WorldWideScience

Sample records for neurologic outcome area

  1. Neurologic Outcomes of Complex Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenke, Lawrence G; Fehlings, Michael G; Shaffrey, Christopher I

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, multicenter, international observational study. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate motor neurologic outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for complex adult spinal deformity (ASD). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The neurologic outcomes after surgical correction for ASD have been repo...

  2. Standardized patient outcomes trial (SPOT in neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E. Safdieh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The neurologic examination is a challenging component of the physical examination for medical students. In response, primarily based on expert consensus, medical schools have supplemented their curricula with standardized patient (SP sessions that are focused on the neurologic examination. Hypothesis-driven quantitative data are needed to justify the further use of this resource-intensive educational modality, specifically regarding whether using SPs to teach the neurological examination effects a long-term benefit on the application of neurological examination skills. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional analysis of prospectively collected data from medical students at Weill Cornell Medical College. The control group (n=129 received the standard curriculum. The intervention group (n=58 received the standard curriculum and an additional SP session focused on the neurologic examination during the second year of medical school. Student performance on the neurologic examination was assessed in the control and intervention groups via an OSCE administered during the fourth year of medical school. A Neurologic Physical Exam (NPE score of 0.0 to 6.0 was calculated for each student based on a neurologic examination checklist completed by the SPs during the OSCE. Composite NPE scores in the control and intervention groups were compared with the unpaired t-test. Results: In the fourth year OSCE, composite NPE scores in the intervention group (3.5±1.1 were statistically significantly greater than those in the control group (2.2±1.1 (p<0.0001. Conclusions: SP sessions are an effective tool for teaching the neurologic examination. We determined that a single, structured SP session conducted as an adjunct to our traditional lectures and small groups is associated with a statistically significant improvement in student performance measured 2 years after the session.

  3. Antenatal Magnesium Sulfate and Neurologic Outcome in Preterm Infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doyle, Lex W.; Crowther, Caroline A.; Middleton, Philippa; Marret, Stephane

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review rates of neurologic outcomes reported in childhood for the preterm fetus exposed to antenatal magnesium sulfate. DATA SOURCES: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 3), relevant

  4. Serum tau and neurological outcome in cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Nielsen, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test serum tau as a predictor of neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. METHODS: We measured the neuronal protein tau in serum at 24, 48, and 72 h after cardiac arrest in 689 patients in the prospective international Target Temperature Management trial. The main outcome was poor...... neurological outcome, defined as Cerebral Performance Category 3-5 at 6 months. RESULTS: Increased tau was associated with poor outcome at 6 months after cardiac arrest (median 38.5 [IQR 5.7-245] ng/L in poor versus 1.5 [0.7-2.4] ng/L in good outcome, for tau at 72 h, p... and 36°C targeted temperature after cardiac arrest. INTERPRETATION: Serum tau is a promising novel biomarker for prediction of neurological outcome in patients with cardiac arrest. It may be significantly better than serum NSE, which is recommended in guidelines and currently used in clinical practice...

  5. Serum tau and neurological outcome in cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Nielsen, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test serum tau as a predictor of neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. METHODS: We measured the neuronal protein tau in serum at 24, 48, and 72 hours after cardiac arrest in 689 patients in the prospective international Target Temperature Management trial. The main outcome...... was poor neurological outcome, defined as Cerebral Performance Categories 3-5 at 6 months. RESULTS: Increased tau was associated with poor outcome at 6 months after cardiac arrest (median = 38.5, interquartile range [IQR] = 5.7-245ng/l in poor vs median = 1.5, IQR = 0.7-2.4ng/l in good outcome, for tau....... The accuracy in predicting outcome by serum tau was equally high for patients randomized to 33 °C and 36 °C targeted temperature after cardiac arrest. INTERPRETATION: Serum tau is a promising novel biomarker for prediction of neurological outcome in patients with cardiac arrest. It may be significantly better...

  6. Neurologic long term outcome after drowning in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suominen Pertti K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Drowning is a major source of mortality and morbidity in children worldwide. Neurocognitive outcome of children after drowning incidents cannot be accurately predicted in the early course of treatment. Therefore, aggressive out-of-hospital and in-hospital treatment is emphasized. There are "miracle" cases after long submersion times that have been reported in the medical literature, which mostly concern small children. However, many of the survivors will remain severely neurologically compromised after remarkably shorter submersion times and will consequently be a great burden to their family and society for the rest of their lives. The duration of submersion, the need of advanced life support at the site of the accident, the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, whether spontaneous breathing and circulation are present on arrival at the emergency room are important factors related to survival with mild neurological deficits or intact function in drowned children. Data on long-term outcome are scarce. The used outcome measurement methods and the duration of follow-up have not been optimal in most of the existing studies. Proper neurological and neurophysiological examinations for drowned children are superior to outcome scales based chart reviews. There is evidence that gross neurological examination at the time of discharge from the hospital in young children does not reveal all the possible sequelae related to hypoxic brain injury and thus long-term follow-up of drowned resuscitated children is strongly recommended.

  7. Disease Patterns and Outcome for Medical Neurological Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To review the disease pattern and outcome for neurological patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu, Nigeria was undertaken. Patients and Methods: The hospital records (case notes ICU records) were reviewed retrospectively for five years and the ...

  8. Urea cycle disorders: brain MRI and neurological outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bireley, William R. [University of Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Van Hove, Johan L.K. [University of Colorado, Department of Genetics and Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Aurora, CO (United States); Gallagher, Renata C. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Genetics and Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Aurora, CO (United States); Fenton, Laura Z. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Urea cycle disorders encompass several enzyme deficiencies that can result in cerebral damage, with a wide clinical spectrum from asymptomatic to severe. The goal of this study was to correlate brain MRI abnormalities in urea cycle disorders with clinical neurological sequelae to evaluate whether MRI abnormalities can assist in guiding difficult treatment decisions. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with urea cycle disorders and symptomatic hyperammonemia. Brain MRI images were reviewed for abnormalities that correlated with severity of clinical neurological sequelae. Our case series comprises six urea cycle disorder patients, five with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and one with citrullinemia type 1. The observed trend in distribution of brain MRI abnormalities as the severity of neurological sequelae increased was the peri-insular region first, extending into the frontal, parietal, temporal and, finally, the occipital lobes. There was thalamic restricted diffusion in three children with prolonged hyperammonemia. Prior to death, this site is typically reported to be spared in urea cycle disorders. The pattern and extent of brain MRI abnormalities correlate with clinical neurological outcome in our case series. This suggests that brain MRI abnormalities may assist in determining prognosis and helping clinicians with subsequent treatment decisions. (orig.)

  9. Good neurological outcome after accidental hyopthermia presenting with asytole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, I; Imboden, P; Paal, P; Koppenberg, J

    2017-03-01

    A 43-year-old woman became exhausted and fainted on descent at 1127 MAMSL altitude and snowfall. A rescue team diagnosed asystole. With manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) she was transported to the next extracorporeal life support (ECLS) center. Admission temperature was 20.7 °C. CPR continued until ECLS was initiated. Two days later she was awake, orientated, and with no neurological deficits. With hypothermic cardiac arrest, a favorable outcome depends on early continuous CPR, triage, and ECLS rewarming. It holds true that "nobody is dead until they are warmed and dead" if one cools first and arrests thereafter.

  10. Hyperlipidemia and Statins Affect Neurological Outcome in Lumbar Spine Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wu-Fu; Liu, Shih-Wei; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Lin, Feng-Shu; Chen, Li-Fu; Wu, Jau-Ching; Chen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Laura; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich; Lo, Su-Shun

    2015-01-01

    The disabling pathophysiologic effects of lipid and neuroprotective effects of statins have recently been demonstrated for acute spinal cord injuries in animal models. This large scale population-based study aimed to investigate the effect hyperlipidemia and the use of statins in patients with lumbar spine injury. The National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan was used to identify patients with lumbar spine injury. A total of 2844 patients were grouped into three: no hyperlipidemia, hyperlipidemia using low-dose of statins (≤90 of the defined daily dosage (DDD)), and severe hyperlipidemia using high-dose of statins (>90 DDD). A Cox multiple regression model was used to compare the incidence rates of disability among the three groups. The results showed that patients with hyperlipidemia appeared a higher risk of permanent disability (adjusted HR = 1.38, p = 0.28). In subgroup analysis, patients with severe hyperlipidemia had a higher risk of disability (adjusted HR = 3.1, p hyperlipidemia using low-dose statins had a similar risk of permanently disability (adjusted HR = 0.83, p = 0.661). Hyperlipidemia adversely affected the neurological outcomes of lumbar spinal injury. Statins may have the potential to reverse this higher risk of disability. However, this beneficiary effect of statins only existed in patients using a lower dose (≤90 DDD). PMID:25568970

  11. Risk Factors and Neurologic Outcomes in Childhood Arterial Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Sezer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to describe clinical characteristics, treatment modalities and outcomes of children with arterial ischemic stroke (AIS. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 102 children (62 girls and 40 boys with AIS admitted at our hospital between 2009 and 2015. Age at stroke, sex, medical history, family history, clinical findings upon admission, history of seizure, and radiological findings were recorded. Cardiac assessment, hematological and immunological tests, metabolic screening were all performed in the patients. Results: In 25 children stroke occured as a complication of cardiac disease, 12 had transient cerebral arteriopathy, 11 had Down’s syndrome, 9 had thalassemia, 7 had moyamoya disease, 6 had MTHFR mutation, 4 had homozygote for factor V Leiden, 3 had protein C deficiency, 1 had sickle cell disease, and in 24 children no underlying cause could be found. Multiple risk factors were found in 16 children and recurrent stroke was observed in 4 patients. Hemiplegia was the commonest initial clinical presentation (88.2% followed by seizure (66.6% and decreased level of consciousness (54.9%. The avarage length of follow-up was 32.1±5.4 months. The outcome in all 102 stroke patients was as follows: asymptomatic 57.8%; persistent neurologic deficit or epilepsy 40.2%; and death 2%. Conclusion: Our study showed an underlying cause for AIS in 76.5% of the patients; 42.2% of the patients either died or had motor and/or cognitive sequelae and recurrence occured despite prophylactic aspirin treatment in 4 patients. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(3.000: 278-283

  12. Detection of β-amyloid oligomers as a predictor of neurological outcome after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatson, Joshua Wayne; Warren, Victoria; Abdelfattah, Kareem; Wolf, Steven; Hynan, Linda S; Moore, Carol; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Minei, Joseph P; Madden, Christopher; Wigginton, Jane G

    2013-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is known to be a risk factor for Alzheimer-like dementia. In previous studies, an increase in β-amyloid (Aβ) monomers, such as β-amyloid 42 (Aβ42), in the CSF of patients with TBI has been shown to correlate with a decrease in amyloid plaques in the brain and improved neurological outcomes. In this study, the authors hypothesized that the levels of toxic high-molecular-weight β-amyloid oligomers are increased in the brain and are detectable within the CSF of TBI patients with poor neurological outcomes. Samples of CSF were collected from 18 patients with severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale Scores 3-8) and a ventriculostomy. In all cases the CSF was collected within 72 hours of injury. The CSF levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and Aβ42 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The levels of high-molecular-weight β-amyloid oligomers were measured using Western blot analysis. Patients with good outcomes showed an increase in the levels of CSF Aβ42 (p = 0.003). Those with bad outcomes exhibited an increase in CSF levels of β-amyloid oligomers (p = 0.009) and NSE (p = 0.001). In addition, the CSF oligomer levels correlated with the scores on the extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (r = -0.89, p = 0.0001), disability rating scale scores (r = 0.77, p = 0.005), CSF Aβ42 levels (r = -0.42, p = 0.12), and CSF NSE levels (r = 0.70, p = 0.004). Additionally, the receiver operating characteristic curve yielded an area under the curve for β-amyloid oligomers of 0.8750 ± 0.09. Detection of β-amyloid oligomers may someday become a useful clinical tool for determining injury severity and neurological outcomes in patients with TBI.

  13. Risk Factors and Neurological Outcomes of Neonatal Hypernatremia

    OpenAIRE

    Kamyar Kamrani; Jalaleddin Amiri; Nahide Khosroshahi; zahra sanaei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hypernatremia might lead to neurological and developmental disabilities. This study aimed to determine the frequency, risk factors, and one-year neurological prognosis of hypernatremia in newborns. The findings of the present study may assist the prevention of hypernatremia mortality and complications.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on all neonates admitted to the neonatal ward and the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Bahrami Children's Hospital, Tehran, Ir...

  14. Pattern And Outcome Of Neurological Manifestations Of Hiv/Aids - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The HIV is neurotropic and clinicians need to be aware of its myriad neurologic manifestations, as these may be the only clinical presentation. Objective To evaluate the clinical spectrum and outcome of the neurologic manifestations in patients with HIV / AIDS over a ten year period. Design case - note based ...

  15. Serum Albumin Predicts Long-Term Neurological Outcomes After Acute Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Bobo; Jutzeler, Catherine R; Cragg, Jacquelyn J; Grassner, Lukas; Schwab, Jan M; Casha, Steve; Geisler, Fred; Kramer, John L K

    2017-12-01

    There is a need to identify reliable biomarkers of spinal cord injury recovery for clinical practice and clinical trials. Our objective was to correlate serum albumin levels with spinal cord injury neurological outcomes. We performed a secondary analysis of patients with traumatic spinal cord injury (n = 591) participating in the Sygen clinical trial. Serum albumin concentrations were obtained as part of routine blood chemistry analysis, at trial entry (24-72 hours), 1, 2, and 4 weeks after injury. The primary outcomes were "marked recovery" and lower extremity motor scores, derived from the International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury. Data were analyzed with multivariable logistic and linear regression to adjust for potential confounders. Serum albumin was significantly associated with spinal cord injury neurological outcomes. Higher serum albumin concentrations at 1, 2, and 4 weeks were associated with higher 52-week lower extremity motor score. Similarly, the odds of achieving "marked neurological recovery" was greater for individuals with higher serum albumin concentrations. The association between serum albumin concentrations and neurological outcomes was independent of initial injury severity, treatment with GM-1, and polytrauma. In spinal cord injury, serum albumin is an independent marker of long-term neurological outcomes. Serum albumin could serve as a feasible biomarker for prognosis at the time of injury and stratification in clinical trials.

  16. Hypernatremia predicts adverse cardiovascular and neurological outcomes after SAH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Landis A; Ko, Nerissa; Miss, Jacob; Tung, Poyee P; Kopelnik, Alexander; Banki, Nader M; Gardner, David; Smith, Wade S; Lawton, Michael T; Zaroff, Jonathan G

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of serum sodium are common after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and have been linked to poor outcome. This study analyzed whether abnormal serum sodium levels are associated with cardiac outcomes and mortality after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In a prospective cohort study of SAH patients, the primary predictor variable was subjects' sodium level. Hypernatremia was defined as sodium >143 mmol/L and hyponatremia was study days. Dichotomous outcome variables were cTi > 1.0 microg/L, left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) studied the degree of hypernatremia and sodium supplementation, and the temporal relationship between hypernatremia and cardiac outcomes. The study included 214 subjects. Forty-eight subjects (22%) were hypernatremic on at least one study day, and 45 (21%) were hyponatremic. After multivariate adjustment, hypernatremia was an independent predictor of LVEF hypernatremia is associated with adverse cardiac outcomes and death. SAH patients with hypernatremia should be monitored for evidence of cardiac dysfunction.

  17. Neurological and functional outcomes of subdural hematoma evacuation in patients over 70 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Mulligan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subdural hematoma (SDH is a common disease entity treated by neurosurgical intervention. Although the incidence increases in the elderly population, there is a paucity of studies examining their surgical outcomes. Objectives: To determine the neurological and functional outcomes of patients over 70 years of age undergoing surgical decompression for subdural hematoma. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data on 45 patients above 70 years who underwent craniotomy or burr holes for acute, chronic or mixed subdural hematomas. We analyzed both neurological and functional status before and after surgery. Results: Forty-five patients 70 years of age or older were treated in our department during the study period. There was a significant improvement in the neurological status of patients from admission to follow up as assessed using the Markwalder grading scale (1.98 vs. 1.39; P =0.005, yet no improvement in functional outcome was observed as assessed by Glasgow Outcome Score. Forty-one patients were admitted from home, however only 20 patients (44% were discharged home, 16 (36% discharged to nursing home or rehab, 6 (13% to hospice and 3 (7% died in the postoperative period. Neurological function improved in patients who were older, had a worse pre-operative neurological status, were on anticoagulation and had chronic or mixed acute and chronic hematoma. However, no improvement in functional status was observed. Conclusion: Surgical management of SDH in patients over 70 years of age provides significant improvement in neurological status, but does not change functional status.

  18. Does caesarean section delivery improve neurological outcome in open spina bifida?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A E; Beattie, F

    1994-12-01

    The antenatal diagnosis of fetuses with myelomeningocele (MMC) has focused the attention of those involved in the perinatal care on caesarean section delivery as a possible method of preserving neurological function. In this paper 25 infants with MMC were studied, 10 delivered by pre-labour caesarean section (PL C/S), and 15 by other methods. No difference in motor function was observed post natally with 50% of each group having neurological levels below L3. The PL C/S group was more heterogeneous. The feasibility of selecting a group of less impaired fetuses with good in utero leg movements for PL C/S in order to preserve neurological function depends on the ability of fetal USS to predict post natal neurological function. This preliminary report leaves unanswered the question whether C/S delivery improves neurological outcome in selected cases of open spina bifida.

  19. Risk Factors and Neurological Outcomes of Neonatal Hypernatremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamyar Kamrani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypernatremia might lead to neurological and developmental disabilities. This study aimed to determine the frequency, risk factors, and one-year neurological prognosis of hypernatremia in newborns. The findings of the present study may assist the prevention of hypernatremia mortality and complications.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on all neonates admitted to the neonatal ward and the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU of Bahrami Children's Hospital, Tehran, Iran from September 2013 to September 2014. All the newborns, who were diagnosed with hypernatremia (serum sodium>150 mEq/L were included in this study. The data were collected using a form, which included clinical symptoms and risk factors for neonatal hypernatremia in addition to the laboratory data. Additionally, the patients were subjected to the developmental examination for one year. Another form was used during the follow-up period to collect all the relevant data.Results: A total of 1,923 newborns were examined in the present study. The results demonstrated that 74 (3.8% neonates had sodium levels of >150 mEq/L. Furthermore, jaundice was found to be the most prevalent presentation of hypernatremia, which was reported in 57% of the admitted neonates. Additionally, weight loss was the most common observation on the follow-up examinations. Neonates admitted at older ages (>7 days had higher sodium levels (160.71±8.98 mEq/L. There were 18 neonates with seizures before or during the hospitalization and 19 (25.7% cases showed abnormal development during the one-year follow-up. Moreover, a statistically significant relationship was observed between the abnormal development and the presence of seizure (OR: 2.543, CI: 1.358-4.763.Conclusion: The findings of the current study demonstrated the critical role of weighing the newborns 72-96 h after birth and monitoring for jaundice in the prevention of the neonatal hypernatremia. Furthermore, seizures in these

  20. The Cumulative Partial Pressure of Arterial Oxygen Is Associated With Neurological Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest Treated With Targeted Temperature Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Chun Song; Park, Kyu Nam; Kim, Soo Hyun; Lee, Byung Kook; Oh, Sang Hoon; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Choi, Seung Pill

    2017-12-19

    Hyperoxia could lead to a worse outcome after cardiac arrest. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the cumulative partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) and neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest treated with targeted temperature management. Retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort. An academic tertiary care hospital. A total of 187 consecutive patients treated with targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest. None. The area under the curve of PaO2 for different cutoff values of hyperoxia (≥ 100, ≥ 150, ≥ 200, ≥ 250, and ≥ 300 mm Hg) with different time intervals (0-24, 0-6, and 6-24 hr after return of spontaneous circulation) was calculated for each patient using the trapezoidal method. The primary outcome was the neurologic outcome, as defined by the cerebral performance category, at 6 months after cardiac arrest. Of 187 subjects, 77 (41%) had a good neurologic outcome at 6 months after cardiac arrest. The median age was 54 (43-69) years, and 128 (68%) were male. The area under the curve of PaO2 with cutoff values of greater than or equal to 200, greater than or equal to 250, and greater than or equal to 300 was higher in the poor outcome group at 0-6 and 0-24 hours. The adjusted odds ratios of area under the curve of PaO2 greater than or equal to 200 mm Hg were 1.659 (95% CI, 1.194-2.305) for 0-24 hours after return of spontaneous circulation and 1.548 (95% CI, 1.086-2.208) for 0-6 hours after return of spontaneous circulation. With a higher cumulative exposure to oxygen tension, we found significant increasing trends in the adjusted odds ratio for poor neurologic outcomes. In a new method for PaO2 analysis, cumulative exposure to hyperoxia was associated with neurologic outcomes in a dose-dependent manner. Greater attention to oxygen supply during the first 6 hours appears to be important for outcome after cardiac arrest.

  1. Adapting the neurology area of the Gustavo Fricke Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankelen, A.; González, S.; Aguirre, L.

    2007-11-01

    Within the framework of the subject Clinical Engineering taught at Hospital Dr. Gustavo Fricke of Viña del Mar Chile, we were assigned to undertake a detailed study on the quality of the electrical power main supply of the Neurology Department, on account of reported malfunctioning of some equipment used in this unit. The study results indicated that the problems occurred only in a device for auditory evoked potentials device and, contrary to what was expected, the problem was unrelated to the quality of the electrical main supply. It was also found that the cause for the problem was electromagnetic interference (EMI) emitted from the system's very own components. To solve the problem, we built a Faraday Cage for the signal-processing unit and increased the separating distance among the various system components. This approach enhanced system performance and significantly improved the recorded signals of patients. The solution adopted from this experience was suggested to others health care centers of our country that had been experiencing similar difficulties with the same type of medical equipment.

  2. Acute postoperative neurological deterioration associated with surgery for ruptured intracranial aneurysm: incidence, predictors, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, Kelly B; Todd, Michael M; Bayman, Emine O; Torner, James C

    2012-06-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) results in significant morbidity and mortality, even among patients who reach medical attention in good neurological condition. Many patients have neurological decline in the perioperative period, which contributes to long-term outcomes. The focus of this study is to characterize the incidence of, characteristics predictive of, and outcomes associated with acute postoperative neurological deterioration in patients undergoing surgery for ruptured intracranial aneurysm. The Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysm Surgery Trial (IHAST) was a multicenter randomized clinical trial that enrolled 1001 patients and assesssed the efficacy of hypothermia as neuroprotection during surgery to secure a ruptured intracranial aneurysm. All patients had a radiographically confirmed SAH, were classified as World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) Grade I-III immediately prior to surgery, and underwent surgery to secure the ruptured aneurysm within 14 days of SAH. Neurological assessment with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was performed preoperatively, at 24 and 72 hours postoperatively, and at time of discharge. The primary outcome variable was a dichotomized scoring based on an IHAST version of the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) in which a score of 1 represents a good outcome and a score > 1 a poor outcome, as assessed at 90-days' follow-up. Data from IHAST were analyzed for occurrence of a postoperative neurological deterioration. Preoperative and intraoperative variables were assessed for associations with occurrence of postoperative neurological deterioration. Differences in baseline, intraoperative, and postoperative variables and in outcomes between patients with and without postoperative neurological deterioration were compared with Fisher exact tests. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare variables reported as means. Multiple logistic regression was used to adjust for covariates associated with occurrence

  3. Cervical Anterolisthesis: A Predictor of Poor Neurological Outcomes in Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Patients After Cervical Laminoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oichi, Takeshi; Oshima, Yasushi; Taniguchi, Yuki; Matsubayashi, Yoshitaka; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Takeshita, Katsushi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-04-01

    A retrospective cohort study. To clarify the influence of cervical spondylolisthesis on neurological outcomes in cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) patients after cervical laminoplasty. Studies focusing on the surgical outcomes in CSM patients with cervical spondylolisthesis are limited. We retrospectively reviewed 125 CSM patients after cervical laminoplasty. Neurological outcomes were evaluated by calculating the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) recovery rate at 2 years after surgery. We defined anterolisthesis as a more than 3-mm anterior vertebral displacement in a flexion radiograph and retrolisthesis as a more than 3-mm posterior vertebral displacement in an extension radiograph. We further assessed potential risk factors for poor neurological outcomes after cervical laminoplasty, including cervical alignment, degree of spinal cord compression, duration of myelopathic symptoms, diabetes mellitus, and preoperative JOA score. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the risk factors for poor outcomes (JOA recovery rate Anterolisthesis and retrolisthesis were observed in 13 and 24 patients, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the anterolisthesis was a significant risk factor for poor outcomes (JOA recovery rate Anterolisthesis, but not retrolisthesis, is a significant risk factor for and predictor of poor neurological outcomes after cervical laminoplasty. Cervical laminoplasty should not be considered in CSM patients with anterolisthesis. 2.

  4. High-rise buildings and neurologically favorable outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Nishiyama, Chika; Hayashida, Sumito; Fujii, Tomoko; Izawa, Junichi; Shimamoto, Tomonari; Matsuyama, Tasuku; Hatakeyama, Toshihiro; Katayama, Yusuke; Kiguchi, Takeyuki; Kawamura, Takashi; Iwami, Taku

    2016-12-01

    The number of people living in high-rise buildings has recently been increasing in Japan, and delayed transport time by emergency-medical-service (EMS) personnel from higher floors could lead to lower survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, there are no clinical studies assessing the association between the floor where patients reside and neurologically favorable outcome after OHCA. This was a prospective, population-based study conducted in Osaka City, Japan that enrolled adults aged >=18years suffering an OHCA of cardiac origin before EMS arrival between 2013 and 2014. The primary outcome measure was one-month survival with neurologically favorable outcome. We divided OHCA patients into the following groups: those residing on >=3 floors (the high floor group) and <3 floors (the low floor group). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess factors associated with neurologically favorable outcome. A total of 2979 patients were eligible for analysis. Of them, 1885 (62.3%) occurred below the third floor and 1094 (37.4%) occurred at or above the third floor. The proportion of neurologically favorable outcome after OHCA was significantly lower in the high floor group than in the low floor group (2.7% [30/1094] versus 4.8% [91/1885], P=0.005). In a multivariate analysis, neurologically favorable outcome after OHCA was significantly lower in the high floor group than in the low floor group (adjusted odds ratio, 0.59 [95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.96]). In this population, one-month survival with neurologically favorable outcome from OHCA was lower in the high floor group than in the low floor group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Neurologic Outcomes in Very Preterm Infants Undergoing Surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between surgery in very preterm infants and brain structure at term equivalent and 2-year neurodevelopmental outcome. STUDY DESIGN: A total of 227 infants born at <30 weeks gestation or at a birth weight of <1250 g were prospectively enrolled into a longitudinal observational cohort for magnetic resonance imaging and developmental follow-up. The infants were categorized retrospectively into either a nonsurgical group (n=178) or a surgical group (n=30). Nineteen infants were excluded because of incomplete or unsuitable data. The surgical and nonsurgical groups were compared in terms of clinical demographic data, white matter injury, and brain volume at term. Neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed at age 2 years. RESULTS: Compared with the nonsurgical group, the infants in the surgical group were smaller and more growth-restricted at birth, received more respiratory support and oxygen therapy, and had longer hospital stays. They also had smaller brain volumes, particularly smaller deep nuclear gray matter volumes. Infants who underwent bowel surgery had greater white matter injury. Mental Developmental Index scores were lower in the surgical group, whereas Psychomotor Developmental Index scores did not differ between the groups. The Mental Developmental Index difference became nonsignificant after adjustment for confounding variables. CONCLUSION: Preterm infants exposed to surgery and anesthesia had greater white matter injury and smaller total brain volumes, particularly smaller deep nuclear gray matter volumes. Surgical exposure in the preterm infant should alert the clinician to an increased risk for adverse cognitive outcome.

  6. Systematic review: Outcome reporting bias is a problem in high impact factor neurology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Benjamin; Scott, Jared T; Blubaugh, Mark; Roepke, Brie; Scheckel, Caleb; Vassar, Matt

    2017-01-01

    Selective outcome reporting is a significant methodological concern. Comparisons between the outcomes reported in clinical trial registrations and those later published allow investigators to understand the extent of selection bias among trialists. We examined the possibility of selective outcome reporting in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in neurology journals. We searched PubMed for randomized controlled trials from Jan 1, 2010 -Dec 31, 2015 published in the top 3 impact factor neurology journals. These articles were screened according to specific inclusion criteria. Each author individually extracted data from trials following a standardized protocol. A second author verified each extracted element and discrepancies were resolved. Consistency between registered and published outcomes was evaluated and correlations between discrepancies and funding, journal, and temporal trends were examined. 180 trials were included for analysis. 10 (6%) primary outcomes were demoted, 38 (21%) primary outcomes were omitted from the publication, and 61 (34%) unregistered primary outcomes were added to the published report. There were 18 (10%) cases of secondary outcomes being upgraded to primary outcomes in the publication, and there were 53 (29%) changes in timing of assessment. Of 82 (46%) major discrepancies with reported p-values, 54 (66.0%) favored publication of statistically significant results. Across trials, we found 180 major discrepancies. 66% of major discrepancies with a reported p-value (n = 82) favored statistically significant results. These results suggest a need within neurology to provide more consistent and timely registration of outcomes.

  7. Systematic review: Outcome reporting bias is a problem in high impact factor neurology journals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Howard

    Full Text Available Selective outcome reporting is a significant methodological concern. Comparisons between the outcomes reported in clinical trial registrations and those later published allow investigators to understand the extent of selection bias among trialists. We examined the possibility of selective outcome reporting in randomized controlled trials (RCTs published in neurology journals.We searched PubMed for randomized controlled trials from Jan 1, 2010 -Dec 31, 2015 published in the top 3 impact factor neurology journals. These articles were screened according to specific inclusion criteria. Each author individually extracted data from trials following a standardized protocol. A second author verified each extracted element and discrepancies were resolved. Consistency between registered and published outcomes was evaluated and correlations between discrepancies and funding, journal, and temporal trends were examined.180 trials were included for analysis. 10 (6% primary outcomes were demoted, 38 (21% primary outcomes were omitted from the publication, and 61 (34% unregistered primary outcomes were added to the published report. There were 18 (10% cases of secondary outcomes being upgraded to primary outcomes in the publication, and there were 53 (29% changes in timing of assessment. Of 82 (46% major discrepancies with reported p-values, 54 (66.0% favored publication of statistically significant results.Across trials, we found 180 major discrepancies. 66% of major discrepancies with a reported p-value (n = 82 favored statistically significant results. These results suggest a need within neurology to provide more consistent and timely registration of outcomes.

  8. Early school outcomes for extremely preterm infants with transient neurological abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Heidi M; Taylor, H Gerry; Minich, Nori; Wilson-Costello, Deanne; Hack, Maureen

    2015-09-01

    To determine if transient neurological abnormalities (TNA) at 9 months corrected age predict cognitive, behavioral, and motor outcomes at 6 years of age in extremely preterm infants. A cohort of 124 extremely preterm infants (mean gestational age 25.5wks; 55 males, 69 females), admitted to our unit between 2001 and 2003, were classified based on the Amiel-Tison Neurological Assessment at 9 months and 20 months corrected age as having TNA (n=17), normal neurological assessment (n=89), or neurologically abnormal assessment (n=18). The children were assessed at a mean age of 5 years 11 months (SD 4mo) on cognition, academic achievement, motor ability, and behavior. Compared with children with a normal neurological assessment, children with TNA had higher postnatal exposure to steroids (35% vs 9%) and lower adjusted mean scores on spatial relations (84 [standard error {SE} 5] vs 98 [SE 2]), visual matching (79 [SE 5] vs 91 [SE 2]), letter-word identification (97 [SE 4] vs 108 [SE 1]), and spelling (76 [SE 4] vs 96 [SE 2]) (all p<0.05). Despite a normalized neurological assessment, extremely preterm children with a history TNA are at higher risk for lower cognitive and academic skills than those with normal neurological findings during their first year of school. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  9. Successful outcome in a dog with neurological and respiratory signs following smoke inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaumin, Julien; Hopper, Kate

    2013-01-01

    To report the case management of a patient with smoke inhalation complicated by neurological impairment, carboxyhemoglobinemia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), upper airway obstruction, aspiration pneumonia, and bacteremia. A 1.5-year-old male intact Beagle presented shortly after being involved in a household fire. Upon arrival the dog was diagnosed with ARDS and demonstrated acute neurological signs (eg, obtundation and seizures). Treatment included mechanical ventilation, temporary tracheostomy, and intensive supportive care. During hospitalization, the dog suffered multiple complications including prolonged neurological abnormalities, aspiration pneumonia, and bacteremia. The dog recovered over a 16-day period. This is the first description of extensive management of a patient suffering both neurological and respiratory complication due to smoke inhalation, and details the steps that were taken to achieve a successful outcome. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  10. [Neurological manifestations in riverine populations from areas exposed to mercury in the Brazilian Amazon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Eliana Dirce Torres; Souza, Givago da Silva; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Costa, Carlos Araújo da; Araújo, Amélia A de; Pinheiro, Maria da Conceição Nascimento

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluated current levels of mercury exposure and sensory symptoms in adults from three riverine communities in Pará State, Brazil, two of which located in the Tapajós River basin and one in the Tocantins basin. Participants in this study included 78 residents in Barreiras (Tapajós), 30 in São Luiz do Tapajós (Tapajós), and 49 in Furo do Maracujá (Tocantins). Total hair mercury concentrations were quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and neurological evaluation was conducted by routine examination. Mercury concentrations in the Tapajós communities were higher than those in the Tocantins (p neurological changes showed no significant difference between the communities in exposed areas and control areas for the changes observed by conventional neurological examination, except for gait deviation (p mercury exposure levels, there was a low frequency of sensory alterations according to conventional neurological testing.

  11. Outcomes from a US military neurology and traumatic brain injury telemedicine program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkiewicz, Ilana R; Lappan, Charles M; Neely, Edward T; Hesselbrock, Roger R; Girard, Philip D; Alphonso, Aimee L; Tsao, Jack W

    2012-09-18

    This study evaluated usage of the Army Knowledge Online (AKO) Telemedicine Consultation Program for neurology and traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases in remote overseas areas with limited access to subspecialists. We performed a descriptive analysis of quantity of consults, response times, sites where consults originated, military branches that benefitted, anatomic locations of problems, and diagnoses. This was a retrospective analysis that searched electronic databases for neurology consults from October 2006 to December 2010 and TBI consults from March 2008 to December 2010. A total of 508 consults were received for neurology, and 131 consults involved TBI. For the most part, quantity of consults increased over the years. Meanwhile, response times decreased, with a mean response time of 8 hours, 14 minutes for neurology consults and 2 hours, 44 minutes for TBI consults. Most neurology consults originated in Iraq (67.59%) followed by Afghanistan (16.84%), whereas TBI consults mainly originated from Afghanistan (40.87%) followed by Iraq (33.91%). The most common consultant diagnoses were headaches, including migraines (52.1%), for neurology cases and mild TBI/concussion (52.3%) for TBI cases. In the majority of cases, consultants recommended in-theater management. After receipt of consultant's recommendation, 84 known neurology evacuations were facilitated, and 3 known neurology evacuations were prevented. E-mail-based neurology and TBI subspecialty teleconsultation is a viable method for overseas providers in remote locations to receive expert recommendations for a range of neurologic conditions. These recommendations can facilitate medically necessary patient evacuations or prevent evacuations for which on-site care is preferable.

  12. Neurological outcome in school-age children after in utero exposure to coumarins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesseling, J; Van Driel, D; Smrkovsky, M; Van der Veer, E; Geven-Boere, LM; Sauer, PJJ; Touwen, BCL

    The effect of prenatal exposure to coumarins (acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon) on neurological outcome was assessed in a cohort of 306 children aged 7-15 years. Findings were compared with those in a non-exposed cohort of 267 children, matched for sex, age, and demographic region. We used a

  13. Initial arterial carbon dioxide tension is associated with neurological outcome after resuscitation from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolins, Molly L; Henning, Daniel J; Gaieski, David F; Grossestreuer, Anne V; Jaworski, Alison; Johnson, Nicholas J

    2017-05-01

    To determine the relationships between partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2), prescribed minute ventilation (MV), and neurologic outcome in patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest. This was a retrospective cohort study utilizing a multicenter database of adult patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest. The primary outcome was neurologic status at hospital discharge, defined by Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score: CPC 1-2 was favorable, CPC 3-5 was poor. We compared rates of initial normocarbia (PaCO2 31-49mmHg) and mean sequential PaCO2 measurements obtained over the first 24h. We also assessed the influence of MV on the PaCO2 at initial, 6, 12, 18, and 24h after cardiac arrest using univariate linear regression. One hundred and fourteen patients from 3 institutions met inclusion criteria. Overall, 46/114 (40.4%, 95% CI: 31.4-49.4%) patients survived to hospital discharge, and 33/114 (28.9%, 20.6-37.2%) had CPC 1-2 at the time of discharge. A total of 38.9% (95% CI: 29.9-47.9%) of patients had initial normocarbia; 43.2% (28.6-57.8%) of these patients were discharged with CPC 1-2, compared with 20.3% (10.8-29.8%) of dyscarbic patients. By 6h, neurologic outcomes were not significantly associated with PaCO2. Prescribed MV was not associated with PaCO2 at any time point with the exception of a weak correlation at hour 18. Initial normocarbia was associated with favorable neurological outcome in patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest. This relationship was not seen at subsequent time points. There was no significant association between prescribed MV and PaCO2 or neurologic outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Feasibility of the collection of patient-reported outcomes in an ambulatory neurology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Lidia M V R; Schwamm, Eli; Moura Junior, Valdery; Seitz, Michael P; Hsu, John; Cole, Andrew J; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-12-06

    To determine whether patients could self-report physical and mental health assessments in the waiting room and whether these assessments would be associated with modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and Quality of Life in Epilepsy (QOLIE-10) scores. We offered iPad-based surveys to consecutive adult neurology patients at check-in to collect patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). We collected demographic and clinical data on 6,075 patients through survey or administrative claims and PROMs from participating patients. We compared demographic characteristics of participants and nonparticipants and tested associations between physical and mental health scores and mRS and QOLIE-10. Of 6,075 patients seen by neurologists during the study period, 2,992 (49.3%) participated in the survey. Compared to nonparticipating patients, participating patients more often were privately insured (53.5% vs 42.7%, p neurology (nonsubspecialty) clinics (53.1% vs 46.6%, p Neurology.

  15. Mortality and neurological outcome in the elderly after target temperature management for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Pellis, Tommaso; Kuiper, Michael

    2015-01-01

    allocation was not statistically significant for either mortality or neurological outcome. CONCLUSION: Increasing age is associated with significantly increased mortality after OHCA, but mortality rate is not influenced by level of target temperature. Risk of poor neurological outcome also increases with age...

  16. Is the number of microembolic signals related to neurologic outcome in coronary bypass surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malheiros Suzana M. F.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB may potentially reduce the number of microembolic signals (MES associated with aortic manipulation or generated by the pump circuit, resulting in a better neurologic outcome after surgery. Our aim was to compare the frequency of MES and neurologic complications in CABG with and without CPB. Twenty patients eligible to routine CABG without CPB were randomized to surgery with CPB and without CPB and continuously monitored by transcranial Doppler. Neurologic examination was performed in all patients before and after surgery. The two groups were similar with respect to demographics, risk factors, grade of aortic atheromatous disease and number of grafts. The frequency of MES in the nonCPB group was considerably lower than in CPB patients, however, we did not observe any change in the neurologic examination during the early postoperative period. Neurologic complications after CABG may be related to the size and composition of MES rather than to their absolute numbers. A large prospective multicentric randomized trial may help to elucidate this complex issue.

  17. Association between cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration and one-month neurological outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiura, Masahiro; Hamabe, Yuichi; Akashi, Akiko; Sakurai, Atsushi; Tahara, Yoshio; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nagao, Ken; Yaguchi, Arino; Morimura, Naoto

    2017-04-21

    The duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important factor associated with the outcomes for an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, the appropriate CPR duration remains unclear considering pre- and in-hospital settings. The present study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the CPR duration (including both the pre- and in-hospital duration) and neurologically favorable outcomes 1-month after cardiac arrest. Data were utilized from a prospective multi-center cohort study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients transported to 67 emergency hospitals between January 2012 and March 2013 in the Kanto area of Japan. A total of 3,353 patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (age ≥18 years) who underwent CPR by emergency medical service personnel and achieved the return of spontaneous circulation in a pre- or in-hospital setting were analyzed. The primary outcome was a 1-month favorable neurological outcome. Logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the influence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration. The CPR duration that achieved a cumulative proportion >99% of cases with a 1-month neurologically favorable outcome was determined. Of the 3,353 eligible cases, pre-hospital return of spontaneous circulation was obtained in 1,692 cases (50.5%). A total of 279 (8.3%) cases had a 1-month neurologically favorable outcome. The CPR duration was significantly and inversely associated with 1-month neurologically favorable outcomes with adjustment for pre- and in-hospital confounders (adjusted odds ratio: 0.911, per minute, 95% CI: 0.892-0.929, p CPR, the probability of a 1-month neurologically favorable outcome decreased from 8.3 to 0.7%. At 45 min of CPR, the cumulative proportion for a 1-month neurologically favorable outcome reached >99%. The CPR duration was independently and inversely associated with 1-month neurologically favorable outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The CPR duration required to achieve return

  18. The Association Between Arterial Oxygen Tension and Neurological Outcome After Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas J; Dodampahala, Kalani; Rosselot, Babette; Perman, Sarah M; Mikkelsen, Mark E; Goyal, Munish; Gaieski, David F; Grossestreuer, Anne V

    2017-03-01

    A number of observational studies have evaluated the association between arterial oxygen tensions and outcome after cardiac arrest with variable results. The objective of this study is to determine the association between arterial oxygen tension and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. A retrospective cohort analysis was performed using the Penn Alliance for Therapeutic Hypothermia registry. Adult patients who experienced return of spontaneous circulation after in-hospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and had a partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) recorded within 48 hours were included. Our primary exposure of interest was PaO2. Hyperoxemia was defined as PaO2 > 300 mmHg, hypoxemia as PaO2 arrests were witnessed, and pulseless electrical activity was the most common initial rhythm (40%). More than 72% of the patients had cardiac etiology for their arrests, and 55% underwent targeted temperature management. A total of 38% of patients survived to hospital discharge. There was no significant association between PaO2 at any time interval and neurological outcome at hospital discharge. Hyperoxemia at 12 hours after cardiac arrest was associated with decreased odds of survival (OR 0.17 [0.03-0.89], p = 0.032). There was no significant association between arterial oxygen tension measured within the first 48 hours after cardiac arrest and neurological outcome.

  19. Neurological outcome in surgically treated patients with incomplete closed traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, B; Mohammed, A; Samuel, J; Mues, J; Kluger, P

    2008-09-01

    Retrospective study based on a reference paper. Neurological outcome in patients who were managed surgically with closed traumatic cervical spine injury was evaluated using the ASIA motor scoring system and Frankel grading. To assess the accuracy of motor charting and Frankel grading as tools to evaluate neurological outcome in closed traumatic cervical spine injury, and also to evaluate how the surgically treated patients fared in their neurological recovery by measurement tools as in the reference paper. National Spinal Injuries Centre, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury, UK. Fifty-seven patients were admitted within 2 days of the injury with closed traumatic cervical spine injuries (1997-2004). Thirty-seven (65%) met the inclusion criteria as per the referenced paper, that is, were treated surgically, were Frankel grade B and above and had at least 12 months follow up. The remaining 20 patients were not included as they did not meet the inclusion criteria. The breakdown of the 20 patients is given in Table 1. The mean recovery percentage (MRP) and mean deficit percentage (MDP) were calculated as per the referenced paper. An evaluation of 37 patients surgically treated, who had follow up of at least 12 months, showed that preservation of pin prick below the level of lesion, and preservation of anal tone and perianal sensation were good prognostic indicators. There was no correlation between degree of encroachment of canal or the degree of kyphosis to MDP or MRP. The mean time from injury to mobilization was 7.6 days in 25 out of 37 patients. Twelve of the 37 patients had prolonged immobilization because of ITU stay or because they were initially treated conservatively. Three out of the 37 patients developed DVT/PE. Mean hospital stay was 6.4 months. The neurological outcome in surgically treated patients is comparable to the conservatively treated patients. The Frankel grading and ASIA motor charting combined is a powerful tool in assessing the neurological

  20. Comparison of admission random glucose, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin in predicting the neurological outcome of acute ischemic stroke: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Ying Sung

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Hyperglycemia is a known predictor of negative outcomes in stroke. Several glycemic measures, including admission random glucose, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, have been associated with bad neurological outcomes in acute ischemic stroke, particularly in nondiabetic patients. However, the predictive power of these glycemic measures is yet to be investigated. Methods This retrospective study enrolled 484 patients with acute ischemic stroke from January 2009 to March 2013, and complete records of initial stroke severity, neurological outcomes at three months, and glycemic measures were evaluated. We examined the predictive power of admission random glucose, fasting glucose, and HbA1c for neurological outcomes in acute ischemic stroke. Furthermore, subgroup analyses of nondiabetic patients and patients with diabetes were performed separately. Results Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis revealed that admission random glucose and fasting glucose were significant predictors of poor neurological outcomes, whereas HbA1c was not (areas under the ROC curve (AUCs: admission random glucose = 0.564, p = 0.026; fasting glucose = 0.598, p = 0.001; HbA1c = 0.510, p = 0.742. Subgroup analyses of nondiabetic patients and those with diabetes revealed that only fasting glucose predicts neurological outcomes in patients with diabetes, and the AUCs of these three glycemic measures did not differ between the two groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis of the study patients indicated that only age, initial stroke severity, and fasting glucose were independent predictors of poor neurological outcomes, whereas admission random glucose and HbA1c were not (adjusted odds ratio: admission random glucose = 1.002, p = 0.228; fasting glucose = 1.005, p = 0.039; HbA1c = 1.160, p = 0.076. Furthermore, subgroup multivariate logistic regression analyses of nondiabetic patients and those with diabetes indicated that none of the

  1. Comparison of neurological health outcomes between two adolescent cohorts exposed to pesticides in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Ahmed A.; Bonner, Matthew R.; Hendy, Olfat; Abdel Rasoul, Gaafar; Wang, Kai; Olson, James R.; Rohlman, Diane S.

    2017-01-01

    Pesticide-exposed adolescents may have a higher risk of neurotoxic effects because of their developing brains and bodies. However, only a limited number of studies have addressed this risk among adolescents. The aim of this study was to compare neurological outcomes from two cohorts of Egyptian adolescents working as pesticide applicators. In 2005 and 2009, two cohorts of male adolescents working as pesticide applicators for the cotton crop were recruited from Menoufia Governorate, Egypt. The...

  2. NON NEUROLOGICAL OUTCOME COMPARISON OF EARLY AND DELAYED SURGICAL STABILIZATION IN C-SPINE FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. B. Mahadewa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non neurological outcome postsurgical stabilization in C-spine injury has not been reported. Non neurological outcome i.e. the risk of lung infection (pneumonia, systemic inflammation response syndrome (SIRS, length of postoperative care (LOPOC which can compromise the recovery process and treatment period. This study aims to investigate non neurological outcome comparison after early surgical stabilization (ESS and delayed surgical stabilization (DSS in patients with C-spine fractures. Methods: The author retrospectively reviews 59 of 108 consecutive patients who met the inclusion criteria with C-spine fractures who underwent surgical stabilization at the Sanglah General Hospital, between 2007 and 2010. Consisting of 25 patients underwent ESS and 34 patients were treated by DSS. The last follow up period range was 3-36 months. Non neurological outcome were evaluated and compared; the risk of pneumonia, SIRS and LOPOC. Results: Significant statistically between ESS and DSS in; the risk of pneumonia (ESS: DSS= 1:9 by Chi-square-test (p=0.023; the risk of SIRS (ESS: DSS= 1:11 by Chi-square-test (p=0.008; and the LOPOC (ESS: DSS= 6.84:9.97 by independent t-test (p=0.000. Application of ESS for C-spine fractures could provide early mobilization, prompt treatment and facilitate early rehabilitation thus significantly reduces complications due to prolong immobilization and reduces LOPOC. Conclussion: It can be concluded that the ESS strategy is effective and efficient thus may propose an option of surgical timing in C-spine fractures.

  3. Antenatal magnesium sulfate and neurologic outcome in preterm infants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Lex W; Crowther, Caroline A; Middleton, Philippa; Marret, Stéphane

    2009-06-01

    To systematically review rates of neurologic outcomes reported in childhood for the preterm fetus exposed to antenatal magnesium sulfate. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 3), relevant references from retrieved articles, and abstracts submitted to major congresses. We sought all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of antenatal magnesium sulfate with neurologic outcomes reported for the fetus. Five eligible RCTs with 6,145 fetuses were identified; in four studies (4,446 fetuses) the primary intent was neuroprotection of the fetus. Methods of the Cochrane Collaboration were used to analyze the data. Antenatal magnesium sulfate therapy given to women at risk of preterm birth substantially reduced the risk of cerebral palsy in their children (relative risk [RR] 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54-0.87; five trials; 6,145 infants). The number needed to treat to prevent one case of cerebral palsy was 63 (95% CI 43-155). Moreover, there was a significant reduction in the rate of substantial gross motor dysfunction (RR 0.61; 95% CI 0.44-0.85; four trials; 5,980 infants). No statistically significant effect of antenatal magnesium sulfate therapy was detected on pediatric mortality (RR 1.01; 95% CI 0.82-1.23; five trials; 6,145 infants), or on other neurologic impairments or disabilities in the first few years of life. There were no significant effects of antenatal magnesium sulfate on combined rates of mortality with neurologic outcomes, except in the studies where the primary intent was neuroprotection, where there was a reduction in death or cerebral palsy (RR 0.85; 95% CI 0.74-0.98; four trials; 4,446 infants). Antenatal magnesium sulfate therapy given to women at risk of preterm birth is neuroprotective against motor disorders in childhood for the preterm fetus.

  4. Resveratrol Attenuates Neurodegeneration and Improves Neurological Outcomes after Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Bonsack

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is a devastating type of stroke with a substantial public health impact. Currently, there is no effective treatment for ICH. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether the post-injury administration of Resveratrol confers neuroprotection in a pre-clinical model of ICH. To this end, ICH was induced in adult male CD1 mice by collagenase injection method. Resveratrol (10 mg/kg or vehicle was administered at 30 min post-induction of ICH and the neurobehavioral outcome, neurodegeneration, cerebral edema, hematoma resolution and neuroinflammation were assessed. The Resveratrol treatment significantly attenuated acute neurological deficits, neurodegeneration and cerebral edema after ICH in comparison to vehicle treated controls. Further, Resveratrol treated mice exhibited improved hematoma resolution with a concomitant reduction in the expression of proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1β after ICH. Altogether, the data suggest the efficacy of post-injury administration of Resveratrol in improving acute neurological function after ICH.

  5. Prehospital plasma resuscitation associated with improved neurologic outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Matthew C; Thiels, Cornelius A; Aho, Johnathon M; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Zielinski, Martin D; Stubbs, James A; Jenkins, Donald H; Zietlow, Scott P

    2017-09-01

    Trauma-related hypotension and coagulopathy worsen secondary brain injury in patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Early damage control resuscitation with blood products may mitigate hypotension and coagulopathy. Preliminary data suggest resuscitation with plasma in large animals improves neurologic function after TBI; however, data in humans are lacking. We retrospectively identified all patients with multiple injuries age >15 years with head injuries undergoing prehospital resuscitation with blood products at a single Level I trauma center from January 2002 to December 2013. Inclusion criteria were prehospital resuscitation with either packed red blood cells (pRBCs) or thawed plasma as sole colloid resuscitation. Patients who died in hospital and those using anticoagulants were excluded. Primary outcomes were Glasgow Outcomes Score Extended (GOSE) and Disability Rating Score (DRS) at dismissal and during follow-up. Of 76 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 53% (n = 40) received prehospital pRBCs and 47% (n = 36) received thawed plasma. Age, gender, injury severity or TBI severity, arrival laboratory values, and number of prehospital units were similar (all p > 0.05). Patients who received thawed plasma had an improved neurologic outcome compared to those receiving pRBCs (median GOSE 7 [7-8] vs. 5.5 [3-7], p plasma had improved functionality compared to pRBCs (median DRS 2 [1-3.5] vs. 9 [3-13], p plasma compared to pRBCs by both median GOSE (8 [7-8] vs. 6 [6-7], p plasma is associated with improved neurologic and functional outcomes at discharge and during follow-up compared to pRBCs alone. These preliminary data support the further investigation and use of plasma in the resuscitation of critically injured TBI patients. Therapeutic, level V.

  6. Targeted Temperature Management for 48 vs 24 Hours and Neurologic Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Hans; Søreide, Eldar; de Haas, Inge

    2017-01-01

    hours results in better neurologic outcomes compared with currently recommended, standard, 24-hour TTM. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was an international, investigator-initiated, blinded-outcome-assessor, parallel, pragmatic, multicenter, randomized clinical superiority trial in 10 intensive...... (33 ± 1°C) for 48 hours (n = 176) or 24 hours (n = 179), followed by gradual rewarming of 0.5°C per hour until reaching 37°C. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was 6-month neurologic outcome, with a Cerebral Performance Categories (CPC) score of 1 or 2 used to define favorable outcome......: In unconscious survivors from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest admitted to the ICU, targeted temperature management at 33°C for 48 hours did not significantly improve 6-month neurologic outcome compared with targeted temperature management at 33°C for 24 hours. However, the study may have had limited power...

  7. Prognostication of neurologic outcome in cardiac arrest patients after mild therapeutic hypothermia: a meta-analysis of the current literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamps, M.J.; Horn, J.; Oddo, M.; Fugate, J.E.; Storm, C.; Cronberg, T.; Wijman, C.A.; Wu, O.; Binnekade, J.M.; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the sensitivity and false positive rate (FPR) of neurological examination and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) to predict poor outcome in adult patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). METHODS: MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched

  8. Comparison of neurological health outcomes between two adolescent cohorts exposed to pesticides in Egypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A Ismail

    Full Text Available Pesticide-exposed adolescents may have a higher risk of neurotoxic effects because of their developing brains and bodies. However, only a limited number of studies have addressed this risk among adolescents. The aim of this study was to compare neurological outcomes from two cohorts of Egyptian adolescents working as pesticide applicators. In 2005 and 2009, two cohorts of male adolescents working as pesticide applicators for the cotton crop were recruited from Menoufia Governorate, Egypt. The same application schedule and pesticides were used at both times, including both organophosphorus, and pyrethroid compounds. Participants in both cohorts completed three neurobehavioral tests, health and exposure questionnaires, and medical and neurological screening examinations. In addition, blood samples were collected to measure butyryl cholinesterase (BChE activity. Pesticide applicators in both cohorts reported more neurological symptoms and signs than non-applicators, particularly among participants in the 2005 cohort (OR ranged from 1.18 to 15.3. Except for one test (Trail Making B, there were no significant differences between either applicators or non-applicators of both cohorts on the neurobehavioral outcome measures (p > 0.05. The 2005 cohort showed greater inhibition of serum BChE activity than the 2009 cohort (p < 0.05. In addition, participants with depressed BChE activity showed more symptoms and signs than others without BChE depression (p < 0.05. Our study is the first to examine the consistency of health outcomes associated with pesticide exposure across two cohorts tested at different times from the same geographical region in rural Egypt. This similar pattern of findings across the two cohorts provides strong evidence of the health impact of exposure of adolescents to pesticides.

  9. Comparison of neurological health outcomes between two adolescent cohorts exposed to pesticides in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Matthew R.; Hendy, Olfat; Abdel Rasoul, Gaafar; Wang, Kai; Olson, James R.; Rohlman, Diane S.

    2017-01-01

    Pesticide-exposed adolescents may have a higher risk of neurotoxic effects because of their developing brains and bodies. However, only a limited number of studies have addressed this risk among adolescents. The aim of this study was to compare neurological outcomes from two cohorts of Egyptian adolescents working as pesticide applicators. In 2005 and 2009, two cohorts of male adolescents working as pesticide applicators for the cotton crop were recruited from Menoufia Governorate, Egypt. The same application schedule and pesticides were used at both times, including both organophosphorus, and pyrethroid compounds. Participants in both cohorts completed three neurobehavioral tests, health and exposure questionnaires, and medical and neurological screening examinations. In addition, blood samples were collected to measure butyryl cholinesterase (BChE) activity. Pesticide applicators in both cohorts reported more neurological symptoms and signs than non-applicators, particularly among participants in the 2005 cohort (OR ranged from 1.18 to 15.3). Except for one test (Trail Making B), there were no significant differences between either applicators or non-applicators of both cohorts on the neurobehavioral outcome measures (p > 0.05). The 2005 cohort showed greater inhibition of serum BChE activity than the 2009 cohort (p < 0.05). In addition, participants with depressed BChE activity showed more symptoms and signs than others without BChE depression (p < 0.05). Our study is the first to examine the consistency of health outcomes associated with pesticide exposure across two cohorts tested at different times from the same geographical region in rural Egypt. This similar pattern of findings across the two cohorts provides strong evidence of the health impact of exposure of adolescents to pesticides. PMID:28231336

  10. Rosuvastatin improves myocardial and neurological outcomes after asphyxial cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yun; Wu, Yichen; Meng, Min; Luo, Man; Zhao, Hongmei; Sun, Hong; Gao, Sumin

    2017-03-01

    Rosuvastatin, a potent HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, is cholesterol-lowering drugs and reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. This study is to explore whether rosuvastatin improves outcomes after cardiac arrest in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 8min of cardiac arrest (CA) by asphyxia and randomly assigned to three experimental groups immediately following successful resuscitation: Sham; Control; and Rosuvastatin. The survival, hemodynamics, myocardial function, neurological outcomes and apoptosis were assessed. The 7-d survival rate was greater in the rosuvastatin treated group compared to the Control group (P=0.019 by log-rank test). Myocardial function, as measured by cardiac output and ejection fraction, was significantly impaired after CA and notably improved in the animals treated with rosuvastatin beginning at 60min after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) (Pcardiac troponin T and neuron-specific enolase and the caspase-3 activity were significantly decreased in the Rosuvastatin group when compared with the Control group (P<0.05). In conclusion, rosuvastatin treatment substantially improves the 7-d survival rate as well as myocardial function and neurological outcomes after ROSC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Angiotensin AT2-receptor stimulation improves survival and neurological outcome after experimental stroke in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwengel, Katja; Namsolleck, Pawel; Lucht, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    /BL6J or AT2R-knockout mice (AT2-KO) underwent MCAO for 30 min followed by reperfusion. Starting 45 min after MCAO, mice were treated once daily for 4 days with either vehicle or C21 (0.03 mg/kg ip). Neurological deficits were scored daily. Infarct volumes were measured 96 h post-stroke by MRI. C21......This study investigated the effect of post-stroke, direct AT2-receptor (AT2R) stimulation with the non-peptide AT2R-agonist compound 21 (C21) on infarct size, survival and neurological outcome after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in mice and looked for potential underlying mechanisms. C57...... significantly improved survival after MCAO when compared to vehicle-treated mice. C21 treatment had no impact on infarct size, but significantly attenuated neurological deficits. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) (receptor for BDNF) and growth...

  12. Cerebrolysin effects on neurological outcomes and cerebral blood flow in acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiri-Nikpour MR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Reza Amiri-Nikpour,1 Surena Nazarbaghi,1 Babak Ahmadi-Salmasi,1 Tayebeh Mokari,2 Urya Tahamtan,2 Yousef Rezaei3 1Department of Neurology, Imam Khomeini Hospital, 2School of Medicine, 3Seyyed-al-Shohada Heart Center, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran Background: Cerebrolysin, a brain-derived neuropeptide, has been shown to improve the neurological outcomes of stroke, but no study has demonstrated its effect on cerebral blood flow. This study aimed to determine the cerebrolysin impact on the neurological outcomes and cerebral blood flow. Methods: In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, 46 patients who had acute focal ischemic stroke were randomly assigned into two groups to receive intravenously either 30 mL of cerebrolysin diluted in normal saline daily for 10 days (n=23 or normal saline alone (n=23 adjunct to 100 mg of aspirin daily. All patients were examined using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and transcranial Doppler to measure the mean flow velocity and pulsatility index (PI of their cerebral arteries at baseline as well as on days 30, 60, and 90. Results: The patients’ mean age was 60±9.7 years, and 51.2% of patients were male. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was significantly lower in the cerebrolysin group compared with the placebo group on day 60 (median 10, interquartile range 9–11, P=0.008 and day 90 (median 11, interquartile range 10–13.5, P=0.001. The median of PI in the right middle cerebral artery was significantly lower in the cerebrolysin group compared with the placebo group on days 30, 60, and 90 (P<0.05. One patient in the cerebrolysin group and two patients in the placebo group died before day 30 (4.3% versus 8.7%. Conclusion: Cerebrolysin can be useful to improve the neurological outcomes and the PI of middle cerebral artery in patients with acute focal ischemic stroke. Keywords: ischemic stroke, cerebrolysin, neuroprotection, NIHSS, mean

  13. Acute flaccid paralysis in South African children: Causes, respiratory complications and neurological outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pijl, Jolanda; Wilmshurst, Jo M; van Dijk, Monique; Argent, Andrew; Booth, Jane; Zampoli, Marco

    2017-09-28

    To describe the causes, clinical presentation and neurological outcome of acute flaccid paralysis in children. A retrospective study in a tertiary paediatric hospital in South Africa. Data on clinical presentation, respiratory complications and long-term neurological outcomes of children presenting with acute flaccid paralysis were collected. Logistic regression analysis was applied to determine predictors for the need of mechanical ventilation. The study included 119 patients, 99 of whom had Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS); 47 patients (39.5%) required mechanical ventilation. Backward logistic regression analysis revealed that bulbar dysfunction (P < 0.001), autonomic dysfunction (P = 0.003) and upper limb paralysis (P = 0.038) significantly predicted the need for mechanical ventilation. EuroQol-5D scores of self-care problems and usual activities after discharge significantly declined over time. In this large series from Africa, GBS was the main cause of acute flaccid paralysis in children and was associated with significant morbidity. Other causes of acute flaccid paralysis mimicking GBS were not uncommon and should be excluded in this setting. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  14. Neurophysiological prediction of neurological good and poor outcome in post-anoxic coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippo, A; Carrai, R; Scarpino, M; Spalletti, M; Lanzo, G; Cossu, C; Peris, A; Valente, S; Amantini, A

    2017-06-01

    Investigation of the utility of association between electroencephalogram (EEG) and somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) for the prediction of neurological outcome in comatose patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest (CA) treated with therapeutic hypothermia, according to different recording times after CA. Glasgow Coma Scale, EEG and SEPs performed at 12, 24 and 48-72 h after CA were assessed in 200 patients. Outcome was evaluated by Cerebral Performance Category 6 months after CA. Within 12 h after CA, grade 1 EEG predicted good outcome and bilaterally absent (BA) SEPs predicted poor outcome. Because grade 1 EEG and BA-SEPs were never found in the same patient, the recording of both EEG and SEPs allows us to correctly prognosticate a greater number of patients with respect to the use of a single test within 12 h after CA. At 48-72 h after CA, both grade 2 EEG and BA-SEPs predicted poor outcome with FPR=0.0%. When these neurophysiological patterns are both present in the same patient, they confirm and strengthen their prognostic value, but because they also occurred independently in eight patients, poor outcome is predictable in a greater number of patients. The combination of EEG/SEP findings allows prediction of good and poor outcome (within 12 h after CA) and of poor outcome (after 48-72 h). Recording of EEG and SEPs in the same patients allows always an increase in the number of cases correctly classified, and an increase of the reliability of prognostication in a single patient due to concordance of patterns. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Methylmercury exposure and neurological outcomes in Taiji residents accustomed to consuming whale meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masaaki; Hachiya, Noriyuki; Murata, Ken-ya; Nakanishi, Ichiro; Kondo, Tomoyoshi; Yasutake, Akira; Miyamoto, Ken-ichiro; Ser, Ping Han; Omi, Sanae; Furusawa, Hana; Watanabe, Chiho; Usuki, Fusako; Sakamoto, Mineshi

    2014-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a major environmental neurotoxicant that causes damage to the central nervous system. In Japan, industrial emission of MeHg has resulted in MeHg intoxication in Minamata and Niigata, the so-called Minamata disease. Humans are exposed to MeHg derived from natural sources, primarily fish and fish predators. Therefore, MeHg continues to be an environmental risk to human health, particularly in susceptible populations that frequently consume substantial amounts of fish or fish predators such as whale. This study aimed to investigate the health effects of MeHg exposure in adults. The subjects were 194 residents (117 males, 77 females; age 20-85 years) who resided in the coastal town of Taiji, the birthplace of traditional whaling in Japan. We analyzed hair for mercury content and performed detailed neurological examinations and dietary surveys. Audiometry, magnetic resonance imaging, and electromyography were performed to diagnose neurological defects. Whole blood mercury and selenium (Se) levels were measured in 23 subjects. The geometric mean of the hair mercury levels was 14.9 μg/g. Twelve subjects revealed hair mercury levels >50 μg/g (NOAEL) set by WHO. Hair mercury levels significantly correlated with daily whale meat intake. These results suggested that residents in Taiji were highly exposed to MeHg by ingesting MeHg-contaminated whale meat. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated no significant correlations between hair mercury levels and neurological outcomes, whereas some of the findings significantly correlated with age. A significantly positive correlation between whole blood mercury and Se levels was observed and the whole blood mercury/Se molar ratios of all subjects were exposure in this study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Perinatal death and neurological damage as a sequential chain of poor outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Koutarou; Sameshima, Hiroshi; Kodama, Yuki; Furukawa, Seishi; Kaneko, Masatoki; Ikenoue, Tsuyomu

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the risk factors of perinatal death and neurological damage. Perinatal death and neurological damage were retrospectively investigated using a population-based study of 108 024 deliveries from 1998 to 2007. Main factors studied were asphyxia, growth restriction and preterm delivery perinatal deaths (4.3/1000) and 220 neurological damages (2.0/1000). Preterm delivery accounted for 50% of perinatal deaths and neurological damage, whereas it constituted 2.6% of total births. Multiple regression analyses showed that prematurity death, neonatal death and neurological damage. Prematurity perinatal death to neurological damage.

  17. Cystic periventricular leukomalacia in the neonate: analysis of sequential sonographic findings and neurologic outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Seok; Yoo, Dong Soo [Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    To analyse the sequential sonographic findings of cystic PVL and to evaluate relationship between sonographic grading of PVL and patterns of neurologic outcomes. Authors have retrospectively analysed the sequential sonographic findings of 36 cases of PVL in the preterm neonates. Initial sonographic features done within 3 days of life were divided into 3 patients such as normal, localized, and diffuse hyperechogenic flare. Grading of PVL confirmed by follow-up studies was classified as involvement of one lobe (grade 1), two lobes (grade 2) and more than extent of grade 2 (grade 3). The relationship between sonographic grading of leukomalacia and later neurologic outcomes were also analysed. Initial sonographic patterns according to grading of PVL were normal pattern in seven of nine (77.8%) of grade 1, diffuse hyperechogenic flares in five of eight cases of grade 2 and in 13 of 16 cases of grade 3. There was a significant difference between the grades and frequency of pattern of diffuse hyperechoic flare (p=0.021). Average detection timing of cystic PVL was 38.4{+-}18.9 days in grade 1, 29.8{+-}14 days in grade 2, and 19.1{+-}5.6 days in grade 3 with a significant statistical difference between the detection time and grades (p=0.037). Cerebral palsy has occurred in 62.5% of grade 1 and 100% of grade 2 and grade 3 (p=0.043). Frequency of spastic quadriplegia was higher in grade 3 (76.5%) than in grade 1 (25%) and grade 2 (12.5%) (p=0.001). Most of grade 1 cystic PVL revealed normal pattern of white matter echogenicity in initial ultrasonography and needed follow up examination over one month period. Spastic quadriplegia occured mainly in patients with grade 3 cystic PVL.

  18. Mildly Reduced Brain Swelling and Improved Neurological Outcome in Aquaporin-4 Knockout Mice following Controlled Cortical Impact Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiaoming; Uchida, Kazuyoshi; Papadopoulos, Marios C; Zador, Zsolt; Manley, Geoffrey T; Verkman, Alan S

    2015-10-01

    Brain edema following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Prior indirect evidence has suggested the involvement of astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in the pathogenesis of TBI. Here, focal TBI was produced in wild type (AQP4(+/+)) and knockout (AQP4(-/-)) mice by controlled cortical impact injury (CCI) following craniotomy with dura intact (parameters: velocity 4.5 m/sec, depth 1.7 mm, dwell time 150 msec). AQP4-deficient mice showed a small but significant reduction in injury volume in the first week after CCI, with a small improvement in neurological outcome. Mechanistic studies showed reduced intracranial pressure at 6 h after CCI in AQP4(-/-) mice, compared with AQP4(+/+) control mice (11 vs. 19 mm Hg), with reduced local brain water accumulation as assessed gravimetrically. Transmission electron microscopy showed reduced astrocyte foot-process area in AQP4(-/-) mice at 24 h after CCI, with greater capillary lumen area. Blood-brain barrier disruption assessed by Evans blue dye extravasation was similar in AQP4(+/+) and AQP4(-/-) mice. We conclude that the mildly improved outcome in AQP4(-/-) mice following CCI results from reduced cytotoxic brain water accumulation, though concurrent cytotoxic and vasogenic mechanisms in TBI make the differences small compared to those seen in disorders where cytotoxic edema predominates.

  19. Neurological outcomes after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, late onset metachromatic leukodystrophy and Hurler syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Souza, Carolina Fischinger Moura de; Poswar, Fabiano de Oliveira; Donis, Karina Carvalho; Campos, Lillian Gonçalves; Deyl, Adriana Vanessa Santini; Burin, Maira Graeff; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Matte, Ursula da Silveira; Giugliani, Roberto; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Vedolin, Leonardo Modesti; Gregianin, Lauro José; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2016-12-01

    To describe survival and neurological outcomes after HSCT for these disorders. Seven CALD, 2 MLD and 2 MPS-IH patients underwent HSCT between 2007 and 2014. Neurological examinations, magnetic resonance imaging, molecular and biochemical studies were obtained at baseline and repeated when appropriated. Favorable outcomes were obtained with 4/5 related and 3/6 unrelated donors. Two patients died from procedure-related complications. Nine transplanted patients were alive after a median of 3.7 years: neurological stabilization was obtained in 5/6 CALD, 1/2 MLD, and one MPS-IH patient. Brain lesions of the MPS-IH patient were reduced four years after HSCT. Good outcomes were obtained when HSCT was performed before adulthood, early in the clinical course, and/or from a related donor.

  20. Xenon improves neurological outcome and reduces secondary injury following trauma in an in vivo model of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, Clara; Gruss, Marco; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Hirnet, Tobias; Werner, Christian; Engelhard, Kristin; Franks, Nicholas P; Thal, Serge C; Dickinson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the neuroprotective efficacy of the inert gas xenon following traumatic brain injury, and to determine whether application of xenon has a clinically relevant therapeutic time window. Design Controlled animal study. Setting University research laboratory. Subjects Male C57BL/6N mice (n=196) Interventions 75% xenon, 50% xenon or 30% xenon, with 25% oxygen (balance nitrogen) treatment following mechanical brain lesion by controlled cortical impact. Measurements & Main Results Outcome following trauma was measured using: 1) functional neurological outcome score, 2) histological measurement of contusion volume, 3) analysis of locomotor function and gait. Our study shows that xenon-treatment improves outcome following traumatic brain injury. Neurological outcome scores were significantly (pxenon-treated groups in the early phase (24 hours) and up to 4 days after injury. Contusion volume was significantly (pxenon-treated groups. Xenon treatment significantly (pxenon was given 15 minutes after injury or when treatment was delayed 1 hour or 3 hours after injury. Neurological outcome was significantly (pxenon treatment was given 15 minutes or 1 hour after injury. Improvements in locomotor function (pxenon-treated group, 1 month after trauma. Conclusions These results show for the first time that xenon improves neurological outcome and reduces contusion volume following traumatic brain injury in mice. In this model, xenon application has a therapeutic time window of up to at least 3 hours. These findings support the idea that xenon may be of benefit as a neuroprotective treatment in brain trauma patients. PMID:25188549

  1. A prospective emergency department-based study of pattern and outcome of neurologic and neurosurgical diseases in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthélemy, Ernest Joseph; Benjamin, Ernest; Edouard Jean-Pierre, Marie Yolaine; Poitevien, Geneviève; Ernst, Silvia; Osborn, Irene; Germano, Isabelle M

    2014-12-01

    To perform the first prospective survey of neurologic and neurosurgical emergency department (ED) admissions in Haiti. Data of all ED admissions at 3 Haitian hospitals for 90 consecutive days per site were collected prospectively. Patients who were given a diagnosis of a neurologic or neurosurgical disorder by the ED physician were entered in a deidentified database including demographics, presenting symptoms, brain imaging (when available), requests for neurosurgical consultation, and outcome. Of the 7628 patients admitted to the ED during this study, 1243 patients had a neurologic disorder, yielding an ED-based neurologic disease prevalence of 16%. The 3 most common neurologic diseases were cerebrovascular disease (31%), neurotrauma (28%), and altered mental status (12%). Neurosurgical pathologies represented 19% of all neurologic admissions with a combined ED-based disease prevalence of 3%. Mortality rate was 9%. The most common neurosurgical disease was neurotrauma (87%), caused by motor vehicle accidents (59%), falls (20%), and assault (17%). Neurosurgical procedures were performed in 14 of 208 patients with a mortality rate of 33%. This prospective survey represents the first study of neurosurgical or neurologic disease patterns in Haiti. The results suggest specific disease priorities for this population that can guide efforts to improve Haitian health care and conduct more comprehensive epidemiologic studies in Haiti. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis with severe neurological outcomes following virosomal seasonal influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicino, Cristiano; Infante, Maria Teresa; Gandoglia, Ilaria; Miolo, Nadia; Mancardi, Gian Luigi; Zappettini, Simona; Capello, Elisabetta; Orsi, Andrea; Tamburini, Tiziano; Grandis, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an inflammatory, usually monophasic, immune mediate, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system which involves the white matter. ADEM is more frequent in children and usually occurs after viral infections, but may follow vaccinations, bacterial infections, or may occur without previous events. Only 5% of cases of ADEM are preceded by vaccination within one month prior to symptoms onset. The diagnosis of ADEM requires both multifocal involvement and encephalopathy and specific demyelinating lesions of white matter. Overall prognosis of ADEM patients is often favorable, with full recovery reported in 23% to 100% of patients from pediatric cohorts, and more severe outcome in adult patients. We describe the first case of ADEM occurred few days after administration of virosomal seasonal influenza vaccine. The patient, a 59-year-old caucasic man with unremarkable past medical history presented at admission decreased alertness, 10 days after flu vaccination. During the 2 days following hospitalization, his clinical conditions deteriorated with drowsiness and fever until coma. The magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed multiple and symmetrical white matter lesions in both cerebellar and cerebral hemispheres, suggesting demyelinating disease with inflammatory activity, compatible with ADEM. The patient was treated with high dose of steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin with relevant sequelae and severe neurological outcomes.

  3. Surgical and neurologic outcomes after robotic thymectomy in 100 consecutive patients with myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marulli, Giuseppe; Schiavon, Marco; Perissinotto, Egle; Bugana, Antonella; Di Chiara, Francesco; Rebusso, Alessandro; Rea, Federico

    2013-03-01

    Thymectomy is a well-defined therapeutic option for patients with myasthenia gravis; however, controversies still exist about the surgical approach, indication, and timing for surgery. We reviewed our experience reporting surgical and neurologic results after robotic thymectomy in patients with myasthenia gravis. Between 2002 and 2010, 100 patients (74 female and 26 male; median age, 37 years) underwent left-sided robotic thymectomy using the da Vinci robotic system (Intuitive Surgical, Inc, Sunnyvale, Calif). The Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America classification was adopted for pre- and postoperative evaluation. Preoperative Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America class was I in 10% of patients, II in 35% of patients, III in 39% of patients, and IV in 16% of patients. Median operative time was 120 (60-300) minutes. No death or intraoperative complications occurred. Postoperative complications were observed in 6 patients (6%) (bleeding requiring blood transfusions in 3, chylothorax in 1, fever in 1, and myasthenic crisis in 1). Median hospital stay was 3 days (range, 2-14 days). Histologic analysis revealed 76 patients (76%) with hyperplasia, 7 patients (7%) with atrophy, 8 patients (8%) with small thymomas, and 9 patients (9%) with normal thymus; ectopic thymic tissue was found in 26 patients (26%). Clinical follow-up showed a 5-year probability of complete stable remission and overall improvement of 28.5% and 87.5%. Remission was significantly associated with preoperative I to II Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America class (P = .02). A significant improvement rate was found in Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America class I to II (P = .03) and AbAchR+ (P = .04). A high percentage of patients interrupted or reduced their medications. Robotic thymectomy is a safe and effective procedure. We observed a neurologic benefit in a great number of patients. A better clinical outcome was obtained in patients with early Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America class

  4. Memory outcomes following cognitive interventions in children with neurological deficits: A review with a focus on under-studied populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Yael; Geva, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Given the primary role of memory in children's learning and well-being, the aim of this review was to examine the outcomes of memory remediation interventions in children with neurological deficits as a function of the affected memory system and intervention method. Fifty-seven studies that evaluated the outcome of memory interventions in children were identified. Thirty-four studies met the inclusion criteria, and were included in a systematic review. Diverse rehabilitation methods for improving explicit and implicit memory in children were reviewed. The analysis indicates that teaching restoration strategies may improve, and result in the generalisation of, semantic memory and working memory performance in children older than 7 years with mild to moderate memory deficits. Factors such as longer protocols, emotional support, and personal feedback contribute to intervention efficacy. In addition, the use of compensation aids seems to be highly effective in prospective memory tasks. Finally, the review unveiled a lack of studies with young children and the absence of group interventions. These findings point to the importance of future evidence-based intervention protocols in these areas.

  5. Slow pupillary light responses in infants at high risk of cerebral palsy were associated with periventricular leukomalacia and neurological outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, E.G.; Vermeulen, R.J.; Dijkstra, L.J.; Hielkema, T.; Kos, C.; Bos, A.F; Hadders-Algra, M.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Having observed slow pupillary light responses (PLRs) in infants at high risk of cerebral palsy, we retrospectively evaluated whether these were associated with specific brain lesions or unfavourable outcomes. METHODS: We carried out neurological examinations on 30 infants at very high risk of

  6. The "brain-sparing" effect: antenatal cerebral Doppler findings in relation to neurologic outcome in very preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherjon, S. A.; Smolders-DeHaas, H.; Kok, J. H.; Zondervan, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to study the relationship between fetal cerebral circulation and neurologic outcome. STUDY DESIGN: In 117 high-risk fetuses (gestational age 25 to 33 weeks) flow velocity waveforms were recorded from the umbilical and medial cerebral arteries. The ratio between umbilical

  7. Slow pupillary light responses in infants at high risk of cerebral palsy were associated with periventricular leukomalacia and neurological outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, Elisa G.; Vermeulen, R. Jeroen; Dijkstra, Linze J.; Hielkema, Tjitske; Kos, Claire; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Having observed slow pupillary light responses (PLRs) in infants at high risk of cerebral palsy, we retrospectively evaluated whether these were associated with specific brain lesions or unfavourable outcomes. Methods: We carried out neurological examinations on 30 infants at very high risk of

  8. Prenatal DHA status and neurological outcome in children at age 5.5 years are positively associated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolano-Margarit, M Victoria; Ramos, Rosa; Beyer, Jeannette; Csábi, Györgyi; Parrilla-Roure, Montserrat; Cruz, Francisco; Perez-Garcia, Miguel; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Gil, Angel; Decsi, Tamás; Koletzko, Berthold V; Campoy, Cristina

    2011-06-01

    Beneficial effects of perinatal DHA supply on later neurological development have been reported. We assessed the effects of maternal DHA supplementation on the neurological development of their children. Healthy pregnant women from Spain, Germany, and Hungary were randomly assigned to a dietary supplement consisting of either fish oil (FO) (500 mg/d DHA + 150 mg/d EPA), 400 μg/d 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, both, or placebo from wk 20 of gestation until delivery. Fatty acids in plasma and erythrocyte phospholipids (PL) were determined in maternal blood at gestational wk 20 and 30 and in cord and maternal blood at delivery. Neurological development was assessed with the Hempel examination at the age of 4 y and the Touwen examination at 5.5 y. Minor neurological dysfunction, neurological optimality score (NOS), and fluency score did not differ between groups at either age, but the odds of children with the maximal NOS score increased with every unit increment in cord blood DHA level at delivery in plasma PL (95% CI: 1.094-2.262), erythrocyte phosphatidylethanolamine (95% CI: 1.091-2.417), and erythrocyte phosphatidylcholine (95% CI: 1.003-2.643). We conclude that higher DHA levels in cord blood may be related to a better neurological outcome at 5.5 y of age.

  9. Omega-3 LC-PUFA supply and neurological outcomes in children with phenylketonuria (PKU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletzko, Berthold; Beblo, Skadi; Demmelmair, Hans; Hanebutt, Fabienne L

    2009-03-01

    Children with phenylketonuria (PKU) follow a diet with very low intakes of natural protein, which is devoid of food sources of the omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). A resulting DHA depletion has been demonstrated in PKU children and may account for detectable subtle neurological deficits that are not explained by variation in plasma phenylalanine concentrations. We supplemented 36 children with PKU ages 1 to 11 years for 3 months with encapsulated fish oil providing a daily dose of 15 mg DHA/kg body weight. DHA supplementation resulted in significantly faster visual evoked potential latencies, indicating more rapid central nervous system information processing. In addition, DHA significantly improved outcomes in a test of motor function and coordination. No changes over time were seen in age-matched healthy controls. Because the PKU children had a good supply of the omega-3 precursor alpha-linolenic acid, these observations lead us to conclude that endogenous conversion of alpha-linolenic acid is not sufficient to provide adequate amounts of DHA that support optimal function, and hence DHA appears to be a conditional essential substrate for children with PKU. Because early treated PKU children are healthy, with normal fatty acid turnover, these data may indicate a need to supply some DHA to children in general. Further studies are ongoing aiming at establishing quantitative DHA requirements in children.

  10. Neurological outcomes after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, late onset metachromatic leukodystrophy and Hurler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Alex Morales Saute

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is the only available treatment for the neurological involvement of disorders such as late-onset metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD, mucopolysaccharidosis type I-Hurler (MPS-IH, and X-linked cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (CALD. Objective To describe survival and neurological outcomes after HSCT for these disorders. Methods Seven CALD, 2 MLD and 2 MPS-IH patients underwent HSCT between 2007 and 2014. Neurological examinations, magnetic resonance imaging, molecular and biochemical studies were obtained at baseline and repeated when appropriated. Results Favorable outcomes were obtained with 4/5 related and 3/6 unrelated donors. Two patients died from procedure-related complications. Nine transplanted patients were alive after a median of 3.7 years: neurological stabilization was obtained in 5/6 CALD, 1/2 MLD, and one MPS-IH patient. Brain lesions of the MPS-IH patient were reduced four years after HSCT. Conclusion Good outcomes were obtained when HSCT was performed before adulthood, early in the clinical course, and/or from a related donor.

  11. Xenon improves neurologic outcome and reduces secondary injury following trauma in an in vivo model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Pires, Rita; Armstrong, Scott P; Sebastiani, Anne; Luh, Clara; Gruss, Marco; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Hirnet, Tobias; Werner, Christian; Engelhard, Kristin; Franks, Nicholas P; Thal, Serge C; Dickinson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To determine the neuroprotective efficacy of the inert gas xenon following traumatic brain injury and to determine whether application of xenon has a clinically relevant therapeutic time window. Controlled animal study. University research laboratory. Male C57BL/6N mice (n = 196). Seventy-five percent xenon, 50% xenon, or 30% xenon, with 25% oxygen (balance nitrogen) treatment following mechanical brain lesion by controlled cortical impact. Outcome following trauma was measured using 1) functional neurologic outcome score, 2) histological measurement of contusion volume, and 3) analysis of locomotor function and gait. Our study shows that xenon treatment improves outcome following traumatic brain injury. Neurologic outcome scores were significantly (p < 0.05) better in xenon-treated groups in the early phase (24 hr) and up to 4 days after injury. Contusion volume was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in the xenon-treated groups. Xenon treatment significantly (p < 0.05) reduced contusion volume when xenon was given 15 minutes after injury or when treatment was delayed 1 or 3 hours after injury. Neurologic outcome was significantly (p < 0.05) improved when xenon treatment was given 15 minutes or 1 hour after injury. Improvements in locomotor function (p < 0.05) were observed in the xenon-treated group, 1 month after trauma. These results show for the first time that xenon improves neurologic outcome and reduces contusion volume following traumatic brain injury in mice. In this model, xenon application has a therapeutic time window of up to at least 3 hours. These findings support the idea that xenon may be of benefit as a neuroprotective treatment in patients with brain trauma.

  12. Effect of ischemic pretreatment on heat shock protein 72, neurologic outcome, and histopathologic outcome in a rabbit model of spinal cord ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, P.; Vanicky, I.; Jacobs, M. J.; Bakker, O.; Lips, J.; Meylaerts, S. A.; Kalkman, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of ischemic pretreatment on heat shock protein 72 concentration and neurologic and histopathologic outcome after transient spinal cord ischemia. In 28 New Zealand White rabbits, an aortic occlusion device was placed infrarenally. The animals were

  13. Randomized comparison between objective-based lectures and outcome-based concept mapping for teaching neurological care to nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Pan, Hui-Ching; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2016-02-01

    Pre-registration programs have been found to insufficiently prepare nurses for working in the neurosciences specialism. Effective approaches to neurology education are important, not only to enhance motivation to learn, but also for learners to develop basic competence in handling patients with neurological problems. To demonstrate that outcome-based course design using concept mapping would bring about significant differences in the nursing students' competency, cognitive load, and learning satisfaction with the neurological care course. A two-group pretest and post-test experimental study was administered. Two of the four clusters of participants were randomly assigned to the experimental group for experiencing an outcome-based course design using concept mapping, and the rest were designated the control group to be given objective-based lectures only. The Competency Inventory of Nursing Students, Cognitive Load Scale of Neurological Nursing, and Learning Satisfaction Scale of Neurological Nursing were used in this study for the students to rate their own performance. In addition, The Concept Map Scoring Scale was used in the experimental group for examining students' concept mapping ability. Significant increases of mean nursing competency scores in both groups from pre-test to post-test were found. There was no statistically significant difference in mean nursing competency score between the experimental group and the control groups at post-test. The mean cognitive load score of the experimental group was lower than the control group at post-test. The mean learning satisfaction scores of the experimental group were higher than the control group. This article provides that outcome-based concept mapping as educational method could encourage a group of nursing students to take a bio-psycho-social approach to medicine, which might ultimately result in better nursing care quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Serological studies of neurologic helminthic infections in rural areas of southwest cameroon: toxocariasis, cysticercosis and paragonimiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkouawa, Agathe; Sako, Yasuhito; Itoh, Sonoyo; Kouojip-Mabou, Alida; Nganou, Christ Nadège; Saijo, Yasuaki; Knapp, Jenny; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Nakao, Minoru; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Moyou-Somo, Roger; Ito, Akira

    2010-07-06

    Both epilepsy and paragonimiasis had been known to be endemic in Southwest Cameroon. A total of 188 people (168 and 20 with and without symptoms confirmed by clinicians, respectively, 84.6% under 20 years old) were selected on a voluntary basis. Among 14 people (8.3%) with history of epilepsy, only one suffered from paragonimiasis. Therefore, we challenged to check antibody responses to highly specific diagnostic recombinant antigens for two other helminthic diseases, cysticercosis and toxocariasis, expected to be involved in neurological diseases. Soil-transmitted helminthic infections were also examined. Fecal samples were collected exclusively from the 168 people. Eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworms were found from 56 (33.3%), 72 (42.8%), and 19 (11.3%) persons, respectively. Serology revealed that 61 (36.3%), 25 (14.9%) and 2 (1.2%) of 168 persons showed specific antibody responses to toxocariasis, paragonimiasis and cysticercosis, respectively. By contrast, 20 people without any symptoms as well as additional 20 people from Japan showed no antibody responses. Among the 14 persons with epilepsy, 5 persons were seropositive to the antigen specific to Toxocara, and one of them was simultaneously positive to the antigens of Paragonimus. The fact that 2 children with no history of epilepsy were serologically confirmed to have cysticercosis strongly suggests that serological survey for cysticercosis in children is expected to be useful for early detection of asymptomatic cysticercosis in endemic areas. Among persons surveyed, toxocariasis was more common than paragonimiasis, but cysticercosis was very rare. However, the fact that 2 children were serologically confirmed to have cysticercosis was very important, since it strongly suggests that serology for cysticercosis is useful and feasible for detection of asymptomatic cysticercotic children in endemic areas for the early treatment.

  15. Serological studies of neurologic helminthic infections in rural areas of southwest cameroon: toxocariasis, cysticercosis and paragonimiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Nkouawa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Both epilepsy and paragonimiasis had been known to be endemic in Southwest Cameroon. A total of 188 people (168 and 20 with and without symptoms confirmed by clinicians, respectively, 84.6% under 20 years old were selected on a voluntary basis. Among 14 people (8.3% with history of epilepsy, only one suffered from paragonimiasis. Therefore, we challenged to check antibody responses to highly specific diagnostic recombinant antigens for two other helminthic diseases, cysticercosis and toxocariasis, expected to be involved in neurological diseases. Soil-transmitted helminthic infections were also examined.Fecal samples were collected exclusively from the 168 people. Eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworms were found from 56 (33.3%, 72 (42.8%, and 19 (11.3% persons, respectively. Serology revealed that 61 (36.3%, 25 (14.9% and 2 (1.2% of 168 persons showed specific antibody responses to toxocariasis, paragonimiasis and cysticercosis, respectively. By contrast, 20 people without any symptoms as well as additional 20 people from Japan showed no antibody responses. Among the 14 persons with epilepsy, 5 persons were seropositive to the antigen specific to Toxocara, and one of them was simultaneously positive to the antigens of Paragonimus. The fact that 2 children with no history of epilepsy were serologically confirmed to have cysticercosis strongly suggests that serological survey for cysticercosis in children is expected to be useful for early detection of asymptomatic cysticercosis in endemic areas.Among persons surveyed, toxocariasis was more common than paragonimiasis, but cysticercosis was very rare. However, the fact that 2 children were serologically confirmed to have cysticercosis was very important, since it strongly suggests that serology for cysticercosis is useful and feasible for detection of asymptomatic cysticercotic children in endemic areas for the early treatment.

  16. The Association Between Spontaneous Hyperventilation, Delayed Cerebral Ischemia, and Poor Neurological Outcome in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Craig A; Sheehan, Kyle M; Tipirneni, Renuka; Roark, Christopher D; Pandey, Aditya S; Thompson, B Gregory; Rajajee, Venkatakrishna

    2015-12-01

    The frequency and associations of spontaneous hyperventilation in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are unknown. Because hyperventilation decreases cerebral blood flow, it may exacerbate delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and worsen neurological outcome. This is a retrospective analysis of data from a prospectively collected cohort of SAH patients at an academic medical center. Spontaneous hyperventilation was defined by PaCO2 7.45 and subdivided into moderate and severe groups. Clinical and demographic characteristics of patients with and without spontaneous hyperventilation were compared using χ (2) or t tests. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the association of moderate and severe hyperventilation with DCI and discharge neurological outcome. Of 207 patients, 113 (55 %) had spontaneous hyperventilation. Spontaneously hyperventilating patients had greater illness severity as measured by the Hunt-Hess, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS), and SAH sum scores. They were also more likely to develop the following complications: pneumonia, neurogenic myocardial injury, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), radiographic vasospasm, DCI, and poor neurological outcome. In a multivariable logistic regression model including age, gender, WFNS, SAH sum score, pneumonia, neurogenic myocardial injury, etiology, and SIRS, only moderate [odds ratio (OR) 2.49, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.10-5.62] and severe (OR 3.12, 95 % CI 1.30-7.49) spontaneous hyperventilation were associated with DCI. Severe spontaneous hyperventilation (OR 4.52, 95 % CI 1.37-14.89) was also significantly associated with poor discharge outcome in multivariable logistic regression analysis. Spontaneous hyperventilation is common in SAH and is associated with DCI and poor neurological outcome.

  17. Neurophysiological and neuroimaging markers of neurological outcome in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare genetic, multisystem disorder, characterized by hamartoma formation in various organs, including the brain, where they are referred to as tubers. The neurologic presentation may include epilepsy, intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorder

  18. Leg pain location and neurological signs relate to outcomes in primary care patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Lisbeth; Hestbæk, Lise; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    Background Low back pain (LBP) patients with related leg pain and signs of nerve root involvement are considered to have a worse prognosis than patients with LBP alone. However, it is unclear whether leg pain location above or below the knee and the presence of neurological signs are important...... in primary care patients. The objectives of this study were to explore whether the four Quebec Task Force categories (QTFC) based on the location of pain and on neurological signs have different characteristics at the time of care seeking, whether these QTFC are associated with outcome, and if so whether......, across LBP with leg pain above the knee and below the knee to LBP with nerve root involvement. However, the variation within the categories was considerable. Conclusion The QTFC identify different LBP subgroups at baseline and there is a consistent ranking of the four categories with respect to outcomes...

  19. Leg pain location and neurological signs relate to outcomes in primary care patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Lisbeth; Hestbæk, Lise; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) patients with related leg pain and signs of nerve root involvement are considered to have a worse prognosis than patients with LBP alone. However, it is unclear whether leg pain location above or below the knee and the presence of neurological signs are important...... in primary care patients. The objectives of this study were to explore whether the four Quebec Task Force categories (QTFC) based on the location of pain and on neurological signs have different characteristics at the time of care seeking, whether these QTFC are associated with outcome, and if so whether......, across LBP with leg pain above the knee and below the knee to LBP with nerve root involvement. However, the variation within the categories was considerable. CONCLUSION: The QTFC identify different LBP subgroups at baseline and there is a consistent ranking of the four categories with respect to outcomes...

  20. Predictors of good neurologic outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 min in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Shin; Lee, Byung Kook; Youn, Chun Song; Kim, Youn-Jung; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong-Woo; Kim, Won Young

    2017-04-07

    Neurologically intact survival after cardiac arrest is possible even after prolonged resuscitation efforts. However, the factors associated with good neurologic outcome in these patients remain unknown. This study identifies predictors associated with good neurologic outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 min in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated with targeted temperature management (TTM). This multicenter, registry-based, retrospective cohort study conducted in 24 hospitals across South Korea between 2007 and 2012 includes adult (≥18 years) non-traumatic OHCA patients with prolonged (>30 min) downtime who underwent TTM treatment. Good neurologic outcomes were defined as cerebral performance category scores of ≤2. Of the 930 comatose adult cardiac arrest patients treated with TTM, 423 patients with prolonged downtime were included. A total of 76 (18.0%) had good neurologic outcome. Multivariable analysis reveal that age good neurologic outcome. The sensitivity and specificity for good neurologic outcome in patients with age <65 years, shockable rhythm, and witnessed arrest are 90.8% and 41.2, 67.6 and 79.5%, and 81.6 and 41.2%, respectively. In prolonged cardiac arrest patients, initial shockable rhythm, age <65 years, or witnessed arrest are predictors for neurologic intact survival.

  1. Effects of 14 Versus 21 Days of Nimodipine Therapy on Neurological Outcomes in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Susan; Bales, James; Tran, Thao Kim; Korab, Gina; Khandelwal, Nita; Joffe, Aaron M

    2016-09-01

    Oral nimodipine is standard therapy for patients suffering an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). During a national drug shortage, nimodipine therapy was shortened from a 21-day course to a 14-day course at our institution. The objective of this study was to compare neurological outcomes among patients who had previously received the standard duration of therapy compared with those who received a shortened duration as a result of the national drug shortage. This retrospective cohort study evaluated adult patients receiving nimodipine for aSAH from January 2012 to August 2013. Neurological outcome, graded by Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at hospital discharge, was compared between patients receiving a shortened course and those receiving the standard duration of nimodipine. A total of 199 aSAH patients were included in the analysis. There were 164 patients in the standard-duration and 35 patients in the shortened-duration group. Baseline patient severity of illness, assessed by SAPS II (Simplified Acute Physiology Score), and severity of aSAH, assessed by Fisher grade, and Hunt and Hess grade scores, did not differ between the treatment groups. A shortened duration of nimodipine was not associated with a higher risk of a poor neurological outcome defined by mRS (odds ratio = 1.85; 95% CI = 0.54-6.32; P = 0.32). Mortality rates were similar between the groups. A 14-day course of nimodipine therapy was not associated with worse neurological outcomes in aSAH patients at one institution. More studies are needed prior to recommending a shortened duration of nimodipine therapy in all aSAH patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. NEUROLOGIC OUTCOME AFTER INTRANEURAL AND PERINEURAL SCIATIC NERVE BLOCK IN PIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldan Kapur

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies in animals have suggested that intraneural application of local anesthetics may cause mechanical injury and pressure ischemia of nerve fascicles. Previous studies, however, have used small animal models and clinically irrelevant injection speed or equipment. Our hypothesis is that an intraneural injection is heralded by higher injection pressure and leads to neurologic impairment in pigs. Ten pigs of mixed breed were studied. After general anesthesia, the sciatic nerves (n = 20 were exposed bilaterally. Under direct vision, a 25-gauge insulated nerve block needle was placed either extraperineurally (n = 10 or subperineurially (n = 10, and 4 ml of preservative-free lidocaine 2% was injected using an automated infusion pump (15 ml / min. Injection pressure data were acquired using an in-line manometer coupled to a computer via an analog-to-digital conversion board. After injection, the animals were awakened and subjected to serial neurologic examinations during the 24 post-intervention hours. All but two perineural injections resulted in injection pressures below 20 psi. In contrast, intraneural injections resulted in significantly higher peak pressures. In 7 (70% intraneural injections, the injections pressures were over 20 psi (20-50 psi. Neurologic function returned to baseline within 24 hours in all sciatic nerve receiving perineural injections. In contrast, residual neurologic impairment was present in 7 sciatic nerves after intraneural injection; residual neurologic impairment was associated with injection pressures > 20 psi. The results indicate that high injection pressure during intraneural injection may be indicative of intrafascicular injection and may predict the development of neurologic injury.Key words: nerve block, injection pressure, neurologic injury, pigs

  3. Brain magnetic resonance imaging pattern and outcome in children with haemolytic-uraemic syndrome and neurological impairment treated with eculizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitiaux, Cyril; Krug, Pauline; Grevent, David; Kossorotoff, Manoelle; Poncet, Sarah; Eisermann, Monika; Oualha, Mehdi; Boddaert, Nathalie; Salomon, Remi; Desguerre, Isabelle

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and the neurological and neuropsychological outcomes in paediatric, diarrhoea-associated haemolytic-uraemic syndrome (D+HUS) with central nervous system impairment treated with eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody. The 14-month single-centre prospective study included seven children (three males, four females; age range 16 mo-7 y 8 mo; median age 3 y 7 mo) with typical D+HUS and acute neurological impairment. In the acute phase of the disease, neurological assessment and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including measurement of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), were performed, and neuropsychological evaluation and brain MRI were also carried out 6 months after disease onset. In the acute phase, basal ganglia and white matter abnormalities with ADC restriction were a common and reversible MRI finding. In all the surviving patients (5/7), follow-up MRI after 6 months was normal, indicating reversible lesions. Clinical and neuropsychological evaluations after 6 months were also normal. This specific brain MRI pattern consisting of an ADC decrease in basal ganglia and white matter without major T2/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) injury may be a key finding in the acute phase of the disease in favour of a vasculitis hypothesis. These reversible lesions were associated with a good neurological outcome. These results call for further evaluation of the potential role of eculizumab in the choice of treatment for severe D+HUS, particularly in the case of early neurological signs. © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  4. Zika virus: what do we know about the viral structure, mechanisms of transmission, and neurological outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Regina Cangussu da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The Zika virus epidemic that started in Brazil in 2014 has spread to >30 countries and territories in Latin America, leading to a rapid rise in the incidence of microcephalic newborns and adults with neurological complications. At the beginning of the outbreak, little was known about Zika virus morphology, genome structure, modes of transmission, and its potential to cause neurological malformations and disorders. With the advancement of basic science, discoveries of the mechanisms of strain variability, viral transfer to the fetus, and neurovirulence were published. These will certainly lead to the development of strategies to block vertical viral transmission, neuronal invasion, and pathogenesis in the near future. This paper reviews the current literature on Zika virus infections, with the aim of gaining a holistic insight into their etiology and pathogenesis. We discuss Zika virus history and epidemiology in Brazil, viral structure and taxonomy, old and newly identified transmission modes, and neurological consequences of infection.

  5. Predictive value of ischemic lesion volume assessed with magnetic resonance imaging for neurological deficits and functional outcome poststroke: A critical review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiemanck, S.K.; Kwakkel, G.; Post, M.W.; Prevo, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ischemic lesion volume is assumed to be an important predictor of poststroke neurological deficits and functional outcome. This critical review examines the methodological quality of MRI studies and the predictive value of hemispheric infarct volume for neurological deficits (at body

  6. Association Between Comorbidities, Nutritional Status, and Anticlotting Drugs and Neurologic Outcomes in Geriatric Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Tomoya; Hifumi, Toru; Kawakita, Kenya; Nakashima, Ryuta; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Shishido, Hajime; Ogawa, Daiske; Okauchi, Masanobu; Shindo, Atsushi; Kawanishi, Masahiko; Tamiya, Takashi; Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Several studies using trauma data banks and registers showed that age, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Injury Severity Score, and intraventricular hemorrhage were independent factors for neurologic outcomes in geriatric patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, these analyses did not comprehensively evaluate factors particularly associated with geriatric patients. We aimed to identify factors particularly associated with geriatric patients that affect neurologic outcomes in TBI. Patients aged ≥65 years who were hospitalized consecutively in Kagawa University Hospital with severe TBI between 1 January 2008 and 31 October 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated background factors particularly associated with geriatric patients, including comorbidities (Charlson Comorbidity Index [CCI]), nutritional status (serum albumin level), and presence/absence of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, in addition to baseline characteristics. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of unfavorable neurologic outcomes (UO), as defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 1-3 at discharge from hospital. The association between CCI and UO was evaluated in a subgroup analysis. UO occurred in 65.0% of 140 patients. Multivariate analyses showed that the CCI (odds ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-3.29; P = 0.011), age, and GCS were independent predictors of UO. In subgroup analyses of patients with an initial GCS score of 13-15, the rate of UO significantly increased with CCI score (CCI 0, 35.5%; CCI 1 or 2, 39.4%; CCI >2, 83.3%; P geriatric patients with severe TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of Collateral Blood Vessels Detected by Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Neurological Outcome After Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Havenon, Adam; Haynor, David R; Tirschwell, David L; Majersik, Jennifer J; Smith, Gordon; Cohen, Wendy; Andre, Jalal B

    2017-04-01

    Robust collateral blood vessels have been associated with better neurologic outcome following acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The most commonly used methods for identifying collaterals are contrast-based angiographic imaging techniques, which are not possible in all patients after AIS. To assess the association between the presence of collateral vessels identified using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging, a technique that does not require exogenous administration of contrast, and neurologic outcome in patients after AIS. This retrospective cohort study examined 38 patients after AIS admitted to a tertiary academic medical center between 2012 and 2014 who underwent MRI with ASL. According to a prespecified hypothesis, ASL images were graded for the presence of collaterals by 2 neuroradiologists. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores at discharge and other composite data were abstracted from the medical record by a neurologist blinded to radiologic data. Of the 38 patients, 19 (50.0%) were male, and the mean (SD) age was 61 (20) years. In 25 of 38 patients (65.8%), collaterals were detected using ASL, which were significantly associated with both a good outcome (mRS score of 0-2 at discharge; P = .02) and a 1-point decrease in mRS score at discharge (odds ratio, 6.4; 95% CI, 1.7-23.4; P = .005). In a multivariable ordinal logistic regression model, controlling for admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, history of atrial fibrillation, premorbid mRS score, and stroke parent artery status, there was a strong association between the presence of ASL collaterals and a 1-point decrease in the mRS score at discharge (odds ratio, 5.1; 95% CI, 1.2-22.1; P = .03). Following AIS, the presence of ASL collaterals is strongly associated with better neurological outcome at hospital discharge. This novel association between ASL collaterals and improved neurologic outcome may help guide prognosis and management, particularly in patients

  8. Morphological, functional and neurological outcomes of craniectomy versus cranial vault remodeling for isolated nonsyndromic synostosis of the sagittal suture: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwin, May; Schultz, Timothy J; Anderson, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    -analysis was only possible for the primary morphological outcome (post-operative cephalic index).Morphological (cephalic index):At one year follow-up, post-operatively remodeling offers an advantage over craniectomy (Z = 4.16, Padvantage over the other. Longer follow-up is required to compare outcomes at different time points.Patients who have surgery (any type) for isolated sagittal synostosis may have deficiencies in different subdomains at later school-age testing, whilst maintaining an age-appropriate global intelligence quotient (IQ) and school performance. There is no evidence to suggest that surgery of either type imparts any benefit in terms of functional or neurological outcomes.There is no evidence to suggest that surgery of either type imparts any benefit in terms of functional or neurological outcomes. While school performance and general IQ may be comparable to age-matched controls, patients with sagittal synostosis who have undergone surgical repair of any type may be at risk of deficiencies in sub-areas of testing and be at risk of learning disorders.There is insufficient evidence regarding mortality, infection, postoperative ICP and aesthetic outcome. While transfusion rates were greater in the remodeling group, this may be due to higher rates of elective transfusion.The inconclusive findings indicate an ongoing need for higher quality primary research comparing the morphological and functional outcomes of craniectomy and cranial vault remodeling in primary sagittal synostosis. Outcomes should be measured in both the short and long term.

  9. Slow pupillary light responses in infants at high risk of cerebral palsy were associated with periventricular leukomalacia and neurological outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Elisa G; Vermeulen, R Jeroen; Dijkstra, Linze J; Hielkema, Tjitske; Kos, Claire; Bos, Arend F; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2016-12-01

    Having observed slow pupillary light responses (PLRs) in infants at high risk of cerebral palsy, we retrospectively evaluated whether these were associated with specific brain lesions or unfavourable outcomes. We carried out neurological examinations on 30 infants at very high risk of cerebral palsy five times until the corrected age of 21 months, classifying each PLR assessment as normal or slow. The predominant reaction during development was determined for each infant. Neonatal brain scans were classified based on the type of brain lesion. Developmental outcome was evaluated at 21 months of corrected age with a neurological examination, the Bayley Scales of Infant Development Second Edition and the Infant Motor Profile. Of the 30 infants, 16 developed cerebral palsy. Predominantly slow PLRs were observed in eight infants and were associated with periventricular leukomalacia (p = 0.007), cerebral palsy (p = 0.039), bilateral cerebral palsy (p = 0.001), poorer quality of motor behaviour (p slow PLR in infants at high risk of cerebral palsy were associated with periventricular leukomalacia and poorer developmental outcome. Slow PLR might be an expression of white matter damage, resulting in dysfunction of the complex cortico-subcortical circuitries. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Long-term employment outcomes following rehabilitation for significant neurological impairment in UK military personnel: a 3-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Sardar; McRann, J; McGilloway, E

    2017-08-09

    Returning to employment is a major modifiable factor affecting long-term health in brain injury which neurological and vocational rehabilitation attempts to address. In military patients, little is known about long-term employability, whether employment is sustained and how they fare in civilian roles. A telephone review was undertaken of every military patient having undergone inpatient neurorehabilitation between 2012 and 2014. This was compared to their employment outcomes one to three years post discharge. We further evaluated whether this employment was sustained over successive years in the same patients. Finally, we identify those rehabilitation interventions deemed most influential in improving employment outcomes in brain injury. During this period, an average of 57 (51-61) such patients were discharged each year. A review conducted by telephone successfully contacted 46% (43%-49% across cohorts) of all possible patients; 71.4% (64-81) returned to work increasing to 80.7% (76-85) including those training/actively seeking-work. Overall, 31.7% (24-40) returned to full-time military-in those leaving, 89.6% (85.4-90.9) were discharged for medical reasons. Severity of brain injury was unrelated to successful employment; 63.6%/78.6% had the same vocational outcome over two consecutive years while 36.3%/21.4% showed improved outcomes. Despite significant brain/neurological injury (graded by severity/Mayo Portland Adaptability Inventory 4), 80.7% (76-85) were working/training 2/3 years postdischarge from neurorehabilitation with 31.7% returning to full-time military role. Inability to continue within the military was not synonymous with inability to work. Return to work was independent of severity of brain/neurological injury and follow-up over consecutive years demonstrated sustained employment. The argument against inpatient neurorehabilitation has always been cost> This 3-year analysis reinforces that patients can and most likely will return to employment with

  11. Long time to diagnosis of medulloblastoma in children is not associated with decreased survival or with worse neurological outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Francois Brasme

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The long time to diagnosis of medulloblastoma, one of the most frequent brain tumors in children, is the source of painful remorse and sometimes lawsuits. We analyzed its consequences for tumor stage, survival, and sequelae. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This retrospective population-based cohort study included all cases of pediatric medulloblastoma from a region of France between 1990 and 2005. We collected the demographic, clinical, and tumor data and analyzed the relations between the interval from symptom onset until diagnosis, initial disease stage, survival, and neuropsychological and neurological outcome. RESULTS: The median interval from symptom onset until diagnosis for the 166 cases was 65 days (interquartile range 31-121, range 3-457. A long interval (defined as longer than the median was associated with a lower frequency of metastasis in the univariate and multivariate analyses and with a larger tumor volume, desmoplastic histology, and longer survival in the univariate analysis, but not after adjustment for confounding factors. The time to diagnosis was significantly associated with IQ score among survivors. No significant relation was found between the time to diagnosis and neurological disability. In the 62 patients with metastases, a long prediagnosis interval was associated with a higher T stage, infiltration of the fourth ventricle floor, and incomplete surgical resection; it nonetheless did not influence survival significantly in this subgroup. CONCLUSIONS: We found complex and often inverse relations between time to diagnosis of medulloblastoma in children and initial severity factors, survival, and neuropsychological and neurological outcome. This interval appears due more to the nature of the tumor and its progression than to parental or medical factors. These conclusions should be taken into account in the information provided to parents and in expert assessments produced for malpractice claims.

  12. Combination of 24-Hour and 7-Day Relative Neurological Improvement Strongly Predicts 90-Day Functional Outcome of Endovascular Stroke Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jie; Wang, Huaiming; Tu, Mingyi; Zi, Wenjie; Hao, Yonggang; Yang, Dong; Liu, Wenhua; Wan, Yue; Geng, Yu; Lin, Min; Jin, Ping; Xiong, Yunyun; Xu, Gelin; Yin, Qin; Liu, Xinfeng

    2018-01-03

    Early judgment of long-term prognosis is the key to making medical decisions in acute anterior circulation large-vessel occlusion stroke (LVOS) after endovascular treatment (EVT). We aimed to investigate the relationship between the combination of 24-hour and 7-day relative neurological improvement (RNI) and 90-day functional outcome. We selected the target population from a multicenter ischemic stroke registry. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores at baseline, 24 hours, and 7 days were collected. RNI was calculated by the following equation: (baseline NIHSS - 24-hour/7-day NIHSS)/baseline NIHSS × 100%. A modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2 at 90 days was defined as a favorable outcome. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between RNI and 90-day outcome. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis was performed to identify the predictive power and cutoff point of RNI for functional outcome. A total of 568 patients were enrolled. Both 24-hour and 7-day RNI were independent predictors of 90-day outcome. The best cutoff points of 24-hour and 7-day RNI were 28% and 42%, respectively. Compared with those with 24-hour RNI of less than 28% and 7-day RNI of less than 42%, patients with 24-hour RNI of 28% or greater and 7-day RNI of 42% or greater had a 39.595-fold (95% confidence interval 22.388-70.026) increased probability of achieving 90-day favorable outcome. The combination of 24-hour and 7-day RNI very strongly predicts 90-day functional outcome in patients with acute anterior circulation LVOS who received EVT, and it can be used as an early accurate surrogate of long-term outcome. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of Dispatcher‐Assisted Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on Neurological Outcomes in Children With Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Prospective, Nationwide, Population‐Based Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Maeda, Tetsuo; Goto, Yumiko

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of dispatcher‐assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on neurological outcomes in children is unclear. We investigated whether dispatcher‐assisted bystander CPR shows favorable neurological outcomes (Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2) in children with out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Methods and Results Children (n=5009, ageCPR (n=2287); bystander CPR with dispatcher instruction (n=2019); and bystander CPR without dispatcher instruction (n=703) groups. The primary endpoint was favorable neurological outcome at 1 month post‐OHCA. Dispatcher CPR instruction was offered to 53.9% of patients, significantly increasing bystander CPR provision rate (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 7.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.60 to 8.57). Bystander CPR with and without dispatcher instruction were significantly associated with improved 1‐month favorable neurological outcomes (aOR, 1.81 and 1.68; 95% CI, 1.24 to 2.67 and 1.07 to 2.62, respectively), compared to no bystander CPR. Conventional CPR was associated with increased odds of 1‐month favorable neurological outcomes irrespective of etiology of cardiac arrest (aOR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.56 to 3.41). However, chest‐compression‐only CPR was not associated with 1‐month meaningful outcomes (aOR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.67 to 1.64). Conclusions In children with OHCA, dispatcher‐assisted bystander CPR increased bystander CPR provision rate and was associated with improved 1‐month favorable neurological outcomes, compared to no bystander CPR. Conventional bystander CPR was associated with greater likelihood of neurologically intact survival, compared to chest‐compression‐only CPR, irrespective of cardiac arrest etiology. PMID:24785780

  14. Adverse birth outcomes in a malarious area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalanda, B. F.; Verhoeff, F. H.; Chimsuku, L.; Harper, G.; Brabin, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    To determine factors associated with fetal growth, preterm delivery and stillbirth in an area of high malaria transmission in Southern Malawi, a cross-sectional study of pregnant women attending and delivering at two study hospitals was undertaken. A total of 243 (17.3%) babies were preterm and 54

  15. CD47 deficiency improves neurological outcomes of traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Yu, Zhanyang; Liu, Yu; Bai, Yang; Jiang, Yinghua; van Leyen, Klaus; Yang, Yong-Guang; Lok, Josephine M; Whalen, Michael J; Lo, Eng H; Wang, Xiaoying

    2017-03-16

    CD47 is a receptor for signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα) in self-recognition by the innate immune system, and a receptor of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) contributing to vascular impairment in response to stress. However, the roles of CD47 in traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not been investigated. In this study we aimed to test our hypothesis that CD47 mediates early neutrophil brain infiltration and late brain vascular remodeling after TBI. Mice were subjected to TBI using a controlled cortical impact (CCI) device. We examined early phase neutrophil infiltration, and late phase brain vessel density, pro-angiogenic markers VEGF and Ang-1 protein expression, neurological function deficits and lesion volumes for up to three weeks after TBI. Our results show that mice deficient in CD47 (CD47 Knockout) had significantly less brain neutrophil infiltration at 24h, upregulated VEGF expression in peri-lesion cortex at 7 and 14days, and increased blood vessel density at 21days after TBI, compared to wild type (WT) mice. CD47 knockout also significantly decreased sensorimotor function deficits and reduced brain lesion volume at 21days after TBI. We conclude that CD47 may play pathological roles in brain neutrophil infiltration, progression of brain tissue damage, impairment of cerebrovascular remodeling and functional recovery after TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Improved Early Postresuscitation EEG Activity for Animals Treated with Hypothermia Predicted 96 hr Neurological Outcome and Survival in a Rat Model of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bihua Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the effect of hypothermia on 96 hr neurological outcome and survival by quantitatively characterizing early postresuscitation EEG in a rat model of cardiac arrest. Materials and Methods. In twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats, cardiac arrest was induced through high frequency transesophageal cardiac pacing. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated after 5 mins untreated arrest. Immediately after resuscitation, animals were randomized to either 2 hrs of hypothermia (N=10 or normothermia (N=10. EEG, ECG, aortic pressure, and core temperature were continuously recorded for 6 hrs. Neurological outcome was evaluated daily during the 96 hrs postresuscitation period. Results. No differences in the baseline measurements and resuscitation outcome were observed between groups. However, 96 hr neurological deficit score (204 ± 255 versus 500 ± 0, P=0.005 and survival (6/10 versus 0/10, P=0.011 were significantly better in the hypothermic group. Quantitative analysis of early postresuscitation EEG revealed that burst frequency and spectrum entropy were greatly improved in the hypothermic group and correlated with 96 hr neurological outcome and survival. Conclusion. The improved burst frequency during burst suppression period and preserved spectrum entropy after restoration of continuous background EEG activity for animals treated with hypothermia predicted favorable neurological outcome and survival in this rat model of cardiac arrest.

  17. Improved early postresuscitation EEG activity for animals treated with hypothermia predicted 96 hr neurological outcome and survival in a rat model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bihua; Song, Feng-Qing; Sun, Lei-Lei; Lei, Ling-Yan; Gan, Wei-Ni; Chen, Meng-Hua; Li, Yongqin

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hypothermia on 96 hr neurological outcome and survival by quantitatively characterizing early postresuscitation EEG in a rat model of cardiac arrest. In twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats, cardiac arrest was induced through high frequency transesophageal cardiac pacing. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated after 5 mins untreated arrest. Immediately after resuscitation, animals were randomized to either 2 hrs of hypothermia (N = 10) or normothermia (N = 10). EEG, ECG, aortic pressure, and core temperature were continuously recorded for 6 hrs. Neurological outcome was evaluated daily during the 96 hrs postresuscitation period. No differences in the baseline measurements and resuscitation outcome were observed between groups. However, 96 hr neurological deficit score (204 ± 255 versus 500 ± 0, P = 0.005) and survival (6/10 versus 0/10, P = 0.011) were significantly better in the hypothermic group. Quantitative analysis of early postresuscitation EEG revealed that burst frequency and spectrum entropy were greatly improved in the hypothermic group and correlated with 96 hr neurological outcome and survival. The improved burst frequency during burst suppression period and preserved spectrum entropy after restoration of continuous background EEG activity for animals treated with hypothermia predicted favorable neurological outcome and survival in this rat model of cardiac arrest.

  18. Does diffusion restriction changes in magnetic resonance imaging predict neurological outcome in neonatal seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Manipriya; Amborium, Prakash; Umamaheswari, B; Ramani, Gokul; Ninan, Binu

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are a common manifestation of brain dysfunction. Neonatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has rapidly become the study of choice for the evaluation of central nervous systems disorders in newborns. According to a study conducted in Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, diffusion Restriction (DR) changes in the MRI is a good indicator of cell dysfunction (reversible or irreversible) within one week of insult. The main aim of this study was to find the association of DR changes in MRI of brain for neonatal seizures with long term neurodevelopment outcome. This is a retrospective observational study conducted in Sri Ramachandra University. Retrospective data was collected for the time period of January 2010 to December 2011 from medical records department (MRD) for patient data, neonatal intensive care unit and reports from PACS for MRI images and the Karthikeyan child development unit for their developmental follow up reports. Comparison of composite score for various domains with DR changes was done with a t-test and comparison of babies with developmental delay and DR changes with Chi-square test. MRI DR changes with developmental outcome in different domains namely cognition, language-receptive/expressive, fine and gross motor was studied. There is no statistical significance among those who have DR changes and with those who do not have DR changes. Though diffusion restriction changes in MRI may not predict adverse long term neuro developmental outcome, they can be of use with regards to individual etiological profile as in stroke. Larger group study and long term follow up is required to substantiate these findings.

  19. The impact of mode of delivery on infant neurologic outcomes in myelomeningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Stephanie; Lee, Philip S; Deibert, Christopher P; Tempel, Zachary J; Zwagerman, Nathan T; Florio, Karen; Bonfield, Christopher M; Emery, Stephen P

    2016-10-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal route of delivery for fetuses who are diagnosed prenatally with myelomeningocele. Current recommendations are based partly on antiquated studies with questionable methods. All studies that have been published to date suffer from nonstandardized outcome measures, selection bias, and small sample size. The larger studies are >15 years old. The purpose of this study was to provide information for evidence-based decision-making regarding the impact of route of delivery on motor outcomes for pediatric patients with prenatally were diagnosed myelomeningocele in a well-defined retrospective cohort. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively for all neonates who had been diagnosed with a myelomeningocele at birth from 1995-2015 within the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center system, as identified through the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh Neurosurgery Department operative database. Records were matched with maternal records with the use of the Center for Assistance in Research that used eRecord. Data from 72 maternal-neonatal pairs were analyzed for multiple variables. The primary outcome measure was the difference between the functional and anatomic motor levels in the child at the age of 2 years, stratified by mode of delivery and presence or absence of labor. The sample size necessary to detect a difference between the groups with power of 0.8 and significance of .05 was calculated to be 52 subjects total (26 per group). Functional levels were slightly better than predicted by anatomic levels for all pediatric patient groups, regardless of mode of delivery or presence of labor. Anatomic levels were slightly lower (better), and defects were smaller for those infants who underwent vaginal delivery or a trial of labor, likely attributable to selection bias. Attempts to correct for this selection bias did not change the results. No other outcomes that were analyzed were associated significantly with mode of delivery or

  20. Clinical, neurological and clinicopathological signs, treatment and outcome of metaldehyde intoxication in 18 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yas-Natan, E; Segev, G; Aroch, I

    2007-08-01

    To describe the clinical signs, clinicopathological abnormalities and outcome of metaldehyde intoxication in dogs. Medical records of dogs presenting between 1989 and 2005 with a diagnosis of metaldehyde toxicity were reviewed retrospectively. Data obtained from the medical record included signalment, history, clinical signs, laboratory tests results, hospitalisation period length, treatments and outcome. Eighteen dogs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The most prevalent clinical signs were seizures, hyperthermia, tachycardia and muscle tremors. Serum biochemistry abnormalities included increased serum muscle enzymes activities, acidaemia (six dogs) and decreased blood bicarbonate (eight dogs). Treatment was symptomatic and supportive. Hyperbilirubinaemia was observed in two dogs. Diazepam was the most commonly used anticonvulsant followed by phenobarbitone and pentobarbital. General inhalant anaesthesia was required in nine of 18 dogs with seizures unresponsive to anticonvulsants. The survival was 83 per cent (15 of 18 dogs). This clinical study recorded, for the first time in the veterinary literature, several clinicopathological abnormalities from severely intoxicated dogs. Metabolic acidosis was common, while acute or delayed hepatotoxicity was an uncommon complication.

  1. Neurological prognostication of outcome in patients in coma after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Andrea O; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Management of coma after cardiac arrest has improved during the past decade, allowing an increasing proportion of patients to survive, thus prognostication has become an integral part of post-resuscitation care. Neurologists are increasingly confronted with raised expectations of next of kin and the necessity to provide early predictions of long-term prognosis. During the past decade, as technology and clinical evidence have evolved, post-cardiac arrest prognostication has moved towards a multimodal paradigm combining clinical examination with additional methods, consisting of electrophysiology, blood biomarkers, and brain imaging, to optimise prognostic accuracy. Prognostication should never be based on a single indicator; although some variables have very low false positive rates for poor outcome, multimodal assessment provides resassurance about the reliability of a prognostic estimate by offering concordant evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Quick epinephrine administration induces favorable neurological outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, H; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, S; Sagisaka, R; Takyu, H

    2017-05-01

    This research is to study if quick administration of adrenaline on OHCA prior to hospitalization has an effect on improving CPC1-2 at one month. A total 13,326 cases were extracted from 2011 to 2014 Utstein data for this retrospective cohort study, also, EMT reached the patients within 16min after 119 called and adrenaline was then administered within 22min of after contact. Patients were contacted within 8min of the 119 call (n=6956), and were contacted between 8 and 16min after the call (n=6370). Further divided into groups in which the adrenaline was administered within/without 10min after contact. Primary outcome was the rate of a good prognosis for cerebral performance (CPC1-2) at 1 month and secondary outcome was the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) rate. The odds ratio of the CPC1-2 at 1month by the EMS reached within 8min after 119 call and then adrenaline administered within 10min was 2.12 (1.54-2.92).Those reached between 8 and 16min was 2.66 (1.97-3.59). However, the ROSC rate was 2.00 (1.79-2.25) for those reached within 8min and also 2.00 (1.79-2.25) for those reached between 8min and 16min. In cases of OHCA, it appears that the CPC1-2 rate after 1month can be improved even in cases where the victim is reached >8min after the 119 call, as long as the victim is reached within 16min and emergency responders administer the adrenaline as quickly as possible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. No Benefit in Neurologic Outcomes of Survivors of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest with Mechanical Compression Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Ryan; Redman, Ted; Ross, Elliot; Ely, Rachel; Saidler, Clayton; Arana, Allyson; Wampler, David; Miramontes, David

    2018-01-18

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major cause of death and morbidity in the United States. Quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has proven to be a key factor in improving survival. The aim of our study was to investigate the outcomes of OHCA when mechanical CPR (LUCAS 2 Chest Compression System™) was utilized compared to conventional CPR. Although controlled trials have not demonstrated a survival benefit to the routine use of mechanical CPR devices, there continues to be an interest for their use in OHCA. We conducted a retrospective observational study of OHCA comparing the outcomes of mechanical and manual chest compressions in a fire department based EMS system serving a population of 1.4 million residents. Mechanical CPR devices were geographically distributed on 11 of 33 paramedic ambulances. Data were collected over a 36-month period and outcomes were dichotomized based on utilization of mechanical CPR. The primary outcome measure was survival to hospital discharge with a cerebral performance category (CPC) score of 1 or 2. This series had 3,469 OHCA reports, of which 2,999 had outcome data and met the inclusion criteria. Of these 2,236 received only manual CPR and 763 utilized a mechanical CPR device during the resuscitation. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was attained in 44% (334/763) of the mechanical CPR resuscitations and in 46% (1,020/2,236) of the standard manual CPR resuscitations (p = 0.32). Survival to hospital discharge was observed in 7% (52/763) of the mechanical CPR resuscitations and 9% (191/2,236) of the manual CPR group (p = 0.13). Discharge with a CPC score of 1 or 2 was observed in 4% (29/763) of the mechanical CPR resuscitation group and 6% (129/2,236) of the manual CPR group (p = 0.036). In our study, use of the mechanical CPR device was associated with a poor neurologic outcome at hospital discharge. However, this difference was no longer evident after logistic regression adjusting for confounding variables

  4. Improved neurological outcome by intramuscular injection of human amniotic fluid derived stem cells in a muscle denervation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jung Chen

    Full Text Available The skeletal muscle develops various degrees of atrophy and metabolic dysfunction following nerve injury. Neurotrophic factors are essential for muscle regeneration. Human amniotic fluid derived stem cells (AFS have the potential to secrete various neurotrophic factors necessary for nerve regeneration. In the present study, we assess the outcome of neurological function by intramuscular injection of AFS in a muscle denervation and nerve anastomosis model.Seventy two Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-250 gm were enrolled in this study. Muscle denervation model was conducted by transverse resection of a sciatic nerve with the proximal end sutured into the gluteal muscle. The nerve anastomosis model was performed by transverse resection of the sciatic nerve followed by four stitches reconnection. These animals were allocated to three groups: control, electrical muscle stimulation, and AFS groups.NT-3 (Neurotrophin 3, BDNF (Brain derived neurotrophic factor, CNTF (Ciliary neurotrophic factor, and GDNF (Glia cell line derived neurotrophic factor were highly expressed in AFS cells and supernatant of culture medium. Intra-muscular injection of AFS exerted significant expression of several neurotrophic factors over the distal end of nerve and denervated muscle. AFS caused high expression of Bcl-2 in denervated muscle with a reciprocal decrease of Bad and Bax. AFS preserved the muscle morphology with high expression of desmin and acetylcholine receptors. Up to two months, AFS produced significant improvement in electrophysiological study and neurological functions such as SFI (sciatic nerve function index and Catwalk gait analysis. There was also significant preservation of the number of anterior horn cells and increased nerve myelination as well as muscle morphology.Intramuscular injection of AFS can protect muscle apoptosis and likely does so through the secretion of various neurotrophic factors. This protection furthermore improves the nerve

  5. Impact of cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration on neurologically favourable outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A population-based study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Tasuku; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Nishiyama, Chika; Nishiuchi, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Yasuyuki; Kawamura, Takashi; Ohta, Bon; Iwami, Taku

    2017-04-01

    The optimal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) duration for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains unclear. We aimed to assess the association between CPR duration and outcome after OHCA. This prospective, population-based observational study conducted in Osaka, Japan enrolled 6981 adult patients with non-traumatic witnessed OHCA who achieved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) from January 2005 through December 2012. CPR duration was defined as the time of CPR initiation by emergency medical service personnel to the ROSC in pre-hospital settings or after hospital admission. The primary outcome was one-month survival with neurologically favourable outcome (cerebral performance category scale 1 or 2). Overall, median CPR duration was 25min (interquartile range: 15-34) and the proportion of neurologically favourable outcome was 12.5% (875/6,981). The proportion of neurologically favourable outcome among the CPR duration ≥31min group was significantly lower compared with that among the 0-5min group (55.1% [320/581] versus 2.2% [54/2424], adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.04; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.03-0.05 in all patients, 78.4% [240/306] versus 11.4% [30/264], AOR 0.04; 95% CI 0.02-0.06 in the shockable group, 29.1% [80/275] versus 1.1% [24/2160], and AOR 0.03; 95% CI 0.02-0.05 in the non-shockable group). The cumulative proportion for neurologically favourable outcome reached 99% after 44, 41, and 43min of CPR in all patients, the shockable group, and the non-shockable group, respectively. The proportion of patients with neurologically favourable outcome declined with increasing CPR duration, but some OHCA patients could benefit from prolonged CPR duration >30min. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Supratentorial gliomas in eloquent areas: which parameters can predict functional outcome and extent of resection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannantonio Spena

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, few parameters have been found that can aid in patient selection and surgical strategy for eloquent area gliomas. AIMS: The aim of the study was to analyze preoperative and intraoperative factors that can predict functional outcome and extent of resection in eloquent area tumors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted on 60 patients harboring supratentorial gliomas in eloquent areas undergoing awake surgery. The analysis considered clinical, neuroradiologic (morphologic, intraoperative, and postoperative factors. End-points were extent of resection (EOR as well as functional short- and long-term outcome. Postoperatively, MRI objectively established the EOR. χ(2 analyses were used to evaluate parameters that could be predictive. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the best combination to predict binary positive outcomes. RESULTS: In 90% of the cases, subcortical stimulation was positive in the margins of the surgical cavity. Postoperatively, 51% of the patients deteriorated but 90% of the patients regained their preoperative neurological score. Factors negatively affecting EOR were volume, degree of subcortical infiltration, and presence of paresis (P<0.01. Sharp margins and cystic components were more amenable to gross total resection (P<0.01. Contrast enhancement (P<0.02, higher grade (P<0.01, paresis (P<0.01, and residual tumor in the cortex (P<0.02 negatively affected long-term functional outcomes, whereas postoperative deterioration could not be predicted for any factor other than paresis. Subcortical stimulation did not correlate with deterioration, both postoperatively (P<0.08 and at follow-up (P<0.042. CONCLUSIONS: Biological and morphological factors such as type of margins, volume, preoperative neurological status, cystic components, histology and the type of infiltration into the white matter must be considered when planning intraoperative mapping.

  7. [Radiological outcomes of unstable thoraco-lumbar fractures without neurological deficit treated through percutaneous surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Rafael; Lorente, Alejandro; Rosa, Bárbara; Palacios, Pablo; Barrios, Carlos

    2017-11-06

    To analyse the radiological outcomes in the long term of unstable thoracic and lumbar fractures treated through percutaneous surgery. Retrospective review of a series of patients with unstable thoracic and lumbar fractures treated with percutaneous minimally invasive surgery between 2010 and 2015 in three different hospital centres. Six radiological parameters were measured annually during a 2-year period: Fracture angle, kyphotic deformity, sagittal index, percentage of compression, degree of displacement and deformation angle. A total of 37 patients were included with a median age of 41.3 years and a median follow-up period of 2.2 years. Fracture angle rose from 14.8° to 17.1° (increase of 15.54%), kyphotic deformity from 15.9° to 17.7° (increase of 11.32%), sagittal index from 10.1 to 12.3 (increase of 21.78%), percentage of compression from 32.7% to 36.8% (increase of 12.53%), degree of displacement from 3.0mm to 4.4mm (increase of 50%) and deformation angle from 20.7° to 22.9° (increase of 10.62%). All the radiological parameters studied lost correction throughout the 24 months of follow-up; the degree of displacement and the sagittal index were the most marked. Nevertheless, the greatest loss of correction occurred in the first postoperative year, the parameters then stabilised over the 24 months of follow up. We routinely recommend the measurement of all previous parameters for the follow up of unstable thoracic and lumbar fractures treated through percutaneous surgery. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. [Long term radiological outcomes of unstable thoraco-lumbar fractures without neurological deficit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Alejandro; Lorente, Rafael; Rosa, Bárbara; Palacios, Pablo; Burgos, Jesús; Barrios, Carlos

    To analyse the radiological outcomes in the long term of unstable thoraco-lumbar fractures. Retrospective review of 100 patients with unstable thoracolumbar fractures treated with posterolateral fusion and short screw fixation for compression and flexion-distraction type fractures, and long segment posterior fixation for fractures-dislocations or more than one vertebra fractured, between 2000 and 2010 at three different hospital centers. Six radiological parameters were measured annually during a 4-year period: Fracture angle, kyphotic deformity, sagittal index, percentage of compression, degree of displacement and deformation angle. A total of 100 patients were included with a median age of 36,4 years and a median follow-up period of 7.2 years. Fracture angle rose from 11,6° to 14,5° (increase of 25%), kyphotic deformity from 14,5° to 16,7° (increase of 15,17%), sagittal index from 8,7 to 10,8 (increase of 24,13%), percentage of compression from 31,8% to 36,5% (increase of 6,88%), degree of displacement from 2,8mm to 4,6mm (increase of 14,77%) and deformation angle from 19.7° to 21.4° (increase of 8,62%). All the radiological parameters studied lost correction throughout the 48 months of follow-up, being the fracture angle the most affected one. Nevertheless, the greatest loss of correction occurs in the first postoperative year, stabilizing the parameters afterwards over the 4 years of follow up. We routinely recommend the measurement of all previous parameters for the follow up of unstable thoracolumbar fractures. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of Rehabilitation Outcomes for Long Term Neurological Conditions: A Cohort Analysis of the Australian Rehabilitation Outcomes Centre Dataset for Adults of Working Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Vanderstay, Roxana; Stevermuer, Tara; Simmonds, Frances; Khan, Fary; Eagar, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    To describe and compare outcomes from in-patient rehabilitation (IPR) in working-aged adults across different groups of long-term neurological conditions, as defined by the UK National Service Framework. Analysis of a large Australian prospectively collected dataset for completed IPR episodes (n = 28,596) from 2003-2012. De-identified data for adults (16-65 years) with specified neurological impairment codes were extracted, cleaned and divided into 'Sudden-onset' conditions: (Stroke (n = 12527), brain injury (n = 7565), spinal cord injury (SCI) (n = 3753), Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) (n = 805)) and 'Progressive/stable' conditions (Progressive (n = 3750) and Cerebral palsy (n = 196)). Key outcomes included Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores, length of stay (LOS), and discharge destination. Mean LOS ranged from 21-57 days with significant group differences in gender, source of admission and discharge destination. All six groups showed significant change (p<0.001) between admission and discharge that was likely to be clinically important across a range of items. Significant between-group differences were observed for FIM Motor and Cognitive change scores (Kruskal-Wallis p<0.001), and item-by-item analysis confirmed distinct patterns for each of the six groups. SCI and GBS patients were generally at the ceiling of the cognitive subscale. The 'Progressive/stable' conditions made smaller improvements in FIM score than the 'Sudden-onset conditions', but also had shorter LOS. All groups made gains in independence during admission, although pattern of change varied between conditions, and ceiling effects were observed in the FIM-cognitive subscale. Relative cost-efficiency between groups can only be indirectly inferred. Limitations of the current dataset are discussed, together with opportunities for expansion and further development.

  10. Comparison of Rehabilitation Outcomes for Long Term Neurological Conditions: A Cohort Analysis of the Australian Rehabilitation Outcomes Centre Dataset for Adults of Working Age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Turner-Stokes

    Full Text Available To describe and compare outcomes from in-patient rehabilitation (IPR in working-aged adults across different groups of long-term neurological conditions, as defined by the UK National Service Framework.Analysis of a large Australian prospectively collected dataset for completed IPR episodes (n = 28,596 from 2003-2012.De-identified data for adults (16-65 years with specified neurological impairment codes were extracted, cleaned and divided into 'Sudden-onset' conditions: (Stroke (n = 12527, brain injury (n = 7565, spinal cord injury (SCI (n = 3753, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS (n = 805 and 'Progressive/stable' conditions (Progressive (n = 3750 and Cerebral palsy (n = 196. Key outcomes included Functional Independence Measure (FIM scores, length of stay (LOS, and discharge destination.Mean LOS ranged from 21-57 days with significant group differences in gender, source of admission and discharge destination. All six groups showed significant change (p<0.001 between admission and discharge that was likely to be clinically important across a range of items. Significant between-group differences were observed for FIM Motor and Cognitive change scores (Kruskal-Wallis p<0.001, and item-by-item analysis confirmed distinct patterns for each of the six groups. SCI and GBS patients were generally at the ceiling of the cognitive subscale. The 'Progressive/stable' conditions made smaller improvements in FIM score than the 'Sudden-onset conditions', but also had shorter LOS.All groups made gains in independence during admission, although pattern of change varied between conditions, and ceiling effects were observed in the FIM-cognitive subscale. Relative cost-efficiency between groups can only be indirectly inferred. Limitations of the current dataset are discussed, together with opportunities for expansion and further development.

  11. Long-term neurological outcome of term-born children treated with two or more anti-epileptic drugs during the neonatal period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, Mariska J.; Roze, Elise; van der Veere, Christa N.; ter Horst, Hendrik J.; Brouwer, Oebele F.; Bos, Arend F.

    Background: Neonatal seizures may persist despite treatment with multiple anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). Objective: To determine in term-born infants with seizures that required two or more AEDs, whether treatment efficacy and/or the underlying disorder were related to neurological outcome.

  12. Effect of Admission Glasgow Coma Scale Motor Score on Neurological Outcome in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients Receiving Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hifumi, Toru; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Kawakita, Kenya; Sawano, Hirotaka; Tahara, Yoshio; Hase, Mamoru; Nishioka, Kenji; Shirai, Shinichi; Hazui, Hiroshi; Arimoto, Hideki; Kashiwase, Kazunori; Kasaoka, Shunji; Motomura, Tomokazu; Yasuga, Yuji; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Ken; Nonogi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Because the initial (on admission) Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) examination has not been fully evaluated in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest (CA) who receive therapeutic hypothermia (TH), the aim of the present study was to determine any association between the admission GCS motor score and neurologic outcomes in patients with out-of-hospital CA who receive TH. In the J-PULSE-HYPO study registry, patients with bystander-witnessed CA were eligible for inclusion. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on GCS motor score (1, 2-3, and 4-5) to assess various effects on neurologic outcome. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of good neurologic outcome at 90 days. Of 452 patients, 302 were enrolled. There was a significant difference among the 3 patient groups with regard to neurologic outcome at 90 days in the univariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that the GCS motor score on admission, age >65 years, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the time from collapse to return of spontaneous circulation, and pupil size patients sustaining out-of-hospital CA who receive TH.

  13. Sports neurology topics in neurologic practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conidi, Francis X.; Drogan, Oksana; Giza, Christopher C.; Kutcher, Jeffery S.; Alessi, Anthony G.; Crutchfield, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sought to assess neurologists' interest in sports neurology and learn about their experience in treating sports-related neurologic conditions. A survey was sent to a random sample of American Academy of Neurology members. A majority of members (77%) see at least some patients with sports-related neurologic issues. Concussion is the most common sports-related condition neurologists treat. More than half of survey participants (63%) did not receive any formal or informal training in sports neurology. At least two-thirds of respondents think it is very important to address the following issues: developing evidence-based return-to-play guidelines, identifying risk factors for long-term cognitive-behavioral sequelae, and developing objective diagnostic criteria for concussion. Our findings provide an up-to-date view of the subspecialty of sports neurology and identify areas for future research. PMID:24790800

  14. Comparison of the four proposed Apgar scoring systems in the assessment of birth asphyxia and adverse early neurologic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalili, Hosein; Nili, Firouzeh; Sheikh, Mahdi; Hardani, Amir Kamal; Shariat, Mamak; Nayeri, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    To compare the Conventional, Specified, Expanded and Combined Apgar scoring systems in predicting birth asphyxia and the adverse early neurologic outcomes. This prospective cohort study was conducted on 464 admitted neonates. In the delivery room, after delivery the umbilical cord was double clamped and a blood samples was obtained from the umbilical artery for blood gas analysis, meanwhile on the 1- , 5- and 10- minutes Conventional, Specified, Expanded, and Combined Apgar scores were recorded. Then the neonates were followed and intracranial ultrasound imaging was performed, and the following information were recorded: the occurrence of birth asphyxia, hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and neonatal seizure. The Combined-Apgar score had the highest sensitivity (97%) and specificity (99%) in predicting birth asphyxia, followed by the Specified-Apgar score that was also highly sensitive (95%) and specific (97%). The Expanded-Apgar score was highly specific (95%) but not sensitive (67%) and the Conventional-Apgar score had the lowest sensitivity (81%) and low specificity (81%) in predicting birth asphyxia. When adjusted for gestational age, only the low 5-minute Combined-Apgar score was independently associated with the occurrence of HIE (B = 1.61, P = 0.02) and IVH (B = 2.8, P = 0.01). The newly proposed Combined-Apgar score is highly sensitive and specific in predicting birth asphyxia and also is a good predictor of the occurrence of HIE and IVH in asphyxiated neonates.

  15. Effect of midazolam versus propofol sedation on markers of neurological injury and outcome after isolated severe head injury: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ghori, Kamran A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Midazolam and propofol are sedative agents commonly administered to patients with brain injury. We compared plasma concentrations of glial cell S100beta protein and nitric oxide (NO) between patients who received midazolam and those who received propofol sedation after severe brain injury, and investigated the association between S100beta and NO concentrations and neurological outcome. DESIGN: 28 patients with severe head injury (Glasgow Coma Score <9) who required sedation and ventilation were randomly assigned to receive midazolam (n =15) or propofol (n = 13) based sedation. Blood samples were drawn daily for 5 days for estimation of S100beta and NO concentrations. Neurological outcome was assessed 3 months later as good (Glasgow Outcome Score [GOS], 4-5) or poor (GOS, 1-3). RESULTS: A good neurological outcome was observed in 8\\/15 patients (53%) in the midazolam group and 7\\/13 patients (54%) in the propofol group. Patients with a poor outcome had higher serum S100beta concentrations on ICU admission and on Days 1-4 in the ICU than those with a good outcome (mean [SD] on Day 1, 0.99 [0.81] v 0.41 [0.4] microg\\/L; Day 2, 0.80 [0.81] v 0.41 [0.24] microg\\/L; Day 3, 0.52 [0.55] v 0.24 [0.25] microg\\/L; and Day 4, 0.54 [0.43] v 0.24 [0.35] microg\\/L; P<0.05). There was no significant difference on Day 5. Plasma NO concentrations were not associated with outcome. In subgroup analysis, there was no difference in S100beta and NO concentrations between patients with a good outcome versus those with a poor outcome in either the midazolam or propofol group. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma concentrations of markers of neurological injury in patients with severe head injury were similar in those who received midazolam sedation and those who received propofol. Patients who had a poor neurological outcome at 3 months had consistently higher serum S100beta concentrations during the initial 4 days after injury than patients who had a good outcome.

  16. Prenatal DHA Status and Neurological Outcome in Children at Age 5.5 Years Are Positively Associated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Victoria Escolano-Margarit, M.; Ramos, Rosa; Beyer, Jeannette; Csabi, Gyoergyi; Parrilla-Roure, Montserrat; Cruz, Francisco; Perez-Garcia, Miguel; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Gil, Angel; Decsi, Tamas; Koletzko, Berthold V.; Campoy, Cristina

    Beneficial effects of perinatal DHA supply on later neurological development have been reported. We assessed the effects of maternal DHA supplementation on the neurological development of their children. Healthy pregnant women from Spain, Germany, and Hungary were randomly assigned to a dietary

  17. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and neurological developmental outcome at 18 months in healthy term infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwstra, H; Dijck-Brouwer, DAJ; Boehm, G; Boersma, ER; Muskiet, FAJ; Hadders-Algra, M

    Aim: Previously, we found a beneficial effect of 2 mo supplementation of infant formula with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) on neurological condition at 3 mo in healthy term infants. The aim of the present follow-up study was to evaluate whether the effect on neurological condition

  18. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Yuan-Shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-Dong; Chang, Rui-Ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Fang, Xiang-Shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-Yuan; Huang, Zi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis.

  19. The Neurological Compromised Spine Due to Ewing Sarcoma. What First: Surgery or Chemotherapy? Therapy, Survival, and Neurological Outcome of 15 Cases With Primary Ewing Sarcoma of the Vertebral Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Lida; Kaal, Suzanne E J; Schreuder, Hendrik W B; Bartels, Ronald H M A

    2015-11-01

    The vertebral column is an infrequent site of primary involvement in Ewing sarcoma. Yet when Ewing sarcoma is found in the spine, the urge for decompression is high because of the often symptomatic compression of neural structures. It is unclear in alleviating a neurological deficit whether chemotherapy is preferred over decompressive laminectomy. To underline, in this case series, the efficiency of initial chemotherapy before upfront surgery in the setting of high-grade spinal cord or cauda equina compression of primary Ewing sarcoma. Fifteen patients with Ewing sarcoma primarily located in the spine were treated at our institution between 1983 and 2015. Localization, neurological deficit expressed as Frankel grade, and outcome expressed as Rankin scale before and after initial chemotherapy, the recurrence rate, and overall survival were evaluated. The multidisciplinary approach of 1 case will be discussed in detail. Nine patients (60%) were female. The age at presentation was 15.0 ± 5.5 years (range: 0.9-22.8 years). Ten patients (67%) were initially treated with chemotherapy, and 1 patient (7%) was treated primarily with radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy. The remaining 4 patients (27%) were initially treated with decompressive surgery. All patients treated primarily nonsurgically improved neurologically at follow-up, showing the importance of chemotherapy as an effective initial treatment option. Adequate and quick decompression of neural structures with similar results can be achieved by chemotherapy and radiotherapy, avoiding the local spill of malignant cells.

  20. Genetics of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Mottagui-Tabar, Salim; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2004-05-01

    Neurological diseases are defined as an inappropriate function of the peripheral or central nervous system due to impaired electrical impulses throughout the brain and/or nervous system that may present with heterogeneous symptoms according to the parts of the system involved in these pathologic processes. Growing evidence on genetic components of neurological disease have been collected during recent years. Genetic studies have opened the way for understanding the underlying pathology of many neurological disorders. The outcome of current intense research into the genetics of neurological disorders will hopefully be the introduction of new diagnostic tools and the discovery of potential targets for new and more effective medications and preventive measures.

  1. Neurological outcome scale for traumatic brain injury: III. Criterion-related validity and sensitivity to change in the NABIS hypothermia-II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Stephen R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Moretti, Paolo; Macleod, Marianne C; Pedroza, Claudia; Drever, Pamala; Fourwinds, Sierra; Frisby, Melisa L; Beers, Sue R; Scott, James N; Hunter, Jill V; Traipe, Elfrides; Valadka, Alex B; Okonkwo, David O; Zygun, David A; Puccio, Ava M; Clifton, Guy L

    2013-09-01

    The neurological outcome scale for traumatic brain injury (NOS-TBI) is a measure assessing neurological functioning in patients with TBI. We hypothesized that the NOS-TBI would exhibit adequate concurrent and predictive validity and demonstrate more sensitivity to change, compared with other well-established outcome measures. We analyzed data from the National Acute Brain Injury Study: Hypothermia-II clinical trial. Participants were 16-45 years of age with severe TBI assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury. For analysis of criterion-related validity (concurrent and predictive), Spearman's rank-order correlations were calculated between the NOS-TBI and the glasgow outcome scale (GOS), GOS-extended (GOS-E), disability rating scale (DRS), and neurobehavioral rating scale-revised (NRS-R). Concurrent validity was demonstrated through significant correlations between the NOS-TBI and GOS, GOS-E, DRS, and NRS-R measured contemporaneously at 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury (all pvalidity as well as sensitivity to change, compared with gold-standard outcome measures. The NOS-TBI may enhance prediction of outcome in clinical practice and measurement of outcome in TBI research.

  2. Birth outcomes in the Inuit-inhabited areas of Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhong-Cheng; Senécal, Sacha; Simonet, Fabienne; Guimond, Éric; Penney, Christopher; Wilkins, Russell

    2010-01-01

    Background Information on health disparities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations is essential for developing public health programs aimed at reducing such disparities. The lack of data on disparities in birth outcomes between Inuit and non-Inuit populations in Canada prompted us to compare birth outcomes in Inuit-inhabited areas with those in the rest of the country and in other rural and northern areas of Canada. Methods We conducted a cohort study of all births in Canada during 1990–2000 using linked vital data. We identified 13 642 births to residents of Inuit-inhabited areas and 4 054 489 births to residents of all other areas. The primary outcome measures were preterm birth, stillbirth and infant death. Results Compared with the rest of Canada, Inuit-inhabited areas had substantially higher rates of preterm birth (risk ratio [RR] 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.38–1.52), stillbirth (RR 1.68, 95% CI 1.38–2.04) and infant death (RR 3.61, 95% CI 3.17–4.12). The risk ratios and absolute differences in risk for these outcomes changed little over time. Excess mortality was observed for all major causes of infant death, including congenital anomalies (RR 1.64), immaturity-related conditions (RR 2.96), asphyxia (RR 2.43), sudden infant death syndrome (RR 7.15), infection (RR 8.32) and external causes (RR 7.30). Maternal characteristics accounted for only a small part of the risk disparities. Substantial risk ratios for preterm birth, stillbirth and infant death remained when the comparisons were restricted to other rural or northern areas of Canada. Interpretation The Inuit-inhabited areas had much higher rates of preterm birth, stillbirth and infant death compared with the rest of Canada and with other rural and northern areas. There is an urgent need for more effective interventions to improve maternal and infant health in Inuit-inhabited areas. PMID:20100852

  3. Neuron-Specific Enolase as a Predictor of Death or Poor Neurological Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C and 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stammet, Pascal; Collignon, Olivier; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a widely-used biomarker for prognostication of neurological outcome after cardiac arrest, but the relevance of recommended cutoff values has been questioned due to the lack of a standardized methodology and uncertainties over the influence of temperature...... levels were assessed in blood samples obtained 24, 48, and 72 h after return of spontaneous circulation. The primary outcome was neurological outcome at 6 months using the cerebral performance category score. RESULTS: NSE was a robust predictor of neurological outcome in a baseline variable......-adjusted model, and target temperature did not significantly affect NSE values. Median NSE values were 18 ng/ml versus 35 ng/ml, 15 ng/ml versus 61 ng/ml, and 12 ng/ml versus 54 ng/ml for good versus poor outcome at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively (p neurological outcome...

  4. U0126 attenuates cerebral vasoconstriction and improves long-term neurologic outcome after stroke in female rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahnstedt, Hilda; Mostajeran, Maryam; Blixt, Frank W

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences are well known in cerebral ischemia and may impact the effect of stroke treatments. In male rats, the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 reduces ischemia-induced endothelin type B (ETB) receptor upregulation, infarct size and improves acute neurologic function after experimental stroke. However...... occlusion (tMCAO, 120 minutes) was induced in female Wistar rats, with U0126 (30 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle administered at 0 and 24 hours of reperfusion, or with no treatment. Infarct volumes were determined and neurologic function was assessed by 6-point and 28-point neuroscores. ETB receptor......-mediated contraction was studied with myograph and protein expression with immunohistochemistry. In vitro organ culture and tMCAO resulted in vascular ETB receptor upregulation and activation of ERK1/2 that was prevented by U0126. Although no effect on infarct size, U0126 improved the long-term neurologic function...

  5. Preserved heart rate variability during therapeutic hypothermia correlated to 96 hrs neurological outcomes and survival in a pig model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqin; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Guan, Jun; Barbut, Denise; Bisera, Joe; Weil, Max Harry; Tang, Wanchun

    2012-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia initiated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves neurologic outcomes and survival after prolonged cardiac arrest. However, the potential mechanism by which hypothermia improves neurologic outcomes remains unclear. In the current study, we investigated the effect of rapid head cooling on 96-hr neurologic outcomes and survival by heart rate variability analysis in a pig model of prolonged cardiac arrest. Prospective randomized controlled animal study. University-affiliated research laboratory. Yorkshire-X domestic pigs (Sus scrofa). A protocol of 10 mins of untreated ventricular fibrillation followed by 5 mins of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a pig model of cardiac arrest was used in this study. Sixteen male domestic pigs weighing between 39 and 45 kg were randomized into two groups, hypothermia (n = 8) and control (n = 8). For the hypothermia group, intranasal-induced head cooling was initiated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation and persisted for 4 hrs after resuscitation. For the control group, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started with normothermia. Time and frequency domain heart rate variability was calculated in 5-min sections of electrocardiographic recordings at baseline and 4 hrs after resuscitation. Neurologic outcomes were evaluated every 24 hrs during the 96-hr postresuscitation observation period. No differences in the baseline measurement and resuscitation outcome were observed between the groups. However, the 96-hr cerebral performance categories of the hypothermic group were significantly lower than control (1.0 ± 0.0 vs. 4.0 ± 1.9, p = .003). Four hrs after resuscitation, mean RR interval, heart rate variability triangular index, and normalized very-low-frequency power were restored to baseline in the hypothermia group. Square root of the mean squared differences of successive RR intervals and SD of instantaneous RR intervals were significantly improved in the cooled animals compared with controls. A significant

  6. Automatic external defibrillation and its effects on neurologic outcome in cardiac arrest patients in an urban, two-tiered EMS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J; Held, T; Heegaard, W; Crimmins, T

    1997-01-01

    To describe the use of the Automatic External Defibrillation (AED) device in an urban, two-tiered Emergency Medical Service (EMS) response setting with regard to its potential effects on cardiac arrest patient survival and neurologic outcome. A retrospective and descriptive design was utilized to study all cardiac arrest patients that had resuscitations attempted in the prehospital environment over a 30-month period. The study took place in a two-tiered EMS system serving an urban population of 368,383 persons. The first tier of EMS response is provided by the City Fire Department, which is equipped with a standard AED device. All first-tier personnel are trained to the level of Emergency Medical Technician-Basic. The second tier of EMS response is provided by personnel from one of two ambulance services. All second-tier personnel are trained to the level of Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic. 271 cardiac arrest patients were identified for inclusion. One-hundred nine of these patients (40.2%) had an initial rhythm of either ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia and were shocked using the AED upon the arrival of first-tier personnel. Forty-two patients (38.5%) in this group had a return of spontaneous circulation in the field and 22 (20.2%) survived to hospital discharge. Of the survivors, 17 (77.3%) had moderate to good neurologic function at discharge based on the Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Categories. Faster response times by the first-tier personnel appeared to correlate with better neurologic outcomes. First responder-based AED usage on patients in ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia can be applied successfully in an urban setting utilizing a two-tiered EMS response. In this study, a 20.2% survival to hospital discharge rate was obtained. Seventy-seven percent of these survivors had a moderate to good neurologic outcome based on the Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Categories.

  7. Functional Outcomes in Individuals Undergoing Very Early (Spinal Cord Injury: Analysis of Neurological Improvement from the Austrian Spinal Cord Injury Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiassich, Georg; Gollwitzer, Maria; Gaderer, Franz; Blocher, Martina; Osti, Michael; Lill, Markkus; Ortmaier, Reinhold; Haider, Thomas; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Resch, Herbert; Aschauer-Wallner, Stephanie

    2017-08-10

    Our study aim was to assess the neurological outcomes of surgical decompression and stabilization within 5 and 24 h after injury. We performed a multi-center, retrospective cohort study in adolescents and adults 15-85 years of age presenting cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) at one of 6 Austrian trauma centers participating in the Austrian Spinal Cord Injury Study (ASCIS). Neurological outcomes were measured using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade according to the International Standards For Neurological Classification Of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) form after at least 6 months of follow-up (FU). Of the 49 enrolled patients with acute CSCI, 33 underwent surgical decompression within 5 h (mean 3.2 h ± 1.1 h; very early group) after injury, and 16 underwent surgical decompression between 5 and 24 h (mean 8.6 h ± 5.5 h; early group). Significant neurological improvement was observed among the entire study population between the preoperative assessment and the FU. We identified a significant difference in the AIS grade at the last FU between the groups the using Jonckheere-Terpstra test for doubly ordered crosstabs (p = 0.011) and significantly different AIS improvement rates in the early group (Poisson model, p = 0.018). Improvement by one AIS grade was observed in 31% and 42% of the patients in the early and very early groups, respectively (p = 0.54). Improvement by two AIS grades was observed in 31% and 6% of the patients in the early and very early groups, respectively (p = 0.03; relative risk [RR], 5.2; 95% CI, 1.1-35). Improvement by three AIS grades was observed in 6% and 3% of patients in the early and very early groups, respectively (p = 1.0). Decompression of the spinal cord within 24 h after SCI was associated with an improved neurological outcome. No additional neurological benefit was observed in patients who underwent decompression within 5 h of injury.

  8. Diagnostic and prognostic role of MRI in spinal trauma, its comparison and correlation with clinical profile and neurological outcome, according to ASIA impairment scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh C Parashari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a non-invasive diagnostic tool in patients with acute and chronic spinal trauma and to compare and correlate the MRI findings with those of patients′ clinical profile and neurological outcome according to ASIA impairment scale to assess prognostic and clinical value of MRI. Materials and Methods: Sixty two patients of spinal trauma formed the study group in a prospective fashion. The patients undergoing MR imaging and magnetic resonance images were analyzed and correlated with findings on neurological examination according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA impairment scale (AIS at the time of MRI examination and subsequently at sub-acute interval to assess neurological outcome. Statistical Analysis : Sample profile was described in terms of 95% confidence limit and proportion. To describe strength of association between extent of spinal cord injury and outcome, odd′s ratio, bivariate and multi variant analysis, was used. Pearson′s chi square (χ 2 statistics was applied to test the association between two categorical variables. Data were analyzed using statistical software package, STATA 9.2 and the difference was considered to be significant if ′P′ value was <0.05. Observation and Results: The cord edema without hemorrhage was the most common MR finding (41.5%. The others were sizable focus of hemorrhage within the cord (33%, epidural hematoma (5.0%, and normal cord (26%. Majority of MR findings correlated well with clinical profile of the patient according to ASIA impairment scale. This study demonstrated that patients with presence of sizable focus of haemorrhage had larger cord edema and more severe grade of initial ASIA impairment scale( AIS with poor recovery at follow up (P=0.032.Improvement in upper extremity was more than lower extremity. Severe cord compression was also associated with poor neurological outcome; however it was not

  9. Prospective study of the correlation between admission plasma homocysteine levels and neurological outcome following subarachnoid hemorrhage: a case for the reverse epidemiology paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Goudihalli, Sachin; Mukherjee, Kanchan K; Singh, Harnarayan; Srinivasan, Anirudh; Danish, Mohammad; Mahalingam, Shanthanam; Dhandapani, Manju; Gupta, Sunil K; Khandelwal, N; Mathuriya, Suresh N

    2015-03-01

    Homocysteine (tHcy) has been known over the last few decades for its putative impact on vascular diseases, but has not been evaluated much in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This study was carried out to assess its prognostic impact on the neurological outcome following SAH. Admission plasma tHcy was evaluated in 90 SAH patients and prospectively studied in relation to various factors and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) at 3 months. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using SPSS 21. tHcy was significantly higher following SAH compared to matched controls [median (IQR): 25.7 (17.3-35.9) vs. 14.0 (9.8-17.6) μmol/l, p logistic regression adjusting for the effects of age, systemic disease, WFNS grade, Fisher grade, site of aneurysm, clipping or coiling revealed higher tHcy to have a significant independent association with both survival (p = 0.01) and favorable outcome (p = 0.04). Higher homocysteine levels following SAH appear to have a significant association with both survival and favorable neurological outcome, independent of other known prognostic factors, apparently exemplifying "reverse epidemiology paradox" in which a conventional risk factor seems to impart a survival advantage.

  10. Time-courses of plasma IL-6 and HMGB-1 reflect initial severity of clinical presentation but do not predict poor neurologic outcome following subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Kiiski

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: High initial IL-6 values seem to reflect the intensity of the inflammatory response but not the brain damage per se. An early inflammatory response might even be beneficial since although elevated IL-6 levels were observed in patients with a more severe initial clinical presentation, they were not associated with neurological outcome. The lack of correlation between IL-6 and HMGB1 questions the role of macrophages in the process of the secretion of these inflammatory markers after aSAH, instead pointing to the activation of alternative pro-inflammatory pathways.

  11. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Hepatitis C virus and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 co-infection: impact on liver disease, virological markers, and neurological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espíndola, Otávio M; Vizzoni, Alexandre G; Lampe, Elisabeth; Andrada-Serpa, Maria José; Araújo, Abelardo Q C; Leite, Ana Claudia C

    2017-04-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with neurological abnormalities, such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and peripheral neuropathy (PN). Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the leading cause of chronic liver disease worldwide, and causes PN in approximately 9% of patients. Because the interplay between these potentially neuropathogenic viruses in the same individual is still poorly understood, the clinical and laboratory outcomes of co-infected patients were evaluated and compared with those of controls. The prevalence rates of neurological and laboratory abnormalities were evaluated in HCV/HTLV-1 co-infected patients (n=50), and in subjects with single HCV (n=46) or HTLV-1 (n=150) infection. A higher frequency of isolated PN was present in HCV-infected patients; this was not associated with cryoglobulinemia. No difference was found in the frequency of PN or HAM/TSP when co-infected subjects were compared to singly infected subjects. Hepatic involvement was present in HCV-infected subjects, as shown by increased levels of serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and bilirubin, in addition to thrombocytopenia. On the other hand, HCV/HTLV-1 co-infected individuals presented a better prognosis for hepatic involvement when compared with singly HCV-infected subjects. These data suggest that HCV/HTLV-1 co-infection does not mutualistically alter the outcome with regard to neurological manifestations. Nonetheless, changes in the immunological environment induced by HTLV-1 infection could lead to a reduction in hepatic damage, even without significant HCV clearance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Adjuvant treatment with monosialoganglioside may improve neurological outcomes in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Sheng

    Full Text Available Ganglioside has a neuroprotective role in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. This study aimed to evaluate the neurological outcomes of monosialoganglioside as adjuvant treatment for neonatal HIE by conducting a meta-analysis.A comprehensive literature search was made in the Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang, CNKI, VIP databases through October 2016. Randomized controlled trials comparing monosialoganglioside with the usual treatment for newborns having HIE deemed eligible. Weighted mean difference (WMD and risk ratio (RR with 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated for continuous and dichotomous data, respectively.Ten trials consisting of 787 neonates were included. Adjuvant treatment with monosialoganglioside significantly reduced major neurodevelopmental disabilities (RR = 0.35; 95% CI = 0.21-0.57, cerebral palsy (RR = 0.32; 95% CI = 0.12-0.87, mental retardation (RR = 0.31; 95% CI = 0.11-0.88 as well as improved the mental (WMD = 14.95; 95% CI = 7.44-22.46 and psychomotive (WMD = 13.40; 95% CI = 6.69-20.11 development index during the follow-up. Also, monosialoganglioside significantly improved Neonatal Behavioral Neurological Assessment scores (WMD = 2.91; 95% CI = 2.05-3.78 compared with the usual treatment. However, adverse effects associated with monosialoganglioside were poorly reported in the included trials.Adjuvant treatment with monosialoganglioside had beneficial effects in improving neurological outcomes in neonatal HIE. However, these findings should be interpreted with caution because of methodological flaws in the included trials. Furthermore, safety of monosialoganglioside use should also be further evaluated.

  14. A HOSPITAL-BASED RETROSPECTIVE COMPARATIVE STUDY OF COMPLICATIONS, OUTCOMES, CLINICAL AND LABORATORY PARAMETERS OF MALARIA WITH AND WITHOUT NEUROLOGICAL INVOLVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaib Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Classically associated with Plasmodium falciparum, neurological complications in severe malaria is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. However, reports implicate the long considered benign Plasmodium vivax for causing severe malaria as well. We aimed to analyze the cerebral complications in malaria, and study if there is a specie-related difference in the presentation and outcomes. Methods: We retrospectively compared patients of malaria hospitalised from 2009-15, with (n=105 and without (n=1155 neurological involvement in terms of outcomes, complications, demographic attributes, clinical features, and laboratory parameters. Subsequently, the same parameters were studied in those with cerebral malaria due to mono-infections of vivax or falciparum and their co-infection. Results: Cerebral malaria was observed in 8.3% (58/696, 7.4% (38/513 and 17.6% (6/51 of vivax, falciparum and combined plasmodial infections respectively. Those with cerebral malaria had significantly (p0.05. P. vivax emerged as the predominant cause of cerebral malaria and its virulence was comparable to P. falciparum.

  15. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination.......0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with ≥1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any neurological...

  16. Development of a patient reported outcome measure for fatigue in motor neurone disease: the Neurological Fatigue Index (NFI-MND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibbons Chris J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this research was to develop a disease-specific measure for fatigue in patients with motor neurone disease (MND by generating data that would fit the Rasch measurement model. Fatigue was defined as reversible motor weakness and whole-body tiredness that was predominantly brought on by muscular exertion and was partially relieved by rest. Methods Qualitative interviews were undertaken to confirm the suitability of a previously identified set of 52 neurological fatigue items as relevant to patients with MND. Patients were recruited from five U.K. MND clinics. Questionnaires were administered during clinic or by post. A sub-sample of patients completed the questionnaire again after 2-4 weeks to assess test-retest validity. Exploratory factor analyses and Rasch analysis were conducted on the item set. Results Qualitative interviews with ten MND patients confirmed the suitability of 52 previously identified neurological fatigue items as relevant to patients with MND. 298 patients consented to completing the initial questionnaire including this item set, with an additional 78 patients completing the questionnaire a second time after 4-6 weeks. Exploratory Factor Analysis identified five potential subscales that could be conceptualised as representing: 'Energy', 'Reversible muscular weakness' (shortened to 'Weakness', 'Concentration', 'Effects of heat' and 'Rest'. Of the original five factors, two factors 'Energy' and 'Weakness' met the expectations of the Rasch model. A higher order fatigue summary scale, consisting of items from the 'Energy' and 'Weakness' subscales, was found to fit the Rasch model and have acceptable unidimensionality. The two scales and the higher order summary scale were shown to fulfil model expectations, including assumptions of unidimensionality, local independency and an absence of differential item functioning. Conclusions The Neurological Fatigue Index for MND (NFI-MND is a simple, easy

  17. A moderate dose of propofol and rapidly induced mild hypothermia with extracorporeal lung and heart assist (ECLHA) improve the neurological outcome after prolonged cardiac arrest in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Keisuke; Okamoto, Taisuke; Tanimoto, Hironari; Taguchi, Hiroyuki; Tashiro, Masafumi; Sugita, Michiko; Takeya, Motohiro; Terasaki, Hidenori

    2006-08-01

    Propofol has been shown to protect against neuronal damage induced by brain ischaemia in small animal models. We reported previously that mild hypothermia (33 degrees C) in combination with extracorporeal lung and heart assist (ECLHA) improved the neurological outcome in dogs with cardiac arrest (CA) of 15 min induced during normothermia. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of propofol infusion under mild hypothermia with ECLHA in this model. Twenty-one female dogs (15 mongrel dogs and 6 beagles) were divided into three groups: Midazolam 0.1 mg/(kg h) infusion group (M, n=7), Propofol 2 mg/(kg h) infusion group (P2, n=7), Propofol 4 mg/(kg h) infusion group (P4, n=7). Normothermic ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced in all dogs for 15 min, followed by brief ECLHA and 168 h of intensive care. The drug infusion was initiated at a constant rate after the restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) to 24 h. Mild hypothermia (33 degrees C) was maintained for 20 h. Neurological deficit scores (NDS: 0%=normal, 100%=brain death) were evaluated for neurological function from 33 to 168 h. One dog in the M group died, and the remaining dogs survived for 168 h. The P4 group showed better neurological recovery compared with the M group (48 h, 21+/-16% versus 32+/-15%; 72 h, 7+/-6% versus 25+/-11%; 96 h, 6+/-6% versus 21+/-6%; 120 h, 5+/-5% versus 20+/-6%; 144 h, 4+/-4% versus 20+/-6%; 168 h, 4+/-4% versus 20+/-6%, pdog in the P2 and three dogs in the P4 group achieved full neurological recovery (NDS: 0%). The number of intact pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 was greater in the propofol groups than midazolam group (p<0.05). The combination of propofol infusion at a rate of 4 mg/(kg h), 24h and rapidly induced mild hypothermia (33 degrees C) with ECLHA might provide a successful means of cerebral resuscitation from CA.

  18. The predictive value of thyroid hormone levels on the neurological outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-dong CHEN

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the correlation between thyroid hormone levels in patients with acute ischemic stroke and the severity of disease and short-term prognosis. Methods According to the level of serum total triiodothyronine (TT3, 98 patients who presented first acute ischemic stroke and without history of thyroid abnormality were divided into low TT3 group and normal TT3 group. Thyroid hormone levels and neurological function defect of those patients were tested, and their neural functional recovery after 3 months was evaluated.  Results Low TT3 group had more severe neural function defect compared to normal TT3 group (χ2 = 58.134, P = 0.000. There were no significant differences on total thyroxine (TT4; t = 1.636, P = 0.105 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH; t = 1.059, P = 0.292 between 2 groups. There was a significantly negative correlation between TT3 levels and National Insititute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score on admission (r = -0.672, P = 0.000. Patients with low TT3 showed a significantly smaller percentage of neurological function improvement on both NIHSS ( χ2 = 8.993, P = 0.003 and modified Rankin Scale (mRS; χ2 = 6.247, P = 0.012 scores compared to those with normal TT3 at 90 d after onset.  Conclusions Low T3 level is associated with the severity of acute ischemic stroke and neural functional recovery, suggesting serum T3 level may be a predictor of neural function improvement in patients with acute ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.02.009

  19. Neurology in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chong-Tin

    2015-02-10

    Asia is important as it accounts for more than half of the world population. The majority of Asian countries fall into the middle income category. As for cultural traditions, Asia is highly varied, with many languages spoken. The pattern of neurologic diseases in Asia is largely similar to the West, with some disease features being specific to Asia. Whereas Asia constitutes 60% of the world's population, it contains only 20% of the world's neurologists. This disparity is particularly evident in South and South East Asia. As for neurologic care, it is highly variable depending on whether it is an urban or rural setting, the level of economic development, and the system of health care financing. To help remedy the shortage of neurologists, most counties with larger populations have established training programs in neurology. These programs are diverse, with many areas of concern. There are regional organizations serving as a vehicle for networking in neurology and various subspecialties, as well as an official journal (Neurology Asia). The Asian Epilepsy Academy, with its emphasis on workshops in various locations, EEG certification examination, and fellowships, may provide a template of effective regional networking for improving neurology care in the region. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Survival and Neurologic Outcome After Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest. Results of the Andalusian Out-of-hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell Ortiz, Fernando; Mellado Vergel, Francisco; López Messa, Juan Bautista; Fernández Valle, Patricia; Ruiz Montero, María M; Martínez Lara, Manuela; Vergara Pérez, Santiago; Vivar Díaz, Itziar; Caballero García, Auxiliadora; García Alcántara, Ángel; García Del Águila, Javier

    2016-05-01

    There is a paucity of data on prehospital cardiac arrest in Spain. Our aim was to describe the incidence, patient characteristics, and outcomes of out-of-hospital emergency care for this event. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospective registry of cardiopulmonary arrest handled by an out-of-hospital emergency service between January 2008 and December 2012. The registry included all patients considered to have a cardiac etiology as the cause of arrest, with a descriptive analysis performed of general patient characteristics and factors associated with good neurologic outcome at hospital discharge. A total of 4072 patients were included, with an estimated incidence of 14.6 events per 100000 inhabitants and year; 72.6% were men. The mean age was 62.0 ± 15.8 years, 58.6% of cases occurred in the home, 25% of patients had initial defibrillable rhythm, 28.8% of patients arrived with a pulse at the hospital (58.3% of the group with defibrillable rhythm), and 10.2% were discharged with good neurologic outcome. The variables associated with this recovery were: witnessed arrest (P=.04), arrest witnessed by emergency team (P=.005), previous life support (P=.04), initial defibrillable rhythm (P=.0001), and performance of a coronary interventional procedure (P=.0001). More than half the cases of sudden cardiac arrest occur at home, and the population was found to be relatively young. Although recovery was satisfactory in 1 out of every 10 patients, there is a need for improvement in the phase prior to emergency team arrival. Coronary interventional procedures had an impact on patient prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Classification of neurological abnormalities in children with congenital melanocytic naevus syndrome identifies magnetic resonance imaging as the best predictor of clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waelchli, R; Aylett, S E; Atherton, D; Thompson, D J; Chong, W K; Kinsler, V A

    2015-09-01

    The spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities described in association with congenital melanocytic naevi (CMN) includes congenital, acquired, melanotic and nonmelanotic pathology. Historically, symptomatic CNS abnormalities were considered to carry a poor prognosis, although studies from large centres have suggested a much wider variation in outcome. To establish whether routine MRI of the CNS is a clinically relevant investigation in children with multiple CMN (more than one at birth), and to subclassify radiological abnormalities. Of 376 patients seen between 1991 and 2013, 289 fulfilled our criterion for a single screening CNS MRI, which since 2008 has been more than one CMN at birth, independent of size and site of the largest naevus. Cutaneous phenotyping and radiological variables were combined in a multiple regression model of long-term outcome measures (abnormal neurodevelopment, seizures, requirement for neurosurgery). Twenty-one per cent of children with multiple CMN had an abnormal MRI. Abnormal MRI was the most significant predictor of all outcome measures. Abnormalities were subclassified into group 1 'intraparenchymal melanosis alone' (n = 28) and group 2 'all other pathology' (n = 18). Group 1 was not associated with malignancy or death during the study period, even when symptomatic with seizures or developmental delay, whereas group 2 showed a much more complex picture, requiring individual assessment. For screening for congenital neurological lesions a single MRI in multiple CMN is a clinically relevant strategy. Any child with a stepwise change in neurological/developmental symptoms or signs should have an MRI with contrast of the brain and spine to look for new CNS melanoma. © 2015 The Authors. British Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists.

  2. Normal neurologic and developmental outcome after an accidental intravenous infusion of expressed breast milk in a neonate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, C Anthony

    2012-02-03

    Here we describe a premature male infant who was accidentally given 10 mL of expressed breast milk intravenously over a 3.5-hour period. Having survived this event with supportive care, this boy was attending regular school with no obvious neurologic or learning difficulties at 6 years of age. In 1998, after a query on an e-mail discussion group for health care providers in neonatology (NICU-net), we were informed of 8 similar events that proved fatal in 3 infants. A root-cause analysis revealed that accidental intravenous administration of breast milk or formula can be avoided by the use of color-coded enteral-administration sets with Luer connections that are not compatible with intravenous cannulas. The addition of methylene blue to feeds, or bolus enteral feeds (instead of continuous gastric feedings), may also help prevent such errors. These cases show the value of gathering information about rare but important events through a neonatal network. In addition, they confirm that prevention of medical error should focus on faulty systems rather than faulty people.

  3. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  4. CNS penetration of intrathecal-lumbar idursulfase in the monkey, dog and mouse: implications for neurological outcomes of lysosomal storage disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calias, Pericles; Papisov, Mikhail; Pan, Jing; Savioli, Nancy; Belov, Vasily; Huang, Yan; Lotterhand, Jason; Alessandrini, Mary; Liu, Nan; Fischman, Alan J; Powell, Jan L; Heartlein, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge for the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS) disorders is the lack of convenient and effective methods for delivering biological agents to the brain. Mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter syndrome) is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (I2S). I2S is a large, highly glycosylated enzyme. Intravenous administration is not likely to be an effective therapy for disease-related neurological outcomes that require enzyme access to the brain cells, in particular neurons and oligodendrocytes. We demonstrate that intracerebroventricular and lumbar intrathecal administration of recombinant I2S in dogs and nonhuman primates resulted in widespread enzyme distribution in the brain parenchyma, including remarkable deposition in the lysosomes of both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Lumbar intrathecal administration also resulted in enzyme delivery to the spinal cord, whereas little enzyme was detected there after intraventricular administration. Mucopolysaccharidosis II model is available in mice. Lumbar administration of recombinant I2S to enzyme deficient animals reduced the storage of glycosaminoglycans in both superficial and deep brain tissues, with concurrent morphological improvements. The observed patterns of enzyme transport from cerebrospinal fluid to the CNS tissues and the resultant biological activity (a) warrant further investigation of intrathecal delivery of I2S via lumbar catheter as an experimental treatment for the neurological symptoms of Hunter syndrome and (b) may have broader implications for CNS treatment with biopharmaceuticals.

  5. CNS penetration of intrathecal-lumbar idursulfase in the monkey, dog and mouse: implications for neurological outcomes of lysosomal storage disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pericles Calias

    Full Text Available A major challenge for the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS disorders is the lack of convenient and effective methods for delivering biological agents to the brain. Mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter syndrome is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (I2S. I2S is a large, highly glycosylated enzyme. Intravenous administration is not likely to be an effective therapy for disease-related neurological outcomes that require enzyme access to the brain cells, in particular neurons and oligodendrocytes. We demonstrate that intracerebroventricular and lumbar intrathecal administration of recombinant I2S in dogs and nonhuman primates resulted in widespread enzyme distribution in the brain parenchyma, including remarkable deposition in the lysosomes of both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Lumbar intrathecal administration also resulted in enzyme delivery to the spinal cord, whereas little enzyme was detected there after intraventricular administration. Mucopolysaccharidosis II model is available in mice. Lumbar administration of recombinant I2S to enzyme deficient animals reduced the storage of glycosaminoglycans in both superficial and deep brain tissues, with concurrent morphological improvements. The observed patterns of enzyme transport from cerebrospinal fluid to the CNS tissues and the resultant biological activity (a warrant further investigation of intrathecal delivery of I2S via lumbar catheter as an experimental treatment for the neurological symptoms of Hunter syndrome and (b may have broader implications for CNS treatment with biopharmaceuticals.

  6. Early and continuous neurologic improvements after intravenous thrombolysis are strong predictors of favorable long-term outcomes in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Leonard L L; Paliwal, Prakash; Teoh, Hock L; Seet, Raymond C; Chan, Bernard P L; Wakerley, Benjamin; Liang, Shen; Rathakrishnan, Rahul; Chong, Vincent F; Ting, Eric Y S; Sharma, Vijay K

    2013-11-01

    Intravenously administered tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) remains the only approved therapeutic agent for arterial recanalization in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Considerable proportion of AIS patients demonstrate changes in their neurologic status within the first 24 hours of intravenous thrombolysis with IV tPA. However, there are little available data on the course of clinical recovery in subacute 2- to 24-hour window and its impact. We evaluated whether neurologic improvement at 2 and 24 hours after IV tPA bolus can predict functional outcomes in AIS patients at 3 months. Data for consecutive AIS patients treated with IV tPA within 4.5 hours of symptom onset during 2007-2011 were prospectively entered in our thrombolyzed registry. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were recorded before IV tPA bolus, at 2 and 24 hours. Early neurologic improvement (ENI) at 2 hours was defined as a reduction in NIHSS score by 10 or more points from baseline or an absolute score of 4 or less points at 2 hours. Continuous neurologic improvement (CNI) was defined as a reduction of NIHSS score by 8 or more points between 2 and 24 hours or an absolute score of 4 or less points at 24 hours. Favorable functional outcomes at 3 months were determined by modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0-1. Of 2460 AIS patients admitted during the study period, 263 (10.7%) received IV tPA within the time window; median age was 64 years (range 19-92), with 63.9% being men, a median NIHSS score of 17 points (range 5-35), and a median onset-to-treatment time of 145 minutes (range 57-270). Overall, 130 (49.4%) thrombolyzed patients achieved an mRS score of 0-1 at 3 months. The female gender, age, and baseline NIHSS score were found to be significantly associated with CNI on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, NIHSS score at onset and female gender (odds ratio [OR]: 2.218, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.140-4.285; P=.024) were found to be independent predictors of

  7. Serious adverse neonatal outcomes such as 5-minute Apgar score of zero and seizures or severe neurologic dysfunction are increased in planned home births after cesarean delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos Grünebaum

    Full Text Available The United States is with 37,451 home births in 2014 the country with the largest absolute number of home births among all developed countries. The purpose of this study was to examine the occurrence and risks of a 5-minute Apgar score of zero and neonatal seizures or serious neurologic dysfunction in women with a history of prior cesarean delivery for planned home vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC, compared to hospital VBAC and hospital birth cesarean deliveries for term normal weight infants in the United States from 2007-2014. We report in this study outcomes of women who had one or more prior cesarean deliveries and included women who had a successful vaginal birth after a trial of labor after cesarean (TOLAC at home and in the hospital, and a repeat cesarean delivery in the hospital. We excluded preterm births (<37 weeks and infants weighing under 2500 g. Hospital VBACS were the reference. Women with a planned home birth VBAC had an approximately 10-fold and higher increase in adverse neonatal outcomes when compared to hospital VBACS and hospital repeat cesarean deliveries, a significantly higher incidence and risk of a 5-minute Apgar score of 0 of 1 in 890 (11.24/10,000, relative risk 9.04, 95% confidence interval 4-20.39, p<.0001 and an incidence of neonatal seizures or severe neurologic dysfunction of 1 in 814 (Incidence: 12.27/10,000, relative risk 11.19, 95% confidence interval 5.13-24.29, p<.0001. Because of the significantly increased neonatal risks, obstetric providers should therefore not offer or perform planned home TOLACs and for those desiring a VBAC should strongly recommend a planned TOLAC in the appropriate hospital setting. We emphasize that this stance should be accompanied by effective efforts to make TOLAC available in the appropriate hospital setting.

  8. Neurologic Diseases and Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Daniel A; Chokroverty, Sudansu

    2017-03-01

    Sleep disorders and neurologic illness are common and burdensome in their own right; when combined, they can have tremendous negative impact at an individual level as well as societally. The socioeconomic burden of sleep disorders and neurologic illness can be identified, but the real cost of these conditions lies far beyond the financial realm. There is an urgent need for comprehensive care and support systems to help with the burden of disease. Further research in improving patient outcomes in those who suffer with these conditions will help patients and their families, and society in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  10. Psychometric Properties of a Generic, Patient-Centred Palliative Care Outcome Measure of Symptom Burden for People with Progressive Long Term Neurological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Crosby, Vincent; Wilcock, Andrew; Burman, Rachael; Silber, Eli; Hepgul, Nilay; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Higginson, Irene J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is no standard palliative care outcome measure for people with progressive long term neurological conditions (LTNC). This study aims to determine the psychometric properties of a new 8-item palliative care outcome scale of symptom burden (IPOS Neuro-S8) in this population. Data and Methods Data were merged from a Phase II palliative care intervention study in multiple sclerosis (MS) and a longitudinal observational study in idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD), multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The IPOS Neuro-S8 was assessed for its data quality, score distribution, ceiling and floor effects, reliability, factor structure, convergent and discriminant validity, concurrent validity with generic (Palliative care Outcome Scale) and condition specific measures (Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale; Non-motor Symptoms Questionnaire; Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire), responsiveness and minimally clinically important difference. Results Of the 134 participants, MS patients had a mean Extended Disability Status Scale score 7.8 (SD = 1.0), patients with an IPD, MSA or PSP were in Hoehn & Yahr stage 3–5. The IPOS Neuro-S8 had high data quality (2% missing), mean score 8 (SD = 5; range 0–32), no ceiling effects, borderline floor effects, good internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = 0.7) and moderate test-retest reliability (intraclass coefficient = 0.6). The results supported a moderately correlated two-factor structure (Pearson’s r = 0.5). It was moderately correlated with generic and condition specific measures (Pearson’s r: 0.5–0.6). There was some evidence for discriminant validity in IPD, MSA and PSP (p = 0.020), and for good responsiveness and longitudinal construct validity. Conclusions IPOS Neuro-S8 shows acceptable to promising psychometric properties in common forms of progressive LTNCs. Future work needs to confirm these findings with larger samples and its usefulness in wider disease groups. PMID

  11. Outcome of cataract surgery in rural areas of Kaduna State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To evaluate the visual outcome of all patients who had cataract surgery with intraocular lens implant in five Local Government Areas (LGAs) of Kaduna State and to identify reasons for poor outcome and to proffer suggestions to improve outcome. Materials and Methods: A prospective study using the WHO cataract ...

  12. Primary care perceptions of neurology and neurology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Angela M; Wade, Carrie; McCarron, Mark O

    2016-06-01

    Neurophobia (fear of neural sciences) and evaluation of independent sector contracts in neurology have seldom been examined among general practitioners (GPs). A questionnaire determined GPs' perceptions of neurology compared with other medical specialties. GP experiences of neurology services with independent sector companies and the local National Health Service (NHS) were compared. Areas of potential improvement in NHS neurology services were recorded from thematic analyses. Among 76 GPs neurology was perceived to be as interesting as other medical specialties. GPs reported less knowledge, more difficulty and less confidence in neurology compared with other medical specialties. There was a preference for a local NHS neurology service (pneurology services provided better patient satisfaction. GPs prefer local NHS neurology services to independent sector contracts. GPs' evaluations should inform commissioning of neurology services. Combating neurophobia should be an integral part of responsive commissioning. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. The prevalence of abnormal preoperative neurological examination in Scheuermann kyphosis: correlation with X-ray, magnetic resonance imaging, and surgical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Woojin; Lenke, Lawrence G; Bridwell, Keith H; Hu, Guangxun; Buchowski, Jacob M; Dorward, Ian G; Pahys, Joshua M; Cho, Samuel K; Kang, Matthew M; Zebala, Lukas P; Koester, Linda A

    2014-10-01

    Retrospective. The purpose of this study was to report the prevalence of abnormal neurological findings detected by physical examination in Scheuermann kyphosis and to correlate it to radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and results of operative treatment. There have been sporadic reports about abnormal neurological findings in patients with Scheuermann kyphosis. Among 82 patients with Scheuermann kyphosis who underwent corrective surgery, 69 primary cases were selected. Patients' charts were reviewed retrospectively in terms of pre and postoperative neurological examinations. Sensory or motor change was defined as an abnormal neurological examination. Their duration, associated problems, and various parameters on preoperative radiographs and MRI examinations were also measured to search for any atypical findings associated with an abnormal neurological examination. There were 6 cases (9%) (group AbN), with an abnormal neurological examination ranging from severe myelopathy to a subtle change (e.g., sensory paresthesias on trunk). Five patients recovered to a normal neurological examination after corrective surgery. The remaining 1 patient with severe myelopathy also showed marked improvement and was ambulatory unassisted by 2-year follow-up. In patients with a normal neurological examination (group N, n = 63), only 1 patient had neurological sequelae because of anterior spinal artery syndrome after combined anterior-posterior correction. No preoperative radiographical parameters were significantly different between groups. Average age was 21.3 (AbN) and 18.6 (N) years (P = 0.55). Average preoperative T5-12 kyphosis was 69.0° (AbN) and 72.5° (N) (P = 0.61). Forty-two magnetic resonance images were obtained and all showed typical findings of Scheuermann kyphosis. Five patients in the AbN group (1 patient underwent computed tomography/myelography) and 37 patients in the N group underwent an MRI. The prevalence of abnormal neurological findings in

  14. Patient satisfaction with outpatient neurology services: a momentum for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geberemichael, Sisay Gizaw; Metaferia, Guta Zenebe; Takele, Getahun Mengistu; Johnston, James C

    2011-04-15

    Outcome measures of patient satisfaction are increasingly accepted as an integral component of the overall healthcare quality assessment. A survey of the outpatient neurology services in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia was performed to determine the overall patient satisfaction, provide an assessment of current services and form the foundation for improved expansion of neurological care. 233 patients were recruited from the Addis Ababa University Teaching Hospital outpatient general neurology clinic by a cross-sectional sample survey design. Data from structured interview and abstraction of medical records were analyzed by SPSS for Windows version 15.0 computer software. Visual analysis of mean satisfaction scores and Spearman's rho correlation coefficients generated priority indices serving to guide expansion of neurology services. 212 patients with mean age of 40.1 and a 1:1M: F ratio completed the survey. The variation of overall patient satisfaction (mean, 70.4; SD, 12.4) was independently predicted by patient clinical outcome expectations and satisfaction on waiting area, overall service of doctor and card room [R(2)=0.305; F (8,195)=10.685, p=0.000]. Mean satisfaction scores for specific dimensions of the outpatient general neurology clinic ranged from 57.2 for waiting time at the clinic to 74.0 for overall service of the guards. Waiting time at the clinic stood first among the top five priority indices. This survey demonstrates predictors of overall patient satisfaction with the outpatient neurology services, and delineates priority areas warranting further improvement. It is the first African study on patient satisfaction with neurology services, and provides a guide for neurological or other specialty clinics seeking to improve and expand medical services. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Neurological outcomes in children with and without amalgam-related mercury exposure: seven years of longitudinal observations in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Martin; Martins, Isabel P; Castro-Caldas, Alexandre; Bernardo, Mario; Luis, Henrique; Amaral, Helena; Leitão, Jorge; Martin, Michael D; Townes, Brenda; Rosenbaum, Gail; Woods, James S; Derouen, Timothy

    2008-02-01

    Although large-scale, randomized trials involving children have been completed and their results demonstrate an absence of neurobehavioral effects from clinical exposure to mercury amalgam, neurological findings from such studies have not been reported. The authors conducted a randomized, prospective trial examining the safety of dental amalgam in which 507 children aged 8 through 12 years were assigned to treatment with either amalgam or resin-based composite. During seven years of follow-up, the authors performed annual clinical neurological examinations, including an evaluation of neurological hard signs (NHSs), presence of tremor and neurological soft signs (NSSs). The authors found no significant differences between treatment groups in any of the neurological measures. Groups did not differ with respect to the presence or absence of NHSs or tremor, nor the presence or absence or severity of NSSs at any point. As expected, NSS severity scores diminished with increasing age. Even at the levels of amalgam exposure in this study (a mean of 7.7-10.7 amalgam surfaces per subject across the seven years of follow-up), the authors conclude that exposure to mercury from dental amalgam does not adversely affect neurological status. The current evidence is that potential neurobehavioral or neurological effects from dental amalgam mercury exposure in children are inconsequential.

  16. Neurological aspects of eclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Dejana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The difficult types of preeclampsia and eclampsia are presented with the neurological symptoms. The break of cerebral autoregulation mechanism plays the most important role in pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm. Nevertheless eclampsia isn’t just an ordinary hypertensive encephalopathy because other pathogenic mechanisms are involved in its appearance. The main neuropathologic changes are multifocal vasogenic edema, perivascular multiple microinfarctions and petechial hemorrhages. Neurological clinical manifestations are convulsions, headache, visual disturbances and rarely other discrete focal neurological symptoms. Eclampsia is a high-risk factor for onset of hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke. This is a reason why neurological diagnostic tests are sometimes needed. The method of choice for evaluation of complicated eclampsia is computerized brain topography that shows multiple areas of hypodensity in occipitoparietal regions. These changes are focal vasogenic cerebral edema. For differential diagnosis of eclampsia and stroke other diagnostic methods can be used - fundoscopic exam, magnetic resonance brain imaging, cerebral angiography and cerebrospinal fluid exam. The therapy of eclampsia considers using of magnesium sulfate, antihypertensive, anticonvulsive and antiedematous drugs.

  17. Prehospital predictors of neurological outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients aged 95 years and older: A nationwide population-based observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funada, Akira; Goto, Yoshikazu; Maeda, Tetsuo; Tada, Hayato; Teramoto, Ryota; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Kenshi; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2017-01-01

    Population aging has rapidly progressed in Japan. However, few data exist regarding the characteristics of extremely elderly patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We aimed to determine the prehospital predictors of one-month survival with favorable neurological outcomes (Cerebral Performance Category scale, category 1 or 2; CPC 1-2) in this population. We investigated 23,520 OHCA patients aged ≥95 years from a prospectively recorded, nationwide, Utstein-style Japanese database between 2008 and 2012. The primary study endpoint was one-month CPC 1-2 after OHCA. The one-month CPC 1-2 rate was 0.27% (63/23,520). Only two variables were significantly associated with one-month CPC 1-2 in a multivariate logistic regression model: prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) [adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 94.4; 95% confidential interval (CI), 50.1-191.7] and emergency medical service (EMS)-witnessed arrest (aOR, 5.1; 95% CI, 2.6-10.2). When stratified by these two predictors, the one-month CPC 1-2 rates were 20.2% (18/89) for patients who had both prehospital ROSC and EMS-witnessed arrest, 4.2% (33/783) for those who had prehospital ROSC without EMS-witnessed arrest, 0.28% (3/1065) for those who had EMS-witnessed arrest without prehospital ROSC, and 0.04% (9/21,583) for those who had neither predictor, respectively. The crucial prehospital predictors for one-month CPC 1-2 in elderly OHCA patients aged ≥95 years in Japan were prehospital ROSC and EMS-witnessed arrest and the former was the predominant predictor. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cognitive outcome after awake surgery for tumors in language areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, B; Talacchi, A; Squintani, G; Casagrande, F; Capasso, R; Miceli, G

    2012-06-01

    In surgery for tumors of the dominant hemisphere, the attention devoted to quality of resection and preservation of language function has not been accompanied by comparable interest in preservation of cognitive abilities which may affect quality of life. We studied 22 patients undergoing awake surgery for glioma removal in the language areas of the brain. Besides monitoring tumor variables (size, location, histology, edema), we used a multifaceted battery of tests to investigate mood, cognition, and language in an attempt to assess the burden of disease and treatment, and the relationships between these three dimensions. Baseline assessment showed that 45% of the patients were depressed and 23% anxious; some cognitive and language impairment was noted for 59 and 50%, respectively. A general decline in postoperative cognitive performance (significant for memory and attention only) and language function (significant for picture naming) was observed, whereas depression was unchanged and anxiety decreased. Tumor histology, but not demographic variables or extent of resection, correlated with postoperative cognitive changes: patients undergoing surgery for high-grade tumors were more likely to improve. No correlation was observed between scores for mood, cognition, and language function. A subset of patients with low-grade glioma was followed up for 3-6 months; although some improvement was observed they did not always regain their preoperative performance. In conclusion, we believe that cognitive assessment performed in conjunction with language testing is a necessary step in the global evaluation of brain tumor patients both before and after surgery.

  19. A Quality Assessment of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures for Sexual Function in Neurologic Patients Using the Consensus-based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments Checklist: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hoen, Lisette A; Groen, Jan; Scheepe, Jeroen R; Reuvers, Sarah; Diaz, David Castro; Fernández, Bárbara Padilla; Del Popolo, Giulio; Musco, Stefania; Hamid, Rizwan; Ecclestone, Hazel; Karsenty, Gilles; Phé, Veronique; Boissier, Romain; Kessler, Thomas M; Gross, Tobias; Schneider, Marc P; Pannek, Jürgen; Blok, Bertil F M

    2016-06-23

    Impaired sexual function has a significant effect on quality of life. Various patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are available to evaluate sexual function. The quality of the PROMs to be used for neurologic patients remains unknown. To systematically review which validated PROMs are available to evaluate sexual function in neurologic patients and to critically assess the quality of the validation studies and measurement properties for each identified PROM. A systematic review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis statement. The included publications were assessed according to the Consensus-Based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments checklist. Twenty-one studies for PROMs regarding sexual function were identified for the following patient groups: spinal cord injury (11 studies), multiple sclerosis (MS; 6 studies), Parkinson's disease (2 studies), traumatic brain injury (1 study), and epilepsy (1 study). The evidence for the quality of PROMs was found to be variable, and overall evaluation of measurement properties was lacking in 71% of the studies. The measurement error and responsiveness were not studied in any of the publications. Several PROMs have been identified to evaluate sexual function in neurologic patients. Strong evidence was found only for the Multiple Sclerosis Intimacy and Sexuality Questionnaire-15 and Multiple Sclerosis Intimacy and Sexuality Questionnaire-19 for patients with MS, although evidence was lacking for certain measurement properties as well. Future research should focus on identifying relevant PROMs and establishing adequate quality for all measurement properties in studies with high methodological quality. A quality assessment of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for sexual function in neurologic patients was made. The evidence found for good PROMs was limited. Studies with high methodological quality are needed to improve the quality of

  20. Advocacy in neurology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pauranik, Apoorva

    2008-01-01

    ...), launched the Neurological Alliance of Ireland, a nationwide coalition of patient advocacy groups and physicians and authored Standards of Care, the "blueprint" for the development of neurological...

  1. Palliative care and neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  2. Clinical prospective study of biochemical markers and evoked potentials for identifying adverse neurological outcome after thoracic and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lases, E.C.; Schepens, M.A.; Haas, F.J.L.M.; Aarts, L.P.H.J.; Beek, H.T. ter; Dongen, E. van; Siegers, H.P.; Tweel, I. van de; Boezeman, E.H.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neurological deficit after repair of a thoracic or thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAA/TAAA) remains a devastating complication. The aim of our study was to investigate the clinical value of biochemical markers [S-100B, neurone-specific enolase (NSE) and lactate dehydrogenase (LD)],

  3. Religiosity and behavioral health outcomes of adolescents living in disaster-vulnerable areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Theda; Shields, Joseph; Tueller, Stephen; Larson, Sharon

    2015-04-01

    The influence of religiosity on behavioral health outcomes among adolescents living in disaster-prone areas has been understudied. This study utilized data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (2005-2010) to examine the relationship between religion, depression, marijuana use, and binge drinking. The sample included 12,500 adolescents residing in the Gulf Coast region of the USA. Results show that religious salience was directly related to depression, marijuana, and binge drinking. It was also indirectly related to both substance use outcomes through depression. Religious service attendance was unrelated to any of the outcomes. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  4. A global assessment of the social and conservation outcomes of protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldekop, J A; Holmes, G; Harris, W E; Evans, K L

    2016-02-01

    Protected areas (PAs) are a key strategy for protecting biological resources, but they vary considerably in their effectiveness and are frequently reported as having negative impacts on local people. This has contributed to a divisive and unresolved debate concerning the compatibility of environmental and socioeconomic development goals. Elucidating the relationship between positive and negative social impacts and conservation outcomes of PAs is key for the development of more effective and socially just conservation. We conducted a global meta-analysis on 165 PAs using data from 171 published studies. We assessed how PAs affect the well-being of local people, the factors associated with these impacts, and crucially the relationship between PAs' conservation and socioeconomic outcomes. Protected areas associated with positive socioeconomic outcomes were more likely to report positive conservation outcomes. Positive conservation and socioeconomic outcomes were more likely to occur when PAs adopted comanagement regimes, empowered local people, reduced economic inequalities, and maintained cultural and livelihood benefits. Whereas the strictest regimes of PA management attempted to exclude anthropogenic influences to achieve biological conservation objectives, PAs that explicitly integrated local people as stakeholders tended to be more effective at achieving joint biological conservation and socioeconomic development outcomes. Strict protection may be needed in some circumstances, yet our results demonstrate that conservation and development objectives can be synergistic and highlight management strategies that increase the probability of maximizing both conservation performance and development outcomes of PAs. © 2015 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  5. Neurology advanced practice providers: A position paper of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Heidi B; Fritz, Joseph V; Govindarajan, Raghav; Penfold Murray, Rebecca; Boyle, Kathryn B; Getchius, Thomas S D; Freimer, Miriam

    2015-08-01

    There are many factors driving health care reform, including unsustainable costs, poor outcomes, an aging populace, and physician shortages. These issues are particularly relevant to neurology. New reimbursement models are based on value and facilitated by the use of multidisciplinary teams. Integration of advanced practice providers (APPs) into neurology practice offers many advantages with new models of care. Conversely, there are many and varied challenges financially and logistically with these practice models. The American Academy of Neurology has formed a Work Group to address the needs of both neurologists and neurologic APPs and monitor the effect of APPs on quality and cost of neurologic care.

  6. Neurological aspects of grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Adriana C; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Natalia P; de Mello Schier, Alexandre R; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flavia; Nardi, Antonio E; Machado, Sergio; Pessoa, Tamires M

    2014-01-01

    Despite grief being a universal experience and the increased scientific attention paid to grief and bereavement in recent years, studies that seek to better understand the role of the neurological aspects of grief are still scarce. We found 5 studies that discussed the relationship between the neurological aspects of grief due to the death of a loved one. All studies showed an activation of common areas, i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), insula and amygdala. These findings could indicate that there is a group of areas working together and responding to generate the symptomatology of grief. Because grief is a universal experience, it is essential that the necessary and effective support can be provided to those who experience the loss of someone considered important in their lives, and this requires understanding grief's manifestation, its differential diagnosis in reference to other clinical conditions, mainly psychiatric ones, and adequate forms of intervention and treatment when necessary. Proper understanding and support can help prevent the emergence of more serious health problems.

  7. Single versus Serial Measurements of Neuron-Specific Enolase and Prediction of Poor Neurological Outcome in Persistently Unconscious Patients after Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - A TTM-Trial Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Hassager, Christian; Stammet, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prediction of neurological outcome is a crucial part of post cardiac arrest care and prediction in patients remaining unconscious and/or sedated after rewarming from targeted temperature management (TTM) remains difficult. Current guidelines suggest the use of serial measurements...... of the biomarker neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in combination with other predictors of outcome in patients admitted after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). This study sought to investigate the ability of NSE to predict poor outcome in patients remaining unconscious at day three after OHCA. In addition......) of 0.83. A combination of all three NSE measurements yielded the highest discovered AUC (0.88, p = .0002). Easily applicable combinations of serial NSE measurements did not significantly improve prediction over a single measurement at 48 hours (AUC 0.58-0.84 versus 0.83). CONCLUSION: NSE is a strong...

  8. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions.

  9. Neurological complications of chickenpox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girija A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the neurological complications of chickenpox with prognosis. Background: The neurological complications occur in 0.03% of persons who get chickenpox. There is no universal vaccination against chicken pox in India. Most patients prefer alternate modalities of treatment. Hence these complications of chickenpox are likely to continue to occur. Study Design: A prospective study was conducted for 2 years (from March 2002 on the admitted cases with neurological complications after chickenpox (with rash or scar. Patients were investigated with CT/MRI, CSF study, EEG and nerve conduction studies and hematological workup. They were followed-up for 1 year and outcome assessed using modified Rankin scale. Results: The latency for the neurological complications was 4-32 days (mean: 16.32 days. There were 18 cases: 10 adults (64% and 8 children (36%. Cerebellar ataxia (normal CT/MRI was observed in 7 cases (32% (mean age: 6.85 years. One patient (6 years had acute right hemiparesis in the fifth week due to left capsular infarct. All these cases spontaneously recovered by 4 weeks. The age range of the adult patients was 13-47 years (mean: 27 years. The manifestations included cerebellar and pyramidal signs (n-4 with features of demyelination in MRI who recovered spontaneously or with methylprednisolone by 8 weeks. Patient with encephalitis recovered in 2 weeks with acyclovir. Guillain Barre syndrome of the demyelinating type (n-2 was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG and they had a slow recovery by a modified Rankin scale (mRs score of 3 and 2 at 6 months and 1 year, respectively. One case died after hemorrhage into the occipital infarct. There were two cases of asymmetrical neuropathy, one each of the seventh cranial and brachial neuritis. Conclusion: Spontaneous recovery occurs in post-chickenpox cerebellar ataxia. Rarely, serious complications can occur in adults. The demyelinating disorders, either of the central or peripheral

  10. Sleep Disorders in Childhood Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Tolaymat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep problems are frequently addressed as a primary or secondary concern during the visit to the pediatric neurology clinic. Sleep disorders can mimic other neurologic diseases (e.g., epilepsy and movement disorders, and this adds challenges to the diagnostic process. Sleep disorders can significantly affect the quality of life and functionality of children in general and those with comorbid neurological diseases in particular. Understanding the pathophysiology of sleep disorders, recognizing the implications of sleep disorder in children with neurologic diseases and behavioral difficulties, and early intervention continue to evolve resulting in better neurocognitive outcomes.

  11. Quality Metrics in Inpatient Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Amar

    2015-12-01

    Quality of care in the context of inpatient neurology is the standard of performance by neurologists and the hospital system as measured against ideal models of care. There are growing regulatory pressures to define health care value through concrete quantifiable metrics linked to reimbursement. Theoretical models of quality acknowledge its multimodal character with quantitative and qualitative dimensions. For example, the Donabedian model distils quality as a phenomenon of three interconnected domains, structure-process-outcome, with each domain mutually influential. The actual measurement of quality may be implicit, as in peer review in morbidity and mortality rounds, or explicit, in which criteria are prespecified and systemized before assessment. As a practical contribution, in this article a set of candidate quality indicators for inpatient neurology based on an updated review of treatment guidelines is proposed. These quality indicators may serve as an initial blueprint for explicit quality metrics long overdue for inpatient neurology. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Acute hospitalization and discharge outcome of neurologically intact trauma patients sustaining thoracolumbar vertebral fractures managed conservatively with thoracolumbosacral orthoses and physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorre, P J

    1999-02-01

    To identify the acute hospital discharge functional status achieved and the amount of physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) received by neurologically intact patients with thoracolumbar vertebral fractures managed only by bracing with a custom-molded thoracolumbosacral orthosis (TLSO). These patients would be expected to ambulate independently soon after receiving their TLSOs unless they had concomitant lower extremity injuries, but they may need assistance with lower extremity activities of daily living. Retrospective study. Urban, level I trauma center. Twenty-seven subjects who sustained one or more thoracolumbar fractures, were neurologically intact, and were managed nonoperatively with a custom-molded TLSO. Median time to TLSO arrival, start of PT, number of PT sessions, time to ambulate independently from admission, and length of stay (LOS). Median time to TLSO arrival was 2 days, start of PT was 4 days, number of PT sessions was one, time to ambulate independently from admission was 3(1/2) days, and LOS was 5 days. Subjects with lower extremity fractures required significantly (p TLSO ambulate independently after receiving one or two sessions of PT and can be discharged home on the same day of PT clearance. Patients with lower-extremity fractures need more PT to achieve independent ambulation. The consequences of a minority of these patients being evaluated and seen by OT are not fully known. Future research may be able to document the need for more OT services.

  13. [Neurorehabilitation, neurology, rehabilitation medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbán, Edina; Szél, István; Fáy, Veronika; Dénes, Zoltán; Lippai, Zoltán; Fazekas, Gábor

    2013-05-30

    We have read several publications of great authority on the neurological profession in the last two years in which were expressed assessments of the current situation combined with opinions about neurology and the necessity to reorganize neurological patient care. These articles took up the question of neurorehabilitation too. The authors, who on a daily basis, deal with the rehabilitation of people with disabilities as a consequence of neurological conditions, summarize some important definitions of rehabilitation medicine and the present system of neurological rehabilitation, as it is defined by the rehabilitation profession.

  14. Neurology at the bedside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Waldemar, Gunhild

    This updated and expanded new edition takes neurology trainees by the hand and guides them through the whole patient encounter - from an efficient neurological history and bedside examination through to differential diagnosis, diagnostic procedures and treatment. At each step the expert authors......, as have new chapters including neurogenetics, neurorehabilitation, neurocritical care and heuristic neurological reasoning. In addition, this second edition now includes more than 100 unique case histories. Neurology at the Bedside, Second Edition is written for neurologists in all stages of training....... Medical students, general practitioners and others with an interest in neurology will also find invaluable information here....

  15. Area racism and birth outcomes among Blacks in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, David H; Clouston, Sean; Martz, Connor D; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Cooper, Hannah L F; Turpin, Rodman; Stephens-Davidowitz, Seth; Kramer, Michael R

    2017-04-13

    There is increasing evidence that racism is a cause of poor health outcomes in the United States, including adverse birth outcomes among Blacks. However, research on the health consequences of racism has faced measurement challenges due to the more subtle nature of contemporary racism, which is not necessarily amenable to assessment through traditionally used survey methods. In this study, we circumvent some of these limitations by examining a previously developed Internet query-based proxy of area racism (Stephens-Davidowitz, 2014) in relation to preterm birth and low birthweight among Blacks. Area racism was measured in 196 designated market areas as the proportion of total Google searches conducted between 2004 and 2007 containing the "n-word." This measure was linked to county-level birth data among Blacks between 2005 and 2008, which were compiled by the National Center for Health Statistics; preterm birth and low birthweight were defined as racism was associated with relative increases of 5% in the prevalence of preterm birth and 5% in the prevalence of low birthweight among Blacks. Our study provides evidence for the utility of an Internet query-based measure as a proxy for racism at the area-level in epidemiologic studies, and is also suggestive of the role of racism in contributing to poor birth outcomes among Blacks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-term reintegration and quality of life in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and a good neurological outcome: findings after more than 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonesson, Bengt; Kronvall, Erik; Säveland, Hans; Brandt, Lennart; Nilsson, Ola G

    2017-04-28

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to examine long-term quality of life (QOL) and reintegration in patients with good neurological recovery after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and SAH of unknown cause (SAH NUD). METHODS A long-term follow-up was performed in an original cohort of 113 individuals who had suffered SAH (93 with aSAH and 20 with SAH NUD) between 1977 and 1984. Self-reporting assessments, performed > 20 years after the bleeding episode, included the Quality of Life Scale (QOLS), Psychological General Well-Being (PGWB) index, and Reintegration to Normal Living (RNL) index, along with information on sleep disturbances and work status. RESULTS Seventy-one survivors were identified. Questionnaires were returned by 67 individuals who had suffered SAH 20-28 years previously. The QOL was rated in the normal range for both the QOLS score (aSAH 90.3 vs SAH NUD 88.6) and the PGWB index (aSAH 105.9 vs SAH NUD 102.8). Ninety percent of patients had returned to their previous employment. Complete RNL was reported by 40% of patients with aSAH and by 46% of patients with SAH NUD; mild to moderate readjustment difficulties by 55% and 38%, respectively; and severe difficulties by 5% of patients with aSAH and 15% of patients with SAH NUD. Self-rated aspects of cognition, mood, and energy resources in addition resulted in a substantial drop in overall reintegration. Sleep disturbances were reported by 26%. CONCLUSIONS More than half of patients with SAH who had early good neurological recovery experienced reintegration difficulties after > 20 years. However, the general QOL was not adversely affected by this impairment. Inability to return to work after SAH was associated with lower QOLS scores. Sleep disturbances were associated with lower PGWB scores.

  17. Profile of Neurological admissions at the University of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The burden of Neurological diseases may be on the increase especially in developing countries. Improved outcome in these settings may require appreciation of the spectrum of Neurological diseases and the impediments to their management. We aim to determine the profile of neurological admissions and ...

  18. Effect of preparation surface area on the clinical outcome of full veneer crowns in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Jessica; Soukup, Jason W; Collins, Caitlyn; Siverling, Sarah; Ploeg, Heidi-Lynn; Snyder, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Crown therapy is commonly used in veterinary medicine to provide support to teeth which have previously fractured, received root canal therapy, have significant wear, or experienced other detrimental removal of tooth substance. As with several aspects of veterinary medicine, many of the recommendations or guidelines for crown therapy originate from human dentistry, which are then transferred to veterinary patients. Due to the significant difference in the anatomy of teeth and function of the oral cavity between humans and dogs, these guidelines need to be studied to determine the appropriateness of their use in veterinary patients. This article evaluates the relationship between surface area of the preparation and clinical outcome of full veneer crown therapy of the canine tooth in dogs. Although there appeared to be a positive relationship between preparations with greater surface area and successful clinical outcome, it was not found to be statistically significant.

  19. Serial brain MRI and ultrasound findings: relation to gestational age, bilirubin level, neonatal neurologic status and neurodevelopmental outcome in infants at risk of kernicterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkoltsiou, Konstantina; Tzoufi, Meropi; Counsell, Serena; Rutherford, Mary; Cowan, Frances

    2008-12-01

    To describe cranial ultrasound (cUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in neonates at risk of kernicterus, in relation to gestational age (GA), total serum bilirubin (TSB), age at imaging and neurodevelopmental outcome. Neonates with peak TSB > 400 micromol/L and/or signs of bilirubin encephalopathy. Review of neonatal data, cUS, preterm, term and later MRI scans and neurodevelopmental outcome. 11 infants were studied, two kernicterus are not seen early remains unexplained.

  20. Chapter 38: American neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemon, Frank R

    2010-01-01

    The great formative event in the history of North America, the Civil War of 1861 to 1865, was the stimulus for the development of clinical neurology and the neurosciences. The first neurological research center on the continent was the US Army hospital at Turner's Lane, Philadelphia, PA. Silas Weir Mitchell and his colleagues described causalgia (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), phantom limb sensation, and Horner's syndrome (before Horner). The medical leader of the Northern army was William Hammond. After the conclusion of hostilities, he began a huge clinical practice in New York City. In the United States, clinical neurology began in private practice, unlike Europe, where neurology began in institutions. Hammond's textbook, which first used the term athetosis, was used by a generation of physicians who encountered patients with neurological signs and symptoms. Early in the 20th century, neurological institutions were formed around universities; probably the most famous was the Montreal Neurological Institute founded by Wilder Penfield. The US federal government sponsored extensive research into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system through the Neurological Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, later called the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. The government officially classified the final 10 years of the 20th century as the Decade of the Brain and provided an even greater level of research funding.

  1. Duration of Prehospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Favorable Neurological Outcomes for Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Nationwide, Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Funada, Akira; Goto, Yumiko

    2016-12-20

    The appropriate duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) remains unclear and may differ based on initial rhythm. We aimed to determine the relationship between the duration of prehospital CPR by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel and post-OHCA outcomes. We analyzed the records of 12 877 pediatric patients who experienced OHCAs (Prehospital EMS-initiated CPR duration was defined as the time from CPR initiation by EMS personnel to prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or to hospital arrival when prehospital ROSC was not achieved during prehospital CPR efforts. The rates of 30-day survival and 30-day CPC 1 to 2 were 9.1% (n=1167) and 2.5% (n=325), respectively. Prehospital EMS-initiated CPR duration was significantly and inversely associated with 30-day outcomes (adjusted odds ratio for 1-minute increments: 0.94, 95% confidence interval: 0.93-0.95 for survival; adjusted odds ratio: 0.90, 95% confidence interval: 0.88-0.92 for CPC 1-2). The duration of prehospital EMS-initiated CPR, beyond which the chance for favorable outcomes diminished to prehospital EMS-initiated CPR durations beyond which the chance for 30-day survival with CPC 1 to 2 diminished to prehospital CPR duration, beyond which the chance for favorable outcome diminished to Prehospital EMS-initiated CPR duration for pediatric OHCAs was independently and inversely associated with 30-day favorable outcomes. The duration of prehospital EMS-initiated CPR, beyond which the chance for 30-day favorable outcomes diminished to <1%, was 42 minutes. However, the CPR duration to achieve this proportion of outcomes differed based on initial rhythm. Further research is required to elucidate appropriate CPR duration for pediatric OHCAs, including in-hospital CPR time. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02432196. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Towards quantitative condition assessment of biodiversity outcomes: Insights from Australian marine protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Prue F E; Flander, Louisa B; Cook, Carly N

    2017-08-01

    Protected area management effectiveness (PAME) evaluation is increasingly undertaken to evaluate governance, assess conservation outcomes and inform evidence-based management of protected areas (PAs). Within PAME, quantitative approaches to assess biodiversity outcomes are now emerging, where biological monitoring data are directly assessed against quantitative (numerically defined) condition categories (termed quantitative condition assessments). However, more commonly qualitative condition assessments are employed in PAME, which use descriptive condition categories and are evaluated largely with expert judgement that can be subject to a range of biases, such as linguistic uncertainty and overconfidence. Despite the benefits of increased transparency and repeatability of evaluations, quantitative condition assessments are rarely used in PAME. To understand why, we interviewed practitioners from all Australian marine protected area (MPA) networks, which have access to long-term biological monitoring data and are developing or conducting PAME evaluations. Our research revealed that there is a desire within management agencies to implement quantitative condition assessment of biodiversity outcomes in Australian MPAs. However, practitioners report many challenges in transitioning from undertaking qualitative to quantitative condition assessments of biodiversity outcomes, which are hampering progress. Challenges include a lack of agency capacity (staff numbers and money), knowledge gaps, and diminishing public and political support for PAs. We point to opportunities to target strategies that will assist agencies overcome these challenges, including new decision support tools, approaches to better finance conservation efforts, and to promote more management relevant science. While a single solution is unlikely to achieve full evidence-based conservation, we suggest ways for agencies to target strategies and advance PAME evaluations toward best practice. Copyright

  3. Focal neurological deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or head Electromyogram (EMG), nerve conduction velocities (NCV) MRI of the back, neck, or head Spinal tap Alternative Names Neurological deficits - focal Images Brain References Daroff RB, Jankovic ...

  4. Low-grade astrocytoma: surgical outcomes in eloquent versus non-eloquent brain areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André de Macedo Bianco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of 81 patients with low-grade astrocytoma (LGA comparing the efficacy of aggressive versus less aggressive surgery in eloquent and non-eloquent brain areas was conducted. Extent of surgical resection was analyzed to assess overall survival (OS and progression- free survival (PFS. Degree of tumor resection was classified as gross total resection (GTR, subtotal resection (STR or biopsy. GTR, STR and biopsy in patients with tumors in non-eloquent areas were performed in 31, 48 and 21% subjects, whereas in patients with tumors in eloquent areas resections were 22.5, 35 and 42.5%. Overall survival was 4.7 and 1.9 years in patients with tumors in non-eloquent brain areas submitted to GTR/STR and biopsy (p=0.013, whereas overall survival among patients with tumors in eloquent area was 4.5 and 2.1 years (p=0.33. Improved outcome for adult patients with LGA is predicted by more aggressive surgery in both eloquent and non-eloquent brain areas.

  5. Understanding local-scale drivers of biodiversity outcomes in terrestrial protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Megan D; Craigie, Ian D; Dudley, Nigel; Hockings, Marc

    2017-07-01

    Conservation relies heavily on protected areas (PAs) maintaining their key biodiversity features to meet global biodiversity conservation goals. However, PAs have had variable success, with many failing to fully maintain their biodiversity features. The current literature concerning what drives variability in PA performance is rapidly expanding but unclear, sometimes contradictory, and spread across multiple disciplines. A clear understanding of the drivers of successful biodiversity conservation in PAs is necessary to make them fully effective. Here, we conduct a comprehensive assessment of the current state of knowledge concerning the drivers of biological outcomes within PAs, focusing on those that can be addressed at local scales. We evaluate evidence in support of potential drivers to identify those that enable more successful outcomes and those that impede success and provide a synthetic review. Interactions are discussed where they are known, and we highlight gaps in understanding. We find that elements of PA design, management, and local and national governance challenges, species and system ecology, and sociopolitical context can all influence outcomes. Adjusting PA management to focus on actions and policies that influence the key drivers identified here could improve global biodiversity outcomes. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. [Application of psychophysics to neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi

    2008-04-01

    Although psychophysics has already been used in many neurological evaluations including the visual and hearing tests, the use of psychophysics has been limited to the evaluation of sensory disorders. In this review paper, however, the author introduced recent attempts to apply psychophysics to the evaluation of higher cognitive functions such as perception of scenes and facial expressions. Psychophysics was also used to measure visual hypersensitivity in a patient with migraine. The benefits of the use of psychophysics in neurological and neuropsychological settings would be as follows. (1) We can evaluate higher cognitive functions quantitatively. (2) We can measure performance both above and below the normal range by the same method. (3) We can use the same stimulus and task as other research areas such as neuroscience and neuroimaging, and compare results between research areas.

  7. Information technology, the internet, and the future of neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulden, Sarah A

    2003-05-01

    This review addresses the impact of information technology and the Internet on the current and future practice of neurology. Information technology is influencing medical practice in ways that could be both beneficial and harmful. Scenarios are presented to depict some of the ways in which the practice of neurology is being influenced by the growth of technology. First, the advantages and disadvantages of e-mail as a means of doctor-patient communication are presented. Some of the ethical and legal issues arising in this context are discussed.Second, the Internet is changing neurologists' relationships to other professionals in the health care industry. Geographical isolation is less problematic than in the past. Telemedicine, including remote consulting via the Web, has special implications for neurologists in several areas, including stroke management, movement disorders, and epilepsy.Third, the growing availability of large databases, powerful search engines, and online full-text journals is discussed. Skill in navigating and managing these resources will become increasingly important. New computer-assisted decision support systems will continue to be implemented. Applications exist or are being developed for use by clinicians for many specific neurologic disorders.Finally, some of the problematic issues concerning medical use of the Internet are discussed, including availability, portability, security, quality, and outcomes. Medical information systems, with their attendant advantages and limitations, will become increasingly significant in the practice of neurology. Despite overall improvement in access to information, major barriers still exist to the proper implementation and utilization of truly integrated information systems.

  8. Functional neurological disorders: imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, V

    2014-10-01

    Functional neurological disorders, also known as conversion disorder, are unexplained neurological symptoms. These symptoms are common and can be associated with significant consequences. This review covers the neuroimaging literature focusing on functional motor symptoms including motor functioning and upstream influences including self-monitoring and internal representations, voluntariness and arousal and trauma. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  9. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Living with HIV/AIDS × What research is being done? The National Institute of Neurological ... the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Living with HIV/AIDS See More About Research The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke ( ...

  10. Symptom prevalence, severity and palliative care needs assessment using the Palliative Outcome Scale: a cross-sectional study of patients with Parkinson's disease and related neurological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Tariq Z; Higginson, Irene J; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Martin, Anne; Burman, Rachel; Leigh, P Nigel

    2013-09-01

    Palliative care is rarely being offered to patients with Parkinson's disease. To assess symptom prevalence, severity and palliative care needs in advanced stages of Parkinsonism. A cross-sectional survey using a palliative care assessment tool, the Palliative Outcome Scale was administered to patients. Eight-two patients with a diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease, multiple systems atrophy or progressive supranuclear palsy were included in the study. Their mean age and disease stages 3-5 Hoehn and Yahr were 67 years and 4.1, respectively. Patients reported a mean of 10.7 (standard deviation = 3.9) physical symptoms. Over 80% had pain, fatigue, day time somnolence and problems with mobility. Other symptoms in 50%-80% included constipation, loss of bladder control, swallowing difficulties, drooling, breathlessness and sleep problems. Symptoms rated as causing severe problems were pain, fatigue, constipation and drooling. Assessment of mood revealed 70% of the patients felt anxiety and 60% had felt depressed. Eight-five per cent felt their families were anxious or worried about them. Thirty-eight per cent would have liked more information and 42% had practical problems that still needed to be addressed. There was a positive correlation between number of symptoms and disease severity (r = 0.39, p = 0.01). The total mean Palliative Outcome Scale score was 13.6 (standard deviation = 6.1), suggesting moderate palliative care needs. This is the first study to describe the care needs of people with Parkinson's disease using the Palliative Outcome Scale tool. The burden of symptoms and concerns was high in advanced stages of disease. It might be appropriate that people severely affected by these conditions should be considered for referral to specialist palliative care services.

  11. Analgesia-sedation in PICU and neurological outcome: a secondary analysis of long-term neuropsychological follow-up in meningococcal septic shock survivors*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zellem, Lennart; Utens, Elisabeth M; de Wildt, Saskia N; Vet, Nienke J; Tibboel, Dick; Buysse, Corinne

    2014-03-01

    To investigate whether analgesic and sedative drug use during PICU treatment is associated with long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in children who survived meningococcal septic shock. This study concerned a secondary analysis of data from medical and psychological follow-up of a cross-sectional cohort of all consecutive surviving patients with septic shock and purpura requiring intensive care treatment between 1988 and 2001 at the Erasmus MC-Sophia Children's Hospital. At least 4 years after PICU admission, these children showed impairments on several domains of neuropsychological functioning. In the present study, type, number, and dose of sedatives and analgesics were retrospectively evaluated. Tertiary care university hospital. Seventy-seven meningococcal septic shock survivors (median age, 2.1 yr). None. Forty-five patients (58%) received one or more analgesic and/or sedative drugs during PICU admission, most commonly benzodiazepines (n = 39; 51%), followed by opioids (n = 23; 30%). In total, 12 different kinds of analgesic or sedative drugs were given. The use and dose of opioids were significantly associated with poor test outcome on full-scale intelligence quotient (p = 0.02; Z = -2.28), verbal intelligence quotient (p = 0.02; Z = -2.32), verbal intelligence quotient subtests (verbal comprehension [p = 0.01; Z = -2.56] and vocabulary [p = 0.01; Z = -2.45]), and visual attention/executive functioning (Trial Making Test part B) (p = 0.03; Z = -2.17). In multivariate analysis adjusting for patient and disease characteristics, the use of opioids remained significant on most neuropsychological tests. The use of opioids during PICU admission was significantly associated with long-term adverse neuropsychological outcome independent of severity of illness scores in meningococcal septic shock survivors.

  12. Body Mass Index and Total Psoas Area Affect Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Pneumonectomy for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervochon, Remi; Bobbio, Antonio; Guinet, Claude; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Rabbat, Antoine; Régnard, Jean-François; Roche, Nicolas; Damotte, Diane; Iannelli, Antonio; Alifano, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Hypothesizing that morphometric measurements are reliable markers of fitness in patients with lung cancer requiring aggressive surgical intervention, the purpose of this study was to assess their impact on postoperative outcome and long-term survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) requiring pneumonectomy. Height, weight, and body mass index (BMI), as well as usual clinical, laboratory (including C-reactive protein [CRP] concentrations), and pathologic data were retrospectively retrieved from files of 161 consecutive patients treated by pneumonectomy for NSCLC, whose preoperative computed tomographic (CT) scans were available in the Picture Archive and Communication System (PACS) of the hospital. Cross-sectional areas of right and left psoas areas (measured by CT scan at the L3 level), perirenal fat thickness, and anterior subcutaneous tissue thickness at the left renal vein level were also assessed. BMI and total psoas area were strongly and directly correlated (p = 0.0000001), whereas BMI was inversely related to CRP levels. Sarcopenia (total psoas area ≤33rd percentile) was associated with high CRP levels (>20 mg/L) (p = 0.010). Factors associated with 90-day mortality included older age (p = 0.000045), lower body weight (p = 0.032), and BMI less than or equal to 25 kg/m 2 (p = 0.013). At univariate analysis, long-term outcome was negatively affected by a nonsquamous cell histologic type (p = 0.011), pathologic stage IIIB-IV (p =0.026), CRP levels greater than 20 mg/L (p = 0.017), BMI less than or equal to 25 kg/m 2 (p = 0.010), and total psoas area less than or equal to the 33rd percentile (p = 0.029). Multivariate analysis showed the independent prognostic value of both BMI and total psoas area. BMI less than or equal to 25 kg/m 2 and total psoas cross-sectional area less than or equal to the 33rd percentile are prognostic determinants in patients with NSCLC requiring pneumonectomy. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic

  13. Child Neurology Education for Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V F; Patel, Anup D; Behnam-Terneus, Maria; Sautu, Beatriz Cunill-De; Verbeck, Nicole; McQueen, Alisa; Fromme, H Barrett; Mahan, John D

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the current state of child neurology education during pediatric residency provides adequate preparation for pediatric practice. A survey was sent to recent graduates from 3 pediatric residency programs to assess graduate experience, perceived level of competence, and desire for further education in child neurology. Responses from generalists versus subspecialists were compared. The response rate was 32%, half in general pediatric practice. Only 22% feel very confident in approaching patients with neurologic problems. This may represent the best-case scenario as graduates from these programs had required neurology experiences, whereas review of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency curricula revealed that the majority of residencies do not. Pediatric neurologic problems are common, and pediatric residency graduates do encounter such problems in practice. The majority of pediatricians report some degree of confidence; however, some clear areas for improvement are apparent.

  14. Survival and neurological outcomes after nasopharyngeal cooling or peripheral vein cold saline infusion initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Barbut, Denise; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Cho, Jun Hwi; Sun, Shijie; Li, Yongqin; Weil, Max Harry; Tang, Wanchun

    2010-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves the success of resuscitation. In this study, we compared the effects of nasopharyngeal cooling with cold saline infusion initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on resuscitation outcome in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest. We hypothesized that nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation would yield better resuscitation outcome when compared with cold saline infusion. Randomized, prospective animal study. University-affiliated research laboratory. Yorkshire-X domestic pigs (Sus scrofa). Ventricular fibrillation was induced in 14 pigs weighing 38 +/- 2 kg. After 15 mins of untreated ventricular fibrillation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed for 5 mins before defibrillation. Coincident with the start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, animals were randomly assigned to receive nasopharyngeal cooling with the aid of the RhinoChill Device (BeneChill, San Diego, CA) or cold saline infusion with 30 mL/kg 4 degrees C saline. One hour after restoration of spontaneous circulation, surface cooling was begun with the aid of a water blanket in both groups and maintained for 4 hrs. Jugular vein temperature significantly decreased in animals subjected to nasopharyngeal cooling in comparison with those receiving cold saline infusion (p cold saline infusion (p cold saline infusion group (p = .02). In this model, nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation improved the success of resuscitation compared to cooling with cold saline infusion.

  15. Costs and outcome of assertive community treatment (ACT) in a rural area in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Lene Halling; Aagaard, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Health economic evidence of assertive community treatment (ACT) in Denmark is limited. The aim of the study was to assess the costs and outcome of ACT among 174 patients with severe and persistent mental illness in a rural area of Denmark. Methods: The study was based on a quasi-experime......Purpose: Health economic evidence of assertive community treatment (ACT) in Denmark is limited. The aim of the study was to assess the costs and outcome of ACT among 174 patients with severe and persistent mental illness in a rural area of Denmark. Methods: The study was based on a quasi......-experimental design with a control group from the neighbouring region. Costs and retention in mental health services were analysed by using register data 1 year before and 4 years after inclusion in the study. Data on the use of supportive housing were available for the year before baseline and the subsequent 2 years...... only. Results: Seventy eight percent of the patients receiving ACT were in contact with psychiatric services at the 4-year follow-up, while 69% of the patients in the control group had contact with psychiatric services (P

  16. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Modelling multiple hospital outcomes: the impact of small area and primary care practice variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congdon Peter

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Appropriate management of care – for example, avoiding unnecessary attendances at, or admissions to, hospital emergency units when they could be handled in primary care – is an important part of health strategy. However, some variations in these outcomes could be due to genuine variations in health need. This paper proposes a new method of explaining variations in hospital utilisation across small areas and the general practices (GPs responsible for patient primary care. By controlling for the influence of true need on such variations, one may identify remaining sources of excess emergency attendances and admissions, both at area and practice level, that may be related to the quality, resourcing or organisation of care. The present paper accordingly develops a methodology that recognises the interplay between population mix factors (health need and primary care factors (e.g. referral thresholds, that allows for unobserved influences on hospitalisation usage, and that also reflects interdependence between hospital outcomes. A case study considers relativities in attendance and admission rates at a North London hospital involving 149 small areas and 53 GP practices. Results: A fixed effects model shows variations in attendances and admissions are significantly related (positively to area and practice need, and nursing home patients, and related (negatively to primary care access and distance of patient homes from the hospital. Modelling the impact of known factors alone is not sufficient to produce a satisfactory fit to the observations, and random effects at area and practice level are needed to improve fit and account for overdispersion. Conclusion: The case study finds variation in attendance and admission rates across areas and practices after controlling for need, and remaining differences between practices may be attributable to referral behaviour unrelated to need, or to staffing, resourcing, and access issues. In

  18. Neurology and international organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J

    2013-07-23

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private-public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and colleges. The continued engagement of neurologists is essential for the growing number of international organizations that can and should incorporate neurologic disease into their global agendas.

  19. Patient-reported outcomes in Huntington's disease: Quality of life in neurological disorders (Neuro-QoL) and Huntington's disease health-related quality of life (HDQLIFE) physical function measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Ready, Rebecca E; Frank, Samuel; Cella, David; Hahn, Elizabeth A; Goodnight, Siera M; Schilling, Stephen G; Boileau, Nicholas R; Dayalu, Praveen

    2017-07-01

    There is a need for patient-reported outcome measures that capture the impact that motor impairments have on health-related quality of life in individuals with Huntington's disease. The objectives of this study were to establish the reliability and validity of new physical functioning patient-reported outcome measures in Huntington's disease. A total of 510 individuals with Huntington's disease completed 2 Quality of Life in Neurological Disorders (Lower Extremity Function and Upper Extremity Function) and 3 Huntington's Disease Health-Related Quality of Life (Chorea, Speech Difficulties, and Swallowing Difficulties) measures. Clinician-rated and generic self-report measures were also administered. Reliabilities for the new patient reported physical functioning measures were excellent (all Cronbach's α > .92). Convergent, discriminant validity and known group validity was supported. The results provide psychometric support for new patient-reported physical functioning measures and the fact that these measures can be used as clinically meaningful endpoints in Huntington's disease research and clinical practice. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Exposure to selected endocrine disruptors and neonatal outcome of 86 healthy boys from Nice area (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker-Davis, Françoise; Wagner-Mahler, Kathy; Bornebusch, Laure; Delattre, Isabelle; Ferrari, Patricia; Gal, Jocelyn; Boda-Buccino, Mireille; Pacini, Patricia; Tommasi, Camille; Azuar, Pierre; Bongain, André; Fénichel, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    In utero and lactational exposure to endocrine disruptors is thought to be potentially harmful on fetal and infant development. Data of exposure in France is scarce. This is a prospective study with (1) collection of 84 cord bloods (CB) and 69 milks from 86 mothers delivering healthy boys (gestational age >or= 34 weeks) at two maternity wards in Southern France, between 2002 and 2005 and (2) screening for 15 xenobiotics with anti-androgenic and/or estrogenic effects: DDE, 7 PCBs, dibutylphthalate and its metabolite mBP, HCB, lindane, linuron, procymidone and vinclozoline. Correlations were made with delivery and neonatal outcomes. All CB and milks were contaminated by one or more xenobiotics (mainly PCBs, DDE, HCB, and phthalates) with good correlation between CB and milk concentrations. Compared to other geographical areas, exposure was usually in the lower bracket. Milk [PCB180] was associated with lower birth weight. Infant head circumference correlated negatively with [HCB] and positively with [mBP] in CB. There was a similar but not significant trend for birth weight and length. [DDE] in milk was higher in older mothers and in women born in Africa. In utero and lactational exposure is ubiquitous in our area. Contamination of milk with HCB, mBP, and PCB 180 showed weak correlations with infant growth. This snapshot of exposure in an area with no major industry will serve for further monitoring. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Measuring MERCI: exploring data mining techniques for examining the neurologic outcomes of stroke patients undergoing endo-vascular therapy at Erlanger Southeast Stroke Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNabb, Matthew; Cao, Yu; Devlin, Thomas; Baxter, Blaise; Thornton, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical Embolus Removal in Cerebral Ischemia (MERCI) has been supported by medical trials as an improved method of treating ischemic stroke past the safe window of time for administering clot-busting drugs, and was released for medical use in 2004. The importance of analyzing real-world data collected from MERCI clinical trials is key to providing insights on the effectiveness of MERCI. Most of the existing data analysis on MERCI results has thus far employed conventional statistical analysis techniques. To the best of our knowledge, advanced data analytics and data mining techniques have not yet been systematically applied. To address the issue in this thesis, we conduct a comprehensive study on employing state of the art machine learning algorithms to generate prediction criteria for the outcome of MERCI patients. Specifically, we investigate the issue of how to choose the most significant attributes of a data set with limited instance examples. We propose a few search algorithms to identify the significant attributes, followed by a thorough performance analysis for each algorithm. Finally, we apply our proposed approach to the real-world, de-identified patient data provided by Erlanger Southeast Regional Stroke Center, Chattanooga, TN. Our experimental results have demonstrated that our proposed approach performs well.

  2. Neurological diseases and pain

    OpenAIRE

    Borsook, David

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequentl...

  3. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Low-Molecular-Weight Fucoidan Attenuates Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Improves Neurological Outcome After Traumatic Brain Injury in Aged Mice: Involvement of Sirt3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Zhu, Mang; He, Zhong-Zheng

    2016-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and long-term disability. Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from brown algae, possesses potent anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. Considering TBI happens frequently in adults, especially in aged individuals, we herein sought to define the protective effects of low-molecular-weight fucoidan (LMWF) in the aged mice. 16- to 18-month-old mice administered with LMWF (1-50 mg/kg) or vehicle were subjected to TBI using a controlled cortical impact (CCI) model. LMWF at the doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg significantly reduced both cortical and hippocampal lesion volume. This protection was associated with reduced neuronal apoptosis, as evidenced by TUNEL staining. Importantly, LMWF was effective even when administered up to 4 h after TBI. Treatment with LMWF improved long-term neurobehavioral outcomes, including sensorimotor function, and hippocampus-associated spatial learning and memory. In addition, LMWF significantly suppressed protein carbonyl, lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, as well as mitochondrial dysfunction, which was evidenced by mitochondrial cytochrome c release and collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). To evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms, the expression of sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. The results showed that TBI significantly increased the expression of Sirt3, which was further elevated by LMWF treatment. Knockdown of Sirt3 using intracerebroventricular injection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) partially prevented the therapeutic effects of LMWF. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that LMWF exerts neuroprotection against TBI in the aged brain, which may be associated with the attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction through Sirt3 activation.

  5. [Relationship between pesticide exposure and adverse pregnancy outcomes among reproductive couples in rural areas of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Y M; Chen, S; Li, J J; Jin, R R; Pan, H; Jiang, Y

    2017-06-10

    Objective: To analyze the association between pesticide exposure and adverse pregnancy outcomes in women from the rural areas of China. Methods: Data of "National Free Preconception Health Examination Project (NFPHEP)" from January 2010 to December 2012 was used for analysis. A total of 248 501 families that were planning to deliver a baby in the next 6 months were enrolled. Data on paternal exposure to pesticides before or during pregnancy was collected through questionnaires, with related outcomes on pregnancy recorded by doctors. Results: Among all the 248 501 participants, 1 806 (0.74%) women and 2 653 (1.09%) men reported to have been exposed to pesticide before pregnancy, with 505 (0.21%) reported of having been exposed to pesticide during the period of pregnancy. Maternal exposure to pesticide was found a risk factor related to stillbirth (OR=3.37, 95%CI: 2.05-5.55), peculiar smell pregnancy (OR=3.17, 95%CI:1.18-8.55) and low birth weight (OR=7.56, 95% CI: 5.36-10.66). Paternal exposure to pesticide was also found related to miscarriage (OR=1.37, 95% CI: 1.03-1.80), low birth weight (OR=3.65, 95% CI:1.51-8.84), or giant infant (OR=0.64, 95%CI: 0.44-0.93). Maternal exposure to pesticide during pregnancy appeared a risk factor on miscarriage (OR=4.65, 95% CI: 3.47-6.24). Other adverse outcomes on pregnancy would include premature birth and high birth weight. Conclusion: Parental pesticide exposure appeared a risk factor on stillbirth, peculiar smell pregnancy, low birth weight and miscarriage.

  6. [Neurologic presentation in haemolytic-uraemic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche-Martínez, A; Póo, P; Maristany-Cucurella, M; Jiménez-Llort, A; Camacho, J A; Campistol, J

    Haemolytic-uraemic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anaemia, thrombopenia and multiorganic aggression, specially renal, gastrointestinal and central nervous system disturbances. Sporadic in Spain (2/1,500,000 inhabitants), its clinical onset includes acute renal failure, hypertension and central nervous system symptoms (irritability, drowsiness, convulsions, cortical blindness, hemiparesia or coma), due to metabolic distress, hypertension or central nervous system microangiopathy. Few long-term outcome studies have been published. A retrospective analysis of a series of 58 patients with HUS between 1981 and 2006, is reported. Clinical onset, laboratory, electrophysiology, neuroimaging tests, and prognosis factors are reviewed, together with long-term clinical outcome. 22 children presented neurologic symptoms, seven had some neurological test; one patient died; in five some neurological sequelae persisted (hemiparesia, cognitive deficit, visual-perception deficit), the other 16 remaining asymptomatic. Neurological morbility is high in HUS (27% of the children with neurological symptoms), with a 1.7% mortality. Seizure at onset was not a poor prognosis factor in our group. No positive correlation can be established between neuroimaging and long-term outcome.

  7. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines on Hearing Preservation Outcomes in Patients With Sporadic Vestibular Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Matthew L; Vivas, Esther X; McCracken, D Jay; Sweeney, Alex D; Neff, Brian A; Shepard, Neil T; Olson, Jeffrey J

    2018-02-01

    What is the overall probability of maintaining serviceable hearing following stereotactic radiosurgery utilizing modern dose planning, at 2, 5, and 10 yr following treatment? Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering stereotactic radiosurgery should be counseled that there is moderately high probability (>50%-75%) of hearing preservation at 2 yr, moderately high probability (>50%-75%) of hearing preservation at 5 yr, and moderately low probability (>25%-50%) of hearing preservation at 10 yr. Among patients with AAO-HNS (American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery hearing classification) class A or GR (Gardner-Robertson hearing classification) grade I hearing at baseline, what is the overall probability of maintaining serviceable hearing following stereotactic radiosurgery, utilizing modern dose planning, at 2, 5, and 10 yr following treatment? Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering stereotactic radiosurgery should be counseled that there is a high probability (>75%-100%) of hearing preservation at 2 yr, moderately high probability (>50%-75%) of hearing preservation at 5 yr, and moderately low probability (>25%-50%) of hearing preservation at 10 yr. What patient- and tumor-related factors influence progression to nonserviceable hearing following stereotactic radiosurgery using ≤13 Gy to the tumor margin? Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering stereotactic radiosurgery should be counseled regarding the probability of successful hearing preservation based on the following prognostic data: the most consistent prognostic features associated with maintenance of serviceable hearing are good preoperative word recognition and/or pure tone thresholds with variable cut-points reported, smaller tumor size, marginal tumor dose ≤12 Gy, and cochlear dose ≤4 Gy. Age and sex are not strong predictors of hearing preservation outcome. What is the overall probability of maintaining

  8. Ecological and social outcomes of a new protected area in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jaclyn M; Burgess, Neil D; Rantala, Salla; Vihemäki, Heini; Jambiya, George; Gereau, Roy E; Makonda, Fortunatus; Njilima, Fadhili; Sumbi, Peter; Kizaji, Adam

    2014-12-01

    Balancing ecological and social outcomes of conservation actions is recognized in global conservation policy but is challenging in practice. Compensation to land owners or users for foregone assets has been proposed by economists as an efficient way to mitigate negative social impacts of human displacement from protected areas. Joint empirical assessments of the conservation and social impacts of protected area establishment involving compensation payments are scarce. We synthesized social and biological studies related to the establishment of the Derema forest corridor in Tanzania's biodiverse East Usambara Mountains. This lengthy conservation process involved the appropriation of approximately 960 ha of native canopy agroforest and steep slopes for the corridor and monetary compensation to more than 1100 claimants in the surrounding villages. The overarching goals from the outset were to conserve ecological processes while doing no harm to the local communities. We evaluated whether these goals were achieved by analyzing 3 indicators of success: enhancement of forest connectivity, improvement of forest condition, and mitigation of negative impacts on local people's livelihoods. Indicators of forest connectivity and conditions were enhanced through reductions of forest loss and exotic species and increases in native species and canopy closure. Despite great efforts by national and international organizations, the intervention failed to mitigate livelihood losses especially among the poorest people. The Derema case illustrates the challenges of designing and implementing compensation schemes for conservation-related displacement of people. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  9. [Charles Miller Fisher: a giant of neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    C. Miller Fisher MD, one of the great neurologists in the 20th century, died in April 2012. Born in Canada, he studied medicine at the University of Toronto. As a Canadian Navy medical doctor he participated in World War II and was a war prisoner from 1941 to 1944. He did a residency in neurology at the Montreal Neurological Institute between 1946 and 1948, and later on was a Fellow in Neurology and Neuropathology at the Boston City Hospital. In 1954 he entered the Massachusetts General Hospital as a neurologist and neuropathologist, where he remained until his retirement, in 2005. His academic career ended as Professor Emeritus at Harvard University. His area of special interest in neurology was cerebrovascular disease (CVD). In 1954 he created the first Vascular Neurology service in the world and trained many leading neurologists on this field. His scientific contributions are present in more than 250 publications, as journal articles and book chapters. Many of his articles, certainly not restricted to CVD, were seminal in neurology. Several concepts and terms that he coined are currently used in daily clinical practice. The chapters on CVD, in seven consecutive editions of Harrison's Internal Medicine textbook, are among his highlights. His death was deeply felt by the neurological community.

  10. [Neurology and literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2010-10-01

    Literature complements medical literature in the academic and clinical development of neurologists. The present article explores the contributions of writers of fiction on neurology. Literary works of fiction with particular reference to neurology. A symbiosis between writers of fiction and doctors has been well recognised. From Shakespeare to Cervantes by way of Dickens and Cela to writer - physicians such as Anton Chekhov or António Lobo Antunes have contributed through their medically informed literature to the better understanding of neurology. Some writers like Dostoevsky, Machado de Assis and Margiad Evans have written about their own experiences with disease thus bringing new insights to medicine. Furthermore, some neurological disorders have been largely based on literary descriptions. For instance, Dostoevsky's epilepsy has been retrospectively analysed by famous neurologists including Freud, Alajouanine or Gastaut, whilst his writings and biography have prompted others like Waxman and Geschwind to describe typical behavioural changes in temporal lobe epilepsy, finding their source of inspiration in Dostoevsky. Likewise, Cirignotta et al have named an unusual type of seizure after the Russian novelist. Inspired by Lewis Carroll, Todd introduced the term Alice in Wonderland Syndrome to refer to visual distortions generally associated with migraine. Writers of fiction offer a humanised perception of disease by contributing new insights into the clinical history, informing about the subjective experience of the illness and helping to eradicate the stigma associated to neurological disorders.

  11. Suicide in Neurologic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniegas, David B.; Anderson, C. Alan

    2002-11-01

    The risk of attempted or completed suicide is increased in patients with migraine with aura, epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, and Huntington's disease. Contrary to the general perception that the risk of suicide among patients with Alzheimer's disease and other dementing conditions is low, several reports suggest that the risk of suicide in these patients increases relative to the general population. Some patients at risk for neurologic disorders are also at increased risk for suicide; in particular, the risk of suicide is increased among persons at risk for Huntington's disease, independent of the presence or absence of the Huntington's gene mutation. The risk of attempted or completed suicide in neurologic illness is strongly associated with depression, feelings of hopelessness or helplessness, and social isolation. Additional suicide risk factors in persons with neurologic illness include cognitive impairment, relatively younger age (under 60 years), moderate physical disability, recent onset or change in illness, a lack of future plans or perceived meaning in life, recent losses (personal, occupational, or financial), and prior history of psychiatric illness or suicidal behavior. Substance dependence, psychotic disorders, anxiety disorders, and some personality disorders (eg, borderline personality disorder) may also contribute to increased risk of suicide among persons with neurologic illnesses. Identification and aggressive treatment of psychiatric problems, especially depression, as well as reduction of modifiable suicide risk factors among patients with neurologic illness is needed to reduce the risk of attempted and completed suicide in this population.

  12. Neurologic manifestations of achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jacqueline T; Bodensteiner, John B; Butler, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the best described and most common form of the congenital short-limbed dwarfing conditions. Achondroplasia is apparent at birth and has a birth prevalence of 1 in 20000-30000 live-born infants. Achondroplasia is inherited as an autosomal dominant condition, although 80% of cases occur sporadically as new events in their families. Achondroplasia is caused, in virtually all of the cases, by a G380R mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). Patients with achondroplasia should be evaluated by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians including geneticists, neurologists, and orthopedists, since there are numerous bony and neurological complications. The most severe complication results from craniocervical stenosis and medullary and upper spinal cord compression, which can have devastating and even lethal sequelae during early childhood. In subsequent decades, including adolescence, spinal cord and nerve compression are more prominent. The neurological complications of achondroplasia have been recognized in adults for more than a century and are attributed to bony defects, connective tissue structures, or both. Similar neurological complications are now appreciated in infants, young children, and teenagers with achondroplasia. Defective connective tissue elements in achondroplasia frequently lead to ligamentous laxity, which can aggravate the complications associated with bony stenosis. Bony abnormalities are known to cause neurological morbidity and lead to a shortened lifespan. Neurological complications associated with achondroplasia are reviewed, including recommendations for the evaluation and management of these clinical problems. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Neurological sleep disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ramin

    2014-11-01

    Neurological sleep disorders are common in the general population and may have a strong impact on quality of life. General practitioners play a key role in recognizing and managing sleep disorders in the general population. They should therefore be familiar with the most important neurological sleep disorders. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the most prevalent and important neurological sleep disorders, including Restless legs syndrome (with and without periodic limb movements in sleep), narcolepsy, NREM- and REM-sleep parasomnias and the complex relationship between sleep and epilepsies. Although narcolepsy is considered as a rare disease, recent discoveries in narcolepsy research provided insight in the function of brain circuitries involved in sleep wake regulation. REM sleep behavioral parasomnia (RBD) is increasingly recognized to represent an early manifestation of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular evolving synucleinopathies. Early diagnosis may thus open new perspectives for developing novel treatment options by targeting neuroprotective substances.

  14. Secondary Education and Health Outcomes in Young People from the Cape Area Panel Study (CAPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Joseph L; Viner, Russell M

    2016-01-01

    Education is one of the strongest social determinants of health, yet previous literature has focused on primary education. We examined whether there are additional benefits to completing upper secondary compared to lower secondary education in a middle-income country. We performed a longitudinal analysis of the Cape Area Panel Study, a survey of adolescents living in South Africa. We undertook causal modeling using structural marginal models to examine the association between level of education and various health outcomes, using inverse probability weighting to control for sex, age, ethnicity, home language, income, whether employed in past year, region of birth, maternal educational status, marital status, whether currently pregnant and cognitive ability. Educational attainment was defined as primary (grades 1-7), lower secondary (grades 8-9) or upper secondary (grades 10-12). Of 3,432 participants, 165 (4.8%) had completed primary education, 646 (18.8%) lower secondary and 2,621 (76.3%) upper secondary. Compared to those completing lower secondary, males completing upper secondary education were less likely to have a health problem (OR 0.49; 95%CI 0.27-0.88; p = 0.02); describe their health as poor (0.52; 0.29-0.95; p = 0.03) or report that health interferes with daily life (0.54; 0.29-0.99; p = 0.047). Females were less likely to have been pregnant (0.45; 0.33-0.61; peducation and alcohol use, psychological distress, obesity, increased waist circumference or hypertension. Completing upper secondary education was associated with improved health outcomes compared with lower secondary education. Expanding upper secondary education offers middle-income countries an effective way of improving adolescent health.

  15. The neurological disease ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark; Cox, Alexander P; Chaudhry, Naveed; Ng, Marcus; Sule, Donat; Duncan, William; Ray, Patrick; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Smith, Barry; Ruttenberg, Alan; Szigeti, Kinga; Diehl, Alexander D

    2013-12-06

    We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms 'disease', 'diagnosis', 'disease course', and 'disorder'. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. ND seeks to provide a formal foundation for the representation of clinical and research data

  16. Neurological manifestations of snake bite in Sri Lanka.

    OpenAIRE

    Seneviratne U; Dissanayake S

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Snake bite is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in certain parts of Sri Lanka. This study was designed to determine the offending snakes, neurological manifestations, disease course, and outcome in neurotoxic envenomation. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Fifty six consecutive patients admitted with neurological manifestations following snake bite were studied prospectively. Data were obtained regarding the offending snakes, neurological symptoms, time taken for onset of...

  17. Psychometric evaluation of the pediatric and parent-proxy Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System and the Neurology and Traumatic Brain Injury Quality of Life measurement item banks in pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertisch, Hilary; Rivara, Frederick P; Kisala, Pamela A; Wang, Jin; Yeates, Keith Owen; Durbin, Dennis; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Bell, Michael J; Temkin, Nancy; Tulsky, David S

    2017-07-01

    The primary objective is to provide evidence of convergent and discriminant validity for the pediatric and parent-proxy versions of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Anxiety, Depression, Anger, Peer Relations, Mobility, Pain Interference, and Fatigue item banks, the Neurology Quality of Life measurement system (Neuro-QOL) Cognition-General Concerns and Stigma item banks, and the Traumatic Brain Injury Quality of Life (TBI-QOL) Executive Function and Headache item banks in a pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) sample. Participants were 134 parent-child (ages 8-18 years) days. Children all sustained TBI and the dyads completed outcome ratings 6 months after injury at one of six medical centers across the United States. Ratings included PROMIS, Neuro-QOL, and TBI-QOL item banks, as well as the Pediatric Quality of Life inventory (PedsQL), the Health Behavior Inventory (HBI), and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) as legacy criterion measures against which these item banks were validated. The PROMIS, Neuro-QOL, and TBI-QOL item banks demonstrated good convergent validity, as evidenced by moderate to strong correlations with comparable scales on the legacy measures. PROMIS, Neuro-QOL, and TBI-QOL item banks showed weaker correlations with ratings of unrelated constructs on legacy measures, providing evidence of discriminant validity. Our results indicate that the constructs measured by the PROMIS, Neuro-QOL, and TBI-QOL item banks are valid in our pediatric TBI sample and that it is appropriate to use these standardized scores for our primary study analyses.

  18. Neurologic Complications in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuero, Mauricio Ruiz; Varelas, Panayiotis N

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women are subject to the same complications as the general population, as well to specific neurologic complications associated with pregnancy, such as preeclampsia or eclampsia. The hormonal and physiologic changes during pregnancy lead to altered incidences of these complications, which usually present during the late period of pregnancy, labor, or the puerperium. In addition, the treatment of these conditions is different from that of nonpregnant women, because special attention is paid to avoid any abnormalities or death of the fetus. This article discusses the most common of these neurologic complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The neurology literature 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoujah, Danya; Chang, Wan-Tsu W; Abraham, Michael K

    2017-09-06

    Emergency neurology is a complex and rapidly changing field. Its evolution can be attributed in part to increased imaging options, debates about optimal treatment, and simply the growth of emergency medicine as a specialty. Every year, a number of articles published in emergency medicine or other specialty journals should become familiar to the emergency physician. This review summarizes neurology articles published in 2016, which the authors consider crucial to the practice of emergency medicine. The articles are categorized according to disease process, with the understanding that there can be significant overlap among articles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. General Practitioners' Empathy and Health Outcomes: A Prospective Observational Study of Consultations in Areas of High and Low Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Stewart W; Higgins, Maria; Bikker, Annemieke M; Fitzpatrick, Bridie; McConnachie, Alex; Lloyd, Suzanne M; Little, Paul; Watt, Graham C M

    2016-03-01

    We set out to compare patients' expectations, consultation characteristics, and outcomes in areas of high and low socioeconomic deprivation, and to examine whether the same factors predict better outcomes in both settings. Six hundred fifty-nine patients attending 47 general practitioners in high- and low-deprivation areas of Scotland participated. We assessed patients' expectations of involvement in decision making immediately before the consultation and patients' perceptions of their general practitioners' empathy immediately after. Consultations were video recorded and analyzed for verbal and non-verbal physician behaviors. Symptom severity and related well-being were measured at baseline and 1 month post-consultation. Consultation factors predicting better outcomes at 1 month were identified using backward selection methods. Patients in deprived areas had less desire for shared decision-making (P behaviors that were less patient centered. Outcomes were worse at 1 month in deprived than in affluent groups (70% response rate; P behaviors within the consultation, and health outcomes differ substantially between high- and low-deprivation areas. In both settings, patients' perceptions of the physicians' empathy predict health outcomes. These findings are discussed in the context of inequalities and the "inverse care law." © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  1. Problem neurology residents: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabby, David S; Majeed, Muhammed H; Schwartzman, Robert J

    2011-06-14

    Problem residents are found across most medical specialties at a prevalence of about 10%. This study was designed to explore the prevalence and causes of problem neurology residents and to compare neurology programs' responses and outcomes. Directors of 126 US neurology residency programs were sent an electronic survey. We collected data on demographics, first and all "identifiers" of problem residents, and year of training in which the problem was found. We asked about observable signs, etiology, and who performed remediation. We asked what resources were used and what outcomes occurred. Ninety-five program directors completed surveys (75% response rate). Almost all neurology programs have problem residents (81%). Age, sex, marital status, being a US native, or attending a US medical school had no effect on problem status. Being a parent carried a lower likelihood of problems (32%). Most commonly the problem is acted on during the first year of training. Faculty members without defined educational roles were the most frequent first identifiers. Program directors were the most common remediators. The most common remediation techniques were increasing supervision and assigning a faculty mentor. Graduate medical education office and psychiatric or psychological counseling services were most often used. Eleven percent of problem residents required a program for impaired physicians and 14% required a leave of absence. Sixteen percent were dismissed from their programs. The prevalence of problem residents in neurology is similar to other disciplines, and various resources are available to remediate them.

  2. Brain Arteriovenous Malformations Located in Language Area: Surgical Outcomes and Risk Factors for Postoperative Language Deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yuming; Lin, Fuxin; Wu, Jun; Li, Hao; Chen, Xin; Li, Zhicen; Ma, Ji; Cao, Yong; Wang, Shuo; Zhao, Jizong

    2017-09-01

    Case selection for surgical treatment of language-area brain arteriovenous malformations (L-BAVMs) remains difficult. This study aimed to determine the surgical outcomes and risk factors for postoperative language deficits (LDs) in patients with L-BAVMs. Patients with L-BAVMs who underwent microsurgical resection between September 2012 and June 2016 were reviewed. All patients had undergone preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Both functional and angioarchitectural factors were analyzed regarding the postoperative LD. Functional factors included the eloquence involved, the side of blood-oxygenation level-dependent signal activation and the white-matter fibers (anterior segment, long segment [LS], and posterior segment of arcuate fasciculus, and the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus) involved. Sixty-nine patients with L-BAVMs were reviewed. Postoperative short- and long-term LD was found in 32 (46.4%) and 14 (20.3%) patients, respectively. Twelve of the 14 patients with Geschwind's territory L-BAVMs (85.7%) had short-term LD, compared with 10 (34.5%) in Wernicke's and 10 (38.5%) in Broca's area. LS involvement (P = 0.001) and larger nidus size (P = 0.017) were independent risk factors for the short-term LD. Meanwhile, nidus size (P = 0.007), preoperative LD (P = 0.008), and LS involvement (P = 0.028) were independent risk factors for long-term LD. L-BAVMs located in Geschwind's territory can cause a high incidence of LD. LS involvement and larger nidus size are risk factors for postoperative short- and long-term LD, and preoperative LD is a risk factor for postoperative, long-term LD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Program Director Survey: Attitudes Regarding Child Neurology Training and Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Ignacio; Feist, Terri B; Gilbert, Donald L

    2016-04-01

    As a result of major clinical and scientific advances and changes in clinical practice, the role of adult neurology training for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability (NDD) certification has become controversial. The most recently approved requirements for board eligibility for child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents still include 12 months in adult neurology rotations. The objective of this study was to assess United States child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residency program directors' opinions regarding optimal residency training. The authors developed an 18-item questionnaire and contacted all 80 child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors via e-mail, using SurveyMonkey. A total of 44 program directors responded (55%), representing programs that train 78 categorical and 94 total resident positions, approximately 70% of those filled in the match. Respondents identified multiple areas where child neurology residents need more training, including genetics and neuromuscular disease. A substantial majority (73%) believed child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents need less than 12 adult neurology training months; however, most (75%) also believed adult hospital service and man-power needs (55%) and finances (34%) would pose barriers to reducing adult neurology. Most (70%) believed reductions in adult neurology training should be program flexible. A majority believed the written initial certification examination should be modified with more child neurology and fewer basic neuroscience questions. Nearly all (91%) felt the views of child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors are under-represented within the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Residency Review Committee. The requirement for 12 adult neurology months for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability certification is not consistent with the views of the majority of program

  4. CAPriCORN: Chicago Area Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Abel N; Hynes, Denise M; Goel, Satyender; Solomonides, Anthony E; Price, Ron; Hota, Bala; Sims, Shannon A; Bahroos, Neil; Angulo, Francisco; Trick, William E; Tarlov, Elizabeth; Rachman, Fred D; Hamilton, Andrew; Kaleba, Erin O; Badlani, Sameer; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Silverstein, Jonathan C; Tobin, Jonathan N; Schwartz, Michael A; Levine, David; Wong, John B; Kennedy, Richard H; Krishnan, Jerry A; Meltzer, David O; Collins, John M; Mazany, Terry

    2014-01-01

    The Chicago Area Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Network (CAPriCORN) represents an unprecedented collaboration across diverse healthcare institutions including private, county, and state hospitals and health systems, a consortium of Federally Qualified Health Centers, and two Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals. CAPriCORN builds on the strengths of our institutions to develop a cross-cutting infrastructure for sustainable and patient-centered comparative effectiveness research in Chicago. Unique aspects include collaboration with the University HealthSystem Consortium to aggregate data across sites, a centralized communication center to integrate patient recruitment with the data infrastructure, and a centralized institutional review board to ensure a strong and efficient human subject protection program. With coordination by the Chicago Community Trust and the Illinois Medical District Commission, CAPriCORN will model how healthcare institutions can overcome barriers of data integration, marketplace competition, and care fragmentation to develop, test, and implement strategies to improve care for diverse populations and reduce health disparities. PMID:24821736

  5. Wikipedia and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C.; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, WM

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a

  6. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Parpura, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 149-158 ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA309/09/1696 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : amyotrophic lateral sclerosis * Alzheimer's disease * Alexander disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  7. Pattern of neurological admissions in the tropics: Experience at Kano, Northwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owolabi L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kano is the most populated state in Nigeria with a population totaling 9,383,682. The pattern of neurologic diseases in this area is not known. Objective: To determine the of pattern of neurologic diseases warranting admission in a tertiary hospital in Kano and compare it with those elsewhere in the country with the view to using the data generated as a baseline for planning purposes and for future studies. Materials and Methods: The medical records of all cases admitted with neurologic diseases in the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano between January 2005 and September 2008, were retrospectively reviewed and the frequency of neurologic diseases, sex, age, and outcome of these diseases analyzed. Result: Stroke, predominantly ischemic, accounted for 77.6% of the neurological cases for the period of study. Central nervous system infections, comprising mainly of meningitis and tetanus, accounted for 6.6% (64 and 3% (29 of cases, respectively. The myelopathies were the cause of neurologic admissions in 5.4% (53 with paraplegia and quadriplegia resulting from myelopathies accounting for 5% (49 and 0.4% (4 of the cases. Hypertensive encephalopathy and status epilepticus as the causes of admissions accounted for 1.6% each. Gullain Barre syndrome, Parkinson′s disease, and cerebral malaria were relatively rare causes of neurologic admissions in this study. The average duration of hospitalization was 25 days, and regarding outcome, 219 (22.4% of these cases died. Conclusions: Stroke appeared to be the most common neurologic admission and the most common cause of neurologic and medical death in Kano as observed in other regions of the country and a little over one-fifths of stroke patients die. Central nervous system infections mainly meningitis and tetanus are the next common cause of admission. In view of these findings, the provision of a regional stroke unit, the improvement of the sanitary conditions of the home and environment; the

  8. Secondary Education and Health Outcomes in Young People from the Cape Area Panel Study (CAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Aim Education is one of the strongest social determinants of health, yet previous literature has focused on primary education. We examined whether there are additional benefits to completing upper secondary compared to lower secondary education in a middle-income country. Methods We performed a longitudinal analysis of the Cape Area Panel Study, a survey of adolescents living in South Africa. We undertook causal modeling using structural marginal models to examine the association between level of education and various health outcomes, using inverse probability weighting to control for sex, age, ethnicity, home language, income, whether employed in past year, region of birth, maternal educational status, marital status, whether currently pregnant and cognitive ability. Educational attainment was defined as primary (grades 1–7), lower secondary (grades 8–9) or upper secondary (grades 10–12). Results Of 3,432 participants, 165 (4.8%) had completed primary education, 646 (18.8%) lower secondary and 2,621 (76.3%) upper secondary. Compared to those completing lower secondary, males completing upper secondary education were less likely to have a health problem (OR 0.49; 95%CI 0.27–0.88; p = 0.02); describe their health as poor (0.52; 0.29–0.95; p = 0.03) or report that health interferes with daily life (0.54; 0.29–0.99; p = 0.047). Females were less likely to have been pregnant (0.45; 0.33–0.61; psex under 16 was also less likely (males 0.63; 0.44–0.91; p = 0.01; females 0.39; 0.26–0.58; peducation and alcohol use, psychological distress, obesity, increased waist circumference or hypertension. Conclusion Completing upper secondary education was associated with improved health outcomes compared with lower secondary education. Expanding upper secondary education offers middle-income countries an effective way of improving adolescent health. PMID:27280408

  9. Secondary Education and Health Outcomes in Young People from the Cape Area Panel Study (CAPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Ward

    Full Text Available Education is one of the strongest social determinants of health, yet previous literature has focused on primary education. We examined whether there are additional benefits to completing upper secondary compared to lower secondary education in a middle-income country.We performed a longitudinal analysis of the Cape Area Panel Study, a survey of adolescents living in South Africa. We undertook causal modeling using structural marginal models to examine the association between level of education and various health outcomes, using inverse probability weighting to control for sex, age, ethnicity, home language, income, whether employed in past year, region of birth, maternal educational status, marital status, whether currently pregnant and cognitive ability. Educational attainment was defined as primary (grades 1-7, lower secondary (grades 8-9 or upper secondary (grades 10-12.Of 3,432 participants, 165 (4.8% had completed primary education, 646 (18.8% lower secondary and 2,621 (76.3% upper secondary. Compared to those completing lower secondary, males completing upper secondary education were less likely to have a health problem (OR 0.49; 95%CI 0.27-0.88; p = 0.02; describe their health as poor (0.52; 0.29-0.95; p = 0.03 or report that health interferes with daily life (0.54; 0.29-0.99; p = 0.047. Females were less likely to have been pregnant (0.45; 0.33-0.61; p<0.001 or pregnant under 18 (0.32; 0.22-0.46; p<0.001; and having had sex under 16 was also less likely (males 0.63; 0.44-0.91; p = 0.01; females 0.39; 0.26-0.58; p<0.001. Cigarette smoking was less likely (males 0.52; 0.38-0.70; p = <0.001; females 0.56; 0.41-0.76; p<0.001, as was taking illicit drugs in males (0.6; 0.38-0.96; p = 0.03. No associations were found between education and alcohol use, psychological distress, obesity, increased waist circumference or hypertension.Completing upper secondary education was associated with improved health outcomes compared with lower secondary

  10. Modification of the cutaneous dermatomyositis disease area and severity index, an outcome instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaee, M; Fiorentino, D; Okawa, J; Taylor, L; Coley, C; Troxel, A B; Werth, V P

    2010-03-01

    Validated outcome measures in dermatology help standardize and improve patient care. A scoring system of skin disease severity in dermatomyositis known as the Cutaneous Dermatomyositis Disease Area and Severity Index (CDASI) has been developed. To simplify and improve the tool for clinical research and care, we modified the CDASI and validated the new version, v2. The original CDASI has four activity and two damage measures. The modified CDASI has three activity and two damage measures. The skin disease of 20 patients with dermatomyositis was evaluated by the same dermatologist using both the original and the modified CDASI. Global validation measures were implemented to assess overall skin disease state, skin disease activity and skin damage. Spearman's rho (r(sp)), adjusted for multiple observations on subjects, was used to determine the relationship between the two versions of the CDASI and their correlation with the physician global measures (PGMs). The total score and activity and damage subscores of the original and the modified CDASI correlated perfectly with each other (r(sp) = 0.99, 1.00, 1.00). The PGM-overall skin scale correlated with the total scores (r(sp) = 0.72, r(sp) = 0.76) and activity subscores (r(sp) = 0.68, r(sp) = 0.63) but not with the damage subscores (r(sp) = 0.14, r(sp) = 0.15) of the original and the modified CDASI, respectively. However, the PGM-activity and PGM-damage scales correlated with the activity (r(sp) = 0.76, r(sp) = 0.75) and damage subscores (r(sp) = 0.90, r(sp) = 0.90), respectively, of the original and the modified CDASI. The modified CDASI is perfectly correlated with the original CDASI. It has equally good concurrent validity with the PGM-overall skin and PGM-activity scales. The CDASI subscores have equally good concurrent validity with the PGM-activity and PGM-damage scales. We suggest that PGMs of skin disease activity and damage should be assessed separately for greater specificity. The modified CDASI is a refined

  11. Increased perirenal fat area is not associated with adverse outcomes after laparoscopic total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levic, Katarina; Bulut, Orhan; Schødt, Mette

    2017-01-01

    .001). Perirenal fat area was not associated with any of the measured adverse outcomes. Patients with BMI ≥ 30 had significantly higher intraoperative blood loss (191 mL, p = 0.001). Conclusion Perirenal fat area was not an important predictor of adverse outcomes in patients undergoing laparoscopic rectal cancer......Introduction Intraabdominal visceral obesity may increase technical challenges during laparoscopic rectal resection and hypothetically therefore increase the risk of perioperative complications. The aim of this study was to analyze intraabdominal obesity by means of perirenal fat against risk...... with intravenous contrast were assessed in a blinded manner to estimate the perirenal fat area (cm2). Result A total of 195 patients were included (median age 70 years (range 27–87), 58 women and 137 men) for analysis. There was a moderate correlation between BMI and perirenal fat area (r = 0.499, p = 0...

  12. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  13. Perinatal pharmacology: applications for neonatal neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Anne; Allegaert, Karel

    2011-11-01

    The principles of clinical pharmacology also apply to neonates, but their characteristics warrant a tailored approach. We focus on aspects of both developmental pharmacokinetics (concentration/time relationship) and developmental pharmacodynamics (concentration/effect relationship) in neonates. We hereby aimed to link concepts used in clinical pharmacology with compound-specific observations (anti-epileptics, analgosedatives) in the field of neonatal neurology. Although in part anecdotal, we subsequently illustrate the relevance of developmental pharmacology in the field of neonatal neurology by a specific intervention (e.g. whole body cooling), specific clinical presentations (e.g. short and long term outcome following fetal exposure to antidepressive agents, the development of new biomarkers for fetal alcohol syndrome) and specific clinical needs (e.g. analgosedation in neonates, excitocytosis versus neuro-apoptosis/impaired synaptogenesis). Copyright © 2011 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The neurology of proverbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lancker, D

    1990-01-01

    Although proverb tests are commonly used in the mental status examination surprisingly little is known about either normal comprehension or the interpretation of proverbial expressions. Current proverbs tests have conceptual and linguistic shortcomings, and few studies have been done to investigate the specific effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders on the interpretation of proverbs. Although frontal lobes have traditionally been impugned in patients who are "concrete", recent studies targeting deficient comprehension of non literal language (e.g. proverbs, idioms, speech formulas, and indirect requests) point to an important role of the right hemisphere (RH). Research describing responses of psychiatrically and neurologically classified groups to tests of proverb and idiom usage is needed to clarify details of aberrant processing of nonliteral meanings. Meanwhile, the proverb test, drawing on diverse cognitive skills, is a nonspecific but sensitive probe of mental status.

  15. The Neurology of Proverbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Van Lancker

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Although proverb tests are commonly used in the mental status examination surprisingly little is known about either normal comprehension or the interpretation of proverbial expressions. Current proverbs tests have conceptual and linguistic shortcomings, and few studies have been done to investigate the specific effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders on the interpretation of proverbs. Although frontal lobes have traditionally been impugned in patients who are “concrete”, recent studies targeting deficient comprehension of non literal language (e.g. proverbs, idioms, speech formulas, and indirect requests point to an important role of the right hemisphere (RH. Research describing responses of psychiatrically and neurologically classified groups to tests of proverb and idiom usage is needed to clarify details of aberrant processing of nonliteral meanings. Meanwhile, the proverb test, drawing on diverse cognitive skills, is a nonspecific but sensitive probe of mental status.

  16. Vaccination and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunization of children has been proven very effective in elimination of life threatening complications of many infectious diseases in developed countries. However, as vaccination-preventable infectious diseases and their complications have become rare, the interest focuses on immunization-related adverse reactions. Unfortunately, fear of vaccination-related adverse effects can led to decreased vaccination coverage and subsequent epidemics of infectious diseases. This review includes reports about possible side effects following vaccinations in children with neurological disorders and also published recommendations about vaccinating children with neurological disorders. From all international published data anyone can conclude that vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society.

  17. [Vitamin D and neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenot, Éric; Camu, William

    2013-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk of multiple sclerosis and also with a higher relapse rate as well as a higher number of MRI lesions. Elders with vitamin D deficiency have worse cognitive performance. Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease. Ischemic stroke are more frequent and more severe in patients with low vitamin D levels. Carotid atherosclerosis is more frequent and more severe in patients with vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk and worse prognosis of Parkinson's disease. In the different neurological disorders discussed herein, gene polymorphisms that could alter vitamin D metabolism are also associated with a higher incidence or a worse disease prognosis. Despite the links between vitamin D deficiency and the risks of developing neurological disorders, there is, to date, no proof that supplementation could alter the course of these diseases. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Neurological legal disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishna H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders with a prolonged course, either remediable or otherwise are being seen increasingly in clinical practice and many such patients are young and are part of some organization or other wherein their services are needed if they were healthy and fit. The neurologists who are on the panel of these organizations are asked to certify whether these subjects are fit to work or how long they should be given leave. These certificates may be produced in the court of law and may be subjected to verification by another neurologist or a medical board. At present there are no standard guidelines in our country to effect such certification unlike in orthopedic specialty or in ophthalmology. The following is a beginning, based on which the neurologist can certify the neurological disability of such subjects and convey the same meaning to all neurologists across the country.

  19. Neurologic complications of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, James M; Weimer, Louis H

    2014-06-01

    This review serves as an overview of neurologic conditions associated with alcohol abuse or withdrawal, including epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnostic approach, and treatment. Frequent alcohol abuse and frank alcoholism are very common among adults in the United States. Although rates decline with each decade, as many as 10% of the elderly drink excessively. Given the ubiquitous nature of alcoholism in society, its complications have been clinically recognized for generations, with recent advances focusing on improved understanding of ethanol's biochemical targets and the pathophysiology of its complications. The chronic effects of alcohol abuse are myriad and include neurologic complications through both direct and indirect effects on the central and peripheral nervous systems. These disorders include several encephalopathic states related to alcohol intoxication, withdrawal, and related nutritional deficiencies; acute and chronic toxic and nutritional peripheral neuropathies; and myopathy. Although prevention of alcoholism and its neurologic complications is the optimal strategy, this article reviews the specific treatment algorithms for alcohol withdrawal and its related nutritional deficiency states.

  20. The Relationship between Bible Literacy and Behavioral and Academic Outcomes in Urban Areas: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeynes, William

    2010-01-01

    A meta-analysis is undertaken, including 11 studies, to determine whether there is a relationship between Bible knowledge on one hand and academic and behavioral outcomes on the other among those living in urban areas. The results indicate that increased Bible knowledge is associated with higher levels of student academic achievement and positive…

  1. Neurological complications in hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Gabriella; Codemo, Valentina; Palmieri, Arianna; Schiff, Sami; Cagnin, Annachiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo

    2012-02-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can impair correct absorption of an adequate amount of thiamine and can cause electrolyte imbalance. This study investigated the neurological complications in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis gravidarum. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted for hyperemesis gravidarum. Besides undernutrition, a neurological examination disclosed weakness with hyporeflexia, ophthalmoparesis, multidirectional nystagmus and optic disks swelling; the patient became rapidly comatose. Brain MRI showed symmetric signal hyperintensity and swelling of periaqueductal area, hypothalamus and mammillary bodies, medial and posterior portions of the thalamus and columns of fornix, consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Neurophysiological studies revealed an axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy, likely due to thiamine deficiency or critical illness polyneuropathy. Sodium and potassium supplementation and parenteral thiamine were administered with improvement of consciousness state in a few days. WE evolved in Korsakoff syndrome. A repeat MRI showed a marked improvement of WE-related alterations and a new hyperintense lesion in the pons, suggestive of central pontine myelinolysis. No sign or symptom due to involvement of the pons was present.

  2. Neurologic Complications of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with celiac disease (CD [n=l 11] and controls (n=211 were questioned regarding neurologic disorders, their charts were reviewed, and they received neurologic evaluations, including brain imaging or EEG if indicated, in a study of neurologic complications of CD at Carmel Medical Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

  3. African Journal of Neurological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Neurological Sciences (AJNS) is owned and controlled by the Pan African Association of Neurological Sciences (PAANS). The AJNS's aim is to publish scientific papers of any aspects of Neurological Sciences. AJNS is published quarterly. Articles submitted exclusively to the AJNS are accepted if neither ...

  4. Head injury in Germany: A population-based prospective study on epidemiology, causes, treatment and outcome of all degrees of head-injury severity in two distinct areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickels, Eckhard; von Wild, Klaus; Wenzlaff, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the ratio of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) to moderate and severe TBI, about the time that elapses until primary care is given, about the number of patients requiring immediate surgery and about the early outcome and the costs. In a prospective study two regions taken as model examples were investigated: the City of Hanover with its surrounding catchment area and Münster with its regions. From 1 March 2000 until 28 February 2001 all patients were recruited who were admitted to a hospital emergency department due to a TBI; 6783 patients (58.4% male, 41.6% female; 29.7% children < 16 years) were included; 5220 (73%) received in-hospital treatment; and 258 were given early rehabilitation. The incidence of TBI is 332 per 100 000 head of population. The GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale) or other forms of neurological examinations were performed in only 56% of all cases. According to the GCS status, 90.2% are classified as mild, 3.9% as moderate and 5.2% as severe. Intubation is given only to 76.1% of patients with severe TBI. Lethality was 1%. The predominant cause of TBI is falls, with 52.5% of all cases, while 26.3% were due to road accidents. The time elapsing between the accident event and initial examination at the hospital is less than 1 hour in 63% of all cases. X-rays were taken in 82% of all cases of TBI, with 19.3% of the patients receiving a CT scan; 58.7% of all TBI patients have additional injuries of the facial skull, 8.8% of the vertebral column, 7.2% of the thorax, 2.6% of the abdomen, 3.4% of the pelvis and 19.6% of one or more extremities. One year after the accident, 50% of all patients still required treatment even after mild TBI. It is necessary to follow the TBI guidelines, e.g. regarding intubation and neurological examination. The indication for cranial x-rays and CT should be reconsidered.

  5. Neurology and literature 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2014-05-01

    Good literary fiction has the potential to move us, extend our sense of life, transform our prospective views and help us in the face of adversity. A neurological disorder is likely to be the most challenging experience a human being may have to confront in a lifetime. As such, literary recreations of illnesses have a doubly powerful effect. Study the synergies between neurology and fictional literature with particular reference to narrative based medicine (NBM). Doctors establish boundaries between the normal and the abnormal. Taking a clinical history is an act of interpretation in which the doctor integrates the science of objective signs and measurable quantities with the art of subjective clinical judgment. The more discrepancy there is between the patient's experience with the illness and the doctor's interpretation of that disease, the less likely the doctor-patient interaction is to succeed. NBM contributes to a better discernment of the meanings, thus considering disease as a biographical event rather than just a natural fact. Drawing from their own experience with disease, writers of fiction provide universal insights through their narratives, whilst neuroscientists, like Cajal, have occasionally devoted their scientific knowledge to literary narratives. Furthermore, neurologists from Alzheimer to Oliver Sacks remind us of the essential value of NBM in the clinic. Integrating NBM (the narrative of patients) and the classic holistic approach to patients with our current paradigm of evidence based medicine represents a challenge as relevant to neurologists as keeping up with technological and scientific advances. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Neurological Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rudrappa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus infection in humans is mostly asymptomatic. Less than 1% of neuro-invasive cases show a fatality rate of around 10%. Acute flaccid paralysis of respiratory muscles leading to respiratory failure is the most common cause of death. Although the peripheral nervous system can be involved, isolated phrenic nerve palsy leading to respiratory failure is rare and described in only two cases in the English literature. We present another case of neurological respiratory failure due to West Nile virus-induced phrenic nerve palsy. Our case reiterates the rare, but lethal, consequences of West Nile virus infection, and the increase of its awareness among physicians.

  7. The joint influence of area income, income inequality, and immigrant density on adverse birth outcomes: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giraud Julie

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between area characteristics and birth outcomes is modified by race. Whether such associations vary according to social class indicators beyond race has not been assessed. Methods This study evaluated effect modification by maternal birthplace and education of the relationship between neighbourhood characteristics and birth outcomes of newborns from 1999–2003 in the province of Québec, Canada (N = 353,120 births. Areas (N = 143 were defined as administrative local health service delivery districts. Multi-level logistic regression was used to model the association between three area characteristics (median household income, immigrant density and income inequality and the two outcomes preterm birth (PTB and small-for-gestational age (SGA birth. Effect modification by social class indicators was evaluated in analyses stratified according to maternal birthplace and education. Results Relative to the lowest tertile, high median household income was associated with SGA birth among Canadian-born mothers (odds ratio (OR 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.06, 1.20 and mothers with high school education or less (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.02, 1.24. Associations between median household income and PTB were weaker. Relative to the highest tertile, low immigrant density was associated with a lower odds of PTB among foreign-born mothers (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.63, 1.00 but a higher odds of PTB among Canadian-born mothers (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07, 1.21. Associations with income inequality were weak or absent. Conclusion The association between area factors and birth outcomes is modified by maternal birthplace and education. Studies have found that race interacts in a similar manner. Public health policies focussed on perinatal health must consider the interaction between individual and area characteristics.

  8. The joint influence of area income, income inequality, and immigrant density on adverse birth outcomes: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Nathalie; Giraud, Julie; Daniel, Mark

    2009-07-14

    The association between area characteristics and birth outcomes is modified by race. Whether such associations vary according to social class indicators beyond race has not been assessed. This study evaluated effect modification by maternal birthplace and education of the relationship between neighbourhood characteristics and birth outcomes of newborns from 1999-2003 in the province of Québec, Canada (N = 353,120 births). Areas (N = 143) were defined as administrative local health service delivery districts. Multi-level logistic regression was used to model the association between three area characteristics (median household income, immigrant density and income inequality) and the two outcomes preterm birth (PTB) and small-for-gestational age (SGA) birth. Effect modification by social class indicators was evaluated in analyses stratified according to maternal birthplace and education. Relative to the lowest tertile, high median household income was associated with SGA birth among Canadian-born mothers (odds ratio (OR) 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06, 1.20) and mothers with high school education or less (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.02, 1.24). Associations between median household income and PTB were weaker. Relative to the highest tertile, low immigrant density was associated with a lower odds of PTB among foreign-born mothers (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.63, 1.00) but a higher odds of PTB among Canadian-born mothers (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07, 1.21). Associations with income inequality were weak or absent. The association between area factors and birth outcomes is modified by maternal birthplace and education. Studies have found that race interacts in a similar manner. Public health policies focussed on perinatal health must consider the interaction between individual and area characteristics.

  9. Dengue: a new challenge for neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Puccioni-Sohler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue infection is a leading cause of illness and death in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Forty percent of the world’s population currently lives in these areas. The clinical picture resulting from dengue infection can range from relatively minor to catastrophic hemorrhagic fever. Recently, reports have increased of neurological manifestations. Neuropathogenesis seems to be related to direct nervous system viral invasion, autoimmune reaction, metabolic and hemorrhagic disturbance. Neurological manifestations include encephalitis, encephalopathy, meningitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, and cerebromeningeal hemorrhage. The development of neurological symptoms in patients with positive Immunoglobulin M (IgM dengue serology suggests a means of diagnosing the neurological complications associated with dengue. Viral antigens, specific IgM antibodies, and the intrathecal synthesis of dengue antibodies have been successfully detected in cerebrospinal fluid. However, despite diagnostic advancements, the treatment of neurological dengue is problematic. The launch of a dengue vaccine is expected to be beneficial.

  10. Improving the Rank Precision of Population Health Measures for Small Areas with Longitudinal and Joint Outcome Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athens, Jessica K; Remington, Patrick L; Gangnon, Ronald E

    2015-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute has published the County Health Rankings since 2010. These rankings use population-based data to highlight health outcomes and the multiple determinants of these outcomes and to encourage in-depth health assessment for all United States counties. A significant methodological limitation, however, is the uncertainty of rank estimates, particularly for small counties. To address this challenge, we explore the use of longitudinal and pooled outcome data in hierarchical Bayesian models to generate county ranks with greater precision. In our models we used pooled outcome data for three measure groups: (1) Poor physical and poor mental health days; (2) percent of births with low birth weight and fair or poor health prevalence; and (3) age-specific mortality rates for nine age groups. We used the fixed and random effects components of these models to generate posterior samples of rates for each measure. We also used time-series data in longitudinal random effects models for age-specific mortality. Based on the posterior samples from these models, we estimate ranks and rank quartiles for each measure, as well as the probability of a county ranking in its assigned quartile. Rank quartile probabilities for univariate, joint outcome, and/or longitudinal models were compared to assess improvements in rank precision. The joint outcome model for poor physical and poor mental health days resulted in improved rank precision, as did the longitudinal model for age-specific mortality rates. Rank precision for low birth weight births and fair/poor health prevalence based on the univariate and joint outcome models were equivalent. Incorporating longitudinal or pooled outcome data may improve rank certainty, depending on characteristics of the measures selected. For measures with different determinants, joint modeling neither improved nor degraded rank precision. This approach suggests a simple way to use existing information to

  11. Educational interventions in neurology: a comprehensive systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColgan, P; McKeown, P P; Selai, C; Doherty-Allan, R; McCarron, M O

    2013-07-01

    A fear of neurology and neural sciences (neurophobia) may have clinical consequences. There is therefore a need to formulate an evidence-based approach to neurology education. A comprehensive systematic review of educational interventions in neurology was performed. BEI, Cochrane Library, Dialog Datastar, EBSCO Biomedical, EBSCO Psychology & Behavioral Sciences, EMBASE, ERIC, First Search, MDConsult, Medline, Proquest Medical Library and Web of Knowledge databases were searched for all published studies assessing interventions in neurology education among undergraduate students, junior medical doctors and residents up to and including July 2012. Two independent literature searches were performed for relevant studies, which were then classified for level of evidence using the Centre of Evidence-based Medicine criteria and four levels of Kirkpatrick educational outcomes. One systematic review, 16 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nine non-randomized cohort/follow-up studies, 33 case series or historically controlled studies and three mechanism-based reasoning studies were identified. Educational interventions showed favourable evaluation or assessment outcomes in 15 of 16 (94%) RCTs. Very few studies measured subsequent clinical behaviour (two studies) and patient outcomes (one study). There is very little high quality evidence of demonstrably effective neurology education. However, RCTs are emerging, albeit without meeting comprehensive educational criteria. An improving evidence base in the quality of neurology education will be important to reduce neurophobia. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  12. Agreement between personally generated areas of quality of life concern and standard outcome measures in people with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburub, Ala' S; Gagnon, B; Rodríguez, A M; Mayo, Nancy E

    2016-09-01

    People with advanced cancer experience different sequelae which have unique effects on quality of life (QOL). The patient-generated index (PGI) is a personalized measure that allows patients to nominate, rate, and value areas that have the most impact on QOL. Fatigue, pain, and aspects of physical function are among the top 10 areas with QOL impact. An area of validation that is lacking for the PGI is the extent to which spontaneously nominated areas of QOL that patients are concerned with, agree with ratings obtained from standard patient reported outcomes (PROs). Data from 192 patients were used to compare ratings on fatigue, pain, and physical function obtained from PGI to those from standard outcome measures. Within one severity rating, agreement ranged from 32.1 to 76.9 % within the fatigue domain, 34.2 to 95.24 % for pain, and between 84.2 and 94.7 % for physical function. Of the 10 items where the PGI had the highest agreement, 7 came from the RAND-36. At the domain level, people nominating an area scored in the more impaired range on standard measures than people who did not. PGI gives comparable information as do standard measures. PGI provides important information to guide clinical care of the patient and also produces a legitimate total score suitable for research.

  13. Deja vu in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Edward

    2005-01-01

    The significance of deja vu is widely recognised in the context of temporal lobe epilepsy, and enquiry about deja vu is frequently made in the clinical assessment of patients with possible epilepsy. Deja vu has also been associated with several psychiatric disorders. The historical context of current understanding of deja vu is discussed. The literature reveals deja vu to be a common phenomenon consistent with normality. Several authors have suggested the existence of a "pathological" form of deja vu that differs, qualitatively or quantitatively, from "non-pathological" deja vu. The features of deja vu suggesting neurological or psychiatric pathology are discussed. Several neuroanatomical and psychological models of the deja vu experience are highlighted, implicating the perceptual, mnemonic and affective regions of the lateral temporal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala in the genesis of deja vu. A possible genetic basis for a neurochemical model of deja vu is discussed. Clinical approaches to the patient presenting with possible deja vu are proposed.

  14. Consciousness: A Neurological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea E. Cavanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness is a state so essentially entwined with human experience, yet so difficult to conceptually define and measure. In this article, we explore how a bidimensional model of consciousness involving both level of arousal and subjective awareness of the contents of consciousness can be used to differentiate a range of healthy and altered conscious states. These include the different sleep stages of healthy individuals and the altered states of consciousness associated with neurological conditions such as epilepsy, vegetative state and coma. In particular, we discuss how arousal and awareness are positively correlated in normal physiological states with the exception of REM sleep, while a disturbance in this relationship is characteristic of vegetative state, minimally conscious state, complex partial seizures and sleepwalking.

  15. Neurology and diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. History of neurologic examination books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors).

  17. Neurological sequelae of bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-07-01

    We reported on occurrence and impact of neurological sequelae after bacterial meningitis. We reviewed occurrence of neurological sequelae in children and adults after pneumococcal and meningococcal meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Adults with pneumococcal meningitis have the highest risk of developing focal neurological deficits, which are most commonly caused by cerebral infarction, but can also be due to cerebritis, subdural empyema, cerebral abscess or intracerebral bleeding. Focal deficits may improve during clinical course and even after discharge, but a proportion of patients will have persisting focal neurological deficits that often interfere in patient's daily life. Hearing loss occurs in a high proportion of patients with pneumococcal meningitis and has been associated with co-existing otitis. Children and adults recovering from bacterial meningitis without apparent neurological deficits are at risk for long-term cognitive deficits. Early identification of neurological sequelae is important for children to prevent additional developmental delay, and for adults to achieve successful return in society after the disease. Neurological sequelae occur in a substantial amount of patients following bacterial meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Perioperative Management of Neurological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet Singh Dhallu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative care of the patients with neurological diseases can be challenging. Most important consideration is the management and understanding of pathophysiology of these disorders and evaluation of new neurological changes that occur perioperatively. Perioperative generally refers to 3 phases of surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. We have tried to address few commonly encountered neurological conditions in clinical practice, such as delirium, stroke, epilepsy, myasthenia gravis, and Parkinson disease. In this article, we emphasize on early diagnosis and management strategies of neurological disorders in the perioperative period to minimize morbidity and mortality of patients.

  19. Splicing Regulation in Neurologic Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Licatalosi, Donny D; Darnell, Robert B

    2006-01-01

    .... It is becoming evident that alternative splicing plays a particularly important role in neurologic disease, which is perhaps not surprising given the important role splicing plays in generating...

  20. MATERNAL OUTCOME IN PREGNANCY INDUCED HYPERTENSION IN A TEACHING HOSPITAL IN A RURAL AREA IN TELANGANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Reddy Kothapally

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM To analyse the maternal outcome in pregnancy induced hypertension and improve the management strategies. INTRODUCTION Pregnancy induced hypertension is a medical disease peculiar to pregnancy, making pregnancy a high risk condition. Among medical disorders complicating pregnancy, it stands next to anaemia in prevalence. It is responsible for majority of the maternal morbidity and mortality. It also has an adverse perinatal outcome. Hence, early detection and timely intervention of women with pregnancy induced hypertension is important for good maternal and perinatal outcome. MATERIAL & METHODS The present Prospective Observational study was done from April 2015 to February 2016 in the department of obstetrics & gynaecology at Bhaskar medical college and general hospital, Yenkepally, Moinabad, Telangana. A total of 102 pregnant women with pregnancy induced hypertension were enrolled into the study. Demographic details like age, parity, previous obstetric history of pregnancy induced hypertension and diabetes, past history of polycystic ovarian disease, treatment for infertility, gestational age at which hypertension developed in the present pregnancy were noted. Relevant investigations were performed. Gestational age of delivery, mode of delivery and maternal complications were noted. RESULTS The incidence of pregnancy induced hypertension was 4% in the study population. About 59.8% developed pregnancy induced hypertension in the third trimester. Out of this, 64.7% cases were gestational hypertension and 35.3% cases were preeclampsia. Nearly half (41.7% of preeclampsia cases were severe preeclampsia. Postpartum haemorrhage is the commonest complication (13.7%, next being imminent eclampsia (7.8%, abruption (4.9%, eclampsia (3.9% and HELLP syndrome (0.98%. 80% of cases could be delivered beyond 37 weeks of gestational age. 71.57% of cases had lower segment caesarean section for indicated conditions. More than half of pregnancy induced

  1. Cannabinoids in neurology – Brazilian Academy of Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. D. Brucki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of cannabidiol in some neurological conditions was allowed by Conselho Regional de Medicina de São Paulo and by Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA. Specialists on behalf of Academia Brasileira de Neurologia prepared a critical statement about use of cannabidiol and other cannabis derivatives in neurological diseases.

  2. Usefulness of Videotape Instruction in an Academic Department of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David M.; Kaufman, Rita G.

    1983-01-01

    Videotape instruction produced better performance in identification in only certain areas in a neurology clerkship: neuropsychologic phenomena, disorders with subtle or unique movements, and seizures. The choice and cost of equipment and some professional assurances are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  3. Music Education and Medicine: Music and the Neurology of Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Frank R.

    1991-01-01

    Explores how the body's biological clock affects the way musicians practice and perform. Delineates questions concerning this phenomenon. Discusses the implications for music teaching and focuses on areas for collaborative research between neurology researchers and music educators. (NL)

  4. The Free Trade Area of the Americas : positive outcomes for Brazil and the global community

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmer, Michael David

    2010-01-01

    This document discusses Brazil and the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA). Since the FTAA is only a proposed agreement and trade apparatus at the moment, NAFTA is used as a working model and its influence on and benefit for Mexico and that country’s economy.

  5. Are neurology residents interested in headache?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago-Veiga, A B; Santos-Lasaosa, S; Viguera Romero, J; Pozo-Rosich, P

    The years of residency are the pillars of the subsequent practice in every medical specialty. The aim of our study is to evaluate the current situation, degree of involvement, main interests, and perceived quality of the training received by Spanish residents of neurology, specifically in the area of headache. A self-administered survey was designed by the Headache Study Group of the Spanish Society of Neurology (GECSEN) and was sent via e-mail to all residents who were members of the Society as of May 2015. Fifty-three residents completed the survey (N = 426, 12.4%): 6% were first year residents, 25.5% second year, 23.5% third year, and 45% fourth year residents, all from 13 different Spanish autonomous communities. The areas of greatest interest are, in this order: Vascular neurology, headache, and epilepsy. Of them, 85% believe that the area of headache is undervalued. More than half of residents (52.8%) do not rotate in specific Headache Units and only 35.8% complete their training dominating anaesthetic block and toxin infiltration techniques. Of them, 81.1% believe that research is scarce or absent; 69.8% have never made a poster/presentation, 79.3% have not published and only 15% collaborate on research projects in this area. Lastly, 40% believe that they have not received adequate training. Headache is among the areas that interest our residents the most; however, we believe that we must improve their training both at a patient healthcare level and as researchers. Thus, increasing the number of available courses, creating educational web pages, involving residents in research, and making a rotation in a specialised unit mandatory are among the fundamental objectives of the GECSEN. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Shiga toxin Mediated Neurologic Changes in Murine Model of Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Pradhan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Seizures and neurologic involvement have been reported in patients infected with Shiga toxin (Stx producing E. coli, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS with neurologic involvement is associated with more severe outcome. We investigated the extent of renal and neurologic damage in mice following injection of the highly potent form of Stx, Stx2a, and less potent Stx1. As observed in previous studies, Stx2a brought about moderate to acute tubular necrosis of proximal and distal tubules in the kidneys. Brain sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E appeared normal, although some red blood cell congestion was observed. Microglial cell responses to neural injury include up-regulation of surface-marker expression (e.g. Iba1 and stereotypical morphological changes. Mice injected with Stx2a showed increased Iba1 staining, mild morphological changes associated with microglial activation (thickening of processes, and increased microglial staining per unit area. Microglial changes were observed in the cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala regions, but not the nucleus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of Stx2a-treated mice revealed no hyper-intensities in the brain, although magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS revealed significantly decreased levels of phosphocreatine in the thalamus. Less dramatic changes were observed following Stx1 challenge. Neither immortalized microvascular endothelial cells from the cerebral cortex of mice (bEnd.3 nor primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells were found to be susceptible to Stx1 or Stx2a. The lack of susceptibility to Stx for both cell types correlated with an absence of receptor expression. These studies indicate Stx causes subtle, but identifiable changes in the mouse brain.

  7. The effects of neurologic assessment E-learning in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji Yeon; Issenberg, S Barry; Roh, Young Sook

    2017-10-01

    A firm understanding of the preliminary assessment of a patient with neurological disorders is needed for ensuring optimal patient outcomes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of using e-learning on neurologic assessment knowledge, ability, and self-confidence among nurses. This study used a non-equivalent control group pretest-posttest design. Nurses working in the neurology and neurosurgery wards, Republic of Korea PARTICIPANTS: A convenience sample of 50 nurses was assigned to either the experimental group (n=24) or the control group (n=26). The experimental group participated in the self-directed e-learning program related to neurologic assessment, and control group underwent self-directed learning with handout. Knowledge, ability, and self-confidence were measured at pretest and posttest. There were no significant differences in knowledge (U=270, p=0.399) and self-confidence (U=241.5, p=0.171) between the two groups. Nurses in the experimental group showed higher neurologic assessment ability compared with those in the control group (U=199, p=0.028). Self-directed neurologic assessment e-learning induced improvement in the neurologic assessment ability among nurses. Self-directed e-learning can be applied for improving competencies in neurologic assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Neurological interpretation of dreams] .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, J A; Gil-Nagel, A

    2000-10-01

    Cerebral cortical activity is constant throughout the entire human life, but substantially changes during the different phases of the sleep-wake cycle (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep), as well as in relation to available information. In particular, perception of the environment is closely linked to the wake-state, while during sleep perception turns to the internal domain or endogenous cerebral activity. External and internal information are mutually exclusive. During wakefulness a neuronal mechanism allows attention to focus on the environment whereas endogenous cortical activity is ignored. The opposite process is provided during sleep. The function external attention-internal attention is coupled with the two modes of brain function during wakefulness and during sleep, providing two possible cortical status: thinking and dreaming. Several neurological processes may influence the declaration of the three states of being or may modify their orderly oscillation through the sleep-wake cycle. In addition, endogenous information and its perception (dreams) may be modified. Disturbances of dreaming may configurate in different general clinical scenarios: lack of dreaming, excess of dreaming (epic dreaming), paroxysmal dreaming (epileptic), nightmares, violent dreaming, daytime-dreaming (hallucinations), and lucid dreaming. Sensorial deprivation, as well as the emergence of internal perception may be the underlying mechanism of hallucinations. The probable isomorphism between hallucinations and dreaming is postulated, analyzed and discussed.

  9. Comparison of Personal BTEX Exposure and Pregnancy Outcomes among Pregnant Women Residing in and Near Petrochemical Industrial Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nantaporn Phatrabuddha

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Petrochemical industrial air pollution is a major problem in many cities in Asia, including Rayong, Thailand. Some of this pollution, e.g. benzene are human carcinogen.To determine the levels of exposure to BTEX compounds and examine the pregnancy outcomes among pregnantwomen living in and near petrochemical industrial area. 110 pregnancy women were monitored, using a combination of environmental and biological sampling for BTEX exposure.Results showed that personal exposures to BTEX were significantly higher in pregnant women living in the petrochemical industrial area than those living near the petrochemical industrial area (P< 0.001. These were in agree with urinary metabolites of BTEX on Thursday afternoon, i.e. t,t-muconic acid, hippuric acid, mandelic acid and methyl-hippuric acid. The urinary metabolites of BTEX were also correlated well with personal exposure (P< 0.05. For pregnancy outcomes, there were no difference between the groups in the prevalence of low birth weight for gestational age (< 2,500 grams, and APGAR score below 7 at 1 and 5 minutes. Upon data analysis of relations between BTEX exposure level and maternal gain weight, gestation age, birth weight, and APGAR score at 1-minute and 5-minutes, no significant relationship was found. Our data indicates that pregnant women residing ina heavy industrial city such as MapTaPhut have exposed to toxic substances, i.e. BTEX in a higher level than those in more outer industrial city who are exposed to less industrial pollutions.

  10. Neurologic Injury in Operatively Treated Acetabular Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Yelena; Tornetta, Paul; Jones, Clifford; Gilde, Alex K; Schemitsch, Emil; Vicente, Milena; Horwitz, Daniel; Sanders, David; Firoozabadi, Reza; Leighton, Ross; de Dios Robinson, Juan; Marcantonio, Andrew; Hamilton, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a series of operatively treated acetabular fractures with neurologic injury and to track sensory and motor recovery. Operatively treated acetabular fractures with neurologic injury from 8 trauma centers were reviewed. Patients were followed for at least 6 months or to neurologic recovery. Functional outcome was documented at 3 months, 6 months, and final follow-up. Outcomes included motor and sensory recovery, brace use, development of chronic regional pain syndrome, and return to work. One hundred thirty-seven patients (101 males and 36 females), average age 42 (17-87) years, met the criteria. Mechanism of injury included MVC (67%), fall (11%), and other (22%). The most common fracture types were transverse + posterior wall (33%), posterior wall (23%), and both-column (23%). Deficits were identified as preoperative in 57%, iatrogenic in 19% (immediately after surgery), and those that developed postoperatively in 24%. A total of 187 nerve deficits associated with the following root levels were identified: 7 in L2-3, 18 in L4, 114 in L5, and 48 in S1. Full recovery occurred in 54 (29%), partial recovery in 69 (37%), and 64 (34%) had no recovery. Forty-three percent of S1 deficits and 29% of L5 deficits had no recovery. Fifty-five percent of iatrogenic injuries did not recover. Forty-eight patients wore a brace at the final follow-up, all for an L5 root level deficit. Although 60% (42/70) returned to work, chronic regional pain syndrome was seen to develop in 19% (18/94). Peripheral neurologic injury in operatively treated acetabular fractures occurs most commonly in the sciatic nerve distribution, with L5 root level deficits having only a 26% chance of full recovery. Prognostic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  11. Interventional neurology: a reborn subspecialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgell, Randall C; Alshekhlee, Amer; Yavagal, Dileep R; Vora, Nirav; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2012-10-01

    Neurologists have a long history of involvement in cerebral angiography; however, the roots of neurologist involvement in therapeutic endovascular procedures have not been previously documented. As outlined in this article, it has taken the efforts of several early pioneers to lay the ground work for interventional neurology, a specialty that has become one of the fastest growing neurological subspecialties. The ground work, along with a great clinical need, has allowed the modern interventional neurologist to tackle some of the most intractable diseases, especially those affecting the cerebral vasculature. The institutionalization of interventional neurology as a subspecialty was first advocated in 1995 in an article entitled, "Interventional Neurology, a subspecialty whose time has come." The institutions created in the wake of this article have provided the framework that has allowed interventional neurology to transition from "a subspecialty whose time has come" to a subspecialty that is here to stay and thrive. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  12. Modulation of motor area activity by the outcome for a player during observation of a baseball game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotaro Shimada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Observing competitive games such as sports is a pervasive entertainment among humans. The inclination to watch others play may be based on our social-cognitive ability to understand the internal states of others. The mirror neuron system, which is activated when a subject observes the actions of others, as well as when they perform the same action themselves, seems to play a crucial role in this process. Our previous study showed that activity of the mirror neuron system was modulated by the outcome of the subject's favored player during observation of a simple competitive game (rock-paper-scissors. However, whether the mirror neuron system responds similarly in a more complex and naturalistic sports game has not yet been fully investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we measured the activity of motor areas when the subjects, who were amateur baseball field players (non-pitchers, watched short movie clips of scenes in professional baseball games. The subjects were instructed to support either a batter or a pitcher when observing the movie clip. The results showed that activity in the motor area exhibited a strong interaction between the subject's supported side (batter or pitcher and the outcome (a hit or an out. When the subject supported the batter, motor area activity was significantly higher when the batter made an out than when he made a hit. However, such modulation was not apparent when the subject supported the pitcher. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This result indicates that mirror neuron system activity is modulated by the outcome for a particular player in a competitive game even when observing a complex and naturalistic sports game. We suggest that our inclination to watch competitive games is facilitated by this characteristic of the mirror neuron system.

  13. Modulation of motor area activity by the outcome for a player during observation of a baseball game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Sotaro

    2009-11-25

    Observing competitive games such as sports is a pervasive entertainment among humans. The inclination to watch others play may be based on our social-cognitive ability to understand the internal states of others. The mirror neuron system, which is activated when a subject observes the actions of others, as well as when they perform the same action themselves, seems to play a crucial role in this process. Our previous study showed that activity of the mirror neuron system was modulated by the outcome of the subject's favored player during observation of a simple competitive game (rock-paper-scissors). However, whether the mirror neuron system responds similarly in a more complex and naturalistic sports game has not yet been fully investigated. In the present study, we measured the activity of motor areas when the subjects, who were amateur baseball field players (non-pitchers), watched short movie clips of scenes in professional baseball games. The subjects were instructed to support either a batter or a pitcher when observing the movie clip. The results showed that activity in the motor area exhibited a strong interaction between the subject's supported side (batter or pitcher) and the outcome (a hit or an out). When the subject supported the batter, motor area activity was significantly higher when the batter made an out than when he made a hit. However, such modulation was not apparent when the subject supported the pitcher. This result indicates that mirror neuron system activity is modulated by the outcome for a particular player in a competitive game even when observing a complex and naturalistic sports game. We suggest that our inclination to watch competitive games is facilitated by this characteristic of the mirror neuron system.

  14. Effect of maternal iodine supplementation on thyroid function and birth outcome in goiter endemic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anees, Mariam; Anis, Riffat Aysha; Yousaf, Sohail; Murtaza, Iram; Sultan, Aneesa; Arslan, Muhammad; Shahab, Muhammad

    2015-04-01

    The study was undertaken to examine the clinical and endocrine parameters of thyroid in a total of 460 pregnant women belonging to non-goiter areas (group 1; n = 156) and endemic areas without (group 2; n = 154) and with iodine supplementation (group 3; n = 150), and their respective newborns. Women of group 3 with visible goiter were administered two capsules of iodized oil orally each containing 200 mg of iodine, from weeks 6--8 of pregnancy. Blood samples were obtained from all groups during each trimester, at parturition (umbilical cord blood) and after delivery. Serum triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were measured by specific enzyme immunoassays. In group 2, serum T4 concentrations were low while T3 and TSH levels were high which showed hypothyroidism in the women of endemic areas. Goiter size decreased in most of the subjects who received a single dose of iodized oil and resulted in increase in serum concentrations of thyroid hormones; whereas, TSH levels decreased. Iodine supplementation also resulted in raised T4 and low TSH levels in the cord blood of neonates. During the course of study, two abortions, three still births and one cretin were reported in group 2; none was reported in group 3; and one still birth was reported in group 1. The oral administration of a single dose of iodized oil is capable of correcting iodine deficiency both clinically and endocrinologically in mothers and neonates. Iodine supplementation has the potential to positively impact the birth weight of newborns.

  15. Global conservation outcomes depend on marine protected areas with five key features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Graham J; Stuart-Smith, Rick D; Willis, Trevor J; Kininmonth, Stuart; Baker, Susan C; Banks, Stuart; Barrett, Neville S; Becerro, Mikel A; Bernard, Anthony T F; Berkhout, Just; Buxton, Colin D; Campbell, Stuart J; Cooper, Antonia T; Davey, Marlene; Edgar, Sophie C; Försterra, Günter; Galván, David E; Irigoyen, Alejo J; Kushner, David J; Moura, Rodrigo; Parnell, P Ed; Shears, Nick T; Soler, German; Strain, Elisabeth M A; Thomson, Russell J

    2014-02-13

    In line with global targets agreed under the Convention on Biological Diversity, the number of marine protected areas (MPAs) is increasing rapidly, yet socio-economic benefits generated by MPAs remain difficult to predict and under debate. MPAs often fail to reach their full potential as a consequence of factors such as illegal harvesting, regulations that legally allow detrimental harvesting, or emigration of animals outside boundaries because of continuous habitat or inadequate size of reserve. Here we show that the conservation benefits of 87 MPAs investigated worldwide increase exponentially with the accumulation of five key features: no take, well enforced, old (>10 years), large (>100 km(2)), and isolated by deep water or sand. Using effective MPAs with four or five key features as an unfished standard, comparisons of underwater survey data from effective MPAs with predictions based on survey data from fished coasts indicate that total fish biomass has declined about two-thirds from historical baselines as a result of fishing. Effective MPAs also had twice as many large (>250 mm total length) fish species per transect, five times more large fish biomass, and fourteen times more shark biomass than fished areas. Most (59%) of the MPAs studied had only one or two key features and were not ecologically distinguishable from fished sites. Our results show that global conservation targets based on area alone will not optimize protection of marine biodiversity. More emphasis is needed on better MPA design, durable management and compliance to ensure that MPAs achieve their desired conservation value.

  16. Leishmania-HIV co-infection: clinical presentation and outcomes in an urban area in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota, Gláucia F; de Sousa, Marcos R; de Mendonça, Andrea Laender Pessoa; Patrocinio, Allan; Assunção, Luiza Siqueira; de Faria, Sidnei Rodrigues; Rabello, Ana

    2014-04-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an emerging condition affecting HIV-infected patients living in Latin America, particularly in Brazil. Leishmania-HIV coinfection represents a challenging diagnosis because the clinical picture of VL is similar to that of other disseminated opportunistic diseases. Additionally, coinfection is related to treatment failure, relapse and high mortality. To assess the clinical-laboratory profile and outcomes of VL-HIV-coinfected patients using a group of non HIV-infected patients diagnosed with VL during the same period as a comparator. The study was conducted at a reference center for infectious diseases in Brazil. All patients with suspected VL were evaluated in an ongoing cohort study. Confirmed cases were divided into two groups: with and without HIV coinfection. Patients were treated according to the current guidelines of the Ministry of Health of Brazil, which considers antimony as the first-choice therapy for non HIV-infected patients and recommends amphotericin B for HIV-infected patients. After treatment, all patients with CD4 counts below 350 cells/mm3 received secondary prophylaxis with amphotericin B. Between 2011 and 2013, 168 patients with suspected VL were evaluated, of whom 90 were confirmed to have VL. In total, 51% were HIV coinfected patients (46 patients). HIV-infected patients had a lower rate of fever and splenomegaly compared with immunocompetent patients. The VL relapse rate in 6 months was 37% among HIV-infected patients, despite receiving secondary prophylaxis. The overall case-fatality rate was 6.6% (4 deaths in the HIV-infected group versus 2 deaths in the non HIV-infected group). The main risk factors for a poor outcome at 6 months after the end of treatment were HIV infection, bleeding and a previous VL episode. Although VL mortality rates among HIV-infected individuals are close to those observed among immunocompetent patients treated with amphotericin B, HIV coinfection is related to a low clinical response

  17. Leishmania-HIV co-infection: clinical presentation and outcomes in an urban area in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia F Cota

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is an emerging condition affecting HIV-infected patients living in Latin America, particularly in Brazil. Leishmania-HIV coinfection represents a challenging diagnosis because the clinical picture of VL is similar to that of other disseminated opportunistic diseases. Additionally, coinfection is related to treatment failure, relapse and high mortality. OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical-laboratory profile and outcomes of VL-HIV-coinfected patients using a group of non HIV-infected patients diagnosed with VL during the same period as a comparator. METHODS: The study was conducted at a reference center for infectious diseases in Brazil. All patients with suspected VL were evaluated in an ongoing cohort study. Confirmed cases were divided into two groups: with and without HIV coinfection. Patients were treated according to the current guidelines of the Ministry of Health of Brazil, which considers antimony as the first-choice therapy for non HIV-infected patients and recommends amphotericin B for HIV-infected patients. After treatment, all patients with CD4 counts below 350 cells/mm3 received secondary prophylaxis with amphotericin B. RESULTS: Between 2011 and 2013, 168 patients with suspected VL were evaluated, of whom 90 were confirmed to have VL. In total, 51% were HIV coinfected patients (46 patients. HIV-infected patients had a lower rate of fever and splenomegaly compared with immunocompetent patients. The VL relapse rate in 6 months was 37% among HIV-infected patients, despite receiving secondary prophylaxis. The overall case-fatality rate was 6.6% (4 deaths in the HIV-infected group versus 2 deaths in the non HIV-infected group. The main risk factors for a poor outcome at 6 months after the end of treatment were HIV infection, bleeding and a previous VL episode. CONCLUSION: Although VL mortality rates among HIV-infected individuals are close to those observed among immunocompetent patients treated with

  18. Heart failure outcomes based on race and gender of patients in a medically undeserved area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Linda L; Steele, James R

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate changes in quality of life (QoL), disease severity and exercise tolerance of heart failure (HF) patients in a medically underserved clinic based on race and gender. Despite advances in the treatment of HF over the past decade, incidence, morbidity and mortality for patients continue to rise while QoL declines. HF is common in African-Americans and women; however, there is limited research focusing on race and gender variables. Health related QoL, disease severity measured by B-type natriuretic peptide blood test (BNP) and ejection fraction (EF), and exercise tolerance measured by six minute walk test (6MWT) were assessed at admission and at 6 months in a convenience sample of 53 patients. Variables were compared by race and gender. The sample was 67.9% African American and 62.3% male. Men had greater improvements than women in QoL, BNP, and EF, while women had greater improvements in the 6MWT. African Americans had greater improvements than Whites in all four variables. Even in the presence of disease severity in patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III and IV HF, there were significant improvements in QoL, BNP, HF outcomes demonstrating the importance of developing culturally sensitive and gender-specific treatment plans.

  19. Green areas and health outcomes: a systematic review of the scientific literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Di Nardo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Growing medical evidence shows that access to the natural environment improves health and wellbeing, prevents disease and helps people recover from illness. Experiencing nature in the outdoors can help tackle obesity and coronary heart disease. Green areas exert their benefits on both physical and mental health, promoting physical activity and strengthening the sense of community thus positively influencing social interaction. Urbanization poses problems through effects such as environmental pollution, accidents, heat island effects, climate change and a consequent demand for urban green areas.

    Material and methods: We performed literature searches of electronic journal databases for studies and reviews that focused on the relationship between green spaces and health. We looked at the effects on physical health, mental health, social health, physical activity and well-being in its broadest sense and then we categorically organized our findings.

    Results: We found many contradictory and unexpected results. However, the reported findings were generally consistent and supported the current view that urban design and the availability of urban green spaces are key elements of prosperity and individual/collective comfort, so as to influence both the perceived health and the objective physical conditions in a measurable way. A weak relationship between physical activity levels and green space availability is observed.

    Conclusions: The occasionally contradictory results that emerged in this study suggest that a opulation’s esponse to urban design interventions is often unpredictable. Further research is needed to quantify the trength of relation between green spaces and urban health, but also to investigate the social and behavioural spects which are more difficult to measure and understand.

  20. Neurological examination in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Paluš

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This clinical review about the neurological examination in small animals describes the basics about the first steps of investigation when dealing with neurological patients. The knowledge of how to perform the neurological examination is important however more important is how to correctly interpret these performed tests. A step-by-step approach is mandatory and examiners should master the order and the style of performing these tests. Neurological conditions can be sometimes very distressing for owners and for pets that might not be the most cooperating. The role of a veterinary surgeon, as a professional, is therefore to collect the most relevant history, to examine a patient in a professional manner and to give to owners an educated opinion about the further treatment and prognosis. However neurological examinations might look challenging for many. But it is only the clinical application of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to an every-day situation for practicing veterinarians and it does not require any specific in-to-depth knowledge. This clinical review is aimed not only to provide the information on how to perform the neurological examination but it is also aimed to appeal on veterinarians to challenge their daily routine and to start practicing on neurologically normal patients. This is the best and only way to differentiate between the normal and abnormal in a real situation.

  1. Evaluating the outcomes of a hearing screening service for grade one learners in urban areas at Durban, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Govender

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Early intervention through hearing screening can reduce the negative impact of hearing loss for children. Optimal outcomes are achieved when an appropriate screening protocol is selected, a pathway for follow up care is established, and when a hearing conservation component is included. This study aimed to describe the outcomes of a hearing screening service provided to grade one learners in urban areas at Durban. A cross-sectional design was employed. Learners (n=241 were conveniently sampled from six randomly selected schools. They were screened using otoscopy, tympanometry and pure tone audiometry. Fifty eight participants (24% obtained a refer result, with 33% referred for diagnostic assessments, 29% for middle ear pathology and 38% for cerumen management. Findings further revealed that only 33% of referrals were followed up indicating poor compliance. Association between test results and income levels (P=0.38 as well as distance to the nearest health care facility (P=0.22 did not influence test outcomes. School aged children do present with common ear problems. Appropriate protocol selection, ensuring compliance to recommendations and education on hearing conservation are essential components of any health initiative.

  2. Canadian Paediatric Neurology Workforce Survey and Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doja, Asif; Orr, Serena L; McMillan, Hugh J; Kirton, Adam; Brna, Paula; Esser, Michael; Tang-Wai, Richard; Major, Philippe; Poulin, Chantal; Prasad, Narayan; Selby, Kathryn; Weiss, Shelly K; Yeh, E Ann; Callen, David Ja

    2016-05-01

    Little knowledge exists on the availability of academic and community paediatric neurology positions. This knowledge is crucial for making workforce decisions. Our study aimed to: 1) obtain information regarding the availability of positions for paediatric neurologists in academic centres; 2) survey paediatric neurology trainees regarding their perceptions of employment issues and career plans; 3) survey practicing community paediatric neurologists 4) convene a group of paediatric neurologists to develop consensus regarding how to address these workforce issues. Surveys addressing workforce issues regarding paediatric neurology in Canada were sent to: 1) all paediatric neurology program directors in Canada (n=9) who then solicited information from division heads and from paediatric neurologists in surrounding areas; 2) paediatric neurology trainees in Canada (n=57) and; 3) community paediatric neurologists (n=27). A meeting was held with relevant stakeholders to develop a consensus on how to approach employment issues. The response rate was 100% from program directors, 57.9% from residents and 44% from community paediatric neurologists. We found that the number of projected positions in academic paediatric neurology is fewer than the number of paediatric neurologists that are being trained over the next five to ten years, despite a clinical need for paediatric neurologists. Paediatric neurology residents are concerned about job availability and desire more career counselling. There is a current and projected clinical demand for paediatric neurologists despite a lack of academic positions. Training programs should focus on community neurology as a viable career option.

  3. Outcome of an oral health outreach programme for preschool children in a low socioeconomic multicultural area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennhall, Inger; Matsson, Lars; Schröder, Ulla; Twetman, Svante

    2008-03-01

    Despite a significant reduction in the prevalence of dental caries, childhood tooth decay is still a public health problem in both developed and developing countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the caries preventive effect of an oral health programme for preschool children living in a low socioeconomic multicultural area in the city of Malmö, Sweden. Eight hundred and four 2-year-old children were enrolled and recalled every third month between ages 2 and 3 and semi-annually between ages 3 and 5 years. From an outreach facility, parents were instructed on oral health with a focus on toothbrushing and diet, and provided fluoride tablets free of charge. Participants completed a clinical examination and a structured interview at age of 5 years, at which point 651 children (81%) remained in the programme. The results of the intervention group were compared with a non-intervention reference group consisting of 201 5-year-old children from the same district. In the intervention group, 96% attended four or more of their scheduled appointments, and mean caries prevalence was significantly lower than in the reference group (5.4 deft vs. 6.9 deft; P early start of oral health programme had a significant beneficial effect on caries prevalence after 3 years.

  4. Neurological Manifestations of Dengue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Hong Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue counts among the most commonly encountered arboviral diseases, representing the fastest spreading tropical illness in the world. It is prevalent in 128 countries, and each year >2.5 billion people are at risk of dengue virus infection worldwide. Neurological signs of dengue infection are increasingly reported. In this review, the main neurological complications of dengue virus infection, such as central nervous system (CNS, peripheral nervous system, and ophthalmic complications were discussed according to clinical features, treatment and possible pathogenesis. In addition, neurological complications in children were assessed due to their atypical clinical features. Finally, dengue infection and Japanese encephalitis were compared for pathogenesis and main clinical manifestations.

  5. Why neurology? Factors which influence career choice in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V; Hoyle, Chad; Yin, Han; McCoyd, Matthew; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the factors which influence the decision to pursue a career in neurology. An anonymous survey was developed using a Likert scale to rate responses. The survey was sent to adult and child neurology faculty, residents and fellows, as well as medical students applying for neurology. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the factors of influence. Respondents were subsequently categorized into pre-neurology trainees, neurology trainees, child neurologists and adult neurologists, and differences between the groups were analysed using Pearson's chi-square test. One hundred and thirty-three anonymous responses were received. The respondents were neurologists across all levels of training and practice. Across all respondents, the most common factor of high importance was intellectual content of specialty, challenging diagnostic problems, type of patient encountered and interest in helping people. Responses were similar across the groups; however, the earliest trainees cited interest in helping people as most important, while those in neurology training and beyond cite intellectual content of the specialty as most important. As trainees transition from their earliest levels of clinical experience into working as residents and faculty, there is a shift in the cited important factors. Lifestyle and financial factors seem to be the least motivating across all groups. Encouragement from peers, mentors, faculty and practicing physicians is considered high influences in a smaller number of neurologists. This may present an opportunity for practicing neurologists to make connections with medical students early in their education in an effort to encourage and mentor candidates.

  6. Neurologic Intensive Care Unit Electrolyte Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutto, Craig; French, Mindy

    2017-06-01

    Dysnatremia is a common finding in the intensive care unit (ICU) and may be a predictor for mortality and poor clinical outcomes. Depending on the time of onset (ie, on admission vs later in the ICU stay), the incidence of dysnatremias in critically ill patients ranges from 6.9% to 15%, respectively. The symptoms of sodium derangement and their effect on brain physiology make early recognition and correction paramount in the neurologic ICU. Hyponatremia in brain injured patients can lead to life-threatening conditions such as seizures and may worsen cerebral edema and contribute to alterations in intracranial pressure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  8. Sparring And Neurological Function In Professional Boxers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Stiller

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDespite increased interest regarding the potentially long-term negative impact of chronic traumatic brain injury (CTBI, limited research had been conducted regarding such injuries and neurological outcomes in real world settings. To increase understanding regarding the relationship between sparring (e.g., number of years actively training for professional boxing and neurological functioning, professional boxers (n = 237 who competed in Maryland between 2003 to 2008 completed measures regarding sparring exposure (Cumulative Sparring Index; CSI and performance on tests of cognition (Symbol Digit Modalities Test; SDMT and balance (Sharpened Romberg Test; SRT. Measures were completed prior to boxing matches. Higher scores on the CSI (increased sparring exposure were associated with poorer performance on both tests of cognition (SDMT and balance (SRT. A threshold effect was noted regarding performance on the SDMT, with those reporting CSI values greater than about 150 experiencing a decline in cognition. A history of frequent and/or intense sparring may pose a significant risk for developing boxing associated neurological sequelae. Implementing administration of clinically meaningful tests before bouts, such as the CSI, SDMT, and/or the SRT, as well as documentation of results into the boxer’s physicals or medical profiles may be an important step for improving boxing safety.

  9. Neurological Diagnostic Tests and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of diagnostic imaging techniques and chemical and metabolic analyses to detect, manage, and treat neurological disease. Some ... performed in a doctor’s office or at a clinic. Fluoroscopy is a type of x-ray that ...

  10. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosińska, Justyna; Łukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  11. Neurologic Complications of Smallpox Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Smallpox and smallpox vaccination is reviewed from the Departments of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, and University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque.

  12. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  13. Neurologic disorder and criminal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Sufferers from neurologic and psychiatric disorders are not uncommonly defendants in criminal trials. This chapter surveys a variety of different ways in which neurologic disorder bears on criminal responsibility. It discusses the way in which a neurologic disorder might bear on the questions of whether or not the defendant acted voluntarily; whether or not he or she was in the mental state that is required for guilt for the crime; and whether or not he or she is deserving of an insanity defense. The discussion demonstrates that a just determination of whether a sufferer from a neurologic disorder is diminished in his or her criminal responsibility for harmful conduct requires equal appreciation of the nature of the relevant disorder and its impact on behavior, on the one hand, and of the legal import of facts about the psychologic mechanisms through which behavior is generated, on the other. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C. during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20 th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation′s first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835, Calcutta (1835 and Mumbai (1848. Prior to India′s independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI. Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN. Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930′s. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951 include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991. The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in

  15. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shrikant; Trikamji, Bhavesh; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Parampreet; Nair, Rajasekharan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation's first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835), Calcutta (1835) and Mumbai (1848). Prior to India's independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI). Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN). Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930's. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951) include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991). The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in the amount of

  16. Neurological complications of kernicterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlOtaibi, Suad F; Blaser, Susan; MacGregor, Daune L

    2005-08-01

    Prevention of bilirubin encephalopathy relies on the detection of newborns who are at risk of developing serious hyperbilirubinemia. The objective of this study was to reassess the clinical syndrome of kernicterus as neurodiagnostic studies have become more readily available and can be used to evaluate these infants. The study population was neonates born at term or near term admitted to The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, between January 1990 and May 2000. During the study period, there were 9776 admissions (average number of admissions per year--888 infants). The inclusion criteria were that patients had total serum bilirubin levels of >400 micromol/L at the time of diagnosis and no evidence of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Records were reviewed to establish neurodevelopment outcomes. Twelve neonates (nine males) were identified. Bilirubin levels at the time of diagnosis ranged from 405 to 825 micromol/L. Causes of these elevated levels included glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (seven patients), dehydration (three patients), sepsis (one patient), and was undetermined in one patient. Abnormal visual evoked potentials were found in three of nine patients and abnormal brainstem auditory evoked potentials in seven of ten patients. Abnormal electroencephalograms were documented in five patients studied. Brain magnetic resonance imaging results were abnormal in three of four patients. Magnetic resonance imaging typically showed an increased signal in the posteromedial aspect of the globus pallidus and was, therefore, useful in the assessment of the structural changes of chronic bilirubin encephalopathy after kernicterus.

  17. Prognostic value of ICU-acquired hypernatremia in patients with neurological dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bei; Han, Qianpeng; Mengke, Nashun; He, Kairan; Zhang, Yiqin; Nie, Zhiqiang; Zeng, Hongke

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have indicated that hypernatremia is associated with increased mortality. In this study, we aimed to explore the relationship between intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired hypernatremia and the prognosis of critically neurological patients.Based on serum sodium level in the ICU, 450 patients were divided into 3 groups: 222 had normal serum sodium, 142 had mild hypernatremia, and 86 had severe hypernatremia. Kaplan-Meier and multivariable binary logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the prognostic value of hypernatremia in critically neurological patients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed for serum sodium levels to determine their roles in predicting ICU mortality.Hypernatremia was significantly related with age, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, serum sodium, APACHE II score, and serum creatinine. Moreover, the different treatment outcome including mechanical ventilation, the days of stayed in ICU, and Glasgow Outcome Scale score had correlation with serum sodium levels. Old ages, GCS score, therapeutic intervention scoring system (TISS) score, APACHE II score, serum sodium peak, and so on were all associated with the mortality. In addition, hypernatremia was an independent prognostic factor for critically neurological patients by logistic regression analysis (odds ratio = 1.192, 95% confidence interval = 1.135-1.252, P = 0.000). Moreover, we got the sensitivity of 79.4% and specificity of 74.5% in the ROC analysis between peak serum sodium and the mortality. The area under the ROC curve was 0.844, and the optimal cutoff value was 147.55.Our results showed that ICU-acquired hypernatremia may be a potential prognosis marker for critically neurological patients.

  18. The tablet device in hospital neurology and in neurology graduate medical education: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Pravin; Newey, Christopher R; Bhimraj, Adarsh

    2015-01-01

    There is limited literature on tablet devices for neurohospitalists and in neurological graduate medical education. This study evaluated utilization, benefits, and limitations of customized tablets on inpatient neurology practice and resident education. The hypothesis was the perception of the tablet would be positive, given their portability, convenience to accessing point-of-care reference, and accessibility to the electronic medical record. Second-generation iPads with neurology-specific applications and literature were provided to our in-hospital general, stroke, and consult neurology teams. After 1 year, residents on these teams were surveyed on demographic data, familiarity, and utilization of the iPad and their perceptions of the device. All 27 residents responded to the survey. Most participants (23 of 27) used a tablet while on inpatient service. Twelve regularly utilized the neurology-specific apps and/or accessed scientific articles. Technologically savvy residents felt significantly more comfortable using tablets and were more quickly acquainted with the features. Thirteen respondents wanted a formal orientation on the advanced features of the tablet independent of their familiarity with the device or level of technological comfort. Overall, the perception was that the tablet was beneficial for inpatient clinical care and as an educational reference. Participants became easily familiarized with the device features quickly, regardless of whether they owned one previously or not. Most physicians indicated interest in advanced features of tablets; however, a formal orientation may be beneficial for optimal utilization. A reliable network connection is essential to in-hospital use of tablet devices. Additional research pertaining to patient outcomes, objective educational benefit, and cost-effectiveness is necessary.

  19. Neurologic presentation of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushara, Khalafalla O

    2005-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) long has been associated with neurologic and psychiatric disorders including cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, epilepsy, dementia, and depression. Earlier reports mainly have documented the involvement of the nervous system as a complication of prediagnosed CD. However, more recent studies have emphasized that a wider spectrum of neurologic syndromes may be the presenting extraintestinal manifestation of gluten sensitivity with or without intestinal pathology. These include migraine, encephalopathy, chorea, brain stem dysfunction, myelopathy, mononeuritis multiplex, Guillain-Barre-like syndrome, and neuropathy with positive antiganglioside antibodies. The association between most neurologic syndromes described and gluten sensitivity remains to be confirmed by larger epidemiologic studies. It further has been suggested that gluten sensitivity (as evidenced by high antigliadin antibodies) is a common cause of neurologic syndromes (notably cerebellar ataxia) of otherwise unknown cause. Additional studies showed high prevalence of gluten sensitivity in genetic neurodegenerative disorders such as hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia and Huntington's disease. It remains unclear whether gluten sensitivity contributes to the pathogenesis of these disorders or whether it represents an epiphenomenon. Studies of gluten-free diet in patients with gluten sensitivity and neurologic syndromes have shown variable results. Diet trials also have been inconclusive in autism and schizophrenia, 2 diseases in which sensitivity to dietary gluten has been implicated. Further studies clearly are needed to assess the efficacy of gluten-free diet and to address the underlying mechanisms of nervous system pathology in gluten sensitivity.

  20. Neurological aspects of vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho Pimenta, A J; Castelo Branco, N A

    1999-03-01

    Mood and behavioral abnormalities are the most common early findings related to vibroacoustic disease (VAD). Other signs and symptoms have been observed in VAD patients. Brain MRI discloses small multifocal lesions in about 50% of subjects with more than 10 yr of occupational exposure to large pressure amplitude (> or = 90 dB SPL) and low frequency (< or = 500 Hz) (LPALF) noise. However, to date, there have been no studies globally integrating all the neurological, imaging and neurophysiological data of VAD patients. This is the main goal of this study. The 60 male Caucasians diagnosed with VAD were neurologically evaluated in extreme detail in order to systematically identify the most common and significant neurological disturbances in VAD. This population demonstrates cognitive changes (identified through psychological and neurophysiological studies (ERP P300)), vertigo and auditory changes, visual impairment, epilepsy, and cerebrovascular diseases. Neurological examination reveals pathological signs and reflexes, most commonly the palmo-mental reflex. A vascular pattern underlying the multifocal hyperintensities in T2 MR imaging, with predominant involvement of the small arteries of the white matter, is probably the visible organic substratum of the neurological picture. However, other pathophyisological mechanisms are involved in epileptic symptomatology.

  1. Neurologic considerations in propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, John; Chapman, Kimberly A; Summar, Marshall L; Ah Mew, Nicholas; Sutton, V Reid; MacLeod, Erin; Stagni, Kathy; Ueda, Keiko; Franks, Jill; Island, Eddie; Matern, Dietrich; Peña, Loren; Smith, Brittany; Urv, Tiina; Venditti, Charles; Chakarapani, Anupam; Gropman, Andrea L

    2012-01-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an organic acidemia which has a broad range of neurological complications, including developmental delay, intellectual disability, structural abnormalities, metabolic stroke-like episodes, seizures, optic neuropathy, and cranial nerve abnormalities. As the PA consensus conference hosted by Children's National Medical Center progressed from January 28 to 30, 2011, it became evident that neurological complications were common and a major component of morbidity, but the role of imaging and the basis for brain pathophysiology were unclear. This paper reviews the hypothesized pathophysiology, presentation and uses the best available evidence to suggest programs for treatment, imaging, and monitoring the neurological complications of PA. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acupuncture application for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyangsook; Park, Hi-Joon; Park, Jongbae; Kim, Mi-Ja; Hong, Meesuk; Yang, Jongsoo; Choi, Sunmi; Lee, Hyejung

    2007-01-01

    Acupuncture has been widely used for a range of neurological disorders. Despite its popularity, the evidence to support the use of acupuncture is contradictory. This review was designed to summarize and to evaluate the available evidence of acupuncture for neurological disorders. Most of the reviewed studies suffer from lack of methodological rigor. Owing to paucity and poor quality of the primary studies, no firm conclusion could be drawn on the use of acupuncture for epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, ataxic disorders, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injury. For stroke rehabilitation, the evidence from recent high-quality trials and previous systematic reviews is not convincing. More rigorous trials are warranted to establish acupuncture's role in neurological disorders.

  3. [Child neurology and multimedia technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    Methods of computer technology (intelligent technology, IT), such as multimedia and virtual reality, are utilized more and more in all medical fields including child neurology. Advances in the digitalization of individual medical data and multi-media technology have enabled patients to be able to obtain their own medical data by small media and to receive medical treatment at any hospitals even if they are located in distance place. Changes from a doctor oriented to patients oriented medicine is anticipated. It is necessary to store medical data from birth to adulthood and to accumulate epidemiological data of rare diseases such as metabolic diseases or degenerative diseases especially in child neurology, which highly require tele medicine and telecare at home. Moreover, IT may improve in the QOL of patients with neurological diseases and of their families. Cooperation of medicine and engineering is therefore necessary. Results of our experiments on telemedicine, telecare and virtual reality are described.

  4. Solitary Plasmacytoma: A Review Of Clinical, Ocular, Neurological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extramedullary plasmacytoma can affect practically all the systems in the body including the eyes, nervous system, head and neck, respiratory system, breast, gastrointestinal system, urogenital system and lymph nodes. These systemic manifestations are reviewed. Key words: Plasmacytoma, ocular, outcome, neurological, ...

  5. [Joseph Babinski's contribution to neurological symptomatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Tetsuo

    2014-11-01

    Joseph Babinski (1857-1932) was an excellent clinician. André Breton, a French poet, described Babinski's way of clinical examination in his Manifeste du surréalisme (1924), which vividly revealed Babinski's meticulous character. Babinski is well known by his eponymous Babinski reflex. Although some predecessors had described this phenomenon briefly, its meaning was interpreted by Babinski. His contribution to neurological symptomatology was not restricted to his plantar skin reflex, but also to other wide area. In this article, symptoms described by Babinski, i.e. plantar skin reflex, cerebellar symptoms including cerebellar asynergy, adiadochokinesis, dysmetria, cerebellar catalepsy, and rising sign, platysma sign, anosognosia are explained and are critically discussed.

  6. Long-term outcome of children with acute cerebellitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennes, E; Zotter, S; Dorninger, L; Hartmann, H; Häusler, M; Huppke, P; Jacobs, J; Kraus, V; Makowski, C; Schlachter, K; Ulmer, H; van Baalen, A; Koch, J; Gotwald, T; Rostasy, K

    2012-10-01

    Acute cerebellitis (AC) is characterized by cerebellar symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes primarily confined to the cerebellum. To analyze the neurological and cognitive long-term outcome of children with AC. Children with AC diagnosed by typical clinical features and MRI findings were included in this retrospective study. Medical charts were reviewed and neurological deficits were assessed by neurological examination or by the expanded disability status scale telephone interview. Cognitive outcome was evaluated with a parental questionnaire (Kognitive Probleme bei Kindern und Jugendlichen). A total of 11 children (6 boys, 5 girls; age range: 3 years to 14 years and 10 months) were included. Of them, six children had a severe disease manifestation including mental status changes and neurological symptoms. Of the rest, two children had a moderate and three children had a mild form of AC. MRI of the cerebellum was obtained in the acute phase revealing signal alterations with different patterns. The average follow-up period was 4 years and 4 months. A complete recovery was observed in five children. Neurological sequelae were reported in five children ranging from ataxia to mild tremor. Cognitive deficits were found in six patients. The affected areas of cognition did include spatial visualization ability, language skills, and concentration. Neurological and cognitive sequelae are common in children with AC and underline the role of the cerebellum in cognition. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Neurological manifestations of snake bite in Sri Lanka.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seneviratne U

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Snake bite is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in certain parts of Sri Lanka. This study was designed to determine the offending snakes, neurological manifestations, disease course, and outcome in neurotoxic envenomation. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Fifty six consecutive patients admitted with neurological manifestations following snake bite were studied prospectively. Data were obtained regarding the offending snakes, neurological symptoms, time taken for onset of symptoms, neurological signs, and time taken for recovery. RESULTS: The offending snake was Russell′s viper in 27(48.2%, common and Sri Lankan krait in 19(33.9%, cobra in 3(5.4%, and unidentified in 7(12.5%. Ptosis was the commonest neurological manifestation seen in 48(85.7% followed by ophthalmoplegia (75%, limb weakness (26.8%, respiratory failure (17.9%, palatal weakness (10.7%, neck muscle weakness (7.1%, and delayed sensory neuropathy (1.8%. Neurological symptoms were experienced usually within 6 hours after the bite. Following administration of antivenom, the signs of recovery became evident within a few hours to several days. The duration for complete recovery ranged from four hours to two weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Complete recovery of neuromuscular weakness was observed in all patients except for one who died with intracerebral haemorrhage shortly after admission.

  8. Neurological manifestation of colonic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Chaudhary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders are extremely rare in cancer patients and are most commonly associated with certain tumors, such as ovarian cancer, small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. We report here a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in a 53-year-old man with colonic adenocarcinoma with a solitary liver metastasis. His paraneoplastic syndrome was successfully treated by methylprednisolone and primary oncologic therapies including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive surgery. This is also the first documented case of simultaneous manifestation of a sensory neuropathy and limbic encephalitis with colon cancer.

  9. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    . Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement...... treatment is available to prevent irreversible organ damage. Females with Fabry's disease who present with pain have often been ignored and misdiagnosed because of the disorder's X-linked inheritance. This Review will stress the importance of recognizing neurological symptoms for the diagnosis of Fabry...

  10. Sleep disorders in neurological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Guryevich Poluektov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disorders are closely associated with both nervous system diseases and mental disorders; however, such patients prefer to seek just neurological advice. Insomnia is the most common complaint in routine clinical practice. It is characterized by different impairments in sleep and daytime awakening. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is less common, but more clinically important because of its negative impact on the cardiovascular and nervous systems. The common neurological disorders are restless legs syndrome and REM sleep behavior disorder, as well as narcolepsy, the major manifestations of which are impaired nocturnal sleep and daytime awakening.

  11. Resection of cavernous angioma located in eloquent areas using functional cortical and subcortical mapping under awake conditions. Outcomes in a 50-case multicentre series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, M; Wager, M; Corns, R; Capelle, L; Mandonnet, E; Fontaine, D; Reyns, N; Dezamis, E; Matsuda, R; Bresson, D; Duffau, H; Pallud, J

    2017-06-01

    Surgical resection of supratentorial cavernous angiomas located in eloquent areas poses a significant risk to the patient of postoperative neurological impairment and justifies intraoperative functional monitoring. Multicentre retrospective series of adult patients with cavernous angiomas located within eloquent areas and treated with functional-based surgical resection according to functional boundaries under intraoperative functional cortico-subcortical monitoring under awake conditions. Fifty patients (18 males, mean 36.3±10.8 year-old) underwent surgical resection with intraoperative cortico-subcortical functional mapping using direct electrostimulation under awake conditions for a cavernous angioma located in eloquent areas with a mean postoperative follow-up of 21.0±21.2 months. At presentation, the cavernous angioma had previously resulted in severe impairment (neurological deficit in 34%, seizures in 70%, uncontrolled seizures in 34%, reduced Karnofsky Performance Status score of 70 or less in 24%, inability to work in 52%). Functional-based surgical resection allowed complete removal of the cavernous angioma in 98% and of the haemosiderin rim in 82%. Postoperative seizures and other complications were rare, and similarly so across all centres included in this series. Postoperatively, we found functional improvement in 84% of patients (reduced Karnofsky Performance Status score of 70 or less in 6%, uncontrolled seizures in 16%, and inability to work in 11%). Functional-based surgical resection aids the safe and complete resection of cavernous angiomas located in eloquent areas while minimizing the surgical risks. Functional mapping has to be considered in such challenging cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Neurologic Manifestations of Vitamin B Deficiency after Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punchai, Suriya; Hanipah, Zubaidah Nor; Meister, Katherine M; Schauer, Philip R; Brethauer, Stacy A; Aminian, Ali

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, clinical presentation, and outcomes of neurologic disorders secondary to vitamin B deficiencies following bariatric surgery. Patients at a single academic institution who underwent bariatric surgery and developed neurologic complications secondary to low levels of vitamins B1, B2, B6, and B12 between the years 2004 and 2015 were studied. In total, 47 (0.7%) bariatric surgical patients (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass n = 36, sleeve gastrectomy n = 9, and duodenal switch n = 2) developed neurologic manifestations secondary to vitamin B deficiencies. Eleven (23%) patients developed postoperative anatomical complications contributed to poor oral intake. Median duration to onset of neurologic manifestation following surgery was 12 months (IQR, 5-32). Vitamin deficiencies reported in the cohort included B1 (n = 30), B2 (n = 1), B6 (n = 12), and B12 (n = 12) deficiency. The most common manifestations were paresthesia (n = 31), muscle weakness (n = 15), abnormal gait (n = 11), and polyneuropathy (n = 7). Four patients were diagnosed with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) which was developed after gastric bypass (n = 3) and sleeve gastrectomy (n = 1). Seven patients required readmission for management of severe vitamin B deficiencies. Overall, resolution of neurologic symptoms with nutritional interventions and pharmacotherapy was noted in 40 patients (85%). The WKS was not reversible, and all four patients had residual mild ataxia and nystagmus at the last follow-up time. Nutritional neurologic disorders secondary to vitamin B deficiency are relatively uncommon after bariatric surgery. While neurologic disorders are reversible in most patients (85%) with vitamin replacements, persistent residual neurologic symptoms are common in patients with WKS.

  13. Education Research: Neurology resident education: Trending skills, confidence, and professional preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Justin T; Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M; Engstrom, John

    2016-03-15

    To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Expanding the neurological examination using functional neurologic assessment: part II neurologic basis of applied kinesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, W H; Yanuck, S F

    1999-03-01

    Functional Neurologic Assessment and treatment methods common to the practice of applied kinesiology are presented. These methods are proposed to enhance neurological examination and treatment procedures toward more effective assessment and care of functional impairment. A neurologic model for these procedures is proposed. Manual assessment of muscular function is used to identify changes associated with facilitation and inhibition, in response to the introduction of sensory receptor-based stimuli. Muscle testing responses to sensory stimulation of known value are compared with usually predictable patterns based on known neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, guiding the clinician to an understanding of the functional status of the patient's nervous system. These assessment procedures are used in addition to other standard diagnostic measures to augment rather than replace the existing diagnostic armamentarium. The proper understanding of the neurophysiologic basis of muscle testing procedures will assist in the design of further investigations into applied kinesiology. Accordingly, the neurophysiologic basis and proposed mechanisms of these methods are reviewed.

  15. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  16. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  17. Proprioceptive reflexes and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Proprioceptive reflexes play an important role during the control of movement and posture. Disturbed modulation of proprioceptive reflexes is often suggested as the cause for the motoric features present in neurological disorders. In this thesis methods are developed and evaluated to quantify

  18. [Neurology in medieval regimina sanitatis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Frutos González, V; Guerrero Peral, A L

    2011-09-01

    In medical medieval literature some works about dietetics stand out. Dietetics, as a separate branch of medicine, includes not only food or drinks, but other environmental factors influencing on health. They are known as regimina sanitatis or salutis, and specially developed in the Christian west. They generally consisted of a balance between the Galenic "six non-natural things"; factors regulating health and its protection: environment, exercise, food, sleep, bowel movements and emotions. After reviewing the sources and defining the different stages of this genre, we have considered three of the most out-standing medieval regimina, the anonymous Regimen sanitatis salernitanum, Arnaldo de Vilanova's Regimen sanitatis ad regem aragonum and Bernardo de Gordon's Tractatus of conservatione vite humane. In them we review references to neurological disease. Though not independently considered, there is a significant presence of neurological diseases in the regimina. Dietetics measures are proposed to preserve memory, nerves, or hearing, as well as for the treatment of migraine, epilepsy, stroke or dizziness. Regimina are quiet representative among medical medieval literature, and they show medieval physicians vision of neurological diseases. Dietetics was considered useful to preserve health, and therapeutics was based on natural remedies. 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Education Research: Neurology training reassessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Matthew B.; Coleman, Mary; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Engstrom, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the strengths and weaknesses of neurology resident education using survey methodology. Methods: A 27-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2011. Results: Of eligible respondents, 49.8% of residents returned the survey. Most residents believed previously instituted duty hour restrictions had a positive impact on resident quality of life without impacting patient care. Most residents rated their faculty and clinical didactics favorably. However, many residents reported suboptimal preparation in basic neuroscience and practice management issues. Most residents (71%) noted that the Residency In-service Training Examination (RITE) assisted in self-study. A minority of residents (14%) reported that the RITE scores were used for reasons other than self-study. The vast majority (86%) of residents will enter fellowship training following residency and were satisfied with the fellowship offers they received. Conclusions: Graduating residents had largely favorable neurology training experiences. Several common deficiencies include education in basic neuroscience and clinical practice management. Importantly, prior changes to duty hours did not negatively affect the resident perception of neurology residency training. PMID:23091077

  20. Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javor, Andrija; Koller, Monika; Lee, Nick; Chamberlain, Laura; Ransmayr, Gerhard

    2013-02-06

    'Neuromarketing' is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods 'neuromarketing' and scientific ones 'consumer neuroscience'. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience. In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research. We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology:First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington's disease.Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson's disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom.Third, trust research in the medical context lacks

  1. Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background ‘Neuromarketing’ is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods ‘neuromarketing’ and scientific ones ‘consumer neuroscience’. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience. Discussion In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research. Summary We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology: First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington’s disease. Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom

  2. International electives in neurology training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jennifer L.; Coleman, Mary E.; Engstrom, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the current status of global health training and humanitarian relief opportunities in US and Canadian postgraduate neurology programs. Background: There is a growing interest among North American trainees to pursue medical electives in low- and middle-income countries. Such training opportunities provide many educational and humanitarian benefits but also pose several challenges related to organization, human resources, funding, and trainee and patient safety. The current support and engagement of neurology postgraduate training programs for trainees to pursue international rotations is unknown. Methods: A survey was distributed to all program directors in the United States and Canada (December 2012–February 2013) through the American Academy of Neurology to assess the training opportunities, institutional partnerships, and support available for international neurology electives. Results: Approximately half of responding programs (53%) allow residents to pursue global health–related electives, and 11% reported that at least 1 trainee participated in humanitarian relief during training (survey response rate 61%, 143/234 program directors). Canadian programs were more likely to allow residents to pursue international electives than US programs (10/11, 91% vs 65/129, 50%, p = 0.023). The number of trainees participating in international electives was low: 0%–9% of residents (55% of programs) and 10%–19% of residents (21% of programs). Lack of funding was the most commonly cited reason for residents not participating in global health electives. If funding was available, 93% of program directors stated there would be time for residents to participate. Most program directors (75%) were interested in further information on global health electives. Conclusions: In spite of high perceived interest, only half of US neurology training programs include international electives, mostly due to a reported lack of funding. By contrast, the majority

  3. Creating a database to facilitate multilevel analyses of mental health determinants and outcomes in rural and remote areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Philip; Stain, Helen J; Kelly, Brian; Lewin, Terry J; Higginbotham, Nick

    2008-07-01

    The lack of consistent findings regarding comparisons of mental health between rural and urban areas has been attributed in part to methodological shortcomings, including poor conceptualization of 'rurality'. To address the diversity of rural and remote communities, an interdisciplinary collaboration sought to establish a database incorporating a range of domains hypothesised to be major influences on the mental health of individuals, families and communities. The database domains included health (physical and mental), health service utilisation, sociodemographic characteristics, climate patterns, agricultural activity and primary industry. Important steps in the development of the database were addressing issues related to ethics, ownership, accessing data sources, sustainability of the database and integration of differing outcomes sought by the collaborators. The paper describes the database while an illustrative example of analysis demonstrates its application. The potential for multilevel analyses between the database and other datasets is discussed as well as challenges for the future development of this valuable resource for rural mental health research. The Centre for Rural and Remote Mental Health database will be a valuable resource for rural mental health research.

  4. Variability in Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate by Area under the Curve Predicts Renal Outcomes in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Chia Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Greater variability in renal function is associated with mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. However, few studies have demonstrated the predictive value of renal function variability in relation to renal outcomes. This study investigates the predictive ability of different methods of determining estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR variability for progression to renal replacement therapy (RRT in CKD patients. This was a prospective observational study, which enrolled 1,862 CKD patients. The renal end point was defined as commencement of RRT. The variability in eGFR was measured by the area under the eGFR curve (AUC%. A significant improvement in model prediction was based on the −2 log likelihood ratio statistic. During a median 28.7-month follow-up, there were 564 (30.3% patients receiving RRT. In an adjusted Cox model, a smaller initial eGFR AUC%_12M (P<0.001, a smaller peak eGFR AUC%_12M (P<0.001, and a larger negative eGFR slope_12M (P<0.001 were associated with a higher risk of renal end point. Two calculated formulas: initial eGFR AUC%_12M and eGFR slope_12M were the best predictors. Our results demonstrate that the greater eGFR variability by AUC% is associated with the higher risk of progression to RRT.

  5. Active citizenship and acquired neurological communication difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Bennett, Amanda; Cairney, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    People with communication impairments may face barriers to civic participation, with resulting marginalisation of individuals who wish to be actively involved. The investigation aimed to explore the experience of civically engaged adults with acquired neurological communication difficulties. Six people with acquired neurological communication difficulties were interviewed. Discussion included the definition of active citizenship, their civic involvement, motivations, related barriers and facilitators. Qualitative analysis was undertaken, with data categorised, coded and examined for recurring themes. All participants were active in disability-related organisations and four undertook wider civic roles. Motivations included activity being out with the home and wanting to effect change for themselves and the populations they represented. Disability group meetings were more positive experiences than broader community activities, which were associated with fatigue and frustration, commonly resulting from communication difficulties and unmet support needs. All participants identified a need for professional and public educational about disability and communication and made recommendations on content, methods and priority groups. For these participants civic engagement had positive and negative dimensions. Speech and language therapists should promote reduction of the barriers that impede the active citizenship rights of people with communication support needs. Civic participation may be a relevant measure of outcome in communication impaired populations.

  6. Neurological complications in adult spinal deformity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Justin A; Reid, Patrick; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    The number of surgeries performed for adult spinal deformity (ASD) has been increasing due to an aging population, longer life expectancy, and studies supporting an improvement in health-related quality of life scores after operative intervention. However, medical and surgical complication rates remain high, and neurological complications such as spinal cord injury and motor deficits can be especially debilitating to patients. Several independent factors potentially influence the likelihood of neurological complications including surgical approach (anterior, lateral, or posterior), use of osteotomies, thoracic hyperkyphosis, spinal region, patient characteristics, and revision surgery status. The majority of ASD surgeries are performed by a posterior approach to the thoracic and/or lumbar spine, but anterior and lateral approaches are commonly performed and are associated with unique neural complications such as femoral nerve palsy and lumbar plexus injuries. Spinal morphology, such as that of hyperkyphosis, has been reported to be a risk factor for complications in addition to three-column osteotomies, which are often utilized to correct large deformities. Additionally, revision surgeries are common in ASD and these patients are at an increased risk of procedure-related complications and nervous system injury. Patient selection, surgical technique, and use of intraoperative neuromonitoring may reduce the incidence of complications and optimize outcomes.

  7. Neurologic manifestations of hypothyroidism in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertalan, Abigail; Kent, Marc; Glass, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common endocrine disease in dogs. A variety of clinicopathologic abnormalities may be present; however, neurologic deficits are rare. In some instances, neurologic deficits may be the sole manifestation of hypothyroidism. Consequent ly, the diagnosis and management of the neurologic disorders associated with hypothyroidism can be challenging. This article describes several neurologic manifestations of primary hypothyroidism in dogs; discusses the pathophysiology of hypothyroidism-induced neurologic disorders affecting the peripheral and central nervous systems; and reviews the evidence for the neurologic effects of hypothyroidism.

  8. E-learning for neurological bladder management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognoni, Carla; Fizzotti, Gabriella; Pistarini, Caterina; Mazzoleni, M Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Regarding the impact of visceral dysfunction on quality of life, bowel and bladder management is a very important problem. The management of the patient with neurological bladder is often a source of uncertainty for both patients and healthcare personnel. Since the need of specialized training is growing, two CME e-learning courses have been developed to provide physicians and nurses competencies for the enhancement of the daily life of the patients. The present study aims at evaluating courses attendance and outcomes. Attendance data confirm the interest for both courses. The results document a pretty good objective and subjective effectiveness of the e-learning courses but low attitude to exploit he support of an asynchronous tutor. The analysis of test results gives some hints for eventual quality improvement of the courses themselves.

  9. Opinion & Special Articles: Mentoring in neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Effective academic mentoring significantly affects a physician's choice of career, academic productivity, and professional trajectory. The mentoring relationship is necessary for the continued success of medical training. It is critical to cultivate a climate in which mentoring can thrive. In order to improve the quality and outcomes of mentoring, we must adopt a comprehensive plan. There are interventions at every level of training that will ensure that the current cohort of neurologists receives the requisite expertise needed to flourish and inspire future trainees. Professional organizations must articulate a comprehensive vision of mentoring. Institutions must create an infrastructure to support mentors. Mentors should work in active partnerships with their mentees to forge sustained, productive relationships. Mentees must actively contribute to their own mentoring. Proper mentorship will ensure a bright future for academic neurology. PMID:24616198

  10. Neurologic and Functional Morbidity in Critically Ill Children With Bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shein, Steven L; Slain, Katherine N; Clayton, Jason A; McKee, Bryan; Rotta, Alexandre T; Wilson-Costello, Deanne

    2017-09-19

    including demographics, use of mechanical ventilation was the only variable that was associated with increased neurologic and functional morbidity in both cohorts. In two large, multicenter databases, neurologic and functional morbidity was common among previously healthy children admitted to the PICU with bronchiolitis. Prospective studies are needed to measure neurologic and functional outcomes using more precise metrics. Identification of modifiable risk factors may subsequently lead to improved outcomes from this common PICU condition.

  11. Radiological findings correlate with neurological deficits but not with pain after operatively treated sacral fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tötterman, Anna; Hellund, Johan C; Glott, Thomas; Madsen, Jan Erik; Røise, Olav

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Neurological deficits and pain are common after displaced sacral fractures. However, little is known about the association between the long-term clinical outcomes and radiological findings. We examined the long-term radiological findings and their correlations with lumbosacral pain and neurological deficits in the lower extremities after surgery for sacral fractures. Methods 28 consecutive patients with operatively treated displaced sacral fractures were followed for mean 11 (8–13) years. Sensorimotor impairments of the lower extremities were classified according to the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA). Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). All patients underwent conventional radiographic examination and CT, and the images were scrutinized for nonunion, residual displacement, narrowing of the sacral foramina, and post-foraminal encroachment of the L5 and S1 nerves. Results There was residual displacement of ≥ 10 mm in 16 of the 28 patients. 26 patients had narrowing of 1 or more neural root foramina in L5-S4. 8 patients reported having no pain, 11 had pain only in the lumbosacral area, and 9 had pain in combination with radiating leg pain. Statistically significant correlations were found between narrowing of the sacral foramina and neurological deficits in the corresponding dermatomes. Significant correlations were also found between post-foraminal encroachment of L5 nerves and both sensory and motor deficits. No correlations were found between pain and radiological findings. Interpretation Pathological radiological findings are common 11 years after operatively treated displaced sacral fractures. Sacral foraminal and L5 post-foraminal bony encroachments were common findings and correlated with neurological deficits. However, lumbosacral pain did not correlate with radiological sequelae after fracture healing. PMID:24694272

  12. Lumbar Muscle Cross-Sectional Areas Do Not Predict Clinical Outcomes in Adults With Spinal Stenosis: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellhorn, Alfred C; Suri, Pradeep; Rundell, Sean D; Olafsen, Nathan; Carlson, M Jake; Johnson, Steve; Fry, Adrielle; Annaswamy, Thiru M; Gilligan, Christopher; Comstock, Bryan; Heagerty, Patrick; Friedly, Janna; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2017-06-01

    Minimal longitudinal data exist regarding the role of lumbar musculature in predicting back pain and function. In cross-sectional study designs, there is often atrophy of the segmental multifidus muscle in subjects with low back pain compared with matched controls. However, the cross-sectional design of these studies prevents drawing conclusions regarding whether lumbar muscle characteristics predict or modify future back pain or function. The primary objective of this study is to determine whether the cross-sectional area (CSA) of lumbar muscles predict functional status or back pain at 6- or 12-month follow-up in older adults with spinal degeneration. The secondary objective is to evaluate whether these muscle characteristics improve outcome prediction above and beyond the prognostic information conferred by demographic and psychosocial variables. Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. A total of 209 adults aged 50 years and older with clinical and radiographic spinal stenosis from the Lumbar Epidural steroid injection for Spinal Stenosis (LESS) trial. Using baseline magnetic resonance images, we calculated CSAs of the lumbar multifidus, psoas, and quadratus lumborum muscles using a standardized protocol by manually tracing the borders of each of the muscles. The relationship between lumbar muscle CSAs and baseline measures was assessed with Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficients. The relationship between lumbar muscle characteristics and 6- and 12-month Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) and back pain Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) responses was further evaluated with multivariate linear regression. A hierarchical approach to the regression was performed: a basic model with factors of conceptual importance including age, gender, BMI, and baseline RDQ score formed the first step. The second and third steps evaluated whether psychosocial variables or muscle measures conferred additional prognostic information to the basic model. Function

  13. Neurological diseases in famous painters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechowski-Jozwiak, Bartlomiej; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Visual art production involves multiple processes including basic motor skills, such as coordination of movements, visual-spatial processing, emotional output, sociocultural context, and creativity. Thus, the relationship between artistic output and brain diseases is particularly complex, and brain disorders may lead to impairment of artistic production in multiple domains. Neurological conditions may also occasionally modify artistic style and lead to surprisingly innovative features in people with an initial loss of creativity. This chapter focuses on anecdotal reports of various neurological disorders and their potential consequences on works produced by famous or well-established artists, including Carl Frederik Reutersward, Giorgio de Chirico, Krystyna Habura, Leo Schnug, Ignatius Brennan, and many others. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  15. Proust, neurology and Stendhal's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio A G; Munhoz, Renato P; Cardoso, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Marcel Proust is one of the most important French writers of the 20th century. His relationship with medicine and with neurology is possibly linked to the fact that his asthma was considered to be a psychosomatic disease classified as neurasthenia. Stendhal's syndrome is a rare psychiatric syndrome characterized by anxiety and affective and thought disturbances when a person is exposed to a work of art. Here, the authors describe neurological aspects of Proust's work, particularly the occurrence of Stendhal's syndrome and syncope when he as well as one of the characters of In Search of Lost Time see Vermeer's View of Delft during a visit to a museum. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  17. [Deficiency, disability, neurology and cinema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Cano de la Cuerda, Roberto; Jiménez-Antona, Carmen

    2010-12-16

    Cinema has been defined in many different ways, but most of them agree that it should be considered both a technique and an art. Although films often depict fantasy stories, in many cases they also reflect day-to-day realities. In its earliest days cinema was already attracted to the world of health and sickness, and frequently addressed topics like medical practice, how patients lived with their illnesses, bioethical issues, the relationship between physician and patient or research. To review the presence of neurological pathologies in the cinema with a view to identifying the main neurological disorders that have been portrayed in films. Likewise it also intends to describe the medical praxis that is employed, the relationship between physician and patient, how the experiences of the patient and the family are represented, the adaptation to social and occupational situations, and the intervention of other health care professionals related with neurological patients. Some of the most significant films that have addressed these topics were reviewed and it was seen that in some of them the illness is dealt with in a very true-to-life manner, whereas others tend to include a greater number of inaccuracies and a larger degree of fiction. Cinema has helped to shape certain ways of thinking about the health care professionals who work with neurological patients, the importance of support from the family and the social role, among other things. This confirms that resorting to cinematographic productions is a fruitful tool for stimulating a critical interest in the past and present of medical practice.

  18. Iatrogenic neurologic deficit after lumbar spine surgery: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, George M; Williams, Kim A; Arnold, Paul; Fehlings, Michael; Harrop, James S

    2015-12-01

    Iatrogenic neurologic deficits after lumbar spine surgery are rare complications, but important to recognize and manage. Complications such as radiculopathy, spinal cord compression, motor deficits (i.e. foot drop with L5 radiculopathy), and new onset radiculitis, while uncommon do occur. Attempts at mitigating these complications with the use of neuromonitoring have been successful. Guidance in the literature as to the true rate of iatrogenic neurologic deficit is limited to several case studies and retrospective designed studies describing the management, prevention and treatment of these deficits. The authors review the lumbar spinal surgery literature to examine the incidence of iatrogenic neurologic deficit in the lumbar spinal surgery literature. An advanced MEDLINE search conducted on May 14th, 2015 from January 1, 2004 through May 14, 2015, using the following MeSH search terms "postoperative complications," then subterms "lumbar vertebrae," treatment outcome," "spinal fusion," and "radiculopathy" were included together with "postoperative complications" in a single search. Postoperative complications including radiculopathy, weakness, and spinal cord compression were included. The definition of iatrogenic neurologic complication was limited to post-operative radiculopathy, motor weakness or new onset pain/radiculitis. An advanced MEDLINE search conducted on May 14th, 2015 using all of the above terms together yielded 21 results. After careful evaluation, 11 manuscripts were excluded and 10 were carefully reviewed. The most common indications for surgery were degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylosis, scoliosis, and lumbar stenosis. In 2783 patients in 12 total studies, there were 56 patients who had reported a postoperative neurologic deficit for a rate of 5.7. The rates of deficits ranged from 0.46% to 17% in the studies used. The average rate of reported neurologic complications within these papers was 9% (range 0.46-24%). Thirty patients of a total of

  19. Prospects for neurology and psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, W M; Kandel, E R

    2001-02-07

    Neurological and psychiatric illnesses are among the most common and most serious health problems in developed societies. The most promising advances in neurological and psychiatric diseases will require advances in neuroscience for their elucidation, prevention, and treatment. Technical advances have improved methods for identifying brain regions involved during various types of cognitive activity, for tracing connections between parts of the brain, for visualizing individual neurons in living brain preparations, for recording the activities of neurons, and for studying the activity of single-ion channels and the receptors for various neurotransmitters. The most significant advances in the past 20 years have come from the application to the nervous system of molecular genetics and molecular cell biology. Discovery of the monogenic disorder responsible for Huntington disease and understanding its pathogenesis can serve as a paradigm for unraveling the much more complex, polygenic disorders responsible for such psychiatric diseases as schizophrenia, manic depressive illness, and borderline personality disorder. Thus, a new degree of cooperation between neurology and psychiatry is likely to result, especially for the treatment of patients with illnesses such as autism, mental retardation, cognitive disorders associated with Alzheimer and Parkinson disease that overlap between the 2 disciplines.

  20. Functional Disorders in Neurology : Case Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new

  1. Clinical trials in neurology: design, conduct, analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravina, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    .... Clinical Trials in Neurology aims to improve the efficiency of clinical trials and the development of interventions in order to enhance the development of new treatments for neurologic diseases...

  2. [A Study on the Cognitive Learning Effectiveness of Scenario-Based Concept Mapping in a Neurological Nursing Course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui-Ching; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2015-12-01

    The multiple levels of knowledge related to the neurological system deter many students from pursuing studies on this topic. Thus, in facing complicated and uncertain medical circumstances, nursing students have diffi-culty adjusting and using basic neurological-nursing knowledge and skills. Scenario-based concept-mapping teaching has been shown to promote the integration of complicated data, clarify related concepts, and increase the effectiveness of cognitive learning. To investigate the effect on the neurological-nursing cognition and learning attitude of nursing students of a scenario-based concept-mapping strategy that was integrated into the neurological nursing unit of a medical and surgical nursing course. This quasi-experimental study used experimental and control groups and a pre-test / post-test design. Sopho-more (2nd year) students in a four-year program at a university of science and technology in Taiwan were convenience sampled using cluster randomization that was run under SPSS 17.0. Concept-mapping lessons were used as the intervention for the experimental group. The control group followed traditional lesson plans only. The cognitive learning outcome was measured using the neurological nursing-learning examination. Both concept-mapping and traditional lessons significantly improved post-test neurological nursing learning scores (p learning attitude with regard to the teaching material. Furthermore, a significant number in the experimental group expressed the desire to add more lessons on anatomy, physiology, and pathology. These results indicate that this intervention strategy may help change the widespread fear and refusal of nursing students with regard to neurological lessons and may facilitate interest and positively affect learning in this important subject area. Integrating the concept-mapping strategy and traditional clinical-case lessons into neurological nursing lessons holds the potential to increase post-test scores significantly

  3. Evaluation of Traumatic Spine by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Correlation with Neurological Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magu, Sarita; Singh, Deepak; Yadav, Rohtas Kanwar; Bala, Manju

    2015-10-01

    Prospective study. To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with clinical profile and neurological status of the patient and to correlate the MRI findings with neurological recovery of the patients and predict the outcome. Previous studies have reported poor neurological recovery in patients with cord hemorrhage, as compared to cord edema in spine injury patients. High canal compromise, cord compression along with higher extent of cord injury also carries poor prognostic value. Neurological status of patients was assessed at the time of admission and discharge in as accordance with the American Spine Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. Mean stay in hospital was 14.11±5.74 days. Neurological status at admission and neurological recovery at discharge was compared with various qualitative cord findings and quantitative parameters on MRI. In 27 patients, long-term follow-up was done at mean time of 285.9±43.94 days comparing same parameters. Cord edema and normal cord was associated with favorable neurological outcome. Cord contusion showed lesser neurological recovery, as compared to cord edema. Cord hemorrhage was associated with worst neurological status at admission and poor neurological recovery. Mean canal compromise (MCC), mean spinal cord compression (MSCC) and lesion length values were higher in patients presenting with ASIA A impairment scale injury and showed decreasing trends towards ASIA E impairment scale injury. Patients showing neurological recovery had lower mean MCC, MSCC, and lesion length, as compared to patients showing no neurological recovery (p<0.05). Cord hemorrhage, higher MCC, MSCC, and lesion length values have poor prognostic value in spine injury patients.

  4. Ischemia may be the primary cause of the neurologic deficits in classic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyhøj Olsen, T; Friberg, L; Lassen, N A

    1987-01-01

    This study investigates whether the cerebral blood flow reduction occurring in attacks of classic migraine is sufficient to cause neurologic deficits. Regional cerebral blood flow measured with the xenon 133 intracarotid injection technique was analyzed in 11 patients in whom a low-flow area...... ischemia and neurologic deficits. Hence, this study suggests a vascular origin of the prodromal neurologic deficits that may accompany attacks of classic migraine....

  5. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, the mean transverse diameter at the same levels ranges from 24.45 mm to 27.00 mm and the mean value of Torg ratio is 0.96. With respect to narrow cervical spinal canal, the following charaterstics are found: firstly, extension of the cervical spine results in statistically significant stenosis as compared with the flexed or neutral positions; secondly, females sustain cervical spinal canal narrowing more easily than males; finally, the consistent narrowest cervical canal level is at C 4 for all ethnicity, but there is a slight variation in the sagittal diameter of cervical spinal stenosis (≤14 mm in Whites, ≤ 12 mm in Japanese, ≤13.7 mm in Chinese. Narrow sagittal cervical canal diameter brings about an increased risk of neurological injuries in traumatic, degenerative and inflam-matory conditions and is related with extension of cervical spine, gender, as well as ethnicity. It is hoped that this re-view will be helpful in diagnosing spinal cord and neuro-logical injuries with the geometric parameters of cervical spine in the future. Key words: Spinal cord injuries; Spinal stenosis; Trauma, nervous system

  6. Neurological manifestaions among Sudanese patients with multiple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study demonstrated that the most common non- neurological symptoms was locomotor symptoms (24%) ,while the most common neurological symptoms were backache and neck pain .The most common neurological findings were cord compression (8%) followed by peripheral neuropathy (2%) and CVA (2%). 22% of ...

  7. [Outcome of treating initial tuberculosis in the area south of Seville in a 5-year period (1994-1998].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Rodríguez, F; Muñoz Lucena, F; Umbría Domínguez, S; Méndez, C; Nogales Pérez, M

    2001-04-01

    To analyze the outcome of treating initial tuberculosis (ITB) in the hospital district south of Seville (Spain). A descriptive study of treatment outcome in cases of ITB in our district between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 1998. Outcome was classified according to World Health Organization guidelines:successful (S) potentially unsuccessful (PU), exitus (EX) and transferred out (T).Four hundred fifty-four patients (mean age 35 years) were enrolled; 22% were HIV+ and 21% were intravenous drug users (IVDU). Treatment was self-administered in all cases, with 98% being given the standard prescription of 6 or 9 drugs. No subsequent case history was found for 15 cases, such that outcome could not be assessed. Of the 439 evaluable cases, outcome was S for 74% (326/439), PU for 16% (70/439), EX for 8% (36/439) and T for 6. Outcome for HIV + patients was poorer than for HIV- patients (S: 35/98 versus 291/341, p HIV+ patients was higher than that of HIV- patients (EX:18/98 versus 18/341, p treatment failure were recorded and up to 78% (31/40)were cases of loss of follow-up or abandonment. The variable most closely related to PU was IVDU status (OR = 10.5, p HIV+ and IVDU, which are the factors associated with poorer outcome of self-administered treatment, indicating that supervised treatment is advisable in cases where those factors are present.

  8. Teleneurology applications: Report of the Telemedicine Work Group of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, Lawrence R; Tsao, Jack W; Levine, Steven R; Swain-Eng, Rebecca J; Adams, Robert J; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Hess, David C; Moro, Elena; Schwamm, Lee H; Steffensen, Steve; Stern, Barney J; Zuckerman, Steven J; Bhattacharya, Pratik; Davis, Larry E; Yurkiewicz, Ilana R; Alphonso, Aimee L

    2013-02-12

    To review current literature on neurology telemedicine and to discuss its application to patient care, neurology practice, military medicine, and current federal policy. Review of practice models and published literature on primary studies of the efficacy of neurology telemedicine. Teleneurology is of greatest benefit to populations with restricted access to general and subspecialty neurologic care in rural areas, those with limited mobility, and those deployed by the military. Through the use of real-time audio-visual interaction, imaging, and store-and-forward systems, a greater proportion of neurologists are able to meet the demand for specialty care in underserved communities, decrease the response time for acute stroke assessment, and expand the collaboration between primary care physicians, neurologists, and other disciplines. The American Stroke Association has developed a defined policy on teleneurology, and the American Academy of Neurology and federal health care policy are beginning to follow suit. Teleneurology is an effective tool for the rapid evaluation of patients in remote locations requiring neurologic care. These underserved locations include geographically isolated rural areas as well as urban cores with insufficient available neurology specialists. With this technology, neurologists will be better able to meet the burgeoning demand for access to neurologic care in an era of declining availability. An increase in physician awareness and support at the federal and state level is necessary to facilitate expansion of telemedicine into further areas of neurology.

  9. Adverse pregnancy outcomes in an area where multidrug-resistant plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum infections are endemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poespoprodjo, Jeanne Rini; Fobia, Wendy; Kenangalem, Enny; Lampah, Daniel A; Warikar, Noah; Seal, Andrew; McGready, Rose; Sugiarto, Paulus; Tjitra, Emiliana; Anstey, Nicholas M; Price, Ric N

    2008-05-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection exerts a considerable burden on pregnant women, but less is known about the adverse consequences of Plasmodium vivax infection. In Papua, Indonesia, where multiple drug resistance to both species has emerged, we conducted a cross-sectional hospital-based study to quantify the risks and consequences of maternal malaria. From April 2004 through December 2006, 3046 pregnant women were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of parasitemia at delivery was 16.8% (432 of 2570 women had infections), with 152 (35.2%) of these 432 infections being associated with fever. The majority of infections were attributable to P. falciparum (250 [57.9%]); 146 (33.8%) of the infections were attributable to P. vivax, and 36 (8.3%) were coinfections with both species. At delivery, P. falciparum infection was associated with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration, <7 g/dL; odds ratio [OR], 2.8; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.0-4.0) and a 192 g (95% CI, 119-265) reduction in mean birth weight (P<.001). P. vivax infection was associated with an increased risk of moderate anemia (hemoglobin concentration, 7-11 g/dL; OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.2-2.9; P=.01) and a 108 g (95% CI, 17.5-199) reduction in mean birth weight (P<.019). Parasitemia was associated with preterm delivery (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1-2.0; P=.02) and stillbirth (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.3-4.1; P=.007) but was not associated with these outcomes after controlling for the presence of fever and severe anemia, suggesting that malaria increases the risk of preterm delivery and stillbirth through fever and contribution to severe anemia rather than through parasitemia per se. These observations highlight the need for novel, safe, and effective treatment and prevention strategies against both multidrug-resistant P. falciparum and multidrug-resistant P. vivax infections in pregnant women in areas of mixed endemicity.

  10. Blog and Podcast Watch: Neurologic Emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Grock

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch presents high quality open-access educational blogs and podcasts in emergency medicine (EM based on the ongoing ALiEM Approved Instructional Resources (AIR and AIR-Professional series. Both series critically appraise resources using an objective scoring rubric. This installment of the Blog and Podcast Watch highlights the topic of neurologic emergencies from the AIR series. Methods: The AIR series is a continuously building curriculum that follows the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Director’s (CORD annual testing schedule. For each module, relevant content is collected from the top 50 Social Media Index sites published within the previous 12 months, and scored by eight board members using five equally weighted measurement outcomes: Best Evidence in Emergency Medicine (BEEM score, accuracy, educational utility, evidence based, and references. Resources scoring ≥30 out of 35 available points receive an AIR label. Resources scoring 27-29 receive an honorable mention label, if the executive board agrees that the post is accurate and educationally valuable. Results: A total of 125 blog posts and podcasts were evaluated. Key educational pearls from the 14 AIR posts are summarized, and the 20 honorable mentions are listed. Conclusion: The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch series is based on the AIR and AIR-Pro series, which attempts to identify high quality educational content on open-access blogs and podcasts. This series provides an expert-based, post-publication curation of educational social media content for EM clinicians with this installment focusing on neurologic emergencies.

  11. Performance and treatment outcome of tuberculosis among patients on Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme in Urban and Tribal areas of a district in Maharashtra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivshakti Dattatray Pawar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP was introduced in the country as a pilot project since 1993 in a phased manner and expanded throughout the country by the year 2005. Although studies have shown the success of RNTCP, data pertaining to the indicators of programme performance in urban and tribal set up are rare. Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess and compare the RNTCP in urban and tribal areas of Maharashtra through the indicators of performance and outcome of the patients. Patients and Methods: A retrospective comparative record-based study was conducted in selected urban and tribal areas' tuberculosis (TB units. Records of patients enrolled newly for TB treatment and those already undergoing treatment under RNTCP from April 2015 to September 2015 (6 months were considered for analysis. Chi-square test and Z-test (test of significance are applied where required by using Epi Info 7 and Microsoft Excel 2010.Results: Sputum smear collection was significantly higher in urban areas (P = 0.001. In urban areas, new TB case detection was 35%, while in tribal areas, it was 42% as per the RNTCP norms. Sputum positivity was marginally more in tribal (5.87% than urban (3.28% areas. Cure rate was more in urban areas than tribal (P = 0.001 areas. There were statistically significantly high default cases in tribal areas. Conclusions: Sputum collection and sputum positivity rate were low in urban and tribal areas, but TB screening, especially in tribal areas, was significantly low. Sputum positivity was significantly higher in tribal areas. Significantly low cure rate and high default rate in tribal area warrant the need for strengthening of RNTCP activities in tribal areas.

  12. Atypical Neurological Manifestations Of Hypokalemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    pal P K

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A part from the well-established syndrome of motor paralysis, hypokalemia may present with atypical neurological manifestations, which are not well documented in literature. Methods: We treated 30 patients of hypokalemia whose neurological manifestations improved after corrections of hypokalemia. A retrospective chart review of the clinical profile was done with emphasis on the evolution of symptoms and occurrence of unusual manifestations. Results: Twenty-eight patients had subacute quadriparesis with duration of symptoms varying from 10hrs to 7 days and two had slowly progressive quadriparesis. Fifty percent of patients had more than one attack of paralysis. Early asymmetric weakness (11, stiffness and abnormal posture of hands (7, predominant bibrachial weakness (4, distal paresthesias (4, hemiparesthesia (1, hyperreflexia(4, early severe weakness of neck muscles (3, chorea (1, trismus (1,and, retention of urine (1 were the unusual features observed. The means level of serum potassium on admission was 2.1+0.6mEq/L.and the serum creatine kinase was elevated in 14 out of 17 patients. All patients except two had complete recovery.

  13. Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Vakhnina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common vascular diseases. The brain as target organs in hypertension is damaged more often and earlier. Neurological complications due to hypertension are frequently hyperdiagnosed in Russian neurological practice. Thus, headache, dizziness, impaired recall of recent events, nocturnal sleep disorders, and many other complaints in a hypertensive patient are usually regarded as a manifestation of dyscirculatory encephalopathy. At the same time headaches (tension headache and migraine in hypertensive patients are predominantly primary; headache associated with dramatic marked elevations in blood pressure is encountered in only a small number of patients. The role of cerebrovascular diseases in the development of dizziness in hypertensive patients is also overestimated. The vast majority of cases, patients with this complaint are in fact identified to have benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, Mеniеre’s disease, vestibular neuronitis, or vestibular migraine. Psychogenic disorders or multisensory insufficiency are generally responsible for non-systemic vertigo in hypertensive patients. Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency may cause non-systemic vertigo as a subjective equivalent of postural instability.Cognitive impairments (CIs are the most common and earliest manifestation of cerebrovascular lesion in hypertension. In most cases, CIs in hypertension were vascular and associated with cerebrovascular lesion due to lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis. However, mixed CIs frequently occur when hypertensive patients are also found to have signs of a degenerative disease, most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease.

  14. [Oliver Sacks and literary neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardiola, Elena; Banos, Josep E

    2014-03-16

    Popular medical literature attempts to discuss medical topics using a language that is, as far as possible, free of all medical jargon so as to make it more easily understandable by the general public. The very complexity of neurology makes it more difficult for the stories dealing with this specialty to be understood easily by an audience without any kind of medical training. This paper reviews the works written by Oliver Sacks involving the field of neurology aimed at the general public, and the main characteristics and the clinical situation discussed by the author are presented. Some biographical notes about Oliver Sacks are also included and the 11 books published by this author over the last 40 years are also analysed. In each case they are put into a historical context and the most outstanding aspects justifying what makes them an interesting read are commented on. In most cases, the genesis of the work is explained together with its most significant features. The works of Sacks contain a wide range of very interesting clinical situations that are usually explained by means of a language that is readily comprehensible to the general public. It also provides neurologists with a holistic view of different clinical situations, together with a discussion of their biographical, historical and developmental components.

  15. Survey on current practices for neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, Hans; Cronberg, Tobias; Dünser, Martin W; Duranteau, Jacques; Horn, Janneke; Oddo, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    To investigate current practices and timing of neurological prognostication in comatose cardiac arrest patients. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to the 8000 members of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine during September and October 2012. The survey had 27 questions divided into three categories: background data, clinical data, decision-making and consequences. A total of 1025 respondents (13%) answered the survey with complete forms in more than 90%. Twenty per cent of respondents practiced outside of Europe. Overall, 22% answered that they had national recommendations, with the highest percentage in the Netherlands (>80%). Eighty-nine per cent used induced hypothermia (32-34 °C) for comatose cardiac arrest patients, while 11% did not. Twenty per cent had separate prognostication protocols for hypothermia patients. Seventy-nine per cent recognized that neurological examination alone is not enough to predict outcome and a similar number (76%) used additional methods. Intermittent electroencephalography (EEG), brain computed tomography (CT) scan and evoked potentials (EP) were considered most useful. Poor prognosis was defined as cerebral performance category (CPC) 3-5 (58%) or CPC 4-5 (39%) or other (3%). When prognosis was considered poor, 73% would actively withdraw intensive care while 20% would not and 7% were uncertain. National recommendations for neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest are uncommon and only one physician out of five uses a separate protocol for hypothermia treated patients. A neurological examination alone was considered insufficient to predict outcome in comatose patients and most respondents advocated a multimodal approach: EEG, brain CT and EP were considered most useful. Uncertainty regarding neurological prognostication and decisions on level of care was substantial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A dual process model of diversity outcomes : The case of the South African Police Service in the Pretoria area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jackson, L.T.B.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.; Molokoane, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    Orientation: The study addresses the question of how employees of the South African Police Service (SAPS) cope with intercultural relations in an increasingly diverse organisation. Research purpose: A dual-process model of diversity outcomes was tested in which a distinction is made between a

  17. Understanding the importance of medical student clerkships in poor health outcome regions served by Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) in impoverished locations of Southern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashruta

    2017-01-01

    Area Health Education Centers provide health professional students the opportunity to explore the benefits of practicing in a rural and underserved location. The status of health conditions in chronic disease patients residing in impoverished regions of the US provides the chance to understand the factors that are responsible for constant inadequate outcomes in underserved and rural communities. Many limiting barriers to positive health outcomes occur in disproportionate numbers in the Southern Black Belt. Students should consider participating in rural and underserved clerkships, and ultimately a career as a health care provider in a poor health outcome region. In addition, promising programs (e.g. telemedicine, community health workers) to help implement patient-centered evidence-based interventions can tackle current chronic disease issues commonly encountered by health professionals who work with diverse patient populations.

  18. A dual-process model of diversity outcomes: The case South African police service in the Pretoria area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon T.B. Jackson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The study addresses the question of how employees of the South African Police Service (SAPS cope with intercultural relations in an increasingly diverse organisation.Research purpose: A dual-process model of diversity outcomes was tested in which a distinction is made between a positive (work-related stream that links positive diversity conditions through active coping to work outcomes and a relatively independent health related stream of negative antecedents, mediating passive coping skills and ill-health related outcomes.Motivation for the study: To test the viability of a dual-process model to understand diversity outcomes in the workplace.Research design, approach and methods: A convenience sample (n= 158 was recruited from members of the SAPS in Gauteng, using a cross-sectional design. Instruments used in previous acculturation research were adapted to measure contextual factors, coping and diversity outcomes.Main findings: A very good fit for the proposed hypothetical model was found. Approach coping partially mediated the relationship between positive acculturation conditions and the subjective experience of work success whereas avoidance coping fully mediated the relationship between discrimination, and ill-health symptoms are related to ill-health symptoms.Practical/managerial implications: Mainstream-facilitating conditions and discrimination influence individual coping styles, which in turn impact on ill-health and the subjective experience of work success. In addition, ill-health also impacts negatively on work-success experiences amongst the sampled SAPS members. It would thus make sense for the SAPS to sanction discrimination.Contribution/value added: A variation of the mediated dual-process model for diversity (Jackson & Van de Vijver, in press, using coping strategies as mediators was supported. The model adds new insights in diversity in organisations.

  19. [Post-ischemia neurologic recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud-Chaumeil, Bernard; Pariente, Jérémie; Albucher, Jean-François; Loubinoux, Isabelle; Chollet, François

    2002-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most common affliction of patients with neurological symptoms. Rehabilitation of stroke patients is a difficult task. Our knowledge on rehabilitation has recently improved with the emergence of data from new neuroimaging techniques. A prospective, double blind, cross over, placebo, controlled study on 8 patients with pure motor hemiparesia, is conducted to determine the influence of a single dose of fluoxetine on motor performance and cerebral activation of patients recovering from stroke. Each patient undergoes two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) examinations, one under fluoxetine and one under placebo. A single dose of fluoxetine is enough to modulate cerebral sensori-motor activation and significantly improves motor skills of the affected side. Further studies are required to investigate the effect of chronic administration of fluoxetine on motor function.

  20. Neurology of foreign language aptitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Biedroń

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This state-of-the art paper focuses on the poorly explored issue of foreign language aptitude, attempting to present the latest developments in this field and reconceptualizations of the construct from the perspective of neuroscience. In accordance with this goal, it first discusses general directions in neurolinguistic research on foreign language aptitude, starting with the earliest attempts to define the neurological substrate for talent, sources of difficulties in the neurolinguistic research on foreign language aptitude and modern research methods. This is followed by the discussion of the research on the phonology of foreign language aptitude with emphasis on functional and structural studies as well as their consequences for the knowledge of the concept. The subsequent section presents the studies which focus on lexical and morphosyntactic aspects of foreign language aptitude. The paper ends with a discussion of the limitations of contemporary research, the future directions of such research and selec ed methodological issues.

  1. Aphasia, Just a Neurological Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ozdemir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto%u2019s encephalopathy (HE is a rare disorder associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. Etiology of HE is not completely understood. High levels of serum antithyroid antibodies are seen in HE. Presentation with otoimmune thyroiditis, cognitive impairment, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms and absence of bacterial or viral enfections are characteristics of HE. HE is a steroid responsive encephalopathy. 60 years old male patient admitted to hospital with forget fulness continuing for 9 months and speech loss starting 2 days ago. Strong positivity of antithyroid antibodies increases the odds for HE. Thyroid function tests showed severe hypothyroidism. Electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging results were compatible with HE. HE is diagnosed with differantial diagnosis and exclusion of other reasons. This uncommon disorder is not recognised enough. High titres of serum antithyroid antiboides are always needed for diagnosis. Correct diagnosis requires awareness of wide range of cognitive and clinical presentations of HE.

  2. Porphyria and its neurologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Jennifer A; Dyck, P James B

    2014-01-01

    Porphyrias are rare disorders resulting from a defect in the heme biosynthetic pathway. They can produce significant disease of both the peripheral and central nervous systems, in addition to other organ systems, with acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, and variegate porphyria as the subtypes associated with neurologic manifestations. The presence of a motor-predominant peripheral neuropathy (axonal predominant), accompanied by gastrointestinal distress and neuropsychiatric manifestations, should be a strong clue to the diagnosis of porphyria. Clinical confirmation can be made through evaluation of urine porphyrins during an exacerbation of disease. While hematin is helpful for acute treatment, long-term effective management requires avoidance of overstimulation of the cytochrome P450 pathway, as well as other risk factor control. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical and neurological characteristics of aortic thromboembolism in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, R; Penderis, J; Chang, Y P; Zoia, A; Mosley, J; Anderson, T J

    2008-04-01

    To characterise the clinical presentation and neurological abnormalities in dogs affected by aortic thromboembolism. The medical records of 13 dogs diagnosed with aortic thromboembolism as the cause of the clinical signs, and where a complete neurological examination was performed, were reviewed retrospectively. The onset was acute in only four dogs, chronic in five dogs (with all of these presenting as exercise intolerance) or chronic with acute deterioration in four dogs. Dogs with an acute onset of clinical signs were more severely affected exhibiting neurological deficits, while dogs with a chronic onset of disease predominantly presented with the exercise intolerance and minimal deficits. The locomotor deficits included exercise intolerance with pelvic limb weakness (five of 13), pelvic limb ataxia (one of 13), monoparesis (two of 13), paraparesis (two of 13), non-ambulatory paraparesis (two of 13) and paraplegia (one of 13). There was an apparent male predisposition and the cavalier King charles spaniel was overrepresented. The rate of onset of clinical signs appears to segregate dogs affected by aortic thromboembolism into two groups, with different clinical characteristics and outcomes. Dogs with an acute onset of the clinical signs tend to be more severely affected, while dogs with a chronic onset predominantly present with exercise intolerance. It is therefore important to consider aortic thromboembolism as a differential diagnosis in dogs with an acute onset of pelvic limb neurological deficits and in dogs with longer standing exercise intolerance.

  4. Putting experimental dynamics into the field: the German 'Ostfeldzug' and the creation of emergency care chains in military neurology and neurological surgery, 1941-1945.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnisch, Frank W

    2014-01-01

    The interconnections between the history of neurology and neurological surgery with the development of modern, technological warfare are a vastly under-researched area of medical history. The main objectives of this paper are hence to contribute to the understanding and analysis of a major case example from World War II. The article's research is based on work at the Bundesarchiv in Koblenz, the Max Planck Gesellschaft in Berlin, and literature regarding the Fuehrungsstab der Luftwaffe, undertaken as part of a larger scale project on the history of the neurosciences and psychiatry in the first half of the 20th century. The current article focuses particularly on the Ostfeldzug of the Wehrmacht and the creation of emergency care chains in military neurology and neurological surgery. Its results show how major German neurologists, such as Otfrid Foerster, Wilhelm Toennis, Georg Merrem and Klaus Joachim Zuelch have contributed to the development of emergency care chains in military neurology. Key Messages: In conclusion, despite the atrocities and often-inhumane ways through which knowledge was gathered in contemporary military neurology, a better understanding of modern neurology can be gained from a critical assessment of the history of military neurology during World War II. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Neurologic deficits and arachnoiditis following neuroaxial anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrete, J A

    2003-01-01

    Of late, regional anesthesia has enjoyed unprecedented popularity; this increase in cases has brought a higher frequency of instances of neurological deficit and arachnoiditis that may appear as transient nerve root irritation, cauda equina, and conus medullaris syndromes, and later as radiculitis, clumped nerve roots, fibrosis, scarring dural sac deformities, pachymeningitis, pseudomeningocele, and syringomyelia, etc., all associated with arachnoiditis. Arachnoiditis may be caused by infections, myelograms (mostly from oil-based dyes), blood in the intrathecal space, neuroirritant, neurotoxic and/or neurolytic substances, surgical interventions in the spine, intrathecal corticosteroids, and trauma. Regarding regional anesthesia in the neuroaxis, arachnoiditis has resulted from epidural abscesses, traumatic punctures (blood), local anesthetics, detergents, antiseptics or other substances unintentionally injected into the spinal canal. Direct trauma to nerve roots or the spinal cord may be manifested as paraesthesia that has not been considered an injurious event; however, it usually implies dural penetration, as there are no nerve roots in the epidural space posteriorly. Sudden severe headache while or shortly after an epidural block using the loss of resistance to air approach usually suggests pneumocephalus from an intradural injection of air. Burning severe pain in the lower back and lower extremities, dysesthesia and numbness not following the usual dermatome distribution, along with bladder, bowel and/or sexual dysfunction, are the most common symptoms of direct trauma to the spinal cord. Such patients should be subjected to a neurological examination followed by an MRI of the effected area. Further spinal procedures are best avoided and the prompt administration of IV corticosteroids and NSAIDs need to be considered in the hope of preventing the inflammatory response from evolving into the proliferative phase of arachnoiditis.

  6. High-Attenuation Areas on Chest Computed Tomography and Clinical Respiratory Outcomes in Community-Dwelling Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolanczuk, Anna J; Oelsner, Elizabeth C; Barr, R Graham; Bernstein, Elana J; Hoffman, Eric A; Easthausen, Imaani J; Stukovsky, Karen Hinckley; RoyChoudhury, Arindam; Michos, Erin D; Raghu, Ganesh; Kawut, Steven M; Lederer, David J

    2017-12-01

    Areas of increased lung attenuation visualized by computed tomography are associated with all-cause mortality in the general population. It is uncertain whether this association is attributable to interstitial lung disease (ILD). To determine whether high-attenuation areas are associated with the risk of ILD hospitalization and mortality in the general population. We performed a cohort study of 6,808 adults aged 45-84 years sampled from six communities in the United States. High-attenuation areas were defined as the percentage of imaged lung volume with attenuation values between -600 and -250 Hounsfield units. An adjudication panel determined ILD hospitalization and death. After adjudication, 52 participants had a diagnosis of ILD during 75,232 person-years (median, 12.2 yr) of follow-up. There were 48 hospitalizations attributable to ILD (crude rate, 6.4 per 10,000 person-years). Twenty participants died as a result of ILD (crude rate, 2.7 per 10,000 person-years). High-attenuation areas were associated with an increased rate of ILD hospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.6 per 1-SD increment in high-attenuation areas; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-3.5; P areas were also associated with an increased rate of ILD-specific death (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-3.0; P Areas of increased lung attenuation are a novel risk factor for ILD hospitalization and mortality. Measurement of high-attenuation areas by screening and diagnostic computed tomography may be warranted in at-risk adults.

  7. Public policy performance for social development : solar energy approach to assess technological outcome in Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    OpenAIRE

    Arenas-Aquino, A.R.; Matsumoto-Kuwabara, Y.; Kleiche Dray, Mina

    2017-01-01

    Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) is the most populated urban area in the country. In 2010, MCMA required 14.8% of total energy domestic demand, but greenhouse gas emissions accounted for 7.7% of domestic emissions. Mexico has massive renewable energy potential that could be harnessed through solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. The problem to explore is the relationship between local and federal public strategies in MCMA and their stance on energy transition concern, social empowerment, ne...

  8. Pediatric neurology of the dog and cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavely, James A

    2006-05-01

    The neurologic examination in the puppy or kitten can be a challenging experience. Understanding the development of behavior reflexes and movement in puppies and kittens enables us to overcome some of these challenges and to recognize the neurologically abnormal patient. Subsequently,we can identify the neuroanatomic localization and generate a differential diagnosis list. This article first reviews the pediatric neurologic examination and then discusses diseases unique to these individuals.

  9. [Future directions of neurology - breakthrough to the next stage ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Shoji

    2010-11-01

    The 51st Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Neurology was held in Tokyo (Tokyo International Forum) from Thursday, May 20 to Saturday, May 22, 2010 with as many as 5,471 attendants. Our Society has been celebrating its 50th anniversary during the period from 2009 through 2010. At the 51st Annual Meeting in 2010, we looked toward the future, as we celebrate our 50th anniversary together with distinguished guests closely related to our Society. The theme for the 51st Annual Meeting was set as "Future of Neurology-Breakthrough to the next stage-." As represented in the theme, I hope that the Annual Meeting provided an excellent opportunity for all of us to look ahead to the future of Neurology and our Society in the next half-century. We have achieved tremendous advances in better understanding neurological diseases and developing more efficacious treatment over the last half century. Great strides have been made in all areas, of which diagnostic imaging, molecular genetics, immunology and physiology are just a few examples, and understanding of diseases has similarly taken a great leap forward. In Japan, the aging of society coupled with the declining birthrate has placed ever-increasing expectations on neurologists to provide better care for dementia, cerebrovascular disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Given this situation our Society is required to provide outstanding education in both the pre- and post-graduate context, and, furthermore, to ensure that excellent training programs are available for young neurologists preparing for Board certification. Looking towards the future of neurology, we should continue to anticipate new, ground-breaking achievements for better understanding neurological diseases and establishing more effective treatment through our ongoing endeavors.

  10. Challenges in neurological practice in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The burden of neurological illness is much higher in developing countries. Neurological disorders in these countries are mainly due to poverty and malnutrition. Spectrums of diseases are also different in comparison with developed countries. Lack of resources, ignorance, and overpopulation make it very difficult and challenging to tackle this problem. Majority of the patients are seen by general practitioners who have little knowledge about neurological illnesses. Most of the countries have very few or no neurologist. There is a greater need of taking neurological care at primary care level where majority of the patients struggle with epilepsy, stroke and neuroinfections.

  11. Retrospective analysis underestimates neurological deficits in complex spinal deformity surgery: a Scoli-RISK-1 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael P; Lenke, Lawrence G; Godzik, Jakub; Pellise, Ferran; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Smith, Justin S; Lewis, Stephen J; Ames, Christopher P; Carreon, Leah Y; Fehlings, Michael G; Schwab, Frank; Shimer, Adam L

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors conducted a study to compare neurological deficit rates associated with complex adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery when recorded in retrospective and prospective studies. Retrospective studies may underreport neurological deficits due to selection, detection, and recall biases. Prospective studies are expensive and more difficult to perform, but they likely provide more accurate estimates of new neurological deficit rates. METHODS New neurological deficits were recorded in a prospective study of complex ASD surgeries (pSR1) with a defined outcomes measure (decrement in American Spinal Injury Association lower-extremity motor score) for neurological deficits. Using identical inclusion criteria and a subset of participating surgeons, a retrospective study was created (rSR1) and neurological deficit rates were collected. Continuous variables were compared with the Student t-test, with correction for multiple comparisons. Neurological deficit rates were compared using the Mantel-Haenszel method for standardized risks. Statistical significance for the primary outcome measure was p spinal deformities, and exclusion criteria were identical. Sagittal Cobb measurements were higher in pSR1, although sagittal alignment was similar. Preoperative neurological deficit rates were similar in the groups. Three-column osteotomies were more common in pSR1, particularly vertebral column resection. New neurological deficits were more common in pSR1 (pSR1 17.3% [95% CI 12.6-22.2] and rSR1 9.0% [95% CI 5.0-13.0]; p = 0.01). The majority of deficits in both studies were at the nerve root level, and the distribution of level of injury was similar. CONCLUSIONS New neurological deficit rates were nearly twice as high in the prospective study than the retrospective study with identical inclusion criteria. These findings validate concerns regarding retrospective cohort studies and confirm the need for and value of carefully designed prospective, observational cohort

  12. Factors associated with successful vaginal birth after cesarean section and outcomes in rural area of Anatolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senturk MB

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mehmet Baki Senturk,1 Yusuf Cakmak,2 Halit Atac,2 Mehmet Sukru Budak3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bakirkoy Dr Sadi Konuk Teaching and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Batman State Hospital, Batman, Turkey; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Diyarbakir Research Hospital, Diyarbakir, Turkey Abstract: Successful vaginal birth after cesarean section is more comfortable than repeat emergency or elective cesarean section. Antenatal examinations are important in selection for trial of labor, while birth management can be difficult when the patients present at emergency condition. But there is an increased chance of vaginal birth with advanced cervical dilation. This study attempts to evaluate factors associated with success of vaginal birth after cesarean section and to compare the maternal and perinatal outcomes between vaginal birth after cesarean section and intrapartum cesarean section in patients who were admitted to hospital during the active or second stage of labor. A retrospective evaluation was made from the results of 127 patients. Cesarean section was performed in 57 patients; 70 attempted trial of labor. The factors associated with success of vaginal birth after cesarean section were investigated. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were compared between the groups. Vaginal birth after cesarean section was successful in 55% of cases. Advanced cervical opening, effacement, gravidity, parity, and prior vaginal delivery were factors associated with successful vaginal birth. The vaginal birth group had more complications (P<0.01, but these were minor. The rate of blood transfusion and prevalence of changes in hemoglobin level were similar in both groups (P>0.05. In this study, cervical opening, effacement, gravidity, parity, and prior vaginal delivery were important factors for successful vaginal birth after cesarean section. The patients’ requests influenced outcome. Trial of

  13. Risk factors for fatal outcome from rocky mountain spotted Fever in a highly endemic area-Arizona, 2002-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Joanna J; Traeger, Marc S; Humpherys, Dwight; Mahoney, Dianna L; Martinez, Michelle; Emerson, Ginny L; Tack, Danielle M; Geissler, Aimee; Yasmin, Seema; Lawson, Regina; Williams, Velda; Hamilton, Charlene; Levy, Craig; Komatsu, Ken; Yost, David A; McQuiston, Jennifer H

    2015-06-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a disease that now causes significant morbidity and mortality on several American Indian reservations in Arizona. Although the disease is treatable, reported RMSF case fatality rates from this region are high (7%) compared to the rest of the nation (<1%), suggesting a need to identify clinical points for intervention. The first 205 cases from this region were reviewed and fatal RMSF cases were compared to nonfatal cases to determine clinical risk factors for fatal outcome. Doxycycline was initiated significantly later in fatal cases (median, day 7) than nonfatal cases (median, day 3), although both groups of case patients presented for care early (median, day 2). Multiple factors increased the risk of doxycycline delay and fatal outcome, such as early symptoms of nausea and diarrhea, history of alcoholism or chronic lung disease, and abnormal laboratory results such as elevated liver aminotransferases. Rash, history of tick bite, thrombocytopenia, and hyponatremia were often absent at initial presentation. Earlier treatment with doxycycline can decrease morbidity and mortality from RMSF in this region. Recognition of risk factors associated with doxycycline delay and fatal outcome, such as early gastrointestinal symptoms and a history of alcoholism or chronic lung disease, may be useful in guiding early treatment decisions. Healthcare providers should have a low threshold for initiating doxycycline whenever treating febrile or potentially septic patients from tribal lands in Arizona, even if an alternative diagnosis seems more likely and classic findings of RMSF are absent. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Neutrophils and viral-induced neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grist, Jonathan J; Marro, Brett; Lane, Thomas E

    2016-06-08

    Infection of the central nervous system (CNS) by neurotropic viruses represents an increasing worldwide problem in terms of morbidity and mortality for people of all ages. Although unique structural features of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) provide a physical and physiological barrier, a number of neurotropic viruses are able to enter the CNS resulting in a variety of pathological outcomes. Nonetheless, antigen-specific lymphocytes are ultimately able to accumulate within the CNS and contribute to defense by reducing or eliminating the invading viral pathogen. Alternatively, infiltration of activated cells of the immune system may be detrimental, as these cells can contribute to neuropathology that may result in long-term cellular damage or death. More recently, myeloid cells e.g. neutrophils have been implicated in contributing to both host defense and disease in response to viral infection of the CNS. This review highlights recent studies using coronavirus-induced neurologic disease as a model to determine how neutrophils affect effective control of viral replication as well as demyelination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Two year neurological outcomes of very low birth weight infants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Of the 120 infants evaluated, 14 (11.7%; 95% Cl 6.2-17.1) had cerebral palsy, 11 (9.2%; 95% Cl 4.8-16.9) were delayed on cognitive assessment while 32 (26.7%; 95% Cl 9.3-38.1) were found to have functional disabilities. The factors associated with functional disability in the cohort included; neonatal illness (P ...

  16. Silas Weir Mitchell: Neurologists and Neurology during the American Civil War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, François; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    With few exceptions, neurology was nonexistent in the United States until the Civil War years. From 1861 to 1865, the United States saw a bitter armed conflict between the North (the Union) and the South (the Confederate States or Confederacy), and during those years, neurology was born in the United States. In 1861, Silas Weir Mitchell, together with George Morehouse and William Keen, opened and operated the first neurological hospital in Philadelphia, with the backing of the Surgeon General William Hammond. They treated and studied many peripheral nerve diseases, which led to their making the medical world aware of several conditions, including causalgia (now known as complex regional pain syndrome) and the phantom limb phenomenon. Progress in neurology, both at that time and in subsequent years, owed a great deal to cross-fertilization from Europe. Charles Edouard Brown-Séquard exemplified this. He held multiple medical positions on both sides of the Atlantic, including a position at Harvard in 1864. His teachings, to some extent, contributed to the development of neurology in the United States. In the Confederate states, medical care was less well organized, and neurology only developed later. After the war, in 1874, Mitchell, Hammond, and a few others founded the American Neurological Association. While war influenced the development of medicine, and neurology in particular, medicine also helped to shape the outcome of the war. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Predictive factors of neurological complications and one-month mortality after liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eFu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurological complications are common after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. We aimed to characterize the risk factors associated with neurological complications and mortality among patients who underwent OLT in the post-model for end-stage liver disease (MELD era.Methods: In a retrospective review, we evaluated 227 consecutive patients at the Keck Hospital of the University of Southern California before and after OLT to define the type and frequency of and risk factors for neurological complications and mortality.Results: Neurological complications were common (n=98, with encephalopathy being most frequent (56.8%, followed by tremor (26.5%, hallucinations (11.2%, and seizure (8.2%. Factors associated with neurological complications after OLT included preoperative dialysis, hepatorenal syndrome, renal insufficiency, intra-operative dialysis, preoperative encephalopathy, preoperative mechanical ventilation, and infection. Preoperative infection was an independent predictor of neurological complications (OR 2.83, 1.47 – 5.44. One-month mortality was 8.8% and was independently associated with urgent re-transplant, preoperative intubation, intraoperative arrhythmia, and intraoperative use of multiple pressors.Conclusion: Neurological complications are common in patients undergoing OLT in the post-MELD era, with encephalopathy being most frequent. An improved understanding of the risk factors related to both neurological complications and one-month mortality post-transplantation can better guide perioperative care and help improve outcomes among OLT patients.

  18. Outcomes from the USDA/ARS area-wide project for management of the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, became established in the continental US in 1985 and now infests 30 states. In 2007 the USDA Agricultural Research Service funded an “area-wide” project focused on the management of this species. The project was a unique federal, state, local collaborati...

  19. Healthcare provider perceptions of the role of interprofessional care in access to and outcomes of primary care in an underserved area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shaowei; Teichman, Peter G; Latif, David; Boyd, Jennifer; Gupta, Rahul

    2018-03-01

    To meet the needs of an aging population who often have multiple chronic conditions, interprofessional care is increasingly adopted by patient-centred medical homes and Accountable Care Organisations to improve patient care coordination and decrease costs in the United States, especially in underserved areas with primary care workforce shortages. In this cross-sectional survey across multiple clinical settings in an underserved area, healthcare providers perceived overall outcomes associated with interprofessional care teams as positive. This included healthcare providers' beliefs that interprofessional care teams improved patient outcomes, increased clinic efficiency, and enhanced care coordination and patient follow-up. Teams with primary care physician available each day were perceived as better able to coordinate care and follow up with patients (p = .031), while teams that included clinical pharmacists were perceived as preventing medication-associated problems (p interprofessional care model as a useful strategy to improve various outcomes across different clinical settings in the context of a shortage of primary care physicians.

  20. PYRITINOL USAGE IN PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Zavadenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of developmental disorders, correction of learning disabilities and behavioral problems in children should be prompt, complex and include pharmacotherapy with nootropic agents. The results of recent studies shown in this review proved effectiveness of pharmacotherapy with pyritinol in children with perinatal injury of central nervous system and its consequences, psychomotor and speech development delay, dyslexia, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, cognitive disorders and learning disabilities (including manifestations of epilepsy, chronic tic disorders and Tourette syndrome. Due to its ability to optimize metabolic processes in central nervous system, pyritinol is used in treatment of vegetative dysfunction in children and adolescents, especially associated with asthenical manifestations, as well as in complex therapy of exertion headache and migraine. The drug is effective in treatment of cognitive disorders in children and adolescents with epilepsy, pyritinol was administered without changing of the basic anticonvulsive therapy and no deterioration (increase of severity of seizures or intensity of epileptiform activity on electroencephalogramms was observed. Significant nootropic effect of pyritinol, including neurometabolic, neuroprotective, neurodynamic and other mechanisms, in association with safety and rare side effects of this drug determines its wide usage in pediatric neurology.

  1. Toward a Neurology of Loneliness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacioppo, Stephanie; Capitanio, John P.; Cacioppo, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Social isolation has been recognized as a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in humans for more than a quarter century. The brain is the key organ of social connections and processes, however, and the same objective social relationship can be experienced as caring and protective or as exploitive and isolating. We review evidence that the perception of social isolation (i.e., loneliness) impacts brain and behavior and is a risk factor for broad-based morbidity and mortality. However, the causal role of loneliness on neural mechanisms and mortality is difficult to test conclusively in humans. Mechanistic animal studies provide a lens through which to evaluate the neurological effects of a member of a social species living chronically on the social perimeter. Experimental studies show that social isolation produces significant changes in brain structures and processes in adult social animals. These effects are not uniform across the brain or across species but instead are most evident in brain regions that reflect differences in the functional demands of solitary versus social living for a particular species. The human and animal literatures have developed independently, however, and significant gaps also exist. The current review underscores the importance of integrating human and animal research to delineate the mechanisms through which social relationships impact the brain, health, and well-being. PMID:25222636

  2. Gluten sensitivity and neurological manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Berio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors report on six cases of gluten-sensitivity, also defined non-celiac gluten sensitivity, characterized by abdominal features (diarrhea, bloating, pain, genetic positivity for predisposition to celiac disease (DQB1* 02 in all cases; DQA1*05 in three; DQA1*02 in two, DQB1*03 in two, negative anti-t-Transglutaminase antibodies, normal mucosa on biopsy in four cases, type 1 of Marsh in one case. The subjects presented frequent central nervous system (CNS symptoms: headache in three patients, somnolence in one, electroencephalogram aspecific alterations in three (in two of them with previous seizures, leptomeningeal cyst in one, intracranial calcification in one, cerebral gliosis in two. After a gluten-free diet, all intestinal and clinical CNS features remitted, but re-appeared after gluten reintroduction. On the basis of the neurological signs, the authors stress the relevance of immune innate system in the pathogenesis of these cases with possible subsequent evolution on immune adaptive system involvement.

  3. Endocannabinoid System in Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Roberta; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Marasco, Daniela; Malfitano, Anna M

    2016-01-01

    Several studies support the evidence that the endocannabinoid system and cannabimimetic drugs might have therapeutic potential in numerous pathologies. These pathologies range from neurological disorders, atherosclerosis, stroke, cancer to obesity/metabolic syndrome and others. In this paper we review the endocannabinoid system signaling and its alteration in neurodegenerative disorders like multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease and discuss the main findings about the use of cannabinoids in the therapy of these pathologies. Despite different etiologies, neurodegenerative disorders exhibit similar mechanisms like neuro-inflammation, excitotoxicity, deregulation of intercellular communication, mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of brain tissue homeostasis. Current treatments ameliorate the symptoms but are not curative. Interfering with the endocannabinoid signaling might be a valid therapeutic option in neuro-degeneration. To this aim, pharmacological intervention to modulate the endocannabinoid system and the use of natural and synthetic cannabimimetic drugs have been assessed. CB1 and CB2 receptor signaling contributes to the control of Ca2+ homeostasis, trophic support, mitochondrial activity, and inflammatory conditions. Several studies and patents suggest that the endocannabinoid system has neuro-protective properties and might be a target in neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Neurological Adverse Effects after Radiation Therapy for Stage II Seminoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbeskov Lauritsen, Liv; Meidahl Petersen, Peter; Daugaard, Gedske

    2012-01-01

    against the tumour bed) with a conventional fractionation of 2 Gy/day, 5 days per week. RT was applied as hockey-stick portals, also called L-fields. In 2 cases, the symptoms fully resolved. Therapeutic irradiation can cause significant injury to the peripheral nerves of the lumbosacral plexus and....../or to the spinal cord. RT is believed to produce plexus injury by both direct toxic effects and secondary microinfarction of the nerves, but the exact pathophysiology of RT-induced injury is unclear. Since reported studies of radiation-induced neurological adverse effects are limited, it is difficult to estimate...... their frequency and outcome. The treatment of neurological symptoms due to RT is symptomatic....

  5. Neurological abnormalities in full-term asphyxiated newborns and salivary S100B testing: the "Cooperative Multitask against Brain Injury of Neonates" (CoMBINe) international study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzolo, Diego; Pluchinotta, Francesca; Bashir, Moataza; Aboulgar, Hanna; Said, Hala Mufeed; Iman, Iskander; Ivani, Giorgio; Conio, Alessandra; Tina, Lucia Gabriella; Nigro, Francesco; Li Volti, Giovanni; Galvano, Fabio; Michetti, Fabrizio; Di Iorio, Romolo; Marinoni, Emanuela; Zimmermann, Luc J; Gavilanes, Antonio D W; Vles, Hans J S; Kornacka, Maria; Gruszfeld, Darek; Frulio, Rosanna; Sacchi, Renata; Ciotti, Sabina; Risso, Francesco M; Sannia, Andrea; Florio, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in newborns: its prognosis depends both on the severity of the asphyxia and on the immediate resuscitation to restore oxygen supply and blood circulation. Therefore, we investigated whether measurement of S100B, a consolidated marker of brain injury, in salivary fluid of PA newborns may constitute a useful tool for the early detection of asphyxia-related brain injury. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 292 full-term newborns admitted to our NICUs, of whom 48 suffered PA and 244 healthy controls admitted at our NICUs. Saliva S100B levels measurement longitudinally after birth; routine laboratory variables, neurological patterns, cerebral ultrasound and, magnetic resonance imaging were performed. The primary end-point was the presence of neurological abnormalities at 12-months after birth. S100B salivary levels were significantly (P3.25 MoM S100B achieved a sensitivity of 100% (CI5-95%: 89.3%-100%) and a specificity of 100% (CI5-95%: 98.6%-100%) as a single marker for predicting the occurrence of abnormal neurological outcome (area under the ROC curve: 1.000; CI5-95%: 0.987-1.0). S100B protein measurement in saliva, soon after birth, is a useful tool to identify which asphyxiated infants are at risk of neurological sequelae.

  6. Neurological abnormalities in full-term asphyxiated newborns and salivary S100B testing: the "Cooperative Multitask against Brain Injury of Neonates" (CoMBINe international study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Gazzolo

    Full Text Available Perinatal asphyxia (PA is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in newborns: its prognosis depends both on the severity of the asphyxia and on the immediate resuscitation to restore oxygen supply and blood circulation. Therefore, we investigated whether measurement of S100B, a consolidated marker of brain injury, in salivary fluid of PA newborns may constitute a useful tool for the early detection of asphyxia-related brain injury.We conducted a cross-sectional study in 292 full-term newborns admitted to our NICUs, of whom 48 suffered PA and 244 healthy controls admitted at our NICUs. Saliva S100B levels measurement longitudinally after birth; routine laboratory variables, neurological patterns, cerebral ultrasound and, magnetic resonance imaging were performed. The primary end-point was the presence of neurological abnormalities at 12-months after birth.S100B salivary levels were significantly (P3.25 MoM S100B achieved a sensitivity of 100% (CI5-95%: 89.3%-100% and a specificity of 100% (CI5-95%: 98.6%-100% as a single marker for predicting the occurrence of abnormal neurological outcome (area under the ROC curve: 1.000; CI5-95%: 0.987-1.0.S100B protein measurement in saliva, soon after birth, is a useful tool to identify which asphyxiated infants are at risk of neurological sequelae.

  7. Impact of a Revised Curriculum Focusing on Clinical Neurology and Musculoskeletal Care on a Required Fourth-Year Medical Student Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Norbury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A Required Fourth-Year Medical Student Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R Clerkship was found to increase students’ knowledge of PM&R; however the students’ overall rotation evaluations were consistently lower than the other 8 required clerkships at the medical school. Objective. To describe the impact of a revised curriculum based upon Entrustable Professional Activities and focusing on basic pain management, musculoskeletal care, and neurology. Setting. Academic Medical Center. Participants. 73 fourth-year medical students. Methods. The curriculum changes included a shift in the required readings from rehabilitation specific topics toward more general content in the areas of clinical neurology and musculoskeletal care. Hands-on workshops on neurological and musculoskeletal physical examination techniques, small group case-based learning, an anatomy clinical correlation lecture, and a lecture on pain management were integrated into the curriculum. Main Outcome Measurements. Student evaluations of the clerkship. Results. Statistically significant improvements were found in the students’ evaluations of usefulness of lecturers, development of patient interviewing skills, and diagnostic and patient management skills (p≤0.05. Conclusions. This study suggests that students have a greater satisfaction with a required PM&R clerkship when lecturers utilize a variety of pedagogic methods to teach basic pain, neurology and musculoskeletal care skills in the rehabilitation setting rather than rehabilitation specific content.

  8. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  9. Task analysis in neurosciences programme design - neurological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Defining educational objectives is the key to achieving the goal of professional competence in students. The technique of task analysis was selected to determine components of competence in clinical neurology appropriate to the needs of primary care. A survey of neurological problems in general practice revealed that ...

  10. Archives: African Journal of Neurological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 28 of 28 ... Archives: African Journal of Neurological Sciences. Journal Home > Archives: African Journal of Neurological Sciences. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue ...

  11. Suspecting Neurological Dysfunction From E Mail Messages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A non medical person suspected and confirmed neurological dysfunction in an individual, based only on e mail messages sent by the individual. With email communication becoming rampant “peculiar” email messages may raise the suspicion of neurological dysfunction. Organic pathology explaining the abnormal email ...

  12. Neurological and neurosurgical manifestations of human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adults in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire and in Kinshasa and among inpatients in Ugandan hospitals. Ninety per cent of deaths ... various parts of the continent. Neurological manifestations. The spectrum of neurological diseases reported in ... Primary effects of HIV. HEADACHE. Case report. A Malawian 46-year-old male senior ...

  13. Neurological condition assessed with the Hempel examination and cognition and behaviour at 4years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendelaar, Pamela; Seggers, Jorien; Heineman, Maas Jan; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2017-09-01

    To investigate associations between neurological condition, assessed with the Hempel examination, in terms of minor neurological dysfunction (MND) and neurological optimality, and cognition and behaviour at 4years. Cross-sectional analyses within a prospective, assessor-blinded follow-up study. Four-year-old singletons born to subfertile parents (n=235; 120 boys). Outcome parameters were complex minor neurological dysfunction (complex MND) and the neurological optimality score (NOS). Cognitive outcome was evaluated with the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, resulting in a total intelligence quotient (IQ). Behavioural outcome was evaluated with the Child Behavior Checklist, resulting in a total problem T-score. Fifty-seven (24.3%) children had complex MND. None of the children showed fine motor dysfunction, suggesting a ceiling effect of the Hempel assessment. Complex MND was not correlated with IQ or total problem T-score. Nevertheless, a higher NOS was correlated with a higher IQ and a lower total problem T-score (adjusted mean estimate [95% confidence interval]: cognition: 0.445 [0.026; 0.865], p=0.038; behaviour: -0.458 [-0.830; -0.087], p=0.016). At age 4, complex MND assessed with the Hempel assessment was not associated with cognition and behaviour, presumably due to a ceiling effect in the Hempel domain of fine motor function. A more optimal neurological condition was associated with higher IQ and better behaviour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Recent advances in metabolomics in neurological disease, and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai-hua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Xi-jun

    2013-10-01

    Discovery of clinically relevant biomarkers for diseases has revealed metabolomics has potential advantages that classical diagnostic approaches do not. The great asset of metabolomics is that it enables assessment of global metabolic profiles of biofluids and discovery of biomarkers distinguishing disease status, with the possibility of enhancing clinical diagnostics. Most current clinical chemistry tests rely on old technology, and are neither sensitive nor specific for a particular disease. Clinical diagnosis of major neurological disorders, for example Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, on the basis of current clinical criteria is unsatisfactory. Emerging metabolomics is a powerful technique for discovering novel biomarkers and biochemical pathways to improve diagnosis, and for determination of prognosis and therapy. Identifying multiple novel biomarkers for neurological diseases has been greatly enhanced with recent advances in metabolomics that are more accurate than routine clinical practice. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is known to be a rich source of small-molecule biomarkers for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, and is in close contact with diseased areas in neurological disorders, could potentially be used for disease diagnosis. Metabolomics will drive CSF analysis, facilitate and improve the development of disease treatment, and result in great benefits to public health in the long-term. This review covers different aspects of CSF metabolomics and discusses their significance in the postgenomic era, emphasizing the potential importance of endogenous small-molecule metabolites in this emerging field.

  15. Mapping Africa's way into prominence in the field of neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Mayowa O; Bower, James H; Ogunniyi, Adesola

    2007-12-01

    Although neurology originated in Africa, there is little modern African contribution to the advancement of knowledge in this field. We present the African neurologic service and scientific productivity indices and suggest a development plan. We conducted PubMed and EMBASE searches for articles about neurologic services in Africa. To assess scientific productivity, we determined the number of publications of African origin in journals with high impact. The neurologist-population ratio in African countries varies from 1 per 162,885 persons to none in 11 countries, compared with 1 per 29,200 persons in the United States. There are few African publications in high-impact international journals of neurology. Africa faces a heavy burden of communicable diseases and increasing noncommunicable diseases, with few workers, poor equipment, and little research effort to bear it. There is a need for African neuroscientists to discover areas of research unique to the continent in order to advance the frontiers of knowledge for all neurologists. International collaboration and support are required to improve the number of workers, resources, and research productivity.

  16. Palliative care and neurology: time for a paradigm shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean; Kluger, Benzi

    2014-08-05

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Neurology objective structured clinical examination reliability using generalizability theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Angela D; Park, Yoon Soo; Lukas, Rimas V; Brorson, James R

    2015-11-03

    This study examines factors affecting reliability, or consistency of assessment scores, from an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in neurology through generalizability theory (G theory). Data include assessments from a multistation OSCE taken by 194 medical students at the completion of a neurology clerkship. Facets evaluated in this study include cases, domains, and items. Domains refer to areas of skill (or constructs) that the OSCE measures. G theory is used to estimate variance components associated with each facet, derive reliability, and project the number of cases required to obtain a reliable (consistent, precise) score. Reliability using G theory is moderate (Φ coefficient = 0.61, G coefficient = 0.64). Performance is similar across cases but differs by the particular domain, such that the majority of variance is attributed to the domain. Projections in reliability estimates reveal that students need to participate in 3 OSCE cases in order to increase reliability beyond the 0.70 threshold. This novel use of G theory in evaluating an OSCE in neurology provides meaningful measurement characteristics of the assessment. Differing from prior work in other medical specialties, the cases students were randomly assigned did not influence their OSCE score; rather, scores varied in expected fashion by domain assessed. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Prevalence and Distribution of Neurological Disease in a Neurology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uche

    . Background: Specialization in various areas of medicine is established in most tertiary hospitals in Nigeria. There is thus an increasing awareness by the populace on need for specialist medical care. However ...

  19. Left ventricular apical akinetic aneurysmatic area associated with permanent right ventricular apical pacing for advanced atrioventricular block: clinical characteristics and long-term outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Kai-Hang; Siu, Chung-Wah; Zhang, Xue-Hua; Wang, Mei; Lee, Kathy L F; Lau, Chu-Pak; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2011-04-01

    Right ventricular apical (RVA) pacing can induce left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony and dysfunction. In this article, we describe the prevalence, clinical characteristics, and outcome in a subset of patients with unrecognized LV apical akinetic aneurysmatic area associated with permanent RVA pacing as potential causes of heart failure (HF) and/or ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT). We retrospectively studied 220 patients with permanent RVA pacing and no pre-existing structural heart disease in our follow-up clinic for high-degree atrioventricular block. Patients who presented with new-onset HF, chest pain, or VT following RVA pacing were evaluated by echocardiogram and cardiac catheterization. RVA pacing-induced LV apical akinetic aneurysmatic area was diagnosed in the absence of significant coronary artery disease by left ventriculogram. After a mean 8.8 ± 6.3 years, eight patients (3.6%) had LV apical akinetic aneurysmatic area. Of those with LV apical akinetic aneurysmatic area, four patients presented with or died of VT. There was no evidence of LV apical akinetic aneurysmatic area on echocardiogram or left ventriculogram in the remaining 212 patients. The four patients with LV apical akinetic aneurysmatic area and HF underwent cardiac resynchronization therapy: in all cases LV ejection fraction improved (from 33 ± 6 to 47 ± 10%, P = 0.03), and LV apical akinetic aneurysmatic area resolved in two. Permanent RVA pacing for high-degree atrioventricular block is associated with LV apical akinetic aneurysmatic area. This condition was associated with a high incidence of VT and cardiovascular complication, but was possibly reversible with cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  20. Neurology in the Vietnam War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Carl H; Daroff, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Between December 1965 and December 1971, the United States maintained armed forces in Vietnam never less than 180,000 men and women in support of the war. At one time, this commitment exceeded half a million soldiers, sailors, and airmen from both the United States and its allies. Such forces required an extensive medical presence, including 19 neurologists. All but two of the neurologists had been drafted for a 2-year tour of duty after deferment for residency training. They were assigned to Vietnam for one of those 2 years in two Army Medical Units and one Air Force facility providing neurological care for American and allied forces, as well as many civilians. Their practice included exposure to unfamiliar disorders including cerebral malaria, Japanese B encephalitis, sleep deprivation seizures, and toxic encephalitis caused by injection or inhalation of C-4 explosive. They and neurologists at facilities in the United States published studies on all of these entities both during and after the war. These publications spawned the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Study, which was conceived during the Korean War and continues today as the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Center. It initially focused on post-traumatic epilepsy and later on all effects of brain injury. The Agent Orange controversy arose after the war; during the war, it was not perceived as a threat by medical personnel. Although soldiers in previous wars had developed serious psychological impairments, post-traumatic stress disorder was formally recognized in the servicemen returning from Vietnam. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system.

  2. Poorer Quality Outcomes of Medicare-Certified Home Health Care in Areas With High Levels of Native American/Alaska Native Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towne, Samuel D; Probst, Janice C; Mitchell, Jordan; Chen, Zhimin

    2015-12-01

    Compared with most other groups, many Native Americans or Alaska Natives (NA/AN) individuals are concentrated in rural areas, which typically have lower health service availability. We examined whether quality indicators reported to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) by Medicare-certified home health care agencies are equal in areas with high NA/AN concentration. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis. The unit of analysis was the ZIP Code Tabulation Area (N = 32,239). The independent variable was NA/AN concentration at/above 4.2% (95th percentile). Dependent variables included risk-adjusted patient self-care quality measures. Areas with high levels of NA/AN residents had poorer quality outcomes across both utilization (e.g., hospital admission) and improvement measures (e.g., walking, bathing), for 9 of 12 risk-adjusted patient self-care quality measures. Identifying gaps in quality among multiple measures of home health care for high-risk areas allows practitioners and home health care service providers to target quality improvement interventions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Focal neurological signs in hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients: an underestimated entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadranel, J F; Lebiez, E; Di Martino, V; Bernard, B; El Koury, S; Tourbah, A; Pidoux, B; Valla, D; Opolon, P

    2001-02-01

    Focal neurological signs have been poorly documented in the course of hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients because they are not mentioned in any textbooks of liver diseases. Having the opportunity to observe such cases, we underwent a prospective study to determine incidence, characteristics, associated factors, prognostic significance, and outcome of this rare form of hepatic encephalopathy. Over a 12-month period, all cirrhotic patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit of our department for hepatic encephalopathy were prospectively studied. Patients with clinical and electroencephalogram evidences of hepatic encephalopathy were examined by a senior physician and, in cases of focal neurological signs, underwent examination by a neurologist, CT scan, lumbar punction, and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging and echo Doppler examination of neck and head vessels. Clinical and biological parameters were compared in patients during episodes with and without focal neurological signs, and outcome was noted. Thirty-four cirrhotic patients were hospitalized for 48 episodes of hepatic encephalopathy; two of these patients with cerebral hematoma were excluded. Twenty-four patients exhibited 38 hepatic encephalopathy episodes without focal neurological signs (82.6%), and eight patients exhibited eight hepatic encephalopathy episodes with focal neurological signs (17.4%) that were hemiplegia and hemiparesia in six patients (75%). In all patients, cerebral CT scan and cerebrospinal fluid examination disclosed no abnormalities, as neither did cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (n = 5) and echo Doppler examination of neck and head vessels (n = 5). Except for female sex, which was more often encountered in patients with focal neurological signs (p < 0.05), there were no differences between episodes with and without focal neurological signs for any of the parameters studied. In surviving patients who recovered from hepatic encephalopathy (7/8), focal neurological

  4. Public policy performance for social development: solar energy approach to assess technological outcome in Mexico City Metropolitan Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas-Aquino, Angel Raúl; Matsumoto-Kuwabara, Y; Kleiche-Dray, M

    2017-11-01

    Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) is the most populated urban area in the country. In 2010, MCMA required 14.8% of total energy domestic demand, but greenhouse gas emissions accounted for 7.7% of domestic emissions. Mexico has massive renewable energy potential that could be harnessed through solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. The problem to explore is the relationship between local and federal public strategies in MCMA and their stance on energy transition concern, social empowerment, new technology appropriation, and the will to boost social development and urban sustainability. A public policy typology was conducted through instruments of State intervention approach, based on political agenda articulation and environmental local interactions. Social equality is encouraged by means of forthright funding and in-kind support and energy policies focus on non-renewable energy subsidies and electric transmission infrastructure investment. There is a lack of vision for using PV technology as a guiding axis for marginalized population development. It is essential to promote economic and political rearrangement in order to level and structure environmental governance. It is essential to understand people's representation about their own needs along with renewable energy.

  5. [Neuro-rehabilitation for neurological disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yukihiro

    2011-11-01

    Our understanding of motor learning, neuro-plasticity and functional recovery after the occurrence of brain lesion has grown significantly. New findings in basic neuroscience provided stimuli for research in motor rehabilitation. Electrical stimulation can be applied in a variety of ways to the neurological impairment. Especially, electromyography (EMG) initiated electrical muscle stimulation improves motor dysfunction of the hemiparetic arm and hand. Triggered electrical stimulation is reported to be more effective than non-triggered electrical stimulation in facilitating upper extremity motor recovery. Power-assisted FES induces greater muscle contraction by electrical stimulation in proportion to the voluntary integrated EMG signal picked up. Daily power-assisted FES home program therapy with the novel equipment has been able to improve wrist, finger extension and shoulder flexion effectively. Combined modulation of voluntary movement, proprioceptional sensory feedback and electrical stimulation might play an important role to facilitate impaired sensory-motor integration in power-assisted FES therapy. It is recognized that increased cerebral blood flow in the sensory-motor cortex area on the injured side during power-assisted FES session compared to simple active movement or simple electrical stimulation in a multi-channels Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study to non-invasively and dynamically measure hemoglobin levels in the brain during functional activity.

  6. Multiple roles of metalloproteinases in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Hill, Jeff W; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    Once thought to mainly act in brain to remodel the extracellular matrix, the family of metalloproteinases is important in many normal and pathological processes in the nervous system. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are the two major families of metalloproteinases in the brain. MMPs are comprised of several related enzymes that act on extracellular molecules. Normally, they are important in angiogenesis and neurogenesis in development. In neuroinflammatory illnesses, they disrupt the basal lamina and tight junction proteins to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB). ADAMs are important in neuroinflammation through activation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and their action as secretases that modulate the action of receptors on the cell surface. Four tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are the main inhibitors of the MMPs and ADAMs. Recently, MMPs were found to affect DNA repair processes by an unexpected intranuclear action. MMPs and ADAMs have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and vascular cognitive impairment. Growing literature on the functions of MMPs and ADAMs in the central nervous system is opening up new and exciting areas of research that may lead to novel approaches to treatment of neurological diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gano, Lindsey B.; Patel, Manisha; Rho, Jong M.

    2014-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a broad-spectrum therapy for medically intractable epilepsy and is receiving growing attention as a potential treatment for neurological disorders arising in part from bioenergetic dysregulation. The high-fat/low-carbohydrate “classic KD”, as well as dietary variations such as the medium-chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins diet, the low-glycemic index treatment, and caloric restriction, enhance cellular metabolic and mitochondrial function. Hence, the broad neuroprotective properties of such therapies may stem from improved cellular metabolism. Data from clinical and preclinical studies indicate that these diets restrict glycolysis and increase fatty acid oxidation, actions which result in ketosis, replenishment of the TCA cycle (i.e., anaplerosis), restoration of neurotransmitter and ion channel function, and enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Further, there is mounting evidence that the KD and its variants can impact key signaling pathways that evolved to sense the energetic state of the cell, and that help maintain cellular homeostasis. These pathways, which include PPARs, AMP-activated kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and the sirtuins, have all been recently implicated in the neuroprotective effects of the KD. Further research in this area may lead to future therapeutic strategies aimed at mimicking the pleiotropic neuroprotective effects of the KD. PMID:24847102

  8. Speech and neurology-chemical impairment correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayre, Harb S.

    2002-05-01

    Speech correlates of alcohol/drug impairment and its neurological basis is presented with suggestion for further research in impairment from poly drug/medicine/inhalent/chew use/abuse, and prediagnosis of many neuro- and endocrin-related disorders. Nerve cells all over the body detect chemical entry by smoking, injection, drinking, chewing, or skin absorption, and transmit neurosignals to their corresponding cerebral subsystems, which in turn affect speech centers-Broca's and Wernick's area, and motor cortex. For instance, gustatory cells in the mouth, cranial and spinal nerve cells in the skin, and cilia/olfactory neurons in the nose are the intake sensing nerve cells. Alcohol depression, and brain cell damage were detected from telephone speech using IMPAIRLYZER-TM, and the results of these studies were presented at 1996 ASA meeting in Indianapolis, and 2001 German Acoustical Society-DEGA conference in Hamburg, Germany respectively. Speech based chemical Impairment measure results were presented at the 2001 meeting of ASA in Chicago. New data on neurotolerance based chemical impairment for alcohol, drugs, and medicine shall be presented, and shown not to fully support NIDA-SAMSHA drug and alcohol threshold used in drug testing domain.

  9. Neurocritical care education during neurology residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drogan, O.; Manno, E.; Geocadin, R.G.; Ziai, W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Limited information is available regarding the current state of neurocritical care education for neurology residents. The goal of our survey was to assess the need and current state of neurocritical care training for neurology residents. Methods: A survey instrument was developed and, with the support of the American Academy of Neurology, distributed to residency program directors of 132 accredited neurology programs in the United States in 2011. Results: A response rate of 74% (98 of 132) was achieved. A dedicated neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) existed in 64%. Fifty-six percent of residency programs offer a dedicated rotation in the neuro-ICU, lasting 4 weeks on average. Where available, the neuro-ICU rotation was required in the vast majority (91%) of programs. Neurology residents' exposure to the fundamental principles of neurocritical care was obtained through a variety of mechanisms. Of program directors, 37% indicated that residents would be interested in performing away rotations in a neuro-ICU. From 2005 to 2010, the number of programs sending at least one resident into a neuro-ICU fellowship increased from 14% to 35%. Conclusions: Despite the expansion of neurocritical care, large proportions of US neurology residents have limited exposure to a neuro-ICU and neurointensivists. Formal training in the principles of neurocritical care may be highly variable. The results of this survey suggest a charge to address the variability of resident education and to develop standardized curricula in neurocritical care for neurology residents. PMID:22573636

  10. The epidemiology, management, outcomes and areas for improvement of burn care in central Malawi: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, J C; Campbell, E L P; Mjuweni, S; Muyco, A P; Cairns, B A; Charles, A G

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the epidemiology of burn injuries and quantifies the appropriateness of use of available interventions at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Malawi, between July 2008 and June 2009 (370 burn patients). Burns accounted for 4.4% of all injuries and 25.9% of all burns presenting to the hospital were admitted. Most patients (67.6%) were Burns occurred most frequently in the cool, dry season and in the evening. The mean burn surface area (second/third degree) was 14.1% and most burns (74%) presented within 8 h. The commonest procedure was debridement and/or amputation. The mean hospital stay was 21.1 days, in-hospital mortality was 27% and wound infection rate was 31%. Available interventions (intravenous fluids, nutrition therapy, physiotherapy) were misapplied in 59% of cases. It is concluded that primary prevention should address paediatric and scald burns, and secondary prevention should train providers to use available interventions appropriately.

  11. Statin-induced liver injury in an area endemic for hepatitis B virus infection: risk factors and outcome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li Yueh; Huang, Yi-Shin; Perng, Chin-Lin; Huang, Bryan; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2016-09-01

    Statin-induced liver injury (SILI) is quite rare, but may be severe. Little is known about the impact of chronic hepatitis B infection (CHBI) on SILI. We aimed to investigate the risk factors and outcome of SILI, with special reference to its interaction with CHBI. Patients with SILI were recruited from our hospital, and three-to-one drug-matched controls were randomly selected. The clinical data of the patients were then compared. A total of 108 patients with SILI and 324 controls were enrolled. The patients with SILI were both older and had a higher statin dose than the controls. There was no predilection of liver injury associated with the seven available statins. Among the SILI patients, there was no statistical difference between the baseline and peak liver enzyme tests, and latency and severity between hepatitis B carriers (n = 16) and non-carriers (n = 92). High dose of statin and age were the two independent risk factors of SILI (OR and 95% CI: 1.93, 1.08-3.35, P = 0.025, and 1.73, 1.07-2.80, P = 0.027, respectively). Permanent discontinuation of statin was noted in 50 (46.3%) patients with SILI due to severe SILI or recurrent hepatotoxicity after rechallenge of other statins. High dose of statin and old age may increase patient susceptibility to SILI; however, CHBI and abnormal baseline liver tests are not risk factors of SILI. Nonetheless, SILI is still worthy of notice, because nearly half of the overt cases discontinued statin treatment due to severe hepatotoxicity in this study. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Prevalence and Distribution of Neurological Disease in a Neurology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Specialization in various areas of medicine is established in most tertiary hospitals in Nigeria. There is thus an increasing awareness by the populace on need for specialist medical care. However, neurologists are few and unevenly spread in the country. This raises a serious concern considering the enormous ...

  13. The impact of a fast track area on quality and effectiveness outcomes: a Middle Eastern emergency department perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Devkaran, Subashnie

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency department (ED) overcrowding is a ubiquitous problem with serious public health implications. The fast track area is a novel method which aims to reduce waiting time, patient dissatisfaction and morbidity. |The study objective was to determine the impact of a fast track area (FTA) on both effectiveness measures (i.e. waiting times [WT] and length of stay [LOS]) and quality measures (i.e. LWBS rates and mortality rates) in non-urgent patients. The secondary objective was to assess if a FTA negatively impacted on urgent patients entering the ED. METHODS: The study took place in a 500 bed, urban, tertiary care hospital in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. This was a quasi-experimental, which examined the impact of a FTA on a pre-intervention control group (January 2005) (n = 4,779) versus a post-intervention study group (January 2006) (n = 5,706). RESULTS: Mean WTs of Canadian Triage Acuity Scale (CTAS) 4 patients decreased by 22 min (95% CI 21 min to 24 min, P < 0.001). Similarly, mean WTs of CTAS 5 patients decreased by 28 min (95% CI 19 min to 37 min, P < 0.001) post FTA. The mean WTs of urgent patients (CTAS 2\\/3) were also significantly reduced after the FTA was opened (P < 0.001). The LWBS rate was reduced from 4.7% to 0.7% (95% CI 3.37 to 4.64; P < 0.001). Opening a FTA had no significant impact on mortality rates (P = 0.88). CONCLUSION: The FTA improved ED effectiveness (WTs and LOS) and quality measures (LWBS rates) whereas mortality rate remained unchanged.

  14. Neurological outcome of newborns with neonatal seizures: a cohort study in a tertiary university hospital Prognóstico neurológico de recém nascidos com crises convulsivas: estudo de coorte em hospital terciário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Lahorgue Nunes

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the neurological outcome of newborns with seizures. METHOD: Cohort study with newborns prospectively followed. Perinatal characteristics and etiological screening were related to outcome in a regression model. RESULTS: During the study 3659 newborns were admitted and 2.7% were diagnosed as having seizures. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (51% was the etiology more frequently associated to seizures and also to postneonatal epilepsy (53%. In the follow up 25 died during the acute neonatal illness and 9 during the first years of life, 19 were diagnosed as having post neonatal epilepsy, 35 had developmental delay and 11 an association among this two comorbidities. A significant association between abnormal postnatal EEG and neuroimaging to developmental delay (p=0.014, p=0.026 was observed. The group of newborns that had seizures presented an increased risk of developing epilepsy compared to newborns from the same cohort without seizures (19.3/100 vs. 1.8/100, pOBJETIVO: Avaliar o prognóstico neurológico de neonatos com crises convulsivas. MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo, realizado em coorte de neonatos provenientes de hospital terciário. As características clínicas perinatais e os resultados de exames complementares foram correlacionados com prognóstico através de modelo de regressão logística. RESULTADOS: Durante o estudo 3659 neonatos foram internados, sendo que 101 apresentaram crises convulsivas (2,7%. A encefalopatia hipóxico-isquêmica foi a etiologia mais frequentemente associada às crises (51%. O seguimento evidenciou 25 óbitos no período neonatal e 9 durante os primeiros anos de vida, 19 lactentes desenvolveram epilepsia, 35 atraso no desenvolvimento e 11 associação entre os dois desfechos. O modelo de regressão logística aplicado mostrou associação significativa entre EEG pós neonatal anormal e neuroimagem anormal com atraso no desenvolvimento (p=0,014, p=0,026. Os neonatos em estudo, quando

  15. Neurological examination: pioneering authors and their books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péricles Maranhão-Filho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to highlight some of the most important pioneering books specifically focused on the neurological examination and their authors. During the XIX Century, Alexander Hammond, William Gowers and Charles Mills pioneered the neurological literature, followed in the XX Century by Aloysio de Castro, Monrad-Krohn, Derek Denny-Brown, Robert Wartenberg, Gordon Holmes, and Russel DeJong. With determination and a marked sense of observation and research, they competently developed and spread the technique and art of the neurological exam.

  16. Effect of visceral fat area on outcomes of laparoscopyassisted distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer: subgroup analysis by gender and parameters of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Ji-Eon; Kim, Min-Chan; Kim, Ki-Han; Oh, Jong-Young; Kim, Yoo-Min

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the visceral fat area (VFA) of patients with gastric cancer undergoing laparoscopic surgery on operative outcomes such as number of retrieved lymph nodes (LNs) and operative time. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and the CT scans of 597 patients with gastric cancer who underwent laparoscopy assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) with partial omentectomy and LN dissection (>D1 plus beta). Patients were stratified by gender, VFA, and body mass index (BMI), and the clinicopathologic characteristics and operative outcomes were evaluated. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the effects of VFA and BMI on the number of retrieved LNs and operative time in male and female patients. The mean number of retrieved LNs was significantly decreased for both male and female patients with high VFA. The operative time was significantly longer for both male and female patients with high VFA. The number of retrieved LNs had a statistically significant negative correlation with VFA in both men and women, but not with BMI. The operative time had a statistically significant positive correlation with VFA in men, whereas the operative time had a statistically significant positive correlation with BMI in women. The preoperative VFA of male patients with gastric cancer who undergo LADG may affect the number of retrieved LNs and operative time. VFA was more useful than BMI for predicting outcomes of LADG.

  17. NON-TRAUMATIC COMA- INCIDENCE, AETIOLOGY AND OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjun R. Patil

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute non-traumatic coma is one of the most common paediatric emergencies, which arouses much anxiety and apprehension in both parents and physicians. Due to heterogeneity of causes in these patients, prediction of outcome is difficult and unfortunately no single clinical, laboratory or electrophysiological parameters singly predict their outcome. Aetiology of nontraumatic coma varies depending on different geographical area. We have attempted to find the incidence, aetiology and outcome and delineate neurological signs to predict the prognosis in this study. The aim of this study is to study the incidence, aetiology and outcome of non-traumatic coma in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS 100 consecutive cases of non-traumatic coma between 5months and 15 years of age were selected for the study. Clinical signs and findings were recorded at admission (‘0’ Hr and after ‘48’ Hrs. of hospital stay. Aetiology of coma is determined on the basis of clinical history, examination and relevant laboratory investigations by the treating physician. These children were followed up till the death in the hospital or discharged from the hospital. Discharged patients were asked for followup after 4 weeks. During this period, all of them were evaluated by formal neurological examination and for special sensory involvement. The neurological outcomes were categorised into 6 groups (I-VI based on the severity of neurological involvement. Chisquare test was applied to determine the predictors of outcome. RESULTS 1. The incidence of non-traumatic coma in our hospital based study was 8.02% of all paediatric admissions and 21.64% of all PICU admissions. 2. CNS infections contributed the majority (58% of cases. (Dengue encephalitis-28%, viral encephalitis-12%, TB meningitis-8%, pyogenic meningitis- 6%, Shigella encephalopathy-3% and cerebral malaria-1%. 3. Other non-infectious aetiologies were toxic and metabolic group- 21%, post status epilepticus- 9

  18. Music therapy in neurological rehabilitation settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galińska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The neurologic music therapy is a new scope of music therapy. Its techniques deal with dysfunctions resulting from diseases of the human nervous system. Music can be used as an alternative modality to access functions unavailable through non-musical stimulus. Processes in the brain activated by the influence of music can be generalized and transferred to non-musical functions. Therefore, in clinical practice, the translation of non-musical therapeutic exercises into analogous, isomorphic musical exercises is performed. They make use of the executive peculiarity of musical instruments and musical structures to prime, cue and coordinate movements. Among musical components, a repetitive rhythm plays a significant role. It regulates physiologic and behavioural functions through the mechanism of entrainment (synchronization of biological rhythms with musical rhythm based on acoustic resonance). It is especially relevant for patients with a deficient internal timing system in the brain. Additionally, regular rhythmic patterns facilitate memory encoding and decoding of non-musical information hence music is an efficient mnemonic tool. The music as a hierarchical, compound language of time, with its unique ability to access affective/motivational systems in the brain, provides time structures enhancing perception processes, mainly in the range of cognition, language and motor learning. It allows for emotional expression and improvement of the motivation for rehabilitation activities. The new technologies of rhythmic sensory stimulation (i.e. Binaural Beat Stimulation) or rhythmic music in combination with rhythmic light therapy appear. This multimodal forms of stimulation are used in the treatment of stroke, brain injury, dementia and other cognitive deficits. Clinical outcome studies provide evidence of the significant superiority of rehabilitation with music over the one without music.

  19. Neurologic complications of shoulder joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Craig M

    2017-07-05

    Little attention has been given to neurologic complications after shoulder joint replacement (SJR). Previously thought to occur infrequently, it is likely that many are not clinically recognized, and they can result in postoperative morbidity and impair the patient's recovery. The purpose of this study was to document the prevalence of nerve complications after SJR, to identify the nerves involved, and to define patient outcomes. This was a retrospective review of 211 SJRs in 202 patients during a 5-year period were included, with 89 male and 122 female patients at an average age of 70 years. All patients underwent a comprehensive analysis of any postoperative nerve complication, including onset, duration, investigation, treatment, and symptom resolution. Of the 211 SJR procedures, 44 were identified as having sustained a nerve complication (20.9%), with 36 female (81.8%) and 8 male patients (18.2%). Reverse SJR was associated with the highest number of nerve complications. The median nerve (25 patients) and musculocutaneous nerve (8 patients) were most commonly involved. Most nerve complications were transient and resolved within 6 months. Permanent sequelae and injuries that required secondary surgical intervention were rare. The occurrence of nerve complications after SJR is common, but almost all will fully recover. Most are transient neurapraxias involving the lateral cord of the brachial plexus. Women are more likely to be affected, as are patients who have undergone prior surgery to the affected shoulder. Most are likely to be the result of excessive traction or direct injury to the nerves during glenoid exposure. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neurological AdverseEffects after Radiation Therapyfor Stage II Seminoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv Ebbeskov Lauritsen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We report 3 cases of patients with testicular cancer and stage II seminoma who developed neurological symptoms with bilateral leg weakness about 4 to 9 months after radiation therapy (RT. They all received RT to the para-aortic lymph nodes with a total dose of 40 Gy (36 Gy + 4 Gy as a boost against the tumour bed with a conventional fractionation of2 Gy/day, 5 days per week. RT was applied as hockey-stick portals, also called L-fields. In 2 cases, the symptoms fully resolved. Therapeutic irradiation can cause significant injury to the peripheral nerves of the lumbosacral plexus and/or to the spinal cord. RT is believed to produce plexus injury by both direct toxic effects and secondary microinfarction of the nerves, but the exact pathophysiology of RT-induced injury is unclear. Since reported studies of radiation-induced neurological adverse effects are limited, it is difficult to estimate their frequency and outcome. The treatment of neurological symptoms due to RT is symptomatic.

  1. Improved Neuropsychological and Neurological Functioning Across Three Antiretroviral Regimens in Diverse Resource-Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5199, the International Neurological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K.; Jiang, H.; Kumwenda, J.; Supparatpinyo, K.; Evans, S.; Campbell, T. B.; Price, R.; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N.; La Rosa, A.; Santos, B.; Silva, M. T.; Montano, S.; Kanyama, C.; Faesen, S.; Murphy, R.; Hall, C.; Marra, C. M.; Marcus, C.; Berzins, B.; Allen, R.; Housseinipour, M.; Amod, F.; Sanne, I.; Hakim, J.; Walawander, A.; Nair, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) A5199 compared the neurological and neuropsychological (NP) effects of 3 antiretroviral regimens in participants infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in resource-limited settings. Methods. Participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand, and Zimbabwe were randomized to 3 antiretroviral treatment arms: A (lamivudine-zidovudine plus efavirenz, n = 289), B (atazanavir, emtricitabine, and didanosine-EC, n = 293), and C (emtricitabine-tenofovir-disoproxil fumarate plus efavirenz, n = 278) as part of the ACTG PEARLS study (A5175). Standardized neurological and neuropsychological (NP) screening examinations (grooved pegboard, timed gait, semantic verbal fluency, and finger tapping) were administered every 24 weeks from February 2006 to May 2010. Associations with neurological and neuropsychological function were estimated from linear and logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations. Results. The median weeks on study was 168 (Q1 = 96, Q3 = 192) for the 860 participants. NP test scores improved (P  .10). Significant country effects were noted on all NP tests and neurological outcomes (P < .01). Conclusions. The study detected no significant differences in neuropsychological and neurological outcomes between randomized ART regimens. Significant improvement occurred in neurocognitive and neurological functioning over time after initiation of ARTs. The etiology of these improvements is likely multifactorial, reflecting reduced central nervous system HIV infection, better general health, and practice effects. This study suggests that treatment with either of the World Health Organization –recommended first-line antiretroviral regimens in resource-limited settings will improve neuropsychological functioning and reduce neurological dysfunction. Clinical trials registration.  NCT00096824. PMID:22661489

  2. Neurological injuries and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: the challenge of the new ECMO era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martucci, Gennaro; Lo Re, Vincenzina; Arcadipane, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life-saving mechanical respiratory and/or circulatory support for potentially reversible severe heart or respiratory injury untreatable with conventional therapies. Thanks to the technical and management improvements the use of ECMO has increased dramatically in the last few years. Data in the literature show a progressive increase in the overall outcome. Considering the improving survival rate of patients on ECMO, and the catastrophic effect of neurological injuries in such patients, the topic of neurological damage during the ICU stay in ECMO is gaining importance. We present a case series of six neurological injuries that occurred in 1 year during the ECMO run or after the ECMO weaning. In each case the neurological complication had a dramatic effect: ranging from brain death to prolonged ICU stay and long term disability. This case series has an informative impact for the multidisciplinary teams treating ECMO patients because of its heterogeneity in pathogenesis and clinical manifestation: cerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke due to cerebral fat embolism, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis due to H1N1 Influenza. In our ECMO hub we started strict neurological monitoring involving intensivists, a neurologist and our radiology service, but neurological complications are still an insidious diagnosis and treatment. Considering several possible neurological injuries may help reduce delay in diagnosis and speed rehabilitation.

  3. Mobilization of patients in neurological Intensive Care Units of India: A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Anup; Chakravarthy, Kalyana; Rao, Bhamini K

    2016-06-01

    The rehabilitation needs of the patients in neurological Intensive Care Units (ICUs) vary from that of a medical ICU patient. Early mobilization is known to improve the various neurological outcomes in patients admitted to neurological ICUs, although little is known about the practice pattern among physiotherapists. The mobilization practice pattern may vary significantly than that of developed countries due to the reasons of differences in training of professionals, availability of equipment, and financial assistance by health insurance. To study the current mobilization practices by the physiotherapists in neurological ICUs of India. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a content validated questionnaire about the mobilization practices. Online questionnaire was distributed to physiotherapists working in neurological ICUs of India. Descriptive statistics were used. Out of 185 e-mails sent, 82 physiotherapists completed the survey (survey response rate = 44%). Eighty participants (97.6%) mentioned that the patients received some form of mobilization during the day. The majority of the physiotherapists (58.5%), "always" provided bed mobility exercises to their patients when it was found appropriate for the patients. Many physiotherapists (41.5%) used tilt table "sometimes" to introduce orthostatism for their patients. Mobilization in various forms is being practiced in the neurological ICUs of India. However, fewer mobilization sessions are conducted on weekends and night hours in Indian Neurological ICUs.

  4. Education research: a case-based bioethics curriculum for neurology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolchin, Benjamin; Willey, Joshua Z; Prager, Kenneth

    2015-03-31

    In 2012, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) updated and expanded its ethics curriculum into Practical Ethics in Clinical Neurology, a case-based ethics curriculum for neurologists. We piloted a case-based bioethics curriculum for neurology residents using the framework and topics recommended by the AAN, matched to clinical cases drawn from Columbia's neurologic services. Our primary outcome was residents' ability to analyze and manage ethically complex cases as measured on precurriculum and postcurriculum multiple-choice quizzes. Secondary outcomes included precurriculum and postcurriculum self-assessed comfort in discussing and managing ethically complex cases, as well as attendance at ethics discussion sessions as compared to attendance at other didactic sessions. Resident performance on quizzes improved from 75.8% to 86.7% (p = 0.02). Comfort in discussing ethically complex cases improved from 6.4 to 7.4 on a 10-point scale (p = 0.03). Comfort in managing such cases trended toward improvement but did not reach statistical significance. Attendance was significantly better at ethics discussions (73.5%) than at other didactic sessions (61.7%, p = 0.04). Our formal case-based ethics curriculum for neurology residents, based on core topics drawn from the AAN's published curricula, was successfully piloted. Our study showed a statistically significant improvement in residents' ability to analyze and manage ethically complex cases as measured by multiple-choice tests and self-assessments. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Neurological melioidosis in Norway presenting with a cerebral abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv Hesstvedt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological melioidosis is a rare condition, as less than 30 cases have been reported in the last 50 years. We present a case of neurological melioidosis, presenting with a cerebral abscess in a returning traveler from an endemic area. While traveling in Cambodia on holiday, the patient was admitted to local hospital for pneumonia. Her condition improved after antimicrobial treatment, and she returned to Norway when discharged. The patient had several contacts with the health care system after returning to Norway, due to recurrent fever and deterioration. Short-term antimicrobial treatment was given with temporary improvement in her condition. Eventually she developed stroke-like symptoms, and a cerebral abscess was found. Cultures from the abscess were positive for Burkholderia pseudomallei and the treatment was adjusted accordingly.

  6. LEARNERS SATISFACTION FACTORS IN NEUROLOGY RELATED MOOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionela MANIU

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to investigate the factors that are influencing student satisfaction in case of neurology related massive open online courses (MOOCs. We analyzed data collected from learners enrolled in 40 neurology related MOOCs, by manually looking for information in these courses reviews. The main identified satisfaction factors can be grouped into the following categories: content related factors: course content, additional materials, assignments, external research and teaching - learning related factors (teacher presentation techniques / style: engaging, clear, coherent, knowledgeable, sharing / explanation, interactive, excitement, considering student’s needs, inspiring, sense of humor. Competences, skills and objectives pursued by neurology related MOOCs are also discussed. Analyzing these factors can be useful in new courses management (design and implementation and also in understanding the needs (motivation, behaviors, perception of 21st century learners interested in neurology related fields.

  7. [Voice disorders caused by neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, J; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Mate, M A; Cobeta, I

    To review voice disorders in neurological diseases, with special emphasis to acoustic analysis. In the first part of this article we describe data regarding neural control of voice, physiology of phonation, and examination of the patient with voice disturbances, including the use of voice laboratory, acoustic analysis fundamentals, phonetometric measures and aerodynamic measures. In the second part, we review the voice disturbances associated to neurological diseases, emphasizing into movement disorders (specially Parkinson s disease, essential tremor, and spasmodic dysphonia). A number of neurological diseases causing alterations of corticospinal pathway, cerebellum, basal ganglia and upper and/or lower motoneurons can induce voice disturbances. Voice examination using ear, nose & throat examination, endoscopy and videorecording of laryngeal movements, acoustic analysis, elecroglottography, laryngeal electromyography, and aerodynamic measures, could be useful in the clinical examination of some neurological diseases.

  8. Axon guidance proteins in neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Battum, Eljo Y.; Brignani, Sara; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/197768814

    2015-01-01

    Many neurological disorders are characterised by structural changes in neuronal connections, ranging from presymptomatic synaptic changes to the loss or rewiring of entire axon bundles. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this perturbed connectivity are poorly understood, but recent studies

  9. Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gano, Lindsey B; Patel, Manisha; Rho, Jong M

    2014-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a broad-spectrum therapy for medically intractable epilepsy and is receiving growing attention as a potential treatment for neurological disorders arising in part from bioenergetic dysregulation...

  10. Transient Neurological Symptoms after Spinal Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Hatipoglu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine has been used for more than 50 years for spinal anesthesia and has a remarkable safety record. In 1993, a new adverse effect, transient neurologic toxicity was described in patients recovering from spinal anesthesia with lidocaine. Transient neurological symptoms have been defined as pain in the lower extremities (buttocks, thighs and legs after an uncomplicated spinal anesthesia and after an initial full recovery during the immediate postoperative period (less than 24 h. The incidence of transient neurological symptoms reported in prospective, randomized trials varies from 4% to 37%. The etiology of transient neurological symptoms remains unkonwn. Despite the transient nature of this syndrome, it has proven to be difficult to treat effectively. Drug or some interventional therapy may be necessary. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 33-44

  11. Severe hypernatremia: survival without neurologic sequelae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borrego Domínguez, R R; Imaz Roncero, A; López-Herce Cid, J; Seriñá Ramírez, C

    2003-01-01

    .... She had a convulsive crisis without subsequent neurologic impairment. The second patient, a 3-year-old girl with pseudohypoaldosteronism type I and encephalopathy, had hypernatremia (203 mEq/l...

  12. Diabetic cachectic neuropathy: An uncommon neurological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    access article is distributed under. Creative Commons licence CC-BY-NC 4.0. CASE REPORT. Diabetic cachectic neuropathy: An uncommon neurological complication of diabetes. A Iyagba, MBBS, FWACP, FMCP; A Onwuchekwa, MBBS, FMCP.

  13. Neurological Complications Of Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia: Any ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , of the neurological deficits complicating chronic myeloid leukaemia. Method: Using patients\\' case folders and haematological malignancy register all cases of chronic myeloid leukaemia seen in Jos University Teaching Hospital between July ...

  14. Dermatology referrals in a neurological set up

    OpenAIRE

    Deeptara Pathak Thapa; Amit Thapa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Dermatology is a specialty, which not only deals with dermatological problems with outpatient but also inpatients referrals. The importances of Dermatologist in hospital setting are rising due to changing condition of medical care. Since no peer-reviewed articles are available for dermatological problems in a neurological set up, we conducted this study to know about pattern of skin disorders in neurological patients. Material and Methods: The present study was a prospectiv...

  15. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS IN NEUROLOGY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les principaux diagnostics étaient: un Accident vasculaire cérébral (42,1%), un abcès cérébral (17,9%) et une méningo-encéphalite (ME) dans 11,9%. ... Death risk was in the one hand higher for neurological infectious than for stroke and in the second hand higher for neurological infectious than for all other diseases.

  16. [The attitudes and behavior of the general primary-care physician towards the neurological patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabella Abril, B; Pérez Sánchez, J

    1995-04-15

    1) To find the opinion of general practitioners working in primary care (GP in PC) regarding how they deal with neurological patients. 2) To find the effect on this question of intern training in family and community medicine (FCM). A survey filled out by a representative sample of GP in PC working at PC public clinics in 1991 in a health region in Catalonia. 56 GP in PC. A self-administered selection questionnaire (multiple choice and scale of 5 points). MEASUREMENTS, MAIN RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Less confidence handling neurological patients than patients with other common medical conditions. Greater need for recycling in neurology than in other basic areas of medicine. Positive impact of FCM intern training on doctors' approach to the examination of neurological patients and application of basic exploratory techniques (ophthalmoscope, reflex hammer, diapason and phonendoscope). The GP intern-trained in FCM lacks confidence in present out-patient specialised support (the area neuropsychiatrist).

  17. Supratentorial cavernous malformations in eloquent and deep locations: surgical approaches and outcomes. Clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Edward F; Gabriel, Rodney A; Potts, Matthew B; Berger, Mitchel S; Lawton, Michael T

    2011-03-01

    Resection of cavernous malformations (CMs) located in functionally eloquent areas of the supratentorial compartment is controversial. Hemorrhage from untreated lesions can result in devastating neurological injury, but surgery has potentially serious risks. We hypothesized that an organized system of approaches can guide operative planning and lead to acceptable neurological outcomes in surgical patients. The authors reviewed the presentation, surgery, and outcomes of 79 consecutive patients who underwent microresection of supratentorial CMs in eloquent and deep brain regions (basal ganglia [in 27 patients], sensorimotor cortex [in 23], language cortex [in 3], thalamus [in 6], visual cortex [in 10], and corpus callosum [in 10]). A total of 13 different microsurgical approaches were organized into 4 groups: superficial, lateral transsylvian, medial interhemispheric, and posterior approaches. The majority of patients (93.7%) were symptomatic. Hemorrhage with resulting focal neurological deficit was the most common presentation in 53 patients (67%). Complete resection, as determined by postoperative MR imaging, was achieved in 76 patients (96.2%). Overall, the functional neurological status of patients improved after microsurgical dissection at the time of discharge from the hospital and at follow-up. At 6 months, 64 patients (81.0%) were improved relative to their preoperative condition and 14 patients (17.7%) were unchanged. Good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale score ≤ 2, living independently) were achieved in 77 patients (97.4%). Multivariate analysis of demographic and surgical factors revealed that preoperative functional status was the only predictor of postoperative modified Rankin Scale score (OR 4.6, p = 0.001). Six patients (7.6%) had transient worsening of neurological examination after surgery, and 1 patient (1.3%) was permanently worse. There was no surgical mortality. The authors present a system of 13 microsurgical approaches to 6 location targets

  18. Adult Hip Flexion Contracture due to Neurological Disease: A New Treatment Protocol—Surgical Treatment of Neurological Hip Flexion Contracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Nicodemo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital, traumatic, or extrinsic causes can lead people to paraplegia; some of these are potentially; reversible and others are not. Paraplegia can couse hip flexion contracture and, consequently, pressure sores, scoliosis, and hyperlordosis; lumbar and groin pain are strictly correlated. Scientific literature contains many studies about children hip flexion related to neurological diseases, mainly caused by cerebral palsy; only few papers focus on this complication in adults. In this study we report our experience on surgical treatment of adult hip flexion contracture due to neurological diseases; we have tried to outline an algorithm to choose the best treatment avoiding useless or too aggressive therapies. We present 5 cases of adult hips flexion due to neurological conditions treated following our algorithm. At 1-year-follow-up all patients had a good clinical outcome in terms of hip range of motion, pain and recovery of walking if possible. In conclusion we think that this algorithm could be a good guideline to treat these complex cases even if we need to treat more patients to confirm this theory. We believe also that postoperation physiotherapy it is useful in hip motility preservation, improvement of muscular function, and walking ability recovery when possible.

  19. Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease may initially present as a neurological disorder. Alternatively, celiac disease may be complicated by neurological changes. With impaired nutrient absorption, different deficiency syndromes may occur and these may be manifested clinically with neurological changes. However, in patients with deficiency syndromes, extensive involvement of the small intestine with celiac disease is often evident. There are a number of reports of celiac disease associated with neuropathy, ataxia, dementia and seizure disorder. In these reports, there is no clear relationship with nutrient deficiency and a precise mechanism for the neurological changes has not been defined. A small number of patients have been reported to have responded to vitamin E administration, but most do not. In some, gluten antibodies have also been described, especially in those with ataxia, but a consistent response to a gluten-free diet has not been defined. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with unexplained neurological disorders, including ataxia and dementia. Further studies are needed, however, to determine if a gluten-free diet will lead to improvement in the associated neurological disorder.

  20. EEG in Sarcoidosis Patients Without Neurological Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin Topçuoğlu, Özgür; Kavas, Murat; Öztaş, Selahattin; Arınç, Sibel; Afşar, Gülgün; Saraç, Sema; Midi, İpek

    2017-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease affecting nervous system in 5% to 10% of patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is accepted as the most sensitive method for detecting neurosarcoidosis. However, the most common findings in MRI are the nonspecific white matter lesions, which may be unrelated to sarcoidosis and can occur because of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and other inflammatory or infectious disorders, as well. Autopsy studies report more frequent neurological involvement than the ante mortem studies. The aim of this study is to assess electroencephalography (EEG) in sarcoidosis patients without neurological findings in order to display asymptomatic neurological dysfunction. We performed EEG on 30 sarcoidosis patients without diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis or prior neurological comorbidities. Fourteen patients (46.7%) showed intermittant focal and/or generalized slowings while awake and not mentally activated. Seven (50%) of these 14 patients with EEG slowings had nonspecific white matter changes while the other half showed EEG slowings in the absence of MRI changes. We conclude that EEG slowings, when normal variants (psychomotor variant, temporal theta of elderly, frontal theta waves) are eliminated, may be an indicator of dysfunction in brain activity even in the absence of MRI findings. Hence, EEG may contribute toward detecting asymptomatic neurological dysfunction or probable future neurological involvement in sarcoidosis patients. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2016.

  1. Neurological manifestations of dengue viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carod-Artal FJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Javier Carod-Artal1,21Neurology Department, Raigmore hospital, Inverness, UK; 2Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Dengue is the most common mosquito-borne viral infection worldwide. There is increased evidence for dengue virus neurotropism, and neurological manifestations could make part of the clinical picture of dengue virus infection in at least 0.5%–7.4% of symptomatic cases. Neurological complications have been classified into dengue virus encephalopathy, dengue virus encephalitis, immune-mediated syndromes (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, myelitis, Guillain–Barré syndrome, neuritis brachialis, acute cerebellitis, and others, neuromuscular complications (hypokalemic paralysis, transient benign muscle dysfunction and myositis, and dengue-associated stroke. Common neuro-ophthalmic complications are maculopathy and retinal vasculopathy. Pathogenic mechanisms include systemic complications and metabolic disturbances resulting in encephalopathy, direct effect of the virus provoking encephalitis, and postinfectious immune mechanisms causing immune-mediated syndromes. Dengue viruses should be considered as a cause of neurological disorders in endemic regions. Standardized case definitions for specific neurological complications are still needed. Keywords: encephalitis, encephalopathy, dengue fever, neurological complications

  2. Childhood acute bacterial meningitis: risk factors for acute neurological complications and neurological sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniuk, Sérgio A; Hamdar, Fátima; Ducci, Renata D; Kira, Ariane T F; Cat, Mônica N L; Cruz, Cristina R da

    2011-01-01

    To assess acute neurological complications and neurological sequelae of childhood acute bacterial meningitis in order to determine possible warning signs. This retrospective study evaluated children with acute bacterial meningitis (between 1 month and 14 years of age) admitted between 2003 and 2006. Of the 44 patients studied, 17 (38.6%) had acute neurological complications. Seizure was the most frequent (31.8%) complication. Patients with acute neurological complications showed a higher frequency of lower neutrophil count (p = 0.03), seizure at admission (p 200 mg/dL (p < 0.01), and cerebrospinal fluid glucose concentration/glycemia ratio (p < 0.01) were identified as risk variables for sequelae. Neutrophil count < 60%, seizure at admission, and S. pneumoniae as the etiologic agent were identified as warning signs for acute neurological complications, while protein levels, cerebrospinal fluid glucose concentration/glycemia ratio, and seizure at admission were seen as risk factors for neurological sequelae.

  3. Effects of music and music therapy on mood in neurological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raglio, Alfredo; Attardo, Lapo; Gontero, Giulia; Rollino, Silvia; Groppo, Elisabetta; Granieri, Enrico

    2015-03-22

    Mood disorder and depressive syndromes represent a common comorbid condition in neurological disorders with a prevalence rate that ranges between 20% and 50% of patients with stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Notwithstanding, these conditions are often under-diagnosed and under-treated in the clinical practice and negatively affect the functional recovery, the adherence to treatment, the quality of life, and even the mortality risk. In addition, a bidirectional association between depression and neurological disorders may be possible being that depressive syndromes may be considered as a risk factor for certain neurological diseases. Despite the large amount of evidence regarding the effects of music therapy (MT) and other musical interventions on different aspects of neurological disorders, no updated article reviewing outcomes such as mood, emotions, depression, activity of daily living and so on is actually available; for this reason, little is known about the effectiveness of music and MT on these important outcomes in neurological patients. The aim of this article is to provide a narrative review of the current literature on musical interventions and their effects on mood and depression in patients with neurological disorders. Searching on PubMed and PsycInfo databases, 25 studies corresponding to the inclusion criteria have been selected; 11 of them assess the effects of music or MT in Dementia, 9 explore the efficacy on patients with Stroke, and 5 regard other neurological diseases like Multiple Sclerosis, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/motor neuron disease, Chronic quadriplegia, Parkinson's Disease, and Acquired Brain dysfunctions. Selected studies are based on relational and rehabilitative music therapy approaches or concern music listening interventions. Most of the studies support the efficacy of MT and other musical interventions on mood, depressive syndromes, and quality of life on neurological patients.

  4. Consequences of neurologic lesions assessed by Barthel Index after Botox® injection may be underestimated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionyssiotis Y

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Y Dionyssiotis,1,2 D Kiourtidis,3 A Karvouni,3 A Kaliontzoglou,3 I Kliafas31Medical Department, Rehabilitation Center Amyntaio, General Hospital of Florina, Amyntaio, Florina, 2Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department, Rhodes General Hospital, Rhodes, Dodecanese, 3Neurologic Department, Rhodes General Hospital, Rhodes, Dodecanese, GreecePurpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the consequences of neurologic lesions are underestimated when the Barthel Index (BI is used to assess the clinical outcome of botulinum toxin injection.Patients and methods: The records for all in- and outpatients with various neurologic lesions (stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, and so forth who had been referred to the authors’ departments and who had received botulinum toxin type A (Botox® for spasticity within a 4-year period (2008–2011 were examined retrospectively. BI data were collected and analyzed.Results: The BI score was found to have increased in follow-up assessments (P = 0.048. No correlation was found between the degree of spasticity and the BI score.Conclusion: The specific injection of Botox in patients with neurologic lesions was not strongly correlated with a significant functional outcome according to the BI. The results of this study suggest that clinicians need to look at other measurement scales for the assessment of significant outcomes of Botox in the rehabilitation process after neurologic lesions.Keywords: botulinum toxin type A, spasticity, stroke, multiple sclerosis

  5. Neurology in a globalizing world: World Congress of Neurology, Vienna, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinski, Vladimir

    2013-06-11

    The World Congress of Neurology (figure 1) theme "Neurology in a Globalizing World" acknowledges that science and increasingly medicine and neurology are becoming globalized. The best way to manage change is to shape it. It is becoming increasingly clear that brain diseases, particularly stroke and dementia, are projected to rise at a rate that could overwhelm our clinics and hospitals. Hence a new emphasis on prevention and the need to work across disciplines beyond our traditional roles. Neurologists are the guardians of the brain and need to take the lead role in advancing new approaches in stemming the tide of neurologic diseases.

  6. What is the Future of Pediatric Neurology in Canada? Resident and Faculty Perceptions of Training and Workforce Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doja, Asif; Clarkin, Chantalle; Whiting, Sharon; Moharir, Mahendranath

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric neurology trainee numbers have grown considerably in Canada; recent research, however, has shown that the number of pediatric neurology graduates is outpacing the need for future pediatric neurologists. The purpose of this study was to seek the opinion of pediatric neurology program directors and trainees regarding possible solutions for this issue. Two focus groups were convened during the Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation annual congress in June 2012; one consisted of current and former program directors, and the other of current pediatric neurology trainees. Groups were asked for their perceptions regarding child neurology manpower issues in Canada as well as possible solutions. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed for analysis. Theme-based qualitative analysis was used to analyze the transcripts. Major themes emerging from both focus groups included the emphasis on community pediatric neurology as a viable option for trainees, including the need for community mentors; recognizing the needs of underserviced areas; and establishing academic positions for community preceptors. The need for career mentoring and support structures during residency training was another major theme which arose. Program directors and trainees also gave examples of ways to reduce the current oversupply of trainees in Canada, including limiting the number of trainees entering programs, as well as creating a long-term vision of child neurology in Canada. A nationwide dialogue to discuss the supply and demand of manpower in academic and community pediatric neurology is essential. Career guidance options for pediatric neurology trainees across the country merit further strengthening.

  7. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Tibor; Schwarcz, Attila; Horváth, Réka A; Barsi, Péter; Janszky, József

    2008-01-30

    The present contribution discusses the clinical use of functional MRI (fMRI) and its role in the most common neurological diseases. FMRI was found a reliable and reproducible examination tool resulting in a wide distribution of fMRI methods in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy in determining the relationship of eloquent areas and the epileptic focus. Preliminary data suggest that fMRI using memory paradigms can predict the postoperative memory decline in epilepsy surgery by determining whether a reorganization of memory functions took place. Speech-activated fMRI became the most used tool in determining hemispheric dominance. Visual and sensory-motor cortex can also be routinely investigated by fMRI which helps in decision on epilepsy surgery. FMRI combined with EEG is a new diagnostic tool in epilepsy and sleep disorders. FMRI can identify the penumbra after stroke and can provide an additional information on metabolic state of the threatened brain tissue. FMRI has a predictive role in post-stroke recovery. In relapsing-remitting MS an adaptive reorganization can be demonstrated by fMRI affecting the visual, motor, and memory systems, despite preserved functional performance. Much more extensive reorganization can be demonstrated in secondary progressive MS. These findings suggest that the different stages of MS are related to different stages of the reorganization and MS becomes progressive when there is no more reserve capacity in the brain for reorganization. FMRI offers the capability of detecting early functional hemodynamic alterations in Alzheimer's disease before morphological changes. FMRI can be a valuable tool to test and monitor treatment efficacy in AD. FMRI can also provide information about the mechanisms of different therapeutic approaches in Parkinson disorder including drug treatment and deep brain stimulation.

  8. When to write a neurology case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rison, Richard A; Shepphird, Jennifer Kelly; Beydoun, Said R

    2016-04-06

    Case report publication has seen a resurgence in recent years as awareness of the value of case reports in clinical medicine has grown. Not all areas of medical research are amenable to large clinical trials. Many topics are better addressed by more detailed descriptions of multi-factorial components that contribute to outcomes, and these are areas where case reports shine. Determining the suitability of a case for publication requires background research and discussion. Writing a case or series reinforces many aspects of the medical training process, and house staff are encouraged to research, write, and submit reports. The medical community benefits in many ways from case reports, from improving individual patient care to guiding future research directions.

  9. Status of neurology medical school education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imran I.; Isaacson, Richard S.; Safdieh, Joseph E.; Finney, Glen R.; Sowell, Michael K.; Sam, Maria C.; Anderson, Heather S.; Shin, Robert K.; Kraakevik, Jeff A.; Coleman, Mary; Drogan, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To survey all US medical school clerkship directors (CDs) in neurology and to compare results from a similar survey in 2005. Methods: A survey was developed by a work group of the American Academy of Neurology Undergraduate Education Subcommittee, and sent to all neurology CDs listed in the American Academy of Neurology database. Comparisons were made to a similar 2005 survey. Results: Survey response rate was 73%. Neurology was required in 93% of responding schools. Duration of clerkships was 4 weeks in 74% and 3 weeks in 11%. Clerkships were taken in the third year in 56%, third or fourth year in 19%, and fourth year in 12%. Clerkship duration in 2012 was slightly shorter than in 2005 (fewer clerkships of ≥4 weeks, p = 0.125), but more clerkships have moved into the third year (fewer neurology clerkships during the fourth year, p = 0.051). Simulation training in lumbar punctures was available at 44% of schools, but only 2% of students attempted lumbar punctures on patients. CDs averaged 20% protected time, but reported that they needed at least 32%. Secretarial full-time equivalent was 0.50 or less in 71% of clerkships. Eighty-five percent of CDs were “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied,” but more than half experienced “burnout” and 35% had considered relinquishing their role. Conclusion: Trends in neurology undergraduate education since 2005 include shorter clerkships, migration into the third year, and increasing use of technology. CDs are generally satisfied, but report stressors, including inadequate protected time and departmental support. PMID:25305155

  10. Long-term psychological outcomes of flood survivors of hard-hit areas of the 1998 Dongting Lake flood in China: Prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wenjie; Kaminga, Atipatsa C; Tan, Hongzhuan; Wang, Jieru; Lai, Zhiwei; Wu, Xin; Liu, Aizhong

    2017-01-01

    Although numerous studies have indicated that exposure to natural disasters may increase survivors' risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety, studies focusing on the long-term psychological outcomes of flood survivors are limited. Thus, this study aimed to estimate the prevalence of PTSD and anxiety among flood survivors 17 years after the 1998 Dongting Lake flood and to identify the risk factors for PTSD and anxiety. This cross-sectional study was conducted in December 2015, 17 years after the 1998 Dongting Lake flood. Survivors in hard-hit areas of the flood disaster were enrolled in this study using a stratified, systematic random sampling method. Well qualified investigators conducted face-to-face interviews with participants using the PTSD Checklist-Civilian version, the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale, the Chinese version of the Social Support Rating Scale and the Revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Short Scale for Chinese to assess PTSD, anxiety, social support and personality traits, respectively. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with PTSD and anxiety. A total of 325 participants were recruited in this study, and the prevalence of PTSD and anxiety was 9.5% and 9.2%, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression analyses indicated that female sex, experiencing at least three flood-related stressors, having a low level of social support, and having the trait of emotional instability were risk factors for long-term adverse psychological outcomes among flood survivors after the disaster. PTSD and anxiety were common long-term adverse psychological outcomes among flood survivors. Early and effective psychological interventions for flood survivors are needed to prevent the development of PTSD and anxiety in the long run after a flood, especially for individuals who are female, experience at least three flood-related stressors, have a low level of social support and have the trait of emotional

  11. Opsoclonus-ataxia caused by childhood neuroblastoma: developmental and neurologic sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Wendy G; Davalos-Gonzalez, Yolanda; Brumm, Virdette L; Aller, Sonia K; Burger, Elvira; Turkel, Susan B; Borchert, Mark S; Hollar, Susan; Padilla, Sonia

    2002-01-01

    Opsoclonus-ataxia, also called "dancing eye syndrome," is a serious neurologic condition that is often a paraneoplastic manifestation of occult neuroblastoma in early childhood. Despite resection of tumor and immunosuppressive therapy, outcome generally includes significant developmental and behavioral sequelae. There is controversy about how treatment alters outcome. The goals of this study were to understand the ongoing neurologic and developmental deficits of children who are treated for opsoclonus-ataxia with associated neuroblastoma; to relate treatment history to outcome; and to quantify objectively the acute changes in motor function, speech, mood, and behavior related to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment. Patients were children with opsoclonus-ataxia caused by neuroblastoma, regardless of interval since diagnosis. Records were reviewed, and children underwent comprehensive evaluations, including neurologic examination and tests of cognitive and adaptive function, speech and language, and fine and gross motor abilities. Psychiatric interview and questionnaires were used to assess current and previous behavior. In 6 children, a videotaped standardized examination of eye movements was performed. Additional examinations were performed immediately before and 2 to 3 days after treatment with IVIg in 5 children. Seventeen children, ages 1.75 to 12.62 years, were examined. All had a stage I or II neuroblastoma resected 3 months to 11 years previously. None received any other treatment for the tumor. All but 1 had received at least 1 year of either oral corticosteroids or corticotropin (ACTH); 12 had received 1 or more courses of IVIg, 2 g/kg. Three had received other immunosuppressive treatment, including cyclophosphamide. Cognitive development and adaptive behavior were delayed or abnormal in nearly all children. Expressive language was more impaired than receptive language. Speech was impaired, including both intelligibility and overall output. Fine and

  12. Comparison of the outcome of silicone Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation with a surface area between 96 and 184 mm² in adult eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyung Min; Hwang, Young Hoon; Jung, Jong Jin; Sohn, Yong Ho; Kim, Hwang Ki

    2013-10-01

    To compare the success rates, complications, and visual outcomes between silicone Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation with 96 mm(2) (FP8) or 184 mm(2) (FP7) surface areas. This study is a retrospective review of the records from 132 adult patients (134 eyes) that underwent silicone AGV implant surgery. Among them, the outcomes of 24 eyes from 24 patients with refractory glaucoma who underwent FP8 AGV implantation were compared with 76 eyes from 76 patients who underwent FP7 AGV implantation. Preoperative and postoperative data, including intraocular pressure (IOP), visual acuity, number of medications, and complications were compared between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the 2 groups (p > 0.05). The postoperative visual acuity of the patients in the FP8 group was better than that of the patients in the FP7 group in some early postoperative periods (p 0.05). Postoperative IOP was not significantly different between the 2 groups (p > 0.05) except for IOP on postoperative day 1 (11.42 mmHg for the FP7 group and 7.42 mmHg for the FP8 group; p = 0.031). There was no statistical difference in success rates, final IOP, number of medications, or complication rates between the 2 groups (p > 0.05). The FP7 and FP8 AGV implants showed no difference in terms of vision preservation, IOP reduction, and number of glaucoma medications required.

  13. [Early prediction of the neurological result at 12 months in newborns at neurological risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbón, F; Garibotti, G; Moguilevsky, J

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Amiel-Tison neurological examination (AT) and cranial ultrasound at term for predicting the neurological result at 12 months in newborns with neurological risk. The study included 89 newborns with high risk of neurological damage, who were discharged from the Neonatal Intensive Care of the Hospital Zonal Bariloche, Argentina. The assessment consisted of a neurological examination and cranial ultrasound at term, and neurological examination and evaluation of development at 12 months. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictor value was calculated. The relationship between perinatal factors and neurodevelopment at 12 month of age was also calculated using logistic regression models. Seventy children completed the follow-up. At 12 months of age, 14% had an abnormal neurological examination, and 17% abnormal development. The neurological examination and the cranial ultrasound at term had low sensitivity to predict abnormal neurodevelopment. At 12 months, 93% of newborns with normal AT showed normal neurological results, and 86% normal development. Among newborns with normal cranial ultrasound the percentages were 90 and 81%, respectively. Among children with three or more perinatal risk factors, the frequency of abnormalities in the neurological response was 5.4 times higher than among those with fewer risk factors, and abnormal development was 3.5 times more frequent. The neurological examination and cranial ultrasound at term had low sensitivity but high negative predictive value for the neurodevelopment at 12 months. Three or more perinatal risk factors were associated with neurodevelopment abnormalities at 12 months of age. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Is there an association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function in older people? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Lisa M; Mills, Kerry; Clarke, Robert; Dangour, Alan D

    2015-08-28

    Low vitamin B12 status is common in older people; however, its public health significance in terms of neurological manifestations remains unclear. The present systematic review evaluated the association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function and clinically relevant neurological outcomes in adults aged 50+ years. A systematic search of nine bibliographic databases (up to March 2013) identified twelve published articles describing two longitudinal and ten cross-sectional analyses. The included study populations ranged in size (n 28-2287) and mean/median age (range 65-81 years). Studies reported various neurological outcomes: nerve function; clinically measured signs and symptoms of nerve function; self-reported neurological symptoms. Studies were assessed for risk of bias, and results were synthesised qualitatively. Among the general population groups of older people, one longitudinal study reported no association, and four of seven cross-sectional studies reported limited evidence of an association of vitamin B12 status with some, but not all, neurological outcomes. Among groups with clinical and/or biochemical evidence of low vitamin B12 status, one longitudinal study reported an association of vitamin B12 status with some, but not all, neurological outcomes and three cross-sectional analyses reported no association. Overall, there is limited evidence from observational studies to suggest an association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function in older people. The heterogeneity and quality of the evidence base preclude more definitive conclusions, and further high-quality research is needed to better inform understanding of public health significance in terms of neurological function of vitamin B12 status in older people.

  15. Standards in Neurological Rehabilitation, June 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Barnes

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS Scientific Panel on Neurorehabilitation established a Task Force on standards in neurological rehabilitation in June 1996. The remit for the Task Force was to: (1 produce a report on the state of neurological rehabilitation across Europe; and (2 recommend standards for the provision of neurological services for disabled people. The main conclusions of the Task Force were as follows: (1 A questionnaire circulated to each European member country has indicated a significant lack of adequate neurological rehabilitation facilities across Europe. Very few countries have any established network of neurological rehabilitation centres. Few countries have adequately trained neurological rehabilitation physicians, therapists or nurses. Such poor facilities should be seen in the context of the large numbers and increasing prevalence of people with neurological disabilities. (2 The Task Force has summarized the significant benefits that can follow from the establishment of a dedicated and cost effective neurological rehabilitation service including functional improvement, reduction of unnecessary complications, better coordination and use of limited resources, improved opportunities for education, training and research and a clear point of contact for the disabled person. (3 The Task Force recommends minimum standards for the prevention of neurological disability including access to health education, genetic counselling and emergency resources. The Task Force also encourages governments to invest in improved legislation for accident prevention. (4 The Task Force has outlined some minimum standards for the staffing of a neurological rehabilitation service including improved training both for neurologists and rehabilitation physicians. Such training could include a cross-national training programme both for physicians and other health care staff. (5 The Task Force supports a two-tier system of

  16. Neurological complications of dengue fever: Experience from a tertiary center of north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajesh; Sharma, Pawan; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Atam, Veerendra; Singh, Maneesh Kumar; Mehrotra, Hardeep Singh

    2011-10-01

    Dengue, an acute viral disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, is highly endemic in many tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Neurological complications of dengue infection have been observed more frequently in the recent past and some studies highlighted varied neurological complications arising in the course of dengue illness. In this retrospective study, we report various neurological complications observed during the last 2 years in patients of dengue fever. The patients presenting with neurological complications with positive serology (IgM antibody) for dengue infection were consecutively recruited from the Department of Neurology/Medicine from a tertiary center of Lucknow, India. These patients were subjected to a detailed clinical evaluation, laboratory assessment including blood count, hematocrit, coagulation parameters, biochemical assays, serology for dengue fever, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for human immunodeficiency virus and other relevant investigations. Twenty-six patients with neurological complications associated with confirmed dengue infection were observed during the last 2 years. Eighteen of these patients were male. Of the 26 patients, 10 patients were suffering from brachial neuritis, four patients had encephalopathy, three patients were consistent with the diagnosis of Guillain Barre syndrome, three patients had hypokalemic paralysis associated with dengue fever and two patients had acute viral myositis. Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome was diagnosed in two patients, myelitis in one patient and acute disseminated encephalo-myelitis also in one patient. Dengue fever was associated with widespread neurological complications. Brachial neuritis and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome were observed for the first time in this study.

  17. [Deficiency, disability, neurology and television series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Martínez-Martínez, Ariadna; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    The portrayal of neurological disability and deficiency on television has not always been approached in the same way, but has instead tended to reflect the standpoint taken by society with regard to these issues and how they are dealt with according to the prevailing conceptions and values at each particular time. To address the appearance of neurological pathologies in television series and to ponder on the image they have in such contexts. Deficiency and disability of neurological origin have often been depicted on television in series, telefilms and documentaries, and in a wide variety of ways. Here we examine different television series and how they have dealt with neurological pathology, its diagnosis and its treatment, as well as the figure of the healthcare professional and social-familial adaptation. Examples cited include series such as House MD, Glee, American Horror Story, Homeland or Game of Thrones. Television series are a useful tool for making some neurological pathologies better known to the public and for dispelling the myths surrounding others, provided that the pathologies are dealt with in a realistic manner, which is not always the case. More care should be taken with regard to the way in which health professionals are portrayed in television series, as it is not always done correctly and may mislead viewers, who take what they see on the TV as being real.

  18. Intervertebral Disc Characteristic on Progressive Neurological Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Yudoyono

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the intervertebral disc characteristic on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in lumbar herniated disc (LHD patients with progressive neurological deficit. Methods: Patients were collected retrospectively from Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Database from 2011–2013 with LHD, had neurological deficit such as radiculopathy and cauda equine syndrome for less than four weeks with a positive sign confirmed by neurological examination and confirmatory with MRI examination. Results: A total of 14 patients with lumbar herniated disc disease (10 males, 4 females suffered from progressive neurological deficit with an average age of (52.07±10.9 years old. Early disc height was 9.38±0.5 mm and progressive neurological deficit state disc height was 4.03±0.53 mm, which were significantly different statisticaly (p<0.01. Symptoms of radiculopathy were seen in 11 patients and cauda equine syndrome in three patients. Modic changes grade 1 was found in five patients, grade 2 in eight patients,grade 3 in one patient, Pfirmman grade 2 in eleven patients and grade 3 in three patients. Thecal sac compression 1/3 compression was seen in four patients and 2/3 compression in ten patients. Conclusions: Neurosurgeon should raise concerns on the characteristic changes of intervertebral disc in magnetic resonance imaging examination to avoid further neural injury in lumbar herniated disc patients.

  19. Neurology referrals to a liaison psychiatry service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, P

    2012-02-03

    The objective of the present study was to assess the activity of the Liaison Psychiatry service of Cork University Hospital in relation to all in-patient neurology referrals over a 12-month period. Of 1685 neurology admissions, 106 (6%) were referred to liaison psychiatry for assessment. 91 referrals (86%) met criteria for a psychiatric disorder according to DSM-IV, the commonest being major depression (24%) and somatoform disorder (23%). Patients with multiple sclerosis or epilepsy comprised nearly half of all referrals (48 cases; 45%). Approximately 20% of M.S. in-patients (21 cases) were referred for psychiatric assessment, with the corresponding figure in epilepsy being 25% (18 cases). Although only 106 (6%) neurology in-patients were referred to liaison psychiatry, psychiatric diagnoses were documented in 327 (20%) discharge forms, presumably reflecting previous diagnosis. The above findings indicate that psychiatric illness is common among neurology inpatients screened by liaison psychiatry yet referral rates are relatively low in terms of the overall number of neurology in-patients. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 86% of referrals indicating high concordance between neurologists and liaison psychiatry regarding the presence of a psychiatric disorder.

  20. [Neurologic involvement in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal-Rodríguez, L; Perea-Martínez, A; Loredo-Abdalá, A; Rodríguez-Herrera, R; del Angel-Aguilar, A; Reynes-Manzur, J N

    1991-07-01

    The neurologic complication seen in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) has hardly been studied for which therefore its prevalence is unknown. Some of the clinical manifestations surrounding this event have been studied and have been divided into the following two groups: cervical articular spinal disease and extra-articular manifestations, more commonly seen in adults, the atlas-axoidal subluxation and the neuropathies. A group of 213 children diagnosed as having JRA according to the criteria setforth by the American Association of Rheumatology and followed by the Department of Internal Medicine of the National Institute of Pediatrics, 10 patients were found to have neurologic symptomatology (4.6%). Their arthritis was studied as well as their association with activity data and seropositivity. We found 6 female and 4 male patients with neurologic manifestations; their ages ranged from 7 to 14 years. Six of them were diagnosed with sero-positive polyarticular JRA and the other four with polyarticular sero-negative. All patients showed some activity and the appearance of the neurologic complications ranged between two months and seven years. No correlation was found between the beginning of the arthritis and the neurologic symptomatology, their sex or the type of arthritis. Seven of the cases showed peripheral neuropathy. Two cases had atlas-atloid subluxation and another child showed having cervical column inflammation with a rheumatoid pannus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Neurological Manifestations of Medical Child Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Katharine; Rood, Corey; Patel, Anup; Thackeray, Jonathan D; Brink, Farah W

    2016-01-01

    Medical child abuse occurs when a child receives unnecessary and harmful, or potentially harmful, medical care at the instigation of a caretaker through exaggeration, falsification, or induction of symptoms of illness in a child. Neurological manifestations are common with this type of maltreatment. We sought to review common reported neurological manifestations that may alert the clinician to consider medical child abuse. In addition, the possible sequelae of this form of child maltreatment is discussed, as well as practice recommendations for establishing the diagnosis and stopping the abuse once it is identified. A review of the medical literature was conducted regarding the reported neurological presentations of this entity. Neurological manifestations of medical child abuse include false reports of apparent life-threatening events and seizures and reports of induction of symptoms from poisoning. Failure to correlate objective findings with subjective complaints may lead to unnecessary and potentially harmful testing or treatment. This form of child maltreatment puts a child at significant risk of long-term morbidity and mortality. A wide variety of neurological manifestations have been reported in cases of medical child abuse. It is important for the practicing neurologist to include medical child abuse on the differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurological complications in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Arnold

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD are frequently afflicted with neurological complications. These complications can potentially affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Common neurological complications in CKD include stroke, cognitive dysfunction, encephalopathy, peripheral and autonomic neuropathies. These conditions have significant impact not only on patient morbidity but also on mortality risk through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of these conditions can provide insights into effective management strategies for neurological complications. This review describes clinical management of neurological complications in CKD with reference to the contributing physiological and pathological derangements. Stroke, cognitive dysfunction and dementia share several pathological mechanisms that may contribute to vascular impairment and neurodegeneration. Cognitive dysfunction and dementia may be differentiated from encephalopathy which has similar contributing factors but presents in an acute and rapidly progressive manner and may be accompanied by tremor and asterixis. Recent evidence suggests that dietary potassium restriction may be a useful preventative measure for peripheral neuropathy. Management of painful neuropathic symptoms can be achieved by pharmacological means with careful dosing and side effect considerations for reduced renal function. Patients with autonomic neuropathy may respond to sildenafil for impotence. Neurological complications often become clinically apparent at end-stage disease, however early detection and management of these conditions in mild CKD may reduce their impact at later stages.

  3. Clinical utility of early amplitude integrated EEG in monitoring term newborns at risk of neurological injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina A. Toso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to test the clinical utility of an early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG to predict short-term neurological outcome in term newborns at risk of neurology injury. METHODS: this was a prospective, descriptive study. The inclusion criteria were neonatal encephalopathy, neurologic disturbances, and severe respiratory distress syndrome. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and likelihood ratio (LR were calculated. Clinical and demographic data were analyzed. Neurological outcome was defined as the sum of clinical, electroimaging, and neuroimaging findings. RESULTS: ten of the 21 monitored infants (48% presented altered short-term neurologic outcome. The aEEG had 90% sensitivity, 82% specificity, 82% positive predictive value, and 90% negative predictive value. The positive LR was 4.95, and the negative LR was 0.12. In three of 12 (25% encephalopathic infants, the aEEG allowed for a better definition of the severity of their condition. Seizures were detected in eight infants (38%, all subclinical at baseline, and none had a normal aEEG background pattern. The status of three infants (43% evolved and required two or more drugs for treatment. CONCLUSIONS: in infants with encephalopathy or other severe illness, aEEG disturbances occur frequently. aEEG provided a better classification of the severity of encephalopathy, detected early subclinical seizures, and allowed for monitoring of the response to treatment. aEEG was a useful tool at the neonatal intensive care unit for predicting poor short-term neurological outcomes for all sick newborn.

  4. Combining Amplitude Spectrum Area with Previous Shock Information Using Neural Networks Improves Prediction Performance of Defibrillation Outcome for Subsequent Shocks in Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mi; Lu, Yubao; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Hehua; Gong, Yushun; Li, Yongqin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative ventricular fibrillation (VF) waveform analysis is a potentially powerful tool to optimize defibrillation. However, whether combining VF features with additional attributes that related to the previous shock could enhance the prediction performance for subsequent shocks is still uncertain. A total of 528 defibrillation shocks from 199 patients experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were analyzed in this study. VF waveform was quantified using amplitude spectrum area (AMSA) from defibrillator's ECG recordings prior to each shock. Combinations of AMSA with previous shock index (PSI) or/and change of AMSA (ΔAMSA) between successive shocks were exercised through a training dataset including 255shocks from 99patientswith neural networks. Performance of the combination methods were compared with AMSA based single feature prediction by area under receiver operating characteristic curve(AUC), sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and prediction accuracy (PA) through a validation dataset that was consisted of 273 shocks from 100patients. A total of61 (61.0%) patients required subsequent shocks (N = 173) in the validation dataset. Combining AMSA with PSI and ΔAMSA obtained highest AUC (0.904 vs. 0.819, pdefibrillation outcome for subsequent shocks.

  5. Chiropractic Identity: A Neurological, Professional, and Political Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Anthony L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to propose a focused assessment of the identity of chiropractic and its profession, triangulating multiple viewpoints converging upon various aspects and definitions of neurology, manual medicine, and alternative or mainstream medicine. Over 120 years since its inception, chiropractic has struggled to achieve an identity for which its foundations could provide optimal health care. Despite recognition of the benefits of spinal manipulation in various government guidelines, advances in US military and Veterans Administration, and persistently high levels of patient satisfaction, the chiropractic profession remains underrepresented in most discussions of health care delivery. Distinguishing characteristics of doctors of chiropractic include the following: (1) they embrace a model of holistic, preventive medicine (wellness); (2) they embrace a concept of neurological imbalance in which form follows function, disease follows disturbed biochemistry, and phenomenology follows physiology; (3) they diagnose, and their institutions of training are accredited by a body recognized by the US Department of Education; (4) they manage patients on a first-contact basis, often as primary care providers in geographical areas that are underserved; (5) the spine is their primary-but not exclusive-area of interaction; (6) they deliver high-velocity, low-amplitude adjustments with a superior safety record compared with other professions; and (7) they use a network of institutions worldwide that have shown increasing commitments to research. This article provides an overview of chiropractic identity from 6 points of view: (1) concepts of manual medicine; (2) areas of interest beyond the spine; (3) concepts of the chiropractic subluxation; (4) concepts of neurology; (5) concepts of mainstream or alternative health care; and (6) concepts of primary care, first-contact provider, or specialist.

  6. Nonlocal neurology: beyond localization to holonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, G G; O'Carroll, C P

    2010-11-01

    The concept of local pathology has long served neurology admirably. Relevant models include self-organizing nonlinear brain dynamics, global workspace and dynamic core theories. However such models are inconsistent with certain clinical phenomena found in Charles Bonnet syndrome, disjunctive agnosia and schizophrenia, where there is disunity of content within the unity of consciousness. This is contrasted with the split-brain case where there is disunity of content and disunity of consciousnesses. The development of quantum brain theory with it nonlocal mechanisms under the law of the whole ("holonomy") offers new possibilities for explaining disintegration within unity. Dissipative quantum brain dynamics and its approach to the binding problem, memory and consciousness are presented. A nonlocal neurology armed with a holonomic understanding might see more deeply into what clinical neurology has always aspired to: the patient as a whole. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The History of Reimbursements in Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen E Lakhan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA addresses consumer protection, employer-provided insurance coverage, as well as the government's role in providing health care access to the most vulnerable populations. Within the practice of neurology, the PPACA has the challenging goal of reconciling the needs of the growing elderly population with the financial barriers to costly yet available health care services. To bridge that gap, all health care professionals working in the field of neurology must reflect on the effect previous Medicare reimbursement policies have had on the current practice of neurology, and utilize lessons learned in recent years. The test of time will tell whether the PPACA will achieve the goal of decreasing in health care spending while ensuring quality universal healthcare services.

  8. Cotard syndrome in neurological and psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Bermudez, Jesus; Aguilar-Venegas, Luis C; Crail-Melendez, Daniel; Espinola-Nadurille, Mariana; Nente, Francisco; Mendez, Mario F

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the frequency and characteristics of Cotard syndrome among neurological and psychiatric inpatients at a tertiary referral center. All inpatients from the National Institute of Neurology of Mexico (March 2007-May 2009) requiring neuropsychiatric consultation were reviewed. Among 1,321 inpatient consultations, 63.7% had neurological disease and one (0.11%) had viral encephalitis and Cotard syndrome. Of inpatients, 36.2% had pure psychiatric disorders and three (0.62%) had Cotard syndrome, associated with psychotic depression, depersonalization, and penile retraction (koro syndrome). This review discusses potential mechanisms for Cotard syndrome, including the role of a perceptual-emotional dissociation in self-misattribution in the deliré des negations.

  9. A national neurological excellence centers network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzi, S; Cristiani, P; Cavallini, A

    1998-02-01

    The most relevant problems related to the management of neurological disorders are (i) the frequent hospitalization in nonspecialist departments, with the need for neurological consultation, and (ii) the frequent requests of GPs for highly specialized investigations that are very expensive and of little value in arriving at a correct diagnosis. In 1996, the Consorzio di Bioingegneria e Informatica Medica in Italy realized the CISNet project (in collaboration with the Consorzio Istituti Scientifici Neuroscienze e Tecnologie Biomediche and funded by the Centro Studi of the National Public Health Council) for the implementation of a national neurological excellence centers network (CISNet). In the CISNet project, neurologists will be able to give on-line interactive consultation and off-line consulting services identifying correct diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, evaluating the need for both examination in specialist centers and admission to specialized centers, and identifying the most appropriate ones.

  10. What is the essential neurological examination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Lima

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine which aspects would be essential to the neurological examination (NE in a given specific situation (a patient referred with a potential neurological complaint, but the history suggests that a neurological problem is unlikely, we presented the same questionnaire used by Moore and Chalk in Canada to 19 neurologists in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We considered significant aspects of NE, whose average responses were greater than or equal to 3.5: visual fields, fundoscopy, pursuit eye movements, facial muscle power testing, gait, pronator drift or rapid arm movement in upper limbs, finger-nose, tone in arms and legs, five tendon reflexes, and plantar responses. We concluded that, despite geographical and economical differences between Brazil and Canada, neurologists from both countries agree about the essential NE in the proposed scenario.

  11. The Role of Emot