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Sample records for neurological motor function

  1. Biological and perceived stress in motor functional neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apazoglou, Kalliopi; Mazzola, Viridiana; Wegrzyk, Jennifer; Polara, Giulia Frasca; Aybek, Selma

    2017-11-01

    Current models explaining motor functional neurological disorders (FND) integrate both the neurobiological mechanisms underlying symptoms production and the role of psychosocial stressors. Imaging studies have suggested abnormal motor control linked to impaired emotional and stress regulation. However, little is known on the biological stress regulation in FND. Our aim was to study the biological and perceived response to stress in patients with motor FND. Sixteen patients with motor FND (DSM-5 criteria) and fifteen healthy controls underwent the Trier Social Stress Test. Hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) response was evaluated with salivary cortisol and autonomous sympathetic response with salivary alpha-amylase. Area under the curve was computed to reflect background levels (AUCg) and change over time (AUCi). Life adversities and perceived subjective stress on a visual analog scale (VAS) were correlated with biological responses. FND patients had significantly higher background levels (AUCg) of both stress markers (cortisol and amylase) than controls. The biological response (AUCi) to stress did not differ between groups for both markers but the subjective response showed an interaction effect with patients reporting higher levels of stress than controls. After stress, controls showed a strong correlation between subjective and objective sympathetic values (amylase) but not patients. The number and subjective impact of adverse life events correlated with cortisol AUCg in patients only. This study confirms a baseline HPA-axis and sympathetic hyperarousal state in motor FND related to life adversities. During a social stress, dissociation between perceived stress and biological markers was observed in patients only, reflecting a dysregulation of interoception capacity, which might represent an endophenotype of this disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional neurological disorders: imaging.

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    Voon, V

    2014-10-01

    Functional neurological disorders, also known as conversion disorder, are unexplained neurological symptoms. These symptoms are common and can be associated with significant consequences. This review covers the neuroimaging literature focusing on functional motor symptoms including motor functioning and upstream influences including self-monitoring and internal representations, voluntariness and arousal and trauma. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  3. Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation for glioma removal: prognostic value in motor function recovery from postsurgical neurological deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Tomokazu; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Tamura, Manabu; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Niki, Chiharu; Kawamata, Takakazu

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) as a prognostic predictor for upper-extremity motor functional recovery from postsurgical neurological deficits. METHODS Preoperative and postoperative nTMS studies were prospectively applied in 14 patients (mean age 39 ± 12 years) who had intraparenchymal brain neoplasms located within or adjacent to the motor eloquent area in the cerebral hemisphere. Mapping by nTMS was done 3 times, i.e., before surgery, and 1 week and 3 weeks after surgery. To assess the response induced by nTMS, motor evoked potential (nTMS-MEP) was recorded using a surface electromyography electrode attached to the abductor pollicis brevis (APB). The cortical locations that elicited the largest electromyography response by nTMS were defined as hotspots. Hotspots for APB were confirmed as positive responsive sites by direct electrical stimulation (DES) during awake craniotomy. The distances between hotspots and lesions (DHS-L) were measured. Postoperative neurological deficits were assessed by manual muscle test and dynamometer. To validate the prognostic value of nTMS in recovery from upper-extremity paresis, the following were investigated: 1) the correlation between DHS-L and the serial grip strength change, and 2) the correlation between positive nTMS-MEP at 1 week after surgery and the serial grip strength change. RESULTS From the presurgical nTMS study, MEPs from targeted muscles were identified in 13 cases from affected hemispheres. In one case, MEP was not evoked due to a huge tumor. Among 9 cases from which intraoperative DES mapping for hand motor area was available, hotspots for APB identified by nTMS were concordant with DES-positive sites. Compared with the adjacent group (DHS-L motor recovery at 1 week, 3 weeks, and 3 months after surgery (r = 0.87, 0.88, and 0.77, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Navigated TMS is a useful tool for identifying motor eloquent

  4. The microstructural status of the corpus callosum is associated with the degree of motor function and neurological deficit in stroke patients.

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    Li, Yongxin; Wu, Ping; Liang, Fanrong; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-01-01

    Human neuroimaging studies and animal models have suggested that white matter damage from ischemic stroke leads to the functional and structural reorganization of perilesional and remote brain regions. However, the quantitative relationship between the transcallosal tract integrity and clinical motor performance score after stroke remains unexplored. The current study employed a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate the relationship between white matter diffusivity changes and the clinical scores in stroke patients. Probabilistic fiber tracking was also used to identify structural connectivity patterns in the patients. Thirteen ischemic stroke patients and fifteen healthy control subjects participated in this study. TBSS analyses showed that the corpus callosum (CC) and bilateral corticospinal tracts (CST) in the stroke patients exhibited significantly decreased fractional anisotropy and increased axial and radial diffusivity compared with those of the controls. Correlation analyses revealed that the motor and neurological deficit scores in the stroke patients were associated with the value of diffusivity indices in the CC. Compared with the healthy control group, probabilistic fiber tracking analyses revealed that significant changes in the inter-hemispheric fiber connections between the left and right motor cortex in the stroke patients were primarily located in the genu and body of the CC, left anterior thalamic radiation and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, bilateral CST, anterior/superior corona radiate, cingulum and superior longitudinal fasciculus, strongly suggesting that ischemic induces inter-hemispheric network disturbances and disrupts the white matter fibers connecting motor regions. In conclusion, the results of the present study show that DTI-derived measures in the CC can be used to predict the severity of motor skill and neurological deficit in stroke patients. Changes in structural

  5. Evaluation of motor imagery ability in neurological patients: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Heremans, Elke; Vercruysse, Sarah; Spildooren, Joke; Feys, Peter; Helsen, W.; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Motor imagery is a promising new intervention strategy within neurological rehabilitation. However, previous studies have shown that the ability to perform motor imagery is not well preserved in all neurological patients. Therefore, patients’ motor imagery ability needs to be thoroughly examined when they are included in motor imagery rehabilitation programs or studies. In the past, objective methods to evaluate motor imagery were lacking rigour, and participants’ imagery ability was often in...

  6. Neuromodulation of lower limb motor control in restorative neurology

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    Minassian, Karen; Hofstoetter, Ursula; Tansey, Keith; Mayr, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    One consequence of central nervous system injury or disease is the impairment of neural control of movement, resulting in spasticity and paralysis. To enhance recovery, restorative neurology procedures modify altered, yet preserved nervous system function. This review focuses on functional electrical stimulation (FES) and spinal cord stimulation (SCS) that utilize remaining capabilities of the distal apparatus of spinal cord, peripheral nerves and muscles in upper motor neuron dysfunctions. FES for the immediate generation of lower limb movement along with current rehabilitative techniques is reviewed. The potential of SCS for controlling spinal spasticity and enhancing lower limb function in multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury is discussed. The necessity for precise electrode placement and appropriate stimulation parameter settings to achieve therapeutic specificity is elaborated. This will lead to our human work of epidural and transcutaneous stimulation targeting the lumbar spinal cord for enhancing motor functions in spinal cord injured people, supplemented by pertinent human research of other investigators. We conclude that the concept of restorative neurology recently received new appreciation by accumulated evidence for locomotor circuits residing in the human spinal cord. Technological and clinical advancements need to follow for a major impact on the functional recovery in individuals with severe damage to their motor system. PMID:22464657

  7. Functional Disorders in Neurology : Case Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new

  8. Rehabilitation Training and Resveratrol Improve the Recovery of Neurological and Motor Function in Rats after Cerebral Ischemic Injury through the Sirt1 Signaling Pathway.

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    Shi, Na; Zhu, Chongtian; Li, Liying

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the recovery of motor function in rats through the silent information regulator factor 2-related enzyme 1 (Sirt1) signal pathway-mediated rehabilitation training. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MACO) was used to induce ischemia/reperfusion injury. The rats were subjected to no treatment (model), rehabilitation training (for 21 days), resveratrol (5 mg/kg for 21 days), and rehabilitation training plus resveratrol treatment. 24 h later, They were assessed for neurobehavioral score and motor behavior score and expression of brain derived-nerve neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB). Compared with sham group, models had significantly higher neurobehavioral scores, balance beam, and rotary stick scores. Compared with the model group, rats in rehabilitation training and resveratrol groups had significantly reduced scores. Compared with rehabilitation training or resveratrol treatment alone, rehabilitation plus resveratrol further reduced the scores significantly. The percentage of cells expressing BDNF and TrkB and expression levels of BDNF and TrkB were similar between the model and sham groups, significantly increased in rehabilitation training and resveratrol groups, and further increased in rehabilitation training plus resveratrol group. These results indicate that rehabilitation raining plus resveratrol can significantly improve the recovery of motor function in rats after cerebral ischemic injury, which is likely related to the upregulation of the BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway.

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in neurology.

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    Auer, Tibor; Schwarcz, Attila; Horváth, Réka A; Barsi, Péter; Janszky, József

    2008-01-30

    The present contribution discusses the clinical use of functional MRI (fMRI) and its role in the most common neurological diseases. FMRI was found a reliable and reproducible examination tool resulting in a wide distribution of fMRI methods in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy in determining the relationship of eloquent areas and the epileptic focus. Preliminary data suggest that fMRI using memory paradigms can predict the postoperative memory decline in epilepsy surgery by determining whether a reorganization of memory functions took place. Speech-activated fMRI became the most used tool in determining hemispheric dominance. Visual and sensory-motor cortex can also be routinely investigated by fMRI which helps in decision on epilepsy surgery. FMRI combined with EEG is a new diagnostic tool in epilepsy and sleep disorders. FMRI can identify the penumbra after stroke and can provide an additional information on metabolic state of the threatened brain tissue. FMRI has a predictive role in post-stroke recovery. In relapsing-remitting MS an adaptive reorganization can be demonstrated by fMRI affecting the visual, motor, and memory systems, despite preserved functional performance. Much more extensive reorganization can be demonstrated in secondary progressive MS. These findings suggest that the different stages of MS are related to different stages of the reorganization and MS becomes progressive when there is no more reserve capacity in the brain for reorganization. FMRI offers the capability of detecting early functional hemodynamic alterations in Alzheimer's disease before morphological changes. FMRI can be a valuable tool to test and monitor treatment efficacy in AD. FMRI can also provide information about the mechanisms of different therapeutic approaches in Parkinson disorder including drug treatment and deep brain stimulation.

  10. Expanding the neurological examination using functional neurologic assessment: part II neurologic basis of applied kinesiology.

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    Schmitt, W H; Yanuck, S F

    1999-03-01

    Functional Neurologic Assessment and treatment methods common to the practice of applied kinesiology are presented. These methods are proposed to enhance neurological examination and treatment procedures toward more effective assessment and care of functional impairment. A neurologic model for these procedures is proposed. Manual assessment of muscular function is used to identify changes associated with facilitation and inhibition, in response to the introduction of sensory receptor-based stimuli. Muscle testing responses to sensory stimulation of known value are compared with usually predictable patterns based on known neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, guiding the clinician to an understanding of the functional status of the patient's nervous system. These assessment procedures are used in addition to other standard diagnostic measures to augment rather than replace the existing diagnostic armamentarium. The proper understanding of the neurophysiologic basis of muscle testing procedures will assist in the design of further investigations into applied kinesiology. Accordingly, the neurophysiologic basis and proposed mechanisms of these methods are reviewed.

  11. Fetal Cocaine Exposure: Neurologic Effects and Sensory-Motor Delays

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    Arendt, Robert E.; Minnes, Sonnia; Singer, Lynn T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Research on animal models demonstrates that fetal cocaine exposure results in neurologic deficits in memory and learning. Although drug effects on human infants are difficult to separate from other environmental influences of a drug-using lifestyle, studies suggest that infants exposed to cocaine in utero have reduced growth, delays in sensory-motor development, attentional deficits, and depressed responsivity to social stimulation. Standard interventions to promote behavioral state regulation in affected infants may be helpful when parents are capable of participating. PMID:25688173

  12. Sexual function in women with neurological disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hulter, Birgitta

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study sexual function in women with neurological disorders at fairly distinct and separate locations. The dissertation comprises descriptive, retrospective, quantitative studies on sexual functioning in women with hypothalamo-pituitary disorders (HPD) (n:48), multiple sclerosis (MS)(n:47), and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) (n:42). The results werecompared with those in an age-matched control group (C) (n:42), and as reported by representat...

  13. Hypnosis as therapy for functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeley, Q

    2016-01-01

    Suggestion in hypnosis has been applied to the treatment of functional neurologic symptoms since the earliest descriptions of hypnosis in the 19th century. Suggestion in this sense refers to an intentional communication of beliefs or ideas, whether verbally or nonverbally, to produce subjectively convincing changes in experience and behavior. The recognition of suggestion as a psychologic process with therapeutic applications was closely linked to the derivation of hypnosis from earlier healing practices. Animal magnetism, the immediate precursor of hypnosis, arrived at a psychologic concept of suggestion along with other ideas and practices which were then incorporated into hypnosis. Before then, other forms of magnetism and ritual healing practices such as exorcism involved unintentionally suggestive verbal and nonverbal stimuli. We consider the derivation of hypnosis from these practices not only to illustrate the range of suggestive processes, but also the consistency with which suggestion has been applied to the production and removal of dissociative and functional neurologic symptoms over many centuries. Nineteenth-century practitioners treated functional symptoms with induction of hypnosis per se; imperative suggestions, or commands for specific effects; "medical clairvoyance" in hypnotic trance, in which patients diagnosed their own condition and predicted the time and manner of their recovery; and suggestion without prior hypnosis, known as "fascination" or "psychotherapeutics." Modern treatments largely involve different types of imperative suggestion with or without hypnosis. However, the therapeutic application of suggestion in hypnosis to functional and other symptoms waned in the first half of the 20th century under the separate pressures of behaviorism and psychoanalysis. In recent decades suggestion in hypnosis has been more widely applied to treating functional neurologic symptoms. Suggestion is typically applied within the context of other

  14. Sparring And Neurological Function In Professional Boxers

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    John W Stiller

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDespite increased interest regarding the potentially long-term negative impact of chronic traumatic brain injury (CTBI, limited research had been conducted regarding such injuries and neurological outcomes in real world settings. To increase understanding regarding the relationship between sparring (e.g., number of years actively training for professional boxing and neurological functioning, professional boxers (n = 237 who competed in Maryland between 2003 to 2008 completed measures regarding sparring exposure (Cumulative Sparring Index; CSI and performance on tests of cognition (Symbol Digit Modalities Test; SDMT and balance (Sharpened Romberg Test; SRT. Measures were completed prior to boxing matches. Higher scores on the CSI (increased sparring exposure were associated with poorer performance on both tests of cognition (SDMT and balance (SRT. A threshold effect was noted regarding performance on the SDMT, with those reporting CSI values greater than about 150 experiencing a decline in cognition. A history of frequent and/or intense sparring may pose a significant risk for developing boxing associated neurological sequelae. Implementing administration of clinically meaningful tests before bouts, such as the CSI, SDMT, and/or the SRT, as well as documentation of results into the boxer’s physicals or medical profiles may be an important step for improving boxing safety.

  15. Functional neurologic recovery in two dogs diagnosed with severe

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    Mônica Vicky Bahr Arias

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injuries to the vertebral column, spinal cord, and cauda equina nerve roots occur frequently in human and veterinary medicine and lead to devastating consequences. Complications include partial or complete loss of motor, sensory, and visceral functions, which are among the main causes of euthanasia in dogs. The present case report describes neurological functional recovery in two dogs that were treated surgically for severe spinal fracture and vertebral luxation. In the first case, a stray, mixed breed puppy was diagnosed with thoracolumbar syndrome and Schiff-Scherrington posture, as well as a T13 caudal epiphyseal fracture with 100% luxation between vertebrae T13 and L1; despite these injuries, the animal did show deep pain sensation in the pelvic limbs. Decompression through hemilaminectomy and spinal stabilization with vertebral body pins and bone cement were performed, and the treatment was supplemented with physiotherapy and acupuncture . In the second case, a mixed breed dog was diagnosed with a vertebral fracture and severe luxation between L6 and L7 after a vehicular trauma, but maintained nociception and perineal reflex. Surgical stabilization of the spine was performed using a modified dorsal segmental fixation technique Both patients showed significant recovery of neurological function. Complete luxation of the spinal canal observed radiographically does not mean a poor prognosis, and in some cases, motor, sensory, and visceral functions all have the potential for recovery. In the first case the determining factor for good prognosis was the presence of deep pain perception, and in the second case the prognosis was determined by the presence of sensitivity and anal sphincter tone during the initial neurological examination

  16. Staging neurological disorders: expressions of cognitive and motor disorder.

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    Archer, Trevor; Kostrzewa, Richard M

    2010-08-01

    In neurologic disorders, there are progressive losses in regional brain structural integrity, circuitry, and neuronal process that threaten individuals' ability to express functional capacity at several levels of severity. The classification of (a) patients on the basis of diagnosis, risk prognosis, and intervention outcome forms the basis of clinical staging and (b) laboratory animals on the basis of animal model of brain disorder, extent of insult and dysfunctional expression, provides the components for the clinical staging and preclinical staging, respectively, of the disease state with certain associated epidemiological, biological, and genetic characteristics. The investigation of epigenetics and biomarkers is intrinsic to any analysis of the progressive nature of the neurogenerative disorders, in the present account disorders relating to Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, and diabetes.

  17. Rett syndrome: disruption of epigenetic control of postnatal neurological functions.

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    Pohodich, Amy E; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-10-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in the X-linked gene Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) cause a devastating pediatric neurological disorder called Rett syndrome. In males, these mutations typically result in severe neonatal encephalopathy and early lethality. On the other hand, owing to expression of the normal allele in ∼50% of cells, females do not suffer encephalopathy but instead develop Rett syndrome. Typically females with Rett syndrome exhibit a delayed onset of neurologic dysfunction that manifests around the child's first birthday and progresses over the next few years. Features of this disorder include loss of acquired language and motor skills, intellectual impairment and hand stereotypies. The developmental regression observed in patients with Rett syndrome arises from altered neuronal function and is not the result of neurodegeneration. Maintenance of an appropriate level of MeCP2 appears integral to the function of healthy neurons as patients with increased levels of MeCP2, owing to duplication of the Xq28 region encompassing the MECP2 locus, also present with intellectual disability and progressive neurologic symptoms. Despite major efforts over the past two decades to elucidate the molecular functions of MeCP2, the mechanisms underlying the delayed appearance of symptoms remain unclear. In this review, we will highlight recent findings that have expanded our knowledge of MeCP2's functions, and we will discuss how epigenetic regulation, chromatin organization and circuit dynamics may contribute to the postnatal onset of Rett syndrome. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Neurological abnormalities and neurocognitive functions in healthy elder people: A structural equation modeling analysis

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    Chan Raymond CK

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aims Neurological abnormalities have been reported in normal aging population. However, most of them were limited to extrapyramidal signs and soft signs such as motor coordination and sensory integration have received much less attention. Very little is known about the relationship between neurological soft signs and neurocognitive function in healthy elder people. The current study aimed to examine the underlying relationships between neurological soft signs and neurocognition in a group of healthy elderly. Methods One hundred and eighty healthy elderly participated in the current study. Neurological soft signs were evaluated with the subscales of Cambridge Neurological Inventory. A set of neurocognitive tests was also administered to all the participants. Structural equation modeling was adopted to examine the underlying relationship between neurological soft signs and neurocognition. Results No significant differences were found between the male and female elder people in neurocognitive function performances and neurological soft signs. The model fitted well in the elderly and indicated the moderate associations between neurological soft signs and neurocognition, specifically verbal memory, visual memory and working memory. Conclusions The neurological soft signs are more or less statistically equivalent to capture the similar information done by conventional neurocognitive function tests in the elderly. The implication of these findings may serve as a potential neurological marker for the early detection of pathological aging diseases or related mental status such as mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Neurological abnormalities and neurocognitive functions in healthy elder people: a structural equation modeling analysis.

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    Chan, Raymond C K; Xu, Ting; Li, Hui-jie; Zhao, Qing; Liu, Han-hui; Wang, Yi; Yan, Chao; Cao, Xiao-yan; Wang, Yu-na; Shi, Yan-fang; Dazzan, Paola

    2011-08-10

    Neurological abnormalities have been reported in normal aging population. However, most of them were limited to extrapyramidal signs and soft signs such as motor coordination and sensory integration have received much less attention. Very little is known about the relationship between neurological soft signs and neurocognitive function in healthy elder people. The current study aimed to examine the underlying relationships between neurological soft signs and neurocognition in a group of healthy elderly. One hundred and eighty healthy elderly participated in the current study. Neurological soft signs were evaluated with the subscales of Cambridge Neurological Inventory. A set of neurocognitive tests was also administered to all the participants. Structural equation modeling was adopted to examine the underlying relationship between neurological soft signs and neurocognition. No significant differences were found between the male and female elder people in neurocognitive function performances and neurological soft signs. The model fitted well in the elderly and indicated the moderate associations between neurological soft signs and neurocognition, specifically verbal memory, visual memory and working memory. The neurological soft signs are more or less statistically equivalent to capture the similar information done by conventional neurocognitive function tests in the elderly. The implication of these findings may serve as a potential neurological marker for the early detection of pathological aging diseases or related mental status such as mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Apollo's curse: neurological causes of motor impairments in musicians.

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    Altenmüller, Eckart; Ioannou, Christos I; Lee, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Performing music at a professional level is probably one of the most complex human accomplishments. Extremely fast and complex, temporo-spatially predefined movement patterns have to be learned, memorized, and retrieved with high reliability in order to meet the expectations of listeners. Performing music requires not only the integration of multimodal sensory and motor information, and its precise monitoring via auditory and kinesthetic feedback, but also emotional communicative skills, which provide a "speaking" rendition of a musical masterpiece. To acquire these specialized auditory-sensory-motor and emotional skills, musicians must undergo extensive training periods over many years, which start in early childhood and continue on through stages of increasing physical and strategic complexities. Performance anxiety, linked to high societal pressures such as the fear of failure and heightened self-demands, frequently accompanies these learning processes. Motor disturbances in musicians are common and include mild forms, such as temporary motor fatigue with short-term reduction of motor skills, painful overuse injuries following prolonged practice, anxiety-related motor failures during performances (choking under pressure), as well as more persistent losses of motor control, here termed "dynamic stereotypes" (DSs). Musician's dystonia (MD), which is characterized by the permanent loss of control of highly skilled movements when playing a musical instrument, is the gravest manifestation of dysfunctional motor programs, frequently linked to a genetic susceptibility to develop such motor disturbances. In this review chapter, we focus on different types of motor failures in musicians. We argue that motor failures in musicians develop along a continuum, starting with subtle transient degradations due to fatigue, overuse, or performance stress, which transform by and by into more permanent, still fluctuating motor degradations, the DSs, until a more irreversible

  1. Neurobiological Foundations of Neurologic Music Therapy: Rhythmic Entrainment and the Motor System

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    Michael eThaut

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractEntrainment is defined by a temporal locking process in which one system’s motion or signal frequency entrains the frequency of another system. This process is a universal phenomenon that can be observed in physical (e.g., pendulum clocks and biological systems (e.g. fire flies. However, entrainment can also be observed between human sensory and motor systems. The function of rhythmic entrainment in rehabilitative training and learning was established for the first time by Thaut and colleagues in several research studies in the early 1990s. It was shown that the inherent periodicity of auditory rhythmic patterns could entrain movement patterns in patients with movement disorders (see for a review: Thaut et al, 1999. Physiological, kinematic and behavioral movement analysis showed very quickly that entrainment cues not only changed the timing of movement but also improved spatial and force parameters. Mathematical models have shown that anticipatory rhythmic templates as critical time constraints can result in the complete specification of the dynamics of a movement over the entire movement cycle, thereby optimizing motor planning and execution. Furthermore, temporal rhythmic entrainment has been successfully extended into applications in cognitive rehabilitation and speech and language rehabilitation, and thus become one of the major neurological mechanisms linking music and rhythm to brain rehabilitation. These findings provided a scientific basis for the development of Neurologic Music Therapy.

  2. Neurobiological foundations of neurologic music therapy: rhythmic entrainment and the motor system.

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    Thaut, Michael H; McIntosh, Gerald C; Hoemberg, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Entrainment is defined by a temporal locking process in which one system's motion or signal frequency entrains the frequency of another system. This process is a universal phenomenon that can be observed in physical (e.g., pendulum clocks) and biological systems (e.g., fire flies). However, entrainment can also be observed between human sensory and motor systems. The function of rhythmic entrainment in rehabilitative training and learning was established for the first time by Thaut and colleagues in several research studies in the early 1990s. It was shown that the inherent periodicity of auditory rhythmic patterns could entrain movement patterns in patients with movement disorders (see for a review: Thaut et al., 1999). Physiological, kinematic, and behavioral movement analysis showed very quickly that entrainment cues not only changed the timing of movement but also improved spatial and force parameters. Mathematical models have shown that anticipatory rhythmic templates as critical time constraints can result in the complete specification of the dynamics of a movement over the entire movement cycle, thereby optimizing motor planning and execution. Furthermore, temporal rhythmic entrainment has been successfully extended into applications in cognitive rehabilitation and speech and language rehabilitation, and thus become one of the major neurological mechanisms linking music and rhythm to brain rehabilitation. These findings provided a scientific basis for the development of neurologic music therapy.

  3. A novel porcine model of ataxia telangiectasia reproduces neurological features and motor deficits of human disease.

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    Beraldi, Rosanna; Chan, Chun-Hung; Rogers, Christopher S; Kovács, Attila D; Meyerholz, David K; Trantzas, Constantin; Lambertz, Allyn M; Darbro, Benjamin W; Weber, Krystal L; White, Katherine A M; Rheeden, Richard V; Kruer, Michael C; Dacken, Brian A; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Davis, Bryan T; Rohret, Judy A; Struzynski, Jason T; Rohret, Frank A; Weimer, Jill M; Pearce, David A

    2015-11-15

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a progressive multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the AT-mutated (ATM) gene. AT is a neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by cerebellar degeneration in children leading to motor impairment. The disease progresses with other clinical manifestations including oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immune disorders, increased susceptibly to cancer and respiratory infections. Although genetic investigations and physiological models have established the linkage of ATM with AT onset, the mechanisms linking ATM to neurodegeneration remain undetermined, hindering therapeutic development. Several murine models of AT have been successfully generated showing some of the clinical manifestations of the disease, however they do not fully recapitulate the hallmark neurological phenotype, thus highlighting the need for a more suitable animal model. We engineered a novel porcine model of AT to better phenocopy the disease and bridge the gap between human and current animal models. The initial characterization of AT pigs revealed early cerebellar lesions including loss of Purkinje cells (PCs) and altered cytoarchitecture suggesting a developmental etiology for AT and could advocate for early therapies for AT patients. In addition, similar to patients, AT pigs show growth retardation and develop motor deficit phenotypes. By using the porcine system to model human AT, we established the first animal model showing PC loss and motor features of the human disease. The novel AT pig provides new opportunities to unmask functions and roles of ATM in AT disease and in physiological conditions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Terminal decline in motor function.

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    Wilson, Robert S; Segawa, Eisuke; Buchman, Aron S; Boyle, Patricia A; Hizel, Loren P; Bennett, David A

    2012-12-01

    The study aim was to test the hypothesis that motor function undergoes accelerated decline proximate to death. As part of a longitudinal clinical-pathologic study, 124 older Roman Catholic nuns, priests, and monks completed at least 7 annual clinical evaluations, died, and underwent brain autopsy and uniform neuropathologic examination. Each evaluation included administration of 11 motor tests and 19 cognitive tests from which global measures of motor and cognitive function were derived. The global motor measure (baseline M = 0.82, SD = 0.21) declined a mean 0.024 unit per year (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.032, -0.016) until a mean of 2.46 years (95% CI: -2.870, -2.108) before death when rate of decline increased nearly fivefold to -0.117 unit per year (95% CI: -0.140, -0.097). The global cognitive measure (baseline M = 0.07, SD = 0.45) declined a mean of 0.027-unit per year (95% CI: -0.041, -0.014) until a mean of 2.76 years (95% CI: -3.157, -2.372) before death when rate of decline increased more than 13-fold to -0.371 unit per year (95% CI: -0.443, -0.306). Onset of terminal motor decline was highly correlated with onset of terminal cognitive decline (r = .94, 95% CI: 0.81, 0.99), but rates of motor and cognitive change were not strongly correlated (preterminal r = .20, 95% CI: -0.05, 0.38; terminal r = .34, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.62). Higher level of plaques and tangles was associated with earlier onset of terminal decline in motor function, but no pathologic measures were associated with rate of preterminal or terminal motor decline. The results demonstrate that motor and cognitive functions both undergo a period of accelerated decline in the last few years of life. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  5. Structural Equation Modeling of Motor Impairment, Gross Motor Function, and the Functional Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

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    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study…

  6. Compensatory recombination phenomena of neurological functions in central dysphagia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-dong Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We speculate that cortical reactions evoked by swallowing activity may be abnormal in patients with central infarction with dysphagia. The present study aimed to detect functional imaging features of cerebral cortex in central dysphagia patients by using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The results showed that when normal controls swallowed, primary motor cortex (BA4, insula (BA13, premotor cortex (BA6/8, supramarginal gyrus (BA40, and anterior cingulate cortex (BA24/32 were activated, and that the size of the activated areas were larger in the left hemisphere compared with the right. In recurrent cerebral infarction patients with central dysphagia, BA4, BA13, BA40 and BA6/8 areas were activated, while the degree of activation in BA24/32 was decreased. Additionally, more areas were activated, including posterior cingulate cortex (BA23/31, visual association cortex (BA18/19, primary auditory cortex (BA41 and parahippocampal cortex (BA36. Somatosensory association cortex (BA7 and left cerebellum in patients with recurrent cerebral infarction with central dysphagia were also activated. Experimental findings suggest that the cerebral cortex has obvious hemisphere lateralization in response to swallowing, and patients with recurrent cerebral infarction with central dysphagia show compensatory recombination phenomena of neurological functions. In rehabilitative treatment, using the favorite food of patients can stimulate swallowing through visual, auditory, and other nerve conduction pathways, thus promoting compensatory recombination of the central cortex functions.

  7. Neurological, nutritional and alcohol consumption factors underlie cognitive and motor deficits in chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fama, Rosemary; Le Berre, Anne-Pascale; Hardcastle, Cheshire; Sassoon, Stephanie A; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Sullivan, Edith V; Zahr, Natalie M

    2017-12-15

    Variations in pattern and extent of cognitive and motor impairment occur in alcoholism (ALC). Causes of such heterogeneity are elusive and inconsistently accounted for by demographic or alcohol consumption differences. We examined neurological and nutritional factors as possible contributors to heterogeneity in impairment. Participants with ALC (n = 96) and a normal comparison group (n = 41) were examined on six cognitive and motor domains. Signs of historically determined subclinical Wernicke's encephalopathy were detected using the Caine et al. criteria, which were based on postmortem examination and chart review of antemortem data of alcoholic cases with postmortem evidence for Wernicke's encephalopathy. Herein, four Caine criteria provided quantification of dietary deficiency, cerebellar dysfunction, low general cognitive functioning and oculomotor abnormalities in 86 of the 96 ALC participants. Subgroups based on Caine criteria yielded a graded effect, where those meeting more criteria exhibited greater impairment than those meeting no to fewer criteria. These results could not be accounted for by history of drug dependence. Multiple regression indicated that compromised performance on ataxia, indicative of cerebellar dysfunction, predicted non-mnemonic and upper motor deficits, whereas low whole blood thiamine level, consistent with limbic circuit dysfunction, predicted mnemonic deficits. This double dissociation indicates biological markers that contribute to heterogeneity in expression of functional impairment in ALC. That non-mnemonic and mnemonic deficits are subserved by the dissociable neural systems of frontocerebellar and limbic circuitry, both commonly disrupted in ALC, suggests neural mechanisms that can differentially affect selective functions, thereby contributing to heterogeneity in pattern and extent of dysfunction in ALC. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  8. Olfaction Is Related to Motor Function in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qu; Resnick, Susan M; Studenski, Stephanie A

    2017-08-01

    Among older adults, both olfaction and motor function predict future cognitive decline and dementia, suggesting potential shared causal pathways. However, it is not known whether olfactory and motor function are independently related in late life. We assessed cross-sectional associations of olfaction with motor and cognitive function, using concurrent data on olfactory function, mobility, balance, fine motor function, manual dexterity, and cognition in 163 Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging participants aged 60 and older without common neurological diseases (n = 114 with available cognitive data). Using multiple linear regression, we adjusted for age, sex, race, smoking history, height, and weight for mobility and balance, and education for cognition. We used multiple linear regression to test whether olfaction-motor associations were independent of cognition and depressive symptoms. Olfactory scores were significantly associated with mobility (usual gait speed, rapid gait speed, 400-m walk time, and Health ABC Physical Performance Battery score), balance, fine motor function, and manual dexterity (all p function is associated with mobility, balance, fine motor function, and manual dexterity, and independent of cognitive function, with challenging upper and lower extremity motor function tasks. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if olfactory performance predicts future mobility and functional decline.

  9. Specific postural support promotes variation in motor behaviour of infants with minor neurological dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf-Peters, Victorine B.; De Groot-Hornstra, Agnes H.; Dirks, Tineke; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of specific postural support on motor behaviour of infants with and without minor neurological dysfunction (MND). The following questions were addressed: (1) Does application of supportive pillows affect the time during which the infant exhibits general movements

  10. Treatment of functional motor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelauff, Jeannette M.; Dreissen, Yasmine E. M.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Stone, Jon

    2014-01-01

    For the treatment of functional motor disorder, we recommend a three-stage approach. Firstly, patients must be assessed and given an unambiguous diagnosis, with an explanation that helps them understand that they have a genuine disorder, with the potential for reversibility. A key ingredient is

  11. Treatment of functional motor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelauff, Jeannette M.; Dreissen, Yasmine E. M.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Stone, Jon

    OPINION STATEMENT: For the treatment of functional motor disorder, we recommend a three-stage approach. Firstly, patients must be assessed and given an unambiguous diagnosis, with an explanation that helps them understand that they have a genuine disorder, with the potential for reversibility. A key

  12. Cognitive-analytical therapy for a patient with functional neurological symptom disorder-conversion disorder (psychogenic myopia: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nasiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional neurological symptom disorder commonly presents with symptoms and defects of sensory and motor functions. Therefore, it is often mistaken for a medical condition. It is well known that functional neurological symptom disorder more often caused by psychological factors. There are three main approaches namely analytical, cognitive and biological to manage conversion disorder. Any of such approaches can be applied through short-term treatment programs. In this case, study a 12-year-old boy with the diagnosed functional neurological symptom disorder (psychogenic myopia was put under a cognitive-analytical treatment. The outcome of this treatment modality was proved successful.

  13. Environmental Exposure to Manganese in Air: Associations with Tremor and Motor Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Manganese (Mn) inhalation has been associated with neuropsychological and neurological sequelae in exposed workers. Few environmental epidemiologic studies have examined the potentialy neurotoxic effects of Mn exposure in ambient air on motor function and han...

  14. MotorBrain: A mobile app for the assessment of users' motor performance in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Andrea; Chittaro, Luca; Burigat, Stefano; Budai, Riccardo

    2017-05-01

    Human motor skills or impairments have been traditionally assessed by neurologists by means of paper-and-pencil tests or special hardware. More recently, technologies such as digitizing tablets and touchscreens have offered neurologists new assessment possibilities, but their use has been restricted to a specific medical condition, or to stylus-operated mobile devices. The objective of this paper is twofold. First, we propose a mobile app (MotorBrain) that offers six computerized versions of traditional motor tests, can be used directly by patients (with and without the supervision of a clinician), and aims at turning millions of smartphones and tablets available to the general public into data collection and assessment tools. Then, we carry out a study to determine whether the data collected by MotorBrain can be meaningful for describing aging in human motor performance. A sample of healthy participants (N= 133) carried out the motor tests using MotorBrain on a smartphone. Participants were split into two groups (Young, Old) based on their age (less than or equal to 30 years, greater than or equal to 50 years, respectively). The data collected by the app characterizes accuracy, reaction times, and speed of movement. It was analyzed to investigate differences between the two groups. The app does allow measuring differences in neuromotor performance. Data collected by the app allowed us to assess performance differences due to the aging of the neuromuscular system. Data collected through MotorBrain is suitable to make meaningful distinctions among different kinds of performance, and allowed us to highlight performance differences associated to aging. MotorBrain supports the building of a large database of neuromotor data, which can be used for normative purposes in clinical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Neurologic and Functional Morbidity in Critically Ill Children With Bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shein, Steven L; Slain, Katherine N; Clayton, Jason A; McKee, Bryan; Rotta, Alexandre T; Wilson-Costello, Deanne

    2017-09-19

    Neurologic and functional morbidity occurs in ~30% of PICU survivors, and young children may be at particular risk. Bronchiolitis is a common indication for PICU admission among children less than 2 years old. Two single-center studies suggest that greater than 10-25% of critical bronchiolitis survivors have neurologic and functional morbidity but those estimates are 20 years old. We aimed to estimate the burden of neurologic and functional morbidity among more recent bronchiolitis patients using two large, multicenter databases. Analysis of the Pediatric Health Information System and the Virtual Pediatric databases. Forty-eight U.S. children's hospitals (Pediatric Health Information System) and 40 international (mostly United States) children's hospitals (Virtual Pediatric Systems). Previously healthy PICU patients less than 2 years old admitted with bronchiolitis between 2009 and 2015 who survived and did not require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or cardiopulmonary resuscitation. None. Neurologic and functional morbidity was defined as a Pediatric Overall Performance Category greater than 1 at PICU discharge (Virtual Pediatric Systems subjects), or a subsequent hospital encounter involving developmental delay, feeding tubes, MRI of the brain, neurologist evaluation, or rehabilitation services (Pediatric Health Information System subjects). Among 3,751 Virtual Pediatric Systems subjects and 9,516 Pediatric Health Information System subjects, ~20% of patients received mechanical ventilation. Evidence of neurologic and functional morbidity was present at PICU discharge in 707 Virtual Pediatric Systems subjects (18.6%) and more chronically in 1,104 Pediatric Health Information System subjects (11.6%). In both cohorts, neurologic and functional morbidity was more common in subjects receiving mechanical ventilation (27.5% vs 16.5% in Virtual Pediatric Systems; 14.5% vs 11.1% in Pediatric Health Information System; both p < 0.001). In multivariate models also

  16. Head Impact Exposure and Neurologic Function of Youth Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munce, Thayne A; Dorman, Jason C; Thompson, Paul A; Valentine, Verle D; Bergeron, Michael F

    2015-08-01

    Football players are subjected to repetitive impacts that may lead to brain injury and neurologic dysfunction. Knowledge about head impact exposure (HIE) and consequent neurologic function among youth football players is limited. This study aimed to measure and characterize HIE of youth football players throughout one season and explore associations between HIE and changes in selected clinical measures of neurologic function. Twenty-two youth football players (11-13 yr) wore helmets outfitted with a head impact telemetry (HIT) system to quantify head impact frequency, magnitude, duration, and location. Impact data were collected for each practice (27) and game (9) in a single season. Selected clinical measures of balance, oculomotor performance, reaction time, and self-reported symptoms were assessed before and after the season. The median individual head impacts per practice, per game, and throughout the entire season were 9, 12, and 252, respectively. Approximately 50% of all head impacts (6183) had a linear acceleration between 10g and 20g, but nearly 2% were greater than 80g. Overall, the head impact frequency distributions in this study population were similar in magnitude and location as in high school and collegiate football, but total impact frequency was lower. Individual changes in neurologic function were not associated with cumulative HIE. This study provides a novel examination of HIE and associations with short-term neurologic function in youth football and notably contributes to the limited HIE data currently available for this population. Whereas youth football players can experience remarkably similar head impact forces as high school players, cumulative subconcussive HIE throughout one youth football season may not be detrimental to short-term clinical measures of neurologic function.

  17. Plasticity and functional recovery in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, V S

    2005-01-01

    Experiments on patients with phantom limbs suggest that neural connections in the adult human brain are much more malleable than previously assumed. Three weeks after amputation of an arm, sensations from the ipsilateral face are referred to the phantom; this effect is caused by the sensory input from the face skin 'invading' and activating deafferented hand zones in the cortex and thalamus. Many phantom arms are 'paralysed' in a painful position. If a mirror is propped vertically in the sagittal plane and the patient looks at the reflection of his/her normal hand, this reflection appears superimposed on the 'felt' position of the phantom. Remarkably, if the real arm is moved, the phantom is felt to move as well and this sometimes relieves the painful cramps in the phantom. Mirror visual feedback (MVF) has shown promising results with chronic regional pain syndrome and hemiparesis following stroke. These results suggest two reasons for a paradigm shift in neurorehabilitation. First, there appears to be tremendous latent plasticity even in the adult brain. Second, the brain should be thought of, not as a hierarchy of organised autonomous modules, each of which delivers its output to the next level, but as a set of complex interacting networks that are in a state of dynamic equilibrium with the brain's environment. Both principles can be potentially exploited in a clinical context to facilitate recovery of function.

  18. Diagnosis and management of functional neurological symptoms: The Dutch experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Schipper, L.J.; Vermeulen, M; Eeckhout, A.M.; Foncke, E.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Functional neurological symptoms (FNS) were considered as a psychiatric disorder at the beginning of the 20th century (conversion disorder). Psychiatrists performed diagnosis and treatment throughout most of the past century in the Netherlands, but in the latest decades patients were

  19. Diagnosis and management of functional neurological symptoms: The Dutch experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Schipper, Laura J.; Vermeulen, Marinus; Eeckhout, Augustinus M.; Foncke, Elisabeth M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Functional neurological symptoms (FNS) were considered as a psychiatric disorder at the beginning of the 20th century (conversion disorder). Psychiatrists performed diagnosis and treatment throughout most of the past century in the Netherlands, but in the latest decades patients were usually firstly

  20. Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2016-09-01

    This article discusses the most interesting presentations at Digestive Disease Week, held in San Diego, in the field of functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders. One of the most important contributions was undoubtedly the presentation of the new Rome IV diagnostic criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders. We therefore devote some space in this article to explaining these new criteria in the most common functional disorders. In fact, there has already been discussion of data comparing Rome IV and Rome III criteria in the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome, confirming that the new criteria are somewhat more restrictive. From the physiopathological point of view, several studies have shown that the aggregation of physiopathological alterations increases symptom severity in distinct functional disorders. From the therapeutic point of view, more data were presented on the efficacy of acotiamide and its mechanisms of action in functional dyspepsia, the safety and efficacy of domperidone in patients with gastroparesis, and the efficacy of linaclotide both in irritable bowel syndrome and constipation. In irritable bowel syndrome, more data have come to light on the favourable results of a low FODMAP diet, with emphasis on its role in modifying the microbiota. Finally, long-term efficacy data were presented on the distinct treatment options in achalasia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. 5-HT2A Agonists: A Novel Therapy for Functional Neurological Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Alexander; Carter, Olivia; Norman, Trevor; Kanaan, Richard

    2017-05-01

    Functional neurological disorders are frequently encountered in clinical practice. They have a poor prognosis and treatment options are limited. Their etiology is unknown, but leading theories propose a disturbance of somatic self-representation: the mind perceives dysfunction of a body region despite intact motor and sensory pathways. Central to this model is the concept of an abnormal top-down cognitive influence upon sensorimotor function. There is growing interest in the use of 5-HT2A agonists in the management of neuropsychiatric conditions. Recent studies have shown that these agents induce changes in neural activity that disrupt hierarchical brain dynamics and modulate networks subserving self-related processing. Converging evidence suggests they may hold unique therapeutic potential in functional neurological disorders. This is of importance given the considerable personal and societal burden of this condition and we argue a clinical trial to test this hypothesis is warranted. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  2. Synthesis of functionalized molecular motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Wiel, MKJ; Feringa, BL

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic routes to two molecular motors are reported. The sterically hindered central olefinic bond connecting the two halves of these C,symmetric molecules was prepared by a McMurry reaction. In this way, a motor with two five-membered rings and a motor with two six-membered rings were prepared,

  3. Children with behavioral problems and motor problems have a worse neurological condition than children with behavioral problems only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Lieke H. J.; Maathuis, Carel G. B.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Some evidence suggests that children with specific behavioral problems are at risk for motor problems. It is unclear whether neurological condition plays a role in the propensity of children with behavioral problems to develop Motor problems. Aims: To examine the relation between

  4. The quality of the early motor repertoire in preterm infants predicts minor neurologic dysfunction at school age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Janneke L. M.; Einspieler, Christa; Butcher, Phillipa R.; Van Braeckel, Koenraad N. J. A.; Prechtl, Heinz F. R.; Bos, Arend F.

    Objective The quality of a child's motor repertoire at age 3 to 4 months postterm is predictive of later cerebral palsy (CP). Its predictive power for minor neurologic dysfunction (MND) is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the predictive value of the quality of the early motor repertoire for

  5. [Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the most interesting studies on functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders presented at Digestive Diseases Week (DDW), 2015. Researchers are still seeking biomarkers for irritable bowel syndrome and have presented new data. One study confirmed that the use of low-dose antidepressants has an antinociceptive effect without altering the psychological features of patients with functional dyspepsia. A contribution that could have immediate application is the use of transcutaneous electroacupuncture, which has demonstrated effectiveness in controlling nausea in patients with gastroparesis. New data have come to light on the importance of diet in irritable bowel syndrome, although the effectiveness of a low-FODMAP diet seems to be losing momentum with time. Multiple data were presented on the long-term efficacy of rifaximin therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhoea. In addition, among other contributions, and more as a curiosity, a study evaluated the effect of histamine in the diet of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. A role for myosin Va in cerebellar plasticity and motor learning: a possible mechanism underlying neurological disorder in myosin Va disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Mariko; Kishimoto, Yasushi; Tanaka, Masahiko; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Hirashima, Naohide; Murata, Yoshiharu; Kano, Masanobu; Takagishi, Yoshiko

    2011-04-20

    Mutations of the myosin Va gene cause the neurological diseases Griscelli syndrome type 1 and Elejalde syndrome in humans and dilute phenotypes in rodents. To understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the neurological disorders in myosin Va diseases, we conducted an integrated analysis at the molecular, cellular, electrophysiological, and behavioral levels using the dilute-neurological (d-n) mouse mutant. These mice manifest an ataxic gait and clonic seizures during postnatal development, but the neurological disorders are ameliorated in adulthood. We found that smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) rarely extended into the dendritic spines of Purkinje cells (PCs) of young d-n mice, and there were few, if any, IP(3) receptors. Moreover, long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-PC synapses was abolished, consistent with our previous observations in juvenile lethal dilute mutants. Young d-n mice exhibited severe impairment of cerebellum-dependent motor learning. In contrast, adult d-n mice showed restoration of motor learning and LTD, and these neurological changes were associated with accumulation of SER and IP(3) receptors in some PC spines and the expression of myosin Va proteins in the PCs. RNA interference-mediated repression of myosin Va caused a reduction in the number of IP(3) receptor-positive spines in cultured PCs. These findings indicate that myosin Va function is critical for subsequent processes in localization of SER and IP(3) receptors in PC spines, LTD, and motor learning. Interestingly, d-n mice had defects of motor coordination from young to adult ages, suggesting that the role of myosin Va in PC spines is not sufficient for motor coordination.

  7. Motor Coordination and Executive Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Since Piaget, the view that motor and cognitive development are interrelated has gained wide acceptance. However, empirical research on this issue is still rare. Few studies show a correlation of performance in cognitive and motor tasks in typically developing children. More specifically, Diamond A. (2000) hypothesizes an involvement of executive…

  8. Comparative Sensitivity of Intraoperative Motor Evoked Potential Monitoring in Predicting Postoperative Neurologic Deficits: Nondegenerative versus Degenerative Myelopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Aaron J.; Safaee, Michael; Chou, Dean; Weinstein, Philip R.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Clark, John P.; Mummaneni, Praveen V.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design ?Retrospective review. Objective ?Intraoperative motor evoked potential (MEP) monitoring in spine surgery may assist surgeons in taking corrective measures to prevent neurologic deficits. The efficacy of monitoring MEPs intraoperatively in patients with myelopathy from nondegenerative causes has not been quantified. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of intraoperative MEP monitoring in patients with myelopathy caused by nondegenerative processes to patients with degenera...

  9. Hypnosis as a model of functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeley, Q

    2016-01-01

    In the 19th century it was recognized that neurologic symptoms could be caused by "morbid ideation" as well as organic lesions. The subsequent observation that hysteric (now called "functional") symptoms could be produced and removed by hypnotic suggestion led Charcot to hypothesize that suggestion mediated the effects of ideas on hysteric symptoms through as yet unknown effects on brain activity. The advent of neuroimaging 100 years later revealed strikingly similar neural correlates in experiments matching functional symptoms with clinical analogs created by suggestion. Integrative models of suggested and functional symptoms regard these alterations in brain function as the endpoint of a broader set of changes in information processing due to suggestion. These accounts consider that suggestions alter experience by mobilizing representations from memory systems, and altering causal attributions, during preconscious processing which alters the content of what is provided to our highly edited subjective version of the world. Hypnosis as a model for functional symptoms draws attention to how radical alterations in experience and behavior can conform to the content of mental representations through effects on cognition and brain function. Experimental study of functional symptoms and their suggested counterparts in hypnosis reveals the distinct and shared processes through which this can occur. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a patient reported outcome measure for fatigue in motor neurone disease: the Neurological Fatigue Index (NFI-MND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibbons Chris J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this research was to develop a disease-specific measure for fatigue in patients with motor neurone disease (MND by generating data that would fit the Rasch measurement model. Fatigue was defined as reversible motor weakness and whole-body tiredness that was predominantly brought on by muscular exertion and was partially relieved by rest. Methods Qualitative interviews were undertaken to confirm the suitability of a previously identified set of 52 neurological fatigue items as relevant to patients with MND. Patients were recruited from five U.K. MND clinics. Questionnaires were administered during clinic or by post. A sub-sample of patients completed the questionnaire again after 2-4 weeks to assess test-retest validity. Exploratory factor analyses and Rasch analysis were conducted on the item set. Results Qualitative interviews with ten MND patients confirmed the suitability of 52 previously identified neurological fatigue items as relevant to patients with MND. 298 patients consented to completing the initial questionnaire including this item set, with an additional 78 patients completing the questionnaire a second time after 4-6 weeks. Exploratory Factor Analysis identified five potential subscales that could be conceptualised as representing: 'Energy', 'Reversible muscular weakness' (shortened to 'Weakness', 'Concentration', 'Effects of heat' and 'Rest'. Of the original five factors, two factors 'Energy' and 'Weakness' met the expectations of the Rasch model. A higher order fatigue summary scale, consisting of items from the 'Energy' and 'Weakness' subscales, was found to fit the Rasch model and have acceptable unidimensionality. The two scales and the higher order summary scale were shown to fulfil model expectations, including assumptions of unidimensionality, local independency and an absence of differential item functioning. Conclusions The Neurological Fatigue Index for MND (NFI-MND is a simple, easy

  11. Functions of myosin motors tailored for parasitism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Christina; Graindorge, Arnault; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Myosin motors are one of the largest protein families in eukaryotes that exhibit divergent cellular functions. Their roles in protozoans, a diverse group of anciently diverged, single celled organisms with many prominent members known to be parasitic and to cause diseases in human and livestock......, are largely unknown. In the recent years many different approaches, among them whole genome sequencing, phylogenetic analyses and functional studies have increased our understanding on the distribution, protein architecture and function of unconventional myosin motors in protozoan parasites. In Apicomplexa......, myosins turn out to be highly specialized and to exhibit unique functions tailored to accommodate the lifestyle of these parasites....

  12. Simple motor tasks independently predict extubation failure in critically ill neurological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutchak, Fernanda Machado; Rieder, Marcelo de Mello; Victorino, Josué Almeida; Meneguzzi, Carla; Poersch, Karla; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Bianchin, Marino Muxfeldt

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of simple motor tasks such as hand grasping and tongue protrusion as predictors of extubation failure in critically ill neurological patients. This was a prospective cohort study conducted in the neurological ICU of a tertiary care hospital in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Adult patients who had been intubated for neurological reasons and were eligible for weaning were included in the study. The ability of patients to perform simple motor tasks such as hand grasping and tongue protrusion was evaluated as a predictor of extubation failure. Data regarding duration of mechanical ventilation, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, mortality, and incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia were collected. A total of 132 intubated patients who had been receiving mechanical ventilation for at least 24 h and who passed a spontaneous breathing trial were included in the analysis. Logistic regression showed that patient inability to grasp the hand of the examiner (relative risk = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.01-2.44; p Glasgow Coma Scale scores at extubation (p de tarefas motoras simples, tais como preensão de mão e protrusão da língua, para predizer extubação malsucedida em pacientes neurológicos críticos. Estudo prospectivo de coorte realizado na UTI neurológica de um hospital terciário em Porto Alegre (RS). Pacientes adultos que haviam sido intubados por motivos neurológicos e que eram candidatos ao desmame foram incluídos no estudo. O estudo avaliou se a capacidade dos pacientes de realizar tarefas motoras simples como apertar as mãos do examinador e pôr a língua para fora seria um preditor de extubação malsucedida. Foram coletados dados referentes ao tempo de ventilação mecânica, tempo de internação na UTI, tempo de internação hospitalar, mortalidade e incidência de pneumonia associada à ventilação mecânica. Foram incluídos na análise 132 pacientes intubados que haviam recebido ventilação mecânica durante pelo

  13. How Can a Ketogenic Diet Improve Motor Function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Veyrat-Durebex

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A ketogenic diet (KD is a normocaloric diet composed by high fat (80–90%, low carbohydrate, and low protein consumption that induces fasting-like effects. KD increases ketone body (KBs production and its concentration in the blood, providing the brain an alternative energy supply that enhances oxidative mitochondrial metabolism. In addition to its profound impact on neuro-metabolism and bioenergetics, the neuroprotective effect of specific polyunsaturated fatty acids and KBs involves pleiotropic mechanisms, such as the modulation of neuronal membrane excitability, inflammation, or reactive oxygen species production. KD is a therapy that has been used for almost a century to treat medically intractable epilepsy and has been increasingly explored in a number of neurological diseases. Motor function has also been shown to be improved by KD and/or medium-chain triglyceride diets in rodent models of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal cord injury. These studies have proposed that KD may induce a modification in synaptic morphology and function, involving ionic channels, glutamatergic transmission, or synaptic vesicular cycling machinery. However, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms underlying the impact of KD on motor function and the perspectives of its use to acquire the neuromuscular effects. The aim of this review is to explore the conditions through which KD might improve motor function. First, we will describe the main consequences of KD exposure in tissues involved in motor function. Second, we will report and discuss the relevance of KD in pre-clinical and clinical trials in the major diseases presenting motor dysfunction.

  14. Motor nervous pathway function is impaired after treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a study with motor evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harila-Saari, A H; Huuskonen, U E; Tolonen, U; Vainionpää, L K; Lanning, B M

    2001-03-01

    The objective was to evaluate whether motor nervous pathways are affected when patients are treated for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Thirty-two children with ALL were studied at the end of treatment by means of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by magnetic stimulation (MS) transcranially and peripherally and underwent a detailed neurological examination. Thirty-two healthy children matched with them for age, sex, and height served as a control group. The latencies of the MEPs were significantly prolonged along the entire motor nervous pathway in the patients with ALL compared with the healthy controls, indicating demyelination in the thick motor fibres. The MEP amplitudes of the distal extremities elicited by stimulation at the brachial plexus and LV spinal level were significantly lowered in the patients treated for ALL, also indicating anatomical or functional loss of descending motor fibres and/or muscle fibres. The MEP amplitudes elicited by cortical MS showed wider variation and no clear abnormalities were found. Neurological signs and symptoms were common after treatment: 41% of the patients had depressed deep tendon reflexes, 31% had fine motor difficulties and 63% gross motor difficulties, and 34% had dysdiadochokinesia. The conduction delay within the peripheral nerve was related to the post-therapeutic interval after administration of vincristine and the lesions within the CNS to the number of injections of intrathecal methotrexate. The present results show adverse effects of the ALL treatment on the entire motor nervous pathways. In our experience, the measurement of MEPs by MS provides an objective, painless, and practical tool for assessing the treatment-related neurotoxicity in both the CNS and the peripheral nerves. These disturbances in the motor nervous pathways at the end of treatment raise the question of the long-term effects of ALL treatment on the motor nerve tracts, and have led us to employ MEPs to study these effects

  15. Stress, childhood trauma, and cognitive functions in functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, K; Pasman, J

    2016-01-01

    Conversion disorder (CD) has traditionally been ascribed to psychologic factors such as trauma, stress, or emotional conflict. Although reference to the psychologic origin of CD has been removed from the criteria list in DSM-5, many theories still incorporate CD as originating from adverse events. This chapter provides a critical review of the literature on stressful life events in CD and discusses current cognitive and neurobiologic models linking psychologic stressors with conversion symptomatology. In addition, we propose a neurobiologic stress model integrating those cognitive models with neuroendocrine stress research and propose that stress and stress-induced changes in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function may result in cognitive alterations, that in turn contribute to experiencing conversion symptoms. Experimental studies indeed suggest that basal as well as stress-induced changes in HPA axis responding lead to alterations in attentional processing in CD. Although those changes are stronger in traumatized patients, similar patterns have been observed in patients who do not report a history of traumatic events. We conclude that, whereas adverse events may play an important role in many cases of CD, a substantial proportion of patients do not report a history of traumatization or recent stressful events. Studies integrating effects of stress on cognitive functioning in CD are scarce. We propose that, instead of focusing research on defining etiologic events in terms of symptom-eliciting events, future research should work towards an integrated mechanistic account, assessing alterations in cognitive and biologic stress systems in an integrated manner in patients with CD. Such an account may not only serve early symptom detection, it might also provide a starting point for better-targeted interventions. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Prion proteins: physiological functions and role in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Kieseier, Bernd; Frohman, Elliot; Eagar, Todd N; Rosenberg, Roger N; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Stüve, Olaf

    2008-01-15

    Stanley Prusiner was the first to promote the concept of misfolded proteins as a cause for neurological disease. It has since been shown by him and other investigators that the scrapie isoform of prion protein (PrP(Sc)) functions as an infectious agent in numerous human and non-human disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). Interestingly, other organ systems appear to be less affected, and do not appear to lead to major co-morbidities. The physiological function of the endogenous cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is much less clear. It is intriguing that PrP(c) is expressed on most tissues in mammals, suggesting not only biological functions outside the CNS, but also a role other than the propagation of its misfolded isotype. In this review, we summarize accumulating in vitro and in vivo evidence regarding the physiological functions of PrP(C) in the nervous system, as well as in lymphoid organs.

  17. Neurología funcional del blefaroespasmo Functional neurology of blepharospasm

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    Fidias E. León-Sarmiento

    2008-08-01

    blink reflex. It consists of three responses called non-nociceptive (R1, nociceptive (R2 and ultranociceptive (R3. Such blink reflexes, mostly the ultranociceptive response (R3, seem to be very useful to understand more deeply the pathophysiology of this focal dystonia, to perform the functional endophenotyping and to do a more appropriate follow-up of this complex neurological problem.

  18. Functional neurological symptoms modulate processing of emotionally salient stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiess, Johanna; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Schmidt, Roger; Wienbruch, Christian; Steffen, Astrid

    2016-12-01

    Dysfunctional emotion processing has been discussed as a contributing factor to functional neurological symptoms (FNS) in the context of conversion disorder, and refers to blunted recognition and the expression of one's own feelings. However, the emotion processing components characteristic for FNS and/or relevant for conversion remain to be specified. With this goal, the present study targeted the initial, automatic discrimination of emotionally salient stimuli. The magnetoencephalogram (MEG) was monitored in 21 patients with functional weakness and/or sensory disturbance subtypes of FNS and 21 healthy comparison participants (HC) while they passively watched 600 emotionally arousing, pleasant, unpleasant or neutral stimuli in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) design. Neuromagnetic activity was analyzed 110-330ms following picture onset in source space for prior defined posterior and central regions of interest. As early as 110ms and across presentation interval, posterior neural activity modulation by picture category was similar in both groups, despite smaller initial (110-150ms) overall and posterior power in patients with FNS. The initial activity modulation by picture category was also evident in the left sensorimotor area in patients with FNS, but not significant in HC. Similar activity modulation by emotional picture category in patients with FNS and HC suggests that the fast, automatic detection of emotional salience is unchanged in patients with FNS, but involves an emotion-processing network spanning posterior and sensorimotor areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional MRI evidence for fine motor praxis dysfunction in children with persistent speech disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redle, Erin; Vannest, Jennifer; Maloney, Thomas; Tsevat, Rebecca K.; Eikenberry, Sarah; Lewis, Barbara; Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Tkach, Jean; Holland, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    Children with persistent speech disorders (PSD) often present with overt or subtle motor deficits; the possibility that speech disorders and motor deficits could arise from a shared neurological base is currently unknown. Functional MRI (fMRI) was used to examine the brain networks supporting fine motor praxis in children with PSD and without clinically identified fine motor deficits. Methods This case-control study included 12 children with PSD (mean age 7.42 years, 4 female) and 12 controls (mean age 7.44 years, 4 female). Children completed behavioral evaluations using standardized motor assessments and parent reported functional measures. During fMRI scanning, participants completed a cued finger tapping task contrasted passive listening. A general linear model approach identified brain regions associated with finger tapping in each group and regions that differed between groups. The relationship between regional fMRI activation and fine motor skill was assessed using a regression analysis. Results Children with PSD had significantly poorer results for rapid speech production and fine motor praxis skills, but did not differ on classroom functional skills. Functional MRI results showed that children with PSD had significantly more activation in the cerebellum during finger tapping. Positive correlations between performance on a fine motor praxis test and activation multiple cortical regions were noted for children with PSD but not for controls. Conclusions Over-activation in the cerebellum during a motor task may reflect a subtle abnormality in the non-speech motor neural circuitry in children with PSD. PMID:25481413

  20. Functional Semi-Blind Source Separation Identifies Primary Motor Area Without Active Motor Execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcaro, Camillo; Cottone, Carlo; Cancelli, Andrea; Salustri, Carlo; Tecchio, Franca

    2018-04-01

    High time resolution techniques are crucial for investigating the brain in action. Here, we propose a method to identify a section of the upper-limb motor area representation (FS_M1) by means of electroencephalographic (EEG) signals recorded during a completely passive condition (FS_M1bySS). We delivered a galvanic stimulation to the median nerve and we applied to EEG the semi-Blind Source Separation (s-BSS) algorithm named Functional Source Separation (FSS). In order to prove that FS_M1bySS is part of FS_M1, we also collected EEG in a motor condition, i.e. during a voluntary movement task (isometric handgrip) and in a rest condition, i.e. at rest with eyes open and closed. In motor condition, we show that the cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) of FS_M1bySS does not differ from FS_ M1 CMC (0.04 for both sources). Moreover, we show that the FS_M1bySS's ongoing whole band activity during Motor and both rest conditions displays high mutual information and time correlation with FS_M1 (above 0.900 and 0.800, respectively) whereas much smaller ones with the primary somatosensory cortex [Formula: see text] (about 0.300 and 0.500, [Formula: see text]). FS_M1bySS as a marker of the upper-limb FS_M1 representation obtainable without the execution of an active motor task is a great achievement of the FSS algorithm, relevant in most experimental, neurological and psychiatric protocols.

  1. The influence of fish oil on neurological development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M; Jan, Mohammed M

    2014-01-01

    Fish oil originates from fish tissue rich in omega-3 fatty acids. These include eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Healthy individuals are advised to consume foods rich in fish oil at least twice a week. However, such intake varies depending on cultural or personal preference, and socio-economic status. Many families and patients with chronic neurological conditions consume supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids. We are frequently requested to give advice and recommendations on using such agents to help improve neurological developmental and cognitive functions. The objective of this review is to discuss the available literature supporting the role of fish oils on brain development and function. There is a growing body of literature suggesting a potential benefit of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids; however it is still unclear if there are response variations according to the developmental stage, age, and dose. L'influence de l'huile de poisson sur le développement et la fonction neurologique. L'huile de poisson provient de tissus de poisson riches en acides gras oméga-3, l'acide eicosapentaéno&IUque (EPA) et l'acide docosahexaénoïque (DHA). On conseille aux individus en bonne santé de consommer des aliments riches en huiles de poisson au moins deux fois par semaine. Cependant, leur consommation varie selon les préférences culturelles ou personnelles ainsi que selon le statut socio-économique. Plusieurs familles et plusieurs patients atteints de maladies neurologiques chroniques consomment des suppléments contenant des acides gras oméga-3. On nous demande souvent des conseils et des recommandations sur l'utilisation de ces agents pour aider à améliorer le développement neurologique et les fonctions cognitives. L'objectif de cette revue est de discuter de la littérature disponible en faveur du rôle des huiles de poisson dans le développement et le fonctionnement du cerveau. Il existe une documentation de plus en

  2. Correlation properties of spontaneous motor activity in healthy infants: a new computer-assisted method to evaluate neurological maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmeier, Sandra; Grunt, Sebastian; Delgado-Eckert, Edgar; Latzin, Philipp; Steinlin, Maja; Fuhrer, Katharina; Frey, Urs

    2013-06-01

    Qualitative assessment of spontaneous motor activity in early infancy is widely used in clinical practice. It enables the description of maturational changes of motor behavior in both healthy infants and infants who are at risk for later neurological impairment. These assessments are, however, time-consuming and are dependent upon professional experience. Therefore, a simple physiological method that describes the complex behavior of spontaneous movements (SMs) in infants would be helpful. In this methodological study, we aimed to determine whether time series of motor acceleration measurements at 40-44 weeks and 50-55 weeks gestational age in healthy infants exhibit fractal-like properties and if this self-affinity of the acceleration signal is sensitive to maturation. Healthy motor state was ensured by General Movement assessment. We assessed statistical persistence in the acceleration time series by calculating the scaling exponent α via detrended fluctuation analysis of the time series. In hand trajectories of SMs in infants we found a mean α value of 1.198 (95 % CI 1.167-1.230) at 40-44 weeks. Alpha changed significantly (p = 0.001) at 50-55 weeks to a mean of 1.102 (1.055-1.149). Complementary multilevel regression analysis confirmed a decreasing trend of α with increasing age. Statistical persistence of fluctuation in hand trajectories of SMs is sensitive to neurological maturation and can be characterized by a simple parameter α in an automated and observer-independent fashion. Future studies including children at risk for neurological impairment should evaluate whether this method could be used as an early clinical screening tool for later neurological compromise.

  3. Cortical arousal in children and adolescents with functional neurological symptoms during the auditory oddball task

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    Kasia Kozlowska, MBBS., PhD. FRANZCP

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Our findings add to a growing literature indicating that a baseline state of high arousal may be a precondition for generating functional neurological symptoms, a finding that helps explain why a range of psychological and physiological stressors can trigger functional neurological symptoms in some patients. Interventions that target cortical arousal may be central to the treatment of paediatric patients with functional neurological symptom disorder.

  4. [Functional and motor digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2013-10-01

    This article discusses the most interesting studies on functional and motility gastrointestinal disorders presented in Digestive Diseases Week (DDW) in 2013. New data were reported on the clinical importance of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) and on how they can produce numerous disturbances such as inflammatory bowel disease. These disturbances are associated with somatic functional disease and particularly with fatigue. In addition, new data have emerged on the physiopathology of these disorders, with some studies reporting that environmental factors and events in early infancy can favor their development. Data were also presented on how bile acids can increase susceptibility to diarrhea in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and on how the type of food intake can favor the development of symptoms. More data are available on the presence of underlying celiac disease in patients with IBS, which should prompt us to investigate this disease in our patients. Likewise, indiscriminate application of a gluten-free diet in patients with IBS has been shown not to produce a clear improvement. Regarding the physiopathology of functional dyspepsia (FD), results have been presented on how psychological factors can modify gastric accommodation and how this is in turn related to visceral hypersensitivity and gastric emptying. Regarding therapy, mirtazapine can improve symptoms and lead to weight gain in patients with severe FD and substantial weight loss. Results were presented on new drugs for IBS such as ibodutant and on old drugs with new applications such as mesalazine and ebastine. The antinociceptive effect of linaclotide is now better understood and a meta-analysis has shown its effectiveness in IBS with constipation as the main symptom. In patients with constipation, pelvic floor dysynergy can be diagnosed by a simple clinical interview and rectal touch. More data are available on the efficacy of prucalopride (which has been shown to accelerate

  5. Effectiveness of music-based interventions on motricity or cognitive functioning in neurological populations: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumdjian, Lousin; Sarkamo, Teppo; Leone, Carmela; Leman, Marc; Feys, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Motor and cognitive symptoms are frequent in persons with neurological disorders and often require extensive long-term rehabilitation. Recently, a variety of music-based interventions have been introduced into neurological rehabilitation as training tools. This review aims to 1) describe and define music-based intervention modalities and content which are applied in experimental studies; and 2) describe the effects of these interventions on motor and/or cognitive symptoms in the neurological population. The databases PubMed and Web of Science were searched. Cited references of included articles where screened for potential inclusion. A systematic literature search up to 20th of June 2016 was conducted to include controlled trials and cohort studies that have used music-based interventions for ≥3 weeks in the neurological population (in- and outpatients) targeting motor and/or cognitive symptoms. No limitations to publication date was set. EVIDENCE SYNTHESISː Nineteen articles comprising thirteen randomized controlled trials (total participants Nexp=241, Nctrl=269), four controlled trials (Nexp=59, Nctrl=53) and two cohort studies (N.=27) were included. Fourteen studies were conducted in stroke, three in Parkinson's disease, and two in multiple sclerosis population. Modalities of music-based interventions were clustered into four groups: instrument-based, listening-based, rhythm-based, and multicomponent-based music interventions. Overall, studies consistently showed that music-based interventions had similar or larger effects than conventional rehabilitation on upper limb function (N.=16; fine motricity, hand and arm capacity, finger and hand tapping velocity/variability), mobility (N.=7; gait parameters), and cognition (N.=4; verbal memory and focused attention). CONCLUSIONSː Variety of modalities using music-based interventions has been identified and grouped into four clusters. Effects of interventions demonstrate an improvement in the domains assessed

  6. The neurological basis of motor asymmetry following unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine brain lesions in the rat: the effect of motor decortication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossman, A R; Sambrook, M A; Gergies, S W; Slater, P

    1977-12-01

    The role of the motor cortex in the mediation of asymmetric movement after unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) brain lesions has been examined in the rat. The effect of unilateral and bilateral sensorimotor decortication upon spontaneous and drug (apomorphine and amphetamine)-induced motor asymmetry has been studied following unilateral injection of 6-OHDA into the lateral hypothalamus. Both bilateral decortication and unilateral decortication on the side of the 6-OHDA lesion caused a transient reversal of the spontaneous motor asymmetry normally seen in 6-OHDA lesioned animals. Neither unilateral nor bilateral sensorimotor decortication abolished drug-induced turning behaviour. It is postulated that subcortical basal ganglia efferent pathways may be involved in the mediation of motor asymmetry after unilateral 6-OHDA lesions of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection.

  7. Effect of sensory and motor connectivity on hand function in pediatric hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Disha; Barachant, Alexandre; Gordon, Andrew M; Ferre, Claudio; Kuo, Hsing-Ching; Carmel, Jason B; Friel, Kathleen M

    2017-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that somatosensory system injury would more strongly affect movement than motor system injury in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (USCP). This hypothesis was based on how somatosensory and corticospinal circuits adapt to injury during development; whereas the motor system can maintain connections to the impaired hand from the uninjured hemisphere, this does not occur in the somatosensory system. As a corollary, cortical injury strongly impairs sensory function, so we hypothesized that cortical lesions would impair hand function more than subcortical lesions. Twenty-four children with unilateral cerebral palsy had physiological and anatomical measures of the motor and somatosensory systems and lesion classification. Motor physiology was performed with transcranial magnetic stimulation and somatosensory physiology with vibration-evoked electroencephalographic potentials. Tractography of the corticospinal tract and the medial lemniscus was performed with diffusion tensor imaging, and lesions were classified by magnetic resonance imaging. Anatomical and physiological results were correlated with measures of hand function using 2 independent statistical methods. Children with disruptions in the somatosensory connectivity and cortical lesions had the most severe upper extremity impairments, particularly somatosensory function. Motor system connectivity was significantly correlated with bimanual function, but not unimanual function or somatosensory function. Both sensory and motor connectivity impact hand function in children with USCP. Somatosensory connectivity could be an important target for recovery of hand function in children with USCP. Ann Neurol 2017;82:766-780. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  8. Functional MRT in psychiatry and neurology; Funktionelle MRT in Psychiatrie und Neurologie

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    Schneider, F. [Universitaetsklinikum der RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie; Fink, G.R. (eds.) [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie

    2007-07-01

    Almost no other method has reach such an interest as the functional imaging in psychiatric and neurological science; it is fascinating to observe the brain at work. The fundamentals of functional magnetic resonance tomography (fMRT) and the interpretation of MRT images are explained; the state-of-the-art is discussed. The book is focussed on the functional imaging within psychiatry and neurology. The book contains 45 contributions within the following chapters: fundamentals, higher brain accomplishments, disease pattern, examinatory examples, perspectives.

  9. NLRP3 Inflammasome in Neurological Diseases, from Functions to Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Limin; Pei, Lei; Yao, Shanglong; Wu, Yan; Shang, You

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinflammation has been identified as a causative factor of multiple neurological diseases. The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-, leucine-rich repeat- and pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, a subcellular multiprotein complex that is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), can sense and be activated by a wide range of exogenous and endogenous stimuli such as microbes, aggregated and misfolded proteins, and adenosine triphosphate, which results in activation of caspase-1. Activated caspase-1 subsequently leads to the processing of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediates rapid cell death. IL-1β and IL-18 drive inflammatory responses through diverse downstream signaling pathways, leading to neuronal damage. Thus, the NLRP3 inflammasome is considered a key contributor to the development of neuroinflammation. In this review article, we briefly discuss the structure and activation the NLRP3 inflammasome and address the involvement of the NLRP3 inflammasome in several neurological disorders, such as brain infection, acute brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, we review a series of promising therapeutic approaches that target the NLRP3 inflammasome signaling including anti-IL-1 therapy, small molecule NLRP3 inhibitors and other compounds, however, these approaches are still experimental in neurological diseases. At present, it is plausible to generate cell-specific conditional NLRP3 knockout (KO) mice via the Cre system to investigate the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome, which may be instrumental in the development of novel pharmacologic investigations for neuroinflammation-associated diseases. PMID:28337127

  10. Age-dependent time courses of recovery for motor functions following acute toluene intoxication in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel-Herter, Susan R; Slaght, Shelby L; McKay, Bruce E

    2014-05-01

    Toluene is a psychoactive chemical found in many household products including adhesives and thinners. Inhalation of these vapors can cause euphoria and impairments in motor control and neurological functioning. Misuse and abuse of toluene is most common in children, which may in part be due to an age-dependent neurobehavioral sensitivity to toluene. Here we assessed the effects of acute binge-like toluene inhalations (15 or 30 min; ∼5,000 ppm) on tasks that examine locomotion, exploration, balance, gait, and neurological functioning for adolescent (1 month), young adult (2-3 months), adult (5-6 months), and older adult (10-12 months) rats. Both motor and neurological functions were impaired following acute toluene inhalation at all ages. However, only the duration to recover from deficits in motor functions differed among age groups, with adolescent and young adult rats requiring notably longer recovery times than older rats. Our results are suggestive of an age-dependent vulnerability to the intoxicating effects of toluene. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effectiveness of music-based interventions on motricity or cognitive functioning in neurological populations: a systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Moumdjian, Lousin; Sarkamo, Teppo; Leone, Carmela; Leman, Marc; Feys, Peter

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Motor and cognitive symptoms are frequent in persons with neurological disorders and often require extensive long-term rehabilitation. Recently, a variety of musicbased interventions have been introduced into neurological rehabilitation as training tools. AIM: This review aims to a) describe and define music-based intervention modalities and content which are applied in experimental studies, and b) describe the effects of these interventions on motor and/or cognitive symptoms...

  12. Effects of estrogen on functional and neurological recovery after spinal cord injury: An experimental study with rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olavo Biraghi Letaif

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES:To evaluate the functional and histological effects of estrogen as a neuroprotective agent after a standard experimentally induced spinal cord lesion.METHODS:In this experimental study, 20 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: one group with rats undergoing spinal cord injury (SCI at T10 and receiving estrogen therapy with 17-beta estradiol (4mg/kg immediately following the injury and after the placement of skin sutures and a control group with rats only subjected to SCI. A moderate standard experimentally induced SCI was produced using a computerized device that dropped a weight on the rat's spine from a height of 12.5 mm. Functional recovery was verified with the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scale on the 2nd, 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, 35th and 42nd days after injury and by quantifying the motor-evoked potential on the 42nd day after injury. Histopathological evaluation of the SCI area was performed after euthanasia on the 42nd day.RESULTS:The experimental group showed a significantly greater functional improvement from the 28th to the 42nd day of observation compared to the control group. The experimental group showed statistically significant improvements in the motor-evoked potential compared with the control group. The results of pathological histomorphometry evaluations showed a better neurological recovery in the experimental group, with respect to the proportion and diameter of the quantified nerve fibers.CONCLUSIONS:Estrogen administration provided benefits in neurological and functional motor recovery in rats with SCI beginning at the 28th day after injury.

  13. Beneficial effect of pramipexole for motor function and depression in Parkinson’s disease

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    Osamu Kano

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Osamu Kano1,2, Ken Ikeda2, Tetsuhito Kiyozuka2, Konosuke Iwamoto2, Hirono Ito2, Yuji Kawase2, Ryuta Sato2, Toshiki Fujioka2, Yo Araki2, Shigeji Baba2, Yasuo Iwasaki21Department of Neurology, Methodist Neurological Institute, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Neurology, Toho University Omori Medical Center, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: We examined whether pramipexole (PPX can influence depressive scale in normal and mild depressive parkinsonian patients. In an open study of PPX as an add-on to L-dopa therapy or single administration, 36 nondemented outpatients with Parkinson’s disease (PD were entered first. All were in the stage II or III of Hoehn and Yahr scale (H&Y. PPX were started at 0.125 mg/day and daily doses were increased to 1.5 mg/day. At 3 months after PPX treatment, patients were re-evaluated. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale III, H&Y stage, and freezing of gait questionnaire were compared in patients before and after PPX treatment. These scores were significantly improved after PPX administration. There were no correlations between HAM-D and those motor functions. We suggest that PPX treatment has antidepressant effects in depressive PD patients and also ameliorates HAM-D score in nondepressive PD patients in addition to motor function.Keywords: Parkinson disease, pramipexole, motor function, depression, antidepressant effect

  14. Effects of poverty on cognitive function: a hidden neurologic epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Donna C

    2008-08-05

    Mental retardation is one of the most prevalent neurologic disorders globally. Surveys in high-income countries show 3 to 5 per 1,000 with severe intellectual disability, i.e., IQ below 55. Estimates from developing countries, however, have found prevalence rates from 5 to as much as 22 per 1,000. Protein-energy malnutrition, dietary micronutrient deficiencies, environmental toxins, and lack of early sensory stimulation or the ability to profit from it may contribute to neurodevelopmental disabilities. Tropical diseases such as parasitosis with resultant anemia, malaria, and other infections are major contributory causes. Reduction of poverty and its effects would reduce the present and future burden of mental retardation and cognitive dysfunction, especially in developing countries.

  15. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society Guideline on management of multifocal motor neuropathy. Report of a Joint Task Force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society - first revision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, Ivo N.; Leger, Jean-Marc; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Cornblath, David R.; Hadden, Robert D. M.; Koski, Carol L.; Pollard, John D.; Sommer, Claudia; Illa, Isabel; van den Bergh, Peter; van Dorrn, Pieter A.

    2010-01-01

    A European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society consensus guideline on the definition, investigation, and treatment of multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) was published in 2006. The aim is to revise this guideline. Disease experts considered references retrieved from MEDLINE

  16. Neurological soft signs in persons with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and the relationships to neuropsychological functions

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    Li Hui-jie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurological abnormalities have been reported in people with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI. The current study aimed to examine the prevalence of neurological soft signs (NSS in this clinical group and to examine the relationship of NSS to other neuropsychological performances. Methods Twenty-nine people with aMCI and 28 cognitively healthy elderly people were recruited for the present study. The NSS subscales (motor coordination, sensory integration, and disinhibition of the Cambridge Neurological Inventory and a set of neuropsychological tests were administered to all the participants. Results People with aMCI exhibited significantly more motor coordination signs, disinhibition signs, and total NSS than normal controls. Correlation analysis showed that the motor coordination subscale score and total score of NSS were significantly inversely correlated with the combined Z-score of neuropsychological tests in aMCI group. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggested that people with aMCI demonstrated a higher prevalence of NSS compared to healthy elderly people. Moreover, NSS was found to be inversely correlated with the neuropsychological performances in persons with aMCI. When taken together, these findings suggested that NSS may play a potential important role and serve as a tool to assist in the early detection of aMCI.

  17. Neurological and functional outcomes of subdural hematoma evacuation in patients over 70 years of age

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    Patrick Mulligan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subdural hematoma (SDH is a common disease entity treated by neurosurgical intervention. Although the incidence increases in the elderly population, there is a paucity of studies examining their surgical outcomes. Objectives: To determine the neurological and functional outcomes of patients over 70 years of age undergoing surgical decompression for subdural hematoma. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data on 45 patients above 70 years who underwent craniotomy or burr holes for acute, chronic or mixed subdural hematomas. We analyzed both neurological and functional status before and after surgery. Results: Forty-five patients 70 years of age or older were treated in our department during the study period. There was a significant improvement in the neurological status of patients from admission to follow up as assessed using the Markwalder grading scale (1.98 vs. 1.39; P =0.005, yet no improvement in functional outcome was observed as assessed by Glasgow Outcome Score. Forty-one patients were admitted from home, however only 20 patients (44% were discharged home, 16 (36% discharged to nursing home or rehab, 6 (13% to hospice and 3 (7% died in the postoperative period. Neurological function improved in patients who were older, had a worse pre-operative neurological status, were on anticoagulation and had chronic or mixed acute and chronic hematoma. However, no improvement in functional status was observed. Conclusion: Surgical management of SDH in patients over 70 years of age provides significant improvement in neurological status, but does not change functional status.

  18. Increased pediatric functional neurological symptom disorders after the Boston marathon bombings: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Réjean M; Pier, Danielle B; de Gusmão, Claudio M; Bernson-Leung, Miya E; Maski, Kiran P; Urion, David K; Waugh, Jeff L

    2014-11-01

    Functional neurological symptom disorders are frequently the basis for acute neurological consultation. In children, they are often precipitated by high-frequency everyday stressors. The extent to which a severe traumatic experience may also precipitate functional neurological abnormalities is unknown. For the 2-week period after the Boston Marathon bombings, we prospectively collected data on patients whose presentation suggested a functional neurological symptom disorder. We assessed clinical and demographic variables, duration of symptoms, extent of educational impact, and degree of connection to the Marathon bombing. We contacted all patients at 6 months after presentation to determine the outcome and accuracy of the diagnosis. In a parallel study, we reported a baseline of 2.6 functional neurological presentations per week in our emergency room. In the week after the Marathon bombings, this frequency tripled. Ninety-one percent of presentations were delayed by 1 week, with onset around the first school day after a city-wide lockdown. Seventy-three percent had a history of a prior psychiatric diagnosis. At the 6 months follow-up, no functional neurological symptom disorder diagnoses were overturned and no new organic diagnosis was made. Pediatric functional neurological symptom disorder may be precipitated by both casual and high-intensity stressors. The 3.4-fold increase in incidence after the Boston Marathon bombings and city-wide lockdown demonstrates the marked effect that a community-wide tragedy can have on the mental health of children. Care providers must be aware of functional neurological symptom disorders after stressful community events in vulnerable patient populations, particularly those with prior psychiatric diagnoses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society guideline on management of multifocal motor neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, I. N.; Bouche, P.; Illa, I.; Léger, J.-M.; van den Bergh, P.; Cornblath, D. R.; Evers, E. M. A.; Hadden, R. D. M.; Hughes, R. A. C.; Koski, C. L.; Nobile-Orazio, E.; Pollard, J.; Sommer, C.; van Doorn, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    Several diagnostic criteria for multifocal motor neuropathy have been proposed in recent years and a beneficial effect of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and various other immunomodulatory drugs has been suggested in several trials and uncontrolled studies. The objectives were to prepare consensus

  20. Limb distribution, motor impairment, and functional classification of cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, J.A.; Rosenbaum, P.L.

    2004-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), limb distribution, and type of motor impairment. Data used were collected in the Ontario Motor Growth study, a longitudinal cohort study with a population-based sample of children with cerebral

  1. Visual-motor integration functioning in a South African middle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visual-motor integration functioning has been identified as playing an integral role in different aspects of a child's development. Sensory-motor development is not only foundational to the physical maturation process, but is also imperative for progress with formal learning activities. Deficits in visual-motor integration have ...

  2. Association between gross-motor and executive function depends on age and motor task complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spedden, Meaghan Elizabeth; Malling, Anne Sofie B; Andersen, Ken Kjøller

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to examine associations between motor and executive function across the adult lifespan and to investigate the role of motor complexity in these associations. Young, middle-aged and older adults (n = 82; 19-83y) performed two gross-motor tasks with different levels of complexity...... and a Stroop-like computer task. Performance was decreased in older adults. The association between motor and cognitive performance was significant for older adults in the complex motor task (p = 0.03, rs = -0.41), whereas no significant associations were found for young or middle-aged groups, suggesting...... that the link between gross-motor and executive function emerges with age and depends on motor complexity....

  3. Motor function domains in alternating hemiplegia of childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Melanie; Gordon, Kelly; Hall, Amanda; Jasien, Joan; Lardinois, Kara; Uchitel, Julie; Mclean, Melissa; Prange, Lyndsey; Wuchich, Jeffrey; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2017-08-01

    To characterize motor function profiles in alternating hemiplegia of childhood, and to investigate interrelationships between these domains and with age. We studied a cohort of 23 patients (9 males, 14 females; mean age 9y 4mo, range 4mo-43y) who underwent standardized tests to assess gross motor, upper extremity motor control, motor speech, and dysphagia functions. Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), Gross Motor Function Measure-88 (GMFM-88), Manual Ability Classification System (MACS), and Revised Melbourne Assessment (MA2) scales manifested predominantly mild impairments; motor speech, moderate to severe; Modified Dysphagia Outcome and Severity Scale (M-DOSS), mild-to moderate deficits. GMFCS correlated with GMFM-88 scores (Pearson's correlation, p=0.002), MACS (p=0.038), and MA2 fluency (p=0.005) and accuracy (p=0.038) scores. GMFCS did not correlate with motor speech (p=0.399), MA2 dexterity (p=0.247), range of motion (p=0.063), or M-DOSS (p=0.856). Motor speech was more severely impaired than the GMFCS (phemiplegia of childhood, argue against the presence of worse motor function in older patients, identify tools helpful in evaluating this population, and identify oropharyngeal function as the more severely affected domain, suggesting that brain areas controlling this function are more affected than others. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  4. Disruption of rolandic gamma-band functional connectivity by seizures is associated with motor impairments in children with epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George M Ibrahim

    Full Text Available Although children with epilepsy exhibit numerous neurological and cognitive deficits, the mechanisms underlying these impairments remain unclear. Synchronization of oscillatory neural activity in the gamma frequency range (>30 Hz is purported to be a mechanism mediating functional integration within neuronal networks supporting cognition, perception and action. Here, we tested the hypothesis that seizure-induced alterations in gamma synchronization are associated with functional deficits. By calculating synchrony among electrodes and performing graph theoretical analysis, we assessed functional connectivity and local network structure of the hand motor area of children with focal epilepsy from intracranial electroencephalographic recordings. A local decrease in inter-electrode phase synchrony in the gamma bands during ictal periods, relative to interictal periods, within the motor cortex was strongly associated with clinical motor weakness. Gamma-band ictal desychronization was a stronger predictor of deficits than the presence of the seizure-onset zone or lesion within the motor cortex. There was a positive correlation between the magnitude of ictal desychronization and impairment of motor dexterity in the contralateral, but not ipsilateral hand. There was no association between ictal desynchronization within the hand motor area and non-motor deficits. This study uniquely demonstrates that seizure-induced disturbances in cortical functional connectivity are associated with network-specific neurological deficits.

  5. Development of a Kinect-based exergaming system for motor rehabilitation in neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estepa, A.; Sponton Piriz, S.; Albornoz, E.; Martínez, C.

    2016-04-01

    The development of videogames for physical therapy, known as exergames, has gained much interest in the last years. In this work, a sytem for rehabilitation and clinical evaluation of neurological patients is presented. The Microsoft Kinect device is used to track the full body of patients, and three games were developed to exercise and assess different aspects of balance and gait rehabilitation. The system provides visual feedback by means of an avatar that follows the movements of the patients, and sound and visual stimuli for giving orders during the experience. Also, the system includes a database and management tools for further analysis and monitoring of therapies. The results obtained show, on the one side, a great reception and interest of patients to use the system. On the other side, the specialists considered very useful the data collected and the quantitative analysis provided by the system, which was then adopted for the clinical routine.

  6. Acute, transient hemorrhagic hypotension does not aggravate structural damage or neurologic motor deficits but delays the long-term cognitive recovery following mild to moderate traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Christian; Stover, John F.; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Hoover, Rachel C.; Morales, Diego M.; Schouten, Joost W.; McMillan, Asenia; Soltesz, Kristie; Motta, Melissa; Spangler, Zachery; Neugebauer, Edmund; McIntosh, Tracy K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Posttraumatic hypotension is believed to increase morbidity and mortality in traumatically brain-injured patients. Using a clinically relevant model of combined traumatic brain injury with superimposed hemorrhagic hypotension in rats, the present study evaluated whether a reduction in mean arterial blood pressure aggravates regional brain edema formation, regional cell death, and neurologic motor/cognitive deficits associated with traumatic brain injury. Design Experimental prospective, randomized study in rodents. Setting Experimental laboratory at a university hospital. Subjects One hundred nineteen male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 350-385 g. Interventions Experimental traumatic brain injury of mild to moderate severity was induced using the lateral fluid percussion brain injury model in anesthetized rats (n = 89). Following traumatic brain injury, in surviving animals one group of animals was subjected to pressure-controlled hemorrhagic hypotension, maintaining the mean arterial blood pressure at 50-60 mm Hg for 30 mins (n = 47). The animals were subsequently either resuscitated with lactated Ringer’s solution (three times shed blood volume, n = 18) or left uncompensated (n = 29). Other groups of animals included those with isolated traumatic brain injury (n = 34), those with isolated hemorrhagic hypotension (n = 8), and sham-injured control animals receiving anesthesia and surgery alone (n = 22). Measurements and Main Results The withdrawal of 6-7 mL of arterial blood significantly reduced mean arterial blood pressure by 50% without decreasing arterial oxygen saturation or Pao2. Brain injury induced significant cerebral edema (p hypotension. Brain injury-induced neurologic deficits persisted up to 20 wks after injury and were also not aggravated by the hemorrhagic hypotension. Cognitive dysfunction persisted for up to 16 wks postinjury. The superimposition of hemorrhagic hypotension significantly delayed the time course of cognitive recovery

  7. Functional connectivity between somatosensory and motor brain areas predicts individual differences in motor learning by observing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Heather R; Gribble, Paul L

    2017-08-01

    Action observation can facilitate the acquisition of novel motor skills; however, there is considerable individual variability in the extent to which observation promotes motor learning. Here we tested the hypothesis that individual differences in brain function or structure can predict subsequent observation-related gains in motor learning. Subjects underwent an anatomical MRI scan and resting-state fMRI scans to assess preobservation gray matter volume and preobservation resting-state functional connectivity (FC), respectively. On the following day, subjects observed a video of a tutor adapting her reaches to a novel force field. After observation, subjects performed reaches in a force field as a behavioral assessment of gains in motor learning resulting from observation. We found that individual differences in resting-state FC, but not gray matter volume, predicted postobservation gains in motor learning. Preobservation resting-state FC between left primary somatosensory cortex and bilateral dorsal premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, and primary somatosensory cortex and left superior parietal lobule was positively correlated with behavioral measures of postobservation motor learning. Sensory-motor resting-state FC can thus predict the extent to which observation will promote subsequent motor learning.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We show that individual differences in preobservation brain function can predict subsequent observation-related gains in motor learning. Preobservation resting-state functional connectivity within a sensory-motor network may be used as a biomarker for the extent to which observation promotes motor learning. This kind of information may be useful if observation is to be used as a way to boost neuroplasticity and sensory-motor recovery for patients undergoing rehabilitation for diseases that impair movement such as stroke. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Maturation of Corpus Callosum Anterior Midbody Is Associated with Neonatal Motor Function in Eight Preterm-Born Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Preethi; Pannek, Kerstin; D'Acunto, M. Giulia; Guzzetta, Andrea; Rose, Stephen E.; Colditz, Paul B.; Finnigan, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background. The etiology of motor impairments in preterm infants is multifactorial and incompletely understood. Whether corpus callosum development is related to impaired motor function is unclear. Potential associations between motor-related measures and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the corpus callosum in preterm infants were explored. Methods. Eight very preterm infants (gestational age of 28–32 weeks) underwent the Hammersmith neonatal neurological examination and DTI assessments at gestational age of 42 weeks. The total Hammersmith score and a motor-specific score (sum of Hammersmith motor subcategories) were calculated. Six corpus callosum regions of interest were defined on the mid-sagittal DTI slice—genu, rostral body, anterior midbody, posterior midbody, isthmus, and splenium. The fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) of these regions were computed, and correlations between these and Hammersmith measures were sought. Results. Anterior midbody FA measures correlated positively with total Hammersmith (rho = 0.929, P = 0.001) and motor-specific scores (rho = 0.857, P = 0.007). Total Hammersmith scores also negatively correlated with anterior midbody MD measures (rho = −0.714, P = 0.047). Discussion. These results suggest the integrity of corpus callosum axons, particularly anterior midbody axons, is important in mediating neurological functions. Greater callosal maturation was associated with greater motor function. Corpus callosum DTI may prove to be a valuable screening or prognostic marker. PMID:23509639

  9. Maturation of Corpus Callosum Anterior Midbody Is Associated with Neonatal Motor Function in Eight Preterm-Born Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Mathew

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The etiology of motor impairments in preterm infants is multifactorial and incompletely understood. Whether corpus callosum development is related to impaired motor function is unclear. Potential associations between motor-related measures and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI of the corpus callosum in preterm infants were explored. Methods. Eight very preterm infants (gestational age of 28–32 weeks underwent the Hammersmith neonatal neurological examination and DTI assessments at gestational age of 42 weeks. The total Hammersmith score and a motor-specific score (sum of Hammersmith motor subcategories were calculated. Six corpus callosum regions of interest were defined on the mid-sagittal DTI slice—genu, rostral body, anterior midbody, posterior midbody, isthmus, and splenium. The fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD of these regions were computed, and correlations between these and Hammersmith measures were sought. Results. Anterior midbody FA measures correlated positively with total Hammersmith (rho =0.929, P=0.001 and motor-specific scores (rho =0.857, P=0.007. Total Hammersmith scores also negatively correlated with anterior midbody MD measures (rho =−0.714, P=0.047. Discussion. These results suggest the integrity of corpus callosum axons, particularly anterior midbody axons, is important in mediating neurological functions. Greater callosal maturation was associated with greater motor function. Corpus callosum DTI may prove to be a valuable screening or prognostic marker.

  10. Cognitive and cognitive-motor interventions affecting physical functioning: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murer Kurt

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several types of cognitive or combined cognitive-motor intervention types that might influence physical functions have been proposed in the past: training of dual-tasking abilities, and improving cognitive function through behavioral interventions or the use of computer games. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the literature regarding the use of cognitive and cognitive-motor interventions to improve physical functioning in older adults or people with neurological impairments that are similar to cognitive impairments seen in aging. The aim was to identify potentially promising methods that might be used in future intervention type studies for older adults. Methods A systematic search was conducted for the Medline/Premedline, PsycINFO, CINAHL and EMBASE databases. The search was focused on older adults over the age of 65. To increase the number of articles for review, we also included those discussing adult patients with neurological impairments due to trauma, as these cognitive impairments are similar to those seen in the aging population. The search was restricted to English, German and French language literature without any limitation of publication date or restriction by study design. Cognitive or cognitive-motor interventions were defined as dual-tasking, virtual reality exercise, cognitive exercise, or a combination of these. Results 28 articles met our inclusion criteria. Three articles used an isolated cognitive rehabilitation intervention, seven articles used a dual-task intervention and 19 applied a computerized intervention. There is evidence to suggest that cognitive or motor-cognitive methods positively affects physical functioning, such as postural control, walking abilities and general functions of the upper and lower extremities, respectively. The majority of the included studies resulted in improvements of the assessed functional outcome measures. Conclusions The current evidence on the

  11. Motor abnormalities in first-episode psychosis patients and long-term psychosocial functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Manuel J; García de Jalón, Elena; Campos, M Sol; Moreno-Izco, Lucía; Lorente-Omeñaca, Ruth; Sánchez-Torres, Ana M; Peralta, Víctor

    2017-09-07

    Motor abnormalities (MAs) are highly prevalent in patients with first-episode psychosis both before any exposure and after treatment with antipsychotic drugs. However, the extent to which these abnormalities have predictive value for long-term psychosocial functioning is unknown. One hundred antipsychotic-naive first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients underwent extensive motor evaluation including catatonic, parkinsonism, dyskinesia, akathisia and neurological soft signs. Patients were assessed at naïve state and 6months later. Patients were followed-up in their naturalistic treatment and settings and their psychosocial functioning was assessed at 6-month, 1year, 5year and 10years from the FEP by collecting all available information. A set of linear mixed models were built to account for the repeated longitudinal assessment of psychosocial functioning during the follow-up regarding to the five domains of MAs (catatonic, parkinsonism, akathisia, dyskinesia and neurologic soft-signs) at index episode at antipsychotic naïve state and after 6months of FEP. Basic epidemiological variables, schizophrenia diagnosis and average of chlorpromazine equivalent doses of antipsychotic drugs were included as covariates. Catatonic signs and dyskinesia at drug-naïve state were significantly associated with poor long-term psychosocial functioning. Moreover, higher scores on parkinsonism, akathisia, neurological soft signs and catatonic signs at 6-month of FEP but not dyskinesia showed significant associations with poor long-term psychosocial functioning. Our results added empirical evidence to motor abnormalities as core manifestations of psychotic illness before and after antipsychotic treatment with high predictive value for poor long-term psychosocial functioning in FEP patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of vibration therapy on spasticity and motor function in children with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katusic, Ana; Alimovic, Sonja; Mejaski-Bosnjak, Vlatka

    2013-01-01

    As the motor system relies heavily on deep sensory stimulation, recent studies have investigated the effect of vibration stimuli. Although research suggests a positive influence of vibration on motor performance in individuals with neurological disorders, there are very limited numbers of studies in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of sound wave vibration therapy on spasticity and motor function in children with CP. In this 3-month trial, 89 children with spastic CP were randomized to either continue their physiotherapy treatment (PT) or to receive vibration therapy twice a week in addition to their PT program. The randomization was stratified according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level to ensure similar functional ability. Children were assessed at baseline and after the 12-week intervention period. The outcomes measured were spasticity level as assessed by Modified Modified Ashworth Scale (MMAS) and gross motor function as assessed by Gross Motor Function Measurement (GMFM-88). Subgroup analysis was performed for the GMFCS. Significant differences between groups were detected for changes in spasticity level and gross motor function after the three months intervention. In conclusion, vibration therapy may decrease spasticity and improve motor performance in children with CP. The results of the present trial serve as valuable input for evidence-based treatments in paediatric neurorehabilitation.

  13. Corticospinal tract atrophy and motor fMRI predict motor preservation after functional cerebral hemispherectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anthony C; Ibrahim, George M; Poliakov, Andrew V; Wang, Page I; Fallah, Aria; Mathern, Gary W; Buckley, Robert T; Collins, Kelly; Weil, Alexander G; Shurtleff, Hillary A; Warner, Molly H; Perez, Francisco A; Shaw, Dennis W; Wright, Jason N; Saneto, Russell P; Novotny, Edward J; Lee, Amy; Browd, Samuel R; Ojemann, Jeffrey G

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The potential loss of motor function after cerebral hemispherectomy is a common cause of anguish for patients, their families, and their physicians. The deficits these patients face are individually unique, but as a whole they provide a framework to understand the mechanisms underlying cortical reorganization of motor function. This study investigated whether preoperative functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) could predict the postoperative preservation of hand motor function. METHODS Thirteen independent reviewers analyzed sensorimotor fMRI and colored fractional anisotropy (CoFA)-DTI maps in 25 patients undergoing functional hemispherectomy for treatment of intractable seizures. Pre- and postoperative gross hand motor function were categorized and correlated with fMRI and DTI findings, specifically, abnormally located motor activation on fMRI and corticospinal tract atrophy on DTI. RESULTS Normal sensorimotor cortical activation on preoperative fMRI was significantly associated with severe decline in postoperative motor function, demonstrating 92.9% sensitivity (95% CI 0.661-0.998) and 100% specificity (95% CI 0.715-1.00). Bilaterally robust, symmetric corticospinal tracts on CoFA-DTI maps were significantly associated with severe postoperative motor decline, demonstrating 85.7% sensitivity (95% CI 0.572-0.982) and 100% specificity (95% CI 0.715-1.00). Interpreting the fMR images, the reviewers achieved a Fleiss' kappa coefficient (κ) for interrater agreement of κ = 0.69, indicating good agreement (p motor function can be identified prior to hemispherectomy, where fMRI or DTI suggests that cortical reorganization of motor function has occurred prior to the operation.

  14. THE SPECIFICS OF FUNCTIONAL MOTOR ASYMMETRIES IN EARLY ONTOGENESIS

    OpenAIRE

    Berdichevskaia E.M; Zaytseva N.V.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the level of development of motor functions, particulars of the functional motor asymmetries and their dynamics in the process of treatment of children with cerebral palsy. We examined 445 children 4 – 7 years of age, including 95 patients with the most prevalent forms of cerebral palsy (spastic diplegia and hemiparesis) and 350 practically healthy children. In the study of functional asymmetries of motion global delay in the formation of the morpho-functional parameters of the cen...

  15. Transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials in Great Danes with and without clinical signs of cervical spondylomyelopathy: association with neurological findings and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Vaquero, P; da Costa, R C

    2014-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (TMMEPs) assess the functional integrity of the descending motor pathways, which are typically compromised in canine cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM). The objective of this prospective study was to establish the reference ranges of TMMEP latency and amplitude in clinically normal (control) Great Danes (GDs), compare TMMEPs obtained in GDs with and without CSM, and determine whether there is any association between TMMEP data and severity of neurological signs or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Twenty-nine client-owned GDs were enrolled (15 controls, 14 CSM-affected). All dogs underwent TMMEPs under sedation, and latencies and amplitudes were recorded from the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and cranial tibial (CT) muscles. MRI of the cervical vertebral column was performed to evaluate the presence and severity of spinal cord (SC) compression, and the presence of SC signal changes. ECR and CT latencies were significantly longer in CSM-affected than control GDs. No significant differences between groups were found for amplitudes or neuronal path lengths. For the CT TMMEPs, CSM-affected GDs with moderate and severe clinical signs had significantly longer latencies than those with mild clinical signs. Significantly longer CT latencies were found in dogs with moderate and severe SC compression compared with dogs with mild compression. CT TMMEPs could not be recorded in 7/9 CSM-affected GDs with SC signal changes. These results provide a reference range for TMMEPs of clinically normal GDs. The use of TMMEPs is a valid ancillary test to assess the integrity of motor pathways in GDs with CSM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Motor Abnormalities: From Neurodevelopmental to Neurodegenerative Through "Functional" (Neuro)Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Victor; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2017-09-01

    Motor abnormalities (MAs) of severe mental disorders have been traditionally neglected both in clinical practice and research, although they are an increasing focus of attention because of their clinical and neurobiological relevance. For historical reasons, most of the literature on MAs has been focused to a great extent on schizophrenia, and as a consequence their prevalence and featural properties in other psychiatric or neuropsychiatric disorders are poorly known. In this article, we evaluated the extent to which catatonic, extrapyramidal and neurological soft signs, and their associated clinical features, are present transdiagnostically. We examined motor-related features in neurodevelopmental (schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder, autism spectrum disorders), "functional" (nonschizophrenic nonaffective psychoses, mood disorders) and neurodegenerative (Alzheimer's disease) disorders. Examination of the literature revealed that there have been very few comparisons of motor-related features across diagnoses and we had to rely mainly in disorder-specific studies to compare it transdiagnostically. One or more motor domains had a substantial prevalence in all the diagnoses examined. In "functional" disorders, MAs, and particularly catatonic signs, appear to be markers of episode severity; in chronic disorders, although with different degree of strength or evidence, all motor domains are indicators of both disorder severity and poor outcome; lastly, in Alzheimer's disease they are also indicators of disorder progression. MAs appear to represent a true transdiagnostic domain putatively sharing neurobiological mechanisms of neurodevelopmental, functional or neurodegenerative origin.

  17. Motor-evoked potentials (MEP) during brainstem surgery to preserve corticospinal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnthein, Johannes; Bozinov, Oliver; Melone, Angelina Graziella; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2011-09-01

    Brainstem surgery bears a risk of damage to the corticospinal tract (CST). Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) are used intraoperatively to monitor CST function in order to detect CST damage at a reversible stage and thus impede permanent neurological deficits. While the method of MEP is generally accepted, warning criteria in the context of brainstem surgery still have to be agreed on. We analyzed 104 consecutive patients who underwent microsurgical resection of lesions affecting the brainstem. Motor grade was documented prior to surgery, early postoperatively and at discharge. A baseline MEP stimulation intensity threshold was defined and intraoperative testing aimed to keep MEP response amplitude constant. MEPs were considered deteriorated and the surgical team was notified whenever the threshold was elevated by ≥20 mA or MEP response fell under 50%. On the first postoperative day, 18 patients experienced new paresis that resolved by discharge in 11. MEPs deteriorated in 39 patients, and 16 of these showed new postoperative paresis, indicating a 41% risk of new paresis. In the remaining 2/18 patients, intraoperative MEPs were stable, although new paresis appeared postoperatively. In one of these patients, intraoperative hemorrhage caused postoperative swelling, and the new motor deficit persisted until discharge. Of all 104 patients, 7 deteriorated in motor grade at discharge, 92 remained unchanged, and 5 patients have improved. Adjustment of surgical strategy contributed to good motor outcome in 33/39 patients. MEP monitoring may help significantly to prevent motor deficits during demanding neurosurgical procedures on the brainstem.

  18. Exchange of rotor components in functioning bacterial flagellar motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuoka, Hajime; Inoue, Yuichi [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Terasawa, Shun [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Takahashi, Hiroto [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ishijima, Akihiko, E-mail: ishijima@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-03-26

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a rotary motor driven by the electrochemical potential of a coupling ion. The interaction between a rotor and stator units is thought to generate torque. The overall structure of flagellar motor has been thought to be static, however, it was recently proved that stators are exchanged in a rotating motor. Understanding the dynamics of rotor components in functioning motor is important for the clarifying of working mechanism of bacterial flagellar motor. In this study, we focused on the dynamics and the turnover of rotor components in a functioning flagellar motor. Expression systems for GFP-FliN, FliM-GFP, and GFP-FliG were constructed, and each GFP-fusion was functionally incorporated into the flagellar motor. To investigate whether the rotor components are exchanged in a rotating motor, we performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. After photobleaching, in a tethered cell producing GFP-FliN or FliM-GFP, the recovery of fluorescence at the rotational center was observed. However, in a cell producing GFP-FliG, no recovery of fluorescence was observed. The transition phase of fluorescence intensity after full or partially photobleaching allowed the turnover of FliN subunits to be calculated as 0.0007 s{sup -1}, meaning that FliN would be exchanged in tens of minutes. These novel findings indicate that a bacterial flagellar motor is not a static structure even in functioning state. This is the first report for the exchange of rotor components in a functioning bacterial flagellar motor.

  19. Functional progression of patients with neurological diseases in a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit: Our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madurga Revilla, P; López Pisón, J; Samper Villagrasa, P; García Íñiguez, J P; Garcés Gómez, R; Domínguez Cajal, M; Gil Hernández, I

    2017-11-23

    Neurological diseases explain a considerable proportion of admissions to paediatric intensive care units (PICU), and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. This study aims to analyse the functional progression of children with critical neurological conditions. Retrospective descriptive study of children admitted to PICU with neurological diseases over a period of 3 years (2012-2014), assessing vital and functional prognosis at PICU discharge and at one year according to the Pediatric Cerebral and Overall Performance Category scales (PCPC-POPC) and the Functional Status Scale (FSS). The results are compared with our previous data (1990-1999), and those of the international multicentre PANGEA study. A total of 266 children were studied. The mortality rate was 3%; the PRISM-III and PIM2 models did not show predictive ability. Clinically significant worsening was observed in functional health at discharge in 30% of the sample, according to POPC, 15% according to PCPC, and 5% according to FSS. After one year, functional performance improved according to PCPC-POPC, but not according to FSS. Children with no underlying neurological disease had a higher degree of functional impairment; this was prolonged over time. We observed a decrease in overall and neurocritical mortality compared with our previous data (5.60 vs. 2.1%, P=.0003, and 8.44 vs. 2.63%, P=.0014, respectively). Compared with the PANGEA study, both mortality and cerebral functional impairment in neurocritical children were lower in our study (1.05 vs. 13.32%, P<.0001, and 10.47% vs. 23.79%, P<.0001, respectively). Nearly one-third of critically ill children have neurological diseases. A significant percentage, mainly children without underlying neurological diseases, had a clinically significant functional impact at PICU discharge and after a year. Neuromonitoring and neuroprotection measures and the evaluation of functional progression are necessary to improve critical child care. Copyright

  20. Effect of Admission Glasgow Coma Scale Motor Score on Neurological Outcome in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients Receiving Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hifumi, Toru; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Kawakita, Kenya; Sawano, Hirotaka; Tahara, Yoshio; Hase, Mamoru; Nishioka, Kenji; Shirai, Shinichi; Hazui, Hiroshi; Arimoto, Hideki; Kashiwase, Kazunori; Kasaoka, Shunji; Motomura, Tomokazu; Yasuga, Yuji; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Ken; Nonogi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Because the initial (on admission) Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) examination has not been fully evaluated in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest (CA) who receive therapeutic hypothermia (TH), the aim of the present study was to determine any association between the admission GCS motor score and neurologic outcomes in patients with out-of-hospital CA who receive TH. In the J-PULSE-HYPO study registry, patients with bystander-witnessed CA were eligible for inclusion. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on GCS motor score (1, 2-3, and 4-5) to assess various effects on neurologic outcome. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of good neurologic outcome at 90 days. Of 452 patients, 302 were enrolled. There was a significant difference among the 3 patient groups with regard to neurologic outcome at 90 days in the univariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that the GCS motor score on admission, age >65 years, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the time from collapse to return of spontaneous circulation, and pupil size patients sustaining out-of-hospital CA who receive TH.

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been performed on 20 right handed volunteers at 1.5 Tesla using echo planar imaging (EPI) protocol. Index finger tapping invoked localized activation in the primary motor area. Consistent and highly reproducible activation in the primary motor area was observed ...

  2. Motor assessment in pediatric neuropsychology: relationships to executive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Executive function often refers to control behaviors such as "initiating," "sustaining," "inhibiting," and "switching." These mechanisms contribute to regulation of thinking and emotion but can be observed most clearly in the motor system. Neuropsychology has been influenced by "top-down" models of cognitive control that emerged from information-processing theories of cognition. In fact, neural models provide evidence that control processes are highly interactive within the cortico-striatal-cerebellar circuits. Cognition unfolds in response to motor-driven adaptation, and evidence exists for similar firing of brain cells and circuits during "imagined action" as in actual motor behavior. The motor system develops early and yet is not routinely assessed in neuropsychological evaluation of children with neurodevelopmental disorders. This article reviews some of the approaches to motor assessment that have sensitivity to neurodevelopmental disorders, and advocates for inclusion of motor assessment, particularly in evaluating control processes independent of culture, language, and other confounders.

  3. Motor levels in high cervical spinal cord injuries: Implications for the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Steffen; Kirshblum, Steven C; Weidner, Norbert; Rupp, Rüdiger; Schuld, Christian

    2016-09-01

    To verify the hypothesis that motor levels (ML) inferred from sensory levels in the upper cervical segments C2-C4 according to the current version of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) are counterintuitive in cases where the most rostral myotomes C5 and C6 are graded as intact. Prospective cohort study of ISNCSCI instructional course participants completing a post-test after the workshop to determine the MLs in two variants of a complete, high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) case scenario. Both variants were based on the same ISNCSCI sensory and MLs of C2. In the first variant myotomes C5 and C6 were bilaterally graded as intact, while in variant 2 only active movements against gravity were possible (grade 3). Eight ISNCSCI instructional courses conducted during the study period from November 2012 until March 2015 in the framework of the European Multicenter Study on Human Spinal Cord Injury (EMSCI- http//emsci.org ). Ninety-two clinicians from twenty-two SCI centers. Most of the attendees were physicians (58.7%) or physical therapists (33.7%) and had less than one year (44.6%) experience in SCI medicine. Not applicable. The classification performance described as percentage of correctly determined MLs by the clinicians. Variant 2 (89.13%) was significantly (P definition in ISNCSCI may be needed.

  4. Soft Robotic Haptic Interface with Variable Stiffness for Rehabilitation of Neurologically Impaired Hand Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Sebastian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The human hand comprises complex sensorimotor functions that can be impaired by neurological diseases and traumatic injuries. Effective rehabilitation can bring the impaired hand back to a functional state because of the plasticity of the central nervous system to relearn and remodel the lost synapses in the brain. Current rehabilitation therapies focus on strengthening motor skills, such as grasping, employ multiple objects of varying stiffness so that affected persons can experience a wide range of strength training. These devices have limited range of stiffness due to the rigid mechanisms employed in their variable stiffness actuators. This paper presents a novel soft robotic haptic device for neuromuscular rehabilitation of the hand, which is designed to offer adjustable stiffness and can be utilized in both clinical and home settings. The device eliminates the need for multiple objects by employing a pneumatic soft structure made with highly compliant materials that act as the actuator of the haptic interface. It is made with interchangeable sleeves that can be customized to include materials of varying stiffness to increase the upper limit of the stiffness range. The device is fabricated using existing 3D printing technologies, and polymer molding and casting techniques, thus keeping the cost low and throughput high. The haptic interface is linked to either an open-loop system that allows for an increased pressure during usage or closed-loop system that provides pressure regulation in accordance to the stiffness the user specifies. Preliminary evaluation is performed to characterize the effective controllable region of variance in stiffness. It was found that the region of controllable stiffness was between points 3 and 7, where the stiffness appeared to plateau with each increase in pressure. The two control systems are tested to derive relationships between internal pressure, grasping force exertion on the surface, and displacement using

  5. Effect of cerebrolysin on gross motor function of children with cerebral palsy: a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Jafar; Safavifar, Faezeh

    2017-06-01

    Gross motor dysfunction is considered as the most challenging problem in cerebral palsy (CP). It is proven that improvement of gross motor function could reduce CP-related disabilities and provide better quality of life in this group of patients. Therefore, the aim of this trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of cerebrolysin (CBL) on gross motor function of children with CP who are undergoing treatment. In this clinical trial study, paediatric patients aged 18-75 months with spastic diplegic or quadriplegic cerebral palsy, who were under rehabilitation therapy, were selected and randomly allocated in control and CBL groups. Patients in CBL group underwent treatment with standard rehabilitation therapy plus CBL. The latter was administrated intramuscularly as a single daily dose of 0.1 cc/kg for 10 days and then continued weekly for 4 months. Gross motor function of participants in the two studied groups, before and after trial, was evaluated and compared using the validated Persian version of gross motor function classification system-expanded and revised (GMFCS-E&R). During this trial, 108 patients with CP were evaluated for eligibility. From these, 50 patients were enrolled and randomly allocated in the CBL and control groups. Four months after trial, the mean level of GMFCS decreased significantly in the two groups (P motor function in patients with CP. This finding is consistent with neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects of CBL, which have been reported in various clinical trials in other neurological disorders. Further studies are recommended to establish the value of continued neuroprotection and to determine the pharmacokinetics/dynamics of CBL in this group of patients.

  6. Oral-Motor Function and Feeding Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Oral Motor Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence based as well as infant driven and family focused. In the context of anticipated maturation of…

  7. Improved Neuropsychological and Neurological Functioning Across Three Antiretroviral Regimens in Diverse Resource-Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5199, the International Neurological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K.; Jiang, H.; Kumwenda, J.; Supparatpinyo, K.; Evans, S.; Campbell, T. B.; Price, R.; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N.; La Rosa, A.; Santos, B.; Silva, M. T.; Montano, S.; Kanyama, C.; Faesen, S.; Murphy, R.; Hall, C.; Marra, C. M.; Marcus, C.; Berzins, B.; Allen, R.; Housseinipour, M.; Amod, F.; Sanne, I.; Hakim, J.; Walawander, A.; Nair, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) A5199 compared the neurological and neuropsychological (NP) effects of 3 antiretroviral regimens in participants infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in resource-limited settings. Methods. Participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand, and Zimbabwe were randomized to 3 antiretroviral treatment arms: A (lamivudine-zidovudine plus efavirenz, n = 289), B (atazanavir, emtricitabine, and didanosine-EC, n = 293), and C (emtricitabine-tenofovir-disoproxil fumarate plus efavirenz, n = 278) as part of the ACTG PEARLS study (A5175). Standardized neurological and neuropsychological (NP) screening examinations (grooved pegboard, timed gait, semantic verbal fluency, and finger tapping) were administered every 24 weeks from February 2006 to May 2010. Associations with neurological and neuropsychological function were estimated from linear and logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations. Results. The median weeks on study was 168 (Q1 = 96, Q3 = 192) for the 860 participants. NP test scores improved (P  .10). Significant country effects were noted on all NP tests and neurological outcomes (P < .01). Conclusions. The study detected no significant differences in neuropsychological and neurological outcomes between randomized ART regimens. Significant improvement occurred in neurocognitive and neurological functioning over time after initiation of ARTs. The etiology of these improvements is likely multifactorial, reflecting reduced central nervous system HIV infection, better general health, and practice effects. This study suggests that treatment with either of the World Health Organization –recommended first-line antiretroviral regimens in resource-limited settings will improve neuropsychological functioning and reduce neurological dysfunction. Clinical trials registration.  NCT00096824. PMID:22661489

  8. Effects of mirror therapy through functional activites and motor standards in motor function of the upper limb after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Medeiros, Candice Simões Pimenta de; Fernandes, Sabrina Gabrielle Gomes; Lopes, Johnnatas Mikael; Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; Cacho, Roberta de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy through functional activities and motor standards in upper limb function of chronic stroke subjects. Six patients with paresis of the arm within at least six months after stroke were randomly to a group of functional activities (GAF - n=3) and group of motor standards (GPM - n=3). Both groups performed 15 sessions of mirror therapy for 30 minutes, but the first one (GAF) were instructed to do the bilateral and symmetrical movements bas...

  9. Nmf9 Encodes a Highly Conserved Protein Important to Neurological Function in Mice and Flies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxiao Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Many protein-coding genes identified by genome sequencing remain without functional annotation or biological context. Here we define a novel protein-coding gene, Nmf9, based on a forward genetic screen for neurological function. ENU-induced and genome-edited null mutations in mice produce deficits in vestibular function, fear learning and circadian behavior, which correlated with Nmf9 expression in inner ear, amygdala, and suprachiasmatic nuclei. Homologous genes from unicellular organisms and invertebrate animals predict interactions with small GTPases, but the corresponding domains are absent in mammalian Nmf9. Intriguingly, homozygotes for null mutations in the Drosophila homolog, CG45058, show profound locomotor defects and premature death, while heterozygotes show striking effects on sleep and activity phenotypes. These results link a novel gene orthology group to discrete neurological functions, and show conserved requirement across wide phylogenetic distance and domain level structural changes.

  10. Aerobic exercise to improve cognitive function in adults with neurological disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Michelle N; Smith, Ashleigh E; Mackintosh, Shylie F

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate whether aerobic exercise improves cognition in adults diagnosed with neurologic disorders. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, EMBASE, PEDro, AMED, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, ERIC, and Google Scholar, with the last search performed in December 2010. We included controlled clinical trials and randomized controlled trials with adults diagnosed with a neurologic disorder. Studies were included if they compared a control group with a group involved in an aerobic exercise program to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and if they measured cognition as an outcome. Two reviewers independently extracted data and methodologic quality of the included trials. From the 67 trials reviewed, a total of 7 trials, involving 249 participants, were included. Two trials compared the effectiveness of yoga and aerobic exercise in adults with multiple sclerosis. Two trials evaluated the effect of exercise on patients with dementia, and 2 trials evaluated the effectiveness of exercise to improve cognition after traumatic brain injury. One trial studied the effect of a cycling program in people with chronic stroke. Lack of commonality between measures of cognition limited meta-analyses. Results from individual studies show that aerobic exercise improved cognition in people with dementia, improved attention and cognitive flexibility in patients with traumatic brain injury, improved choice reaction time in people with multiple sclerosis, and enhanced motor learning in people with chronic stroke. There is limited evidence to support the use of aerobic exercise to improve cognition in adults with neurologic disorders. Of the 67 studies retrieved, less than half included cognition as an outcome, and few studies continued the aerobic exercise program long enough to be considered effective. Further studies investigating the effect of aerobic exercise interventions on cognition in people with neurologic conditions are required. Copyright

  11. Functional Neuroimaging of Motor Control inParkinson’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M; Eickhoff, Simon B; Løkkegaard, Annemette

    2014-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging has been widely used to study the activation patterns of the motor network in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), but these studies have yielded conflicting results. This meta-analysis of previous neuroimaging studies was performed to identify patterns of abnormal...... movement-related activation in PD that were consistent across studies. We applied activation likelihood estimation (ALE) of functional neuroimaging studies probing motor function in patients with PD. The meta-analysis encompassed data from 283 patients with PD reported in 24 functional neuroimaging studies...... and yielded consistent alterations in neural activity in patients with PD. Differences in cortical activation between PD patients and healthy controls converged in a left-lateralized fronto-parietal network comprising the presupplementary motor area, primary motor cortex, inferior parietal cortex...

  12. Respiratory functional and motor control deficits in children with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Goutam; Behrman, Andrea L; Aslan, Sevda C; Trimble, Shelley; Ovechkin, Alexander V

    2018-01-01

    Children with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at high risk for developing complications due to respiratory motor control deficits. However, underlying mechanisms of these abnormalities with respect to age, development, and injury characteristics are unclear. To evaluate the effect of SCI and age on respiratory motor control in children with SCI, we compared pulmonary function and respiratory motor control outcome measures in healthy typically developing (TD) children to age-matched children with chronic SCI. We hypothesized that the deficits in respiratory functional performance in children with SCI are due to the abnormal and age-dependent respiratory muscle activation patterns. Fourteen TD (age 7±2 yrs., Mean±SD) and twelve children with SCI (age 6±1 yrs.) were evaluated by assessing Forced Vital Capacity (FVC); Forced Expiratory Volume in 1sec (FEV1); and respiratory electromyographic activity during maximum inspiratory and maximum expiratory airway pressure measurements (PImax and PEmax). The results indicate a significant reduction (prespiratory muscles below the neurological level of injury (rectus abdominous and external oblique muscles). In addition, children with SCI had significantly increased (prespiratory functional and motor control deficits in children are age-dependent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessing motor function in young children with transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Shalini; Rezaie, Roozbeh; McAfee, Samuel S; Choudhri, Asim F; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas; Fulton, Stephen; Boop, Frederick A; Wheless, James W; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Accurate noninvasive assessment of motor function using functional MRI (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a challenge in patients who are very young or who are developmentally delayed. In such cases, passive mapping of the sensorimotor cortex is performed under sedation. We examined the feasibility of using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a motor mapping tool in awake children younger than 3 years of age. Six children underwent motor mapping with TMS while awake as well as passive sensorimotor mapping under conscious sedation with MEG during tactile stimulation (n = 5) and fMRI during passive hand movements (n = 4). Stimulation of the motor cortex via TMS successfully elicited evoked responses in contralateral hand muscles in 5 patients. The location of primary motor cortex in the precentral gyrus identified by TMS corresponded with the postcentral location of the primary sensory cortex identified by MEG in 2 patients and to the sensorimotor cortex identified by fMRI in 3 children. In this cohort, we demonstrate that TMS can illuminate abnormalities in motor physiology including motor reorganization. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using TMS-derived contralateral silent periods to approximate the location of motor cortex in the absence of an evoked response. When compared to chronological age, performance functioning level appears to be better in predicting successful mapping outcome with TMS. Our findings indicate that awake TMS is a safe alternative to MEG and fMRI performed under sedation to localize the motor cortex and provides additional insight into the underlying pathophysiology and motor plasticity in toddlers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mapping of brain function with positron emission tomography for pathophysiological analysis of neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nariai, Tadashi [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). Graduate School

    2001-02-01

    The role of PET is discussed mainly through author's clinical experience in patients with brain lesions from the view of mapping of brain function. Procedure for PET concept in clinical practice is summarized. PET using tracers like [{sup 15}O]water and [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose for mapping of the function has been used in combination with MRI, MEG (magnetoencephalography), SPECT and other imaging means for morphological identification. Actual those images before and after surgery are presented in cases of epilepsy, moyamoya disease, stegnosis of cervical artery, arteriovenous malformation and oligodendroglioma. Images of [{sup 11}C]flumazenil in epilepsies are also presented to show the neurological dysfunctions. PET evaluation of neurological functions is concluded to become more important in parallel with the advancement of therapeutics. (K.H.)

  15. Visual-Motor Maturity and Executive Functions in Schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luisa Silva de Oliveira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Visual-motor maturity and executive functions are closely related in the child development process. This study aimed to investigate the relation between visual-motor abilities and executive functions in 83 healthy children between 7 and 10 years old. The tools used were the Bender Gestalt Visual-Motor Test - Gradual Scoring System (B-GSS, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST, Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM, and Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure (ROCF. The correlation between the B-GSS and WCST scores was significantly negative (r = -.23, p < .033, while ROCF variables, such as Total Memory and Total Copy, had a moderate, significant correlation with total B-GSS score (r = -.55, p < .001; r = -.44, p < .001, respectively. The results empirically show the relation between executive functions and visual-motor maturity and are discussed in face of developmental neuropsychology.

  16. Combining afferent stimulation and mirror therapy for rehabilitating motor function, motor control, ambulation, and daily functions after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Keh-chung; Huang, Pai-chuan; Chen, Yu-ting; Wu, Ching-yi; Huang, Wen-ling

    2014-02-01

    Mirror therapy (MT) and mesh glove (MG) afferent stimulation may be effective in reducing motor impairment after stroke. A hybrid intervention of MT combined with MG (MT + MG) may broaden aspects of treatment benefits. To demonstrate the comparative effects of MG + MT, MT, and a control treatment (CT) on the outcomes of motor impairments, manual dexterity, ambulation function, motor control, and daily function. Forty-three chronic stroke patients with mild to moderate upper extremity impairment were randomly assigned to receive MT + MG, MT, or CT for 1.5 hours/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Outcome measures were the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and muscle tone measured by Myoton-3 for motor impairment and the Box and Block Test (BBT) and 10-Meter Walk Test (10 MWT) for motor function. Secondary outcomes included kinematic parameters for motor control and the Motor Activity Log and ABILHAND Questionnaire for daily function. FMA total scores were significantly higher and synergistic shoulder abduction during reach was less in the MT + MG and MT groups compared with the CT group. Performance on the BBT and the 10 MWT (velocity and stride length in self-paced task and velocity in as-quickly-as-possible task) were improved after MT + MG compared with MT. MT + MG improved manual dexterity and ambulation. MT + MG and MT reduced motor impairment and synergistic shoulder abduction more than CT. Future studies may integrate functional task practice into treatments to enhance functional outcomes in patients with various levels of motor severity. The long-term effects of MG + MT remain to be evaluated.

  17. [Post-ischemia neurologic recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud-Chaumeil, Bernard; Pariente, Jérémie; Albucher, Jean-François; Loubinoux, Isabelle; Chollet, François

    2002-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most common affliction of patients with neurological symptoms. Rehabilitation of stroke patients is a difficult task. Our knowledge on rehabilitation has recently improved with the emergence of data from new neuroimaging techniques. A prospective, double blind, cross over, placebo, controlled study on 8 patients with pure motor hemiparesia, is conducted to determine the influence of a single dose of fluoxetine on motor performance and cerebral activation of patients recovering from stroke. Each patient undergoes two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) examinations, one under fluoxetine and one under placebo. A single dose of fluoxetine is enough to modulate cerebral sensori-motor activation and significantly improves motor skills of the affected side. Further studies are required to investigate the effect of chronic administration of fluoxetine on motor function.

  18. Effects of blueberries on inflammation, motor performance and cognitive function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motor and cognitive function decrease with age, to include deficits in balance, coordination, gait, processing speed, executive function, memory, and spatial learning. These functional declines may be caused by long term increases in and susceptibility to oxidative stress and inflammation. Research ...

  19. Cooling of the epileptic focus suppresses seizures with minimal influence on neurologic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Masami; Inoue, Takao; Nomura, Sadahiro; Maruta, Yuichi; He, Yeting; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Shirao, Satoshi; Owada, Yuji; Kunitsugu, Ichiro; Yamakawa, Toshitaka; Tokiwa, Tatsuji; Ishizuka, Satoshi; Yamakawa, Takeshi; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2012-03-01

    Focal brain cooling is effective for suppression of epileptic seizures, but it is unclear if seizures can be suppressed without a substantial influence on normal neurologic function. To address the issue, a thermoelectrically driven cooling system was developed and applied in free-moving rat models of focal seizure and epilepsy. Focal seizures limited to the unilateral forelimb were induced by local application of a penicillin G solution or cobalt powder to the unilateral sensorimotor cortex. A proportional integration and differentiation (PID)-controlled, thermoelectrically driven cooling device (weight of 11 g) and bipolar electrodes were chronically implanted on the eloquent area (on the epileptic focus) and the effects of cooling (20, 15, and 10°C) on electrocorticography, seizure frequency, and neurologic changes were investigated. Cooling was associated with a distinct reduction of the epileptic discharges. In both models, cooling of epileptic foci significantly improved both seizure frequency and neurologic functions from 20°C down to 15°C. Cooling to 10°C also suppressed seizures, but with no further improvement in neurologic function. Subsequent investigation of sensorimotor function revealed significant deterioration in foot-fault tests and the receptive field size at 15°C. Despite the beneficial effects in ictal rats, sensorimotor functions deteriorated at 15°C, thereby suggesting a lower limit for the therapeutic temperature. These results provide important evidence of a therapeutic effect of temperatures from 20 to 15°C using an implantable, hypothermal device for focal epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. Role of motor unit structure in defining function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, R. J.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    Motor units, defined as a motoneuron and all of its associated muscle fibers, are the basic functional units of skeletal muscle. Their activity represents the final output of the central nervous system, and their role in motor control has been widely studied. However, there has been relatively little work focused on the mechanical significance of recruiting variable numbers of motor units during different motor tasks. This review focuses on factors ranging from molecular to macroanatomical components that influence the mechanical output of a motor unit in the context of the whole muscle. These factors range from the mechanical properties of different muscle fiber types to the unique morphology of the muscle fibers constituting a motor unit of a given type and to the arrangement of those motor unit fibers in three dimensions within the muscle. We suggest that as a result of the integration of multiple levels of structural and physiological levels of organization, unique mechanical properties of motor units are likely to emerge. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Methylphenidate improves motor functions in children diagnosed with Hyperkinetic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iversen Synnøve

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A previous study showed that a high percentage of children diagnosed with Hyperkinetic Disorder (HKD displayed a consistent pattern of motor function problems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of methylphenidate (MPH on such motor performance in children with HKD Methods 25 drug-naïve boys, aged 8–12 yr with a HKD-F90.0 diagnosis, were randomly assigned into two groups within a double blind cross-over design, and tested with a motor assessment instrument, during MPH and placebo conditions. Results The percentage of MFNU scores in the sample indicating 'severe motor problems' ranged from 44–84%, typically over 60%. Highly significant improvements in motor performance were observed with MPH compared to baseline ratings on all the 17 subtests of the MFNU 1–2 hr after administration of MPH. There were no significant placebo effects. The motor improvement was consistent with improvement of clinical symptoms. Conclusion The study confirmed our prior clinical observations showing that children with ADHD typically demonstrate marked improvements of motor functions after a single dose of 10 mg MPH. The most pronounced positive MPH response was seen in subtests measuring either neuromotor inhibition, or heightened muscular tone in the gross movement muscles involved in maintaining the alignment and balance of the body. Introduction of MPH generally led to improved balance and a generally more coordinated and controlled body movement.

  2. Development programme motor function of children with mental retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozina Zh.L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study the rehabilitation program recovery of motor function of children with mental retardation. Material-methods: the study involved 19 students from primary diagnosis - mental retardation. Age of children was 8 - 9 years and 9 - 10 years. Motor speed detection reaction carried out using a falling line setting (in cm. Determination of speed integral motor actions performed with running 30 meters to go. From cross-country test also used the shuttle run 4x9 meters. Results : a program of exercise for children with mental retardation. Exercises aimed at correcting the basic movements, flexibility correction, correction and development of coordination abilities, adjustment and development of physical fitness, correction and prevention of secondary fractures. Conclusions : it was found that the rehabilitation program for development and correction of motor function of children with mental retardation is an effective and affordable to adjust coordination abilities and flexibility.

  3. Excitability of motor cortices as a function of emotional sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeilipoor, Naeem; Pizzolato, Fabio; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Cesari, Paola

    2013-01-01

    We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to clarify how non-verbal emotionally-characterized sounds modulate the excitability of the corticospinal motor tract (CST). While subjects were listening to sounds (monaurally and binaurally), single TMS pulses were delivered to either left or right primary motor cortex (M1), and electromyographic activities were recorded from the contralateral abductor pollicis brevis muscle. We found a significant increase in CST excitability in response to unpleasant as compared to neutral sounds. The increased excitability was lateralized as a function of stimulus valence: Unpleasant stimuli resulted in a significantly higher facilitation of motor potentials evoked in the left hemisphere, while pleasant stimuli yielded a greater CST excitability in the right one. Furthermore, TMS induced higher motor evoked potentials when listening to unpleasant sounds with the left than with the right ear. Taken together, our findings provide compelling evidence for an asymmetric modulation of CST excitability as a function of emotional sounds along with ear laterality.

  4. Neurofeedback-based functional near-infrared spectroscopy upregulates motor cortex activity in imagined motor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapborisuth, Pawan; Zhang, Xian; Noah, Adam; Hirsch, Joy

    2017-04-01

    Neurofeedback is a method for using neural activity displayed on a computer to regulate one's own brain function and has been shown to be a promising technique for training individuals to interact with brain-machine interface applications such as neuroprosthetic limbs. The goal of this study was to develop a user-friendly functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)-based neurofeedback system to upregulate neural activity associated with motor imagery, which is frequently used in neuroprosthetic applications. We hypothesized that fNIRS neurofeedback would enhance activity in motor cortex during a motor imagery task. Twenty-two participants performed active and imaginary right-handed squeezing movements using an elastic ball while wearing a 98-channel fNIRS device. Neurofeedback traces representing localized cortical hemodynamic responses were graphically presented to participants in real time. Participants were instructed to observe this graphical representation and use the information to increase signal amplitude. Neural activity was compared during active and imaginary squeezing with and without neurofeedback. Active squeezing resulted in activity localized to the left premotor and supplementary motor cortex, and activity in the motor cortex was found to be modulated by neurofeedback. Activity in the motor cortex was also shown in the imaginary squeezing condition only in the presence of neurofeedback. These findings demonstrate that real-time fNIRS neurofeedback is a viable platform for brain-machine interface applications.

  5. Transcriptomics of aged Drosophila motor neurons reveals a matrix metalloproteinase that impairs motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpurua, Jorge; Mahoney, Rebekah E; Eaton, Benjamin A

    2018-02-07

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is responsible for transforming nervous system signals into motor behavior and locomotion. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, an age-dependent decline in motor function occurs, analogous to the decline experienced in mice, humans, and other mammals. The molecular and cellular underpinnings of this decline are still poorly understood. By specifically profiling the transcriptome of Drosophila motor neurons across age using custom microarrays, we found that the expression of the matrix metalloproteinase 1 (dMMP1) gene reproducibly increased in motor neurons in an age-dependent manner. Modulation of physiological aging also altered the rate of dMMP1 expression, validating dMMP1 expression as a bona fide aging biomarker for motor neurons. Temporally controlled overexpression of dMMP1 specifically in motor neurons was sufficient to induce deficits in climbing behavior and cause a decrease in neurotransmitter release at neuromuscular synapses. These deficits were reversible if the dMMP1 expression was shut off again immediately after the onset of motor dysfunction. Additionally, repression of dMMP1 enzymatic activity via overexpression of a tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases delayed the onset of age-dependent motor dysfunction. MMPs are required for proper tissue architecture during development. Our results support the idea that matrix metalloproteinase 1 is acting as a downstream effector of antagonistic pleiotropy in motor neurons and is necessary for proper development, but deleterious when reactivated at an advanced age. © 2018 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Motor cortex electrical stimulation augments sprouting of the corticospinal tract and promotes recovery of motor function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B Carmel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The corticospinal system—with its direct spinal pathway, the corticospinal tract (CST—is the primary system for controlling voluntary movement. Our approach to CST repair after injury in mature animals was informed by our finding that activity drives establishment of connections with spinal cord circuits during postnatal development. After incomplete injury in maturity, spared CST circuits sprout and partially restore lost function. Our approach harnesses activity to augment this injury-dependent CST sprouting and to promote function. Lesion of the medullary pyramid unilaterally eliminates all CST axons from one hemisphere and allows examination of CST sprouting from the unaffected hemisphere. We discovered that ten days of electrical stimulation of either the spared CST or motor cortex induces CST axon sprouting that partially reconstructs the lost CST. Stimulation also leads to sprouting of the cortical projection to the magnocellular red nucleus, where the rubrospinal tract originates. Coordinated outgrowth of the CST and cortical projections to the red nucleus could support partial re-establishment of motor systems connections to the denervated spinal motor circuits. Stimulation restores skilled motor function in our animal model. Lesioned animals have a persistent forelimb deficit contralateral to pyramidotomy in the horizontal ladder task. Rats that received motor cortex stimulation either after acute or chronic injury showed a significant functional improvement that brought error rate to pre-lesion control levels. Reversible inactivation of the stimulated motor cortex reinstated the impairment demonstrating the importance of the stimulated system to recovery. Motor cortex electrical stimulation is an effective approach to promote spouting of spared CST axons. By optimizing activity-dependent sprouting in animals, we could have an approach that can be translated to the human for evaluation with minimal delay.

  7. Motor cortex electrical stimulation augments sprouting of the corticospinal tract and promotes recovery of motor function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Jason B.; Martin, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The corticospinal system—with its direct spinal pathway, the corticospinal tract (CST) – is the primary system for controlling voluntary movement. Our approach to CST repair after injury in mature animals was informed by our finding that activity drives establishment of connections with spinal cord circuits during postnatal development. After incomplete injury in maturity, spared CST circuits sprout, and partially restore lost function. Our approach harnesses activity to augment this injury-dependent CST sprouting and to promote function. Lesion of the medullary pyramid unilaterally eliminates all CST axons from one hemisphere and allows examination of CST sprouting from the unaffected hemisphere. We discovered that 10 days of electrical stimulation of either the spared CST or motor cortex induces CST axon sprouting that partially reconstructs the lost CST. Stimulation also leads to sprouting of the cortical projection to the magnocellular red nucleus, where the rubrospinal tract originates. Coordinated outgrowth of the CST and cortical projections to the red nucleus could support partial re-establishment of motor systems connections to the denervated spinal motor circuits. Stimulation restores skilled motor function in our animal model. Lesioned animals have a persistent forelimb deficit contralateral to pyramidotomy in the horizontal ladder task. Rats that received motor cortex stimulation either after acute or chronic injury showed a significant functional improvement that brought error rate to pre-lesion control levels. Reversible inactivation of the stimulated motor cortex reinstated the impairment demonstrating the importance of the stimulated system to recovery. Motor cortex electrical stimulation is an effective approach to promote spouting of spared CST axons. By optimizing activity-dependent sprouting in animals, we could have an approach that can be translated to the human for evaluation with minimal delay. PMID:24994971

  8. [Simple and useful evaluation of motor difficulty in childhood (9-12 years old children ) by interview score on motor skills and soft neurological signs--aim for the diagnosis of developmental coordination disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Shuhei

    2009-09-01

    Many children with developmental disorders are known to have motor impairment such as clumsiness and poor physical ability;however, the objective evaluation of such difficulties is not easy in routine clinical practice. In this study, we aimed to establish a simple method for evaluating motor difficulty of childhood. This method employs a scored interview and examination for detecting soft neurological signs (SNSs). After a preliminary survey with 22 normal children, we set the items and the cutoffs for the interview and SNSs. The interview consisted of questions pertaining to 12 items related to a child's motor skills in his/her past and current life, such as skipping, jumping a rope, ball sports, origami, and using chopsticks. The SNS evaluation included 5 tests, namely, standing on one leg with eyes closed, diadochokinesia, associated movements during diadochokinesia, finger opposition test, and laterally fixed gaze. We applied this method to 43 children, including 25 cases of developmental disorders. Children showing significantly high scores in both the interview and SNS were assigned to the "with motor difficulty" group, while those with low scores in both the tests were assigned to the "without motor difficulty" group. The remaining children were assigned to the "with suspicious motor difficulty" group. More than 90% of the children in the "with motor difficulty" group had high impairment scores in Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC), a standardized motor test, whereas 82% of the children in the "without motor difficulty" group revealed no motor impairment. Thus, we conclude that our simple method and criteria would be useful for the evaluation of motor difficulty of childhood. Further, we have discussed the diagnostic process for developmental coordination disorder using our evaluation method.

  9. Impairments of Motor Function While Multitasking in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronemer, Sharif I; Mandel, Jordan A; Sacktor, Ned C; Marvel, Cherie L

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) became a treatable illness with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART). As a result, patients with regular access to CART are expected to live decades with HIV. Long-term HIV infection presents unique challenges, including neurocognitive impairments defined by three major stages of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The current investigation aimed to study cognitive and motor impairments in HIV using a novel multitasking paradigm. Unlike current standard measures of cognitive and motor performance in HIV, multitasking increases real-world validity by mimicking the dual motor and cognitive demands that are part of daily professional and personal settings (e.g., driving, typing and writing). Moreover, multitask assessments can unmask compensatory mechanisms, normally used under single task conditions, to maintain performance. This investigation revealed that HIV+ participants were impaired on the motor component of the multitask, while cognitive performance was spared. A patient-specific positive interaction between motor performance and working memory recall was driven by poor HIV+ multitaskers. Surprisingly, HAND stage did not correspond with multitask performance and a variety of commonly used assessments indicated normal motor function among HIV+ participants with poor motor performance during the experimental task. These results support the use of multitasks to reveal otherwise hidden impairment in chronic HIV by expanding the sensitivity of clinical assessments used to determine HAND stage. Future studies should examine the capability of multitasks to predict performance in personal, professional and health-related behaviors and prognosis of patients living with chronic HIV.

  10. Impairments of Motor Function While Multitasking in HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherie L. Marvel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV became a treatable illness with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART. As a result, patients with regular access to CART are expected to live decades with HIV. Long-term HIV infection presents unique challenges, including neurocognitive impairments defined by three major stages of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND. The current investigation aimed to study cognitive and motor impairments in HIV using a novel multitasking paradigm. Unlike current standard measures of cognitive and motor performance in HIV, multitasking increases real-world validity by mimicking the dual motor and cognitive demands that are part of daily professional and personal settings (e.g., driving, typing and writing. Moreover, multitask assessments can unmask compensatory mechanisms, normally used under single task conditions, to maintain performance. This investigation revealed that HIV+ participants were impaired on the motor component of the multitask, while cognitive performance was spared. A patient-specific positive interaction between motor performance and working memory recall was driven by poor HIV+ multitaskers. Surprisingly, HAND stage did not correspond with multitask performance and a variety of commonly used assessments indicated normal motor function among HIV+ participants with poor motor performance during the experimental task. These results support the use of multitasks to reveal otherwise hidden impairment in chronic HIV by expanding the sensitivity of clinical assessments used to determine HAND stage. Future studies should examine the capability of multitasks to predict performance in personal, professional and health-related behaviors and prognosis of patients living with chronic HIV.

  11. Rebuilding motor function of the spinal cord based on functional electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Yan; Du, Wei; Huang, Wei; Chen, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Rebuilding the damaged motor function caused by spinal cord injury is one of the most serious challenges in clinical neuroscience. The function of the neural pathway under the damaged sites can be rebuilt using functional electrical stimulation technology. In this study, the locations of motor function sites in the lumbosacral spinal cord were determined with functional electrical stimulation technology. A three-dimensional map of the lumbosacral spinal cord comprising the relationship between the motor function sites and the corresponding muscle was drawn. Based on the individual experimental parameters and normalized coordinates of the motor function sites, the motor function sites that control a certain muscle were calculated. Phasing pulse sequences were delivered to the determined motor function sites in the spinal cord and hip extension, hip flexion, ankle plantarflexion, and ankle dorsiflexion movements were successfully achieved. The results show that the map of the spinal cord motor function sites was valid. This map can provide guidance for the selection of electrical stimulation sites during the rebuilding of motor function after spinal cord injury.

  12. Rebuilding motor function of the spinal cord based on functional electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yan Shen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rebuilding the damaged motor function caused by spinal cord injury is one of the most serious challenges in clinical neuroscience. The function of the neural pathway under the damaged sites can be rebuilt using functional electrical stimulation technology. In this study, the locations of motor function sites in the lumbosacral spinal cord were determined with functional electrical stimulation technology. A three-dimensional map of the lumbosacral spinal cord comprising the relationship between the motor function sites and the corresponding muscle was drawn. Based on the individual experimental parameters and normalized coordinates of the motor function sites, the motor function sites that control a certain muscle were calculated. Phasing pulse sequences were delivered to the determined motor function sites in the spinal cord and hip extension, hip flexion, ankle plantarflexion, and ankle dorsiflexion movements were successfully achieved. The results show that the map of the spinal cord motor function sites was valid. This map can provide guidance for the selection of electrical stimulation sites during the rebuilding of motor function after spinal cord injury.

  13. Childhood craniopharyngioma: survival, local control, endocrine and neurologic function following radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danoff, B.F.; Cowchock, F.S.; Kramer, S.

    1983-02-01

    Between 1961 and 1978, 19 patients with a diagnosis of childhood or teenage craniopharyngioma received supervoltage radiotherapy. All patients had previously undergone either partial surgical resection (10 patients), total gross resection (3 patients), or aspiration and biopsy (6 patients). Fourteen patients were treated primarily and five were treated for recurrence. The five-year survival was 73% with a 10-year survival of 64%. Sixteen percent developed a recurrence following radiotherapy. Long term effects were assesed in terms of neurologic, intellectual, psychological and endocrine function. Seventy-nine percent had none or minimal neurologic disability. The mean full scale IQ for the group was 90. There were no additional endocrine deficiencies that could be directly attributed to radiation. Behavioral disorders occurred in 50%. These results are at least comparable, if not superior, to those of surgery.

  14. Theory of mind tasks and executive functions: a systematic review of group studies in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulafia-Brakha, T; Christe, B; Martory, M-D; Annoni, J-M

    2011-03-01

    A growing number of studies have been addressing the relationship between theory of mind (TOM) and executive functions (EF) in patients with acquired neurological pathology. In order to provide a global overview on the main findings, we conducted a systematic review on group studies where we aimed to (1) evaluate the patterns of impaired and preserved abilities of both TOM and EF in groups of patients with acquired neurological pathology and (2) investigate the existence of particular relations between different EF domains and TOM tasks. The search was conducted in Pubmed/Medline. A total of 24 articles met the inclusion criteria. We considered for analysis classical clinically accepted TOM tasks (first- and second-order false belief stories, the Faux Pas test, Happe's stories, the Mind in the Eyes task, and Cartoon's tasks) and EF domains (updating, shifting, inhibition, and access). The review suggests that (1) EF and TOM appear tightly associated. However, the few dissociations observed suggest they cannot be reduced to a single function; (2) no executive subprocess could be specifically associated with TOM performances; (3) the first-order false belief task and the Happe's story task seem to be less sensitive to neurological pathologies and less associated to EF. Even though the analysis of the reviewed studies demonstrates a close relationship between TOM and EF in patients with acquired neurological pathology, the nature of this relationship must be further investigated. Studies investigating ecological consequences of TOM and EF deficits, and intervention researches may bring further contributions to this question. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Ocular Motor Function in Patients with Bilateral Vestibular Weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Amir Hossein Ghazizadeh Hashemi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with bilateral weakness (BW have many difficulties in gaze stability that interfere with their normal function. The aim of this study was to evaluate ocular motor functions in patients with BW to better understand the problem of gaze instability in these patients.   Materials and Methods: Patients were referred from the Otolaryngology Department for Vestibular Assessment to our clinic between November 2014 and March 2015. We assessed ocular motor function (gaze, saccade, and smooth pursuit in patients over the age of 18 years with BW, as verified by a caloric test.   Results: Seventy-eight patients completed all the tests. The mean age of patients was 51.9 (±15.9 years, and 47 (60% were female. Abnormal results were found in five (6.4%, 32 (41%, and seven (9% patients with respect to gaze, smooth pursuit, and saccade, respectively. There were positive but relatively weak relationships between age and ocular motor results.   Conclusion:  Patients with BW suffer from dizziness and unsteadiness. These patients have abnormal function in ocular motor (especially smooth pursuit tests. The ocular motor dysfunction is responsible for gaze instability in static positions such as standing.

  16. Functional implications of age differences in motor system connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Jeanne; Peltier, Scott J; Bo, Jin; Fling, Brett W; Welsh, Robert C; Seidler, Rachael D

    2010-01-01

    Older adults show less lateralized task-related brain activity than young adults. One potential mechanism of this increased activation is that age-related degeneration of the corpus callosum (CC) may alter the balance of inhibition between the two hemispheres. To determine whether age differences in interhemispheric connectivity affect functional brain activity in older adults, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess resting functional connectivity and functional activation during a simple motor task. We found that older adults had smaller CC area compared to young adults. Older adults exhibited greater recruitment of ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1), which was associated with longer reaction times. Additionally, recruitment of ipsilateral M1 in older adults was correlated with reduced resting interhemispheric connectivity and a larger CC. We suggest that reduced interhemispheric connectivity reflects a loss of the ability to inhibit the non-dominant hemisphere during motor task performance for older adults, which has a negative impact on performance.

  17. Human motor corpus callosum: topography, somatotopy, and link between microstructure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Mathias; Lauterbach-Soon, Birgit; Hattingen, Elke; Jung, Patrick; Singer, Oliver; Volz, Steffen; Klein, Johannes C; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Ziemann, Ulf

    2007-11-07

    The corpus callosum (CC) is the principal white matter fiber bundle connecting neocortical areas of the two hemispheres. Although an object of extensive research, important details about the anatomical and functional organization of the human CC are still largely unknown. Here we focused on the callosal motor fibers (CMFs) that connect the primary motor cortices (M1) of the two hemispheres. Topography and somatotopy of CMFs were explored by using a combined functional magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion tensor imaging fiber-tracking procedure. CMF microstructure was assessed by fractional anisotropy (FA), and CMF functional connectivity between the hand areas of M1 was measured by interhemispheric inhibition using paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation. CMFs mapped onto the posterior body and isthmus of the CC, with hand CMFs running significantly more anteriorly and ventrally than foot CMFs. FA of the hand CMFs but not FA of the foot CMFs correlated linearly with interhemispheric inhibition between the M1 hand areas. Findings demonstrate that CMFs connecting defined body representations of M1 map onto a circumscribed region in the CC in a somatotopically organized manner. The significant and topographically specific positive correlation between FA and interhemispheric inhibition strongly suggests that microstructure can be directly linked to functional connectivity. This provides a novel way of exploring human brain function that may allow prediction of functional connectivity from variability of microstructure in healthy individuals, and potentially, abnormality of functional connectivity in neurological or psychiatric patients.

  18. Effects of gross motor function and manual function levels on performance-based ADL motor skills of children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung-Ok

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine effects of Gross Motor Function Classification System and Manual Ability Classification System levels on performance-based motor skills of children with spastic cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three children with cerebral palsy were included. The Assessment of Motor and Process Skills was used to evaluate performance-based motor skills in daily life. Gross motor function was assessed using Gross Motor Function Classification Systems, and manual function was measured using the Manual Ability Classification System. [Results] Motor skills in daily activities were significantly different on Gross Motor Function Classification System level and Manual Ability Classification System level. According to the results of multiple regression analysis, children categorized as Gross Motor Function Classification System level III scored lower in terms of performance based motor skills than Gross Motor Function Classification System level I children. Also, when analyzed with respect to Manual Ability Classification System level, level II was lower than level I, and level III was lower than level II in terms of performance based motor skills. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that performance-based motor skills differ among children categorized based on Gross Motor Function Classification System and Manual Ability Classification System levels of cerebral palsy.

  19. Structure-Function Relationships behind the Phenomenon of Cognitive Resilience in Neurology: Insights for Neuroscience and Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    David Rudrauf

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of cognitive resilience, that is, the dynamical preservation of normal functions despite neurological disorders, demonstrates that cognition can be highly robust to devastating brain injury. Here, cognitive resilience is considered across a range of neurological conditions. Simple computational models of structure-function relationships are used to discuss hypotheses about the neural mechanisms of resilience. Resilience expresses functional redundancies in brain networks and su...

  20. Functional MRI of motor speech area combined with motor stimulation during resting period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yeong Su; Park, Hark Hoon; Chung, Gyung Ho; Lee, Sang Yong [Chonbuk National Univ. College of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Chon, Su Bin; Kang, Shin Hwa [Kimje Jungang Hospital, Kimje (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    To evaluate functional MR imaging of the motor speech area with and without motor stimulation during the rest period. Nine healthy, right-handed volunteers(M:F=7:2, age:21-40years) were included in this study. Brain activity was mapped using a multislice, gradient echo single shot EPI on a 1.5T MR scanner. The paradigm consisted on a series of alternating rest and activation tasks, performed six times. Each volunteer in the first study(group A) was given examples of motor stimulation during the rest period, while each in the second study(group B) was not given examples of a rest period. Motor stimulation in group A was achieved by continuously flexing five fingers of the right hand. In both groups, maximum internal word generation was achieved during the activation period. Using fMRI analysis software(Stimulate 5.0) and a cross-correlation method(backgroud threshold, 200; correlation threshold, 0.3; ceiling, 1.0; floor, 0.3; minimal count, 3), functional images were analysed. After correlating the activated foci and a time-signal intensity curve, the activated brain cortex and number of pixels were analysed and compared between the two tasks. The t-test was used for statistical analysis. In all nine subjects in group A and B, activation was observed in and adjacent to the left Broca's area. The mean number of activated pixels was 31.6 in group A and 27.8 in group B, a difference which was not statistically significant(P>0.1). Activities in and adjacent to the right Broca's area were seen in seven of group A and four of group B. The mean number of activated pixels was 14.9 in group A and 18 in group B. Eight of nine volunteers in group A showed activity in the left primary motor area with negative correlation to the time-signal intensity curve. The mean number of activated pixels for this group was 17.5. In three volonteers, activation in the right primary motor area was also observed, the mean number of activated pixels in these cases was 10.0. During the

  1. Ocular Motor Function in Children with Spastic Hemiplegia Evaluated by the Ocular Motor Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydberg, A; Ygge, J; Olsson, M

    2017-09-01

    To assess the ocular motor functions in children with spastic hemiplegia by using the Ocular Motor Score (OMS). This study included 34 children, median age 11 years. The children were divided into 3 groups according to the underlying brain lesion; group 1 malformations, group 2 white matter damage of immaturity (WMDI), and group 3 cortical/subcortical lesions. The OMS protocol consists of 15 different subtests evaluating ocular motor functions. The OMS is divided into 2 parts, a static and a dynamic. The results from each subtest are scored 0, 0.3, 0.5, or 1, according to the level of disturbance, where 0 corresponds to normal function and 1 represents the maximum disability in the certain subtest. A total OMS (tOMS) between 0 and 15 can be obtained. The median tOMS in the whole spastic hemiplegia group was 2.5 (range 1.3-5.8). The highest median tOMS 5.2 was seen in group 1, in the children with malformations. Strabismus was found in 45% (15/34) of the children, with an equal percentage in all 3 groups. The children with spastic hemiplegia had a median tOMS of 2.7 and the highest median tOMS was seen in children with malformations. The OMS protocol is easy to use clinically and gives a quick overview of the patient´s ocular motor functions.

  2. Effects of elastic therapeutic taping on motor function in children with motor impairments: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Andréa Baraldi; Lima-Alvarez, Carolina Daniel de; Rocha, Ana Carolinne Portela; Tudella, Eloisa

    2017-03-22

    The elastic therapeutic taping has been considered a promising resource for disabled children. To systematically review the evidence of the effects of elastic therapeutic taping on motor function in children with motor impairments. Three independent evaluators conducted searches in electronic databases (MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, LILACS, BIREME/BVS, Science Direct, SciELO, and PEDro). Clinical studies design, published until 2016, involving elastic therapeutic taping and children aged 0-12 years with motor impairments were included. The variables considered were the methodological aspects (study design, participants, outcome measurements, and experimental conditions); results presented in the studies, and also the methodological quality of studies. Final selection was composed by 12 manuscripts (five randomized controlled trials), published in the last 10 years. Among them, cerebral palsy (CP) was the most recurrent disorder (n = 7), followed by congenital muscular torticollis (n = 2) and brachial plexus palsy (n = 2). Positive results were associated with taping application: improvement in the upper limb function, gross motor skills, postural control, muscular balance, and performance in the dynamics functional and daily activities. Lower quality of the studies, clinical and population heterogeneity existed across studies. The elastic therapeutic taping has been shown to be a promising adjunct resource to the conventional rehabilitation in children with motor impairments. However, high methodological studies about its efficacy in this population are already scarce. Implications for Rehabilitation Elastic therapeutic taping has been shown to be a promising adjunct resource to the conventional rehabilitation in disabled children. Clinical trials have indicated improvement in the postural control and functional activities with both, upper and lower limbs, and increase in the functional independency resulting from the taping use. Randomized control trials and

  3. Immune responses at brain barriers and implications for brain development and neurological function in later life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen B. Stolp

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available For a long time the brain has been considered an immune-privileged site due to a muted inflammatory response and the presence of protective brain barriers. It is now recognised that neuroinflammation may play an important role in almost all neurological disorders and that the brain barriers may be contributing through either normal immune signalling, or disruption of their basic physiological mechanisms. The distinction between normal function and dysfunction at the barriers is difficult to dissect, partly due to a lack of understanding of normal barrier function and partly because of physiological changes that occur as part of normal development and ageing. Brain barriers consist of a number of interacting structural and physiological elements including tight junctions between adjacent barrier cells and an array of influx and efflux transporters. Despite these protective mechanisms, the capacity for immune-surveillance of the brain is maintained, and there is evidence of inflammatory signalling at the brain barriers that may be an important part of the body’s response to damage or infection. This signalling system appears to change both with normal ageing, and during disease. Changes may affect diapedesis of immune cells and active molecular transfer, or cause rearrangement of the tight junctions and an increase in passive permeability across barrier interfaces. Here we review the many elements that contribute to brain barrier functions and how they respond to inflammation, particularly during development and aging. The implications of inflammation–induced barrier dysfunction for brain development and subsequent neurological function are also discussed.

  4. The Gemin associates of survival motor neuron are required for motor function in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Borg

    Full Text Available Membership of the survival motor neuron (SMN complex extends to nine factors, including the SMN protein, the product of the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA disease gene, Gemins 2-8 and Unrip. The best-characterised function of this macromolecular machine is the assembly of the Sm-class of uridine-rich small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP particles and each SMN complex member has a key role during this process. So far, however, only little is known about the function of the individual Gemin components in vivo. Here, we make use of the Drosophila model organism to uncover loss-of-function phenotypes of Gemin2, Gemin3 and Gemin5, which together with SMN form the minimalistic fly SMN complex. We show that ectopic overexpression of the dead helicase Gem3(ΔN mutant or knockdown of Gemin3 result in similar motor phenotypes, when restricted to muscle, and in combination cause lethality, hence suggesting that Gem3(ΔN overexpression mimics a loss-of-function. Based on the localisation pattern of Gem3(ΔN, we predict that the nucleus is the primary site of the antimorphic or dominant-negative mechanism of Gem3(ΔN-mediated interference. Interestingly, phenotypes induced by human SMN overexpression in Drosophila exhibit similarities to those induced by overexpression of Gem3(ΔN. Through enhanced knockdown we also uncover a requirement of Gemin2, Gemin3 and Gemin5 for viability and motor behaviour, including locomotion as well as flight, in muscle. Notably, in the case of Gemin3 and Gemin5, such function also depends on adequate levels of the respective protein in neurons. Overall, these findings lead us to speculate that absence of any one member is sufficient to arrest the SMN-Gemins complex function in a nucleocentric pathway, which is critical for motor function in vivo.

  5. Functional connectivity in amygdalar-sensory/(pre)motor networks at rest: new evidence from the Human Connectome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toschi, Nicola; Duggento, Andrea; Passamonti, Luca

    2017-05-01

    The word 'e-motion' derives from the Latin word 'ex-moveo' which literally means 'moving away from something/somebody'. Emotions are thus fundamental to prime action and goal-directed behavior with obvious implications for individual's survival. However, the brain mechanisms underlying the interactions between emotional and motor cortical systems remain poorly understood. A recent diffusion tensor imaging study in humans has reported the existence of direct anatomical connections between the amygdala and sensory/(pre)motor cortices, corroborating an initial observation in animal research. Nevertheless, the functional significance of these amygdala-sensory/(pre)motor pathways remain uncertain. More specifically, it is currently unclear whether a distinct amygdala-sensory/(pre)motor circuit can be identified with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). This is a key issue, as rs-fMRI offers an opportunity to simultaneously examine distinct neural circuits that underpin different cognitive, emotional and motor functions, while minimizing task-related performance confounds. We therefore tested the hypothesis that the amygdala and sensory/(pre)motor cortices could be identified as part of the same resting-state functional connectivity network. To this end, we examined independent component analysis results in a very large rs-fMRI data-set drawn from the Human Connectome Project (n = 820 participants, mean age: 28.5 years). To our knowledge, we report for the first time the existence of a distinct amygdala-sensory/(pre)motor functional network at rest. rs-fMRI studies are now warranted to examine potential abnormalities in this circuit in psychiatric and neurological diseases that may be associated with alterations in the amygdala-sensory/(pre)motor pathways (e.g. conversion disorders, impulse control disorders, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis). © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of

  6. Is there an association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function in older people? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Lisa M; Mills, Kerry; Clarke, Robert; Dangour, Alan D

    2015-08-28

    Low vitamin B12 status is common in older people; however, its public health significance in terms of neurological manifestations remains unclear. The present systematic review evaluated the association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function and clinically relevant neurological outcomes in adults aged 50+ years. A systematic search of nine bibliographic databases (up to March 2013) identified twelve published articles describing two longitudinal and ten cross-sectional analyses. The included study populations ranged in size (n 28-2287) and mean/median age (range 65-81 years). Studies reported various neurological outcomes: nerve function; clinically measured signs and symptoms of nerve function; self-reported neurological symptoms. Studies were assessed for risk of bias, and results were synthesised qualitatively. Among the general population groups of older people, one longitudinal study reported no association, and four of seven cross-sectional studies reported limited evidence of an association of vitamin B12 status with some, but not all, neurological outcomes. Among groups with clinical and/or biochemical evidence of low vitamin B12 status, one longitudinal study reported an association of vitamin B12 status with some, but not all, neurological outcomes and three cross-sectional analyses reported no association. Overall, there is limited evidence from observational studies to suggest an association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function in older people. The heterogeneity and quality of the evidence base preclude more definitive conclusions, and further high-quality research is needed to better inform understanding of public health significance in terms of neurological function of vitamin B12 status in older people.

  7. Neurological function following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion is improved by the Ruyi Zhenbao pill in a rats

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, TIAN; DUAN, SIJIN; WANG, HAIPING; SUN, SHAN; HAN, BING; FU, FENGHUA

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanisms of the Ruyi Zhenbao pill on neurological function following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion following reperfusion. The rats received intragastrically either sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (control and model groups) or Ruyi Zhenbao pill at doses of 0.2, 0.4 or 0.8 g/kg. Neurological function was assessed by cylinder, adhesive and beam-walking te...

  8. Awareness and use of Gross Motor Function Classification System ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction The degree of disability in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) can be evaluated with the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), a valid tool which was designed for such purposes. However, there appears to be paucity of data on the awareness and use of the GMFCS particularly in the ...

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    brain is able to control the muscles in the body in a pre- cise and efficient way. Motor function is controlled ..... fatigue, since the volunteer expressed difficulty in tap- ping, though he continued the task till the end of ... muscle during execution of slow and fast tapping (Blinken- berg et al 1996). The area of activation within the ...

  10. Implications of a neural network model of early sensori-motor development for the field of developmental neurology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heijst, JJ; Touwen, BCL; Vos, JE

    This paper reports on a neural network model for early sensori-motor development and on the possible implications of this research for our understanding and, eventually, treatment of motor disorders like cerebral palsy. We recapitulate the results we published in detail in a series of papers [1-4].

  11. Angiogenic microspheres promote neural regeneration and motor function recovery after spinal cord injury in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shukui; Yao, Shenglian; Wen, Yujun; Wang, Ying; Wang, Hao; Xu, Qunyuan

    2016-01-01

    This study examined sustained co-delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin-1 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) encapsulated in angiogenic microspheres. These spheres were delivered to sites of spinal cord contusion injury in rats, and their ability to induce vessel formation, neural regeneration and improve hindlimb motor function was assessed. At 2–8 weeks after spinal cord injury, ELISA-determined levels of VEGF, angiopoietin-1, and bFGF were significantly higher in spinal cord tissues in rats that received angiogenic microspheres than in those that received empty microspheres. Sites of injury in animals that received angiogenic microspheres also contained greater numbers of isolectin B4-binding vessels and cells positive for nestin or β III-tubulin (P spinal cord injury and markedly stimulate angiogenesis and neurogenesis, accelerating recovery of neurologic function. PMID:27641997

  12. Impact of baseline vitamin B12 status on the effect of vitamin B12 supplementation on neurologic function in older people: secondary analysis of data from the OPEN randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, L M; Allen, E; Clarke, R; Mills, K; Uauy, R; Dangour, A D

    2017-10-01

    The available evidence from randomised controlled trials suggests that vitamin B12 supplementation does not improve neurologic function in older people with marginal but not deficient Vitamin B12 status. This secondary analysis used data from the Older People and Enhanced Neurological function (OPEN) randomised controlled trial to assess whether baseline vitamin B12 status or change in vitamin B12 status over 12 months altered the effectiveness of dietary vitamin B12 supplementation on neurologic function in asymptomatic older people with depleted vitamin B12 status at study entry. Vitamin B12 status was measured as serum concentrations of vitamin B12, holotranscobalamin, homocysteine and via a composite indicator (cB12). Neurological function outcomes included eleven electrophysiological measures of sensory and motor components of peripheral and central nerve function. Linear regression analyses were restricted to participants randomised into the intervention arm of the OPEN trial (n=91). Analyses revealed an inconsistent pattern of moderate associations between some measures of baseline vitamin B12 status and some neurological responses to supplementation. The directions of effect varied and heterogeneity in effect across outcomes could not be explained according to type of neurological outcome. There was no evidence of differences in the neurological response to vitamin B12 supplementation according to change from baseline over 12 months in any indicator of B12 status. This secondary analysis of high-quality data from the OPEN trial provides no evidence that baseline (or change from baseline) vitamin B12 status modifies the effect of vitamin B12 supplementation on peripheral or central nerve conduction among older people with marginal vitamin B12 status. There is currently insufficient evidence of efficacy for neurological function to support population-wide recommendations for vitamin B12 supplementation in healthy asymptomatic older people with marginal

  13. Neurologic music therapy improves executive function and emotional adjustment in traumatic brain injury rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaut, Michael H; Gardiner, James C; Holmberg, Dawn; Horwitz, Javan; Kent, Luanne; Andrews, Garrett; Donelan, Beth; McIntosh, Gerald R

    2009-07-01

    This study examined the immediate effects of neurologic music therapy (NMT) on cognitive functioning and emotional adjustment with brain-injured persons. Four treatment sessions were held, during which participants were given a pre-test, participated in 30 min of NMT that focused on one aspect of rehabilitation (attention, memory, executive function, or emotional adjustment), which was followed by post-testing. Control participants engaged in a pre-test, 30 min of rest, and then a post-test. Treatment participants showed improvement in executive function and overall emotional adjustment, and lessening of depression, sensation seeking, and anxiety. Control participants improved in emotional adjustment and lessening of hostility, but showed decreases in measures of memory, positive affect, and sensation seeking.

  14. Role of corpus callosum integrity in arm function differs based on motor severity after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jill Campbell; Dewanjee, Pritha; Tran, George; Quinlan, Erin Burke; Dodakian, Lucy; McKenzie, Alison; See, Jill; Cramer, Steven C

    2017-01-01

    While the corpus callosum (CC) is important to normal sensorimotor function, its role in motor function after stroke is less well understood. This study examined the relationship between structural integrity of the motor and sensory sections of the CC, as reflected by fractional anisotropy (FA), and motor function in individuals with a range of motor impairment level due to stroke. Fifty-five individuals with chronic stroke (Fugl-Meyer motor score range 14 to 61) and 18 healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging and a set of motor behavior tests. Mean FA from the motor and sensory regions of the CC and from corticospinal tract (CST) were extracted and relationships with behavioral measures evaluated. Across all participants, FA in both CC regions was significantly decreased after stroke (p motor function. However, these relationships varied based on degree of motor impairment: in individuals with relatively less motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer motor score > 39), motor status correlated with FA in the CC but not the CST, while in individuals with relatively greater motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer motor score ≤ 39), motor status correlated with FA in the CST but not the CC. The role interhemispheric motor connections play in motor function after stroke may differ based on level of motor impairment. These findings emphasize the heterogeneity of stroke, and suggest that biomarkers and treatment approaches targeting separate subgroups may be warranted.

  15. Active exergames to improve cognitive functioning in neurological disabilities: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Gioia; Carta, Mauro G; Sancassiani, Federica; Machado, Sergio; Prosperini, Luca

    2017-10-25

    Exergames represent a way to perform physical activity through active video games, serving as potentially useful tool in the field of neurorehabilitation. However, little is known regarding the possible role of exergames in improving cognitive functions in persons suffering from neurological disabilities. A search for relevant articles was carried out on PubMed/Medline, Scopus, PEDro, and Google Scholar. Only randomized controlled studies and non-randomized but controlled studies were retained. The following additional inclusion criteria were applied: studies focused on physical activity interventions carried out by means of exergames; populations targeted were affected by neurological disabilities; and reported results were related to cognitive outcomes. We calculated standardized mean differences (SMD) and pooled results using a random effects meta-analysis. Of 520 abstracts screened, thirteen studies met the criteria to be included yielding a total of 465 participants, 233 randomized to exergames, and 232 allocated to the alternative or no intervention. The included studies varied in terms of studied populations (e.g., multiple sclerosis, post-stroke hemiparesis, Parkinson's disease, dementia, dyslexia, Down syndrome), type and duration of interventions, and cognitive outcome measures. Exergames significantly improved executive functions (SMD=0.53, p=0.005; 8 studies, n=380) and visuo-spatial perception (SMD=0.65, phome.

  16. Personality traits, education, physical exercise, and childhood neurological function as independent predictors of adult obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Helen; Furnham, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether personality traits, education, physical exercise, parental socio-economic conditions, and childhood neurological function are independently associated with obesity in 50 year old adults in a longitudinal birth cohort study. The sample consisted of 5,921 participants born in Great Britain in 1958 and followed up at 7, 11, 33, 42, and 50 years with data on body mass index measured at 42 and 50 years. There was an increase of adult obesity from 14.2% at age 42 to 23.6% at 50 years. Cohort members who were reported by teachers on overall clumsiness as "certainly applied" at age 7 were more likely to become obese at age 50. In addition, educational qualifications, traits Conscientiousness and Extraversion, psychological distress, and physical exercise were all significantly associated with adult obesity. The associations remained to be significant after controlling for birth weight and gestation, maternal and paternal BMI, childhood BMI, childhood intelligence and behavioural adjustment, as well as diet. Neurological function in childhood, education, trait Conscientiousness, and exercise were all significantly and independently associated with adult obesity, each explained unique individual variability.

  17. Personality traits, education, physical exercise, and childhood neurological function as independent predictors of adult obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Cheng

    Full Text Available To investigate whether personality traits, education, physical exercise, parental socio-economic conditions, and childhood neurological function are independently associated with obesity in 50 year old adults in a longitudinal birth cohort study.The sample consisted of 5,921 participants born in Great Britain in 1958 and followed up at 7, 11, 33, 42, and 50 years with data on body mass index measured at 42 and 50 years.There was an increase of adult obesity from 14.2% at age 42 to 23.6% at 50 years. Cohort members who were reported by teachers on overall clumsiness as "certainly applied" at age 7 were more likely to become obese at age 50. In addition, educational qualifications, traits Conscientiousness and Extraversion, psychological distress, and physical exercise were all significantly associated with adult obesity. The associations remained to be significant after controlling for birth weight and gestation, maternal and paternal BMI, childhood BMI, childhood intelligence and behavioural adjustment, as well as diet.Neurological function in childhood, education, trait Conscientiousness, and exercise were all significantly and independently associated with adult obesity, each explained unique individual variability.

  18. Functional Performance and Associations between Performance Tests and Neurological Assessment Differ in Men and Women with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medijainen, Kadri; Pääsuke, Mati; Lukmann, Aet; Taba, Pille

    2015-01-01

    Neurological assessment of a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD) is expected to reflect upon functional performance. As women are known to report more limitations even for same observed functional performance level, present study was designed to examine whether associations between neurological assessments and functional performance differ across genders. 14 men and 14 women with PD participated. Functional performance was assessed by measuring walking speeds on 10-meter walk test (10MWT) and by performing timed-up-and-go-test (TUG). Neurological assessment included Hoehn and Yahr Scale (HY), Movement Disorders Society Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS), Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale (S-E), and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). In women with PD, Kendall's tau-b correlation analyses revealed significant correlations between functional performance tests and neurological assessment measures, with the exception in MMSE. No corresponding associations were found for men, although they demonstrated better functional performance, as expected. Men in similar clinical stage of the PD perform better on functional tests than women. Disease severity reflects upon functional performance differently in men and women with PD. Results indicate that when interpreting the assessment results of both functional performance and neurological assessment tests, the gender of the patient should be taken into consideration.

  19. Functional Performance and Associations between Performance Tests and Neurological Assessment Differ in Men and Women with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadri Medijainen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurological assessment of a patient with Parkinson’s disease (PD is expected to reflect upon functional performance. As women are known to report more limitations even for same observed functional performance level, present study was designed to examine whether associations between neurological assessments and functional performance differ across genders. Methods. 14 men and 14 women with PD participated. Functional performance was assessed by measuring walking speeds on 10-meter walk test (10MWT and by performing timed-up-and-go-test (TUG. Neurological assessment included Hoehn and Yahr Scale (HY, Movement Disorders Society Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS, Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale (S-E, and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE. Results. In women with PD, Kendall’s tau-b correlation analyses revealed significant correlations between functional performance tests and neurological assessment measures, with the exception in MMSE. No corresponding associations were found for men, although they demonstrated better functional performance, as expected. Conclusion. Men in similar clinical stage of the PD perform better on functional tests than women. Disease severity reflects upon functional performance differently in men and women with PD. Results indicate that when interpreting the assessment results of both functional performance and neurological assessment tests, the gender of the patient should be taken into consideration.

  20. Effects of motor imagery combined with functional electrical stimulation on upper limb motor function of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-feng LIU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effects of motor imagery (MI combined with the third generation functional electrical stimulation (FES on upper limb motor function in acute ischemic stroke patients with hemiplegia.  Methods Forty acute ischemic stroke patients, within 48 h of onset, were randomly divided into FES group (N = 20 and combination group (FES combined with motor imagery, N = 20. All patients received basic routine rehabilitation training, for example, good limb positioning, accepting braces, balance training and training in the activities of daily living (ADL. FES group received the third generation FES therapy and the combination group also received motor imagery for 2 weeks. All of the patients were assessed with Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA, Action Research Arm Test (ARAT and active range of motion (AROM of wrist dorsiflexion before and after 2 weeks of treatment.  Results After 2 weeks of treatment, the 2 groups had significantly higher FMA score, ARAT score and AROM of wrist dorsiflexion than that in pre-treatment (P = 0.000, for all. Besides, the FMA score (t = - 2.528, P = 0.016, ARAT score (t = - 2.562, P = 0.014 and AROM of wrist dorsiflexion (t = - 2.469, P = 0.018 in the combination group were significantly higher than that in the FES group. There were interactions of treatment methods with observation time points (P < 0.05, for all.  Conclusions Motor imagery combined with the third generation FES can effectively promote the recovery of upper limb motor function and motion range of wrist dorsiflexion in patients with acute ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.008

  1. Role of corpus callosum integrity in arm function differs based on motor severity after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Jill Campbell; Dewanjee, Pritha; Tran, George; Quinlan, Erin Burke; Dodakian, Lucy; McKenzie, Alison; See, Jill; Cramer, Steven C.

    2017-01-01

    While the corpus callosum (CC) is important to normal sensorimotor function, its role in motor function after stroke is less well understood. This study examined the relationship between structural integrity of the motor and sensory sections of the CC, as reflected by fractional anisotropy (FA), and motor function in individuals with a range of motor impairment level due to stroke. Fifty-five individuals with chronic stroke (Fugl-Meyer motor score range 14 to 61) and 18 healthy controls under...

  2. Early motor development, early visual attention and functional outcome in children : insights into functional brain development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hitzert, Marrit

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigated development of motor behavior and visual attention in the first six months of life, in relation to risk factors for an adverse development and in relation to functional outcome of the children later in life. We investigated variability in motor behavior by assessing

  3. SMN is required for sensory-motor circuit function in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imlach, Wendy L.; Beck, Erin S.; Choi, Ben Jiwon; Lotti, Francesco; Pellizzoni, Livio; McCabe, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a lethal human disease characterized by motor neuron dysfunction and muscle deterioration due to depletion of the ubiquitous Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) protein. Drosophila SMN mutants have reduced muscle size and defective locomotion, motor rhythm and motor neuron neurotransmission. Unexpectedly, restoration of SMN in either muscles or motor neurons did not alter these phenotypes. Instead, SMN must be expressed in proprioceptive neurons and interneurons in the motor circuit to non-autonomously correct defects in motor neurons and muscles. SMN depletion disrupts the motor system subsequent to circuit development and can be mimicked by the inhibition of motor network function. Furthermore, increasing motor circuit excitability by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of K+ channels can correct SMN-dependent phenotypes. These results establish sensory-motor circuit dysfunction as the origin of motor system deficits in this SMA model and suggest that enhancement of motor neural network activity could ameliorate the disease. PMID:23063130

  4. Sleep parameters, functional status and time post-stroke are associated with off-line motor skill learning in people with chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eSiengsukon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mounting evidence demonstrates that individuals with stroke benefit from sleep to enhance learning of a motor task. While stage NREM2 sleep and REM sleep have been associated with off-line motor skill learning in neurologically-intact individuals, it remains unknown which sleep parameters or specific sleep stages are associated with off-line motor skill learning in individuals with stroke. Methods: Twenty individuals with chronic stroke (> 6 months following stroke and 10 neurologically slept for three consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory with polysomnography. Participants practiced a tracking task the morning before the third night and underwent a retention test the morning following the third night. Off-line learning on the tracking task was assessed. Pearson’s correlations assessed for associations between the magnitude of off-line learning and sleep variables, age, upper extremity motor function, stroke severity, depression and time since stroke occurrence.Results: Individuals with stroke performed with significantly less error on the tracking task following a night of sleep (p=.006 while the control participants did not (p=.816. Increased sleep efficiency (r= -.285, less time spent in stage NREM3 sleep (r=.260, and more time spent in stage REM sleep (r= -.266 was weakly-to-moderately associated with increased magnitude of off-line motor learning. Furthermore, higher upper-extremity motor function (r = -.400, lower stroke severity (r = .360, and less time since stroke occurrence (r=.311 were moderately associated with increased magnitude of off-line motor learning. Conclusion: This study is the first study to provide insight into which sleep stages and individual characteristics may be associated with off-line learning in people with stroke. Future work should continue to understand which factors or combination of factors promote off-line motor learning in people with neurologic injury to best promote motor recovery in

  5. Return of normal urological and neurological function after revision surgery for spondyloptosis. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Quaidoo, Sean M; Hunt, Travis; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Arlet, Vincent

    2007-03-01

    The authors report on the return of neurological and urological function in an adolescent after revision surgery for spondyloptosis 5 years after the index procedure for high-grade spondylolisthesis. This 16-year-old girl with Grade 3 spondylolisthesis was initially treated with a posterolateral reduction and fusion. Following surgery, cauda equina syndrome symptoms developed and did not resolve despite subsequent surgical decompression. Five years later, because of worsening radicular pain, an inability to walk for significant distances, and no resolution of persistent bladder dysfunction, the patient presented with spondyloptosis. Posterior decompression, sacral dome osteotomy, and posterior reduction were performed and followed 3 days later with the placement of an anterior fibula autograft. Her bladder function recovered within 6 months, and at the 18-month follow up the patient reported a normal ability to ambulate.

  6. Motor recovery, functional status, and health-related quality of life in patients with complete spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Charles G; Noonan, Vanessa K; Smith, Donna E; Wing, Peter C; Dvorak, Marcel F; Kwon, Brian K; Kwon, Brian

    2005-10-01

    A retrospective cohort with cross- sectional follow-up. The primary objective was to determine motor recovery in patients with complete traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Secondary objectives included: 1) determining which factors predict local recovery, 2) assessing functional status using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and 3) assessing generic health-related quality of life using the Short Form-36 (SF-36). Motor recovery following complete SCI has been documented in the literature; however, it has been difficult to interpret: 1) spinal shock is often not addressed; 2) the definition of complete SCI has changed over the last 10 years; and 3) few studies differentiate between local neurologic recovery in the zone of partial preservation and neurologic recovery caudal to the lesion. All patients admitted to Vancouver Hospital with a complete SCI between 1994 and 2001 were identified and included in the study if they remained complete following the resolution of spinal shock. Minimum 2-year follow-up consisted of an ASIA motor score, an FIM, and the SF-36. Of 133 patients identified, 94 were eligible and 70 completed follow-up. For the tetraplegic patients, the average ASIA motor score was 11.9 +/- 10.7 on admission and 20.1 +/- 10.8 at follow-up, a change reflecting local recovery only. For the paraplegic patients, the average ASIA motor score was 49.3 +/- 2.4 on admission and 50.6 +/- 1.7 at follow-up. Motor recovery does not occur below the zone of injury for patients with complete SCI. Varying degrees of local recovery can be expected in tetraplegic individuals.

  7. Excitability of motor cortices as a function of emotional sounds.

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    Naeem Komeilipoor

    Full Text Available We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to clarify how non-verbal emotionally-characterized sounds modulate the excitability of the corticospinal motor tract (CST. While subjects were listening to sounds (monaurally and binaurally, single TMS pulses were delivered to either left or right primary motor cortex (M1, and electromyographic activities were recorded from the contralateral abductor pollicis brevis muscle. We found a significant increase in CST excitability in response to unpleasant as compared to neutral sounds. The increased excitability was lateralized as a function of stimulus valence: Unpleasant stimuli resulted in a significantly higher facilitation of motor potentials evoked in the left hemisphere, while pleasant stimuli yielded a greater CST excitability in the right one. Furthermore, TMS induced higher motor evoked potentials when listening to unpleasant sounds with the left than with the right ear. Taken together, our findings provide compelling evidence for an asymmetric modulation of CST excitability as a function of emotional sounds along with ear laterality.

  8. Disrupted avoidance learning in functional neurological disorder: Implications for harm avoidance theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Laurel S; To, Benjaman; Baek, Kwangyeol; Chang-Webb, Yee-Chien; Mitchell, Simon; Strelchuk, Daniela; Mikheenko, Yevheniia; Phillips, Wendy; Zandi, Michael; Jenaway, Allison; Walsh, Cathy; Voon, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Functional neurological disorder (FND) is an elusive disorder characterized by unexplained neurological symptoms alongside aberrant cognitive processing and negative affect, often associated with amygdala reactivity. We examined the effect of negative conditioning on cognitive function and amygdala reactivity in 25 FND patients and 20 healthy volunteers (HV). Participants were first conditioned to stimuli paired with negative affective or neutral (CS +/CS -) information. During functional MRI, subjects then performed an instrumental associative learning task to avoid monetary losses in the context of the previously conditioned stimuli. We expected that FND patients would be better at learning to avoid losses when faced with negatively conditioned stimuli (increased harm avoidance). Multi-echo resting state fMRI was also collected from the same subjects and a robust denoising method was employed, important for removing motion and physiological artifacts. FND subjects were more sensitive to the negative CS + compared to HV, demonstrated by a reinforcement learning model. Contrary to expectation, FND patients were generally more impaired at learning to avoid losses under both contexts (CS +/CS -), persisting to choose the option that resulted in a negative outcome demonstrated by both behavioural and computational analyses. FND patients showed enhanced amygdala but reduced dorsolateral prefrontal cortex responses when they received negative feedback. Patients also had increased resting state functional connectivity between these two regions. FND patients had impaired instrumental avoidance learning, findings that parallel previous observations of impaired action-outcome binding. FND patients further show enhanced behavioural and neural sensitivity to negative information. However, this did not translate to improved avoidance learning. Put together, our findings do not support the theory of harm avoidance in FND. We highlight a potential mechanism by which

  9. Motor function in the elderly: evidence for the reserve hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaz, Alexis; Vicente-Vytopilova, Pavla; Tavernier, Béatrice; Sabia, Séverine; Dumurgier, Julien; Mazoyer, Bernard; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Tzourio, Christophe

    2013-07-30

    The reserve hypothesis accounts for the lack of direct relationship between brain pathology and its clinical manifestations. Research has mostly focused on cognition; our objective is to examine whether the reserve hypothesis applies to motor function. We investigated whether education, a marker of reserve, modifies the association between white matter lesions (WMLs), a marker of vascular brain damage, and maximum walking speed (WS), an objective measure of motor function. We also examined the cross-sectional and longitudinal association between education and WS. Data are from 4,010 participants aged 65-85 years in the longitudinal Three-City-Dijon Study with up to 4 WS measures over 10 years. We examined the interaction between education and WMLs for baseline WS. We studied the association between education and repeated WS measures using linear mixed models, and the role of covariates in explaining the education-WS association. Education was strongly associated with baseline WS; the difference in mean WS between the high and low education groups (0.145 m/s, 95% confidence interval = 0.125-0.165) was equivalent to 7.4 years of age. WMLs were associated with slow WS only in the low education group (p interaction = 0.026). WS declined significantly over time (-0.194 m/s/10 years, 95% confidence interval = -0.206, -0.182), but education did not influence rate of decline. Anthropometric characteristics, parental education, general health, and cognition had the strongest role in explaining the baseline education-WS association. Participants with more education were less susceptible to WMLs' effect on motor function. Higher education was associated with better motor performances but not with motor decline. These results are consistent with the passive reserve hypothesis.

  10. Brain motor functional changes after somatosensory discrimination training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarasso, Elisabetta; Agosta, Federica; Temporiti, Federico; Adamo, Paola; Piccolo, Fabio; Copetti, Massimiliano; Gatti, Roberto; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-08-31

    Somatosensory discrimination training may modulate cognitive processes, such as movement planning and monitoring, which can be useful during active movements. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of somatosensory discrimination training on brain functional activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during motor and sensory tasks in healthy subjects. Thirty-nine healthy young subjects were randomized into two groups: the experimental group underwent somatosensory discrimination training consisting of shape, surface and two-point distance discrimination; and the control group performed a simple object manipulation. At baseline and after 2 weeks of training, subjects underwent sensorimotor evaluations and fMRI tasks consisting of right-hand tactile stimulation, manipulation of a simple object, and complex right-hand motor sequence execution. Right-hand dexterity improved in both groups, but only the experimental group showed improvements in all manual dexterity tests. After training, the experimental group showed: decreased activation of the ipsilateral sensorimotor areas during the tactile stimulation task; increased activation of the contralateral postcentral gyrus and thalamus bilaterally during the manipulation task; and a reduced recruitment of the ipsilateral pre/postcentral gyri and an increased activation of the basal ganglia and cerebellum contralaterally during the complex right-hand motor task. In healthy subjects, sensory discrimination training was associated with lateralization of brain activity in sensorimotor areas during sensory and motor tasks. Further studies are needed to investigate the usefulness of this training in motor rehabilitation of patients with focal lesions in the central nervous system.

  11. Jisuikang, a Chinese herbal formula, increases neurotrophic factor expression and promotes the recovery of neurological function after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese medicine compound, Jisuikang, can promote recovery of neurological function by inhibiting lipid peroxidation, scavenging oxygen free radicals, and effectively improving the local microenvironment after spinal cord injury. However, the mechanism remains unclear. Thus, we established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury using a modified version of Allen's method. Jisuikang (50, 25, and 12.5 g/kg/d and prednisolone were administered 30 minutes after anesthesia. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor scale scores and the oblique board test showed improved motor function recovery in the prednisone group and moderate-dose Jisuikang group compared with the other groups at 3–7 days post-injury. The rats in the moderate-dose Jisuikang group recovered best at 14 days post-injury. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy showed that the survival rate of neurons in treatment groups increased after 3–7 days of administration. Further, the structure of neurons and glial cells was more distinct, especially in prednisolone and moderate-dose Jisuikang groups. Western blot assay and immunohistochemistry showed that expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in injured segments was maintained at a high level after 7–14 days of treatment. In contrast, expression of nerve growth factor (NGF was down-regulated at 7 days after spinal cord injury. Real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that expression of BDNF and NGF mRNA was induced in injured segments by prednisolone and Jisuikang. At 3–7 days after injury, the effect of prednisolone was greater, while 14 days after injury, the effect of moderate-dose Jisuikang was greater. These results confirm that Jisuikang can upregulate BDNF and NGF expression for a prolonged period after spinal cord injury and promote repair of acute spinal cord injury, with its effect being similar to prednisolone.

  12. Establishing score equivalence of the Functional Independence Measure motor scale and the Barthel Index, utilising the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and Rasch measurement theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodinger, Birgit; O'Connor, Rory J; Stucki, Gerold; Tennant, Alan

    2017-05-16

    Two widely used outcome measures to assess functioning in neurological rehabilitation are the Functional Independence Measure (FIM™) and the Barthel Index. The current study aims to establish the equivalence of the total score of the FIM™ motor scale and the Barthel Index through the application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and Rasch measurement theory. Secondary analysis of a large sample of patients with stroke, spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis, undergoing rehabilitation was conducted. All patients were assessed at the same time on both the FIM™ and the Barthel Index. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Linking Rules were used to establish conceptual coherency between the 2 scales, and the Rasch measurement model to establish an exchange of the total scores. Using the FIM™ motor scale, items from both scales linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health d4 Mobility or d5 Self-care chapters. Their co-calibration satisfied the assumptions of the Rasch model for each of 3 diagnostic groups. A ceiling effect was observed for the Barthel Index when contrasted against the FIM™ motor scale. Having a Rasch interval metric to transform scores between the FIM™ motor scale and Barthel Index is valuable for monitoring functioning, meta-analysis, quality audits and hospital benchmarking.

  13. Gastrointestinal motor function in patients with portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Brinch, K; Hansen, Erik Feldager

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Existing data on gastric emptying and small-intestinal transit rates in portal-hypertensive patients are scarce and contradictory, and so far, the motor function of the colon has not been assessed in these patients. In this study we evaluated the propulsive effect of all main segments...... the test meal between patients and controls. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the colonic transit is often accelerated in patients with portal hypertension, whereas the motor function of the stomach and the small intestine is unaffected.......BACKGROUND: Existing data on gastric emptying and small-intestinal transit rates in portal-hypertensive patients are scarce and contradictory, and so far, the motor function of the colon has not been assessed in these patients. In this study we evaluated the propulsive effect of all main segments...... of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with well-characterized portal hypertension. METHODS: Eight patients with a postsinusoidal hepatic pressure gradient of at least 13 mmHg and eight age- and sex-matched healthy controls participated in the study. Gastric emptying, small-intestinal transit, and colonic transit...

  14. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-jing Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL. Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

  15. Maresin 1 Promotes Inflammatory Resolution, Neuroprotection, and Functional Neurological Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francos-Quijorna, Isaac; Santos-Nogueira, Eva; Gronert, Karsten; Sullivan, Aaron B; Kopp, Marcel A; Brommer, Benedikt; David, Samuel; Schwab, Jan M; López-Vales, Ruben

    2017-11-29

    Resolution of inflammation is defective after spinal cord injury (SCI), which impairs tissue integrity and remodeling and leads to functional deficits. Effective pharmacological treatments for SCI are not currently available. Maresin 1 (MaR1) is a highly conserved specialized proresolving mediator (SPM) hosting potent anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties with potent tissue regenerative actions. Here, we provide evidence that the inappropriate biosynthesis of SPM in the lesioned spinal cord hampers the resolution of inflammation and leads to deleterious consequences on neurological outcome in adult female mice. We report that, after spinal cord contusion injury in adult female mice, the biosynthesis of SPM is not induced in the lesion site up to 2 weeks after injury. Exogenous administration of MaR1, a highly conserved SPM, propagated inflammatory resolution after SCI, as revealed by accelerated clearance of neutrophils and a reduction in macrophage accumulation at the lesion site. In the search of mechanisms underlying the proresolving actions of MaR1 in SCI, we found that this SPM facilitated several hallmarks of resolution of inflammation, including reduction of proinflammatory cytokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CCL3, CCL4, IL6, and CSF3), silencing of major inflammatory intracellular signaling cascades (STAT1, STAT3, STAT5, p38, and ERK1/2), redirection of macrophage activation toward a prorepair phenotype, and increase of the phagocytic engulfment of neutrophils by macrophages. Interestingly, MaR1 administration improved locomotor recovery significantly and mitigated secondary injury progression in a clinical relevant model of SCI. These findings suggest that proresolution, immunoresolvent therapies constitute a novel approach to improving neurological recovery after acute SCI.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Inflammation is a protective response to injury or infection. To result in tissue homeostasis, inflammation has to resolve over time. Incomplete or delayed

  16. Neurological function of the puborectalis muscle in patients with or without soiling after ileal J-pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Ryouichi

    2014-11-01

    To clarify the puborectalis muscle (PM) function in pediatric patients with soiling after ileal J-pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) for ulcerative colitis, the author examined the neurological functions of the PM. Twelve patients 3 months after IPAA were studied (average age 13.6 years). Five patients showed soiling every day (group A1) and 7 patients showed soiling 2 to 3 days per week (Group A2). All patients 1.5 years after IPAA showed continence (group B). Twenty subjects served as a control (Group C; average age 13.5 years). Right, left and posterior sides of the sacral nerve terminal motor latency (SNTML) were measured by magnetic stimulation. On the right, left and posterior sides, patients in group A1 exhibited significant prolongation of the SNTML compared with patients in groups A2, B and C (P<.05 each). Group A2 exhibited significant prolongation compared with groups B and C (P<.05 each). There were no significant differences of the SNTML between right and left sides, between right and posterior sides and between left and posterior sides in groups A1, A2, B and C. The SNTML of the PM demonstrates significant latency in those children who have early post-IPAA soilage. The neurological function of the PM potentially injured during an operation may recover, and correlates with normalization of continence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of mental practice and movement observation on motor memory, cognitive function and motor performance in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline D. C. Altermann

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With aging, it is important to maintain cognitive and motor functions to ensure autonomy and quality of life. During the acquisition of motor skills, it is necessary for the elderly to understand the purpose of the proposed activities. Physical and mental practice, as well as demonstrations, are strategies used to learn movements. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the influence of mental practice and the observation of movement on motor memory and to understand the relationship between cognitive function and motor performance in the execution of a sequence of digital movements in the elderly. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 45 young and 45 aged subjects. The instruments used were Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Manual Preference Inventory and a Digital Motor Task (composed of a training of a sequence of movements, an interval and a test phase. The subjects were divided into three subgroups: control, mental practice and observation of movement. RESULTS: The elderly depend more strongly on mental practice for the acquisition of a motor memory. In comparing the performances of people in different age groups, we found that in the elderly, there was a negative correlation between the MMSE score and the execution time as well as the number of errors in the motor task. CONCLUSIONS: For the elderly, mental practice can advantage motor performance. Also, there is a significant relationship between cognitive function, learning and the execution of new motor skills.

  18. Influence of mental practice and movement observation on motor memory, cognitive function and motor performance in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altermann, Caroline D. C.; Martins, Alexandre S.; Carpes, Felipe P.; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B.

    2014-01-01

    Background With aging, it is important to maintain cognitive and motor functions to ensure autonomy and quality of life. During the acquisition of motor skills, it is necessary for the elderly to understand the purpose of the proposed activities. Physical and mental practice, as well as demonstrations, are strategies used to learn movements. Objectives To investigate the influence of mental practice and the observation of movement on motor memory and to understand the relationship between cognitive function and motor performance in the execution of a sequence of digital movements in the elderly. Method This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 45 young and 45 aged subjects. The instruments used were Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Manual Preference Inventory and a Digital Motor Task (composed of a training of a sequence of movements, an interval and a test phase). The subjects were divided into three subgroups: control, mental practice and observation of movement. Results The elderly depend more strongly on mental practice for the acquisition of a motor memory. In comparing the performances of people in different age groups, we found that in the elderly, there was a negative correlation between the MMSE score and the execution time as well as the number of errors in the motor task. Conclusions For the elderly, mental practice can advantage motor performance. Also, there is a significant relationship between cognitive function, learning and the execution of new motor skills. PMID:24839046

  19. Revisiting Mitochondrial Function and Metabolism in Pluripotent Stem Cells: Where Do We Stand in Neurological Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Carla; Rego, A Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are powerful cellular tools that can generate all the different cell types of the body, and thus overcome the often limited access to human disease tissues; this becomes highly relevant when aiming to investigate cellular (dys)function in diseases affecting the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated that PSC and differentiated cells show altered mitochondrial function and metabolic profiles and production of reactive oxygen species. This raises an emerging paradigm about the role of mitochondria in stem cell biology and urges the need to identify mitochondrial pathways involved in these processes. In this respect, this review focuses on the metabolic profile of PSC and how mitochondrial function can influence the reprogramming and differentiation processes. Indeed, both embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) favor the glycolytic pathway as a major source of energy production over oxidative phosphorylation. PSC mitochondria are characterized by a spherical shape, low copy number of mitochondrial DNA, and a hyperpolarized state. Indeed, mitochondria appear to have a crucial role in reprogramming iPSC, in the maintenance of a pluripotent state, and in differentiation. Moreover, an increase in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation has to occur for differentiation to succeed. Therefore, in vitro differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into neurons can be compromised if those mechanisms are impaired. Future research should shed light on how mitochondrial impairment occurring in pre differentiation neural stages (e.g., in NSC or premature neurons) may contribute for the etiopathogenesis of neurodevelopmental and neurological disorders.

  20. Cingulo-insular structural alterations associated with psychogenic symptoms, childhood abuse and PTSD in functional neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, David L; Matin, Nassim; Barsky, Arthur; Costumero-Ramos, Victor; Makaretz, Sara J; Young, Sigrid S; Sepulcre, Jorge; LaFrance, W Curt; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2017-06-01

    Adverse early-life events are predisposing factors for functional neurological disorder (FND) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cingulo-insular regions are implicated in the biology of both conditions and are sites of stress-mediated neuroplasticity. We hypothesised that functional neurological symptoms and the magnitude of childhood abuse would be associated with overlapping anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insular volumetric reductions, and that FND and PTSD symptoms would map onto distinct cingulo-insular areas. This within-group voxel-based morphometry study probes volumetric associations with self-report measures of functional neurological symptoms, adverse life events and PTSD symptoms in 23 mixed-gender FND patients. Separate secondary analyses were also performed in the subset of 18 women with FND to account for gender-specific effects. Across the entire cohort, there were no statistically significant volumetric associations with self-report measures of functional neurological symptom severity or childhood abuse. In women with FND, however, parallel inverse associations were observed between left anterior insular volume and functional neurological symptoms as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 and the Screening for Somatoform Symptoms Conversion Disorder subscale. Similar inverse relationships were also appreciated between childhood abuse burden and left anterior insular volume. Across all subjects, PTSD symptom severity was inversely associated with dorsal ACC volume, and the magnitude of lifetime adverse events was inversely associated with left hippocampal volume. This study reveals distinct cingulo-insular alterations for FND and PTSD symptoms and may advance our understanding of FND. Potential biological convergence between stress-related neuroplasticity, functional neurological symptoms and reduced insular volume was identified. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017

  1. The functional role of motor activation in language processing: Motor cortical oscillations support lexical-semantic retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elk, M. van; Schie, H.T. van; Zwaan, R.A.; Bekkering, H.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing experimental evidence that processing action-related language results in the automatic activation of associated regions of the motor and premotor cortex. However, the functional significance of motor activation in language processing is still under debate. In the present EEG

  2. The functional role of motor activation in language processing: Motor cortical oscillations support lexical-semantic retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Elk (M.); H.T. van Schie (H.); R.A. Zwaan (Rolf); H. Bekkering (H.)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThere is increasing experimental evidence that processing action-related language results in the automatic activation of associated regions of the motor and premotor cortex. However, the functional significance of motor activation in language processing is still under debate. In the

  3. The relationship between motor function, cognition, independence and quality of life in myelomeningocele patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Carolina Lundberg; Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares de; Becker, Karine Kyomi; Teixeira, Rosani Aparecida Antunes; Voos, Mariana Callil; Hasue, Renata Hydee

    2017-08-01

    Motor function, cognition, functional independence and quality of life have been described in myelomeningocele patients, but no study has investigated their relationships. We aimed to investigate the relationships between motor function, cognition, functional independence, quality of life, age, and lesion level in myelomeningocele patients, and investigate the influence of hydrocephalus on these variables. We assessed 47 patients with the Gross Motor Function Measure (motor function), Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices (cognition), Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (functional independence) and the Autoquestionnaire Qualité de vie Enfant Imagé (quality of life). Spearman's correlation tests determined relationships between the variables. The Friedman ANOVAs determined the influence of hydrocephalus. Motor function was strongly related to mobility and lesion level, and moderately related to cognition, self-care and social function. Cognition and quality of life were moderately related to functional independence. Age correlated moderately with functional independence and quality of life. Hydrocephalus resulted in poorer motor/cognitive outcomes and lower functional independence.

  4. The addition of functional task-oriented mental practice to conventional physical therapy improves motor skills in daily functions after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa C. Santos-Couto-Paz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mental practice (MP is a cognitive strategy which may improve the acquisition of motor skills and functional performance of athletes and individuals with neurological injuries. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether an individualized, specific functional task-oriented MP, when added to conventional physical therapy (PT, promoted better learning of motor skills in daily functions in individuals with chronic stroke (13±6.5 months post-stroke. METHOD: Nine individuals with stable mild and moderate upper limb impairments participated, by employing an A1-B-A2 single-case design. Phases A1 and A2 included one month of conventional PT, and phase B the addition of MP training to PT. The motor activity log (MAL-Brazil was used to assess the amount of use (AOU and quality of movement (QOM of the paretic upper limb; the revised motor imagery questionnaire (MIQ-RS to assess the abilities in kinesthetic and visual motor imagery; the Minnesota manual dexterity test to assess manual dexterity; and gait speed to assess mobility. RESULTS: After phase A1, no significant changes were observed for any of the outcome measures. However, after phase B, significant improvements were observed for the MAL, AOU and QOM scores (p<0.0001, and MIQ-RS kinesthetic and visual scores (p=0.003; p=0.007, respectively. The significant gains in manual dexterity (p=0.002 and gait speed (p=0.019 were maintained after phase A2. CONCLUSIONS: Specific functional task-oriented MP, when added to conventional PT, led to improvements in motor imagery abilities combined with increases in the AOU and QOM in daily functions, manual dexterity, and gait speed.

  5. A preliminary investigation of sleep quality in functional neurological disorders: Poor sleep appears common, and is associated with functional impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Christopher D; Kyle, Simon D

    2017-07-15

    Functional neurological disorders (FND) are disabling conditions for which there are few empirically-supported treatments. Disturbed sleep appears to be part of the FND context; however, the clinical importance of sleep disturbance (extent, characteristics and impact) remains largely unknown. We described sleep quality in two samples, and investigated the relationship between sleep and FND-related functional impairment. We included a sample recruited online via patient charities (N=205) and a consecutive clinical sample (N=20). Participants completed validated measures of sleep quality and sleep characteristics (e.g. total sleep time, sleep efficiency), mood, and FND-related functional impairment. Poor sleep was common in both samples (89% in the clinical range), which was characterised by low sleep efficiency (M=65.40%) and low total sleep time (M=6.05h). In regression analysis, sleep quality was negatively associated with FND-related functional impairment, accounting for 16% of the variance and remaining significant after the introduction of mood variables. These preliminary analyses suggest that subjective sleep disturbance (low efficiency, short sleep) is common in FND. Sleep quality was negatively associated with the functional impairment attributed to FND, independent of depression. Therefore, sleep disturbance may be a clinically important feature of FND. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Relationship between muscle strength and motor function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene F. Nunes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Measuring muscle strength and motor function is part of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD assessment. However, the relationship between these variables is controversial. Objective To investigate the relationship between muscle strength and motor function and between these variables and age. Method Muscle strength was measured by Medical Research Council (MRC scale and motor function, by Motor Function Measure (MFM, in 40 non-ambulatory patients. Spearman tests investigated the relationships between muscle strength, motor function and age. Results Total MRC and MFM scores were strongly related to each other (r = 0.94; p 0.05. Strong and moderate relationships between partial muscle strength and motor function scores were found. Higher correlation coefficients were found between total scores and Dimensions 2 (axial/ proximal control and 3 (distal control of MFM. Conclusion Muscle strength and motor function are strongly correlated and seem to decrease proportionally in DMD.

  7. Psychometric Comparisons of Three Measures for Assessing Motor Functions in Preschoolers with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuang, Y-P.; Su, C-Y.; Huang, M-H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Deficit in motor performance is common in children with intellectual disabilities (ID). A motor function measure with sound psychometric properties is indispensable for clinical and research use. The purpose of this study was to compare the psychometric properties of three commonly used clinical measures for assessing motor function in…

  8. Cargo binding activates myosin VIIA motor function in cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Ikebe, Reiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    Myosin VIIA, thought to be involved in human auditory function, is a gene responsible for human Usher syndrome type 1B, which causes hearing and visual loss. Recent studies have suggested that it can move processively if it forms a dimer. Nevertheless, it exists as a monomer in vitro, unlike the well-known two-headed processive myosin Va. Here we studied the molecular mechanism, which is currently unknown, of activating myosin VIIA as a cargo-transporting motor. Human myosin VIIA was present ...

  9. Sensory and Motor Peripheral Nerve Function and Incident Mobility Disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ward, R. E.; Boudreau, R. M.; Caserotti, P.

    2014-01-01

    ObjectivesTo assess the relationship between sensorimotor nerve function and incident mobility disability over 10years. DesignProspective cohort study with longitudinal analysis. SettingTwo U.S. clinical sites. ParticipantsPopulation-based sample of community-dwelling older adults with no mobilit...... disability at 2000/01 examination (N=1,680; mean age SD 76.52.9, body mass index 27.14.6; 50.2% female, 36.6% black, 10.7% with diabetes mellitus). MeasurementsMotor nerve conduction amplitude (poor...

  10. An examination of the relationship between motor coordination and executive functions in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rigoli, D; Piek, J.P.; Kane, R; Oosterlaan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim Research suggests important links between motor coordination and executive functions. The current study examined whether motor coordination predicts working memory, inhibition, and switching performance, extending previous research by accounting for attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder

  11. Differential changes in the development of motor coordination and executive functions in children with motor coordination impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Eva; Molitor, Sabine; Schneider, Wolfgang

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive and motor coordination skills of children with and without motor coordination impairments were examined with a one-year follow-up investigation. Initially, children were between 4 and 6 years old. Age-appropriate tests of executive functions (updating, switching, inhibition, interference control), motor coordination (the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2) and fitness (the Körperkoordinations-Test für Kinder) were administered in two consecutive years. Several background variables (age, socioeconomic status, medical support, clinical interventions, leisure activities) and potential moderators (nonverbal intelligence, reaction time, visual perception) were controlled. The matched sample consisted of 48 control children and 48 children with motor coordination impairments. The children's executive functions dramatically improved during the one-year period. With regard to motor coordination performance, half of the impaired children caught up to the control children's level ("remission group"), while the remaining half showed no improvement ("persisting group"). Compared to the persisting group, the children in the remission group showed markedly better interference control at both measurement points. The correlation between executive functions and motor coordination is significant in the persisting group, but not in the remission group. The results of the study are discussed in the light of the role of executive functions, especially inhibition processes, for the automatization of motor coordination tasks.

  12. Computerized Functional Reach Test to Measure Balance Stability in Elderly Patients With Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scena, Silvio; Steindler, Roberto; Ceci, Moira; Zuccaro, Stefano Maria; Carmeli, Eli

    2016-10-01

    The ability to maintain static and dynamic balance is a prerequisite for safe walking and for obtaining functional mobility. For this reason, a reliable and valid means of screening for risk of falls is needed. The functional reach test (FRT) is used in many countries, yet it does not provide some kinematic parameters such as shoulder or pelvic girdles translation. The purpose was to analyze video records measuring of distance, velocity, time length, arm direction and girdles translation while doing FRT. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted where the above variables were correlated to the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) for mental status and the Tinetti balance assessment test, which have been validated, in order to computerize the FRT (cFRT) for elderly patients with neurological disorders. Eighty patients were tested and 54 were eligible to serve as experimental group. The patients underwent the MMSE, the Tinetti test and the FRT. LAB view software was used to record the FRT performances and to process the videos. The control group consisted of 51 healthy subjects who had been previously tested. The experimental group was not able to perform the tests as well as the healthy control subjects. The video camera provided valuable kinematic results such as bending down while performing the forward reach test. Instead of manual measurement, we proposed to use a cheap with fair resolution web camera to accurately estimate the FRT. The kinematic parameters were correlated with Tinetti and MMSE scores. The performance values established in this study indicate that the cFRT is a reliable and valid assessment, which provides more accurate data than "manual" test about functional reach.

  13. Effect of adjuvant argatroban therapy on neurological function, endothelial injury and inflammation state in patient with acute cerebral infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Che

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of adjuvant argatroban therapy on neurological function, endothelial injury and inflammation state in patient with acute cerebral infarction. Methods: A total of 118 patients with acute cerebral infarction were divided into observation group and control group according to the random number table, control group received conventional treatment, observation group received argatroban + conventional treatment, and then differences in TCD cerebral blood flow, serum neurological function, endothelial injury and inflammatory marker levels were compared between two groups after treatment. Results: TCD MCA and ACA values of observation group after treatment were higher than those of control group (P<0.05; serum neurological function indexes copeptin, NT-proBNP, PAO and S-100B levels of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group, endothelial injury index ET-1 level was lower than that of control group, NO and CGRP levels were higher than those of control group, and inflammatory markers hs-CRP, TNF-毩, IL-6, MMP-9 and Lp-PLA2 levels were lower than those of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Adjuvant argatroban therapy can optimize the overall condition in patients with acute cerebral infarction, and plays a positive role in improving the neurological function, reducing endothelial injury and inflammation state, etc.

  14. Combined motor cortex and spinal cord neuromodulation promotes corticospinal system functional and structural plasticity and motor function after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weiguo; Amer, Alzahraa; Ryan, Daniel; Martin, John H

    2016-03-01

    An important strategy for promoting voluntary movements after motor system injury is to harness activity-dependent corticospinal tract (CST) plasticity. We combine forelimb motor cortex (M1) activation with co-activation of its cervical spinal targets in rats to promote CST sprouting and skilled limb movement after pyramidal tract lesion (PTX). We used a two-step experimental design in which we first established the optimal combined stimulation protocol in intact rats and then used the optimal protocol in injured animals to promote CST repair and motor recovery. M1 was activated epidurally using an electrical analog of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS). The cervical spinal cord was co-activated by trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) that was targeted to the cervical enlargement, simulated from finite element method. In intact rats, forelimb motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were strongly facilitated during iTBS and for 10 min after cessation of stimulation. Cathodal, not anodal, tsDCS alone facilitated MEPs and also produced a facilitatory aftereffect that peaked at 10 min. Combined iTBS and cathodal tsDCS (c-tsDCS) produced further MEP enhancement during stimulation, but without further aftereffect enhancement. Correlations between forelimb M1 local field potentials and forelimb electromyogram (EMG) during locomotion increased after electrical iTBS alone and further increased with combined stimulation (iTBS+c-tsDCS). This optimized combined stimulation was then used to promote function after PTX because it enhanced functional connections between M1 and spinal circuits and greater M1 engagement in muscle contraction than either stimulation alone. Daily application of combined M1 iTBS on the intact side and c-tsDCS after PTX (10 days, 27 min/day) significantly restored skilled movements during horizontal ladder walking. Stimulation produced a 5.4-fold increase in spared ipsilateral CST terminations. Combined neuromodulation achieves optimal motor

  15. Prevalence of depression, fatigue, and sleep disturbances in patients with myelopathy: Their relation with functional and neurological recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Nitin; Gupta, Anupam; Khanna, Meeka; Taly, Arun B; Thennarasu, K

    2016-11-01

    To observe the prevalence of fatigue, depression, and sleep disturbance in patients with myelopathy and their correlation with neurological and functional recovery. Study conducted in a university tertiary research hospital with 127 patients with myelopathy (92 males) admitted to neurorehabilitation unit between January 2010 and December 2013. Mean age was 32.71 ± 13.08 years (range 15-65 years), and mean duration of injury was 76.22 ± 82.5 days (range 14-365 days). Functional status and impairments were assessed using Barthel Index and Spinal Cord Independence Measures. Depression, fatigue, and sleep disturbances were assessed using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scales, respectively. Neurological recovery was assessed using American Spinal Injury Association's impairment scale. Forty-four out of 104 (42%) patients had borderline or confirmed depression, 36/108 (33%) had significant fatigue, and 62/106 (58%) had significant sleep disturbances at admission. Significant correlation was observed between change in fatigue and depression scores with change in functional status scores (P  0.05) between change in sleep disturbance scores and functional status score and neurological recovery (P > 0.05). Similarly, change in fatigue and depression scores had no correlation with neurological status improvement. Fatigue, depression, and sleep disturbance scores showed significant improvement, that is, admission vs. discharge scores (P < 0.05) with significant correlation between improvement in all three variables (P < 0.05). Study variables showed significant improvement in the present study with myelopathy patients but not necessarily correlating with functional and neurological recovery.

  16. Inhibition of inflammatory cytokines after early decompression may mediate recovery of neurological function in rats with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-bing Xie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of inflammatory cytokines are involved in spinal cord injury and influence the recovery of neuronal function. In the present study, we established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury by cerclage. The cerclage suture was released 8 or 72 hours later, to simulate decompression surgery. Neurological function was evaluated behaviorally for 3 weeks after surgery, and tumor necrosis factor α immunoreactivity and apoptosis were quantified in the region of injury. Rats that underwent decompression surgery had significantly weaker immunoreactivity of tumor necrosis factor α and significantly fewer apoptotic cells, and showed faster improvement of locomotor function than animals in which decompression surgery was not performed. Decompression at 8 hours resulted in significantly faster recovery than that at 72 hours. These data indicate that early decompression may improve neurological function after spinal cord injury by inhibiting the expression of tumor necrosis factor α.

  17. Resection of Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-Positive Prerolandic Motor Areas Causes Permanent Impairment of Motor Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Tobias; Bulubas, Lucia; Sabih, Jamil; Conway, Neal; Wildschutz, Noémie; Sollmann, Nico; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian; Krieg, Sandro M

    2017-07-01

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) helps to determine the distribution of motor eloquent areas prior to brain surgery. Yet, the eloquence of primary motor areas frontal to the precentral gyrus identified via nTMS is unclear. To investigate the resection of nTMS-positive prerolandic motor areas and its correlation with postsurgical impairment of motor function. Forty-three patients with rolandic or prerolandic gliomas (WHO grade I-IV) underwent nTMS prior to surgery. Only patients without ischemia within the motor system in postoperative MRI diffusion sequences were enrolled. Based on the 3-dimensional fusion of preoperative nTMS motor mapping data with postsurgical MRI scans, we identified nTMS points that were resected in the infiltration zone of the tumor. We then classified the resected points according to the localization and latency of their motor evoked potentials. Surgery-related paresis was graded as transient (≤6 weeks) or permanent (>6 weeks). Out of 43, 31 patients (72%) showed nTMS-positive motor points in the prerolandic gyri. In general, 13 out of 43 patients (30%) underwent resection of nTMS points. Ten out of these patients showed postoperative paresis. There were 2 (15%) patients with a transient and 8 (62%) with a permanent surgery-related paresis. In 3 cases (23%), motor function remained unimpaired. After resection of nTMS-positive motor points, 62% of patients suffered from a new permanent paresis. Thus, even though they are located in the superior or middle frontal gyrus, these cortical areas must undergo intraoperative mapping.

  18. Ocular motor and sensory function in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almer, Zina; Klein, Kathyrn S; Marsh, Laura; Gerstenhaber, Melissa; Repka, Michael X

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of dopaminergic medication and deep brain stimulation on ocular function in Parkinson's disease (PD) and to measure vision-related quality of life in subjects with PD. Prospective, comparative case series. Twenty-seven PD and 16 control subjects were recruited. Visual acuity, ocular motor function, convergence, and vision-related quality of life using the 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ-25) were measured. Visual sensory and motor measurements were obtained during the on and off states of PD dopaminergic treatment. Convergence ability and vision-related quality of life. The PD subjects had a mean age of 58.8 years; 30% were female. Their mean duration of PD was 10.9 ± 6.8 years. The control subjects had a mean age of 61.6 years; 56% were female. There was no difference in visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, or color vision of the PD subjects in their on state compared with controls. Convergence amplitudes measured with base-out prism were significantly poorer in PD subjects in their on state compared with controls (24.1 ± 8 Δ vs. 14.8 ± 10.3 Δ; P = 0.003). The mean composite VFQ-25 score was significantly worse in the PD subjects compared with the controls (87.1 ± 8.69 vs. 96.6 ± 3.05; P = 0.0001). Comparing the PD subjects in their on with their off states, there was no difference in distance exodeviation, near exodeviation, or ocular ductions. Mean convergence amplitudes and near point of convergence were better in the on state compared with the off state: 14.8 ± 10.3 Δ versus 10.7 ± 9.0 Δ (P = 0.0006) and 13.1 ± 9.1 cm versus 18.1 ± 12.2 cm (P = 0.002), respectively. Convergence ability is significantly poorer in PD subjects in both the on and off states compared with controls, but improves significantly with systemic dopaminergic treatment. Ocular motor function in PD subjects fluctuates in response to treatment, which complicates ophthalmic management. Parkinson's disease subjects have a

  19. Effectiveness of motor imagery or mental practice in functional recovery after stroke: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Carrasco, D; Aboitiz Cantalapiedra, J

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, many stroke rehabilitation methods have been developed. Mental practice (MP) is a dynamic state in which the subject evokes an imaginary representation of a motor action or skill in order to learn or perfect that action. Although functional imaging has shown that MP produces similar cortical activation patterns to those of movement, the clinical effectiveness of such methods in rehabilitation and functional recovery has yet to be demonstrated. Systematic search of all clinical studies published in the main scientific databases between December 2011 and October 2012 concerning mental practice in stroke rehabilitation. We selected 23 clinical trials testing different MP protocols in patients with hemiparesis. MP is effective when used in conjunction with conventional physical therapy for functional rehabilitation of both upper and lower limbs, as well as for the recovery of daily activities and skills. Owing to the heterogeneity of the studies with regard to the intervention protocol, specific imagery technique, time spent practicing, patient characteristics, etc., more studies are needed in order to determine the optimal treatment protocol and patient profile. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Relationship between functional connectivity and motor function assessment in stroke patients with hemiplegia: a resting-state functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Liu, Hongliang; Wang, Li; Yang, Jun; Yan, Rubing; Zhang, Jingna; Sang, Linqiong; Li, Pengyue; Wang, Jian; Qiu, Mingguo

    2016-05-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used to examine the brain mechanisms of stroke patients with hemiplegia, but the relationship between functional connectivity (FC) and treatment-induced motor function recovery has not yet been fully investigated. This study aimed to identify the brain FC changes in stroke patients and study the relationship between FC and motor function assessment using the resting-state fMRI. Seventeen stroke patients with hemiplegia and fifteen healthy control subjects (HCSs) were recruited in this study. We compared the FC between the ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1) and the whole brain of the patients with the FC of the HCSs and studied the FC changes in the patients before and after conventional rehabilitation and motor imagery therapy. Additionally, correlations between the FC change and motor function of the patients were studied. Compared to the HCSs, the FC in the patient group was significantly increased between the ipsilesional M1 and the ipsilesional inferior parietal cortex, frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA), and contralesional angular and decreased between the ipsilesional M1 and bilateral M1. After the treatment, the FC between the ipsilesional M1 and contralesional M1 increased while the FC between the ipsilesional M1 and ipsilesional SMA and paracentral lobule decreased. A statistically significant correlation was found between the FC change in the bilateral M1 and the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) score change. Our results revealed an abnormal motor network after stroke and suggested that the FC could serve as a biomarker of motor function recovery in stroke patients with hemiplegia.

  1. Relationship between functional connectivity and motor function assessment in stroke patients with hemiplegia: a resting-state functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ye; Wang, Li; Zhang, Jingna; Sang, Linqiong; Li, Pengyue; Qiu, Mingguo [Third Military Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing (China); Liu, Hongliang; Yan, Rubing [Third Military Medical University, Department of Rehabilitation, Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China); Yang, Jun; Wang, Jian [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China)

    2016-05-15

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used to examine the brain mechanisms of stroke patients with hemiplegia, but the relationship between functional connectivity (FC) and treatment-induced motor function recovery has not yet been fully investigated. This study aimed to identify the brain FC changes in stroke patients and study the relationship between FC and motor function assessment using the resting-state fMRI. Seventeen stroke patients with hemiplegia and fifteen healthy control subjects (HCSs) were recruited in this study. We compared the FC between the ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1) and the whole brain of the patients with the FC of the HCSs and studied the FC changes in the patients before and after conventional rehabilitation and motor imagery therapy. Additionally, correlations between the FC change and motor function of the patients were studied. Compared to the HCSs, the FC in the patient group was significantly increased between the ipsilesional M1 and the ipsilesional inferior parietal cortex, frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA), and contralesional angular and decreased between the ipsilesional M1 and bilateral M1. After the treatment, the FC between the ipsilesional M1 and contralesional M1 increased while the FC between the ipsilesional M1 and ipsilesional SMA and paracentral lobule decreased. A statistically significant correlation was found between the FC change in the bilateral M1 and the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) score change. Our results revealed an abnormal motor network after stroke and suggested that the FC could serve as a biomarker of motor function recovery in stroke patients with hemiplegia. (orig.)

  2. Farmacologia da unidade motora: aspectos de interesse em neurologia Pharmacology of motor end-plate: aspects related to neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Sannomiya

    1975-09-01

    Full Text Available Os AA fazem revisão sobre a unidade motora em seu aspecto morfológico, fisiológico e farmacológico como base para o estudo e tratamento da miastenia grave e da síndrome miastênica. Estudos eletromiográficos, farmacológicos e eletrofisiológicos, realizados por diversos autores, determinam características especiais que definem a miastenia grave e a síndrome miastênica. Certos sinais e sintomas, comumente observados em casos de envenenamento por elapídeos, são semelhantes aos causados por drogas bloqueadoras neuromusculares.In order to understand the treatment of miasthenia gravis and miasthenic sindrome, the morphology, physiology and pharmacology of the motor unit were reviewed. Electromiographic, pharmacologic and electrophysiologic studies accomplished by several authors have special caractheristics which define miasthenia gravis and miasthenic sindrome. Certain venoms such as those from Elapidae can produce signals and symptoms resembling those produced by neuromuscular blocking drugs.

  3. Expanded functional coupling of subcortical nuclei with the motor resting-state network in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Siebner, Hartwig R; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Wu, Xingchen; Biswal, Bharat; Paulson, Olaf B; Dyrby, Tim B; Skimminge, Arnold; Blinkenberg, Morten; Madsen, Kristoffer H

    2013-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) impairs signal transmission along cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical connections, affecting functional integration within the motor network. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during motor tasks has revealed altered functional connectivity in MS, but it is unclear how much motor disability contributed to these abnormal functional interaction patterns. To avoid any influence of impaired task performance, we examined disease-related changes in functional motor connectivity in MS at rest. A total of 42 patients with MS and 30 matched controls underwent a 20-minute resting-state fMRI session at 3 Tesla. Independent component analysis was applied to the fMRI data to identify disease-related changes in motor resting-state connectivity. Patients with MS showed a spatial expansion of motor resting-state connectivity in deep subcortical nuclei but not at the cortical level. The anterior and middle parts of the putamen, adjacent globus pallidus, anterior and posterior thalamus and the subthalamic region showed stronger functional connectivity with the motor network in the MS group compared with controls. MS is characterised by more widespread motor connectivity in the basal ganglia while cortical motor resting-state connectivity is preserved. The expansion of subcortical motor resting-state connectivity in MS indicates less efficient funnelling of neural processing in the executive motor cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops.

  4. Effects of professional rehabilitation training on the recovery of neurological function in young stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-jin-zi Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Young stroke patients have a strong desire to return to the society, but few studies have been conducted on their rehabilitation training items, intensity, and prognosis. We analyzed clinical data of young and middle-aged/older stroke patients hospitalized in the Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, China Rehabilitation Research Center, Capital Medical University, China from February 2014 to May 2015. Results demonstrated that hemorrhagic stroke (59.6% was the primary stroke type found in the young group, while ischemic stroke (60.0% was the main type detected in the middle-aged/older group. Compared with older stroke patients, education level and incidence of hyperhomocysteinemia were higher in younger stroke patients, whereas, incidences of hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease were lower. The average length of hospital stay was longer in the young group than in the middle-aged/older group. The main risk factors observed in the young stroke patients were hypertension, drinking, smoking, hyperlipidemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, diabetes, previous history of stroke, and heart disease. The most accepted rehabilitation program consisted of physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, acupuncture and moxibustion. Average rehabilitation training time was 2.5 hours/day. Barthel Index and modified Rankin Scale scores were increased at discharge. Six months after discharge, the degree of occupational and economic satisfaction declined, and there were no changes in family life satisfaction. The degrees of other life satisfaction (such as friendship improved. The degree of disability and functional status improved significantly in young stroke patients after professional rehabilitation, but the number of patients who returned to society within 6 months after stroke was still small.

  5. Theory of mind, emotional and social functioning, and motor severity in children and adolescents with dystonic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegboye, Dolapo; Sterr, Annette; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Owen, Tamsin J

    2017-05-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate whether children and adolescents with dystonic cerebral palsy (CP) present with emotional and social difficulties along side motor limitations. Twenty-two verbal and nonverbal children and adolescents with dystonic CP were compared with a normative sample of twenty children and adolescents on measures of theory of mind (ToM), emotion regulation (ER), and social difficulties (SD). Higher social and emotional difficulties were found in the dystonic CP group compared to the control group. Nonverbal participants with dystonic CP were found to present with greater social impairment and lower ToM ability than their verbal counterparts. Emotional regulation and hyperactivity and attentional difficulties (HAD) significantly predicted ToM ability and social difficulties. Lower Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level and IQ also contributed to differences in ToM ability. Findings support the need for greater attention to the emotional health and social development of children/adolescents with dystonic CP, along with assessments of motor difficulties in the planning and implementation of interventions and individual care plans. Further research is needed to explore links between motor disorder and mental state understanding in this clinical group. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Relation between hand function and gross motor function in full term infants aged 4 to 8 months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Solange F.; Figueiredo, Elyonara M.; Gonçalves, Rejane V.; Mancini, Marisa C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In children, reaching emerges around four months of age, which is followed by rapid changes in hand function and concomitant changes in gross motor function, including the acquisition of independent sitting. Although there is a close functional relationship between these domains, to date they have been investigated separately. Objective: To investigate the longitudinal profile of changes and the relationship between the development of hand function (i.e. reaching for and manipulating an object) and gross motor function in 13 normally developing children born at term who were evaluated every 15 days from 4 to 8 months of age. Method: The number of reaches and the period (i.e. time) of manipulation to an object were extracted from video synchronized with the Qualisys(r) movement analysis system. Gross motor function was measured using the Alberta Infant Motor Scale. ANOVA for repeated measures was used to test the effect of age on the number of reaches, the time of manipulation and gross motor function. Hierarchical regression models were used to test the associations of reaching and manipulation with gross motor function. Results: Results revealed a significant increase in the number of reaches (p<0.001), the time of manipulation (p<0.001) and gross motor function (p<0.001) over time, as well as associations between reaching and gross motor function (R2=0.84; p<0.001) and manipulation and gross motor function (R2=0.13; p=0.02) from 4 to 6 months of age. Associations from 6 to 8 months of age were not significant. Conclusion: The relationship between hand function and gross motor function was not constant, and the age span from 4 to 6 months was a critical period of interdependency of hand function and gross motor function development. PMID:25714437

  7. Gastrointestinal motor function in patients with portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Brinch, K; Hansen, Erik Feldager

    2000-01-01

    rates were evaluated in all subjects by means of a gamma camera technique. The technique was also used to measure the frequency of antral contractions. RESULTS: No difference was observed in gastric mean emptying time or small-intestinal mean transit time of liquid and solid markers between patients......BACKGROUND: Existing data on gastric emptying and small-intestinal transit rates in portal-hypertensive patients are scarce and contradictory, and so far, the motor function of the colon has not been assessed in these patients. In this study we evaluated the propulsive effect of all main segments...... of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with well-characterized portal hypertension. METHODS: Eight patients with a postsinusoidal hepatic pressure gradient of at least 13 mmHg and eight age- and sex-matched healthy controls participated in the study. Gastric emptying, small-intestinal transit, and colonic transit...

  8. Motor and mental training in older people: Transfer, interference, and associated functional neural responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraxbekk, C J; Hagkvist, Filip; Lindner, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Learning new motor skills may become more difficult with advanced age. In the present study, we randomized 56 older individuals, including 30 women (mean age 70.6 years), to 6 weeks of motor training, mental (motor imagery) training, or a combination of motor and mental training of a finger tapping sequence. Performance improvements and post-training functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were used to investigate performance gains and associated underlying neural processes. Motor-only training and a combination of motor and mental training improved performance in the trained task more than mental-only training. The fMRI data showed that motor training was associated with a representation in the premotor cortex and mental training with a representation in the secondary visual cortex. Combining motor and mental training resulted in both premotor and visual cortex representations. During fMRI scanning, reduced performance was observed in the combined motor and mental training group, possibly indicating interference between the two training methods. We concluded that motor and motor imagery training in older individuals is associated with different functional brain responses. Furthermore, adding mental training to motor training did not result in additional performance gains compared to motor-only training and combining training methods may result in interference between representations, reducing performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Walking, Gross Motor Development, and Brain Functional Connectivity in Infants and Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrus, Natasha; Eggebrecht, Adam T; Todorov, Alexandre; Elison, Jed T; Wolff, Jason J; Cole, Lyndsey; Gao, Wei; Pandey, Juhi; Shen, Mark D; Swanson, Meghan R; Emerson, Robert W; Klohr, Cheryl L; Adams, Chloe M; Estes, Annette M; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Botteron, Kelly N; McKinstry, Robert C; Constantino, John N; Evans, Alan C; Hazlett, Heather C; Dager, Stephen R; Paterson, Sarah J; Schultz, Robert T; Styner, Martin A; Gerig, Guido; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Piven, Joseph; Pruett, John R

    2018-02-01

    Infant gross motor development is vital to adaptive function and predictive of both cognitive outcomes and neurodevelopmental disorders. However, little is known about neural systems underlying the emergence of walking and general gross motor abilities. Using resting state fcMRI, we identified functional brain networks associated with walking and gross motor scores in a mixed cross-sectional and longitudinal cohort of infants at high and low risk for autism spectrum disorder, who represent a dimensionally distributed range of motor function. At age 12 months, functional connectivity of motor and default mode networks was correlated with walking, whereas dorsal attention and posterior cingulo-opercular networks were implicated at age 24 months. Analyses of general gross motor function also revealed involvement of motor and default mode networks at 12 and 24 months, with dorsal attention, cingulo-opercular, frontoparietal, and subcortical networks additionally implicated at 24 months. These findings suggest that changes in network-level brain-behavior relationships underlie the emergence and consolidation of walking and gross motor abilities in the toddler period. This initial description of network substrates of early gross motor development may inform hypotheses regarding neural systems contributing to typical and atypical motor outcomes, as well as neurodevelopmental disorders associated with motor dysfunction. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Mutations of EXOSC3/Rrp40p associated with neurological diseases impact ribosomal RNA processing functions of the exosome in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Abby; Gabunilas, Jason; Jen, Joanna C; Chanfreau, Guillaume F

    2017-04-01

    The RNA exosome is a conserved multiprotein complex that achieves a large number of processive and degradative functions in eukaryotic cells. Recently, mutations have been mapped to the gene encoding one of the subunits of the exosome, EXOSC3 (yeast Rrp40p), which results in pontocerebellar hypoplasia with motor neuron degeneration in human patients. However, the molecular impact of these mutations in the pathology of these diseases is not well understood. To investigate the molecular consequences of mutations in EXOSC3 that lead to neurological diseases, we analyzed the effect of three of the mutations that affect conserved residues of EXOSC3/Rrp40p (G31A, G191C, and W238R; G8A, G148C, and W195R, respectively, in human and yeast) in S. cerevisiae We show that the severity of the phenotypes of these mutations in yeast correlate with that of the disease in human patients, with the W195R mutant showing the strongest growth and RNA processing phenotypes. Furthermore, we show that these mutations affect more severely pre-ribosomal RNA processing functions of the exosome rather than other nuclear processing or surveillance functions. These results suggest that delayed or defective pre-rRNA processing might be the primary defect responsible for the pathologies detected in patients with mutations affecting EXOSC3 function in residues conserved throughout eukaryotes. © 2017 Gillespie et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  11. Effects of hippotherapy on gross motor function and functional performance of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Sook; Rha, Dong Wook; Shin, Jung Soon; Kim, Soohyeon; Jung, Soojin

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of hippotherapy on gross motor function and functional performance in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). We recruited 34 children (M:F=15:19, age: 3-12 years) with spastic CP who underwent hippotherapy for 45 minutes twice a week for 8 weeks. Twenty-one children with spastic CP were recruited for control group. The distribution of gross motor function classification system level and mean age were not significantly different between the two groups. Outcome measures, including the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM)-66, GMFM-88 and the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory: Functional Skills Scale (PEDI-FSS), were assessed before therapy and after the 8-weeks intervention as outcome measures. There were no significant differences between intervention and control groups in mean baseline total scores of GMFM-66, GMFM-88 or PEDI-FSS. After the 8-weeks intervention, mean GMFM-66 and GMFM-88 scores were significantly improved in both groups. However, the hippotherapy group had significantly greater improvement in dimension E and GMFM-66 total score than the control group. The total PEDI-FSS score and the sub-scores of its 3 domains were significantly improved in the hippotherapy group, but not in the control group. The results of our study demonstrate the beneficial effects of hippotherapy on gross motor function and functional performance in children with CP compared to control group. The significant improvement in PEDI-FSS scores suggests that hippotherapy may be useful to maximize the functional performance of children with CP.

  12. Structure and Function Study of Phi29 DNA packaging motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Huaming

    molecules were required to bind to one short dsDNA molecule. The inhibitive curve of Walker B mutant gp16 analyzed by binomial distribution model showed that one inactive mutant gp16 in the gp16 ring could block the function of the motor and the stoichiometry of gp16 was six. These findings facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanism of viral DNA packaging: a novel viral DNA packaging model "push through a one-way valve" was proposed. In this model, the connector functioned as a valve to allow DNA to enter but prevented it from sliding out during DNA packaging; the six subunits in the gp16 ring acted sequentially to push DNA into the connector channel. ATP binding of gp16 induced a conformation change with a high affinity for dsDNA. Then, the ATP was hydrolyzed which resulted in the movement of subdomains in this individual gp16 subunit and DNA was pushed forward, followed by the double helix of dsDNA being brought forward to the adjacent subunit in the gp16 ring. The elucidation of the viral DNA packaging mechanism holds great potential for developing artificial motors for delivering drugs and other molecular cargos.

  13. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and motor and intellectual functioning in 86 patients born at term with spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Yurika; Onuma, Akira; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Sato-Shirai, Ikuko; Tanaka, Soichiro; Kobayashi, Satoru; Wakusawa, Keisuke; Inui, Takehiko; Kure, Shigeo; Haginoya, Kazuhiro

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the association between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns and motor function, epileptic episodes, and IQ or developmental quotient in patients born at term with spastic diplegia. Eighty-six patients born at term with cerebral palsy (CP) and spastic diplegia (54 males, 32 females; median age 20 y, range 7-42 y) among 829 patients with CP underwent brain MRI between 1990 and 2008. The MRI and clinical findings were analysed retrospectively. Intellectual disability was classified according to the Enjoji developmental test or the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (3rd edition). The median ages at diagnosis of CP, assignment of Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level, cognitive assessment, and MRI were 2 years (range 5 mo-8 y), 6 years (2 y 8 mo-19 y), 6 years (1 y 4 mo-19 y), and 7 years (10 mo-30 y) respectively. MRI included normal findings (41.9%), periventricular leukomalacia, hypomyelination, and porencephaly/periventricular venous infarction. The frequency of patients in GMFCS levels III to V and intellectual disability did not differ between those with normal and abnormal MRI findings. Patients with normal MRI findings had significantly fewer epileptic episodes than those with abnormal ones (p=0.001). Varied MRI findings, as well as the presence of severe motor dysfunction and intellectual disability (despite normal MRI), suggest that patients born at term with spastic diplegia had heterogeneous and unidentified pathophysiology. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  14. Caregiver-reported health-related quality of life of children with cerebral palsy and their families and its association with gross motor function: A South Indian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surender, S; Gowda, Vykuntaraju K; Sanjay, K S; Basavaraja, G V; Benakappa, Naveen; Benakappa, Asha

    2016-01-01

    In children, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) includes parental impact and family functioning along with concepts of illness, functional status, mental health, and comfort. We are focusing on the impact of cerebral palsy (CP) on children's HRQOL and their families, and its relationship with gross motor dysfunction. CP children aged 3-10 years under regular neurology follow-up were enrolled. The HRQOL and motor severity were prospectively assessed using lifestyle assessment questionnaire-CP and gross motor function classification systems, respectively. One hundred children participated in this study. Thirty-three percent of children had good, 22% had mildly affected, whereas 45% had moderately to severely affected HRQOL. A significant association is present between gross motor function classification system and HRQOL. HRQOL in CP and their caregivers is highly impaired. The degree of impairment is associated with physical independence, mobility, clinical burden, and social integration dimensions. Therapies targeting these dimensions and associated comorbidities will improve the HRQOL. Gross motor function classification system is a good indicator of HRQOL.

  15. Caregiver-reported health-related quality of life of children with cerebral palsy and their families and its association with gross motor function: A South Indian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Surender

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In children, health-related quality of life (HRQOL includes parental impact and family functioning along with concepts of illness, functional status, mental health, and comfort. We are focusing on the impact of cerebral palsy (CP on children's HRQOL and their families, and its relationship with gross motor dysfunction. Subjects and Methods: CP children aged 3–10 years under regular neurology follow-up were enrolled. The HRQOL and motor severity were prospectively assessed using lifestyle assessment questionnaire-CP and gross motor function classification systems, respectively. Results: One hundred children participated in this study. Thirty-three percent of children had good, 22% had mildly affected, whereas 45% had moderately to severely affected HRQOL. A significant association is present between gross motor function classification system and HRQOL. Conclusion: HRQOL in CP and their caregivers is highly impaired. The degree of impairment is associated with physical independence, mobility, clinical burden, and social integration dimensions. Therapies targeting these dimensions and associated comorbidities will improve the HRQOL. Gross motor function classification system is a good indicator of HRQOL.

  16. Correlations between motor and sensory functions in upper limb chronic hemiparetics after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Botossi Scalha

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Describe the somatosensory function of the affected upper limb of hemiparetic stroke patients and investigate the correlations between measurements of motor and sensory functions in tasks with and without visual deprivation. METHOD: We applied the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA, Nottingham Sensory Assessment (NSA, and several motor and sensory tests: Paper manipulation (PM, Motor Sequences (MS, Reaching and grasping (RG Tests Functional (TF, Tactile Discrimination (TD, Weight Discrimination (WD and Tactile Recognition of Objects (RO. RESULTS: We found moderate correlations between the FMA motor subscale and the tactile sensation score of the NSA. Additionally, the FMA sensitivity was correlated with the NSA total; and performance on the WD test items correlated with the NSA. CONCLUSION: There was a correlation between the sensory and motor functions of the upper limb in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients. Additionally, there was a greater reliance on visual information to compensate for lost sensory-motor skills.

  17. Music-based interventions in neurological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihvonen, Aleksi J; Särkämö, Teppo; Leo, Vera; Tervaniemi, Mari; Altenmüller, Eckart; Soinila, Seppo

    2017-08-01

    During the past ten years, an increasing number of controlled studies have assessed the potential rehabilitative effects of music-based interventions, such as music listening, singing, or playing an instrument, in several neurological diseases. Although the number of studies and extent of available evidence is greatest in stroke and dementia, there is also evidence for the effects of music-based interventions on supporting cognition, motor function, or emotional wellbeing in people with Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, or multiple sclerosis. Music-based interventions can affect divergent functions such as motor performance, speech, or cognition in these patient groups. However, the psychological effects and neurobiological mechanisms underlying the effects of music interventions are likely to share common neural systems for reward, arousal, affect regulation, learning, and activity-driven plasticity. Although further controlled studies are needed to establish the efficacy of music in neurological recovery, music-based interventions are emerging as promising rehabilitation strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. De Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM): een onderzoek naar de betrouwbaarheid van de Nederlandse vertaling.

    OpenAIRE

    Veenhof, C.; Ketelaar, M.; Petegem-van Beek, E. van

    2003-01-01

    This article is about the psychometric characteristics of the Dutch translation of the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM). It describes the reliability of the instrument. The article "Gross Motor Function Measure" (GMFM): a validity study of the Dutch translation focusses on the responsiveness of the GMFM. Aim: to investigate the reliability of the Dutch translation of the GMFM. The GMFM is a criterion-referenced instrument constructed to evaluate the development of motor skills in children ...

  19. De Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM): een onderzoek naar de responsiviteit van de Nederlandse vertaling.

    OpenAIRE

    Veenhof, C.; Ketelaar, M.; Petegem-van Beek, E. van; Vermeer, A.

    2003-01-01

    This article is about the psychometric characteristics of the Dutch translation of the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM). It describes the responsiveness to change. The article "Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM): a reliability study of the Dutch translation" focuses on the reliability of the GMFM. Aim: To evaluate the validity of the Dutch translation of the GMFM. The GMFM is a criterion-referenced instrument constructed to evaluate the development of motor skills in children with cerebra...

  20. Motor Imagery Learning Modulates Functional Connectivity of Multiple Brain Systems in Resting State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Long, Zhiying; Ge, Ruiyang; Xu, Lele; Jin, Zhen; Yao, Li; Liu, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Background Learning motor skills involves subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the sensory-motor system. This idea was mostly derived from the investigations on motor execution learning which mainly recruits the processing of sensory-motor information. Behavioral evidences demonstrated that motor skills in our daily lives could be learned through imagery procedures. However, it remains unclear whether the modulation of resting-state functional connectivity also exists in the sensory-motor system after motor imagery learning. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a fMRI investigation on motor imagery learning from resting state. Based on previous studies, we identified eight sensory and cognitive resting-state networks (RSNs) corresponding to the brain systems and further explored the functional connectivity of these RSNs through the assessments, connectivity and network strengths before and after the two-week consecutive learning. Two intriguing results were revealed: (1) The sensory RSNs, specifically sensory-motor and lateral visual networks exhibited greater connectivity strengths in precuneus and fusiform gyrus after learning; (2) Decreased network strength induced by learning was proved in the default mode network, a cognitive RSN. Conclusions/Significance These results indicated that resting-state functional connectivity could be modulated by motor imagery learning in multiple brain systems, and such modulation displayed in the sensory-motor, visual and default brain systems may be associated with the establishment of motor schema and the regulation of introspective thought. These findings further revealed the neural substrates underlying motor skill learning and potentially provided new insights into the therapeutic benefits of motor imagery learning. PMID:24465577

  1. Motor imagery learning modulates functional connectivity of multiple brain systems in resting state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Long, Zhiying; Ge, Ruiyang; Xu, Lele; Jin, Zhen; Yao, Li; Liu, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Learning motor skills involves subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the sensory-motor system. This idea was mostly derived from the investigations on motor execution learning which mainly recruits the processing of sensory-motor information. Behavioral evidences demonstrated that motor skills in our daily lives could be learned through imagery procedures. However, it remains unclear whether the modulation of resting-state functional connectivity also exists in the sensory-motor system after motor imagery learning. We performed a fMRI investigation on motor imagery learning from resting state. Based on previous studies, we identified eight sensory and cognitive resting-state networks (RSNs) corresponding to the brain systems and further explored the functional connectivity of these RSNs through the assessments, connectivity and network strengths before and after the two-week consecutive learning. Two intriguing results were revealed: (1) The sensory RSNs, specifically sensory-motor and lateral visual networks exhibited greater connectivity strengths in precuneus and fusiform gyrus after learning; (2) Decreased network strength induced by learning was proved in the default mode network, a cognitive RSN. These results indicated that resting-state functional connectivity could be modulated by motor imagery learning in multiple brain systems, and such modulation displayed in the sensory-motor, visual and default brain systems may be associated with the establishment of motor schema and the regulation of introspective thought. These findings further revealed the neural substrates underlying motor skill learning and potentially provided new insights into the therapeutic benefits of motor imagery learning.

  2. Motor functions and adaptive behaviour in children with childhood apraxia of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tükel, Şermin; Björelius, Helena; Henningsson, Gunilla; McAllister, Anita; Eliasson, Ann Christin

    2015-01-01

    Undiagnosed motor and behavioural problems have been reported for children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). This study aims to understand the extent of these problems by determining the profile of and relationships between speech/non-speech oral, manual and overall body motor functions and adaptive behaviours in CAS. Eighteen children (five girls and 13 boys) with CAS, 4 years 4 months to 10 years 6 months old, participated in this study. The assessments used were the Verbal Motor Production Assessment for Children (VMPAC), Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOT-2) and Adaptive Behaviour Assessment System (ABAS-II). Median result of speech/non-speech oral motor function was between -1 and -2 SD of the mean VMPAC norms. For BOT-2 and ABAS-II, the median result was between the mean and -1 SD of test norms. However, on an individual level, many children had co-occurring difficulties (below -1 SD of the mean) in overall and manual motor functions and in adaptive behaviour, despite few correlations between sub-tests. In addition to the impaired speech motor output, children displayed heterogeneous motor problems suggesting the presence of a global motor deficit. The complex relationship between motor functions and behaviour may partly explain the undiagnosed developmental difficulties in CAS.

  3. Disentangling the relationship between children's motor ability, executive function and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mirko; Egger, Fabienne; Benzing, Valentin; Jäger, Katja; Conzelmann, Achim; Roebers, Claudia M; Pesce, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    Even though positive relations between children's motor ability and their academic achievement are frequently reported, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Executive function has indeed been proposed, but hardly tested as a potential mediator. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine the mediating role of executive function in the relationship between motor ability and academic achievement, also investigating the individual contribution of specific motor abilities to the hypothesized mediated linkage to academic achievement. At intervals of ten weeks, 236 children aged between 10 and 12 years were tested in terms of their motor ability (t1: cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, motor coordination), core executive functions (t2: updating, inhibition, shifting), and academic achievement (t3: mathematics, reading, spelling). Structural equation modelling revealed executive function to be a mediator in the relation between motor ability and academic achievement, represented by a significant indirect effect. In separate analyses, each of the three motor abilities were positively related to children's academic achievement. However, only in the case of children's motor coordination, the mediation by executive function accounted for a significance percentage of variance of academic achievement data. The results provide evidence in support of models that conceive executive function as a mechanism explaining the relationship that links children's physical activity-related outcomes to academic achievement and strengthen the advocacy for quality physical activity not merely focused on health-related physical fitness outcomes, but also on motor skill development and learning.

  4. Disentangling the relationship between children’s motor ability, executive function and academic achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Fabienne; Benzing, Valentin; Jäger, Katja; Conzelmann, Achim; Roebers, Claudia M.; Pesce, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    Even though positive relations between children’s motor ability and their academic achievement are frequently reported, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Executive function has indeed been proposed, but hardly tested as a potential mediator. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine the mediating role of executive function in the relationship between motor ability and academic achievement, also investigating the individual contribution of specific motor abilities to the hypothesized mediated linkage to academic achievement. At intervals of ten weeks, 236 children aged between 10 and 12 years were tested in terms of their motor ability (t1: cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, motor coordination), core executive functions (t2: updating, inhibition, shifting), and academic achievement (t3: mathematics, reading, spelling). Structural equation modelling revealed executive function to be a mediator in the relation between motor ability and academic achievement, represented by a significant indirect effect. In separate analyses, each of the three motor abilities were positively related to children’s academic achievement. However, only in the case of children’s motor coordination, the mediation by executive function accounted for a significance percentage of variance of academic achievement data. The results provide evidence in support of models that conceive executive function as a mechanism explaining the relationship that links children’s physical activity-related outcomes to academic achievement and strengthen the advocacy for quality physical activity not merely focused on health-related physical fitness outcomes, but also on motor skill development and learning. PMID:28817625

  5. Predictive value of ischemic lesion volume assessed with magnetic resonance imaging for neurological deficits and functional outcome poststroke: A critical review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiemanck, S.K.; Kwakkel, G.; Post, M.W.; Prevo, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ischemic lesion volume is assumed to be an important predictor of poststroke neurological deficits and functional outcome. This critical review examines the methodological quality of MRI studies and the predictive value of hemispheric infarct volume for neurological deficits (at body

  6. Cargo binding activates myosin VIIA motor function in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Ikebe, Reiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2011-04-26

    Myosin VIIA, thought to be involved in human auditory function, is a gene responsible for human Usher syndrome type 1B, which causes hearing and visual loss. Recent studies have suggested that it can move processively if it forms a dimer. Nevertheless, it exists as a monomer in vitro, unlike the well-known two-headed processive myosin Va. Here we studied the molecular mechanism, which is currently unknown, of activating myosin VIIA as a cargo-transporting motor. Human myosin VIIA was present throughout cytosol, but it moved to the tip of filopodia upon the formation of dimer induced by dimer-inducing reagent. The forced dimer of myosin VIIA translocated its cargo molecule, MyRip, to the tip of filopodia, whereas myosin VIIA without the forced dimer-forming module does not translocate to the filopodial tips. These results suggest that dimer formation of myosin VIIA is important for its cargo-transporting activity. On the other hand, myosin VIIA without the forced dimerization module became translocated to the filopodial tips in the presence of cargo complex, i.e., MyRip/Rab27a, and transported its cargo complex to the tip. Coexpression of MyRip promoted the association of myosin VIIA to vesicles and the dimer formation. These results suggest that association of myosin VIIA monomers with membrane via the MyRip/Rab27a complex facilitates the cargo-transporting activity of myosin VIIA, which is achieved by cluster formation on the membrane, where it possibly forms a dimer. Present findings support that MyRip, a cargo molecule, functions as an activator of myosin VIIA transporter function.

  7. De Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM): een onderzoek naar de betrouwbaarheid van de Nederlandse vertaling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Ketelaar, M.; Petegem-van Beek, E. van

    2003-01-01

    This article is about the psychometric characteristics of the Dutch translation of the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM). It describes the reliability of the instrument. The article "Gross Motor Function Measure" (GMFM): a validity study of the Dutch translation focusses on the responsiveness of

  8. A Strategy for Embedding Functional Motor and Early Numeracy Skill Instruction into Physical Education Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whinnery, Stacie B.; Whinnery, Keith W.; Eddins, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the challenges educators face when attempting to find a balance between both functional and academic skill instruction for students with severe, multiple disabilities including motor impairments. The authors describe a strategy that employs embedded instruction of early numeracy and functional motor skills during physical…

  9. De Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM): een onderzoek naar de responsiviteit van de Nederlandse vertaling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Ketelaar, M.; Petegem-van Beek, E. van; Vermeer, A.

    2003-01-01

    This article is about the psychometric characteristics of the Dutch translation of the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM). It describes the responsiveness to change. The article "Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM): a reliability study of the Dutch translation" focuses on the reliability of the

  10. Functional connectivity for somatosensory and motor cortex in spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Harold; Dixit, Sachin; Litkowski, Patricia; Wingert, Jason R

    2009-12-01

    Functional connectivity (fcMRI) was analyzed in individuals with spastic diplegia and age-matched controls. Pearson correlations (r-values) were computed between resting state spontaneous activity in selected seed regions (sROI) and each voxel throughout the brain. Seed ROI were centered on foci activated by tactile stimulation of the second fingertip in somatosensory and parietal dorsal attention regions. The group with diplegia showed significantly expanded networks for the somatomotor but not dorsal attention areas. These expanded networks overran nearly all topological representations in somatosensory and motor areas despite a sROI in a fingertip focus. A possible underlying cause for altered fcMRI in the group with dipegia, and generally sensorimotor deficits in spastic diplegia, is that prenatal third trimester white-matter injury leads to localized damage to subplate neurons. We hypothesize that intracortical connections become dominant in spastic diplegia through successful competition with diminished or absent thalamocortical inputs. Similar to the effects of subplate ablations on ocular dominance columns (Kanold and Shatz, Neuron 2006;51:627-638), a spike timing-dependent plasticity model is proposed to explain a shift towards intracortical inputs.

  11. Neurotechnology for monitoring and restoring sensory, motor, and autonomic functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pae C.; Knaack, Gretchen; Weber, Douglas J.

    2016-05-01

    The rapid and exponential advances in micro- and nanotechnologies over the last decade have enabled devices that communicate directly with the nervous system to measure and influence neural activity. Many of the earliest implementations focused on restoration of sensory and motor function, but as knowledge of physiology advances and technology continues to improve in accuracy, precision, and safety, new modes of engaging with the autonomic system herald an era of health restoration that may augment or replace many conventional pharmacotherapies. DARPA's Biological Technologies Office is continuing to advance neurotechnology by investing in neural interface technologies that are effective, reliable, and safe for long-term use in humans. DARPA's Hand Proprioception and Touch Interfaces (HAPTIX) program is creating a fully implantable system that interfaces with peripheral nerves in amputees to enable natural control and sensation for prosthetic limbs. Beyond standard electrode implementations, the Electrical Prescriptions (ElectRx) program is investing in innovative approaches to minimally or non-invasively interface with the peripheral nervous system using novel magnetic, optogenetic, and ultrasound-based technologies. These new mechanisms of interrogating and stimulating the peripheral nervous system are driving towards unparalleled spatiotemporal resolution, specificity and targeting, and noninvasiveness to enable chronic, human-use applications in closed-loop neuromodulation for the treatment of disease.

  12. Alterations in resting functional connectivity due to recent motor task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Kuang-Chi; Uh, Jinsoo; Mao, Deng; Xu, Feng; Xiao, Guanghua; Lu, Hanzhang

    2013-09-01

    The impact of recent experiences of task performance on resting functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) has important implications for the design of many neuroimaging studies, because, if an effect is present, the fcMRI scan then must be performed before any evoked fMRI or after a time gap to allow it to dissipate. The present study aims to determine the effect of simple button presses, which are used in many cognitive fMRI tasks as a response recording method, on later acquired fcMRI data. Human volunteers were subject to a 23-minute button press motor task. Their resting-state brain activity before and after the task was assessed with fcMRI. It was found that, compared to the pre-task resting period, the post-task resting fcMRI revealed a significantly higher (p=0.002, N=24) cross correlation coefficient (CC) between left and right motor cortices. These changes were not present in sham control studies that matched the paradigm timing but had no actual task. The amplitude of fcMRI signal fluctuation (AF) also demonstrated an increase in the post-task period compared to pre-task. These changes were observed using both the right-hand-only task and the two-hand task. Study of the recovery time course of these effects revealed that the CC changes lasted for about 5 min while the AF change lasted for at least 15 min. Finally, voxelwise analysis revealed that the pre/post-task differences were also observed in several other brain regions, including the auditory cortex, visual areas, and the thalamus. Our data suggest that the recent performance of the simple button press task can result in elevated fcMRI CC and AF in relevant brain networks and that fcMRI scan should be performed either before evoked fMRI or after a sufficient time gap following fMRI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical, neurological, and neurophysiological evaluation of the efficiency of motor rehabilitation in children with cerebral palsy using robotic mechanotherapy and transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina A. Ikoeva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Rehabilitation of patients with cerebral palsy (CP remains a very difficult task. Stable and growing movement restrictions in such patients cause a life-long need for treatment and rehabilitation. Neurorehabilitation of children with CP at various stages includes not only traditional physical rehabilitation methods, but also extensive use of robotic mechanotherapy techniques and new technologies in the field of neurophysiology. One of such technology is non-invasive percutaneous electrical stimulation of the spinal cord. Aim of the study: To assess the effect of transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the spinal cord to improve the motor function of children with spastic diplegia using the “Lokomat” robotic mechanotherapy system. Materials and methods. A clinical rehabilitation study of 26 patients aged 6–12 years with CP was conducted. The treatment group included 11 patients who received one course of robotic mechanotherapy using the “Lokomat” system combined with transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the spinal cord. The control group included 15 patients who received one course of robotic mechanotherapy only. Results. A comparative analysis of the two groups based on the results of clinical examinations using specific scales (GMFCS, GMFM-88, Modified Ashworth Scale of Muscle Spasticity, locomotor tests (L-FORCE, L-ROM, and evaluations of muscle activity using electromyography showed that one course of rehabilitation resulted in improvement in motor function in all patients of both groups, but positive dynamics were more significant in the treatment group that underwent percutaneous electrical stimulation of the spinal cord. Conclusion. Based on clinical data, changes in indicators of the locomotor tests L-FORCE and L-ROM, as well as assessment of changes in muscle activity, showed that motor rehabilitation of children with spastic diplegia using the “Lokomat” robotic mechanotherapy system combined with

  14. Prenatal smoking exposure, measured as maternal serum cotinine, and children's motor developmental milestones and motor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Høgenhof; Høyer, Birgit Bjerre; Pedersen, Henning Sloth

    2016-01-01

    school age (assessed by the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire 2007 (DCDQ'07)). METHOD: In 2002-2004, 1,253 pregnant women from Greenland and Ukraine were included in the INUENDO birth cohort. The participating women filled in questionnaires and 1,177 provided blood samples, which were...... of breastfeeding. Data were stratified by country. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference in age at motor milestones was found comparing children of smokers with children of non-smokers. Also, there was no statistically significant difference in motor score (Developmental Coordination Disorder......BACKGROUND: Cohort studies have indicated an association between prenatal smoking exposure and children's motor difficulties. However, results are inconsistent and exposure is most often self-reported. Studies indicate that measurement of serum cotinine can result in a more accurate status...

  15. Executive functions as predictors of visual-motor integration in children with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memisevic, Haris; Sinanovic, Osman

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between visual-motor integration and executive functions, and in particular, the extent to which executive functions can predict visual-motor integration skills in children with intellectual disability. The sample consisted of 90 children (54 boys, 36 girls; M age = 11.3 yr., SD = 2.7, range 7-15) with intellectual disabilities of various etiologies. The measure of executive functions were 8 subscales of the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) consisting of Inhibition, Shifting, Emotional Control, Initiating, Working memory, Planning, Organization of material, and Monitoring. Visual-motor integration was measured with the Acadia test of visual-motor integration (VMI). Regression analysis revealed that BRIEF subscales explained 38% of the variance in VMI scores. Of all the BRIEF subscales, only two were statistically significant predictors of visual-motor integration: Working memory and Monitoring. Possible implications of this finding are further elaborated.

  16. Expanded functional coupling of subcortical nuclei with the motor resting-state network in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Siebner, Hartwig R; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) impairs signal transmission along cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical connections, affecting functional integration within the motor network. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during motor tasks has revealed altered functional connectivity in MS...... controls underwent a 20-minute resting-state fMRI session at 3 Tesla. Independent component analysis was applied to the fMRI data to identify disease-related changes in motor resting-state connectivity. RESULTS: Patients with MS showed a spatial expansion of motor resting-state connectivity in deep...... subcortical nuclei but not at the cortical level. The anterior and middle parts of the putamen, adjacent globus pallidus, anterior and posterior thalamus and the subthalamic region showed stronger functional connectivity with the motor network in the MS group compared with controls. CONCLUSION: MS...

  17. [Effectiveness of group physiotherapy on motor function in elderly stroke patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusi, R

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of group physiotherapy with special emphasis on motor function of the elderly stroke patients. The sample comprised sixteen persons who had survived a stroke and who lived at home. The sample was treated by using group physiotherapy weekly and ten times altogether. The patients' motor function were assessed before and after the intervention programme with a chart for assessing motor capacity. In addition, each patient was interviewed regarding his or her usual activity, health and life situation. Mainly descriptive statistical methods were used, e.g medians, lower and upper quartiles. The outcome of the study shows that group physiotherapy has effectiveness to maintain and in some respects also to improve basic motor function. It seems that survivors need and also get different kind of rehabilitation and care to minimize their motor impairment and to maintain their functional capacity.

  18. Function Over Form: Modeling Groups of Inherited Neurological Conditions in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozol, Robert A; Abrams, Alexander J; James, David M; Buglo, Elena; Yan, Qing; Dallman, Julia E

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are a unique cell to behavior model for studying the basic biology of human inherited neurological conditions. Conserved vertebrate genetics and optical transparency provide in vivo access to the developing nervous system as well as high-throughput approaches for drug screens. Here we review zebrafish modeling for two broad groups of inherited conditions that each share genetic and molecular pathways and overlap phenotypically: neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), Intellectual Disability (ID) and Schizophrenia (SCZ), and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Cerebellar Ataxia (CATX), Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) and Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease (CMT). We also conduct a small meta-analysis of zebrafish orthologs of high confidence neurodevelopmental disorder and neurodegenerative disease genes by looking at duplication rates and relative protein sizes. In the past zebrafish genetic models of these neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases have provided insight into cellular, circuit and behavioral level mechanisms contributing to these conditions. Moving forward, advances in genetic manipulation, live imaging of neuronal activity and automated high-throughput molecular screening promise to help delineate the mechanistic relationships between different types of neurological conditions and accelerate discovery of therapeutic strategies.

  19. Altered neurological function in mice immunized with early endosome antigen 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritzler Marvin J

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoantibodies directed against the 160 kDa endosome protein early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1 are seen in patients with neurological diseases. To determine if antibodies to EEA1 have a neuropathological effect, mice from three major histocompatability haplotype backgrounds (H2q, H2b and H2d were immunized with EEA1 (amino acids 82–1411 that was previously shown to contain the target EEA1 epitopes. The mice were then subjected to five neuro-behavioural tests: grid walking, forelimb strength, open field, reaching and rotarod. Results The immunized SWR/J mice with sustained anti-EEA1 antibodies had significantly reduced forelimb strength than the control non-immune mice of the same strain, and BALB/CJ immune mice demonstrated significantly more forelimb errors on the grid walk test than the control group. Conclusions Antibodies to recombinant EEA1 in mice may mediate neurological deficits that are consistent with clinical features of some humans that spontaneously develop anti-EEA1 autoantibodies.

  20. The central role of trunk control in the gross motor function of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Derek John; Butler, Penny; Saavedra, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Aim Improvement of gross motor function and mobility are primary goals of physical therapy in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between segmental control of the trunk and the corresponding gross motor function in children with CP....... Method This retrospective cross-sectional study was based on 92 consecutive referrals of children with CP in Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I to V, 39 females, 53 males (median age 4y [range 1–14y]), and 77, 12, and 3 with spastic, dyskinetic, and ataxic CP respectively...... function and mobility with significant clinical implications for the treatment of children with CP....

  1. Recovery of somatosensory and motor functions of the paretic upper limb in patients after stroke: Comparison of two therapeutic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Macháčková

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Frequent and extensive disturbances to the somatosensory and motor hand functions after stroke are common. This study explores a new therapeutic approach that may improve the effectiveness of rehabilitation for these upper limb impairments. Objective: To assess the effect of rehabilitation combining standard therapy and somatosensory stimulation on sensorimotor hand functions. To compare the effect of this method with the standard method of rehabilitation. Methods: Two groups of patients were used to compare the effect of standard therapy (group A, n = 15, age = 59.8 ± 9.4 years, and the effect of therapy with targeted somatosensory stimulation (group B, n = 15, age = 65.5 ± 8.2. The groups consisted of patients after an ischemic stroke in post-acute phase, with hemiparesis, aged from 45 to 75 years, both men and women. The methods used to assess patients comprised a neurological clinical examination, two batteries of tests of somatosensory function (Rivermead Assessment of Somatosensory Performance, Fabric Matching Test, two batteries of tests of motor function (Nine Hole Peg Test, Test of Manipulation Functions, and activities of daily living assessment. Results: The results show that before therapy a deficit of somatosensory function occurred on the paretic upper limb in more than 50% of patients in both groups. Motor functions were impaired more frequently than somatosensory functions. Somatosensory stimulation therapy had an enhanced improvement of somatosensory functions, especially tactile discrimination of the object surface. Conclusions: Major improvement, particularly of tactile discrimination sensation, occurred in group B, where therapy focused on somatosensory deficit was applied. We did not show that such considerable improvement in discrimination sensation in group B was associated with any change in motor function. Clinical improvement in the motor function of the paretic limb occurred in

  2. Fine motor, sensory and perceptive function of students with attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Paola Matiko Martins; Pinheiro, Fábio Henrique; Germano, Giseli Donadon; Padula, Niura Aparecida de Moura Ribeiro; Lourencetti, Maria Dalva; Santos, Lara Cristina Antunes Dos; Capellini, Simone Aparecida

    2011-12-01

    To characterize and compare the fine motor, sensory and perceptive functions of students with Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity (ADHD) and students with good academic performance, without behavior alteration. Participants were 22 male students from Elementary School distributed into: GI - 11 children with ADHD; and GII - 11 students with good academic performance and no behavior alteration. Students were submitted to the Protocol for Evaluation of Fine Motor, Sensory and Perceptual Function, and to the Dysgraphia Scale. There were differences between GI and GII in tasks concerning fine motor function, sensory function, and perceptual function, with lower performance from GI. All students in GI presented dysgraphia. Students with Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity present lower performance regarding fine motor, sensory and perception functions in relation to students with good academic performance. These difficulties can cause significant impact on academic performance, impairing the development of written language and causing dysgraphia in these students.

  3. Chapter 38: American neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemon, Frank R

    2010-01-01

    The great formative event in the history of North America, the Civil War of 1861 to 1865, was the stimulus for the development of clinical neurology and the neurosciences. The first neurological research center on the continent was the US Army hospital at Turner's Lane, Philadelphia, PA. Silas Weir Mitchell and his colleagues described causalgia (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), phantom limb sensation, and Horner's syndrome (before Horner). The medical leader of the Northern army was William Hammond. After the conclusion of hostilities, he began a huge clinical practice in New York City. In the United States, clinical neurology began in private practice, unlike Europe, where neurology began in institutions. Hammond's textbook, which first used the term athetosis, was used by a generation of physicians who encountered patients with neurological signs and symptoms. Early in the 20th century, neurological institutions were formed around universities; probably the most famous was the Montreal Neurological Institute founded by Wilder Penfield. The US federal government sponsored extensive research into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system through the Neurological Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, later called the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. The government officially classified the final 10 years of the 20th century as the Decade of the Brain and provided an even greater level of research funding.

  4. Structure-Function Relationships behind the Phenomenon of Cognitive Resilience in Neurology: Insights for Neuroscience and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rudrauf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of cognitive resilience, that is, the dynamical preservation of normal functions despite neurological disorders, demonstrates that cognition can be highly robust to devastating brain injury. Here, cognitive resilience is considered across a range of neurological conditions. Simple computational models of structure-function relationships are used to discuss hypotheses about the neural mechanisms of resilience. Resilience expresses functional redundancies in brain networks and suggests a process of dynamic rerouting of brain signals. This process is underlined by a global renormalization of effective connectivity, capable of restoring information transfer between spared brain structures via alternate pathways. Local mechanisms of synaptic plasticity mediate the renormalization at the lowest level of implementation, but it is also driven by top-down cognition, with a key role of self-awareness in fostering resilience. The presence of abstraction layers in brain computation and networking is hypothesized to account for the renormalization process. Future research directions and challenges are discussed regarding the understanding and control of resilience based on multimodal neuroimaging and computational neuroscience. The study of resilience will illuminate ways by which the brain can overcome adversity and help inform prevention and treatment strategies. It is relevant to combating the negative neuropsychological impact of aging and fostering cognitive enhancement.

  5. Electric Transfer Function Model of Switched Reluctance Motors and the Model-Based Current Control Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hiroki; Komaki, Ryoko; Naitoh, Haruo; Yamaba, Akira; Katoh, Hiroki

    This paper presents a current control design for switched reluctance motors (SRMs). The electric transfer characteristic of the motors is studied first. Their transfer function is brought out to be represented by a pure resistive component, which is not constant but varies depending on the motor current and speed. The current control design for SRMs follows the classical design technique used for dc machines, where the zero of PI controller cancels the pole of Ls+R. Because the transfer function of SRMs does not have any poles, an I controller is suitable for them. The integral gain should be adjusted in order to compensate the non-linearity, that is, the variation in the equivalent resistor of the SRMs' transfer function. The values of the integral gain are tuned and tabulated for the motor speed and current. Simulation and experiment demonstrate that the current and speed of the SRMs presents good responses without dependence on the motor speed and current.

  6. Genetics of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Mottagui-Tabar, Salim; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2004-05-01

    Neurological diseases are defined as an inappropriate function of the peripheral or central nervous system due to impaired electrical impulses throughout the brain and/or nervous system that may present with heterogeneous symptoms according to the parts of the system involved in these pathologic processes. Growing evidence on genetic components of neurological disease have been collected during recent years. Genetic studies have opened the way for understanding the underlying pathology of many neurological disorders. The outcome of current intense research into the genetics of neurological disorders will hopefully be the introduction of new diagnostic tools and the discovery of potential targets for new and more effective medications and preventive measures.

  7. Phenotypic variation of colonic motor functions in chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Karthik; Bharucha, Adil E; Camilleri, Michael; Rhoten, Deborah; Bakken, Timothy; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    Colonic motor disturbances in chronic constipation (CC) are heterogeneous and incompletely understood; the relationship between colonic transit and motor activity is unclear. We sought to characterize the phenotypic variability in chronic constipation. Fasting and postprandial colonic tone and phasic activity and pressure-volume relationships were assessed by a barostat manometric assembly in 35 healthy women and 111 women with CC who had normal colon transit (NTC; n = 25), slow transit (STC; n = 19), and defecatory disorders with normal (DD-normal; n = 34) or slow transit (DD-slow; n = 33). Logistic regression models assessed whether motor parameters could discriminate among these groups. Among CC, phenotypes were characterized by principal components analysis of these measurements. Compared with 10th percentile values in healthy subjects, fasting and/or postprandial colonic tone and/or compliance were reduced in 40% with NTC, 47% with STC, 53% with DD-normal, and 42% with DD-slow transit. Compared with healthy subjects, compliance was reduced (P motor dysfunctions, even in NTC. Colonic motor assessments allow chronic constipation to be characterized into phenotypes. Further studies are needed to evaluate the relationship among these phenotypes, enteric neuropathology, and response to treatment in CC. Copyright 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Muscle Hyperalgesia Correlates With Motor Function in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, Diana E.; Marinus, Johan; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; Noldus, Lucas P.J.J.; van Hilten, Jacobus J.

    2013-01-01

    At present it is unclear if disturbed sensory processing plays a role in the development of the commonly observed motor impairments in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). This study aims to investigate the relation between sensory and motor functioning in CRPS patients with and

  9. Time-dependent functional role of the contralesional motor cortex after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.J. Volz

    2017-01-01

    In patients with mild to moderate motor deficits, contralesional M1 has a task- and time-specific negative influence on motor performance of the stroke-affected hand. Our results help to explain previous contradicting findings on the role of contralesional M1 in recovery of function.

  10. Motor Performance of Children with Mild Intellectual Disability and Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuijk, P. J.; Hartman, E.; Scherder, E.; Visscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is a relatively small body of research on the motor performance of children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and borderline intellectual functioning (BIF). Adequate levels of motor skills may contribute to lifelong enjoyment of physical activity, participation in sports and healthy lifestyles. The present study compares…

  11. Motor performance of children with mild intellectual disability and borderline intellectual functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuijk, P. J.; Hartman, E.; Scherder, E.; Visscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a relatively small body of research on the motor performance of children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and borderline intellectual functioning (BIF). Adequate levels of motor skills may contribute to lifelong enjoyment of physical activity, participation in sports and

  12. Motor performance of children with mild intellectual disability and borderline intellectual functioning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuijk, P.J.; Hartman, E.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Visscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a relatively small body of research on the motor performance of children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and borderline intellectual functioning (BIF). Adequate levels of motor skills may contribute to lifelong enjoyment of physical activity, participation in sports and

  13. Stimulation through Simulation? Motor Imagery and Functional Reorganization in Hemiplegic Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Frey, Scott H.

    2004-01-01

    A key factor influencing reorganization of function in damaged neural networks of the adult brain is stimulation. How to stimulate motor areas of patients with paralyses is a formidable challenge. One possibility is to use internal movement simulations, or motor imagery, as an alternative to conventional therapeutic interventions that require…

  14. On the relationship between motor performance and executive functioning in children with intellectual disabilities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, E.; Houwen, S.; Scherder, E.J.A.; Visscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that children with intellectual disabilities (ID) have motor problems and higher-order cognitive deficits. The aim of this study was to examine the motor skills and executive functions in school-age children with borderline and mild ID. The second aim was to

  15. On the relationship between motor performance and executive functioning in children with intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, E.; Houwen, S.; Scherder, E.; Visscher, C.

    Background It has been suggested that children with intellectual disabilities (ID) have motor problems and higher-order cognitive deficits. The aim of this study was to examine the motor skills and executive functions in school-age children with borderline and mild ID. The second aim was to

  16. Unravelling functional neurology: a scoping review of theories and clinical applications in a context of chiropractic manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Anne-Laure; Meyer, Amanda; Etherington, Sarah; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Functional Neurology (FN), a seemingly attractive treatment approach used by some chiropractors, proposes to have an effect on a multitude of conditions but some of its concepts are controversial. A scoping review was performed to describe, in the context of chiropractic manual therapy, 1) the FN theories, and 2) its clinical applications (i.e. its indications, examination procedures, treatment modalities, treatment plans, and clinical outcomes) using four sources: i) one key textbook, ii) the scientific peer-reviewed literature, iii) websites from chiropractors using FN, and iv) semi-structured interviews of chiropractors using FN. The scientific literature was searched in PubMed, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus, completed by a hand search in the journal Functional Neurology, Rehabilitation and Ergonomics (November 2016 and March 2017, respectively). The only textbook on the topic we found was included and articles were chosen if they had an element of manual therapy. There was no restriction for study design but discussion papers were excluded. Websites were found in Google using the search term "Functional Neurology". Chiropractors, known to use FN, were invited based on their geographical location. Theories were mainly uncovered in the textbook as were all aspects of the clinical applications except treatment plans. The other three sources were used for the five aspects of clinical applications. Results were summarized and reported extensively in tables. Eleven articles were included, five websites scrutinized, and four semi-structured interviews performed. FN is based on the belief that reversible lesions in the nervous system are the cause of a multitude of conditions and that specific clusters of neurons can be positively affected by manipulative therapy, but also by many other stimuli. Diagnostic procedures include both conventional and unusual tests, with an interpretation specific to FN. Initial treatment is intense and clinical outcomes reported as positive

  17. Neurological and neuropsychological functions in adults with a history of developmental arsenic poisoning from contaminated milk powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kato, Tsuguhiko; Ohta, Hitoshi; Bellinger, David C; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Grandjean, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    During the summer of 1955, mass arsenic poisoning of bottle-fed infants occurred in the western part of Japan due to contaminated milk powder, and more than 100 died; some childhood victims were later found to suffer from neurological sequelae in adolescence. This unique incident enabled us to explore infancy as a critical period of arsenic exposure in regard to developmental neurotoxicity and its possible persistence through adulthood. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the association between developmental arsenic exposure and the neurological outcomes more than 50 years later. We conducted a retrospective cohort study during the period from April 2012 to February 2013 in two hospitals in Okayama Prefecture, Japan. The study sample consisted of 50 individuals: 27 known poisoning victims from Okayama Prefecture, and 23 non-exposed local controls of similar age. In addition to neurological examination, we adapted a battery of neurophysiological and neuropsychological tests to identify the types of brain functions affected by early-life arsenic exposure. While limited abnormalities were found in the neurophysiological tests, neuropsychological deficits were observed. Except for Finger tapping, all test scores in the exposed group--Vocabulary and Block Design from Wechsler Adults Intelligent Scale III, Design memory subtest from Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning 2, and Grooved pegboard test--were substantially below those obtained by the unexposed. The exposed group showed average performance at least 1.2 standard deviations below the average for the controls. Exposed participants performed less well than controls, even after exclusion of subjects with recognized disabilities or those with a high level of education. Adults who had suffered arsenic poisoning during infancy revealed neuropsychological dysfunctions, even among those subjects not recognized as having disabilities. Developmental neurotoxicity due to arsenic likely results in permanent

  18. MRI and neurological findings in patients with spinal metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Switlyk, M.D.; Hole, K.H.; Knutstad, K. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: marta.switlyk@radiumhospitalet.no; Skjeldal, S.; Zaikova, O. [Department of Orthopedics, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Hald, J.K. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Seierstad, T. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen (Norway)

    2012-12-15

    Background. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the recommended primary investigation method for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Initiating treatment before the development of motor deficits is essential to preserve neurological function. However, the relationship between MRI-assessed grades of spinal metastatic disease and neurological status has not been widely investigated. Purpose. To analyze the association between neurological function and MRI-based assessment of the extent of spinal metastases using two different grading systems. Material and Methods. A total of 284 patients admitted to our institution for initial radiotherapy or surgery for symptomatic spinal metastases were included in the study. Motor and sensory deficits were categorized according to the Frankel classification system. Pre-treatment MRI evaluations of the entire spine were scored for the extent of spinal metastases, presence and severity of spinal cord compression, and nerve root compression. Two MRI-based scales were used to evaluate the degree of cord compression and spinal canal narrowing and relate these findings to neurological function. Results. Of the patients included in the study, 28 were non-ambulatory, 49 were ambulatory with minor motor deficits, and 207 had normal motor function. Spinal cord compression was present in all patients with Frankel scores of B or C, 23 of 35 patients with a Frankel score of D (66%), and 48 of 152 patients with a Frankel score of E (32%). The percentage of patients with severe spinal canal narrowing increased with increasing Frankel grades. The grading according to the scales showed a significant association with the symptoms according to the Frankel scale (P < 0.001). Conclusion. In patients with neurological dysfunction, the presence and severity of impairment was associated with the epidural tumor burden. A significant number of patients had radiological spinal cord compression and normal motor function (occult MSCC)

  19. Functional mapping of the sensorimotor cortex: combined use of magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, and motor evoked potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fujii, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fukui, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Mizushima, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Hasuo, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Tobimatsu, S. [Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurological Inst., Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Combined use of magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was carried out on one patient in an attempt to localise precisely a structural lesion to the central sulcus. A small cyst in the right frontoparietal region was thought to be the cause of generalised seizures in an otherwise asymptomatic woman. First the primary sensory cortex was identified with magnetic source imaging (MSI) of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using MEG and MRI. Second, the motor area of the hand was identified using f-MRI during handsqueezing. Then transcranial magnetic stimulation localised the hand motor area on the scalp, which was mapped onto the MRI. There was a good agreement between MSI, f-MRI and MEP as to the location of the sensorimotor cortex and its relationship to the lesion. Multimodality mapping techniques may thus prove useful in the precise localisation of cortical lesions, and in the preoperative determination of the best treatment for peri-rolandic lesions. (orig.)

  20. Recovery of neurological function despite immediate sleep disruption following diffuse brain injury in the mouse: clinical relevance to medically untreated concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Rachel K; Harrison, Jordan L; O'Hara, Bruce F; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between immediate disruption of posttraumatic sleep and functional outcome in the diffuse brain-injured mouse. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to moderate midline fluid percussion injury (n = 65; 1.4 atm; 6-10 min righting reflex time) or sham injury (n = 44). Cohorts received either intentional sleep disruption (minimally stressful gentle handling) or no sleep disruption for 6 h following injury. Following disruption, serum corticosterone levels (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and posttraumatic sleep (noninvasive piezoelectric sleep cages) were measured. For 1-7 days postinjury, sensorimotor outcome was assessed by Rotarod and a modified Neurological Severity Score (NSS). Cognitive function was measured using Novel Object Recognition (NOR) and Morris water maze (MWM) in the first week postinjury. Neurotrauma research laboratory. Disrupting posttraumatic sleep for 6 h did not affect serum corticosterone levels or functional outcome. In the hour following the first dark onset, sleep-disrupted mice exhibited a significant increase in sleep; however, this increase was not sustained and there was no rebound of lost sleep. Regardless of sleep disruption, mice showed a time-dependent improvement in Rotarod performance, with brain-injured mice having significantly shorter latencies on day 7 compared to sham. Further, brain-injured mice, regardless of sleep disruption, had significantly higher NSS scores postinjury compared with sham. Cognitive behavioral testing showed no group differences among any treatment group measured by MWM and NOR. Short-duration disruption of posttraumatic sleep did not affect functional outcome, measured by motor and cognitive performance. These data raise uncertainty about posttraumatic sleep as a mechanism of recovery from diffuse brain injury.

  1. Standing activity intervention and motor function in a young child with cerebral palsy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audu, Olukemi; Daly, Carol

    2017-02-01

    There is limited evidence to fully justify the use of standing interventions for children with cerebral palsy (CP). This case report describes the impact of an 8-week standing program on motor function in a child with severe CP living in western Africa. The subject was diagnosed with ischemic - hypoxic encephalopathy shortly after birth and with CP at 12 months of age. Gross Motor Function Classification of CP was level IV. Early attempts at physical therapy were interrupted by limited access to medical services. At 18 months, a standing program using a locally constructed standing frame was initiated. The standing intervention was completed at home 5 times a week for 8 weeks. Motor skills were assessed at baseline and post-intervention using the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-66). Scores on the GMFM-66 increased from 28 at baseline to 37.4 in 8 weeks. Improvements in motor function included improved head control, improved upper extremity function, and increased sitting ability. Implementation of a home-based standing program may have contributed to improved motor skills for this child. Further research is needed to determine the effect of standing interventions on functional motor development for children with severe CP.

  2. Gross Motor Function Measure Evolution Ratio: Use as a Control for Natural Progression in Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marois, Pierre; Marois, Mikael; Pouliot-Laforte, Annie; Vanasse, Michel; Lambert, Jean; Ballaz, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    To develop a new way to interpret Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-66) score improvement in studies conducted without control groups in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The curves, which describe the pattern of motor development according to the children's Gross Motor Function Classification System level, were used as historical control to define the GMFM-66 expected natural evolution in children with CP. These curves have been modeled and generalized to fit the curve to particular children characteristics. Research center. Not applicable. Not applicable. Not applicable. Assuming that the GMFM-66 score evolution followed the shape of the Rosenbaum curves, by taking into account the age and GMFM-66 score of children, the expected natural evolution of the GMFM-66 score was predicted for any group of children with CP who were Motor Function Measure Evolution Ratio, was defined as follows: Gross Motor Function Measure Evolution Ratio=measured GMFM-66 score change/expected natural evolution. For practical or ethical reasons, it is almost impossible to use control groups in studies evaluating effectiveness of many therapeutic modalities. The Gross Motor Function Measure Evolution Ratio gives the opportunity to take into account the expected natural evolution of the gross motor function of children with CP, which is essential to accurately interpret the therapy effect on the GMFM-66. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurologic function during developmental and adult stages in Dab1(scm) (scrambler) mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquelin, C; Strazielle, C; Lalonde, R

    2012-01-01

    Homozygous Dab1(scm) mouse mutants with cell ectopias in cerebellar cortex, hippocampus, and neocortex were compared to non-ataxic controls on the SHIRPA primary screening battery on postnatal days 8, 15, and 22, as well as in the adult period. Dab1(scm) mutants were distinguished from non-ataxic controls as early as postnatal day 8 based on body tremor, gait anomalies, and body weight. On postnatal day 15, motor coordination deficits were evident on horizontal bar and inclined or vertical grid tests in association with a weaker grip strength. Likewise, mutants were distinguished from controls on drop righting and hindpaw clasping tests. Further differences were detected on postnatal day 22 in the form of fewer visual placing, touch escape, trunk curl, freezing, and vocalization responses, as well as squares traversed in the open-field. Evaluation at the adult age demonstrated similar impairments, indicative of permanent motor alterations. Neuronal metabolic activity was estimated by cytochrome oxidase histochemistry on cerebellar sections. Cerebellar cortical layers and efferent deep nuclei of Dab1(scm) mice appeared hypometabolic relative to non-ataxic mice despite normal metabolism in both regular and ectopic Purkinje cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional MRT in psychiatry and neurology. 2. rev. and upd. ed.; Funktionelle MRT in Psychiatrie und Neurologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Frank [Universitaetsklinikum Aachen (Germany); Fink, Gereon R. (eds.) [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Uniklinik Koeln (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    The book on functional MRT in psychiatry and neurology covers the following topics: (I) Fundamentals: functional neuro-anatomy, fundamentals of NMR imaging, basic research on the clinical use for diagnostics and therapy; basics of morphometry; real-time fMRT, planning and execution of experimental paradigms; data analysis and statistics; reliability and quality of fMRT experiments; eye movement, neuropharmacologic functional imaging, gender dependent effects, age dependent effects, resting state fMRT; meta analyses. (II) Higher brain achievements: movement and action, perception and attention, visual system and object processing, auditory system, executive functions, somatosensoric system, memory, learning and gratification system, functional neuro-anatomy of speech, number processing and calculation, connectivity, social cognition, emotions, olfactory system, functional imaging in the pain research. (III) Disease pattern: dystonia, Parkinson syndrome, Chorea Huntington, aphasia, apraxia, neglect, amnesia, function recovery following apoplexy, schizophrenia, affective disturbances, anxiety and fear, post-traumatic disturbances, hyperactivity syndrome, personality disorder. (IV) Working tools: brain atlas, tool for integrated analyses of structure, functionality and connectivity (SPM anatomy toolbox).

  5. Shaping Early Reorganization of Neural Networks Promotes Motor Function after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, L J; Rehme, A K; Michely, J; Nettekoven, C; Eickhoff, S B; Fink, G R; Grefkes, C

    2016-06-01

    Neural plasticity is a major factor driving cortical reorganization after stroke. We here tested whether repetitively enhancing motor cortex plasticity by means of intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) prior to physiotherapy might promote recovery of function early after stroke. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to elucidate underlying neural mechanisms. Twenty-six hospitalized, first-ever stroke patients (time since stroke: 1-16 days) with hand motor deficits were enrolled in a sham-controlled design and pseudo-randomized into 2 groups. iTBS was administered prior to physiotherapy on 5 consecutive days either over ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1-stimulation group) or parieto-occipital vertex (control-stimulation group). Hand motor function, cortical excitability, and resting-state fMRI were assessed 1 day prior to the first stimulation and 1 day after the last stimulation. Recovery of grip strength was significantly stronger in the M1-stimulation compared to the control-stimulation group. Higher levels of motor network connectivity were associated with better motor outcome. Consistently, control-stimulated patients featured a decrease in intra- and interhemispheric connectivity of the motor network, which was absent in the M1-stimulation group. Hence, adding iTBS to prime physiotherapy in recovering stroke patients seems to interfere with motor network degradation, possibly reflecting alleviation of post-stroke diaschisis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Non-Invasive Electrical Brain Stimulation Montages for Modulation of Human Motor Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curado, Marco; Fritsch, Brita; Reis, Janine

    2016-02-04

    Non-invasive electrical brain stimulation (NEBS) is used to modulate brain function and behavior, both for research and clinical purposes. In particular, NEBS can be applied transcranially either as direct current stimulation (tDCS) or alternating current stimulation (tACS). These stimulation types exert time-, dose- and in the case of tDCS polarity-specific effects on motor function and skill learning in healthy subjects. Lately, tDCS has been used to augment the therapy of motor disabilities in patients with stroke or movement disorders. This article provides a step-by-step protocol for targeting the primary motor cortex with tDCS and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS), a specific form of tACS using an electrical current applied randomly within a pre-defined frequency range. The setup of two different stimulation montages is explained. In both montages the emitting electrode (the anode for tDCS) is placed on the primary motor cortex of interest. For unilateral motor cortex stimulation the receiving electrode is placed on the contralateral forehead while for bilateral motor cortex stimulation the receiving electrode is placed on the opposite primary motor cortex. The advantages and disadvantages of each montage for the modulation of cortical excitability and motor function including learning are discussed, as well as safety, tolerability and blinding aspects.

  7. Behavioural lateralization in domestic pigs (Sus scrofa)-variations between motor functions and individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goursot, Charlotte; Düpjan, Sandra; Tuchscherer, Armin; Puppe, Birger; Leliveld, Lisette M C

    2017-11-30

    Motor lateralization is hypothesized to depend on the complexity of the motor function, but it might at the same time reflect hemispheric dominance within an individual across motor functions. We investigated possible motor lateralization patterns in four motor functions of different complexity (snout use in a manipulative task, foot use in two-stepping tasks and tail curling) in the domestic pig, a tetrapod species relevant as farm animal but also as a model in human neuroscience. A significant majority of our sample showed individual biases for manipulation with their snout and for curling their tail. Interestingly, the tail curling was lateralized towards the right at the population level and showed stronger lateralization patterns than the snout. Using a cluster analysis with combined tail and snout laterality, we identified groups of individuals with different lateralization patterns across motor functions that potentially reflect the individuals' hemispheric dominance. To conclude, our results suggest that pigs show lateralization patterns that depend on the motor function and on the individual. Such individual lateralization patterns might have broader implications for animal personality and welfare. Our study lays the methodological groundwork for future research on laterality in pigs.

  8. Excitability of Motor Cortices as a Function of Emotional Sounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komeilipoor, N.; Pizzolato, F.; Daffertshofer, A.; Cesari, P.

    2013-01-01

    We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to clarify how non-verbal emotionally-characterized sounds modulate the excitability of the corticospinal motor tract (CST). While subjects were listening to sounds (monaurally and binaurally), single TMS pulses were delivered to either left or right

  9. Psychological consequences of congenital hypothyroidism: Cognitive, motor and psychosocial functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluijs Veer, L.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis shows that although the development of children with (permanent) congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is considerably improved by early treatment as a result of neonatal screening, they are still at risk for motor and cognitive problems. This applies especially for children with severe CH.

  10. Parental questionnaire as a screening instrument for motor function at age five

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordbye-Nielsen, Kirsten; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: No standardised method is used to determine motor function in children in general practice in Denmark. Our aim was to evaluate the correlation between a parental questionnaire assessing motor function at the age of five years and the clinical test Movement Assessment Battery...... for Children (M-ABC), and to assess whether one or more questions could be used to screen for motor problems at the age of five years. Methods: This study was based on a parental questionnaire containing ten questions. The M-ABC was used as the gold standard. n = 755 children. The Mann-Whitney rank sum test...... expressed concern about the child’s motor development had a sensitivity of 17.0% and a specificity of 93.9%. 
 Conclusion: A parental questionnaire used as a screening instrument to identify children with motor problems has a reasonable specificity, but a low sensitivity. The six questions can be used...

  11. Visual-motor and executive functions in children born preterm: the Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Birgitta; Lundequist, Aiko; Smedler, Ann-Charlotte

    2010-10-01

    Visual-motor development and executive functions were investigated with the Bender Test at age 5½ years in 175 children born preterm and 125 full-term controls, within the longitudinal Stockholm Neonatal Project. Assessment also included WPPSI-R and NEPSY neuropsychological battery for ages 4-7 (Korkman, 1990). Bender protocols were scored according to Brannigan & Decker (2003), Koppitz (1963) and a complementary neuropsychological scoring system (ABC), aimed at executive functions and developed for this study. Bender results by all three scoring systems were strongly related to overall cognitive level (Performance IQ), in both groups. The preterm group displayed inferior visual-motor skills compared to controls also when controlling for IQ. The largest group differences were found on the ABC scoring, which shared unique variance with NEPSY tests of executive function. Multiple regression analyses showed that hyperactive behavior and inattention increased the risk for visual-motor deficits in children born preterm, whereas no added risk was seen among hyperactive term children. Gender differences favoring girls were strongest within the preterm group, presumably reflecting the specific vulnerability of preterm boys. The results indicate that preterm children develop a different neurobehavioral organization from children born at term, and that the Bender test with a neuropsychological scoring is a useful tool in developmental screening around school start. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2010 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  12. Physical activity and obesity mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents’ academic achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantomaa, Marko T.; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Kankaanpää, Anna; Kaakinen, Marika; Rodriguez, Alina; Taanila, Anja; Ahonen, Timo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Tammelin, Tuija

    2013-01-01

    The global epidemic of obesity and physical inactivity may have detrimental implications for young people’s cognitive function and academic achievement. This prospective study investigated whether childhood motor function predicts later academic achievement via physical activity, fitness, and obesity. The study sample included 8,061 children from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986, which contains data about parent-reported motor function at age 8 y and self-reported physical activity, predicted cardiorespiratory fitness (cycle ergometer test), obesity (body weight and height), and academic achievement (grades) at age 16 y. Structural equation models with unstandardized (B) and standardized (β) coefficients were used to test whether, and to what extent, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and obesity at age 16 mediated the association between childhood motor function and adolescents’ academic achievement. Physical activity was associated with a higher grade-point average, and obesity was associated with a lower grade-point average in adolescence. Furthermore, compromised motor function in childhood had a negative indirect effect on adolescents’ academic achievement via physical inactivity (B = –0.023, 95% confidence interval = –0.031, –0.015) and obesity (B = –0.025, 95% confidence interval = –0.039, –0.011), but not via cardiorespiratory fitness. These results suggest that physical activity and obesity may mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents’ academic achievement. Compromised motor function in childhood may represent an important factor driving the effects of obesity and physical inactivity on academic underachievement. PMID:23277558

  13. Physical activity and obesity mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantomaa, Marko T; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Kankaanpää, Anna; Kaakinen, Marika; Rodriguez, Alina; Taanila, Anja; Ahonen, Timo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Tammelin, Tuija

    2013-01-29

    The global epidemic of obesity and physical inactivity may have detrimental implications for young people's cognitive function and academic achievement. This prospective study investigated whether childhood motor function predicts later academic achievement via physical activity, fitness, and obesity. The study sample included 8,061 children from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986, which contains data about parent-reported motor function at age 8 y and self-reported physical activity, predicted cardiorespiratory fitness (cycle ergometer test), obesity (body weight and height), and academic achievement (grades) at age 16 y. Structural equation models with unstandardized (B) and standardized (β) coefficients were used to test whether, and to what extent, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and obesity at age 16 mediated the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement. Physical activity was associated with a higher grade-point average, and obesity was associated with a lower grade-point average in adolescence. Furthermore, compromised motor function in childhood had a negative indirect effect on adolescents' academic achievement via physical inactivity (B = -0.023, 95% confidence interval = -0.031, -0.015) and obesity (B = -0.025, 95% confidence interval = -0.039, -0.011), but not via cardiorespiratory fitness. These results suggest that physical activity and obesity may mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement. Compromised motor function in childhood may represent an important factor driving the effects of obesity and physical inactivity on academic underachievement.

  14. Structurofunctional resting-state networks correlate with motor function in chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin T. Kalinosky

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The results demonstrate that changes after a stroke in both intrinsic and network-based structurofunctional correlations at rest are correlated with motor function, underscoring the importance of residual structural connectivity in cortical networks.

  15. Safety Aspects of Postanesthesia Care Unit Discharge without Motor Function Assessment after Spinal Anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Jørgensen, Christoffer Calov; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postanesthesia care unit (PACU) discharge without observation of lower limb motor function after spinal anesthesia has been suggested to significantly reduce PACU stay and enhance resource optimization and early rehabilitation but without enough data to allow clinical recommendations....... METHODS: A multicenter, semiblinded, noninferiority randomized controlled trial of discharge from the PACU with or without assessment of lower limb motor function after elective total hip or knee arthroplasty under spinal anesthesia was undertaken. The primary outcome was frequency of a successful fast.......68. RESULTS: A total of 1,359 patients (98.8% follow-up) were available for analysis (93% American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1 to 2). The primary outcome occurred in 92.2% and 92.0%, corresponding to no motor function assessment being noninferior to motor function assessment with OR 0.97 (95% CI, 0...

  16. [POSTER] ChiroChroma: An Augmented Reality Game for the Assessment of Hand Motor Functionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jockin, Pieter; Liu, Lu; Liu, Xin; Cidota, M.A.; Lukosch, S.G.

    2017-01-01

    For a better understanding of how different diseases (e.g. neurovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, and musculoskeletal pain conditions) affect human motor function, a uniform, standardized and objective evaluation is a desirable goal expressed within the clinical community. We explore

  17. Motor functioning, exploration, visuospatial cognition and language development in preschool children with autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellendoorn, Annika; Wijnroks, Lex; van Daalen, Emma; Dietz, Claudine; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Leseman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand typical and atypical developmental trajectories it is important to assess how strengths or weaknesses in one domain may be affecting performance in other domains. This study examined longitudinal relations between early fine motor functioning, visuospatial cognition,

  18. Motor function and respiratory capacity in patients with late-onset pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illes, Zsolt; Mike, Andrea; Trauninger, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The relationship between skeletal muscle strength and respiratory dysfunction in Pompe disease has not been examined by quantitative methods. We investigated correlations among lower extremity proximal muscle strength, respiratory function, and motor performance. Methods: Concentric...

  19. Effect of Hippotherapy on Motor Proficiency and Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy Who Walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Danielle; Corriveau, Hélène; Dugas, Claude

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of hippotherapy on physical capacities of children with cerebral palsy. Thirteen children (4-12 years old) with cerebral palsy classified in Gross Motor Function Classification System Level I or II were included in this prospective quasi-experimental ABA design study. Participants received 10 weeks of hippotherapy (30 min per week). Gross motor function and proficiency were measured with the Bruininks-Oseretski Motor Proficiency short form [BOT2-SF]) and the Gross Motor Function Measure-88 [GMFM-88] (Dimension D and E) twice before the program (T1 and T1'), immediately after (T2), and 10 weeks following the end of the program (T3). Mean scores for dimensions D and E of the GMFM-88 Dimension scores (p = .005) and three out of the eight items of the BOT2-SF (fine motor precision (p = .013), balance (p = .025), and strength (p = .012) improved between baseline and immediately after intervention; mean scores immediately following and 10 weeks following intervention did not differ. Hippotherapy provided by a trained therapist who applies an intense and graded session for 10 weeks can improve body functions and performance of gross motor and fine motor activities in children with cerebral palsy.

  20. Motor function measure scale, steroid therapy and patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine C. da Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the evolution of motor function in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD treated with steroids (prednisolone or deflazacort through the Motor Function Measure (MFM, which evaluates three dimensions of motor performance (D1, D2, D3. METHODS: Thirty-three patients with DMD (22 ambulant, 6 non-ambulant and 5 who lost the capacity to walk during the period of the study were assessed using the MFM scale six times over a period of 18 months. RESULTS: All the motor functions remained stable for 14 months in all patients, except D1 for those who lost their walking ability. In ambulant patients, D2 (axial and proximal motor capacities motor functions improved during six months; an improvement in D3 (distal motor capacity was noted during the total follow-up. D1 (standing posture and transfers and total score were useful to predict the loss of the ability to walk. CONCLUSIONS: The use of the MFM in DMD patients confirms the benefits of the steroid treatment for slowing the progression of the disease.

  1. [Neuro-rehabilitation for neurological disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yukihiro

    2011-11-01

    Our understanding of motor learning, neuro-plasticity and functional recovery after the occurrence of brain lesion has grown significantly. New findings in basic neuroscience provided stimuli for research in motor rehabilitation. Electrical stimulation can be applied in a variety of ways to the neurological impairment. Especially, electromyography (EMG) initiated electrical muscle stimulation improves motor dysfunction of the hemiparetic arm and hand. Triggered electrical stimulation is reported to be more effective than non-triggered electrical stimulation in facilitating upper extremity motor recovery. Power-assisted FES induces greater muscle contraction by electrical stimulation in proportion to the voluntary integrated EMG signal picked up. Daily power-assisted FES home program therapy with the novel equipment has been able to improve wrist, finger extension and shoulder flexion effectively. Combined modulation of voluntary movement, proprioceptional sensory feedback and electrical stimulation might play an important role to facilitate impaired sensory-motor integration in power-assisted FES therapy. It is recognized that increased cerebral blood flow in the sensory-motor cortex area on the injured side during power-assisted FES session compared to simple active movement or simple electrical stimulation in a multi-channels Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study to non-invasively and dynamically measure hemoglobin levels in the brain during functional activity.

  2. Understanding the relationship between brain and upper limb function in children with unilateral motor impairments: A multimodal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Maya; Green, Dido; Rudisch, Julian; Zielinski, Ingar M; Benthem-Muñiz, Marta; Jongsma, Marijtje L A; McClelland, Verity; Steenbergen, Bert; Shiran, Shelly; Ben Bashat, Dafna; Barker, Gareth J

    2018-01-01

    ) and a mixed (n = 1) connectivity pattern; again without clear association with MMs. No differences were found between children with and without MMs in lesion scores, motor fMRI laterality indices, CST diffusivity values, and upper limb function. In the genu, midbody, and splenium of the CC, higher fractional anisotropy values were found in children with MMs compared to children without MMs. The EEG data indicated a stronger mu-restoration above the contralateral hemisphere in 6/8 children and above the ipsilateral hemisphere in 2/8 children. The current results demonstrate benefits from the use of different modalities when studying upper-limb function in children with CP; not least to accommodate to the variations in tolerance and feasibility of implementation of the differing methods. These exposed multiple individual brain-reorganization patterns corresponding to different functional motor abilities. Additional research is warranted to understand the transactional influences of early brain injury, neuroplasticity and developmental and environmental factors on hand function in order to develop targeted interventions. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. DTI Measures Track and Predict Motor Function Outcomes in Stroke Rehabilitation Utilizing BCI Technology

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    Jie eSong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tracking and predicting motor outcomes is important in determining effective stroke rehabilitation strategies. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI allows for evaluation of the underlying structural integrity of brain white matter tracts and may serve as a potential biomarker for tracking and predicting motor recovery. In this study, we examined the longitudinal relationship between DTI measures of the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC and upper-limb motor outcomes in 13 stroke patients (median 20-month post-stroke who completed up to 15 sessions of intervention using brain-computer interface (BCI technology. Patients’ upper-limb motor outcomes and PLIC DTI measures including fractional anisotropy (FA, axial diffusivity (AD, radial diffusivity (RD and mean diffusivity (MD were assessed longitudinally at four time points: pre-, mid-, immediately post- and one-month-post intervention. DTI measures and ratios of each DTI measure comparing the ipsilesional and contralesional PLIC were correlated with patients’ motor outcomes to examine the relationship between structural integrity of the PLIC and patients’ motor recovery. We found that lower diffusivity and higher FA values of the ipsilesional PLIC were significantly correlated with better upper-limb motor function. Baseline DTI ratios were significantly correlated with motor outcomes measured immediately post and one-month-post BCI interventions. A few patients achieved improvements in motor recovery meeting the minimum clinically important difference (MCID. These findings suggest that upper-limb motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions relates to the microstructural status of the PLIC. Lower diffusivity and higher FA measures of the ipsilesional PLIC contribute towards better motor recovery in the stroke-affected upper-limb. DTI-derived measures may be a clinically useful biomarker in tracking and predicting motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI

  4. Cerebral localization of functions and the neurology of language: fact versus fiction or is it something else?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Elliott D

    2010-06-01

    Over the last 15 years there has been a burgeoning number of publications using functional brain imaging (>40,000 articles based on an ISI/Web of Science search) to localize behavioral and cognitive processes to specific areas in the human brain that are often not confirmed by traditional, lesion-based studies. Thus, there is a need to reassess what cerebral localization of functions is and is not. Otherwise, there is no rational way to interpret the escalating claims of localization in the functional imaging literature that is taking on the appearance of neurophysiologic "phrenology". This article will present arguments to suggest that functional localization in the brain is a robust but very dynamic, four-dimensional process. It is a learned phenomenon driven over time by large-scale, spatially distributed, neural networks seeking to efficiently maximize the processing, storage, and manipulation of information for cognitive and behavioral operations. Because of historical considerations and space limitations, the main focus will be on localization of language-related functions whose theoretical neurological basis can be generalized for any complex cognitive-behavioral function.

  5. Early clinical predictors of motor function in the upper extremity one month post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snickars, Jenny; Persson, Hanna C; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S

    2017-03-06

    To investigate factors within 3 days post-stroke that could predict severe impairment in motor function in the upper extremity at one month post-stroke. This cross-sectional study included 104 patients with first-ever stroke and impaired motor function in the upper extremity. Initial impairment in motor function, demographic data, type of stroke and stroke risk factors were chosen as possible predictors. Severe impairment in motor function was defined as ≤ 31p according to the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for Upper Extremity (FMA-UE). Logistic regression was used to predict severe impairment in motor function at one month post-stroke. Three possible prediction models were found, comprising stroke severity combined with grip strength and sex, finger extension or shoulder abduction. Models including grip strength or finger extension gave the most accurate predictions, with overall predictive ability 90.4% (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.847-0.961) and sensitivity 92.9% (95% CI 0.851-1.0) and 90.5% (95% CI 0.816-0.979), respectively. Within 3 days post-stroke, severe impairment in motor function in the upper extremity at one month can be predicted using assessment of stroke severity in combination with grip strength, finger extension or shoulder abduction. This may facilitate early planning of rehabilitation for patients with impaired upper extremity in the stroke unit.

  6. Orofacial cutaneous function in speech motor control and learning

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Somatosensory signals from facial skin can provide a rich source of sensory input. However, it is unknown yet how cutaneous input works on speech motor control and learning. This chapter introduces a kinesthetic role of orofacial cutaneous afferents in speech processing. We argue for specificity of the orofacial somatosensory system from anatomical and physiological perspectives. The contribution of cutaneous afferents to speech production is evident in neurophysiologi...

  7. Decoding post-stroke motor function from structural brain imaging

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    Jane M. Rondina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical research based on neuroimaging data has benefited from machine learning methods, which have the ability to provide individualized predictions and to account for the interaction among units of information in the brain. Application of machine learning in structural imaging to investigate diseases that involve brain injury presents an additional challenge, especially in conditions like stroke, due to the high variability across patients regarding characteristics of the lesions. Extracting data from anatomical images in a way that translates brain damage information into features to be used as input to learning algorithms is still an open question. One of the most common approaches to capture regional information from brain injury is to obtain the lesion load per region (i.e. the proportion of voxels in anatomical structures that are considered to be damaged. However, no systematic evaluation has yet been performed to compare this approach with using patterns of voxels (i.e. considering each voxel as a single feature. In this paper we compared both approaches applying Gaussian Process Regression to decode motor scores in 50 chronic stroke patients based solely on data derived from structural MRI. For both approaches we compared different ways to delimit anatomical areas: regions of interest from an anatomical atlas, the corticospinal tract, a mask obtained from fMRI analysis with a motor task in healthy controls and regions selected using lesion-symptom mapping. Our analysis showed that extracting features through patterns of voxels that represent lesion probability produced better results than quantifying the lesion load per region. In particular, from the different ways to delimit anatomical areas compared, the best performance was obtained with a combination of a range of cortical and subcortical motor areas as well as the corticospinal tract. These results will inform the appropriate methodology for predicting long term motor outcomes

  8. Impairments of Motor Function While Multitasking in HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Kronemer, Sharif I.; Mandel, Jordan A.; Sacktor, Ned C.; Marvel, Cherie L.

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) became a treatable illness with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART). As a result, patients with regular access to CART are expected to live decades with HIV. Long-term HIV infection presents unique challenges, including neurocognitive impairments defined by three major stages of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The current investigation aimed to study cognitive and motor impairments in HIV using a novel multitasking p...

  9. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...

  10. Motor and Executive Function Profiles in Adult Residents ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Exposure to elevated levels of manganese (Mn) may be associated with tremor, motor and executive dysfunction (EF), clinically resembling Parkinson’s disease (PD). PD research has identified tremor-dominant (TD) and non-tremor dominant (NTD) profiles. NTD PD presents with bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural sway, and is associated with EF impairment with lower quality of life (QoL). Presence and impact of tremor, motor, and executive dysfunction profiles on health-related QoL and life satisfaction were examined in air-Mn exposed residents of two Ohio, USA towns. Participants and Methods: From two Ohio towns exposed to air-Mn, 186 residents (76 males) aged 30-75 years were administered measures of EF (Animal Naming, ACT, Rey-O Copy, Stroop Color-Word, and Trails B), motor and tremor symptoms (UPDRS), QoL (BRFSS), life satisfaction (SWLS), and positive symptom distress (SCL-90-R). Air-Mn exposure in the two towns was modeled with 10 years of air-monitoring data. Cluster analyses detected the presence of symptom profiles by grouping together residents with similar scores on these measures. Results: Overall, mean air-Mn concentration for the two towns was 0.53 µg/m3 (SD=.92). Two-step cluster analyses identified TD and NTD symptom profiles. Residents in the NTD group lacked EF impairment; EF impairment represented a separate profile. An unimpaired group also emerged. The NTD and EF impairment groups were qualitatively similar, with relatively lo

  11. Gain-of-function SAMD9L mutations cause a syndrome of cytopenia, immunodeficiency, MDS, and neurological symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesi, Bianca; Davidsson, Josef; Voss, Matthias; Rahikkala, Elisa; Holmes, Tim D; Chiang, Samuel C C; Komulainen-Ebrahim, Jonna; Gorcenco, Sorina; Rundberg Nilsson, Alexandra; Ripperger, Tim; Kokkonen, Hannaleena; Bryder, David; Fioretos, Thoas; Henter, Jan-Inge; Möttönen, Merja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Nilsson, Lars; Pronk, Cornelis Jan; Puschmann, Andreas; Qian, Hong; Uusimaa, Johanna; Moilanen, Jukka; Tedgård, Ulf; Cammenga, Jörg; Bryceson, Yenan T

    2017-04-20

    Several monogenic causes of familial myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) have recently been identified. We studied 2 families with cytopenia, predisposition to MDS with chromosome 7 aberrations, immunodeficiency, and progressive cerebellar dysfunction. Genetic studies uncovered heterozygous missense mutations in SAMD9L, a tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome arm 7q. Consistent with a gain-of-function effect, ectopic expression of the 2 identified SAMD9L mutants decreased cell proliferation relative to wild-type protein. Of the 10 individuals identified who were heterozygous for either SAMD9L mutation, 3 developed MDS upon loss of the mutated SAMD9L allele following intracellular infections associated with myeloid, B-, and natural killer (NK)-cell deficiency. Five other individuals, 3 with spontaneously resolved cytopenic episodes in infancy, harbored hematopoietic revertant mosaicism by uniparental disomy of 7q, with loss of the mutated allele or additional in cisSAMD9L truncating mutations. Examination of 1 individual indicated that somatic reversions were postnatally selected. Somatic mutations were tracked to CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cell populations, being further enriched in B and NK cells. Stimulation of these cell types with interferon (IFN)-α or IFN-γ induced SAMD9L expression. Clinically, revertant mosaicism was associated with milder disease, yet neurological manifestations persisted in 3 individuals. Two carriers also harbored a rare, in trans germ line SAMD9L missense loss-of-function variant, potentially counteracting the SAMD9L mutation. Our results demonstrate that gain-of-function mutations in the tumor suppressor SAMD9L cause cytopenia, immunodeficiency, variable neurological presentation, and predisposition to MDS with -7/del(7q), whereas hematopoietic revertant mosaicism commonly ameliorated clinical manifestations. The findings suggest a role for SAMD9L in regulating IFN-driven, demand-adapted hematopoiesis. © 2017 by The American

  12. MotomiRs: miRNAs in Motor Neuron Function and Disease

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    Zachary C. E. Hawley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available MiRNAs are key regulators of the mammalian transcriptome that have been increasingly linked to degenerative diseases of the motor neurons. Although many of the miRNAs currently incriminated as participants in the pathogenesis of these diseases are also important to the normal development and function of motor neurons, at present there is no knowledge of the complete miRNA profile of motor neurons. In this review, we examine the current understanding with respect to miRNAs that are specifically required for motor neuron development, function and viability, and provide evidence that these should be considered as a functional network of miRNAs which we have collectively termed MotomiRs. We will also summarize those MotomiRs currently known to be associated with both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, and discuss their potential use as biomarkers.

  13. Action in Perception: Prominent Visuo-Motor Functional Symmetry in Musicians during Music Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burunat, Iballa; Brattico, Elvira; Puoliväli, Tuomas; Ristaniemi, Tapani; Sams, Mikko; Toiviainen, Petri

    2015-01-01

    Musical training leads to sensory and motor neuroplastic changes in the human brain. Motivated by findings on enlarged corpus callosum in musicians and asymmetric somatomotor representation in string players, we investigated the relationship between musical training, callosal anatomy, and interhemispheric functional symmetry during music listening. Functional symmetry was increased in musicians compared to nonmusicians, and in keyboardists compared to string players. This increased functional symmetry was prominent in visual and motor brain networks. Callosal size did not significantly differ between groups except for the posterior callosum in musicians compared to nonmusicians. We conclude that the distinctive postural and kinematic symmetry in instrument playing cross-modally shapes information processing in sensory-motor cortical areas during music listening. This cross-modal plasticity suggests that motor training affects music perception. PMID:26422790

  14. Action in Perception: Prominent Visuo-Motor Functional Symmetry in Musicians during Music Listening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iballa Burunat

    Full Text Available Musical training leads to sensory and motor neuroplastic changes in the human brain. Motivated by findings on enlarged corpus callosum in musicians and asymmetric somatomotor representation in string players, we investigated the relationship between musical training, callosal anatomy, and interhemispheric functional symmetry during music listening. Functional symmetry was increased in musicians compared to nonmusicians, and in keyboardists compared to string players. This increased functional symmetry was prominent in visual and motor brain networks. Callosal size did not significantly differ between groups except for the posterior callosum in musicians compared to nonmusicians. We conclude that the distinctive postural and kinematic symmetry in instrument playing cross-modally shapes information processing in sensory-motor cortical areas during music listening. This cross-modal plasticity suggests that motor training affects music perception.

  15. Action in Perception: Prominent Visuo-Motor Functional Symmetry in Musicians during Music Listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burunat, Iballa; Brattico, Elvira; Puoliväli, Tuomas; Ristaniemi, Tapani; Sams, Mikko; Toiviainen, Petri

    2015-01-01

    Musical training leads to sensory and motor neuroplastic changes in the human brain. Motivated by findings on enlarged corpus callosum in musicians and asymmetric somatomotor representation in string players, we investigated the relationship between musical training, callosal anatomy, and interhemispheric functional symmetry during music listening. Functional symmetry was increased in musicians compared to nonmusicians, and in keyboardists compared to string players. This increased functional symmetry was prominent in visual and motor brain networks. Callosal size did not significantly differ between groups except for the posterior callosum in musicians compared to nonmusicians. We conclude that the distinctive postural and kinematic symmetry in instrument playing cross-modally shapes information processing in sensory-motor cortical areas during music listening. This cross-modal plasticity suggests that motor training affects music perception.

  16. Effects of hypothermia combined with neural stem cell transplantation on recovery of neurological function in rats with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Jianjun

    2015-03-01

    The microenvironment of the injured spinal cord is hypothesized to be involved in driving the differentiation and survival of engrafted neural stem cells (NSCs). Hypothermia is known to improve the microenvironment of the injured spinal cord in a number of ways. To investigate the effect of NSC transplantation in combination with hypothermia on the recovery of rat spinal cord injury, 60 Sprague‑Dawley female rats were used to establish a spinal cord hemisection model. They were divided randomly into three groups: A, spinal cord injury group; B, NSC transplantation group; and C, NSC transplantation + hypothermia group. At 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks post‑injury, the motor function of all animals was evaluated using the Basso, Beattie and Besnaham locomotor scoring system and the inclined plane test. At 4 weeks post‑transplantation, histological analysis and immunocytochemistry were performed. At 8 weeks post‑transplantation, horseradish peroxidase nerve tracing and transmission electron microscopy were conducted to observe axonal regeneration. The outcome of hind limb motor function recovery in group C significantly surpassed that in group B at 4 weeks post‑injury (Pcells were observed in the spinal cords of group C. Fewer of these cells were found in group B and fewer still in group A. The differences among the three groups were significant (Ptransplantation promoted the recovery of hind limb function in rats, and combination treatment with hypothermia produced synergistic effects.

  17. The application of motor learning strategies within functionally based interventions for children with neuromotor conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Danielle; Wishart, Laurie; Missiuna, Cheryl; Wright, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    To identify and describe the application of 3 motor learning strategies (verbal instructions, practice, and verbal feedback) within 4 intervention approaches (cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance, neuromotor task training, family-centered functional therapy, and activity-focused motor interventions). A scoping review of the literature was conducted. Two themes characterizing the application of motor learning strategies within the approaches are identified and described. Application of a motor learning strategy can be a defining component of the intervention or a means of enhancing generalization and transfer of learning beyond the intervention. Often, insufficient information limits full understanding of strategy application within the approach. A greater understanding of the application, and perceived nonapplication, of motor learning strategies within intervention approaches has important clinical and research implications.

  18. Musical training induces functional plasticity in perceptual and motor networks: insights from resting-state FMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Luo

    Full Text Available A number of previous studies have examined music-related plasticity in terms of multi-sensory and motor integration but little is known about the functional and effective connectivity patterns of spontaneous intrinsic activity in these systems during the resting state in musicians. Using functional connectivity and Granger causal analysis, functional and effective connectivity among the motor and multi-sensory (visual, auditory and somatosensory cortices were evaluated using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in musicians and non-musicians. The results revealed that functional connectivity was significantly increased in the motor and multi-sensory cortices of musicians. Moreover, the Granger causality results demonstrated a significant increase outflow-inflow degree in the auditory cortex with the strongest causal outflow pattern of effective connectivity being found in musicians. These resting state fMRI findings indicate enhanced functional integration among the lower-level perceptual and motor networks in musicians, and may reflect functional consolidation (plasticity resulting from long-term musical training, involving both multi-sensory and motor functional integration.

  19. Musical training induces functional plasticity in perceptual and motor networks: insights from resting-state FMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cheng; Guo, Zhi-wei; Lai, Yong-xiu; Liao, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Kendrick, Keith M; Yao, De-zhong; Li, Hong

    2012-01-01

    A number of previous studies have examined music-related plasticity in terms of multi-sensory and motor integration but little is known about the functional and effective connectivity patterns of spontaneous intrinsic activity in these systems during the resting state in musicians. Using functional connectivity and Granger causal analysis, functional and effective connectivity among the motor and multi-sensory (visual, auditory and somatosensory) cortices were evaluated using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in musicians and non-musicians. The results revealed that functional connectivity was significantly increased in the motor and multi-sensory cortices of musicians. Moreover, the Granger causality results demonstrated a significant increase outflow-inflow degree in the auditory cortex with the strongest causal outflow pattern of effective connectivity being found in musicians. These resting state fMRI findings indicate enhanced functional integration among the lower-level perceptual and motor networks in musicians, and may reflect functional consolidation (plasticity) resulting from long-term musical training, involving both multi-sensory and motor functional integration.

  20. The embodied mind: A review on functional genomic and neurological correlates of mind-body therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehsam, David; Lutgendorf, Susan; Mills, Paul J; Rickhi, Badri; Chevalier, Gaétan; Bat, Namuun; Chopra, Deepak; Gurfein, Blake

    2017-02-01

    A broad range of mind-body therapies (MBTs) are used by the public today, and a growing body of clinical and basic sciences research has resulted in evidence-based integration of many MBTs into clinical practice. Basic sciences research has identified some of the physiological correlates of MBT practices, leading to a better understanding of the processes by which emotional, cognitive and psychosocial factors can influence health outcomes and well-being. In particular, results from functional genomics and neuroimaging describe some of the processes involved in the mind-body connection and how these can influence health outcomes. Functional genomic and neurophysiological correlates of MBTs are reviewed, detailing studies showing changes in sympathetic nervous system activation of gene transcription factors involved in immune function and inflammation, electroencephalographic and neuroimaging studies on MBT practices, and persistent changes in neural function and morphology associated with these practices. While the broad diversity of study designs and MBTs studied presents a patchwork of results requiring further validation through replication and longitudinal studies, clear themes emerge for MBTs as immunomodulatory, with effects on leukocyte transcription and function related to inflammatory and innate immune responses, and neuromodulatory, with effects on brain function and morphology relevant for attention, learning, and emotion regulation. By detailing the potential mechanisms of action by which MBTs may influence health outcomes, the data generated by these studies have contributed significantly towards a better understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying MBTs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Aberrant functional connectome in neurologically asymptomatic patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofen Ma

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the topological organization of intrinsic functional brain networks in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD.Resting-state functional MRI data were collected from 22 patients with ESRD (16 men, 18-61 years and 29 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs, 19 men, 32-61 years. Whole-brain functional networks were obtained by calculating the interregional correlation of low-frequency fluctuations in spontaneous brain activity among 1,024 parcels that cover the entire cerebrum. Weighted graph-based models were then employed to topologically characterize these networks at different global, modular and nodal levels.Compared to HCs, the patients exhibited significant disruption in parallel information processing over the whole networks (P < 0.05. The disruption was present in all the functional modules (default mode, executive control, sensorimotor and visual networks although decreased functional connectivity was observed only within the default mode network. Regional analysis showed that the disease disproportionately weakened nodal efficiency of the default mode components and tended to preferentially affect central or hub-like regions. Intriguingly, the network abnormalities correlated with biochemical hemoglobin and serum calcium levels in the patients. Finally, the functional changes were substantively unchanged after correcting for gray matter atrophy in the patients.Our findings provide evidence for the disconnection nature of ESRD's brain and therefore have important implications for understanding the neuropathologic substrate of the disease from disrupted network organization perspective.

  2. Effects of functional physical activity on the maintenance of motor function in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís Fajersztajn

    Full Text Available Abstract It is widely known that older adults, even frail individuals, can improve their physical function using appropriately targeted exercise. Nevertheless, older adults with Alzheimer's disease (AD have been excluded from the majority of studies on exercise. The functional-task physical activity program is based on activities of daily living, and may be suited for elderly people with AD because it focuses on the maintenance and stimulation of preserved abilities. In addition, session costs are substantially reduced by adopting a group approach. Furthermore, the group approach may improve the social interaction of the demented patient. Objectives: To determine whether a functional-task physical activity program in groups can maintain motor function in elderly with AD. Methods: 10 elderly diagnosed with mild or moderate AD were assigned into one of two groups: subjects with and without intervention. The intervention consisted of a 12-week function-task physical activity program in groups. Measurements: activities of daily living (Katz and Lawton & Brody questionnaires, mobility (Timed Up and Go Test, Timed Up and Go manual Test and Timed Up and Go Cognitive Test, cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination, behavioral disturbances (Neuropsychiatric Inventory I-brief and functional balance (Berg Balance Scale. Results: A statistically significant difference between the two groups was found regarding the functional balance mean change measured by Berg scale score (p=0.046. A significant improvement of 1.60 points (95%CI[0.22;2.98] was observed in the intervention group on this scale, while the non-intervention group showed -0.40 points (95%CI[-1.78;0.98], no change. Conclusions: It is possible to treat mild and moderate Alzheimer's patients using a group approach. The functional task physical activity program was efficient in functional balance improvement and also appeared to prevent mobility decline.

  3. Haptic fMRI: combining functional neuroimaging with haptics for studying the brain's motor control representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Samir; Brantner, Gerald; Aholt, Chris; Kay, Kendrick; Khatib, Oussama

    2013-01-01

    A challenging problem in motor control neuroimaging studies is the inability to perform complex human motor tasks given the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner's disruptive magnetic fields and confined workspace. In this paper, we propose a novel experimental platform that combines Functional MRI (fMRI) neuroimaging, haptic virtual simulation environments, and an fMRI-compatible haptic device for real-time haptic interaction across the scanner workspace (above torso ∼ .65×.40×.20m(3)). We implement this Haptic fMRI platform with a novel haptic device, the Haptic fMRI Interface (HFI), and demonstrate its suitability for motor neuroimaging studies. HFI has three degrees-of-freedom (DOF), uses electromagnetic motors to enable high-fidelity haptic rendering (>350Hz), integrates radio frequency (RF) shields to prevent electromagnetic interference with fMRI (temporal SNR >100), and is kinematically designed to minimize currents induced by the MRI scanner's magnetic field during motor displacement (Tesla fMRI scanner's baseline noise variation (∼.85±.1%). Finally, HFI is haptically transparent and does not interfere with human motor tasks (tested for .4m reaches). By allowing fMRI experiments involving complex three-dimensional manipulation with haptic interaction, Haptic fMRI enables-for the first time-non-invasive neuroscience experiments involving interactive motor tasks, object manipulation, tactile perception, and visuo-motor integration.

  4. Dopamine inactivation efficacy related to functional DAT1 and COMT variants influences motor response evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Bender

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dopamine plays an important role in orienting, response anticipation and movement evaluation. Thus, we examined the influence of functional variants related to dopamine inactivation in the dopamine transporter (DAT1 and catechol-O-methyltransferase genes (COMT on the time-course of motor processing in a contingent negative variation (CNV task. METHODS: 64-channel EEG recordings were obtained from 195 healthy adolescents of a community-based sample during a continuous performance task (A-X version. Early and late CNV as well as motor postimperative negative variation were assessed. Adolescents were genotyped for the COMT Val(158Met and two DAT1 polymorphisms (variable number tandem repeats in the 3'-untranslated region and in intron 8. RESULTS: The results revealed a significant interaction between COMT and DAT1, indicating that COMT exerted stronger effects on lateralized motor post-processing (centro-parietal motor postimperative negative variation in homozygous carriers of a DAT1 haplotype increasing DAT1 expression. Source analysis showed that the time interval 500-1000 ms after the motor response was specifically affected in contrast to preceding movement anticipation and programming stages, which were not altered. CONCLUSIONS: Motor slow negative waves allow the genomic imaging of dopamine inactivation effects on cortical motor post-processing during response evaluation. This is the first report to point towards epistatic effects in the motor system during response evaluation, i.e. during the post-processing of an already executed movement rather than during movement programming.

  5. Dopamine Inactivation Efficacy Related to Functional DAT1 and COMT Variants Influences Motor Response Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Stephan; Rellum, Thomas; Freitag, Christine; Resch, Franz; Rietschel, Marcella; Treutlein, Jens; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Brandeis, Daniel; Banaschewski, Tobias; Laucht, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Background Dopamine plays an important role in orienting, response anticipation and movement evaluation. Thus, we examined the influence of functional variants related to dopamine inactivation in the dopamine transporter (DAT1) and catechol-O-methyltransferase genes (COMT) on the time-course of motor processing in a contingent negative variation (CNV) task. Methods 64-channel EEG recordings were obtained from 195 healthy adolescents of a community-based sample during a continuous performance task (A-X version). Early and late CNV as well as motor postimperative negative variation were assessed. Adolescents were genotyped for the COMT Val158Met and two DAT1 polymorphisms (variable number tandem repeats in the 3′-untranslated region and in intron 8). Results The results revealed a significant interaction between COMT and DAT1, indicating that COMT exerted stronger effects on lateralized motor post-processing (centro-parietal motor postimperative negative variation) in homozygous carriers of a DAT1 haplotype increasing DAT1 expression. Source analysis showed that the time interval 500–1000 ms after the motor response was specifically affected in contrast to preceding movement anticipation and programming stages, which were not altered. Conclusions Motor slow negative waves allow the genomic imaging of dopamine inactivation effects on cortical motor post-processing during response evaluation. This is the first report to point towards epistatic effects in the motor system during response evaluation, i.e. during the post-processing of an already executed movement rather than during movement programming. PMID:22649558

  6. Differential effects of aging on motor and cognitive functioning in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shumita; Frndak, Seth; Drake, Allison S; Irwin, Lauren; Zivadinov, Robert; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Benedict, Ralph Hb

    2017-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are impaired in motor and cognitive performance, but the extent to which these deficits are magnified by aging is unknown. In one prior study, differences in cognitive processing speed between MS patients and healthy individuals were of similar magnitude across the lifespan. Here, we have improved on this work by expanding assessment to multiple cognitive domains and motor functioning. To determine whether the degree of cognitive and motor dysfunction in MS is magnified with increasing age. In all, 698 MS patients (aged 29-71 years) and 226 healthy controls (HCs; aged 18-72 years) completed neuroperformance tests covering ambulation, upper extremity function, information processing speed, and memory. Linear regression models predicting cognitive and motor function revealed main effects of MS/HC diagnosis, age, and education across all measures. There was also an interaction between age and diagnosis on measures of motor function, but not on cognitive outcomes. The progression of motor decline is amplified by aging in MS. However, the degree of cognitive impairment does not vary across the lifespan. Thus, evidence of accelerated cognitive impairment in older adults with MS may signal the presence of other age-related cognitive pathologies.

  7. Does caesarean section delivery improve neurological outcome in open spina bifida?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A E; Beattie, F

    1994-12-01

    The antenatal diagnosis of fetuses with myelomeningocele (MMC) has focused the attention of those involved in the perinatal care on caesarean section delivery as a possible method of preserving neurological function. In this paper 25 infants with MMC were studied, 10 delivered by pre-labour caesarean section (PL C/S), and 15 by other methods. No difference in motor function was observed post natally with 50% of each group having neurological levels below L3. The PL C/S group was more heterogeneous. The feasibility of selecting a group of less impaired fetuses with good in utero leg movements for PL C/S in order to preserve neurological function depends on the ability of fetal USS to predict post natal neurological function. This preliminary report leaves unanswered the question whether C/S delivery improves neurological outcome in selected cases of open spina bifida.

  8. The impact of therapeutic hypothermia on neurological function and quality of life after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Horsted, Tina I

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the impact of therapeutic hypothermia on cognitive function and quality of life in comatose survivors of out of Hospital Cardiac arrest (OHCA). METHODS: We prospectively studied comatose survivors of OHCA consecutively admitted in a 4-year period. Therapeutic hypothermia...

  9. Neurology of Affective Prosody and Its Functional-Anatomic Organization in Right Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Elliott D.; Monnot, Marilee

    2008-01-01

    Unlike the aphasic syndromes, the organization of affective prosody in brain has remained controversial because affective-prosodic deficits may occur after left or right brain damage. However, different patterns of deficits are observed following left and right brain damage that suggest affective prosody is a dominant and lateralized function of…

  10. Left Brain vs. Right Brain: Findings on Visual Spatial Capacities and the Functional Neurology of Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbfleisch, M. Layne; Gillmarten, Charles

    2013-01-01

    As neuroimaging technologies increase their sensitivity to assess the function of the human brain and results from these studies draw the attention of educators, it becomes paramount to identify misconceptions about what these data illustrate and how these findings might be applied to educational contexts. Some of these "neuromyths" have…

  11. The impact of self-reported depressive symptoms on memory function in neurological outpatients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, R.P.C.; Ruis, C.; Kappelle, L.J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the effect of self-reported depressive symptoms on memory function in a non-psychiatric, non-litigation outpatient sample and to identify which memory tests may be most susceptible for depression-related decline. METHODS: Self-reported depressive symptoms were measured by the

  12. The relationship between executive function and fine motor control in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Emily J; Johnson, Andrew R; Riddle, Hayley; Gasson, Natalie; Kane, Robert; Loftus, Andrea M

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between executive function (EF) and fine motor control in young and older healthy adults. Participants completed 3 measures of executive function; a spatial working memory (SWM) task, the Stockings of Cambridge task (planning), and the Intra-Dimensional Extra-Dimensional Set-Shift task (set-shifting). Fine motor control was assessed using 3 subtests of the Purdue Pegboard (unimanual, bimanual, sequencing). For the younger adults, there were no significant correlations between measures of EF and fine motor control. For the older adults, all EFs significantly correlated with all measures of fine motor control. Three separate regressions examined whether planning, SWM and set-shifting independently predicted unimanual, bimanual, and sequencing scores for the older adults. Planning was the primary predictor of performance on all three Purdue subtests. A multiple-groups mediation model examined whether planning predicted fine motor control scores independent of participants' age, suggesting that preservation of planning ability may support fine motor control in older adults. Planning remained a significant predictor of unimanual performance in the older age group, but not bimanual or sequencing performance. The findings are discussed in terms of compensation theory, whereby planning is a key compensatory resource for fine motor control in older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Executive Function Is Associated With Off-Line Motor Learning in People With Chronic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dughmi, Mayis; Al-Sharman, Alham; Stevens, Suzanne; Siengsukon, Catherine F

    2017-04-01

    Sleep has been shown to promote off-line motor learning in individuals following stroke. Executive function ability has been shown to be a predictor of participation in rehabilitation and motor recovery following stroke. The purpose of this study was to explore the association between executive function and off-line motor learning in individuals with chronic stroke compared with healthy control participants. Seventeen individuals with chronic stroke (>6 months poststroke) and 9 healthy adults were included in the study. Participants underwent 3 consecutive nights of polysomnography, practiced a continuous tracking task the morning of the third day, and underwent a retention test the morning after the third night. Participants underwent testing on 4 executive function tests after the continuous tracking task retention test. Participants with stroke showed a significant positive correlation between the off-line motor learning score and performance on the Trail-Making Test from Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (r = 0.652; P = 0.005), while the healthy control participants did not. Regression analysis showed that the Trail-Making Test-Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System is a significant predictor of off-line motor learning (P = 0.008). This is the first study to demonstrate that better performance on an executive function test of attention and set-shifting predicts a higher magnitude of off-line motor learning in individuals with chronic stroke. This emphasizes the need to consider attention and set-shifting abilities of individuals following stroke as these abilities are associated with motor learning. This in turn could affect learning of activities of daily living and impact functional recovery following stroke.Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A166).

  14. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Motor Cortex: Hemispheric Asymmetry and Handedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Gi; Ashe, James; Hendrich, Kristy; Ellermann, Jutta M.; Merkle, Hellmut; Ugurbil, Kamil; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.

    1993-07-01

    A hemispheric asymmetry in the functional activation of the human motor cortex during contralateral (C) and ipsilateral (I) finger movements, especially in right-handed subjects, was documented with nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at high field strength (4 tesla). Whereas the right motor cortex was activated mostly during contralateral finger movements in both right-handed (C/I mean area of activation = 36.8) and left-handed (C/I = 29.9) subjects, the left motor cortex was activated substantially during ipsilateral movements in left-handed subjects (C/I = 5.4) and even more so in right-handed subjects (C/I = 1.3).

  15. Frequency response function of motors for switching noise energy with a new experimental approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunsu [Ensemble Center for Automotive Research, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jong-Yun [Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Switching energy in electrical vehicles can create serious noise from the motors. However, the characteristics of switching noise in vehicle motors are not clear due to the complexity of measuring them. This study proposes a new experimental method to investigate the switching noise energy of a vehicle motor based on frequency response functions. A function generator-amplifier system is used to gen- erate the switching energy instead of the complex battery-inverter system that has previously been used to examine the noise energy characteristics. Even though newly adapted experimental method is simple, the switching noise energy was explicitly investigated under various input signals. Thus, this simple new method can be used to investigate the dynamic characteristics of noise energy in a vehicle motor.

  16. The neurological effects of ghrelin in brain diseases: Beyond metabolic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qian; Du, Xixun; Li, Yong; Gong, Bing; Shi, Limin; Tang, Tingting; Jiang, Hong

    2017-02-01

    Ghrelin, a peptide released by the stomach that plays a major role in regulating energy metabolism, has recently been shown to have effects on neurobiological behaviors. Ghrelin enhances neuronal survival by reducing apoptosis, alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress, and accordingly improving mitochondrial function. Ghrelin also stimulates the proliferation, differentiation and migration of neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs). Additionally, the ghrelin is benefit for the recovery of memory, mood and cognitive dysfunction after stroke or traumatic brain injury. Because of its neuroprotective and neurogenic roles, ghrelin may be used as a therapeutic agent in the brain to combat neurodegenerative disease. In this review, we highlight the pre-clinical evidence and the proposed mechanisms underlying the role of ghrelin in physiological and pathological brain function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Androgen Treatment Effects on Motor Function, Cognition, and Behavior in Boys with Klinefelter Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Judith L; Kushner, Harvey; Kowal, Karen; Bardsley, Martha; Davis, Shanlee; Reiss, Allan L; Tartaglia, Nicole; Roeltgen, David

    2017-06-01

    To examine the effects of early low-dose androgen on motor, cognitive, and behavioral function in prepubertal boys with Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY). Double-blind trial of 84 boys, ages 4-12 years, randomized to oxandrolone (Ox; 0.06?mg/kg daily; n?=?43) or placebo (Pl; n?=?41) for 24 months. Standardized assessments were performed at baseline and every 12 months for 24 months evaluating motor, cognitive, and behavioral function. The 24-month outcomes were better in the Ox vs. Pl group on 1 of 5 primary endpoints (motor function/strength): Bruininks Visual-Motor scale (P?=?.005), without significant differences between the 2 groups for the other 4 components. Secondary analyses suggested improvement in the Ox vs. Pl group in the anxiety/depression (P?=?.03) and social problems (P?=?.01) scales on the Child Behavior Checklist, anxiety (P?=?.04) on the Piers Harris Self Concept Scale, and interpersonal problems (P?=?.02) on the Children's Depression Inventory, without significant differences in hyperactive or aggressive behaviors. This double-blind, randomized trial demonstrates that 24 months of childhood low-dose androgen treatment in boys with Klinefelter syndrome benefited 1 of 5 primary endpoints (visual-motor function). Secondary analyses demonstrated positive effects of androgen on aspects of psychosocial function (anxiety, depression, social problems), without significant effects on cognitive function, or hyperactive or aggressive behaviors. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00348946. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Results of the study of motor and evacuation function of the stomach after gastroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serikova, S N; Korochanskaia, N V; Durleshter, V M

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of motor and evacuated functions of upper parts of digestive tract in patients with hard scarring gastric ulcers (HSGU) after organ-preserving surgery by gastroplasty method. Motor and evacuated functions of the operated stomach were studied in 74 patients after gastroplasty (GP) with invaginated corporo-antral anastomosis (CAA) and 30 patients after GP with corporo-antral sphincter (KAS) formation from the ileal loop in different post-operated periods. The roentgenologic barium passage trough the upper parts of digestive tract and inter-digestive motor activity were assessed. The recovery of functional condition of the operated stomach after GP occurred during a year. It stipulated by adequate motor and evacuated functions of anastomosis performed. The GP technique with KAS formation from the ileal loop has number of advantages before its analogue GP with invaginated KAA: the muscular cuff from the ileal loop obstacles the dilatation of gastric tube; recovers the reservoir function of the fundal gastric part; provides the bolus portioned delivery to antral gastric portion to prevent its overload. The results of the study of motor and evacuated functions of operated stomach have proved that GP with KAS formation from the ileal loop was the optimal method of HSGU surgical treatment.

  19. Using Brain Oscillations and Corticospinal Excitability to Understand and Predict Post-Stroke Motor Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Thibaut

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available What determines motor recovery in stroke is still unknown and finding markers that could predict and improve stroke recovery is a challenge. In this study, we aimed at understanding the neural mechanisms of motor function recovery after stroke using neurophysiological markers by means of cortical excitability (transcranial magnetic stimulation—TMS and brain oscillations (electroencephalography—EEG. In this cross-sectional study, 55 subjects with chronic stroke (62 ± 14 yo, 17 women, 32 ± 42 months post-stroke were recruited in two sites. We analyzed TMS measures (i.e., motor threshold—MT—of the affected and unaffected sides and EEG variables (i.e., power spectrum in different frequency bands and different brain regions of the affected and unaffected hemispheres and their correlation with motor impairment as measured by Fugl-Meyer. Multiple univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to identify the predictors of good motor function. A significant interaction effect of MT in the affected hemisphere and power in beta bandwidth over the central region for both affected and unaffected hemispheres was found. We identified that motor function positively correlates with beta rhythm over the central region of the unaffected hemisphere, while it negatively correlates with beta rhythm in the affected hemisphere. Our results suggest that cortical activity in the affected and unaffected hemisphere measured by EEG provides new insights on the association between high-frequency rhythms and motor impairment, highlighting the role of an excess of beta in the affected central cortical region in poor motor function in stroke recovery.

  20. Characterizing the cargo binding and regulatory function of the tail domain in Ncd motor protein

    OpenAIRE

    Lonergan, Natalie Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Non-claret disjunctional (Ncd) is a kinesin-14 microtubule motor protein involved in the assembly and stability of meiotic and mitotic spindles in Drosophila oocytes and early embryos, respectively. Ncd functions by cross-linking microtubules through the tail and motor domains. It was originally believed that the role of the Ncd tail domain was to only statically bind microtubules. However, the Ncd tail domain has recently been shown to have properties that stabilize and bundle...

  1. Dose-effect relationships between manganese exposure and neurological, neuropsychological and pulmonary function in confined space bridge welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Rosemarie M; Roels, Harry A; Nakagawa, Sanae; Drezgic, Marija; Diamond, Emily; Park, Robert; Koller, William; Bowler, Russell P; Mergler, Donna; Bouchard, Maryse; Smith, Donald; Gwiazda, Roberto; Doty, Richard L

    2007-03-01

    Although adverse neuropsychological and neurological health effects are well known among workers with high manganese (Mn) exposures in mining, ore-processing and ferroalloy production, the risks among welders with lower exposures are less well understood. Confined space welding in construction of a new span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge without adequate protection was studied using a multidisciplinary method to identify the dose-effect relationship between adverse health effects and Mn in air or whole blood. Bridge welders (n = 43) with little or no personal protection equipment and exposed to a welding fume containing Mn, were administered neurological, neuropsychological, neurophysiological and pulmonary tests. Outcome variables were analysed in relation to whole blood Mn (MnB) and a Cumulative Exposure Index (CEI) based on Mn-air, duration and type of welding. Welders performed a mean of 16.5 months of welding on the bridge, were on average 43.8 years of age and had on average 12.6 years of education. The mean time weighted average of Mn-air ranged from 0.11-0.46 mg/m(3) (55% >0.20 mg/m(3)). MnB >10 microg/l was found in 43% of the workers, but the concentrations of Mn in urine, lead in blood and copper and iron in plasma were normal. Forced expiratory volume at 1s: forced vital capacity ratios (FEV(1)/FVC) were found to be abnormal in 33.3% of the welders after about 1.5 years of welding at the bridge. Mean scores of bradykinesia and Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale exceeded 4 and 6, respectively. Computer assisted tremor analysis system hand tremor and body sway tests, and University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test showed impairment in 38.5/61.5, 51.4 and 88% of the welders, respectively. Significant inverse dose-effect relationships with CEI and/or MnB were found for IQ (pfunction (p

  2. Dose–effect relationships between manganese exposure and neurological, neuropsychological and pulmonary function in confined space bridge welders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Rosemarie M; Roels, Harry A; Nakagawa, Sanae; Drezgic, Marija; Diamond, Emily; Park, Robert; Koller, William; Bowler, Russell P; Mergler, Donna; Bouchard, Maryse; Smith, Donald; Gwiazda, Roberto; Doty, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    Background Although adverse neuropsychological and neurological health effects are well known among workers with high manganese (Mn) exposures in mining, ore‐processing and ferroalloy production, the risks among welders with lower exposures are less well understood. Methods Confined space welding in construction of a new span of the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge without adequate protection was studied using a multidisciplinary method to identify the dose–effect relationship between adverse health effects and Mn in air or whole blood. Bridge welders (n = 43) with little or no personal protection equipment and exposed to a welding fume containing Mn, were administered neurological, neuropsychological, neurophysiological and pulmonary tests. Outcome variables were analysed in relation to whole blood Mn (MnB) and a Cumulative Exposure Index (CEI) based on Mn‐air, duration and type of welding. Welders performed a mean of 16.5 months of welding on the bridge, were on average 43.8 years of age and had on average 12.6 years of education. Results The mean time weighted average of Mn‐air ranged from 0.11–0.46 mg/m3 (55% >0.20 mg/m3). MnB >10 µg/l was found in 43% of the workers, but the concentrations of Mn in urine, lead in blood and copper and iron in plasma were normal. Forced expiratory volume at 1s: forced vital capacity ratios (FEV1/FVC) were found to be abnormal in 33.3% of the welders after about 1.5 years of welding at the bridge. Mean scores of bradykinesia and Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale exceeded 4 and 6, respectively. Computer assisted tremor analysis system hand tremor and body sway tests, and University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test showed impairment in 38.5/61.5, 51.4 and 88% of the welders, respectively. Significant inverse dose–effect relationships with CEI and/or MnB were found for IQ (p⩽0.05), executive function (p⩽0.03), sustaining concentration and sequencing (p⩽0.04), verbal learning (p

  3. Wearable accelerometry-based technology capable of assessing functional activities in neurological populations in community settings: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steins, Dax; Dawes, Helen; Esser, Patrick; Collett, Johnny

    2014-03-13

    Integrating rehabilitation services through wearable systems has the potential to accurately assess the type, intensity, duration, and quality of movement necessary for procuring key outcome measures. This review aims to explore wearable accelerometry-based technology (ABT) capable of assessing mobility-related functional activities intended for rehabilitation purposes in community settings for neurological populations. In this review, we focus on the accuracy of ABT-based methods, types of outcome measures, and the implementation of ABT in non-clinical settings for rehabilitation purposes. Cochrane, PubMed, Web of Knowledge, EMBASE, and IEEE Xplore. The search strategy covered three main areas, namely wearable technology, rehabilitation, and setting. Potentially relevant studies were categorized as systems either evaluating methods or outcome parameters. Methodological qualities of studies were assessed by two customized checklists, depending on their categorization and rated independently by three blinded reviewers. Twelve studies involving ABT met the eligibility criteria, of which three studies were identified as having implemented ABT for rehabilitation purposes in non-clinical settings. From the twelve studies, seven studies achieved high methodological quality scores. These studies were not only capable of assessing the type, quantity, and quality measures of functional activities, but could also distinguish healthy from non-healthy subjects and/or address disease severity levels. While many studies support ABT's potential for telerehabilitation, few actually utilized it to assess mobility-related functional activities outside laboratory settings. To generate more appropriate outcome measures, there is a clear need to translate research findings and novel methods into practice.

  4. A randomised controlled trial investigating the effect of vitamin B12 supplementation on neurological function in healthy older people: the Older People and Enhanced Neurological function (OPEN study protocol [ISRCTN54195799

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whyte Ken

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin B12 deficiency is common in older people and the prevalence increases with age. Vitamin B12 deficiency may present as macrocytic anaemia, subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord, or as neuropathy, but is often asymptomatic in older people. The diagnosis and indications for treatment are clear for individuals with low plasma levels of vitamin B12 in the setting of megaloblastic anaemia and neuropathy, but the relevance of treatment of vitamin B12 deficiency in the absence of such clinical signs is uncertain. Methods The aim of the present study is to assess whether dietary supplementation with crystalline vitamin B12 will improve electrophysiological indices of neurological function in older people who have biochemical evidence of vitamin B12 insufficiency in the absence of anaemia. To test this hypothesis we designed a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial involving 200 older people aged 75 years or greater who were randomly allocated to receive either a daily oral tablet containing 1 mg vitamin B12 or a matching placebo tablet. The primary outcome assessed at 12 months is change in electrophysiological indices of peripheral and central neurosensory responses required for mobility and sensory function. We here report the detailed study protocol. Conclusions In view of the high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in later life, the present trial could have considerable significance for public health.

  5. Remote Physical Activity Monitoring in Neurological Disease: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Valerie A. J.; Pitsch, Erica; Tahir, Peggy; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Allen, Diane D.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review of studies using remote physical activity monitoring in neurological diseases, highlighting advances and determining gaps. Methods Studies were systematically identified in PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 2004 to December 2014 that monitored physical activity for ≥24 hours in adults with neurological diseases. Studies that measured only involuntary motor activity (tremor, seizures), energy expenditure or sleep were excluded. Feasibility, findings, and protocols were examined. Results 137 studies met inclusion criteria in multiple sclerosis (MS) (61 studies); stroke (41); Parkinson's Disease (PD) (20); dementia (11); traumatic brain injury (2) and ataxia (1). Physical activity levels measured by remote monitoring are consistently low in people with MS, stroke and dementia, and patterns of physical activity are altered in PD. In MS, decreased ambulatory activity assessed via remote monitoring is associated with greater disability and lower quality of life. In stroke, remote measures of upper limb function and ambulation are associated with functional recovery following rehabilitation and goal-directed interventions. In PD, remote monitoring may help to predict falls. In dementia, remote physical activity measures correlate with disease severity and can detect wandering. Conclusions These studies show that remote physical activity monitoring is feasible in neurological diseases, including in people with moderate to severe neurological disability. Remote monitoring can be a psychometrically sound and responsive way to assess physical activity in neurological disease. Further research is needed to ensure these tools provide meaningful information in the context of specific neurological disorders and patterns of neurological disability. PMID:27124611

  6. Enhanced functional connectivity between putamen and supplementary motor area in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjun Yu

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a surprisingly heterogeneous disorder with symptoms including resting tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity. PD has been associated with abnormal task related brain activation in sensory and motor regions as well as reward related network. Although corticostriatal skeletomotor circuit dysfunction is implicated in the neurobiology of Parkinson's disease, the functional connectivity within this circuit at the resting state is still unclear for PD. Here we utilized resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure the functional connectivity of striatum and motor cortex in 19 patients with PD and 20 healthy controls. We found that the putamen, but not the caudate, exhibited enhanced connectivity with supplementary motor area (SMA, using either the putamen or the SMA as the "seed region". Enhanced SMA-amygdala functional connectivity was also found in the PD group, compared with normal controls. Our findings highlight the key role of hyper-connected putamen-SMC circuit in the pathophysiology of PD.

  7. Spectrum of ocular manifestations in CLN2-associated batten (Jansky-Bielschowsky) disease correlate with advancing age and deteriorating neurological function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlin, Anton; Sondhi, Dolan; Witmer, Matthew T; Wessel, Matthew M; Mezey, Jason G; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Hackett, Neil R; Yohay, Kaleb; Kosofsky, Barry; Souweidane, Mark M; Kaplitt, Michael G; D'Amico, Donald J; Crystal, Ronald G; Kiss, Szilárd

    2013-01-01

    Late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL), one form of Batten's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting from a CLN2 gene mutation. The spectrum of ophthalmic manifestations of LINCL and the relationship with neurological function has not been previously described. Patients underwent ophthalmic evaluations, including anterior segment and dilated exams, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography. Patients were also assessed with the LINCL Neurological Severity Scale. Ophthalmic findings were categorized into one of five severity scores, and the association of the extent of ocular disease with neurological function was assessed. Fifty eyes of 25 patients were included. The mean age at the time of exam was 4.9 years (range 2.5 to 8.1). The mean ophthalmic severity score was 2.6 (range 1 to 5). The mean neurological severity score was 6.1 (range 2 to 11). Significantly more severe ophthalmic manifestations were observed among older patients (p<0.005) and patients with more severe neurological findings (p<0.03). A direct correlation was found between the Ophthalmic Severity Scale and the Weill Cornell Neurological Scale (p<0.002). A direct association was also found between age and the ophthalmic manifestations (p<0.0002), with older children having more severe ophthalmic manifestations. Ophthalmic manifestations of LINCL correlate closely with the degree of neurological function and the age of the patient. The newly established LINCL Ophthalmic Scale may serve as an objective marker of LINCL severity and disease progression, and may be valuable in the evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies for LINCL, including gene therapy.

  8. Spectrum of ocular manifestations in CLN2-associated batten (Jansky-Bielschowsky disease correlate with advancing age and deteriorating neurological function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Orlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL, one form of Batten's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting from a CLN2 gene mutation. The spectrum of ophthalmic manifestations of LINCL and the relationship with neurological function has not been previously described. METHODS: Patients underwent ophthalmic evaluations, including anterior segment and dilated exams, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography. Patients were also assessed with the LINCL Neurological Severity Scale. Ophthalmic findings were categorized into one of five severity scores, and the association of the extent of ocular disease with neurological function was assessed. RESULTS: Fifty eyes of 25 patients were included. The mean age at the time of exam was 4.9 years (range 2.5 to 8.1. The mean ophthalmic severity score was 2.6 (range 1 to 5. The mean neurological severity score was 6.1 (range 2 to 11. Significantly more severe ophthalmic manifestations were observed among older patients (p<0.005 and patients with more severe neurological findings (p<0.03. A direct correlation was found between the Ophthalmic Severity Scale and the Weill Cornell Neurological Scale (p<0.002. A direct association was also found between age and the ophthalmic manifestations (p<0.0002, with older children having more severe ophthalmic manifestations. CONCLUSIONS: Ophthalmic manifestations of LINCL correlate closely with the degree of neurological function and the age of the patient. The newly established LINCL Ophthalmic Scale may serve as an objective marker of LINCL severity and disease progression, and may be valuable in the evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies for LINCL, including gene therapy.

  9. Spectrum of Ocular Manifestations in CLN2-Associated Batten (Jansky-Bielschowsky) Disease Correlate with Advancing Age and Deteriorating Neurological Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlin, Anton; Sondhi, Dolan; Witmer, Matthew T.; Wessel, Matthew M.; Mezey, Jason G.; Kaminsky, Stephen M.; Hackett, Neil R.; Yohay, Kaleb; Kosofsky, Barry; Souweidane, Mark M.; Kaplitt, Michael G.; D’Amico, Donald J.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Kiss, Szilárd

    2013-01-01

    Background Late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL), one form of Batten’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting from a CLN2 gene mutation. The spectrum of ophthalmic manifestations of LINCL and the relationship with neurological function has not been previously described. Methods Patients underwent ophthalmic evaluations, including anterior segment and dilated exams, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography. Patients were also assessed with the LINCL Neurological Severity Scale. Ophthalmic findings were categorized into one of five severity scores, and the association of the extent of ocular disease with neurological function was assessed. Results Fifty eyes of 25 patients were included. The mean age at the time of exam was 4.9 years (range 2.5 to 8.1). The mean ophthalmic severity score was 2.6 (range 1 to 5). The mean neurological severity score was 6.1 (range 2 to 11). Significantly more severe ophthalmic manifestations were observed among older patients (p<0.005) and patients with more severe neurological findings (p<0.03). A direct correlation was found between the Ophthalmic Severity Scale and the Weill Cornell Neurological Scale (p<0.002). A direct association was also found between age and the ophthalmic manifestations (p<0.0002), with older children having more severe ophthalmic manifestations. Conclusions Ophthalmic manifestations of LINCL correlate closely with the degree of neurological function and the age of the patient. The newly established LINCL Ophthalmic Scale may serve as an objective marker of LINCL severity and disease progression, and may be valuable in the evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies for LINCL, including gene therapy. PMID:24015292

  10. Relationships between Motor and Executive Functions and the Effect of an Acute Coordinative Intervention on Executive Functions in Kindergartners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Stein

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence indicating positive, causal effects of acute physical activity on cognitive performance of school children, adolescents, and adults. However, only a few studies examined these effects in kindergartners, even though correlational studies suggest moderate relationships between motor and cognitive functions in this age group. One aim of the present study was to examine the correlational relationships between motor and executive functions among 5- to 6-year-olds. Another aim was to test whether an acute coordinative intervention, which was adapted to the individual motor functions of the children, causally affected different executive functions (i.e., motor inhibition, cognitive inhibition, and shifting. Kindergartners (N = 102 were randomly assigned either to a coordinative intervention (20 min or to a control condition (20 min. The coordination group performed five bimanual exercises (e.g., throwing/kicking balls onto targets with the right and left hand/foot, whereas the control group took part in five simple activities that hardly involved coordination skills (e.g., stamping. Children’s motor functions were assessed with the Movement Assessment Battery for Children 2 (Petermann, 2009 in a pre-test (T1, 1 week before the intervention took place. Motor inhibition was assessed with the Simon says task (Carlson and Wang, 2007, inhibition and shifting were assessed with the Hearts and Flowers task (Davidson et al., 2006 in the pre-test and again in a post-test (T2 immediately after the interventions. Results revealed significant correlations between motor functions and executive functions (especially shifting at T1. There was no overall effect of the intervention. However, explorative analyses indicated a three-way interaction, with the intervention leading to accuracy gains only in the motor inhibition task and only if it was tested directly after the intervention. As an unexpected effect, this result needs to be treated

  11. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination.......0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with ≥1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any neurological...

  12. Therapeutic effects of functional electrical stimulation on gait, motor recovery, and motor cortex in stroke survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.V. Shendkar, MTech

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: FES combined with physiotherapy induced better outcomes in the swing phase of the gait cycle, activation of the affected ankle dorsiflexor muscles and cortical function when compared with conventional physiotherapy alone.

  13. Modulation of Functional Connectivity in Auditory-Motor Networks in Musicians Compared with Nonmusicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomar-García, María-Ángeles; Zatorre, Robert J; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Bueichekú, Elisenda; Ávila, César

    2017-05-01

    Correlation of spontaneous fluctuations at rest between anatomically distinct brain areas are proposed to reflect the profile of individual a priori cognitive biases, coded as synaptic efficacies in cortical networks. Here, we investigate functional connectivity at rest (rs-FC) in musicians and nonmusicians to test for differences in auditory, motor, and audiomotor connectivity. As expected, musicians had stronger rs-FC between the right auditory cortex (AC) and the right ventral premotor cortex than nonmusicians, and this stronger rs-FC was greater in musicians with more years of practice. We also found reduced rs-FC between the motor areas that control both hands in musicians compared with nonmusicians, which was more evident in the musicians whose instrument required bimanual coordination and as a function of hours of practice. Finally, we replicated previous morphometric data to show an increased volume in the right AC in musicians, which was greater in those with earlier musical training, and that this anatomic feature was in turn related to greater rs-FC between auditory and motor systems. These results show that functional coupling within the motor system and between motor and auditory areas is modulated as a function of musical training, suggesting a link between anatomic and functional brain features. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Method of motor function recovery in patients with muscle spasticity after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Potokii

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to prove the effectiveness of an innovative method of recovery of motor function of persons with spasticity after stroke. Material: in the experiment involved 26 patients aged 45-68 years who have had an ischemic stroke, a period of illness from 6 months to 5 years. Results: the analysis of specialized literature on the problem of reduced mobility due to spasticity confirms that spastic muscle condition after stroke significantly reduces the possibility of movement after stroke. The results of applying the method of recovery of motor function of persons with post-stroke spasticity of the muscles, which is based on the use of the second phase of post isometric relaxation - passive stretching muscles after heat-treatment procedures. This study confirms the high efficiency of this method for reducing pain in the shoulder and restore motor function of persons with spasticity after stroke. Conclusions: the implementation of the proposed method of recovery of motor function of persons with spasticity of muscles can increase the amplitude of the active movements of the shoulder and elbow joints, and, consequently, improve motor function in patients after stroke.

  15. Enhanced motor function and its neurophysiological correlates after navigated low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the contralesional motor cortex in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Shahid; Vernet, Marine; Najib, Umer; Perez, Jennifer; Alonso-Alonso, Miguel; Knobel, Mark; Yoo, Woo-Kyoung; Edwards, Dylan; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2016-08-11

    The net effect of altered interhemispheric interactions between homologous motor cortical areas after unilateral stroke has been previously reported to contribute to residual hemiparesis. Using this framework, we hypothesized that navigated 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the contralesional hemisphere would induce a stronger physiological and behavioural response in patients with residual motor deficit than in healthy subjects, because an imbalance in interhemispheric excitability may underlie motor dysfunction. Navigated rTMS was conducted in 8 chronic stroke patients (67.50±13.77 years) and in 8 comparable normal subjects (57.38±9.61 years). We evaluated motor function (Finger tapping, Nine Hole Peg test, Strength Index and Reaction Time) as well as the excitatory and inhibitory function (resting motor threshold, motor evoked potential amplitude, intra-cortical inhibition and facilitation, and silent period) of the stimulated and non-stimulated motor cortex before and after navigated rTMS. rTMS induced an increase in excitability in the ipsilesional (non-stimulated) motor cortex and led to improved performance in the finger tapping task and pinch force task. These physiological and behavioral effects were more prominent (or robust) in the group of stroke patients than in the control group. Navigated low-frequency rTMS involving precise and consistent targeting of the contralesional hemisphere in stroke patients enhanced the cortical excitability of the ipsilesional hemisphere and the motor response of the hemiparetic hand.

  16. Cornel iridoid glycoside reduces infarct size measured by magnetic resonance imaging and improves neurological function after focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cui-Cui; Li, Lin; Zheng, Sha-Sha; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Li; Li, Ya-Li; Zhang, Lan

    2015-08-11

    To investigate the effect of cornel iridoid glycoside (CIG), an ingredient extracted from traditional Chinese herb Cornus offificinalis, on neurological function and infarct size in rats as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after ischemic stroke. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three group: control (n=11), model (n=20) and CIG (n=16) groups. Rats in the model and CIG groups underwent 90-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) followed by reperfusion. Their neurological defect was measured by using a modified neurological severity score (mNSS). T2-weighted MRI (T2-MRI) of the brain was performed in vivo from 2 to 28 days after MCAO. The infarct volume in the brain was also measured using 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining 28 days after stroke. CIG, 60 mg/(kg day), administered by oral gavage starting from 6 h after the onset of MCAO improved neurological function at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days post occlusion (PMRI and improved neurological function 2-28 days after focal cerebral ischemia in rats, suggesting that CIG could be a clinical application in improving stroke treatment.

  17. Functional connectivity of primary motor cortex is dependent on genetic burden in prodromal Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Katherine A; Lowe, Mark J; Harrington, Deborah L; Lin, Jian; Durgerian, Sally; Mourany, Lyla; Paulsen, Jane S; Rao, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Subtle changes in motor function have been observed in individuals with prodromal Huntington disease (prHD), but the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood nor is the cumulative effect of the disease (disease burden) on functional connectivity. The present study examined the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) connectivity of the primary motor cortex (M1) in 16 gene-negative (NEG) controls and 48 gene-positive prHD participants with various levels of disease burden. The results showed that the strength of the left M1 connectivity with the ipsilateral M1 and somatosensory areas decreased as disease burden increased and correlated with motor symptoms. Weakened M1 connectivity within the motor areas was also associated with abnormalities in long-range connections that evolved with disease burden. In this study, M1 connectivity was decreased with visual centers (bilateral cuneus), but increased with a hub of the default mode network (DMN; posterior cingulate cortex). Changes in connectivity measures were associated with worse performance on measures of cognitive-motor functioning. Short- and long-range functional connectivity disturbances were also associated with volume loss in the basal ganglia, suggesting that weakened M1 connectivity is partly a manifestation of striatal atrophy. Altogether, the results indicate that the prodromal phase of HD is associated with abnormal interhemispheric interactions among motor areas and disturbances in the connectivity of M1 with visual centers and the DMN. These changes may, respectively, contribute to increased motor symptoms, visuomotor integration problems, and deficits in the executive control of movement as individuals approach a manifest diagnosis.

  18. Functional Analysis Identified Habit Reversal Components for the Treatment of Motor Tics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrene, Brad A.; Harpole, Lauren Lestremau; Sterling, Heather E.; Perry, Erin J.; Burton, Britney; Zoder-Martell, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    This study included brief functional analyses and treatment for motor tics exhibited by two children with Tourette Syndrome. Brief functional analyses were conducted in an outpatient treatment center and results were used to develop individualized habit reversal procedures. Treatment data were collected in clinic for one child and in clinic and…

  19. Conversion Disorder, Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder, and Chronic Pain: Comorbidity, Assessment, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Patricia; Deptula, Andrew; Yuan, Derek Y

    2017-06-01

    This paper examines the overlap of conversion disorder with chronic pain conditions, describes ways to assess for conversion disorder, and provides an overview of evidence-based treatments for conversion disorder and chronic pain, with a focus on conversion symptoms. Conversion disorder is a significant problem that warrants further study, given that there are not many well-established guidelines. Accurate and timely assessment should help move treatment in a more fruitful direction and avoid unnecessary medical interventions. Advances in neuroimaging may also help further our understanding of conversion disorder. Creating a supportive environment and a collaborative treatment relationship and improving understanding of conversion symptoms appear to help individuals diagnosed with conversion disorder engage in appropriate treatments. Novel uses of earlier treatments, such as hypnosis and psychodynamic approaches, could potentially be beneficial and require a more vigorous and systematic study. There are treatments that produce significant improvements in functioning and reduction of physical symptoms from conversion disorder even for very severe cases. Hypnotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and inpatient multidisciplinary treatment with intensive physiotherapy for severe cases have the most evidence to support reduction of symptoms. Components of treatment for conversion disorder overlap with treatments for chronic pain and can be used together to produce therapeutic effects for both conditions. Treatment needs to be tailored for each individual's specific symptoms.

  20. Structural and functional evaluation of cortical motor areas in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosottini, Mirco; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Piazza, Selina; Diciotti, Stefano; Cecchi, Paolo; Fabbri, Serena; Carlesi, Cecilia; Mascalchi, Mario; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2012-03-01

    The structural and functional data gathered with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques about the brain cortical motor damage in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are controversial. In fact some structural MRI studies showed foci of gray matter (GM) atrophy in the precentral gyrus, even in the early stage, while others did not. Most functional MRI (fMRI) studies in ALS reported hyperactivation of extra-primary motor cortices, while contradictory results were obtained on the activation of the primary motor cortex. We aimed to investigate the cortical motor circuitries in ALS patients by a combined structural and functional approach. Twenty patients with definite ALS and 16 healthy subjects underwent a structural examination with acquisition of a 3D T1-weighted sequence and fMRI examination during a maximal force handgrip task executed with the right-hand, the left-hand and with both hands simultaneously. The T1-weighted images were analyzed with Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) that showed several clusters of reduced cortical GM in ALS patients compared to controls including the pre and postcentral gyri, the superior, middle and inferior frontal gyri, the supplementary motor area, the superior and inferior parietal cortices and the temporal lobe, bilaterally but more extensive on the right side. In ALS patients a significant hypoactivation of the primary sensory motor cortex and frontal dorsal premotor areas as compared to controls was observed. The hypoactivated areas matched with foci of cortical atrophy demonstrated by VBM. The fMRI analysis also showed an enhanced activation in the ventral premotor frontal areas and in the parietal cortex pertaining to the fronto-parietal motor circuit which paralleled with disease progression rate and matched with cortical regions of atrophy. The hyperactivation of the fronto-parietal circuit was asymmetric and prevalent in the left hemisphere. VBM and fMRI identified structural and functional markers of an extended

  1. Effect of therapist-based constraint-induced therapy at home on motor control, motor performance and daily function in children with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-ling; Kang, Lin-ju; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Fei-Chuan; Chen, Hsieh-Ching; Wu, Ching-yi

    2013-03-01

    To determine the effect of therapist-based constraint-induced therapy at home on motor performance, daily function and reaching control for children with cerebral palsy. A single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Forty-seven children (23 boys; 24 girls) with unilateral cerebral palsy, aged 6-12 years, were randomized to constraint-induced therapy (n = 24) or traditional rehabilitation (n = 23). Constraint-induced therapy involved intensive functional training of the more affected arm while the less affected arm was restrained. Traditional rehabilitation involved functional unilateral and bilateral arm training. Both groups received individualized therapist-based interventions at home for 3.5-4 hours/day, two days a week for four weeks. Motor performance and daily function were measured by the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale, Second Edition and the Pediatric Motor Activity Log. Reaching control was assessed by the kinematics of reaction time, movement time, movement unit and peak velocity. There were larger effects in favour of constraint-induced therapy on motor performance, daily function, and some aspects of reaching control compared with traditional rehabilitation. Children receiving constraint-induced therapy demonstrated higher scores for Peabody Developmental Motor Scale, Second Edition - Grasping (pretest mean ± SD, 39.9 ± 3.1; posttest, 44.1 ± 2.8; P Motor Activity Log (pretest, 1.8 ± 0.3; posttest, 2.5 ± 0.3; P control of reaching in children with unilateral cerebral palsy than traditional rehabilitation.

  2. Research progress of motor function assessments and their clinical applications in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei SHI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, clinically featured as progressive skeletal muscle atrophy with gradual loss of muscle strength and activity abilities, is the most common genetic muscular disease in children throughout the world. The core and continuous characteristic of DMD is motor dysfunction. Motor function assessments of DMD are now focusing on muscle strength, walking ability, range of motion and ability of activities, still without unified standards. Confirming the comprehensive, scientific, reasonable and accurate evaluation tools for DMD assessment is the premise of research in motor developmental rules of DMD, which will help to better understand the motor progress of DMD and to supply evidences for choosing treatment methods, confirming timing of intervention, assessing effect of treatments and designing rehabilitation plans. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.06.002

  3. Stimulus electrodiagnosis and motor and functional evaluations during ulnar nerve recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane F. R. M. Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Distal ulnar nerve injury leads to impairment of hand function due to motor and sensorial changes. Stimulus electrodiagnosis (SE is a method of assessing and monitoring the development of this type of injury. OBJECTIVE: To identify the most sensitive electrodiagnostic parameters to evaluate ulnar nerve recovery and to correlate these parameters (Rheobase, Chronaxie, and Accommodation with motor function evaluations. METHOD: A prospective cohort study of ten patients submitted to ulnar neurorrhaphy and evaluated using electrodiagnosis and motor assessment at two moments of neural recovery. A functional evaluation using the DASH questionnaire (Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand was conducted at the end to establish the functional status of the upper limb. RESULTS: There was significant reduction only in the Chronaxie values in relation to time of injury and side (with and without lesion, as well as significant correlation of Chronaxie with the motor domain score. CONCLUSION: Chronaxie was the most sensitive SE parameter for detecting differences in neuromuscular responses during the ulnar nerve recovery process and it was the only parameter correlated with the motor assessment.

  4. Motor function deficits in schizophrenia: an fMRI and VBM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sadhana; Modi, Shilpi; Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Namita; Khushu, Subash [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), NMR Research Center, Delhi (India); Goyal, Satnam; Bhatia, Triptish; Deshpande, Smita N. [RML Hospital, PGIMER, New Delhi (India)

    2014-05-15

    To investigate whether the motor functional alterations in schizophrenia (SZ) are also associated with structural changes in the related brain areas using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). A sample of 14 right-handed SZ patients and 14 right-handed healthy control subjects matched for age, sex, and education were examined with structural high-resolution T1-weighted MRI; fMRI images were obtained during right index finger-tapping task in the same session. fMRI results showed reduced functional activation in the motor areas (contralateral precentral and postcentral gyrus) and ipsilateral cerebellum in SZ subjects as compared to healthy controls (n = 14). VBM analysis also revealed reduced grey matter in motor areas and white matter reduction in cerebellum of SZ subjects as compared to controls. The present study provides an evidence for a possible association between structural alterations in the motor cortex and disturbed functional activation in the motor areas in persons affected with SZ during a simple finger-tapping task. (orig.)

  5. The functional role of post-movement beta oscillations in motor termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Kurz, Max J; Gehringer, James E; Wilson, Tony W

    2017-03-24

    Shortly after movement termination, there is a strong increase or resynchronization of the beta rhythm (15-30 Hz) across the sensorimotor network of humans, known as the post-movement beta rebound (PMBR). This response has been associated with active inhibition of the motor network following the completion of a movement, sensory afferentation of the sensorimotor cortices, and other functions. However, studies that have directly probed the role of the PMBR in movement execution have reported mixed results, possibly due to differences in the amount of total motor output and/or movement complexity. Herein, we used magnetoencephalography during an isometric-force control task to examine whether alterations in the timing of motor termination demands modulate the PMBR, independent of differences in the motor output itself. Briefly, we manipulated the amount of time between the cue to initiate the force and the cue to terminate the force, such that participants were either forced to terminate quickly or slowly. We also performed a control experiment to test for temporal predictability effects. Our results indicated that the PMBR was stronger immediately following movement termination in the prefrontal cortices, supplementary motor area, left postcentral gyrus, paracentral lobule, and parietal cortex when participants were forced to terminate more quickly. These results were not attributable to the temporal predictability of each condition. These findings support the notion that the PMBR response at least partially serves motor inhibition, independent of the parameters within the motor output itself, and that particular nodes of the motor network may be differentially modulated by motor termination.

  6. On the functional organization and operational principles of the motor cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capaday, Charles; Ethier, Christian; Van Vreeswijk, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies on the functional organization and operational principles of the motor cortex (MCx), taken together, strongly support the notion that the MCx controls the muscle synergies subserving movements in an integrated manner. For example, during pointing the shoulder, elbow and wrist muscles...... representation of muscles in the MCx. A key question addressed in this article is whether the selection of movement related muscle synergies is a dynamic process involving the moment to moment functional linking of a variety of motor cortical points, or rather the selection of fixed patterns embedded in the MCx...... appear to be controlled as a coupled functional system, rather than singly and separately. The recurrent pattern of intrinsic synaptic connections between motor cortical points is likely part of the explanation for this operational principle. So too is the reduplicated, non-contiguous and intermingled...

  7. The Effect of Vestibular Stimulation on Motor Functions of Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontano, Marco; Medici, Alessandra; Iosa, Marco; Chiariotti, Alessia; Fusillo, Giulia; Manzari, Leonardo; Morelli, Daniela

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) has been defined as a nonprogressive disease of movement and posture development. Physical therapy techniques use different forms of sensory stimulation to improve neuromotor development. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a vestibular stimulation training in improving motor functions in cerebral palsy. Fourteen children with CP were randomly separated into two different groups in a cross-over trial. Over a period of 10 weeks, each group performed 10 sessions of 50 min of neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT) and 10 sessions of vestibular training (VR). Children were evaluated with the Gross Motor Function Measurement-88 scale, the Goal Attainment Scale and the root mean square of head accelerations. A significant improvement in the GAS-score (p = .003) was noted after NDT+VR. Vestibular stimulation integrated with NDT proved to be an effective complementary strategy for facilitating motor functioning.

  8. The Human Serum Metabolome of Vitamin B-12 Deficiency and Repletion, and Associations with Neurological Function in Elderly Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Alex; Grapov, Dmitry; Fahrmann, Johannes; Harvey, Danielle; Green, Ralph; Miller, Joshua W; Fedosov, Sergey N; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Hampel, Daniela; Pedersen, Theresa L; Fiehn, Oliver; Newman, John W; Uauy, Ricardo; Allen, Lindsay H

    2017-08-09

    Background: The specific metabolomic perturbations that occur in vitamin B-12 deficiency, and their associations with neurological function, are not well characterized.Objective: We sought to characterize the human serum metabolome in subclinical vitamin B-12 deficiency and repletion.Methods: A before-and-after treatment study provided 1 injection of 10 mg vitamin B-12 (with 100 mg pyridoxine and 100 mg thiamin) to 27 community-dwelling elderly Chileans (∼74 y old) with vitamin B-12 deficiency, as evaluated with serum vitamin B-12, total plasma homocysteine (tHcy), methylmalonic acid (MMA), and holotranscobalamin. The combined indicator of vitamin B-12 status (cB-12) was computed. Targeted metabolites [166 acylcarnitines, amino acids, sugars, glycerophospholipids, and sphingolipids (liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry)], and untargeted metabolites [247 chemical entities (gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry)] were measured at baseline and 4 mo after treatment. A peripheral nerve score was developed. Differences before and after treatment were examined. For targeted metabolomics, the data from 18 individuals with adequate vitamin B-12 status (selected from the same population) were added to the before-and-after treatment data set. Network visualizations and metabolic pathways are illustrated.Results: The injection increased serum vitamin B-12, holotranscobalamin, and cB-12 (P vitamin B-12 status and nerve function. Multiple connections were identified with primary metabolites (e.g., an inverse relation between vitamin B-12 markers and tryptophan, tyrosine, and pyruvic, succinic, and citric acids, and a direct correlation between the nerve score and arginine).Conclusions: The human serum metabolome in vitamin B-12 deficiency and the changes that occur after supplementation are characterized. Metabolomics revealed connections between vitamin B-12 status and serum metabolic markers of mitochondrial function, myelin integrity, oxidative

  9. Assignment Confidence in Localization of the Hand Motor Cortex: Comparison of Structural Imaging With Functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Neslin; Mohan, Suyash; Maralani, Pejman J; Duddukuri, Srikalyan; O'Rourke, Donald M; Melhem, Elias R; Wolf, Ronald L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assign confidence levels to structural MRI and functional MRI (fMRI) for localization of the primary motor cortex. Ninety-one fMRI studies with at least one motor task (178 hemispheres) were identified. Three anatomic assessments were used to localize the primary motor cortex: relation between the superior frontal sulcus and precentral sulcus; cortical thickness; and configuration of the precentral knob. In 105 hemispheres, interreader agreement was assessed for two investigators with different experience levels. Confidence ratings from 0 to 5 (0, no confidence; 5, 100% confidence) were assigned for fMRI and each anatomic localization method. Cortical thickness had the highest confidence rating (mean, 4.90 ± 0.47 [SD]) with only one failure. The relation between the superior frontal sulcus and precentral sulcus had the lowest confidence rating (4.33 ± 0.91) with three failures. The greatest statistical significance was observed for the cortical thickness and superior frontal sulcus-precentral sulcus methods (post hoc Bonferroni test, p Confidence rating scores were significantly higher for the cortical thickness sign than for fMRI results (4.72 ± 0.54) for a single motor task (post hoc Bonferroni test, p = 0.006); however, the mean confidence rating for fMRI improved to 4.87 ± 0.36 when additional motor tasks were performed. Interreader differences were least for the cortical thickness sign (paired t test, t = 4.25, p confidence regarding localization of the primary motor cortex; however, localization of motor function is more specific when combined with fMRI findings. Multiple techniques can be used to increase confidence in identifying the hand motor cortex.

  10. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation ameliorates motor function deterioration of spinocerebellar ataxia by rescuing cerebellar Purkinje cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Wei-Hsien

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA refers to a disease entity in which polyglutamine aggregates are over-produced in Purkinje cells (PCs of the cerebellum as well as other neurons in the central nervous system, and the formation of intracellular polyglutamine aggregates result in the loss of neurons as well as deterioration of motor functions. So far there is no effective neuroprotective treatment for this debilitating disease although numerous efforts have been made. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs possess multi-lineage differentiation potentials as well as immuno-modulatory properties, and are theoretically good candidates for SCA treatment. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether transplantation of human MSCs (hMSCs can rescue cerebellar PCs and ameliorate motor function deterioration in SCA in a pre-clinical animal model. Method Transgenic mice bearing poly-glutamine mutation in ataxin-2 gene (C57BL/6J SCA2 transgenic mice were serially transplanted with hMSCs intravenously or intracranially before and after the onset of motor function loss. Motor function of mice was evaluated by an accelerating protocol of rotarod test every 8 weeks. Immunohistochemical stain of whole brain sections was adopted to demonstrate the neuroprotective effect of hMSC transplantation on cerebellar PCs and engraftment of hMSCs into mice brain. Results Intravenous transplantation of hMSCs effectively improved rotarod performance of SCA2 transgenic mice and delayed the onset of motor function deterioration; while intracranial transplantation failed to achieve such neuroprotective effect. Immunohistochemistry revealed that intravenous transplantation was more effective in the preservation of the survival of cerebellar PCs and engraftment of hMSCs than intracranial injection, which was compatible to rotarod performance of transplanted mice. Conclusion Intravenous transplantation of hMSCs can indeed delay the onset as well as improve the motor

  12. Motor and extra-motor gray matter integrity may underlie neurophysiologic parameters of motor function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a combined voxel-based morphometry and transcranial stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christidi, Foteini; Karavasilis, Efstratios; Velonakis, Georgios; Rentzos, Michail; Zambelis, Thomas; Zouvelou, Vasiliki; Xirou, Sophia; Ferentinos, Panagiotis; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Evdokimidis, Ioannis; Karandreas, Nikolaos

    2018-02-07

    The association between gray matter (GM) density and neurophysiologic changes is still unclear in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We evaluated the relationship between GM density and motor system integrity combining voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in ALS. We included 17 ALS patients and 22 healthy controls (HC) who underwent 3D-T1-weighted imaging. Among the ALS group, we applied left motor cortex single-pulse TMS. We used whole-brain VBM comparing ALS and HC in GM density. We also conducted regression analysis to examine correlations between GM density and the following TMS parameters: motor evoked potential (MEP)/M ratio and central motor conduction time (CMCT). We found significantly decreased GM density in ALS patients in several frontal, temporal, parietal/occipital and cerebellar regions (p motor area (negative association). CMCT was associated with GM density in (a) inferior frontal gyrus and middle cingulated gyrus (positive association) and (b) superior parietal lobule; cuneus and cerebellum (negative association). Our findings support a significant interaction between motor and extra-motor structural and functional changes and highlight that motor and extra-motor GM integrity may underlie TMS parameters of motor function in ALS patients.

  13. Improving gross motor function and postural control with hippotherapy in children with Down syndrome: case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Danielle; Dugas, Claude

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe the impact of an 11-week hippotherapy program on the gross motor functions of two children (respectively 28 and 37 months old) diagnosed with Down syndrome. Hippotherapy is a strategy that uses the horse's motion to stimulate and enhance muscle contraction and postural control. The children were assessed by the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and accelerometry. The results indicate that both children improved on many dimensions of the GMFM. Power spectral analysis of the acceleration signals showed improvement in postural control of either the head or trunk, because the children adopted two different adaptative strategies to perturbation induced by the moving horse.

  14. Functional Motor Recovery in Stroke Survivors-Determinants in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patient care and evaluation in clinic and frequency of visits to the physical therapist predicted group membership between functional recovery and others. Conclusion: In spite of the lean neurorehabilitation facilities in the setting of this study, ...

  15. Potentiation of motor sub-networks for motor control but not working memory: Interaction of dACC and SMA revealed by resting-state directed functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwadkar, Vaibhav A; Asemi, Avisa; Burgess, Ashley; Chowdury, Asadur; Bressler, Steven L

    2017-01-01

    The dorsal Anterior Cingulate Cortex (dACC) and the Supplementary Motor Area (SMA) are known to interact during motor coordination behavior. We previously discovered that the directional influences underlying this interaction in a visuo-motor coordination task are asymmetric, with the dACC→SMA influence being significantly greater than that in the reverse direction. To assess the specificity of this effect, here we undertook an analysis of the interaction between dACC and SMA in two distinct contexts. In addition to the motor coordination task, we also assessed these effects during a (n-back) working memory task. We applied directed functional connectivity analysis to these two task paradigms, and also to the rest condition of each paradigm, in which rest blocks were interspersed with task blocks. We report here that the previously known asymmetric interaction between dACC and SMA, with dACC→SMA dominating, was significantly larger in the motor coordination task than the memory task. Moreover the asymmetry between dACC and SMA was reversed during the rest condition of the motor coordination task, but not of the working memory task. In sum, the dACC→SMA influence was significantly greater in the motor task than the memory task condition, and the SMA→dACC influence was significantly greater in the motor rest than the memory rest condition. We interpret these results as suggesting that the potentiation of motor sub-networks during the motor rest condition supports the motor control of SMA by dACC during the active motor task condition.

  16. Effect of hippotherapy on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jeong-Yi; Chang, Hyun Jung; Yi, Sook-Hee; Lee, Ji Young; Shin, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether hippotherapy has a clinically significant effect on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Randomized controlled trial. Outpatient therapy center. Ninety-two children with CP, aged 4-10 years, presenting variable function (Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS] levels I-IV). Hippotherapy (30 minutes twice weekly for 8 consecutive weeks). Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM)-88, GMFM-66, and Pediatric Balance Scale. Pre- and post-treatment measures were completed by 91 children (45 in the intervention group and 46 in the control group). Differences in improvement on all three measures significantly differed between groups after the 8-week study period. Dimensions of GMFM-88 improved significantly after hippotherapy varied by GMFCS level: dimension E in level I, dimensions D and E in level II, dimensions C and D in level III, and dimensions B and C in level IV. Hippotherapy positively affects gross motor function and balance in children with CP of various functional levels.

  17. Primary motor cortex functionally contributes to language comprehension: An online rTMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Nikola; Feurra, Matteo; Shpektor, Anna; Myachykov, Andriy; Shtyrov, Yury

    2017-02-01

    Among various questions pertinent to grounding human cognitive functions in a neurobiological substrate, the association between language and motor brain structures is a particularly debated one in neuroscience and psychology. While many studies support a broadly distributed model of language and semantics grounded, among other things, in the general modality-specific systems, theories disagree as to whether motor and sensory cortex activity observed during language processing is functional or epiphenomenal. Here, we assessed the role of motor areas in linguistic processing by investigating the responses of 28 healthy volunteers to different word types in semantic and lexical decision tasks, following repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of primary motor cortex. We found that early rTMS (delivered within 200ms of word onset) produces a left-lateralised and meaning-specific change in reaction speed, slowing down behavioural responses to action-related words, and facilitating abstract words - an effect present only during semantic, but not lexical, decision. We interpret these data in light of action-perception theory of language, bolstering the claim that motor cortical areas play a functional role in language comprehension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evidence for cell autonomous AP1 function in regulation of Drosophila motor-neuron plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consoulas Christos

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor AP1 mediates long-term plasticity in vertebrate and invertebrate central nervous systems. Recent studies of activity-induced synaptic change indicate that AP1 can function upstream of CREB to regulate both CREB-dependent enhancement of synaptic strength as well as CREB-independent increase in bouton number at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ. However, it is not clear from this study if AP1 functions autonomously in motor neurons to directly modulate plasticity. Results Here, we show that Fos and Jun, the two components of AP1, are abundantly expressed in motor neurons. We further combine immunohistochemical and electrophysiological analyses with use of a collection of enhancers that tightly restrict AP1 transgene expression within the nervous system to show that AP1 induction or inhibition in, but not outside of, motor neurons is necessary and sufficient for its modulation of NMJ size and strength. Conclusion By arguing against the possibility that AP1 effects at the NMJ occur via a polysynaptic mechanism, these observations support a model in which AP1 directly modulates NMJ plasticity processes through a cell autonomous pathway in the motor neuron. The approach described here may serve as a useful experimental paradigm for analyzing cell autonomy of genes found to influence structure and function of Drosophila motor neurons.

  19. Combination of 24-Hour and 7-Day Relative Neurological Improvement Strongly Predicts 90-Day Functional Outcome of Endovascular Stroke Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jie; Wang, Huaiming; Tu, Mingyi; Zi, Wenjie; Hao, Yonggang; Yang, Dong; Liu, Wenhua; Wan, Yue; Geng, Yu; Lin, Min; Jin, Ping; Xiong, Yunyun; Xu, Gelin; Yin, Qin; Liu, Xinfeng

    2018-01-03

    Early judgment of long-term prognosis is the key to making medical decisions in acute anterior circulation large-vessel occlusion stroke (LVOS) after endovascular treatment (EVT). We aimed to investigate the relationship between the combination of 24-hour and 7-day relative neurological improvement (RNI) and 90-day functional outcome. We selected the target population from a multicenter ischemic stroke registry. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores at baseline, 24 hours, and 7 days were collected. RNI was calculated by the following equation: (baseline NIHSS - 24-hour/7-day NIHSS)/baseline NIHSS × 100%. A modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2 at 90 days was defined as a favorable outcome. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between RNI and 90-day outcome. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis was performed to identify the predictive power and cutoff point of RNI for functional outcome. A total of 568 patients were enrolled. Both 24-hour and 7-day RNI were independent predictors of 90-day outcome. The best cutoff points of 24-hour and 7-day RNI were 28% and 42%, respectively. Compared with those with 24-hour RNI of less than 28% and 7-day RNI of less than 42%, patients with 24-hour RNI of 28% or greater and 7-day RNI of 42% or greater had a 39.595-fold (95% confidence interval 22.388-70.026) increased probability of achieving 90-day favorable outcome. The combination of 24-hour and 7-day RNI very strongly predicts 90-day functional outcome in patients with acute anterior circulation LVOS who received EVT, and it can be used as an early accurate surrogate of long-term outcome. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Disease-specific monoclonal antibodies targeting glutamate decarboxylase impair GABAergic neurotransmission and affect motor learning and behavioral functions

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    Mario U Manto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies to the smaller isoform of glutamate decarboxylase can be found in patients with type 1 diabetes and a number of neurological disorders, including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and limbic encephalitis. The detection of disease-specific autoantibody epitopes led to the hypothesis that distinct glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies may elicit specific neurological phenotypes. We explored the in vitro/in vivo effects of well-characterized monoclonal glutamate decarboxylase antibodies. We found that glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies present in patients with stiff person syndrome (n = 7 and cerebellar ataxia (n = 15 recognized an epitope distinct from that recognized by glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies present in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 10 or limbic encephalitis (n = 4. We demonstrated that the administration of a monoclonal glutamate decarboxylase antibody representing this epitope specificity (1 disrupted in vitro the association of glutamate decarboxylase with γ-Aminobutyric acid containing synaptic vesicles, (2 depressed the inhibitory synaptic transmission in cerebellar slices with a gradual time course and a lasting suppressive effect, (3 significantly decreased conditioned eyelid responses evoked in mice, with no modification of learning curves in the classical eyeblink-conditioning task, (4 markedly impaired the facilitatory effect exerted by the premotor cortex over the motor cortex in a paired-pulse stimulation paradigm, and (5 induced decreased exploratory behavior and impaired locomotor function in rats. These findings support the specific targeting of glutamate decarboxylase by its autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of stiff-person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia. Therapies of these disorders based on selective removal of such glutamate decarboxylase antibodies could be envisioned.

  1. Mental representation and mental practice: experimental investigation on the functional links between motor memory and motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Cornelia; Land, William M; Popp, Carmen; Schack, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on mental representation of complex action has revealed distinct differences in the structure of representational frameworks between experts and novices. More recently, research on the development of mental representation structure has elicited functional changes in novices' representations as a result of practice. However, research investigating if and how mental practice adds to this adaptation process is lacking. In the present study, we examined the influence of mental practice (i.e., motor imagery rehearsal) on both putting performance and the development of one's representation of the golf putt during early skill acquisition. Novice golfers (N = 52) practiced the task of golf putting under one of four different practice conditions: mental, physical, mental-physical combined, and no practice. Participants were tested prior to and after a practice phase, as well as after a three day retention interval. Mental representation structures of the putt were measured, using the structural dimensional analysis of mental representation. This method provides psychometric data on the distances and groupings of basic action concepts in long-term memory. Additionally, putting accuracy and putting consistency were measured using two-dimensional error scores of each putt. Findings revealed significant performance improvements over the course of practice together with functional adaptations in mental representation structure. Interestingly, after three days of practice, the mental representations of participants who incorporated mental practice into their practice regime displayed representation structures that were more similar to a functional structure than did participants who did not incorporate mental practice. The findings of the present study suggest that mental practice promotes the cognitive adaptation process during motor learning, leading to more elaborate representations than physical practice only.

  2. Mental representation and mental practice: experimental investigation on the functional links between motor memory and motor imagery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Frank

    Full Text Available Recent research on mental representation of complex action has revealed distinct differences in the structure of representational frameworks between experts and novices. More recently, research on the development of mental representation structure has elicited functional changes in novices' representations as a result of practice. However, research investigating if and how mental practice adds to this adaptation process is lacking. In the present study, we examined the influence of mental practice (i.e., motor imagery rehearsal on both putting performance and the development of one's representation of the golf putt during early skill acquisition. Novice golfers (N = 52 practiced the task of golf putting under one of four different practice conditions: mental, physical, mental-physical combined, and no practice. Participants were tested prior to and after a practice phase, as well as after a three day retention interval. Mental representation structures of the putt were measured, using the structural dimensional analysis of mental representation. This method provides psychometric data on the distances and groupings of basic action concepts in long-term memory. Additionally, putting accuracy and putting consistency were measured using two-dimensional error scores of each putt. Findings revealed significant performance improvements over the course of practice together with functional adaptations in mental representation structure. Interestingly, after three days of practice, the mental representations of participants who incorporated mental practice into their practice regime displayed representation structures that were more similar to a functional structure than did participants who did not incorporate mental practice. The findings of the present study suggest that mental practice promotes the cognitive adaptation process during motor learning, leading to more elaborate representations than physical practice only.

  3. Combination of cyclosporine and erythropoietin improves brain infarct size and neurological function in rats after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Pei-Lin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study tested the superiority of combined cyclosporine A (CsA-erythropoietin (EPO therapy compared with either one in limiting brain infarction area (BIA and preserving neurological function in rat after ischemic stroke (IS. Methods Fifty adult-male SD rats were equally divided into sham control (group 1, IS plus intra-peritoneal physiological saline (at 0.5/24/48 h after IS (group 2, IS plus CsA (20.0 mg/kg at 0.5/24h, intra-peritoneal (group 3, IS plus EPO (5,000IU/kg at 0.5/24/48h, subcutaneous (group 4, combined CsA and EPO (same route and dosage as groups 3 and 4 treatment (group 5 after occlusion of distal left internal carotid artery. Results BIA on day 21 after acute IS was higher in group 2 than in other groups and lowest in group 5 (all p Conclusion combined treatment with CsA and EPO was superior to either one alone in protecting rat brain from ischemic damage after IS.

  4. Neurologic Outcomes of Complex Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenke, Lawrence G; Fehlings, Michael G; Shaffrey, Christopher I

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, multicenter, international observational study. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate motor neurologic outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for complex adult spinal deformity (ASD). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The neurologic outcomes after surgical correction for ASD have been repo...

  5. Evaluation of preoperative high magnetic field motor functional MRI (3 Tesla) in glioma patients by navigated electrocortical stimulation and postoperative outcome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roessler, K; Donat, M; Lanzenberger, R; Novak, K; Geissler, A; Gartus, A; Tahamtan, A R; Milakara, D; Czech, T; Barth, M; Knosp, E; Beisteiner, R

    2005-01-01

    The validity of 3 Tesla motor functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with gliomas involving the primary motor cortex was investigated by intraoperative navigated motor cortex stimulation (MCS...

  6. Intrathecal amantadine for prolonged spinal blockade of sensory and motor functions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Kan, Chung-Dann; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Lin, Heng-Teng; Hung, Ching-Hsia

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to compare the hypothesized local anesthetic action of amantadine (1-adamantanamine) with that of the known local anesthetic mepivacaine. Motor, proprioceptive, and nociceptive functions were evaluated in rats after intrathecal administration. Amantadine elicited spinal anesthesia in a dose-related fashion and produced a better sensory-selective action over motor blockade (P amantadine (P Amantadine (63.5 μmol/kg) and mepivacaine (7.1 μmol/kg) produced complete spinal block of motor function, proprioception, and nociception. On an equipotent basis (ED25 , ED50 , and ED75 ), the duration of amantadine was longer (P amantadine was less potent than mepivacaine at producing spinal anesthesia. The spinal block duration produced by amantadine was greater than that produced by mepivacaine. Both amantadine and mepivacaine produced a markedly nociceptive-specific blockade. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  7. Combining diffusion tensor imaging and gray matter volumetry to investigate motor functioning in chronic stroke.

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    Ming Yang

    Full Text Available Motor impairment after stroke is related to the integrity of the corticospinal tract (CST. However, considerable variability in motor impairment remains unexplained. To increase the accuracy in evaluating long-term motor function after ischemic stroke, we tested the hypothesis that combining diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and gray matter (GM volumetry can better characterize long-term motor deficit than either method alone in patients with chronic stroke. We recruited 31 patients whose Medical Research Council strength grade was ≤ 3/5 in the extensor muscles of the affected upper extremity in the acute phase. We used the Upper Extremity Fugl-Meyer (UE-FM assessment to evaluate motor impairment, and as the primary outcome variable. We computed the fractional anisotropy ratio of the entire CST (CSTratio and the volume of interest ratio (VOIratio, between ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres, to explain long-term motor impairment. The results showed that CSTratio, VOIratio of motor-related brain regions, and VOIratio in the temporal lobe were correlated with UE-FM. A multiple regression model including CSTratio and VOIratio of the caudate nucleus explained 40.7% of the variability in UE-FM. The adjusted R2 of the regression model with CSTratio as an independent variable was 29.4%, and that of using VOIratio of the caudate nucleus as an independent variable was 23.1%. These results suggest that combining DTI and GM volumetry may achieve better explanation of long-term motor deficit in stroke patients, than using either measure individually. This finding may provide guidance in determining optimal neurorehabilitative interventions.

  8. Exposure to neonicotinoids influences the motor function of adult worker honeybees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Sally M; Willis, Sarah J; Wright, Geraldine A

    2014-10-01

    Systemic pesticides such as neonicotinoids are commonly used on flowering crops visited by pollinators, and their use has been implicated in the decline of insect pollinator populations in Europe and North America. Several studies show that neonicotinoids affect navigation and learning in bees but few studies have examined whether these substances influence their basic motor function. Here, we investigated how prolonged exposure to sublethal doses of four neonicotinoid pesticides (imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, clothianidin, dinotefuran) and the plant toxin, nicotine, affect basic motor function and postural control in foraging-age worker honeybees. We used doses of 10 nM for each neonicotinoid: field-relevant doses that we determined to be sublethal and willingly consumed by bees. The neonicotinoids were placed in food solutions given to bees for 24 h. After the exposure period, bees were more likely to lose postural control during the motor function assay and fail to right themselves if exposed to imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, clothianidin. Bees exposed to thiamethoxam and nicotine also spent more time grooming. Other behaviours (walking, sitting and flying) were not significantly affected. Expression of changes in motor function after exposure to imidacloprid was dose-dependent and affected all measured behaviours. Our data illustrate that 24 h exposure to sublethal doses of neonicotinoid pesticides has a subtle influence on bee behaviour that is likely to affect normal function in a field setting.

  9. Motor ability and adaptive function in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Yi Wang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a common neuropsychiatric disorder. Previous studies have reported that children with ADHD exhibit deficits of adaptive function and insufficient motor ability. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between adaptive function and motor ability in children with ADHD compared with a group of normal children. The study group included 25 children with ADHD (19 boys and 6 girls, aged from 4.6 years to 8.6 years (mean±standard deviation, 6.5±1.2. A group of 24 children without ADHD (normal children were selected to match the children with ADHD on age and gender. The Movement Assessment Battery for Children, which includes three subtests, was used to assess the motor ability of the children of both groups. The Chinese version of Adaptive Behavior Scales, which consists of 12 life domains, was used to assess adaptive function of the children with ADHD. Compared with the normal children, children with ADHD exhibited poorer motor ability on all the three subtests of motor assessment. In the ADHD group, nine (36% children had significant motor impairments and seven (28% were borderline cases. A total of 10 (40% children with ADHD had definite adaptive problems in one or more adaptive domains. With statistically controlling of IQ for the ADHD group, those children with impaired motor ability had significantly poorer behaviors in the adaptive domain of home living (p=0.035. Moreover, children with ADHD who had severely impaired manual dexterity performed worse than the control group in the adaptive domains of home living (r=−0.47, p=0.018, socialization (r=−0.49, p=0.013, and self-direction (r=−0.41, p=0.040. In addition, children with poorer ball skills had worse home living behavior (r=−0.56, p=0.003. Children who had more impaired balance exhibited poorer performance in social behavior (r=−0.41, p=0.040. This study found significant correlation between motor ability and

  10. Motor ability and adaptive function in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Yi; Huang, Tzu-Hsiu; Lo, Sing-Kai

    2011-10-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder. Previous studies have reported that children with ADHD exhibit deficits of adaptive function and insufficient motor ability. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between adaptive function and motor ability in children with ADHD compared with a group of normal children. The study group included 25 children with ADHD (19 boys and 6 girls), aged from 4.6 years to 8.6 years (mean±standard deviation, 6.5±1.2). A group of 24 children without ADHD (normal children) were selected to match the children with ADHD on age and gender. The Movement Assessment Battery for Children, which includes three subtests, was used to assess the motor ability of the children of both groups. The Chinese version of Adaptive Behavior Scales, which consists of 12 life domains, was used to assess adaptive function of the children with ADHD. Compared with the normal children, children with ADHD exhibited poorer motor ability on all the three subtests of motor assessment. In the ADHD group, nine (36%) children had significant motor impairments and seven (28%) were borderline cases. A total of 10 (40%) children with ADHD had definite adaptive problems in one or more adaptive domains. With statistically controlling of IQ for the ADHD group, those children with impaired motor ability had significantly poorer behaviors in the adaptive domain of home living (p=0.035). Moreover, children with ADHD who had severely impaired manual dexterity performed worse than the control group in the adaptive domains of home living (r=-0.47, p=0.018), socialization (r=-0.49, p=0.013), and self-direction (r=-0.41, p=0.040). In addition, children with poorer ball skills had worse home living behavior (r=-0.56, p=0.003). Children who had more impaired balance exhibited poorer performance in social behavior (r=-0.41, p=0.040). This study found significant correlation between motor ability and adaptive

  11. Neonatal loss of motor function in human spina bifida aperta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sival, Deborah A; van Weerden, Tiemen W; Vles, Johan S H; Timmer, Albertus; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Staal-Schreinemachers, A L; Hoving, Eelco W.; Sollie, Krystyne M; Kranen-Mastenbroek, Vivianne J M; Sauer, Pieter J J; Brouwer, Oebele F

    OBJECTIVE: In neonates with spina bifida aperta (SBA), leg movements innervated by spinal segments located caudal to the meningomyelocele are transiently present. This study in neonates with SBA aimed to determine whether the presence of leg movements indicates functional integrity of neuronal

  12. Fluoxetine does not impair motor function in patients with Parkinson's disease: Correlation between mood and motor functions with plasma concentrations of fluoxetine/norfluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the most commonly chosen antidepressants in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. The aim of our study was to assess the influence of fluoxetine (Flu on motor functions in patients with PD. Methods. In this prospective, controlled, open-label study, 18 patients with PD and mild depression [(10 ≤ Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HDRS ≤ 23] without dementia [(25 ≤ Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE] were treated with Flu. Both single and repeated dose effects of Flu were assessed on days 1-80. Plasma concentrations of Flu and norfluoxetine (NORFlu were correlated with the results of selected motor function performance scores: The Unified Parkinsons Disease Rating Score (UPDRS, Finger Tapping Test (FTT and Purdue Pegboard Test (PPT. Severity of PD, depression and dementia were evaluated using standard tests [(Hoehn and Yahr stages (HY, activity of daily living (ADL, UPDRS, HDRS, MMSE]. Results. Steady-state for Flu/NORFlu was reached after 18 days of treatment. Such a plateau correlated with significant improvements in both scores of depression and Parkinson's disability (HDRS, UPDRS and ADL, respectively. In addition, FTT and PPT scores also increased until day 18, with further slight fluctuations around the plateau. Optimal motor performances correlated with Flu concentrations of approximately 60-110 μg/L. Conclusion. Flu (20 mg/day significantly reduced depression in PD patients while it did not impair their motor performances. Because substantial placebo effects may arise in studies of PD and depression, large, prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials are warranted. [Acknowledgment. Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175090

  13. Aerobic exercise prior to task-specific training to improve poststroke motor function: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkenborghs, S R; Visser, M M; Nilsson, M; Callister, R; van Vliet, P

    2018-02-13

    Aerobic exercise can improve upper limb motor function in both healthy and stroke populations. Research in animals after stroke has shown that aerobic exercise combined with forelimb motor training improved forelimb motor function more than aerobic exercise or motor training alone. There is a lack of knowledge about this combined intervention in humans after stroke. These 2 case reports describe the exploratory implementation of a combined aerobic exercise and task-specific training intervention to improve upper limb motor function in one person in subacute stroke recovery and one person in chronic stroke recovery. Case descriptions Subacute participant: 45-year-old female, 3 months after ischemic stroke resulting in left-sided hemiparesis affecting her non-dominant upper limb, with a baseline Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) score of 10/57 and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) score of 39/75. Chronic participant: 69-year-old female, 14 years after ischemic stroke resulting in right-sided hemiparesis affecting her non-dominant upper limb, with a baseline ARAT score of 13/57 and WMFT score of 34/75. Intervention Participants performed 30 min of lower limb cycling immediately prior to 30 min of upper limb task-specific training. Sessions were undertaken 3 times a week for 8 weeks in a university rehabilitation laboratory. Results The combined intervention was feasible and perceived as acceptable and beneficial. Participants improved their upper limb motor function on the ARAT (subacute participant = 4 points; chronic participant = 2 points) and WMFT (subacute participant = 5 points; chronic participant = 3 points). Participants improved their aerobic fitness (subacute participant = +4.66 ml O 2 /kg/min; chronic participant = +7.34 ml O 2 /kg/min) and 6-minute walking distance (subacute participant = +50 m; chronic participant = +37 m). Discussion Combining aerobic exercise with task-specific training may be a worthwhile therapeutic approach to

  14. Ifenprodil for prolonged spinal blockades of motor function and nociception in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the proposed spinal anesthetic effect of ifenprodil, an a1 adrenergic receptor antagonist, with that of the long-acting local anesthetic bupivacaine. After intrathecally injecting the rats with five different doses of each drug, the dose-response curves of ifenprodil and bupivacaine were constructed to obtain the 50% effective dose (ED50). The spinal blockades of motor function and nociception of ifenprodil were compared with that of bupivacaine. We showed that either ifenprodil or bupivacaine produced spinal blockades of motor function and nociception dose-dependently. On the ED50 basis, the potency of ifenprodil (0.42(0.38-0.46) μmol; 0.40(0.36-0.44) μmol) was equal (p>0.05) to that of bupivacaine (0.38(0.36-0.40) μmol; 0.35(0.32-0.38) μmol) in motor function and nociception, respectively. At the equianesthetic doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), duration produced by ifenprodil was greater than that produced by bupivacaine in motor function and nociception (p<0.05 for the differences). Furthermore, both ifenprodil and bupivacaine showed longer duration of sensory blockade than that of motor blockade (p<0.05 for the differences). The resulting data demonstrated that ifenprodil produces a dose-dependent local anesthetic effect in spinal anesthesia. Ifenprodil shows a more sensory-selective duration of action over motor block, whereas the duration of anesthesia is significantly longer with ifenprodil than with bupivacaine. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional aging in the nervous system contributes to age-dependent motor activity decline in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Bi; Lei, Haoyun; Feng, Zhaoyang; Liu, Jianfeng; Hsu, Ao-Lin; Shawn Xu, X. Z.

    2013-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive decline in multiple physiological functions (i.e. functional aging). As animals age, they exhibit a gradual loss in motor activity, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we approach this question in C. elegans by functionally characterizing its aging nervous system and muscles. We find that motor neurons exhibit a progressive functional decline, beginning in early life. Surprisingly, body-wall muscles, which are previously thought to undergo functional aging, do not manifest such a decline until mid-late life. Notably, motor neurons first develop a deficit in synaptic vesicle fusion followed by that in quantal size and vesicle docking/priming, revealing specific functional deteriorations in synaptic transmission. Pharmacological stimulation of synaptic transmission can improve motor activity in aged animals. These results uncover a critical role for the nervous system in age-dependent motor activity decline in C. elegans and provide insights into how functional aging occurs in this organism. PMID:24011074

  16. Suitability of functional evaluation embedded in serious game rehabilitation exercises to assess motor development across lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnechère, B; Sholukha, V; Omelina, L; Van Vooren, M; Jansen, B; Van Sint Jan, S

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if the results of activities performed using specially developed serious games for physical rehabilitation could be used as an indicator of the natural maturation and decline of motor control in healthy participants. Eighty-one participants (19 children (5-15 years old), 40 adults (18-65 years old) and 22 aged subjects (60-88 years old) participated in this study. Motions performed were recorded using the Kinect sensor. Three different exercises embedded in the games were used to assess upper limb, trunk and lower limb control. The trial duration and accuracy, measures of gross motor function and fine motor control, respectively, were computed for each participant. ANOVA tests shows statistically significant differences between the three groups for duration (53±15, 27±10 and 119±30s for children, adults and elderly subjects respectively) and accuracy (87±5, 89±10 and 70±8% for children, adults and elderly subjects respectively). The slopes of the curves that approximated the evolution of the performance over various ages are coherent with previous studies about motor control development and physiological decline. The proposed solution, i.e. serious games rehabilitation exercises coupled to motion analysis, seems to be an interesting tool to assess global motor function. Further studies are needed to study the influence of pathologies on the studied parameters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Alcohol hangover: type and time-extension of motor function impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadayian, Analía G; Cutrera, Rodolfo A

    2013-06-15

    Alcohol hangover is defined as the unpleasant next-day state following an evening of excessive alcohol consumption. Hangover begins when ethanol is absent in plasma and is characterized by physical and psychological symptoms. During hangover cognitive functions and subjective capacities are affected along with inefficiency, reduced productivity, absenteeism, driving impairments, poor academic achievement and reductions in motor coordination. The aim of this work was to study the type and length of motor and exploratory functions from the beginning to the end of the alcohol hangover. Male Swiss mice were injected i.p. either with saline (control group) or with ethanol (3.8 g/kg BW) (hangover group). Motor performance, walking deficiency, motor strength, locomotion and exploratory activity were evaluated at a basal point (ZT0) and every 2 h up to 20 h after blood alcohol levels were close to zero (hangover onset). Motor performance was 80% decreased at the onset of hangover (pperformance during the next 16 h (peffects of alcohol hangover. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Safety and efficacy of Cerebrolysin in motor function recovery after stroke: a meta-analysis of the CARS trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guekht, Alla; Vester, Johannes; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Gusev, Eugene; Hoemberg, Volker; Rahlfs, Volker W; Bajenaru, Ovidiu; Popescu, Bogdan O; Doppler, Edith; Winter, Stefan; Moessler, Herbert; Muresanu, Dafin

    2017-07-13

    This meta-analysis combines the results of two identical stroke studies (CARS-1 and CARS-2) assessing efficacy of Cerebrolysin on motor recovery during early rehabilitation. Cerebrolysin is a parenterally administered neuropeptide preparation approved for the treatment of stroke. Both studies had a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design. Treatment with 30 ml Cerebrolysin once daily for 3 weeks was started 24-72 h after stroke onset. In addition, patients participated in a standardized rehabilitation program for 21 days that was initiated within 72 h after stroke onset. For both studies, the original analysis data were used for meta-analysis (individual patient data analysis). The combination of these two studies by meta-analytic procedures was pre-planned, and the methods were pre-defined under blinded conditions. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney (MW) effect size of the two studies on the ARAT score on day 90 indicated superiority of Cerebrolysin compared with placebo (MW 0.62, P pooling procedure, day 90, last observation carried forward; N = 442). Also, analysis of early benefit at day 14 and day 21 by means of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, which is regarded as most sensitive to early improvements, showed statistical significance (MW 0.59, P < 0.002). The corresponding number-needed-to-treat (NNT) for clinically relevant changes in early NIHSS was 7.1 (95% CI: 4 to 22). Cerebrolysin had a beneficial effect on motor function and neurological status in early rehabilitation patients after acute ischemic stroke. Safety aspects were comparable to placebo, showing a favourable benefit/risk ratio.

  19. Vascular dementia Cognitive, functional and behavioral assessment Recommendations of the Scientific Department of Cognitive Neurology and Aging of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology. Part II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliasz Engelhardt

    Full Text Available Abstract Vascular dementia (VaD is the most prevalent form of secondary dementia and the second most common of all dementias. The present paper aims to define guidelines on the basic principles for treating patients with suspected VaD (and vascular cognitive impairment - no dementia using an evidence-based approach. The material was retrieved and selected from searches of databases (Medline, Scielo, Lilacs, preferentially from the last 15 years, to propose a systematic way to assess cognition, function and behavior, and disease severity staging, with instruments adapted for our milieu, and diagnosis disclosure. The present proposal contributes to the definition of standard diagnostic criteria for VaD based on various levels of evidence. It is noteworthy that only around half of the population of patients with vascular cognitive impairment present with dementia, which calls for future proposals defining diagnostic criteria and procedures for this condition.

  20. The effect of intra-uterine breech position on postnatal motor functions of the lower limbs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sival, D A; Prechtl, H F; Sonder, G H; Touwen, B C

    The effect of intra-uterine movement restriction on the development of motor functions was studied longitudinally by comparing infants born after uncomplicated breech position (n = 13) with control infants (vertex position, n = 5-10). Before birth, fetal leg posture was studied at regular intervals

  1. Relations of Preschoolers' Visual-Motor and Object Manipulation Skills With Executive Function and Social Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Megan; Lipscomb, Shannon; McClelland, Megan M; Duncan, Rob; Becker, Derek; Anderson, Kim; Kile, Molly

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this article was to examine specific linkages between early visual-motor integration skills and executive function, as well as between early object manipulation skills and social behaviors in the classroom during the preschool year. Ninety-two children aged 3 to 5 years old (Mage = 4.31 years) were recruited to participate. Comprehensive measures of visual-motor integration skills, object manipulation skills, executive function, and social behaviors were administered in the fall and spring of the preschool year. Our findings indicated that children who had better visual-motor integration skills in the fall had better executive function scores (B = 0.47 [0.20], p skills in the fall showed significantly stronger social behavior in their classrooms (as rated by teachers) in the spring, including more self-control (B - 0.03 [0.00], p social behavior in the fall and other covariates. Children's visual-motor integration and object manipulation skills in the fall have modest to moderate relations with executive function and social behaviors later in the preschool year. These findings have implications for early learning initiatives and school readiness.

  2. The progeroid gene BubR1 regulates axon myelination and motor function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, C.I.; Yoo, K.H.; Hussaini, S.M.; Jeon, B.T.; Welby, J.; Gan, H.; Scarisbrick, I.A.; Zhang, Z.; Baker, D.J.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Rodriguez, M.; Jang, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Myelination, the process by which oligodendrocytes form the myelin sheath around axons, is key to axonal signal transduction and related motor function in the central nervous system (CNS). Aging is characterized by degenerative changes in the myelin sheath, although the molecular underpinnings of

  3. functional motor recovery in stroke survivors-determinants in a sub ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-01

    Apr 1, 2014 ... IN A SUB-SAHARAN AFRICAN STROKE UNIT. F. A. IMARHIAGBE and O. A. ABIDAKUN. ABSTRACT. Objective: To find out the determinants of functional motor recovery in stroke survivors. Design: A prospective cross-sectional ..... in skilled nursing facilities. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2005;86:373-379. 14.

  4. 24-Hour motor activity and autonomic cardiac functioning in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Volkers (Anita)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe studies of this thesis concern the spontaneous pattern of motor activity and autonomic cardiac functioning in major depressive disorder. The main purpose of the studies was to obtain insight in the psychomotor and autonomic cardiac dysfunction in depression by investigating the

  5. Schizotypal Personality Traits and Atypical Lateralization in Motor and Language Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Tomohisa; Sugimori, Eriko; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    Atypical cerebral lateralization in motor and language functions in regard to schizotypal personality traits in healthy populations, as well as among schizophrenic patients, has attracted attention because these traits may represent a risk factor for schizophrenia. Although the relationship between handedness and schizotypal personality has been…

  6. Influence of the environment on performance of gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatudimu, Margaret Bukola

    2012-01-01

    Assessment and physiotherapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) are conventionally carried out in the hospital or clinic setting. However, the daily lives of these children include a variety of environmental settings in addition to the clinical setting. The objective of this study was therefore to explore the possible influence of the environment on motor function in children with CP. Purposively selected children with CP (n=107), ages 1 and 6 years with mean age of 2.1 years (SD 1.10 yrs), were involved in this study. The motor function of each child was assessed in the hospital and at their homes within a one-week interval, using the gross motor function measure (GMFM); this was done at the baseline and on a monthly basis for eight consecutive months. The paired t-test rank was computed to compare the overall GMFM score and each of the sub-domain scores measured in the clinic and at home. GMFM scores measured at home were significantly higher than those measured in the clinic and this pattern was also obtained for the sub-domains throughout the study period, suggesting that children performed gross motor functions better at their homes than in the clinic.

  7. Relationship between vitamin B12 and sensory and motor peripheral nerve function in older adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leishear, K.; Boudreau, R.M.; Studenski, S.A.; Ferrucci, L.; Rosano, C.; Rekeneire, N. de; Houston, D.K.; Kritchevsky, S.B.; Schwartz, A.V.; Vinik, A.I.; Hogervorst, E.; Yaffe, K.; Harris, T.B.; Newman, A.B.; Strotmeyer, E.S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine whether deficient B12 status or low serum B12 levels are associated with worse sensory and motor peripheral nerve function in older adults. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. PARTICIPANTS: Two thousand two hundred and eighty-seven

  8. Postural Care for People with Intellectual Disabilities and Severely Impaired Motor Function: A Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Janet; Baines, Susannah; Emerson, Eric; Hatton, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Background: Poor postural care can have severe and life-threatening complications. This scoping review aims to map and summarize existing evidence regarding postural care for people with intellectual disabilities and severely impaired motor function. Method: Studies were identified via electronic database searches (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and…

  9. Relations of Preschoolers' Visual-Motor and Object Manipulation Skills with Executive Function and Social Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Megan; Lipscomb, Shannon; McClelland, Megan M.; Duncan, Rob; Becker, Derek; Anderson, Kim; Kile, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to examine specific linkages between early visual-motor integration skills and executive function, as well as between early object manipulation skills and social behaviors in the classroom during the preschool year. Method: Ninety-two children aged 3 to 5 years old (M[subscript age] = 4.31 years) were…

  10. Sensory and Motor Peripheral Nerve Function and Longitudinal Changes in Quadriceps Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ward, R. E.; Boudreau, R. M.; Caserotti, P.

    2015-01-01

    = 76.3 +/- 2.8, body mass index = 27.2 +/- 4.6 kg/m(2), strength = 96.3 +/- 34.7 Nm, 51.0% female, 34.8% black) from the Health ABC study. Isokinetic quadriceps strength was measured semiannually over 6 years. Peroneal motor nerve conduction amplitude and velocity were recorded. Sensory nerve function...

  11. Relationship between Executive Functions and Motor Stereotypies in Children with Autistic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMonda, Brittany C.; Holtzer, Roee; Goldman, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on the relationship between motor stereotypies and impairments in executive functions (EF) in children with Autistic Disorder (AD) and in children with Developmental Language Disorders (DLD). We hypothesized that low EF performance would predict higher frequency and longer durations of stereotypies in the AD group only.…

  12. Neuroinflammation increases GABAergic tone and impairs cognitive and motor function in hyperammonemia by increasing GAT-3 membrane expression. Reversal by sulforaphane by promoting M2 polarization of microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Taoro-Gonzalez, Lucas; Gonzalez-Usano, Alba; Agusti, Ana; Balzano, Tiziano; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-04-18

    Hyperammonemia induces neuroinflammation and increases GABAergic tone in the cerebellum which contributes to cognitive and motor impairment in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The link between neuroinflammation and GABAergic tone remains unknown. New treatments reducing neuroinflammation and GABAergic tone could improve neurological impairment. The aims were, in hyperammonemic rats, to assess whether: (a) Enhancing endogenous anti-inflammatory mechanisms by sulforaphane treatment reduces neuroinflammation and restores learning and motor coordination. (b) Reduction of neuroinflammation by sulforaphane normalizes extracellular GABA and glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway and identify underlying mechanisms. (c) Identify steps by which hyperammonemia-induced microglial activation impairs cognitive and motor function and how sulforaphane restores them. We analyzed in control and hyperammonemic rats, treated or not with sulforaphane, (a) learning in the Y maze; (b) motor coordination in the beam walking; (c) glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway and extracellular GABA by microdialysis; (d) microglial activation, by analyzing by immunohistochemistry or Western blot markers of pro-inflammatory (M1) (IL-1b, Iba-1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) microglia (Iba1, IL-4, IL-10, Arg1, YM-1); and (e) membrane expression of the GABA transporter GAT-3. Hyperammonemia induces activation of astrocytes and microglia in the cerebellum as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Hyperammonemia-induced neuroinflammation is associated with increased membrane expression of the GABA transporter GAT-3, mainly in activated astrocytes. This is also associated with increased extracellular GABA in the cerebellum and with motor in-coordination and impaired learning ability in the Y maze. Sulforaphane promotes polarization of microglia from the M1 to the M2 phenotype, reducing IL-1b and increasing IL-4, IL-10, Arg1, and YM-1 in the cerebellum. This is associated with astrocytes deactivation and normalization of GAT-3 membrane

  13. Repeated sessions of functional repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation increases motor cortex excitability and motor control in survivors of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Crystal L; Tracy, Brian L; Paxton, Roger J; Malcolm, Matthew P

    2013-01-01

    To determine the impact of a single-session of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and an rTMS intervention on neurophysiology and motor control in survivors of stroke. Twelve stroke survivors were randomized into functional-rTMS or passive-rTMS conditions. Measures of short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF), and force steadiness (coefficient of variation, CV) at 10 and 20% of maximum voluntary contraction were assessed at baseline and after a single-session of rTMS (post single-session), and again following an intervention of 8 rTMS sessions (2 sessions per day; post-intervention). Functional-rTMS required subjects to exceed a muscle activation threshold assessed by surface electromyography to trigger each rTMS train; the passive-rTMS group received rTMS while relaxed. ICF scores significantly increased following the single-session of functional-rTMS compared to the decrease following passive-rTMS. The increase in APB SICI and ICF scores following the intervention was significantly greater for the functional-rTMS group compared to the decreases following passive-rTMS. The groups were significantly different in the CV of force (20%) following the single-session of rTMS, and in the 10 and 20% tasks following the intervention. The functional-rTMS group increased steadiness overtime, whereas the passive group demonstrated a return to baseline following the intervention session. No differences were observed in first dorsal interosseus (FDI) measures (SICI and ICF) between groups. The functional-rTMS protocol enhanced cortical excitability following a single-session and after repeated sessions and improved steadiness, whereas the passive stimulation protocol tended to decrease excitation and no improvements in steadiness were observed.

  14. Proprioceptive reflexes and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Proprioceptive reflexes play an important role during the control of movement and posture. Disturbed modulation of proprioceptive reflexes is often suggested as the cause for the motoric features present in neurological disorders. In this thesis methods are developed and evaluated to quantify

  15. Functional compensation of motor function in pre-symptomatic Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klöppel, Stefan; Draganski, Bogdan; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2009-01-01

    Involuntary choreiform movements are a clinical hallmark of Huntington's disease. Studies in clinically affected patients suggest a shift of motor activations to parietal cortices in response to progressive neurodegeneration. Here, we studied pre-symptomatic gene carriers to examine the compensat......Involuntary choreiform movements are a clinical hallmark of Huntington's disease. Studies in clinically affected patients suggest a shift of motor activations to parietal cortices in response to progressive neurodegeneration. Here, we studied pre-symptomatic gene carriers to examine...

  16. Combined functional task practice and dynamic high intensity resistance training promotes recovery of upper-extremity motor function in post-stroke hemiparesis: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Carolynn; Dozono, Jody; Schmidt, Stephen; Jue, Mary; Lum, Peter

    2006-09-01

    Weakness is a significant impairment in persons with post-stroke hemiparesis, yet traditional clinical perspectives caution against strengthening in neurological populations. Significant correlations between weakness and functional movement have been demonstrated, however, a clear relationship between increased strength and functional improvement has been elusive. This case study describes a combined program of dynamic, high-intensity resistance training and functional task practice for the upper-extremity in adult hemiparesis. The patient was a 65-year-old, right hand dominant woman who presented to the Neural Control of Movement Laboratory at the Palo Alto VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Center 16 weeks following clipping of an unruptured aneurysm with consequent dense right hemiparesis. She received 7 weeks of acute rehabilitation according to CARF guidelines (ie, at least 3 hours of two or more disciplines, 6 days per week). Her baseline research evaluation revealed significant upperextremity deficits at the ICF body structure/function level including: weakness, shoulder pain, mild resistance to passive movement, and need for moderate to maximal assistance in many activities of daily living including bathing and dressing. The Stroke Impact Scale score reporting her perspective indicated she had recovered from her stroke only 50%. The hybrid resistance training-functional task practice intervention, detailed in this report, was delivered 3 times per week for 6 weeks with each session lasting 75:00. The subject revealed marked improvements in isometric and dynamic force production in 5 key upper-extremity actions: elbow flexion, elbow extension, shoulder flexion, shoulder abduction, and shoulder external rotation. Strength gains were accompanied by increased EMG activation immediately postintervention and by a combination of increased activation and apparent hypertrophic effects at 6 month follow up. Marked improvements were noted in all clinical and

  17. Effect of water - based exercise on motor function, balance function and walking ability in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-zhao WANG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effect of water-based exercise on motor function, balance function and walking ability in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD.  Methods Forty patients with primary PD were randomly divided into conventional land-based rehabilitation therapy group (land-based group, N = 20 and water-based exercise group (water-based group, N = 20. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Ⅲ (UPDRS Ⅲ was used to evaluate the patients' motor function. Berg Balance Scale (BBS and Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT were used to evaluate balance function. The 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT and 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT were used to evaluate walking ability. All the tests were carried out before and after 8-week training in 2 groups.  Results Patients in both groups had a significant decrease on UPDRS Ⅲ score (P = 0.000, TUGT (P = 0.000 after training, while they had a significant increase on BBS score (P = 0.000, 6MWT (P = 0.000 and 10MWT (P = 0.000. The water-based group had significantly lower UPDRSⅢ score (P = 0.037, shorter TUGT (P = 0.013 and higher BBS score (P = 0.018 than those in land-based group after training.  Conclusions Both conventional land-based training and water-based training had positive effect on motor function, balance function and walking ability in PD patients. The water-based training had more positive effect than land-based therapy on motor function and balance function. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.05.006

  18. A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY ON THE ASSESSMENT OF FUNCTIONAL MOTOR DISABILITY IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadugodapitiya .S .I

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy (CP is one of the most common conditions in childhood causing severe physical disability. Spastic paresis is the most common form of CP. According to the topographic classification, CP is divided into spastic hemiplegia, diplegia and quadriplegia. Distribution of functional motor disability is varied in each type of CP. Aims: To describe functional motor disability in children with cerebral palsy using standard scales. Method: This cross-sectional descriptive study included 93 children with cerebral palsy (CP. Functional motor disability of each type of spastic CP was assessed using standard scales. Results: The dominant sub-type of cerebral palsy in the present study was spastic diplegia. Most affected muscle with spasticity was gastrocnemius-soleus group of muscles. Active range of motion of foot eversion and dorsiflexion were the most affected movements in all the types of CP. In the overall sample, only 35% were able to walk independently. Majority of subjects with quadriplegia were in levels III and IV of Gross Motor Functional Classification Scale representing severe disability. There was a significant relationship observed between the muscle tone and range of motion of their corresponding joints as well as between the muscle tone of gastrocnemius-soleus group of muscles and the ankle components of Observational Gait Analysis. Conclusions: Results of the present study confirms the clinical impression of disability levels in each type of CP and showed that the assessment of functional motor disability in children with different types of spastic CP is useful in planning and evaluation of treatment options.

  19. Language and motor function thresholds during pediatric extra-operative electrical cortical stimulation brain mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zea Vera, Alonso; Aungaroon, Gewalin; Horn, Paul S; Byars, Anna W; Greiner, Hansel M; Tenney, Jeffrey R; Arthur, Todd M; Crone, Nathan E; Holland, Katherine D; Mangano, Francesco T; Arya, Ravindra

    2017-10-01

    To examine current thresholds and their determinants for language and motor mapping with extra-operative electrical cortical stimulation (ECS). ECS electrocorticograph recordings were reviewed to determine functional thresholds. Predictors of functional thresholds were found with multivariable analyses. In 122 patients (age 11.9±5.4years), average minimum, frontal, and temporal language thresholds were 7.4 (± 3.0), 7.8 (± 3.0), and 7.4 (± 3.1) mA respectively. Average minimum, face, upper and lower extremity motor thresholds were 5.4 (± 2.8), 6.1 (± 2.8), 4.9 (± 2.3), and 5.3 (± 3.3) mA respectively. Functional and after-discharge (AD)/seizure thresholds were significantly related. Minimum, frontal, and temporal language thresholds were higher than AD thresholds at all ages. Minimum motor threshold was higher than minimum AD threshold up to 8.0years of age, face motor threshold was higher than frontal AD threshold up to 11.8years age, and lower subsequently. UE motor thresholds remained below frontal AD thresholds throughout the age range. Functional thresholds are frequently above AD thresholds in younger children. These findings raise concerns about safety and neurophysiologic validity of ECS mapping. Functional and AD/seizure thresholds relationships suggest individual differences in cortical excitability which cannot be explained by clinical variables. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancing motor network activity using real-time functional MRI neurofeedback of left premotor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo Ferreira Marins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurofeedback by functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI is a technique of potential therapeutic relevance that allows individuals to be aware of their own neurophysiological responses and to voluntarily modulate the activity of specific brain regions, such as the premotor cortex (PMC, important for motor recovery after brain injury. We investigated (i whether healthy human volunteers are able to up-regulate the activity of the left PMC during a right hand finger tapping motor imagery (MI task while receiving continuous fMRI-neurofeedback, and (ii whether successful modulation of brain activity influenced non-targeted motor control regions. During the MI task, participants of the neurofeedback group (NFB received ongoing visual feedback representing the level of fMRI responses within their left PMC. Control (CTL group participants were shown similar visual stimuli, but these were non-contingent on brain activity. Both groups showed equivalent levels of behavioral ratings on arousal and motor imagery, before and during the fMRI protocol. In the NFB, but not in CLT group, brain activation during the last run compared to the first run revealed increased activation in the left PMC. In addition, the NFB group showed increased activation in motor control regions extending beyond the left PMC target area, including the supplementary motor area, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Moreover, in the last run, the NFB group showed stronger activation in the left PMC/inferior frontal gyrus when compared to the CTL group. Our results indicate that modulation of PMC and associated motor control areas can be achieved during a single neurofeedback-fMRI session. These results contribute to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of MI-based neurofeedback training, with direct implications for rehabilitation strategies in severe brain disorders, such as stroke.

  1. Patient-reported outcomes in Huntington's disease: Quality of life in neurological disorders (Neuro-QoL) and Huntington's disease health-related quality of life (HDQLIFE) physical function measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Ready, Rebecca E; Frank, Samuel; Cella, David; Hahn, Elizabeth A; Goodnight, Siera M; Schilling, Stephen G; Boileau, Nicholas R; Dayalu, Praveen

    2017-07-01

    There is a need for patient-reported outcome measures that capture the impact that motor impairments have on health-related quality of life in individuals with Huntington's disease. The objectives of this study were to establish the reliability and validity of new physical functioning patient-reported outcome measures in Huntington's disease. A total of 510 individuals with Huntington's disease completed 2 Quality of Life in Neurological Disorders (Lower Extremity Function and Upper Extremity Function) and 3 Huntington's Disease Health-Related Quality of Life (Chorea, Speech Difficulties, and Swallowing Difficulties) measures. Clinician-rated and generic self-report measures were also administered. Reliabilities for the new patient reported physical functioning measures were excellent (all Cronbach's α > .92). Convergent, discriminant validity and known group validity was supported. The results provide psychometric support for new patient-reported physical functioning measures and the fact that these measures can be used as clinically meaningful endpoints in Huntington's disease research and clinical practice. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  2. Neurologic Injury in Operatively Treated Acetabular Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Yelena; Tornetta, Paul; Jones, Clifford; Gilde, Alex K; Schemitsch, Emil; Vicente, Milena; Horwitz, Daniel; Sanders, David; Firoozabadi, Reza; Leighton, Ross; de Dios Robinson, Juan; Marcantonio, Andrew; Hamilton, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a series of operatively treated acetabular fractures with neurologic injury and to track sensory and motor recovery. Operatively treated acetabular fractures with neurologic injury from 8 trauma centers were reviewed. Patients were followed for at least 6 months or to neurologic recovery. Functional outcome was documented at 3 months, 6 months, and final follow-up. Outcomes included motor and sensory recovery, brace use, development of chronic regional pain syndrome, and return to work. One hundred thirty-seven patients (101 males and 36 females), average age 42 (17-87) years, met the criteria. Mechanism of injury included MVC (67%), fall (11%), and other (22%). The most common fracture types were transverse + posterior wall (33%), posterior wall (23%), and both-column (23%). Deficits were identified as preoperative in 57%, iatrogenic in 19% (immediately after surgery), and those that developed postoperatively in 24%. A total of 187 nerve deficits associated with the following root levels were identified: 7 in L2-3, 18 in L4, 114 in L5, and 48 in S1. Full recovery occurred in 54 (29%), partial recovery in 69 (37%), and 64 (34%) had no recovery. Forty-three percent of S1 deficits and 29% of L5 deficits had no recovery. Fifty-five percent of iatrogenic injuries did not recover. Forty-eight patients wore a brace at the final follow-up, all for an L5 root level deficit. Although 60% (42/70) returned to work, chronic regional pain syndrome was seen to develop in 19% (18/94). Peripheral neurologic injury in operatively treated acetabular fractures occurs most commonly in the sciatic nerve distribution, with L5 root level deficits having only a 26% chance of full recovery. Prognostic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  3. Motor and cognitive function in Lewy body dementia: comparison with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Gnanalingham, K K; Byrne, E. J.; Thornton, A.; Sambrook, M A; Bannister, P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Motor and cognitive function were compared in patients with Lewy body dementia, Parkinson's disease, or Alzheimer's disease, to identify features that may be clinically useful in differentiating Lewy body dementia from Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. METHODS: A range of neuropsychological function and extrapyrimidal signs (EPS) was assessed in 16 patients with Lewy body dementia, 15 with Parkinson's disease, 25 with Alzheimer's disease, and 22 control subjects. RESULTS...

  4. What drives progressive motor deficits in patients with acute pontine infarction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue-bao Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive motor deficits are relatively common in acute pontine infarction and frequently associated with increased functional disability. However, the factors that affect the progression of clinical motor weakness are largely unknown. Previous studies have suggested that pontine infarctions are caused mainly by basilar artery stenosis and penetrating artery disease. Recently, lower pons lesions in patients with acute pontine infarctions have been reported to be related to progressive motor deficits, and ensuing that damage to the corticospinal tracts may be responsible for the worsening of neurological symptoms. Here, we review studies on motor weakness progression in pontine infarction and discuss the mechanisms that may underlie the neurologic worsening.

  5. Transfer function modeling of parallel connected two three-phase induction motor implementation using LabView platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunabalan, R.; Sanjeevikumar, P.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the transfer function modeling and stability analysis of two induction motors of same ratings and parameters connected in parallel. The induction motors are controlled by a single inverter and the entire drive system is modeled using transfer function in LabView. Further...

  6. Profiles and Cognitive Predictors of Motor Functions among Early School-Age Children with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuang, Y.-P.; Wang, C.-C.; Huang, M.-H.; Su, C.-Y.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the study was to describe sensorimotor profile in children with mild intellectual disability (ID), and to examine the association between cognitive and motor function. Methods: A total of 233 children with mild ID aged 7 to 8 years were evaluated with measures of cognitive, motor and sensory integrative functioning.…

  7. THE DIFFERENCES IN FUNCTIONAL AND MOTOR INDICATORS BETWEEN THE PROFESSIONAL GROUPS OF KARATE AND JUDO FEMALE COMPETITORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Patrik Drid

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Training session which is being held in the frame of schedule and working program, also in the frame of preparation of professional karate and judo competitors, holds a signifi cant infl uence to particular functional and motor capabilities. The subject of investigation is differences in functional and motor indicators between two select groups.

  8. Iron insufficiency compromises motor neurons and their mitochondrial function in Irp2-null mice

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Suh Young

    2011-10-07

    Genetic ablation of Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2), which post-transcriptionally regulates iron metabolism genes, causes a gait disorder in mice that progresses to hind-limb paralysis. Here we have demonstrated that misregulation of iron metabolism from loss of Irp2 causes lower motor neuronal degeneration with significant spinal cord axonopathy. Mitochondria in the lumbar spinal cord showed significantly decreased Complex I and II activities, and abnormal morphology. Lower motor neurons appeared to be the most adversely affected neurons, and we show that functional iron starvation due to misregulation of iron import and storage proteins, including transferrin receptor 1 and ferritin, may have a causal role in disease. We demonstrated that two therapeutic approaches were beneficial for motor neuron survival. First, we activated a homologous protein, IRP1, by oral Tempol treatment and found that axons were partially spared from degeneration. Secondly, we genetically decreased expression of the iron storage protein, ferritin, to diminish functional iron starvation. These data suggest that functional iron deficiency may constitute a previously unrecognized molecular basis for degeneration of motor neurons in mice.

  9. Neuroplasticity-Based Technologies and Interventions for Restoring Motor Functions in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straudi, Sofia; Basaglia, Nino

    2017-01-01

    Motor impairments are very common in multiple sclerosis (MS), leading to a reduced Quality of Life and active participation. In the past decades, new insights into the functional reorganization processes that occur after a brain injury have been introduced. Specifically, the motor practice seems to be determinant to induce neuroplastic changes and motor recovery. More recently, these findings have been extended to multiple sclerosis, in particular, it has been hypothesized that disease progression, functional reorganization and disability are mutually related. For this reason, neuroplasticity-based technologies and interventions have been rapidly introduced in MS rehabilitation. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT), robotics and virtual reality training are new rehabilitative interventions that deliver an intensive e task-specific practice, which are two critical factors associated with functional improvements and cortical reorganization. Another promising strategy for enhancing neuroplastic changes is non-invasive brain stimulation that can be used with a priming effect on motor training. The aims of this chapter are to review the evidence of neuroplastic changes in multiple sclerosis and to present technologies and interventions that have been tested in clinical trials.

  10. Motor coordination correlates with academic achievement and cognitive function in children

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    Valter Rocha Fernandes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between exercise and cognition is an important topic of research that only recently began to unravel. Here we set out to investigate the relation between motor skills, cognitive function and school performance in 45 students from 8 to 14 years of age. We used a cross-sectional design to evaluate motor coordination (Touch Test Disc, agility (Shuttle Run Speed - running back and forth, school performance (Academic Achievement Test, the Stroop test and 6 sub-tests of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV (WISC-IV. We found that the Touch Test Disc was the best predictor of school performance (R²=0.20. Significant correlations were also observed between motor coordination and several indices of cognitive function, such as the total score of the Academic Achievement Test (Spearman’s rho=0.536; p<=0.001, as well as two WISC-IV sub-tests: block design (R= -0.438;p=0.003 and cancellation (rho= -0.471; p=0.001. All the other cognitive variables pointed in the same direction, and even correlated with agility, but did not reach statistical significance. Altogether, the data indicate that visual motor coordination and visual selective attention, but not agility, may influence academic achievement and cognitive function. The results highlight the importance of investigating the correlation between physical skills and different aspects of cognition.

  11. Histological and functional benefit following transplantation of motor neuron progenitors to the injured rat spinal cord.

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    Sharyn L Rossi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Motor neuron loss is characteristic of cervical spinal cord injury (SCI and contributes to functional deficit.In order to investigate the amenability of the injured adult spinal cord to motor neuron differentiation, we transplanted spinal cord injured animals with a high purity population of human motor neuron progenitors (hMNP derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. In vitro, hMNPs displayed characteristic motor neuron-specific markers, a typical electrophysiological profile, functionally innervated human or rodent muscle, and secreted physiologically active growth factors that caused neurite branching and neuronal survival. hMNP transplantation into cervical SCI sites in adult rats resulted in suppression of intracellular signaling pathways associated with SCI pathogenesis, which correlated with greater endogenous neuronal survival and neurite branching. These neurotrophic effects were accompanied by significantly enhanced performance on all parameters of the balance beam task, as compared to controls. Interestingly, hMNP transplantation resulted in survival, differentiation, and site-specific integration of hMNPs distal to the SCI site within ventral horns, but hMNPs near the SCI site reverted to a neuronal progenitor state, suggesting an environmental deficiency for neuronal maturation associated with SCI.These findings underscore the barriers imposed on neuronal differentiation of transplanted cells by the gliogenic nature of the injured spinal cord, and the physiological relevance of transplant-derived neurotrophic support to functional recovery.

  12. In vivo optogenetic tracing of functional corticocortical connections between motor forelimb areas

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    Riichiro eHira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between distinct motor cortical areas are essential for coordinated motor behaviors. In rodents, the motor cortical forelimb areas are divided into at least two distinct areas: the rostral forelimb area (RFA and the caudal forelimb area (CFA. The RFA is thought to be an equivalent of the premotor cortex in primates, whereas the CFA is believed to be an equivalent of the primary motor cortex. Although reciprocal connections between the RFA and the CFA have been anatomically identified in rats, it is unknown whether there are functional connections between these areas that can induce postsynaptic spikes. In this study, we used an in vivo Channelrhodopsin-2 photostimulation method to trace the functional connections between the mouse RFA and CFA. Simultaneous electrical recordings were utilized to detect spiking activities induced by synaptic inputs originating from photostimulated areas. This method, in combination with anatomical tracing, demonstrated that the RFA receives strong functional projections from layer 2/3 and/or layer 5a, but not from layer 5b, of the CFA. Further, the CFA receives strong projections from layer 5b neurons of the RFA. The onset latency of electrical responses evoked in remote areas upon photostimulation of the other areas was approximately 10 ms, which is consistent with the synaptic connectivity between these areas. Our results suggest that neuronal activities in the RFA and the CFA during movements are formed through asymmetric reciprocal connections.

  13. Aging-associated changes in motor axon voltage-gated Na(+) channel function in mice.

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    Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer; Alvarez, Susana; Klein, Dennis; Martini, Rudolf; Krarup, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating myelin abnormalities and conduction slowing occur in peripheral nerves during aging. In mice deficient of myelin protein P0, severe peripheral nervous system myelin damage is associated with ectopic expression of Nav1.8 voltage-gated Na(+) channels on motor axons aggravating the functional impairment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular aging on motor axon function with particular emphasis on Nav1.8. We compared tibial nerve conduction and excitability measures by threshold tracking in 12 months (mature) and 20 months (aged) wild-type (WT) mice. With aging, deviations during threshold electrotonus were attenuated and the resting current-threshold slope and early refractoriness were increased. Modeling indicated that, in addition to changes in passive membrane properties, motor fibers in aged WT mice were depolarized. An increased Nav1.8 isoform expression was found by immunohistochemistry. The depolarizing excitability features were absent in Nav1.8 null mice, and they were counteracted in WT mice by a Nav1.8 blocker. Our data suggest that alteration in voltage-gated Na(+) channel isoform expression contributes to changes in motor axon function during aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Neurological soft signs in pervasive developmental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halayem, S; Bouden, A; Halayem, M B; Tabbane, K; Amado, I; Krebs, M O

    2010-09-01

    'éthique, Razi Hospital), according to the declaration of Helsinki. There was no difference between patients and controls with respect to sex, age and cognitive function. All children had an IQ higher than 81. Significant differences were found between AD children and control group in the motor integration function and sensory integration function. Different NSS scores were significantly higher in the PDDNOS group than in controls: the total scores, motor coordination, motor integration function, sensory integration and abnormal movements. Lower performance in motor coordination skills was associated with higher ADI-R communication score in the AD group. No relationship was found between NSS and CARS' total sore. This study confirms the impaired neurological functioning in autistic as well as PDDNOS children. The association of motor impairment with autistic symptoms highlights the argument that motor control problems can be part of the autism spectrum disorders. The lack of relationship between NSS and intellectual aptitude in the clinical sample provides new elements for the neurodevelopment model of the autism spectrum. Copyright © 2010 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure and Function of the Bi-Directional Bacterial Flagellar Motor

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    Yusuke V. Morimoto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial flagellum is a locomotive organelle that propels the bacterial cell body in liquid environments. The flagellum is a supramolecular complex composed of about 30 different proteins and consists of at least three parts: a rotary motor, a universal joint, and a helical filament. The flagellar motor of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica is powered by an inward-directed electrochemical potential difference of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane. The flagellar motor consists of a rotor made of FliF, FliG, FliM and FliN and a dozen stators consisting of MotA and MotB. FliG, FliM and FliN also act as a molecular switch, enabling the motor to spin in both counterclockwise and clockwise directions. Each stator is anchored to the peptidoglycan layer through the C-terminal periplasmic domain of MotB and acts as a proton channel to couple the proton flow through the channel with torque generation. Highly conserved charged residues at the rotor–stator interface are required not only for torque generation but also for stator assembly around the rotor. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of the structure and function of the proton-driven bacterial flagellar motor.

  16. Enantiopure Functional Molecular Motors Obtained by a Switchable Chiral-Resolution Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Gan, Jefri; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pizzolato, Stefano F; Chang, Mu-Chieh; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-05-17

    Molecular switches, rotors, and motors play an important role in the development of nano-machines and devices, as well as responsive and adaptive functional materials. For unidirectional rotors based on chiral overcrowded alkenes, their stereochemical homogeneity is of crucial importance. Herein, a method to obtain new and functionalizable overcrowded alkenes in enantiopure form is presented. The procedure involves a short synthesis of three steps and a solvent-switchable chiral resolution by using a readily available resolving agent. X-ray crystallography revealed the mode of binding of the motor with the resolving agent, as well as the absolute configuration of the motor. (1) H NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopy techniques were used to determine the dynamic behavior of this molecular motor. This method provides rapid access to ample amounts of enantiopure molecular motors, which will greatly facilitate the further development of responsive molecular systems based on chiral overcrowded alkenes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Prolonged Minocycline Treatment Impairs Motor Neuronal Survival and Glial Function in Organotypic Rat Spinal Cord Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkernelle, Josephine; Fansa, Hisham; Ebmeyer, Uwe; Keilhoff, Gerburg

    2013-01-01

    Background Minocycline, a second-generation tetracycline antibiotic, exhibits anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in various experimental models of neurological diseases, such as stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injury. However, conflicting results have prompted a debate regarding the beneficial effects of minocycline. Methods In this study, we analyzed minocycline treatment in organotypic spinal cord cultures of neonatal rats as a model of motor neuron survival and regeneration after injury. Minocycline was administered in 2 different concentrations (10 and 100 µM) at various time points in culture and fixed after 1 week. Results Prolonged minocycline administration decreased the survival of motor neurons in the organotypic cultures. This effect was strongly enhanced with higher concentrations of minocycline. High concentrations of minocycline reduced the number of DAPI-positive cell nuclei in organotypic cultures and simultaneously inhibited microglial activation. Astrocytes, which covered the surface of the control organotypic cultures, revealed a peripheral distribution after early minocycline treatment. Thus, we further analyzed the effects of 100 µM minocycline on the viability and migration ability of dispersed primary glial cell cultures. We found that minocycline reduced cell viability, delayed wound closure in a scratch migration assay and increased connexin 43 protein levels in these cultures. Conclusions The administration of high doses of minocycline was deleterious for motor neuron survival. In addition, it inhibited microglial activation and impaired glial viability and migration. These data suggest that especially high doses of minocycline might have undesired affects in treatment of spinal cord injury. Further experiments are required to determine the conditions for the safe clinical administration of minocycline in spinal cord injured patients. PMID:23967343

  18. Neurological changes in brain structure and functions among individuals with a history of childhood sexual abuse: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Lyzette; Nydegger, Liesl A; Camarillo, Giselle; Trinidad, Dennis R; Schramm, Emily; Ames, Susan L

    2015-10-01

    Review literature focused on neurological associations in brain structure among individuals with a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA). A review of literature examining physiological irregularities in brain structures of individuals with a history of CSA was conducted. Results revealed that a history of CSA was associated with irregularities in the cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. These irregularities have been recognized to contribute to various cognitive, behavioral, and psychological health outcomes later in life. Age of CSA onset was associated with differential neurological brain structures. Mental and behavioral health problems such as anxiety, depression, substance abuse, dissociative disorders, and sexual dysfunction are associated with CSA and may persist into adulthood. Research depicting the associations of CSA on neurological outcomes emphasizes the need to examine the biological and subsequent psychological outcomes associated with CSA. Early intervention is imperative for CSA survivors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 76 FR 22107 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; NIH Toolbox for Assessment of Neurological and...

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    2011-04-20

    ... four domains of neurological and behavioral functioning (cognitive, emotional, motor and sensory) for... 70% English-speaking and 30% Spanish-speaking. Frequency of Response: Once or twice (depending on... Responses per Respondent: 1-2; Average Burden Hours per Response: 1.96; and Estimated Total Annual Burden...

  20. 75 FR 22596 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; NIH Toolbox for Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral...

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    2010-04-29

    ... four domains of neurological and behavioral functioning (cognitive, emotional, motor and sensory) for..., with 66% English-speaking and 34% Spanish-speaking. Frequency of Response: Once to the screener, and... Respondents: 52,800 for the screener and 5,660 for the Toolbox measures; Estimated Number of Responses per...

  1. Design, modeling and control of a novel multi functional translational-rotary micro ultrasonic motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncdemir, Safakcan

    The major goal of this thesis was to design and develop an actuator, which is capable of producing translational and rotary output motions in a compact structure with simple driving conditions, for the needs of small-scale actuators for micro robotic systems. Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors were selected as the target actuator schemes because of their unbeatable characteristics in the meso-scale range, which covers the structure sizes from hundred micrometers to ten millimeters and with operating ranges from few nanometers to centimeters. In order to meet the objectives and the design constraints, a number of key research tasks had to be undertaken. The design constraints and objectives were so stringent and entangled that none of the existing methods in literature could solve the research problems individually. Therefore, several unique methods were established to accomplish the research objectives. The methods produced novel solutions at every stage of design, development and modeling of the multi functional micro ultrasonic motor. Specifically, an ultrasonic motor utilizing slanted ceramics on a brass rod was designed. Because of the unique slanted ceramics design, longitudinal and torsional mode vibration modes could be obtained on the same structure. A ring shaped mobile element was loosely fitted on the metal rod stator. The mobile element moved in translational or rotational, depending on whether the vibration mode was longitudinal or torsional. A new ultrasonic motor drive method was required because none of the existing ultrasonic motor drive techniques were able to provide both output modes in a compact and cylindrical structure with the use of single drive source. By making use of rectangular wave drive signals, saw-tooth shaped displacement profile could be obtained at longitudinal and torsional resonance modes. Thus, inheriting the operating principle of smooth impact drive method, a new resonance type inertial drive was introduced. This new technique

  2. Methylprednisolone promotes recovery of neurological function after spinal cord injury: association with Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway activation

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    Gong-biao Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Some studies have indicated that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is activated following spinal cord injury, and expression levels of specific proteins, including low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein-6 phosphorylation, β-catenin, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β, are significantly altered. We hypothesized that methylprednisolone treatment contributes to functional recovery after spinal cord injury by inhibiting apoptosis and activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In the current study, 30 mg/kg methylprednisolone was injected into rats with spinal cord injury immediately post-injury and at 1 and 2 days post-injury. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scores showed that methylprednisolone treatment significantly promoted locomotor functional recovery between 2 and 6 weeks post-injury. The number of surviving motor neurons increased, whereas the lesion size significantly decreased following methylprednisolone treatment at 7 days post-injury. Additionally, caspase-3, caspase-9, and Bax protein expression levels and the number of apoptotic cells were reduced at 3 and 7 days post-injury, while Bcl-2 levels at 7 days post-injury were higher in methylprednisolone-treated rats compared with saline-treated rats. At 3 and 7 days post-injury, methylprednisolone up-regulated expression and activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein-6 phosphorylation, β-catenin, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β phosphorylation. These results indicate that methylprednisolone-induced neuroprotection may correlate with activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  3. Outline of restorative neurology: definition, clinical practice, assessment, intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijevic, Milan R

    2012-06-01

    Rather than focusing on the deficits and lost function caused by upper motor neuron lesions or disorders, it is more advantageous to elucidate, in each individual, the specific neural functions that remain available, and then, to build upon them by designing a treatment protocol to optimize their effectiveness and thus improve recovery. The practice of Restorative Neurology is based on detailed assessment of the individual patient, the use of neurophysiological methods to elucidate and characterize subclinical function and the application of interventions that modify neural activity to improve clinical function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Technology-aided assessment of sensori-motor function in early infancy

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    Alessandro G Allievi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a pressing need for new techniques capable of providing accurate information about sensori-motor function during the first 2 years of childhood. Here we review current clinical methods and challenges for assessing motor function in early infancy, and discuss the potential benefits of applying technology-assisted methods. We also describe how the use of these tools with neuroimaging, and in particular functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, can shed new light on the intra-cerebral processes underlying neurodevelopmental impairment. This knowledge is of particular relevance in the early infant brain which has an increased capacity for compensatory neural plasticity. Such tools could bring a wealth of knowledge about the underlying pathophysiological processes of diseases such as cerebral palsy; act as biomarkers to monitor the effects of possible therapeutic interventions; and provide clinicians with much needed early diagnostic information.

  5. Altered Functional Connectivity Between Precuneus and Motor Systems in Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibes, Raíssa Benocci; Novaes, Natalia P; Lucato, Leandro T; Campanholo, Kenia R; Melo, Luciano M; Leite, Claudia C; Amaro, Edson; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Cardoso, Ellison Fernando; Sato, João Ricardo

    2017-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects motor skills and cognition. As brain structure and function are compromised, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be a helpful tool to further investigate how intrinsic connectivity is impaired on the disease. The precuneus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are hub regions involved on the default mode network (DMN), a system that is active during rest and related to cognitive processes. We hypothesized that PD patients would present a decrease in functional connectivity among these two regions and the rest of the brain. Our goal was to identify regions in which functional connectivity to precuneus and mPFC was altered in PD. This study was based on resting-state fMRI data from 37 healthy subjects and 55 PD patients. Precuneus and mPFC were selected as seed regions in a whole brain functional connectivity mapping. As expected, we found abnormal connectivity from precuneus to motor system regions in PD patients, pointing toward a decreased connectivity in the disease. No significant group effects were found for the mPFC. Our findings suggest that internetwork connectivity from DMN to motor system is impaired in PD.

  6. Motor planning under temporal uncertainty is suboptimal when the gain function is asymmetric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Keiji; Shinya, Masahiro; Kudo, Kazutoshi

    2015-01-01

    For optimal action planning, the gain/loss associated with actions and the variability in motor output should both be considered. A number of studies make conflicting claims about the optimality of human action planning but cannot be reconciled due to their use of different movements and gain/loss functions. The disagreement is possibly because of differences in the experimental design and differences in the energetic cost of participant motor effort. We used a coincident timing task, which requires decision making with constant energetic cost, to test the optimality of participant's timing strategies under four configurations of the gain function. We compared participant strategies to an optimal timing strategy calculated from a Bayesian model that maximizes the expected gain. We found suboptimal timing strategies under two configurations of the gain function characterized by asymmetry, in which higher gain is associated with higher risk of zero gain. Participants showed a risk-seeking strategy by responding closer than optimal to the time of onset/offset of zero gain. Meanwhile, there was good agreement of the model with actual performance under two configurations of the gain function characterized by symmetry. Our findings show that human ability to make decisions that must reflect uncertainty in one's own motor output has limits that depend on the configuration of the gain function.

  7. Motor planning under temporal uncertainty is suboptimal when the gain function is asymmetric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji eOta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For optimal action planning, the gain/loss associated with actions and the variability in motor output should both be considered. A number of studies make conflicting claims about the optimality of human action planning but cannot be reconciled due to their use of different movements and gain/loss functions. The disagreement is possibly because of differences in the experimental design and differences in the energetic cost of participant motor effort. We used a coincident timing task, which requires decision making with constant energetic cost, to test the optimality of participant’s timing strategies under four configurations of the gain function. We compared participant strategies to an optimal timing strategy calculated from a Bayesian model that maximizes the expected gain. We found suboptimal timing strategies under two configurations of the gain function characterized by asymmetry, in which higher gain is associated with higher risk of zero gain. Participants showed a risk-seeking strategy by responding closer than optimal to the time of onset/offset of zero gain. Meanwhile, there was good agreement of the model with actual performance under two configurations of the gain function characterized by symmetry. Our findings show that human ability to make decisions that must reflect uncertainty in one’s own motor output has limits that depend on the configuration of the gain function.

  8. Functional BOLD MRI: comparison of different field strengths in a motor task

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    Meindl, T. [University Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, University Hospitals - Innenstadt, Munich (Germany); Born, C.; Britsch, S.; Reiser, M.; Schoenberg, S. [University Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the benefit of an increased field strength for functional magnetic resonance imaging in a motor task. Six right-handed volunteers were scanned at 1.5 T and 3.0 T using a motor task. Each experiment consisted of two runs with four activation blocks, each with right- and left-hand tapping. Analysis was done using BrainVoyagerQX {sup registered}. Differences between both field strengths concerning signal to noise (SNR), blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal change, functional sensitivity and BOLD contrast to noise (CNR) were tested using a paired t test. Delineation of activations and artifacts were graded by two independent readers. Results were further validated by means of a phantom study. The sensorimotor and premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area, subcortical and cerebellar structures were activated at each field strength. Additional activations of the right premotor cortex and right superior temporal gyrus were found at 3.0 T. Signal-to-noise, percentage of BOLD signal change, BOLD CNR and functional sensitivity improved at 3.0 T by a factor of up to 2.4. Functional imaging at 3.0 T results in detection of additional activated areas, increased SNR, BOLD signal change, functional sensitivity and BOLD CNR. (orig.)

  9. Memantine elicits spinal blockades of motor function, proprioception, and nociception in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2015-12-01

    Although memantine blocks sodium currents and produces local skin anesthesia, spinal anesthesia with memantine is unknown. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of memantine in spinal anesthesia and its comparison with a widely used local anesthetic lidocaine. After intrathecally injecting the rats with five doses of each drug, the dose-response curves of memantine and lidocaine were constructed. The potencies of the drugs and durations of spinal anesthetic effects on motor function, proprioception, and nociception were compared with those of lidocaine. We showed that memantine produced dose-dependent spinal blockades in motor function, proprioception, and nociception. On a 50% effective dose (ED50 ) basis, the rank of potency was lidocaine greater than memantine (P < 0.05 for the differences). At the equipotent doses (ED25 , ED50 , ED75 ), the block duration produced by memantine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P < 0.05 for the differences). Memantine, but not lidocaine, displayed more sensory/nociceptive block than motor block. The preclinical data demonstrated that memantine is less potent than lidocaine, whereas memantine produces longer duration of spinal anesthesia than lidocaine. Memantine shows a more sensory-selective action over motor blockade. © 2015 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  10. Validation of a Smartphone Application Measuring Motor Function in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Will; Evans, Andrew; Williams, David R

    2016-04-02

    Measurement of motor function is critical to the assessment and management of Parkinson's disease. Ambulatory motor assessment has the potential to provide a glimpse of the patient's clinical state beyond the consultation. We custom-designed a smartphone application that quantitatively measures hand dexterity and hypothesized that this can give an indication of a patient's overall motor function. The aims of this study were to (i) validate this smartphone application against MDS-UPDRS motor assessment (MDS-UPDRS-III) and the two-target tapping test; (ii) generate a prediction model for MDS-UPDRS-III; (iii) assess repeatability of our smartphone application and (iv) examine compliance and user-satisfaction of this application. 103 patients with Parkinson's disease were recruited from two movement disorders clinics. After initial assessment, a group of patients underwent repeat assessment within two weeks. Patients were invited to use the smartphone application at home over three days, followed by a survey to assess their experience. Significant correlation between key smartphone application test parameters and MDS-UPDRS-III (r = 0.281-0.608, p smartphone application tests parameters and predicted MDS-UPDRS-III was moderate to strong (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.584-0.763, p identified that our patients were very comfortable with the smartphone application and mobile technology. Our smartphone application demonstrated satisfactory repeatability and validity when measured against MDS-UPDRS-III. Its performance is acceptable considering our smartphone application measures hand dexterity only.

  11. Association between fine motor skills and binocular visual function in children with reading difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niechwiej-Szwedo, Ewa; Alramis, Fatimah; Christian, Lisa W

    2017-12-01

    Performance of fine motor skills (FMS) assessed by a clinical test battery has been associated with reading achievement in school-age children. However, the nature of this association remains to be established. The aim of this study was to assess FMS in children with reading difficulties using two experimental tasks, and to determine if performance is associated with reduced binocular function. We hypothesized that in comparison to an age- and sex-matched control group, children identified with reading difficulties will perform worse only on a motor task that has been shown to rely on binocular input. To test this hypothesis, motor performance was assessed using two tasks: bead-threading and peg-board in 19 children who were reading below expected grade and age-level. Binocular vision assessment included tests for stereoacuity, fusional vergence, amplitude of accommodation, and accommodative facility. In comparison to the control group, children with reading difficulties performed significantly worse on the bead-threading task. In contrast, performance on the peg-board task was similar in both groups. Accommodative facility was the only measure of binocular function significantly associated with motor performance. Findings from our exploratory study suggest that normal binocular vision may provide an important sensory input for the optimal development of FMS and reading. Given the small sample size tested in the current study, further investigation to assess the contribution of binocular vision to the development and performance of FMS and reading is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Increasing MuSK Activity Delays Denervation and Improves Motor Function in ALS Mice

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    María J. Pérez-García

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a devastating disease that progresses from detachment of motor nerve terminals to complete muscle paralysis and lethal respiratory failure within 5 years of diagnosis. Genetic studies have linked mutations in several genes to ALS, and mice bearing mutations in SOD1 recapitulate hallmark features of the disease. We investigated whether disease symptoms can be ameliorated by co-opting the retrograde signaling pathway that promotes attachment of nerve terminals to muscle. We crossed SOD1G93A mice with transgenic mice that express MuSK, a receptor tyrosine kinase that is required for retrograde signaling, and we used histological and behavioral assays to assess motor innervation and behavior. A 3-fold increase in MuSK expression delayed the onset and reduced the extent of muscle denervation, improving motor function for more than a month without altering survival. These findings suggest that increasing MuSK activity by pharmacological means has the potential to improve motor function in ALS.

  13. Plasticity of the postural function to sport and/or motor experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    This review addresses the possible structural and functional adaptations of the postural function to motor experience. Evidence suggests that postural performance and strategy evolve after training in inactive subjects. In trained subjects, postural adaptations could also occur, since elite athletes exhibit better postural performance than, and different postural strategy to sub-elite athletes. The postural adaptations induced are specific to the context in which the physical activity is practiced. They appear to be so specific that there would be no or only a very slight effect of transfer to non-experienced motor tasks (apart from in subjects presenting low initial levels of postural performance, such as aged subjects). Yet adaptations could occur as part of the interlimb relationship, particularly when the two legs do not display the same motor experience. Mechanistic explanations as well as conceptual models are proposed to explain how postural adaptations operate according to the nature of physical activities and the context in which they are practiced as well as the level of motor expertise of individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of motor imagery therapy on cognitive function of patients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-jun GONG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the rehabilitation effect of motor imagery therapy on cognitive function of stroke patients.  Methods A total of 99 stroke patients with mild to moderate cognitive dysfunction were randomly divided into 3 groups: control group (N = 33, cognitive training group (N = 33 and motor imagery training group (N = 33. All patients received conventional rehabilitation training. Before and after 8-week training, all subjects were assessed with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA. At the same time, event-related potential (ERP was examined to detect P300 latency and amplitude.   Results ompared with before training, MMSE (P = 0.000 and MoCA (P = 0.000 scores were significantly increased, P300 latency was shortened (P = 0.000 and P300 amplitude was increased (P = 0.000 in 3 groups after 8 - week training. There were significant differences among 3 groups on MMSE (P = 0.030 and MoCA (P = 0.013 scores, P300 latency (P = 0.004 and P300 amplitude (P = 0.009 before and after training. Among them, cognitive training group and motor imagery training group had significantly higher MMSE (P = 0.019, 0.021 and MoCA (P = 0.003, 0.031 scores, shorter P300 latency (P = 0.020, 0.003 and higher P300 amplitude (P = 0.003, 0.002 than control group.  Conclusions Motor imagery training can not only improve motor function of stroke patients, but also improve their cognitive function. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.06.005

  15. SPECIFIC FEATURES OF YOUNG VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS IN MOTOR AND INTELECTUAL FUNCTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenko Vuković

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Volleyball is a complex sport activity, which sets before its players numerous requirements relating the space of motor and intellectual abilities. The issue is the following: what is the relation between these two subsystems of anthropological space and/or are there are any differences in motor and intellectual functioning, between the population of female volleyball players and girls who do not train volleyball? A research of motor and intellectual abilities was carried out on the sample of 383 girls from the territory of Vojvodina, and the following towns: Subotica, Zrenjanin, Klek, Sremska Mitrovica, Sremski Karlovci and Novi Sad, 12-16 years old, out of which 194 do not practice organized physical activities and 189 volleyball players (at least three years in training process. The objective of the research was to establish specific features of young female volleyball players, in motor and intellectual functioning, in relation to the girls that do not practice organized physical activity. Testing of the structural differences in motor and intellectual functioning of two groups of girls was performed by application of canonical discriminant analysis, so we can conclude that there are differences on the qualitative level. Variables which mainly contributed to differences are the following: estimation of flexibility, speed of alternative arm movements, coordination and explosive strength of legs. On the sample of 15 – 16 year old girls, the difference between two groups on subjects and/or variable which are at the very top according to the significance of influences based on which the groups are discriminated, are variables for estimation of coordination and intellectual abilities, and which are known to be of a great significance for sport outplaying, to which we are directed as by analysis of the structure of moving so by analysis of situations in volleyball.

  16. Motor skills, cognitive development and balance functions of children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malak, Roksana; Kotwicka, Małgorzata; Krawczyk-Wasielewska, Agnieszka; Mojs, Ewa; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2013-01-01

    Motor and cognitive development of children with Down syndrome (DS) is delayed and inharmonic. Neuro-muscular abnormalities, such as hypotonia, retained primary reflexes, and slow performance of volitional reaction, result in difficulties with body balance. The aim of the presented study is to assess the global motor functions and body balance of children with DS in relation to age and mental development. The study group consisted of 79 children with DS (42 boys, 37 girls), average age 6 years and 3 months ± 4 years and 6 months. Participants were divided according to age range into 3 groups: 6 years old. Children were assessed using Gross Motor Function Measure-88 (GMFM-88) and Paediatric Balance Scale (PBS). Psychological diagnosis served to determine the degree of mental development using the Brunet-Lezine Scale for children younger than 3 years old, and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) for those who are older than 3 years. Nine children in research group had not been diagnosed by psychologists, which is the reason why the analysis referring to mental development was performed in 70 children (34 girls, 36 boys), with an average age of 4 years and 6 months. GMFM-88 scores were significantly lower in children with moderate psychomotor delay than in children with mild psychomotor delay, or normally developed children, p=0.043. GMFM-88 scores in children with profound mental impairment were lower than in children with mild or moderate mental impairment. There was a statistical significant correlation between GMFM-88 scores and the PBS scores, r= 0.7, p<0.0001. Motor development of children with Down syndrome from towns and villages in the Greater Poland region is associated with cognitive development, especially in the first three years of life, with the balance functions being closely related to motor skills.

  17. Inter-Relationships of Functional Status in Cerebral Palsy: Analyzing Gross Motor Function, Manual Ability, and Communication Function Classification Systems in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Ho, Nhan Thi; Dodge, Nancy; Hurvitz, Edward A.; Slaughter, Jaime; Workinger, Marilyn Seif; Kent, Ray D.; Rosenbaum, Peter; Lenski, Madeleine; Messaros, Bridget M.; Vanderbeek, Suzette B.; Deroos, Steven; Paneth, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the relationships among the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), Manual Ability Classification System (MACS), and Communication Function Classification System (CFCS) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Using questionnaires describing each scale, mothers reported GMFCS, MACS, and CFCS levels in 222…

  18. Quantitative Evaluation of Median Nerve Motor Function in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Using Load Cell : Correlation with Clinical, Electrodiagnostic, and Ultrasonographic Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong Hwan; Park, Sung Bae; Lee, Sang Hyung; Son, Young-Je; Chung, Gih Sung; Yang, Hee-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Objective Major complaints of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) are sensory components. However, motor deficit also impedes functional status of hand. Contrary to evaluation of sensory function, the objective, quantitative evaluation of median nerve motor function is not easy. The motor function of median was evaluated quantitatively using load cell and its correlation with findings of electrodiagnostic study (EDS) was evaluated. Methods Objective motor function of median nerve was evaluated by lo...

  19. [Neurological sleep disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ramin

    2014-11-01

    Neurological sleep disorders are common in the general population and may have a strong impact on quality of life. General practitioners play a key role in recognizing and managing sleep disorders in the general population. They should therefore be familiar with the most important neurological sleep disorders. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the most prevalent and important neurological sleep disorders, including Restless legs syndrome (with and without periodic limb movements in sleep), narcolepsy, NREM- and REM-sleep parasomnias and the complex relationship between sleep and epilepsies. Although narcolepsy is considered as a rare disease, recent discoveries in narcolepsy research provided insight in the function of brain circuitries involved in sleep wake regulation. REM sleep behavioral parasomnia (RBD) is increasingly recognized to represent an early manifestation of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular evolving synucleinopathies. Early diagnosis may thus open new perspectives for developing novel treatment options by targeting neuroprotective substances.

  20. Locomotor function after long-duration space flight: effects and motor learning during recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Feiveson, Alan H; Fiedler, James; Cohen, Helen; Peters, Brian T; Miller, Chris; Brady, Rachel; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2010-05-01

    Astronauts returning from space flight and performing Earth-bound activities must rapidly transition from the microgravity-adapted sensorimotor state to that of Earth's gravity. The goal of the current study was to assess locomotor dysfunction and recovery of function after long-duration space flight using a test of functional mobility. Eighteen International Space Station crewmembers experiencing an average flight duration of 185 days performed the functional mobility test (FMT) pre-flight and post-flight. To perform the FMT, subjects walked at a self selected pace through an obstacle course consisting of several pylons and obstacles set up on a base of 10-cm-thick, medium-density foam for a total of six trials per test session. The primary outcome measure was the time to complete the course (TCC, in seconds). To assess the long-term recovery trend of locomotor function after return from space flight, a multilevel exponential recovery model was fitted to the log-transformed TCC data. All crewmembers exhibited altered locomotor function after space flight, with a median 48% increase in the TCC. From the fitted model we calculated that a typical subject would recover to 95% of his/her pre-flight level at approximately 15 days post-flight. In addition, to assess the early motor learning responses after returning from space flight, we modeled performance over the six trials during the first post-flight session by a similar multilevel exponential relation. We found a significant positive correlation between measures of long-term recovery and early motor learning (P learning helps astronauts make rapid modifications in their motor control strategies during the first hours after landing. Further, this early motor learning appears to reinforce the adaptive realignment, facilitating re-adaptation to Earth's 1-g environment on return from space flight.

  1. Compound muscle action potential and motor function in children with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewelt, Aga; Krosschell, Kristin J; Scott, Charles; Sakonju, Ai; Kissel, John T; Crawford, Thomas O; Acsadi, Gyula; D'anjou, Guy; Elsheikh, Bakri; Reyna, Sandra P; Schroth, Mary K; Maczulski, Jo Anne; Stoddard, Gregory J; Elovic, Elie; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2010-11-01

    Reliable outcome measures that reflect the underlying disease process and correlate with motor function in children with SMA are needed for clinical trials. Maximum ulnar compound muscle action potential (CMAP) data were collected at two visits over a 4-6-week period in children with SMA types II and III, 2-17 years of age, at four academic centers. Primary functional outcome measures included the Modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (MHFMS) and MHFMS-Extend. CMAP negative peak amplitude and area showed excellent discrimination between the ambulatory and non-ambulatory SMA cohorts (ROC = 0.88). CMAP had excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.96-0.97, n = 64) and moderate to strong correlation with the MHFMS and MHFMS-Extend (r = 0.61-0.73, n = 68, P < 0.001). Maximum ulnar CMAP amplitude and area is a feasible, valid, and reliable outcome measure for use in pediatric multicenter clinical trials in SMA. CMAP correlates well with motor function and has potential value as a relevant surrogate for disease status.

  2. Strong Functional Connectivity among Homotopic Brain Areas Is Vital for Motor Control in Unilateral Limb Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengxu Wei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism underlying brain region organization for motor control in humans remains poorly understood. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study, right-handed volunteers were tasked to maintain unilateral foot movements on the right and left sides as consistently as possible. We aimed to identify the similarities and differences between brain motor networks of the two conditions. We recruited 18 right-handed healthy volunteers aged 25 ± 2.3 years and used a whole-body 3T system for magnetic resonance (MR scanning. Image analysis was performed using SPM8, Conn toolbox and Brain Connectivity Toolbox. We determined a craniocaudally distributed, mirror-symmetrical modular structure. The functional connectivity between homotopic brain areas was generally stronger than the intrahemispheric connections, and such strong connectivity led to the abovementioned modular structure. Our findings indicated that the interhemispheric functional interaction between homotopic brain areas is more intensive than the interaction along the conventional top–down and bottom–up pathways within the brain during unilateral limb movement. The detected strong interhemispheric horizontal functional interaction is an important aspect of motor control but often neglected or underestimated. The strong interhemispheric connectivity may explain the physiological phenomena and effects of promising therapeutic approaches. Further accurate and effective therapeutic methods may be developed on the basis of our findings.

  3. Functional Compensation of Motor Function in Pre-Symptomatic Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppel, Stefan; Draganski, Bogdan; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Weiller, Cornelius; Frackowiak, Richard S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Involuntary choreiform movements are a clinical hallmark of Huntington's disease. Studies in clinically affected patients suggest a shift of motor activations to parietal cortices in response to progressive neurodegeneration. Here, we studied pre-symptomatic gene carriers to examine the compensatory mechanisms that underlie the phenomenon of…

  4. Effects of an adapted physical activity program on motor and non-motor functions and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugusi, Lucia; Solla, Paolo; Zedda, Francesca; Loi, Martina; Serpe, Roberto; Cannas, Antonino; Marrosu, Francesco; Mercuro, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have clearly shown that strategies of health promotion, such as fitness and general exercise programs, may improve quality of life (QoL), motor and non-motor functions in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. However, little is known about the effects of specific Adapted Physical Activity (APA) programs on PD patients. To determine the effects of an APA program on motor and non-motor symptoms, functional performances and QoL in PD patients. Nine consecutive PD patients (5 men, 4 women, 64.4 ± 6.8 years) able to ambulate independently (Hoehn and Yahr: from stage 1 to 3) and not demented, were enrolled. Patients performed an APA program, 3 sessions/week, for 9 weeks. Exercises focused on balance, walking, strength and functional activities. Functional effects were assessed by Six Minute Walking Test (6MWT), Five Time Sit to Stand Test (FTSST), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Sit and Reach Test (SRT), and Timed Up and Go test (TUG). Motor impairment and disability were assessed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale - part III (UPDRS-III) and the Hoehn and Yahr Scale, respectively. Non-motor symptoms were evaluated by PD Fatigue Scale (PFS), Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and PD Quality of life scale, 8 items (PDQ-8). A significant decrease in resting HR (67.55 ± 10.85 vs 70.22 ± 12.34 bpm, p < 0.05) and a significant increase in walked distance (p < 0.0005) were observed. A significant impairment of the muscles strength was noted (FTSST, p < 0.05). BBS showed a significant increase in balance abilities (p < 0.0005) and safety with mobility (TUG, p < 0.005) was enhanced. Finally, a significant improvement in motor and non-motor symptoms was detected: UPDRS-III (p < 0.00005), PFS (p < 0.005), BDI-II (p < 0.05) and PDQ-8 (p < 0.05). A tailored exercise program in PD patients could be effective as an adjunct to conventional therapy on improving daily activities, motor and non-motor symptoms, with better QoL.

  5. Neuro-motor deficits in six- to eight-year old learners with ADHD and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the nature of coordination, visual-motor integration and neurological functioning in children diagnosed with ADHD and whether the likelihood of motor impairment will increase with the presence of co-occurring DCD (DAMP). Ninety-five learners (60 boys; 35 girls) with a mean age of 6.9 years ...

  6. Increased functional connectivity one week after motor learning and tDCS in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Stéphanie; Dricot, Laurence; Laloux, Patrice; Desfontaines, Philippe; Evrard, Frédéric; Peeters, André; Jamart, Jacques; Vandermeeren, Yves

    2017-01-06

    Recent studies using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) demonstrated that changes in functional connectivity (FC) after stroke correlate with recovery. The aim of this study was to explore whether combining motor learning to dual transcranial direct current stimulation (dual-tDCS, applied over both primary motor cortices (M1)) modulated FC in stroke patients. Twenty-two chronic hemiparetic stroke patients participated in a baseline rs-fMRI session. One week later, dual-tDCS/sham was applied during motor skill learning (intervention session); one week later, the retention session started with the acquisition of a run of rs-fMRI imaging. The intervention+retention sessions were performed once with dual-tDCS and once with sham in a randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled, double-blind design. A whole-brain independent component analysis based analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated no changes between baseline and sham sessions in the somatomotor network, whereas a FC increase was observed one week after dual-tDCS compared to baseline (qFDR motor and premotor regions in both hemispheres. At baseline and one week after sham, the strongest FC was observed between the M1 and dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) of the undamaged hemisphere. In contrast, one week after dual-tDCS, the strongest FC was found between the M1 and PMd of the damaged hemisphere. Thus, a single session of dual-tDCS combined with motor skill learning increases FC in the somatomotor network of chronic stroke patients for one week. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of rehabilitation training support system for occupational therapy of upper limb motor function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yoshifumi; Hirose, Akinori; Uno, Takashi; Uchid, Masaki; Ukai, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Nobuyuki

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we propose a new rehabilitation training support system for upper limbs. The proposed system enables therapists to quantitatively evaluate the therapeutic effect of upper limb motor function during training, to easily change the load of resistance of training and to easily develop a new training program suitable for the subjects. For this purpose we develop control algorithms of training programs in the 3D force display robot. The 3D force display robot has parallel link mechanism with three motors. The control algorithm simulating sanding training is developed for the 3D force display robot. Moreover the teaching/training function algorithm is developed. It enables the therapists to easily make training trajectory suitable for subject's condition. The effectiveness of the developed control algorithms is verified by experiments.

  8. Neurological Soft Signs and Corpus Callosum morphology in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, G; Quartini, A; Paolemili, M; Clemente, R; Iannitelli, A; Di Biasi, C; Gualdi, G

    2011-07-25

    Neurological Soft Signs (NSS) have been found to be more prevalent in schizophrenic patients. A breakdown in intracortical functional connectivity, including interhemispheric communication, has been suggested in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Indeed, problems with interhemispheric information transfer via the Corpus Callosum (CC) have been documented in schizophrenics. Our study goal was to relate NSS to CC morphology. CC Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measurements were collected from 29 right-handed male schizophrenia inpatients. NSS were evaluated employing the Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES). We examined the scores obtained from the NES total and the three NES subscales: Integrative Sensory Function, Motor Coordination, and Sequencing Of Complex Motor Acts. We compared CC morphology of patients with "high" NSS with that of patients with "low" NSS. Correlation analyses were performed to further clarify the relationship between CC size, NSS, and total lifetime antipsychotic consumption. Patients with "high" scores at the Sequencing Of Complex Motor Acts subscale showed a smaller CC rostral body, whereas patients with "high" scores at the Integrative Sensory Function subscale showed a smaller CC splenium. For both the NES total and the Sequencing Of Complex Motor Acts subscale, "high" scores were accompanied by an increase of the CC genu. Correlation analyses revealed a significant inverse correlation between the CC rostral body size and the Sequencing Of Complex Motor Acts subscale score. In addition, a significant positive correlation was shown between the CC genu size and both the NES total and the Sequencing Of Complex Motor Acts subscale scores. The presence of NSS and the accompanying CC structural abnormalities were independent on antipsychotic treatment. Our data provide evidence for an association between NSS and CC morphology and further support the hypothesis of a disturbed interhemispheric functional connectivity in schizophrenia. Copyright

  9. Muscle-Derived GDNF: A Gene Therapeutic Approach for Preserving Motor Neuron Function in ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    To perform crucial and extensive pre-clinical studies to enable an investigational new drug (IND) application with the Food and Drug Administration...investigational new drug (IND) application with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the approval to move the use of intramuscular GDNF delivery...function has been shown in acute models of motor neuron injury and in transgenic mouse models of ALS using various delivery strategies by a number

  10. Effect of a chloride channel activator, lubiprostone, on colonic sensory and motor functions in healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Sweetser, Seth; Busciglio, Irene A.; Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E.; Szarka, Lawrence A.; Papathanasopoulos, Athanasios; Burton, Duane D.; Eckert, Deborah J.; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2008-01-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid chloride channel activator, is efficacious in treatment of chronic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. The study aim was to compare effects of lubiprostone and placebo on colonic sensory and motor functions in humans. In double-blind, randomized fashion, 60 healthy adults received three oral doses of placebo or 24 μg lubiprostone per day in a parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial. A barostat-manometry tube was placed in th...

  11. Rasch analysis of the motor function measure in patients with congenital muscle dystrophy and congenital myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillerot, Carole; Rippert, Pascal; Kinet, Virginie; Renders, Anne; Jain, Minal; Waite, Melissa; Glanzman, Allan M; Girardot, Francoise; Hamroun, Dalil; Iwaz, Jean; Ecochard, René; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Bérard, Carole; Poirot, Isabelle; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2014-11-01

    To monitor treatment effects in patients with congenital myopathies and congenital muscular dystrophies, valid outcome measures are necessary. The Motor Function Measure (MFM) was examined for robustness, and changes are proposed for better adequacy. Observational study based on data previously collected from several cohorts. Nineteen departments of physical medicine or neuromuscular consultation in France, Belgium, and the United States. Patients (N=289) aged 5 to 77 years. None. A Rasch analysis examined the robustness of the MFM across the disease spectrum. The 3 domains of the scale (standing position and transfers, axial and proximal motor function, and distal motor function) were independently examined with a partial credit model. The original 32-item MFM did not sufficiently fit the Rasch model expectations in either of its domains. Switching from a 4- to a 3-category response scale in 18 items restored response order in 16. Various additional checks suggested the removal of 7 items. The resulting Rasch-scaled Motor Function Measure with 25 items for congenital disorders of the muscle (Rs-MFM25(CDM)) demonstrated a good fit to the Rasch model. Domain 1 was well targeted to the whole severity spectrum-close mean locations for items and persons (0 vs 0.316)-whereas domains 2 and 3 were better targeted to severe cases. The reliability coefficients of the Rs-MFM25(CDM) suggested sufficient ability for each summed score to distinguish between patient groups (0.9, 0.8, and 0.7 for domains 1, 2, and 3, respectively). A sufficient agreement was found between results of the Rasch analysis and physical therapists' opinions. The Rs-MFM25(CDM) can be considered a clinically relevant linear scale in each of its 3 domains and may be soon reliably used for assessment in congenital disorders of the muscle. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Combined Effect Of Botulinum Toxin And Splinting On Motor Components And Function Of People With Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Aryan Shamili; Bijan Forogh; Marzieh Pashmdarfard

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective: Spasticity is one of the problems following stroke. Due to this increase in muscle tone, patients are confronted to problems in motor control and difficulties in activities of daily living and complications such as shortness and contracture. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Simultaneous use of both splint and botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) injection on spasticity, range of motion and upper extremity function in a 3-month period. Methods: The design ...

  13. DIFFERENCES IN FUNCTIONAL AND MOTOR ABILITIES OFYOUNG FOOTBALL PLAYERS, BASKETBALL AND VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    Franja Fratrić; Miodrag Starovlah

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this research is to determine whether and what differences exist between the three groups of subjects (high-quality football, volleyball and basketball cadets and youth age), in the motoric and functional abilities, as well as to identify dif- ferences between subgroups within each sport. The sample consists of 61 volleyball, 31 basketball player and football player 31 (total n = 123) male, cadet and youth age are members of local clubs. Subjects were born between 01.01.1991 ...

  14. AAV-BDNF mediated attenuation of quinolinic acid-induced neuropathology and motor function impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kells, A P; Henry, R A; Connor, B

    2008-07-01

    Maintenance and plasticity of striatal neurons is dependent on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is depleted in the Huntington's disease striatum due to reduced expression and disrupted corticostriatal transportation. In this study we demonstrate that overexpression of BDNF in the striatum attenuates motor impairment and reduces the extent of striatal damage following quinolinic acid lesioning. Transfer of the BDNF gene to striatal neurons using serotype 1/2 adeno-associated viral vectors enhanced BDNF protein levels in the striatum, but induced weight loss and seizure activity following long-term high-level expression. Lower concentration BDNF expression supported striatal neurons against excitotoxic insult, as demonstrated by enhanced krox-24 immunopositive neuron survival, reduction of striatal atrophy and maintenance of the patch/matrix organization. Additionally, BDNF expression attenuated motor impairment in the forelimb use cylinder test, sensorimotor neglect in the corridor food selection task and reversed apomorphine-induced rotational behaviour. Direct correlations were shown for the first time between BDNF-mediated attenuation of behavioural impairment and the integrity of the globus pallidus, seemingly independent from the severity of striatal lesioning. These results demonstrate that BDNF holds considerable therapeutic potential for alleviating both neuropathological and motor function deficits in the Huntington's disease brain, and the critical role of pallidal neurons in facilitating motor performance.

  15. Potential of robots as next-generation technology for clinical assessment of neurological disorders and upper-limb therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen H. Scott, PhD; Sean P. Dukelow, MD, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Robotic technologies have profoundly affected the identification of fundamental properties of brain function. This success is attributable to robots being able to control the position of or forces applied to limbs, and their inherent ability to easily, objectively, and reliably quantify sensorimotor behavior. Our general hypothesis is that these same attributes make robotic technologies ideal for clinically assessing sensory, motor, and cognitive impairments in stroke and other neurologi-cal ...

  16. Running exercise enhances motor functional recovery with inhibition of dendritic regression in the motor cortex after collagenase-induced intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Yasuyuki; Tamakoshi, Keigo; Waseda, Yuya; Ishida, Kazuto

    2016-03-01

    Rehabilitative approaches benefit motor functional recovery after stroke and relate to neuronal plasticity. We investigated the effects of a treadmill running exercise on the motor functional recovery and neuronal plasticity after collagenase-induced striatal intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with type IV collagenase into the left striatum to induce ICH. Sham-operated animals were injected with saline instead of collagenase. The animals were randomly assigned to the sham control (SC), the sham exercise (SE), the ICH control (IC), or the ICH exercise (IE) group. The exercise groups were forced to run on a treadmill at a speed of 9 m/min for 30 min/day between days 4 and 14 after surgery. Behavioral tests were performed using a motor deficit score, a beam-walking test and a cylinder test. At fifteen days after surgery, the animals were sacrificed, and their brains were removed. The motor function of the IE group significantly improved compared with the motor function of the IC group. No significant differences in cortical thickness were found between the groups. The IC group had fewer branches and shorter dendrite lengths compared with the sham groups. However, dendritic branches and lengths were not significantly different between the IE and the other groups. Tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) expression levels increased in the IE compared with IC group, but no significant differences in other protein (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF; Nogo-A; Rho-A/Rho-associated protein kinase 2, ROCK2) expression levels were found between the groups. These results suggest that improved motor function after a treadmill running exercise after ICH may be related to the prevention of dendritic regression due to TrkB upregulation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Cerebral motor function in very premature-at-birth adolescents: a brain stimulation exploration of kangaroo mother care effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Cyril; Charpak, Nathalie; Ruiz-Peláez, Juan G; Tessier, Réjean

    2012-10-01

      Given that prematurity has deleterious effects on brain networking development beyond childhood, the study explored whether an early intervention such as Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) in very preterm preemies could have influenced brain motor function up to adolescence.   Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) of 39 adolescents born very prematurely (37 weeks' gestational age, >2500 g) to assess the functional integrity of motor circuits in each hemisphere (motor planning) and between hemispheres (callosal function).   All TMS outcomes were similar between KMC and term adolescents, with typical values as in healthy adults, and better than in Controls. KMC adolescents presented faster conduction times revealing more efficient M1 cell synchronization (p motor pathways in the KMC group suggests that the Kangaroo Mother Care positively influenced the premature brain networks and synaptic efficacy up to adolescence. © 2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  18. The clinical effect of hippotherapy on gross motor function of children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Litlle

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy (CP is the most common cause of physical disability affecting gross motor function (GMF in early childhood. Hippotherapy is a treatment approach aimed at improving GMF in children with CP. Several systematic reviews have been published showing an improvement in Dimension E of the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM after hippotherapy. However, these reviews failed to evaluate the clinical effect of hippotherapy in improving GMF in children with CP.Objective: To critically appraise the evidence of hippotherapy to ascertain whether it is a clinically meaningful approach for children with CP.Methodology: Five computerised bibliographic databases were searched. Predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria were set. The PEDro scale was used to assess the quality of the studies. A revised JBI Data extraction tool was used to extract data from the selected articles. Revman© Review Manager Software was used to create forest plots for comparisons of results.Results: All studies used the GMFM as an outcome measure for gross motor function. The added benefit of hippotherapy is a minimum 1% and a maximum 7% increase on the GMFM scores. However, all 95% confidence intervals (CI around all the mean differences were insignificant.Conclusion: The clinical effect of hippotherapy on the GMF of children with CP is small. Larger studies are required to provide evidence of the effect of hippotherapy within this population.

  19. Musical Training Induces Functional Plasticity in Perceptual and Motor Networks: Insights from Resting-State fMRI

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng Luo; Zhi-wei Guo; Yong-xiu Lai; Wei Liao; Qiang Liu; Kendrick, Keith M; De-zhong Yao; Hong Li

    2012-01-01

    A number of previous studies have examined music-related plasticity in terms of multi-sensory and motor integration but little is known about the functional and effective connectivity patterns of spontaneous intrinsic activity in these systems during the resting state in musicians. Using functional connectivity and Granger causal analysis, functional and effective connectivity among the motor and multi-sensory (visual, auditory and somatosensory) cortices were evaluated using resting-state fu...

  20. Degeneration of corpus callosum and recovery of motor function after stroke: a multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling E; Tittgemeyer, Marc; Imperati, Davide; Diekhoff, Svenja; Ameli, Mitra; Fink, Gereon R; Grefkes, Christian

    2012-12-01

    Animal models of stroke demonstrated that white matter ischemia may cause both axonal damage and myelin degradation distant from the core lesion, thereby impacting on behavior and functional outcome after stroke. We here used parameters derived from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate the effect of focal white matter ischemia on functional reorganization within the motor system. Patients (n = 18) suffering from hand motor deficits in the subacute or chronic stage after subcortical stroke and healthy controls (n = 12) were scanned with both diffusion MRI and functional MRI while performing a motor task with the left or right hand. A laterality index was employed on activated voxels to assess functional reorganization across hemispheres. Regression analyses revealed that diffusion MRI parameters of both the ipsilesional corticospinal tract (CST) and corpus callosum (CC) predicted increased activation of the unaffected hemisphere during movements of the stroke-affected hand. Changes in diffusion MRI parameters possibly reflecting axonal damage and/or destruction of myelin sheath correlated with a stronger bilateral recruitment of motor areas and poorer motor performance. Probabilistic fiber tracking analyses revealed that the region in the CC correlating with the fMRI laterality index and motor deficits connected to sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area, ventral premotor cortex, superior parietal lobule, and temporoparietal junction. The results suggest that degeneration of transcallosal fibers connecting higher order sensorimotor regions constitute a relevant factor influencing cortical reorganization and motor outcome after subcortical stroke. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Active exercise interventions improve gross motor function of ambulant/semi-ambulant children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clutterbuck, Georgina; Auld, Megan; Johnston, Leanne

    2018-01-05

    Evaluate effectiveness of active exercise interventions for improving gross motor activity/participation of school-aged, ambulant/semi-ambulant children with cerebral palsy (CP). A systematic review was conducted following PRISMA guidelines. Five databases were searched for papers including school-aged children with CP, participating in active, exercise interventions with gross motor outcomes measured at the Activity/Participation level. Interventions with previous systematic reviews were excluded (e.g. hippotherapy). Evidence Level and conduct were examined by two raters. Seven interventions (34 studies) met criteria. All studies reported on gross motor function, however, a limited number investigated participation outcomes. Strong positive evidence was available for Gross Motor Activity Training (n= 6, Evidence Level II-IV), and Gross Motor Activity Training with progressive resistance exercise plus additional physiotherapy (n = 3, all Evidence Level II). Moderate positive evidence exists for Gross Motor Activity Training plus additional physiotherapy (n = 2, all Evidence Level II) and Physical Fitness Training (n = 4, Evidence Level II-V). Weak positive evidence was available for Modified Sport (n = 3, Evidence Level IV-V) and Non-Immersive Virtual Reality (n = 12, Evidence Level II-V). There was strong evidence against Gross Motor Activity Training plus progressive resistance exercise without additional physiotherapy (n = 4, all Evidence Level II). Active, performance-focused exercise with variable practice opportunities improves gross motor function in ambulant/semi-ambulant children with CP. Implications for rehabilitation Active exercise interventions improve gross motor function of ambulant/semi-ambulant children with cerebral palsy. Gross Motor Activity Training is the most common and effective intervention. Practice variability is essential to improve gross motor function. Participation was rarely measured and requires further

  2. Does a physiotherapy programme of gross motor training influence motor function and activities of daily living in children presenting with developmental coordination disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonill S. Maharaj

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD lack motor coordination and have difficulty performing motor skills and activities of daily living. Research shows these children do not outgrow their motor difficulties and without intervention do not improve. Physiotherapy is relevant for these children, but due to limited clinical protocols for DCD the aim of this study was to determine the effect of a gross motor training programme for 6–12-year-old children with DCD.Methods: This randomised pre-test, post-test study recruited 64 children with scores of 15th percentile or below using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC. The children were divided equally into an intervention group receiving 8 weeks of gross motor training for core stability, strengthening exercises, balance and coordination with task-specific activities for 30 min per week, while the control group continued with general therapy and activities of daily living. The M-ABC and Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ were used to assess each child before and after 8 weeks.Results: Sixty children completed the study, with 43 males and 17 females (mean age 10.02 years, SD = 2.10. There were no adverse reactions to the programme and M-ABC scores for the intervention programme improved by 6.46%, ball skills (3.54% and balance (4.80% compared with the control (0.17% and (0.15%, respectively. There were significant (p < 0.05 improvements in DCDQ scores, but teachers allocated lower scores than parents.Conclusion: This study supports 8 weeks of gross mo