WorldWideScience

Sample records for neurological clinical practice

  1. Outline of restorative neurology: definition, clinical practice, assessment, intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijevic, Milan R

    2012-06-01

    Rather than focusing on the deficits and lost function caused by upper motor neuron lesions or disorders, it is more advantageous to elucidate, in each individual, the specific neural functions that remain available, and then, to build upon them by designing a treatment protocol to optimize their effectiveness and thus improve recovery. The practice of Restorative Neurology is based on detailed assessment of the individual patient, the use of neurophysiological methods to elucidate and characterize subclinical function and the application of interventions that modify neural activity to improve clinical function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions.

  3. An evidence-based approach to clinical questions in the practice of equine neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Biervliet, Jérôme

    2007-08-01

    The practice of equine neurology has special challenges posed by the size of the animal being examined. Many diagnostic procedures routinely used in small animal practice are unsafe when applied to the equine patient or unavailable to the equine practitioner. Therefore, astute observation is the mainstay of making a neuroanatomic diagnosis, and detailed evidence on the deficits present may be difficult to obtain. Because clinical observation can sometimes be ambiguous and somewhat subjective, it is even more important to approach equine neurology from an evidence-based point of view. Here, such an approach is outlined for the diagnosis of cervical vertebral compressive myelopathy (CVCM), one of the most common noninfectious causes of equine neurologic disease. This article is an attempt to summarize all aspects of making a diagnosis of CVCM on the basis of signalment, clinical examination, ancillary diagnostic tests, and pathologic examination. Each of these considerations has inherent limitations regarding diagnostic accuracy, which are discussed.

  4. Linking genes to neurological clinical practice: the genomic basis for neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Allon; Curtis, Catherine L; Kleim, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale genomics projects such as the Human Genome Project and the International HapMap Project promise significant advances in the ability to diagnose and treat many conditions, including those with a neurological basis. A major focus of research has emerged in the neurological sciences to elucidate the molecular and genetic basis of various neurological diseases. Indeed, genetic factors are implicated in susceptibility for many neurological disorders, with family history studies providing strong evidence of familial risk for conditions such as stroke, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. Heritability studies also suggest a strong genetic contribution to the risk for neurological diseases. Genome-wide association studies are also uncovering novel genetic variants associated with neurological disorders. Whole-genome and exome sequencing are likely to provide novel insights into the genetic basis of neurological disorders. Genetic factors are similarly associated with clinical phenotypes such as symptom severity and progression as well as response to treatment. Specifically, disease progression and functional restoration depend, in part, on the capacity for neural plasticity within residual neural tissues. Furthermore, such plasticity may be influenced in part by the presence of polymorphisms in several genes known to orchestrate neural plasticity including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Apolipoprotein E. (APOE). It is important for neurorehabilitation therapist practicing in the "genomic era" to be aware of the potential influence of genetic factors during clinical encounters, as advances in molecular sciences are revealing information of critical relevance to the clinical rehabilitation management of individuals with neurological conditions. Video Abstract available (See Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A88) for more insights from the authors.

  5. Sleep disorders in neurological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Guryevich Poluektov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disorders are closely associated with both nervous system diseases and mental disorders; however, such patients prefer to seek just neurological advice. Insomnia is the most common complaint in routine clinical practice. It is characterized by different impairments in sleep and daytime awakening. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is less common, but more clinically important because of its negative impact on the cardiovascular and nervous systems. The common neurological disorders are restless legs syndrome and REM sleep behavior disorder, as well as narcolepsy, the major manifestations of which are impaired nocturnal sleep and daytime awakening.

  6. Clinical Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Van Den Dool, Joost; Balash, Yacov

    2017-01-01

    issues still remain open in the clinical practice. We performed a systematic review of the literature on botulinum toxin treatment for CD based on a question-oriented approach, with the aim to provide practical recommendations for the treating clinicians. Key questions from the clinical practice were...... of anticoagulants, neurological comorbidities) should also be further explored....

  7. Organophosphate intermediate syndrome with neurological complications of extrapyramidal symptoms in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark B. Detweiler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphates (OPs are ubiquitous in the world as domestic and industrial agricultural insecticides. Intentional poisoning as suicides attempts are clinical phenomena seen in emergency departments and clinics in agricultural areas. Intermediate syndrome with the neurological complication of extra pyramidal symptoms following acute OP ingestion may occur in pediatric and adult cases. While death is the most serious consequence of toxic OP doses, low levels of exposure and nonfatal doses may disrupt the neurobehavioral development of fetuses and children in addition to bring linked to testicular cancer and male and female infertility. These are disturbing. Chronic and acute toxicity from OPs are barriers to the health of our present and future generations. Symptoms and treatment of acute and chronic OP exposure are briefly referenced with inclusion of the intermediate syndrome. Suggestions for local and systemic reduction of the acute and long term consequences of OP ingestion are opined.

  8. Sports neurology topics in neurologic practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conidi, Francis X.; Drogan, Oksana; Giza, Christopher C.; Kutcher, Jeffery S.; Alessi, Anthony G.; Crutchfield, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sought to assess neurologists' interest in sports neurology and learn about their experience in treating sports-related neurologic conditions. A survey was sent to a random sample of American Academy of Neurology members. A majority of members (77%) see at least some patients with sports-related neurologic issues. Concussion is the most common sports-related condition neurologists treat. More than half of survey participants (63%) did not receive any formal or informal training in sports neurology. At least two-thirds of respondents think it is very important to address the following issues: developing evidence-based return-to-play guidelines, identifying risk factors for long-term cognitive-behavioral sequelae, and developing objective diagnostic criteria for concussion. Our findings provide an up-to-date view of the subspecialty of sports neurology and identify areas for future research. PMID:24790800

  9. nal dysraphism. Clinical, neurological and diagnostic features. The cases from practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko О.A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article provides basic information about the actual problem of modern medicine — spinal dysraphism, in particular Spina bifida. Despite some achievements of methods of prenatal diagnosis and prevention, this anomaly is a common congenital anomalies and significant factor of the invalidisation. This should be considered for optimization of pre- and postnatal diagnostics, prevention and treatment of this anomaly. Description of clinical cases from practice is described.

  10. Reflections on Ethics and Humanity in Pediatric Neurology: the Value of Recognizing Ethical Issues in Common Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronen, Gabriel M; Rosenbaum, Peter L

    2017-05-01

    Our goals in this reflection are to (i) identify the ethical dimensions inherent in any clinical encounter and (ii) bring to the forefront of our pediatric neurology practice the myriad of opportunities to explore and learn from these ethical questions. We highlight specifically Beauchamp and Childress's principles of biomedical ethics. We use the terms ethics in common clinical practice and an ethical lens to remind people of the ubiquity of ethical situations and the usefulness of using existing ethical principles to analyze and resolve difficult situations in clinical practice. We start with a few common situations with which many of us tend to struggle. We describe what we understand as ethics and how and why developments in technology, novel potential interventions, policies, and societal perspectives challenge us to think about and debate ethical issues. Individual patients are not a singular population; each patient has their own unique life situations, culture, goals, and expectations that need to be considered with a good dose of humanity and humility. We believe that using an ethical lens-by which we mean making an explicit effort to identify and consider these issues openly-will help us to achieve this goal in practice, education, and research.

  11. Clinical trials in neurology: design, conduct, analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravina, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    .... Clinical Trials in Neurology aims to improve the efficiency of clinical trials and the development of interventions in order to enhance the development of new treatments for neurologic diseases...

  12. The Spanish Society of Neurology's official clinical practice guidelines for epilepsy. Special considerations in epilepsy: comorbidities, women of childbearing age, and elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri Llerda, J A; Suller Marti, A; de la Peña Mayor, P; Martínez Ferri, M; Poza Aldea, J J; Gomez Alonso, J; Mercadé Cerdá, J M

    2015-10-01

    The characteristics of some population groups (patients with comorbidities, women of childbearing age, the elderly) may limit epilepsy management. Antiepileptic treatment in these patients may require adjustments. We searched articles in Pubmed, clinical practice guidelines for epilepsy, and recommendations by the most relevant medical societies regarding epilepsy in special situations (patients with comorbidities, women of childbearing age, the elderly). Evidence and recommendations are classified according to the prognostic criteria of Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine (2001) and the European Federation of Neurological Societies (2004) for therapeutic interventions. Epilepsy treatment in special cases of comorbidities must be selected properly to improve efficacy with the fewest side effects. Adjusting antiepileptic medication and/or hormone therapy is necessary for proper seizure management in catamenial epilepsy. Exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AED) during pregnancy increases the risk of birth defects and may affect fetal growth and/or cognitive development. Postpartum breastfeeding is recommended, with monitoring for adverse effects if sedative AEDs are used. Finally, the elderly are prone to epilepsy, and diagnostic and treatment characteristics in this group differ from those of other age groups. Although therapeutic limitations may be more frequent in older patients due to comorbidities, they usually respond better to lower doses of AEDs than do other age groups. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Ethical clinical translation of stem cell interventions for neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, David J; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Smith, Timothy R; Ammirati, Mario; Brennum, Jannick; Mendez, Ivar; Ammar, Ahmed S; Balak, Naci; Bolles, Gene; Esene, Ignatius Ngene; Mathiesen, Tiit; Broekman, Marike L

    2017-01-17

    The application of stem cell transplants in clinical practice has increased in frequency in recent years. Many of the stem cell transplants in neurologic diseases, including stroke, Parkinson disease, spinal cord injury, and demyelinating diseases, are unproven-they have not been tested in prospective, controlled clinical trials and have not become accepted therapies. Stem cell transplant procedures currently being carried out have therapeutic aims, but are frequently experimental and unregulated, and could potentially put patients at risk. In some cases, patients undergoing such operations are not included in a clinical trial, and do not provide genuinely informed consent. For these reasons and others, some current stem cell interventions for neurologic diseases are ethically dubious and could jeopardize progress in the field. We provide discussion points for the evaluation of new stem cell interventions for neurologic disease, based primarily on the new Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation released by the International Society for Stem Cell Research in May 2016. Important considerations in the ethical translation of stem cells to clinical practice include regulatory oversight, conflicts of interest, data sharing, the nature of investigation (e.g., within vs outside of a clinical trial), informed consent, risk-benefit ratios, the therapeutic misconception, and patient vulnerability. To help guide the translation of stem cells from the laboratory into the neurosurgical clinic in an ethically sound manner, we present an ethical discussion of these major issues at stake in the field of stem cell clinical research for neurologic disease. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. The Right Therapy for Neurological Disorders: From Randomized Trials to Clinical Practice - Patients versus Investigator Expectations and Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Lucie I; Kolb, Steve

    2016-01-01

    People living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are now more proactive in making decisions about their treatment options, in particular with increased awareness through social media and the Internet. Together with increased awareness about the disease comes increased frustration that there is still only one Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug that modestly improves survival. While efforts are underway to improve clinical trial design, patient involvement in trial design, clinical outcomes, and risk/benefit evaluations have become more recognized and will play a major role in the future success of clinical trials. This chapter addresses the perspective of people living with ALS and their perceptions of clinical trials. We describe various organizations and programs available that provide increased education and patient involvement. Stronger partnerships between those living with ALS, clinicians, government, nonprofit organizations, and regulatory agencies will significantly impact treatment development. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY IN A NIGERIAN NEUROLOGY CLINIC

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-05-28

    May 28, 2013 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 89 No. 2 February 2012. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY IN A NIGERIAN NEUROLOGY CLINIC. P. O. Ajiboye, FWACP, Senior Lecturer/ Consultant Psychiatrist, Department of Behavioural Sciences, University of Ilorin/. University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Kwara State, ...

  16. Reasoning about Frailty in Neurology: Neurobiological Correlates and Clinical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canevelli, M; Troili, F; Bruno, G

    2014-01-01

    To date, the frailty syndrome has surprisingly attracted limited attention in the field of neurology and neuroscience. Nevertheless, several concepts closely related to frailty, such as vulnerability, susceptibility, and homeostatic reserves, have been increasingly investigated and documented at level of neuronal cells, brain networks, and functions. Similarly, several aspects commonly assessed in the neurological practice, including cognitive functioning and emotional/affective status, clearly appear to be major determinants of the individual's vulnerability and resiliency to stressors. Therefore, they should be carefully considered in the clinical approach to frail subjects. Moreover, dysfunctions of these domains, if timely detected, may be suitable to be targeted by interventions providing beneficial effects to the overall health status of the individual. In the present article, we discuss the neurobiological processes potentially contributing to frailty. Moreover, we reason about the clinical manifestations allowing the prompt and easy recognition of frail persons in the neurological practice.

  17. Neurology advanced practice providers: A position paper of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Heidi B; Fritz, Joseph V; Govindarajan, Raghav; Penfold Murray, Rebecca; Boyle, Kathryn B; Getchius, Thomas S D; Freimer, Miriam

    2015-08-01

    There are many factors driving health care reform, including unsustainable costs, poor outcomes, an aging populace, and physician shortages. These issues are particularly relevant to neurology. New reimbursement models are based on value and facilitated by the use of multidisciplinary teams. Integration of advanced practice providers (APPs) into neurology practice offers many advantages with new models of care. Conversely, there are many and varied challenges financially and logistically with these practice models. The American Academy of Neurology has formed a Work Group to address the needs of both neurologists and neurologic APPs and monitor the effect of APPs on quality and cost of neurologic care.

  18. Coalescence of psychiatry, neurology, and neuropsychology: from theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Miles G; Goldstein, Martin; Katz, David; O'Neil, Sarah Quimby; Joseph, Anthony; Price, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    In a climate of renewed interest in the synergy between neurology and psychiatry, practitioners are increasingly recognizing the importance of exchange and collaboration between these two disciplines. However, there are few working models of interdisciplinary teams that freely share expertise in real time, while providing clinical and academic training to future physicians who specialize in the central nervous system. Over the past 11 years, the McLean Hospital Neuropsychiatry and Behavioral Neurology service has provided proof-of-principle for such collaboration, demonstrating that a team comprising psychiatrists, neurologists, and neuropsychologists can function effectively as a unit while maintaining the autonomy of these three disciplines and also synthesizing their combined knowledge. In addition to delivering enhanced patient care and promoting medical research, this clinical service has provided enriched cross-specialty training for fellows, residents, and medical students. The practical functioning of the team is described, and case vignettes are presented to illustrate the team's collaborative synergism in practice.

  19. Challenges in neurological practice in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The burden of neurological illness is much higher in developing countries. Neurological disorders in these countries are mainly due to poverty and malnutrition. Spectrums of diseases are also different in comparison with developed countries. Lack of resources, ignorance, and overpopulation make it very difficult and challenging to tackle this problem. Majority of the patients are seen by general practitioners who have little knowledge about neurological illnesses. Most of the countries have very few or no neurologist. There is a greater need of taking neurological care at primary care level where majority of the patients struggle with epilepsy, stroke and neuroinfections.

  20. Survey on current practices for neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, Hans; Cronberg, Tobias; Dünser, Martin W; Duranteau, Jacques; Horn, Janneke; Oddo, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    To investigate current practices and timing of neurological prognostication in comatose cardiac arrest patients. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to the 8000 members of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine during September and October 2012. The survey had 27 questions divided into three categories: background data, clinical data, decision-making and consequences. A total of 1025 respondents (13%) answered the survey with complete forms in more than 90%. Twenty per cent of respondents practiced outside of Europe. Overall, 22% answered that they had national recommendations, with the highest percentage in the Netherlands (>80%). Eighty-nine per cent used induced hypothermia (32-34 °C) for comatose cardiac arrest patients, while 11% did not. Twenty per cent had separate prognostication protocols for hypothermia patients. Seventy-nine per cent recognized that neurological examination alone is not enough to predict outcome and a similar number (76%) used additional methods. Intermittent electroencephalography (EEG), brain computed tomography (CT) scan and evoked potentials (EP) were considered most useful. Poor prognosis was defined as cerebral performance category (CPC) 3-5 (58%) or CPC 4-5 (39%) or other (3%). When prognosis was considered poor, 73% would actively withdraw intensive care while 20% would not and 7% were uncertain. National recommendations for neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest are uncommon and only one physician out of five uses a separate protocol for hypothermia treated patients. A neurological examination alone was considered insufficient to predict outcome in comatose patients and most respondents advocated a multimodal approach: EEG, brain CT and EP were considered most useful. Uncertainty regarding neurological prognostication and decisions on level of care was substantial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ethical clinical translation of stem cell interventions for neurologic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cote, David J; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Smith, Timothy R

    2017-01-01

    The application of stem cell transplants in clinical practice has increased in frequency in recent years. Many of the stem cell transplants in neurologic diseases, including stroke, Parkinson disease, spinal cord injury, and demyelinating diseases, are unproven-they have not been tested...... in prospective, controlled clinical trials and have not become accepted therapies. Stem cell transplant procedures currently being carried out have therapeutic aims, but are frequently experimental and unregulated, and could potentially put patients at risk. In some cases, patients undergoing such operations...... are not included in a clinical trial, and do not provide genuinely informed consent. For these reasons and others, some current stem cell interventions for neurologic diseases are ethically dubious and could jeopardize progress in the field. We provide discussion points for the evaluation of new stem cell...

  2. Automatisms: bridging clinical neurology with criminal law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolnick, Joshua; Parvizi, Josef

    2011-03-01

    The law, like neurology, grapples with the relationship between disease states and behavior. Sometimes, the two disciplines share the same terminology, such as automatism. In law, the "automatism defense" is a claim that action was involuntary or performed while unconscious. Someone charged with a serious crime can acknowledge committing the act and yet may go free if, relying on the expert testimony of clinicians, the court determines that the act of crime was committed in a state of automatism. In this review, we explore the relationship between the use of automatism in the legal and clinical literature. We close by addressing several issues raised by the automatism defense: semantic ambiguity surrounding the term automatism, the presence or absence of consciousness during automatisms, and the methodological obstacles that have hindered the study of cognition during automatisms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY IN A NIGERIAN NEUROLOGY CLINIC

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-05-28

    May 28, 2013 ... medication effects and psychological reactions to the illness. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a good example of a disabling neurological disorder and it is now apparent that the underlying neurodegenerative disorder is a major cause of psychiatric disturbances even though the psychological reactions to the ...

  4. Guidelines from The Italian Neurological and Neuroradiological Societies for the use of magnetic resonance imaging in daily life clinical practice of multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Massimo; Rocca, Maria A; Bastianello, Stefano; Comi, Giancarlo; Gallo, Paolo; Gallucci, Massimo; Ghezzi, Angelo; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Minonzio, Giorgio; Pantano, Patrizia; Pozzilli, Carlo; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Trojano, Maria; Falini, Andrea; De Stefano, Nicola

    2013-12-01

    MRI is highly sensitive in detecting focal white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). For this reason, it has been formally included in the diagnostic workup of patients with clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of MS, through the definition of ad hoc sets of criteria to show disease dissemination in space and time. MRI is used in virtually all clinical trials of the disease as a surrogate measure of treatment response. Several guidelines have been published to help characterizing the imaging features on conventional MR sequences of "typical" MS lesions and work has also been performed to identify "red flags" which should alert the clinicians to exclude possible alternative conditions. Despite this, the application of the available guidelines and criteria in daily life clinical practice is still limited and varies among and within countries (including Italy) due to regulatory issues and heterogeneity of MRI facilities. It is crucial for neurologists and neuroradiologists to become familiar with these criteria to improve the quality of their diagnostic assessment. In patients with established MS, the main problem is to define standard procedures for monitoring the course of the disease and treatment response. This review aims at providing daily life guidelines to clinicians for a correct application of MRI in the workup of patients suspected of having MS as well as in the monitoring of disease evolution in those with established MS. It also offers clues for the standardization of MRI studies and relative reporting to be applied at a national level.

  5. Breadth versus volume: Neurology outpatient clinic cases in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V; Blood, Angela D; Park, Yoon Soo; Brorson, James R; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-06-01

    This study examined how volume in certain patient case types and breadth across patient case types in the outpatient clinic setting are related to Neurology Clerkship student performance. Case logs from the outpatient clinic experience of 486 students from The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, USA, participating in the 4week Neurology Clerkship from July 2008 to June 2013 were reviewed. A total of 12,381 patient encounters were logged and then classified into 13 diagnostic categories. How volume of cases within categories and the breadth of cases across categories relate to the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology and a Neurology Clerkship Objective Structured Clinical Examination was analyzed. Volume of cases was significantly correlated with the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology (r=.290, pNeurology (r=.231, p=.017), however was not significantly correlated with any component of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Volume of cases correlated with higher performance on measures of specialty knowledge and clinical skill. Fewer relationships emerged correlating breadth of cases and performance on the same measures. This study provides guidance to educators who must decide how much emphasis to place on volume versus breadth of cases in outpatient clinic learning experiences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The practice of neurology: Looking ahead by looking back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringel, Steven P

    2015-05-19

    Over the last 50 years, there have been many improvements in therapy for individuals with neurologic disorders. Simultaneously, the complexity and cost of care have increased. The delivery of neurologic services is inefficient. The needs of both patients and neurologists are not being optimally addressed. Although greater attention is on the quality, safety, and value of the care, there remains a need for fundamental redesign in the way neurologic services are provided. The future practice of neurology will likely be interdisciplinary and provide both easy access and efficient coordination of services. No matter what changes in financing of health care are adopted, focus needs to be on reducing health care costs. Patients seeking neurologic care will expect seamless, innovative, and cost-effective services and to be active participants in their care. The proposed modifications address current demands and advocate for prospective innovative solutions. The changes proposed to improve care for patients will simultaneously make the careers of neurologists more gratifying and less stressful. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. neurological practIce analysis in neurosciences design general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    206. SA MEDICAL JOURNAL VOLUME 63 5 FEBRUARY 1983 neurological. •. practIce. - analysis in neurosciences design general. Task programme problems in. R. F. GLEDHILL ... components of competence are critical incident analysis and task analysis. ... confident approach to these patients. The other study, which.

  8. Vinken and Bruyn's Handbook of Clinical Neurology - A witness of late-twentieth century neurological progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehler, P. J.; Jennekens, F. G. I.

    2008-01-01

    Vinken and Bruyn's Handbook of Clinical Neurology (HCN) is best characterized as an encyclopedia. In this paper we describe the origin, production, and reception of HCN. Data were gathered from a literature search, by screening of HCN-volumes, interviewing key-role persons and a study of an

  9. Vestibular Rehabilitation for Peripheral Vestibular Hypofunction: An Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline: FROM THE AMERICAN PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSOCIATION NEUROLOGY SECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Courtney D; Herdman, Susan J; Whitney, Susan L; Cass, Stephen P; Clendaniel, Richard A; Fife, Terry D; Furman, Joseph M; Getchius, Thomas S D; Goebel, Joel A; Shepard, Neil T; Woodhouse, Sheelah N

    2016-04-01

    Uncompensated vestibular hypofunction results in postural instability, visual blurring with head movement, and subjective complaints of dizziness and/or imbalance. We sought to answer the question, "Is vestibular exercise effective at enhancing recovery of function in people with peripheral (unilateral or bilateral) vestibular hypofunction?" A systematic review of the literature was performed in 5 databases published after 1985 and 5 additional sources for relevant publications were searched. Article types included meta-analyses, systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, case control series, and case series for human subjects, published in English. One hundred thirty-five articles were identified as relevant to this clinical practice guideline. Based on strong evidence and a preponderance of benefit over harm, clinicians should offer vestibular rehabilitation to persons with unilateral and bilateral vestibular hypofunction with impairments and functional limitations related to the vestibular deficit. Based on strong evidence and a preponderance of harm over benefit, clinicians should not include voluntary saccadic or smooth-pursuit eye movements in isolation (ie, without head movement) as specific exercises for gaze stability. Based on moderate evidence, clinicians may offer specific exercise techniques to target identified impairments or functional limitations. Based on moderate evidence and in consideration of patient preference, clinicians may provide supervised vestibular rehabilitation. Based on expert opinion extrapolated from the evidence, clinicians may prescribe a minimum of 3 times per day for the performance of gaze stability exercises as 1 component of a home exercise program. Based on expert opinion extrapolated from the evidence (range of supervised visits: 2-38 weeks, mean = 10 weeks), clinicians may consider providing adequate supervised vestibular rehabilitation sessions for the patient to understand the goals of the program

  10. Assessment of neurological clinical management reasoning in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Rimas V; Blood, Angela; Park, Yoon Soo; Brorson, James R

    2014-06-01

    In neurology education there is evidence that trainees may have greater ability in general localization and diagnosis than they do in treatment decisions, particularly with considering longer term care and supportive care. We hypothesized that medical students completing a neurology clerkship would exhibit greater skill at considering the acute diagnostic and therapeutic management than at considering supportive management measures. Data from 720 standardized patient encounters by 360 medical students completing a neurology clerkship being evaluated via an objective structured clinical examination were analyzed for skill in three components of clinical decision making: diagnostic evaluation, therapeutic intervention, and supportive intervention. Scores for all standardized patient encounters over the 2008-2012 interval revealed a significantly higher percentage of correct responses in both the diagnostic (mean [M]=62.6%, standard deviation [SD]=20.3%) and therapeutic (M=63.0%, SD=28.8%) categories in comparison to the supportive (M=31.8%, SD=45.2%) category. However, only scores in therapeutic and supportive treatment plans were found to be significant predictors of the USA National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) clinical neurology subject examination scores; on average, a percent increase in therapeutic and support scores led to 5 and 2 point increases in NBME scores, respectively. We demonstrate empirical evidence of deficits in a specific component of clinical reasoning in medical students at the completion of a neurology clerkship. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical and neurological characteristics of aortic thromboembolism in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, R; Penderis, J; Chang, Y P; Zoia, A; Mosley, J; Anderson, T J

    2008-04-01

    To characterise the clinical presentation and neurological abnormalities in dogs affected by aortic thromboembolism. The medical records of 13 dogs diagnosed with aortic thromboembolism as the cause of the clinical signs, and where a complete neurological examination was performed, were reviewed retrospectively. The onset was acute in only four dogs, chronic in five dogs (with all of these presenting as exercise intolerance) or chronic with acute deterioration in four dogs. Dogs with an acute onset of clinical signs were more severely affected exhibiting neurological deficits, while dogs with a chronic onset of disease predominantly presented with the exercise intolerance and minimal deficits. The locomotor deficits included exercise intolerance with pelvic limb weakness (five of 13), pelvic limb ataxia (one of 13), monoparesis (two of 13), paraparesis (two of 13), non-ambulatory paraparesis (two of 13) and paraplegia (one of 13). There was an apparent male predisposition and the cavalier King charles spaniel was overrepresented. The rate of onset of clinical signs appears to segregate dogs affected by aortic thromboembolism into two groups, with different clinical characteristics and outcomes. Dogs with an acute onset of the clinical signs tend to be more severely affected, while dogs with a chronic onset predominantly present with exercise intolerance. It is therefore important to consider aortic thromboembolism as a differential diagnosis in dogs with an acute onset of pelvic limb neurological deficits and in dogs with longer standing exercise intolerance.

  12. Solitary Plasmacytoma: A Review Of Clinical, Ocular, Neurological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extramedullary plasmacytoma can affect practically all the systems in the body including the eyes, nervous system, head and neck, respiratory system, breast, gastrointestinal system, urogenital system and lymph nodes. These systemic manifestations are reviewed. Key words: Plasmacytoma, ocular, outcome, neurological, ...

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine use in a pediatric neurology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburahma, Samah K; Khader, Yousef S; Alzoubi, Karem; Sawalha, Noor

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the frequency and determinants of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in children attending a pediatric neurology clinic in North Jordan, a parent completed questionnaire survey of children attending the pediatric neurology clinic at King Abdullah University Hospital from March to July 2008 was conducted. A review of 176 completed questionnaires showed that 99 parents (56%) had used CAM for their child's specific neurological illness. The most common modalities were prayer/reciting the Quran (77%), religious healers (30%), massage with olive oil (32%), and consumption of honey products (29%). The most common reason was religious beliefs in 68%. None reported lack of trust in conventional medicine as the reason behind seeking CAM. Factors significantly associated with CAM use were speech delay, belief in its usefulness, father's age more than 30 years, and mothers with education less than high school. CAM had a supplementary role in relation to traditional western medicine use. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An Analysis of Disorders seen at the Paediatric Neurology Clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    METHODS: All children presenting at the paediatric neurology clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria over a period of 20 months were prospectively studied. Diagnoses were made from detailed history, thorough physical examination, with particular emphasis on the central nervous system and appropriate ...

  15. Hypothyroidism in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Qari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease that was seen in the clinical practice especially for family physicians. Methods: This review article covered the important practical clinical issues for managing overt hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and hypothyroidism during pregnancy. Conclusions: The clinical issues were addressed by clinical scenario followed by questions and stressed on the important clinical points.

  16. The pioneers of clinical neurology in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegri, Ricardo Francisco

    2008-08-15

    The field of neurology in South America (SA) began to emerge towards the end of the nineteenth century, following the origin of the specialty in Europe. There was a consistent and long-standing admiration for European training, which led to the birth of the discipline in South America. The first steps took place almost simultaneously with European countries in Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile and Peru. This paper will unearth information on the pioneers of clinical neurology in SA. Taken together, these sources reveal several important milestones in the long history of the field. The department of Neurology at the Hospital San Roque de Buenos Aires was created in 1885 and headed by José María Ramos Mejía, who then took over as Professor of Neurology at the University of Buenos Aires School of Medicine in 1887. The first institute of neurology in Latin America, the Instituto Neurológico de Montevideo, was founded in 1926 under Américo Ricaldoni's direction. Seventeen years later, the Arquivos de Neuropsiquiatria from San Pablo was created, and is still in existence. Up until the present, South America has made dozens of important research contributions, the most important in the diagnosis and treatment of regional endemic diseases.

  17. Delays in clinical development of neurological drugs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masayuki

    2017-06-28

    The delays in the approval and development of neurological drugs between Japan and other countries have been a major issue for patients with neurological diseases. The objective of this study was to analyze factors contributing to the delay in the launching of neurological drugs in Japan. We analyzed data from Japan and the US for the approval of 42 neurological drugs, all of which were approved earlier in the US than in Japan, and examined the potential factors that may cause the delay of their launch. Introductions of the 42 drugs in Japan occurred at a median of 87 months after introductions in the US. The mean review time of new drug applications for the 20 drugs introduced in Japan in January 2011 or later (15 months) was significantly shorter than that for the other 22 drugs introduced in Japan in December 2010 or earlier (24 months). The lag in the Japan's review time behind the US could not explain the approval delays. In the 31 of the 42 drugs, the application data package included overseas data. The mean review time of these 31 drugs (17 months) was significantly shorter than that of the other 11 drugs without overseas data (26 months). The mean approval lag behind the US of the 31 drugs (78 months) was also significantly shorter than that of the other 11 drugs (134 months). These results show that several important reforms in the Japanese drug development and approval system (e.g., inclusion of global clinical trial data) have reduced the delays in the clinical development of neurological drugs.

  18. Neurology objective structured clinical examination reliability using generalizability theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Angela D; Park, Yoon Soo; Lukas, Rimas V; Brorson, James R

    2015-11-03

    This study examines factors affecting reliability, or consistency of assessment scores, from an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in neurology through generalizability theory (G theory). Data include assessments from a multistation OSCE taken by 194 medical students at the completion of a neurology clerkship. Facets evaluated in this study include cases, domains, and items. Domains refer to areas of skill (or constructs) that the OSCE measures. G theory is used to estimate variance components associated with each facet, derive reliability, and project the number of cases required to obtain a reliable (consistent, precise) score. Reliability using G theory is moderate (Φ coefficient = 0.61, G coefficient = 0.64). Performance is similar across cases but differs by the particular domain, such that the majority of variance is attributed to the domain. Projections in reliability estimates reveal that students need to participate in 3 OSCE cases in order to increase reliability beyond the 0.70 threshold. This novel use of G theory in evaluating an OSCE in neurology provides meaningful measurement characteristics of the assessment. Differing from prior work in other medical specialties, the cases students were randomly assigned did not influence their OSCE score; rather, scores varied in expected fashion by domain assessed. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. The child neurology clinical workforce in 2015: Report of the AAP/CNS Joint Taskforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter B; Bale, James F; Mintz, Mark; Joshi, Sucheta M; Gilbert, Donald L; Radabaugh, Carrie; Ruch-Ross, Holly

    2016-09-27

    More than a decade has passed since the last major workforce survey of child neurologists in the United States; thus, a reassessment of the child neurology workforce is needed, along with an inaugural assessment of a new related field, neurodevelopmental disabilities. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Child Neurology Society conducted an electronic survey in 2015 of child neurologists and neurodevelopmental disabilities specialists. The majority of respondents participate in maintenance of certification, practice in academic medical centers, and offer subspecialty care. EEG reading and epilepsy care are common subspecialty practice areas, although many child neurologists have not had formal training in this field. In keeping with broader trends, medical school debts are substantially higher than in the past and will often take many years to pay off. Although a broad majority would choose these fields again, there are widespread dissatisfactions with compensation and benefits given the length of training and the complexity of care provided, and frustrations with mounting regulatory and administrative stresses that interfere with clinical practice. Although not unique to child neurology and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such issues may present barriers for the recruitment of trainees into these fields. Creative approaches to enhance the recruitment of the next generation of child neurologists and neurodevelopmental disabilities specialists will benefit society, especially in light of all the exciting new treatments under development for an array of chronic childhood neurologic disorders. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Chapter 12: the anatomical foundations of clinical neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentivoglio, Marina; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The chapter provides an itinerary of knowledge on nervous system anatomy as one of the pillars of clinical neurology. The journey starts from the Renaissance explosion on the approach to the human body, its functions and its diseases, dealing with the seminal contributions of Leonardo da Vinci and Vesalius. The itinerary proceeds through the contributions of the 17th century, especially by Thomas Willis and the pioneering investigations of Marcello Malpighi and Antony van Leeuwenhoek, and onto the 18th century. The itinerary thus leads to the progress from gross anatomy to the microscopic investigation of the nervous system in the 19th century: the reticular theories, the revolution of the neural doctrine and their protagonists (Camillo Golgi and Santiago Ramón y Cajal), which initiated the modern era of the neurosciences. The chapter also includes sections on the contributions of developmental neuroanatomy to neurology, on the history of tract tracing, and on the cytoarchitecture of the cerebral cortex. The never-ending story of the anatomical foundations of clinical neurology continues to evolve at the dawn of the 21st century, including knowledge that guides deep brain stimulation, and novel approaches to the anatomy of the living brain based on rapidly developing neuroimaging technology.

  1. Challenges facing palliative neurology practice: A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofton, T E; Chum, M; Schulz, V; Gofton, B T; Sarpal, A; Watling, C

    2018-02-15

    This study aimed to develop a conceptual understanding of the specific characteristics of palliative care in neurology and the challenges of providing palliative care in the setting of neurological illness. The study was conducted at London Health Sciences Centre in Canada using grounded theory methodology. Qualitative thematic analysis was applied to focus group (health care providers physicians, nursing, allied health, trainees) and semi-structured interview (patient-caregiver dyads) data to explore challenges facing the delivery of palliative care in neurology. Specific characteristics of neurological disease that affect palliative care in neurology were identified: 1) timelines of disease progression, 2) barriers to communication arising from neurologic disease, 3) variability across disease progression, and 4) threat to personhood arising from functional and cognitive impairments related to neurologic disease. Moreover, three key challenges that shaped and complicated palliative care in neurology were identified: 1) uncertainty with respect to prognosis, support availability and disease trajectory, 2) inconsistency in information, attitudes and skills among care providers, care teams, caregivers and families, and 3) existential distress specific to neurological disease, including emotional, psychological and spiritual distress resulting from loss of function, autonomy and death. These challenges were experienced across groups, but manifested themselves in different ways for each group. Further research regarding prognosis, improved identification of patients with palliative care needs, developing an approach to palliative care delivery within neurology and the creation of more robust educational resources for teaching palliative neurology are expected to improve neurologists' comfort with palliative care, thereby enhancing care delivery in neurology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Persistence with antiepileptic drugs in epilepsy patients treated in neurological practices in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Louis; Hamer, Hajo M; Kostev, Karel

    2017-08-01

    The goal of this study was to analyze the persistence with antiepileptic drugs (AED) and associated factors in patients followed in neurological practices in Germany. This study included patients aged 18years or over who received two initial diagnoses of epilepsy and a first prescription of AED between 2007 and 2015 in a neurological practice (index date). The main outcome measure was the rate of AED persistence within five years of the index date. Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed to study treatment persistence as a function of age. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the relationship between non-persistence and demographic/clinical variables. A total of 8192 patients followed in neurological practices were included. After five years of follow-up, 41.1% (≤40years), 45.2%, (41-60years) and 50.1% (>60years) of patients followed in neurological practices were persistent (log-rank p-value60years: OR=1.19, 95% CI: 1.09-1.31; 41-60years vs. >60years: OR=1.10, 95% CI: 1.01-1.19). Furthermore, patients receiving old AED (OR=1.16, 95% CI: 1.01-1.34) or gabapentin (OR=1.46, 95% CI: 1.16-1.83) and those diagnosed with depression (OR=1.12, 95% CI: 1.03-1.21) were at a higher risk of non-persistence, whereas those receiving levetiracetam (OR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.60-0.80) or lamotrigine (OR=0.88, 95% CI: 0.79-0.97) and those with dementia (OR=0.74, 95% CI: 0.65-0.83) were at a lower risk. The rate of epilepsy patients persistent with AED was low after five years of treatment. Age, gender, co-morbidities, and drug characteristics were associated with this persistence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Improving clinical cognitive testing: report of the AAN Behavioral Neurology Section Workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffner, Kirk R; Gale, Seth A; Barrett, A M; Boeve, Bradley F; Chatterjee, Anjan; Coslett, H Branch; D'Esposito, Mark; Finney, Glen R; Gitelman, Darren R; Hart, John J; Lerner, Alan J; Meador, Kimford J; Pietras, Alison C; Voeller, Kytja S; Kaufer, Daniel I

    2015-09-08

    To evaluate the evidence basis of single-domain cognitive tests frequently used by behavioral neurologists in an effort to improve the quality of clinical cognitive assessment. Behavioral Neurology Section members of the American Academy of Neurology were surveyed about how they conduct clinical cognitive testing, with a particular focus on the Neurobehavioral Status Exam (NBSE). In contrast to general screening cognitive tests, an NBSE consists of tests of individual cognitive domains (e.g., memory or language) that provide a more comprehensive diagnostic assessment. Workgroups for each of 5 cognitive domains (attention, executive function, memory, language, and spatial cognition) conducted evidence-based reviews of frequently used tests. Reviews focused on suitability for office-based clinical practice, including test administration time, accessibility of normative data, disease populations studied, and availability in the public domain. Demographic and clinical practice data were obtained from 200 respondents who reported using a wide range of cognitive tests. Based on survey data and ancillary information, between 5 and 15 tests in each cognitive domain were reviewed. Within each domain, several tests are highlighted as being well-suited for an NBSE. We identified frequently used single-domain cognitive tests that are suitable for an NBSE to help make informed choices about clinical cognitive assessment. Some frequently used tests have limited normative data or have not been well-studied in common neurologic disorders. Utilizing standardized cognitive tests, particularly those with normative data based on the individual's age and educational level, can enhance the rigor and utility of clinical cognitive assessment. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Computerizing clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie

    . The analysis focuses on the emergence of general clinical work practice demands on guidance • An analysis of guidance demands from clinical work practice and business strategy, focusing on implications for the design of computerised CPGs. In my research, I have applied observation studies, interviews......It is well described that hospitals have problems with sustaining high quality of care and expedient introduction of new medical knowledge. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been promoted as a remedy to deal with these problems. It is, however, also well described that application...... and compliance with CPGs in most areas of clinical practice are deficient. Computerization of CPGs has been brought forward as a method to disseminate and to support application of CPGs. Until now, CPG-computerization has focused on development of formal expressions of CPGs. The developed systems have, however...

  5. The Clinical Spectrum of Neurological Manifestations in HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is primarily neurotrophic and lymphotrophic. Diverse neurologic sequealae have been documented with variations based on disease severity, but geographic variation may determine the distribution of these neurological complications. Objective: This study was ...

  6. Improved Neuropsychological and Neurological Functioning Across Three Antiretroviral Regimens in Diverse Resource-Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5199, the International Neurological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K.; Jiang, H.; Kumwenda, J.; Supparatpinyo, K.; Evans, S.; Campbell, T. B.; Price, R.; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N.; La Rosa, A.; Santos, B.; Silva, M. T.; Montano, S.; Kanyama, C.; Faesen, S.; Murphy, R.; Hall, C.; Marra, C. M.; Marcus, C.; Berzins, B.; Allen, R.; Housseinipour, M.; Amod, F.; Sanne, I.; Hakim, J.; Walawander, A.; Nair, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) A5199 compared the neurological and neuropsychological (NP) effects of 3 antiretroviral regimens in participants infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in resource-limited settings. Methods. Participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand, and Zimbabwe were randomized to 3 antiretroviral treatment arms: A (lamivudine-zidovudine plus efavirenz, n = 289), B (atazanavir, emtricitabine, and didanosine-EC, n = 293), and C (emtricitabine-tenofovir-disoproxil fumarate plus efavirenz, n = 278) as part of the ACTG PEARLS study (A5175). Standardized neurological and neuropsychological (NP) screening examinations (grooved pegboard, timed gait, semantic verbal fluency, and finger tapping) were administered every 24 weeks from February 2006 to May 2010. Associations with neurological and neuropsychological function were estimated from linear and logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations. Results. The median weeks on study was 168 (Q1 = 96, Q3 = 192) for the 860 participants. NP test scores improved (P  .10). Significant country effects were noted on all NP tests and neurological outcomes (P < .01). Conclusions. The study detected no significant differences in neuropsychological and neurological outcomes between randomized ART regimens. Significant improvement occurred in neurocognitive and neurological functioning over time after initiation of ARTs. The etiology of these improvements is likely multifactorial, reflecting reduced central nervous system HIV infection, better general health, and practice effects. This study suggests that treatment with either of the World Health Organization –recommended first-line antiretroviral regimens in resource-limited settings will improve neuropsychological functioning and reduce neurological dysfunction. Clinical trials registration.  NCT00096824. PMID:22661489

  7. The placebo response: neurobiological and clinical issues of neurological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, Antonella; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    The recent upsurge in placebo research has demonstrated the sound neurobiological substrate of a phenomenon once believed to be only patient mystification, or at best a variable to control in clinical trials, bringing about a new awareness of its potential exploitation to the patient's benefit and framing it as a positive context effect, with the power to influence the therapy outcome. Placebo effects have been described both in the experimental setting and in different clinical conditions, many of which are of neurological interest. Multiple mechanisms have been described, namely conditioning and cognitive factors like expectation, desire, and reward. A body of evidence from neurochemical, pharmacological, and neuroimaging studies points to the involvement of neural pathways specific to single conditions, such as the activation of the endogenous antinociceptive system during placebo analgesia or the release of dopamine in the striatum of parkinsonian patients experiencing placebo reduction of motor impairment. The possible clinical applications of placebo studies range from the design of clinical trials incorporating specific recommendations and minimizing the use of placebo arms to the optimization of the context surrounding the patient, in order to maximize the placebo component present in any treatment.

  8. Milestone-compatible neurology resident assessments: A role for observable practice activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lyell K; Dimberg, Elliot L; Boes, Christopher J; Eggers, Scott D Z; Dodick, David W; Cutsforth-Gregory, Jeremy K; Leep Hunderfund, Andrea N; Capobianco, David J

    2015-06-02

    Beginning in 2014, US neurology residency programs were required to report each trainee's educational progression within 29 neurology Milestone competency domains. Trainee assessment systems will need to be adapted to inform these requirements. The primary aims of this study were to validate neurology resident assessment content using observable practice activities (OPAs) and to develop assessment formats easily translated to the Neurology Milestones. A modified Delphi technique was used to establish consensus perceptions of importance of 73 neurology OPAs among neurology educators and trainees at 3 neurology residency programs. A content validity score (CVS) was derived for each neurology OPA, with scores ≥4.0 determined in advance to indicate sufficient content validity. The mean CVS for all OPAs was 4.4 (range 3.5-5.0). Fifty-seven (78%) OPAs had a CVS ≥4.0, leaving 16 (22%) below the pre-established threshold for content validity. Trainees assigned a higher importance to individual OPAs (mean CVS 4.6) compared to faculty (mean 4.4, p = 0.016), but the effect size was small (η(2) = 0.10). There was no demonstrated effect of length of education experience on perceived importance of neurology OPAs (p = 0.23). Two sample resident assessment formats were developed, one using neurology OPAs alone and another using a combination of neurology OPAs and the Neurology Milestones. This study provides neurology training programs with content validity evidence for items to include in resident assessments, and sample assessment formats that directly translate to the Neurology Milestones. Length of education experience has little effect on perceptions of neurology OPA importance. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Screening EEG in Aircrew Selection: Clinical Aerospace Neurology Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jonathan B.; Riley, Terrence

    2001-01-01

    .0139% (4/28627). After review of the value of the EEG as a screening tool, the US Navy now uses EEG only for certain clinical indications (head injury, unexplained loss of consciousness, family history of epilepsy, and abnormal neurological exam). Currently the US Navy does not use EEG for screening for any flight applicant without a neurologic indication. In the US Navy, an electroencephalographic pattern is determined to be epileptiform by a neurologist.

  10. Clinical practice guideline: tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunkel, David E; Bauer, Carol A; Sun, Gordon H; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Chandrasekhar, Sujana S; Cunningham, Eugene R; Archer, Sanford M; Blakley, Brian W; Carter, John M; Granieri, Evelyn C; Henry, James A; Hollingsworth, Deena; Khan, Fawad A; Mitchell, Scott; Monfared, Ashkan; Newman, Craig W; Omole, Folashade S; Phillips, C Douglas; Robinson, Shannon K; Taw, Malcolm B; Tyler, Richard S; Waguespack, Richard; Whamond, Elizabeth J

    2014-10-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of sound without an external source. More than 50 million people in the United States have reported experiencing tinnitus, resulting in an estimated prevalence of 10% to 15% in adults. Despite the high prevalence of tinnitus and its potential significant effect on quality of life, there are no evidence-based, multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines to assist clinicians with management. The focus of this guideline is on tinnitus that is both bothersome and persistent (lasting 6 months or longer), which often negatively affects the patient's quality of life. The target audience for the guideline is any clinician, including nonphysicians, involved in managing patients with tinnitus. The target patient population is limited to adults (18 years and older) with primary tinnitus that is persistent and bothersome. The purpose of this guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians managing patients with tinnitus. This guideline provides clinicians with a logical framework to improve patient care and mitigate the personal and social effects of persistent, bothersome tinnitus. It will discuss the evaluation of patients with tinnitus, including selection and timing of diagnostic testing and specialty referral to identify potential underlying treatable pathology. It will then focus on the evaluation and treatment of patients with persistent primary tinnitus, with recommendations to guide the evaluation and measurement of the effect of tinnitus and to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for tinnitus sufferers. The development group made a strong recommendation that clinicians distinguish patients with bothersome tinnitus from patients with nonbothersome tinnitus. The development group made a strong recommendation against obtaining imaging studies of the head and neck in patients with tinnitus, specifically to evaluate tinnitus that does not localize to 1 ear, is nonpulsatile

  11. [Applicability of the Therapeutic Nursing Theory in Neurological (Early-) Rehabilitation into Nursing Practice - A Case Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschläger, Sindy; Muser, Jürgen; Müller, Elisabeth

    2017-05-30

    Purpose The objective of the study is to describe how the theory of therapeutic nursing in neurological (early) rehabilitation can be transferred into nursing practice. Materials and Methods The theory was developed using the method of grounded theory by Glaser and Strauss. Open participatory observations (n=92) and episodic interviews (n=10) with nursing professionals and nursing auxiliaries were conducted in 5 inpatient rehabilitation clinics. Data analysis was performed using the constant comparative method by Glaser and Strauss. Results By means of a case study, the applicability of the theory into nursing practice with regard to the following care situations is described: (1) training for personal care, (2) therapeutic positioning, (3) oral hygiene, (4) training of sensory-motor perception and (5) counseling relatives. Consequently, the categories of the theory: (1) nursing care, (2) observation/perception, (3) communication, (4) autonomy and individual needs of patients and their relatives, (5) multi-professional team and (6) prerequisites are transferred into the case scenario. Conclusions The case study demonstrates how the therapeutic nursing theory in neurological (early-) rehabilitation can be transferred into nursing practice and reveals the complexity of nursing interventions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Prevalence and predictors of unexplained neurological symptoms in an academic neurology outpatient clinic--an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, T.J.; Leeuw, H.F. de; Klumpers, U.M.H.; Kappelle, L.J.; Gijn, J. van

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (a) To determine the prevalence of unexplained symptoms among newly referred patients in a Dutch academic outpatient clinic for general neurology; (b) To identify factors that can serve as characteristics and possibly as screening instruments for unexplained symptoms in this population.

  13. Learning clinical practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    How do you learn clinical practice? What should we do to ensure that the ... work to a curriculum, and within a programme, so that their learning can be managed. So, postgraduate medical ... Derek Bok (former president of Harvard University), if you think education is hard work, try working without it. Dr Richard Bregazzi.

  14. Clinical perspectives on medical marijuana (cannabis) for neurologic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Fife, Terry D.; Moawad, Heidi; Moschonas, Constantine; Shepard, Katie; Hammond, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The American Academy of Neurology published an evidence-based systematic review of randomized controlled trials using marijuana (Cannabis sativa) or cannabinoids in neurologic disorders. Several cannabinoids showed effectiveness or probable effectiveness for spasticity, central pain, and painful spasms in multiple sclerosis. The review justifies insurance coverage for dronabinol and nabilone for these indications. Many insurance companies already cover these medications for other indications....

  15. Cannabinoid-based medicines for neurological disorders--clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen

    2007-08-01

    Whereas the cannabis plant has a long history of medicinal use, it is only in recent years that a sufficient understanding of the pharmacology of the main plant constituents has allowed for a better understanding of the most rational therapeutic targets. The distribution of cannabinoid receptors, both within the nervous system and without, and the development of pharmacological tools to investigate their function has lead to a substantial increase in efforts to develop cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Concomitant with these efforts, the understanding of the pharmacology of plant cannabinoids at receptor and other systems distinct from the cannabinoid receptors suggests that the therapeutic applications of plant-derived cannabinoids (and presumably their synthetic derivatives also) may be diverse. This review aims to discuss the clinical evidence investigating the use of medicines derived, directly or indirectly, from plant cannabinoids with special reference to neurological disorders. Published studies suggest that the oral administration of cannabinoids may not be the preferred route of administration and that plant extracts show greater evidence of efficacy than synthetic compounds. One of these, Sativex (GW Pharmaceuticals), was approved as a prescription medicine in Canada in 2005 and is currently under regulatory review in the EU.

  16. Good Clinical Practice Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango, Jaime; Chuck, Tina; Ellenberg, Susan S.; Foltz, Bridget; Gorman, Colleen; Hinrichs, Heidi; McHale, Susan; Merchant, Kunal; Shapley, Stephanie; Wild, Gretchen

    2016-01-01

    Good Clinical Practice (GCP) is an international standard for the design, conduct, performance, monitoring, auditing, recording, analyses, and reporting of clinical trials. The goal of GCP is to ensure the protection of the rights, integrity, and confidentiality of clinical trial participants and to ensure the credibility and accuracy of data and reported results. In the United States, trial sponsors generally require investigators to complete GCP training prior to participating in each clinical trial to foster GCP and as a method to meet regulatory expectations (ie, sponsor’s responsibility to select qualified investigators per 21 CFR 312.50 and 312.53(a) for drugs and biologics and 21 CFR 812.40 and 812.43(a) for medical devices). This training requirement is often extended to investigative site staff, as deemed relevant by the sponsor, institution, or investigator. Those who participate in multiple clinical trials are often required by sponsors to complete repeated GCP training, which is unnecessarily burdensome. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative convened a multidisciplinary project team involving partners from academia, industry, other researchers and research staff, and government to develop recommendations for streamlining current GCP training practices. Recommendations drafted by the project team, including the minimum key training elements, frequency, format, and evidence of training completion, were presented to a broad group of experts to foster discussion of the current issues and to seek consensus on proposed solutions. PMID:27390628

  17. The Workforce Task Force report: clinical implications for neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, William D; Vatz, Kenneth A; Griggs, Robert C; Pedley, Timothy

    2013-07-30

    The American Academy of Neurology Workforce Task Force (WFTF) report predicts a future shortfall of neurologists in the United States. The WFTF data also suggest that for most states, the current demand for neurologist services already exceeds the supply, and by 2025 the demand for neurologists will be even higher. This future demand is fueled by the aging of the US population, the higher health care utilization rates of neurologic services, and by a greater number of patients gaining access to the health care system due to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Uncertainties in health care delivery and patient access exist due to looming concerns about further Medicare reimbursement cuts. This uncertainty is set against a backdrop of Congressional volatility on a variety of issues, including the repeal of the sustainable growth rate for physician reimbursement. The impact of these US health care changes on the neurology workforce, future increasing demands, reimbursement, and alternative health care delivery models including accountable care organizations, nonphysician providers such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, and teleneurology for both stroke and general neurology are discussed. The data lead to the conclusion that neurologists will need to play an even larger role in caring for the aging US population by 2025. We propose solutions to increase the availability of neurologic services in the future and provide other ways of meeting the anticipated increased demand for neurologic care.

  18. Clinical perspectives on medical marijuana (cannabis) for neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Terry D; Moawad, Heidi; Moschonas, Constantine; Shepard, Katie; Hammond, Nancy

    2015-08-01

    The American Academy of Neurology published an evidence-based systematic review of randomized controlled trials using marijuana (Cannabis sativa) or cannabinoids in neurologic disorders. Several cannabinoids showed effectiveness or probable effectiveness for spasticity, central pain, and painful spasms in multiple sclerosis. The review justifies insurance coverage for dronabinol and nabilone for these indications. Many insurance companies already cover these medications for other indications. It is unlikely that the review will alter coverage for herbal marijuana. Currently, no payers cover the costs of herbal medical marijuana because it is illegal under federal law and in most states. Cannabinoid preparations currently available by prescription may have a role in other neurologic conditions, but quality scientific evidence is lacking at this time.

  19. Ketorolac in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Evgenyevich Karateev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the data available in the literature on the use of ketorolac in clinical practice. Ketorolac is a highly effective analgesic that has proven to be the best drug in the treatment of pronounced acute pain (during monotherapy and combination analgesic therapy in the postoperative period or after serious injuries. The drug is excellently combined with narcotic analgesics, which permits reductions in the dose of opioids and in the risk of their adverse reactions. When given in standard doses and used for a short period, Ketorolac is reasonably safe, which makes it the drug of choice to relieve acute pain in therapeutic practice. It may be successfully used in cases of acute lower back pain, toothache, migraine, renal and hepatic colics, and in many other situations requiring prompt and potent analgesia, but it is inexpedient to administer narcotic analgesics. Ketorolac should be regarded as a good alternative to metamizole (analgin that is still popular in our country.

  20. The Bobath concept - a model to illustrate clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielsen, Marc; Vaughan-Graham, Julie; Holland, Ann; Magri, Alba; Suzuki, Mitsuo

    2017-12-17

    The model of Bobath clinical practice provides a framework identifying the unique aspects of the Bobath concept in terms of contemporary neurological rehabilitation. The utilisation of a framework to illustrate the clinical application of the Bobath concept provides the basis for a common understanding with respect to Bobath clinical practice, education, and research. The development process culminating in the model of Bobath clinical practice is described. The use of the model in clinical practice is illustrated using two cases: a client with a chronic incomplete spinal cord injury and a client with a stroke. This article describes the clinical application of the Bobath concept in terms of the integration of posture and movement with respect to the quality of task performance, applying the Model of Bobath Clinical Practice. Facilitation, a key aspect of Bobath clinical practice, was utilised to positively affect motor control and perception in two clients with impairment-related movement problems due to neurological pathology and associated activity limitations and participation restrictions - the outcome measures used to reflect the individual clinical presentation. Implications for Rehabilitation The model of Bobath clinical practice provides a framework identifying the unique aspects of the Bobath-concept. The model of Bobath clinical practice provides the basis for a common understanding with respect to Bobath clinical practice, education, and research. The clinical application of the Bobath-concept highlights the integration of posture and movement with respect to the quality of task performance. Facilitation, a key aspect of Bobath clinical practice, positively affects motor control, and perception.

  1. The Clinical Spectrum Of Paediatric Neurological Disorders In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The predominant neurologic morbidities included: cerebral palsy (42.4%), epilepsy (27.8%), febrile seizure (6.5%), mental retardation(6.2%), microcephaly (5.6%), behavioral problems (5.6%), poliomyelitis (4.5%), hydrocephalus (4.2%), visual impairment (2.8%), down syndrome (1.7%), and attention deficit hyperactivity ...

  2. [Frequency of hereditary neurologic diseases. A clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, M; Baldini, S; Voltolin, G; Norat, M; Bottacchi, E

    1993-09-01

    The nervous system is affected in 30% of hereditary monogenic disorders and as many as 500 single-gene disorders display major neurologic symptoms. We have studied the frequency of hereditary neurological diseases to assess their importance in daily hospital activity. Only single-gene hereditary diseases with central or peripheral nervous system involvement were considered; thus chromosomal diseases and diseases with multifactorial etiology were excluded. We surveyed admission to in- and out-patient departments of Neurology, Pediatrics, and Dermatology of the Aosta Regional Hospital for the calendar years 1982-1991, collecting 229 cases, 95 women and 134 men. Out-patient departments held 126 patients, the others came from in-patient departments. Admission to the neurological in-patient department were 1.8% of total neurological admissions in the same period. Each diagnosis was assigned to the code number of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-IX Revision, 1975). We found 33 different phenotypes. Most frequent diagnoses were: essential tremor (89 patients), hereditary sensory-motor neuropathy (HSMN) type I (28), Huntington's chorea (13), progressive muscular dystrophy limb-girdle type (8), neurofibromatosis type I (9), HSMN type II (9), spinocerebellar ataxia (9), hereditary spastic paraplegia (7), spinal muscular atrophy type IV (5), myotonic dystrophy (5), cerebellar ataxia (4), HSMN type III (4), spinal muscular atrophy type II and III (3), tuberous sclerosis (3). Essential tremor mostly affected persons in the over-50 age groups. On the contrary, the other neurologic monogenic diseases were diagnosed in all ages with the following age-group breakdown: 0-9, 11%; 10-19, 16%; 20-29, 15%; 30-39, 8%; 40-49, 11%; 50-59, 19%; 60-69, 14%, 70+, 7%. Consistently with the general rule, autosomic recessive diseases have the earliest onset and autosomic dominant ones the latest; HSMN, spinal muscular atrophy and Huntington's chorea were the disorders diagnosed

  3. Neuropsychiatric Lupus in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Alessi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease involving multiple organs, characterized by the production of autoantibodies and the development of tissue injury. The etiology of SLE is partially known, involving multiple genetic and environmental factors. As many as 50% of patients with SLE have neurological involvement during the course of their disease. Neurological manifestations are associated with impaired quality of life, and high morbidity and mortality rates. Nineteen neuropsychiatric syndromes have been identified associated with SLE, and can be divided into central and peripheral manifestations. This article reviews major neuropsychiatric manifestations in patients with SLE and discusses their clinical features, radiological findings and treatment options.

  4. Launching Effectiveness Research to Guide Practice in Neurosurgery: A National Institute Neurological Disorders and Stroke Workshop Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicke, Patricia; Abosch, Aviva; Asher, Anthony; Barker, Fred G; Ghogawala, Zoher; Harbaugh, Robert; Jehi, Lara; Kestle, John; Koroshetz, Walter; Little, Roderick; Rubin, Donald; Valadka, Alex; Wisniewski, Stephen; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2017-04-01

    This workshop addressed challenges of clinical research in neurosurgery. Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) have high internal validity, but often insufficiently generalize to real-world practice. Observational studies are inclusive but often lack sufficient rigor. The workshop considered possible solutions, such as (1) statistical methods for demonstrating causality using observational data; (2) characteristics required of a registry supporting effectiveness research; (3) trial designs combining advantages of observational studies and RCTs; and (4) equipoise, an identified challenge for RCTs. In the future, advances in information technology potentially could lead to creation of a massive database where clinical data from all neurosurgeons are integrated and analyzed, ending the separation of clinical research and practice and leading to a new "science of practice." Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  5. Chapter 38: American neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemon, Frank R

    2010-01-01

    The great formative event in the history of North America, the Civil War of 1861 to 1865, was the stimulus for the development of clinical neurology and the neurosciences. The first neurological research center on the continent was the US Army hospital at Turner's Lane, Philadelphia, PA. Silas Weir Mitchell and his colleagues described causalgia (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), phantom limb sensation, and Horner's syndrome (before Horner). The medical leader of the Northern army was William Hammond. After the conclusion of hostilities, he began a huge clinical practice in New York City. In the United States, clinical neurology began in private practice, unlike Europe, where neurology began in institutions. Hammond's textbook, which first used the term athetosis, was used by a generation of physicians who encountered patients with neurological signs and symptoms. Early in the 20th century, neurological institutions were formed around universities; probably the most famous was the Montreal Neurological Institute founded by Wilder Penfield. The US federal government sponsored extensive research into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system through the Neurological Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, later called the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. The government officially classified the final 10 years of the 20th century as the Decade of the Brain and provided an even greater level of research funding.

  6. Resource costing for multinational neurologic clinical trials: methods and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, K; Burke, J; Drummond, M; Davies, L; Carlsson, P; Gruger, J; Harris, A; Lucioni, C; Gisbert, R; Llana, T; Tom, E; Bloom, B; Willke, R; Glick, H

    1998-11-01

    We present the results of a multinational resource costing study for a prospective economic evaluation of a new medical technology for treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage within a clinical trial. The study describes a framework for the collection and analysis of international resource cost data that can contribute to a consistent and accurate intercountry estimation of cost. Of the 15 countries that participated in the clinical trial, we collected cost information in the following seven: Australia, France, Germany, the UK, Italy, Spain, and Sweden. The collection of cost data in these countries was structured through the use of worksheets to provide accurate and efficient cost reporting. We converted total average costs to average variable costs and then aggregated the data to develop study unit costs. When unit costs were unavailable, we developed an index table, based on a market-basket approach, to estimate unit costs. To estimate the cost of a given procedure, the market-basket estimation process required that cost information be available for at least one country. When cost information was unavailable in all countries for a given procedure, we estimated costs using a method based on physician-work and practice-expense resource-based relative value units. Finally, we converted study unit costs to a common currency using purchasing power parity measures. Through this costing exercise we developed a set of unit costs for patient services and per diem hospital services. We conclude by discussing the implications of our costing exercise and suggest guidelines to facilitate more effective multinational costing exercises.

  7. Diagnostic work-up of neurological syndromes in a rural African setting: knowledge, attitudes and practices of health care providers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Mpanya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurological disorders of infectious origin are common in rural sub-Saharan Africa and usually have serious consequences. Unfortunately, these syndromes are often poorly documented for lack of diagnostic tools. Clinical management of these diseases is a major challenge in under-equipped rural health centers and hospitals. We documented health care provider knowledge, attitudes and practices related to this syndrome in two rural health zones in Bandundu Province, Democratic Republic of Congo. METHODS: We used a qualitative research approach combining observation, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. We observed 20 patient-provider contacts related to a neurological syndrome, conducted 12 individual interviews and 4 focus group discussions with care providers. All interviews were audiotaped and the transcripts were analyzed with the software ATLAS.ti. RESULTS: Care providers in this region usually limit their diagnostic work-up to clinical examination primarily because of the financial hurdles in this entirely out-of-pocket payment system. The patients prefer to purchase drugs rather than diagnostic tests. Moreover the general lack of diagnostic tools and the representation of the clinician as a "diviner" do not enhance any use of laboratory or other diagnostic methods. CONCLUSION: Innovation in diagnostic technology for neurological disorders is badly needed in Central-Africa, but its uptake in clinical practice will only be a success if tools are simple, affordable and embedded in a patient-centered approach.

  8. Clinical Identification of Dysarthria Types among Neurologists, Residents in Neurology and Speech Therapists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaff, M.; Kuiper, T.; Zwinderman, A.; van de Warrenburg, B.; Poels, P.; Offeringa, A.; van der Kooi, A.; Speelman, H.; de Visser, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Classification of dysarthria types comprises flaccid, spastic, ataxic, hypo- and hyperkinetic and mixed dysarthria. This study focussed on the ability of neurologists to clinically identify the correct type of dysarthria in neurological patients. Methods: Eighteen patients with

  9. Clinical identification of dysarthria types among neurologists, residents in neurology and speech therapists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, M. Van der; Kuiper, T.; Zwinderman, A.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Poels, P.J.E.; Offeringa, A.; Kooi, A. van der; Speelman, H.D.; Visser, M. de

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Classification of dysarthria types comprises flaccid, spastic, ataxic, hypo- and hyperkinetic and mixed dysarthria. This study focussed on the ability of neurologists to clinically identify the correct type of dysarthria in neurological patients. METHODS: Eighteen patients with

  10. [Quality of clinical and neurologic monitoring in a cohort of extremely premature infants, 2002-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpak, Nathalie; Montealegre-Pomar, Adriana

    2015-07-01

    Objective To explore the clinical course of a cohort of newborns mental retardation, and 2.7 % had convulsions. 72 % were monitored by a pediatrician, 65 % needed physical therapy, and 39 % needed speech therapy. 7 % repeated years in school and 9% of those over 4 years old had not begun to write. 4 % of those who could write had difficulties. 81 % of those over 6 years old had difficulties dressing themselves; 55 % did not practice sports. Discussion Extremely premature or low birth weight premature babies have a higher level of respiratory and neurological consequences that affect their quality of life and that of their family. It is important to strictly monitor their health after 12 months in order to promptly detect and manage neuro-psychomotor and sensorial development disorders.

  11. Clinical NMR imaging of the brain in children: normal and neurologic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M.A, (Hammersmith Hospital, London, England); Pennock, J.M.; Bydder, G.M.; Steiner, R.E.; Thomas, D.J.; Hayward, R.; Bryant, D.R.T.; Payne, J.A.; Levene, M.I.; Whitelaw, A.; Dubowitz, L.M.S.; Dubowitz, V.

    1983-11-01

    The results of initial clinical nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in eight normal and 52 children with a wide variety of neurologic diseases were reviewed. The high level of gray-white matter contrast available with inversion-recovery sequences provided a basis for visualizing normal myelination as well as delays or deficits in this process. The appearances seen in cases of parenchymal hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and proencephalic cysts are described. Ventricular enlargement was readily identified and marginal edema was demonstrated with spin-echo sequences. Abnormalities were seen in cerebral palsy, congenital malformations, Hallervorden-Spatz disease, aminoaciduria, and meningitis. Space-occupying lesions were identified by virtue of their increased relaxation times and mass effects. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has considerable potential in pediatric neuroradiologic practice, in some conditions supplying information not available by computed tomography or sonography.

  12. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may...... practice. By investments in education, applied research, and The Cochrane Collaboration, evidence-based medicine may form a stronger basis for clinical practice....

  13. Improving clinical practice guidelines for practicing cardiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhorin, Jesaia; Bodenheimer, Monty; Brown, Mary; Case, Robert; Dwyer, Edward M; Eberly, Shirley; Francis, Charles; Gillespie, John A; Goldstein, Robert E; Greenberg, Henry; Haigney, Mark; Krone, Ronald J; Klein, Helmut; Lichstein, Edgar; Locati, Emanuela; Marcus, Frank I; Moss, Arthur J; Oakes, David; Ryan, Daniel H; Bloch Thomsen, Poul E; Zareba, Wojciech

    2015-06-15

    Cardiac-related clinical practice guidelines have become an integral part of the practice of cardiology. Unfortunately, these guidelines are often long, complex, and difficult for practicing cardiologists to use. Guidelines should be condensed and their format upgraded, so that the key messages are easier to comprehend and can be applied more readily by those involved in patient care. After presenting the historical background and describing the guideline structure, we make several recommendations to make clinical practice guidelines more user-friendly for clinical cardiologists. Our most important recommendations are that the clinical cardiology guidelines should focus exclusively on (1) class I recommendations with established benefits that are supported by randomized clinical trials and (2) class III recommendations for diagnostic or therapeutic approaches in which quality studies show no benefit or possible harm. Class II recommendations are not evidence based but reflect expert opinions related to published clinical studies, with potential for personal bias by members of the guideline committee. Class II recommendations should be published separately as "Expert Consensus Statements" or "Task Force Committee Opinions," so that both majority and minority expert opinions can be presented in a less dogmatic form than the way these recommendations currently appear in clinical practice guidelines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional Disorders in Neurology : Case Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new

  15. Teaching and assessment in otolaryngology and neurology: Does the timing of clinical courses matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dünne, A A; Zapf, S; Hamer, H M; Folz, B J; Käuser, G; Fischer, M R G

    2006-11-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of clinical courses as a learning environment. To accurately assess performance in these courses, equal conditions for all candidates are required. We investigated the influence of the proximity of the course to the students test taking, the students' learning styles, and their self-motivation for learning in relation to performance success. One hundred and eleven students were randomized into eight groups, each attending a 2 week course in otolaryngology with a high proportion of patient-related teaching, and a 2 week long course in neurology with a low level of patient-related teaching. All students took multiple-choice end-of-term exams to assess their knowledge in both subjects. There was a different time interval between the course participation and the test taking for each of the groups. Performance success was correlated with the different groups, as well as with the type of learning style (LIST questionnaire) and with motivation for learning (study interest questionnaire). Explorative rank variance analysis showed a significant correlation between students' performance on the written exam and the time interval between completion of the neurology course and test-taking, with the shortest interval corresponding to highest scores (P = 0.002). There was no such effect on the success rate in otolaryngology (P = 0.28). Study motivation was not the major component for performance success, but a strong correlation between the use of strategic and deep learning styles and success in the exam was observed (R = 0.62; P exam plays a significant role on performance success; this effect does not occur in a course with a high proportion of practical patient-related teaching. More studies on clinical courses are needed to establish how students can be given adequate opportunities to develop necessary skills for patient care and for objective success on assessment. With such further information, the effectiveness of clinical courses

  16. Interprofessional Clinical Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Louis A.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses clinical education as a method for teaching interprofessional theory and practice. Pure and vicarious models are dealt with. A combined professional and interprofessional clinical experience is seen as the best compromise. (MT)

  17. Positron emission tomography clinical practice

    CERN Document Server

    Valk, Peter E; Bailey, Dale L; Townsend, David W; Maisey, Michael N

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a contemporary reference to the science, technology and clinical applications of PET and PET/CT. The opening chapters summarize the scientific aspects of PET and PET/CT including physics, instrumentation, radiation dosimetry and radiation protection. A chapter on normal variants in FDG PET imaging serves as an introduction to the clinical chapters, which cover oncology applications and have been updated to include the impact of FDG PET/CT imaging in oncology. The book concludes with chapters on the use of PET and PET/CT in cardiology and neurology and PET imaging of infectio

  18. Clinical neurology: why this still matters in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, David J; Appleton, Jason P

    2015-02-01

    This review argues that even with the tremendous advances in diagnostic neuroimaging that the clinical skills involved in clinical neurology (ie, history, examination, localisation and differential diagnosis) remain key. Yet a number of recent audits suggest that large numbers of patients are failing to be assessed properly with a risk of patient harm, costly, unnecessary or inappropriate investigations, or delayed diagnosis. We review some of the reasons why patients are not being assessed properly neurologically, in part as many doctors have limited neurological exposure and are hence neurophobic. We propose that a solution to these issues centres around ensuring that a core set of basic neurological skills is taught at an undergraduate level, whereas higher level skills, such as the use of heuristics, are taught at postgraduate level. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Childhood developmental disorders: an academic and clinical convergence point for psychiatry, neurology, psychology and pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Allan L

    2009-01-01

    Significant advances in understanding brain development and behavior have not been accompanied by revisions of traditional academic structure. Disciplinary isolation and a lack of meaningful interdisciplinary opportunities are persistent barriers in academic medicine. To enhance clinical practice, research, and training for the next generation, academic centers will need to take bold steps that challenge traditional departmental boundaries. Such change is not only desirable but, in fact, necessary to bring about a truly innovative and more effective approach to treating disorders of the developing brain. I focus on developmental disorders as a convergence point for transcending traditional academic boundaries. First, the current taxonomy of developmental disorders is described with emphasis on how current diagnostic systems inadvertently hinder research progress. Second, I describe the clinical features of autism, a phenomenologically defined condition, and Rett and fragile X syndromes, neurogenetic diseases that are risk factors for autism. Finally, I describe how the fields of psychiatry, psychology, neurology, and pediatrics now have an unprecedented opportunity to promote an interdisciplinary approach to training, research, and clinical practice and, thus, advance a deeper understanding of developmental disorders. Research focused on autism is increasingly demonstrating the heterogeneity of individuals diagnosed by DSM criteria. This heterogeneity hinders the ability of investigators to replicate research results as well as progress towards more effective, etiology-specific interventions. In contrast, fragile X and Rett syndromes are 'real' diseases for which advances in research are rapidly accelerating towards more disease-specific human treatment trials. A major paradigm shift is required to improve our ability to diagnose and treat individuals with developmental disorders. This paradigm shift must take place at all levels - training, research and clinical

  20. Current role of melatonin in pediatric neurology: clinical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Oliviero; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Besag, Frank; Biran, Valerie; Braam, Wiebe; Cortese, Samuele; Moavero, Romina; Parisi, Pasquale; Smits, Marcel; Van der Heijden, Kristiaan; Curatolo, Paolo

    2015-03-01

    Melatonin, an indoleamine secreted by the pineal gland, plays a key role in regulating circadian rhythm. It has chronobiotic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging properties. A conference in Rome in 2014 aimed to establish consensus on the roles of melatonin in children and on treatment guidelines. The best evidence for efficacy is in sleep onset insomnia and delayed sleep phase syndrome. It is most effective when administered 3-5 h before physiological dim light melatonin onset. There is no evidence that extended-release melatonin confers advantage over immediate release. Many children with developmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and intellectual disability have sleep disturbance and can benefit from melatonin treatment. Melatonin decreases sleep onset latency and increases total sleep time but does not decrease night awakenings. Decreased CYP 1A2 activity, genetically determined or from concomitant medication, can slow metabolism, with loss of variation in melatonin level and loss of effect. Decreasing the dose can remedy this. Animal work and limited human data suggest that melatonin does not exacerbate seizures and might decrease them. Melatonin has been used successfully in treating headache. Animal work has confirmed a neuroprotective effect of melatonin, suggesting a role in minimising neuronal damage from birth asphyxia; results from human studies are awaited. Melatonin can also be of value in the performance of sleep EEGs and as sedation for brainstem auditory evoked potential assessments. No serious adverse effects of melatonin in humans have been identified. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Most Common Causes of Eye Pain at 2 Tertiary Ophthalmology and Neurology Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Randy C; Koeppel, Jan N; Christensen, Chance D; Snow, Karisa B; Ma, Junjie; Katz, Bradley J; Krauss, Howard R; Landau, Klara; Warner, Judith E A; Crum, Alison V; Straumann, Dominik; Digre, Kathleen B

    2018-01-12

    Eye pain is a common complaint, but no previous studies have determined the most common causes of this presenting symptom. Our objective was to determine the most common causes of eye pain in 2 ophthalmology and neurology departments at academic medical centers. This was a retrospective cross-sectional analysis and chart review at the departments of ophthalmology and neurology at the University Hospital Zurich (USZ), University of Zürich, Switzerland, and the University of Utah (UU), USA. Data were analyzed from January 2012 to December 2013. We included patients aged 18 years or older presenting with eye pain as a major complaint. Two thousand six hundred three patient charts met inclusion criteria; 742 were included from USZ and 1,861 were included from UU. Of these, 2,407 had been seen in an ophthalmology clinic and 196 had been seen in a neurology clinic. Inflammatory eye disease (conjunctivitis, blepharitis, keratitis, uveitis, dry eye, chalazion, and scleritis) was the underlying cause of eye pain in 1,801 (69.1%) of all patients analyzed. Although only 71 (3%) of 2,407 patients had migraine diagnosed in an ophthalmology clinic as the cause of eye pain, migraine was the predominant cause of eye pain in the neurology clinics (100/196; 51%). Other causes of eye pain in the neurology clinics included optic neuritis (44 patients), trigeminal neuralgia, and other cranial nerve disorders (8 patients). Eye pain may be associated with a number of different causes, some benign and others sight- or life-threatening. Because patients with eye pain may present to either a neurology or an ophthalmology clinic and because the causes of eye pain may be primarily ophthalmic or neurologic, the diagnosis and management of these patients often requires collaboration and consultation between the 2 specialties.

  2. Clinical profile of neurological complications in HIV- reactive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    2014-07-26

    Jul 26, 2014 ... radiculopathy. Though three patients of these four were already taking anti- retroviral drugs, neuropathy in them could not be attributed to these drugs. Tingling, sensory loss, lower limb distal muscle weakness, backache and imbalance were the clinical features noted. In the present study, HIV-associated.

  3. Psychiatric morbidity in stroke patients attending a neurology clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Specific diagnoses recorded were depression (19.2%), generalised anxiety disorder (9.6%), harmful alcohol use (2.4%); dementia, somatoform disorder, phobia and delusional disorder each had a prevalence of 1.2%. Clinical and sociodemographic variables were not significantly associated with psychiatric morbidity.

  4. Clinical characteristics of basilar-type migraine in the neurological clinic of a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Guomin; Fan, Wen; Li, Nan; Wang, Jing; Li, Wangwen; Tan, Ge; Zhou, Jiying

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of basilar-type migraine in the neurology outpatient clinic of a university hospital in China. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the neurology outpatient of a tertiary care hospital in Chongqing between January 2010 and December 2011. All consecutive patients citing headache as their chief complaint were asked to complete a face-to-face interview by a qualified headache specialist using a detailed questionnaire for headache. The diagnosis of basilar-type migraine was made according to International Classification of Headache Disorders Second Edition. Of the 1,526 headache patients, 23 (1.5%) were diagnosed with basilar-type migraine (19 women, four men). Basilar-type migraine occurred in 6.6% (23/348) of patients with migraine with nonhemiplegic aura. Mean age at onset was 20.3 ± 11.7 years (range 6-49 years). Among these patients, 65% (15/23) reported bilateral pain, 35% (8/23) unilateral pain. The basilar-type aura comprised diplopia 52%, vertigo 43%, tinnitus 43%, bilateral visual symptoms 39%, hypacusia 26%, ataxia 26%, dysarthria 22%, bilateral paresthesias 13%, and decreased level of consciousness 13%. Intense emotional stimuli (74%) and sleep disorders (65%) were the most common trigger factors, followed by change in weather, sunshine, cold wind, acute stress, alcohol, and fatigue. Basilar-type migraine is an episodic disorder and occurred in 1.5% of patients with headache. More than one-half of patients have their first attack in the second and third decade of life. Trigger factors were common, and patients should be educated to avoid trigger factors. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Education research: case logs in the assessment of medical students in the neurology outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V; Brorson, James R; Amidei, Christina; Lukas, Rimas V

    2014-04-22

    Using outpatient neurology clinic case logs completed by medical students on neurology clerkships, we examined the impact of outpatient clinical encounter volume per student on outcomes of knowledge assessed by the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Clinical Neurology Subject Examination and clinical skills assessed by the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Data from 394 medical students from July 2008 to June 2012, representing 9,791 patient encounters, were analyzed retrospectively. Pearson correlations were calculated examining the relationship between numbers of cases logged per student and performance on the NBME examination. Similarly, correlations between cases logged and performance on the OSCE, as well as on components of the OSCE (history, physical examination, clinical formulation), were evaluated. There was a correlation between the total number of cases logged per student and NBME examination scores (r = 0.142; p = 0.005) and OSCE scores (r = 0.136; p = 0.007). Total number of cases correlated with the clinical formulation component of the OSCE (r = 0.172; p = 0.001) but not the performance on history or physical examination components. The volume of cases logged by individual students in the outpatient clinic correlates with performance on measures of knowledge and clinical skill. In measurement of clinical skill, seeing a greater volume of patients in the outpatient clinic is related to improved clinical formulation on the OSCE. These findings may affect methods employed in assessment of medical students, residents, and fellows.

  6. Cockayne syndrome without typical clinical manifestations including neurologic abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi-Hashimoto, H; Akaeda, T; Maihara, T; Ikenaga, M; Horio, T

    1998-10-01

    Although patients with mild symptoms of atypical Cockayne syndrome (CS) have been described, there has not been a report of a patient with CS whose only clinical manifestation was cutaneous photosensitivity. Cells from patients with CS show UV sensitivity, reduced recovery of RNA synthesis, but normal UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis. On the other hand, the patients with UV-sensitive syndrome have only cutaneous photosensitivity and skin freckles, whereas those cells respond to UV radiation in a similar fashion to the CS cells. We describe a patient with CS who showed only photosensitivity without typical clinical manifestations of CS, but his cells showed UV sensitivity, reduced recovery of RNA synthesis, and normal unscheduled DNA synthesis after UV radiation similar to CS cells. Furthermore, the patient was assigned to complementation group B of CS on the basis of the results of complementation analysis. The present report suggests that CS has a wider spectrum than that considered previously.

  7. The Bobath concept in contemporary clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Julie Vaughan; Eustace, Catherine; Brock, Kim; Swain, Elizabeth; Irwin-Carruthers, Sheena

    2009-01-01

    Future development in neurorehabilitation depends upon bringing together the endeavors of basic science and clinical practice. The Bobath concept is widely utilized in rehabilitation following stroke and other neurological conditions. This concept was first developed in the 1950s, based on the neuroscience knowledge of those times. The theoretical basis of the Bobath concept is redefined based on contemporary neuroscience and rehabilitation science. The framework utilized in the Bobath concept for the analysis of movement and movement dysfunction is described. This framework focuses on postural control for task performance, the ability to move selectively, the ability to produce coordinated sequences of movement and vary movement patterns to fit a task, and the role of sensory input in motor behaviour and learning. The article describes aspects of clinical practice that differentiate this approach from other models of practice. Contemporary practice in the Bobath concept utilizes a problem-solving approach to the individual's clinical presentation and personal goals. Treatment is focused toward remediation, where possible, and guiding the individual towards efficient movement strategies for task performance. The aim of this article is to provide a theoretical framework on which future research into the Bobath concept can be based.

  8. Clinical Practice in Portuguese Sexology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcão, Violeta; Ribeiro, Sofia; Almeida, Joana; Giami, Alain

    2017-11-17

    Few studies explore the clinicians' knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding sexuality, despite their role in the sexual-health socialization process. This study focuses on Portuguese sexologists engaged in clinical practice. It aims to characterize sexologists' sex education and training and their clinical practices, including diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. This research followed the methodology of an European survey on sexology as a profession (Euro-Sexo). From the 91 respondents who completed questionnaires, 51 (56%) were active in clinical practice. Results indicate that the Portuguese clinical sexologist is significantly older, predominantly male, has had training in sexology, performs more scientific research, and is more engaged in teaching activities when compared to nonclinical working sexologists. This article describes the main sexual problems presented by patients to Portuguese clinical sexologists and highlights differences in the professional groups and approaches toward treating these problems by medical doctors and nonmedical professionals. Results reinforce the idea that there are intra-European differences in the educational background of sexologists and reveal important variations in Portuguese sexologists' education, training, and clinical practice. The representations and practices of the sexologists in Portugal, as in other European countries, are embedded in cultural scenarios and sexual cultures, with implications for the clinical practice.

  9. MAGNESIUM IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Trisvetova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is a macronutrient that is needed for normal body functions. Magnesium deficiency resulting from the influence of exogenous and endogenous factors, is diagnosed by clinical manifestations, resembling the known disease. Magnesium deficiency corrected with the magnesium therapy. Studies show the effectiveness of magnesium orotate for many cardiovascular diseases.

  10. MAGNESIUM IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Trisvetova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is a macronutrient that is needed for normal body functions. Magnesium deficiency resulting from the influence of exogenous and endogenous factors, is diagnosed by clinical manifestations, resembling the known disease. Magnesium deficiency corrected with the magnesium therapy. Studies show the effectiveness of magnesium orotate for many cardiovascular diseases.

  11. MAGNESIUM IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    E. L. Trisvetova

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is a macronutrient that is needed for normal body functions. Magnesium deficiency resulting from the influence of exogenous and endogenous factors, is diagnosed by clinical manifestations, resembling the known disease. Magnesium deficiency corrected with the magnesium therapy. Studies show the effectiveness of magnesium orotate for many cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Neural prostheses in clinical applications--trends from precision mechanics towards biomedical microsystems in neurological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, T; Schuettler, M; Koch, K P

    2004-04-01

    Neural prostheses partially restore body functions by technical nerve excitation after trauma or neurological diseases. External devices and implants have been developed since the early 1960s for many applications. Several systems have reached nowadays clinical practice: Cochlea implants help the deaf to hear, micturition is induced by bladder stimulators in paralyzed persons and deep brain stimulation helps patients with Parkinson's disease to participate in daily life again. So far, clinical neural prostheses are fabricated with means of precision mechanics. Since microsystem technology opens the opportunity to design and develop complex systems with a high number of electrodes to interface with the nervous systems, the opportunity for selective stimulation and complex implant scenarios seems to be feasible in the near future. The potentials and limitations with regard to biomedical microdevices are introduced and discussed in this paper. Target specifications are derived from existing implants and are discussed on selected applications that has been investigated in experimental research: a micromachined implant to interface a nerve stump with a sieve electrode, cuff electrodes with integrated electronics, and an epiretinal vision prosthesis.

  13. The practice of neurology, 2000-2010: report of the AAN Member Research Subcommittee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adornato, B T; Drogan, O; Thoresen, P; Coleman, M; Henderson, V W; Henry, K A; Liu, L; Mortimer, J A; Schneck, M J; Borenstein, A R

    2011-11-22

    To present an analysis of American Academy of Neurology (AAN) membership demographics and practice trends over the past decade. Data from the 2009 AAN Census and 2010 Practice Profile Form (PPF) surveys were compared to results from 2004 and 2000 surveys. The Census was sent to all AAN members, and the PPF was sent to a random sample of US practicing neurologists. Since 2000, AAN membership increased by 31%, and the number of US neurologist-members increased by 14%. Mean age of US neurologists increased from 48.6 to 53.3 years, and 23.9% of neurologists are women. There was a 15% increase in the proportion of neurologists relative to the US population, from 3.41 neurologists per 100,000 population in 2000 to 3.92 neurologists in 2009. In 2009, 24.1% of US neurologists were in solo practice, 27.8% were in a neurology group, and 35.6% were in multispecialty/university settings, with little change in practice arrangements over time. The top 5 practice interest areas were unchanged since 2004 as were the number of hours devoted to patient care (42.3) or total work hours per week (57.1). Little change was observed in performed procedures, except increased use of botulinum toxin and nerve blocks and a decline in lumbar punctures. Neurologists rely more on physician assistants to see follow-up and new patients independently (p neurologic diagnosis and therapy, there has been little change in practice characteristics of US neurologists.

  14. Neurological complications ofLyme disease – clinical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jastrzębska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease is a chronic, multiorgan disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted by Ixodes ticks. Poland has medium to high rate of tick infection. Lyme disease incidence has been increasing in recent years, with the peak incidence recorded in the summer, especially in endemic areas. The risk of infection depends on the type of spirochete and the time it is present in the human skin. It is crucial to remove the parasite as soon as possible, not later than 24 hours after the spirochete enters the body. The infection usually occurs in three stages, although not all of them have to be present. A characteristic erythema migrans or, less common, lymphocytic lymphoma, may be observed in the first stage of the disease. General symptoms, such as myocarditis, arthritis or nervous system involvement, are developed in the second stage. In the late stage of the disease, serious irreversible complications of the nervous system, musculoskeletal system or the skin occur. The diagnosis of Lyme disease is based on a history of tick bite as well as on the presence of clinical symptoms confirmed by serological findings. The presence of erythema migrans is sufficient for diagnosis and treatment initiation, therefore laboratory diagnostics is not necessary in this case. Serological diagnostics is primarily based on ELISA testing, while the second step uses a Western blot test. Positive serology test in the absence of clinical symptoms or a positive medical history is insufficient for diagnosis and treatment initiation. The type of the antibiotic used as well as the route and duration of its administration depend on the stage of the disease and on the affected organ. The most common antimicrobials used in the treatment of Lyme disease include amoxicillin, doxycycline (over the age of 12 years and ceftriaxone.

  15. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 1 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 10, No 3 (2007) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 20, No 1 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. An Intelligent Computerized Stretch Reflex Measurement System For Clinical And Investigative Neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Chutkow, J. G.; Riggs, M. T.; Cristiano, V. D.

    1987-05-01

    We describe the design of a reliable, user-friendly preprototype system for quantifying the tendon stretch reflexes in humans and large mammals. A hand-held, instrumented reflex gun, the impactor of which contains a single force sensor, interfaces with a computer. The resulting test system can deliver sequences of reproducible stimuli at graded intensities and adjustable durations to a muscle's tendon ("tendon taps"), measure the impacting force of each tap, and record the subsequent reflex muscle contraction from the same tendon -- all automatically. The parameters of the reflex muscle contraction include latency; mechanical threshold; and peak time, peak magnitude, and settling time. The results of clinical tests presented in this paper illustrate the system's potential usefulness in detecting neurologic dysfunction affecting the tendon stretch reflexes, in documenting the course of neurologic illnesses and their response to therapy, and in clinical and laboratory neurologic research.

  19. Feasibility of the collection of patient-reported outcomes in an ambulatory neurology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Lidia M V R; Schwamm, Eli; Moura Junior, Valdery; Seitz, Michael P; Hsu, John; Cole, Andrew J; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-12-06

    To determine whether patients could self-report physical and mental health assessments in the waiting room and whether these assessments would be associated with modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and Quality of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-10) scores. We offered iPad-based surveys to consecutive adult neurology patients at check-in to collect patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). We collected demographic and clinical data on 6,075 patients through survey or administrative claims and PROMs from participating patients. We compared demographic characteristics of participants and nonparticipants and tested associations between physical and mental health scores and mRS and QOLIE-10. Of 6,075 patients seen by neurologists during the study period, 2,992 (49.3%) participated in the survey. Compared to nonparticipating patients, participating patients more often were privately insured (53.5% vs 42.7%, p neurology (nonsubspecialty) clinics (53.1% vs 46.6%, p Neurology.

  20. Education Research: Bias and poor interrater reliability in evaluating the neurology clinical skills examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, L A.; London, Z; Neel, R; Brock, C; Kissela, B M.; Schultz, L; Gelb, D J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) has recently replaced the traditional, centralized oral examination with the locally administered Neurology Clinical Skills Examination (NEX). The ABPN postulated the experience with the NEX would be similar to the Mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise, a reliable and valid assessment tool. The reliability and validity of the NEX has not been established. Methods: NEX encounters were videotaped at 4 neurology programs. Local faculty and ABPN examiners graded the encounters using 2 different evaluation forms: an ABPN form and one with a contracted rating scale. Some NEX encounters were purposely failed by residents. Cohen’s kappa and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated for local vs ABPN examiners. Results: Ninety-eight videotaped NEX encounters of 32 residents were evaluated by 20 local faculty evaluators and 18 ABPN examiners. The interrater reliability for a determination of pass vs fail for each encounter was poor (kappa 0.32; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11, 0.53). ICC between local faculty and ABPN examiners for each performance rating on the ABPN NEX form was poor to moderate (ICC range 0.14-0.44), and did not improve with the contracted rating form (ICC range 0.09-0.36). ABPN examiners were more likely than local examiners to fail residents. Conclusions: There is poor interrater reliability between local faculty and American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology examiners. A bias was detected for favorable assessment locally, which is concerning for the validity of the examination. Further study is needed to assess whether training can improve interrater reliability and offset bias. GLOSSARY ABIM = American Board of Internal Medicine; ABPN = American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology; CI = confidence interval; HFH = Henry Ford Hospital; ICC = intraclass correlation coefficients; IM = internal medicine; mini-CEX = Mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise; NEX = Neurology Clinical

  1. Divorce in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, B E

    1981-03-01

    The family physician today has many families in his/her practice who have decided on divorce and who turn to the family physician for guidance. The effect of divorce for children from infancy to age three years is primarily related to the mother's emotional adjustment to the divorce. Preschool and school aged children are most at risk for personality disturbances because of their emerging sense of identity and need for both parents as figures of identification. The adolescent is initially the most painfully distressed by the divorce but, in fact, is in time the least affected of all the age groups. An intervention aimed at helping reduce the pathological effect on the child's development is outlined, which includes an emphasis on the parents working together for the benefit of the children, the suggestion that the children be allowed as much continuity in their lifestyle as possible, and the need for each parent not to deprecate or blame the other so that the child may have a positive image of both parents.

  2. Potential of robots as next-generation technology for clinical assessment of neurological disorders and upper-limb therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scott, Stephen H; Dukelow, Sean P

    2011-01-01

    .... Our general hypothesis is that these same attributes make robotic technologies ideal for clinically assessing sensory, motor, and cognitive impairments in stroke and other neurological disorders...

  3. Mindfulness Meditation in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Paul; Sephton, Sandra; Weissbecker, Inka; Hoover, Katherine; Ulmer, Christi; Studts, Jamie L.

    2004-01-01

    The practice of mindfulness is increasingly being integrated into contemporary clinical psychology. Based in Buddhist philosophy and subsequently integrated into Western health care in the contexts of psychotherapy and stress management, mindfulness meditation is evolving as a systematic clinical intervention. This article describes…

  4. Cherubism: best clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadaki Maria E

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cherubism is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by bilateral and symmetric fibro-osseous lesions limited to the mandible and maxilla. In most patients, cherubism is due to dominant mutations in the SH3BP2 gene on chromosome 4p16.3. Affected children appear normal at birth. Swelling of the jaws usually appears between 2 and 7 years of age, after which, lesions proliferate and increase in size until puberty. The lesions subsequently begin to regress, fill with bone and remodel until age 30, when they are frequently not detectable. Fibro-osseous lesions, including those in cherubism have been classified as quiescent, non-aggressive and aggressive on the basis of clinical behavior and radiographic findings. Quiescent cherubic lesions are usually seen in older patients and do not demonstrate progressive growth. Non-aggressive lesions are most frequently present in teenagers. Lesions in the aggressive form of cherubism occur in young children and are large, rapidly growing and may cause tooth displacement, root resorption, thinning and perforation of cortical bone. Because cherubism is usually self-limiting, operative treatment may not be necessary. Longitudinal observation and follow-up is the initial management in most cases. Surgical intervention with curettage, contouring or resection may be indicated for functional or aesthetic reasons. Surgical procedures are usually performed when the disease becomes quiescent. Aggressive lesions that cause severe functional problems such as airway obstruction justify early surgical intervention.

  5. Cherubism: best clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, Maria E; Lietman, Steven A; Levine, Michael A; Olsen, Bjorn R; Kaban, Leonard B; Reichenberger, Ernst J

    2012-05-24

    Cherubism is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by bilateral and symmetric fibro-osseous lesions limited to the mandible and maxilla. In most patients, cherubism is due to dominant mutations in the SH3BP2 gene on chromosome 4p16.3. Affected children appear normal at birth. Swelling of the jaws usually appears between 2 and 7 years of age, after which, lesions proliferate and increase in size until puberty. The lesions subsequently begin to regress, fill with bone and remodel until age 30, when they are frequently not detectable.Fibro-osseous lesions, including those in cherubism have been classified as quiescent, non-aggressive and aggressive on the basis of clinical behavior and radiographic findings. Quiescent cherubic lesions are usually seen in older patients and do not demonstrate progressive growth. Non-aggressive lesions are most frequently present in teenagers. Lesions in the aggressive form of cherubism occur in young children and are large, rapidly growing and may cause tooth displacement, root resorption, thinning and perforation of cortical bone.Because cherubism is usually self-limiting, operative treatment may not be necessary. Longitudinal observation and follow-up is the initial management in most cases. Surgical intervention with curettage, contouring or resection may be indicated for functional or aesthetic reasons. Surgical procedures are usually performed when the disease becomes quiescent. Aggressive lesions that cause severe functional problems such as airway obstruction justify early surgical intervention.

  6. Clinical Practice. Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Dennis M; Rosen, Clifford J

    2016-01-21

    Key Clinical Points Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Fractures and osteoporosis are common, particularly among older women, and hip fractures can be devastating. Treatment is generally recommended in postmenopausal women who have a bone mineral density T score of -2.5 or less, a history of spine or hip fracture, or a Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) score indicating increased fracture risk. Bisphosphonates (generic) and denosumab reduce the risk of hip, nonvertebral, and vertebral fractures; bisphosphonates are commonly used as first-line treatment in women who do not have contraindications. Teriparatide reduces the risk of nonvertebral and vertebral fractures. Osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures have been reported with treatment but are rare. The benefit-to-risk ratio for osteoporosis treatment is strongly positive for most women with osteoporosis. Because benefits are retained after discontinuation of alendronate or zoledronic acid, drug holidays after 5 years of alendronate therapy or 3 years of zoledronic acid therapy may be considered for patients at lower risk for fracture.

  7. Clinical neurological examination vs electrophysiological studies: Reflections from experiences in occupational medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2015-01-01

    a diagnosis requires the identification of the responsible pathology and the involved tissues and structures. Consequently, improved diagnostic approaches are needed. This editorial discusses the potentials of using the clinical neurologic examination in patients with upper limb complaints related to work...

  8. Development of clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Steven D; Areán, Patricia A; Craske, Michelle G; Crawford, Kermit A; Kivlahan, Daniel R; Magnavita, Jeffrey J; Ollendick, Thomas H; Sexton, Thomas L; Spring, Bonnie; Bufka, Lynn F; Galper, Daniel I; Kurtzman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are intended to improve mental, behavioral, and physical health by promoting clinical practices that are based on the best available evidence. The American Psychological Association (APA) is committed to generating patient-focused CPGs that are scientifically sound, clinically useful, and informative for psychologists, other health professionals, training programs, policy makers, and the public. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2011 standards for generating CPGs represent current best practices in the field. These standards involve multidisciplinary guideline development panels charged with generating recommendations based on comprehensive systematic reviews of the evidence. The IOM standards will guide the APA as it generates CPGs that can be used to inform the general public and the practice community regarding the benefits and harms of various treatment options. CPG recommendations are advisory rather than compulsory. When used appropriately, high-quality guidelines can facilitate shared decision making and identify gaps in knowledge.

  9. Clinical utility of early amplitude integrated EEG in monitoring term newborns at risk of neurological injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina A. Toso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to test the clinical utility of an early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG to predict short-term neurological outcome in term newborns at risk of neurology injury. METHODS: this was a prospective, descriptive study. The inclusion criteria were neonatal encephalopathy, neurologic disturbances, and severe respiratory distress syndrome. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and likelihood ratio (LR were calculated. Clinical and demographic data were analyzed. Neurological outcome was defined as the sum of clinical, electroimaging, and neuroimaging findings. RESULTS: ten of the 21 monitored infants (48% presented altered short-term neurologic outcome. The aEEG had 90% sensitivity, 82% specificity, 82% positive predictive value, and 90% negative predictive value. The positive LR was 4.95, and the negative LR was 0.12. In three of 12 (25% encephalopathic infants, the aEEG allowed for a better definition of the severity of their condition. Seizures were detected in eight infants (38%, all subclinical at baseline, and none had a normal aEEG background pattern. The status of three infants (43% evolved and required two or more drugs for treatment. CONCLUSIONS: in infants with encephalopathy or other severe illness, aEEG disturbances occur frequently. aEEG provided a better classification of the severity of encephalopathy, detected early subclinical seizures, and allowed for monitoring of the response to treatment. aEEG was a useful tool at the neonatal intensive care unit for predicting poor short-term neurological outcomes for all sick newborn.

  10. Plasmapheresis in neurological disorders: six years experience from University Clinical center Tuzla

    OpenAIRE

    Osman Sinanović; Sanela Zukić; Adnan Burina; Nermina Pirić; Renata Hodžić; Mirza Atić; Mirna Alečković-Halilović; Enisa Mešić

    2017-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) is an extracorporeal blood purification technique that is designed to remove substances with a large molecular weight. The TPE procedure includes removal of antibodies, alloantibodies, immune complexes, monoclonal protein, toxins or cytokines, and involves the replenishment of a specific plasma factor. The aim of the study was to describe the clinical response to TPE in various neurological patients, and to assess the clinical response to this the...

  11. Neural prostheses in clinical practice: biomedical microsystems in neurological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, T

    2007-01-01

    Technical devices have supported physicians in diagnosis, therapy, and rehabilitation since ancient times. Neural prostheses interface parts of the nervous system with technical (micro-) systems to partially restore sensory and motor functions that have been lost due to trauma or diseases. Electrodes act as transducers to record neural signals or to excite neural cells by means of electrical stimulation. The field of neural prostheses has grown over the last decades. An overview of neural prostheses illustrates the opportunities and limitations of the implants and performance in their current size and complexity. The implementation of microsystem technology with integrated microelectronics in neural implants 20 years ago opened new fields of application, but also new design paradigms and approaches with respect to the biostability of passivation and housing concepts and electrode interfaces. Microsystem specific applications in the peripheral nervous system, vision prostheses and brain-machine interfaces show the variety of applications and the challenges in biomedical microsystems for chronic nerve interfaces in new and emerging research fields that bridge neuroscientific disciplines with material science and engineering. Different scenarios are discussed where system complexity strongly depends on the rehabilitation objective and the amount of information that is necessary for the chosen neuro-technical interface.

  12. Clinical reasoning in neurology: use of the repertory grid technique to investigate the reasoning of an experienced occupational therapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Kathy; Grice, James W

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the use of a structured interview methodology, the repertory grid technique, for investigating the clinical reasoning of an experienced occupational therapist in the domain of upper limb hypertonia as a result of brain injury. Repertory grid interviews were completed before and after exposure to a protocol designed to guide clinical reasoning and decision-making in relation to upper limb neurological rehabilitation. Data were subjected to both qualitative and quantitative analyses. Qualitative analysis focussed on clinical reasoning content. Common themes across the pre- and post-exposure interviews were the use of theoretical frameworks and practice models, the significance of clinical expertise, and discrimination of 'broad' and 'specific' aspects, as well as differentiation between 'therapist and client-related' aspects of the clinical situation. Quantitative analysis indicated that for both pre- and post-exposure repertory grids, clinical reasoning was structured in terms of two main concepts. In the pre-exposure grid, these were related to the therapist's role, and to the 'scope' of practice tasks (either broad or specific). In the post-exposure grid the two main concepts were upper limb performance, and client-centred aspects of the therapy process. The repertory grid technique is proposed as an effective tool for exploring occupational therapy clinical reasoning, based on its capacity for accessing personal frames of reference, and elucidating both the meaning and the structure supporting clinical reasoning.

  13. Leadership theory in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Hui Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In current clinical settings, effective clinical leadership ensures a high-quality health care system that consistently provides safe and efficient care. It is useful, then, for health care professionals to be able to identify the leadership styles and theories relevant to their nursing practice. Being adept in recognizing these styles not only enables nurses to develop their skills to become better leaders but also improves relationships with colleagues and leaders who have previously been challenging to work with. This article aims to use different leadership theories to interpret a common scenario in clinical settings in order to improve leadership effectiveness. Ultimately, it is found that different leadership styles are needed for different situations, and leaders should know which approach is most effective in a given scenario to achieve the organization's goals. Keywords: Leadership, Leadership theory, Clinical practice, Transformational leadership, Participative leadership, Transactional leadership

  14. NURSING LEADERSHIP IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    Efstratiou,Fragkoula; Roumeliotis,Efstratios; Efstratiou,Nikoleta

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Leadership is the influence of a person to a group or organization, and involves setting objectives, creating incentives for the production of work and contributing to the preservation of the group and its culture. Aim: The aim of this literature review was to inform about the role of the clinical nurse leader and its results in clinical practice of nursing. Methodology: The study was written depenting on articles that were found in the web and in electronic databases Science Di...

  15. Leadership theory in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Jie-Hui Xu

    2017-01-01

    In current clinical settings, effective clinical leadership ensures a high-quality health care system that consistently provides safe and efficient care. It is useful, then, for health care professionals to be able to identify the leadership styles and theories relevant to their nursing practice. Being adept in recognizing these styles not only enables nurses to develop their skills to become better leaders but also improves relationships with colleagues and leaders who have previously been c...

  16. [Swiss scrapie surveillance. I. Clinical aspects of neurological diseases in sheep and goats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, E; Botteron, C; Ehrensperger, F; Fatzer, R; Jaggy, A; Kolly, C; Meylan, M; Zurbriggen, A; Doherr, M G

    2005-10-01

    Small ruminants infected with scrapie show a large range of often unspecific clinical symptoms. The most-often described signs, locomotion, sensibility and behavioural disorders and emaciation, rarely occur together, and cases have been described in which only one of those signs was detectable.Thus, formulating a well-circumscribed definition of a clinical suspect case is difficult. Most animals with CNS-effecting diseases such as listeriosis, polioencephalomacia, cerebrospinal nematidiasis and enterotoxemia will, in a thorough neurological examination, show at least some scrapie-like symptoms. Among the 22 neurological field cases examined in this study, a goat with cerebral gliomatosis and hair lice showed the closest similarity to clinical scrapie. The unilateral deficiency of the cerebral nerves has potential as an clinical exclusion criterion for scrapie. However, the laboratory confirmation--or exclusion--of scrapie remains important. It thus needs to be realized that a consistent and thorough examination of neurologically diseased small ruminants (including fallen stock) is the backbone of a good surveillance system for these diseases. This should be a motivation for submitting adult sheep and goats for neuropathological examination.

  17. Neurological Surgery Training Abroad as a Progression to the Final Year of Training and Transition to Independent Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Robert M.; Asthagiri, Ashok R.; Jane, John A.; Jane, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Residents at the University of Virginia spend 1 year abroad at a neurological surgery program prior to their chief year. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) considers international rotations elective experiences and does not count them toward clinical accreditation. Objective We compared clinical training obtained in New Zealand (NZ) to data from US ACGME-accredited programs to see if it was reasonable to reconsider the former as clinical training. Methods We compared US national average chief case volumes to those performed by University of Virginia residents rotating in NZ over the past 3 years, using case volume comparisons and a survey of the residents' experience. Results The mean number of cases performed in NZ was above the 50th percentile for US averages for adult cranial cases, including the 70th to 90th percentile for aneurysms and 50th to 70th percentile for tumors. The average number of cases performed in 1 year in NZ satisfied the cranial case quota for 4 of 6 adult and 2 of 3 pediatric areas over the entire residency. The rotation doubled the cranial exposure of graduating residents at the chief level without diluting the experience of residents in the core program. All residents reported being “very satisfied” with the experience, noting it facilitated their transition to chief year and independent practice. Conclusions Clinical training obtained during an international rotation in NZ is comparable to that attained in the United States. The international experience in NZ facilitated advancement in all 6 competencies, and should be considered adequate for clinical neurological surgery education. PMID:26140124

  18. Neurological Surgery Training Abroad as a Progression to the Final Year of Training and Transition to Independent Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Robert M; Asthagiri, Ashok R; Jane, John A; Jane, John A

    2014-12-01

    Residents at the University of Virginia spend 1 year abroad at a neurological surgery program prior to their chief year. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) considers international rotations elective experiences and does not count them toward clinical accreditation. We compared clinical training obtained in New Zealand (NZ) to data from US ACGME-accredited programs to see if it was reasonable to reconsider the former as clinical training. We compared US national average chief case volumes to those performed by University of Virginia residents rotating in NZ over the past 3 years, using case volume comparisons and a survey of the residents' experience. The mean number of cases performed in NZ was above the 50th percentile for US averages for adult cranial cases, including the 70th to 90th percentile for aneurysms and 50th to 70th percentile for tumors. The average number of cases performed in 1 year in NZ satisfied the cranial case quota for 4 of 6 adult and 2 of 3 pediatric areas over the entire residency. The rotation doubled the cranial exposure of graduating residents at the chief level without diluting the experience of residents in the core program. All residents reported being "very satisfied" with the experience, noting it facilitated their transition to chief year and independent practice. Clinical training obtained during an international rotation in NZ is comparable to that attained in the United States. The international experience in NZ facilitated advancement in all 6 competencies, and should be considered adequate for clinical neurological surgery education.

  19. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice is the official publication of the Medical and Dental Consultants Association of Nigeria (MDCAN) established in 1997 and published ... Evaluation of Candida Albicans Biofilm Formation on Various Parts of Implant Material Surfaces · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  20. Clinical and Neurological Status in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment due to Chronic Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokudhon N. Madjidova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was to study the neurological status and cognitive function in patients with stage I and II CCI, depending on its nature. Material and Methods: The study included 302 patients (mean age - 61.3±0.3 years; 165/54.6% men and 137/45.4% women with stage I and II CCI. Clinical and neurological examination, study of cognitive function, and MRI were performed in all patients. The degree of cognitive defect was determined by the MMSE (Mini-Mental State Exam test and the Bourdon test (visual perception and vigilance. All the subjects were categorized into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 133 patients with the amnestic type of MCI (AT-MCI; Group 2 consisted of 169 patients with the multifunction type of MCI (MT-MCI. Results: The highest frequency of complaints of a cerebral nature was observed in Group 2 patients with MT-MCI compared to Group 1 patients with AT-MCI. It should be noted that memory impairment occurred in all patients in Group 1. The clinical-neurological examination revealed that the subjective complaints of a cerebral nature occurred significantly more frequently in Group 2 patients compared with Group 1 patients, except for the memory disorders, which prevailed in Group 1 patients with AT-MCI. With regard to the objective symptoms, the focal neurological symptoms occurred with equal frequency in both groups. It should be noted that the symptoms of the carotid region were more frequent in Group 2 patients and the symptoms of the vertebrobasilar region in Group 1 patients. The parameters of the cognitive function related to the concentration and stability of attention were less disturbed in patients with AT-MCI compared with the patients having the MT-MCI, and those parameters correlated with the parameters of the neurological focal symptoms.

  1. Overlap between Headache, Depression, and Anxiety in General Neurological Clinics: A Cross-sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Cui-Bai Wei; Jian-Ping Jia; Fen Wang; Ai-Hong Zhou; Xiu-Mei Zuo; Chang-Biao Chu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies have reported that depression and anxiety have bidirectional relationship with headache. However, few researches investigated the roles of depression or anxiety in patients with headache. We surveyed the prevalence of depression and anxiety as a complication or cause of headache among outpatients with a chief complaint of headache at neurology clinics in general hospitals. Additional risk factors for depression and anxiety were also analyzed. Methods: A cross-secti...

  2. Experience from two decades of the Cambridge Rapid Access Neurology Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axinte, Laura T; Fiddes, Barnaby D; Donaghy, Alastair; Whyte, Adam; Allen, Chris; Sawcer, Stephen J; Adam, Robert J; Stacpoole, Sybil R L

    2015-10-01

    We report on the evolution of the rapid access neurology clinic (established in 1995) at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge. Annualised attendance data demonstrate an ever increasing demand, with primary headache disorders now accounting for more than 40% of referrals. Secondary causes of headache (including intracranial tumours, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, carotid or vertebral artery dissection and subdural haematomas) remain infrequent. In all such cases, there were additional diagnostic clues. The number of patients referred with problems related to chronic neurological diseases has fallen considerably, reflecting the roles of specialist nurses and clinics. Imaging investigation of choice shifted from computerised tomography scan (45 to 16%) towards magnetic resonance imaging (17 to 47%). Management is increasingly on an outpatient basis, often without the need for a follow-up appointment. The experience presented here should inform further development of rapid access neurology clinics across the UK and suggests the need for acute headache services, in line with those for transient ischaemic attack and first seizure. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical radiopharmacy: principles and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, B A; Hladik, W B; Norenberg, J P

    1996-04-01

    On the average, radiopharmacists spend about 17.2% of their time in clinical activities if their practice setting is in an institution, and about 8.5% of their time if their practice setting is in a centralized nuclear pharmacy. A recent survey of radiopharmacists was conducted to determine: (1) the percentage of time they spend engaged in selected activities, and (2) the specific clinical activities in which they are involved. A few radiopharmacists spend as much as 50% of their time in clinical activities, but most spend only 5% to 20% of their time. Some of the clinical activities involve direct interactions with patients, such as explaining the reasons for administering the radioactive material or actually administering the dose. Other clinical activities are indirect, such as reviewing charts before or after studies and making recommendations to other health care professionals. About half of the pharmacists surveyed see a need for increasing their clinical activities. The need to maximize the time involved in providing pharmaceutical care is discussed and several patient-care activities/responsibilities are proposed.

  4. History of neurologic examination books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors).

  5. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  6. Reflections in the clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell-Carrió, F; Hernández-Clemente, J C

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze some models of expert decision and their impact on the clinical practice. We have analyzed decision-making considering the cognitive aspects (explanatory models, perceptual skills, analysis of the variability of a phenomenon, creating habits and inertia of reasoning and declarative models based on criteria). We have added the importance of emotions in decision making within highly complex situations, such as those occurring within the clinical practice. The quality of the reflective act depends, among other factors, on the ability of metacognition (thinking about what we think). Finally, we propose an educational strategy based on having a task supervisor and rectification scenarios to improve the quality of medical decision making. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Perioperative Management of Neurological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet Singh Dhallu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative care of the patients with neurological diseases can be challenging. Most important consideration is the management and understanding of pathophysiology of these disorders and evaluation of new neurological changes that occur perioperatively. Perioperative generally refers to 3 phases of surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. We have tried to address few commonly encountered neurological conditions in clinical practice, such as delirium, stroke, epilepsy, myasthenia gravis, and Parkinson disease. In this article, we emphasize on early diagnosis and management strategies of neurological disorders in the perioperative period to minimize morbidity and mortality of patients.

  8. [Physician Counseling about Physical and Sports Activity in Neurological Practices in Germany: Results of a Survey Among Members of the German Neurological Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, C D; Reuter, I; Straube, A; Tettenborn, B; Braumann, K M; Reimers, A K

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a major but modifiable risk factor for morbidity and mortality. Regular physical activity has preventive and therapeutic effects on numerous diseases including neurological disorders. Therefore, it is desirable that physicians motivate their patients to increase their physical and sports activities and that they help them to overcome barriers to exercising. The present study is a survey of neurologists who are members of the German Neurological Society with their own practices; they were asked whether they advised their patients on the benefits of physical activity. Details on physician counseling on physical activity were obtained, such as the frequency of counseling, the neurological disorders considered by the practitioners to be worth the effort of counseling, and the barriers to exercise on the part of patients. More than 80 % of the participants who responded to the survey stated that they frequently provide their patients with advice on the preventive and therapeutic aspects of physical activity. Almost all of them recommended endurance sports; this was followed by Far Eastern types of sport such as tai chi or yoga (70 % of all physicians who advice sports activities). The frequency of counseling about physical activity significantly correlated to the physician's own sports activity. Frequency of counseling was reduced if the physician assessed the patients to be incapable of adopting and maintaining a lifestyle of habitual physical activity. Lack of time as well as an insufficient reimbursement of the counseling, however, did not significantly influence the frequency of counseling. The physician's own sports activity matched that of individuals with similar social status. Thus, a selection bias does not seem to be of importance regarding the results of the survey. However, since only 169 of the 784 invited neurologists (21.6 %) responded to the questionnaire, the representativeness of the survey may be limited. Counseling about

  9. Clinical application of multi-shot diffusion EPI in neurological disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Tetsuya; Hirata, Koichi; Kubo, Jin; Yamazaki, Kaoru [Dokkyo Univ., Mibu, Tochigi (Japan). School of Medicine; Sato, Toshihiko

    1998-05-01

    Using the multi-shot EPI method we investigated the clinical application of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of neurological disease. The multi-shot method provided better susceptibility artifact-free DWI than the single-shot method particularly in the region of the posterior cranial fossa. DWI using the multi-shot EPI method readily shows the pyramidal tract extending from the internal capsule to the brainstems which is inaccessible by the conventional single-shot EPI method, and providing three-dimensional and distinct images of pyramidal tract changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or cerebral infarction with pyramidal tract disturbance. Our findings suggest that the use of DWI with the multi-shot EPI method would provide a technique for the easy diagnosis and evaluation of various neurological diseases. (author)

  10. Heavy cannabis use prior psychosis in schizophrenia: clinical, cognitive and neurological evidences for a new endophenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Jasmina; Ramoz, Nicolas; Le Strat, Yann; Gorwood, Philip; Dubertret, Caroline

    2017-02-11

    Cannabis use is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia, and is considered to impact late neurodevelopment. Neurological soft signs (NSS) associated with schizophrenia are considered as markers of early neurodevelopmental impairment. Our study examines the association between heavy cannabis use before the onset of psychosis and clinical, neuropsychological and neurological symptoms, including NSS. In a cross-sectional study, we consecutively included 61 patients with schizophrenia (34 reporting heavy cannabis use before the onset of psychosis and 27 not reporting such use), in the setting of a University Hospital and a Medical Center. Symptoms assessment and substance use disorder were evaluated with the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies. NSS were assessed with the Neurological Evaluation Scale. Psychopathology was assessed with the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale. All patients underwent a battery of neurocognitive tests evaluating attention, memory and executive functions domains. Patients with heavy cannabis use before the onset of psychosis showed significantly less NSS (p cannabis before the onset of schizophrenia. Patients with heavy cannabis use before the onset of schizophrenia may exhibit later neurodevelopmental impairment than those who do not report such use. Schizophrenia associated with heavy cannabis use could represent a specific phenotype.

  11. Undiagnosed depression and its correlates in a predominantly immigrant Hispanic neurology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai-Srivastava, Soma; Zheng, Ling

    2011-10-01

    Previous studies have reported a high incidence of depression in neurology clinics, however areas where there are predominantly underserved immigrants have not been studied. Retrospective cohort study in an academic outpatient neurology clinic in Los Angeles, California. Newly referred patients (N=318) were assessed consecutively for depression using a PHQ-9 questionnaire, accompanied by review of the assessment of the depressive disorder. The patient cohort consisted of 190 females (59%) and 130 males (41%), primarily of Hispanic descent (72%), with 8% Asian 11% white, and 5% African-American. Sixty-eight percent (68%) had depression, with 40% exhibiting moderate to severe depression. Patients who had moderate to severe depression (based on PHQ-9) were more likely to be unemployed (75.2% vs. 60.7%, p=0.008), dependent on government income (29.5% vs. 20.4%, p=0.06), and have headache or pain as the reason for referral (42.4% vs. 28.5%, p=0.03). Severity of depression also significantly correlated with current treatment by psychiatrist, current antidepressant use, and less independent living. Patients with moderate to severe depression were more likely to have made ER visits in the last 12 months (0.9 vs. 0.7, p=0.01) and were taking more medications (3.3 vs. 2.5, p=0.03), compared to patient with mild or no depression. The presence of moderate to severe depression significantly correlated with socioeconomic status, use of emergency room, and presence of headache/pain. Neurology clinics with predominantly underserved immigrant patients have a disproportionate amount of depression, which may be related to socioeconomic factors resulting in overutilization of scarce healthcare resources. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Good clinical practice in nebulization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautzenberg, B; Fauroux, B; Bonfils, P; Diot, P; Faurisson, F

    1998-01-01

    A meeting on nebulization held in April 1997 defined good clinical practices. Guidelines that were proposed pertained to the following: pneumatic and ultrasonic nebulizers; delivering circuit, occluded or not, the choice of the tip being done according to the disease to treat and to the drugs to be delivered; various functions, depending on the type of nebulizer; the particle size, as it will indicate which disease may be treated: between 2 and 6 microns for bronchi, between 0.5 et 3 microns for lung, > 5 microns for ear, nose and throat diseases; compatibility between the type of nebulizer and drugs. Ten drugs are currently registered in France. Nebulization has multiple clinical indications, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, acute laryngitis, and in infants, acute bronchiolitis. The prescription must be detailed, and the physician should make sure that the medical staff put it into application.

  13. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  14. Retrospective study of the clinical effects of acupuncture on cervical neurological diseases in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching Ming; Chang, Fang Chia; Lin, Chung Tien

    2016-09-30

    This study was conducted to evaluate new acupuncture protocols for the clinical treatment of cervical spinal cord diseases in 19 dogs. Three treatment options containing Jing-jiaji (cervical jiaji) were developed to treat neck pain, hemiparesis, and tetraparesis depending on the severity. The interval between the neurological disease onset and treatment (duration of signs), time to improvement after treatment, and recovery time were compared in dogs by body weight, age, and dry needle acupuncture (AP) with or without electro-AP (EAP). The duration of signs was longer in dogs weighing greater than 10 kg than in those weighing less than 10 kg (p< 0.05). Improvement and recovery times did not vary by body weight. Additionally, improvement and recovery times did not vary by age. The improvement and recovery times were longer in the AP+EAP group than the AP group (p< 0.05). Acupuncture with Jing-jiaji was effective in cervical spinal cord diseases in different sized dogs and in middle-aged and senior dogs. This report standardized AP treatment containing Jing-jiaji for canine cervical problems and evaluated its effects. The newly standardized AP methodology offers clinical practitioners an effective way to improve the outcomes of cervical neurological diseases in dogs.

  15. Neurology and psychiatry: waking up to opportunities of sleep. : State of the art and clinical/research priorities for the next decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, C L; Ferini-Strambi, L; Brown, S; Adamantidis, A; Benedetti, F; Bruni, O; Cajochen, C; Dolenc-Groselj, L; Ferri, R; Gais, S; Huber, R; Khatami, R; Lammers, G J; Luppi, P H; Manconi, M; Nissen, C; Nobili, L; Peigneux, P; Pollmächer, T; Randerath, W; Riemann, D; Santamaria, J; Schindler, K; Tafti, M; Van Someren, E; Wetter, T C

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, evidence has emerged for a bidirectional relationship between sleep and neurological and psychiatric disorders. First, sleep-wake disorders (SWDs) are very common and may be the first/main manifestation of underlying neurological and psychiatric disorders. Secondly, SWDs may represent an independent risk factor for neuropsychiatric morbidities. Thirdly, sleep-wake function (SWF) may influence the course and outcome of neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review summarizes the most important research and clinical findings in the fields of neuropsychiatric sleep and circadian research and medicine, and discusses the promise they bear for the next decade. The findings herein summarize discussions conducted in a workshop with 26 European experts in these fields, and formulate specific future priorities for clinical practice and translational research. More generally, the conclusion emerging from this workshop is the recognition of a tremendous opportunity offered by our knowledge of SWF and SWDs that has unfortunately not yet entered as an important key factor in clinical practice, particularly in Europe. Strengthening pre-graduate and postgraduate teaching, creating academic multidisciplinary sleep-wake centres and simplifying diagnostic approaches of SWDs coupled with targeted treatment strategies yield enormous clinical benefits for these diseases. © 2015 EAN.

  16. Clinical Features and Neurologic Complications of Children Hospitalized With Chikungunya Virus in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, José A; Hagood, Nancy L; Summer, Andrea; Medina, Marco T; Holden, Kenton R

    2017-07-01

    The first case of Chikungunya virus in Honduras was identified in 2014. The virus has spread widely across Honduras via the Aedes aegypti mosquito, leading to an outbreak of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in 2015 that significantly impacted children. A retrospective chart review of 235 children diagnosed with CHIKV and admitted to the National Autonomous University of Honduras Hospital Escuela (Hospital Escuela) in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, was accomplished with patients who were assessed for clinical features and neurologic complications. Of 235 children admitted to Hospital Escuela with CHIKV, the majority had symptoms of fever, generalized erythematous rash, and irritability. Fourteen percent had clinical arthritis. Ten percent of patients had seizures. Six percent had meningoencephalitis. There were 2 childhood deaths during the course of this study, one from meningoencephalitis and another from myocarditis. Chikungunya virus can cause severe complications in children, the majority of which impact the central nervous system.

  17. How to measure pain in neurological conditions? A systematic review of psychometric properties and clinical utility of measurement tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Sarah F; Brown, Philip

    2014-07-01

    To systematically review the psychometric properties and clinical utility of measures of pain in neurological conditions. Electronic databases (AMED, CINAHL, MEDLINE, PEDro and Web of Knowledge) were searched from their inception to February 2013. Studies investigating any measurement tool to assess pain in central nervous system conditions were systematically identified. Data about their psychometric properties and clinical utility were extracted and analysed independently. The strength of the psychometric properties and clinical utility were assessed. A total of 13 articles met the selection criteria, which assessed 11 measurement tools; eight pain rating scales; one Neuropathic Pain Scale; and two measures of pain interference with every-day life. Most of the pain rating scales were specifically for hemiplegic shoulder pain. None had been sufficiently developed to recommend for use in clinical practice or research. Evaluation of reliability and the ability to detect change were particularly sparse. Reliability depended on the type of tools used. Patients with right hemisphere damage favoured verbal/written responses, while people with left hemisphere damage preferred and reported more effectively using visual/numeric responses. Validity between measures of pain intensity was moderate, while validity with mood or quality of life was weak to moderate. None of the selected measures of pain have been fully developed or evaluated to demonstrate that they provide accurate, relevant reproducible information. © The Author(s) 2013.

  18. Supernumerary teeth in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Szkaradkiewicz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyperdontia is the condition of having supernumerary teeth, or teeth which appear in addition to the regular number of teeth. The prevalence rates of supernumerary teeth in the permanent dentition amounts 0.1-6.9%, and in deciduous dentition 0.4-0.8%. The presence of supernumerary teeth can be found in everyday dental practice.Case presentation: We describe 3 cases of patients with supernumerary teeth. First patient had supernumerary lateral incisor 12s, second - premolar fused, multicuspid, supernumerary deciduous tooth 64s of having several interconnected roots, and third - erupted odontoma between teeth 13 and 14. In all cases treatment involved the removal of the supernumerary tooth.Conclusions: The decision on proceeding with the supernumerary teeth should be based on the full clinical picture and interview. Early diagnosis and removal of supernumerary teeth allow to avoid or reduce possible complications.

  19. Infliximab in Russian clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G V Lukina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of infliximab began (INF in Russia in 2001. It was the first genetically engineered biological agent (GEBA registered in our country to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. With the advent of infliximab, a Russian biological rheumatoid arthritis therapy registry started its work. In October 2005, it was set up on the basis of GEBA centers founded in the leading rheumatology clinics of Russia. Objective: to generalize the Russian experience in using INF (its efficacy, tolerance, and side effects in patients with RA in real clinical practice within the framework of a multicenter observational study. Subjects and methods. The register included patients with a valid diagnosis of RA in whom INF treatment was first started. The main indication for this was previous basic therapy failure. This investigation analyzed 396 patients receiving INF therapy. Prior to INF administration, all the patients were examined to identify whether they had possible latent tuberculosis, by applying chest X-ray study and Mantoux test. The European League Against Rheumatism criteria were used to evaluate the efficiency of INF therapy. The relationship between the therapeutic effects of the drug and its cumulative dose was specially used. The trend in X-ray progression was estimated using the Sharp method modified by van der Heijde. INF was given in a dose of 3 mg/kg by the classical regimen: at 0, 2, and 6 weeks, then every 8 weeks. The main assessment periods were at 22 and 46—54 weeks. Results. Analysis of the data of real clinical practice in Russia demonstrates that the use of INF in RA patients with the inadequate effect of traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs is able to cause a rapid and pronounced reduction in disease activity. There is significant evidence that the IFN-treated patients with RA had also suppressed bone destruction. INF treatment for early RA gives rise to remissions more frequently in the early stage of

  20. Potential of robots as next-generation technology for clinical assessment of neurological disorders and upper-limb therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen H. Scott, PhD; Sean P. Dukelow, MD, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Robotic technologies have profoundly affected the identification of fundamental properties of brain function. This success is attributable to robots being able to control the position of or forces applied to limbs, and their inherent ability to easily, objectively, and reliably quantify sensorimotor behavior. Our general hypothesis is that these same attributes make robotic technologies ideal for clinically assessing sensory, motor, and cognitive impairments in stroke and other neurologi-cal ...

  1. Mass spectrometry strategies for clinical metabolomics and lipidomics in psychiatry, neurology, and neuro-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics research has the potential to provide biomarkers for the detection of disease, for subtyping complex disease populations, for monitoring disease progression and therapy, and for defining new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. These potentials are far from being realized because of a number of technical, conceptual, financial, and bioinformatics issues. Mass spectrometry provides analytical platforms that address the technical barriers to success in metabolomics research; however, the limited commercial availability of analytical and stable isotope standards has created a bottleneck for the absolute quantitation of a number of metabolites. Conceptual and financial factors contribute to the generation of statistically under-powered clinical studies, whereas bioinformatics issues result in the publication of a large number of unidentified metabolites. The path forward in this field involves targeted metabolomics analyses of large control and patient populations to define both the normal range of a defined metabolite and the potential heterogeneity (eg, bimodal) in complex patient populations. This approach requires that metabolomics research groups, in addition to developing a number of analytical platforms, build sufficient chemistry resources to supply the analytical standards required for absolute metabolite quantitation. Examples of metabolomics evaluations of sulfur amino-acid metabolism in psychiatry, neurology, and neuro-oncology and of lipidomics in neurology will be reviewed.

  2. A new clinical tool for assessing numerical abilities in neurological diseases: Numerical Activities of Daily Living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo eSemenza

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to build an instrument, the Numerical Activities of Daily Living (NADL, designed to identify the specific impairments in numerical functions that may cause problems in everyday life. These impairments go beyond what can be inferred from the available scales evaluating activities of daily living in general, and are not adequately captured by measures of the general deterioration of cognitive functions as assessed by standard clinical instruments like the MMSE and MoCA. We assessed a control group (n = 148 and a patient group affected by a wide variety of neurological conditions (n = 175, with NADL along with IADL, MMSE, and MoCA. The NADL battery was found to have satisfactory construct validity and reliability, across a wide age range. This enabled us to calculate appropriate criteria for impairment that took into account age and education. It was found that neurological patients tended to overestimate their abilities as compared to the judgment made by their caregivers, assessed with objective tests of numerical abilities.

  3. A new clinical tool for assessing numerical abilities in neurological diseases: numerical activities of daily living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, Carlo; Meneghello, Francesca; Arcara, Giorgio; Burgio, Francesca; Gnoato, Francesca; Facchini, Silvia; Benavides-Varela, Silvia; Clementi, Maurizio; Butterworth, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to build an instrument, the numerical activities of daily living (NADL), designed to identify the specific impairments in numerical functions that may cause problems in everyday life. These impairments go beyond what can be inferred from the available scales evaluating activities of daily living in general, and are not adequately captured by measures of the general deterioration of cognitive functions as assessed by standard clinical instruments like the MMSE and MoCA. We assessed a control group (n = 148) and a patient group affected by a wide variety of neurological conditions (n = 175), with NADL along with IADL, MMSE, and MoCA. The NADL battery was found to have satisfactory construct validity and reliability, across a wide age range. This enabled us to calculate appropriate criteria for impairment that took into account age and education. It was found that neurological patients tended to overestimate their abilities as compared to the judgment made by their caregivers, assessed with objective tests of numerical abilities. PMID:25126077

  4. Frequency of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Among Patients with Epilepsy Attending a Tertiary Neurology Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Al-Abri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with a median lifetime prevalence of 14 per 1000 subjects. Sleep disorders could influence epileptic seizure. The most common sleep disorder is obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS which occurs in 2% of adult women and 4% of adult men in the general population. The aim of this study is to estimate the frequency of OSAS among patients with epilepsy and to study the seizure characteristics among those patients with co-morbid OSAS.  Methods: Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of epilepsy who attended the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital neurology clinic were recruited for the study between June 2011 and April 2012. Patients were screened for OSAS by direct interview using the validated Arabic version of the Berlin questionnaire. Patients identified as high-risk underwent polysomnography.  Results: A total of 100 patients with epilepsy (55 men and 45 women were screened for OSAS. Generalized and focal seizure was found in 67% of male and 27% of female patients. Six percent of the participants had epilepsy of undetermined type. Only 9% of the sample was found to have high risk of OSAS based on the Berlin questionnaire. No significant correlation was found between risk of OSAS, type of epilepsy, and anti-epileptic drugs.  Conclusion: The risk of OSAS was marginally greater in patients with epilepsy compared to the general population with the overall prevalence of 9%.

  5. Frequency of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome among patients with epilepsy attending a tertiary neurology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abri, Mohammed; Al-Asmi, Abdullah; Al-Shukairi, Aisha; Al-Qanoobi, Arwa; Rmachandiran, Nandhagopal; Jacob, Povothoor; Gujjar, Arunodaya

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with a median lifetime prevalence of 14 per 1000 subjects. Sleep disorders could influence epileptic seizure. The most common sleep disorder is obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) which occurs in 2% of adult women and 4% of adult men in the general population. The aim of this study is to estimate the frequency of OSAS among patients with epilepsy and to study the seizure characteristics among those patients with co-morbid OSAS.  Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of epilepsy who attended the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital neurology clinic were recruited for the study between June 2011 and April 2012. Patients were screened for OSAS by direct interview using the validated Arabic version of the Berlin questionnaire. Patients identified as high-risk underwent polysomnography.  A total of 100 patients with epilepsy (55 men and 45 women) were screened for OSAS. Generalized and focal seizure was found in 67% of male and 27% of female patients. Six percent of the participants had epilepsy of undetermined type. Only 9% of the sample was found to have high risk of OSAS based on the Berlin questionnaire. No significant correlation was found between risk of OSAS, type of epilepsy, and anti-epileptic drugs.  The risk of OSAS was marginally greater in patients with epilepsy compared to the general population with the overall prevalence of 9%.

  6. Neurological examination in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Paluš

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This clinical review about the neurological examination in small animals describes the basics about the first steps of investigation when dealing with neurological patients. The knowledge of how to perform the neurological examination is important however more important is how to correctly interpret these performed tests. A step-by-step approach is mandatory and examiners should master the order and the style of performing these tests. Neurological conditions can be sometimes very distressing for owners and for pets that might not be the most cooperating. The role of a veterinary surgeon, as a professional, is therefore to collect the most relevant history, to examine a patient in a professional manner and to give to owners an educated opinion about the further treatment and prognosis. However neurological examinations might look challenging for many. But it is only the clinical application of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to an every-day situation for practicing veterinarians and it does not require any specific in-to-depth knowledge. This clinical review is aimed not only to provide the information on how to perform the neurological examination but it is also aimed to appeal on veterinarians to challenge their daily routine and to start practicing on neurologically normal patients. This is the best and only way to differentiate between the normal and abnormal in a real situation.

  7. Advances in clinical determinants and neurological manifestations of B vitamin deficiency in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechi, GianPietro; Sechi, Elia; Fois, Chiara; Kumar, Neeraj

    2016-05-01

    B vitamin deficiency is a leading cause of neurological impairment and disability throughout the world. Multiple B vitamin deficiencies often coexist, and thus an understanding of the complex relationships between the different biochemical pathways regulated in the brain by these vitamins may facilitate prompter diagnosis and improved treatment. Particular populations at risk for multiple B vitamin deficiencies include the elderly, people with alcoholism, patients with heart failure, patients with recent obesity surgery, and vegetarians/vegans. Recently, new clinical settings that predispose individuals to B vitamin deficiency have been highlighted. Moreover, other data indicate a possible pathogenetic role of subclinical chronic B vitamin deficiency in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In light of these findings, this review examines the clinical manifestations of B vitamin deficiency and the effect of B vitamin deficiency on the adult nervous system. The interrelationships of multiple B vitamin deficiencies are emphasized, along with the clinical phenotypes related to B vitamin deficiencies. Recent advances in the clinical determinants and diagnostic clues of B vitamin deficiency, as well as the suggested therapies for B vitamin disorders, are described. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Stiff Person Syndrome: A Rare Neurological Disorder, Heterogeneous in Clinical Presentation and Not Easy to Treat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Buechner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stiff person syndrome (SPS is a rare neurological disorder characterized by progressive rigidity of axial and limb muscles associated with painful spasms. SPS can be classified into classic SPS, paraneoplastic SPS, and SPS variants. Its underlying pathogenesis is probably autoimmune, as in most cases antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD are observed. Similarly, paraneoplastic SPS is usually linked to anti-amphiphysin antibodies. Treatment is based on drugs enhancing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA transmission and immunomodulatory agents. Case Series. Patient 1 is a 45-year-old male affected by the classic SPS, Patient 2 is a 73-year-old male affected by paraneoplastic SPS, and Patient 3 is a 68-year-old male affected by the stiff limb syndrome, a SPS variant where symptoms are confined to the limbs. Symptoms, diagnostic findings, and clinical course were extremely variable in the three patients, and treatment was often unsatisfactory and not well tolerated, thus reducing patient compliance. Clinical manifestations also included some unusual features such as recurrent vomiting and progressive dysarthria. Conclusions. SPS is a rare disorder that causes significant disability. Because of its extensive clinical variability, a multitask and personalized treatment is indicated. A clearer understanding of uncommon clinical features and better-tolerated therapeutic strategies are still needed.

  9. Research and clinical practice relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashammakhi N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: I highly value and greet the authors for their editorial. Many important issues related to medical education and its future in Libya have been discussed in this paper [1]. One important point that has been addressed and I feel deserves attention is the “abnormal” relationship between clinical practice and research in Libya. From discussions with colleagues, this problem somehow has evolved from a misconception about educational and training systems that may have occurred in the past. It may also be related to the lack of attention to research that has long existed in Libya [2,3]. The other aspect, shared with many other developing countries, is the misconception of research as unimportant or a luxury aspect of medicine. When it comes to understanding how a system (including healthcare can be updated and developed, the answer is vague! One important reason is a lack of understanding of the impact that research has on developing methods. In developed countries, research is the main academic distinction that leads to appointments for coveted positions in the system and is an important factor for academic promotion. In Libya, there remain arguments about who will be awarded Chair of university clinical departments. Such a post should no doubt be given to those with established academic achievements. When highly qualified persons are at the top of the pyramid this leads to further progress and enhanced research and advancement. The authors have discussed the point of having proper search committees for leadership and faculty positions. I believe that it will help eliminate the current stagnation and help to create innovative solutions. This should lead to improved medical education, health services, and ultimately impact the quality of life of all Libyan citizens.

  10. The epidemiology of epilepsy in children: a report from a Turkish pediatric neurology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünver, Olcay; Keskin, Sabiha Paktuna; Uysal, Serap; Ünver, Afşin

    2015-05-01

    This retrospective cohort study aims to assess the distribution of seizure types and epileptic syndromes in children with epilepsy who were followed up in a tertiary outpatient pediatric neurology clinic between January 2004 and December 2009. The findings of 533 children aged between 2 months and 16 years were evaluated. The International League Against Epilepsy criteria (of 1981 and 1989) were used for diagnosis and classification. The rate of partial seizures (56.5%) was higher than that of generalized seizures (43.5%). Partial seizures were more common during late childhood (P epilepsies (53.3%) were more frequent than generalized epilepsies (37.1%). Generalized epilepsies were more frequent during the first year of life, whereas localization-related epilepsies were more common at later ages (P epilepsies during childhood represent an important health issue for developing countries. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Clinical practice guideline: Allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Michael D; Gurgel, Richard K; Lin, Sandra Y; Schwartz, Seth R; Baroody, Fuad M; Bonner, James R; Dawson, Douglas E; Dykewicz, Mark S; Hackell, Jesse M; Han, Joseph K; Ishman, Stacey L; Krouse, Helene J; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Mims, James Whit W; Omole, Folashade S; Reddy, William D; Wallace, Dana V; Walsh, Sandra A; Warren, Barbara E; Wilson, Meghan N; Nnacheta, Lorraine C

    2015-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is one of the most common diseases affecting adults. It is the most common chronic disease in children in the United States today and the fifth most common chronic disease in the United States overall. AR is estimated to affect nearly 1 in every 6 Americans and generates $2 to $5 billion in direct health expenditures annually. It can impair quality of life and, through loss of work and school attendance, is responsible for as much as $2 to $4 billion in lost productivity annually. Not surprisingly, myriad diagnostic tests and treatments are used in managing this disorder, yet there is considerable variation in their use. This clinical practice guideline was undertaken to optimize the care of patients with AR by addressing quality improvement opportunities through an evaluation of the available evidence and an assessment of the harm-benefit balance of various diagnostic and management options. The primary purpose of this guideline is to address quality improvement opportunities for all clinicians, in any setting, who are likely to manage patients with AR as well as to optimize patient care, promote effective diagnosis and therapy, and reduce harmful or unnecessary variations in care. The guideline is intended to be applicable for both pediatric and adult patients with AR. Children under the age of 2 years were excluded from the clinical practice guideline because rhinitis in this population may be different than in older patients and is not informed by the same evidence base. The guideline is intended to focus on a limited number of quality improvement opportunities deemed most important by the working group and is not intended to be a comprehensive reference for diagnosing and managing AR. The recommendations outlined in the guideline are not intended to represent the standard of care for patient management, nor are the recommendations intended to limit treatment or care provided to individual patients. The development group made a strong

  12. Clinical use of gadobutrol for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng KT

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth T Cheng1, Hannah Y Cheng2, Kam Leung31Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Freelance Technical Writer, New Orleans, LA, USA; 3National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI is an important clinical tool for diagnosing neurological diseases. The appropriate use of a suitable MRI contrast agent or contrast pharmaceutical is essential for CE-MRI to produce desirable diagnostic images. Currently, there are seven contrast agents (CAs or pharmaceuticals approved for clinical imaging of the central nervous system (CNS in the US, Europe, or Japan. All of the clinically approved CAs are water-soluble gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs which do not penetrate the CNS blood–brain barrier (BBB. These agents are used for imaging CNS areas without a BBB, or various pathologies, such as tumors and infection that break down the BBB and allow CAs to enter into the surrounding parenchyma. Clinically, GBCAs are most useful for detecting primary and secondary cerebral neoplastic lesions. Among these CNS GBCAs, gadobutrol (Gd-BT-DO3A, Gadovist™ is a neutral, nonionic, macrocyclic compound that showed promising results from clinical trials of CNS imaging. In comparison with other GBCAs, Gd-BT-DO3A has relatively high in vitro kinetic stability and r1 relaxivity. Gd-BT-DO3A has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in 2011 for CNS imaging. A review of available literature shows that Gd-BT-DO3A exhibits similar safety and clinical efficacy profiles to other GBCAs. Gd-BT-DO3A has the distinguishing feature that it is the only clinical agent commercially available in a formulation of 1.0 M concentration with a relatively higher in vitro T1 shortening per unit volume than other clinical GBCAs which are only

  13. Task analysis in neurosciences programme design - neurological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Defining educational objectives is the key to achieving the goal of professional competence in students. The technique of task analysis was selected to determine components of competence in clinical neurology appropriate to the needs of primary care. A survey of neurological problems in general practice revealed that ...

  14. Pro/con clinical debate: Tracheostomy is ideal for withdrawal of mechanical ventilation in severe neurological impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Luciana; Corno, Eleomore; Terragni, Pier Paok; Stather, David; Ferguson, Niall D

    2004-01-01

    Most clinical trials on the topic of extubation have involved patients outside the neurological intensive care unit. As a result, in this area clinicians are left with little evidence on which to base their decision making. Although tracheostomies are increasingly common procedures, they are not without complications and costs, and hence a decision to perform them should not be taken lightly. In this issue of Critical Care two groups debate the merits of tracheostomy before extubation in a patient with neurological impairment. What becomes very clear is the need for more high quality data for this common clinical problem. PMID:15469593

  15. Childhood Developmental Disorders: An Academic and Clinical Convergence Point for Psychiatry, Neurology, Psychology and Pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Allan L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Significant advances in understanding brain development and behavior have not been accompanied by revisions of traditional academic structure. Disciplinary isolation and a lack of meaningful interdisciplinary opportunities are persistent barriers in academic medicine. To enhance clinical practice, research, and training for the next…

  16. Chapter 24: the coming of molecular biology and its impact on clinical neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher U M

    2010-01-01

    Although the chemical study of the nervous system dates back well into the 19th century, molecular biology and especially molecular neurobiology only began to be established in the second half of the 20th century. This chapter reviews their impact on clinical neuroscience during the 50 years since Watson and Crick published their seminal paper. After a short review of the part played by F.O. Schmitt in establishing molecular neuroscience the chapter outlines work that led to a detailed understanding of the biochemical structure and function of nerve cell membranes and their embedded channel proteins, receptors, and other molecules. The chapter then turns to the numerous pathologies that result from disorders of these elements: the various channel and gap-junction pathologies. The chapter continues with a discussion of some of the diseases caused by defective DNA, especially the trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases (TREDs) and ends with a short account of the development of molecular approaches to prion diseases, myasthenia gravis, and the neurodegenerative diseases of old age. Francis Bacon said long ago that "knowledge is power." The hope is that increasing molecular knowledge will help cure some of the human suffering seen in the neurological ward and clinic.

  17. Vitamin B12 in neurology and ageing; clinical and genetic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaddon, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    The classic neurological and psychiatric features associated with vitamin B12 deficiency have been well described and are the subject of many excellent review articles. The advent of sensitive diagnostic tests, including homocysteine and methylmalonic acid assays, has revealed a surprisingly high prevalence of a more subtle 'subclinical' form of B12 deficiency, particularly within the elderly. This is often associated with cognitive impairment and dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. Metabolic evidence of B12 deficiency is also reported in association with other neurodegenerative disorders including vascular dementia, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis. These conditions are all associated with chronic neuro-inflammation and oxidative stress. It is possible that these clinical associations reflect compromised vitamin B12 metabolism due to such stress. Physicians are also increasingly aware of considerable inter-individual variation in the clinical response to B12 replacement therapy. Further research is needed to determine to what extent this is attributable to genetic determinants of vitamin B12 absorption, distribution and cellular uptake. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Definition of the clinical spectrum of kernicterus and bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Steven M

    2005-01-01

    Kernicterus, currently used to describe both the neuropathology of bilirubin-induced brain injury and its associated clinical findings, is a complex syndrome. The neurobiology of kernicterus, including the determinants and mechanisms of neuronal injury, is discussed along with traditional and evolving definitions ranging from classical kernicterus with athetoid cerebral palsy, impaired upward gaze and deafness, to isolated conditions, for example, auditory neuropathy or dys-synchrony (AN/AD), and subtle bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction (BIND). The clinical expression of BIND varies with location, severity, and time of assessment, influenced by the amount, duration and developmental age of exposure to excessive free bilirubin. Although total serum bilirubin (TSB) is important, kernicterus cannot be defined based solely on TSB. For study purposes kernicterus may be defined in term and near-term infants with TSB > or = 20 mg/dl using abnormal muscle tone on examination, auditory testing diagnostic of AN/AD, and magnetic resonance imaging showing bilateral lesions of globus pallidus+/-subthalamic nucleus.

  19. Child neurology: Past, present, and future: part 1: history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millichap, John J; Millichap, J Gordon

    2009-08-18

    The founding period of child neurology occurred in 3 phases: 1) early individual contributory phase, 2) organized training phase, and 3) expansion phase. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, individuals in pediatrics, neurology, and psychiatry established clinics and made important contributions to the literature on childhood epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and pediatric neurology. The latter half of the 20th century saw the organization of training programs in pediatric neurology, with fellowships supported by the NIH. This development was followed by a rapid expansion in the number of trainees certified in child neurology and their appointment to divisions of neurology in children's hospitals. In recent years, referrals of children with neurologic disorders have increased, and disorders previously managed by pediatricians are often seen in neurology clinics. The era of subspecialization is embraced by the practicing physician. The present day status of pediatric neurology and suggestions for the future development of the specialty are subjects for further discussion.

  20. Procedures for Using Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Patricia; Griffer, Mona; Lund, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides information about clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) to facilitate their application to the practice of speech-language pathology. CPGs are sets of recommendations based on evidence, including expert clinical opinion, that have been developed by a panel of reviewers. In this article, CPGs are defined and their…

  1. Archives: Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 72 ... Archives: Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. Journal Home > Archives: Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives ...

  2. New developments in clinical practice guidelines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correspondence to: Dr Georg Kreymann, e-mail: georg_kreymann@baxter.com. New developments in clinical practice guidelines. During the last four years revised clinical practice guidelines have been published by the major nutritional societies: The American. Society of Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition (ASPEN),1 the ...

  3. Common data elements for clinical research in mitochondrial disease: a National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karaa, A.; Rahman, S.; Lombes, A.; Yu-Wai-Man, P.; Sheikh, M.K.; Alai-Hansen, S.; Cohen, B.H.; Dimmock, D.; Emrick, L.; Falk, M.J.; McCormack, S.; Mirsky, D.; Moore, T.; Parikh, S.; Shoffner, J.; Taivassalo, T.; Tarnopolsky, M.; Tein, I.; Odenkirchen, J.C.; Goldstein, A.; Koene, S.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The common data elements (CDE) project was developed by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) to provide clinical researchers with tools to improve data quality and allow for harmonization of data collected in different research studies. CDEs have been

  4. Clinical Practice Informs Secure Messaging Benefits and Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Jolie N; Hathaway, Wendy; Chavez, Margeaux; Antinori, Nicole; Vetter, Brian; Miller, Brian K; Martin, Tracey L; Kendziora, Lisa; Nazi, Kim M; Melillo, Christine

    2017-10-01

    Background Clinical care team members in Department of Veterans' Affairs (VA) facilities nationwide are working to integrate the use of Secure Messaging (SM) into care delivery and identify innovative uses. Identifying best practices for proactive use of SM is a key factor in its successful implementation and sustained use by VA clinical care team members and veterans. Objectives A collaborative project solicited input from VA clinical care teams about their local practices using SM to provide access to proactive patient-centered care for veterans and enhance workflow. Methods This project implemented a single-item cross-sectional qualitative electronic survey via internal e-mail to local coordinators in all 23 Veterans Integrated Service Networks (VISNs). Content analysis was used to manage descriptive data responses. Descriptive statistics described sample characteristics. Results VA clinical care team members across 15 of 23 VISNs responded to the questionnaire. Content analysis of 171 responses produced two global domains: (1) benefits of SM and (2) SM best practices. Benefits of SM use emphasize enhanced and efficient communication and increased access to care. Care team members incorporate SM into their daily clinical practices, using it to provide services before, during, and after clinical encounters as a best practice. SM users suggest improvements in veteran care, clinical team workflow, and efficient use of health resources. Clinical team members invested in the successful implementation of SM integrate SM into their daily practices to provide meaningful and useful veteran-centered care and improve workflow. Conclusion VA clinical care team members can use SM proactively to create an integrated SM culture. With adequate knowledge and motivation to proactively use this technology, all clinical team members within the VA system can replicate best practices shared by other clinical care teams to generate meaningful and useful interactions with SM

  5. Primary progressive apraxia of speech: clinical features and acoustic and neurologic correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Joseph R; Strand, Edythe A; Clark, Heather; Machulda, Mary; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Josephs, Keith A

    2015-05-01

    This study summarizes 2 illustrative cases of a neurodegenerative speech disorder, primary progressive apraxia of speech (AOS), as a vehicle for providing an overview of the disorder and an approach to describing and quantifying its perceptual features and some of its temporal acoustic attributes. Two individuals with primary progressive AOS underwent speech-language and neurologic evaluations on 2 occasions, ranging from 2.0 to 7.5 years postonset. Performance on several tests, tasks, and rating scales, as well as several acoustic measures, were compared over time within and between cases. Acoustic measures were compared with performance of control speakers. Both patients initially presented with AOS as the only or predominant sign of disease and without aphasia or dysarthria. The presenting features and temporal progression were captured in an AOS Rating Scale, an Articulation Error Score, and temporal acoustic measures of utterance duration, syllable rates per second, rates of speechlike alternating motion and sequential motion, and a pairwise variability index measure. AOS can be the predominant manifestation of neurodegenerative disease. Clinical ratings of its attributes and acoustic measures of some of its temporal characteristics can support its diagnosis and help quantify its salient characteristics and progression over time.

  6. Why neurology? Factors which influence career choice in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V; Hoyle, Chad; Yin, Han; McCoyd, Matthew; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the factors which influence the decision to pursue a career in neurology. An anonymous survey was developed using a Likert scale to rate responses. The survey was sent to adult and child neurology faculty, residents and fellows, as well as medical students applying for neurology. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the factors of influence. Respondents were subsequently categorized into pre-neurology trainees, neurology trainees, child neurologists and adult neurologists, and differences between the groups were analysed using Pearson's chi-square test. One hundred and thirty-three anonymous responses were received. The respondents were neurologists across all levels of training and practice. Across all respondents, the most common factor of high importance was intellectual content of specialty, challenging diagnostic problems, type of patient encountered and interest in helping people. Responses were similar across the groups; however, the earliest trainees cited interest in helping people as most important, while those in neurology training and beyond cite intellectual content of the specialty as most important. As trainees transition from their earliest levels of clinical experience into working as residents and faculty, there is a shift in the cited important factors. Lifestyle and financial factors seem to be the least motivating across all groups. Encouragement from peers, mentors, faculty and practicing physicians is considered high influences in a smaller number of neurologists. This may present an opportunity for practicing neurologists to make connections with medical students early in their education in an effort to encourage and mentor candidates.

  7. Clinical study of syringomyelia. Relation of neurological symptoms and imaging diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohga, Ritsu; Konishi, Yoshihiro; Higashi, Yasuto; Kawai, Kingo; Yasuda, Takeshi; Terao, Akira (Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan))

    1988-12-01

    We discussed the relationship between neurological symptoms and the locations of syringes observed by CT and MRI (imaging diagnosis) in six cases of syringomyelia admitted to our department during the past five years. Neurological symptoms of the upper cervical and thoracic cords were found in six cases and five cases of them had symmetric distribution. Syringes were found in all cases by delayed CT (D-CT) and MRI. Five cases had laterality. The sites in the spinal cord exhibiting severe involvement of neurological symptoms corresponded with the sites of syringes in imaging diagnosis. The main asymmetric lesions of the syringes were located in the posterior horn. They indicated the relationship with the appearance of the neurological symptoms of the lesion. We compared with the width of the longitudinal level from neurological findings and imaging diagnosis. The rostral level of both corresponded in all cases, but the caudal level corresponded in only one case and neurological symptoms were broader than syringes in imaging diagnosis. It was difficult to identify small syringes when there was complicated scoliosis. The diagnosis of typical cases of syringomyelia is mainly based on such neurological symptoms as a bilateral segmental pattern of dissociated sensory impairment in the past, but imaging diagnosis has recently come to be regarded as very important. (J.P.N.).

  8. Lower urinary tract symptoms associated with neurological conditions: Observations on a clinical sample of outpatients neurorehabilitation service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Torelli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The overall aims of this study were to investigate the lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS associated with neurological conditions and their prevalence and impact on a clinical sample of outpatients of a neurorehabilitation service. Materials and methods: We reviewed the files of 132 patients treated in our neurorehabilitation service from December 2012 to December 2013. Patients were divided into several subgroups based on the neurological diagnosis: Multiple Sclerosis (MS, other demyelinating diseases, Peripheral Neuropathy, neurovascular disorders (ND, neoplastic disease, traumatic brain injury (TBI, Parkinson and Parkinsonism, spinal cord injuries (SCI. Urinary status was based on medical evaluations of history of LUTS, type, degree, onset and duration of symptoms. We tried to analyze prevalence, kind of disorder, timing of presentation (if before or after the neurological onset and eventual persistence of urological disorders (in the main group and in all subgroups. Results: At the time of admission to our rehabilitation service, LUTS were observed in 14 out of 132 cases (11%. A high proportion of these outpatients (64.2% presented bothersome urinary symptoms such as incontinence, frequency and urgency (storage LUTS. The most frequent symptom was urinary urge incontinence (42.8%. This symptom was found to be prevalent in the multiple sclerosis and neurovascular disorders. In 93% the urinary symptoms arose as a result of neurologic conditions and 78.5% did not present a complete recovery of urological symptoms in spite of improved selfreported functional activity limitations. None of these patients performed urological rehabilitation. Conclusions: Neurological disorders are a significant issue in rehabilitation services and it can lead to lower tract dysfunction, which causes LUTS. Storage symptoms are more common, especially urge incontinence. Current literature reports that a further optimization of the rehabilitation potential

  9. Acute neurological signs as the predominant clinical manifestation in four dogs with Angiostrongylus vasorum infections in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pors Susanne E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Four dogs with acute neurological signs caused by haemorrhages in the central nervous system were diagnosed with Angiostrongylus vasorum infection as the underlying aetiology. Two dogs presented with brain lesions, one dog with spinal cord lesions and one with lesions in both the brain and spinal cord. Only one dog presented with concurrent signs of classical pulmonary angiostrongylosis (respiratory distress, cough, and only two dogs displayed overt clinical signs of haemorrhages. Results of coagulation assays were inconsistent. Neurological signs reflected the site of pathology and included seizures, various cranial nerve deficits, vestibular signs, proprioceptive deficits, ataxia and paraplegia. One dog died and three were euthanised due to lack of improvement despite medical treatment. This emphasises canine angiostrongylosis as a potential cause of fatal lesions of the central nervous system and the importance of including A. vasorum as a differential diagnosis in young dogs with acute neurological signs in Denmark.

  10. Acute neurological signs as the predominant clinical manifestation in four dogs with Angiostrongylus vasorum infections in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredal, Hanne; Willesen, Jakob L; Jensen, Henrik E; Nielsen, Ole L; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Koch, Jørgen; Kirk, Rikke K; Pors, Susanne E; Skerritt, Geoff C; Berendt, Mette

    2011-06-28

    Four dogs with acute neurological signs caused by haemorrhages in the central nervous system were diagnosed with Angiostrongylus vasorum infection as the underlying aetiology. Two dogs presented with brain lesions, one dog with spinal cord lesions and one with lesions in both the brain and spinal cord. Only one dog presented with concurrent signs of classical pulmonary angiostrongylosis (respiratory distress, cough), and only two dogs displayed overt clinical signs of haemorrhages. Results of coagulation assays were inconsistent. Neurological signs reflected the site of pathology and included seizures, various cranial nerve deficits, vestibular signs, proprioceptive deficits, ataxia and paraplegia. One dog died and three were euthanised due to lack of improvement despite medical treatment. This emphasises canine angiostrongylosis as a potential cause of fatal lesions of the central nervous system and the importance of including A. vasorum as a differential diagnosis in young dogs with acute neurological signs in Denmark.

  11. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garattini, Silvio; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    Using the best quality of clinical research evidence is essential for choosing the right treatment for patients. How to identify the best research evidence is, however, difficult. In this narrative review we summarise these threats and describe how to minimise them. Pertinent literature was consi......Using the best quality of clinical research evidence is essential for choosing the right treatment for patients. How to identify the best research evidence is, however, difficult. In this narrative review we summarise these threats and describe how to minimise them. Pertinent literature...

  12. Supernumerary teeth in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Anna K. Szkaradkiewicz; Tomasz M. Karpiński

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Hyperdontia is the condition of having supernumerary teeth, or teeth which appear in addition to the regular number of teeth. The prevalence rates of supernumerary teeth in the permanent dentition amounts 0.1-6.9%, and in deciduous dentition 0.4-0.8%. The presence of supernumerary teeth can be found in everyday dental practice. Case presentation: We describe 3 cases of patients with supernumerary teeth. First patient had supernumerary lateral incisor 12s, second - premolar fu...

  13. Opioid detoxification: from controlled clinical trial to clinical practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, B.A.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Wensing, M.J.P.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Staak, C.P. van der

    2010-01-01

    Controlled clinical trials have high internal validity but suffer from difficulties in external validity. This study evaluates the generalizability of the results of a controlled clinical trial on rapid detoxification in the everyday clinical practice of two addiction treatment centers. The results

  14. Opioid Detoxification: From Controlled Clinical Trial to Clinical Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, B.A.G.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Wensing, M.J.P.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Staak, C.P.F. van der

    2010-01-01

    Controlled clinical trials have high internal validity but suffer from difficulties in external validity. This study evaluates the generalizability of the results of a controlled clinical trial on rapid detoxification in the everyday clinical practice of two addiction treatment centers. The results

  15. Opioid detoxification : from controlled clinical trial to clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Boukje A G; De Jong, Cor A J; Wensing, Michel; Krabbe, Paul F M; van der Staak, Cees P F

    2010-01-01

    Controlled clinical trials have high internal validity but suffer from difficulties in external validity. This study evaluates the generalizability of the results of a controlled clinical trial on rapid detoxification in the everyday clinical practice of two addiction treatment centers. The results

  16. How GPs implement clinical guidelines in everyday clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbæk Le, Jette; Hansen, Helle P; Riisgaard, Helle

    2015-01-01

    . Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and then analysed using systematic text condensation. RESULTS: Analysis of the interviews revealed three different approaches to the implementation of guidelines in clinical practice. In some practices the GPs prioritized time and resources on collective......BACKGROUND: Clinical guidelines are considered to be essential for improving quality and safety of health care. However, interventions to promote implementation of guidelines have demonstrated only partial effectiveness and the reasons for this apparent failure are not yet fully understood....... OBJECTIVE: To investigate how GPs implement clinical guidelines in everyday clinical practice and how implementation approaches differ between practices. METHODS: Individual semi-structured open-ended interviews with seven GPs who were purposefully sampled with regard to gender, age and practice form...

  17. Retrospective study of the clinical effects of acupuncture on cervical neurological diseases in dogs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Ching Ming; Chang, Fang Chia; Lin, Chung Tien

    2016-01-01

    .... The interval between the neurological disease onset and treatment (duration of signs), time to improvement after treatment, and recovery time were compared in dogs by body weight, age, and dry needle acupuncture (AP...

  18. Impella ventricular support in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burzotta, Francesco; Trani, Carlo; Doshi, Sagar N

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support represents an evolving field of clinical research and practice. Currently, several cardiac assist devices have been developed but, among different institutions and countries, a large variation in indications for use and device selection exists. The Impella platform...... and the operative protocols, this working group attempted to establish the best clinical practice with the technology. The present paper reviews the main theoretical principles of Impella and provides an up-to-date summary of the best practical aspects of device use which may help others gain the maximal advantage...... with Impella technology in a variety of clinical settings....

  19. Digital clinical photography: practical tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutalik, Sharad

    2010-01-01

    Photographs are the most preferred and easiest way of documentation of patient visual features. In aesthetic and cutaneous surgery, there is an increased need for proper photographic documentation, from a medicolegal view point. This article discusses the basic aspects of camera and photography which a dermatologist should be aware before he/she starts with clinical photography.

  20. Digital clinical photography: Practical tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Mutalik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Photographs are the most preferred and easiest way of documentation of patient visual features. In aesthetic and cutaneous surgery, there is an increased need for proper photographic documentation, from a medicolegal view point. This article discusses the basic aspects of camera and photography which a dermatologist should be aware before he/she starts with clinical photography.

  1. Digital Clinical Photography: Practical Tips

    OpenAIRE

    Sharad Mutalik

    2010-01-01

    Photographs are the most preferred and easiest way of documentation of patient visual features. In aesthetic and cutaneous surgery, there is an increased need for proper photographic documentation, from a medicolegal view point. This article discusses the basic aspects of camera and photography which a dermatologist should be aware before he/she starts with clinical photography.

  2. Clinical Trials in Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    APPLICATION FORM. Although a clinical research associate. (CRA) usually completes the applica- tion, it is incumbent upon the investigators (usually represented by the. 'principal' investigators) to ensure that the study is both scientifically and ethically sound, and that the application is logically completed. Many CRAs do.

  3. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment and, when applicable, facilitating patient follow-up to address the management of long-term sequelae or evaluation of new or worsening symptoms not indicative of Bell's palsy. The guideline is intended for all clinicians in any setting who are likely to diagnose and manage patients with Bell's palsy. The target population is inclusive of both adults and children presenting with Bell's palsy. ACTION STATEMENTS: The development group made a strong recommendation that (a) clinicians should assess the patient using history and physical examination to exclude identifiable causes of facial paresis or paralysis in patients presenting with acute-onset unilateral facial paresis or paralysis, (b) clinicians should prescribe oral steroids within 72 hours of symptom onset for Bell's palsy patients 16 years and older, (c) clinicians should not prescribe oral antiviral therapy alone for patients with new-onset Bell's palsy, and (d) clinicians should implement eye protection for Bell's palsy patients with impaired eye closure. The panel made recommendations that (a) clinicians should not obtain routine laboratory testing in patients with new-onset Bell's palsy, (b) clinicians should not routinely perform diagnostic imaging for patients with new-onset Bell's palsy, (c) clinicians should not perform electrodiagnostic testing in Bell's palsy patients with incomplete facial paralysis, and (d) clinicians should reassess or refer to a facial nerve specialist those Bell's palsy patients with (1) new or worsening neurologic findings at any point, (2) ocular symptoms developing at any point, or (3) incomplete facial recovery 3 months after initial symptom onset. The development group provided the following options: (a) clinicians may offer oral antiviral therapy in addition to oral steroids within 72 hours of symptom onset for patients with Bell's palsy, and (b) clinicians may offer electrodiagnostic testing to Bell's palsy patients with complete

  4. HIV prevention in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, T J

    1999-01-01

    Since early in the HIV epidemic, it has been known that HIV is transmitted in very specific ways. However, many personal and societal issues make it difficult to convince people that modifying behaviors can decrease their chances of infection. Physicians are in a unique position to slow the spread of the epidemic, but many are not comfortable discussing risky behaviors and sexual practices with their patients. HIV-positive individuals need tailored interventions that teach how to assume responsibility for preventing HIV transmission. The epidemiology of HIV transmission in the U.S. is discussed.

  5. Social media in clinical practice

    CERN Document Server

    Meskó, Bertalan

    2013-01-01

    The number of patients using social media and the number of applications and solutions used by medical professionals online have been sky-rocketing in the past few years, therefore the rational behind creating a well-designed, clear and tight handbook of practical examples and case studies with simple pieces of suggestions about different social media platforms is evident. While the number of e-patients is rising, the number of web-savvy doctors who can meet the expectations of these new generations of patients is not, this huge gap can only be closed by providing medical professionals with ea

  6. Communities of clinical practice: the social organization of clinical learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Tony; Jaye, Chrystal

    2009-01-01

    The social organization of clinical learning is under-theorized in the sociological literature on the social organization of health care. Professional scopes of practice and jurisdictions are formally defined by professional principles and standards and reflected in legislation; however, these are mediated through the day-to-day clinical activities of social groupings of clinical teams. The activities of health service providers typically occur within communities of clinical practice. These are also major sites for clinical curriculum delivery, where clinical students learn not only clinical skills but also how to be health professionals. In this article, we apply Wenger's model of social learning within organizations to curriculum delivery within a health service setting. Here, social participation is the basis of learning. We suggest that it offers a powerful framework for recognizing and explaining paradox and incongruence in clinical teaching and learning, and also for recognizing opportunities, and devising means, to add value to students' learning experiences.

  7. Behavioral neurology in language and aphasia: from basic studies to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, Kenichi

    2012-10-01

    With increasing aging population, cognitive deteriorations due to neuro- degenerative diseases or stroke are so commonly observed that it is thought to be inevitable with aging. For dementia and stroke, a communication disorder due to language deterioration is one of the main problems. Behavioral neurology aims to clarify the relationship between brain function and behavior; language deterioration is one of the main targets, and its clinical applications are really useful for making better understanding of patients. Language is sequences of sound or characters that carry meanings for communication. From the evolutionary perspective, "language" can be thought about by considering birds and dogs: the basal ganglia and anterior cingulate, and the thalamus and cerebral cortex are thought to provide the neurobiological background, respectively. Humans can use language. The language area is a newly developed brain area in evolution and is mainly localized in the left cerebral hemisphere. Semantic memory has also developed in humans. There are two routes, the superficial and deep routes, with the latter associated with meaning, and three brain areas are involved: the peri-Sylvian area, per-peri-Sylvian area, and right hemisphere. Using these principles, language symptoms of dementia with progressive non-fluent aphasia (PA), semantic dementia (SD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD) can be understood. Namely, the symptoms of PA is understood by the dysfunction of peri-Sylvian language area, those of SD and AD by that of peri-peri-Sylvian language area, and those of some VaD cases and AD cases by that of right hemisphere.

  8. Translating research findings to clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Kate; Fry, Margaret; Shaban, Ramon Z; Considine, Julie

    2017-03-01

    To describe the importance of, and methods for, successfully conducting and translating research into clinical practice. There is universal acknowledgement that the clinical care provided to individuals should be informed on the best available evidence. Knowledge and evidence derived from robust scholarly methods should drive our clinical practice, decisions and change to improve the way we deliver care. Translating research evidence to clinical practice is essential to safe, transparent, effective and efficient healthcare provision and meeting the expectations of patients, families and society. Despite its importance, translating research into clinical practice is challenging. There are more nurses in the frontline of health care than any other healthcare profession. As such, nurse-led research is increasingly recognised as a critical pathway to practical and effective ways of improving patient outcomes. However, there are well-established barriers to the conduct and translation of research evidence into practice. This clinical practice discussion paper interprets the knowledge translation literature for clinicians interested in translating research into practice. This paper is informed by the scientific literature around knowledge translation, implementation science and clinician behaviour change, and presented from the nurse clinician perspective. We provide practical, evidence-informed suggestions to overcome the barriers and facilitate enablers of knowledge translation. Examples of nurse-led research incorporating the principles of knowledge translation in their study design that have resulted in improvements in patient outcomes are presented in conjunction with supporting evidence. Translation should be considered in research design, including the end users and an evaluation of the research implementation. The success of research implementation in health care is dependent on clinician/consumer behaviour change and it is critical that implementation strategy

  9. Placebo interventions, placebo effects and clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Linde, Klaus; Fässler, Margrit; Meissner, Karin

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the role of placebo interventions and placebo effects in clinical practice. We first describe the relevance of different perspectives among scientists, physicians and patients on what is considered a placebo intervention in clinical practice. We then summarize how placebo effects have been investigated in randomized controlled trials under the questionable premise that such effects are produced by placebo interventions. We further discuss why a shift of focus from the pla...

  10. The neurological disease ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark; Cox, Alexander P; Chaudhry, Naveed; Ng, Marcus; Sule, Donat; Duncan, William; Ray, Patrick; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Smith, Barry; Ruttenberg, Alan; Szigeti, Kinga; Diehl, Alexander D

    2013-12-06

    We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms 'disease', 'diagnosis', 'disease course', and 'disorder'. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. ND seeks to provide a formal foundation for the representation of clinical and research data

  11. Collaborative Clinical Practice: An Alternate Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Amy Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Teacher education in the 21st century is encountering increased scrutiny, added pressure, and escalating external regulations but does not have practical and immediate solutions for improving programs. While reforms in teacher education call for additional and improved clinical practice for candidates, through strengthened partnerships with local…

  12. Central venous pressure monitoring in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Katie

    This article provides an overview of central venous pressure (CVP) monitoring in clinical practice. It explores the underpinning anatomy and physiology, as well as the indications and means of access, for the procedure. The mechanics and practicalities of measuring CVP are discussed and information for troubleshooting is provided.

  13. Prevention of cerebrovascular diseases and cognitive impairment in psychiatric and neurological practice: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Merkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased life expectancy and related demographic changes, as well as lifestyle modification in the population enhance a steady rise in the incidence of disorders in middle and later life. It increases the burden of diseases and overloads healthcare systems. Therefore prevention strategies are currently on the cutting edge and becoming more and more essential. The article discusses approaches to preventing the most common mental and neurological disorders in middle and old age. It also describes cerebrovascular disease, dementia, cognitive impairment, and stroke and outlines some state-of-the-art prevention strategies.

  14. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Mission Statement The purpose of the Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice is to promote clinical and academic excellence in Medicine and Dentistry and allied sciences. To this end the Journal will publish its issues regularly and will ensure their prompt distribution to all subscribers and libraries ...

  15. Lexical Concept Distribution Reflects Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Breydo, Eugene; Shubina, Maria; Shalaby, James W.; Einbinder, Jonathan S.; Turchin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    It is not known whether narrative medical text directly reflects clinical reality. We have tested the hypothesis that the pattern of distribution of lexical concept of medication intensification in narrative provider notes correlates with clinical practice as reflected in electronic medication records.

  16. Clinical Practice Update: Pediculosis Capitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Brittany; Evetts, Jessica; McClain, Kymberli; Rosenauer, Amanda; Stellitano, Emily

    2015-01-01

    A review of the current evidence on primary treatment modalities of head lice demonstrates increasing resistance to current regimens. New and alternative therapies are now available. A treatment algorithm was created to address safety and efficacy of treatments, as well as to guide clinicians through navigation of the regimens. Through an online journal search, 59 articles were selected for the review. Literature searches were performed through PubMed, Medline, Ebsco Host, and CINAHL, with key search words of "Pediculosis capitis" and "head lice" in the title, abstract, and index. Meta-analyses and controlled clinical trials were viewed with greater weight if they had a large sample size, were statistically significant, and did not allude to bias. When resistant infestations are well-documented in a locality, changes to the treatment regimen are indicated, and alternative treatments should be considered. Recent studies and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approvals have changed the available treatment options for Pediculosis capitis, including benzyl alcohol, topical ivermectin, spinosad, and the LouseBuster. Further, environmental management and prevention measures should be taken to avoid reinfestation and to prevent the spread of head lice. Continued study is recommended to establish long-term safety of new and alternative agents.

  17. Neuroimaging-use trends in nonacute pediatric headache before and after clinical practice parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, William D; Kayyali, Husam R; Alexander, John J; Simon, Steven D; Morriss, Michael C

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine trends in diagnostic neuroimaging-use rates in nonacute pediatric headache before and after publication of clinical practice guidelines. Retrospective, cross-sectional analysis was conducted of neuroimaging rates for 725 children and adolescents who were aged 3 to 18 years with nonacute headache and normal neurologic examination and were evaluated in a single pediatric neurology clinic during study years 1992, 1996, 2000, and 2004. Following recommendations of current practice parameters, patients with conditions that justify consideration for neuroimaging (eg, progressive headache, abnormal neurologic examination) were excluded from this analysis. We recorded the origin of any neuroimaging request at the time of the clinic visit and any abnormal neuroimaging findings that led to major clinical consequences. Overall, the mean rate of neuroimaging for patients with nonacute headache was 45%. Use rates remained steady during the 13-year study period (range: 41%-47%). The majority of neuroimaging studies were ordered originally by primary care providers. The proportion of neuroimaging studies that were ordered by primary care providers increased significantly from 1992 to 2004. In the evaluation of patients who had nonacute pediatric headache and were referred to a child neurology clinic, neuroimaging-use rates remained stable during the past decade. An increasing proportion of neuroimaging studies are ordered by primary care providers. The influence of evidence-based medicine on medical decision-making may be partly responsible for curbing increases in neuroimaging overuse. The perceived value of neuroimaging by physicians and consumers deserves ongoing study.

  18. Pro/con clinical debate: Tracheostomy is ideal for withdrawal of mechanical ventilation in severe neurological impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Mascia, Luciana; Corno, Eleomore; Terragni, Pier Paok; Stather, David; Ferguson, Niall D

    2004-01-01

    Most clinical trials on the topic of extubation have involved patients outside the neurological intensive care unit. As a result, in this area clinicians are left with little evidence on which to base their decision making. Although tracheostomies are increasingly common procedures, they are not without complications and costs, and hence a decision to perform them should not be taken lightly. In this issue of Critical Care two groups debate the merits of tracheostomy before extubation in a pa...

  19. Voluntary informed consent and good clinical practice for clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most differences, shortcomings and contradictions regarding voluntary informed consent for participation in clinical research relate to the South African-specific guidance documents, i.e. South African Guidelines for Good Practice in the Conduct of Clinical Trials with Human Participants in South Africa (2006) and Ethics in ...

  20. Neurological legal disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishna H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders with a prolonged course, either remediable or otherwise are being seen increasingly in clinical practice and many such patients are young and are part of some organization or other wherein their services are needed if they were healthy and fit. The neurologists who are on the panel of these organizations are asked to certify whether these subjects are fit to work or how long they should be given leave. These certificates may be produced in the court of law and may be subjected to verification by another neurologist or a medical board. At present there are no standard guidelines in our country to effect such certification unlike in orthopedic specialty or in ophthalmology. The following is a beginning, based on which the neurologist can certify the neurological disability of such subjects and convey the same meaning to all neurologists across the country.

  1. A structured approach to neurologic prognostication in clinical cardiac arrest trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cronberg, Tobias; Horn, Janneke; Kuiper, Michael A.; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Brain injury is the dominant cause of death for cardiac arrest patients who are admitted to an intensive care unit, and the majority of patients die after withdrawal of life sustaining therapy (WLST) based on a presumed poor neurologic outcome. Mild induced hypothermia was found to decrease the

  2. Transient neurological attacks in the general population. Prevalence, risk factors, and clinical relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Bots (Michiel); E.C. van der Wilk (Eline); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); A. Hofman (Albert); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients with typical transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) have a higher risk of stroke but a lower risk of cardiac events than patients with nonspecific transient neurological symptoms. We assessed the prevalences of typical TIAs and nonspecific transient

  3. Use of Lower-Limb Robotics to Enhance Practice and Participation in Individuals With Neurological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Arun; Burt, Sheila; Rymer, William Zev

    2017-07-01

    To review lower-limb technology currently available for people with neurological disorders, such as spinal cord injury, stroke, or other conditions. We focus on 3 emerging technologies: treadmill-based training devices, exoskeletons, and other wearable robots. Efficacy for these devices remains unclear, although preliminary data indicate that specific patient populations may benefit from robotic training used with more traditional physical therapy. Potential benefits include improved lower-limb function and a more typical gait trajectory. Use of these devices is limited by insufficient data, cost, and in some cases size of the machine. However, robotic technology is likely to become more prevalent as these machines are enhanced and able to produce targeted physical rehabilitation. Therapists should be aware of these technologies as they continue to advance but understand the limitations and challenges posed with therapeutic/mobility robots.

  4. Common data elements for clinical research in mitochondrial disease: a National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaa, Amel; Rahman, Shamima; Lombès, Anne; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Sheikh, Muniza K; Alai-Hansen, Sherita; Cohen, Bruce H; Dimmock, David; Emrick, Lisa; Falk, Marni J; McCormack, Shana; Mirsky, David; Moore, Tony; Parikh, Sumit; Shoffner, John; Taivassalo, Tanja; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Tein, Ingrid; Odenkirchen, Joanne C; Goldstein, Amy

    2017-05-01

    The common data elements (CDE) project was developed by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) to provide clinical researchers with tools to improve data quality and allow for harmonization of data collected in different research studies. CDEs have been created for several neurological diseases; the aim of this project was to develop CDEs specifically curated for mitochondrial disease (Mito) to enhance clinical research. Nine working groups (WGs), composed of international mitochondrial disease experts, provided recommendations for Mito clinical research. They initially reviewed existing NINDS CDEs and instruments, and developed new data elements or instruments when needed. Recommendations were organized, internally reviewed by the Mito WGs, and posted online for external public comment for a period of eight weeks. The final version was again reviewed by all WGs and the NINDS CDE team prior to posting for public use. The NINDS Mito CDEs and supporting documents are publicly available on the NINDS CDE website ( https://commondataelements.ninds.nih.gov/ ), organized into domain categories such as Participant/Subject Characteristics, Assessments, and Examinations. We developed a comprehensive set of CDE recommendations, data definitions, case report forms (CRFs), and guidelines for use in Mito clinical research. The widespread use of CDEs is intended to enhance Mito clinical research endeavors, including natural history studies, clinical trial design, and data sharing. Ongoing international collaboration will facilitate regular review, updates and online publication of Mito CDEs, and support improved consistency of data collection and reporting.

  5. Neurogenetics in Child Neurology: Redefining a Discipline in the Twenty-first Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Walter E

    2016-12-01

    Increasing knowledge on genetic etiology of pediatric neurologic disorders is affecting the practice of the specialty. I reviewed here the history of pediatric neurologic disorder classification and the role of genetics in the process. I also discussed the concept of clinical neurogenetics, with its role in clinical practice, education, and research. Finally, I propose a flexible model for clinical neurogenetics in child neurology in the twenty-first century. In combination with disorder-specific clinical programs, clinical neurogenetics can become a home for complex clinical issues, repository of genetic diagnostic advances, educational resource, and research engine in child neurology.

  6. The Red Book and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bygott, Catherine

    2012-09-01

    Jung's work is fundamentally an experience, not an idea. From this perspective, I attempt to bridge conference, consulting room and living psyche by considering the influence of the 'Red Book' on clinical practice through the subtle and imaginal. Jung's journey as a man broadens out to have relevance for women. His story is individual but its archetypal foundation finds parallel expression in analytic practice today. © 2012, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  7. [Planning With Nanda, Noc, Nic Taxonomies In Neurologic Rehabilitation. A clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iori, Alessandra; Foracchia, Marco; Gradellini, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Nursing classifications identify a specific professional responsibility, increase nursing visibility, according with nursing evolution of these last years. To evaluate care planning with NANDA taxonomy in neurologic rehabilitation context. Care plan managing with NANDA taxonomy, regarding diagnosis of constipation and impaired skin integrity, using a computerized tool for systematically observation, organized in check list. Registered data with taxonomy planning are higher in quantitative and qualitative terms. For most of patients (87%) one diagnosis has been opened, both diagnosis for 60% of them. Nursing care plan with NANDA taxonomy can be considered a valid methodology of care for neurologic patient, this since it requests a deep and complete registration of first assessment a systematically registration of each monitoring, it increases visibility of nursing job, and it underlines specific autonomy and responsibility in prevention and management of problems.

  8. George Engel's Epistemology of Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraga, Michael; Fuks, Abraham; Boudreau, J Donald

    2014-01-01

    George Engel's (1913-1999) biopsychosocial model, one of the most significant proposals for the renewal of medicine in the latter half of the 20th century, has been understood primarily as a multi-factorial approach to the etiology of disease and as a call to re-humanize clinical practice. This common reading of Engel's model misses the central aspect of his proposal, that the biopsychosocial model is an epistemology for clinical work. By stating the simple fact that the clinician is not dealing directly with a body, but first, and inevitably, with a person, Engel challenged the epistemology implicit in the classical clinical method-a method predicated on the possibility of direct access to the body. Framed in epistemological terms, the issue at stake is not the need to complement medical science with humane virtues, but rather to acknowledge that the object of clinical practice is not the body but the patient.

  9. Neurological outcome scale for traumatic brain injury: III. Criterion-related validity and sensitivity to change in the NABIS hypothermia-II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Stephen R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Moretti, Paolo; Macleod, Marianne C; Pedroza, Claudia; Drever, Pamala; Fourwinds, Sierra; Frisby, Melisa L; Beers, Sue R; Scott, James N; Hunter, Jill V; Traipe, Elfrides; Valadka, Alex B; Okonkwo, David O; Zygun, David A; Puccio, Ava M; Clifton, Guy L

    2013-09-01

    The neurological outcome scale for traumatic brain injury (NOS-TBI) is a measure assessing neurological functioning in patients with TBI. We hypothesized that the NOS-TBI would exhibit adequate concurrent and predictive validity and demonstrate more sensitivity to change, compared with other well-established outcome measures. We analyzed data from the National Acute Brain Injury Study: Hypothermia-II clinical trial. Participants were 16-45 years of age with severe TBI assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury. For analysis of criterion-related validity (concurrent and predictive), Spearman's rank-order correlations were calculated between the NOS-TBI and the glasgow outcome scale (GOS), GOS-extended (GOS-E), disability rating scale (DRS), and neurobehavioral rating scale-revised (NRS-R). Concurrent validity was demonstrated through significant correlations between the NOS-TBI and GOS, GOS-E, DRS, and NRS-R measured contemporaneously at 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury (all pvalidity as well as sensitivity to change, compared with gold-standard outcome measures. The NOS-TBI may enhance prediction of outcome in clinical practice and measurement of outcome in TBI research.

  10. Enhancing reflective practice through online learning: impact on clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, J; Radloff, A

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, radiographers and radiation therapists function in a workplace environment that is protocol-driven with limited functional autonomy. The workplace promotes a culture of conformity and discourages practitioners from reflective and critical thinking, essential attributes for continuing learning and advancing workplace practices. As part of the first author's doctoral study, a continuing professional development (CPD) educational framework was used to design and implement an online module for radiation therapists' CPD activities. The study aimed to determine if it is possible to enhance healthcare practitioners' reflective practice via online learning and to establish the impact of reflective learning on clinical practice. The objectives of the online module were to increase radiation therapists' knowledge in planning for radiation therapy for the breast by assisting them engage in reflective practice. The cyclical process of action research was used to pilot the module twice with two groups of volunteer radiation therapists (twenty-six participants) from Australia, New Zealand and Canada. The online module was evaluated using Kirkpatrick's four-level evaluation model. Evidence indicated that participants were empowered as a result of participation in the module. They began reflecting in the workplace while assuming a more proactive role and increased clinical responsibilities, engaged colleagues in collaborative reflections and adopted evidence-based approaches in advancing clinical practices. The study shows that it is possible to assist practitioners engage in reflective practice using an online CPD educational framework. Participants were able to apply the reflective learning they had developed in their workplace. As a result of their learning, they felt empowered to continue to effect changes in their workplace beyond the cessation of the online module.

  11. Balancing Certainty and Uncertainty in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhi, Alan G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, I question how practitioners can balance the certainty and confidence that they can help their patients with the uncertainty that makes them continually question their beliefs and assumptions. Method: I compare the mechanisms of science and models of clinical practice that may help practitioners achieve the right balance…

  12. Facilitating Critical Thinking in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Deanna; And Others

    Activities to promote the transfer of theoretical knowledge into clinical practice have been developed to facilitate learning by individuals with various learning styles, reduce student stress, and improve teaching methods in a baccalaureate nursing program at the California State University, Chico. Specific activities included innovative…

  13. Introduction: Applying Clinical Psychological Science to Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Christine B; DiVasto, Katherine A

    2017-05-01

    Mental illness is a prevalent and extraordinarily complex phenomenon. Psychologists have developed distinct approaches toward understanding and treating mental illness, rooted in divergent epistemology. This introduction to the Special Issue on Clinical Psychological Science and Practice provides a brief overview of the scientist-practitioner gap, and explores one step (of many) toward bridging this divide. Seven compelling case illustrations featured in this Special Issue apply empirical findings to case formulation, treatment selection, and assessment across complex and varied clinical presentations. This issue thereby demonstrates the feasibility of integrating research and clinical expertise in mental healthcare. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. PRACTICAL RECOMMENDATIONS OF DATA PREPROCESSING AND GEOSPATIAL MEASURES FOR OPTIMIZING THE NEUROLOGICAL AND OTHER PEDIATRIC EMERGENCIES MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionela MANIU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Time management, optimal and timed determination of emergency severity as well as optimizing the use of available human and material resources are crucial areas of emergency services. A starting point for achieving these optimizations can be considered the analysis and preprocess of real data from the emergency services. The benefits of performing this method consist in exposing more useful structures to data modelling algorithms which consequently will reduce overfitting and improves accuracy. This paper aims to offer practical recommendations for data preprocessing measures including feature selection and discretization of numeric attributes regarding age, duration of the case, season, period, week period (workday, weekend and geospatial location of neurological and other pediatric emergencies. An analytical, retrospective study was conducted on a sample consisting of 933 pediatric cases, from UPU-SMURD Sibiu, 01.01.2014 – 27.02.2017 period.

  15. Unravelling functional neurology: a scoping review of theories and clinical applications in a context of chiropractic manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Anne-Laure; Meyer, Amanda; Etherington, Sarah; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Functional Neurology (FN), a seemingly attractive treatment approach used by some chiropractors, proposes to have an effect on a multitude of conditions but some of its concepts are controversial. A scoping review was performed to describe, in the context of chiropractic manual therapy, 1) the FN theories, and 2) its clinical applications (i.e. its indications, examination procedures, treatment modalities, treatment plans, and clinical outcomes) using four sources: i) one key textbook, ii) the scientific peer-reviewed literature, iii) websites from chiropractors using FN, and iv) semi-structured interviews of chiropractors using FN. The scientific literature was searched in PubMed, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus, completed by a hand search in the journal Functional Neurology, Rehabilitation and Ergonomics (November 2016 and March 2017, respectively). The only textbook on the topic we found was included and articles were chosen if they had an element of manual therapy. There was no restriction for study design but discussion papers were excluded. Websites were found in Google using the search term "Functional Neurology". Chiropractors, known to use FN, were invited based on their geographical location. Theories were mainly uncovered in the textbook as were all aspects of the clinical applications except treatment plans. The other three sources were used for the five aspects of clinical applications. Results were summarized and reported extensively in tables. Eleven articles were included, five websites scrutinized, and four semi-structured interviews performed. FN is based on the belief that reversible lesions in the nervous system are the cause of a multitude of conditions and that specific clusters of neurons can be positively affected by manipulative therapy, but also by many other stimuli. Diagnostic procedures include both conventional and unusual tests, with an interpretation specific to FN. Initial treatment is intense and clinical outcomes reported as positive

  16. The practice of clinical neuropsychology in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Jennie

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the development and practice of clinical neuropsychology in Australia. Clinical Neuropsychology has shown rapid growth in Australia over the past three decades. Comprehensive and specialized training programs are producing high quality graduates who are employed in a broad range of settings or private practice. Australia now has a substantial number of clinical neuropsychologists with specialist training. Whilst the majority of Australian clinical neuropsychologists still undertake assessment predominantly, there are growing opportunities for clinical neuropsychologists in rehabilitation and in a broad range of research contexts. Cultural issues relating to the assessment of Indigenous Australians and immigrants from many countries present significant challenges. Some major contributions have been made in the realms of test development and validation across various age groups. Australian clinical neuropsychologists are also contributing significantly to research in the fields of traumatic brain injury, aging and dementias, epilepsy, memory assessment, rehabilitation, substance abuse, and other psychiatric disorders. Expansion of roles of clinical neuropsychologists, in domains such as rehabilitation and research is seen as essential to underpin continuing growth of employment opportunities for the profession.

  17. Study of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with headache using a short structured clinical interview in a rural neurology clinic in Western India

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    Soaham Dilip Desai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric disorders are common in patients attending neurology clinics with headache. Evaluation of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with headache is often missed in the busy neurology clinics. Aims: To assess the prevalence of Axis-I DSM-IV psychiatric disorders in patients with primary headache disorders in a rural-based tertiary neurology clinic in Western India. Settings and Design : A cross-sectional observation survey was conducting assessing all patients with migraine, tension-type headache and chronic daily headache attending the Neurology Clinic of Shree Krishna Hospital, a rural medical teaching hospital in Karamsad, in Gujarat in Western India. Materials and Methods: A total of 101 consecutive consenting adults with headache were interviewed using Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I., a structured diagnostic clinical interview to assess prevalence of Axis-I DSM-IV psychiatric disorders. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics were calculated using SPSS software version 16 and a binomial regression model was used to study the relationship of psychiatric co-morbidity with patient-related factors. Results: 49 out of 101 (48.5% patients with headache suffered from depressive disorders (dysthymia or depression or suicidality, 18 out of 101 patients with headache (17.90% suffered from anxiety related disorders (generalized anxiety disorder or agoraphobia or social phobia or panic disorder. Conclusions: Axis-I psychiatric disorders are a significant comorbidity among patients with headache disorders. M.I.N.I. can be used as a short, less time consuming instrument to assess all patients with headache disorders.

  18. Has clinical activity in paediatric neurology changed in the past 11 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Menéndez, B; Escolar Escamilla, E; Pinel González, A; Cerezo García, M; Martínez Sarries, F J; Morlán Gracia, L

    We believe that the demand for paediatric neurology (PN) care has increased over the past decade, and that reasons for requesting consultations have also changed. The objective of this study is to complete a registry study to profile the demand for PN care in 2013 and compare results to those from a study performed in 2002. A prospective registry of PN healthcare activities was completed at Hospital Universitario de Getafe in 2013. Results were compared with those from a prospective registry study conducted in 2002. The number of visits increased from 1,300 in 2002 to 1,982 in 2013 (a 52.46% increase), and from 32.6 visits per 1,000 children to 57.48 (a 76.32% increase). Outpatient consultations accounted for 92.2% of all PN consultations in 2013. Currently, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most frequent diagnosis (27.6% in 2013 vs. 8.1% in 2002). Although the percentage of headache consultations has decreased (19% in 2013 vs. 22% in 2002), headache was still the most common reason for an initial visit in 2013 (32.1%), followed by ADHD (19.1%). Epilepsy remains the most frequent diagnosis in hospitalised patients (30.3% in 2013 vs. 36.7% in 2002). PN is fundamentally an outpatient activity that has increased considerably in recent years. This increase is mainly due to neurodevelopmental disorders, especially ADHD. We might state that the role of ADHD in PN is comparable to that of dementia in general neurology. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. The shortcomings of clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Leier, Carl V; Geleris, Paraschos; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of medical knowledge related to diagnosis and management over the last 5-6 decades has altered the course of diseases, improved clinical outcomes and increased survival. Thus, it has become difficult for the practicing physician to evaluate the long-term effects of a particular therapy on survival of an individual patient. Further, the approach by each physician to an individual patient with the same disease is not always uniform. In an attempt to assist physicians in applying newly acquired knowledge to patients, clinical practice guidelines were introduced by various scientific societies. Guidelines assist in facilitating the translation of new research discoveries into clinical practice; however, despite the improvements over the years, there are still several issues related to guidelines that often appear ‘lost in translation'. Guidelines are based on the results of randomized clinical trials, other nonrandomized studies, and expert opinion (i.e. the opinion of most members of the guideline committees). The merits and limitations of randomized clinical trials, guideline committees, and presentation of guidelines will be discussed. In addition, proposals to improve guidelines will be presented. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Application of carbon nanotubes in neurology: clinical perspectives and toxicological risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Antonio; Al-Jamal, Khuloud; Nakajima, Takeshi; Hariz, Marwan; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2012-07-01

    Nanomedicine is an emerging field that proposes the application of precisely engineered nanomaterials for the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of certain diseases, including neurological pathologies. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are a new class of nanomaterials, which have been shown to be promising in different areas of nanomedicine. In this review, the application of CNT interfacing with the central nervous system (CNS) will be described, and representative examples of neuroprosthetic devices, such as neuronal implants and electrodes will be discussed. Furthermore, the possible application of CNT-based materials as regenerative matrices of neuronal tissue and as delivery systems for the therapy of CNS will be presented.

  1. [Evolution of the literature on clinical neurology in Spain, France, Italy and Germany over the period 2000-2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inigo, Jesús; Iriarte, Jorge

    2011-11-16

    This study analyzes the productivity and visibility of Spanish publications in the area of clinical neurology in the period 2000-2009 and compared with those for Italy, France and Germany. We used the database Web of Science. The analysis (annual and in five-year) was restricted to the citable documents (original articles, reviews and proceedings papers). Bibliometric indicators used were the number of publications, citations received by publications and Hirsch's h-index. We also assessed the slope of the annual growth rate (b), the number of publications by language and the international collaboration. In the period 2000-2009 there were 46,114 publications in neurology clinic of which 6,998 were Spanish publications (h = 75), 11,629 in Italy (h = 101), French 9,745 (h = 102) and 20,143 in Germany (h = 124). The rate of increase in the total number of publications in Spain (b = 15) was lower than that observed in Italy (b = 65), Germany (b = 61) or France (b = 34). In the case of publications in English, the growth rate was higher for Spain (b = 37) than for France (b = 36) but lower than for Germany (b = 54) and Italy (b = 65). Although the total number of publications and the observed increase are lower in Spain compared to Italy, France or Germany, the Spanish publications in Clinical Neurology shows good trend indicators with regard to publications in English and international collaboration. This improvement was associated with greater visibility as showed by the five-year analysis of citations received by Spanish publications.

  2. Clinical experience of seropositive ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibody in a tertiary neurology referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuebing; Jammoul, Adham; Mente, Karin; Li, Jianbo; Shields, Robert W; Vernino, Steven; Rae-Grant, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Antibody against the acetylcholine receptor of autonomic ganglia (gAChR-Ab) is implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG) and several other disorders. This study was a retrospective evaluation of 95 patients positive for gAChR-Ab. Twenty-one (22%) patients had AAG, with a greater median gAChR-Ab level (0.21 nmol/L) and higher percentage (57%) of antibody levels >0.20 nmol/L when compared with the remaining 74 patients without autonomic manifestations (non-AAG group, 0.10 nmol/L and 15%, respectively). Only 2 new cases of malignancy were diagnosed after gAChR-Ab detection. The non-AAG group was associated with high frequencies of neurological and non-neurological autoimmunity, but also included 23 (31%) patients with mostly degenerative disorders. Detection of gAChR-Ab, especially at a higher level, is helpful for the diagnosis of AAG in patients with corresponding autonomic symptoms. However, its value is limited for predicting cancer risk and for diagnosis and management of patients without autonomic symptoms. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Diagnosis and Development of Screening Items for Migraine in Neurological Practice in Taiwan

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    Shuu-Jiun Wang

    2008-06-01

    Conclusion: Migraine was the most common headache diagnosis in the neurologists’ clinics. Probable migraine was not completely adopted as a migraine spectrum among neurologists. In contrast to ID™, moderate or severe headache intensity replaced headache-related disability as one screening item for migraine in Taiwan.

  4. How to develop guidelines for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeschke, R; Jankowski, M; Brozek, J; Antonelli, M

    2009-09-01

    Recent decades have seen an explosion of clinical practice guidelines documents developed to inform clinicians about the best options for managing treatment, with the explicit intent to influence behaviour. As our exposure to guidelines has increased it has become clear that the process of guideline development should follow specific rules in order to avoid disagreement, misunderstanding, misleading recommendations, and confusion. In this article, we review the approach to developing clinical practice guidelines suggested by an international Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) workgroup. This approach suggests several steps for guideline development: 1. determine the purpose, scope, and intended audience; 2. select the panel of guideline authors; 3. specify the main focused clinical questions that the recommendations will address; 4. decide on the relative importance of outcomes; 5. find and summarize the evidence supporting each recommendation; 6. determine the quality of the available evidence; 7. evaluate the balance of desirable and undesirable consequences for a particular course of action; 8. formulate recommendations, including their strenght; and 9. consider a system for subsequent guideline implementation and evaluation. We aim to help the readers of practice guidelines asses those guidelines' quality and validity, as well as to assist the authors of future guidelines in systematically generating clinical recommendations.

  5. Intravenous high-dose immunotherapy: practical recommendations for use in the treatment of neurological disimmune diseases

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    N. A. Suponeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current publication summarizes main indications and benefits of intravenous high-dose immunotherapy (IHI in the treatment of various autoimmune diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Available products of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG on the Russian market are reviewed. Tactics for choosing optimal medication for IHI based on its effectiveness and safety are analyzed. Dosage calculation and way of administration of IVIG are described, beeing of a high practical value in neurologist’s daily work.

  6. Participatory Research Into Inclusive Practice: Improving Services for People With Long Term Neurological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Cook

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available People with long-term conditions are intensive users of health services as well as being long term users of social care and community services. In the UK, the Department of Health has suggested that the development of a more inclusive approach to services could furnish benefits to people with long-term conditions and financial savings for service providers. Researchers with a varied set of expertise and experience (users of neuro-rehabilitation services, staff working in services, people working with third sector agencies and university academics adopted a participatory research approach to work together to explore what inclusion might look and feel like for people who are long term users of health services. The element of critique and mutual challenge, developed within the research process, disturbed current presentations of inclusion and inclusive practice. It revealed that the more usually expected components of inclusion (trust, respect and shared responsibility whilst necessary for inclusive practice, are not necessarily sufficient. Inclusion is revealed as a complex and challenging process that requires the active construction of a critical communicative space for dialectical and democratic learning for service development.

  7. Good clinical practices: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, R L

    1995-03-01

    Clinical quality assurance has its roots in the evolution of the GCPs. Historically, the fundamental elements of GCPs provided a springboard to develop and refine a paradigm of standard measurements to assure the integrity and quality of research. The research community spontaneously responded by voluntarily establishing quality assurance units and implementing auditing functions to ensure the highest standards in an industry that encompasses science, medicine, and ethics. Although clinical quality assurance is still unregulated in the United States, the performance of good clinical practices has become an integral part of the clinical research process and has impacted the research community on worldwide basis. The establishment of the EC guidelines, the WHO guidelines, and the International Conference on Harmonization are testaments to the increasing emphasis on the future of GCP-related activities.

  8. Clinical Utility and Lifespan Profiling of Neurological Soft Signs in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Raymond C. K.; Xie, Weizhen; Geng, Fu-lei; Wang, Ya; Lui, Simon S. Y.; Wang, Chuan-yue; Yu, Xin; Cheung, Eric F. C.; Rosenthal, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSSs) bear the promise for early detection of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Nonetheless, the sensitivity and specificity of NSSs in the psychosis continuum remains a topic of controversy. It is also unknown how NSSs reveal neurodevelopmental abnormality in schizophrenia. We investigated the effect sizes of NSSs in differentiating individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders from individuals with other psychiatric conditions and from covariate-matched healthy subjects. We also investigated the partitioned age-related variations of NSSs in both schizophrenia and healthy individuals. NSSs were assessed by the abridged version of the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI) in 3105 participants, consisting of healthy individuals (n =1577), unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients (n = 155), individuals with schizotypal personality disorder (n = 256), schizophrenia patients (n = 738), and other psychiatric patients (n = 379). Exact matching and propensity score matching procedures were performed to control for covariates. Multiple regression was used to partition age-related variations. Individuals along the schizophrenia continuum showed elevated levels of NSSs, with moderate effect sizes, in contrast to other psychiatric patients who had minimal NSSs, as well as matched healthy controls. Furthermore, the age-and-NSS relationship in schizophrenia patients was represented by a flat but overall elevated pattern, in contrast to a U-shaped pattern in healthy individuals. In sum, NSSs capture a moderate portion of psychosis proneness with reasonable specificity. Lifespan profiling reveals an abnormal developmental trajectory of NSSs in schizophrenia patients, which supports the endophenotype hypothesis of NSSs by associating it with the neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. PMID:26712863

  9. Education Research: Neurology training reassessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Matthew B.; Coleman, Mary; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Engstrom, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the strengths and weaknesses of neurology resident education using survey methodology. Methods: A 27-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2011. Results: Of eligible respondents, 49.8% of residents returned the survey. Most residents believed previously instituted duty hour restrictions had a positive impact on resident quality of life without impacting patient care. Most residents rated their faculty and clinical didactics favorably. However, many residents reported suboptimal preparation in basic neuroscience and practice management issues. Most residents (71%) noted that the Residency In-service Training Examination (RITE) assisted in self-study. A minority of residents (14%) reported that the RITE scores were used for reasons other than self-study. The vast majority (86%) of residents will enter fellowship training following residency and were satisfied with the fellowship offers they received. Conclusions: Graduating residents had largely favorable neurology training experiences. Several common deficiencies include education in basic neuroscience and clinical practice management. Importantly, prior changes to duty hours did not negatively affect the resident perception of neurology residency training. PMID:23091077

  10. The Advanced Practice Clinical Nurse Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Ann M; Ray, Melinda Mercer; Chamblee, Tracy B; Urden, Linda D; Moody, Rachel

    The clinical nurse specialist (CNS), one of the 4 advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) categories, has a unique role to play in contributing to high-quality patient care and system-level change across multiple health care settings. CNS practice requires advanced knowledge and skills, including specialty expertise, the ability to integrate new knowledge and innovation into the system of care, the ability to consult and collaborate with all health professions, and the mentoring of nursing staff to support and fully implement that new knowledge. The purpose of this article was to describe the role of the CNS, explain the background of the CNS role as it relates to APRN practice, provide current CNS workforce statistics, and share opportunities for hospitals and health systems to strategically use CNSs to advance patient and organizational goals.

  11. Implementing human factors in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Timmons, Stephen; Baxendale, Bryn; Buttery, Andrew; Miles, Giulia; Roe, Bridget; Browes, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To understand whether aviation-derived human factors training is acceptable and useful to healthcare professionals. To understand whether and how healthcare professionals have been able to implement human factors approaches to patient safety in their own area of clinical practice. Methods Qualitative, longitudinal study using semi-structured interviews and focus groups, of a multiprofessional group of UK NHS staff (from the emergency department and operating theatres) who have rece...

  12. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

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    Shrikant Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C. during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20 th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation′s first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835, Calcutta (1835 and Mumbai (1848. Prior to India′s independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI. Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN. Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930′s. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951 include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991. The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in

  13. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shrikant; Trikamji, Bhavesh; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Parampreet; Nair, Rajasekharan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation's first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835), Calcutta (1835) and Mumbai (1848). Prior to India's independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI). Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN). Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930's. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951) include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991). The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in the amount of

  14. Program Director Survey: Attitudes Regarding Child Neurology Training and Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Ignacio; Feist, Terri B; Gilbert, Donald L

    2016-04-01

    As a result of major clinical and scientific advances and changes in clinical practice, the role of adult neurology training for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability (NDD) certification has become controversial. The most recently approved requirements for board eligibility for child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents still include 12 months in adult neurology rotations. The objective of this study was to assess United States child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residency program directors' opinions regarding optimal residency training. The authors developed an 18-item questionnaire and contacted all 80 child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors via e-mail, using SurveyMonkey. A total of 44 program directors responded (55%), representing programs that train 78 categorical and 94 total resident positions, approximately 70% of those filled in the match. Respondents identified multiple areas where child neurology residents need more training, including genetics and neuromuscular disease. A substantial majority (73%) believed child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents need less than 12 adult neurology training months; however, most (75%) also believed adult hospital service and man-power needs (55%) and finances (34%) would pose barriers to reducing adult neurology. Most (70%) believed reductions in adult neurology training should be program flexible. A majority believed the written initial certification examination should be modified with more child neurology and fewer basic neuroscience questions. Nearly all (91%) felt the views of child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors are under-represented within the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Residency Review Committee. The requirement for 12 adult neurology months for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability certification is not consistent with the views of the majority of program

  15. Clinical neuropsychology practice and training in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Laura A; Guger, Sharon

    2016-11-01

    This invited paper provides information about professional neuropsychology issues in Canada and is part of a special issue addressing international perspectives on education, training, and practice in clinical neuropsychology. Information was gathered from literature searches and personal communication with other neuropsychologists in Canada. Canada has a rich neuropsychological history. Neuropsychologists typically have doctoral-level education including relevant coursework and supervised practical experience. Licensure requirements vary across the 10 provinces and there are regional differences in salary. While training at the graduate and internship level mirrors that of our American colleagues, completion of a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in neuropsychology is not required to obtain employment in many settings and there are few postdoctoral training programs in this country. The majority of neuropsychologists are employed in institutional settings (e.g. hospitals, universities, rehabilitation facilities), with a growing number entering private practice or other settings. There are challenges in providing neuropsychological services to the diverse Canadian population and a need for assessment measures and normative data in multiple languages. Canadian neuropsychologists face important challenges in defining ourselves as distinct from other professions and other psychologists, in maintaining funding for high-quality training and research, in establishing neuropsychology-specific training and practice standards at the provincial or national level, and ensuring the clinical care that we provide is efficient and effective in meeting the needs of our patient populations and consumers, both within and outside of the publically funded health care system.

  16. Caring during clinical practice: Midwives’ perspective

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    Mmajapi E. Chokwe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring forms the core of nursing and midwifery. Despite caring being an important emotional aspect of midwifery and nursing, there are general public complaints about uncaring behaviour in midwifery. Therefore, there is a need to explore caring from midwives’ point of view with the hope of identifying solutions and recommendations for midwifery practice. Furthermore, the study aimed to stimulate debate and discussion about the caring behaviour of midwives.Objective: To explore caring during clinical practice as perceived and experienced by midwives.Method: The study was contextual, exploratory and qualitative. The participants were midwives working in state and private hospitals in Tshwane,South Africa where BTech II and III midwifery learners were allocated for work integrated learning (WIL. Data collection was carried out through self-report using a questionnaire and focus group. Questionnaires were distributed to 40 midwives at private and state hospitals in Tshwane. This was followed by two focus group sessions to ensure that data is enriched. The hermeneutic interpretive approach was used to analyse data, and analysis continued until saturation.Results: Themes of caring and uncaring related to patient care and midwives emerged. Thefindings illustrated that the midwives had excellent theoretical knowledge of caring, but someof them did not display caring behaviour during clinical practice.Conclusion: Some of the midwives did not display caring behaviour. Implication for practicewas provided based on the research findings. Recommendations included measures of improving caring behaviours during midwifery practice.

  17. Regulating the placebo effect in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tracey E

    2015-01-01

    Recent research and ethical analysis have forced a clinical and ethical reappraisal of the utility of placebos in medical practice. The main concern of ethics and law is that using placebos in health care involves deception, which is antithetical to patient autonomy and trust in the physician-patient relationship. This article reviews the various, more nuanced scientific conceptions of the placebo effect, and evaluates the ethical and legal objections to deploying placebos in clinical practice. It argues that the placebo effect may be legitimately accommodated on the basis that it does not engage the requirement for material or quasi-fiduciary disclosures of information, and may also be justified by therapeutic privilege. In addition, this reconceptualisation of the placebo effect offers a new justification for therapeutic privilege in these contexts. Notwithstanding this, using the placebo effect in clinical practice raises regulatory issues that will require special regulatory supervision. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Neurology as career option among postgraduate medical students

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    Namit B Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the context of inadequacy of neurology workforce in India, it is important to understand factors that post-graduate medical students consider for and against choosing neurology as their career option. Understanding these factors will help in planning strategies to encourage students to pursue a career in neurology. At present, there is a paucity of studies addressing this issue in India. Aims and Objectives: (1 To analyze factors, which post-graduate students consider for and against choosing neurology as a career specialty. (2 To access the level and quality of neurology exposure in the current MBBS and MD curricula. Materials and Methods: Statewide questionnaire based study was conducted in the state of Maharashtra for students eligible to take DM neurology entrance examination (MD Medicine and MD Pediatrics. Results: In this survey, 243 students were enrolled. Factors bringing students to neurology were - intellectual challenge and logical reasoning (72%, inspired by role model teachers (63%, better quality-of-life (51% and scope for independent practice without expensive infrastructure (48%. Factors preventing students from taking neurology were - perception that most neurological diseases are degenerative (78%, neurology is mainly an academic specialty (40%, neurophobia (43% and lack of procedures (57%. Inadequate exposure and resultant lack of self-confidence were common (31%, 70-80%. 84% of the students felt the need for a short term certification course in neurology after MD. Conclusions: To attract more students to neurology, "role model" teachers of neurology could interact and teach students extensively. Neurologists′ efforts to shed their diagnostician′s image and to shift their focus to therapeutics will help change the image of neurology. Out-patient neurology clinics should be incorporated early in the student′s career. Procedures attract students; hence, they should be made conversant with procedures and

  19. Neurology as career option among postgraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Namit B; Khadilkar, Satish V; Bangar, Sachin S; Patil, Tukaram R; Chaudhari, Chetan R

    2013-10-01

    In the context of inadequacy of neurology workforce in India, it is important to understand factors that post-graduate medical students consider for and against choosing neurology as their career option. Understanding these factors will help in planning strategies to encourage students to pursue a career in neurology. At present, there is a paucity of studies addressing this issue in India. (1) To analyze factors, which post-graduate students consider for and against choosing neurology as a career specialty. (2) To access the level and quality of neurology exposure in the current MBBS and MD curricula. Statewide questionnaire based study was conducted in the state of Maharashtra for students eligible to take DM neurology entrance examination (MD Medicine and MD Pediatrics). In this survey, 243 students were enrolled. Factors bringing students to neurology were - intellectual challenge and logical reasoning (72%), inspired by role model teachers (63%), better quality-of-life (51%) and scope for independent practice without expensive infrastructure (48%). Factors preventing students from taking neurology were - perception that most neurological diseases are degenerative (78%), neurology is mainly an academic specialty (40%), neurophobia (43%) and lack of procedures (57%). Inadequate exposure and resultant lack of self-confidence were common (31%, 70-80%). 84% of the students felt the need for a short term certification course in neurology after MD. To attract more students to neurology, "role model" teachers of neurology could interact and teach students extensively. Neurologists' efforts to shed their diagnostician's image and to shift their focus to therapeutics will help change the image of neurology. Out-patient neurology clinics should be incorporated early in the student's career. Procedures attract students; hence, they should be made conversant with procedures and interventions. Increasing the level of neurological exposure in our current MBBS and MD

  20. Neurology as career option among postgraduate medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Namit B.; Khadilkar, Satish V.; Bangar, Sachin S.; Patil, Tukaram R.; Chaudhari, Chetan R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the context of inadequacy of neurology workforce in India, it is important to understand factors that post-graduate medical students consider for and against choosing neurology as their career option. Understanding these factors will help in planning strategies to encourage students to pursue a career in neurology. At present, there is a paucity of studies addressing this issue in India. Aims and Objectives: (1) To analyze factors, which post-graduate students consider for and against choosing neurology as a career specialty. (2) To access the level and quality of neurology exposure in the current MBBS and MD curricula. Materials and Methods: Statewide questionnaire based study was conducted in the state of Maharashtra for students eligible to take DM neurology entrance examination (MD Medicine and MD Pediatrics). Results: In this survey, 243 students were enrolled. Factors bringing students to neurology were - intellectual challenge and logical reasoning (72%), inspired by role model teachers (63%), better quality-of-life (51%) and scope for independent practice without expensive infrastructure (48%). Factors preventing students from taking neurology were - perception that most neurological diseases are degenerative (78%), neurology is mainly an academic specialty (40%), neurophobia (43%) and lack of procedures (57%). Inadequate exposure and resultant lack of self-confidence were common (31%, 70-80%). 84% of the students felt the need for a short term certification course in neurology after MD. Conclusions: To attract more students to neurology, “role model” teachers of neurology could interact and teach students extensively. Neurologists’ efforts to shed their diagnostician's image and to shift their focus to therapeutics will help change the image of neurology. Out-patient neurology clinics should be incorporated early in the student's career. Procedures attract students; hence, they should be made conversant with procedures and

  1. Practice Parameter: treatment of nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease: report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesiewicz, T A; Sullivan, K L; Arnulf, I; Chaudhuri, K R; Morgan, J C; Gronseth, G S; Miyasaki, J; Iverson, D J; Weiner, W J

    2010-03-16

    Nonmotor symptoms (sleep dysfunction, sensory symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, mood disorders, and cognitive abnormalities) in Parkinson disease (PD) are a major cause of morbidity, yet are often underrecognized. This evidence-based practice parameter evaluates treatment options for the nonmotor symptoms of PD. Articles pertaining to cognitive and mood dysfunction in PD, as well as treatment of sialorrhea with botulinum toxin, were previously reviewed as part of American Academy of Neurology practice parameters and were not included here. A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index was performed to identify clinical trials in patients with nonmotor symptoms of PD published between 1966 and August 2008. Articles were classified according to a 4-tiered level of evidence scheme and recommendations were based on the level of evidence. Sildenafil citrate (50 mg) may be considered to treat erectile dysfunction in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) (Level C). Macrogol (polyethylene glycol) may be considered to treat constipation in patients with PD (Level C). The use of levodopa/carbidopa probably decreases the frequency of spontaneous nighttime leg movements, and should be considered to treat periodic limb movements of sleep in patients with PD (Level B). There is insufficient evidence to support or refute specific treatments for urinary incontinence, orthostatic hypotension, and anxiety (Level U). Future research should include concerted and interdisciplinary efforts toward finding treatments for nonmotor symptoms of PD.

  2. [Informed consent in clinical practice: persistent doubts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottow, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    Informed consent is the core aspect of the patient-physician relationship. Since its beginnings, clinical bioethics was opposed to the authoritarian paternalism characteristic of medicine since the 19th century. The informed consent was developed to provide patients with sufficient information to allow autonomous decisions when faced with medical diagnostic and therapeutic alternatives. In spite of bioethics’ effort to perfect informed consent, the discipline has been unable to avoid informed consent from becoming an impersonal and administrative procedure. Even though the major goal of this procedure is to provide sufficient information to allow patients an objective weighting of benefits and risks of medical practice, the uncertainties of medicine make full disclosure unattainable. Collecting more information finally leads to indecision and ultimate trust in medical advice. The clinical encounter is fundamentally a fiduciary relationship, and bioethics ought to accept that its main objective is to strengthen the trust bond that is essential to the clinical encounter. This goal may become incompatible with the quest for unlimited autonomy. Patients often will only require information as long as they distrust that medical institutions and their professionals are considering their interests and needs. The main proposal of this article is to temper bioethics’ insistence on autonomy, and accept that patients essentially seek to be protected and cared for. Informed consent ought to relent its efforts at full autonomy to the benefit of trustworthiness in medicine, and trust in clinical practice.

  3. Clinical writing: additional ethical and practical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Susan S

    2012-03-01

    The recommendations by Sieck (2011, Obtaining clinical writing informed consent versus using client disguise and recommendations for practice, Psychotherapy, 49, pp. 3-11.) are a helpful starting point for considering the ethical issues involved in the decision to seek or not to seek informed consent from clients before writing about them. Sieck makes a compelling case for the idea that there are circumstances in which the most ethical choice would be to engage in clinical writing about a client without seeking informed consent, but instead disguising the client's identity. The present response raises a number of questions not considered in the article by Sieck. First, how should one disguise a case? Moreover, how should one assess whether the disguise is sufficient to preserve confidentiality while not distorting the clinical material to the point that the material is no longer useful to the field? Second, how can we estimate the likelihood of clients reading clinical writing, particularly in the age of the Internet? Given that psychologist-authored blogs that include reference to clinical material are beginning to emerge, it is crucial that we engage in a much deeper dialogue about the ethics of clinical writing. Third, how does the presentation of clinical material influence public perceptions of psychotherapy and confidentiality? If these public perceptions, in turn, could influence the likelihood of seeking psychotherapy, might these attitudes be important to consider in ethical thinking about clinical writing? Finally, where do we draw the line between clinical writing and single case study research (which requires informed consent)? PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved

  4. The Child Neurology Trainee-as-Teacher: A Clinical Teaching Curriculum Tailored to Learners' Needs and Developmental Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernson-Leung, Miya E; Urion, David K

    2018-01-01

    Clinical teaching skills programs for resident physicians are increasingly offered. Less attention has been devoted to the unique educational roles of specialty residents and subspecialty fellows, many of whom will become academic faculty physicians. These teaching roles, and therefore a trainee's learning needs and motivation, also change over the course of training. We designed and implemented a two-year longitudinal teaching curriculum for child neurology and neurodevelopmental disabilities residents using adult learning theory principles: experiential learning and immediate applicability to specific roles. Core modules included teaching in clinical settings, adult learning, and giving feedback. Training-year-specific modules for second-year residents (n = 11) and final-year residents (n = 10) included teaching through consultation and promoting clinical reasoning in supervisory roles. Learners completed an 11-item self-assessment before and after intervention. The overall program significantly increased residents' self-assessed knowledge of how to assess the level of a learner (P = 0.02, Cohen d = 0.84) and comfort and skill in giving feedback (P = 0.04, d = 0.64; P = 0.04, d = 0.71). The final-year-specific curriculum additionally increased self-assessed skill in teaching same-specialty residents (P = 0.05, d = 1.07) and in promoting clinical reasoning (P = 0.03, d = 1.14). The program was rated highly by trainees and faculty, and has been adopted as an ongoing part of our training program. Our experience offers a reproducible model and theoretical framework for child neurology, neurodevelopmental disabilities, and other specialty programs to develop customized trainee-as-teacher curricula with specialty- and training-year-specific content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hibiscus sabdariffa increases hydroxocobalamin oral bioavailability and clinical efficacy in vitamin B12 deficiency with neurological symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souirti, Zouhayr; Loukili, Mouna; Soudy, Imar D; Rtibi, Kaies; Özel, Aslihan; Limas-Nzouzi, Nicolas; El Ouezzani, Seloua; Eto, Bruno

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the bioavailability and clinical benefits of oral new formulation (HB12 ) of hydroxocobalamin (Hdrx) with Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS). First, in an observational study, a cohort of 30 vitamin B12 -deficient patients (vit B12 < 200 pg/mL) with neurological symptoms received oral fixed dose of Hdrx containing 15 mg Hdrx daily for 10 days followed by 15 mg monthly. Clinical benefits were evaluated on haematological and biochemical parameters, and neurological improvement at days 10 and 90 compared to day 0. To understand the mechanism, intestinal mucosa from mice were mounted in vitro in Ussing chambers to measure Hdrx Fluxes. In the clinical study, serum vitamin B12 level increased from 55.1 ± 36.9 to 1330 ± 335.5 pg/mL at day 10 and 431.0 ± 24.27 pg/mL at day 90, without overt adverse effects. In mice ileum, (i) intestinal bioavailability of Hdrx increased in dose-dependent manner with HB12 . The apparent permeability of Hdrx was Papp = 34.9 ± 4.6 × 10(-6) cm/s in the presence of 3 mg/mL (HB12 B) compared to the control Papp = 6.2 ± 0.7 × 10(-6) cm/s. (ii) Total transepithelial electrical conductance (Gt ) increased in dose-dependent manner with HB12 , Gt = 161.5 ± 10.8 mS/cm² with HB12 B (Hdrx 1 mg + HS 3 mg) compared to the control Hdrx, Gt = 28.7 ± 4.0 mS/cm². In conclusion, the clinical study suggests that injections are not required when Hdrx is given orally. Intestinal bioavailability of Hdrx increased in vitro when it was used concomitantly with HS. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  6. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation for treating neurologic bladder in women: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar, Tahereh; Teimoory, Nastaran; Miri, Elahe; Nikfallah, Abolghasem; Naeimi, Mahsa; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a disabling disorder. Treatment of cases with OAB includes behavioral, pharmacological, surgical interventions and peripheral electrical stimulation. The goal of this study was to determine effects of posterior tibial nerve stimulation on sexual function and pelvic disorders in women with Overactive bladder (OAB). Fifty women were randomly assigned to PTNS (posterior tibial nerve stimulation) plus tolterodine or tolterodine alone treatment. Tolterodine group received 4 mg tolterodine daily for three months while the other group received this treatment plus percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for 12 consequence weeks. Two in PTNS group and 8 in the control group withdrew from the study. Age, education level, and occupation status were not significantly different between two groups. Mean total FSFI and its subscales were not significantly different before and after treatment between two groups. Urine leakage associated with a feeling of urgency and loss of stool or gas from the rectum beyond patient's control became significantly different after treatment between two groups. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation could help urinary problems in women with a neurologic bladder.

  7. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation for treating neurologic bladder in women: a randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Eftekhar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB is a disabling disorder. Treatment of cases with OAB includes behavioral, pharmacological, surgical interventions and peripheral electrical stimulation. The goal of this study was to determine effects of posterior tibial nerve stimulation on sexual function and pelvic disorders in women with Overactive bladder (OAB. Fifty women were randomly assigned to PTNS (posterior tibial nerve stimulation plus tolterodine or tolterodine alone treatment. Tolterodine group received 4 mg tolterodine daily for three months while the other group received this treatment plus percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for 12 consequence weeks. Two in PTNS group and 8 in the control group withdrew from the study. Age, education level, and occupation status were not significantly different between two groups. Mean total FSFI and its subscales were not significantly different before and after treatment between two groups. Urine leakage associated with a feeling of urgency and loss of stool or gas from the rectum beyond patient's control became significantly different after treatment between two groups. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation could help urinary problems in women with a neurologic bladder.

  8. Factors associated with delayed recovery in athletes with concussion treated at a pediatric neurology concussion clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Suzanne; Grim, Rod; Barron, Todd F; Wagenheim, Andrew; Hu, Yaowen Eliot; Hendell, Matthew; Deitch, John; Deibert, Ellen

    2015-11-01

    With the increase in knowledge and management of sport-related concussion over the last 15 years, there has been a shift from a grading scale approach to an individualized management approach. As a result, there is an increased need to better understand the factors involved in delayed recovery of concussion. The purpose of this retrospective study was to examine factors that may be associated with recovery from sport-related concussion in student athletes aged 11 to 18 years old. Of the 366 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 361 were included in our analysis. The primary dependent variable included days until athlete was able to return to play (RTP). Independent variables of interest included age, gender, academic performance, comorbid factors, sports, on-field markers, days until initial neurological evaluation, Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT®) scores, acute headache rescue medications, chronic headache medication, sleep medication, and referral to concussion rehabilitation program. Variables associated with longer median RTP were being female (35 days), having a referral to concussion rehabilitation program (53 days), being prescribed acute headache rescue therapy (34 days), and having chronic headache treatment (53 days) (all p athlete to have access to a provider trained in concussion management in a timely fashion in order to prevent delayed recovery and return to play.

  9. Neuroinflammation - using big data to inform clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendrou, Calliope A; McVean, Gil; Fugger, Lars

    2016-12-01

    Neuroinflammation is emerging as a central process in many neurological conditions, either as a causative factor or as a secondary response to nervous system insult. Understanding the causes and consequences of neuroinflammation could, therefore, provide insight that is needed to improve therapeutic interventions across many diseases. However, the complexity of the pathways involved necessitates the use of high-throughput approaches to extensively interrogate the process, and appropriate strategies to translate the data generated into clinical benefit. Use of 'big data' aims to generate, integrate and analyse large, heterogeneous datasets to provide in-depth insights into complex processes, and has the potential to unravel the complexities of neuroinflammation. Limitations in data analysis approaches currently prevent the full potential of big data being reached, but some aspects of big data are already yielding results. The implementation of 'omics' analyses in particular is becoming routine practice in biomedical research, and neuroimaging is producing large sets of complex data. In this Review, we evaluate the impact of the drive to collect and analyse big data on our understanding of neuroinflammation in disease. We describe the breadth of big data that are leading to an evolution in our understanding of this field, exemplify how these data are beginning to be of use in a clinical setting, and consider possible future directions.

  10. NEUROSYPHILIS IN THERAPEUTIC PRACTICE: CLINICAL OBSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe a clinical case of neurosyphilis diagnosed in a therapeutic inpatient facility.Materials and methods. Female patient T., 61, was hospitalized in the therapeutic department of a general hospital with referral diagnosis of “Stage II hypertensive heart disease, risk 4. Hypertensive crisis of 03.12.2015” with complaints of general fatigue, episodes of transient memory loss with full recovery, unstable blood pressure level. The patient was examined: She underwent treponemal and nontreponemal serological tests for antibodies against Treponema рallidum, hepatitis, human immunodeficiency virus; electrocardiogram; angiography of carotid and vertebral arteries; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI  of the brain with contrast; serological and microscopic examinations of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF.Results. The patient»s medical history described episodes of transient global amnesia with full memory recovery, more frequent in the last year; arterial hypertension; chronic urinary tract infection; and chronic cholecystitis with frequent courses of antibacterial therapy (ceftriaxone. Since 1986, a positive serological reaction for syphilis was observed (Wassermann reaction (WR +++ due to a history of primary syphilis. Considering reliable history of syphilis, positive serum confirmation tests for syphilis (nontreponemal: rapid plasma reagin test 3+; treponemal: passive hemagglutination reaction 4+, antibodies against T. pallidum (total – present, history of neuropsychological symptoms (transient amnesia and acute neurological symptoms before hospitalization (transient ischemic attack, brain MRI data (2 lesions of cerebral circulation disorders of ischemic type in the cortical branches of left and right mesencephalic arteries, a diagnosis of neurosyphilis was proposed, and lumbar puncture was performed for confirmation. Inflammatory characteristics of the CSF (cytosis 19/3, neutrophilia up to 12 cells, insignificant lymphocytosis up

  11. Bridging Neuroanatomy, Neuroradiology and Neurology: Three-Dimensional Interactive Atlas of Neurological Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Nowinski, W. L.; Chua, B.C.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding brain pathology along with the underlying neuroanatomy and the resulting neurological deficits is of vital importance in medical education and clinical practice. To facilitate and expedite this understanding, we created a three-dimensional (3D) interactive atlas of neurological disorders providing the correspondence between a brain lesion and the resulting disorder(s). The atlas contains a 3D highly parcellated atlas of normal neuroanatomy along with a brain pathology database. ...

  12. Litigations and the Obstetrician in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinma, JIB

    2016-01-01

    The expectation of obstetrics is a perfect outcome. Obstetrics malpractice can cause morbidity and mortality that may engender litigation. Globally, increasing trend to litigation in obstetrics practice has resulted in high indemnity cost to the obstetrician with consequent frustration and overall danger to the future of obstetrics practice. The objective was to review litigations and the Obstetrician in Clinical Practice, highlighting medical ethics, federation of gynecology and obstetrics (FIGO’s) ethical responsibility guideline on women's sexual and reproductive health and right; examine the relationship between medical ethics and medical laws; X-ray medical negligence and litigable obstetrics malpractices; and make recommendation towards the improvement of obstetrics practices to avert misconduct that would lead to litigation. Review involves a literature search on the internet in relevant journals, textbooks, and monographs. Knowledge and application of medical ethics are important to the obstetricians to avert medical negligence that will lead to litigation. A medical negligence can occur in any of the three triads of medicare viz: Diagnosis, advice/counseling, and treatment. Lawsuits in obstetrics generally center on errors of omission or commission especially in relation to the failure to perform caesarean section or to perform the operation early enough. Fear of litigation, high indemnity cost, and long working hours are among the main reasons given by obstetricians for ceasing obstetrics practice. Increasing global trend in litigation with high indemnity cost to the obstetrician is likely to jeopardize the future of obstetrics care especially in countries without medical insurance coverage for health practitioners. Litigation in obstetrics can be prevented through the Obstetrician's mindfulness of its possibility; acquainting themselves of the medical laws and guidelines related to their practice; ensuring adequate communication with, and consent of

  13. Narrative medicine in clinical genetics practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowaczyk, Małgorzata J M

    2012-08-01

    Over the last 30 years medicine has undergone a significant paradigm shift. Due to the tremendous advances of modern medicine more and more people are living longer with their illnesses. These people have stories to tell, and they want these stories to be heard: They are reclaiming their voices. As clinical geneticists we need to hear what these voices are telling us, especially so in our area of clinical care where cures are rare, and disease states can be permanent. Narrative medicine is an important new skill set that hones abilities to do just that.This article highlights how integral narrative medicine is to clinical genetics practice, how geneticists already employ many of its tools and how they practice it diligently every day. I will show how geneticists can further improve their abilities to hear and honor patients' stories by writing and sharing stories with patients and with each other as doctors, counselors, and nurses, social workers and chaplains. The review presents the skills of close reading and how they improve patient care and illustrates how geneticists can, by using reflective writing, reshape their emotions in order to understand them, to let them go, and to make room for more. It presents the major types of illness narratives whose recognition allows us to hear and understand patients' stories. When used, the tools of narrative medicine can result in better patient care. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Best Practices in Clinical Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Phansalkar, Shobha; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Jenders, Robert A.; Bobb, Anne M.; Halamka, John D.; Kuperman, Gilad; Payne, Thomas H.; Teasdale, S.; Vaida, A. J.; Bates, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence demonstrates that clinical decision support (CDS) is a powerful tool for improving healthcare quality and ensuring patient safety. However, implementing and maintaining effective decision support interventions presents multiple technical and organizational challenges. Purpose To identify best practices for CDS, using the domain of preventive care reminders as an example. Methods We assembled a panel of experts in CDS and held a series of facilitated online and inperson discussions. We analyzed the results of these discussions using a grounded theory method to elicit themes and best practices. Results Eight best practice themes were identified as important: deliver CDS in the most appropriate ways, develop effective governance structures, consider use of incentives, be aware of workflow, keep content current, monitor and evaluate impact, maintain high quality data, and consider sharing content. Keys themes within each of these areas were also described. Conclusion Successful implementation of CDS requires consideration of both technical and socio-technical factors. The themes identified in this study provide guidance on crucial factors that need consideration when CDS is implemented across healthcare settings. These best practice themes may be useful for developers, implementers, and users of decision support. PMID:21991299

  15. Clinical neuropsychology within adolescent and young-adult psychiatry: conceptualizing theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allott, Kelly; Proffitt, Tina-Marie; McGorry, Patrick D; Pantelis, Christos; Wood, Stephen J; Cumner, Marnie; Brewer, Warrick J

    2013-01-01

    Historically, clinical neuropsychology has made significant contributions to the understanding of brain-behavior relationships, particularly in neurological conditions. During the past several decades, neuropsychology has also become established as an important discipline in psychiatric settings. Cognition is increasingly recognized as being core to psychiatric illnesses and predictive of functional outcomes, augmenting theories regarding symptomatology and illness progression. Adult-type psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and other psychotic, mood, anxiety, eating, substance-related, and personality disorders) typically emerge during adolescence or young adulthood, a critical neurodevelopmental period. Clinical neuropsychological assessment in adolescent psychiatric patients is particularly valuable in informing clinical formulation and intervention and can be therapeutic across a number of levels. This article articulates the theoretical considerations and practical challenges and applications of clinical neuropsychology within adolescent and young-adult psychiatry. The importance of considering the neurodevelopmental context and its relationship to current theoretical models underpinning clinical practice are discussed.

  16. Evidence and experience with onabotulinumtoxinA in chronic migraine: Recommendations for daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago-Veiga, A B; Santos-Lasaosa, S; Cuadrado, M L; Guerrero, Á L; Irimia, P; Láinez, J M; Leira, R; Pascual, J; Sanchez Del Río, M; Viguera, J; Pozo-Rosich, P

    2017-11-20

    OnabotulinumtoxinA has been demonstrated to be effective as a preventive treatment in patients with chronic migraine (CM). Five years after the approval of onabotulinumtoxinA in Spain, the Headache Study Group of the Spanish Society of Neurology considered it worthwhile to gather a group of experts in treating patients with CM in order to draw up, based on current evidence and our own experience, a series of guidelines aimed at facilitating the use of the drug in daily clinical practice. For this purpose, we posed 12 questions that we ask ourselves as doctors, and which we are also asked by our patients. Each author responded to one question, and the document was then reviewed by everyone. We hope that this review will constitute a practical tool to help neurologists treating patients with CM. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. [Asthma clinical practice guidelines: advantages and pitfalls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Vicente; Bellido-Casado, Jesús; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Rodrigo, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    The Clinical Practice Guidelines on asthma have contributed towards unifying concepts and reaching a consensus on performances between different professional groups. However, they have failed in the overall improvement in the management of asthma, the final objective that they are meant to achieve. Today, almost 20 years after they appeared, the majority of asthmatic patients are still inadequately controlled, partly due to lack of follow up by doctors and the rest of health care staff who have to look after them. This lack of follow up of these recommendations is probably associated with a lack of well structured planning in their circulation and implementation. Also, although the recommendations of these guidelines agree in what is essential, they differ in other aspects, which in turn could be determining factors in clinical practice. The purpose of this article has been to establish the main differences in the recommendations that the principal clinical practice guidelines on the disease propose on the diagnosis, classification and treatment of asthma. To do this we have compared, The British Guideline on the Management of Asthma 2007, The Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention/Global Initiative for Asthma 2006 (GINA), the National Prevention program for Education on Asthma (Programa Nacional de Prevención para la Educación del Asma) (NAEPP), the Spanish Guide for the Management of Asthma (Guía Española para el Manejo del Asma 2003) (GEMA) and the ALAT y SEPAR guides, Latin-America and Spain. Recommendations for the Prevention and Treatment of Asthma Exacerbation (América Latina y España. Recomendaciones para la Prevención y el Tratamiento de la Exacerbación Asmática 2008) (ALERTA).

  18. Achieving Educational Goals in Neurology Ward from the Viewpoint of Clinical Clerkship at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Razazian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In medical education, setting goals for clinical clerkship is the responsibility of educational groups. Taking the students' opinions into account, it is possible to study the efficacy of education in terms of learning and achieving educational goals. (1In periodontics and restorative departments of Shahed and Tehran University of Medical Sciences, it is reported that, achieving educational goals is not poss-ible (2. Also, some studies have reported the inadequacy of educational objectives in anesthesia clerkship from the viewpoint of medical students (3. In this descriptive-analytic study, 166 medical students of neurology wards at Imam Reza Hospital in Kermanshah during 2011- 2012 were selected via a survey to study the achievement rate of educational goals. We used a questionnaire to collect data. Reliability of the questionnaire (including content and face validity was obtained via consulting with ten faculty members of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences.The mean age of the participants was 21.34 (±1.43 years. 60.5% of them were females. 3.6% were freshmen and 49.9% were sophomores. 79.5% knew the goals before the start of clinical clerkship and 76.5% took part in the justification session in which their responsibility and method of evaluation were presented. 78.3% of them received the emergency protocol of Neurology. Overall, the participants ranked the goal achievement as high (41.6%, well (45.2% and medium (23.3%. There was no statistically significantly association between achieving educational goals and age and clinical clerkship period. However, there was a statis¬tically significantly association between the increase rate of achieving educational goals and introducing the objectives at the beginning of clinical clerkship period (p=0.011, justification session at the beginning of clinical clerkship (p=0.019 being familiar with emergency protocols of Neurology (p=0.04 and the season (winter in comparison with fall and spring in

  19. The Sherlock Holmes method in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopeña, B

    2014-04-01

    This article lists the integral elements of the Sherlock Holmes method, which is based on the intelligent collection of information through detailed observation, careful listening and thorough examination. The information thus obtained is analyzed to develop the main and alternative hypotheses, which are shaped during the deductive process until the key leading to the solution is revealed. The Holmes investigative method applied to clinical practice highlights the advisability of having physicians reason through and seek out the causes of the disease with the data obtained from acute observation, a detailed review of the medical history and careful physical examination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Confidentiality breaches in clinical practice: what happens in hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran-Aroca, Cristina M; Girela-Lopez, Eloy; Collazo-Chao, Eliseo; Montero-Pérez-Barquero, Manuel; Muñoz-Villanueva, Maria C

    2016-09-02

    Respect for confidentiality is important to safeguard the well-being of patients and ensure the confidence of society in the doctor-patient relationship. The aim of our study is to examine real situations in which there has been a breach of confidentiality, by means of direct observation in clinical practice. By means of direct observation, our study examines real situations in which there has been a breach of confidentiality in a tertiary hospital. To observe and collect data on these situations, we recruited students enrolled in the Medical Degree Program at the University of Cordoba. The observers recorded their entries on standardized templates during clinical internships in different departments: Internal Medicine; Gynecology and Obstetrics; Pediatrics; Emergency Medicine; General and Digestive Surgery; Maxillofacial Surgery; Plastic Surgery; Orthopedics and Traumatology; Digestive; Dermatology; Rheumatology; Mental Health; Nephrology; Pneumology; Neurology; and Ophthalmology. Following 7138 days and 33157 h of observation, we found an estimated Frequency Index of one breach per 62.5 h. As regards the typology of the observed breaches, the most frequent (54,6 %) were related to the consultation and/or disclosure of clinical and/or personal data to medical personnel not involved in the patient's clinical care, as well as people external to the hospital. As regards their severity, severe breaches were the most frequent, accounting for 46.7 % of all incidents. Most of the reported incidents were observed in public areas (37.9 %), such as corridors, elevators, the cafeteria, stairs, and locker rooms. In addition to aspects related to hospital organization or infrastructure, we have shown that all healthcare personnel are involved in confidentiality breaches, especially physicians. While most are committed unintentionally, a non-negligible number are severe, repeated breaches (9.5 %), thus suggesting a certain carelessness, perhaps through ignorance about

  1. Clinical management of psoriasis: principles and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, M; Feldman, S R; Walther, R; Shelk, J; Morgan, P; Gutkin, S W

    2001-01-01

    A chronic condition that compromises many patients' quality of life, psoriasis is treatable with a range of agents, either alone or in combination. Clinical management strategies using these therapies can be organized as a stepped-care approach. For mild disease, corticosteroids and other topical therapies (step 1) are often appropriate. When lesions are more pronounced or extensive, phototherapy (step 2) is often the treatment of choice, and topical treatments or the step 3 agent acitretin can be added to enhance or accelerate therapeutic responses. Step 3 agents, which also include cyclosporine and methotrexate, may be contemplated when psoriasis is moderate or severe. Acitretin may cause acute adverse effects, including mucocutaneous effects, which can be avoided by reducing dosage. Methotrexate treatment can lead to bone marrow suppression and hepatotoxicity, and cyclosporine can cause nephrotoxicity. The clinical uses of these agents are illustrated in part through case presentations drawn from the authors' practices, and the supportive role of the National Psoriasis Foundation is reviewed.

  2. Biosensors in Clinical Practice: Focus on Oncohematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Cortelezzi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are devices that are capable of detecting specific biological analytes and converting their presence or concentration into some electrical, thermal, optical or other signal that can be easily analysed. The first biosensor was designed by Clark and Lyons in 1962 as a means of measuring glucose. Since then, much progress has been made and the applications of biosensors are today potentially boundless. This review is limited to their clinical applications, particularly in the field of oncohematology. Biosensors have recently been developed in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by hematological malignancies, such as the biosensor for assessing the in vitro pre-treatment efficacy of cytarabine in acute myeloid leukemia, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor for assessing the efficacy of imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. The review also considers the challenges and future perspectives of biosensors in clinical practice.

  3. A real life clinical practice of neurologists in the ambulatory setting in Thailand: a pragmatic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannikar Kongbunkiat

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The burden of neurological disorders is high in developing countries. Real life data from neurologists as to how they practice in Thailand are limited in literature. Practices of neurologists in a university hospital clinical setting in Thailand were studied. A prospective study was performed at the ambulatory neurology clinic, Khon Kaen University Hospital, between 1 February and 31 October 2009. The following data were recorded: numbers of patients, characteristics of patients, consultation notes, and time spent for each patient. There were three neurologists, each of whom ran one afternoon clinic, once a week. There were 6137 visits during the 9 months, with an average of 681 visits per month. The total number of patients was 2834. The three most common diseases were cerebrovascular diseases (33%, epilepsy (16%, and movement disorders (non-Parkinson’s disease, 12%. Neurologists spent an average of 6.34 minutes per patient. In conclusion, neurologists in medical schools have limited time to take care of each patient. Several strategies are needed in medical education and neurology training to improve the quality of care.

  4. Inflammatory diseases: Integrating biosimilars into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Steven R

    2015-06-01

    To discuss considerations regarding the selection, prescribing, and monitoring of biosimilars in the clinical management of patients with inflammatory disorders. A search of the Internet as well as PubMed was conducted through August 2014 for information related to the clinical use of biosimilars in chronic inflammatory disorders using the keywords biosimilar, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn׳s disease, ulcerative colitis, and ankylosing spondylitis. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) websites were searched for biosimilar guidelines. Articles and guidelines relating to integrating biosimilars into the clinical management of patients with inflammatory disorders have been published by regulatory agencies, professional associations, healthcare providers, and others. The recent approval of the biosimilar infliximab in some countries makes biosimilars a reality for rheumatologists and others involved in the care of patients with inflammatory disorders. To successfully and confidently integrate biosimilars into clinical practice, physicians must understand factors such as variation in innovator/reference products, extrapolation of data, naming and labeling, interchangeability and automatic substitution, and pharmacovigilance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neurologic Complications of Pre-eclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeman, Gerda G.

    Pre-eclampsia is mainly responsible for the world's large maternal mortality rates, mostly due to acute cerebral complications. This review provides insight into the pathogenesis of the neurologic complications of hypertensive disease in pregnancy. In addition, practical relevance for clinical care

  6. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaj, T J; Nikendei, C

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or "skills labs", i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills. In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I) the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II) an outline of the underlying idea and (III) an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV) the training method's effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V) the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI) the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training.

  7. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugaj, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills.In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II an outline of the underlying idea and (III an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV the training method’s effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training.

  8. Clinical Practices in Collegiate Concussion Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Christine M; Kroshus, Emily; Stamm, Julie M; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Pepin, Michael J; Meehan, William P

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, sports leagues and sports medicine experts have developed guidelines for concussion management. The extent to which current clinical practice is consistent with guideline recommendations is unclear. At the collegiate level, there have been few examinations of concussion management practices and the extent to which meaningful differences across divisions of competition exist. The purposes of this study were to (1) examine current practices in concussion diagnosis and management at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) member colleges, (2) explore the extent to which current practices reflect current recommendations for concussion diagnosis and management, and (3) determine whether there are differences in management patterns across divisions of competition. Descriptive epidemiology study. An electronic questionnaire was sent to sports medicine clinicians at all NCAA member colleges during September and October 2013. Clinicians were asked about baseline assessments, diagnosis and management practices, return-to-play protocols, the perceived prevalence of underdiagnosis, and basic demographic information. Approximately 30% (n = 866) of contacted clinicians, representing nearly 50% (n = 527) of NCAA member colleges, responded to the questionnaire. Preparticipation baseline examinations were administered at the majority of schools (95%), but most (87.5%) administered baseline assessments only to selected high-risk athletes. Computerized neurocognitive testing and balance assessments were most commonly used as preseason baseline and postinjury assessments. Multimodal examination in line with NCAA and other guidance was used only at a minority of institutions. Athletic trainers most commonly administered and interpreted the preseason baseline examination. Most clinicians reported that their institutions' practices were in line with NCAA guidelines during the first 24 hours of an athlete's concussion diagnosis, with exact percentages varying

  9. Clinical, neurological and clinicopathological signs, treatment and outcome of metaldehyde intoxication in 18 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yas-Natan, E; Segev, G; Aroch, I

    2007-08-01

    To describe the clinical signs, clinicopathological abnormalities and outcome of metaldehyde intoxication in dogs. Medical records of dogs presenting between 1989 and 2005 with a diagnosis of metaldehyde toxicity were reviewed retrospectively. Data obtained from the medical record included signalment, history, clinical signs, laboratory tests results, hospitalisation period length, treatments and outcome. Eighteen dogs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The most prevalent clinical signs were seizures, hyperthermia, tachycardia and muscle tremors. Serum biochemistry abnormalities included increased serum muscle enzymes activities, acidaemia (six dogs) and decreased blood bicarbonate (eight dogs). Treatment was symptomatic and supportive. Hyperbilirubinaemia was observed in two dogs. Diazepam was the most commonly used anticonvulsant followed by phenobarbitone and pentobarbital. General inhalant anaesthesia was required in nine of 18 dogs with seizures unresponsive to anticonvulsants. The survival was 83 per cent (15 of 18 dogs). This clinical study recorded, for the first time in the veterinary literature, several clinicopathological abnormalities from severely intoxicated dogs. Metabolic acidosis was common, while acute or delayed hepatotoxicity was an uncommon complication.

  10. Down Syndrome in the Neurology Clinic: Too Much? Too Little? Too Late?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larner, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a review of all patients with Down syndrome seen over a 5-year period by one consultant neurologist in general outpatient and specialist cognitive function clinics. It revealed only 7 cases in greater than 4500 general referrals (= 0.2%), all referred with suspected seizure disorders. The diagnosis of epilepsy was confirmed in…

  11. Outcome of managing impotence in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braatvedt, G D

    1999-07-23

    Outside of controlled clinical trials, the outcome of treatment for unselected men with impotence is uncertain. This study aims to describe the clinical course of consecutive, unselected men referred to a specialist endocrinology private practice with a primary diagnosis of impotence. Consecutive men referred with a primary diagnosis of impotence between June 1995 and December 1997 were studied. After initial evaluation and appropriate investigation, treatment with testosterone in hypogonadal men and instruction in the use of a vacuum device and intracavernosal alprostadil (Caverject) in all men was offered. All men were followed up by telephone and/or questionnaire about erection outcome three to twelve months later. Nineteen diabetic men, aged 53.1+/-8.2 years and forty non-diabetic men, aged 54.8+/-11.6 years were seen. Follow-up information beyond three months was complete in fifty-three (90%). Eighteen eugonadal men chose no further therapy and four of these men had spontaneous return of erections. Eight men were hypogonadal and potency returned in two of six men treated with replacement testosterone. Nine men used the vacuum device, which was effective in three of them. Forty-one men had a trial of Caverject injection, which was effective in twenty-eight. Only twelve of these men used Caverject for longer than six months. Return of erections with therapy beyond three months in unselected men with impotence is successful in only about one-third. Unexpected hypogonadism is relatively common in impotent men, but testosterone replacement therapy has a low rate of improving erections. New therapies for impotence need careful follow-up studies to assess their effectiveness in clinical practice.

  12. Frequency of seizure causes in patients referred to neurology clinic in Khorramabad city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    parviz Bahrami

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Although in most cases seizure is a benign disorder, the frequency of those groups of seizures which need to investigation, diagnosis and special treatment planning, is so great that in each case the full description, detail examination and para clinical assessment should be performed because the diagnostic assessment influences the treatment decisions, family counseling, the need to be followed, and particular follow-up of these patients.

  13. [Progress in methodological characteristics of clinical practice guideline for osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, D; Wang, B; Lin, J H

    2017-06-01

    At present, several clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of osteoarthritis have been developed by institutes or societies. The ultimate purpose of developing clinical practice guidelines is to formulate the process in the treatment of osteoarthritis effectively. However, the methodologies used in developing clinical practice guidelines may place an influence on the transformation and application of that in treating osteoarthritis. The present study summarized the methodological features of individual clinical practice guideline and presented the tools for quality evaluation of clinical practice guideline. The limitations of current osteoarthritis guidelines of China are also indicated. The review article might help relevant institutions improve the quality in developing guide and clinical transformation.

  14. Common Data Elements for Spinal Cord Injury Clinical Research: A National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Alai, Sherita; Anderson, Kim; Charlifue, Susan; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael; Flanders, Adam E.; Jones, Linda; Kleitman, Naomi; Lans, Aria; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Odenkirchen, Joanne; Steeves, John; Tansey, Keith; Widerström-Noga, Eva; Jakeman, Lyn B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a comprehensive set of common data elements (CDEs), data definitions, case report forms and guidelines for use in spinal cord injury (SCI) clinical research, as part of the CDE project at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) of the USA National Institutes of Health. Setting International Working Groups Methods Nine working groups composed of international experts reviewed existing CDEs and instruments, created new elements when needed, and provided recommendations for SCI clinical research. The project was carried out in collaboration with and cross-referenced to development of the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) International SCI Data Sets. The recommendations were compiled, subjected to internal review, and posted online for external public comment. The final version was reviewed by all working groups and the NINDS CDE team prior to release. Results The NINDS SCI CDEs and supporting documents are publically available on the NINDS CDE website and the ISCoS website. The CDEs span the continuum of SCI care and the full range of domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Conclusions Widespread use of common data elements can facilitate SCI clinical research and trial design, data sharing, and retrospective analyses. Continued international collaboration will enable consistent data collection and reporting, and will help ensure that the data elements are updated, reviewed and broadcast as additional evidence is obtained. PMID:25665542

  15. Eslicarbazepine acetate as adjunctive therapy in clinical practice: ESLADOBA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, J; Breia, P; Pimentel, J; Pelejão, R; Carvalho, M; Mateus, P; Grebe, H; Mestre, A; Fernandes, H; Sousa, R; Gala, A

    2017-11-01

    To assess seizure control and tolerability of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) as adjunctive therapy to one baseline antiepileptic drug (AED), in adults with partial-onset seizures (POS) with or without secondary generalization. Multicenter, non-interventional, prospective cohort study conducted between March 2012 and September 2014 at 12 neurology departments in Portugal. Adults with POS not controlled with one AED who had initiated ESL as adjunctive treatment were enrolled. Retention rate was defined at the final visit (Vfinal) 6-9 months of follow-up. Proportion of responders, seizure-free, changes in seizure frequency were evaluated using patients' diaries. Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGI-C) and Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S) were assessed by the neurologist. Fifty-two patients (48.1% male) were included with mean age 41.5±13.3 years. Mean epilepsy duration was 18.5±14.8 years; mean seizure frequency in the four previous weeks to baseline was 7.5±12.7. At Vfinal, retention rate was 73.0%; responder rate and seizure-free rates were 71.1% and 39.5%, respectively. The median relative reduction in seizure frequency between baseline and Vfinal was 82.2%. A reduction in epilepsy severity (CGI-S) was observed in 42.1%. According to CGI-C, 73.6% patients had their epilepsy "much improved" or "very much improved". Twelve patients (23.1%) had at least one adverse event (AE), two (3.9%) had one serious AE, and five (9.6%) discontinued due to AE. Eslicarbazepine acetate showed good retention rates, elicited a significant reduction in seizure frequency, and was well tolerated when used in the clinical practice. © 2017 The Authors. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Are the French neurology residents satisfied with their training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codron, P; Roux, T; Le Guennec, L; Zuber, M

    2015-11-01

    There have been dramatic changes in neurology over the past decade; these advances require a constant adaptation of residents' theoretical and practical training. The French Association of Neurology Residents and the College of Neurology Teachers conducted a national survey to assess the French neurology residents' satisfaction about their training. A 16-item questionnaire was sent via e-mail to French neurology residents completing training in 2014. Data were collected and processed anonymously. Of eligible respondents, 126 returned the survey, representing approximately 40% of all the French neurology residents. Most residents (78%) rated their clinical training favorably. Seventy-two percent reported good to excellent quality teaching of neurology courses from their faculty. However, many residents (40%) felt insufficient their doctoral thesis supervision. All residents intended to enter fellowship training after their residency, and most of them (68%) planned to practice in a medical center. French neurology residents seemed satisfied with the structure and quality of their training program. However, efforts are required to improve management of the doctoral thesis and make private practice more attractive and accessible during the residency. In the future, similar surveys should be scheduled to regularly assess neurology residents' satisfaction and the impact of the forthcoming national and European reforms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. AML in 2017: Advances in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Jacob M

    2017-12-01

    Numerous advances have been made in the biology and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 2017. These include the integration of the assessment of minimal residual disease (MRD) into clinical practice, the approval and near approval of new agents, improvement in therapy for older patients, and the development of a number of promising new agents, including IDH inhibitors, a Hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitor, and a histone deacetylase inhibitor. In addition, the concept of chemotherapy manipulation is still valid and can increase efficacy in some AML populations, and transplant patterns have shifted, enabling more patients to receive a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. These and other advances are critical to improve the outcome for patients with AML. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Self-compassion in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germer, Christopher K; Neff, Kristin D

    2013-08-01

    Self-compassion is conceptualized as containing 3 core components: self-kindness versus self-judgment, common humanity versus isolation, and mindfulness versus overidentification, when relating to painful experiences. Research evidence demonstrates that self-compassion is related to psychological flourishing and reduced psychopathology. Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) is an 8-week training program, meeting 2.5 hours each week, designed to help participants cultivate self-compassion. MSC contains a variety of meditations (e.g., loving-kindness, affectionate breathing) as well as informal practices for use in daily life (e.g., soothing touch, self-compassionate letter writing). A detailed clinical case illustrates the journey of a client through the 8 weeks of MSC training, describing the key features of each session and the client's response. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Charles Miller Fisher: a giant of neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    C. Miller Fisher MD, one of the great neurologists in the 20th century, died in April 2012. Born in Canada, he studied medicine at the University of Toronto. As a Canadian Navy medical doctor he participated in World War II and was a war prisoner from 1941 to 1944. He did a residency in neurology at the Montreal Neurological Institute between 1946 and 1948, and later on was a Fellow in Neurology and Neuropathology at the Boston City Hospital. In 1954 he entered the Massachusetts General Hospital as a neurologist and neuropathologist, where he remained until his retirement, in 2005. His academic career ended as Professor Emeritus at Harvard University. His area of special interest in neurology was cerebrovascular disease (CVD). In 1954 he created the first Vascular Neurology service in the world and trained many leading neurologists on this field. His scientific contributions are present in more than 250 publications, as journal articles and book chapters. Many of his articles, certainly not restricted to CVD, were seminal in neurology. Several concepts and terms that he coined are currently used in daily clinical practice. The chapters on CVD, in seven consecutive editions of Harrison's Internal Medicine textbook, are among his highlights. His death was deeply felt by the neurological community.

  20. Clinical and neurological findings of severe vitamin B12 deficiency in infancy and importance of early diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Nihat; Koc, Ahmet; Üstyol, Lokman; Peker, Erdal; Abuhandan, Mahmut

    2013-10-01

    Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency among children in developing countries may lead to a severe clinical status. In this article, the clinical manifestations of vitamin B12 deficiency and the consequences of delay in its diagnosis have been evaluated. A total of 41 patients who were hospitalised and treated with the diagnosis of severe vitamin B12 deficiency in the paediatric haematology department of the hospital were enrolled in the trial. The diagnosis of severe vitamin B12 deficiency was based on haematological values, a serum vitamin B12 level of vitamin B12 provided recovery in all the patients. The mean age of the patients with full recovery was 11.7 months, while the mean age of patients with partial recovery was 12.9 months. As a delay in the diagnosis causes irreversible neurological damage, early diagnosis and treatment is highly important. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  1. Clinical Understanding of Spasticity: Implications for Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozina Bhimani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is a poorly understood phenomenon. The aim of this paper is to understand the effect of spasticity on daily life and identify bedside strategies that enhance patient’s function and improve comfort. Spasticity and clonus result from an upper motor neuron lesion that disinhibits the tendon stretch reflex; however, they are differentiated in the fact that spasticity results in a velocity dependent tightness of muscle whereas clonus results in uncontrollable jerks of the muscle. Clinical strategies that address function and comfort are paramount. This is a secondary content analysis using a qualitative research design. Adults experiencing spasticity associated with neuromuscular disorder were asked to participate during inpatient acute rehabilitation. They were asked to complete a semistructured interview to explain and describe the nature of their experienced spasticity on daily basis. Spasticity affects activities of daily living, function, and mobility. Undertreated spasticity can lead to pain, immobility, and risk of falls. There were missed opportunities to adequately care for patients with spasticity. Bedside care strategies identified by patients with spasticity are outlined. Uses of alternative therapies in conjunction with medications are needed to better manage spasticity. Patient reports on spasticity are important and should be part of clinical evaluation and practice.

  2. Clinical Understanding of Spasticity: Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Spasticity is a poorly understood phenomenon. The aim of this paper is to understand the effect of spasticity on daily life and identify bedside strategies that enhance patient's function and improve comfort. Spasticity and clonus result from an upper motor neuron lesion that disinhibits the tendon stretch reflex; however, they are differentiated in the fact that spasticity results in a velocity dependent tightness of muscle whereas clonus results in uncontrollable jerks of the muscle. Clinical strategies that address function and comfort are paramount. This is a secondary content analysis using a qualitative research design. Adults experiencing spasticity associated with neuromuscular disorder were asked to participate during inpatient acute rehabilitation. They were asked to complete a semistructured interview to explain and describe the nature of their experienced spasticity on daily basis. Spasticity affects activities of daily living, function, and mobility. Undertreated spasticity can lead to pain, immobility, and risk of falls. There were missed opportunities to adequately care for patients with spasticity. Bedside care strategies identified by patients with spasticity are outlined. Uses of alternative therapies in conjunction with medications are needed to better manage spasticity. Patient reports on spasticity are important and should be part of clinical evaluation and practice. PMID:25276432

  3. Neurology and international organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J

    2013-07-23

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private-public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and colleges. The continued engagement of neurologists is essential for the growing number of international organizations that can and should incorporate neurologic disease into their global agendas.

  4. Pharmacotherapy of Obesity: Clinical Trials to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadde, Kishore M; Pritham Raj, Y

    2017-05-01

    This review provides an overview of the current state of drug therapy for obesity, with a focus on four new drug therapies-lorcaserin, phentermine/topiramate, naltrexone/bupropion, and liraglutide 3.0 mg-which have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for long-term management of obesity since 2012. Topics discussed in this paper include rationale for pharmacotherapy, history of antiobesity drugs, and efficacy and safety data from randomized controlled trials with implications for clinical practice. Weight loss achieved by currently approved drugs ranges from approximately 3 to 9%, above and beyond weight loss with lifestyle counseling alone, after a year. Response and attrition rates in clinical trials indicate that the benefits of pharmacotherapy range from substantial for some patients, modest for others, and no benefits for others still. Decisions regarding selection of a suitable drug from the available pharmacotherapy options and duration of treatment should be based on the expected and observed benefit-to-risk balance and tailored to the needs of each individual patient using the principles of shared decision-making.

  5. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE: CLINICAL GUIDELINES AND REAL CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Shavarova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Expert assessment of real clinical practice compliance with national guidelines on management of patients with chronic heart failure (HF before the opening of the Expert Center of HF treatment.Material and methods. All patients admitted to 2 city clinical hospitals of Moscow with HF were included into the register. Clinical, demographic, laboratory and instrumental characteristics and medical treatment before and during hospitalization were evaluated, as well as recommendations contained in the discharge summary.Results. 300 patients with HF were included into the register. The mean age was 75 years (39, 95; the proportion of men – 44%. 95% of patients had HF IIIV (NYHA, among them 24% HF II, 61% HF III, 15% HF IV (NYHA. HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF was found in 45% of patients. 22% of the patients did not receive medical treatment before admission. 34% of patients with HFrEF received ACE inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, of which only 23% in effective dose. β-blockers were prescribed in 41% of HFeEF patients, of which 22% in the target dose. A third of patients needed in mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRA received spironolactone. During hospitalization 81% of HFrEF patients received ACEI therapy, 12% – ARBs, 91% – β-blockers, 90% – MRA, 81% – loop diuretics and 13% – thiazide diuretics. According to the discharge summary 5% of patients did not receive post-discharge blocker of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system without explanation in the medical documentation. β-blocker with proven efficacy was prescribed to 70% of HFrEF patients. Spironolactone was recommended after discharge in 89% of HFrEF patients.Conclusion. Implementation of register of hospitalized patients with HF gives an opportunity to identify shortcomings in the provision of medical care both in outpatient and inpatient stages. 

  6. Evidence-based practice: a trainee clinical psychologist perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is now the dominant model in health care; its aim is to increase the use of research evidence to inform clinical decision making. Clinical practice guidelines are the predominant method by which research is distilled into practice recommendations. Clinical psychology has its own model which promotes the integration of research evidence with clinical expertise, the scientist practitioner model (SPM). Recent developments within the United Kingdom health service, su...

  7. Neuro-QOL: brief measures of health-related quality of life for clinical research in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cella, D; Lai, J-S; Nowinski, C J; Victorson, D; Peterman, A; Miller, D; Bethoux, F; Heinemann, A; Rubin, S; Cavazos, J E; Reder, A T; Sufit, R; Simuni, T; Holmes, G L; Siderowf, A; Wojna, V; Bode, R; McKinney, N; Podrabsky, T; Wortman, K; Choi, S; Gershon, R; Rothrock, N; Moy, C

    2012-06-05

    To address the need for brief, reliable, valid, and standardized quality of life (QOL) assessment applicable across neurologic conditions. Drawing from larger calibrated item banks, we developed short measures (8-9 items each) of 13 different QOL domains across physical, mental, and social health and evaluated their validity and reliability. Three samples were utilized during short form development: general population (Internet-based, n = 2,113); clinical panel (Internet-based, n = 553); and clinical outpatient (clinic-based, n = 581). All short forms are expressed as T scores with a mean of 50 and SD of 10. Internal consistency (Cronbach α) of the 13 short forms ranged from 0.85 to 0.97. Correlations between short form and full-length item bank scores ranged from 0.88 to 0.99 (0.82-0.96 after removing common items from banks). Online respondents were asked whether they had any of 19 different chronic health conditions, and whether or not those reported conditions interfered with ability to function normally. All short forms, across physical, mental, and social health, were able to separate people who reported no health condition from those who reported 1-2 or 3 or more. In addition, scores on all 13 domains were worse for people who acknowledged being limited by the health conditions they reported, compared to those who reported conditions but were not limited by them. These 13 brief measures of self-reported QOL are reliable and show preliminary evidence of concurrent validity inasmuch as they differentiate people based upon number of reported health conditions and whether those reported conditions impede normal function.

  8. Factors affecting Korean nursing student empowerment in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yang-Heui; Choi, Jihea

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the phenomenon of nursing student empowerment in clinical practice is important. Investigating the cognition of empowerment and identifying predictors are necessary to enhance nursing student empowerment in clinical practice. To identify empowerment predictors for Korean nursing students in clinical practice based on studies by Bradbury-Jones et al. and Spreitzer. A cross-sectional design was used for this study. This study was performed in three nursing colleges in Korea, all of which had similar baccalaureate nursing curricula. Three hundred seven junior or senior nursing students completed a survey designed to measure factors that were hypothesized to influence nursing student empowerment in clinical practice. Data were collected from November to December 2011. Study variables included self-esteem, clinical decision making, being valued as a learner, satisfaction regarding practice with a team member, perception on professor/instructor/clinical preceptor attitude, and total number of clinical practice fields. Data were analyzed using stepwise multiple regression analyses. All of the hypothesized study variables were significantly correlated to nursing student empowerment. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that clinical decision making in nursing (t=7.59, pnursing student empowerment in clinical practice will be possible by using educational strategies to improve nursing student clinical decision making. Simultaneously, attitudes of nurse educators are also important to ensure that nursing students are treated as valued learners and to increase student self-esteem in clinical practice. Finally, diverse clinical practice field environments should be considered to enhance experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical prospective study of biochemical markers and evoked potentials for identifying adverse neurological outcome after thoracic and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lases, E.C.; Schepens, M.A.; Haas, F.J.L.M.; Aarts, L.P.H.J.; Beek, H.T. ter; Dongen, E. van; Siegers, H.P.; Tweel, I. van de; Boezeman, E.H.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neurological deficit after repair of a thoracic or thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAA/TAAA) remains a devastating complication. The aim of our study was to investigate the clinical value of biochemical markers [S-100B, neurone-specific enolase (NSE) and lactate dehydrogenase (LD)],

  10. Clinical relevance of cortical spreading depression in neurological disorders: migraine, malignant stroke, subarachnoid and intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Martin; Dreier, Jens Peter; Fabricius, Martin; Hartings, Jed A; Graf, Rudolf; Strong, Anthony John

    2011-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) and depolarization waves are associated with dramatic failure of brain ion homeostasis, efflux of excitatory amino acids from nerve cells, increased energy metabolism and changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). There is strong clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that CSD is involved in the mechanism of migraine, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. The implications of these findings are widespread and suggest that intrinsic brain mechanisms have the potential to worsen the outcome of cerebrovascular episodes or brain trauma. The consequences of these intrinsic mechanisms are intimately linked to the composition of the brain extracellular microenvironment and to the level of brain perfusion and in consequence brain energy supply. This paper summarizes the evidence provided by novel invasive techniques, which implicates CSD as a pathophysiological mechanism for this group of acute neurological disorders. The findings have implications for monitoring and treatment of patients with acute brain disorders in the intensive care unit. Drawing on the large body of experimental findings from animal studies of CSD obtained during decades we suggest treatment strategies, which may be used to prevent or attenuate secondary neuronal damage in acutely injured human brain cortex caused by depolarization waves.

  11. Stability of psychiatric diagnoses in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daradkeh, T K

    1996-01-01

    This is a retrospective study that aimed at studying the diagnostic stability of psychiatric diagnoses over a 4-year period. Three-hundred and twelve patients (n = 312) admitted more than once to Al Ain in-patient unit from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1993, were the subjects for this study. The sample included patients with the following index diagnoses: acute psychoses (n = 37), alcohol abuse (n = 15), bipolar disorder (n = 27), depressive disorders (n = 63), drug abuse (n = 21), hysteria (n = 23), neurotic disorders (n = 50) and schizophrenia (n = 76). Diagnoses on discharge for first admissions were considered the index diagnoses. The shift from index diagnoses to subsequent diagnoses was counted. Diagnostic stability was calculated as the percentages of index diagnoses that did not change over time. In nearly half of the patients the index diagnoses changed over the 4-year period. Highest diagnostic stability was found in patients with index diagnoses of alcohol abuse, schizophrenia and drug abuse (92%, 74% and 71% respectively), while the lowest stability was found in patients with neurotic, hysterical, depressive disorders, acute psychoses and bipolar disorders (38%, 48% and 45%, 42%, 52% respectively). Two distinct patterns of shifts were noted. First shift occurred between functional psychoses and second shift between depressive and neurotic disorders. This study provides further support to the notion that diagnostic stability in clinical practice is still far from being satisfactory.

  12. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's Palsy executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell's Palsy. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 11 recommendations developed encourage accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment and, when applicable, facilitate patient follow-up to address the management of long-term sequelae or evaluation of new or worsening symptoms not indicative of Bell's palsy. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy; some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, there are numerous diagnostic tests available that are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have an unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy.

  13. [Probiotics and prebiotics in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olveira Fuster, G; González-Molero, I

    2007-05-01

    This article revises the concepts of prebiotics, probiotics and symbiotics, and their use in different situations of daily clinical practice. With a high level of evidence, it is concluded that the use of certain strains of probiotics significantly reduces the risk for antibiotic-induced diarrhea. Although further studies are needed, the use of probiotics, prebiotics, and symbiotics in people suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (particularly ulcerative colitis, and pouchitis) might improve the rates of remission induction/maintenance. The administration of probiotics and symbiotics to patients with liver transplant, severe acute pancreatitis, and intensive and surgical care patients, emerges as a promising therapeutic option that seems to reduce the number of infections; however, it is currently no possible to establish evidence-based recommendations, with a need for a higher number of better designed works. About safety of probiotics and symbiotics, the benefits/risks ratio clearly favors the former since the risk for infection is low, even in immunosuppressed patients. There are, however, selected groups of patients in which caution is advised.

  14. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  15. The clinical nurse specialist and psychiatrist in joint practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shires, B W; Spector, P M

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a joint practice model between a clinical nurse specialist and psychiatrist. The authors address factors to consider in establishing a joint practice--negotiation of roles and benefits as well as clinical supervision. In addition, specific clinical responsibilities for the nurse specialist, as well as potential expanded duties, are outlined.

  16. Clinical Practice Patterns of Canadian Couple/Marital/Family Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, John; Dienhart, Anna; Schmidt, Jonathan; Turner, Jean

    2009-01-01

    This clinical practice pattern survey had two unique aspects. It was a national survey of American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) members in Canada that included all AAMFT membership categories, including student, affiliate, associate, clinical, and supervisor. It compared practice pattern data for clinical members from Canada…

  17. Introducing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Janevik-Ivanovska, Emilija; Avmedovski, Fatmir; YAMAMOTO, Mayumi; Bhonsle, Uday

    2009-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a major diagnostic imaging technique predominantly used in determining the presence and severity of cancers, neurological conditions, and cardiovascular diseases. It is currently the most effective way to check for cancer recurrences and it offers significant advantages over other forms of imaging such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in detecting disease in many patients. In the USA, an estimated 1 129 900 clinical PE...

  18. Quality of clinical trials for selected priority mental and neurological disorders in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulugeta A

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anwar Mulugeta,1 Girmay Medhin,2 Getnet Yimer,1 Rahimush Jemal,3 Abebaw Fekadu,4,5 1Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, 2Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University, 3Department of Pharmacy, Tikur Anbesa Hospital, 4Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; 5Department of Psychological Medicine, Centre for Affective Disorders, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, UK Background: There is a developing consensus on the effectiveness of various interventions for mental disorders in low- and middle-income countries, and it has been proposed that the main task is to scale up these interventions. In this context, we aimed to review the quality and extent of intervention trials for selected priority mental and neurological disorders in sub-Saharan Africa.Methods: Medline and African Journals Online databases were used for searching relevant articles. Both randomized and nonrandomized clinical trials for the treatment of schizophrenia, depression, maternal depression, bipolar disorder, and epilepsy/seizure disorders that involve pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and physical therapy were included. An extensive list of search terms that identified locations, disorders, interventions, and study types were employed. The qualities of the trials were appraised using the single-component quality assessment of the consolidated standards of reporting trials (CONSORT statement and the Jadad scale.Results: From 1,136 studies identified, only 34 trials that fulfilled inclusion criteria were used for quality analysis. Most studies were clinical trials of treatments for epilepsy and were conducted after 2006. In terms of region, the majority of studies were conducted in South Africa (22 of the 34 studies. Approximately half of the trials (53% were conducted in single center and the majority

  19. Clinical practice guideline: management of acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joshua A.; Hsu, Jonathan; Bawazeer, Mohammad; Marshall, John; Friedrich, Jan O.; Nathens, Avery; Coburn, Natalie; May, Gary R.; Pearsall, Emily; McLeod, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the incidence of acute pancreatitis reported worldwide. Despite improvements in access to care, imaging and interventional techniques, acute pancreatitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, recent studies auditing the clinical management of the condition have shown important areas of noncompliance with evidence-based recommendations. This underscores the importance of creating understandable and implementable recommendations for the diagnosis and management of acute pancreatitis. The purpose of the present guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of both mild and severe acute pancreatitis as well as the management of complications of acute pancreatitis and of gall stone–induced pancreatitis. Une hausse de l’incidence de pancréatite aiguë a été constatée à l’échelle mondiale. Malgré l’amélioration de l’accès aux soins et aux techniques d’imagerie et d’intervention, la pancréatite aiguë est toujours associée à une morbidité et une mortalité importantes. Bien qu’il existe des guides de pratique clinique pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, des études récentes sur la vérification de la prise en charge clinique de cette affection révèlent des lacunes importantes dans la conformité aux recommandations fondées sur des données probantes. Ces résultats mettent en relief l’importance de formuler des recommandations compréhensibles et applicables pour le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë. La présente ligne directrice vise à fournir des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, qu’elle soit bénigne ou grave, ainsi que de ses complications et de celles de la pancréatite causée par un calcul biliaire. PMID:27007094

  20. Science in chiropractic clinical practice: identifying a need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, J R

    1991-06-01

    The chiropractic profession has resolved to establish chiropractic clinical care upon a scientifically acceptable foundation. In order for such an ambition to be realized, the cooperation and participation of field practitioners is required. A survey of chiropractors practicing in Australia demonstrated that respondents largely failed to appreciate the power of various research designs to provide clinical practice information. This paper suggests the chasm between professional resolve and clinical practice is not being adequately bridged at the level of field practitioners.

  1. Conceptualizing clinical nurse leader practice: an interpretive synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Institute of Medicine's Future of Nursing report identifies the clinical nurse leader as an innovative new role for meeting higher health-care quality standards. However, specific clinical nurse leader practices influencing documented quality outcomes remain unclear. Lack of practice clarity limits the ability to articulate, implement and measure clinical nurse leader-specific practice and quality outcomes. PURPOSE AND METHODS: Interpretive synthesis design and grounded theory...

  2. Pareto fronts in clinical practice for pinnacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Tomas; van Kesteren, Zdenko; Franssen, Gijs; Damen, Eugène; van Vliet, Corine

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to develop a framework to objectively perform treatment planning studies using Pareto fronts. The Pareto front represents all optimal possible tradeoffs among several conflicting criteria and is an ideal tool with which to study the possibilities of a given treatment technique. The framework should require minimal user interaction and should resemble and be applicable to daily clinical practice. To generate the Pareto fronts, we used the native scripting language of Pinnacle(3) (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA). The framework generates thousands of plans automatically from which the Pareto front is generated. As an example, the framework is applied to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer patients. For each patient and each technique, 3000 plans are generated, resulting in a total of 60,000 plans. The comparison is based on 5-dimensional Pareto fronts. Generating 3000 plans for 10 patients in parallel requires on average 96 h for IMRT and 483 hours for VMAT. Using VMAT, compared to IMRT, the maximum dose of the boost PTV was reduced by 0.4 Gy (P=.074), the mean dose in the anal sphincter by 1.6 Gy (P=.055), the conformity index of the 95% isodose (CI(95%)) by 0.02 (P=.005), and the rectal wall V(65 Gy) by 1.1% (P=.008). We showed the feasibility of automatically generating Pareto fronts with Pinnacle(3). Pareto fronts provide a valuable tool for performing objective comparative treatment planning studies. We compared VMAT with IMRT in prostate patients and found VMAT had a dosimetric advantage over IMRT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Structured clinical documentation in the electronic medical record to improve quality and to support practice-based research in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Jaishree; Dobrin, Sofia; Choi, Janet; Rubin, Susan; Pham, Anna; Patel, Vimal; Frigerio, Roberta; Maurer, Darryck; Gupta, Payal; Link, Lourdes; Walters, Shaun; Wang, Chi; Ji, Yuan; Maraganore, Demetrius M

    2017-01-01

    Using the electronic medical record (EMR) to capture structured clinical data at the point of care would be a practical way to support quality improvement and practice-based research in epilepsy. We describe our stepwise process for building structured clinical documentation support tools in the EMR that define best practices in epilepsy, and we describe how we incorporated these toolkits into our clinical workflow. These tools write notes and capture hundreds of fields of data including several score tests: Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 items, Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Quality of Life in Epilepsy-10 items, Montreal Cognitive Assessment/Short Test of Mental Status, and Medical Research Council Prognostic Index. The tools summarize brain imaging, blood laboratory, and electroencephalography results, and document neuromodulation treatments. The tools provide Best Practices Advisories and other clinical decision support when appropriate. The tools prompt enrollment in a DNA biobanking study. We have thus far enrolled 231 patients for initial visits and are starting our first annual follow-up visits and provide a brief description of our cohort. We are sharing these EMR tools and captured data with other epilepsy clinics as part of a Neurology Practice Based Research Network, and are using the tools to conduct pragmatic trials using subgroup-based adaptive designs. © 2016 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International League Against Epilepsy.

  4. Impact of a Revised Curriculum Focusing on Clinical Neurology and Musculoskeletal Care on a Required Fourth-Year Medical Student Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Norbury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A Required Fourth-Year Medical Student Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R Clerkship was found to increase students’ knowledge of PM&R; however the students’ overall rotation evaluations were consistently lower than the other 8 required clerkships at the medical school. Objective. To describe the impact of a revised curriculum based upon Entrustable Professional Activities and focusing on basic pain management, musculoskeletal care, and neurology. Setting. Academic Medical Center. Participants. 73 fourth-year medical students. Methods. The curriculum changes included a shift in the required readings from rehabilitation specific topics toward more general content in the areas of clinical neurology and musculoskeletal care. Hands-on workshops on neurological and musculoskeletal physical examination techniques, small group case-based learning, an anatomy clinical correlation lecture, and a lecture on pain management were integrated into the curriculum. Main Outcome Measurements. Student evaluations of the clerkship. Results. Statistically significant improvements were found in the students’ evaluations of usefulness of lecturers, development of patient interviewing skills, and diagnostic and patient management skills (p≤0.05. Conclusions. This study suggests that students have a greater satisfaction with a required PM&R clerkship when lecturers utilize a variety of pedagogic methods to teach basic pain, neurology and musculoskeletal care skills in the rehabilitation setting rather than rehabilitation specific content.

  5. Developing a Critical Practice of Clinical Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, W. John

    1985-01-01

    The etymology of the term "clinical supervision" is discussed. How clinical supervision can be used with teachers as an active force toward reform and change is then examined. Through clinical supervision teachers can assist each other to gain control over their own professional lives and destinies. (RM)

  6. Librarian contributions to clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse, Peggy; Protzko, Shandra

    2014-01-01

    Librarians have become more involved in developing high quality systematic reviews. Evidence-based practice guidelines are an extension of systematic reviews and offer another significant area for librarian involvement. This column highlights opportunities and challenges for the librarian working on guideline panels and provides practical considerations for meaningful contributions to the guideline creation process.

  7. Clinical education. Relating practical experiments to theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, B; Oldham, J

    Integrating theory into practice is not without its difficulties. Often concepts derived from the physical and behavioural sciences appear to be unrelated to nursing practice and although noted laboriously by student nurses no active learning occurs. As nurse education changes not only in curriculum content and teaching methodology but in who will do the teaching and in what venue, then the importance of ensuring the relevance of theoretical concepts to nursing practice will increase. This paper illustrates how physiological theory can be integrated into nursing practice by the use of ward-based practical experiments. Currently four such experiments have been introduced and are being evaluated. There is scope for developing further experiments and it is contended that this approach will enhance learning.

  8. At the Crossroads of Clinical Practice and Teacher Leadership: A Changing Paradigm for Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Richard D.; Neel, Michael; Coulter, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the endemic separation between K-12 schools and colleges of education in teacher preparation. Specifically, we examine a new approach related to the promise of clinical practice--a clinical practice program that overlaps a public high school, a graduate-level teacher preparation program, and a professional practice doctoral…

  9. Uses of progesterone in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, M P; Shantha, S

    1999-01-01

    Progesterone is the natural progestagen produced by the corpus luteum during the luteal phase. It is absorbed when administered orally, but is greater than 90% metabolized during the first hepatic pass. This greatly limits the efficacy of once-daily administration and also results in unphysiologically high levels of progesterone metabolites, particularly those reduced at the 5-a position. These metabolites can cause dizziness and drowsiness to the point of preventing the operation of a motor vehicle. Synthetic progestins, such as medroxyprogesterone acetate and norethindrone acetate (NETA), have been specifically designed to resist enzymatic degradation and remain active after oral administration. However, these compounds exert undesirable effects on the liver and often cause severe psychological side effects. The permeability of the skin does not allow for administration of progesterone in the quantities normally produced by the corpus luteum, i.e., up to 25 mg/day during the mid-luteal phase. To avoid this problem, synthetic progestins such as NETA have been administered transdermally. These compounds, though, just like synthetic estrogens administered non-orally, retain undesirable hepatic effects even when administered transdermally. Transvaginal administration of progesterone is a practical non-oral route available for administering progesterone. Early experience was gained with vaginal suppositories, which lack manufacturing controls. Recently, a new progesterone gel formulation has been designed for vaginal use. The clinical acceptability of this product has been enhanced by the bioadhesive characteristics of its polycarbophil-based gel, which conveys controlled and sustained-released properties. Investigations have shown that because of local direct vagina-to-uterus transport, which results in a preferential uterine uptake of progesterone, this formulation given in conjunction with physiological amounts of estradiol produces endometrial changes similar to

  10. Clinical practice guideline (update): adult sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Richard M; Piccirillo, Jay F; Chandrasekhar, Sujana S; Brook, Itzhak; Ashok Kumar, Kaparaboyna; Kramper, Maggie; Orlandi, Richard R; Palmer, James N; Patel, Zara M; Peters, Anju; Walsh, Sandra A; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2015-04-01

    This update of a 2007 guideline from the American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation provides evidence-based recommendations to manage adult rhinosinusitis, defined as symptomatic inflammation of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. Changes from the prior guideline include a consumer added to the update group, evidence from 42 new systematic reviews, enhanced information on patient education and counseling, a new algorithm to clarify action statement relationships, expanded opportunities for watchful waiting (without antibiotic therapy) as initial therapy of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS), and 3 new recommendations for managing chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). The purpose of this multidisciplinary guideline is to identify quality improvement opportunities in managing adult rhinosinusitis and to create explicit and actionable recommendations to implement these opportunities in clinical practice. Specifically, the goals are to improve diagnostic accuracy for adult rhinosinusitis, promote appropriate use of ancillary tests to confirm diagnosis and guide management, and promote judicious use of systemic and topical therapy, which includes radiography, nasal endoscopy, computed tomography, and testing for allergy and immune function. Emphasis was also placed on identifying multiple chronic conditions that would modify management of rhinosinusitis, including asthma, cystic fibrosis, immunocompromised state, and ciliary dyskinesia. The update group made strong recommendations that clinicians (1) should distinguish presumed ABRS from acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) caused by viral upper respiratory infections and noninfectious conditions and (2) should confirm a clinical diagnosis of CRS with objective documentation of sinonasal inflammation, which may be accomplished using anterior rhinoscopy, nasal endoscopy, or computed tomography. The update group made recommendations that clinicians (1) should either offer watchful waiting (without

  11. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  12. Evidence-based guideline update: medical treatment of infantile spasms. Report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the Practice Committee of the Child Neurology Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, C Y; Mackay, M T; Weiss, S K; Stephens, D; Adams-Webber, T; Ashwal, S; Snead, O C

    2012-06-12

    To update the 2004 American Academy of Neurology/Child Neurology Society practice parameter on treatment of infantile spasms in children. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from 2002 to 2011 and searches of reference lists of retrieved articles were performed. Sixty-eight articles were selected for detailed review; 26 were included in the analysis. RECOMMENDATIONS were based on a 4-tiered classification scheme combining pre-2002 evidence and more recent evidence. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether other forms of corticosteroids are as effective as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) for short-term treatment of infantile spasms. However, low-dose ACTH is probably as effective as high-dose ACTH. ACTH is more effective than vigabatrin (VGB) for short-term treatment of children with infantile spasms (excluding those with tuberous sclerosis complex). There is insufficient evidence to show that other agents and combination therapy are effective for short-term treatment of infantile spasms. Short lag time to treatment leads to better long-term developmental outcome. Successful short-term treatment of cryptogenic infantile spasms with ACTH or prednisolone leads to better long-term developmental outcome than treatment with VGB. Low-dose ACTH should be considered for treatment of infantile spasms. ACTH or VGB may be useful for short-term treatment of infantile spasms, with ACTH considered preferentially over VGB. Hormonal therapy (ACTH or prednisolone) may be considered for use in preference to VGB in infants with cryptogenic infantile spasms, to possibly improve developmental outcome. A shorter lag time to treatment of infantile spasms with either hormonal therapy or VGB possibly improves long-term developmental outcomes.

  13. Prevalence of drug resistant epilepsy in adults with epilepsy attending a neurology clinic of a tertiary referral hospital in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Sing Teang; Ho, Choon Siang; Ho, Paul C; Lim, Shih-Hui

    2014-09-01

    To determine the proportion of population of adult people with epilepsy (PWE) in Singapore, who suffer from drug resistant epilepsy (DRE). All adult PWE who had attended the neurology specialist clinic of a tertiary referral hospital in Singapore were profiled for drug responses according to the definition for DRE as specified by the International League against Epilepsy (ILAE) 2010 consensus. This is a retrospective cohort study. Data collected included demographics, characteristics of seizure and epilepsy, blood biochemistry levels, electroencephalogram and brain imaging findings, and medication histories. The types and dosages of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) used were retrieved from case notes and checked against pharmacy records. Each patient was counselled upon the diagnosis of epilepsy and taught to maintain a seizure diary. The dates and number of seizures were retrieved from these diaries at each visit. Treatment-related adverse effects were routinely assessed and hence, patients were assumed to not have treatment-related adverse effects when no relevant documentation was encountered. The prevalence rate of DRE in this clinic was 21.5%, while 40.9% of PWE were drug responsive/seizure free at the point prevalence day (n=557). From multivariate analysis, patients with structural-metabolic aetiology [odds ratio (OR) 1.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.003-3.148], mental retardation [OR 2.51, 95% CI 1.073-5.863], psychiatric illnesses [OR 3.349, 95% CI 1.181-9.501] and pre-treatment seizure frequency of more than once monthly [OR 2.775, 95% CI 1.190-6.469] were found to be more likely to have DRE (p≤0.05). Although the influence of Indian ethnicity on the risk of DRE was only found in the univariate analysis, it warrants investigation in a larger cohort. The findings may aid policy makers in designing treatment guidelines and allocating resources around PWE, with careful considerations that at any given time, 1 in 5 PWE have DRE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B

  14. Compliance with McDonald criteria and red flag recognition in a general neurology practice in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Albertyn, Christine

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The revised McDonald criteria aim to simplify and speed the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). An important principle of the criteria holds there should be no better explanation for the clinical presentation. In Miller et al.\\'s consensus statement on the differential diagnosis of MS, red flags are identified that may suggest a non-MS diagnosis. OBJECTIVE: All new patients with a practice diagnosis of MS were assessed for compliance with McDonald criteria. The group of patients not fulfilling criteria was followed up to assess compliance over time. At the end of the follow-up period, red flags were sought in the group of patients who remained McDonald criteria negative. METHODS: Clinical notes and paraclinical tests were examined retrospectively for compliance with McDonald criteria and for the presence of red flags. RESULTS: Sixty-two patients were identified, with two lost to follow-up. Twenty-six (42%) patients fulfilled criteria at diagnosis. After 53 months follow-up, 47 (78%) patients fulfilled criteria. In the 13 (22%) patients who remain McDonald criteria negative, a total of 20 red flags were identified, ranging from one to six per patient. Alternative diagnoses were considered and further investigations performed in 10 patients with no significantly abnormal results. CONCLUSION: Twenty-two percent of patients still do not fulfill McDonald criteria after 53 months. Dissemination in time was not proven in the majority of patients and the lack of follow-up neuroimaging was an important factor in this. Red flags may be useful in identifying alternative diagnoses, but the yield was low in our cohort.

  15. Learning Styles of Radiography Students during Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, L. Patrice

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. Quantitative, descriptive research methodology identified the learning styles of radiography students. A single self-report questionnaire, developed to assess learning styles in clinical practice, was administered…

  16. Participatory design for computerization of clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie; Pedersen, B. S.

    2011-01-01

    There have been made many attempts on computerization of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), none have, however achieved any general application in clinical work practice. The objective of this paper is: (1) to raise awareness about the impact the design method used for computerization of CPGs...

  17. The Challenges of Clinical Practice as Experienced by First Year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nursing students internalise the art of nursing through clinical practice. The study was exploratory-descriptive and sought to answer the question, "what are the clinical practice experiences and coping strategies of first year general nursing students" ?. The objectives of the study were to: identify the students' ...

  18. IT support for administrative planning of clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Jan; Joustra-Enquist, Ingrid; Hedberg, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The administration of clinical practice placements for nursing students is a highly complex and information driven task. This demonstration is intended to give insight into the web based system KliPP (a Swedish acronym for Clinical Practice Planning) and to discuss the possibilities for further development and use.

  19. Cancer vaccines: from research to clinical practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bot, Adrian; Obrocea, Mihail; Marincola, Francesco M

    2011-01-01

    ..., for both solid and blood borne cancers. Cancer Vaccines: Challenges and Opportunities in Translation is the first text in the field to bring immunotherapy treatments from the laboratory trial to the bedside for the practicing oncologist. Cancer Vaccines...

  20. Good documentation practice in clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Bargaje

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common inspection findings in investigator site inspections is lack of reliable, accurate and adequate source documentation. This also happens to be the most common pitfall identified during sponsor audits. The importance of good documentation practice needs to be emphasized to investigator sites to ensure that the study results are built on the foundation of credible and valid data. This article focuses on the key principles of good documentation practice and offers suggestions for improvement.

  1. Demyelinizing neurological disease after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha-inhibiting agents in a rheumatological outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theibich, Ali; Dreyer, Lene; Magyari, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Biological treatment with inhibitors of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha has dramatically improved the disease course of several chronic rheumatologic conditions. Adverse events (AEs) are primarily infections and hypersensitivity reactions. Demyelinizing neurological symptoms resembling...... multiple sclerosis (MS) have been described as a rare AE. During about 10-year use of anti TNF-alpha, the Danish Medicines Agency has recorded eight cases of MS like AEs. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of demyelinizing AEs both in the central and peripheral nervous system after...... patients who developed neurological symptoms during this time period. We found six patients with signs of demyelinizing neurological disorders: four resembling MS, one MS-like condition, and one multifocal motor neuropathy. During a relatively short time period, we found a remarkably high number...

  2. Conceptualizing clinical nurse leader practice: an interpretive synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's Future of Nursing report identifies the clinical nurse leader as an innovative new role for meeting higher health-care quality standards. However, specific clinical nurse leader practices influencing documented quality outcomes remain unclear. Lack of practice clarity limits the ability to articulate, implement and measure clinical nurse leader-specific practice and quality outcomes. Interpretive synthesis design and grounded theory analysis were used to develop a theoretical understanding of clinical nurse leader practice that can facilitate systematic and replicable implementation across health-care settings. The core phenomenon of clinical nurse leader practice is continuous clinical leadership, which involves four fundamental activities: facilitating effective ongoing communication; strengthening intra and interprofessional relationships; building and sustaining teams; and supporting staff engagement. Clinical nurse leaders continuously communicate and develop relationships within and across professions to promote and sustain information exchange, engagement, teamwork and effective care processes at the microsystem level. Clinical nurse leader-integrated care delivery systems highlight the benefits of nurse-led models of care for transforming health-care quality. Managers can use this study's findings to frame an implementation strategy that addresses theoretical domains of clinical nurse leader practice to help ensure practice success. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [What everybody should know about good clinical practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Lyda

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of countries are adopting good clinical practices guidelines as part of the regulation of clinical studies to register pharmaceutical products and other health-related products. Consequently, all parties involved in the research and development of these products should know them, implement them and ensure their compliance. However, good clinical practices guidelines are just one of the initiatives seeking to achieve the highest ethical and scientific standards in health research and in other areas where humans are research subjects. This review defines such practices and their objectives presenting in a practical manner their legal framework in Colombia, and clarifying their application in studies where interventions use no medications or those that are not clinical trials. Finally, the work discusses the challenges to ensure that good clinical practices contribute to the protection of research participants, the education of trustworthy health professionals, and a culture of respect for human beings.

  4. Failing Clinical Practice & the Unsafe Student: A New Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Judith Marlene; Chernomas, Wanda M

    2016-10-13

    Students who fail clinical courses is a long standing issue in nursing education. Although faculty intuitively "know" a student is in clinical difficulty, the research literature is limited to delineating and describing characteristics of these students. A retrospective analysis of students' files in which there was at least one clinical failure was conducted to identify clinical failure indicators. Files included students who were successful, required to withdraw, or voluntarily withdrew. This study integrates these characteristics in a manner not discussed in the literature. Two themes emerged that characterize student practices: (i) How students are in practice and (ii) Aspects of practice. A third theme surfaced as clinical teachers responded to these students by labelling the practice unsafe and increasing vigilance. A model was developed that shows the relationship between these characteristics and unsafe student practice.

  5. Vagus nerve stimulation in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Albu-Soda, Ahmed; Aziz, Qasim

    2016-11-02

    The diverse array of end organ innervations of the vagus nerve, coupled with increased basic science evidence, has led to vagus nerve stimulation becoming a management option in a number of clinical disorders. This review discusses methods of electrically stimulating the vagus nerve and its current and potential clinical uses.

  6. Canadian Paediatric Neurology Workforce Survey and Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doja, Asif; Orr, Serena L; McMillan, Hugh J; Kirton, Adam; Brna, Paula; Esser, Michael; Tang-Wai, Richard; Major, Philippe; Poulin, Chantal; Prasad, Narayan; Selby, Kathryn; Weiss, Shelly K; Yeh, E Ann; Callen, David Ja

    2016-05-01

    Little knowledge exists on the availability of academic and community paediatric neurology positions. This knowledge is crucial for making workforce decisions. Our study aimed to: 1) obtain information regarding the availability of positions for paediatric neurologists in academic centres; 2) survey paediatric neurology trainees regarding their perceptions of employment issues and career plans; 3) survey practicing community paediatric neurologists 4) convene a group of paediatric neurologists to develop consensus regarding how to address these workforce issues. Surveys addressing workforce issues regarding paediatric neurology in Canada were sent to: 1) all paediatric neurology program directors in Canada (n=9) who then solicited information from division heads and from paediatric neurologists in surrounding areas; 2) paediatric neurology trainees in Canada (n=57) and; 3) community paediatric neurologists (n=27). A meeting was held with relevant stakeholders to develop a consensus on how to approach employment issues. The response rate was 100% from program directors, 57.9% from residents and 44% from community paediatric neurologists. We found that the number of projected positions in academic paediatric neurology is fewer than the number of paediatric neurologists that are being trained over the next five to ten years, despite a clinical need for paediatric neurologists. Paediatric neurology residents are concerned about job availability and desire more career counselling. There is a current and projected clinical demand for paediatric neurologists despite a lack of academic positions. Training programs should focus on community neurology as a viable career option.

  7. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  8. Identification and validation of clinical predictors for the risk of neurological involvement in children with hand, foot, and mouth disease in Sarawak

    OpenAIRE

    del Sel Sylvia; Clear Daniella; Perera David; Mohan Anand; Podin Yuwana; Wong See; Ooi Mong; Chieng Chae; Tio Phaik; Cardosa Mary; Solomon Tom

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) can cause Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with neurological complications, which may rapidly progress to fulminant cardiorespiratory failure, and death. Early recognition of children at risk is the key to reduce acute mortality and morbidity. Methods We examined data collected through a prospective clinical study of HFMD conducted between 2000 and 2006 that included 3 distinct outbreaks of HEV71 to identify risk factors associated with neu...

  9. Genetics of tuberous sclerosis complex: implications for clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caban C

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Caban,1,2 Nubaira Khan,1,2 Daphne M Hasbani,3 Peter B Crino1,2 1Department of Neurology, 2Shriners Hospitals Pediatric Research Center, Temple University School of Medicine, 3Department of Neurology, St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is a multisystem disorder that results from heterozygous mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2. The primary organ systems that are affected include the brain, skin, lung, kidney, and heart, all with variable frequency, penetrance, and severity. Neurological features include epilepsy, autism, and intellectual disability. There are more than 1,500 known pathogenic variants for TSC1 and TSC2, including deletion, nonsense, and missense mutations, and all pathogenic mutations are inactivating, leading to loss of function effects on the encoded proteins TSC1 and TSC2. These proteins form a complex to constitutively inhibit mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling cascade, and as a consequence, mTOR signaling is constitutively active within all TSC-associated lesions. The mTOR inhibitors rapamycin (sirolimus and everolimus have been shown to reduce the size of renal and brain lesions and improve pulmonary function in TSC, and these compounds may also decrease seizure frequency. The clinical application of mTOR inhibitors in TSC has provided one of the first examples of precision medicine in a neurodevelopmental disorder. Keywords: TSC, epilepsy, genetics, mTOR, rapamycin

  10. Best practice in clinical facilitation of undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Judith; McMurray, Anne; Shaban, Ramon Z

    2016-09-01

    Clinical facilitation is critical to successful student clinical experience. The research reported in this paper used an interpretive case study to explore perspectives of clinical facilitators on what constitutes best practice in clinical facilitation of undergraduate nursing students. Eleven clinical facilitators from South East Queensland, Australia, participated in focus groups, interviews and a concept mapping exercise to gather their perspectives on best practice. The data gathered information regarding their prior and current experiences as registered nurses and facilitators, considering reasons they became clinical facilitators, their educational background and self-perceived adequacy of their knowledge for clinical facilitation. Analysis was through constant comparison. Findings of the study provided in-depth insight into the role of clinical facilitators, with best practice conceptualised via three main themes; 'assessing', 'learning to facilitate' and 'facilitating effectively'. While they felt there was some autonomy in the role, the clinical facilitators sought a closer liaison with academic staff and feedback about their performance, in particular their assessment of the students. Key strategies identified for improving best practice included educational support for the clinical facilitators, networking, and mentoring from more experienced clinical facilitators. When implemented, these strategies will help develop the clinical facilitators' skills and ensure quality clinical experiences for undergraduate nursing students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring clinical trials: a practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Síle F; Henley, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the processes and procedures involved in planning, conducting and reporting monitoring activities for large Clinical Trials of Investigational Medicinal Products (CTIMPs), focusing on those conducted in resource-limited settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Music therapy in neurological rehabilitation settings

    OpenAIRE

    Elżbieta Galińska

    2015-01-01

    The neurologic music therapy is a new scope of music therapy. Its techniques deal with dysfunctions resulting from diseases of the human nervous system. Music can be used as an alternative modality to access functions unavailable through non-musical stimulus. Processes in the brain activated by the influence of music can be generalized and transferred to non-musical functions. Therefore, in clinical practice, the translation of non-musical therapeutic exercises into analogous, isomorphic ...

  13. Different clinical utility of oropharyngeal bacterial screening prior to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in oncological and neurological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupa, Radek; Jurankova, Jana; Dastych, Milan; Senkyrik, Michal; Pavlik, Tomas; Prokesova, Jitka; Jecmenova, Marketa; Dolina, Jiri; Hep, Ales

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG). Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274), dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001). Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9%) of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66-41.76). Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08-18.76). During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers.

  14. Different Clinical Utility of Oropharyngeal Bacterial Screening prior to Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oncological and Neurological Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Kroupa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG. Methods. Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Results. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274, dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001. Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9% of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66–41.76. Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08–18.76. Conclusion. During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers.

  15. The neurology literature 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoujah, Danya; Chang, Wan-Tsu W; Abraham, Michael K

    2017-09-06

    Emergency neurology is a complex and rapidly changing field. Its evolution can be attributed in part to increased imaging options, debates about optimal treatment, and simply the growth of emergency medicine as a specialty. Every year, a number of articles published in emergency medicine or other specialty journals should become familiar to the emergency physician. This review summarizes neurology articles published in 2016, which the authors consider crucial to the practice of emergency medicine. The articles are categorized according to disease process, with the understanding that there can be significant overlap among articles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Good clinical practice : Historical background and key aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otte, Andreas; Maier-Lenz, Herbert; Dierckx, Rudi A.

    Clinical research trials (both academic and industry sponsored) are increasingly playing a role in various medical disciplines, including younger fields of clinical trial interest, such as nuclear medicine research. Knowledge for and compliance with good clinical practice (GCP) is essential for

  17. Sterilization and Disinfection Practices in Selected Dental Clinics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To assess the sterilization and disinfection practices in selected dental clinics in Cameroon. The study conducted in the second half of 2009 included 41 dental clinics in 4 out of the 10 provinces in Cameroon. Questionnaire was used to obtain information about the ownership and location of the clinic, washing and packing ...

  18. Measuring Effects on the Clinical Practice from a Configured EHR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, John; Simonsen, Jesper; K. Iversen, Rikke

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the project was to measure the clinical usability of an EHR configured by use of participatory design with clinicians from a neurological stroke unit in order to get input to the County’s future strategy for incremental implementation of EHR. The content of the EHR was defined...... and acquired using various techniques including questionnaires, interviews, observations, and Task Load Index (TLX) ratings. In total, 15 nursing handovers, 8 ward rounds, and 11 patient conferences involving a total of 35 patients and more than 20 clinicians were included in the measurements. Data from...

  19. Clinical librarians as facilitators of nurses' evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Sylvia; Wallmyr, Gudrun

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses' and ward-based clinical librarians' reflections on ward-based clinical librarians as facilitators for nurses' use of evidences-based practice. Nurses' use of evidence-based practice is reported to be weak. Studies have suggested that clinical librarians may promote evidence-based practice. To date, little is known about clinical librarians participating nurses in the wards. A descriptive, qualitative design was adopted for the study. In 2007, 16 nurses who had been attended by a clinical librarian in the wards were interviewed in focus groups. Two clinical librarians were interviewed by individual interviews. In the analysis, a content analysis was used. Three themes were generated from the interviews with nurses: 'The grip of everyday work', 'To articulate clinical nursing issues' and 'The clinical librarians at a catalyst'. The nurses experienced the grip of everyday work as a hindrance and had difficulties to articulate and formulate relevant nursing issues. In such a state, the nurses found the clinical librarian presence in the ward as enhancing the awareness of and the use of evidence-based practice. Three themes emerged from the analysis with the librarians. They felt as outsiders, had new knowledge and acquired a new role as ward-based clinical librarians. Facilitation is needed if nurses' evidence-based practice is going to increase. The combined use of nurses and clinical librarians' knowledge and skills can be optimised. To achieve this, nurses' skills in consuming and implementing evidence ought to be strengthened. The fusion of the information and knowledge management skill of the ward-based clinical librarian and the clinical expertise of the nurses can be of value. With such a collaborative model, nurse and ward-based clinical librarian might join forces to increase the use of evidence-based practice. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. [Neurology and literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2010-10-01

    Literature complements medical literature in the academic and clinical development of neurologists. The present article explores the contributions of writers of fiction on neurology. Literary works of fiction with particular reference to neurology. A symbiosis between writers of fiction and doctors has been well recognised. From Shakespeare to Cervantes by way of Dickens and Cela to writer - physicians such as Anton Chekhov or António Lobo Antunes have contributed through their medically informed literature to the better understanding of neurology. Some writers like Dostoevsky, Machado de Assis and Margiad Evans have written about their own experiences with disease thus bringing new insights to medicine. Furthermore, some neurological disorders have been largely based on literary descriptions. For instance, Dostoevsky's epilepsy has been retrospectively analysed by famous neurologists including Freud, Alajouanine or Gastaut, whilst his writings and biography have prompted others like Waxman and Geschwind to describe typical behavioural changes in temporal lobe epilepsy, finding their source of inspiration in Dostoevsky. Likewise, Cirignotta et al have named an unusual type of seizure after the Russian novelist. Inspired by Lewis Carroll, Todd introduced the term Alice in Wonderland Syndrome to refer to visual distortions generally associated with migraine. Writers of fiction offer a humanised perception of disease by contributing new insights into the clinical history, informing about the subjective experience of the illness and helping to eradicate the stigma associated to neurological disorders.

  1. Treatment resistant schizophrenia and neurological soft signs may converge on the same pathology: Evidence from explanatory analysis on clinical, psychopathological, and cognitive variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Prinzivalli, Emiliano; Callovini, Gemma; D'Ambrosio, Luigi; Altavilla, Benedetta; Avagliano, Camilla; Iasevoli, Felice

    2018-02-02

    Here, we investigated neurological soft signs (NSSs) in treatment resistant schizophrenia (TRS) vs treatment responder schizophrenia (SZ) patients. TRS is a severe condition, affecting approximately one-third of schizophrenia patients and representing a relevant clinical challenge. NSSs are neurological abnormalities reportedly described in schizophrenia patients and linked to dysregulated network connections. We explored the possibility that NSSs may be: i) more severe in TRS patients; ii) differentially associated to clinical/cognitive variables in TRS vs SZ; iii) predictive of having TRS. In addition, we evaluated whether diagnosis may mediate NSSs associations with the above-mentioned variables. Consecutive patients with schizophrenia diagnosis underwent stringent assessment for TRS diagnosis. Demographics and clinical variables were recorded. Psychopathology (by Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, PANSS), cognitive performances, and NSSs (by Neurological Evaluation Scale, NES) were tested. TRS had higher scores than SZ patients in total NES score and in almost all NES subscales, even after correction for duration of illness and antipsychotic dose (ANCOVA, pvariables (above all: duration of disease and negative symptoms) in TRS but not in SZ patients. Two-way ANOVA showed NSS-x-diagnosis interaction in determining outcomes on multiple cognitive performances, but not in other clinical variables. However, simple main effect analysis detected a significant relationship between high severity NSSs and TRS diagnosis on multiple clinical and cognitive outcomes. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that diagnosis was among a discrete number of predictors yielding significant increases in variance explained on NES total, Sensory Integration and Other Signs subscales' scores. NSSs, together with antipsychotic dose and disease severity, were found to be significantly predictive of TRS diagnosis in a binary logistic regression model. These results suggest a stringent

  2. Transition questions in clinical practice - validity and reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein

    2008-01-01

    Transition questions in CLINICAL practice - validity and reproducibility Lauridsen HH1, Manniche C3, Grunnet-Nilsson N1, Hartvigsen J1,2 1   Clinical Locomotion Science, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. e-mail: hlauridsen......@health.sdu.dk 2   Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Part of Clinical Locomotion Science, Odense, Denmark 3   Backcenter Funen, Part of Clinical Locomotion Science, Ringe, Denmark   Abstract  Understanding a change score is indispensable for interpretation of results from clinical studies...

  3. Bridging the Gap Between Clinical Research and Clinical Practice: Introduction to the Special Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachman, Bethany A.; Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Hershenberg, Rachel; Vivian, Dina; Wolfe, Barry E.; Goldfried, Marvin R.

    2013-01-01

    This Special Section, developed by the American Psychology Association's Division 12 (Clinical) 2011 Committee on Science and Practice, highlights different ideas to help bridge the gap between clinical research and clinical practice, and notes recent innovations that help make research–practice integration feasible. The articles consider how to break down the barriers to enhance researcher–practitioner dialogue, as well as how to make ongoing outcome assessment feasible for clinicians. Moreover, the articles address how to promote training in evidence-based practice, and how to translate efficacy research into clinical practice and clinical insight into empirical study to better establish a two-way bridge between research and practice. Ultimately, we hope this series can speak to many different types of psychologists, whether they work mainly as researchers or practitioners, so they can see new ways to integrate and learn from both research and practice. PMID:22642515

  4. Bridging the gap between clinical research and clinical practice: introduction to the special section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachman, Bethany A; Drabick, Deborah A G; Hershenberg, Rachel; Vivian, Dina; Wolfe, Barry E; Goldfried, Marvin R

    2012-06-01

    This Special Section, developed by the American Psychology Association's Division 12 (Clinical) 2011 Committee on Science and Practice, highlights different ideas to help bridge the gap between clinical research and clinical practice, and notes recent innovations that help make research-practice integration feasible. The articles consider how to break down the barriers to enhance researcher-practitioner dialogue, as well as how to make ongoing outcome assessment feasible for clinicians. Moreover, the articles address how to promote training in evidence-based practice, and how to translate efficacy research into clinical practice and clinical insight into empirical study to better establish a two-way bridge between research and practice. Ultimately, we hope this series can speak to many different types of psychologists, whether they work mainly as researchers or practitioners, so they can see new ways to integrate and learn from both research and practice. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Opinion and Special Articles: Neurology education at US osteopathic medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Daniel A; Albert, Dara V F

    2017-12-12

    Osteopathic medical schools have a longstanding tradition of training primary care physicians (PCP). Neurologic symptoms are common in the PCP's office and there is an undersupply of neurologists in the United States. It is therefore crucial for osteopathic medical students to have a strong foundation in clinical neurology. Despite the importance, a mere 6% of osteopathic medical schools have required neurology clerkships. Furthermore, exposure to neurology in medical school through required clerkships has been correlated with matching into neurology residency. As osteopathic medical schools continue to expand, it will become increasingly important to emphasize the American Academy Neurology's published guidelines for a core clerkship curriculum. Practicing neurologists should take an active role in encouraging osteopathic medical schools to adopt these guidelines. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. A brain cancer pathway in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Emilie Lund; Rasmussen, Birthe Krogh

    2012-01-01

    Danish healthcare seeks to improve cancer survival through improved diagnostics, rapid treatment and increased focus on cancer prevention and early help-seeking. In neuro-oncology, this has resulted in the Integrated Brain Cancer Pathway (IBCP). The paper explores how the pathway works in the ini...... in the initial phase in a clinical setting with emphasis on pathway criteria....

  7. Clinical Practice Realities: World and African Perspectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current initiatives. Education is needed to increase knowledge and skills for both nursing and midwifery services, not only to improve care outcomes through clinical skills, but also to offer better leadership and the educa- tion to teach and mentor others. Registered nurses with diploma level education have been sponsored.

  8. How to critically appraise a clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clubb, Adrian B; Dahm, Philipp

    2011-10-01

    Clinical practice guidelines play a critical role in guiding the evidence-based clinical practice of urology. We describe a systematic approach to critical appraisal of urology guidelines. Based on a focused clinical question derived from a clinical scenario, we identified a relevant clinical practice guideline that we critically appraised using the Users' Guide to the Medical Literature framework as to whether the results are valid, what are the results, and can they be applied to the care of an individual patient. A clinical practice guideline by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence on the use of sunitinib as the first line treatment for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma was identified. The guideline development process was found to be appropriately rigorous and included an explicit rating of the quality of evidence. The recommendations were clearly stated and appeared applicable to the specific patient in the clinical scenario. Clinical practice guidelines should be developed using rigorous evidence-based methodology. Urologists should have the skills and knowledge to critically appraise a guideline before applying it to the care of their patients.

  9. Bridging the Gap Between Clinical Research and Clinical Practice: Introduction to the Special Section

    OpenAIRE

    Teachman, Bethany A.; Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Hershenberg, Rachel; Vivian, Dina; Wolfe, Barry E.; Goldfried, Marvin R.

    2012-01-01

    This Special Section, developed by the American Psychology Association's Division 12 (Clinical) 2011 Committee on Science and Practice, highlights different ideas to help bridge the gap between clinical research and clinical practice, and notes recent innovations that help make research–practice integration feasible. The articles consider how to break down the barriers to enhance researcher–practitioner dialogue, as well as how to make ongoing outcome assessment feasible for clinicians. Moreo...

  10. Change in stated clinical practice associated with participation in the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Richman, Joshua S; Qvist, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Clinical researchers have attempted many methods to translate scientific evidence into routine clinical practice, with varying success. Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide an important, practitioner-friendly venue to test these methods. Dentist practitioner-investigators from the Den...

  11. Clinical Scientists Improving Clinical Practices: In Thoughts and Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, the author comments on aspects of Kamhi's (2014) article, which caused the author to think more deeply about definitions of language, theories of learning, and how these two core components of intervention prepare clinical scientists as they search the literature for new knowledge. Interprofessional collaborative…

  12. Diagnostic and prognostic role of MRI in spinal trauma, its comparison and correlation with clinical profile and neurological outcome, according to ASIA impairment scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh C Parashari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a non-invasive diagnostic tool in patients with acute and chronic spinal trauma and to compare and correlate the MRI findings with those of patients′ clinical profile and neurological outcome according to ASIA impairment scale to assess prognostic and clinical value of MRI. Materials and Methods: Sixty two patients of spinal trauma formed the study group in a prospective fashion. The patients undergoing MR imaging and magnetic resonance images were analyzed and correlated with findings on neurological examination according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA impairment scale (AIS at the time of MRI examination and subsequently at sub-acute interval to assess neurological outcome. Statistical Analysis : Sample profile was described in terms of 95% confidence limit and proportion. To describe strength of association between extent of spinal cord injury and outcome, odd′s ratio, bivariate and multi variant analysis, was used. Pearson′s chi square (χ 2 statistics was applied to test the association between two categorical variables. Data were analyzed using statistical software package, STATA 9.2 and the difference was considered to be significant if ′P′ value was <0.05. Observation and Results: The cord edema without hemorrhage was the most common MR finding (41.5%. The others were sizable focus of hemorrhage within the cord (33%, epidural hematoma (5.0%, and normal cord (26%. Majority of MR findings correlated well with clinical profile of the patient according to ASIA impairment scale. This study demonstrated that patients with presence of sizable focus of haemorrhage had larger cord edema and more severe grade of initial ASIA impairment scale( AIS with poor recovery at follow up (P=0.032.Improvement in upper extremity was more than lower extremity. Severe cord compression was also associated with poor neurological outcome; however it was not

  13. [Hypnotic communication and hypnosis in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrli, Hans

    2014-07-02

    In addition to usual medical care it is often critical to consider the patient's inner world in order to sensitively differentiate between harmful and helpful suggestive elements. The respective abilities in terms of hypnotic communication can be easily learned. Confident, empathic attention and a calm, understanding and figurative language narrowing the focus on positive emotions and positive change, which have been shown to improve the patient's chances of healing, are of particular importance. Proper clinical hypnosis goes one step further: it makes explicit use of suggestions, trance, and trance phenomena. The major clinical indications for hypnosis include psychosomatic disorders, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, depression, and pain syndromes. Hypnosis can also be employed as an adjunct for surgical therapy.

  14. Evaluating clinical dermatology practice in medical undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, J M; Sanmartín, V; Martí, R M; Morales, J L; Soler, J; Purroy, F; Pujol, R

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of competences (the set of knowledge, skills and attitudes required to perform a job to a professional level) is considered a fundamental part of medical training. Dermatology competences should include, in addition to effective clinical interviewing and detailed descriptions of skin lesions, appropriate management (diagnosis, differentiation, and treatment) of common skin disorders and tumors. Such competences can only be acquired during hospital clerkships. As a way of certifying these competences, we propose evaluating the different components as follows: knowledge, via clinical examinations or critical incident discussions; communication and certain instrumental skills, via structured workplace observation and scoring using a set of indicators; and attitudes, via joint evaluation by staff familiar with the student. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical practice: vocal nodules in dysphonic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Regina Helena Garcia; Branco, Anete; Tavares, Elaine Lara Mendes; Gramuglia, Andrea Cristina Jóia

    2013-09-01

    Common among children, vocal symptoms are a cause of concern for parents who seek elucidation of their diagnosis and treatment. Vocal nodules are the major cause of dysphonias in children and are related to vocal abuse. We conducted a literature review considering clinical, physiopathological, epidemiological, and histological aspects of vocal nodules, as well as diagnostic methods, highlighting the main studies addressing this issue. The controversial points of treatments were also discussed.

  16. EVALUATION OF PLATELET AGGREGATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Mirzaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of platelet function with subsequent modification of antiplatelet therapy regimen is one of the areas of personalized medicine. Analysis of the causes of inadequate antiplatelet action of clopidogrel, the association of residual platelet reactivity with clinical outcomes and a review of the research on the change of antiplatelet therapy in patients with ischemic heart disease after percutaneous interventions based on the results of platelet function testing, were the aim of this review.

  17. Role of Cardiac PET in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salata, Brian M; Singh, Parmanand

    2017-11-09

    Early identification of atherosclerosis and at-risk lesions plays a critical role in reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease. While invasive coronary angiography serves as the gold standard for diagnosing coronary artery disease, non-invasive imaging techniques provide visualization of both anatomical and functional atherosclerotic processes prior to clinical presentation. The development of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) has greatly enhanced our capability to diagnose and treat patients with early stages of atherosclerosis. Cardiac PET is a powerful, versatile non-invasive diagnostic tool with utility in the identification of high-risk plaques, myocardial perfusion defects, and viable myocardial tissue. Cardiac PET allows for comparisons of myocardial function both at time of rest and stress, providing accurate assessments of both myocardial perfusion and viability. Furthermore, novel PET techniques with unique radiotracers yield clinically relevant data on high-risk plaques in active progressive atherosclerosis. While PET exercise stress tests were previously difficult to perform given short radiotracer half-life, the development of the novel radiotracer Flurpiridaz F-18 provides a promising future for PET exercise stress imaging. In addition, hybrid imaging with computed tomography angiography (CTA) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) provides integration of cardiac function and structure. In this review article, we discuss the principles of cardiac PET, the clinical applications of PET in diagnosing and prognosticating patients at risk for future cardiovascular events, compare PET with other non-invasive cardiac imaging modalities, and discuss future applications of PET in CVD evaluation and management.

  18. Identification and validation of clinical predictors for the risk of neurological involvement in children with hand, foot, and mouth disease in Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Sel Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human enterovirus 71 (HEV71 can cause Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD with neurological complications, which may rapidly progress to fulminant cardiorespiratory failure, and death. Early recognition of children at risk is the key to reduce acute mortality and morbidity. Methods We examined data collected through a prospective clinical study of HFMD conducted between 2000 and 2006 that included 3 distinct outbreaks of HEV71 to identify risk factors associated with neurological involvement in children with HFMD. Results Total duration of fever ≥ 3 days, peak temperature ≥ 38.5°C and history of lethargy were identified as independent risk factors for neurological involvement (evident by CSF pleocytosis in the analysis of 725 children admitted during the first phase of the study. When they were validated in the second phase of the study, two or more (≥ 2 risk factors were present in 162 (65% of 250 children with CSF pleocytosis compared with 56 (30% of 186 children with no CSF pleocytosis (OR 4.27, 95% CI2.79–6.56, p rd or later day of febrile illness, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of ≥ 2 risk factors predictive of CSF pleocytosis were 75%(57/76, 59%(27/46, 75%(57/76 and 59%(27/46, respectively. Conclusion Three readily elicited clinical risk factors were identified to help detect children at risk of neurological involvement. These risk factors may serve as a guide to clinicians to decide the need for hospitalization and further investigation, including cerebrospinal fluid examination, and close monitoring for disease progression in children with HFMD.

  19. Identification and validation of clinical predictors for the risk of neurological involvement in children with hand, foot, and mouth disease in Sarawak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Mong How; Wong, See Chang; Mohan, Anand; Podin, Yuwana; Perera, David; Clear, Daniella; del Sel, Sylvia; Chieng, Chae Hee; Tio, Phaik Hooi; Cardosa, Mary Jane; Solomon, Tom

    2009-01-19

    Human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) can cause Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with neurological complications, which may rapidly progress to fulminant cardiorespiratory failure, and death. Early recognition of children at risk is the key to reduce acute mortality and morbidity. We examined data collected through a prospective clinical study of HFMD conducted between 2000 and 2006 that included 3 distinct outbreaks of HEV71 to identify risk factors associated with neurological involvement in children with HFMD. Total duration of fever >or= 3 days, peak temperature >or= 38.5 degrees C and history of lethargy were identified as independent risk factors for neurological involvement (evident by CSF pleocytosis) in the analysis of 725 children admitted during the first phase of the study. When they were validated in the second phase of the study, two or more (>or= 2) risk factors were present in 162 (65%) of 250 children with CSF pleocytosis compared with 56 (30%) of 186 children with no CSF pleocytosis (OR 4.27, 95% CI2.79-6.56, p or= 38.5 degrees C and history of lethargy had the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 28%(48/174), 89%(125/140), 76%(48/63) and 50%(125/251), respectively in predicting CSF pleocytosis in children that were seen within the first 2 days of febrile illness. For those presented on the 3rd or later day of febrile illness, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of >or= 2 risk factors predictive of CSF pleocytosis were 75%(57/76), 59%(27/46), 75%(57/76) and 59%(27/46), respectively. Three readily elicited clinical risk factors were identified to help detect children at risk of neurological involvement. These risk factors may serve as a guide to clinicians to decide the need for hospitalization and further investigation, including cerebrospinal fluid examination, and close monitoring for disease progression in children with HFMD.

  20. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring – Clinical Practice Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Mako

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM became a subject of considerable scientific interest. Due to the increasing use of the ABPM in everyday clinical practice it is important that all the users have a correct knowledge on the clinical indications, the methodology of using the device including some technical issues and the interpretation of results. In the last years several guidelines and position papers have been published with recommendations for the monitoring process, reference values, for clinical practice and research. This paper represents a summary of the most important aspects related to the use of ABPM in daily practice, being a synthesis of recommendations from the recent published guidelines and position papers. This reference article presents the practical and technical issues of ABPM, the use of this method in special situations, the clinical interpretation of measured values including the presentation of different ABPM patterns, derived parameters, the prognostic significance and the limitations of this method.

  1. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice - Vol 12, No 3 (2009)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sensitivity pattern of bacterial isolates in childhood sepsis in clinical practice at Onitsha · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. E.O Obidike, G Anigbo, C Igbodo ...

  2. A Postdoctoral Fellowship in Industrial Clinical Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Joseph; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A postdoctoral pharmacy fellowship is described that provides training in industrial clinical pharmacy practice and related tasks associated with the development of new pharmaceuticals, through experience in industrial and hospital settings and in research projects. (MSE) PUBTYPE[141

  3. Improving clinical practices for children with language and learning disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhi, Alan G

    2014-04-01

    This lead article of the Clinical Forum addresses some of the gaps that exist between clinical practice and current knowledge about instructional factors that influence learning and language development. Topics reviewed and discussed include principles of learning, generalization, treatment intensity, processing interventions, components of language therapy, grammar goals, and goal prioritization for students with language and learning difficulties. The gaps that exist between current knowledge about learning, language development, and clinical practice often do not receive as much attention as the gaps in the evidence base that addresses the efficacy and effectiveness of language intervention practices and service delivery models. Fortunately, clinicians do not have to wait for future intervention studies to apply their knowledge of learning and language development to clinical practices.

  4. Orienting Nursing Students to Cost Effective Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessner, Muriel W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes five principles for cost-effective clinical practice: efficient use of self, efficient use of equipment and supplies, delegation of work, critical path method, and organization of the environment. (SK)

  5. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS Cancer is a common, serious disease and early diagnosis is a cornerstone in the effort to improve the outcome from cancer disease. The general practitioner (GP) plays a crucial role in achieving this goal. Little is known about GPs’ suspicion of cancer and the activities the GPs...... institute in relation to such suspicion. Knowledge is also sparse on any effects of different diagnostic activities in general practice. The overall aims of this thesis were therefore: -to describe how often Danish GPs suspected cancer or other serious diseases and how they acted on the suspicion......, and to analyse how a suspicion influenced the demand for health care services and predicted a future diagnosis of serious disease - to investigate whether variation in GPs’ diagnostic activity influences cancer patients’ prognosis in relation to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prostate cancer...

  6. Bovine neosporosis: clinical and practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almería, S; López-Gatius, F

    2013-10-01

    Neospora caninum is a protozoan parasite with a wide host range but with a preference for cattle and dogs. Since the description of N. caninum as a new genus and species in 1988, bovine neosporosis has become a disease of international concern as it is among the main causes of abortion in cattle. At present there is no effective treatment or vaccine. This review focuses on the epidemiology of the disease and on prospects for its control in cattle. Finally, based on the implications of clinical findings reported to date, a set of recommendations is provided for veterinarians and cattle farmers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Obsessions before Freud: history and clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The article analyses the significance of the concept of "obsession" in nineteenth-century alienism. From a clinical point of view, Esquirol's description was completed by other authors (Jules Falret, Legrand du Saulle). In the area of psychopathological studies, French alienism, with Morel's emotional delirium or Janet's psychasthenia, defended the emotional theory, as opposed to the intellectual disorder proposed by German doctors. Lastly, the importance of the cultural framework is stressed in the appearance of obsessive symptoms and their interpretation. Along these lines, the article discusses the relationship of religious scruples to melancholy or the appearance of diagnostic categories subject to fin de siècle codes and mentalities.

  8. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline

    OpenAIRE

    Coroneos, Christopher J.; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R.; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. Setting The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and childr...

  9. Risk management in clinical practice. Part 10. Periodontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, P; Needleman, I

    2010-12-11

    A sizeable proportion of patients in clinical practice will have some form of periodontal disease and most of these patients can be well managed in primary care. Unfortunately, dento-legal claims regarding inappropriate periodontal care are increasing rapidly and are now one of the most common reasons for litigation in dentistry. In this paper we will look at aspects of contemporary management of periodontal disease in clinical practice and offer guidance for examination, management and referral.

  10. Sabbatical leaves for nurse-midwives in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleher, K C

    1993-01-01

    The demands of clinical practice seldom allow for time to pursue academic writing, teaching, or the development of individual advanced skills. The burnout rate in professions such as nurse-midwifery cannot be ignored. This article describes how one nurse-midwifery clinical practice implemented a short, rotating sabbatical; specific goals and guidelines are presented. It concludes that a sabbatical leave can be considered as one of many job-related benefits.

  11. Clinical Photography for Trichology Practice: Tips and Tricks

    OpenAIRE

    Ashique, KT; Kaliyadan, Feroze

    2011-01-01

    Clinical photography of hair disorders is an extension of photography in dermatology practice. Some points should be kept in mind while taking images of the hair and hair bearing areas in view of the reflection of light and the subsequent glare that may spoil the result. For documentation of most conditions of the hair, the same general rules of dermatological photography apply. The correct lighting is the most important aspect of clinical photography in trichology practice and can be achieve...

  12. [Complexity of the diagnosis of Wilson disease in clinical practice: our experience in 15 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huarte-Muniesa, María Pilar; Lacalle-Fabo, Esther; Uriz-Otano, Juan; Berisa-Prado, Silvia; Moreno-Laguna, Sira; Burusco-Paternáin, María Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an inherited disorder that causes copper (Cu) accumulation, leading to mainly liver, neurological and/or psychiatric manifestations. In the absence of some of the typical features, diagnosis of WD is difficult and is based on the combination of clinical, biochemical and genetic testing. The aim of this study was to illustrate the complexity of the approach to WD in daily clinical practice. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients with WD, including the clinical presentation, histological and biochemical findings, and follow up after treatment. We also carried out genetic testing, and the Leipzig diagnostic score was applied. We included 15 patients. Four were symptomatic, with liver (n=1), neurological (n=1), psychiatric (n=1) and mixed clinical manifestations (n=1), and 11 were presymptomatic, with elevated transaminases (n=8) and family study (n=3). We observed Kayser-Fleischer ring in 2 patients, both without neurologic symptoms. Ceruloplasmin ≤ 5 mg/dL was present in 73%, and 24-hour urinary Cu> 100 μg in 40%. Liver Cu was >250 μg/g.d.t. in 85% of the patients. The final diagnosis of WD was given by genetic testing (ATP7B gene mutations) in 5 patients with minimal disease features, including one symptomatic patient (psychiatric symptoms). We identified 5 previously reported mutations (p.M645R, p.R827W, p.H1069Q, p.P768L and p.G869R) and 3 unpublished mutations (p.L1313R, p.I1311T and p.A1179D); the most frequent mutation was p.M645R. After treatment, biochemical parameters (transaminases, urinary cooper) and symptoms improved, except in patients with neurological and psychiatric manifestations. Our series illustrates the important role of genetic testing in the diagnosis of WD. The identification of the p.M645R mutation in most of our patients should be kept in mind in the molecular analysis of the ATP7B gene in our region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  13. Present Status of Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duehmke, Eckhart

    Aims of radiation oncology are cure from malignant diseases and - at the same time preservation of anatomy (e.g. female breast, uterus, prostate) and organ functions (e.g. brain, eye, voice, sphincter ani). At present, methods and results of clinical radiotherapy (RT) are based on experiences with natural history and radiobiology of malignant tumors in properly defined situations as well as on technical developments since World War II in geometrical and biological treatment planning in teletherapy and brachytherapy. Radiobiological research revealed tolerance limits of healthy tissues to be respected, effective total treatment doses of high cure probability depending on histology and tumor volume, and - more recently - altered fractionation schemes to be adapted to specific growth fractions and intrinsic radiosensitivities of clonogenic tumor cells. In addition, Biological Response Modifiers (BRM), such as cis-platinum, oxygen and hyperthermia may steepen cell survival curves of hypoxic tumor cells, others - such as tetrachiordekaoxid (TCDO) - may enhance repair of normal tissues. Computer assisted techniques in geometrical RT-planning based on individual healthy and pathologic anatomy (CT, MRT) provide high precision RT for well defined brain lesions by using dedicated linear accelerators (Stereotaxy). CT-based individual tissue compensators help with homogenization of distorted dose distributions in magna field irradiation for malignant lymphomas and with total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, e.g. for leukemia. RT with fast neutrons, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), RT with protons and heavy ions need to be tested in randomized trials before implementation into clinical routine.

  14. Potential Uses of Probiotics in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Gregor; Jass, Jana; Sebulsky, M. Tom; McCormick, John K.

    2003-01-01

    Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. There is now mounting evidence that selected probiotic strains can provide health benefits to their human hosts. Numerous clinical trials show that certain strains can improve the outcome of intestinal infections by reducing the duration of diarrhea. Further investigations have shown benefits in reducing the recurrence of urogenital infections in women, while promising studies in cancer and allergies require research into the mechanisms of activity for particular strains and better-designed trials. At present, only a small percentage of physicians either know of probiotics or understand their potential applicability to patient care. Thus, probiotics are not yet part of the clinical arsenal for prevention and treatment of disease or maintenance of health. The establishment of accepted standards and guidelines, proposed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization, represents a key step in ensuring that reliable products with suitable, informative health claims become available. Based upon the evidence to date, future advances with single- and multiple-strain therapies are on the horizon for the management of a number of debilitating and even fatal conditions. PMID:14557292

  15. Clinical Practice Guideline for Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D and its metabolites have clinical significance because they play a critical function in calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. Although not all of the pathologic mechanisms have been adequately described, vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency, as measured by low levels of 25-OH vitamin D, are associated with a variety of clinical conditions including osteoporosis, falls and fractures in the elderly, decreased immune function, bone pain, and possibly colon cancer and cardiovascular health.2 Apart from inadequate dietary intake, patients may present with low levels of vitamin D if they receive inadequate sunlight. The astronaut population is potentially vulnerable to low levels of vitamin D for several reasons. Firstly, they may train for long periods in Star City, Russia, which by virtue of its northern latitude receives less sunlight in winter months. Secondly, astronauts are deprived of sunlight while aboard the International Space Station (ISS). In addition, ISS crew members are exposed to microgravity for prolonged durations and are likely to develop low bone mineral density despite the use of countermeasures. Therefore, closely monitoring and maintaining adequate vitamin D levels is important for the astronaut corps.

  16. Viral asthma: implications for clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Menendez

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Roger Menendez1, Michael D Goldman21Allergy and Asthma Center of El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA; 2Pulmonary Division, UCLA Gaffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: The natural history of asthma appears to be driven primarily by the timing and duration of viral respiratory infections. From the very high rate of infections in childhood, to the more sporadic pattern seen in adults, the cycle of acute injury followed by an inefficient repair process helps explain the clinical patterns of asthma severity currently recognized by asthma guidelines. Why the asthmatic host responds to viral injury in a particular way is largely a mystery and the subject of intense investigation. The role of viruses in asthma extends not just to intermittent but to persistent disease, and to both the atopic as well as nonatopic phenotypes. Future therapeutic strategies should include primary prevention via the development of antiviral innate immunity-enhancing vaccines, as well as secondary prevention via the use of antiviral agents, or immunomodulators designed to boost the antiviral response or interrupt the proinflammatory cascade.Keywords: asthma, rhinoviruses, exacerbations, epidemiology, phenotypes, clinical trials

  17. Neurologic manifestations of achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jacqueline T; Bodensteiner, John B; Butler, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the best described and most common form of the congenital short-limbed dwarfing conditions. Achondroplasia is apparent at birth and has a birth prevalence of 1 in 20000-30000 live-born infants. Achondroplasia is inherited as an autosomal dominant condition, although 80% of cases occur sporadically as new events in their families. Achondroplasia is caused, in virtually all of the cases, by a G380R mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). Patients with achondroplasia should be evaluated by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians including geneticists, neurologists, and orthopedists, since there are numerous bony and neurological complications. The most severe complication results from craniocervical stenosis and medullary and upper spinal cord compression, which can have devastating and even lethal sequelae during early childhood. In subsequent decades, including adolescence, spinal cord and nerve compression are more prominent. The neurological complications of achondroplasia have been recognized in adults for more than a century and are attributed to bony defects, connective tissue structures, or both. Similar neurological complications are now appreciated in infants, young children, and teenagers with achondroplasia. Defective connective tissue elements in achondroplasia frequently lead to ligamentous laxity, which can aggravate the complications associated with bony stenosis. Bony abnormalities are known to cause neurological morbidity and lead to a shortened lifespan. Neurological complications associated with achondroplasia are reviewed, including recommendations for the evaluation and management of these clinical problems. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A qualitative study of nursing student experiences of clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Farkhondeh; Masoumi, Sara

    2005-01-01

    Background Nursing student's experiences of their clinical practice provide greater insight to develop an effective clinical teaching strategy in nursing education. The main objective of this study was to investigate student nurses' experience about their clinical practice. Methods Focus groups were used to obtain students' opinion and experiences about their clinical practice. 90 baccalaureate nursing students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery) were selected randomly from two hundred students and were arranged in 9 groups of ten students. To analyze the data the method used to code and categories focus group data were adapted from approaches to qualitative data analysis. Results Four themes emerged from the focus group data. From the students' point of view," initial clinical anxiety", "theory-practice gap"," clinical supervision", professional role", were considered as important factors in clinical experience. Conclusion The result of this study showed that nursing students were not satisfied with the clinical component of their education. They experienced anxiety as a result of feeling incompetent and lack of professional nursing skills and knowledge to take care of various patients in the clinical setting. PMID:16280087

  19. Active Interventions in Clinical Practice: Contributions of Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Marilyn; Dolan, Mary M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes two dimensions of Gestalt therapy that can enhance clinical practice--orientation to the present and active-experimental style--and examines them in relation to some traditional principles of practice. Gestalt theory offers a method of discovery that is a combination of phenomenology and behaviorism. (JAC)

  20. Characteristics and Clinical Practices of Rural Marriage and Family Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, James

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a subset of data collected from the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) Practice Research Network project conducted in 2002. A sample of 47 clinical members of AAMFT who indicated they practiced in a rural community provided descriptive information on demographic characteristics, training, clinical…

  1. [Impact of digital technology on clinical practices: perspectives from surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Liu, X J

    2016-04-09

    Digital medical technologies or computer aided medical procedures, refer to imaging, 3D reconstruction, virtual design, 3D printing, navigation guided surgery and robotic assisted surgery techniques. These techniques are integrated into conventional surgical procedures to create new clinical protocols that are known as "digital surgical techniques". Conventional health care is characterized by subjective experiences, while digital medical technologies bring quantifiable information, transferable data, repeatable methods and predictable outcomes into clinical practices. Being integrated into clinical practice, digital techniques facilitate surgical care by improving outcomes and reducing risks. Digital techniques are becoming increasingly popular in trauma surgery, orthopedics, neurosurgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, imaging and anatomic sciences. Robotic assisted surgery is also evolving and being applied in general surgery, cardiovascular surgery and orthopedic surgery. Rapid development of digital medical technologies is changing healthcare and clinical practices. It is therefore important for all clinicians to purposefully adapt to these technologies and improve their clinical outcomes.

  2. Recommendations for the integration of genomics into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdin, Sarah; Gilbert, Adel; Bedoukian, Emma; Carew, Christopher; Adam, Margaret P; Belmont, John; Bernhardt, Barbara; Biesecker, Leslie; Bjornsson, Hans T; Blitzer, Miriam; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Deardorff, Matthew A; Demmer, Laurie; Elliott, Alison; Feldman, Gerald L; Glass, Ian A; Herman, Gail; Hindorff, Lucia; Hisama, Fuki; Hudgins, Louanne; Innes, A Micheil; Jackson, Laird; Jarvik, Gail; Kim, Raymond; Korf, Bruce; Ledbetter, David H; Li, Mindy; Liston, Eriskay; Marshall, Christian; Medne, Livija; Meyn, M Stephen; Monfared, Nasim; Morton, Cynthia; Mulvihill, John J; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi; Roberts, Amy; Shuman, Cheryl; Spinner, Nancy B; Stavropoulos, D James; Valverde, Kathleen; Waggoner, Darrel J; Wilkens, Alisha; Cohn, Ronald D; Krantz, Ian D

    2016-11-01

    The introduction of diagnostic clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) is changing the scope of practice for clinical geneticists. Many large institutions are making a significant investment in infrastructure and technology, allowing clinicians to access CGES, especially as health-care coverage begins to extend to clinically indicated genomic sequencing-based tests. Translating and realizing the comprehensive clinical benefits of genomic medicine remain a key challenge for the current and future care of patients. With the increasing application of CGES, it is necessary for geneticists and other health-care providers to understand its benefits and limitations in order to interpret the clinical relevance of genomic variants identified in the context of health and disease. New, collaborative working relationships with specialists across diverse disciplines (e.g., clinicians, laboratorians, bioinformaticians) will undoubtedly be key attributes of the future practice of clinical genetics and may serve as an example for other specialties in medicine. These new skills and relationships will also inform the development of the future model of clinical genetics training curricula. To address the evolving role of the clinical geneticist in the rapidly changing climate of genomic medicine, two Clinical Genetics Think Tank meetings were held that brought together physicians, laboratorians, scientists, genetic counselors, trainees, and patients with experience in clinical genetics, genetic diagnostics, and genetics education. This article provides recommendations that will guide the integration of genomics into clinical practice.Genet Med 18 11, 1075-1084.

  3. An internet portal for the development of clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhne, W J; Karge, T; Siegmund, B; Preiss, J; Hoffmann, J C; Zeitz, M; Fölsch, U R

    2010-01-01

    The complexity and quality requirements for the development of clinical practice guidelines steadily increase. Internet technologies support this process by optimizing the development process. The aim of this internet based solution was to facilitate the development of clinical practice guidelines. An internet portal was developed allowing for a shared workplace to support clinical practice guideline authoring. It is based on a Content Management System and combines different tools for document handling and editing, communication as well as process and team steering. Until now, the internet portal has been successfully implicated in the development of six evidence- and consensus-based clinical practice guidelines. Additional German and European clinical practice guidelines are currently generated with support of the internet portal. The available tools allow for a flexible design of the scheduled workflow, depending on the requirements of the respective group. An additional strength of the platform is the advantage to transfer all data from a previous version of a guideline into the next 'life-cycle'. The application of the portal results in a considerable reduction of costs and development time of the resulting clinical practice guidelines.

  4. Neurological Manifestations of Dengue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Hong Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue counts among the most commonly encountered arboviral diseases, representing the fastest spreading tropical illness in the world. It is prevalent in 128 countries, and each year >2.5 billion people are at risk of dengue virus infection worldwide. Neurological signs of dengue infection are increasingly reported. In this review, the main neurological complications of dengue virus infection, such as central nervous system (CNS, peripheral nervous system, and ophthalmic complications were discussed according to clinical features, treatment and possible pathogenesis. In addition, neurological complications in children were assessed due to their atypical clinical features. Finally, dengue infection and Japanese encephalitis were compared for pathogenesis and main clinical manifestations.

  5. The Brazilian Neurology centenary (1912-2012 and the common origin of the fields of Neurology and Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleide da Mota Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is reported the Brazilian Neurology birth (1912, that has as the hallmark its first Neurology Cathedra of Rio de Janeiro, and the links between Neurology and Psychiatry, besides the main medical protagonists at that time in Rio de Janeiro: João Carlos Teixeira Brandão (1854-1921, first professor of the cathedra of Clinical Psychiatry and Nervous Diseases (1883-1921; Juliano Moreira (1873-1933, the founder of the Brazilian scientific Psychiatry and director of the Hospício Nacional de Alienados (National Hospice for the Insane (1903-1930; Antônio Austregésilo Rodrigues de Lima (1876-1960, first professor of the cathedra of Neurology, considered the father of the Brazilian Neurology. Aloysio de Castro (1881-1959 was a great Brazilian neurosemiologist at that time. Austregésilo practiced both disciplines, Neurology and Psychiatry, and like Jean-Martin-Charcot, he was very interested in a typically psychiatric disorder, the hysteria. It is also considered in this paper the first Brazilian authors of Neurology and/or Psychiatric texts and the places where Neurology was initially developed by the main founders: Hospício Nacional de Alienados, Santa Casa de Misericórdia do Rio de Janeiro and Policlínica Geral do Rio de Janeiro.

  6. Investigators' perspectives on translating human microbiome research into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slashinski, M J; Whitney, S N; Achenbaum, L S; Keitel, W A; McCurdy, S A; McGuire, A L

    2013-01-01

    Human microbiome research has the potential to transform the practice of medicine, fundamentally shifting the ways in which we think not only about human health, illness and disease, but also about clinical practice and public health interventions. Drawing from a larger qualitative study on ethical, legal and social dimensions of human microbiome research, in this article, we document perspectives related to the translation of human microbiome research into clinical practice, focusing particularly on implications for health, illness and disease. We conducted 60 in-depth, semi-structured interviews (2009-2010) with 63 researchers and National Institutes of Health project leaders ('investigators') involved with human microbiome research. The interviews explored a range of ethical, legal and social implications of human microbiome research, including investigators' perspectives on potential strategies for translating findings to clinical practice. Using thematic content analysis, we identified and analyzed emergent themes and patterns. We identified 3 themes: (1) investigators' general perspectives on the clinical utility of human microbiome research, (2) investigators' perspectives on antibiotic use, overuse and misuse, and (3) investigators' perspectives concerning future challenges of translating data to clinical practice. The issues discussed by investigators concerning the clinical significance of human microbiome research, including embracing a new paradigm of health and disease, the importance of microbial communities, and clinical utility, will be of critical importance as this research moves forward. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for use of tumor markers in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M; Hoffman, Barry R; Chan, Daniel W

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This report presents updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines summarizing quality requirements for the use of tumor markers. METHODS: One subcommittee developed guidelines for analytical quality relevant to serum and tissue-based tumor...

  8. Current clinical practices in Aphasia Therapy in Finland: challenges in moving towards national best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klippi, A; Sellman, J; Heikkinen, P; Laine, M

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to discover and document the state of clinical practices for aphasia therapy in Finland and to gather information for developing national best practice. Two surveys were administered in Finland that explored current clinical practices in aphasia rehabilitation and the resources available to speech and language therapists (SLTs). We integrated and compared the results of these surveys. The results are based on the responses of the 88 (45 + 43) returned questionnaires from SLTs. Four principle themes were identified: planning the aphasia therapy, measures and assessment methods, current therapy service provision, and development suggestions and barriers to change. The results of this study showed considerable consistency in clinical practices among the respondents to the surveys. However, we noticed that there are some discrepancies between the recent research findings and present clinical practices. The findings from this study indicate that there are many challenges in clinical decision-making at the moment in Finland. The article helps clinicians to evaluate the practices they use and to execute justified modifications in order to implement more effective models of practice. It is evident that national best practice guidelines for aphasia therapy would support SLTs in clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Digital clinical records and practice administration in primary dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, I-V; Ireland, R S; Eaton, K A

    2008-04-12

    Usually, a 'computerised dental practice' has included a series of diagnostic instruments, intra-oral cameras, digital radiographic systems, treatment planning systems, CAD-CAM systems, management systems etc. However, these 'island solutions' have not been integrated into one system. Nevertheless, it is possible to produce fully integrated systems for digital clinical records, based on established physiologic and cognitive-ergonomic concepts. The first part of this paper outlines the philosophy behind the development of such a totally integrated system for digital clinical records. The second--digital practice administration--considers how the 'digital revolution' has impacted upon practice administration.

  10. Improving Clinical Practices for Children with Language and Learning Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhi, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This lead article of the Clinical Forum addresses some of the gaps that exist between clinical practice and current knowledge about instructional factors that influence learning and language development. Method: Topics reviewed and discussed include principles of learning, generalization, treatment intensity, processing interventions,…

  11. Early infant feeding practices of mothers attending a postnatal clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine feeding practices of mothers of infants 8 weeks of age or younger, attending the postnatal clinic at Ga-Rankuwa Hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional study of mothers attending the postnatal clinic at Ga-Rankuwa Hospital using a standardised interview schedule. Results: A total of 150 mothers were ...

  12. Conducting research in clinical psychology practice: Barriers, facilitators, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirsten V; Thew, Graham R

    2017-09-01

    The combination of clinical psychologists' therapeutic expertise and research training means that they are in an ideal position to be conducting high-quality research projects. However, despite these skills and the documented benefits of research to services and service users, research activity in practice remains low. This article aims to give an overview of the advantages of, and difficulties in conducting research in clinical practice. We reviewed the relevant literature on barriers to research and reflected on our clinical and research experiences in a range of contexts to offer practical recommendations. We considered factors involved in the planning, sourcing support, implementation, and dissemination phases of research, and outline suggestions to improve the feasibility of research projects in post-qualification roles. We suggest that research leadership is particularly important within clinical psychology to ensure the profession's continued visibility and influence within health settings. Clinical implications Emerging evidence suggests that clinical settings that foster research are associated with better patient outcomes. Suggestions to increase the feasibility of research projects in clinical settings are detailed. Limitations The present recommendations are drawn from the authors' practical experience and may need adaptation to individual practitioners' settings. This study does not attempt to assess the efficacy of the strategies suggested. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society.

  13. Ichthyosis: clinical manifestations and practical treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oji, Vinzenz; Traupe, Heiko

    2009-01-01

    Ichthyoses constitute a large group of cornification disorders that affect the entire integument. The skin is characterized by visible scaling and in many cases by inflammation, for example, in bullous/keratinopathic ichthyosis or Netherton syndrome. From the viewpoint of classification it is useful to distinguish non-syndromic from syndromic types of ichthyosis. Ichthyosis vulgaris and recessive X-linked ichthyosis are common disorders - often of delayed onset, in contrast to congenital ichthyoses, which belong to the group of rare diseases and present at birth with either the features of collodion membrane or congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma. The diagnostic steps are based on clinical data, analyses such as the steroid sulfatase activity test, skin biopsies, and genetic results. However, the dramatic increase in knowledge about the pathophysiology of these conditions has not led to a curative therapy so far. The therapeutic management is multidisciplinary and involves ichthyosis patient organizations in many countries. The mainstay of treatment remains with moisturizing creams containing, for example, urea, lactic acid and other humectants and keratolytics, regular bathing, and mechanical scale removal. Patients with lamellar ichthyosis or ichthyosiform erythroderma in particular profit from oral therapy with retinoids or retinoic acid metabolism-blocking agents.

  14. Portal of Clinical Practice Guidelines: Digital Strategy for the Dissemination of Clinical Practice Guidelines Developed in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez Obando, Fernando; Médico, MSc. Miembro del Departamento de Epidemiología y Bioestadística, así como del Instituto de Genética Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; Médico MSc. Miembro del Departamento de Epidemiología y Bioestadística, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.; Camacho Sánchez, Jhon Jairo; MSc. Miembro del Departamento de Epidemiología y Bioestadística Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.; De La Hoz Bradford, Ana Maria; Médico MSc. Miembro del Departamento de Epidemiología y Bioestadística, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.; Ruiz Morales, Álvaro; Médico MSc. Miembro del Departamento de Epidemiología Clínica y Bioestadística, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.; Maldonado Rivera, Patricia; Médico. Miembro del Departamento de Epidemiología y Bioestadística, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.; López, Pilar; Médico. Miembro del Departamento de Epidemiología y Bioestadística, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In response to the necessity of concise,accurate and practical information to supportclinical decision making, the Colombian government,in partnership with universities and scientificsocieties, has heavily invested in the developmentof clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Objectives:To develop a Web portal for the dissemination andcommunication of CPG and its clinical recommendations.Methodology: Development of the ColombianGPC web portal based on the principlesof adult learning,...

  15. Long term neurological complications of bacterial meningitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neurological disorders in children are common occurrence in clinical practice. The disorder account for more than 170,000 deaths worldwide each year and contributes to the world's disease burden with majority of people affected living in Africa. When affected by such illnesses, a person's memory, motor and ...

  16. Communication course for midwives teaching students in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe; Pedersen, Pernille Mølholt

    taking place in clinical practice and try to align the educational efforts in school and clinical settings for the benefit of the students PERSPECTIVES It is known that students in medical education find that clinical learning experiences do not reinforce the communication skills they learn pre......BACKGROUND The course was initiated by the midwifery department at University College North Denmark in cooperation with the leaders of the maternity units where the affiliated students have their clinical education. The purpose of the course was to enhance the quality of communication education......-clinically (Rosenbaum et al. 2013) and our own experience teaching Danish midwifery students indicates the same problem in our program. Providing an opportunity for the clinical teachers to learn, discuss and practice communication issues with each other and with theoretical teachers can represent an important...

  17. NHS Lanarkshire's leadership development programme's impact on clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Angela M; Dodd, Frances

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect of a clinical leadership programme on senior clinicians within National Health Service Lanarkshire, in terms of key constituents for fostering leadership development, specific skills developed and impact this has had on clinical practice. A qualitative research design was employed over several stages, involving 44 senior clinical managers, with member validation substantiating findings and thematic analysis used to analyse data collected. The programme's impact was evident in acknowledged change to participants' attitude, behaviour and performance with examples conveyed to demonstrate both the effect on clinical practice and perceived organisational benefits gained. The use of role play, scenario planning and enquiry-based learning approaches were deemed critical in achieving such change. Time constraints merited two different cohorts being examined simultaneously during the various stages of the programme. A longitudinal study is underway encompassing the evaluations of several cohorts through various stages of the programme to enable time-based comparisons to be made and enhance the rigour and scrutiny of the programme's impact on clinical practice. The paper is foremost in determining structure and processes employed on the programme, specific leadership skills developed, subsequent effect on clinical practice and perceived organisational benefits gained but not necessarily contemplated by staff prior to embarking on the programme, such as the emergence of communities of practice.

  18. Exchange students crossing language boundaries in clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, K

    2011-12-01

    This article examines challenges and learning outcomes for nursing students from a Central European university of applied sciences who completed 3 months of clinical practice in Norway. The clinical practice was supervised in English by Norwegian nurses and nursing teachers. English is not the primary language in any of the countries. Increases in global migration have contributed to the need for an international dimension in nursing education. Personal mobility is a crucial part of the European Union's goal of becoming a knowledge society. Clinically based experiences pose challenges that are additional to and often more complex than traditional course-based experiences. Students who come from a non-English-speaking country for clinical practice in Norway face challenges regarding language. Accepting incoming students is a way of achieving higher quality and more relevant education in nursing. The study shows that clinical practice in a foreign country gives added value compared with clinical practice at home. Greater self-confidence and understanding of core concepts in nursing is described by the participants. Language differences are not regarded as a problem but as a way of developing personal and professional competence. The ability to compare healthcare systems in the two counties is important in developing competencies in nursing. © 2011 The Author. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  19. A model for reflection for good clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla, John I; Heneghan, Carl; Glasziou, Paul; Thompson, Matthew; Balla, Margaret E

    2009-12-01

    Rationale and aim The rapidly changing knowledge base of clinical practice highlights the need to keep abreast of knowledge changes that are most relevant for the practitioner. We aimed to develop a model for reflection on clinical practice that identified the key elements of medical knowledge needed for good medical practice. Method The dual theory of cognition, an integration of intuitive and analytic processes, provided the framework for the study. The design looked at the congruence between the clinical thinking process and the dual theory. A one-year study was conducted in general practice clinics in Oxfordshire, UK. Thirty-five general practitioners participated in 20-minute interviews to discuss how they worked through recently seen clinical cases. Over a one-year period 72 cases were recorded from 35 interviews. These were categorized according to emerging themes, which were manually coded and substantiated with verbatim quotations. Results There was a close fit between the dual theory and participants' clinical thinking processes. This included instant problem framing, consistent with automatic intuitive thinking, focusing on the risk and urgency of the case. Salient features accounting for these choices were recognizable. There was a second reflective phase, leading to the review of initial judgements. Conclusions The proposed model highlights the critical steps in decision making. This allows regular recalibration of knowledge that is most critical at each of these steps. In line with good practice, the model also links the crucial knowledge used in decision making, to value judgments made in relation to the patient.

  20. A practical guide to writing clinical articles for publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, B

    2012-04-01

    The sharing of nursing knowledge between clinicians can strengthen the profession. Clinicians often underestimate the relevance and importance of what they may contribute and feel daunted by the idea of writing for publication. This article presents a practical approach to writing clinical articles for publication in professional journals such as Nursing Older People. It considers: what is a clinical article; the structure of a clinical article (Why? Where? How? What? What now?); choosing the journal; and understanding the editorial process.

  1. Clinical learning spaces: Crucibles for practice development in physiotherapy clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Narelle; Higgs, Joy; Smith, Megan

    2018-01-10

    This paper, through a deep examination of clinical workplaces as learning spaces, uses a holistic interpretation of clinical education and offers a practice development crucible metaphor as a useful way to deepen how clinical education can be conceptualized. An in-depth conceptualization of clinical education is needed if educators are able to develop wise educational practice and optimize the time students spend in clinical learning settings. The research reported here was undertaken in the qualitative paradigm guided by philosophical hermeneutics. Data collection strategies included observation, semi-structured interviews, focus groups and photo-elicitation. Twenty-four undergraduate physiotherapy students and twelve physiotherapy clinical supervisors participated in this research. Consistent with hermeneutic principles of dialogue of question and answer and hermeneutic circle, data analysis was achieved through an iterative process of reading, interpreting and re-reading the transcripts resulting in the emergence of a deeper understanding of clinical education that is represented for the reader. Clinical education has been revealed as a multidimensional learning space where workplace influences, engagement in professional practices, clinical supervisors' intentions and actions in combination with students' dispositions interact to shape and challenge students' clinical learning. A practice development crucible metaphor has been introduced as a way to represent this complexity and conceptualize clinical education, not as a set of techniques or supervision ratios but as a relational, fluid, complex space where learning is catalyzed. Importantly, the crucible metaphor assists academics, clinical supervisors and students to harness the power of clinical education to facilitate learning during clinical placements.

  2. Time-courses of plasma IL-6 and HMGB-1 reflect initial severity of clinical presentation but do not predict poor neurologic outcome following subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Kiiski

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: High initial IL-6 values seem to reflect the intensity of the inflammatory response but not the brain damage per se. An early inflammatory response might even be beneficial since although elevated IL-6 levels were observed in patients with a more severe initial clinical presentation, they were not associated with neurological outcome. The lack of correlation between IL-6 and HMGB1 questions the role of macrophages in the process of the secretion of these inflammatory markers after aSAH, instead pointing to the activation of alternative pro-inflammatory pathways.

  3. Innovation in clinical pharmacy practice and opportunities for academic--practice partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbins, Paul O; Micek, Scott T; Badowski, Melissa; Cheng, Judy; Gallagher, Jason; Johnson, Samuel G; Karnes, Jason H; Lyons, Kayley; Moore, Katherine G; Strnad, Kyle

    2014-05-01

    Clinical pharmacy has a rich history of advancing practice through innovation. These innovations helped to mold clinical pharmacy into a patient-centered discipline recognized for its contributions to improving medication therapy outcomes. However, innovations in clinical pharmacy practice have now waned. In our view, the growth of academic–practice partnerships could reverse this trend and stimulate innovation among the next generation of pioneering clinical pharmacists. Although collaboration facilitates innovation,academic institutions and health care systems/organizations are not taking full advantage of this opportunity. The academic–practice partnership can be optimized by making both partners accountable for the desired outcomes of their collaboration, fostering symbiotic relationships that promote value-added clinical pharmacy services and emphasizing continuous quality improvement in the delivery of these services. Optimizing academic–practice collaboration on a broader scale requires both partners to adopt a culture that provides for dedicated time to pursue innovation, establishes mechanisms to incubate ideas, recognizes where motivation and vision align, and supports the purpose of the partnership. With appropriate leadership and support, a shift in current professional education and training practices, and a commitment to cultivate future innovators, the academic–practice partnership can develop new and innovative practice advancements that will improve patient outcomes.

  4. Truth telling in medical practice: students' opinions versus their observations of attending physicians' clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Woung-Ru; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Fang, Chun-Kai; Fujimori, Maiko

    2013-07-01

    Truth telling or transmitting bad news is a problem that all doctors must frequently face. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate if medical students' opinions of truth telling differed from their observations of attending physicians' actual clinical practice. The subjects were 275 medical clerks/interns at a medical center in northern Taiwan. Data were collected on medical students' opinions of truth telling, their observations of physicians' clinical practice, students' level of satisfaction with truth telling practiced by attending physicians, and cancer patients' distress level when they were told the truth. Students' truth-telling awareness was significantly higher than the clinical truth-telling practice of attending physicians (ptruth telling of attending physicians (mean ± SD=7.33 ± 1.74). However, our data also show that when cancer patients were informed of bad news, they all experienced medium to above average distress (5.93 ± 2.19). To develop the ability to tell the truth well, one must receive regular training in communication skills, including experienced attending physicians. This study found a significant difference between medical students' opinions on truth telling and attending physicians' actual clinical practice. More research is needed to objectively assess physicians' truth telling in clinical practice and to study the factors affecting the method of truth telling used by attending physicians in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Education research: neurology training reassessed. The 2011 American Academy of Neurology Resident Survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas E; Maas, Matthew B; Coleman, Mary; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Engstrom, John

    2012-10-23

    To assess the strengths and weaknesses of neurology resident education using survey methodology. A 27-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2011. Of eligible respondents, 49.8% of residents returned the survey. Most residents believed previously instituted duty hour restrictions had a positive impact on resident quality of life without impacting patient care. Most residents rated their faculty and clinical didactics favorably. However, many residents reported suboptimal preparation in basic neuroscience and practice management issues. Most residents (71%) noted that the Residency In-service Training Examination (RITE) assisted in self-study. A minority of residents (14%) reported that the RITE scores were used for reasons other than self-study. The vast majority (86%) of residents will enter fellowship training following residency and were satisfied with the fellowship offers they received. Graduating residents had largely favorable neurology training experiences. Several common deficiencies include education in basic neuroscience and clinical practice management. Importantly, prior changes to duty hours did not negatively affect the resident perception of neurology residency training.

  6. Neurological Diagnostic Tests and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of diagnostic imaging techniques and chemical and metabolic analyses to detect, manage, and treat neurological disease. Some ... performed in a doctor’s office or at a clinic. Fluoroscopy is a type of x-ray that ...

  7. Neurological sequelae of bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-07-01

    We reported on occurrence and impact of neurological sequelae after bacterial meningitis. We reviewed occurrence of neurological sequelae in children and adults after pneumococcal and meningococcal meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Adults with pneumococcal meningitis have the highest risk of developing focal neurological deficits, which are most commonly caused by cerebral infarction, but can also be due to cerebritis, subdural empyema, cerebral abscess or intracerebral bleeding. Focal deficits may improve during clinical course and even after discharge, but a proportion of patients will have persisting focal neurological deficits that often interfere in patient's daily life. Hearing loss occurs in a high proportion of patients with pneumococcal meningitis and has been associated with co-existing otitis. Children and adults recovering from bacterial meningitis without apparent neurological deficits are at risk for long-term cognitive deficits. Early identification of neurological sequelae is important for children to prevent additional developmental delay, and for adults to achieve successful return in society after the disease. Neurological sequelae occur in a substantial amount of patients following bacterial meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Expediting the transfer of evidence into practice: building clinical partnerships*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Tamara; Gagnon, Anita J.

    2000-01-01

    A librarian/clinician partnership was fostered in one hospital through the formation of the Evidence-based Practice Committee, with an ulterior goal of facilitating the transfer of evidence into practice. The paper will describe barriers to evidence-based practice and outline the committee's strategies for overcoming these barriers, including the development and promotion of a Web-based guide to evidence-based practice specifically designed for clinicians (health professionals). Educational strategies for use of the Web-based guide will also be addressed. Advantages of this partnership are that the skills of librarians in meeting the needs of clinicians are maximized. The evidence-based practice skills of clinicians are honed and librarians make a valuable contribution to the knowledgebase of the clinical staff. The knowledge acquired through the partnership by both clinicians and librarians will increase the sophistication of the dialogue between the two groups and in turn will expedite the transfer of evidence into practice. PMID:10928710

  9. Reexamination of the ethics of placebo use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Atsushi; Kadooka, Yasuhiro

    2013-05-01

    A placebo is a substance or intervention believed to be inactive, but is administered by the healthcare professional as if it was an active medication. Unlike standard treatments, clinical use of placebo usually involves deception and is therefore ethically problematic. Our attitudes toward the clinical use of placebo, which inevitably includes deception or withholding information, have a tremendous effect on our practice regarding truth-telling and informed consent. A casual attitude towards it weakens the current practice based on shared decision-making and mutual trust between patients and healthcare professionals. Issues concerning the clinical use of placebo are thus intimately related to patient-provider relationships, the public's trust in medicine, and medical education. A review of recent survey studies suggests that the clinical use of placebo appears to be fairly well accepted among healthcare professionals and is common in clinical settings in various countries. However, we think that an ethical discussion is urgently needed because of its controversial nature. If judged to be ethically wrong, the practice should end. In the present paper, we discuss the ethicality of the clinical use of placebo with deception and argue against it, concluding that it is unethical and should be banned. We will show that most arguments in favor of the clinical use of placebo can be refuted and are therefore incorrect or weak. These arguments will be presented and examined individually. Finally, we will briefly consider issues relevant to the clinical use of placebo without deception. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Practice advisory: Recurrent stroke with patent foramen ovale (update of practice parameter): Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messé, Steven R; Gronseth, Gary; Kent, David M; Kizer, Jorge R; Homma, Shunichi; Rosterman, Lee; Kasner, Scott E

    2016-08-23

    To update the 2004 American Academy of Neurology guideline for patients with stroke and patent foramen ovale (PFO) by addressing whether (1) percutaneous closure of PFO is superior to medical therapy alone and (2) anticoagulation is superior to antiplatelet therapy for the prevention of recurrent stroke. Systematic review of the literature and structured formulation of recommendations. Percutaneous PFO closure with the STARFlex device possibly does not provide a benefit in preventing stroke vs medical therapy alone (risk difference [RD] 0.13%, 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.2% to 2.0%). Percutaneous PFO closure with the AMPLATZER PFO Occluder possibly decreases the risk of recurrent stroke (RD -1.68%, 95% CI -3.18% to -0.19%), possibly increases the risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) (RD 1.64%, 95% CI 0.07%-3.2%), and is highly likely to be associated with a procedural complication risk of 3.4% (95% CI 2.3%-5%). There is insufficient evidence to determine the efficacy of anticoagulation compared with antiplatelet therapy in preventing recurrent stroke (RD 2%, 95% CI -21% to 25%). Clinicians should not routinely offer percutaneous PFO closure to patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke outside of a research setting (Level R). In rare circumstances, such as recurrent strokes despite adequate medical therapy with no other mechanism identified, clinicians may offer the AMPLATZER PFO Occluder if it is available (Level C). In the absence of another indication for anticoagulation, clinicians may routinely offer antiplatelet medications instead of anticoagulation to patients with cryptogenic stroke and PFO (Level C). © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Clinical epidemiological and molecular aspects of rubella outbreak with high number of neurological cases, Tunisia 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messedi, Emna; Fki-Berrajah, Lamia; Gargouri, Saba; Chouikha, Anissa; Chaari, Anis; Bouaziz, Mounir; Jallouli, Hajer; Yahia, Ahlem Ben; Hammami, Adnene; Triki, Henda; Karray-Hakim, Héla

    2014-10-01

    A large and unusually prolonged rubella outbreak occurred in Tunisia from April 2011 to July 2012 and was characterized by a high number of neurological cases. To describe the outbreak and to perform virus genotyping of isolated virus strains. From January 2011 to December 2012, 5000 sera for serological diagnosis of acute rubella and 31 cerebrospinal fluid from patients with neurological symptoms were tested for the presence of rubella immunoglobulins G and M. Real-time PCR was performed on 49 throat swabs, 21 cerebrospinal fluid and 27 serum samples. Positive samples were assessed for virus genotyping by sequencing and the obtained sequences were compared to those previously isolated in the country. Acute rubella was confirmed in 280 patients including 15 neonates, 217 children and adults with mild rash and 48 patients with severe rubella (mainly encephalitis, n = 39). Most of acquired rubella cases (60.7%) were aged over 12 years with a male predominance observed in the age group 12-25 years (79%). Females belonged essentially to the unvaccinated age groups under 12 and over 25 years. Among the 23 samples tested positive by real-time PCR, six could be genotyped and clustered with either the 1E genotype, previously detected in Tunisia, or the 2B genotype which has never been isolated in Tunisia before. Gender and age distributions of the patients reflect the impact of the selective rubella vaccination program adopted in Tunisia since 2005. Genotype 1E continues to circulate and genotype 2B was probably recently introduced in Tunisia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical indications for antibiotic use in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Siersma, Volkert

    2017-01-01

    from electronic prescriptions are accessible and available to provide an overview of drug use, in casu antibiotic prescriptions, in Danish general practice. These clinical indications may be further explored in detail to assess rational drug use and congruence with guidelines, but validation......Objective: To assess the availability and applicability of clinical indications from electronic prescriptions on antibiotic use in Danish general practice. Design: Retrospective cohort register-based study including the Danish National Prescription Register. Setting: Population-based study...... of routine electronic antibiotic prescriptions from Danish general practice. Subjects: All 975,626 patients who redeemed an antibiotic prescription at outpatient pharmacies during the 1-year study period (July 2012 to June 2013). Main outcome measures: Number of prescriptions per clinical indication. Number...

  13. Clinical photography for trichology practice: tips and tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashique, Kt; Kaliyadan, Feroze

    2011-01-01

    Clinical photography of hair disorders is an extension of photography in dermatology practice. Some points should be kept in mind while taking images of the hair and hair bearing areas in view of the reflection of light and the subsequent glare that may spoil the result. For documentation of most conditions of the hair, the same general rules of dermatological photography apply. The correct lighting is the most important aspect of clinical photography in trichology practice and can be achieved by reflected light than direct light. Special care should be taken in conditions requiring serial images to document progress/response to treatment and the most important factor in this context is consistency with respect to patient positioning, lighting, camera settings and background. Dermoscopy/trichoscopy can also be incorporated in clinical practice for image documentation.

  14. Sickness-certification practice in different clinical settings; a survey of all physicians in a country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekmer Anna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How physicians handle sickness-certification is essential in the sickness-absence process. Few studies have focused this task of physicians' daily work. Most previous studies have only included general practitioners. However, a previous study indicated that this is a common task also among other physicians. The aim of this study was to gain detailed knowledge about physicians' work with sickness-certification and of the problems they experience in this work. Methods A comprehensive questionnaire regarding sickness-certification practice was sent home to all physicians living and working in Sweden (N = 36,898; response rate: 61%. This study included physicians aged Results Sickness-certification consultations were frequent; 67% of all physicians had such, and of those, 83% had that at least once a week. The proportion who had such consultations >5 times a week varied between clinical settings; from 3% in dermatology to 79% in orthopaedics; and was 43% in primary health care. The OR for finding sickness-certification tasks problematic was highest among the physicians working in primary health care (OR 3.3; CI 2.9-3.7 and rheumatology clinics (OR 2.6; CI 1.9-3.5. About 60% found it problematic to assess patients' work capacity and to provide a prognosis regarding the duration of work incapacity. Conclusions So far, most interventions regarding physicians' sickness-certification practices have been targeted towards primary health care and general practitioners. Our results indicate that the ORs for finding these tasks problematic were highest in primary health care. Nevertheless, physicians in some other clinical settings more often have such consultations and many of them also find these tasks problematic, e.g. in rheumatology, neurology, psychiatry, and orthopaedic clinics. Thus, the results indicate that much can be gained through focusing on physicians in other types of clinics as well, when planning interventions to improve

  15. Presentation of SLE in UK primary care using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Alison L; Davidson, Julie E; Molta, Charles T; Kan, Hong J; McHugh, Neil J

    2017-01-01

    To describe the presenting symptoms of SLE in primary care using the Clinical Practice Research Database (CPRD) and to calculate the time from symptom presentation to SLE diagnosis. Incident cases of SLE were identified from the CPRD between 2000 and 2012. Presenting symptoms were identified from the medical records of cases in the 5 years before diagnosis and grouped using the British Isles Lupus Activity Group (BILAG) symptom domains. The time from the accumulation of one, two and three BILAG domains to SLE diagnosis was investigated, stratified by age at diagnosis (SLE. The most frequently recorded symptoms and signs prior to diagnosis were musculoskeletal, mucocutaneous and neurological. The median time from first musculoskeletal symptom to SLE diagnosis was 26.4 months (IQR 9.3-43.6). There was a significant difference in the time to diagnosis (log rank pSLE diagnosis is long, especially in older patients. SLE should be considered in patients presenting with flaring or chronic musculoskeletal, mucocutaneous and neurological symptoms.

  16. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction: Clinical management recommendations of the Neurologic Incontinence committee of the fifth International Consultation on Incontinence 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Marcus John; Apostolidis, Apostolos; Cocci, Andrea; Emmanuel, Anton; Gajewski, Jerzy B; Harrison, Simon C W; Heesakkers, John P F A; Lemack, Gary E; Madersbacher, Helmut; Panicker, Jalesh N; Radziszewski, Piotr; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Wyndaele, Jean Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of neurological disease and lower urinary tract dysfunction have been produced by the International Consultations on Incontinence (ICI). These are comprehensive guidelines, and were developed to have world-wide relevance. To update clinical management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction from the recommendations of the fourth ICI, 2009. A series of evidence reviews and updates were performed by members of the working group. The resulting guidelines were presented at the 2012 meeting of the European Association of Urology for consultation, and consequently amended to deliver evidence-based conclusions and recommendations in 2013. The current review is a synthesis of the conclusions and recommendations, including the algorithms for initial and specialized management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. The pathophysiology is categorized according to the nature of onset of neurological disease and the part(s) of the nervous system affected. Assessment requires clinical evaluation, general investigations, and specialized testing. Treatment primarily focuses on ensuring safety of the patient and optimizing quality of life. Symptom management covers conservative and interventional measures to aid urine storage and bladder emptying, along with containment of incontinence. A multidisciplinary approach to management is essential. The review offers a pragmatic review of management in the context of complex pathophysiology and varied evidence base. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:657-665, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Neurological aspects of eclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Dejana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The difficult types of preeclampsia and eclampsia are presented with the neurological symptoms. The break of cerebral autoregulation mechanism plays the most important role in pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm. Nevertheless eclampsia isn’t just an ordinary hypertensive encephalopathy because other pathogenic mechanisms are involved in its appearance. The main neuropathologic changes are multifocal vasogenic edema, perivascular multiple microinfarctions and petechial hemorrhages. Neurological clinical manifestations are convulsions, headache, visual disturbances and rarely other discrete focal neurological symptoms. Eclampsia is a high-risk factor for onset of hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke. This is a reason why neurological diagnostic tests are sometimes needed. The method of choice for evaluation of complicated eclampsia is computerized brain topography that shows multiple areas of hypodensity in occipitoparietal regions. These changes are focal vasogenic cerebral edema. For differential diagnosis of eclampsia and stroke other diagnostic methods can be used - fundoscopic exam, magnetic resonance brain imaging, cerebral angiography and cerebrospinal fluid exam. The therapy of eclampsia considers using of magnesium sulfate, antihypertensive, anticonvulsive and antiedematous drugs.

  18. Ethical Issues in Clinical Practice in Endocrinology- Review Article

    OpenAIRE

    Bagher LARIJANI; Farzaneh ZAHEDI

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in different field of medicine have given rise to complex ethical dilemmas in clinical practice. The more the clinicians are sensitized to ethical problems and familiar with ethical decision-making, the more they can value professionalism in their practice. The current paper is designed to emphasize physicians to think ethically in the field of internal medicine and endocrinology. Being aware of the ethical issues and being sensitive to them are the first steps for ethical conduc...

  19. Survey of clinical infant lung function testing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson-Carmichael, Stacey L; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Ascher, Simon B; Hornik, Christoph P; Arets, H G M; Davis, Stephanie D; Hall, Graham L

    2014-02-01

    Data supporting the clinical use of infant lung function (ILF) tests are limited making the interpretation of clinical ILF measures difficult. To evaluate current ILF testing practices and to survey users regarding the indications, limitations and perceived clinical benefits of ILF testing. We created a 26-item survey hosted on the European Respiratory Society (ERS) website between January and May 2010. Notifications were sent to members of the ERS, American Thoracic Society and the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology. Responses were sought from ILF laboratory directors and pediatric respirologists. The survey assessed the clinical indications, patient populations, equipment and reference data used, and perceived limitations of ILF testing. We received 148 responses with 98 respondents having ILF equipment and performing testing in a clinical capacity. Centers in North America were less likely to perform ≥50 studies/year than centers in Europe or other continents (13% vs. 41%). Most respondents used ILF data to either "start a new therapy" (78%) or "help decide about initiation of further diagnostic workup such as bronchoscopy, chest CT or serological testing" (69%). Factors reported as limiting clinical ILF testing were need for sedation, uncertainty regarding clinical impact of study results and time intensive nature of the study. Clinical practices associated with ILF testing vary significantly; centers that perform more studies are more likely to use the results for clinical purposes and decision making. The future of ILF testing is uncertain in the face of the limitations perceived by the survey respondents. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. 'Pastoral practices' for quality improvement in a Kenyan clinical network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGivern, Gerry; Nzinga, Jacinta; English, Mike

    2017-12-01

    We explain social and organisational processes influencing health professionals in a Kenyan clinical network to implement a form of quality improvement (QI) into clinical practice, using the concept of 'pastoral practices'. Our qualitative empirical case study, conducted in 2015-16, shows the way practices constructing and linking local evidence-based guidelines and data collection processes provided a foundation for QI. Participation in these constructive practices gave network leaders pastoral status to then inscribe use of evidence and data into routine care, through championing, demonstrating, supporting and mentoring, with the support of a constellation of local champions. By arranging network meetings, in which the professional community discussed evidence, data, QI and professionalism, network leaders also facilitated the reconstruction of network members' collective professional identity. This consequently strengthened top-down and lateral accountability and inspection practices, disciplining evidence and audit-based QI in local hospitals. By explaining pastoral practices in this way and setting, we contribute to theory about governmentality in health care and extend Foucauldian analysis of QI, clinical networks and governance into low and middle income health care contexts. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Palliative care and neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  2. Clinical and practical considerations in the pharmacologic management of narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpy, Michael J; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Despite published treatment recommendations and the availability of approved and off-label pharmacologic therapies for narcolepsy, the clinical management of this incurable, chronic neurologic disorder remains challenging. While treatment is generally symptomatically driven, decisions regarding which drug(s) to use need to take into account a variety of factors that may affect adherence, efficacy, and tolerability. Type 1 narcolepsy (predominantly excessive daytime sleepiness with cataplexy) or type 2 narcolepsy (excessive daytime sleepiness without cataplexy) may drive treatment decisions, with consideration given either to a single drug that targets multiple symptoms or to multiple drugs that each treat a specific symptom. Other drug-related characteristics that affect drug choice are dosing regimens, tolerability, and potential drug-drug interactions. Additionally, the patient should be an active participant in treatment decisions, and the main symptomatic complaints, treatment goals, psychosocial setting, and use of lifestyle substances (ie, alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, and cannabis) need to be discussed with respect to treatment decisions. Although there is a lack of narcolepsy-specific instruments for monitoring therapeutic effects, clinically relevant subjective and objective measures of daytime sleepiness (eg, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test) can be used to provide guidance on whether treatment goals are being met. These considerations are discussed with the objective of providing clinically relevant recommendations for making treatment decisions that can enhance the effective management of patients with narcolepsy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evidence-based guideline summary: diagnosis and treatment of limb-girdle and distal dystrophies: report of the guideline development subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the practice issues review panel of the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswami, Pushpa; Weiss, Michael; Selcen, Duygu; David, William; Raynor, Elizabeth; Carter, Gregory; Wicklund, Matthew; Barohn, Richard J; Ensrud, Erik; Griggs, Robert C; Gronseth, Gary; Amato, Anthony A

    2014-10-14

    To review the current evidence and make practice recommendations regarding the diagnosis and treatment of limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs). Systematic review and practice recommendation development using the American Academy of Neurology guideline development process. Most LGMDs are rare, with estimated prevalences ranging from 0.07 per 100,000 to 0.43 per 100,000. The frequency of some muscular dystrophies varies based on the ethnic background of the population studied. Some LGMD subtypes have distinguishing features, including pattern of muscle involvement, cardiac abnormalities, extramuscular involvement, and muscle biopsy findings. The few published therapeutic trials were not designed to establish clinical efficacy of any treatment. For patients with suspected muscular dystrophy, clinicians should use a clinical approach to guide genetic diagnosis based on clinical phenotype, inheritance pattern, and associated manifestations (Level B). Clinicians should refer newly diagnosed patients with an LGMD subtype and high risk of cardiac complications for cardiology evaluation even if they are asymptomatic from a cardiac standpoint (Level B). In patients with LGMD with a known high risk of respiratory failure, clinicians should obtain periodic pulmonary function testing (Level B). Clinicians should refer patients with muscular dystrophy to a clinic that has access to multiple specialties designed specifically to care for patients with neuromuscular disorders (Level B). Clinicians should not offer patients with LGMD gene therapy, myoblast transplantation, neutralizing antibody to myostatin, or growth hormone outside of a research study designed to determine efficacy and safety of the treatment (Level R). Detailed results and recommendations are available on the Neurology® Web site at Neurology.org. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. How GPs implement clinical guidelines in everyday clinical practice--a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Jette V; Hansen, Helle P; Riisgaard, Helle; Lykkegaard, Jesper; Nexøe, Jørgen; Bro, Flemming; Søndergaard, Jens

    2015-12-01

    Clinical guidelines are considered to be essential for improving quality and safety of health care. However, interventions to promote implementation of guidelines have demonstrated only partial effectiveness and the reasons for this apparent failure are not yet fully understood. To investigate how GPs implement clinical guidelines in everyday clinical practice and how implementation approaches differ between practices. Individual semi-structured open-ended interviews with seven GPs who were purposefully sampled with regard to gender, age and practice form. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and then analysed using systematic text condensation. Analysis of the interviews revealed three different approaches to the implementation of guidelines in clinical practice. In some practices the GPs prioritized time and resources on collective implementation activities and organized their everyday practice to support these activities. In other practices GPs discussed guidelines collectively but left the application up to the individual GP whilst others again saw no need for discussion or collective activities depending entirely on the individual GP's decision on whether and how to manage implementation. Approaches to implementation of clinical guidelines vary substantially between practices. Supporting activities should take this into account. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Interventional neurology: a reborn subspecialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgell, Randall C; Alshekhlee, Amer; Yavagal, Dileep R; Vora, Nirav; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2012-10-01

    Neurologists have a long history of involvement in cerebral angiography; however, the roots of neurologist involvement in therapeutic endovascular procedures have not been previously documented. As outlined in this article, it has taken the efforts of several early pioneers to lay the ground work for interventional neurology, a specialty that has become one of the fastest growing neurological subspecialties. The ground work, along with a great clinical need, has allowed the modern interventional neurologist to tackle some of the most intractable diseases, especially those affecting the cerebral vasculature. The institutionalization of interventional neurology as a subspecialty was first advocated in 1995 in an article entitled, "Interventional Neurology, a subspecialty whose time has come." The institutions created in the wake of this article have provided the framework that has allowed interventional neurology to transition from "a subspecialty whose time has come" to a subspecialty that is here to stay and thrive. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  6. Clinical neuropsychology in Israel: history, training, practice and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Eli; Hoofien, Dan

    2016-11-01

    This is an invited paper for a special issue on international perspectives on training and practice in clinical neuropsychology. We provide a review of the status of clinical neuropsychology in Israel, including the history of neuropsychological, educational, and accreditation requirements to become a clinical neuropsychologist and to practice clinical neuropsychology. The information is based primarily on the personal knowledge of the authors who have been practicing clinical neuropsychology for over three decades and hold various administrative and academic positions in this field. Second, we conducted three ad hoc surveys among clinical and rehabilitation psychologists; heads of academic programs for rehabilitation and neuropsychology; and heads of accredited service providers. Third, we present a literature review of publications by clinical neuropsychologists in Israel. Most of the clinical neuropsychologists are graduates of either rehabilitation or clinical training programs. The vast majority of neuropsychologists are affiliated with rehabilitation psychology. The training programs (2-3 years of graduate school) provide solid therapeutic and diagnostic skills to the students. Seventy-five percent of the participants in this survey are employed at least part-time by public or state-funded institutions. Israeli neuropsychologists are heavily involved in case management, including vocational counseling, and rehabilitation psychotherapy. Conclusions and future goals: Although clinical neuropsychologists in Israel are well educated and valued by all health professionals, there are still several challenges that must be addressed in order to further advance the field and the profession. These included the need for Hebrew-language standardized and normalized neuropsychological tests and the application of evidence-based interventions in neuropsychological rehabilitation.

  7. A model for ethical practices in clinical phonetics and linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas W

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of clinical phonetics and linguistics as an area of scientific inquiry gives rise to the need for guidelines that define ethical and responsible conduct. The diverse membership of the International Clinical Phonetics and Linguistics Association (ICPLA) and the readership of this journal are uniquely suited to consider ethical issues from diverse perspectives. Accordingly, this paper introduces a multi-tiered six-factor model for ethical practices to stimulate discussion of ethical issues.

  8. Writing and publishing clinical articles: a practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda

    2012-04-01

    The sharing of knowledge among nurses and clinicians can strengthen the healthcare professions. In this context, many clinicians underestimate the relevance and importance of what they can contribute, and find the idea of writing for publication daunting. This article presents a practical approach to writing clinical articles for publication in professional journals such as Emergency Nurse. It covers the characteristics of clinical articles, their structure, choosing a journal and how the editorial process should be understood.

  9. Good Clinical Practice Guidance and Pragmatic Clinical Trials: Balancing the Best of Both Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentz, Robert J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Berdan, Lisa G; Rorick, Tyrus; O'Brien, Emily C; Ibarra, Jenny C; Curtis, Lesley H; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-03-01

    Randomized, clinical trials are commonly regarded as the highest level of evidence to support clinical decisions. Good Clinical Practice guidelines have been constructed to provide an ethical and scientific quality standard for trials that involve human subjects in a manner aligned with the Declaration of Helsinki. Originally designed to provide a unified standard of trial data to support submission to regulatory authorities, the principles may also be applied to other studies of human subjects. Although the application of Good Clinical Practice principles generally led to improvements in the quality and consistency of trial operations, these principles have also contributed to increasing trial complexity and costs. Alternatively, the growing availability of electronic health record data has facilitated the possibility for streamlined pragmatic clinical trials. The central tenets of Good Clinical Practice and pragmatic clinical trials represent potential tensions in trial design (stringent quality and highly efficient operations). In the present article, we highlight potential areas of discordance between Good Clinical Practice guidelines and the principles of pragmatic clinical trials and suggest strategies to streamline study conduct in an ethical manner to optimally perform clinical trials in the electronic age. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Nasogastric feeding practices: a survey using clinical scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ee-Yuee; Ng, Isabel Hui-Ling; Tan, Sherrie Lee-Hong; Jabin, Kamilah; Lee, Leng-Noey; Ang, Ching-Ching

    2012-03-01

    Bolus nasogastric tube feeding is common. Unsafe practices such as failure to confirm tube placement can result in death. It is vital to ensure that nurses are adopting safe practices. To evaluate nurses' practices on bolus nasogastric feeding relating to verification of tube placement, management of gastric residual volume, and response to complications during feeding. Cross-sectional, self-administered survey using clinical scenarios. All nurses who worked in the general wards in a tertiary hospital in August 2008. We developed six clinical scenarios to describe common clinical situations in nurses' daily practices. Participants were instructed to choose the responses that best reflected their practices, and to return the completed questionnaires to the study member present. The survey participation rate was 99.5% (1203 nurses). Seventy-six percent would choose two or more methods to verify placement when they were in doubt. Percentage of hydrogen (pH) testing was the most common first method of checking tube placement. The second and third self-reported methods were auscultation and the bubble test. Few chose radiography to confirm tube placement. When the aspirate was pH 7, and in the presence of positive auscultation, most participants would take further steps to confirm placement. There were variations in the nurses' responses on managing the gastric residual volume, with 78.1% indicating that they would return the aspirate. Most nurses lacked the knowledge to effectively manage patients' distress during tube feeding. The findings showed that the majority of participants reported that they would exercise due caution by taking additional measures to check tube placement when in doubt. The practice gaps identified in the study highlighted a need to realign our care to best practices. Following the study, we revised the institution's guideline, reinforced specific safety precautions on nasogastric feeding, and incorporated clinical scenarios in our training

  11. Pediatric clinical handover: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhuowen; Zhang, Yuxia; Gu, Ying; Xu, Xiaofeng; McArthur, Alexa

    2017-10-01

    Communication of information between and among healthcare providers is an essential element of patient care. Poor clinical handover has been associated with inaccurate clinical assessment and diagnosis, delays in diagnosis, medication errors and decreased patient satisfaction. Effective and efficient transition of patient care information requires an evidence-based handover approach. The aim of this evidence implementation project was to make a contribution to promote evidence-based practice in clinical handover in a pediatric setting and thereby enhance patient safety and service delivery. Seven criteria identified by the Joanna Briggs Institute were used to conduct an audit in the Gastroenterology Department, Children's Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Twelve nurses and 260 handover sessions were involved. The JBI Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice audit tools for promoting change in health practice were used to ascertain compliance with the criteria before and after the implementation of best practice. The program included three phases and was conducted over six months. There were improvements with compliance for each criterion. Face-to-face communication, standardized documentation, identification of patients, care plan handover and transfer of responsibility reached 100% compliance. Detailed observations of the patient improved from 93% to 98%, and there was an 18% improvement for relevant history handover. This project has demonstrated that handover sessions can be more effective by translating evidence into practice through ongoing evidence-based audit. Nursing inter-shift handover requires the use of a highly valuable and important standardized tool. Further audits will need to be carried out in order to maintain the practice change, and ensure the sustainability of the project.

  12. Electroencephalographic neurofeedback: Level of evidence in mental and brain disorders and suggestions for good clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; McGonigal, A; Lopez, R; Daudet, C; Kotwas, I; Bartolomei, F

    2015-12-01

    The technique of electroencephalographic neurofeedback (EEG NF) emerged in the 1970s and is a technique that measures a subject's EEG signal, processes it in real time, extracts a parameter of interest and presents this information in visual or auditory form. The goal is to effectuate a behavioural modification by modulating brain activity. The EEG NF opens new therapeutic possibilities in the fields of psychiatry and neurology. However, the development of EEG NF in clinical practice requires (i) a good level of evidence of therapeutic efficacy of this technique, (ii) a good practice guide for this technique. Firstly, this article investigates selected trials with the following criteria: study design with controlled, randomized, and open or blind protocol, primary endpoint related to the mental and brain disorders treated and assessed with standardized measurement tools, identifiable EEG neurophysiological targets, underpinned by pathophysiological relevance. Trials were found for: epilepsies, migraine, stroke, chronic insomnia, attentional-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, addictive disorders, psychotic disorders. Secondly, this article investigates the principles of neurofeedback therapy in line with learning theory. Different underlying therapeutic models are presented didactically between two continua: a continuum between implicit and explicit learning and a continuum between the biomedical model (centred on "the disease") and integrative biopsychosocial model of health (centred on "the illness"). The main relevant learning model is to link neurofeedback therapy with the field of cognitive remediation techniques. The methodological specificity of neurofeedback is to be guided by biologically relevant neurophysiological parameters. Guidelines for good clinical practice of EEG NF concerning technical issues of electrophysiology and of learning are suggested. These require validation by

  13. Integrated clinical and specialty pharmacy practice model for management of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Rebekah L; Habibi, Mitra; Khamo, Nehrin; Abdou, Sherif; Stubbings, JoAnn

    2014-03-15

    An integrated clinical and specialty pharmacy practice model for the management of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is described. Specialty medications, such as disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) used to treat MS, are costly and typically require special administration, handling, and storage. DMTs are associated with high rates of nonadherence and may have associated safety risks. The University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System developed an MS pharmacy practice model that sought to address the many challenges of coordinating care with multiple entities outside the health system. Several key features of the integrated model include a dedicated clinical pharmacist on the MS specialty team, an integrated specialty pharmacy service, direct access to the electronic medical record, and face-to-face interaction with patients. Through the active involvement of the neurology clinical pharmacist and an onsite specialty pharmacy service, targeted assessments and medication and disease education are provided to the patient before DMT initiation and maintained throughout therapy. In addition, the regular point of contact and refill coordination encourages improved compliance, appropriate medication use, ongoing safety monitoring, and improved communication with the provider for quicker interventions. This fosters increased accessibility, convenience, and patient confidence. Improving patient outcomes--the priority goal of this service model--will be assessed in future planned studies. Through this new practice model, providers are empowered to incorporate specialty medication management into transitions in care, admission and discharge quality indicators, readmissions, and other core measures. An integrated pharmacy practice model that includes an interdisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, and pharmacists improved patient compliance with MS therapies.

  14. Advanced practice nurses' scope of practice: a qualitative study of advanced clinical competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Anna-Lena; Mannevaara, Bodil; Fagerström, Lisbeth

    2011-12-01

    To describe and explore Advanced Practice Nurses' clinical competencies and how these are expressed in clinical practice. Discussion concerning advanced clinical practice has been ongoing in the USA since the 1960s and in the UK since the late 1980s. Approximately 24 countries, excluding the USA, have implemented the role of Advance Practice Nurse (APN). In the Nordic countries, especially Sweden and Finland, APNs have been introduced in some organizations but their competency domains have not yet been clearly defined. The study's theoretical framework emanates from Aristotle's three-dimensional view of knowledge that is epistêmê, technê, and phronesis. Between October 2005 and January 2006, focus group interviews of Clinical Nurse Specialists who provide expert functions in pediatric, internal medicine, and surgical units (n = 26) and APN students (n = 8) were conducted. The data material was analyzed using inductive content analysis. Grouped into five main themes, the study results indicate that APNs possess advanced level clinical competencies in: (A) assessment of patients' caring needs and nursing care activities, (B) the caring relationship, (C) multi-professional teamwork, (D) development of competence and nursing care, and (E) leadership in a learning and caring culture. Clinical competencies consist of advanced skills, which typify an expanding role that offers new possibilities for holistic patient care practice. APNs' scope of practice is characterized by responsibility and competence in making autonomous judgments based on expanded clinical competence. On an advanced level, clinical competence consists not merely of advanced skills for assessing and meeting the needs of patients but also the creation of safe and trustful relationships with patients and collaboration with colleagues. APNs can realize advanced skills in their actions through their manner of knowing, doing, and being. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2011

  15. Standards in Neurological Rehabilitation, June 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Barnes

    1997-01-01

    neurological services. We believe that disabled individuals should have access to a regional specialist service as well as a local community service. The regional specialist service would cater for people with more complicated and severe disabilities, including spinal injury and severe brain injury. The regional centres would provide specialist expertise for wheelchairs and special seating, orthotics, continence and urological services, aids and equipment including communication aids and environmental controls, prosthetics and driving assessment. The Task Force additionally endorses the development of local and community based rehabilitation teams with clear links to the regional centre. (6 The Task Force recognizes the limited amount of rehabilitation research and encourages individuals, universities and governments to invest more in rehabilitation research. Such investment should produce benefits for disabled people and their carers and in the long term benefits for the national economy. (7 The Task Force realizes that neurological rehabilitation is poorly developed both in Europe and the world as a whole. We firmly endorse international co-operation in this field and are happy to co-operate with any international organization in order to develop such links for clinical, educational or research initiatives. (8 The Task Force encourages individual countries to produce a document summarizing their own situation with regard to these standards and to produce a timetable for action to improve their situation. The EFNS Task Force would be pleased to assist in the publication of such deliberations or to act as a focus for international education and research or for sharing of examples of good practice.

  16. Information sources that influence physiatrists' adoption of new clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrer, M J; Grabois, M

    1988-03-01

    As part of a mail survey of physiatrists' views of conducting research, respondents were queried regarding information sources that influenced their introducing a clinical innovation into their practices in the past two years. Complete information was obtained from 356 individuals. The reported practice innovations were categorized as follows: (a) evoked potentials (6% of respondents); (b) electrophysiologic diagnostic procedures other than evoked potentials (19%); (c) other diagnostic/assessment procedures (11%); (d) transcutaneous nerve stimulation (6%); (e) physical treatment procedures other than transcutaneous nerve stimulation (22%); (f) medication (5%); (g) psychologic or social intervention (4%); and (h) altered methods of service delivery (27%). Considered across all practice innovation categories, the average relative importance (in descending order) of the information sources was as follows: (1) discovery in the individual's own practice; (2) a meeting, lecture, or continuing education course; (3) a clinical coworker; (4) a write-up in the clinical literature; (5) the individual's own research; (6) a patient; (7) a write-up in the research literature; (8) a textbook; and (9) the representative of a drug firm or equipment manufacturer. Additional findings concern variables which distinguished a group of 43 individuals who reported introducing no innovation into their practices for the preceding two years, compared to the 356 individuals who did so.

  17. The clinical practice of interventional radiology: a European perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Aoife N

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical environment in which interventional radiology (IR) is practiced throughout Europe. A survey, comprising 12 questions on IR clinical practice, was sent to 1800 CIRSE members. Members were asked to return one survey per department. Two hundred seventy-four departments returned completed questionnaires, 22% from the United Kingdom (n = 60), 11% from Germany (n = 30), 8% from Austria (n = 23), and the remainder spread over Europe. Experts, with more than 10 years of IR experience, comprised 74% of the survey group. Almost one-third of the radiologists dedicated more than 80% of their clinical sessions to IR alone (27%; n = 75), with two-thirds practicing in a university teaching hospital setting (66%; n = 179). Few institutions have dedicated IR inpatient hospital beds (17%; n = 46), however, to compensate, day case beds are available (31%), IR admitting rights are in place (64% overall, 86% for in-patients, and 89% for day cases), and elective IR admissions can be made through other clinicians (87%). IR outpatient clinics are run at 26% of departments, with an average of two sessions per week. Dedicated nurses staff the majority of IR suites (82%), but clinical junior doctors are lacking (46%). Hospital management\\'s refusing access to beds was the most commonly cited reason for not developing a clinical IR service (41%). In conclusion, there is marked variation across European centers in the current practice of IR. Half do not have dedicated junior doctors and only a small minority have inpatient hospital beds. If IR is to be maintained as a dedicated clinical specialty, these issues need to be addressed urgently.

  18. Clinical Vignettes Improve Performance in Anatomy Practical Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikah, December S. K.; Finn, Gabrielle M.; Swamy, Meenakshi; White, Pamela M.; McLachlan, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Although medical curricula now adopt an integrated teaching approach, this is not adequately reflected in assessment of anatomy knowledge and skills. In this study, we aimed to explore the impact of the addition of clinical vignette to item stems on students' performance in anatomy practical examinations. In this study, 129 undergraduate medical…

  19. A Diverse Clinical-Based Practice in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Shelby; Hake, Megan M.; Cook-Benjamin, Lorie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if offering a virtual clinical-based practice would affect teacher candidates' level of confidence in teaching diverse students. During 2012-2014, data were collected using a pre- and post-Likert scale questionnaire. A paired two sample t-test was utilized to determine if there was a significant difference…

  20. Diagnostic value of urinary dysmorphic erythrocytes in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Crop (Meindert); Y.B. de Rijke (Yolanda); P.C.M.S. Verhagen (Paul); K. Cransberg (Karlien); R. Zietse (Bob)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In clinical practice, discriminating between glomerular and nonglomerular causes of hematuria is often difficult. Dysmorphic red blood cells (dRBC) in the urinary sediment are claimed to be effective, but the cutoff points in the literature vary. This follow-up study aimed to

  1. Importance Of Logotherapy In Clinical Practice | Asagba | IFE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of logotherapy has been neglected in the clinical practice in Nigeria. This paper raises some important aspects of logotherapy, which have not been taken in to consideration. For instance, there is the issue of using knowledge and wisdom in logotherapy. Other issues are the great emphasis of responsibility ...

  2. Supporting Clinical Practice Candidates in Learning Community Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarnette, Nancy K.; Sudeck, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to monitor pre-service teacher candidates' progression and implementation of the learning community philosophy along with classroom management strategies. The study took place during their final semester of clinical practice. Data were collected from self-reports, surveys, university supervisor…

  3. Good clinical practice in East Africa: a review | Kimanani | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Good clinical practice in East Africa: a review. E. Kimanani. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal 2001 78 (10): 550-554). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v78i10.8967 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO ...

  4. Attitudes of Labour Ward Staff towards a Clinical Practice Guideline ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Partogram is generally regarded as a clinical practice guideline that is useful in early detection of complications duringlabour. This article described the views of midwives on the use of partogram in monitoring women during labour. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive design was used. Semi-structured interviews were ...

  5. Developing Clinically Practicable Biomarkers for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, James C.

    2017-01-01

    Despite significant advances in understanding the biological bases of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the field remains primarily reliant on observational and parent report measures of behavior to guide clinical practice, conduct research, and evaluate intervention outcomes. There is a critical need for objective measures to more sensitively and…

  6. Perception of Female Doctors\\' Clinical Practice and Teaching in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More women are in medicine. The study aimed at examining medical students' perception of female doctors' clinical practice and teaching as it relates to their gender. The study's design was simple randomized using well-structured questionnaires. One hundred and sixtyone medical students with a mean age of 24.4 ± 2 ...

  7. Editorial: Learning clinical practice | Bregazzi | South Sudan Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Sudan Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 3 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Editorial: Learning clinical practice. Richard Bregazzi. Abstract. No Abstract ...

  8. The use of bone age in clinical practice - Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, D.D.; Caliebe, J.; Binder, Gitte Sommer

    2011-01-01

    This review examines the role of skeletal maturity ('bone age', BA) assessment in clinical practice. BA is mainly used in children with the following conditions: short stature (addressed in part 1 of this review), tall stature, early or late puberty, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (all...

  9. Improving clinical practice through simulation: A case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acquisition of knowledge and skills by nursing students before real-life practice is a familiar nursing education challenge. The use of clinical simulation in nursing education provides many opportunities for students to learn and apply theoretical principles of nursing care in a safe environment. The purpose of this study was ...

  10. Cardiac Sarcoidosis | Bajomo | Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cardiac sarcoidosis is a rare complication which occurs in 1-5% of sarcoidosis. We report here a case seen in Olabisi Onnabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, who presented with heart failure. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice Vol.6(2) 2003: 122-123 ...

  11. Malingering in clinical practice with specific reference to psychiatry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malingering in clinical practice with specific reference to psychiatry and psychology. Frans J Hugo, Frances Hemp. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers ...

  12. Multifunction laser systems in clinical and resort practice

    OpenAIRE

    Zabulonov, Yuriy; Vladimirov, Alexander; Chukhraiev, Nikolay; Elmehsenawi, Yousry; Zukow, Walery

    2016-01-01

    SHUPYKNATIONALMEDICALACADEMY OF POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION UKRAINIANSOCIETY OFPHYSICAL AND REHABILITATION MEDICINE RADOM UNIVERSITY       Yuriy Zabulonov, Alexander Vladimirov, Nikolay Chukhraiev, Yousry Elmehsenawi, Walery Zukow       MULTIFUNCTION LASER SYSTEMS IN CLINICAL AND RESORT PRACTICE   Edited by Yuriy Zabulonov, Alexander Vladimirov, Nikolay Chukhraiev, Yousry Elmehsenawi, Walery Zukow  ...

  13. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice - Vol 20, No 9 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. ... Cancer Patients and Oncology Nursing: Perspectives of Oncology Nurses in Turkey · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ... Oral and Dental Health in Children with Chronic Liver Disease in the Turkey Northeast · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  14. From Paper Based Clinical Practice Guidelines to Declarative Workflow Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao

    2009-01-01

    We present a field study of oncology workflow, involving doctors, nurses and pharmacists at Danish hospitals and discuss the obstacles, enablers and challenges for the use of computer based clinical practice guidelines. Related to the CIGDec approach of Pesic and van der Aalst we then describe ho...

  15. Heart Failure in Zambia: Evidence for Improving Clinical Practice.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    Electrocardiography in clinical practice. Arrhythmias and conduction defects are quite common in. HF, the most common being Atrial Fibrillation (AF) which has serious consequences. In the study, 8% of patients had AF and few other arrhythmias are described. The limitations outlines by the authors are appreciated. Indeed ...

  16. New developments in clinical practice guidelines | Kreymann | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the last four years revised clinical practice guidelines on nutritional support have been published by the major nutritional societies worldwide. The aim of these guidelines is to promote the safe and effective care of patients who need nutritional support as part of their overall management. All guidelines are based on ...

  17. Current referral practices and adolescent transition to Adult clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-02

    Feb 2, 2016 ... Abstract: Background: The goal of adolescent transition from child to adult care services is to provide uninterrupted, coordinated and developmentally appropriate health care as transfers are made from paediatric to adult clinics. Adolescent transition practices are available but not in Nigeria. This study was ...

  18. Decision making in clinical veterinary practice | Anene | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Decision making in clinical veterinary practice. BM Anene. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  19. Evidence-based Dental Practice: Part I. Formulating Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This first of three articles on evidence-based dental practice discusses the historical background of evidence-based medicine/evidence-based dentistry, how to formulate clear clinical questions and how to track down (search) the available evidence in the literature databases. Nigerian Quarterly Journal of Hospital Medicine ...

  20. Terminal sedation and euthanasia: A comparison of clinical practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.C. Rietjens (Judith); J.J.M. van Delden (Johannes); A. van der Heide (Agnes); A.M. Vrakking (Astrid); B.D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen (Bregje); P.J. van der Maas (Paul); G. van der Wal (Gerrit)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: An important issue in the debate about terminal sedation is the extent to which it differs from euthanasia. We studied clinical differences and similarities between both practices in the Netherlands. Methods: Personal interviews were held with a nationwide stratified sample

  1. Semi-Spontaneous Oral Text Production: Measurements in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Marianne; Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil; Moen, Inger; Simonsen, Hanne Gram

    2009-01-01

    Functionally relevant assessment of the language production of speakers with aphasia should include assessment of connected speech production. Despite the ecological validity of everyday conversations, more controlled and monological types of texts may be easier to obtain and analyse in clinical practice. This article discusses some simple…

  2. Paediatrics hiv/aids: Clinical presentation and practical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatrics hiv/aids: Clinical presentation and practical management Challenges in Sokoto, Nigeria. ... Abstract. Background: Implications of continuing HIV/AIDS pandemic in Nigeria is very grave for children. Lack of ... Thirty- six (87.8%) patients had protein – energy malnutrition (PEM), marasmus constituting 58%.

  3. [To construct the clinical guideline of integrative Chinese and Western medicine based on clinical practical data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Shi, Da-Zhuo; Liu, Bao-Yan

    2009-06-01

    Clinical guideline is of important significance to standardize clinical practice. Clinical guideline of evidence-based medicine puts stress on the classification and evaluation of evidences, especially in randomy controlled trial and gives recommendation based on the different grades and intensities of evidences. Since Chinese medicine has its own theoretical system in diagnosis and treatment, and the integrative Western and Chinese medicine (ICWM) is characterized by complicated intervention, making up a clinical guideline for Chinese medicine or ICWM based on the evidence obtained from modern medical research is apparently not so suitable. In this paper, the authors offered to develop a practice-based ICWM clinical guideline, which could be used in complementation with the evidence-based medical clinical guideline, and have a discussion on our preliminary research, looking forward to provide a new thinking path for constructing clinical guideline for Chinese medicine, ICWM and modern medicine.

  4. Communication course for midwives teaching students in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe; Pedersen, Pernille Mølholt

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The course was initiated by the midwifery department at University College North Denmark in cooperation with the leaders of the maternity units where the affiliated students have their clinical education. The purpose of the course was to enhance the quality of communication education......-clinically (Rosenbaum et al. 2013) and our own experience teaching Danish midwifery students indicates the same problem in our program. Providing an opportunity for the clinical teachers to learn, discuss and practice communication issues with each other and with theoretical teachers can represent an important...

  5. 'Nursing research culture' in the context of clinical nursing practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttcher Berthelsen, Connie; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-01-01

    's eight-step framework for concept analysis. Results Five defining attributes of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice were identified: strong monodisciplinary nursing professionalism, academic thinking and socialization, research use as a part of daily nursing practice......, acceptance by colleagues and management and facilitation of resources from management and organization. Conclusion Although the method of concept analysis has been criticized and heavily debated, the development of nursing research cultures based on the defining attributes and antecedents of the concept......Aim To report an analysis of the concept of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice. Background Nursing research culture should be valued for its contribution to improving patient care and should be considered as a routine hospital activity. However, the demand...

  6. Neurologic complications of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, James M; Weimer, Louis H

    2014-06-01

    This review serves as an overview of neurologic conditions associated with alcohol abuse or withdrawal, including epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnostic approach, and treatment. Frequent alcohol abuse and frank alcoholism are very common among adults in the United States. Although rates decline with each decade, as many as 10% of the elderly drink excessively. Given the ubiquitous nature of alcoholism in society, its complications have been clinically recognized for generations, with recent advances focusing on improved understanding of ethanol's biochemical targets and the pathophysiology of its complications. The chronic effects of alcohol abuse are myriad and include neurologic complications through both direct and indirect effects on the central and peripheral nervous systems. These disorders include several encephalopathic states related to alcohol intoxication, withdrawal, and related nutritional deficiencies; acute and chronic toxic and nutritional peripheral neuropathies; and myopathy. Although prevention of alcoholism and its neurologic complications is the optimal strategy, this article reviews the specific treatment algorithms for alcohol withdrawal and its related nutritional deficiency states.

  7. Rate of occult specimen provenance complications in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, John D; Liu, Jingxia

    2013-01-01

    Occult specimen provenance complications (SPCs), which occur when there is an absence of any direct or indirect indication that a specimen switch or contamination may have occurred, constitute a significant patient safety and medical-legal problem because they can lead to misdiagnosis. However, the rate at which occult SPCs occur is unknown because, by definition, this category of errors is not identified by standard laboratory practices. In this study, we evaluated a data set comprising almost 13,000 prostate biopsies that were prospectively tested for specimen provenance errors as part of routine clinical practice. The frequency of occult type 1 errors (a complete transposition between patients) and type 2 errors (contamination of the patient's tissue with 1 or more unrelated patients) was 0.26% and 0.67%, respectively; every urology practice setting and surgical pathology laboratory type with a representative sample size experienced at least 1 type 1 and 1 type 2 error during the study period. Overall, the mean frequency of SPCs across practice settings was 0.22% for type 1 errors and 1.69% for type 2 errors. The type 1 rate showed no correlation with a surgical pathology laboratory setting or urologic practice group setting; the type 2 rate correlated solely with a surgical pathology laboratory setting. The occult SPC rate in this limited data set provides an estimate of the scope of the problem of potential misdiagnosis as a result of occult specimen provenance errors in routine clinical practice.

  8. Learning in clinical practice: the importance of peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Deborah

    To explore whether nursing students learn from each other and, if so, how, when and where this learning takes place. An interpretive ethnographic qualitative research study of a group of pre-registration nursing students (n = 15). Participant observation was the primary tool of data collection. Students gave their consent to be observed in classroom and clinical environments throughout the three years of the pre-registration programme. Data took the form of audio-taped conversations with and between students together with field notes. A thematic analysis was undertaken to reveal the student experience of peer learning. The importance of friendships to clinical learning for students was apparent in three respects: friendships and learning in clinical practice, survival skills and developing clinical skills. The students talked about their friendships being strong and enduring and enabling learning to take place. The students used their peers as a resource to pass on survival skills and help each other to learn how to be a nurse. Students also taught each other a variety of clinical skills. Traditional notions of seniority were challenged because the students appeared more concerned with what their peers had experienced. Friendships were an important aspect of peer learning for the students in this study and, more importantly, friendship fostered learning. Peer learning in clinical practice is an informal and underestimated aspect of clinical learning and is valued by students.

  9. A HOSPITAL-BASED RETROSPECTIVE COMPARATIVE STUDY OF COMPLICATIONS, OUTCOMES, CLINICAL AND LABORATORY PARAMETERS OF MALARIA WITH AND WITHOUT NEUROLOGICAL INVOLVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaib Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Classically associated with Plasmodium falciparum, neurological complications in severe malaria is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. However, reports implicate the long considered benign Plasmodium vivax for causing severe malaria as well. We aimed to analyze the cerebral complications in malaria, and study if there is a specie-related difference in the presentation and outcomes. Methods: We retrospectively compared patients of malaria hospitalised from 2009-15, with (n=105 and without (n=1155 neurological involvement in terms of outcomes, complications, demographic attributes, clinical features, and laboratory parameters. Subsequently, the same parameters were studied in those with cerebral malaria due to mono-infections of vivax or falciparum and their co-infection. Results: Cerebral malaria was observed in 8.3% (58/696, 7.4% (38/513 and 17.6% (6/51 of vivax, falciparum and combined plasmodial infections respectively. Those with cerebral malaria had significantly (p0.05. P. vivax emerged as the predominant cause of cerebral malaria and its virulence was comparable to P. falciparum.

  10. Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Ultrasound Evaluation in Intensive Care Unit: Possible Role and Clinical Aspects in Neurological Critical Patients' Daily Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, M; Spadetta, G; Pulitano, P; Rocco, M; Di Piero, V; Mecarelli, O; Vicenzini, E

    2017-01-01

    Background. The increase of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) is a reliable, noninvasive sonographic marker of intracranial hypertension. Aim of the study was to demonstrate the efficacy of ONSD evaluation, when monitoring neurocritical patients, to early identify malignant intracranial hypertension in patients with brain death (BD). Methods. Data from ultrasound ONSD evaluation have been retrospectively analyzed in 21 sedated critical patients with neurological diseases who, during their clinical course, developed BD. 31 nonneurological controls were used for standard ONSD reference. Results. Patients with neurological diseases, before BD, showed higher ONSD values than control group (CTRL: RT 0.45 ± 0.03 cm; LT 0.45 ± 0.02 cm; pre-BD: RT 0.54 ± 0.02 cm; LT 0.55 ± 0.02 cm; p evaluated with invasive monitoring. ONSD was further significantly markedly increased in respect to the pre-BD evaluation in neurocritical patients after BD, with mean values above 0.7 cm (RT 0.7 ± 0.02 cm; LT 0.71 ± 0.02 cm; p monitoring could be of help in Intensive Care Units when invasive intracranial pressure monitoring is not available, to early recognize intracranial hypertension and to suspect BD in neurocritical patients.

  11. Advancing patient care through innovative practice: the Clinical Partners Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Bella H; Rodis, Jennifer L; Nahata, Milap C; Bennett, Marialice S

    2005-12-01

    The development, implementation, and outcomes assessment of an innovative pharmacist-managed ambulatory care and community pharmacy practice clinic are described. The Clinical Partners Program at The Ohio State University (OSU) provides an active learning environment for students and residents, offers a patient-focused practice model based on pharmaceutical care principles, and serves as an arena for applied research in pharmacy practice. The program offers multiple services, including anticoagulation management, diabetes self-management, cholesterol management, hepatitis C education, herbal product and dietary supplement consultations, medication management, smoking cessation, and wellness. The practice is currently staffed by two faculty members from the college of pharmacy, with a 0.8 full-time-equivalent (FTE) pharmacist and a 0.65 FTE community pharmacy resident. It has served as a training site for 17 pharmacy residents, 28 bachelor of science (B.S.) in pharmacy students, 30 post-B.S. doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) students, and 132 entry-level Pharm.D. students at various levels of training. The most successful methods of reimbursement for programs have been contracted services with OSU Managed Health Care Systems, Inc., which serves OSU faculty and staff and fee-for-service billing, charged directly to non-OSU patients. Numerous studies have shown that Clinical Partners has consistently demonstrated improved therapeutic outcomes over those achieved in traditional practice. Faculty are exploring outreach services, including the development of advanced practice community sites for the college, establishing patient care services within physician offices, and providing disease management services for self-insured employers. The Clinical Partners Program has improved patient care and provided education and training opportunities for pharmacy students and residents.

  12. The frontline clinical manager identifying direct reports' level of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, M Anne; Roussel, Linda; Pennington, Sandra L; Hoying, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Patricia Benner applied the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition to describe and interpret skill acquisition and clinical judgment in nursing practice. Operational definitions for the 5 levels of her original Novice to Expert Theory were used by the study participants in a large Midwestern pediatric hospital to self-identify their level of practice. The frontline clinical managers of these direct care registered nurses (RNs) used the same tool to rate their direct reports. The aim of this portion of a larger study was to determine if the clinical manager's perception of their direct reports was the same as that of the RNs. The results of this study are being used by one study unit's clinical managers as the basis for implementing the Hersey and Blanchard Situational Leadership Model. The clinical managers work with their direct reports depending on the level of practice and the details of the task to be performed. One example is creating therapeutic relationships with each other and with families to ensure a safe environment for all.

  13. The profile of Cerebrovascular Accident patients assisted at the Physical Therapy Neurological Clinic of the University of Passo Fundo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daiane Mazzola; Janaine Cunha Polese; Rodrigo Costa Schuster; Sheila Gemelli de Oliveira

    2007-01-01

    The Cerebrovascular accident (CVA) results from the blood restriction to the brain, leading to the quick development of clinical signs of local or global cerebral function disturbances and its symptoms remain for a period longer...

  14. Training opportunities for the nineteenth-century American neurologist: preludes to the modern neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappert, E J

    1995-09-01

    During the nineteenth century, two parallel developments, a surge in neuroscience discovery and the advent of medical specialization, resulted in new educational demands for advanced, postgraduate neurologic training in the United States. Archival data, including trustees' reports, school charters, and instructional plans from medical institutions in New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and Chicago, document three comparative models for early postgraduate neurologic training. First, senior physicians with an interest in neurologic disease incorporated postgraduates directly into their practice and as laboratory assistants; second, medical universities, as well as distinct postgraduate schools, organized advanced general medical curricula with optional opportunities for focused neurologic training; and third, separate neurologic hospitals provided physicians with full-time clinical instruction specifically in neurology. As a result, although neurology residencies were not established until the 1900s, postgraduate neurologic training was firmly institutionalized in nineteenth-century America. These programs provided doctors in the United States with advanced neurologic educational opportunities and expertise and fostered the development of a distinct American neurologic school.

  15. [Nationwide evaluation of German university teaching methods in neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesalski, A-S; Zupanic, M; Isenmann, S

    2015-06-01

    Germany is confronted with a lack of medical doctors and an increasing need for neurologists in particular. In order to recruit future doctors in neurology it is essential to attract young students when still at university. This article presents the first German national survey of medical students' acceptance of teaching methods in neurology. The participants evaluated teaching methods and examination formats and were asked about their preferences. The survey was based on a questionnaire distributed to 22 German medical schools and 1245 participating students. Interactive teaching methods, especially courses in practical examinations, clinical internships and bedside teaching were highly rated among the students. In contrast, multiple choice tests, as one of the most widespread examination methods, were poorly rated compared to practical and oral examinations. For most of the students it was not decisive, in which semester teaching of neurology took place, while the majority asked for additional and more intensive neurological education. The data give an overview of teaching of neurology in Germany and students' assessment of various approaches. The results should be utilized towards reorientation of future curricula that should aim at innovative and even more practically oriented teaching.

  16. 77 FR 49449 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA...

  17. 77 FR 49448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Baltimore District Office, in...

  18. ACETAZOLAMIDE IN PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY: HISTORY AND PERSPECTIVE OF CILNICAL USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Boyko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Resume the up tob date pharmacological and clinical findings have revealed new opportunities for the use of known for a long time pharmaceutical agents in various fields of practical medicine. For more than 50 years acetozolamide, systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, has been used in neurology to correct liquorodynamic disorders. High clinical efficacy and good tolerb ability in longbterm use has made acetazolamide an essential agent in pediatric neurology, along with this the true therapeutic application of acetazolamide is much wider than it was traditionally thought. This review analyzes the experience of administration of the drug in different branches of pediatric neurology, including those where acetazolamide has been traditionally used along with novel applications to administration of the drug in children.Key words: acetozolamide, carboanhydrase, children, sleep apnea syndrome, glaucoma, hydrocephaly, episodic ataxia type II, migraine, intracranial idiopathic benign hemiplegic hypertension.

  19. An overview of clinical governance policies, practices and initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Travaglia, Joanne F

    2008-02-01

    To map the emergence of, and define, clinical governance; to discuss current best practices, and to explore the implications of these for boards of directors and executives wishing to promote a clinical governance approach in their health services. Review and analysis of the published and grey literature on clinical governance from 1966 to 2006. Medline and CINAHL databases, key journals and websites were systematically searched. Central issues were identified in the literature as key to effective clinical governance. These include: ensuring that links are made between health services' clinical and corporate governance; the use of clinical governance to promote quality and safety through a focus on quality assurance and continuous improvement; the creation of clinical governance structures to improve safety and quality and manage risk and performance; the development of strategies to ensure the effective exchange of data, knowledge and expertise; and the sponsoring of a patient-centred approach to service delivery. A comprehensive approach to clinical governance necessarily includes the active participation of boards and executives in sponsoring and promoting clinical governance as a quality and safety strategy. Although this is still a relatively recent development, the signs are promising.

  20. Neurological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, K S

    1969-10-01

    Dr K S Holt defines the variety of neurologicalresponses which can be elicited in the newbornbaby and considers their importance in diagnosingdelay in development or abnormalities of thenervous system.Dr Mary D Sheridan describes her finely developedmethods and ingenious devices for testingchildren down to the age of 6 months.Dr Margaret Pollak outlines the advantages ofa developmental pediatric clinic in general practiceand quotes examples of how this has helpedher own patients.

  1. Clinical Practice in the Center: Enhancing Learning and Collaboration in Clinical Practice through Professional Development Learning Community Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong-Ji; Daniels, Erika; Ochanji, Moses K.

    2017-01-01

    The traditional model of teacher preparation, which focuses on content and methods courses in a college or university, can create a gap between university faculty and school practitioners. This article describes a series of clinical practice workshops as a viable means to bridge the gap between a university and its partner middle schools in the…

  2. The good laboratory practice and good clinical practice requirements for the production of radiopharmaceuticals in clinical research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vos, FJ; De Decker, M; Dierckx, RA

    Radiopharmaceuticals account for more than 95% of the group of sterile pharmaceutical products and should therefore be handled and produced with care. Since the introduction of the European directive, all pharmaceuticals used in clinical studies must be prepared under good manufacturing practice

  3. Doctors' experience with handheld computers in clinical practice: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Schweikhart, Sharon B; Medow, Mitchell A

    2004-05-15

    To examine doctors' perspectives about their experiences with handheld computers in clinical practice. Qualitative study of eight focus groups consisting of doctors with diverse training and practice patterns. Six practice settings across the United States and two additional focus group sessions held at a national meeting of general internists. 54 doctors who did or did not use handheld computers. Doctors who used handheld computers in clinical practice seemed generally satisfied with them and reported diverse patterns of use. Users perceived that the devices helped them increase productivity and improve patient care. Barriers to use concerned the device itself and personal and perceptual constraints, with perceptual factors such as comfort with technology, preference for paper, and the impression that the devices are not easy to use somewhat difficult to overcome. Participants suggested that organisations can help promote handheld computers by providing advice on purchase, usage, training, and user support. Participants expressed concern about reliability and security of the device but were particularly concerned about dependency on the device and over-reliance as a substitute for clinical thinking. Doctors expect handheld computers to become more useful, and most seem interested in leveraging (getting the most value from) their use. Key opportunities with handheld computers included their use as a stepping stone to build doctors' comfort with other information technology and ehealth initiatives and providing point of care support that helps improve patient care.

  4. Theory-practice integration in selected clinical situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Davhana-Maselesele

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The current changes in health care systems challenge knowledgeable, mature and independent practitioners to integrate theoretical content with practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the problems of integrating theory with practice in selected clinical nursing situations. The study focused on rendering of family planning services to clients as a component of Community Nursing Science. Structured observation schedules were used to observe the theoretical content of the curriculum as well as the practical application of what has been taught in the clinical area. The findings of the study revealed that there was a need for an integrated holistic curriculum, which would address the needs of the community. It was concluded that a problem-based and community-based curriculum, intersectoral collaboration between college and hospital managements and student involvement in all processes of teaching and learning would improve the integration of theory and practice. There also appeared to be a need for tutors to be more involved in clinical teaching and accompaniment.

  5. EFNS guidelines for the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in treatment of neurological diseases: EFNS task force on the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in treatment of neurological diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elovaara, I.; Apostolski, S.; Doorn, P. van

    2008-01-01

    or third-line therapy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, if conventional immunomodulatory therapies are not tolerated (level B), and in relapses during pregnancy or post-partum period (good clinical practice point). IVIG seems to have a favourable effect also in paraneoplastic neurological diseases......Despite high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is widely used in treatment of a number of immune-mediated neurological diseases, the consensus on its optimal use is insufficient. To define the evidence-based optimal use of IVIG in neurology, the recent papers of high relevance were reviewed...

  6. A Clinical Librarian-Nursing Partnership to Bridge Clinical Practice and Research in an Oncology Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginex, Pamela K; Hernandez, Marisol; Vrabel, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Nurses in clinical settings in which evidence-based, individualized care is expected are often the best resource to identify important clinical questions and gaps in practice. These nurses are frequently challenged by a lack of resources to fully develop their questions and identify the most appropriate methods to answer them. A strategic and ongoing partnership between medical library services and nursing can support nurses as they embark on the process of answering these questions and, ultimately, improving patient care and clinical outcomes

  7. Good Clinical Practice Guidance and Pragmatic Clinical Trials: Balancing the Best of Both Worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Mentz, Robert J.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Berdan, Lisa G.; Rorick, Tyrus; O?Brien, Emily C.; Ibarra, Jenny C.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Peterson, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials are commonly regarded as the highest level of evidence to support clinical decisions. Good Clinical Practice (GCP) guidelines have been constructed to provide an ethical and scientific quality standard for trials that involve human subjects in a manner aligned with the Declaration of Helsinki. Originally designed to provide a unified standard of trial data to support submission to regulatory authorities, the principles may also be applied to other studies of human s...

  8. Leadership strategies to influence the use of clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Wendy A; Davies, Barbara; Edwards, Nancy; Graham, Ian D

    2006-12-01

    Support from nursing managers and administrators, together with the role of a dedicated project Lead, are consistently identified as important strategies for nurses to be able to use research evidence in their practice. However, little is known about the key behaviours and activities required to successfully implement and sustain research-based innovations in practice. This study describes the leadership behaviours and activities that influenced nurses' use of clinical practice guidelines. A secondary analysis of qualitative data was conducted to investigate factors that contributed to sustaining (or not) the use of clinical guidelines two and three years after implementation as part of the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario Best Practice Guidelines project. Grounded theory techniques were used to develop a theoretical model of Leadership. Findings indicated a different pattern of leadership in organizations that sustained guidelines, when compared to those that did not. Three broad leadership strategies emerged as central to successfully implementing and sustaining guidelines: (1) facilitating staff to use the guidelines, (2) creating a positive milieu of best practices and (3) influencing organizational structures and processes. Leadership for guideline implementation was found to include such behaviours as support, role-modelling commitment and reinforcing organizational policies and goals consistent with evidence-based care.

  9. From clinical practice guidelines, to clinical guidance in practice - implications for design of computerized guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie

    2010-01-01

    . The transformation from protocols was executed according to a standard operating procedure. Each activity type had a standardized template ensuring uniformity across second order guiding artifacts within a clinic. The guiding artifacts were multi-functional and a wide variety of standardized graphical attributes...

  10. Survey of clinical nutrition practices of Canadian gastroenterologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harminder; Duerksen, Donald R

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Nutrition education is a required part of gastrointestinal training programs. The involvement of gastroenterologists in clinical nutrition once their training has been completed is unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine the practice pattern of gastroenterologists in clinical nutrition and their perceived adequacy of nutrition training during their gastroenterology (GI) fellowship. METHODS: The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology mailed a survey to all of its 463 Canadian clinician members and 88 trainee members. Components of the survey included knowledge of nutritional assessment and total parenteral nutrition, involvement in a nutrition support service, physician involvement in nutritional assessment and nutrition support teams, obesity management, insertion of gastrostomy (G) tubes and management of tube-related complications, and adequacy of training in clinical nutrition. RESULTS: Sixty per cent (n=279) of the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology clinicians and 38% (n=33) of the fellows responded. Of the clinicians, 80% were practicing adult gastroenterologists with the following demographics: those practicing full time in academic centres (42%), community practice (45%), completed training in the last 10 years (32%) and those that completed training in the United States (14%). Although only 6% had a primary focus of nutrition in their GI practices, 65% were involved in nutrition support (including total parenteral nutrition), 74% placed G tubes and 68% managed at least one of the major complications of G tube insertion. Respondents felt a gastroenterologist should be the physician’s consultant on nutrition support services (89%). Areas of potential inadequate training included nutritional assessment, indications for nutrition support, management of obesity and management of G tube-related complications. The majority of clinicians (67%) and trainees (73%) felt that nutrition training in their GI fellowship was

  11. Advocacy in neurology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pauranik, Apoorva

    2008-01-01

    ...), launched the Neurological Alliance of Ireland, a nationwide coalition of patient advocacy groups and physicians and authored Standards of Care, the "blueprint" for the development of neurological...

  12. Incorporating computer-aided language sample analysis into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Lisa Hammett; Hendricks, Sean; Cook, Colleen

    2010-04-01

    During the evaluation of language abilities, the needs of the child are best served when multiple types and sources of data are included in the evaluation process. Current educational policies and practice guidelines further dictate the use of authentic assessment data to inform diagnosis and treatment planning. Language sampling and analysis (LSA) offers an important clinical tool for gathering such authentic assessment data, and computer-aided methods of LSA make it clinically feasible. The purpose of this tutorial is to provide step-by-step procedures for computer-aided LSA (CLSA). This tutorial includes instructions for a 4-step CLSA process: (a) eliciting a representative sample of the child's language and recording it directly onto the computer; (b) transcribing the language sample; (c) analyzing the language sample and interpreting the results using a readily available software program, Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts (SALT; J. Miller & A. Iglesias, 2006); and (d) using the results to plan the child's treatment goals and activities. A case study is provided to illustrate this process. Digital technologies can dramatically improve the feasibility of LSA, potentially transforming clinical practice by providing a quantifiable but naturalistic measure of language. This tutorial will facilitate the integration of useful technologies into clinical practice and provide information regarding the application of CLSA data.

  13. Quality of life among patients living with epilepsy attending the neurology clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinyanjui, Daniel W C; Kathuku, Dammas M; Mburu, John M

    2013-06-18

    Most of the studies on epilepsy in Kenya and indeed the sub-Saharan region of Africa mainly focus on prevalence, psychiatric profile, and factors associated with increased seizure burden. This being the first Kenyan and sub-Saharan African study assessing quality of life among people living with epilepsy, it will identify their 'intangible' needs and enable evidence-based intervention that would ultimately lead to a comprehensive management and better outcome. A cross-sectional comparative study, using the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire, a socio-demographic questionnaire, seizure burden and characteristics, drug and treatment profile questionnaires and the Mini-Mental state examination, among PLWE and those accompanying them, herein referred to as the normal healthy controls, attending the neurology clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. Study was carried out between October 2006 and February 2007 at the neurology clinic in the hospital where three hundred consecutive subjects who satisfied the inclusion criteria and gave consent were recruited.Statistical tests used: Descriptive statistics were used to compute means, standard deviations as well as frequencies. Significance of associations was tested using the Chi square test statistic (x2), an independent samples t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a step-wise (forward) regression analysis. A p living with epilepsy (49.90%) was significantly (p living with epilepsy were a low level of education, higher seizure burden, low annual income, unemployment, unskilled employment, and living in a rural residence. The mean quality of life of people living with epilepsy at Kenyatta National Hospital was significantly impaired and lower than that of the normal controls accompanying them. A comprehensive epilepsy management program is recommended to address this problem and its associated risk factors for the people living with epilepsy in Kenya.

  14. Classification of neurological abnormalities in children with congenital melanocytic naevus syndrome identifies magnetic resonance imaging as the best predictor of clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waelchli, R; Aylett, S E; Atherton, D; Thompson, D J; Chong, W K; Kinsler, V A

    2015-09-01

    The spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities described in association with congenital melanocytic naevi (CMN) includes congenital, acquired, melanotic and nonmelanotic pathology. Historically, symptomatic CNS abnormalities were considered to carry a poor prognosis, although studies from large centres have suggested a much wider variation in outcome. To establish whether routine MRI of the CNS is a clinically relevant investigation in children with multiple CMN (more than one at birth), and to subclassify radiological abnormalities. Of 376 patients seen between 1991 and 2013, 289 fulfilled our criterion for a single screening CNS MRI, which since 2008 has been more than one CMN at birth, independent of size and site of the largest naevus. Cutaneous phenotyping and radiological variables were combined in a multiple regression model of long-term outcome measures (abnormal neurodevelopment, seizures, requirement for neurosurgery). Twenty-one per cent of children with multiple CMN had an abnormal MRI. Abnormal MRI was the most significant predictor of all outcome measures. Abnormalities were subclassified into group 1 'intraparenchymal melanosis alone' (n = 28) and group 2 'all other pathology' (n = 18). Group 1 was not associated with malignancy or death during the study period, even when symptomatic with seizures or developmental delay, whereas group 2 showed a much more complex picture, requiring individual assessment. For screening for congenital neurological lesions a single MRI in multiple CMN is a clinically relevant strategy. Any child with a stepwise change in neurological/developmental symptoms or signs should have an MRI with contrast of the brain and spine to look for new CNS melanoma. © 2015 The Authors. British Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists.

  15. Recent advances in metabolomics in neurological disease, and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai-hua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Xi-jun

    2013-10-01

    Discovery of clinically relevant biomarkers for diseases has revealed metabolomics has potential advantages that classical diagnostic approaches do not. The great asset of metabolomics is that it enables assessment of global metabolic profiles of biofluids and discovery of biomarkers distinguishing disease status, with the possibility of enhancing clinical diagnostics. Most current clinical chemistry tests rely on old technology, and are neither sensitive nor specific for a particular disease. Clinical diagnosis of major neurological disorders, for example Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, on the basis of current clinical criteria is unsatisfactory. Emerging metabolomics is a powerful technique for discovering novel biomarkers and biochemical pathways to improve diagnosis, and for determination of prognosis and therapy. Identifying multiple novel biomarkers for neurological diseases has been greatly enhanced with recent advances in metabolomics that are more accurate than routine clinical practice. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is known to be a rich source of small-molecule biomarkers for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, and is in close contact with diseased areas in neurological disorders, could potentially be used for disease diagnosis. Metabolomics will drive CSF analysis, facilitate and improve the development of disease treatment, and result in great benefits to public health in the long-term. This review covers different aspects of CSF metabolomics and discusses their significance in the postgenomic era, emphasizing the potential importance of endogenous small-molecule metabolites in this emerging field.

  16. What Do Childbearing Women in Your Clinical Practice Look Like?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark Callister, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    With cultural diversity increasing, what do the childbearing women in your practice look like? Beliefs about the central role of motherhood and the use of fertility rites in the life of a woman vary. Although individual differences exist because of the uniqueness of each woman, there are wonderfully rich cultural traditions and practices that influence what a woman believes and enacts. What constitutes a satisfying birth experience varies from woman to woman. Perinatal nurses can find many satisfying clinical experiences by being creative, flexible, and resilient in their approach to providing care. © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  17. Preparing Occupational Therapy Students for the Complexities of Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J. Knecht-Sabres DHS, OTR/L

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examined the effect of a unique amalgam of adult learning methodologies near the end of the occupational therapy (OT students’ didactic education as a means to enhance readiness for clinical practice. Results of quantitative and qualitative data analysis indicated that the use of standardized patients, in combination with a sequential, semistructured, and progressively challenging series of client cases, in an OT adult practice (intervention course, improved the students’ self-perception of their level of comfort and skill on various foundational, yet essential, OT-related competencies.

  18. Evaluating Industry Payments Among Dermatology Clinical Practice Guidelines Authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checketts, Jake X; Sims, Matthew Thomas; Vassar, Matt

    2017-12-01

    It is well documented that financial conflicts of interest influence medical research and clinical practice. Prior to the Open Payments provisions of the Affordable Care Act, financial ties became apparent only through self-disclosure. The nature of financial interests has not been studied among physicians who develop dermatology clinical practice guidelines. To evaluate payments received by physicians who author dermatology clinical practice guidelines, compare disclosure statements for accuracy, determine whether pharmaceutical companies from which the authors received payments manufactured products related to the guidelines, and examine the extent to which the American Academy of Dermatology enforced their Administrative Regulations for guideline development. Three American Academy of Dermatology guidelines published from 2013 to 2016 were retrieved. Double data extraction was used to record financial payments received by 49 guideline authors using the Open Payments database. Payments received by the authors from the date of the initial literature search to the date of publication were used to evaluate disclosure statement accuracy, detail the companies providing payments, and evaluate Administrative Regulations enforcement. This study is applicable to clinical practice guideline panels drafting recommendations, physicians using clinical practice guidelines to inform patient care, and those establishing policies for guideline development. Our main outcomes are the monetary values and types of payments received by physicians who author dermatology guidelines and the accuracy of disclosure statements. Data were collected from the Open Payments database and analyzed descriptively. Of the 49 authors evaluated, 40 received at least 1 reported industry payment, 31 accepted more than $1000, 25 accepted more than $10 000, and 18 accepted more than $50 000. Financial payments amounted to a mean of $157 177 per author. The total reimbursement among the 49 authors

  19. Pharmaco-EEG: A Study of Individualized Medicine in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swatzyna, Ronald J; Kozlowski, Gerald P; Tarnow, Jay D

    2015-07-01

    Pharmaco-electroencephalography (Pharmaco-EEG) studies using clinical EEG and quantitative EEG (qEEG) technologies have existed for more than 4 decades. This is a promising area that could improve psychotropic intervention using neurological data. One of the objectives in our clinical practice has been to collect EEG and quantitative EEG (qEEG) data. In the past 5 years, we have identified a subset of refractory cases (n = 386) found to contain commonalities of a small number of electrophysiological features in the following diagnostic categories: mood, anxiety, autistic spectrum, and attention deficit disorders, Four abnormalities were noted in the majority of medication failure cases and these abnormalities did not appear to significantly align with their diagnoses. Those were the following: encephalopathy, focal slowing, beta spindles, and transient discharges. To analyze the relationship noted, they were tested for association with the assigned diagnoses. Fisher's exact test and binary logistics regression found very little (6%) association between particular EEG/qEEG abnormalities and diagnoses. Findings from studies of this type suggest that EEG/qEEG provides individualized understanding of pharmacotherapy failures and has the potential to improve medication selection. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  20. Clinical management of atopic dermatitis: practical highlights and updates from the atopic dermatitis practice parameter 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Peter A; Lee, Margaret; LeBovidge, Jennifer; Timmons, Karol G; Schneider, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a challenging condition for clinicians and patients. Recent advances were documented in the Atopic Dermatitis Practice Parameter 2012, and we want to provide clinicians with key points from the Atopic Dermatitis Practice Parameter 2012. In this article, we highlight the evidence-based therapy of atopic dermatitis as well as provide practical tips for clinicians and families. An updated review of immunopathology provides a firm basis for patient education and therapy. We also review clinical diagnosis and ways to improve quality of life for patients with atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.