vivo monitoring of fluorescence before, during and after topical 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy of superficial skin cancers. The excitation source comprised a fluorescent tube with the phosphor selected to emit broadband violet light centered at 394 nm. The camera system simultaneously captured spectrally specific images of the fluorescence of the photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX, the illumination profile and the skin autofluorescence. Real-time processing enabled images to be manipulated to create a composite image of high contrast. The application and validation of this method will allow further detailed studies of the characteristics and time-course of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence, during topical photodynamic therapy in human skin in vivo.

  4. The digital sources at the world of technical images: Critical method, new media and the nature of the digital historical sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Telles da Silveira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present essay intends to discuss some of the theoretical aspects related to the usage of digital historical sources by historians. While the largest part of the bibliography about digital historical sources raises methodological questions that try to show the similitudes between digital sources and traditional historical sources, the work here presented aims at showing the differences between them. Through the use of concepts derived from media studies and software studies, it proposes that digital historical sources challenge the claims of factuality of historical discourse and the understanding of historical sources as evidences of the past, raising the need to rethink the relationship between historical method, historical document and historical discourse.

  5. Low-frequency wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging using a high-power near-infrared light-emitting diode light source

    OpenAIRE

    Gioux, Sylvain; Lomnes, Stephen J.; Choi, Hak Soo; Frangioni, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLi) could potentially improve exogenous near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging, because it offers the capability of discriminating a signal of interest from background, provides real-time monitoring of a chemical environment, and permits the use of several different fluorescent dyes having the same emission wavelength. We present a high-power, LED-based, NIR light source for the clinical translation of wide-field (larger than 5 cm in diameter) FLi at frequenc...

  6. Dose reduction in abdominal computed tomography: intraindividual comparison of image quality of full-dose standard and half-dose iterative reconstructions with dual-source computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Matthias S; Wüst, Wolfgang; Brand, Michael; Stahl, Christian; Allmendinger, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M

    2011-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the image quality of iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) in half-dose (HD) datasets compared with full-dose (FD) and HD filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction in abdominal computed tomography (CT). To acquire data with FD and HD simultaneously, contrast-enhanced abdominal CT was performed with a dual-source CT system, both tubes operating at 120 kV, 100 ref.mAs, and pitch 0.8. Three different image datasets were reconstructed from the raw data: Standard FD images applying FBP which served as reference, HD images applying FBP and HD images applying IRIS. For the HD data sets, only data from 1 tube detector-system was used. Quantitative image quality analysis was performed by measuring image noise in tissue and air. Qualitative image quality was evaluated according to the European Guidelines on Quality criteria for CT. Additional assessment of artifacts, lesion conspicuity, and edge sharpness was performed. : Image noise in soft tissue was substantially decreased in HD-IRIS (-3.4 HU, -22%) and increased in HD-FBP (+6.2 HU, +39%) images when compared with the reference (mean noise, 15.9 HU). No significant differences between the FD-FBP and HD-IRIS images were found for the visually sharp anatomic reproduction, overall diagnostic acceptability (P = 0.923), lesion conspicuity (P = 0.592), and edge sharpness (P = 0.589), while HD-FBP was rated inferior. Streak artifacts and beam hardening was significantly more prominent in HD-FBP while HD-IRIS images exhibited a slightly different noise pattern. Direct intrapatient comparison of standard FD body protocols and HD-IRIS reconstruction suggest that the latest iterative reconstruction algorithms allow for approximately 50% dose reduction without deterioration of the high image quality necessary for confident diagnosis.

  7. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a contrast agent for imaging of animal tissue using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Indranil; Raj, Shipra; Roy, Poulomi; Poddar, Raju

    2018-01-01

    We present noninvasive three-dimensional depth-resolved imaging of animal tissue with a swept-source optical coherence tomography system at 1064 nm center wavelength and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a potential contrast agent. A swept-source laser light source is used to enable an imaging rate of 100 kHz (100 000 A-scans s‑1). Swept-source optical coherence tomography is a new variant of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique, offering unique advantages in terms of sensitivity, reduction of motion artifacts, etc. To enhance the contrast of an OCT image, AgNPs are utilized as an exogeneous contrast agent. AgNPs are synthesized using a modified Tollens method and characterization is done by UV–vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. In vitro imaging of chicken breast tissue, with and without the application of AgNPs, is performed. The effect of AgNPs is studied with different exposure times. A mathematical model is also built to calculate changes in the local scattering coefficient of tissue from OCT images. A quantitative estimation of scattering coefficient and contrast is performed for tissues with and without application of AgNPs. Significant improvement in contrast and increase in scattering coefficient with time is observed.

  8. Wide-field-of-view phase-contrast imaging of nanostructures with a comparatively large polychromatic soft x-ray plasma source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasilov, S V; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, T A; Fukuda, Y; Kando, M; Kawachi, T; Skobelev, I Yu; Daido, H; Kato, Y; Bulanov, S V

    2009-11-01

    Polychromatic soft x-ray plasma sources were not previously considered to be among the sources suitable for the propagation based phase contrast imaging because of their comparatively large emission-zone size. In the current work a scheme based on the combination of soft x-ray emission of multicharged ions, generated by the interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with an ultrasonic jet of gas clusters, and an LiF crystal detector was used to obtain phase-enhanced high-resolution images of micro- and nanoscale objects in a wide field of view.

  9. Four-dimensional real-time cine images of wrist joint kinematics using dual source CT with minimal time increment scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Seong; Lee, Young Han; Kim, Sungjun; Cho, Hee Woo; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2013-07-01

    To validate the feasibility of real time kinematography with four-dimensional (4D) dynamic functional wrist joint imaging using dual source CT. Two healthy volunteers performed radioulnar deviation and pronation- supination wrist motions for 10 s and 4 s per cycle in a dual source CT scanner. Scan and reconstruction protocols were set to optimize temporal resolution. Cine images of the reconstructed carpal bone of the moving wrist were recorded. The quality of the images and radiation dosage were evaluated. The 4D cine images obtained during 4 s and 10 s of radioulnar motion showed a smooth stream of movement with good quality and little noise or artifact. Images from the pronation-supination motion showed noise with a masked surface contour. The temporal resolution was optimized at 0.28 s. Using dual source CT, 4D cine images of in vivo kinematics of wrist joint movement were obtained and found to have a shorter scan time, improved temporal resolution and lower radiation dosages compared with those previously reported.

  10. A microwave imaging-based 3D localization algorithm for an in-body RF source as in wireless capsule endoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Rohit; Balasingham, Ilangko

    2015-01-01

    A microwave imaging-based technique for 3D localization of an in-body RF source is presented. Such a technique can be useful for localization of an RF source as in wireless capsule endoscopes for positioning of any abnormality in the gastrointestinal tract. Microwave imaging is used to determine the dielectric properties (relative permittivity and conductivity) of the tissues that are required for a precise localization. A 2D microwave imaging algorithm is used for determination of the dielectric properties. Calibration method is developed for removing any error due to the used 2D imaging algorithm on the imaging data of a 3D body. The developed method is tested on a simple 3D heterogeneous phantom through finite-difference-time-domain simulations. Additive white Gaussian noise at the signal-to-noise ratio of 30 dB is added to the simulated data to make them more realistic. The developed calibration method improves the imaging and the localization accuracy. Statistics on the localization accuracy are generated by randomly placing the RF source at various positions inside the small intestine of the phantom. The cumulative distribution function of the localization error is plotted. In 90% of the cases, the localization accuracy was found within 1.67 cm, showing the capability of the developed method for 3D localization.

  11. What are “X-shaped” Radio Sources Telling Us? I. Very Large Array Imaging of a Large Sample of Candidate XRGs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David H.; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Wang, Kevin X.; Sathyanarayana Rao, Mayuri; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; KleinStern, Carly C.; Morii-Sciolla, Christopher Y.; Simpson, Liana

    2018-01-01

    We present archival and Jansky Very Large Array multi-frequency multi-array radio continuum imaging of a unique sample of 100 radio sources that have been selected to be candidate “X-shaped” radio galaxies (XRGs). The archival data were calibrated in AIPS and imaged using DIFMAP, while the new Very Large Array data were calibrated and imaged in CASA. No attempt was made to re-image the archival data in CASA. Altogether we present images of 95 of the 100 sources. These observations give us the opportunity to study radio sources with synchrotron plasma that is significantly offset from the main radio axis and therefore to open a window into investigations of physical mechanisms responsible for depositing the plasma in off-axis regions. Here, we present the technical details of the observations and all of the total intensity images, while in subsequent papers we use them to examine critically various models for the formation of XRGs. Spectral index and linear polarization information is also presented and analyzed in further papers in this series.

  12. Imaging of pulmonary vein anatomy using low-dose prospective ECG-triggered dual-source computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanke, Philipp; Baumann, Tobias; Langer, Mathias; Pache, Gregor [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    To prospectively investigate the feasibility, image quality and radiation dose estimates for computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the pulmonary veins and left atrium using prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered sequential dual-source (DS) data acquisition at end-systole in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation undergoing radiofrequency ablation. Thirty-five patients (mean age 66.2 {+-} 12.6 years) with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation underwent prospective ECG-triggered sequential DS-CTA with tube current (250 mAs/rotation) centred 250 ms past the R-peak. Tube voltage was adjusted to the BMI (<25 kg/m{sup 2}: 100 kV, >25 kg/m{sup 2}: 120 kV). Presence of motion or stair-step artefacts was assessed. Effective radiation dose was calculated from the dose-length product. All data sets could be integrated into the electroanatomical mapping system. Twenty-two patients (63%) were in sinus rhythm (mean heart rate 69.2 {+-} 11.1 bpm, variability 1.0 {+-} 1.7 bpm) and 13 (37%) showed an ECG pattern of atrial fibrillation (mean heart rate 84.8 {+-} 16.6 bpm, variability 17.9 {+-} 7.5 bpm). Minor step artefacts were observed in three patients (23%) with atrial fibrillation. Mean estimated effective dose was 1.1 {+-} 0.3 and 3.0 {+-} 0.5 mSv for 100 and 120 kV respectively. Imaging of pulmonary vein anatomy is feasible using prospective ECG-triggered sequential data acquisition at end-systole regardless of heart rate or rhythm at the benefit of low radiation dose. (orig.)

  13. Monitoring Oilfield Operations and GHG Emissions Sources Using Object-based Image Analysis of High Resolution Spatial Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, J. G.; Brodrick, P. G.; Brandt, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Fugitive emissions from oil and gas extraction have become a greater concern with the recent increases in development of shale hydrocarbon resources. There are significant gaps in the tools and research used to estimate fugitive emissions from oil and gas extraction. Two approaches exist for quantifying these emissions: atmospheric (or 'top down') studies, which measure methane fluxes remotely, or inventory-based ('bottom up') studies, which aggregate leakage rates on an equipment-specific basis. Bottom-up studies require counting or estimating how many devices might be leaking (called an 'activity count'), as well as how much each device might leak on average (an 'emissions factor'). In a real-world inventory, there is uncertainty in both activity counts and emissions factors. Even at the well level there are significant disagreements in data reporting. For example, some prior studies noted a ~5x difference in the number of reported well completions in the United States between EPA and private data sources. The purpose of this work is to address activity count uncertainty by using machine learning algorithms to classify oilfield surface facilities using high-resolution spatial imagery. This method can help estimate venting and fugitive emissions sources from regions where reporting of oilfield equipment is incomplete or non-existent. This work will utilize high resolution satellite imagery to count well pads in the Bakken oil field of North Dakota. This initial study examines an area of ~2,000 km2 with ~1000 well pads. We compare different machine learning classification techniques, and explore the impact of training set size, input variables, and image segmentation settings to develop efficient and robust techniques identifying well pads. We discuss the tradeoffs inherent to different classification algorithms, and determine the optimal algorithms for oilfield feature detection. In the future, the results of this work will be leveraged to be provide activity

  14. Lensless diffractive imaging with ultra-broadband table-top sources: from infrared to extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, S.M.; Tenner, V.T.; Noom, D.W.E.; Eikema, K.S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Lensless imaging is an approach to microscopy in which a high-resolution image of an object is reconstructed from one or more measured diffraction patterns, providing a solution in situations where the use of imaging optics is not possible. However, current lensless imaging methods are typically

  15. Quantitative assessment of left ventricular function with dual-source CT in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: initial findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, S.; Johnson, T.R.C.; Wintersperger, B.J.; Minaifar, N.; Bhargava, A.; Rist, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.; Nikolaou, K. [University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography are currently regarded as standard modalities for the quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction. With the recent introduction of dual-source computedtomography (DSCT), the increased temporal resolution of 83 ms should also improve the assessment of cardiac function in CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of DSCT in the assessment of left ventricular functional parameters with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as standard of reference. Fifteen patients (two female, 13 male; mean age 50.8 {+-} 19.2 years) underwent CT and MRI examinations on a DSCT (Somatom Definition; Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) and a 3.0-Tesla MR scanner (Magnetom Trio; Siemens Medical Solutions), respectively. Multiphase axial CT images were analysed with a semiautomatic region growing algorithms (Syngo Circulation; Siemens Medical Solutions) by two independent blinded observers. In MRI, dynamic cine loops of short axis slices were evaluated with semiautomatic contour detection software (ARGUS; Siemens Medical Solutions) independently by two readers. End-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), ejection fraction (EF) and stroke volume (SV) were determined for both modalities, and correlation coefficient, systematic error, limits of agreement and inter-observer variability were assessed. In DSCT, EDV and ESV were 135.8 {+-} 41.9 ml and 54.9 {+-} 29.6 ml, respectively, compared with 132.1 {+-} 40.8 ml EDV and 57.6 {+-} 27.3 ml ESV in MRI. Thus, EDV was overestimated by 3.7 ml (limits of agreement -46.1/+53.6), while ESV was underestimated by 2.6 ml (-36.6/+31.4). Mean EF was 61.6 {+-} 12.4% in DSCT and 57.9 {+-} 9.0% in MRI, resulting in an overestimation of EF by 3.8% with limits of agreement at -14.7 and +22.2%. Rank correlation rho values were 0.81 for EDV (P = 0.0024), 0.79 for ESV (P = 0.0031) and 0.64 for EF (P = 0.0168). The kappa value of inter

  16. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult male—internal electron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Matthew; Johnson, Perry; Rajon, Didier; Jokisch, Derek; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley

    2011-04-01

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of the adult male skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida adult male hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2010 Phys. Med. Biol. 55 339-63) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow, associated with radiogenic leukemia, and total shallow marrow, associated with radiogenic bone cancer. Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following sources: bone marrow (active and inactive), trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), and cortical bone (surfaces and volumes). Specific absorbed fractions are computed according to the MIRD schema, and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with site-specific values reported in both tabular and graphical format in an electronic annex available from http://stacks.iop.org/0031-9155/56/2309/mmedia. The distribution of cortical bone and spongiosa at the macroscopic dimensions of the phantom, as well as the distribution of trabecular bone and marrow tissues at the microscopic dimensions of the phantom, is imposed through detailed analyses of whole-body ex vivo CT images (1 mm resolution) and spongiosa-specific ex vivo microCT images (30 µm resolution), respectively, taken from a 40 year male cadaver. The method utilized in this work includes: (1) explicit accounting for changes in marrow self-dose with variations in marrow cellularity, (2) explicit accounting for electron escape from spongiosa, (3) explicit consideration of spongiosa cross-fire from cortical bone, and (4) explicit consideration of the ICRP's change in the surrogate tissue region defining the location of the osteoprogenitor cells (from a 10 µm endosteal layer covering the trabecular and cortical surfaces to a 50 µm shallow marrow layer covering trabecular and medullary cavity surfaces). Skeletal

  17. An image-based skeletal dosimetry model for the ICRP reference adult male-internal electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hough, Matthew; Johnson, Perry; Bolch, Wesley [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Rajon, Didier [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Jokisch, Derek [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Francis Marion University, Florence, SC (United States); Lee, Choonsik, E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-04-21

    In this study, a comprehensive electron dosimetry model of the adult male skeletal tissues is presented. The model is constructed using the University of Florida adult male hybrid phantom of Lee et al (2010 Phys. Med. Biol. 55 339-63) and the EGSnrc-based Paired Image Radiation Transport code of Shah et al (2005 J. Nucl. Med. 46 344-53). Target tissues include the active bone marrow, associated with radiogenic leukemia, and total shallow marrow, associated with radiogenic bone cancer. Monoenergetic electron emissions are considered over the energy range 1 keV to 10 MeV for the following sources: bone marrow (active and inactive), trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes), and cortical bone (surfaces and volumes). Specific absorbed fractions are computed according to the MIRD schema, and are given as skeletal-averaged values in the paper with site-specific values reported in both tabular and graphical format in an electronic annex available from http://stacks.iop.org/0031-9155/56/2309/mmedia. The distribution of cortical bone and spongiosa at the macroscopic dimensions of the phantom, as well as the distribution of trabecular bone and marrow tissues at the microscopic dimensions of the phantom, is imposed through detailed analyses of whole-body ex vivo CT images (1 mm resolution) and spongiosa-specific ex vivo microCT images (30 {mu}m resolution), respectively, taken from a 40 year male cadaver. The method utilized in this work includes: (1) explicit accounting for changes in marrow self-dose with variations in marrow cellularity, (2) explicit accounting for electron escape from spongiosa, (3) explicit consideration of spongiosa cross-fire from cortical bone, and (4) explicit consideration of the ICRP's change in the surrogate tissue region defining the location of the osteoprogenitor cells (from a 10 {mu}m endosteal layer covering the trabecular and cortical surfaces to a 50 {mu}m shallow marrow layer covering trabecular and medullary cavity surfaces). Skeletal

  18. Added value of 80 kVp images to averaged 120 kVp images in the detection of hepatocellular carcinomas in liver transplantation candidates using dual-source dual-energy MDCT: Results of JAFROC analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Hoon [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hyung, E-mail: shkim@radcom.snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Sun [Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gi Hyeon [Department of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Background: To assess the added value of 80 kVp images to weighted average 120 kVp images for detecting hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) using dual-source, dual-energy MDCT. Materials and methods: Forty-one HCCs in 42 patients who underwent liver transplantation (LT) were included. All patients underwent quadruple-phase CT using a 64-row dual-source, dual-energy MDCT with 80 kVp and 140 kVp. For 120 kVp, a linear blending ratio of 0.3 was chosen. Interval reviews for both simulated 120 kVp images without and with pure 80 kVp data were performed independently by two radiologists. They detected HCCs using a 4-point confidence scale. Tumor-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated and compared between the 80 kVp and simulated 120 kVp images. The additional diagnostic value of 80 kVp images was evaluated by jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis. Results: There were 41 HCCs on pathology and 37 of the 41 HCCs were depicted on CT scan. The mean CNR of the 37 HCCs in late arterial and portal-phase images was significantly better in the 80 kVp images than in 120 kVp images. The average JAFROC figure of merit, however, was not significantly improved when 80 kVp was added. Furthermore, the number of false-positives was significantly increased in reader 1 when adding 80 kVp data. Conclusion: The addition of 80 kVp CT images to simulated 120 kVp images did not significantly improve the detection of HCCs despite of the significantly better CNR of 80 kVp images.

  19. Imaging characterization of the rapid adiabatic passage in a source-rotatable, crossed-beam scattering experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huilin; Mondal, Sohidul; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Liu, Kopin

    2017-07-01

    In order to achieve a more efficient preparation of a specific ro-vibrationally excited reactant state for reactive scattering experiments, we implemented the rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) scheme to our pulsed crossed-beam machine, using a single-mode, continuous-wave mid-infrared laser. The challenge for this source-rotatable apparatus lies in the non-orthogonal geometry between the molecular beam and the laser propagation directions. As such, the velocity spread of the supersonic beam results in a significantly broader Doppler distribution that needs to be activated for RAP to occur than the conventional orthogonal configuration. In this report, we detail our approach to shifting, locking, and stabilizing the absolute mid-infrared frequency. We exploited the imaging detection technique to characterize the RAP process and to quantify the excitation efficiency. We showed that with appropriate focusing of the IR laser, a nearly complete population transfer can still be achieved in favorable cases. Compared to our previous setup—a pulsed optical parametric oscillator/amplifier in combination with a multipass ring reflector for saturated absorption, the present RAP scheme with a single-pass, continuous-wave laser yields noticeably higher population-transfer efficiency.

  20. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascali, David, E-mail: davidmascali@lns.infn.it; Castro, Giuseppe; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Gammino, Santo [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József [Institute for Nuclear Research (Atomki), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Bem tér 18/c, H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Caliri, Claudia [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dip.to di Fisica e Astronomia, via Santa Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Romano, Francesco Paolo [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); CNR, Istituto per i Beni Archeologici e Monumentali, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Torrisi, Giuseppe [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, DIIES, Via Graziella, I-89100 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed “on-line” during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  1. Spectroscopic imaging of limiter heat and particle fluxes and the resulting impurity sources during Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephey, L; Wurden, G A; Schmitz, O; Frerichs, H; Effenberg, F; Biedermann, C; Harris, J; König, R; Kornejew, P; Krychowiak, M; Unterberg, E A

    2016-11-01

    A combined IR and visible camera system [G. A. Wurden et al., "A high resolution IR/visible imaging system for the W7-X limiter," Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)] and a filterscope system [R. J. Colchin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 2068 (2003)] were implemented together to obtain spectroscopic data of limiter and first wall recycling and impurity sources during Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas. Both systems together provided excellent temporal and spatial spectroscopic resolution of limiter 3. Narrowband interference filters in front of the camera yielded C-III and H α photon flux, and the filterscope system provided H α , H β , He-I, He-II, C-II, and visible bremsstrahlung data. The filterscopes made additional measurements of several points on the W7-X vacuum vessel to yield wall recycling fluxes. The resulting photon flux from both the visible camera and filterscopes can then be compared to an EMC3-EIRENE synthetic diagnostic [H. Frerichs et al., "Synthetic plasma edge diagnostics for EMC3-EIRENE, highlighted for Wendelstein 7-X," Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)] to infer both a limiter particle flux and wall particle flux, both of which will ultimately be used to infer the complete particle balance and particle confinement time τ P .

  2. X-ray imaging of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials at the Diamond Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakins, D E; Chapman, D J

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach enabling study of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials using the unique combination of high-energy synchrotron X-rays, a hybrid bunch structure, and a new dynamic loading platform. We detail the design and operation of the purpose-built, portable small bore gas-gun, which was installed on the I12 high-energy beamline at the Diamond Light Source and used to drive compression waves into solid and porous metal targets. Using a hybrid bunch structure and broadband X-ray pulses of up to 300 keV, radiographic snapshots were captured during various dynamic deformation processes in cm-scale specimens, thereby contributing to a more complete understanding of the evolution of mesoscale damage. Importantly, we highlight strategies for overcoming the challenges associated with using high-energy X-rays, and suggest areas for improvement needed to advance dynamic imaging through large-scale samples of relevance to engineering scenarios. These preliminary measurements demonstrate the feasibility of probing highly transient phenomena using the presented methodology.

  3. X-ray imaging of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials at the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakins, D. E.; Chapman, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach enabling study of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials using the unique combination of high-energy synchrotron X-rays, a hybrid bunch structure, and a new dynamic loading platform. We detail the design and operation of the purpose-built, portable small bore gas-gun, which was installed on the I12 high-energy beamline at the Diamond Light Source and used to drive compression waves into solid and porous metal targets. Using a hybrid bunch structure and broadband X-ray pulses of up to 300 keV, radiographic snapshots were captured during various dynamic deformation processes in cm-scale specimens, thereby contributing to a more complete understanding of the evolution of mesoscale damage. Importantly, we highlight strategies for overcoming the challenges associated with using high-energy X-rays, and suggest areas for improvement needed to advance dynamic imaging through large-scale samples of relevance to engineering scenarios. These preliminary measurements demonstrate the feasibility of probing highly transient phenomena using the presented methodology.

  4. Spectroscopic imaging of limiter heat and particle fluxes and the resulting impurity sources during Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephey, L.; Wurden, G. A.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Effenberg, F.; Biedermann, C.; Harris, J.; König, R.; Kornejew, P.; Krychowiak, M.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-11-01

    A combined IR and visible camera system [G. A. Wurden et al., "A high resolution IR/visible imaging system for the W7-X limiter," Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)] and a filterscope system [R. J. Colchin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 2068 (2003)] were implemented together to obtain spectroscopic data of limiter and first wall recycling and impurity sources during Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas. Both systems together provided excellent temporal and spatial spectroscopic resolution of limiter 3. Narrowband interference filters in front of the camera yielded C-III and Hα photon flux, and the filterscope system provided Hα, Hβ, He-I, He-II, C-II, and visible bremsstrahlung data. The filterscopes made additional measurements of several points on the W7-X vacuum vessel to yield wall recycling fluxes. The resulting photon flux from both the visible camera and filterscopes can then be compared to an EMC3-EIRENE synthetic diagnostic [H. Frerichs et al., "Synthetic plasma edge diagnostics for EMC3-EIRENE, highlighted for Wendelstein 7-X," Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)] to infer both a limiter particle flux and wall particle flux, both of which will ultimately be used to infer the complete particle balance and particle confinement time τP.

  5. Noninvasive cross-sectional imaging of proximal caries using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Hisaichi; Sadr, Alireza; Wada, Ikumi; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Nikaido, Toru; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of swept-source optical coherent tomography (SS-OCT) in detecting and estimating the depth of proximal caries in posterior teeth in vivo. SS-OCT images and bitewing radiographs were obtained from 86 proximal surfaces of 53 patients. Six examiners scored the locations according to a caries lesion depth scale (0-4) using SS-OCT and the radiographs. The results were compared with clinical observations obtained after the treatment. SS-OCT could detect the presence of proximal caries in tomograms that were synthesized based on the backscatter signal obtained from the proximal carious lesion through occlusal enamel. SS-OCT showed significantly higher sensitivity and larger area under the receiver operating characteristic curve than radiographs for the detection of cavitated enamel lesions and dentin caries (Student's t -test, p proximal lesions in the clinical environment. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Two configurations of miniature Mirau interferometry for swept-source OCT imaging: applications in dermatology and gastroendoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorecki, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    The early diagnosis of cancer is essential since it can be treated more effectively when detected earlier. Visual inspection followed by histological examination is, still today, the gold standard for clinicians. However, a large number of unnecessary surgical procedures are still performed. New diagnostics aids are emerging including the recent techniques of optical coherence tomography (OCT) which permits non-invasive 3D optical biopsies of biological tissues, improving patient's quality of life. Nevertheless, the existing bulk or fiber optics systems are expensive, only affordable at the hospital and thus, not sufficiently used by physicians or cancer's specialists as an early diagnosis tool. We developed two different microsystems based on Mirau interferometry and applied for swept source OCT imaging: one for dermatology and second for gastroenterology. In both cases the architecture is based tem based on spectrally tuned Mirau interferometry. The first configuration, developed in the frame of the European project VIAMOS, includes an active array of 4x4 Mirau interferometers. The matrix of Mirau reference mirrors is integrated on top of an electrostatic vertical comb-drive actuator. In second configuration, developed in the frame of Labex ACTION, we adapted VIAMOS technology to develop an OCT endomicroscope with a single-channel passive Mirau interferometer.

  7. Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G. [UNR; Driscoll, N. [UCSD; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R. [USGS; Louie, J. [UNR; Pullammanappallil, S. [Optim

    2016-08-01

    Amy Eisses, Annie Kell, Graham Kent, Neal Driscoll, Robert Karlin, Rob Baskin, John Louie, and Satish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting, San Diego, Oct. 23-26.

  8. Effect of slice thickness on image noise and diagnostic content of single-source-dual energy computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshipli, Marwan; Kabir, Norlaili A.

    2017-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) employs X-ray radiation to create cross-sectional images. Dual-energy CT acquisition includes the images acquired from an alternating voltage of X-ray tube: a low- and a high-peak kilovoltage. The main objective of this study is to determine the best slice thickness that reduces image noise with adequate diagnostic information using dual energy CT head protocol. The study used the ImageJ software and statistical analyses to aid the medical image analysis of dual-energy CT. In this study, ImageJ software and F-test were utilised as the combination methods to analyse DICOM CT images. They were used to investigate the effect of slice thickness on noise and visibility in dual-energy CT head protocol images. Catphan-600 phantom was scanned at different slice thickness values;.6, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 mm, then quantitative analyses were carried out. The DECT operated in helical mode with another fixed scan parameter values. Based on F-test statistical analyses, image noise at 0.6, 1, and 2 mm were significantly different compared to the other images acquired at slice thickness of 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm. However, no significant differences of image noise were observed at 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm. As a result, better diagnostic image value, image visibility, and lower image noise in dual-energy CT head protocol was observed at a slice thickness of 3 mm.

  9. Image-guided feedback for ophthalmic microsurgery using multimodal intraoperative swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianwei D.; Malone, Joseph D.; El-Haddad, Mohamed T.; Arquitola, Amber M.; Joos, Karen M.; Patel, Shriji N.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2017-02-01

    Surgical interventions for ocular diseases involve manipulations of semi-transparent structures in the eye, but limited visualization of these tissue layers remains a critical barrier to developing novel surgical techniques and improving clinical outcomes. We addressed limitations in image-guided ophthalmic microsurgery by using microscope-integrated multimodal intraoperative swept-source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography (iSS-SESLO-OCT). We previously demonstrated in vivo human ophthalmic imaging using SS-SESLO-OCT, which enabled simultaneous acquisition of en face SESLO images with every OCT cross-section. Here, we integrated our new 400 kHz iSS-SESLO-OCT, which used a buffered Axsun 1060 nm swept-source, with a surgical microscope and TrueVision stereoscopic viewing system to provide image-based feedback. In vivo human imaging performance was demonstrated on a healthy volunteer, and simulated surgical maneuvers were performed in ex vivo porcine eyes. Denselysampled static volumes and volumes subsampled at 10 volumes-per-second were used to visualize tissue deformations and surgical dynamics during corneal sweeps, compressions, and dissections, and retinal sweeps, compressions, and elevations. En face SESLO images enabled orientation and co-registration with the widefield surgical microscope view while OCT imaging enabled depth-resolved visualization of surgical instrument positions relative to anatomic structures-of-interest. TrueVision heads-up display allowed for side-by-side viewing of the surgical field with SESLO and OCT previews for real-time feedback, and we demonstrated novel integrated segmentation overlays for augmented-reality surgical guidance. Integration of these complementary imaging modalities may benefit surgical outcomes by enabling real-time intraoperative visualization of surgical plans, instrument positions, tissue deformations, and image-based surrogate biomarkers correlated with completion of

  10. Low-frequency wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging using a high-power near-infrared light-emitting diode light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Lomnes, Stephen J; Choi, Hak Soo; Frangioni, John V

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLi) could potentially improve exogenous near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging, because it offers the capability of discriminating a signal of interest from background, provides real-time monitoring of a chemical environment, and permits the use of several different fluorescent dyes having the same emission wavelength. We present a high-power, LED-based, NIR light source for the clinical translation of wide-field (larger than 5 cm in diameter) FLi at frequencies up to 35 MHz. Lifetime imaging of indocyanine green (ICG), IRDye 800-CW, and 3,3(')-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) was performed over a large field of view (10 cm by 7.5 cm) using the LED light source. For comparison, a laser diode light source was employed as a gold standard. Experiments were performed both on the bench by diluting the fluorescent dyes in various chemical environments in Eppendorf tubes, and in vivo by injecting the fluorescent dyes mixed in Matrigel subcutaneously into CD-1 mice. Last, measured fluorescence lifetimes obtained using the LED and the laser diode sources were compared with those obtained using a state-of-the-art time-domain imaging system and with those previously described in the literature. On average, lifetime values obtained using the LED and the laser diode light sources were consistent, exhibiting a mean difference of 3% from the expected values and a coefficient of variation of 12%. Taken together, our study offers an alternative to laser diodes for clinical translation of FLi and explores the use of relatively low frequency modulation for in vivo imaging.

  11. Quality controls for gamma cameras and PET cameras: development of a free open-source ImageJ program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Thomas; Ferrer, Ludovic; Berruchon, Jean B.; Cuissard, Regis; Martineau, Adeline; Loonis, Pierre; Couturier, Olivier

    2005-04-01

    Acquisition data and treatments for quality controls of gamma cameras and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) cameras are commonly performed with dedicated program packages, which are running only on manufactured computers and differ from each other, depending on camera company and program versions. The aim of this work was to develop a free open-source program (written in JAVA language) to analyze data for quality control of gamma cameras and PET cameras. The program is based on the free application software ImageJ and can be easily loaded on any computer operating system (OS) and thus on any type of computer in every nuclear medicine department. Based on standard parameters of quality control, this program includes 1) for gamma camera: a rotation center control (extracted from the American Association of Physics in Medicine, AAPM, norms) and two uniformity controls (extracted from the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine, IPEM, and National Electronic Manufacturers Association, NEMA, norms). 2) For PET systems, three quality controls recently defined by the French Medical Physicist Society (SFPM), i.e. spatial resolution and uniformity in a reconstructed slice and scatter fraction, are included. The determination of spatial resolution (thanks to the Point Spread Function, PSF, acquisition) allows to compute the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) in both modalities of cameras. All the control functions are included in a tool box which is a free ImageJ plugin and could be soon downloaded from Internet. Besides, this program offers the possibility to save on HTML format the uniformity quality control results and a warning can be set to automatically inform users in case of abnormal results. The architecture of the program allows users to easily add any other specific quality control program. Finally, this toolkit is an easy and robust tool to perform quality control on gamma cameras and PET cameras based on standard computation parameters, is free, run on

  12. Measuring noise equivalent irradiance of a digital short-wave infrared imaging system using a broadband source to simulate the night spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, John R.; Robinson, Timothy

    2015-05-01

    There is a growing interest in developing helmet-mounted digital imaging systems (HMDIS) for integration into military aircraft cockpits. This interest stems from the multiple advantages of digital vs. analog imaging such as image fusion from multiple sensors, data processing to enhance the image contrast, superposition of non-imaging data over the image, and sending images to remote location for analysis. There are several properties an HMDIS must have in order to aid the pilot during night operations. In addition to the resolution, image refresh rate, dynamic range, and sensor uniformity over the entire Focal Plane Array (FPA); the imaging system must have the sensitivity to detect the limited night light available filtered through cockpit transparencies. Digital sensor sensitivity is generally measured monochromatically using a laser with a wavelength near the peak detector quantum efficiency, and is generally reported as either the Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) or Noise Equivalent Irradiance (NEI). This paper proposes a test system that measures NEI of Short-Wave Infrared (SWIR) digital imaging systems using a broadband source that simulates the night spectrum. This method has a few advantages over a monochromatic method. Namely, the test conditions provide spectrum closer to what is experienced by the end-user, and the resulting NEI may be compared directly to modeled night glow irradiance calculation. This comparison may be used to assess the Technology Readiness Level of the imaging system for the application. The test system is being developed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Air Force Research Laboratory.

  13. Find Good Sources of Online Images: A Picture Doesn't Have to Be a Thousand Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    The Internet is a natural place to look for images that teachers can use in lessons and students can use in projects and assignments. Google, Yahoo, AltaVista--many of these popular search engines offer image searching. Usually there is a tab to click at the top of the page to select image searching; just enter a search term and go! However, this…

  14. On a Possible Source of Some of the Images in the Annalistic Pokhvala to Prince Roman Mstislavich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadym I. Stavyskyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this article is the text known as the “Eulogy (Pokhvala to Prince Roman Mstislavich Galitsky,” which is from the opening section of the Galician-Volhynian Chronicle. The author of the article amplifies remarks made by Alexander Orlov about loanwords taken from translated works that appear in the text of the Pokhvala. The text of the exegesis of prophets by St. Hippolytus of Rome, which was widely known in Slavonic translation from the 12th century as the Slovo o Khriste i ob Antikhriste, produces additional material for comparison. St. Hippolytus’s text offers a possible interpretation of the concept “uma mudrostʹiu,” which the author of the Pokhvala offers as an explanation of the successful foreign policy of Prince Roman; in addition, this explanation helps to clarify the comparison of the prince with the eagle-lion, the lynx, and the crocodile. Certain characteristics of the text of the Pokhvala as revealed in the account of the exile of Khan Atrak by Prince Vladimir Monomakh and the subsequent mission carried out by Khan Syrchan, both unsupported in other sources, were, we believe, influenced by the text of the Slovo as well. It appears that literary images used throughout the Pokhvala were determined by apocalyptic symbols, following the approach that was typical of their interpretation by St. Hippolytus. This conclusion permits us to broaden our notions about the enumeration of works in translation used by the creator of the Galician-Volhynian Chronicle.

  15. SpotMetrics: An Open-Source Image-Analysis Software Plugin for Automatic Chromatophore Detection and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjisolomou, Stavros P.; El-Haddad, George

    2017-01-01

    Coleoid cephalopods (squid, octopus, and sepia) are renowned for their elaborate body patterning capabilities, which are employed for camouflage or communication. The specific chromatic appearance of a cephalopod, at any given moment, is a direct result of the combined action of their intradermal pigmented chromatophore organs and reflecting cells. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the cephalopod coloration system by video recording and analyzing the activation of individual chromatophores in time. The fact that adult cephalopods have small chromatophores, up to several hundred thousand in number, makes measurement and analysis over several seconds a difficult task. However, current advancements in videography enable high-resolution and high framerate recording, which can be used to record chromatophore activity in more detail and accuracy in both space and time domains. In turn, the additional pixel information and extra frames per video from such recordings result in large video files of several gigabytes, even when the recording spans only few minutes. We created a software plugin, “SpotMetrics,” that can automatically analyze high resolution, high framerate video of chromatophore organ activation in time. This image analysis software can track hundreds of individual chromatophores over several hundred frames to provide measurements of size and color. This software may also be used to measure differences in chromatophore activation during different behaviors which will contribute to our understanding of the cephalopod sensorimotor integration system. In addition, this software can potentially be utilized to detect numbers of round objects and size changes in time, such as eye pupil size or number of bacteria in a sample. Thus, we are making this software plugin freely available as open-source because we believe it will be of benefit to other colleagues both in the cephalopod biology field and also within other disciplines. PMID:28298896

  16. Breast MR imaging at 3 T with dual-source radiofrequency transmission offers superior B1 homogeneity: an intraindividual comparison with breast MR imaging at 1.5 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trop, Isabelle; Gilbert, Guillaume; Ivancevic, Marko K; Beaudoin, Gilles

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate and compare B1 homogeneity for breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed at 3 T with dual-source radiofrequency (RF) transmission to 1.5-T MR imaging and 3-T MR imaging with quadrature transmission. This prospective study received institutional review board approval and patients provided informed consent. Women (n = 25; mean age, 53 years; range, 30-68 years) suspected of having breast lesions underwent breast MR imaging examinations on comparable 1.5-T and 3-T clinical systems between February and May 2012. B1 maps were obtained at 1.5 T and at 3 T with quadrature and dual-source RF transmission. Intrabreast differences and differences in mean B1 values between right and left breasts were investigated by using two-sided multivariate analysis of variance with interaction; t tests were used to compare the differences between measured whole-breast mean B1 values and requested B1 values. With quadrature transmission at 1.5 T and 3 T, the mean B1 values showed a statistically significant difference: left-breast measured B1 was -8.9% of requested B1 value at 1.5 T and -13.7% at 3 T (P transmission at 3 T, mean B1 values across the breasts were not statistically different, nor were the measured B1 values compared with requested B1 values (left breast, -0.6%; right breast, -0.7%). At 3 T with dual-source transmission, slight intrabreast local variations in B1 were recorded. MR imaging at 3 T with dual-source RF transmission offered an overall B1 homogeneity for breast imaging that was better than that obtained at 1.5 T and with quadrature transmission. © RSNA, 2013.

  17. Dual-energy imaging of bone marrow edema on a dedicated multi-source cone-beam CT system for the extremities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Thawait, G.; Packard, N.; Yorkston, J.; Demehri, S.; Fritz, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Arthritis and bone trauma are often accompanied by bone marrow edema (BME). BME is challenging to detect in CT due to the overlaying trabecular structure but can be visualized using dual-energy (DE) techniques to discriminate water and fat. We investigate the feasibility of DE imaging of BME on a dedicated flat-panel detector (FPD) extremities cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a unique x-ray tube with three longitudinally mounted sources. Methods: Simulations involved a digital BME knee phantom imaged with a 60 kVp low-energy beam (LE) and 105 kVp high-energy beam (HE) (+0.25 mm Ag filter). Experiments were also performed on a test-bench with a Varian 4030CB FPD using the same beam energies as the simulation study. A three-source configuration was implemented with x-ray sources distributed along the longitudinal axis and DE CBCT acquisition in which the superior and inferior sources operate at HE (and collect half of the projection angles each) and the central source operates at LE. Three-source DE CBCT was compared to a double-scan, single-source orbit. Experiments were performed with a wrist phantom containing a 50 mg/ml densitometry insert submerged in alcohol (simulating fat) with drilled trabeculae down to ~1 mm to emulate the trabecular matrix. Reconstruction-based three-material decomposition of fat, soft tissue, and bone was performed. Results: For a low-dose scan (36 mAs in the HE and LE data), DE CBCT achieved combined accuracy of ~0.80 for a pattern of BME spherical lesions ranging 2.5 - 10 mm diameter in the knee phantom. The accuracy increased to ~0.90 for a 360 mAs scan. Excellent DE discrimination of the base materials was achieved in the experiments. Approximately 80% of the alcohol (fat) voxels in the trabecular phantom was properly identified both for single and 3-source acquisitions, indicating the ability to detect edemous tissue (water-equivalent plastic in the body of the densitometry insert) from the fat inside the trabecular matrix

  18. Initial results of a new generation dual source CT system using only an in-plane comb filter for ultra-high resolution temporal bone imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Mathias; Haubenreisser, Holger; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Henzler, Thomas [Heidelberg University, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Raupach, Rainer; Schmidt, Bernhard; Leidecker, Christianne; Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare, Imaging and Therapy Division, Forchheim (Germany); Lietzmann, Florian; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg University, Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    To prospectively evaluate radiation dose and image quality of a third generation dual-source CT (DSCT) without z-axis filter behind the patient for temporal bone CT. Forty-five patients were either examined on a first, second, or third generation DSCT in an ultra-high-resolution (UHR) temporal bone-imaging mode. On the third generation DSCT system, the tighter focal spot of 0.2 mm{sup 2} removesthe necessity for an additional z-axis-filter, leading to an improved z-axis radiation dose efficiency. Images of 0.4 mm were reconstructed using standard filtered-back-projection or iterative reconstruction (IR) technique for previous generations of DSCT and a novel IR algorithm for the third generation DSCT. Radiation dose and image quality were compared between the three DSCT systems. The statistically significantly highest subjective and objective image quality was evaluated for the third generation DSCT when compared to the first or second generation DSCT systems (all p < 0.05). Total effective dose was 63 %/39 % lower for the third generation examination as compared to the first and second generation DSCT. Temporal bone imaging without z-axis-UHR-filter and a novel third generation IR algorithm allows for significantly higher image quality while lowering effective dose when compared to the first two generations of DSCTs. (orig.)

  19. Performance comparison between 8 and 14 bit-depth imaging in polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragoda, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2011-03-01

    We compare true 8 and 14 bit-depth imaging of SS-OCT and polarization-sensitive SS-OCT (PS-SS-OCT) at 1.3μm wavelength by using two hardware-synchronized high-speed data acquisition (DAQ) boards. The two DAQ boards read exactly the same imaging data for comparison. The measured system sensitivity at 8-bit depth is comparable to that for 14-bit acquisition when using the more sensitive of the available full analog input voltage ranges of the ADC. Ex-vivo structural and birefringence images of an equine tendon sample indicate no significant differences between images acquired by the two DAQ boards suggesting that 8-bit DAQ boards can be employed to increase imaging speeds and reduce storage in clinical SS-OCT/PS-SS-OCT systems. We also compare the resulting image quality when the image data sampled with the 14-bit DAQ from human finger skin is artificially bit-reduced during post-processing. However, in agreement with the results reported previously, we also observe that in our system that real-world 8-bit image shows more artifacts than the image acquired by numerically truncating to 8-bits from the raw 14-bit image data, especially in low intensity image area. This is due to the higher noise floor and reduced dynamic range of the 8-bit DAQ. One possible disadvantage is a reduced imaging dynamic range which can manifest itself as an increase in image artefacts due to strong Fresnel reflection.

  20. Third-generation dual-source 70-kVp chest CT angiography with advanced iterative reconstruction in young children: image quality and radiation dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rompel, Oliver; Janka, Rolf; Lell, Michael M.; Uder, Michael; Hammon, Matthias [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Gloeckler, Martin; Dittrich, Sven [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Cesnjevar, Robert [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Many technical updates have been made in multi-detector CT. To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of high-pitch second- and third-generation dual-source chest CT angiography and to assess the effects of different levels of advanced modeled iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE) in newborns and children. Chest CT angiography (70 kVp) was performed in 42 children (age 158 ± 267 days, range 1-1,194 days). We evaluated subjective and objective image quality, and radiation dose with filtered back projection (FBP) and different strength levels of ADMIRE. For comparison were 42 matched controls examined with a second-generation 128-slice dual-source CT-scanner (80 kVp). ADMIRE demonstrated improved objective and subjective image quality (P <.01). Mean signal/noise, contrast/noise and subjective image quality were 11.9, 10.0 and 1.9, respectively, for the 80 kVp mode and 11.2, 10.0 and 1.9 for the 70 kVp mode. With ADMIRE, the corresponding values for the 70 kVp mode were 13.7, 12.1 and 1.4 at strength level 2 and 17.6, 15.6 and 1.2 at strength level 4. Mean CTDI{sub vol}, DLP and effective dose were significantly lower with the 70-kVp mode (0.31 mGy, 5.33 mGy*cm, 0.36 mSv) compared to the 80-kVp mode (0.46 mGy, 9.17 mGy*cm, 0.62 mSv; P <.01). The third-generation dual-source CT at 70 kVp provided good objective and subjective image quality at lower radiation exposure. ADMIRE improved objective and subjective image quality. (orig.)

  1. Three-dimensional anterior segment imaging in patients with type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis with switchable full depth range swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Raju; Cortés, Dennis E.; Werner, John S.; Mannis, Mark J.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2013-08-01

    A high-speed (100 kHz A-scans/s) complex conjugate resolved 1 μm swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system using coherence revival of the light source is suitable for dense three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of the anterior segment. The short acquisition time helps to minimize the influence of motion artifacts. The extended depth range of the SS-OCT system allows topographic analysis of clinically relevant images of the entire depth of the anterior segment of the eye. Patients with the type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis (KPro) require evaluation of the full anterior segment depth. Current commercially available OCT systems are not suitable for this application due to limited acquisition speed, resolution, and axial imaging range. Moreover, most commonly used research grade and some clinical OCT systems implement a commercially available SS (Axsun) that offers only 3.7 mm imaging range (in air) in its standard configuration. We describe implementation of a common swept laser with built-in k-clock to allow phase stable imaging in both low range and high range, 3.7 and 11.5 mm in air, respectively, without the need to build an external MZI k-clock. As a result, 3-D morphology of the KPro position with respect to the surrounding tissue could be investigated in vivo both at high resolution and with large depth range to achieve noninvasive and precise evaluation of success of the surgical procedure.

  2. 20 cm VLA radio-continuum study of M31-images and point source catalogues DR2: Extraction of a supernova remnant sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvin T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present Data Release 2 of the Point Source Catalogue created from a series of previously constructed radio-continuum images of M31 at λ=20 cm (v=1.4 GHz from archived VLA observations. In total, we identify a collection of 916 unique discrete radio sources across the field of M31. Comparing these detected sources to those listed by Gelfand et al. (2004 at λ=92 cm, the spectral index of 98 sources has been derived. The majority (73% of these sources exhibit a spectral index of α<-0.6, indicating that their emission is predominantly non-thermal in nature, which is typical for background objects and Supernova Remnants (SNRs. Additionally, we investigate the presence of radio counterparts for some 156 SNRs and SNR candidates, finding a total of only 13 of these objects in our images within a 500 search area. Auxiliary optical, radio and X-ray catalogues were cross referenced highlighting a small population of SNRs and SNR candidates common to multi frequency domains.

  3. Survey of candidate gamma-ray sources at TeV energies using a high-resolution Cerenkov imaging system - 1988-1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, P. T.; Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Fegan, D. J.; Hillas, A. M.; Lamb, R. C.; Lang, M. J.; Lawrence, M. A.; Lewis, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The steady TeV gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula has been used to optimize the sensitivity of the Whipple Observatory atmospheric Cerenkov imaging telescope. Using this method, which is of order 20 times more sensitive than the standard method using a simple non-imaging detector, it is possible to detect the Crab Nebula at a significance level in excess of 6 standard deviations (6 sigma) in under 1 hr on source (with a corresponding time observing a background comparison region); a source one-tenth the strength of the Crab Nebula can be detected at the 4 sigma level after 40 hr on the source (and 40 hr on a background region). A variety of sources have been monitored using this technique over the period 1988-1991, but none were detected apart from the Crab Nebula. Upper limits are presented which in many instances are a factor of 10 below the flux of the Crab Nebula. These upper limits assume steady emission from the source and cannot rule out sporadic gamma-ray emission with short duty cycles.

  4. Real-time, near-infrared fluorescence imaging with an optimized dye/light source/camera combination for surgical guidance of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Brian P; Eifler, John B; Castanares, Mark; Chowdhury, Wasim H; Chen, Ying; Mease, Ronnie C; Ma, Rong; Mukherjee, Amarnath; Lupold, Shawn E; Pomper, Martin G; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2015-02-15

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a surface glycoprotein overexpressed on malignant prostate cells, as well as in the neovasculature of many tumors. Recent efforts to target PSMA for imaging prostate cancer rely on suitably functionalized low-molecular-weight agents. YC-27 is a low-molecular-weight, urea-based agent that enables near-infrared (NIR) imaging of PSMA in vivo. We have developed and validated a laparoscopic imaging system (including an optimized light source, LumiNIR) that is capable of imaging small tumor burdens with minimal background fluorescence in real-time laparoscopic extirpative surgery of small prostate tumor xenografts in murine and porcine models. In a mouse model, we demonstrate the feasibility of using real-time NIR laparoscopic imaging to detect and surgically remove PSMA-positive xenografts. We then validate the use of our laparoscopic real-time NIR imaging system in a large animal model. Our novel light source, which is optimized for YC-27, is capable of detecting as little as 12.4 pg/mL of the compound (2.48-pg YC-27 in 200-μL agarose). Finally, in a mouse xenograft model, we demonstrate that the use of real-time NIR imaging can reduce positive surgical margins (PSM). These data indicate that a NIR-emitting fluorophore targeted to PSMA may allow improved surgical treatment of human prostate cancer, reduce the rate of PSMs, and alleviate the need for adjuvant radiotherapy postoperatively. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. SU-F-J-40: Evaluation of Sensitivity of the Automatic Matching Between Cone-Beam CT Image and Simulation CT Image in TrueBeam 2.0 Imaging System 6DoF Considering Different Uncertainty Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaque, J; Bautista-Ballesteros, J; Ibanez-Rosello, B; Lliso, F; Carmona, V; Gimeno, J [Hospital La Fe, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J [Hospital La Fe, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, Alicante (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate the sensitivity of TrueBeam 2.0 Imaging System 6DoF automatic matching tool through the acquisition of cone-beam CT images in different phantoms applying submillimeter translations and rotations of tenths of a degree and registered with image simulation CT. Methods: To evaluate overall system-wide image, we consider two uncertainties source; First, the uncertainty of the manual phantom displacement (ε-m). This uncertainty is calculated by a digital caliper (0.01 mm) for vertical (Vrt), lateral (Lat) and longitudinal (Lng). A digital inclinometer (0.01°) for the pitch and roll and the own phantom scale to evaluate the coordinate rotation (Rtn). The second uncertainty is the displacement detected by the algorithm system of matching (σ-d) that we obtain from the standard deviations of the different measurements. We use three different phantoms. The BrainLab Radiosurgery system for supporting masks with an anthropomorphic dummy adapted to allow displacements of 0.1 mm in Vrt, Lat and Lng dimensions and rotations of 0.1° in Pitch dimension. For the analysis of the Rtn and Roll dimensions we use two homemade phantoms (RinoRot and RinoRoll, La Fe Hospital, Valencia, Spain) that allow rotations of 0.3°. Results: In the case of manual displacement of 0.10 ± 0.03 mm in the translations, the system detect 0.10 ± 0.07 mm, 0.12 ± 0.07 mm and 0.13 ± 0.07 mm (mean ± SD) in Lat, Vrt and Lng respectively. In the case of rotational dimension, manual displacement of 0.3 ± 0.1° was detected with 0.19 ± 0.06°, 0.29 ± 0.03° and 0.27 ± 0.06° in Pitch, Roll and Rtn. Conclusion: We conclude that the sensitivity of the automatic matching system is within 0.10 mm in translations and 0.3° in rotations. These values are under the own sensitivity of the software.

  6. Buffered Fourier domain mode locking: Unidirectional swept laser sources for optical coherence tomography imaging at 370,000 lines/s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Robert; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2006-10-15

    We describe buffered Fourier domain mode locking (FDML), a technique for tailoring the output and multiplying the sweep rate of FDML lasers. Buffered FDML can be used to create unidirectional wavelength sweeps from the normal bidirectional sweeps in an FDML laser without sacrificing sweep rate. We also investigate the role of the laser source in dynamic range versus sensitivity performance in optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Unidirectional sweep rates of 370 kHz over a 100 nm range at a center wavelength of 1300 nm are achieved. High-speed, swept-source OCT is demonstrated at record speeds of up to 370,000 axial scans per second.

  7. Myocardial delayed enhancement with dual-source CT: advantages of targeted spatial frequency filtration and image averaging over half-scan reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurobe, Yusuke; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Ito, Tatsuro; Kurita, Yoshie; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Nakamori, Shiro; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nagata, Motonori; Ishida, Masaki; Dohi, Kaoru; Ito, Masaaki; Sakuma, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Clinical utility of myocardial delayed-enhancement CT is currently limited because of relatively poor contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and artifacts. Targeted spatial-frequency filtration (TSFF) is a hybrid algorithm of half- and full-scan reconstruction that can achieve both high temporal resolution and improved stability of myocardial signal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate image quality of delayed-enhancement CT using TSFF with image averaging and its reproducibility in infarct assessment in comparison with conventional half-scan reconstruction (HALF). Forty patients with suspected coronary artery disease underwent delayed-enhancement CT with HALF and TSFF using dual-source CT. Two blinded readers independently determined the presence and size of delayed enhancement. Image quality, signal-to-noise ratio and CNR were assessed. The presence of delayed enhancement on CT was compared with magnetic resonance imaging in 12 patients. TSFF with averaging of 4 image stacks acquired during 1 breathhold demonstrated significantly better image quality compared with HALF. Good left ventricular lumen-myocardium contrast was consistently achieved with TSFF in patients who received iodine dose of >600 mg I/kg. The signal-to-noise ratio and CNR were 11.3 ± 4.2 and 4.5 ± 1.6 by TSFF, being significantly higher than those by HALF (7.9 ± 2.9 and 3.3 ± 1.8; P improved by using TSFF instead of HALF (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.86 vs 0.50). Agreement with magnetic resonance imaging by kappa statistics was 0.85 with TSFF and 0.74 with HALF. TSFF with image averaging can significantly improve image quality of delayed-enhancement CT and considerably enhances interobserver reproducibility of infarct sizing. Copyright © 2014 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging using violet LEDs as excitation sources for fecal matter contaminate identification on spinach leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food safety in the production of fresh produce for human consumption is a worldwide issue and needs to be addressed to decrease foodborne illnesses and resulting costs. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis techniques for detection of fecal contaminates on spina...

  9. Imaging of the human choroid with a 1.7 MHz A-scan rate FDML swept source OCT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczynska, I.; Migacz, J. V.; Jonnal, R.; Zawadzki, R. J.; Poddar, R.; Werner, J. S.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate OCT angiography (OCTA) and Doppler OCT imaging of the choroid in the eyes of two healthy volunteers and in a geographic atrophy case. We show that visualization of specific choroidal layers requires selection of appropriate OCTA methods. We investigate how imaging speed, B-scan averaging and scanning density influence visualization of various choroidal vessels. We introduce spatial power spectrum analysis of OCT en face angiographic projections as a method of quantitative analysis of choroicapillaris morphology. We explore the possibility of Doppler OCT imaging to provide information about directionality of blood flow in choroidal vessels. To achieve these goals, we have developed OCT systems utilizing an FDML laser operating at 1.7 MHz sweep rate, at 1060 nm center wavelength, and with 7.5 μm axial imaging resolution. A correlation mapping OCA method was implemented for visualization of the vessels. Joint Spectral and Time domain OCT (STdOCT) technique was used for Doppler OCT imaging.

  10. Prospectively ECG-Triggered Sequential Dual-Source Coronary CT Angiography in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: Influence of Heart Rate on Image Quality and Evaluation of Diagnostic Accuracy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yang

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of mean heart rate (HR and heart rate variation (HRV on image quality and diagnostic accuracy of prospectively ECG-triggered sequential dual-source coronary CT angiography (CCTA in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF.Eighty-five patients (49 women, 36 men; mean age 62. 1 ± 9.5 years with persistent AF underwent prospectively ECG-triggered sequential second-generation dual-source CCTA. Tube current and voltage were adjusted according to body mass index (BMI and iterative reconstruction was used. Image quality of coronary segments (four-point scale and presence of significant stenosis (>50% were evaluated. Diagnostic accuracy was analyzed in 30 of the 85 patients who underwent additional invasive coronary angiography (ICA.Only 8 of 1102 (0.7% segments demonstrated poor image quality. No significant impact on image quality was found for mean HR (94.9 ± 21.8 bpm; r=0.034, p=0.758; F=0.413, p=0.663 or HRV (67.5 ± 22.8 bpm; r=0.097, p=0.377; F=0.111, p=0.895. On per-segment analysis, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV were 89.7% (26/29, 99.4% (355/357, 92.9% (26/28, and 99.2% (355/358, respectively, with excellent correlation (kappa=0.91 with ICA. Mean effective dose was 3.3 ± 1.0 mSv.Prospectively ECG-triggered sequential dual-source CCTA provides diagnostic image quality and good diagnostic accuracy for detection of coronary stenosis in AF patients without significant influence by HR or HRV.

  11. Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Catherine, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The theme of this month's issue is "Images"--from early paintings and statuary to computer-generated design. Resources on the theme include Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and others. A page of reproducible activities is also provided. Features include photojournalism, inspirational Web sites, art history, pop art, and myths. (AEF)

  12. MSiReader: an open-source interface to view and analyze high resolving power MS imaging files on Matlab platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, Guillaume; Garrard, Kenneth P; Barry, Jeremy A; Muddiman, David C

    2013-05-01

    During the past decade, the field of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has greatly evolved, to a point where it has now been fully integrated by most vendors as an optional or dedicated platform that can be purchased with their instruments. However, the technology is not mature and multiple research groups in both academia and industry are still very actively studying the fundamentals of imaging techniques, adapting the technology to new ionization sources, and developing new applications. As a result, there important varieties of data file formats used to store mass spectrometry imaging data and, concurrent to the development of MSi, collaborative efforts have been undertaken to introduce common imaging data file formats. However, few free software packages to read and analyze files of these different formats are readily available. We introduce here MSiReader, a free open source application to read and analyze high resolution MSI data from the most common MSi data formats. The application is built on the Matlab platform (Mathworks, Natick, MA, USA) and includes a large selection of data analysis tools and features. People who are unfamiliar with the Matlab language will have little difficult navigating the user-friendly interface, and users with Matlab programming experience can adapt and customize MSiReader for their own needs.

  13. MSiReader: An Open-Source Interface to View and Analyze High Resolving Power MS Imaging Files on Matlab Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, Guillaume; Garrard, Kenneth P.; Barry, Jeremy A.; Muddiman, David C.

    2013-05-01

    During the past decade, the field of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has greatly evolved, to a point where it has now been fully integrated by most vendors as an optional or dedicated platform that can be purchased with their instruments. However, the technology is not mature and multiple research groups in both academia and industry are still very actively studying the fundamentals of imaging techniques, adapting the technology to new ionization sources, and developing new applications. As a result, there important varieties of data file formats used to store mass spectrometry imaging data and, concurrent to the development of MSi, collaborative efforts have been undertaken to introduce common imaging data file formats. However, few free software packages to read and analyze files of these different formats are readily available. We introduce here MSiReader, a free open source application to read and analyze high resolution MSI data from the most common MSi data formats. The application is built on the Matlab platform (Mathworks, Natick, MA, USA) and includes a large selection of data analysis tools and features. People who are unfamiliar with the Matlab language will have little difficult navigating the user-friendly interface, and users with Matlab programming experience can adapt and customize MSiReader for their own needs.

  14. Feasibility and evaluation of dual-source transmit 3D imaging of the orbits: Comparison to high-resolution conventional MRI at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, Achim, E-mail: achim.seeger@gmx.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Schulze, Maximilian, E-mail: maximilian.schulze@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Schuettauf, Frank, E-mail: fschuettauf@uni-tuebingen.de [University Eye Hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Schleichstrasse 12, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Klose, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.klose@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Ernemann, Ulrike, E-mail: ulrike.ernemann@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany); Hauser, Till-Karsten, E-mail: till-karsten.hauser@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, Tübingen 72076 (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Reduced FOV imaging enables a 3D approach for a very fast assessment of the orbits. • Conventional MRI exhibited higher eSNR values and consecutively higher scores for overall image quality in the subjective readers’ analysis. • All pathologies could be detected compared to high-resolution conventional MRI making 3D pTX SPACE to a potential alternative and fast imaging technique. - Abstract: Purpose: To prospectively compare the image quality and diagnostic performance of orbital MR images obtained by using a dual-source parallel transmission (pTX) 3D sequence (Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution, SPACE) with the image quality of conventional high-resolution standard protocol for clinical use in patients at 3T. Materials and methods: After obtaining institutional review board approval and patient consent, 32 patients with clinical indication for orbital MRI were examined using a high-resolution conventional sequences and 3D pTX SPACE sequences. Quantitative measurements, image quality of the healthy orbit, incidence of artifacts, and the subjective diagnostic performance to establish diagnosis was rated. Statistical significance was calculated by using a Student's t-test and nonparametric Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: Length measurements were comparable in the two techniques, 3D pTX SPACE resulted in significant faster image acquisition with higher spatial resolution and less motion artifacts as well as better delineation of the optic nerve sheath. However, estimated contrast-to-noise and signal-to-noise and overall image quality as well as subjective scores of the conventional TSE imaging were rated significantly higher. The conventional MR sequences were the preferred techniques by the readers. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility of 3D pTX SPACE of the orbit resulting in a rapid acquisition of isotropic high-resolution images. Although no pathology was

  15. Prospective versus retrospective ECG gating for dual source CT of the coronary stent: Comparison of image quality, accuracy, and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Lei, E-mail: zhaolei219@sohu.com [Beijing Anzhen Hospital of the Capital University of Medical Sciences (China); Zhang Zhaoqi; Fan Zhanming; Yang Lin; Du Jing [Beijing Anzhen Hospital of the Capital University of Medical Sciences (China)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: To compare image quality, diagnostic accuracy and radiation dose of prospective and retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gated dual source computed tomography (DSCT) for the evaluation of the coronary stent, using conventional coronary angiography (CA) as a standard reference. Design, setting and patients: Sixty patients (heart rates {<=}70 bpm) with previous stent implantation who were scheduled for CA were divided in two groups, receiving either prospective or retrospective ECG gated DSCT separately. Two reviewers scored coronary stent image quality and evaluated stent lumen. Results: There was no significant difference in image quality between the two groups. In the prospective group, there were 86.4% (51/59) stents with interpretable images, in the retrospective group, there were 87.5% (49/56) stents with interpretable images. Image quality was not influenced by age, body mass index or heart rate in either group, but heart rate variability had a weak impact on the image quality of the prospective group. Image noise was higher in the prospective group, but this difference reached statistical significance only by using a smooth kernel reconstruction. Per-stent based sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value were 100%, 84.1%, 68.2%, and 100%, respectively, in the prospective CT angiography group and 94.4%, 86.8%, 77.3%, and 97.1%, respectively, in the retrospective CT angiography group. There was a significant difference in the effective radiation dose between the two groups, mean effective dose in the prospective and retrospective group was 2.2 {+-} 0.5 mSv (1.5-3.2 mSv) and 14.6 {+-} 3.3 mSv (10.0-20.4 mSv) (p < .001) respectively. Conclusions: Compared with retrospective CT angiography, prospective CT angiography has a similar performance in assessing coronary stent patency, but a lower effective dose in selected patients with regular heart rates {<=}70 bpm.

  16. SU-C-16A-01: In Vivo Source Position Verification in High Dose Rate (HDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Flat Panel Imager: Initial Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franich, R; Smith, R; Millar, J [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Haworth, A [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Taylor, M [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Australian Federal Police, Canberra, ACT (Australia); McDermott, L [RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We report our initial clinical experience with a novel position-sensitive source-tracking system based on a flat panel imager. The system has been trialled with 4 prostate HDR brachytherapy patients (8 treatment fractions) in this initial study. Methods: The flat panel imaging system was mounted under a customised carbon fibre couch top assembly (Figure 1). Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate of each patient at the time of catheter placement. X-ray dwell position markers were inserted into three catheters and a radiograph acquired to locate the implant relative to the imaging device. During treatment, as the HDR source dwells were delivered, images were acquired and processed to determine the position of the source in the patient. Source positions measured by the imaging device were compared to the treatment plan for verification of treatment delivery. Results: Measured dwell positions provided verification of relative dwell spacing within and between catheters, in the coronal plane. Measurements were typically within 2.0mm (0.2mm – 3.3mm, s.d. 0.8mm) of the planned positions over 60 dwells (Figure 2). Discrimination between larger dwell intervals and catheter differentiation were clear. This confirms important delivery attributes such as correct transfer tube connection, source step size, relative catheter positions and therefore overall correct plan selection and delivery. The fiducial markers, visible on the radiograph, provided verification of treatment delivery to the correct anatomical location. The absolute position of the dwells was determined by comparing the measured dwell positions with the x-ray markers from the radiograph, validating the programmed treatment indexer length. The total impact on procedure time was less than 5 minutes. Conclusion: The novel, noninvasive HDR brachytherapy treatment verification system was used clinically with minor impact on workflow. The system allows verification of correct treatment

  17. Producing Accurate Stereographic Images with a Flashlight and Layers of Glass: A Source for Stereopsis via Slides or Overhead Projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Michael J.; Levine, Shellie H.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an extremely simple technique (using only Dreiding or Framework molecular models, a flashlight, small sheets of glass, and a piece of cardboard) which produces extremely accurate line drawings of stereoscopic images. Advantages of using the system are noted. (JN)

  18. Extensible Open-Source Zero-Footprint Web Viewer for Oncologic Imaging Research | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Tumor Imaging Metrics Core (TIMC), a CCSG Shared-Resource of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, has developed software for managing the workflow and image measurements for oncology clinical trials. This system currently is in use across the five Harvard hospitals to manage over 600 active clinical trials, with 800 users, and has been licensed and implemented at several other Cancer Centers, including Yale, Utah/Huntsman Cancer Institute, and UW/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance.

  19. Study of Lead as a Source X-ray Radiation Protection with an Analysis Grey Level Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo; Rahma, I. N.; Mosik; Masturi

    2017-04-01

    X-ray utilization in the medical field still has a potential danger for the human. This occurs when exposure to x-ray radiation received exceeds the dose limit value. It required a radiation shielding to prevent the hazard, and lead is one of the metals usually used as x-ray radiation shield. This work aims to determine the metallic lead properties to find out of the step wedge lead radiograph image. The instruments used are the plane x-ray, digital radiography system and personal computer installed by MATLAB, while the material is step wedge lead. The image of radiograph was analysed using GUI applications on MATLAB software to determine the values of grey level from the image and the optical density of the radiograph image. The results showed the greater optical density, the higher the image contrast, and the value of optical density in the image is inversely proportional to the voltage x-ray since the value of grey level at high voltage is smaller than that of at low voltage.

  20. Shear-wave reflection imaging using a MEMS-based 3C landstreamer and a vertical impact source - an esker study in SW Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodic, Bojan; Malehmir, Alireza; Maries, Georgiana; Ahokangas, Elina; Mäkinen, Joni; Pasanen, Antti

    2017-04-01

    Higher resolution of S-wave seismic data compared to the P-wave ones are attractive for the researches working with the seismic methods. This is particularly true for near-surface applications due to significantly lower shear-wave velocities of unconsolidated sediments. Shear-wave imaging, however, poses certain restrictions on both source and receiver selections and also processing strategies. With three component (3C) seismic receivers becoming more affordable and used, shear-wave imaging from vertical sources is attracting more attention for near-surface applications. Theoretically, a vertical impact source will always excite both P- and S-waves although the excited S-waves are radially polarized (SV). There is an exchange of seismic energy between the vertical and radial component of the seismic wavefield. Additionally, it is theoretically accepted that there is no energy conversion or exchange from vertical into the transverse (or SH) component of the seismic wavefield, and the SH-waves can only be generated using SH sources. With the objectives of imaging esker structure (glacial sediments), water table and depth to bedrock, we conducted a seismic survey in Virttaankangas, in southwestern Finland. A bobcat-mounted vertical drop hammer (500 kg) was used as the seismic source. To obtain better source coupling, a 75×75×1.5 cm steel plate was mounted at the bottom of the hammer casing and all the hits made on this plate after placing it firmly on the ground at every shot point. For the data recording, we used a state-of-the-art comprising of 100 units, 240 m-long, 3C MEMS (micro electro-mechanical system) based seismic landstreamer developed at Uppsala University. Although the focus of the study was on the vertical component data, careful inspection of the transverse (SH) component of the raw data revealed clear shear wave reflections (normal moveout velocities ranging from 280-350 m/s at 50 m depth) on several shot gathers. This indicated potential for their

  1. In vivo three-dimensional imaging of normal tissue and tumors in the rabbit pleural cavity using endoscopic swept source optical coherence tomography with thoracoscopic guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tuqiang; Liu, Gangjun; Kreuter, Kelly; Mahon, Sari; Colt, Henri; Mukai, David; Peavy, George M.; Chen, Zhongping; Brenner, Matthew

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a dynamic tunable focal distance graded-refractive-index lens rod-based high-speed 3-D swept-source (SS) optical coherence tomography (OCT) endoscopic system and demonstrate real-time in vivo, high-resolution (10-μm) imaging of pleural-based malignancies in an animal model. The GRIN lens-based 3-D SS OCT system, which images at 39 fps with 512 A-lines per frame, was able to capture images of and detect abnormalities during thoracoscopy in the thoracic cavity, including the pleura, chest wall, pericardium, and the lungs. The abnormalities were confirmed by histological evaluation and compared to OCT findings. The dynamic tunable focal distance range and rapid speed of the probe and SS prototype OCT system enabled this first-reported application of in vivo 3-D thoracoscopic imaging of pleural-based malignancies. The imaging probe of the system was found to be easily adaptable to various sites within the thoracic cavity and can be readily adapted to other sites, including rigid airway endoscopic examinations.

  2. Diagnosis of pulmonary artery embolism. Comparison of single-source CT and 3{sup rd} generation dual-source CT using a dual-energy protocol regarding image quality and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petritsch, Bernhard; Kosmala, Aleksander; Gassenmeier, Tobias; Weng, Andreas Max; Veldhoen, Simon; Kunz, Andreas Steven; Bley, Thorsten Alexander [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-06-15

    To compare radiation dose, subjective and objective image quality of 3 rd generation dual-source CT (DSCT) and dual-energy CT (DECT) with conventional 64-slice single-source CT (SSCT) for pulmonary CTA. 180 pulmonary CTA studies were performed in three patient cohorts of 60 patients each. Group 1: conventional SSCT 120 kV (ref.); group 2: single-energy DSCT 100 kV (ref.); group 3: DECT 90/Sn150 kV. CTDIvol, DLP, effective radiation dose were reported, and CT attenuation (HU) was measured on three central and peripheral levels. The signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) were calculated. Two readers assessed subjective image quality according to a five-point scale. Mean CTDIvol and DLP were significantly lower in the dual-energy group compared to the SSCT group (p < 0.001 [CTDIvol]; p < 0.001 [DLP]) and the DSCT group (p = 0.003 [CTDIvol]; p = 0.003 [DLP]), respectively. The effective dose in the DECT group was 2.79 ± 0.95 mSv and significantly smaller than in the SSCT group (4.60 ± 1.68 mSv, p < 0.001) and the DSCT group (4.24 ± 2.69 mSv, p = 0.003). The SNR and CNR were significantly higher in the DSCT group (p < 0.001). Subjective image quality did not differ significantly among the three protocols and was rated good to excellent in 75 % (135/180) of cases with an inter-observer agreement of 80 %. Dual-energy pulmonary CTA protocols of 3 rd generation dual-source scanners allow for significant reduction of radiation dose while providing excellent image quality and potential additional information by means of perfusion maps. Dual-energy CT with 90/Sn150 kV configuration allows for significant dose reduction in pulmonary CTA. Subjective image quality was similar among the three evaluated CT-protocols (64-slice SSCT, single-energy DSCT, 90/Sn150 kV DECT) and was rated good to excellent in 75% of cases. Dual-energy CT provides potential additional information by means of iodine distribution maps.

  3. Ultrahigh resolution and brilliance laser wakefield accelerator betatron x-ray source for rapid in vivo tomographic microvasculature imaging in small animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Krol, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    We are developing ultrahigh spatial resolution (FWHM microvasculature imaging micro-CT angiography (μCTA) in small animal models using optimized contrast agent. It exploits Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) betatron x-ray emission phenomenon. Ultrashort high-intensity laser pulse interacting with a supersonic gas jet produces an ion cavity ("bubble") in the plasma in the wake of the laser pulse. Electrons that are injected into this bubble gain energy, perform wiggler-like oscillations and generate burst of incoherent x-rays with characteristic duration time comparable to the laser pulse duration, continuous synchrotron-like spectral distribution that might extend to hundreds keV, very high brilliance, very small focal spot and highly directional emission in the cone-beam geometry. Such LWFA betatron x-ray source created in our lab produced 1021 -1023 photonsṡ shot-1ṡmrad-2ṡmm-2/0.1%bw with mean critical energy in the12-30 keV range. X-ray source size for a single laser shot was FWHM=1.7 μm x-ray beam divergence 20-30 mrad, and effective focal spot size for multiple shots FWHM= 2 μm. Projection images of simple phantoms and complex biological objects including insects and mice were obtained in single laser shots. We conclude that ultrahigh spatial resolution μCTA (FWHM 2 μm) requiring thousands of projection images could be accomplished using LWFA betatron x-ray radiation in approximately 40 s with our existing 220 TW laser and sub seconds with next generation of ultrafast lasers and x-ray detectors, as opposed to several hours required using conventional microfocal x-ray tubes. Thus, sub second ultrahigh resolution in vivo microtomographic microvasculature imaging (in both absorption and phase contrast mode) in small animal models of cancer and vascular diseases will be feasible with LWFA betatron x-ray source.

  4. Imaging source slip distribution by the back-projection of P-wave amplitudes from strong-motion records: a case study for the 2010 Jiasian, Taiwan, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Wei-An; Zhao, Li; Wu, Yih-Min; Lee, Shiann-Jong

    2013-06-01

    We propose an approach to imaging earthquake source rupture process by direct back-projection of local high-frequency (0.1-2.5 Hz) P-wave displacements from strong-motion records. A series of synthetic experiments are performed which demonstrate that our approach is capable of recovering the spatial-temporal distribution of the source slip with a good station coverage and a high average coherence value between the target and template waveforms. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by applying it to image the slip distribution of an earthquake occurred on 2010 March 4, in Jiasian (Mw = 6.0 and ML = 6.4) in southern Taiwan. The resulting moment-rate amplitude images show that the source rupture initiated at the vicinity of the hypocentre, followed by a moderate moment-rate release to the southeast of the hypocentre and a subsequent upward propagation, and finally propagated in the northwest direction, in agreement with the distribution of aftershocks. The majority of the slip at 17-20 km depth occurred to the west of the hypocentre, in a general agreement with the slip distributions obtained from dislocation model and finite-fault inversions. Our modified back-projection approach relies on seismic waveforms with the considerations of a recent 3-D structure model, high average coherence value, station correction factor and simplified amplitude correction. It is computationally efficient and allows for near real-time determinations of source slip distributions after earthquakes using strong-motion records. A quick result for the rupture model can be used in the calculation of strong ground-motion, providing important, useful and timely information for seismic hazard mitigation.

  5. A method for verification of treatment delivery in HDR prostate brachytherapy using a flat panel detector for both imaging and source tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Ryan L., E-mail: ryan.smith@wbrc.org.au; Millar, Jeremy L.; Franich, Rick D. [Alfred Health Radiation Oncology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia and School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000 (Australia); Haworth, Annette [School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia and Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC 3002 (Australia); Panettieri, Vanessa [Alfred Health Radiation Oncology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3004 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment delivery is an important step, but is generally difficult to achieve. A technique is required to monitor the treatment as it is delivered, allowing comparison with the treatment plan and error detection. In this work, we demonstrate a method for monitoring the treatment as it is delivered and directly comparing the delivered treatment with the treatment plan in the clinical workspace. This treatment verification system is based on a flat panel detector (FPD) used for both pre-treatment imaging and source tracking. Methods: A phantom study was conducted to establish the resolution and precision of the system. A pretreatment radiograph of a phantom containing brachytherapy catheters is acquired and registration between the measurement and treatment planning system (TPS) is performed using implanted fiducial markers. The measured catheter paths immediately prior to treatment were then compared with the plan. During treatment delivery, the position of the {sup 192}Ir source is determined at each dwell position by measuring the exit radiation with the FPD and directly compared to the planned source dwell positions. Results: The registration between the two corresponding sets of fiducial markers in the TPS and radiograph yielded a registration error (residual) of 1.0 mm. The measured catheter paths agreed with the planned catheter paths on average to within 0.5 mm. The source positions measured with the FPD matched the planned source positions for all dwells on average within 0.6 mm (s.d. 0.3, min. 0.1, max. 1.4 mm). Conclusions: We have demonstrated a method for directly comparing the treatment plan with the delivered treatment that can be easily implemented in the clinical workspace. Pretreatment imaging was performed, enabling visualization of the implant before treatment delivery and identification of possible catheter displacement. Treatment delivery verification was performed by measuring the

  6. A method for verification of treatment delivery in HDR prostate brachytherapy using a flat panel detector for both imaging and source tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ryan L; Haworth, Annette; Panettieri, Vanessa; Millar, Jeremy L; Franich, Rick D

    2016-05-01

    Verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment delivery is an important step, but is generally difficult to achieve. A technique is required to monitor the treatment as it is delivered, allowing comparison with the treatment plan and error detection. In this work, we demonstrate a method for monitoring the treatment as it is delivered and directly comparing the delivered treatment with the treatment plan in the clinical workspace. This treatment verification system is based on a flat panel detector (FPD) used for both pre-treatment imaging and source tracking. A phantom study was conducted to establish the resolution and precision of the system. A pretreatment radiograph of a phantom containing brachytherapy catheters is acquired and registration between the measurement and treatment planning system (TPS) is performed using implanted fiducial markers. The measured catheter paths immediately prior to treatment were then compared with the plan. During treatment delivery, the position of the (192)Ir source is determined at each dwell position by measuring the exit radiation with the FPD and directly compared to the planned source dwell positions. The registration between the two corresponding sets of fiducial markers in the TPS and radiograph yielded a registration error (residual) of 1.0 mm. The measured catheter paths agreed with the planned catheter paths on average to within 0.5 mm. The source positions measured with the FPD matched the planned source positions for all dwells on average within 0.6 mm (s.d. 0.3, min. 0.1, max. 1.4 mm). We have demonstrated a method for directly comparing the treatment plan with the delivered treatment that can be easily implemented in the clinical workspace. Pretreatment imaging was performed, enabling visualization of the implant before treatment delivery and identification of possible catheter displacement. Treatment delivery verification was performed by measuring the source position as each dwell was delivered

  7. IHC Profiler: an open source plugin for the quantitative evaluation and automated scoring of immunohistochemistry images of human tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frency Varghese

    Full Text Available In anatomic pathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC serves as a diagnostic and prognostic method for identification of disease markers in tissue samples that directly influences classification and grading the disease, influencing patient management. However, till today over most of the world, pathological analysis of tissue samples remained a time-consuming and subjective procedure, wherein the intensity of antibody staining is manually judged and thus scoring decision is directly influenced by visual bias. This instigated us to design a simple method of automated digital IHC image analysis algorithm for an unbiased, quantitative assessment of antibody staining intensity in tissue sections. As a first step, we adopted the spectral deconvolution method of DAB/hematoxylin color spectra by using optimized optical density vectors of the color deconvolution plugin for proper separation of the DAB color spectra. Then the DAB stained image is displayed in a new window wherein it undergoes pixel-by-pixel analysis, and displays the full profile along with its scoring decision. Based on the mathematical formula conceptualized, the algorithm is thoroughly tested by analyzing scores assigned to thousands (n = 1703 of DAB stained IHC images including sample images taken from human protein atlas web resource. The IHC Profiler plugin developed is compatible with the open resource digital image analysis software, ImageJ, which creates a pixel-by-pixel analysis profile of a digital IHC image and further assigns a score in a four tier system. A comparison study between manual pathological analysis and IHC Profiler resolved in a match of 88.6% (P<0.0001, CI = 95%. This new tool developed for clinical histopathological sample analysis can be adopted globally for scoring most protein targets where the marker protein expression is of cytoplasmic and/or nuclear type. We foresee that this method will minimize the problem of inter-observer variations across labs and

  8. IHC Profiler: an open source plugin for the quantitative evaluation and automated scoring of immunohistochemistry images of human tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Frency; Bukhari, Amirali B; Malhotra, Renu; De, Abhijit

    2014-01-01

    In anatomic pathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC) serves as a diagnostic and prognostic method for identification of disease markers in tissue samples that directly influences classification and grading the disease, influencing patient management. However, till today over most of the world, pathological analysis of tissue samples remained a time-consuming and subjective procedure, wherein the intensity of antibody staining is manually judged and thus scoring decision is directly influenced by visual bias. This instigated us to design a simple method of automated digital IHC image analysis algorithm for an unbiased, quantitative assessment of antibody staining intensity in tissue sections. As a first step, we adopted the spectral deconvolution method of DAB/hematoxylin color spectra by using optimized optical density vectors of the color deconvolution plugin for proper separation of the DAB color spectra. Then the DAB stained image is displayed in a new window wherein it undergoes pixel-by-pixel analysis, and displays the full profile along with its scoring decision. Based on the mathematical formula conceptualized, the algorithm is thoroughly tested by analyzing scores assigned to thousands (n = 1703) of DAB stained IHC images including sample images taken from human protein atlas web resource. The IHC Profiler plugin developed is compatible with the open resource digital image analysis software, ImageJ, which creates a pixel-by-pixel analysis profile of a digital IHC image and further assigns a score in a four tier system. A comparison study between manual pathological analysis and IHC Profiler resolved in a match of 88.6% (P<0.0001, CI = 95%). This new tool developed for clinical histopathological sample analysis can be adopted globally for scoring most protein targets where the marker protein expression is of cytoplasmic and/or nuclear type. We foresee that this method will minimize the problem of inter-observer variations across labs and further help in

  9. Image quality of ultra-low-dose dual-source CT angiography using high-pitch spiral acquisition and iterative reconstruction in young children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Minwen; Zhao, Hongliang; Xu, Jian; Wu, Yongjie; Li, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Obtaining diagnostic CT image quality with ultra-low radiation dose in young children with congenital heart disease remains challenging. We evaluated the feasibility and image quality of prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition with iterative reconstruction for pediatric cardiovascular CT angiography. Sixty-two consecutive pediatric patients younger than 2 years with congenital heart disease underwent prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral dual-source CT acquisition. Patients were randomly assigned into 2 groups: full tube current (40-70 mAs) scans with filtered back projection reconstruction (group A) and half tube current (20-35 mAs) scans with sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (group B). Attenuation, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and subjective image quality were compared between the 2 groups. Effective radiation dose was also estimated for both groups. No significant difference was found in the attenuation, image noise, SNR, and CNR between the 2 groups in the same evaluated anatomic regions, whereas the attenuation and image noise were slightly lower, and the SNR and CNR were slightly higher in group B. No significant difference was found in subjective image quality between the 2 groups (4.27 ± 0.73 vs. 4.34 ± 0.42; P = .813). Effective dose was 0.06 ± 0.03 mSv in group B and 0.13 ± 0.04 mSv in group A, reflecting dose savings of 53.8% by using iterative reconstruction. A combination of prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition, low tube current, and iterative reconstruction may offer diagnostic image quality in pediatric cardiovascular CT angiography with effective radiation dose < 0.1 mSv. Copyright © 2013 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Initial results of a new generation dual source CT system using only an in-plane comb filter for ultra-high resolution temporal bone imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Mathias; Haubenreisser, Holger; Raupach, Rainer; Schmidt, Bernhard; Lietzmann, Florian; Leidecker, Christianne; Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas; Schad, Lothar R; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Henzler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate radiation dose and image quality of a third generation dual-source CT (DSCT) without z-axis filter behind the patient for temporal bone CT. Forty-five patients were either examined on a first, second, or third generation DSCT in an ultra-high-resolution (UHR) temporal bone-imaging mode. On the third generation DSCT system, the tighter focal spot of 0.2 mm(2) removes the necessity for an additional z-axis-filter, leading to an improved z-axis radiation dose efficiency. Images of 0.4 mm were reconstructed using standard filtered-back-projection or iterative reconstruction (IR) technique for previous generations of DSCT and a novel IR algorithm for the third generation DSCT. Radiation dose and image quality were compared between the three DSCT systems. The statistically significantly highest subjective and objective image quality was evaluated for the third generation DSCT when compared to the first or second generation DSCT systems (all p generation examination as compared to the first and second generation DSCT. Temporal bone imaging without z-axis-UHR-filter and a novel third generation IR algorithm allows for significantly higher image quality while lowering effective dose when compared to the first two generations of DSCTs. • Omitting the z-axis-filter allows a reduction in radiation dose of 50% • A smaller focal spot of 0.2 mm (2) significantly improves spatial resolution • Ultra-high-resolution temporal-bone-CT helps to gain diagnostic information of the middle/inner ear.

  11. Impact of head models in N170 component source imaging: results in control subjects and ADHD patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrachini, L.; Blenkmann, A.; von Ellenrieder, N.; Petroni, A.; Urquina, H.; Manes, F.; Ibáñez, A.; Muravchik, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    The major goal of evoked related potential studies arise in source localization techniques to identify the loci of neural activity that give rise to a particular voltage distribution measured on the surface of the scalp. In this paper we evaluate the effect of the head model adopted in order to estimate the N170 component source in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients and control subjects, considering faces and words stimuli. The standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography algorithm (sLORETA) is used to compare between the three shell spherical head model and a fully realistic model based on the ICBM-152 atlas. We compare their variance on source estimation and analyze the impact on the N170 source localization. Results show that the often used three shell spherical model may lead to erroneous solutions, specially on ADHD patients, so its use is not recommended. Our results also suggest that N170 sources are mainly located in the right occipital fusiform gyrus for faces stimuli and in the left occipital fusiform gyrus for words stimuli, for both control subjects and ADHD patients. We also found a notable decrease on the N170 estimated source amplitude on ADHD patients, resulting in a plausible marker of the disease.

  12. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source and dual-energy CT for visualization of acute ischemic stroke

    CERN Document Server

    Hara, Hidetake; Matsuzawa, Hiroki; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Abe, Shinji; Satoh, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    We have recently developed a phantom that simulates acute ischemic stroke. We attempted to visualize acute-stage cerebral infarction by applying virtual monochromatic images to this phantom using dual-energy CT (DECT). Virtual monochromatic images were created using DECT from 40 to 100 keV at every 10 keV and from 60 to 80 keV at every 1 keV, under three energy conditions of tube voltages with thin (Sn) filters. Calculation of the CNR values allowed us to evaluate the visualization of acute-stage cerebral infarction. The CNR value of a virtual monochromatic image was the highest at 68 keV under 80 kV / Sn 140 kV, at 72 keV under 100 kV / Sn 140 kV, and at 67 keV under 140 kV / 80 kV. The CNR values of virtual monochromatic images between 65 and 75 keV were significantly higher than those obtained for all other created energy images. Therefore, optimal conditions for visualizing acute ischemic stroke were achievable.

  13. Neuropeptide imaging on an LTQ with vMALDI source: The complete `all-in-one' peptidome analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaert, Peter D.; Conaway, Maria C. Prieto; Pekar, Tonya M.; Miller, Ken

    2007-02-01

    Direct tissue imaging was performed on dissected insect tissue using a MALDI ion trap to visualize endogenous neuropeptides. Coupling tissue imaging to tandem MSn allows for the identification of previously known species and the ability to identify new ones by de novo sequencing, as searchable databases for insects are sparse. Direct tissue imaging is an attractive technique for the study of neuropeptides as minimal sample preparation is required prior to mass spectrometry. We successfully identified neuropeptides present in the corpora cardiaca and allata of Acheta domesticus (the house cricket). Diagnostic fragments at low m/z were used to distinguish between lipids and neuropeptides. The distribution of peptides appears to be more differentially localized than that of phospholipids, which seem to be more evenly distributed within the tissue.

  14. Multimodal and multiplex spectral imaging of rat cornea ex vivo using a white-light laser source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Hiroki; Kaji, Yuichi; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Ozawa, Takeaki; Oshika, Tetsuro; Kano, Hideaki

    2015-09-01

    We applied our multimodal nonlinear spectral imaging microscope to the measurement of rat cornea. We successfully obtained multiple nonlinear signals of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), third-order sum frequency generation (TSFG), and second harmonic generation (SHG). Depending on the nonlinear optical processes, the cornea tissue was visualized with different image contrast mechanism simultaneously. Due to white-light laser excitation, multiplex CARS and TSFG spectra were obtained. Combined multimodal and spectral analysis clearly elucidated the layered structure of rat cornea with molecular structural information. This study indicates that our multimodal nonlinear spectral microscope is a promising bioimaging method for tissue study. Multimodal nonlinear spectral images of rat cornea at corneal epithelium and corneal stroma in the in-plane (XY) direction. With use of the combinational analysis of different nonlinear optical processes, detailed molecular structural information is available without staining or labelling. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Remote measurement of river discharge using thermal particle image velocimetry (PIV) and various sources of bathymetric information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, Carl; Kinzel, Paul J.; Nelson, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    Although river discharge is a fundamental hydrologic quantity, conventional methods of streamgaging are impractical, expensive, and potentially dangerous in remote locations. This study evaluated the potential for measuring discharge via various forms of remote sensing, primarily thermal imaging of flow velocities but also spectrally-based depth retrieval from passive optical image data. We acquired thermal image time series from bridges spanning five streams in Alaska and observed strong agreement between velocities measured in situ and those inferred by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), which quantified advection of thermal features by the flow. The resulting surface velocities were converted to depth-averaged velocities by applying site-specific, calibrated velocity indices. Field spectra from three clear-flowing streams provided strong relationships between depth and reflectance, suggesting that, under favorable conditions, spectrally-based bathymetric mapping could complement thermal PIV in a hybrid approach to remote sensing of river discharge; this strategy would not be applicable to larger, more turbid rivers, however. A more flexible and efficient alternative might involve inferring depth from thermal data based on relationships between depth and integral length scales of turbulent fluctuations in temperature, captured as variations in image brightness. We observed moderately strong correlations for a site-aggregated data set that reduced station-to-station variability but encompassed a broad range of depths. Discharges calculated using thermal PIV-derived velocities were within 15% of in situ measurements when combined with depths measured directly in the field or estimated from field spectra and within 40% when the depth information also was derived from thermal images. The results of this initial, proof-of-concept investigation suggest that remote sensing techniques could facilitate measurement of river discharge.

  16. Remote measurement of river discharge using thermal particle image velocimetry (PIV) and various sources of bathymetric information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, Carl J.; Kinzel, Paul J.; Nelson, Jonathan M.

    2017-11-01

    Although river discharge is a fundamental hydrologic quantity, conventional methods of streamgaging are impractical, expensive, and potentially dangerous in remote locations. This study evaluated the potential for measuring discharge via various forms of remote sensing, primarily thermal imaging of flow velocities but also spectrally-based depth retrieval from passive optical image data. We acquired thermal image time series from bridges spanning five streams in Alaska and observed strong agreement between velocities measured in situ and those inferred by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), which quantified advection of thermal features by the flow. The resulting surface velocities were converted to depth-averaged velocities by applying site-specific, calibrated velocity indices. Field spectra from three clear-flowing streams provided strong relationships between depth and reflectance, suggesting that, under favorable conditions, spectrally-based bathymetric mapping could complement thermal PIV in a hybrid approach to remote sensing of river discharge; this strategy would not be applicable to larger, more turbid rivers, however. A more flexible and efficient alternative might involve inferring depth from thermal data based on relationships between depth and integral length scales of turbulent fluctuations in temperature, captured as variations in image brightness. We observed moderately strong correlations for a site-aggregated data set that reduced station-to-station variability but encompassed a broad range of depths. Discharges calculated using thermal PIV-derived velocities were within 15% of in situ measurements when combined with depths measured directly in the field or estimated from field spectra and within 40% when the depth information also was derived from thermal images. The results of this initial, proof-of-concept investigation suggest that remote sensing techniques could facilitate measurement of river discharge.

  17. SU-G-IeP3-10: Molecular Imaging with Clinical X-Ray Sources and Compton Cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernekohl, D; Ahmad, M; Chinn, G; Xing, L [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The application of Compton cameras (CC) is a novel approach translating XFCT to a practical modality realized with clinical CT systems without the restriction of pencil beams. The dual modality design offers additional information without extra patient dose. The purpose of this work is to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of using CCs for volumetric x-ray fluorescence (XF) imaging by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and statistical image reconstruction. Methods: The feasibility of a CC for imaging x-ray fluorescence emitted from targeted lesions is examined by MC simulations. 3 mm diameter water spheres with various gold concentrations and detector distances are placed inside the lung of an adult human phantom (MIRD) and are irradiated with both fan and cone-beam geometries. A sandwich design CC composed of Silicon and CdTe is used to image the gold nanoparticle distribution. The detection system comprises four 16×26 cm{sup 2} detector panels placed on the chest of a MIRD phantom. Constraints of energy-, spatial-resolution, clinical geometries and Doppler broadening are taken into account. Image reconstruction is performed with a list-mode MLEM algorithm with cone-projector on a GPU. Results: The comparison of reconstruction of cone- and fan-beam excitation shows that the spatial resolution is improved by 23% for fan-beams with significantly decreased processing time. Cone-beam excitation increases scatter content disturbing quantification of lesions near the body surface. Spatial resolution and detectability limit in the center of the lung is 8.7 mm and 20 fM for 50 nm diameter gold nanoparticles at 20 mGy. Conclusion: The implementation of XFCT with a CC is a feasible method for molecular imaging with high atomic number probes. Given constrains of detector resolutions, Doppler broadening, and limited exposure dose, spatial resolutions comparable with PET and molecular sensitivities in the fM range are realizable with current detector technology.

  18. Image quality and radiation dose of low tube voltage 3{sup rd} generation dual-source coronary CT angiography in obese patients: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinel, Felix G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Canstein, Christian [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Malvern, PA (United States); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Charleston, SC (United States); Sedlmaier, Martin; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas G. [Siemens Healthcare, Computed Tomography Division, Forchheim (Germany); Harris, Brett S. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Polo Pontino, Latina (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    To assess the influence of tube potential on radiation dose and image quality of third-generation dual-source coronary CT angiography (CTA) in a phantom simulating an obese patient. A thoracic phantom was equipped with tubular inserts containing iodine solution and water. A soft-tissue-equivalent ring around the phantom simulated an obese patient. Images were acquired at tube potentials of 80, 100, 120 and 140 kV with second-generation dual-source CT (DSCT) and 70-150 kV (in 10-kV increments) with third-generation DSCT. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated and CT dose index was recorded. With second-generation DSCT, CNR was highest for 120 kV (19.0) and decreased with lower tube potential (12.0 at 80 kV) owing to disproportionately increased image noise. With third-generation DSCT, 70- and 80-kV acquisitions showed a smaller increase in noise. CNRs for third-generation DSCT were highest for 70 and 80 kV (21.1 and 21.2, respectively). Compared to 120 kV, radiation dose was 68 % and 49 % lower at 70 kV and 80 kV, respectively. Third-generation DSCT enables one to perform coronary CTA at 70-80 kV in obese patients without compromising CNR and thus reduces radiation dose by 49-68 %. (orig.)

  19. Laser-driven proton sources and their applications: femtosecond intense laser plasma driven simultaneous proton and x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiuchi, M; Daido, H; Yogo, A; Sagisaka, A; Ogura, K; Orimo, S; Mori, M; Ma, J; Pirozhkov, A S; Kiriyama, H; Kanazawa, S; Kondo, S; Yamamoto, Y; Shimoura, T; Tanoue, M; Nakai, Y; Akutsu, A; Nagashima, A; Bulanov, S V; Esirkepov, T Z [Advanced Photon Research Center, JAEA, Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto (Japan)], E-mail: nishiuchi.mamiko@jaea.go.jp (and others)

    2008-05-01

    We have performed simultaneous proton and X-ray imaging with an ultra-short and high-intensity Ti: Sap laser system. More than 10{sup 10} protons, whose maximum energy reaches 2.5 MeV, were delivered within a {approx}ps bunch. At the same time, keV X-ray is generated at almost the same place where protons are emitted. We have performed the simultaneous imaging of the copper mesh by using proton and x-ray beams, in practical use of the characteristics of the laser produced plasma that it can provide those beams simultaneously without any serious problems on synchronization.

  20. Gas gun shock experiments with single-pulse x-ray phase contrast imaging and diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, S. N.; Jensen, B. J.; Hooks, D. E.; Fezzaa, K.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Shimada, T.

    2012-07-01

    The highly transient nature of shock loading and pronounced microstructure effects on dynamic materials response call for in situ, temporally and spatially resolved, x-ray-based diagnostics. Third-generation synchrotron x-ray sources are advantageous for x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) and diffraction under dynamic loading, due to their high photon fluxes, high coherency, and high pulse repetition rates. The feasibility of bulk-scale gas gun shock experiments with dynamic x-ray PCI and diffraction measurements was investigated at the beamline 32ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. The x-ray beam characteristics, experimental setup, x-ray diagnostics, and static and dynamic test results are described. We demonstrate ultrafast, multiframe, single-pulse PCI measurements with unprecedented temporal (Laue diffraction. The results not only substantiate the potential of synchrotron-based experiments for addressing a variety of shock physics problems, but also allow us to identify the technical challenges related to image detection, x-ray source, and dynamic loading.

  1. Perception of Solar Eclipses Captured by Art Explains How Imaging Misrepresented the Source of the Solar Wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Woo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The visible corona revealed by the natural phenomenon of solar eclipses has been studied for 150 years. A turning point has been the discovery that the true spatial distribution of coronal brightness can neither be seen nor imaged on account of its unprecedented dynamic range. Howard Russell Butler (1856–1934, the painter of solar eclipses in the early 20th century, possessed the extraordinary skill of painting from memory what he saw for only a brief time. His remarkable but forgotten eclipse paintings are, therefore, ideal for capturing and representing best the perceptual experience of the visible corona. Explained here is how by bridging the eras of visual (late 19th century and imaging investigations (since the latter half of the 20th century, Butler’s paintings reveal why white-light images misled researching and understanding the Sun’s atmosphere, the solar wind. The closure in understanding solar eclipses through the convergence of perception, art, imaging, science and the history of science promises to enrich