WorldWideScience

Sample records for neurologic diseases including

  1. Neurological diseases and pain

    OpenAIRE

    Borsook, David

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequentl...

  2. The neurological disease ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark; Cox, Alexander P; Chaudhry, Naveed; Ng, Marcus; Sule, Donat; Duncan, William; Ray, Patrick; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Smith, Barry; Ruttenberg, Alan; Szigeti, Kinga; Diehl, Alexander D

    2013-12-06

    We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms 'disease', 'diagnosis', 'disease course', and 'disorder'. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. ND seeks to provide a formal foundation for the representation of clinical and research data

  3. Neurologic Complications of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with celiac disease (CD [n=l 11] and controls (n=211 were questioned regarding neurologic disorders, their charts were reviewed, and they received neurologic evaluations, including brain imaging or EEG if indicated, in a study of neurologic complications of CD at Carmel Medical Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

  4. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Parpura, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 2 (2013), s. 149-158 ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184; GA ČR GA309/09/1696 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : amyotrophic lateral sclerosis * Alzheimer's disease * Alexander disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  5. Neurologic Diseases and Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Daniel A; Chokroverty, Sudansu

    2017-03-01

    Sleep disorders and neurologic illness are common and burdensome in their own right; when combined, they can have tremendous negative impact at an individual level as well as societally. The socioeconomic burden of sleep disorders and neurologic illness can be identified, but the real cost of these conditions lies far beyond the financial realm. There is an urgent need for comprehensive care and support systems to help with the burden of disease. Further research in improving patient outcomes in those who suffer with these conditions will help patients and their families, and society in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neurologic presentation of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushara, Khalafalla O

    2005-04-01

    Celiac disease (CD) long has been associated with neurologic and psychiatric disorders including cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, epilepsy, dementia, and depression. Earlier reports mainly have documented the involvement of the nervous system as a complication of prediagnosed CD. However, more recent studies have emphasized that a wider spectrum of neurologic syndromes may be the presenting extraintestinal manifestation of gluten sensitivity with or without intestinal pathology. These include migraine, encephalopathy, chorea, brain stem dysfunction, myelopathy, mononeuritis multiplex, Guillain-Barre-like syndrome, and neuropathy with positive antiganglioside antibodies. The association between most neurologic syndromes described and gluten sensitivity remains to be confirmed by larger epidemiologic studies. It further has been suggested that gluten sensitivity (as evidenced by high antigliadin antibodies) is a common cause of neurologic syndromes (notably cerebellar ataxia) of otherwise unknown cause. Additional studies showed high prevalence of gluten sensitivity in genetic neurodegenerative disorders such as hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia and Huntington's disease. It remains unclear whether gluten sensitivity contributes to the pathogenesis of these disorders or whether it represents an epiphenomenon. Studies of gluten-free diet in patients with gluten sensitivity and neurologic syndromes have shown variable results. Diet trials also have been inconclusive in autism and schizophrenia, 2 diseases in which sensitivity to dietary gluten has been implicated. Further studies clearly are needed to assess the efficacy of gluten-free diet and to address the underlying mechanisms of nervous system pathology in gluten sensitivity.

  7. Splicing Regulation in Neurologic Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Licatalosi, Donny D; Darnell, Robert B

    2006-01-01

    .... It is becoming evident that alternative splicing plays a particularly important role in neurologic disease, which is perhaps not surprising given the important role splicing plays in generating...

  8. Neurological diseases in famous painters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechowski-Jozwiak, Bartlomiej; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Visual art production involves multiple processes including basic motor skills, such as coordination of movements, visual-spatial processing, emotional output, sociocultural context, and creativity. Thus, the relationship between artistic output and brain diseases is particularly complex, and brain disorders may lead to impairment of artistic production in multiple domains. Neurological conditions may also occasionally modify artistic style and lead to surprisingly innovative features in people with an initial loss of creativity. This chapter focuses on anecdotal reports of various neurological disorders and their potential consequences on works produced by famous or well-established artists, including Carl Frederik Reutersward, Giorgio de Chirico, Krystyna Habura, Leo Schnug, Ignatius Brennan, and many others. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  10. [Voice disorders caused by neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, J; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Mate, M A; Cobeta, I

    To review voice disorders in neurological diseases, with special emphasis to acoustic analysis. In the first part of this article we describe data regarding neural control of voice, physiology of phonation, and examination of the patient with voice disturbances, including the use of voice laboratory, acoustic analysis fundamentals, phonetometric measures and aerodynamic measures. In the second part, we review the voice disturbances associated to neurological diseases, emphasizing into movement disorders (specially Parkinson s disease, essential tremor, and spasmodic dysphonia). A number of neurological diseases causing alterations of corticospinal pathway, cerebellum, basal ganglia and upper and/or lower motoneurons can induce voice disturbances. Voice examination using ear, nose & throat examination, endoscopy and videorecording of laryngeal movements, acoustic analysis, elecroglottography, laryngeal electromyography, and aerodynamic measures, could be useful in the clinical examination of some neurological diseases.

  11. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    . Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement...... treatment is available to prevent irreversible organ damage. Females with Fabry's disease who present with pain have often been ignored and misdiagnosed because of the disorder's X-linked inheritance. This Review will stress the importance of recognizing neurological symptoms for the diagnosis of Fabry...

  12. Neurological aspects of vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho Pimenta, A J; Castelo Branco, N A

    1999-03-01

    Mood and behavioral abnormalities are the most common early findings related to vibroacoustic disease (VAD). Other signs and symptoms have been observed in VAD patients. Brain MRI discloses small multifocal lesions in about 50% of subjects with more than 10 yr of occupational exposure to large pressure amplitude (> or = 90 dB SPL) and low frequency (< or = 500 Hz) (LPALF) noise. However, to date, there have been no studies globally integrating all the neurological, imaging and neurophysiological data of VAD patients. This is the main goal of this study. The 60 male Caucasians diagnosed with VAD were neurologically evaluated in extreme detail in order to systematically identify the most common and significant neurological disturbances in VAD. This population demonstrates cognitive changes (identified through psychological and neurophysiological studies (ERP P300)), vertigo and auditory changes, visual impairment, epilepsy, and cerebrovascular diseases. Neurological examination reveals pathological signs and reflexes, most commonly the palmo-mental reflex. A vascular pattern underlying the multifocal hyperintensities in T2 MR imaging, with predominant involvement of the small arteries of the white matter, is probably the visible organic substratum of the neurological picture. However, other pathophyisological mechanisms are involved in epileptic symptomatology.

  13. Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease may initially present as a neurological disorder. Alternatively, celiac disease may be complicated by neurological changes. With impaired nutrient absorption, different deficiency syndromes may occur and these may be manifested clinically with neurological changes. However, in patients with deficiency syndromes, extensive involvement of the small intestine with celiac disease is often evident. There are a number of reports of celiac disease associated with neuropathy, ataxia, dementia and seizure disorder. In these reports, there is no clear relationship with nutrient deficiency and a precise mechanism for the neurological changes has not been defined. A small number of patients have been reported to have responded to vitamin E administration, but most do not. In some, gluten antibodies have also been described, especially in those with ataxia, but a consistent response to a gluten-free diet has not been defined. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with unexplained neurological disorders, including ataxia and dementia. Further studies are needed, however, to determine if a gluten-free diet will lead to improvement in the associated neurological disorder.

  14. Neurological complications in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Arnold

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD are frequently afflicted with neurological complications. These complications can potentially affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Common neurological complications in CKD include stroke, cognitive dysfunction, encephalopathy, peripheral and autonomic neuropathies. These conditions have significant impact not only on patient morbidity but also on mortality risk through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of these conditions can provide insights into effective management strategies for neurological complications. This review describes clinical management of neurological complications in CKD with reference to the contributing physiological and pathological derangements. Stroke, cognitive dysfunction and dementia share several pathological mechanisms that may contribute to vascular impairment and neurodegeneration. Cognitive dysfunction and dementia may be differentiated from encephalopathy which has similar contributing factors but presents in an acute and rapidly progressive manner and may be accompanied by tremor and asterixis. Recent evidence suggests that dietary potassium restriction may be a useful preventative measure for peripheral neuropathy. Management of painful neuropathic symptoms can be achieved by pharmacological means with careful dosing and side effect considerations for reduced renal function. Patients with autonomic neuropathy may respond to sildenafil for impotence. Neurological complications often become clinically apparent at end-stage disease, however early detection and management of these conditions in mild CKD may reduce their impact at later stages.

  15. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system.

  16. Wilson's disease and other neurological copper disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandmann, Oliver; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Kaler, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    The copper metabolism disorder Wilson's disease was first defined in 1912. Wilson's disease can present with hepatic and neurological deficits, including dystonia and parkinsonism. Early-onset presentations in infancy and late-onset manifestations in adults older than 70 years of age are now well recognised. Direct genetic testing for ATP7B mutations are increasingly available to confirm the clinical diagnosis of Wilson's disease, and results from biochemical and genetic prevalence studies suggest that Wilson's disease might be much more common than previously estimated. Early diagnosis of Wilson's disease is crucial to ensure that patients can be started on adequate treatment, but uncertainty remains about the best possible choice of medication. Furthermore, Wilson's disease needs to be differentiated from other conditions that also present clinically with hepatolenticular degeneration or share biochemical abnormalities with Wilson's disease, such as reduced serum ceruloplasmin concentrations. Disordered copper metabolism is also associated with other neurological conditions, including a subtype of axonal neuropathy due to ATP7A mutations and the late-onset neurodegenerative disorders Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neuroelectrophysiological studies on neurological autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hong LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroelectrophysiological manifestations of four clinical typical neurological autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, myasthenia gravis (MG, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis were reviewed in this paper. The diagnostic value of evoked potentials for multiple sclerosis, nerve conduction studies (NCS for Guillain-Barré syndrome, repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS and single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG for myasthenia gravis, and needle electromyography for polymyositis and dermatomyositis were respectively discussed. This review will help to have comprehensive understanding on electrophysiological examinations and their clinical significance in the diagnosis of neurological autoimmune diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.004

  18. Sleep Disorders in Childhood Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Tolaymat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep problems are frequently addressed as a primary or secondary concern during the visit to the pediatric neurology clinic. Sleep disorders can mimic other neurologic diseases (e.g., epilepsy and movement disorders, and this adds challenges to the diagnostic process. Sleep disorders can significantly affect the quality of life and functionality of children in general and those with comorbid neurological diseases in particular. Understanding the pathophysiology of sleep disorders, recognizing the implications of sleep disorder in children with neurologic diseases and behavioral difficulties, and early intervention continue to evolve resulting in better neurocognitive outcomes.

  19. Rare Neurological Manifestation of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzma Rani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated disease characterized by permanent gastrointestinal tract sensitivity to gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has varied clinical manifestations, ranging from gastrointestinal to extraintestinal, including neurological, skin, reproductive and psychiatric symptoms, which makes its diagnosis difficult and challenging. Known neurological manifestations of CD include epilepsy with or without occipital calcification, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and ataxia, headache, neuropathies and behavior disorders. We present the case of a 14-year-old female with headaches and blurred vision for 1 year; she was noted to have papilledema on ophthalmic examination with increased cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure on lumber puncture and was diagnosed as a case of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC. Meanwhile her workup for chronic constipation revealed elevated tissue transglutaminase IgA and antiendomysial IgA antibodies. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of CD. The patient was started on a gluten-free diet, leading to resolution of not only gastrointestinal symptoms but also to almost complete resolution of symptoms of PTC. This report describes the correlation of CD and PTC as its neurological manifestation.

  20. Central nervous system involvement in human immunodeficiency virus disease. A prospective study including neurological examination, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Thomsen, C; Arlien-Søborg, P

    1991-01-01

    the incidence of the AIDS dementia complex (CDC definition) and other neurological complications. Ten patients developed CNS opportunistic infection or malignancy. Among the remaining 57 patients, 12 of 37 (32%) belonging to CDC group IV, and 1 of 20 (5%) belonging to CDC groups II/III developed the AIDS...... dementia complex (p = 0.03). MRI white matter lesions occurred in 32% of CDC group IV patients and 5% of CDC groups II/III patients (p = 0.03). The corresponding figures for brain atrophy at CT were 71% and 30% (p less than 0.01) and for neurologic signs 49% and 20% (p = 0.06). The development of the AIDS...... dementia complex was significantly associated with the occurrence of MRI white matter lesions and a CD4 cell count of less than 200 x 10(6)/l, whereas it was not statistical significantly associated with brain atrophy at baseline. It is concluded that the AIDS dementia complex is a common feature of late...

  1. Central nervous system involvement in human immunodeficiency virus disease. A prospective study including neurological examination, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Thomsen, C; Arlien-Søborg, P

    1991-01-01

    dementia complex (p = 0.03). MRI white matter lesions occurred in 32% of CDC group IV patients and 5% of CDC groups II/III patients (p = 0.03). The corresponding figures for brain atrophy at CT were 71% and 30% (p less than 0.01) and for neurologic signs 49% and 20% (p = 0.06). The development of the AIDS...... dementia complex was significantly associated with the occurrence of MRI white matter lesions and a CD4 cell count of less than 200 x 10(6)/l, whereas it was not statistical significantly associated with brain atrophy at baseline. It is concluded that the AIDS dementia complex is a common feature of late...

  2. Risk of neurological diseases among survivors of electric shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, Kathrine; Meersohn, Andrea; Schüz, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Several studies suggest a link between electric injuries and neurological diseases, where electric shocks may explain elevated risks for neuronal degeneration and, subsequently, neurological diseases. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on the risk of neurological diseases among people...... in Denmark who had survived an electric accident in 1968-2008. The cohort included 3,133 people and occurrences of neurological diseases were determined by linkage to the nationwide population-based Danish National Register of Patients. The numbers of cases observed at first hospital contact in the cohort.......80; 95% CI, 1.23-2.54), for vertigo (SHR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.22-2.05), and for epilepsy (SHR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.11-1.85). Only small numbers of cases of other neurological diseases were found, making the risk estimates unstable. These findings suggest an association between a single electric shock...

  3. Management of oral secretions in neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeachan, Alexander J; Mcdermott, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    Sialorrhoea is a common and problematic symptom that arises from a range of neurological conditions associated with bulbar or facial muscle dysfunction. Drooling can significantly affect quality of life due to both physical complications such as oral chapping, and psychological complications such as embarrassment and social isolation. Thicker, tenacious oral and pharyngeal secretions may result from the drying management approach to sialorrhoea. The management of sialorrhoea in neurological diseases depends on the underlying pathology and severity of symptoms. Interventions include anticholinergic drugs, salivary gland-targeted radiotherapy, salivary gland botulinum toxin and surgical approaches. The management of thick secretions involves mainly conservative measures such as pineapple juice as a lytic agent, cough assist, saline nebulisers and suctioning or mucolytic drugs like carbocisteine. Despite a current lack of evidence and variable practice, management of sialorrhoea should form a part of the multidisciplinary approach needed for long-term neurological conditions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Implication of cannabinoids in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsasua del Valle, Angela

    2006-01-01

    1. Preparations from Cannabis sativa (marijuana) have been used for many centuries both medicinally and recreationally. 2. Recent advances in the knowledge of its pharmacological and chemical properties in the organism, mainly due to Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and the physiological roles played by the endocannabinoids have opened up new strategies in the treatment of neurological and psychiatric diseases. 3. Potential therapeutic uses of cannabinoid receptor agonists include the management of spasticity and tremor in multiple sclerosis/spinal cord injury, pain, inflammatory disorders, glaucoma, bronchial asthma, cancer, and vasodilation that accompanies advanced cirrhosis. CB(1) receptor antagonists have therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease. 4. Dr. Julius Axelrod also contributed in studies on the neuroprotective actions of cannabinoids.

  5. Stem-cell therapy for neurologic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of research on stem cell therapy for various diseases, an important need was felt in the field of neurological diseases. While congenital lesion may not be amenable to stem cell therapy completely, there is a scope of partial improvement in the lesions and halt in further progression. Neuro degenerative lesions like Parkinson′s disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown improvement with stem cell therapy. This article reviews the available literature and summarizes the current evidence in the various neurologic diseases amenable to stem cell therapy, the plausible mechanism of action, ethical concerns with insights into the future of stem cell therapy.

  6. Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo C. DiFrancesco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4 in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic and

  7. Remote Physical Activity Monitoring in Neurological Disease: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Valerie A. J.; Pitsch, Erica; Tahir, Peggy; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Allen, Diane D.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review of studies using remote physical activity monitoring in neurological diseases, highlighting advances and determining gaps. Methods Studies were systematically identified in PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 2004 to December 2014 that monitored physical activity for ≥24 hours in adults with neurological diseases. Studies that measured only involuntary motor activity (tremor, seizures), energy expenditure or sleep were excluded. Feasibility, findings, and protocols were examined. Results 137 studies met inclusion criteria in multiple sclerosis (MS) (61 studies); stroke (41); Parkinson's Disease (PD) (20); dementia (11); traumatic brain injury (2) and ataxia (1). Physical activity levels measured by remote monitoring are consistently low in people with MS, stroke and dementia, and patterns of physical activity are altered in PD. In MS, decreased ambulatory activity assessed via remote monitoring is associated with greater disability and lower quality of life. In stroke, remote measures of upper limb function and ambulation are associated with functional recovery following rehabilitation and goal-directed interventions. In PD, remote monitoring may help to predict falls. In dementia, remote physical activity measures correlate with disease severity and can detect wandering. Conclusions These studies show that remote physical activity monitoring is feasible in neurological diseases, including in people with moderate to severe neurological disability. Remote monitoring can be a psychometrically sound and responsive way to assess physical activity in neurological disease. Further research is needed to ensure these tools provide meaningful information in the context of specific neurological disorders and patterns of neurological disability. PMID:27124611

  8. [Neurological manifestations in atypical Kawasaki disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Guzmán, Edgar; Gámez-González, Luisa Berenise; Rivas-Larrauri, Francisco; Sorcia-Ramírez, Giovanni; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a type of systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. Atypical Kawasaki disease is defined as that where there are signs and symptoms not corresponding to the classical criteria for this nosological entity. Children with atypical Kawasaki disease may present with acute abdominal symptoms, meningeal irritation, pneumonia or renal failure. We describe 4 children with ages ranging from 2 to 12 years who had atypical Kawasaki disease, with neurological and gastrointestinal symptoms as part of the systemic presentation of the disease. Treatment consisted of immunoglobulin and corticosteroids with good evolution. KD is a systemic vasculitis that can involve many territories. Atypical manifestations can mislead the clinician and delay diagnosis. Pediatricians and sub-specialists should be aware of these neurological manifestations in order to provide adequate and opportune treatment.

  9. Wilson's disease and other neurological copper disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandmann, Oliver; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Kaler, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classic copper metabolism disorder, Wilson disease (WD), was first defined in 1912. Both early onset presentations in infancy and late onset manifestations in adults > 70 years are now well recognized. Modern biochemical and genetic prevalence studies suggest that WD may be considerably more common than previously appreciated. Early diagnosis of WD is crucial to ensure that patients can be started on adequate treatment but uncertainty remains about the best possible choice of medication. Direct genetic testing for ATP7B mutations is increasingly available to confirm the clinical diagnosis of WD. WD needs to be differentiated from other conditions that present clinically with hepatolenticular degeneration or share biochemical abnormalities with WD, such as reduced serum cerulo plasmin levels. Disordered copper metabolism is also implied in an increasing number of other neurological conditions, including a subtype of axonal neuropathy due to ATP7A mutations, and the common late-onset neurodegenerative disorders Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25496901

  10. Ethical clinical translation of stem cell interventions for neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, David J; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Smith, Timothy R; Ammirati, Mario; Brennum, Jannick; Mendez, Ivar; Ammar, Ahmed S; Balak, Naci; Bolles, Gene; Esene, Ignatius Ngene; Mathiesen, Tiit; Broekman, Marike L

    2017-01-17

    The application of stem cell transplants in clinical practice has increased in frequency in recent years. Many of the stem cell transplants in neurologic diseases, including stroke, Parkinson disease, spinal cord injury, and demyelinating diseases, are unproven-they have not been tested in prospective, controlled clinical trials and have not become accepted therapies. Stem cell transplant procedures currently being carried out have therapeutic aims, but are frequently experimental and unregulated, and could potentially put patients at risk. In some cases, patients undergoing such operations are not included in a clinical trial, and do not provide genuinely informed consent. For these reasons and others, some current stem cell interventions for neurologic diseases are ethically dubious and could jeopardize progress in the field. We provide discussion points for the evaluation of new stem cell interventions for neurologic disease, based primarily on the new Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation released by the International Society for Stem Cell Research in May 2016. Important considerations in the ethical translation of stem cells to clinical practice include regulatory oversight, conflicts of interest, data sharing, the nature of investigation (e.g., within vs outside of a clinical trial), informed consent, risk-benefit ratios, the therapeutic misconception, and patient vulnerability. To help guide the translation of stem cells from the laboratory into the neurosurgical clinic in an ethically sound manner, we present an ethical discussion of these major issues at stake in the field of stem cell clinical research for neurologic disease. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Advance care planning for patients with advanced neurology diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ka-Chi; Lau, Vikki Wai-Kee; Un, Ka-Chun; Wong, Man-Sheung; Chan, Kwok-Ying

    2017-10-13

    Advanced neurology diseases including motor neuron disease (MND) are usually progressive life-limiting illness and could be devastating for patients, families and caregivers. Although medical technologies, such as enteral feeding and non-invasive ventilation, may prolong life expectancy of the patients, their utilization prompts important ethical questions in regard to their quality of life (QoL). Little attention had been paid on how ACP practice would practically help with patients suffering from different neurology diseases. We are unaware of any published studies on ACP practice among patients with different neurology diseases. In our study, we assessed end-of-life (EOL) care preferences, documentation, and communication in patients with various types of advanced neurology diseases. This was a retrospective chart review of all patients referred to the neuro-palliative care team (NPCT) in a local acute hospital in Hong Kong. The study was approved by the institutional review board of the University of Hong Kong. NPCT consultation was hand abstracted from the electronic health record if there was a subspecialty palliative care (PC) consultation note during the study period. Hand abstraction of data also included any content related to advance care planning (ACP) [advance directive (AD), resuscitation order, ventilator support, artificial feeding, patient wishes, legacy]. For patient who signed AD, items including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (100%), mechanical ventilation (100%), artificial nutrition and hydration (80%) were mentioned more frequently than other EOL interventions. For patients who had ACP but without AD, the most common diagnosis is bad stroke (60%). Place of death, artificial nutrition and hydration were most mentioned EOL interventions. EOL decision making in patients with advanced neurology disease is often delayed. This study showed that MND patients are readier to discuss their EOL issues and signed their AD. The NPCT can play a valuable

  12. Huntington's disease: a perplexing neurological disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Huntington's disease has served as a model for the study of other more common neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Symptomatic treatment of Huntington's disease involves use of Dopamine antagonists, presynaptic dopamine depleters, Antidepressants, Tranquillizers ...

  13. Sleep disorders in children with neurologic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucconi, M; Bruni, O

    2001-12-01

    Pediatric neurologic diseases are often associated with different kinds of sleep disruption (mainly insomnia, less frequently hypersomnia or parasomnias). Due to the key-role of sleep for development, the effort to ameliorate sleep patterns in these children could have important prognostic benefits. Study of sleep architecture and organization in neurologic disorders could lead to a better comprehension of the pathogenesis and a better treatment of the disorders. This article focuses on the following specific neurologic diseases: nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy and abnormal motor behaviors of epileptic origin, evaluating differential diagnosis with parasomnias; achondroplasia, confirming the crucial role of craniofacial deformity in determining sleep-disordered breathing; neuromuscular diseases, mainly Duchenne's muscular dystrophy and myotonic dystrophy; cerebral palsy, evaluating either the features of sleep architecture and the importance of the respiratory problems associated; headaches, confirming the strict relationships with sleep in terms of neurochemical and neurobehavioral substrates; and finally a review on the effectiveness of melatonin for sleep problems in children with neurologic syndromes and mental retardation, blindness, and epilepsy.

  14. [Nutritional and metabolic aspects of neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas Vilà, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system regulates food intake, homoeostasis of glucose and electrolytes, and starts the sensations of hunger and satiety. Different nutritional factors are involved in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases. Patients with acute neurological diseases (traumatic brain injury, cerebral vascular accident hemorrhagic or ischemic, spinal cord injuries, and cancer) and chronic neurological diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease) increase the risk of malnutrition by multiple factors related to nutrient ingestion, abnormalities in the energy expenditure, changes in eating behavior, gastrointestinal changes, and by side effects of drugs administered. Patients with acute neurological diseases have in common the presence of hyper metabolism and hyper catabolism both associated to a period of prolonged fasting mainly for the frequent gastrointestinal complications, many times as a side effect of drugs administered. During the acute phase, spinal cord injuries presented a reduction in the energy expenditure but an increase in the nitrogen elimination. In order to correct the negative nitrogen balance increase intakes is performed with the result of a hyper alimentation that should be avoided due to the complications resulting. In patients with chronic neurological diseases and in the acute phase of cerebrovascular accident, dysphagia could be present which also affects intakes. Several chronic neurological diseases have also dementia, which lead to alterations in the eating behavior. The presence of malnutrition complicates the clinical evolution, increases muscular atrophy with higher incidence of respiratory failure and less capacity to disphagia recuperation, alters the immune response with higher rate of infections, increases the likelihood of fractures and of pressure ulcers, increases the incapacity degree and is an independent factor to increase mortality. The periodic nutritional

  15. Neurological manifestations of atypical celiac disease in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sel, Çiğdem Genç; Aksoy, Erhan; Aksoy, Ayşe; Yüksel, Deniz; Özbay, Ferda

    2017-09-01

    Various typical and atypical neurological manifestations can be seen as the initial symptoms of celiac disease (CD). We suggest that gluten toxicity is the most suspicious triggering risk factor for probable pathophysiological pathways of neurological involvement in atypical CD. The medical charts of 117 patients diagnosed with atypical CD were retrieved from a tertiary center in Ankara, Turkey. Eight patients reported as having neurologic manifestations as initiating symptoms were evaluated in detail. The initial neurological manifestations of CD in our study included atypical absence, which was reported first in this study, generalized tonic-clonic seizures, complex partial seizures, severe axial hypotonia and down phenotype, multifocal leukoencephalopathy, mild optic neuritis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and short duration headaches. Seizures mostly emphasizing atypical absence could be the initial presentation manifestation of CD, first described in this literature. Gluten toxicity could be one of the most powerful triggering factors for developing epilepsy in CD. Learning disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, short duration headaches, mild optic neuritis, encephalopathy, and DS could also be the initial neurological manifestations of atypical CD. A gluten-restricted diet may improve neurological complaints, epileptic discharges, and neuropsychiatric symptoms. All we found may be a small part of the full range of neurological disorders of unknown origin related to CD. Clinical suspicion should be the rule for accurate diagnosis of the disease.

  16. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  17. Outline of metabolic diseases in adult neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochel, F

    2015-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are traditionally defined by enzymatic deficiencies or defects in proteins involved in cellular metabolism. Historically discovered and characterized in children, a growing number of IEM are described in adults, and especially in the field of neurology. In daily practice, it is important to recognize emergency situations as well as neurodegenerative diseases for which a metabolic disease is likely, especially when therapeutic interventions are available. Here, the goal is to provide simple clinical, imaging and biochemical tools that can first orientate towards and then confirm the diagnosis of IEM. General guidelines are presented to treat the most common IEM during metabolic crises - acute encephalopathies with increased plasma ammonia, lactate or homocystein, as well as rhabdomyolysis. Examples of therapeutic strategies currently applied to chronic neurometabolic diseases are also provided - GLUT1 deficiency, adrenoleukodystrophy, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, Niemann-Pick type C and Wilson disease. Genetic counseling is mandatory in some X-linked diseases - ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and adrenoleukodystrophy - and recommended in maternally inherited mitochondrial diseases - mutations of mitochondrial DNA. Besides these practical considerations, the contribution of metabolism to the field of adult neurology and neurosciences is much greater: first, with the identification of blood biomarkers that are progressively changing our diagnostic strategies thanks to lipidomic approaches, as illustrated in the field of spastic paraplegia and atypical psychiatric presentations; and second, through the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms involved in common neurological diseases thanks to the study of these rare diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge eLandgrave-Gómez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS´s regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure.Epigenetics, introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB, regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression.This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of

  19. Ethical clinical translation of stem cell interventions for neurologic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cote, David J; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Smith, Timothy R

    2017-01-01

    The application of stem cell transplants in clinical practice has increased in frequency in recent years. Many of the stem cell transplants in neurologic diseases, including stroke, Parkinson disease, spinal cord injury, and demyelinating diseases, are unproven-they have not been tested...... in prospective, controlled clinical trials and have not become accepted therapies. Stem cell transplant procedures currently being carried out have therapeutic aims, but are frequently experimental and unregulated, and could potentially put patients at risk. In some cases, patients undergoing such operations...... are not included in a clinical trial, and do not provide genuinely informed consent. For these reasons and others, some current stem cell interventions for neurologic diseases are ethically dubious and could jeopardize progress in the field. We provide discussion points for the evaluation of new stem cell...

  20. Caring for Patients With Intractable Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nagase

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a qualitative descriptive study examining nurses’ attitudes about caring for patients with intractable neurological diseases, with a focus on dedication and conflicts. Semistructured interviews were conducted on 11 nurses with more than 5 years of clinical experience in addition to more than 3 years of experience in neurology wards. Senior nursing officers from each hospital selected the participants. In general, these nurses expressed distress over the inevitable progression of disease. Nurses talked about the “basis of dedication,” “conflicts with dedication,” “reorganization for maintaining dedication,” and “the reason for the change from conflict to commitment.” “Reorganization for maintaining dedication” meant that nurses were able to handle the prospect of rededicating themselves to their patients. Furthermore, “the reason for the change from conflict to commitment” referred to events that changed nurses’ outlooks on nursing care, their pride as nurses, or their learning experiences. They felt dedicated and conflicted both simultaneously and separately. While committing to their patients’ physical care, nurses were empowered to think positively and treat patients with dignity in spite of the care taking much time and effort, as well as entailing considerable risk.

  1. New progress in brain aging and its related neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-wei ZHU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain aging-related neurological diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA have become one of the major diseases endangering the health of old people in China. Although the mechanism of brain aging and pathogenesis of its related neurodegenerative diseases remain unclear, protein pathological studies such as tau, α-synuclein (α-Syn, TDP-43 and amyloid-β protein (Aβ based on brain tissue bank and case registration database are opening the door to solve the mystery in the brain aging process and unlock pathogenesis of aging-related neurodegenerative diseases. Research on functional neuroimaging including 11C-PIB PET and 18F-FDDNP PET in Alzheimer's disease and 18F-FDG PET in Parkinson's disease, and biomarkers such as total-tau, phosphorylated-tau, and the 42 amino acid fragment of β-amyloid in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease now become hot topics in the field of elderly dementia and movement disorders. Clinicopathological correlation research of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy is also one of focuses in the geriatric neurological diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.03.004

  2. Olfaction in Neurologic and Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godoy, Maria Dantas Costa Lima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Loss of smell is involved in various neurologic and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease. However, the olfactory test is usually neglected by physicians at large. Objective The aim of this study was to review the current literature about the relationship between olfactory dysfunction and neurologic and neurodegenerative diseases. Data Synthesis Twenty-seven studies were selected for analysis, and the olfactory system, olfaction, and the association between the olfactory dysfunction and dementias were reviewed. Furthermore, is described an up to date in olfaction. Conclusion Otolaryngologist should remember the importance of olfaction evaluation in daily practice. Furthermore, neurologists and physicians in general should include olfactory tests in the screening of those at higher risk of dementia.

  3. Unintended effects of orphan product designation for rare neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sinéad M; Puwanant, Araya; Griggs, Robert C

    2012-10-01

    Since the introduction of the Orphan Drug Act in 1983, designed to promote development of treatments for rare diseases, at least 378 orphan drugs have been approved. Incentives include financial support, tax credits, and perhaps most importantly, extended market exclusivity. These incentives have encouraged industry interest and accelerated research on rare diseases, allowing patients with orphan diseases access to treatments. However, extended market exclusivity has been associated with unacceptably high drug costs, both for newly developed drugs and for drugs that were previously widely available. We suggest that a paradoxical effect of orphan product exclusivity can be reduced patient access to existing drugs. In addition, the costs of each new drug are arguably unsustainable for patients and for the American health care system. Of all the specialties, neurology has the third highest number of orphan product designations, and neurological diseases account for at least one-fifth of rare diseases. Citing the use of tetrabenazine for chorea in Huntington disease, adrenocorticotropic hormone for infantile spasms, and enzyme replacement therapy with alglucosidase alpha for Pompe disease, we highlight these paradoxical effects. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  4. Biomarker discovery in neurological diseases: a metabolomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaf El-Ansary

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Afaf El-Ansary, Nouf Al-Afaleg, Yousra Al-YafaeeBiochemistry Department, Science College, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Biomarkers are pharmacological and physiological measurements or specific biochemicals in the body that have a particular molecular feature that makes them useful for measuring the progress of disease or the effects of treatment. Due to the complexity of neurological disorders, it is very difficult to have perfect markers. Brain diseases require plenty of markers to reflect the metabolic impairment of different brain cells. The recent introduction of the metabolomic approach helps the study of neurological diseases based on profiling a multitude of biochemical components related to brain metabolism. This review is a trial to elucidate the possibility to use this approach to identify plasma metabolic markers related to neurological disorders. Previous trials using different metabolomic analyses including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis will be traced.Keywords: metabolic biomarkers, neurological disorders. metabolome, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, chromatography

  5. Coenzyme Q10 and Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Siciliano

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, or ubiquinone is a small electron carrier of the mitochondrial respiratory chain with antioxidant properties. CoQ10 supplementation has been widely used for mitochondrial disorders. The rationale for using CoQ10 is very powerful when this compound is primary decreased because of defective synthesis. Primary CoQ10 deficiency is a treatable condition, so heightened “clinical awareness” about this diagnosis is essential. CoQ10 and its analogue, idebenone, have also been widely used in the treatment of other neurodegenerative disorders. These compounds could potentially play a therapeutic role in Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich’s ataxia, and other conditions which have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. This article reviews the physiological roles of CoQ10, as well as the rationale and the role in clinical practice of CoQ10 supplementation in different neurological diseases, from primary CoQ10 deficiency to neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Neutrophils and viral-induced neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grist, Jonathan J; Marro, Brett; Lane, Thomas E

    2016-06-08

    Infection of the central nervous system (CNS) by neurotropic viruses represents an increasing worldwide problem in terms of morbidity and mortality for people of all ages. Although unique structural features of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) provide a physical and physiological barrier, a number of neurotropic viruses are able to enter the CNS resulting in a variety of pathological outcomes. Nonetheless, antigen-specific lymphocytes are ultimately able to accumulate within the CNS and contribute to defense by reducing or eliminating the invading viral pathogen. Alternatively, infiltration of activated cells of the immune system may be detrimental, as these cells can contribute to neuropathology that may result in long-term cellular damage or death. More recently, myeloid cells e.g. neutrophils have been implicated in contributing to both host defense and disease in response to viral infection of the CNS. This review highlights recent studies using coronavirus-induced neurologic disease as a model to determine how neutrophils affect effective control of viral replication as well as demyelination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Retromer in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and other neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Scott A; Petsko, Gregory A

    2015-03-01

    Retromer is a protein assembly that has a central role in endosomal trafficking, and retromer dysfunction has been linked to a growing number of neurological disorders. First linked to Alzheimer disease, retromer dysfunction causes a range of pathophysiological consequences that have been shown to contribute to the core pathological features of the disease. Genetic studies have established that retromer dysfunction is also pathogenically linked to Parkinson disease, although the biological mechanisms that mediate this link are only now being elucidated. Most recently, studies have shown that retromer is a tractable target in drug discovery for these and other disorders of the nervous system.

  8. Understanding Neurological Disease Mechanisms in the Era of Epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A.; Mehler, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    The burgeoning field of epigenetics is making a significant impact on our understanding of brain evolution, development, and function. In fact, it is now clear that epigenetic mechanisms promote seminal neurobiological processes, ranging from neural stem cell maintenance and differentiation to learning and memory. At the molecular level, epigenetic mechanisms regulate the structure and activity of the genome in response to intracellular and environmental cues, including the deployment of cell type–specific gene networks and those underlying synaptic plasticity. Pharmacological and genetic manipulation of epigenetic factors can, in turn, induce remarkable changes in neural cell identity and cognitive and behavioral phenotypes. Not surprisingly, it is also becoming apparent that epigenetics is intimately involved in neurological disease pathogenesis. Herein, we highlight emerging paradigms for linking epigenetic machinery and processes with neurological disease states, including how (1) mutations in genes encoding epigenetic factors cause disease, (2) genetic variation in genes encoding epigenetic factors modify disease risk, (3) abnormalities in epigenetic factor expression, localization, or function are involved in disease pathophysiology, (4) epigenetic mechanisms regulate disease-associated genomic loci, gene products, and cellular pathways, and (5) differential epigenetic profiles are present in patient-derived central and peripheral tissues. PMID:23571666

  9. Spasmodic dysphonia: description of the disease and associated neurologic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coelho, Marina Serrato

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spasmodic dysphonia (SD is a problem that affects speech and vocalization, one of the most devastating disorders of oral communication. It is characterized by vocal quality tensaestrangulada, harshly and / or interspersed with abrupt vocal attack and a great tension in the vocal tract. The etiology of spasmodic dysphonia is unclear. Some authors point to psychogenic causes, neurological or even unknown. Objective: To assess the prevalence of muscular dystonias and other neurological symptoms in patients with ED. Method: A retrospective study of 10 cases with diagnosis of ED for symptoms and neurological disorders associated. Results: There was a significant predominance of the disease in females (9:1. The average age of onset of symptoms was 32 years, ranging between 14 and 60 years. The mean disease duration was 10 years. Among the patients, 87.5% had a diagnosis of disorders of movement made by a neurologist, including orofacial dystonias (50%, essential tremor (50% and spastic paraparesis (12%. Conclusion: The presence of movement disorders followed almost all cases of spasmodic dysphonia. More studies are needed to clarify the pathophysiological basis of disease.

  10. Cell therapy: the final frontier for treatment of neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Susmita; Singh, Gurbind; Sreejith, Sailaja; Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Husin, Juani Mazmin; Datta, Indrani; Pal, Rajarshi; Das, Anjan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are devastating because they cause increasing loss of cognitive and physical functions and affect an estimated 1 billion individuals worldwide. Unfortunately, no drugs are currently available to halt their progression, except a few that are largely inadequate. This mandates the search of new treatments for these progressively degenerative diseases. Neural stem cells (NSCs) have been successfully isolated, propagated, and characterized from the adult brains of mammals, including humans. The confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain via NSCs opens up fresh avenues for treating neurological problems. The proof-of-concept studies demonstrating the neural differentiation capacity of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo have raised widespread enthusiasm toward cell-based interventions. It is anticipated that cell-based neurogenic drugs may reverse or compensate for deficits associated with neurological diseases. The increasing interest of the private sector in using human stem cells in therapeutics is evidenced by launching of several collaborative clinical research activities between Pharma giants and research institutions or small start-up companies. In this review, we discuss the major developments that have taken place in this field to position stem cells as a prospective candidate drug for the treatment of neurological disorders. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gano, Lindsey B; Patel, Manisha; Rho, Jong M

    2014-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a broad-spectrum therapy for medically intractable epilepsy and is receiving growing attention as a potential treatment for neurological disorders arising in part from bioenergetic dysregulation...

  12. Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gano, Lindsey B.; Patel, Manisha; Rho, Jong M.

    2014-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a broad-spectrum therapy for medically intractable epilepsy and is receiving growing attention as a potential treatment for neurological disorders arising in part from bioenergetic dysregulation. The high-fat/low-carbohydrate “classic KD”, as well as dietary variations such as the medium-chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins diet, the low-glycemic index treatment, and caloric restriction, enhance cellular metabolic and mitochondrial function. Hence, the broad neuroprotective properties of such therapies may stem from improved cellular metabolism. Data from clinical and preclinical studies indicate that these diets restrict glycolysis and increase fatty acid oxidation, actions which result in ketosis, replenishment of the TCA cycle (i.e., anaplerosis), restoration of neurotransmitter and ion channel function, and enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Further, there is mounting evidence that the KD and its variants can impact key signaling pathways that evolved to sense the energetic state of the cell, and that help maintain cellular homeostasis. These pathways, which include PPARs, AMP-activated kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and the sirtuins, have all been recently implicated in the neuroprotective effects of the KD. Further research in this area may lead to future therapeutic strategies aimed at mimicking the pleiotropic neuroprotective effects of the KD. PMID:24847102

  13. Could a neurological disease be a part of Mozart's pathography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivkić, Goran; Erdeljić, Viktorija

    2011-01-01

    As expected, since we recently celebrated the 250th anniversary of birth of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, there has been again a renewal of interest in his short but intensive life, as well as in the true reason of his untimely dead. Mozart lived and died in time when the medical knowledge was based mostly on subjective observations, without the established basics of standardized medical terminology and methodology. This leaves a great space for hypothesizing about his health problems, as well as about the cause of his death. The medical academic community attributed to Mozart approximately 150 different medical diagnoses. There is much speculation on the possible causes of Mozart's death: uremia, infection, rheumatic fever, trichinellosis, etc. Recently some authors have raised the question about a possible concomitant neurological disease. According to available records, Mozart has shown some elements of cyclotimic disorder, epilepsy and Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Furthermore, the finding of a temporal fracture on (allegedly) Mozart's skull, gives a way to speculations about the possibility of a chronic subdural hematoma and its compressive effect on the temporal lobe. Despite numerous theories on Mozart's pathography that also include a concomitant neurological disorder, the medical and history records about Mozart's health status indicate that he probably had suffered from an infective illness, followed most likely by the reactivation of rheumatic fever, which was followed by strong immunologic reaction in the last days of his life. Taking all the above into consideration, it is reasonably to conclude that Mozart's neurological disturbances were caused by the intensity of the infective disease, and not primarily by a neurological disease.

  14. Texas Occurrence of Lyme Disease and Its Neurological Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandashi, Jad A; Nizamutdinov, Damir; Dayawansa, Samantha; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Huang, Jason H

    2016-06-01

    Today, Lyme disease is the most commonly reported tick-borne disease in the United States and Europe. The culprits behind Lyme disease are the Borrelia species of bacteria. In the USA, Borrelia burgdorferi causes the majority of cases, while in Europe and Asia Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii carry the greatest burden of disease. The clinical manifestations of Lyme disease have been identified as early localized, early disseminated, and late chronic. The neurological effects of Lyme disease include both peripheral and central nervous systems involvement, including focal nerve abnormalities, cranial neuropathies, painful radiculoneuritis, meningitis, and/or toxic metabolic encephalopathy, known as Lyme encephalopathy. Given the geographic predominance of Lyme disease in the Northeast and Midwest of the USA, no major studies have been conducted regarding Southern states. Between 2005 and 2014, the Center for Disease Control has reported 582 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in Texas. Because of the potential for increased incidence and prevalence in Texas, it has become essential for research and clinical efforts to be diverted to the region. The Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Lyme Lab has been investigating the ecology of Lyme disease in Texas and developing a pan-specific serological test for Lyme diagnosis. This report aimed to exposure materials and raise awareness of Lyme disease to healthcare providers.

  15. Emerging Links between Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity and Neurological Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dion eDickman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic signaling systems are ubiquitous forms of biological regulation, having been studied for hundreds of years in the context of diverse physiological processes including body temperature and osmotic balance. However, only recently has this concept been brought to the study of excitatory and inhibitory electrical activity that the nervous system uses to establish and maintain stable communication. Synapses are a primary target of neuronal regulation with a variety of studies over the past 15 years demonstrating that these cellular junctions are under bidirectional homeostatic control. Recent work from an array of diverse systems and approaches has revealed exciting new links between homeostatic synaptic plasticity and a variety of seemingly disparate neurological and psychiatric diseases. These include autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, schizophrenia, and Fragile X Syndrome. Although the molecular mechanisms through which defective homeostatic signaling may lead to disease pathogenesis remain unclear, rapid progress is likely to be made in the coming years using a powerful combination of genetic, imaging, electrophysiological, and next generation sequencing approaches. Importantly, understanding homeostatic synaptic plasticity at a cellular and molecular level may lead to developments in new therapeutic innovations to treat these diseases. In this review we will examine recent studies that demonstrate homeostatic control of postsynaptic protein translation, retrograde signaling, and presynaptic function that may contribute to the etiology of complex neurological and psychiatric diseases.

  16. Quality improvement in neurology: AAN Parkinson disease quality measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, E.M.; Tonn, S.; Swain-Eng, R.; Factor, S.A.; Weiner, W.J.; Bever, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Measuring the quality of health care is a fundamental step toward improving health care and is increasingly used in pay-for-performance initiatives and maintenance of certification requirements. Measure development to date has focused on primary care and common conditions such as diabetes; thus, the number of measures that apply to neurologic care is limited. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) identified the need for neurologists to develop measures of neurologic care and to establish a process to accomplish this. Objective: To adapt and test the feasibility of a process for independent development by the AAN of measures for neurologic conditions for national measurement programs. Methods: A process that has been used nationally for measure development was adapted for use by the AAN. Topics for measure development are chosen based upon national priorities, available evidence base from a systematic literature search, gaps in care, and the potential impact for quality improvement. A panel composed of subject matter and measure development methodology experts oversees the development of the measures. Recommendation statements and their corresponding level of evidence are reviewed and considered for development into draft candidate measures. The candidate measures are refined by the expert panel during a 30-day public comment period and by review by the American Medical Association for Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) II codes. All final AAN measures are approved by the AAN Board of Directors. Results: Parkinson disease (PD) was chosen for measure development. A review of the medical literature identified 258 relevant recommendation statements. A 28-member panel approved 10 quality measures for PD that included full specifications and CPT II codes. Conclusion: The AAN has adapted a measure development process that is suitable for national measurement programs and has demonstrated its capability to independently develop quality measures. GLOSSARY

  17. NLRP3 Inflammasome in Neurological Diseases, from Functions to Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Limin; Pei, Lei; Yao, Shanglong; Wu, Yan; Shang, You

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinflammation has been identified as a causative factor of multiple neurological diseases. The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-, leucine-rich repeat- and pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, a subcellular multiprotein complex that is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), can sense and be activated by a wide range of exogenous and endogenous stimuli such as microbes, aggregated and misfolded proteins, and adenosine triphosphate, which results in activation of caspase-1. Activated caspase-1 subsequently leads to the processing of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediates rapid cell death. IL-1β and IL-18 drive inflammatory responses through diverse downstream signaling pathways, leading to neuronal damage. Thus, the NLRP3 inflammasome is considered a key contributor to the development of neuroinflammation. In this review article, we briefly discuss the structure and activation the NLRP3 inflammasome and address the involvement of the NLRP3 inflammasome in several neurological disorders, such as brain infection, acute brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, we review a series of promising therapeutic approaches that target the NLRP3 inflammasome signaling including anti-IL-1 therapy, small molecule NLRP3 inhibitors and other compounds, however, these approaches are still experimental in neurological diseases. At present, it is plausible to generate cell-specific conditional NLRP3 knockout (KO) mice via the Cre system to investigate the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome, which may be instrumental in the development of novel pharmacologic investigations for neuroinflammation-associated diseases. PMID:28337127

  18. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy for neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Marc S; Samulski, R Jude; McCown, Thomas J

    2013-06-01

    Diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) have provided enormous opportunities for the therapeutic application of viral vector gene transfer. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been the vector of choice in recent clinical trials of neurological disease, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, due to the safety, efficacy, and stability of AAV gene transfer to the CNS. This review highlights the strategies employed for improving direct and peripheral targeting of therapeutic vectors to CNS tissue, and considers the significance of cellular and tissue transduction specificity, transgene regulation, and other variables that influence achievement of successful therapeutic goals. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'New Targets and Approaches to the Treatment of Epilepsy'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Suicide and patients with neurologic diseases. Methodologic problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E N; Stenager, Egon

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The suicide risk in patients with many neurologic diseases has been reported to be greater than that in the general population. Studies on the subject are, however, often encumbered with methodologic problems. We appraised these problems and, based on an evaluation, reappraised knowledge...... of the suicide risk in patients with specific neurologic diseases. DATA SOURCE: Using the computerized database MEDLINE, we identified all published reports with the key words suicide, attempted suicide, and neurologic diseases. STUDY SELECTION: We assessed and reviewed studies concerning the most common...... neurologic diseases for methodologic problems in the study design. DATA EXTRACTION: The following methodologic problems emerged during our review: (1) choice of study type, ie, autopsy study or follow-up study; (2) choice of study population; (3) choice of control groups; (4) epidemiologic...

  20. PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiachuan; Zhang, Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Tian, Mei [University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Human neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are caused by loss of different types of neurons and glial cells in the brain and spinal cord. At present, there are no effective therapies against these disorders. Discovery of the therapeutic potential of stem cells offers new strategies for the treatment of neurological diseases. Direct assessment of stem cells' survival, interaction with the host and impact on neuronal functions after transplantation requires advanced in vivo imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potential molecular imaging modality to evaluate the viability and function of transplanted tissue or stem cells in the nervous system. This review focuses on PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. (orig.)

  1. Hospital admissions for neurological and renal diseases among dentists and dental assistants occupationally exposed to mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Hanehøj, Kirsten; Kjuus, Helge; Juel, Knud

    2011-12-01

    For many years an amalgam containing metallic mercury, which has been associated with neurological and renal diseases, has been used in dentistry. In this nationwide study we compared hospital admissions due to neurological and renal diseases among dentists and dental assistants to admissions in controls. This register-based cohort study included all Danish workers employed in dental clinics, general practitioners' clinics or lawyers' offices between 1964 and 2006. We compared dentists with general practitioners and lawyers, and dental assistants with medical secretaries, nurses and legal secretaries. We also compared dentists and dental assistants employed during periods with high occupational mercury exposure with dentists and dental assistants employed during periods with less mercury exposure. We followed all subjects in a nationwide register of hospital admissions. We analysed risk of neurological diseases, Parkinson's disease and renal diseases using a Cox regression model. The cohort consisted of 122,481 workers including 5371 dentists and 33,858 dental assistants. For neurological diseases, no association was observed for dental assistants, while for dentists an increasing risk for periods with less mercury exposure was observed. Among dental assistants, a negative association between employment length and risk of neurological disease was observed. Admissions for renal disease among dental assistants were increased during periods with less mercury exposure compared with controls. For dentists a non-significant increased risk was observed between employment length and renal disease risk. Our nationwide study does not indicate that occupational exposure to mercury increases the risk of hospital admissions for neurological, Parkinson's or renal diseases.

  2. Awareness Status of Chronic Disabling Neurological Diseases among Elderly Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ji-Ping; Zhu, Lin-Qi; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Shi-Min; Lan, Xiao-Yang; Cui, Bo; Deng, Yu-Cheng; Li, Ying-Hao; Ye, Guang-Hua; Wang, Lu-Ning

    2015-05-20

    The awareness, treatment and prevention of chronic diseases are generally poor among the elderly population of China, whereas the prevention and control of chronic diseases in elderly veteran communities have been ongoing for more than 30 years. Therefore, investigating the awareness status of chronic disabling neurological diseases (CDND) and common chronic diseases (CCD) among elderly veterans may provide references for related programs among the elderly in the general population. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among veterans ≥60 years old in veteran communities in Beijing. The awareness of preventive strategies against dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), sleep disorders, cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and CCD such as hypertension, and the approaches used to access this information, including media, word of mouth (verbal communication among the elderly) and health care professionals, were investigated via face-to-face interviews. The awareness rates for CCD and CVD were approximately 100%, but that for AD was the lowest at elderly veterans was significantly lower than that of CCD. More information about CDND should be disseminated by health care professionals. Appropriate guidance will promote the rapid and extensive dissemination of information about the prevention of CDND by media and word-of-mouth peer education.

  3. Stem cell contributions to neurological disease modeling and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Nicholas; Trujillo, Cleber A; Negraes, Priscilla D; Muotri, Alysson R; Lameu, Claudiana; Ulrich, Henning

    2018-01-03

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a revolutionary tool for disease modeling and drug discovery. The generation of tissue-relevant cell types exhibiting a patient's genetic and molecular background offers the ability to develop individual and effective therapies. In this review, we present some major achievements in the neuroscience field using iPSCs and discuss promising perspectives in personalized medicine. In addition to disease modeling, the understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of neurological disorders is explored, including the discovery of new targets and potential drugs. Ultimately, we highlight how iPSC technology, together with genome editing approaches, may bring a deep impact on pre-clinical trials by reducing costs and increasing the success of treatments in a personalized fashion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recent advances in metabolomics in neurological disease, and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai-hua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Xi-jun

    2013-10-01

    Discovery of clinically relevant biomarkers for diseases has revealed metabolomics has potential advantages that classical diagnostic approaches do not. The great asset of metabolomics is that it enables assessment of global metabolic profiles of biofluids and discovery of biomarkers distinguishing disease status, with the possibility of enhancing clinical diagnostics. Most current clinical chemistry tests rely on old technology, and are neither sensitive nor specific for a particular disease. Clinical diagnosis of major neurological disorders, for example Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, on the basis of current clinical criteria is unsatisfactory. Emerging metabolomics is a powerful technique for discovering novel biomarkers and biochemical pathways to improve diagnosis, and for determination of prognosis and therapy. Identifying multiple novel biomarkers for neurological diseases has been greatly enhanced with recent advances in metabolomics that are more accurate than routine clinical practice. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is known to be a rich source of small-molecule biomarkers for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, and is in close contact with diseased areas in neurological disorders, could potentially be used for disease diagnosis. Metabolomics will drive CSF analysis, facilitate and improve the development of disease treatment, and result in great benefits to public health in the long-term. This review covers different aspects of CSF metabolomics and discusses their significance in the postgenomic era, emphasizing the potential importance of endogenous small-molecule metabolites in this emerging field.

  5. Microbiota and neurologic diseases: potential effects of probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbrello, Giulia; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-10-19

    The microbiota colonizing the gastrointestinal tract have been associated with both gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal diseases. In recent years, considerable interest has been devoted to their role in the development of neurologic diseases, as many studies have described bidirectional communication between the central nervous system and the gut, the so-called "microbiota-gut-brain axis". Considering the ability of probiotics (i.e., live non-pathogenic microorganisms) to restore the normal microbial population and produce benefits for the host, their potential effects have been investigated in the context of neurologic diseases. The main aims of this review are to analyse the relationship between the gut microbiota and brain disorders and to evaluate the current evidence for the use of probiotics in the treatment and prevention of neurologic conditions. Overall, trials involving animal models and adults have reported encouraging results, suggesting that the administration of probiotic strains may exert some prophylactic and therapeutic effects in a wide range of neurologic conditions. Studies involving children have mainly focused on autism spectrum disorder and have shown that probiotics seem to improve neuro behavioural symptoms. However, the available data are incomplete and far from conclusive. The potential usefulness of probiotics in preventing or treating neurologic diseases is becoming a topic of great interest. However, deeper studies are needed to understand which formulation, dosage and timing might represent the optimal regimen for each specific neurologic disease and what populations can benefit. Moreover, future trials should also consider the tolerability and safety of probiotics in patients with neurologic diseases.

  6. Astaxanthin as a Potential Neuroprotective Agent for Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijian Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurological diseases, which consist of acute injuries and chronic neurodegeneration, are the leading causes of human death and disability. However, the pathophysiology of these diseases have not been fully elucidated, and effective treatments are still lacking. Astaxanthin, a member of the xanthophyll group, is a red-orange carotenoid with unique cell membrane actions and diverse biological activities. More importantly, there is evidence demonstrating that astaxanthin confers neuroprotective effects in experimental models of acute injuries, chronic neurodegenerative disorders, and neurological diseases. The beneficial effects of astaxanthin are linked to its oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic characteristics. In this review, we will focus on the neuroprotective properties of astaxanthin and explore the underlying mechanisms in the setting of neurological diseases.

  7. [Neuro-rehabilitation for neurological disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yukihiro

    2011-11-01

    Our understanding of motor learning, neuro-plasticity and functional recovery after the occurrence of brain lesion has grown significantly. New findings in basic neuroscience provided stimuli for research in motor rehabilitation. Electrical stimulation can be applied in a variety of ways to the neurological impairment. Especially, electromyography (EMG) initiated electrical muscle stimulation improves motor dysfunction of the hemiparetic arm and hand. Triggered electrical stimulation is reported to be more effective than non-triggered electrical stimulation in facilitating upper extremity motor recovery. Power-assisted FES induces greater muscle contraction by electrical stimulation in proportion to the voluntary integrated EMG signal picked up. Daily power-assisted FES home program therapy with the novel equipment has been able to improve wrist, finger extension and shoulder flexion effectively. Combined modulation of voluntary movement, proprioceptional sensory feedback and electrical stimulation might play an important role to facilitate impaired sensory-motor integration in power-assisted FES therapy. It is recognized that increased cerebral blood flow in the sensory-motor cortex area on the injured side during power-assisted FES session compared to simple active movement or simple electrical stimulation in a multi-channels Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study to non-invasively and dynamically measure hemoglobin levels in the brain during functional activity.

  8. Lyme disease: neurology, neurobiology, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, John J

    2014-05-01

    The Lyme disease controversy can be largely linked to the misconception that neurobehavioral effects of illness constitute evidence of nervous system infection. Appropriate differentiation between neuroborreliosis (nervous system Borrelia burgdorferi infection) and Lyme encephalopathy (altered nervous system function in individuals with systemic but not nervous system infection)-or encephalopathies of other etiologies-would lessen the controversy considerably, as the attribution of nonspecific symptoms to supposed ongoing central nervous system infection is a major factor perpetuating the debate. Epidemiologic considerations suggest that the entities referred to as "posttreatment Lyme disease" and "chronic Lyme disease" may not actually exist but rather reflect anchoring bias, linking common, nonspecific symptoms to an antecedent medical event. On the other hand, there are data suggesting possible mechanisms by which posttreatment Lyme disease could occur.

  9. Dynamic diseases in neurology and psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, John; Black, Deborah

    1995-03-01

    Thirty-two (32) periodic diseases of the nervous system are identified in which symptoms and/or signs recur. In 10/32, the recurrence of a symptom complex is one of the defining features of the illness, whereas in 22/32 oscillatory signs occur in the setting of an ongoing nervous system disorder. We discuss the possibility that these disorders may be dynamic diseases.

  10. Susac's syndrome, a rare, potentially severe or lethal neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saux, A; Niango, G; Charif, M; Morales, R; Mura, F; Bonafe, A; Mourand, I

    2010-10-15

    Susac's syndrome (SS) is a rare, immune-mediated endotheliopathy affecting the microvasculature of the brain, the inner ear and the retina. Clinical presentation is characterised by a triad: encephalopathy, hearing loss and branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO). Given the rarity of this disease, its natural history still remains partially unknown, but lethal cases appear to be extremely rare since there has never been, to our knowledge, a report of SS leading to death. We report 2 cases of SS illustrating the multiplicity of neurological symptomatology and its unpredictable course. One case is particularly unusual due to its severe neurological evolution, leading to death despite treatments. This report presents clinical and paraclinical findings contributory to SS diagnosis and offers an innovative perspective on disease management. These cases represent the potential severity of this disease. Early, aggressive treatment strategies may be warranted for SS in order to avoid neurological deterioration and lethal evolution. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Frequency of hereditary neurologic diseases. A clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, M; Baldini, S; Voltolin, G; Norat, M; Bottacchi, E

    1993-09-01

    The nervous system is affected in 30% of hereditary monogenic disorders and as many as 500 single-gene disorders display major neurologic symptoms. We have studied the frequency of hereditary neurological diseases to assess their importance in daily hospital activity. Only single-gene hereditary diseases with central or peripheral nervous system involvement were considered; thus chromosomal diseases and diseases with multifactorial etiology were excluded. We surveyed admission to in- and out-patient departments of Neurology, Pediatrics, and Dermatology of the Aosta Regional Hospital for the calendar years 1982-1991, collecting 229 cases, 95 women and 134 men. Out-patient departments held 126 patients, the others came from in-patient departments. Admission to the neurological in-patient department were 1.8% of total neurological admissions in the same period. Each diagnosis was assigned to the code number of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-IX Revision, 1975). We found 33 different phenotypes. Most frequent diagnoses were: essential tremor (89 patients), hereditary sensory-motor neuropathy (HSMN) type I (28), Huntington's chorea (13), progressive muscular dystrophy limb-girdle type (8), neurofibromatosis type I (9), HSMN type II (9), spinocerebellar ataxia (9), hereditary spastic paraplegia (7), spinal muscular atrophy type IV (5), myotonic dystrophy (5), cerebellar ataxia (4), HSMN type III (4), spinal muscular atrophy type II and III (3), tuberous sclerosis (3). Essential tremor mostly affected persons in the over-50 age groups. On the contrary, the other neurologic monogenic diseases were diagnosed in all ages with the following age-group breakdown: 0-9, 11%; 10-19, 16%; 20-29, 15%; 30-39, 8%; 40-49, 11%; 50-59, 19%; 60-69, 14%, 70+, 7%. Consistently with the general rule, autosomic recessive diseases have the earliest onset and autosomic dominant ones the latest; HSMN, spinal muscular atrophy and Huntington's chorea were the disorders diagnosed

  12. Obsessive–Compulsive Symptoms in Neurologic Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. George

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD is an increasingly recognized disorder with a prevalence of 2–3% (Robins et al., 1984. Once thought to be psychodynamic in origin, OCD is now generally recognized as having a neurobiological cause. Although the exact pathophysiology of OCD in its pure form remains unknown, there are numerous reports of obsessive–compulsive symptoms arising in the setting of known neurological disease. In this paper, we review the reported cases of obsessive–compulsive symptoms associated with neurologic diseases and outline the known facts about the underlying neurobiology of OCD. Finally, we synthesize these findings into a proposed theory of the pathophysiology of OCD, in both its pure form and when it accompanies other neurological illness.

  13. Insomnia in central neurologic diseases--occurrence and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Geert; Jennum, Poul; Riemann, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    antidepressants may be an effective treatment for insomnia in stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Melatonin and light treatment can stabilize the sleep-wake circadian rhythm and shorten sleep latency in dementias and PD. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be effective in treating insomnia symptoms......The objective of this review is to highlight the impact of insomnia in central neurological disorders by providing information on its prevalence and give recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. Insomnia in neurological disorders is a frequent, but underestimated symptom. Its occurrence may...... the cause of insomnia must be clearly identified. First line treatment aims at the underlying neurologic disease. The few high quality treatment studies show that short term treatment with hypnotics may be recommended in most disorders after having ruled out high risk for adverse effects. Sedating...

  14. Lipidomic Evaluation of Feline Neurologic Disease after AAV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L. Gray-Edwards

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available GM1 gangliosidosis is a fatal lysosomal disorder, for which there is no effective treatment. Adeno-associated virus (AAV gene therapy in GM1 cats has resulted in a greater than 6-fold increase in lifespan, with many cats remaining alive at >5.7 years of age, with minimal clinical signs. Glycolipids are the principal storage product in GM1 gangliosidosis whose pathogenic mechanism is not completely understood. Targeted lipidomics analysis was performed to better define disease mechanisms and identify markers of disease progression for upcoming clinical trials in humans. 36 sphingolipids and subspecies associated with ganglioside biosynthesis were tested in the cerebrospinal fluid of untreated GM1 cats at a humane endpoint (∼8 months, AAV-treated GM1 cats (∼5 years old, and normal adult controls. In untreated GM1 cats, significant alterations were noted in 16 sphingolipid species, including gangliosides (GM1 and GM3, lactosylceramides, ceramides, sphingomyelins, monohexosylceramides, and sulfatides. Variable degrees of correction in many lipid metabolites reflected the efficacy of AAV gene therapy. Sphingolipid levels were highly predictive of neurologic disease progression, with 11 metabolites having a coefficient of determination (R2 > 0.75. Also, a specific detergent additive significantly increased the recovery of certain lipid species in cerebrospinal fluid samples. This report demonstrates the methodology and utility of targeted lipidomics to examine the pathophysiology of lipid storage disorders.

  15. Pattern of neurological diseases as seen in outpatient children: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    childhood are speech and communication disorders often associated with C/P and post febrile illness in our study. Despite an apparent large number of children with disabilities in developing countries especially in Africa, the majority of studies highlight the preponderance of neurological diseases among adults. As a result ...

  16. Disease Patterns and Outcome for Medical Neurological Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To review the disease pattern and outcome for neurological patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu, Nigeria was undertaken. Patients and Methods: The hospital records (case notes ICU records) were reviewed retrospectively for five years and the ...

  17. Dysprosody nonassociated with neurological diseases--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, José Antonio; Corso, Renato José; Guilherme, Ana Cláudia Rocha; Pinho, Sílvia Rebelo; Nóbrega, Monica de Oliveira

    2004-03-01

    Dysprosody also known as pseudo-foreign dialect, is the rarest neurological speech disorder. It is characterized by alterations in intensity, in the timing of utterance segments, and in rhythm, cadency, and intonation of words. The terms refers to changes as to duration, fundamental frequency, and intensity of tonic and atonic syllables of the sentences spoken, which deprive an individual's particular speech of its characteristics. The cause of this disease is usually associated with neurological pathologies such as brain vascular accidents, cranioencephalic traumatisms, and brain tumors. The authors report a case of dysprosody attended to at the Núcleo de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço de São Paulo (NOSP). It is about a female patient with bilateral III degree Reinke's edema and normal neurological examinations that started presenting characteristics of the German dialect following a larynx microsurgery.

  18. A Case-Control study of the prevalence of neurological diseases in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Assis Aquino Gondim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurological diseases are common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients, but their exact prevalence is unknown. Method We prospectively evaluated the presence of neurological disorders in 121 patients with IBD [51 with Crohn's disease (CD and 70 with ulcerative colitis (UC] and 50 controls (gastritis and dyspepsia over 3 years. Results Our standard neurological evaluation (that included electrodiagnostic testing revealed that CD patients were 7.4 times more likely to develop large-fiber neuropathy than controls (p = 0.045, 7.1 times more likely to develop any type of neuromuscular condition (p = 0.001 and 5.1 times more likely to develop autonomic complaints (p = 0.027. UC patients were 5 times more likely to develop large-fiber neuropathy (p = 0.027 and 3.1 times more likely to develop any type of neuromuscular condition (p = 0.015. Conclusion In summary, this is the first study to prospectively establish that both CD and UC patients are more prone to neuromuscular diseases than patients with gastritis and dyspepsia.

  19. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Resources Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  20. Estimating and communicating prognosis in advanced neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Robert G; Gramling, Robert; Kelly, Adam G

    2013-02-19

    Prognosis can no longer be relegated behind diagnosis and therapy in high-quality neurologic care. High-stakes decisions that patients (or their surrogates) make often rest upon perceptions and beliefs about prognosis, many of which are poorly informed. The new science of prognostication--the estimating and communication "what to expect"--is in its infancy and the evidence base to support "best practices" is lacking. We propose a framework for formulating a prediction and communicating "what to expect" with patients, families, and surrogates in the context of common neurologic illnesses. Because neurologic disease affects function as much as survival, we specifically address 2 important prognostic questions: "How long?" and "How well?" We provide a summary of prognostic information and highlight key points when tailoring a prognosis for common neurologic diseases. We discuss the challenges of managing prognostic uncertainty, balancing hope and realism, and ways to effectively engage surrogate decision-makers. We also describe what is known about the nocebo effects and the self-fulfilling prophecy when communicating prognoses. There is an urgent need to establish research and educational priorities to build a credible evidence base to support best practices, improve communication skills, and optimize decision-making. Confronting the challenges of prognosis is necessary to fulfill the promise of delivering high-quality, patient-centered care.

  1. Clostridial disease associated with neurologic signs: tetanus, botulism, and enterotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rings, D Michael

    2004-07-01

    Clostridial infections are found worldwide in almost all species of animals and may involve a variety of body systems and present with a diversity of clinical signs. Most damage done through clostridial infections is due to the action of toxins released from the bacteria.Thus, disease caused by Clostridium spp should more correctly be called intoxication. Two prominent clostridial infections are associated with neurologic signs: Clostridium botulinum and C tetani. In both infections, the mechanism that is responsible for causing the problem is similar, despite the remarkable difference in clinical presentation. In addition, neurologic signs are described with C perfringens types C and D but are not the dominant feature of these diseases.

  2. Vitamin D and Neurological Diseases: An Endocrine View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Di Somma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D system comprises hormone precursors, active metabolites, carriers, enzymes, and receptors involved in genomic and non-genomic effects. In addition to classical bone-related effects, this system has also been shown to activate multiple molecular mediators and elicit many physiological functions. In vitro and in vivo studies have, in fact, increasingly focused on the “non-calcemic” actions of vitamin D, which are associated with the maintenance of glucose homeostasis, cardiovascular morbidity, autoimmunity, inflammation, and cancer. In parallel, growing evidence has recognized that a multimodal association links vitamin D system to brain development, functions and diseases. With vitamin D deficiency reaching epidemic proportions worldwide, there is now concern that optimal levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream are also necessary to preserve the neurological development and protect the adult brain. The aim of this review is to highlight the relationship between vitamin D and neurological diseases.

  3. Neurological manifestations of ear disease in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garosi, Laurent S; Lowrie, Mark L; Swinbourne, Natalie F

    2012-11-01

    There are four major neuroanatomical structures associated with the ear that, when damaged, result in different neurologic clinical signs. These structures are the facial nerve, the ocular sympathetic tract, the vestibular receptors, and the cochlea. The clinical signs associated with disorders of each structure are discussed, followed by a summary of the diseases that should be considered in each case. The article begins with a description of the neuroanatomy of each of these structures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Features of neurologic semiotics at chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, I V; Baranov, V L; Kolcheva, Iu A

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is actual pathology, when it forms the mixed hypoxemia. In the conditions of a chronic hypoxemia structures of organism with high level of metabolic processes, namely brain tissues, suffer. Character of defeat of the central nervous system at that pathology is insufficiently studied. In this article we studied and analysed the presence of such changes as depression, anxiety, cognitive impairment and features of neurologic semiotics at COPD in 50 patients.

  5. [Depressive disorder in cardiovascular, neurological and oncologic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesková, E

    2005-01-01

    The discovery of antidepressants meant undoubtedly a revolution in psychiatry. The development of antidepressants has changed the image of psychiatry, brought a progress in the treatment and became a stimulus for investigations of mental illnesses ethiopathogenesis. Nowadays it is becoming evident, that many biologic, psychologic and with high probability also social aspects are common for the depression and for somatic disorders. The more prominent is the association of depression with cardiovascular disease. Neurological disease, mainly the epilepsy, Parkinson disease an stroke represent further common sphere. Historically, association between cancer and depression was identified first. The article presents epidemiological data and analyses possible common mechanisms of somatic disease and depression. In the last part the actual data about the treatment of depression in individual somatic diseases are described.

  6. The saccadic and neurological deficits in type 3 Gaucher disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Benko

    Full Text Available Our objective was to characterize the saccadic eye movements in patients with type 3 Gaucher disease (chronic neuronopathic in relationship to neurological and neurophysiological abnormalities. For approximately 4 years, we prospectively followed a cohort of 15 patients with Gaucher type 3, ages 8-28 years, by measuring saccadic eye movements using the scleral search coil method. We found that patients with type 3 Gaucher disease had a significantly higher regression slope of duration vs amplitude and peak duration vs amplitude compared to healthy controls for both horizontal and vertical saccades. Saccadic latency was significantly increased for horizontal saccades only. Downward saccades were more affected than upward saccades. Saccade abnormalities increased over time in some patients reflecting the slowly progressive nature of the disease. Phase plane plots showed individually characteristic patterns of abnormal saccade trajectories. Oculo-manual dexterity scores on the Purdue Pegboard test were low in virtually all patients, even in those with normal cognitive function. Vertical saccade peak duration vs amplitude slope significantly correlated with IQ and with the performance on the Purdue Pegboard but not with the brainstem and somatosensory evoked potentials. We conclude that, in patients with Gaucher disease type 3, saccadic eye movements and oculo-manual dexterity are representative neurological functions for longitudinal studies and can probably be used as endpoints for therapeutic clinical trials.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00001289.

  7. Neurological diseases of the Cavalier King Charles spaniel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusbridge, C

    2005-06-01

    Several neurological syndromes have been described in Cavalier King Charles spaniels and many of the conditions have similar clinical signs. The current knowledge of these syndromes is reviewed in this article, with the aim of enabling the general practitioner to formulate a differential diagnosis and plan for diagnostic tests and treatment. Specifically, the article discusses and contrasts the most common conditions seen, Including occipital hypoplasia/syringomyelia, episodic collapse, epilepsy and vestibular disorders.

  8. Anesthesia in neurologic and psychiatric diseases: is there a 'best anesthesia' for certain diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachenberg, Thomas; Schneemilch, Christine

    2014-08-01

    Patients with diseases affecting the central nervous system present a wide range of clinical manifestations increasing the perioperative risk. The following review focused on recommendations for anaesthesiological management in patients with both neurologic and psychiatric diseases. The heterogeneity of disorders affecting the central nervous system and the variability of comorbidities make definition of standards for anaesthesiological management difficult. Anatomical malpositions, pulmonary and cardiac co-morbidities determine the perioperative risk. Patients require a careful preoperative assessment, including interdisciplinary communication between neurologists, psychiatrists or paediatric physicians. Adequate devices and equipment for airway management should be available before induction of general anesthesia. For premedication in patients with limited respiratory function, clonidine, given orally, is a good alternative. The use of short-acting hypnotic and analgesic drugs (e.g. propofol/remifentanil) can be safely administered for induction and maintenance of anesthesia. The use of volatile agents and succinylcholine is strictly avoided in patients with muscular dystrophy and myopathies. Peripheral and neuroaxial regional anesthesia is not contraindicated in patients with neuromuscular diseases unless there is a rapid deterioration of the neurological status. The 'best' anesthesia includes adequate preoperative evaluation of the individual risk, optimization of comorbidities before elective surgery, the use of short-acting anesthetic agents for induction and maintenance of general anesthesia, avoidance of volatile agents and succinylcholine in muscular dystrophy and myopathies.

  9. Diagnosis, psychiatry and neurology: the case of Huntington Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Although Huntington Disease (HD) is recognized as a neurological condition, it has a number of psychiatric effects, with recent studies suggesting that these effects can appear years prior to the telltale neurological symptoms. This trajectory has, in part, led to the misdiagnosis of HD as a psychiatric illness, as explicated in numerous case studies. This paper utilizes HD as a case study to investigate the social consequences of diagnosis by highlighting the tensions and ambiguities between neurology and psychiatry, while also discussing the difficulties that HD creates for psychiatry's diagnostic schema. Findings are based on 30 in-depth interviews conducted with both individuals with HD and informal caregivers (e.g., spouses) in British Columbia, Canada. The findings address numerous instances of misdiagnosis and the resulting negative impacts for individual health and well-being. The findings are further discussed in relation to the work of Bakhtin and Latour, with suggestions presented to ameliorate such misdiagnoses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A prospective emergency department-based study of pattern and outcome of neurologic and neurosurgical diseases in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthélemy, Ernest Joseph; Benjamin, Ernest; Edouard Jean-Pierre, Marie Yolaine; Poitevien, Geneviève; Ernst, Silvia; Osborn, Irene; Germano, Isabelle M

    2014-12-01

    To perform the first prospective survey of neurologic and neurosurgical emergency department (ED) admissions in Haiti. Data of all ED admissions at 3 Haitian hospitals for 90 consecutive days per site were collected prospectively. Patients who were given a diagnosis of a neurologic or neurosurgical disorder by the ED physician were entered in a deidentified database including demographics, presenting symptoms, brain imaging (when available), requests for neurosurgical consultation, and outcome. Of the 7628 patients admitted to the ED during this study, 1243 patients had a neurologic disorder, yielding an ED-based neurologic disease prevalence of 16%. The 3 most common neurologic diseases were cerebrovascular disease (31%), neurotrauma (28%), and altered mental status (12%). Neurosurgical pathologies represented 19% of all neurologic admissions with a combined ED-based disease prevalence of 3%. Mortality rate was 9%. The most common neurosurgical disease was neurotrauma (87%), caused by motor vehicle accidents (59%), falls (20%), and assault (17%). Neurosurgical procedures were performed in 14 of 208 patients with a mortality rate of 33%. This prospective survey represents the first study of neurosurgical or neurologic disease patterns in Haiti. The results suggest specific disease priorities for this population that can guide efforts to improve Haitian health care and conduct more comprehensive epidemiologic studies in Haiti. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Role of Nitric Oxide from Neurological Disease to Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Ahmed; Abdel Rahman, Mohamed F; Gad, Mohamed Z

    2017-01-01

    Until the beginning of the 1980s, nitric oxide (NO) was just a toxic molecule of a lengthy list of environmental pollutants such as cigarette smoke and smog. In fact, NO had a very bad reputation of being destroyer of ozone, suspected carcinogen and precursor of acid rain. However, by the early 1990s it was well recognized by the medical research community. Over the last two decades, the picture has been totally changed. Diverse lines of evidence have converged to show that this sometime poison is a fundamental player in the everyday business of the human body. NO activity was probed in the brain, arteries, immune system, liver, pancreas, uterus, peripheral nerves, lungs, and almost every system in the human body. NO is a major player in the cardiovascular system as it is involved in regulating blood pressure. In the CNS, it is involved in memory formation and the regulation of cerebral blood flow to ensure adequate supply of blood to the brain. Because NO is involved in many pathways, it has a role in several diseases related to modern life as hypertension, coronary heart diseases, Alzheimer's Disease, stroke and cancer. This chapter focuses on the discussion of the role of NO in neurological diseases and cancer and how can this Janus-faced molecule play a role in the pathology and personalized treatment of these diseases.

  12. Adhesive arachnoiditis in mixed connective tissue disease: a rare neurological manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Maria Usman; Devlin, James Anthony Joseph; Fraser, Alexander

    2016-12-16

    The overall incidence of neurological manifestations is relatively low among patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). We recently encountered a case of autoimmune adhesive arachnoiditis in a young woman with 7 years history of MCTD who presented with severe back pain and myeloradiculopathic symptoms of lower limbs. To the best of our knowledge, adhesive arachnoiditis in an MCTD patient has never been previously reported. We report here this rare case, with the clinical picture and supportive ancillary data, including serology, cerebral spinal fluid analysis, electrophysiological evaluation and spinal neuroimaging, that is, MRI and CT (CT scan) of thoracic and lumbar spine. Her neurological deficit improved after augmenting her immunosuppressant therapy. Our case suggests that adhesive arachnoiditis can contribute to significant neurological deficits in MCTD and therefore requires ongoing surveillance. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Shiga toxin Mediated Neurologic Changes in Murine Model of Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Pradhan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Seizures and neurologic involvement have been reported in patients infected with Shiga toxin (Stx producing E. coli, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS with neurologic involvement is associated with more severe outcome. We investigated the extent of renal and neurologic damage in mice following injection of the highly potent form of Stx, Stx2a, and less potent Stx1. As observed in previous studies, Stx2a brought about moderate to acute tubular necrosis of proximal and distal tubules in the kidneys. Brain sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E appeared normal, although some red blood cell congestion was observed. Microglial cell responses to neural injury include up-regulation of surface-marker expression (e.g. Iba1 and stereotypical morphological changes. Mice injected with Stx2a showed increased Iba1 staining, mild morphological changes associated with microglial activation (thickening of processes, and increased microglial staining per unit area. Microglial changes were observed in the cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala regions, but not the nucleus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of Stx2a-treated mice revealed no hyper-intensities in the brain, although magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS revealed significantly decreased levels of phosphocreatine in the thalamus. Less dramatic changes were observed following Stx1 challenge. Neither immortalized microvascular endothelial cells from the cerebral cortex of mice (bEnd.3 nor primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells were found to be susceptible to Stx1 or Stx2a. The lack of susceptibility to Stx for both cell types correlated with an absence of receptor expression. These studies indicate Stx causes subtle, but identifiable changes in the mouse brain.

  14. Focused Ultrasound: An Emerging Therapeutic Modality for Neurologic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Paul S; Frenkel, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound is only beginning to be applied to neurologic conditions, but the potential of this modality for a wide spectrum of brain applications is high. Engineering advances now allow sound waves to be targeted through the skull to a brain region selected with real time magnetic resonance imaging and thermography, using a commercial array of focused emitters. High intensities of sonic energy can create a coagulation lesion similar to that of older radiofrequency stereotactic methods, but without opening the skull. This has led to the recent Food and Drug Administration approval of focused ultrasound (FUS) thalamotomy for unilateral treatment of essential tremor. Clinical studies of stereotactic FUS for aspects of Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, and refractory psychiatric indications are underway, with promising results. Moderate-intensity FUS has the potential to safely open the blood-brain barrier for localized delivery of therapeutics, while low levels of sonic energy can be used as a form of neuromodulation.

  15. [Neurological diseases and suicide: from neurobiology to hopelessness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanza, A; Baertschi, M; Weber, K; Canuto, A

    2015-02-11

    Neurologic diseases expose at a high risk of suicidal behaviors and they constitute a privileged domain for exploring the heterogeneity of underlying mechanisms. They are in fact characterized by strictly biological injuries that may be involved in cerebral systems considered at the basis of neurobiological vulnerability for suicide. At the same time, they oblige a numberof existential topics to emerge, as the hopelessness in respect of several particularly severe conditions without an etiologic treatment. A clinical approach reserving an unconditional listening can prevent a suicidal attempt. Furthermore, it can illustrate the role of the liaison's psychiatrist, who tries to transform a hopelessness situation into a patient's personal questioning and try to be present when therapeutic action is not longer possible.

  16. [Combination of TMS and MRT to understand neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, F C

    2014-06-01

    Modern neuroimaging techniques, such as structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly used in the neuroscientific research of neurological disorders, such as stroke, tinnitus and movement disorders. These methods offer a non-invasive approach and especially in combination, not only the opportunity to add to the pathophysiological understanding of these disorders but also to provide information about the functional recovery and the natural course of the disease in a predictive way. Based on such knowledge therapeutic approaches can be adapted in a patient-tailored fashion to achieve the best therapeutic effects. Furthermore, these methods might provide additional non-invasive information for neurosurgical interventions reducing perioperative interventional risks.In the present article these aspects will be discussed with a focus on the combination of MRI and TMS especially addressed for the topic of recovery from stroke.

  17. A novel portable, low-cost kinect-based system for motion analysis in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Cunha, Joao Paulo; Rocha, Ana Patricia; Pereira Choupina, Hugo Miguel; Fernandes, Jose Maria; Rosas, Maria Jose; Vaz, Rui; Achilles, Felix; Loesch, Anna Mira; Vollmar, Christian; Hartl, Elisabeth; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2016-08-01

    Many neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease and epilepsy, can significantly impair the motor function of the patients, often leading to a dramatic loss of their quality of life. Human motion analysis is regarded as fundamental towards an early diagnosis and enhanced follow-up in this type of diseases. In this contribution, we present NeuroKinect, a novel system designed for motion analysis in neurological diseases. This system includes an RGB-D camera (Microsoft Kinect) and two integrated software applications, KiT (KinecTracker) and KiMA (Kinect Motion Analyzer). The applications enable the preview, acquisition, review and management of data provided by the sensor, which are then used for motion analysis of relevant events. NeuroKinect is a portable, low-cost and markerless solution that is suitable for use in the clinical environment. Furthermore, it is able to provide quantitative support to the clinical assessment of different neurological diseases with movement impairments, as demonstrated by its usage in two different clinical routine scenarios: gait analysis in Parkinson's disease and seizure semiology analysis in epilepsy.

  18. Chagas disease in a Texan horse with neurologic deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Laura K; Hamer, Sarah A; Shaw, Sarah; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Auckland, Lisa D; Hodo, Carolyn L; Chaffin, Keith; Rech, Raquel R

    2016-01-30

    A 10-year-old Quarter Horse gelding presented to the Texas A&M University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a six month-history of ataxia and lameness in the hind limbs. The horse was treated presumptively for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) based on clinical signs but was ultimately euthanized after its condition worsened. Gross lesions were limited to a small area of reddening in the gray matter of the thoracic spinal cord. Histologically, trypanosome amastigotes morphologically similar to Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease in humans and dogs, were sporadically detected within segments of the thoracic spinal cord surrounded by mild lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. Ancillary testing for Sarcocystis neurona, Neospora spp., Toxoplasma gondii and Leishmania spp. was negative. Conventional and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of affected paraffin embedded spinal cord were positive for T. cruzi, and sequencing of the amplified T. cruzi satellite DNA PCR fragment from the horse was homologous with various clones of T. cruzi in GenBank. While canine Chagas disease cases have been widely reported in southern Texas, this is the first report of clinical T. cruzi infection in an equid with demonstrable amastigotes in the spinal cord. In contrast to previous instances of Chagas disease in the central nervous system (CNS) of dogs and humans, no inflammation or T. cruzi amastigotes were detected in the heart of the horse. Based on clinical signs, there is a potential for misdiagnosis of Chagas disease with other infectious diseases that affect the equine CNS. T. cruzi should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with neurologic clinical signs and histologic evidence of meningomyelitis that originate in areas where Chagas disease is present. The prevalence of T. cruzi in horses and the role of equids in the parasite life cycle require further study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Neurological Diseases as Primary Gliopathies: A Reassessment of Neurocentrism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Verkhratsky

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of the human brain are almost universally attributed to malfunction or loss of nerve cells. However, a considerable amount of work has, during the last decade, expanded our view on the role of astrocytes in CNS (central nervous system, and this analysis suggests that astrocytes contribute to both initiation and propagation of many (if not all neurological diseases. Astrocytes provide metabolic and trophic support to neurons and oligodendrocytes. Here, we shall endeavour a broad overviewing of the progress in the field and forward the idea that loss of homoeostatic astroglial function leads to an acute loss of neurons in the setting of acute insults such as ischaemia, whereas more subtle dysfunction of astrocytes over periods of months to years contributes to epilepsy and to progressive loss of neurons in neurodegenerative diseases. The majority of therapeutic drugs currently in clinical use target neuronal receptors, channels or transporters. Future therapeutic efforts may benefit by a stronger focus on the supportive homoeostatic functions of astrocytes.

  20. Neuroinflammation and neurological alterations in chronic liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmina Montoliu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several million people with chronic liver diseases (cirrhosis, hepatitis show neurological alterations, named hepatic encephalopathy (HE with cognitive and motor alterations that impair quality of life and reduces life span. Inflammation acts synergistically with hyperammonemia to induce cognitive and motor alterations in patients with chronic liver disease and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE. Previous studies in animal models have suggested that neuroinflammation is a major player in HE. This would also be the case in patients with liver cirrhosis or hepatitis C with HE. Rats with MHE show microglial activation and neuroinflammation that is associated with cognitive impairment and hypokinesia. The anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen reduces microglial activation and neuroinflammation and restores cognitive and motor functions in rats with MHE. Chronic hyperammonemia per se induces neuroinflammation. Both peripheral inflammation and hyperammonemia would contribute to neuroinflammation in chronic liver failure. Therefore, neuroinflammation may be a key therapeutic target to improve the cognitive and motor alterations in MHE and overt HE. Identifying new targets to reduce neuroinflammation in MHE without inducing secondary effects would serve to develop new therapeutic tools to reverse the cognitive and motor alterations in patients with HE associated with chronic liver diseases.

  1. Yellow fever vaccine-associated neurological disease, a suspicious case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirão, Pedro; Pereira, Patrícia; Nunes, Andreia; Antunes, Pedro

    2017-03-02

    A 70-year-old man with known cardiovascular risk factors, presented with acute onset expression aphasia, agraphia, dyscalculia, right-left disorientation and finger agnosia, without fever or meningeal signs. Stroke was thought to be the cause, but cerebrovascular disease investigation was negative. Interviewing the family revealed he had undergone yellow fever vaccination 18 days before. Lumbar puncture revealed mild protein elevation. Cultural examinations, Coxiella burnetti, and neurotropic virus serologies were negative. Regarding the yellow fever virus, IgG was identified in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), with negative IgM and virus PCR in CSF. EEG showed an encephalopathic pattern. The patient improved gradually and a week after discharge was his usual self. Only criteria for suspect neurotropic disease were met, but it's possible the time spent between symptom onset and lumbar puncture prevented a definite diagnosis of yellow fever vaccine-associated neurological disease. This gap would have been smaller if the vaccination history had been collected earlier. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. EFNS guidelines for the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in treatment of neurological diseases: EFNS task force on the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in treatment of neurological diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elovaara, I.; Apostolski, S.; van Doorn, P.; Gilhus, N. E.; Hietaharju, A.; Honkaniemi, J.; van Schaik, I. N.; Scolding, N.; Soelberg Sørensen, P.; Udd, B.

    2008-01-01

    Despite high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is widely used in treatment of a number of immune-mediated neurological diseases, the consensus on its optimal use is insufficient. To define the evidence-based optimal use of IVIG in neurology, the recent papers of high relevance were reviewed and

  3. Frontiers in therapeutic development of allopregnanolone for Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W. Irwin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Allopregnanolone (Allo, a neurosteroid, has emerged as a promising promoter of endogenous regeneration in brain. In a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, Allo induced neurogenesis, oligodendrogenesis, white matter generation and cholesterol homeostasis while simultaneously reducing β-amyloid and neuroinflammatory burden. Allo activates signaling pathways and gene expression required for regeneration of neural stem cells and their differentiation into neurons. In parallel, Allo activates systems to sustain cholesterol homeostasis and reduce β-amyloid generation. To advance Allo into studies for chronic human neurological conditions, we examined translational and clinical parameters: dose, regimen, route, formulation, outcome measures, and safety regulations. A treatment regimen of once per week at sub-sedative doses of Allo was optimal for regeneration and reduction in Alzheimer’s pathology. This regimen had a high safety profile following chronic exposure in aged normal and Alzheimer’s mice. Formulation of Allo for multiple routes of administration has been developed for both preclinical and clinical testing. Preclinical evidence for therapeutic efficacy of Allo spans multiple neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, Niemann-Pick, diabetic neuropathy, status epilepticus, and traumatic brain injury. To successfully translate Allo as a therapeutic for multiple neurological disorders, it will be necessary to tailor dose and regimen to the targeted therapeutic mechanisms and disease etiology. Treatment paradigms conducted in accelerated disease models in young animals have a low probability of successful translation to chronic diseases in adult and aged humans. Gender, genetic risks, stage and burden of disease are critical determinants of efficacy. This review focuses on recent advances in development of Allo for Alzheimer’s disease that have the potential to accelerate therapeutic translation for

  4. Enfermedad neurologica por adenovirus Neurologic disease due to adenovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina L. Lema

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de adenovirus (ADV en las infecciones del sistema nervioso central (SNC. Se analizaron 108 muestras de líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR provenientes de 79 casos de encefalitis, 7 meningitis y 22 de otras patologías neurológicas, recibidas en el período 2000-2002. Cuarenta y nueve (47.35% se obtuvieron de pacientes inmunocomprometidos. La presencia de ADV se investigó mediante reacción en cadena de la polimerasa en formato anidado (Nested-PCR. La identificación del genogrupo se realizó mediante análisis filogenético de la secuencia nucleotídica parcial de la región que codifica para la proteína del hexón. Se detectó la presencia de ADV en 6 de 108 (5.5% muestras de LCR analizadas. Todos los casos positivos pertenecieron a pacientes con encefalitis que fueron 79, (6/79, 7.6%. No se observó diferencia estadísticamente significativa entre los casos de infección por ADV en pacientes inmunocomprometidos e inmunocompetentes (p>0.05. Las cepas de ADV detectadas se agruparon en los genogrupos B1 y C. En conclusión, nuestros resultados describen el rol de los ADV en las infecciones neurológicas en Argentina. La información presentada contribuye al conocimiento de su epidemiología, en particular en casos de encefalitis.The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of adenovirusm (ADV infections in neurological disorders. A total of 108 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from 79 encephalitis cases, 7 meningitis and 22 other neurological diseases analysed in our laboratory between 2000 and 2002 were studied. Forty nine (47.4% belonged to immunocompromised patients. Viral genome was detected using nested polymerase chain reaction (Nested-PCR and ADV genotypes were identified using partial gene sequence analysis of hexon gene. Adenovirus were detected in 6 of 108 (5.5% CSF samples tested. All of these were from encephalitis cases, 6/79, representing 7.6% of them. No statistically

  5. Increased neurofilament light chain blood levels in neurodegenerative neurological diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Gaiottino

    Full Text Available Neuronal damage is the morphological substrate of persisting neurological disability. Neurofilaments (Nf are cytoskeletal proteins of neurons and their release into cerebrospinal fluid has shown encouraging results as a biomarker for neurodegeneration. This study aimed to validate the quantification of the Nf light chain (NfL in blood samples, as a biofluid source easily accessible for longitudinal studies.We developed and applied a highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL based immunoassay for quantification of NfL in blood and CSF.Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD (30.8 pg/ml, n=20, Guillain-Barré-syndrome (GBS (79.4 pg/ml, n=19 or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS (95.4 pg/ml, n=46 had higher serum NfL values than a control group of neurological patients without evidence of structural CNS damage (control patients, CP (4.4 pg/ml, n=68, p<0.0001 for each comparison, p=0.002 for AD patients and healthy controls (HC (3.3 pg/ml, n=67, p<0.0001. Similar differences were seen in corresponding CSF samples. CSF and serum levels correlated in AD (r=0.48, p=0.033, GBS (r=0.79, p<0.0001 and ALS (r=0.70, p<0.0001, but not in CP (r=0.11, p=0.3739. The sensitivity and specificity of serum NfL for separating ALS from healthy controls was 91.3% and 91.0%.We developed and validated a novel ECL based sandwich immunoassay for the NfL protein in serum (NfL(Umea47:3; levels in ALS were more than 20-fold higher than in controls. Our data supports further longitudinal studies of serum NfL in neurodegenerative diseases as a potential biomarker of on-going disease progression, and as a potential surrogate to quantify effects of neuroprotective drugs in clinical trials.

  6. Neurologic complications of sickle cell disease in Africa: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noubiap, Jean Jacques; Mengnjo, Michel K; Nicastro, Nicolas; Kamtchum-Tatuene, Joseph

    2017-10-03

    To summarize prevalence data on the neurologic complications of sickle cell disease (SCD) in Africa. We searched EMBASE, PubMed, and African Index Medicus to identify all relevant articles published from inception to May 31, 2016. Each study was reviewed for methodologic quality. A random-effects model was used to estimate the prevalence of neurologic complications of SCD across studies. Thirty-one studies were included. Methodologic quality was high or moderate in 90% of studies. Stroke, conditional and abnormal cerebral blood flow, seizures, and headache were the complications most frequently reported, with overall prevalence rates of 4.2%, 10.6%, 6.1%, 4.4%, and 18.9%, respectively. Some complications, like silent brain infarcts, peripheral neuropathies, neurocognitive deficits, or moyamoya disease, have been rarely or not studied at all in the African setting. Incidence data were scarce and of poor quality. The burden of neurologic complications of SCD is important in Africa and most likely underestimated. A better evaluation of this burden requires larger prospective studies using standard up-to-date screening methods. Accessibility to diagnostic tools such as neuroimaging, transcranial Doppler, EEG, and neuropsychological evaluation, as well as to preventive and therapeutic interventions and trained health care providers, should be improved in routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  7. Cannabinoids: New Promising Agents in the Treatment of Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Giacoppo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Cannabis sativa is considered the most extensively used narcotic. Nevertheless, this fame obscures its traditional employ in native medicine of South Africa, South America, Turkey, Egypt and in many regions of Asia as a therapeutic drug. In fact, the use of compounds containing Cannabis and their introduction in clinical practice is still controversial and strongly limited by unavoidable psychotropic effects. So, overcoming these adverse effects represents the main open question on the utilization of cannabinoids as new drugs for treatment of several pathologies. To date, therapeutic use of cannabinoid extracts is prescribed in patients with glaucoma, in the control of chemotherapy-related vomiting and nausea, for appetite stimulation in patients with anorexia-cachexia syndrome by HIV, and for the treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms. Recently, researcher efforts are aimed to employ the therapeutic potentials of Cannabis sativa in the modulation of cannabinoid receptor activity within the central nervous system, particularly for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as well as psychiatric and non-psychiatric disorders. This review evaluates the most recent available data on cannabinoids utilization in experimental and clinical studies, and highlights their beneficial effects in the prevention of the main neurological diseases and for the clinical treatment of symptoms with them correlated.

  8. Evaluation of the role of SNCA variants in survival without neurological disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Heckman

    Full Text Available A variety of definitions of successful aging have been proposed, many of which relate to longevity, freedom from disease and disability, or preservation of high physical and cognitive function. Many behavioral, biomedical, and psychological factors have been linked with these various measures of successful aging, however genetic predictors are less understood. Parkinson's disease (PD is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder, and variants in the α-synuclein gene (SNCA affect susceptibility to PD. This exploratory study examined whether SNCA variants may also promote successful aging as defined by survival without neurological disease.We utilized 769 controls without neurological disease (Mean age: 79 years, Range: 33-99 years and examined the frequency of 20 different SNCA variants across age groups using logistic regression models. We also included 426 PD cases to assess the effect of these variants on PD risk.There was a significant decline in the proportion of carriers of the minor allele of rs10014396 as age increased (P = 0.021, from 30% in controls younger than 60 to 14% in controls 90 years of age or older. Findings were similar for rs3775439, where the proportion of carriers of the minor allele declined from 32% in controls less than 60 years old to 19% in those 90 or older (P = 0.025. A number of SNCA variants, not including rs10014396 or rs3775439, were significantly associated with susceptibility to PD.In addition to its documented roles in PD and α-synucleinopathies, our results suggest that SNCA has a role in survival free of neurological disease. Acknowledging that our findings would not have withstood correction for multiple testing, validation in an independent series of aged neurologically normal controls is needed.

  9. Modulation of neurogenesis via neurotrophic factors in acupuncture treatments for neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Sae-Won; Choi, Byung Tae

    2017-10-01

    Acupuncture is one of the main healing arts in Oriental medicine. It has long been used in East Asian countries, including Korea and China, and is thought to be an effective alternative treatment for various neurological diseases. The therapeutic effects of acupuncture come from inserting a needle at specific acupoints on the body surface, with subsequent delivery of stimulation via manual rotation or electric pulses (electroacupuncture, EA). In various neurological disease models, peripheral nerve stimulation using acupuncture or EA may have protective effects on neural tissues by increasing expression of neurotrophic factors (NTFs), such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial-derived neurotrophic factor, in the central nervous system, especially the brain. In addition, acupuncture may contribute to recovery from functional impairments following brain damage by encouraging neural stem cell proliferation, which is active at the initial stage of injury, and by further facilitating differentiation. Hence, acupuncture may act as a stimulator activating peripheral nerves at specific acupoints and inducing the expression of various NTFs in the brain. Subsequently, NTFs induced by this treatment trigger autocrine or paracrine signaling, which stimulates adult neurogenesis, thereby exerting therapeutic effects on functional impairments in neurological diseases. Acupuncture may offer an alternative treatment that promotes adult neurogenesis through the expression of NTFs in the brain. It may also have synergistic effects when combined with pharmacological interventions, again facilitating neurogenesis. This review examines recent studies concerning the effects of acupuncture and EA on adult neurogenesis associated with NTF expression in neurological diseases, in particular stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bullous pemphigoid in a leg affected with hemiparesia: a possible relation of neurological diseases with bullous pemphigoid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foureur, N; Descamps, V; Lebrun-Vignes, B; Picard-Dahan, C; Grossin, M; Belaich, S; Crickx, B

    2001-01-01

    We report a typical case of bullous pemphigoid (BP) associated with a neurological disorder and study a possible link between neurological disorders and BP. An 84-year-old hemiplegic woman presented with unilateral BP on the hemiparetic side. BP was confirmed by histological and immunofluorescence data. The medical records of the previous 46 consecutive patients with BP were retrospectively analyzed (average age: 79; median age: 85). Thirty of the 46 patients with BP had neurological disorders. These disorders included dementia, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, cerebral stroke, Parkinson's disease, gonadotropic adenoma, trembling, dyskinesia, lumbar spinal stenosis. In a control group of the 46 consecutive oldest patients (older than 71; average age: 82,5; median age: 80) with another skin disease referred during the previous two-year-period to our one-day-unit only, 13 patients had a neurological disorder. This study demonstrates that there is a high prevalence of neurological disorders in patients with BP (p = 0.0004). A prospective case control study with neurological examination and psychometrical evaluation is warranted to confirm these data. We speculate that neuroautoimmunity associated with the aging process or neurological disorders may be involved in pemphigoid development via an autoimmune response against dystonin which shares homology with bullous pemphigoid antigen 1. Bullous pemphigoid could be considered to be a marker of neurological disorder.

  11. Current research into brain barriers and the delivery of therapeutics for neurological diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenwood, John; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta; Jones, Hazel C

    2017-01-01

    This is a report on the CNS barrier congress held in London, UK, March 22-23rd 2017 and sponsored by Kisaco Research Ltd. The two 1-day sessions were chaired by John Greenwood and Margareta Hammarlund-Udenaes, respectively, and each session ended with a discussion led by the chair. Speakers consi...... consisted of invited academic researchers studying the brain barriers in relation to neurological diseases and industry researchers studying new methods to deliver therapeutics to treat neurological diseases. We include here brief reports from the speakers.......This is a report on the CNS barrier congress held in London, UK, March 22-23rd 2017 and sponsored by Kisaco Research Ltd. The two 1-day sessions were chaired by John Greenwood and Margareta Hammarlund-Udenaes, respectively, and each session ended with a discussion led by the chair. Speakers...

  12. EFNS guidelines for the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in treatment of neurological diseases: EFNS task force on the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in treatment of neurological diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elovaara, I.; Apostolski, S.; Doorn, P. van

    2008-01-01

    or third-line therapy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, if conventional immunomodulatory therapies are not tolerated (level B), and in relapses during pregnancy or post-partum period (good clinical practice point). IVIG seems to have a favourable effect also in paraneoplastic neurological diseases......Despite high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is widely used in treatment of a number of immune-mediated neurological diseases, the consensus on its optimal use is insufficient. To define the evidence-based optimal use of IVIG in neurology, the recent papers of high relevance were reviewed...

  13. Indication and use of electrodiagnostic aids in neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, F M; Fenner, W R

    1987-08-01

    Electrodiagnostic aids, electromyography, auditory brainstem response testing, and electroencephalography are extensions of the neurologic examination and provide valuable information about the nervous system. This article discusses the use and interpretation of electrodiagnostic aids in equine neurology as well as the equipment that is employed. It is hoped that with a better understanding of the available electrodiagnostic aids, they will come into greater use.

  14. Neurological and cardiac complications in a cohort of children with end-stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumana H Albaramki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult patients with chronic kidney disease are at risk of major neurologic and cardiac complications. The purpose of this study is to review the neurological and cardiac complications in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. A retrospective review of medical records of children with ESRD at Jordan University Hospital was performed. All neurological and cardiac events were recorded and analyzed. Data of a total of 68 children with ESRD presenting between 2002 and 2013 were reviewed. Neurological complications occurred in 32.4%; seizures were the most common event. Uncontrolled hypertension was the leading cause of neurological events. Cardiac complications occurred in 39.7%, the most common being pericardial effusion. Mortality from neurological complications was 45%. Neurological and cardiac complications occurred in around a third of children with ESRD with a high mortality rate. More effective control of hypertension, anemia, and intensive and gentle dialysis are needed.

  15. [Swiss scrapie surveillance. I. Clinical aspects of neurological diseases in sheep and goats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, E; Botteron, C; Ehrensperger, F; Fatzer, R; Jaggy, A; Kolly, C; Meylan, M; Zurbriggen, A; Doherr, M G

    2005-10-01

    Small ruminants infected with scrapie show a large range of often unspecific clinical symptoms. The most-often described signs, locomotion, sensibility and behavioural disorders and emaciation, rarely occur together, and cases have been described in which only one of those signs was detectable.Thus, formulating a well-circumscribed definition of a clinical suspect case is difficult. Most animals with CNS-effecting diseases such as listeriosis, polioencephalomacia, cerebrospinal nematidiasis and enterotoxemia will, in a thorough neurological examination, show at least some scrapie-like symptoms. Among the 22 neurological field cases examined in this study, a goat with cerebral gliomatosis and hair lice showed the closest similarity to clinical scrapie. The unilateral deficiency of the cerebral nerves has potential as an clinical exclusion criterion for scrapie. However, the laboratory confirmation--or exclusion--of scrapie remains important. It thus needs to be realized that a consistent and thorough examination of neurologically diseased small ruminants (including fallen stock) is the backbone of a good surveillance system for these diseases. This should be a motivation for submitting adult sheep and goats for neuropathological examination.

  16. Therapeutic plasma exchange in patients with neurological diseases: multicenter retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Emin; Keklik, Muzaffer; Sencan, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Keskin, Ali; Kiki, Ilhami; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Sivgin, Serdar; Korkmaz, Serdal; Okan, Vahap; Doğu, Mehmet Hilmi; Unal, Ali; Cetin, Mustafa; Altuntaş, Fevzi; Ilhan, Osman

    2013-06-01

    Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), is a procedure, changing pathologic substances in the plasma of patients with replacement fluid. TPE has an increasing list of indications in recent years such as neurological, connective tissue, hematological, nephrological, endocrinological and metabolic disorders. We report our multicenter data about therapeutic plasma exchange in patients with neurological diseases. Six University Hospitals' aphaeresis units medical records about neurologic diseases were reviewed retrospectively. Hundred and fifteen patients and 771 TPE sessions from six aphaeresis units' were included to this study. Of the 115 patients, 53 (46%) were men and 62 (54%) were women. The median age was 50 (range: 5-85) years. Of these patients 58.3% were Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), 17.4% were acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), 10.4% were chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), 7% were multiple sclerosis, 6.1% were myasthenia gravis (MG) and 0.9% were Wilson disease (WD). The median number of TPE sessions per patient was 5 (range 1-72). Human albumin was used as a replacement fluid in 66% and fresh frozen plasma was used in 34% of cases. TPE was done through central venous catheters in 66%, and peripheral venous access in 34% of patients. Some complications were seen in patients (18.3%) during TPE sessions. These complications were, complications related to catheter placement procedure (8.7%), hypotension (3.5%), hypocalcaemia (3.5%) and allergic reactions (1.7%). The complication ratios were 2.7% in total 771 TPE procedures. TPE procedure was terminated in 6% of sessions depending on these complications. Overall responses to TPE were noted in 89.5% of patients. In conclusion; Therapeutic plasma exchange is an effective treatment option in several neurologic diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Blood levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in patients with neurological diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A Mayer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The brain-specific astroglial protein GFAP is a blood biomarker candidate indicative of intracerebral hemorrhage in patients with symptoms suspicious of acute stroke. Comparably little, however, is known about GFAP release in other neurological disorders. In order to identify potential "specificity gaps" of a future GFAP test used to diagnose intracerebral hemorrhage, we measured GFAP in the blood of a large and rather unselected collective of patients with neurological diseases. METHODS: Within a one-year period, we randomly selected in-patients of our university hospital for study inclusion. Patients with ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack and intracerebral hemorrhage were excluded. Primary endpoint was the ICD-10 coded diagnosis reached at discharge. During hospital stay, blood was collected, and GFAP plasma levels were determined using an advanced prototype immunoassay at Roche Diagnostics. RESULTS: A total of 331 patients were included, covering a broad spectrum of neurological diseases. GFAP levels were low in the vast majority of patients, with 98.5% of cases lying below the cut-off that was previously defined for the differentiation of intracerebral hemorrhage and ischemic stroke. No diagnosis or group of diagnoses was identified that showed consistently increased GFAP values. No association with age and sex was found. CONCLUSION: Most acute and chronic neurological diseases, including typical stroke mimics, are not associated with detectable GFAP levels in the bloodstream. Our findings underline the hypothesis that rapid astroglial destruction as in acute intracerebral hemorrhage is mandatory for GFAP increase. A future GFAP blood test applied to identify patients with intracerebral hemorrhage is likely to have a high specificity.

  18. Increased neurofilament light chain blood levels in neurodegenerative neurological diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaiottino, J.; Norgren, N.; Dobson, R.; Topping, J.; Nissim, A.; Malaspina, A.; Bestwick, J.P.; Monsch, A.U.; Regeniter, A.; Lindberg, R.L.; Kappos, L.; Leppert, D.; Petzold, A.; Giovannoni, G.; Kuhle, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Neuronal damage is the morphological substrate of persisting neurological disability. Neurofilaments (Nf) are cytoskeletal proteins of neurons and their release into cerebrospinal fluid has shown encouraging results as a biomarker for neurodegeneration. This study aimed to validate the

  19. Dock protein family in brain development and neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei

    2013-11-01

    The family of dedicator of cytokinesis (Dock), a protein family that belongs to the atypical Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rac and/or Cdc42 GTPases, plays pivotal roles in various processes of brain development. To date, 11 members of Docks have been identified in the mammalian system. Emerging evidence has suggested that members of the Dock family are associated with several neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases, including Alzheimer disease and autism spectrum disorders. This review summarizes recent advances on the understanding of the roles of the Dock protein family in normal and diseased processes in the nervous system. Furthermore, interacting proteins and the molecular regulation of Docks are discussed.

  20. Quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination in boys and risk of autoimmune diseases, neurological diseases and venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisch, Morten; Besson, Andréa; Clemmensen, Kim Katrine Bjerring

    2018-01-01

    following HPV vaccination in this group. We investigated if quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccination of 10-17-year-old boys is associated with any unusual risk of autoimmune diseases, neurological diseases or venous thromboembolism. Methods: We conducted a national cohort study of 568 410 boys born in Denmark...... 1988-2006 and followed for 4 million person-years during 2006-16, using nationwide registers to obtain individual-level information about received doses of the qHPV vaccine and hospital records for 39 autoimmune diseases, 12 neurological diseases and venous thromboembolism. For each outcome, we......: 0.71-1.28, n = 46 cases in qHPV-vaccinated boys) and neurological diseases (RR = 0.67; 0.41-1.10, n = 16), as well as for venous thromboembolism (RR = 0.88; 0.33-2.35, n = 4). After taking multiple testing into account, none of the 52 individual outcomes studied appeared to occur in excess among q...

  1. Focused ultrasound as a non-invasive intervention for neurological disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Rory J; Hughes, Mark A; Moran, Carmel M; Kandasamy, Jothy

    2016-06-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) is an incision-less intervention that is a Food and Drug Association (FDA) approved surgical treatment for various pathologies including uterine fibroids and bone metastases. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging thermometry and ability to use FUS across the intact calvarium have re-opened interest in the use of FUS in the treatment of neurological diseases. FUS currently has a European CE mark for use in movement disorders. However, it shows potential in the treatment of other neuropathologies including tumours and as a lesional tool in epilepsy. FUS may exert its therapeutic effect through thermal or mechanical fragmentation of intracranial lesions, or by enhancing delivery of pharmaceutical agents across the blood-brain barrier. In this review, we summarise the mechanisms, clinical applications and potential future of FUS for the treatment of neurological disease. We have searched for and described the recently completed and on-going clinical trials investigating FUS for the treatment of neurological disorders. We identified phase one trials investigating utility of FUS in: movement disorders (including essential tremor and Parkinson's disease), chronic pain, obsessive-compulsive disorder and cerebral tumours. Current literature also reports pre-clinical work exploring utility in epilepsy, neurodegenerative conditions (such as Alzheimer's disease) and thrombolysis. Safety and early efficacy data are now emerging, suggesting that transcalvarial FUS is a feasible and safe intervention. Further evidence is required to determine whether FUS is an effective alternative in comparison to current neurosurgical interventions. The cost of requisite hardware is currently a barrier to widespread uptake in UK neurosurgical centres.

  2. Adult Hip Flexion Contracture due to Neurological Disease: A New Treatment Protocol—Surgical Treatment of Neurological Hip Flexion Contracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Nicodemo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital, traumatic, or extrinsic causes can lead people to paraplegia; some of these are potentially; reversible and others are not. Paraplegia can couse hip flexion contracture and, consequently, pressure sores, scoliosis, and hyperlordosis; lumbar and groin pain are strictly correlated. Scientific literature contains many studies about children hip flexion related to neurological diseases, mainly caused by cerebral palsy; only few papers focus on this complication in adults. In this study we report our experience on surgical treatment of adult hip flexion contracture due to neurological diseases; we have tried to outline an algorithm to choose the best treatment avoiding useless or too aggressive therapies. We present 5 cases of adult hips flexion due to neurological conditions treated following our algorithm. At 1-year-follow-up all patients had a good clinical outcome in terms of hip range of motion, pain and recovery of walking if possible. In conclusion we think that this algorithm could be a good guideline to treat these complex cases even if we need to treat more patients to confirm this theory. We believe also that postoperation physiotherapy it is useful in hip motility preservation, improvement of muscular function, and walking ability recovery when possible.

  3. New Advances in the Treatment of Neurological Diseases Using High Dose Intravenous Immunoglobulins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Since the incidental discovery in 1981 that intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) are immunomodulatory, they have been investigated in a large number of putative autoimmune diseases. This has led to licensing for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, Kawasaki disease, and in neurological disorders for Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Although not licensed, randomized controlled trials have also shown IVIg efficacy in other neuroimmunological diseases such as multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP), myasthenia gravis, dermatomyositis, and stiff-person syndrome. However, other indications are currently being explored including Alzheimer's disease, postpolio syndrome, and narcolepsy. There are even reports from experimental studies in stroke. The results of recently published clinical trials in both the classical neuroimmunological disorders as well as for new indications are reported and their role in clinical practice is discussed. PMID:21180569

  4. Neurological Disease Burden in two Semi-urban Communities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AIM: This study sought to screen for the scope and pattern of neurological dysfunction affecting inhabitants of two semi-urban communities in Enugu, South East Nigeria. METHODS: A descriptive, cross- sectional, questionnaire- based study of inhabitants living in Alfred Camp and Udi Siding communities in Enugu was ...

  5. Is Further Examination Necessary in Patients with Behcets Disease Without Any Neurological Signs or Symptoms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halit YAsAR

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Visually evoked potential examination may be used as a conductive method to detect the subclinical neurological pathologies in Behcets disease. The possible silent neurological involvement should be evaluated with further neuro-screening methods. [Dis Mol Med 2015; 3(3.000: 29-34

  6. Neurological signs in relation to type of cerebrovascular disease in vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staekenborg, S.S.; van der Flier, W.M.; van Straaten, E.C.W.; Lane, R.; Barkhof, F.; Scheltens, P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of a number of neurological signs in a large population of patients with vascular dementia (VaD) and to compare the relative frequency of specific neurological signs dependent on type of cerebrovascular disease. METHODS -

  7. Characteristics and prognosis of pulmonary infection in patients with neurologic disease and hypoproteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Yuan, Mei-zhen; Wang, Liang; Wang, Xue-feng; Liu, Guang-wei

    2015-04-01

    To examine the characteristics and the prognostic influence of pulmonary infections in neurologic disease patients with mild-to-severe hypoproteinemia. We used a retrospective survey method to analyze the characteristics and prognoses of 220 patients with hypoproteinemia complicated with pulmonary infection in the Internal Medicine-Neurology Intensive Care Unit at the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University from January 2010 to December 2013. The patients were divided into mild, moderate and severe hypoproteinemia groups according to their serum albumin levels. The analysis included patient age, sex, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II score), and characteristics of the pulmonary infection, nutritional support and prognosis, among others. Differences in the general information of the 220 cases of hypoalbuminemia patients complicated with varying degrees of pulmonary infection (APACHE II score, age, disease distribution) were statistically significant. The pulmonary infection onset time and pathogen susceptibility in the patients with mild-to-severe hypoalbuminemia were not significantly different. Pulmonary infection onset was more frequently observed within the first 3-11 days following admission in all groups. The nutritional support method did not significantly influence serum albumin protein levels. However, the neurological intensive care unit stay length, total hospitalization cost and disease distribution were significantly different among the patient groups. Patients with cerebrovascular disease, intracranial infections and epilepsy complicated with pulmonary infection represent the high-risk groups for hypoalbuminemia. The Acinetobacter baumannii complex represents the main group of pathogenic bacteria causing lung infections, and the high-risk period for lung infections is 3-11 days after the occurrence of hypoalbuminemia. Patients with severe hypoalbuminemia complicated with pulmonary infection have the worst

  8. Neurological complications ofLyme disease – clinical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jastrzębska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease is a chronic, multiorgan disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted by Ixodes ticks. Poland has medium to high rate of tick infection. Lyme disease incidence has been increasing in recent years, with the peak incidence recorded in the summer, especially in endemic areas. The risk of infection depends on the type of spirochete and the time it is present in the human skin. It is crucial to remove the parasite as soon as possible, not later than 24 hours after the spirochete enters the body. The infection usually occurs in three stages, although not all of them have to be present. A characteristic erythema migrans or, less common, lymphocytic lymphoma, may be observed in the first stage of the disease. General symptoms, such as myocarditis, arthritis or nervous system involvement, are developed in the second stage. In the late stage of the disease, serious irreversible complications of the nervous system, musculoskeletal system or the skin occur. The diagnosis of Lyme disease is based on a history of tick bite as well as on the presence of clinical symptoms confirmed by serological findings. The presence of erythema migrans is sufficient for diagnosis and treatment initiation, therefore laboratory diagnostics is not necessary in this case. Serological diagnostics is primarily based on ELISA testing, while the second step uses a Western blot test. Positive serology test in the absence of clinical symptoms or a positive medical history is insufficient for diagnosis and treatment initiation. The type of the antibiotic used as well as the route and duration of its administration depend on the stage of the disease and on the affected organ. The most common antimicrobials used in the treatment of Lyme disease include amoxicillin, doxycycline (over the age of 12 years and ceftriaxone.

  9. Neurologic complications including paralysis after a medication error involving implanted intrathecal catheters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Timothy F; Feler, Claudio A; Simmons, Bryan P; Melton, Kelley; Craig, Allen S; Moore, William L; Smith, Mark D; Schaffner, William

    2002-01-01

    ... chronic pain (3) . Continuous intrathecal infusions of morphine, bupivacaine, and baclofen have been used to manage a variety of chronic medical problems. Reported complications have been rare and have included catheter failure, dose-associated effects of opiates, local infections temporally associated with pump insertion, epidural abscesse...

  10. Osteopathic manipulative treatment in neurological diseases: Systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerritelli, Francesco; Ruffini, Nuria; Lacorte, Eleonora; Vanacore, Nicola

    2016-10-15

    The aim of the present systematic review is to critically evaluate the effectiveness of OMT as an adjuvant therapy in the management of patients with neurological diseases. A systematic review was conducted and the findings were reported following the PRISMA statement. Twelve databases were searched for articles reporting the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment in neurological disorders. Each article was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and the Jadad score. 10 articles were included. OMT was used to test its efficacy and/or effectiveness in treating tension-type headache, migraine, cerebral palsy and gait analysis in patients affected by Parkinson's Disease. The general quality of the included trials ranged from very low, to low and moderate according to Cochrane standards. High heterogeneity between studies was found for the type of intervention, control and outcome measures used. Results showed that studies on the efficacy and/or effectiveness of OMT treatments are scarce, heterogeneous, and of low methodological quality. Further studies should be conducted including a more pragmatic methodology, an exhaustive description of all investigated and concurrent interventions, and a systematic report of adverse events, so as to obtain robust and generalizable results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence and patterns of neurological involvement in Behcet's disease: a prospective study from Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Araji, A; Sharquie, K; Al-Rawi, Z

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of neurological involvement in Behcet's disease in a prospective study, and to describe the clinical patterns of neurological presentation in this disease in patients attending a multidisciplinary clinic in Baghdad. Methods: All patients attending the clinic who fulfilled the international study group criteria for the diagnosis of Behcet's disease were studied during a two year period starting in April 1999. Patients were assessed neurologically by a neuro-Behcetologist. All those with clinical neurological manifestations were sent for CSF examination, cranial magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance venography and were followed up to explore the patterns of neurological relapse. Results: 140 patients with Behcet's disease were studied. Their mean age was 34.2 years (range 16 to 66); 105 (75%) were men and 35 (25%) were women. The mean duration of the disease was 4.2 years (range 0.4 to 26). Twenty patients (14%) had neurological involvement (neuro-Behcet's disease); 14 of these (70%) were men and six (30%) women. The mean age at the first neurological presentation was 34.1 years. The mean duration of follow up of patients with neuro-Behcet's disease was 20.7 months. Ten patients with neuro-Behcet's disease (50%) presented with parenchymal CNS involvement, six (30%) with intracranial hypertension, and four (20%) with a mixed pattern of both parenchymal CNS involvement and intracranial hypertension. Conclusions: Careful neurological assessment of patients with Behcet's disease may show a relatively high prevalence of neuro-Behcet features, and though the clinical patterns of presentation are characteristic a mixed pattern may occur. PMID:12700303

  12. Retrospective study of the clinical effects of acupuncture on cervical neurological diseases in dogs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Ching Ming; Chang, Fang Chia; Lin, Chung Tien

    2016-01-01

    .... The interval between the neurological disease onset and treatment (duration of signs), time to improvement after treatment, and recovery time were compared in dogs by body weight, age, and dry needle acupuncture (AP...

  13. Neurological Disease Rises from Ocean to Bring Model for Human Epilepsy to Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Ramsdell

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid of macroalgal origin was used for traditional and medicinal purposes in Japan and largely forgotten until its rediscovery in diatoms that poisoned 107 people after consumption of contaminated mussels. The more severely poisoned victims had seizures and/or amnesia and four died; however, one survivor unexpectedly developed temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE a year after the event. Nearly a decade later, several thousand sea lions have stranded on California beaches with neurological symptoms. Analysis of the animals stranded over an eight year period indicated five clusters of acute neurological poisoning; however, nearly a quarter have stranded individually outside these events with clinical signs of a chronic neurological syndrome similar to TLE. These poisonings are not limited to sea lions, which serve as readily observed sentinels for other marine animals that strand during domoic acid poisoning events, including several species of dolphin and whales. Acute domoic acid poisoning is five-times more prominent in adult female sea lions as a result of the proximity of their year-round breeding grounds to major domoic acid bloom events. The chronic neurological syndrome, on the other hand, is more prevalent in young animals, with many potentially poisoned in utero. The sea lion rookeries of the Channel Islands are at the crossroads of domoic acid producing harmful algal blooms and a huge industrial discharge site for dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDTs. Studies in experimental animals suggest that chronic poisoning observed in immature sea lions may result from a spatial and temporal coincidence of DDTs and domoic acid during early life stages. Emergence of an epilepsy syndrome from the ocean brings a human epilepsy model to life and provides unexpected insights into interaction with legacy contaminants and expression of disease at different life stages.

  14. [Application of whole exome sequencing in the diagnosis of hereditary neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinsky, V V; Korneeva, V A; Shatalov, P A

    2015-01-01

    Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) is a promising method in human genetics. Because the majority of pathogenic mutations that lead to the development of diseases are localized in exons and splice sites, WES could become a major tool for the diagnosis of diseases with a complex hereditary nature. This tool appears to be particularly useful for hereditary neurological diseases, such as autism spectrum disorders, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and others. In our review, we discuss the clinical application of WES, with special emphasis on the diagnosis of hereditary neurological diseases.

  15. Functional Performance and Associations between Performance Tests and Neurological Assessment Differ in Men and Women with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medijainen, Kadri; Pääsuke, Mati; Lukmann, Aet; Taba, Pille

    2015-01-01

    Neurological assessment of a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD) is expected to reflect upon functional performance. As women are known to report more limitations even for same observed functional performance level, present study was designed to examine whether associations between neurological assessments and functional performance differ across genders. 14 men and 14 women with PD participated. Functional performance was assessed by measuring walking speeds on 10-meter walk test (10MWT) and by performing timed-up-and-go-test (TUG). Neurological assessment included Hoehn and Yahr Scale (HY), Movement Disorders Society Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS), Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale (S-E), and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). In women with PD, Kendall's tau-b correlation analyses revealed significant correlations between functional performance tests and neurological assessment measures, with the exception in MMSE. No corresponding associations were found for men, although they demonstrated better functional performance, as expected. Men in similar clinical stage of the PD perform better on functional tests than women. Disease severity reflects upon functional performance differently in men and women with PD. Results indicate that when interpreting the assessment results of both functional performance and neurological assessment tests, the gender of the patient should be taken into consideration.

  16. Functional Performance and Associations between Performance Tests and Neurological Assessment Differ in Men and Women with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadri Medijainen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurological assessment of a patient with Parkinson’s disease (PD is expected to reflect upon functional performance. As women are known to report more limitations even for same observed functional performance level, present study was designed to examine whether associations between neurological assessments and functional performance differ across genders. Methods. 14 men and 14 women with PD participated. Functional performance was assessed by measuring walking speeds on 10-meter walk test (10MWT and by performing timed-up-and-go-test (TUG. Neurological assessment included Hoehn and Yahr Scale (HY, Movement Disorders Society Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS, Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale (S-E, and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE. Results. In women with PD, Kendall’s tau-b correlation analyses revealed significant correlations between functional performance tests and neurological assessment measures, with the exception in MMSE. No corresponding associations were found for men, although they demonstrated better functional performance, as expected. Conclusion. Men in similar clinical stage of the PD perform better on functional tests than women. Disease severity reflects upon functional performance differently in men and women with PD. Results indicate that when interpreting the assessment results of both functional performance and neurological assessment tests, the gender of the patient should be taken into consideration.

  17. Electroencephalography as a diagnostic technique for canine neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrzosek Marcin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG is a non-invasive examination method for the assessment of functional central nervous system (CNS disturbances. In human medicine it has a special importance as a diagnostic tool for epilepsy. Although many studies were done on the use of EEG for diagnostics of canine central nervous system disorders, the technique is still not applied routinely. The purpose of this paper was to review the use of the electroencephalography in canine neurological disorders of central nervous system diagnosis and assess the future perspectives of this technique in veterinary medicine.

  18. Targeting plasticity with vagus nerve stimulation to treat neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Seth A; Rennaker, Robert L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Pathological neural activity in a variety of neurological disorders could be treated by directing plasticity to specifically renormalize aberrant neural circuits, thereby restoring normal function. Brief bursts of acetylcholine and norepinephrine can enhance the neural plasticity associated with coincident events. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) represents a safe and effective means to trigger the release of these neuromodulators with a high degree of temporal control. VNS-event pairing can generate highly specific and long-lasting plasticity in sensory and motor cortex. Based on the capacity to drive specific changes in neural circuitry, VNS paired with experience has been successful in effectively ameliorating animal models of chronic tinnitus, stroke, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Targeted plasticity therapy utilizing VNS is currently being translated to humans to treat chronic tinnitus and improve motor recovery after stroke. This chapter will discuss the current progress of VNS paired with experience to drive specific plasticity to treat these neurological disorders and will evaluate additional future applications of targeted plasticity therapy. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Parkinson?s disease between internal medicine and neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Csoti, Ilona; Jost, Wolfgang H.; Reichmann, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    General medical problems and complications have a major impact on the quality of life in all stages of Parkinson?s disease. To introduce an effective treatment, a comprehensive analysis of the various clinical symptoms must be undertaken. One must distinguish between (1) diseases which arise independently of Parkinson?s disease, and (2) diseases which are a direct or indirect consequence of Parkinson?s disease. Medical comorbidity may induce additional limitations to physical strength and cop...

  20. A health systems constraints analysis for neurologic diseases: the example of Timor-Leste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J; Martins, Nelson

    2014-04-08

    Neurologic care exists within health systems and complex social, political, and economic environments. Identification of obstacles within health systems, defined as "constraints," is crucial to improving the delivery of neurologic care within its macroclimate. Here we use the World Health Organization's 6 building blocks of a health system to examine core services for priority interventions related to neurologic disease: (1) service delivery; (2) health workforce; (3) information; (4) medical products, vaccines, and technologies; (5) financing; and (6) leadership and governance. We demonstrate the use of a constraints analysis for neurologic disorders using the example of Timor-Leste, a newly sovereign and low-income country, which aims to improve neurologic care in the coming years.

  1. A novel porcine model of ataxia telangiectasia reproduces neurological features and motor deficits of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraldi, Rosanna; Chan, Chun-Hung; Rogers, Christopher S; Kovács, Attila D; Meyerholz, David K; Trantzas, Constantin; Lambertz, Allyn M; Darbro, Benjamin W; Weber, Krystal L; White, Katherine A M; Rheeden, Richard V; Kruer, Michael C; Dacken, Brian A; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Davis, Bryan T; Rohret, Judy A; Struzynski, Jason T; Rohret, Frank A; Weimer, Jill M; Pearce, David A

    2015-11-15

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a progressive multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the AT-mutated (ATM) gene. AT is a neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by cerebellar degeneration in children leading to motor impairment. The disease progresses with other clinical manifestations including oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immune disorders, increased susceptibly to cancer and respiratory infections. Although genetic investigations and physiological models have established the linkage of ATM with AT onset, the mechanisms linking ATM to neurodegeneration remain undetermined, hindering therapeutic development. Several murine models of AT have been successfully generated showing some of the clinical manifestations of the disease, however they do not fully recapitulate the hallmark neurological phenotype, thus highlighting the need for a more suitable animal model. We engineered a novel porcine model of AT to better phenocopy the disease and bridge the gap between human and current animal models. The initial characterization of AT pigs revealed early cerebellar lesions including loss of Purkinje cells (PCs) and altered cytoarchitecture suggesting a developmental etiology for AT and could advocate for early therapies for AT patients. In addition, similar to patients, AT pigs show growth retardation and develop motor deficit phenotypes. By using the porcine system to model human AT, we established the first animal model showing PC loss and motor features of the human disease. The novel AT pig provides new opportunities to unmask functions and roles of ATM in AT disease and in physiological conditions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Ribavirin inhibits Borna disease virus proliferation and fatal neurological diseases in neonatally infected gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong-Jae; Matsunaga, Hidenori; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2008-12-01

    By using neonatal gerbils, we assessed the effect of ribavirin on the proliferation of Borna disease virus (BDV) in the brain. The intracranial inoculation of ribavirin reduced viral propagation in the acutely infected brain, resulting in protection from fatal neurological disorders. We found that the treatment with ribavirin markedly reduces the numbers of OX-42-positive microglial cells, but does not activate expression of Th1 cytokines, in BDV-infected gerbil brains. Our results suggested that ribavirin directly inhibits BDV replication and might be a potential tool for the treatment of BDV infection.

  3. Brain MRI and SPECT in the diagnosis of early neurological involvement in Wilson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piga, Mario; Satta, Loredana; Serra, Alessandra; Loi, Gianluigi [Policlinico Universitario, University of Cagliari, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Medical Science, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Murru, Alessandra; Demelia, Luigi [Policlinico Universitario, University of Cagliari, Gastroenterology, Department of Medical Science, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Sias, Alessandro [Policlinico Universitario, University of Cagliari, Radiology, Department of Medical Science, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Marrosu, Francesco [Policlinico Universitario, University of Cagliari, Neurology, Department of Medical Science, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy)

    2008-04-15

    To evaluate the impact of brain MRI and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in early detection of central nervous system abnormalities in patients affected by Wilson's disease (WD) with or without neurological involvement. Out of 25 consecutive WD patients, 13 showed hepatic involvement, ten hepatic and neurological manifestations, and twp hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric symptoms, including mainly movement disorders, major depression, and psychosis. Twenty-four healthy, age-gender matched subjects served as controls. All patients underwent brain MRI and {sup 99m}Tc-ethyl-cysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT before starting specific therapy. Voxel-by-voxel analyses were performed using statistical parametric mapping to compare differences in {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain uptake between the two groups. Brain MRI showed T2-weighted hyperintensities in seven patients (28%), six of whom were affected by hepatic and neurological forms. Brain perfusion SPECT showed pathological data in 19 patients (76%), revealing diffuse or focal hypoperfusion in superior frontal (Brodmann area (BA) 6), prefrontal (BA 9), parietal (BA 40), and occipital (BA 18, BA 39) cortices in temporal gyri (BA 37, BA 21) and in caudatus and putamen. Moreover, hepatic involvement was detected in nine subjects; eight presented both hepatic and neurological signs, while two exhibited WD-correlated hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric alterations. All but one patient with abnormal MRI matched with abnormal ECD SPECT. Pathologic MRI findings were obtained in six out of ten patients with hepatic and neurological involvement while abnormal ECD SPECT was revealed in eight patients. Both patients with hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric involvement displayed abnormal ECD SPECT and one displayed an altered MRI. These findings suggest that ECD SPECT might be useful in detecting early brain damage in WD, not only in the perspective of assessing and treating motor impairment but also in evaluating

  4. Endocannabinoid signaling as a synaptic circuit breaker in neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katona, István; Freund, Tamás F

    2008-09-01

    Cannabis sativa is one of the oldest herbal plants in the history of medicine. It was used in various therapeutic applications from pain to epilepsy, but its psychotropic effect has reduced its usage in recent medical practice. However, renewed interest has been fueled by major discoveries revealing that cannabis-derived compounds act through a signaling pathway in the human body. Here we review recent advances showing that endocannabinoid signaling is a key regulator of synaptic communication throughout the central nervous system. Its underlying molecular architecture is highly conserved in synapses from the spinal cord to the neocortex, and as a negative feed-back signal, it provides protection against excess presynaptic activity. The endocannabinoid signaling machinery operates on demand in a synapse-specific manner; therefore, its modulation offers new therapeutic opportunities for the selective control of deleterious neuronal activity in several neurological disorders.

  5. Neurological status predicts response to alpha-blockers in men with voiding dysfunction and Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano M. Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate predictors of the response to doxazosin, a selective alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist, when used for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms in men with Parkinson's disease. METHODS: In a prospective study, 33 consecutive men (mean age 59.2±7.0 years with Parkinson's disease and lower urinary tract symptoms were evaluated. Neurological dysfunction was assessed with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Urological assessment was performed at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment with 4 mg/day of extended-release doxazosin, including symptom evaluation with the International Continence Society male short-form questionnaire, an assessment of the impact of lower urinary tract symptoms on quality of life and urodynamics. Clinical and urodynamic predictors of response were specifically evaluated. RESULTS: Compared with the score at baseline, the total International Continence Society male short-form score was reduced after doxazosin administration, from 17.4±7.5 to 11.1±6.9 (p<0.001. The impact of lower urinary tract symptoms on quality of life was also significantly reduced, from 1.8±1.1 to 1.0±1.0 (p<0.001 and the maximum urinary flow varied from 9.3±4.4 to 11.2±4.6 ml/s (p = 0.025. The severity of neurological impairment was the only predictor of the clinical response. Additionally, patients with a Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score lower than 70 had a significantly higher chance of clinical improvement with doxazosin treatment than those with higher Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores did (RR = 3.10, 95% CI = [1.15 to 5.37], p = 0.011. CONCLUSIONS: Doxazosin resulted in the improvement of lower urinary tract symptoms and the maximum flow rate and was well tolerated in men with Parkinson's disease. The response to treatment is dependent on the severity of neurological disability.

  6. Plasma Signature of Neurological Disease in the Monogenetic Disorder Niemann-Pick Type C*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md. Suhail; Getz, Michelle; Yi, Sue; Kurkewich, Jeffrey; Safeukui, Innocent; Haldar, Kasturi

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of neurological disorders would greatly improve their management and treatment. A major hurdle is that inflammatory products of cerebral disease are not easily detected in blood. Inflammation in multiple organs and heterogeneity in disease present additional challenges in distinguishing the extent to which a blood-based marker reflects disease in brain or other afflicted organs. Murine models of the monogenetic disorder Niemann-Pick Type C present aggressive forms of cerebral and liver inflammatory disease. Microarray analyses previously revealed age-dependent changes in innate immunity transcripts in the mouse brain. We have now validated four putative secretory inflammatory markers that are also elevated in mouse liver. We include limited, first time analysis of human Niemann-Pick Type C liver and cerebellum. Furthermore, we utilized 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD, an emerging therapeutic) administered intraperitoneally in mice, which abrogates inflammatory pathology in the liver but has limited effect on the brain. By analyzing the corresponding effects on inflammatory plasma proteins, we identified cathepsin S as a lead indicator of liver disease. In contrast, lysozyme was a marker of both brain and liver disease. 2-Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin had no effect on transcripts of neuron-specific 24-hydroxylase, and its product 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol was not a useful indicator in mouse plasma. Our data suggest that dual analysis of levels of the inflammatory markers lysozyme and cathepsin S may enable detection of multiple distinct states of neurodegeneration in plasma. PMID:24488491

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Protein Misfolding Mechanisms in Neurological Diseases: A Historical Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Felix; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Evans, Alan C

    2018-01-01

    Protein misfolding refers to a process where proteins become structurally abnormal and lose their specific 3-dimensional spatial configuration. The histopathological presence of misfolded protein (MP) aggregates has been associated as the primary evidence of multiple neurological diseases, including Prion diseases, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. However, the exact mechanisms of MP aggregation and propagation, as well as their impact in the long-term patient's clinical condition are still not well understood. With this aim, a variety of mathematical models has been proposed for a better insight into the kinetic rate laws that govern the microscopic processes of protein aggregation. Complementary, another class of large-scale models rely on modern molecular imaging techniques for describing the phenomenological effects of MP propagation over the whole brain. Unfortunately, those neuroimaging-based studies do not take full advantage of the tremendous capabilities offered by the chemical kinetics modeling approach. Actually, it has been barely acknowledged that the vast majority of large-scale models have foundations on previous mathematical approaches that describe the chemical kinetics of protein replication and propagation. The purpose of the current manuscript is to present a historical review about the development of mathematical models for describing both microscopic processes that occur during the MP aggregation and large-scale events that characterize the progression of neurodegenerative MP-mediated diseases.

  8. A Case of Early Disseminated Neurological Lyme Disease Followed by Atypical Cutaneous Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsi Kantamaneni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease (LD is a tick-borne illness caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. An 80-year-old female from Pennsylvania, USA, presented to an outside hospital with fever, confusion, lower extremity weakness, and stool incontinence. CT head and MRI spine were unremarkable. An infectious work-up including lumbar puncture was negative. She was transferred to our tertiary care hospital. Patient was noted to have mild unilateral right-sided facial droop and a diffuse macular rash throughout the body. She denied any outdoor activities, tick bites, or previous rash. Intravenous ceftriaxone was started for suspected LD. The patient’s symptoms including facial droop resolved within 24 hours of antibiotic therapy. Polymerase chain reaction of the blood, IgM ELISA, and IgM Western blot testing for LD came back positive a few days after initiation of therapy. She was treated for a total of 21 days for neurological LD with complete symptom resolution. Not all patients have the classic “targetoid” EM rash on initial presentation, rash could develop after neurological manifestations, and prompt initiation of antibiotics without awaiting serology is paramount to making a quick and a full recovery. There should be a high index of suspicion for early disseminated LD, as presentations can be atypical.

  9. Systems-level thinking for nanoparticle-mediated therapeutic delivery to neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Chad; Zhang, Mengying; Liao, Rick; Wood, Thomas; Nance, Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    Neurological diseases account for 13% of the global burden of disease. As a result, treating these diseases costs $750 billion a year. Nanotechnology, which consists of small (~1-100 nm) but highly tailorable platforms, can provide significant opportunities for improving therapeutic delivery to the brain. Nanoparticles can increase drug solubility, overcome the blood-brain and brain penetration barriers, and provide timed release of a drug at a site of interest. Many researchers have successfully used nanotechnology to overcome individual barriers to therapeutic delivery to the brain, yet no platform has translated into a standard of care for any neurological disease. The challenge in translating nanotechnology platforms into clinical use for patients with neurological disease necessitates a new approach to: (1) collect information from the fields associated with understanding and treating brain diseases and (2) apply that information using scalable technologies in a clinically-relevant way. This approach requires systems-level thinking to integrate an understanding of biological barriers to therapeutic intervention in the brain with the engineering of nanoparticle material properties to overcome those barriers. To demonstrate how a systems perspective can tackle the challenge of treating neurological diseases using nanotechnology, this review will first present physiological barriers to drug delivery in the brain and common neurological disease hallmarks that influence these barriers. We will then analyze the design of nanotechnology platforms in preclinical in vivo efficacy studies for treatment of neurological disease, and map concepts for the interaction of nanoparticle physicochemical properties and pathophysiological hallmarks in the brain. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1422. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1422 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Epidemiology of neurological diseases in elderly people: what did we learn from the Rotterdam Study?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, A.; de Jong, P.T.V.M.; Duijn, C.M. van; Breteler, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Rotterdam Study is a prospective cohort study that has been ongoing since 1990 in the city of Rotterdam, the Netherlands, among 7983 people aged 55 years or older. One part of the study targets neurological diseases, others deal with cardiovascular, ophthalmological, and endocrine diseases. The

  11. Edaravone Reduces Hyperperfusion-Related Neurological Deficits in Adult Moyamoya Disease: Historical Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Haruto; Nakayama, Naoki; Kazumata, Ken; Kuroda, Satoshi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2016-07-01

    Postoperative hyperperfusion-related transient neurological deficits (TNDs) are frequently observed in adult patients with moyamoya disease who undergo direct bypass procedures. The present study evaluated the effect of the free radical scavenger edaravone on postoperative hyperperfusion in adult moyamoya disease. This study included 92 hemispheres in 72 adult patients who underwent direct bypass for moyamoya disease. Serial measurements of cerebral blood flow were conducted immediately after surgery and on postoperative days 2 and 7. In 40 hemispheres for 36 patients, edaravone (60 mg/d) was administered from the day of surgery to postsurgical day 7. The incidence of postoperative hyperperfusion and associated TNDs were compared with a control group that included 52 hemispheres in 36 patients. Radiological hyperperfusion was observed in 28 of 40 (70.0%) and 39 of 52 (75.0%) hemispheres in the edaravone and control groups, respectively (P=0.30). Hyperperfusion-related TND incidences were significantly lower in the edaravone group compared with the control group (12.5% versus 32.7%; P=0.024). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that edaravone administration (P=0.009) and left-sided surgery (P=0.037) were significantly correlated with hyperperfusion-related TNDs (odds ratios, 0.3 and 4.2, respectively). Perioperative administration of edaravone reduced the incidence of hyperperfusion-related TNDs after direct bypass procedures in adult patients with moyamoya disease. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Antibiotics for the neurological complications of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid, Diego; Auwaerter, Paul G; Rumbaugh, Jeffrey; Gelderblom, Harald

    2016-12-08

    physician- or patient-reported outcomes, or both. In some cases cerebrospinal fluid analysis was included as an indirect biomarker of disease and outcome. None of the studies reported on our proposed primary outcome, 'Improvement in a measure of overall disability in the long term (three or more months).' None of the trials revealed any between-group differences in symptom resolution in response to active treatment. In general, treatment was tolerated well. The quality of adverse event reporting, however, was low. There is mostly low- to very low-quality clinical evidence from a limited number of mostly small, heterogeneous trials with diverse outcome measures, comparing the relative efficacy of central nervous system-penetrant antibiotics for the treatment of LNB. The few existing randomized studies have limited power and lack consistent and well-defined entry criteria and efficacy endpoints. It is not possible to draw firm conclusions on the relative efficacy of accepted antibiotic drug regimens for the treatment of LNB. The majority of people are reported to have good outcomes, and symptoms resolve by 12 months regardless of the antibiotic used. A minority of participants did not improve sufficiently, and some were retreated. These randomized studies provide some evidence that doxycycline, penicillin G, ceftriaxone, and cefotaxime are efficacious in the treatment of European LNB. No evidence of additional efficacy was observed when, in one study, an initial antibiotic treatment with intravenous ceftriaxone was followed by additional longer treatment with oral amoxicillin. There is a lack of evidence identified through our high-quality search strategy on the efficacy of antibiotics for treatment of LNB in the United States.

  13. Burden of invasive group B Streptococcus disease and early neurological sequelae in South African infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyaad Dangor

    Full Text Available Group B Streptococcus (GBS is a leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. We aimed to evaluate the burden of invasive early-onset (0-6 days of life, EOD and late-onset (7-89 days, LOD GBS disease and subsequent neurological sequelae in infants from a setting with a high prevalence (29.5% of HIV among pregnant women.A case-control study was undertaken at three secondary-tertiary care public hospitals in Johannesburg. Invasive cases in infants <3 months age were identified by surveillance of laboratories from November 2012 to February 2014. Neurodevelopmental screening was done in surviving cases and controls at 3 and 6 months of age.We identified 122 cases of invasive GBS disease over a 12 month period. Although the incidence (per 1,000 live births of EOD was similar between HIV-exposed and HIV-unexposed infants (1.13 vs. 1.46; p = 0.487, there was a 4.67-fold (95%CI: 2.24-9.74 greater risk for LOD in HIV-exposed infants (2.27 vs. 0.49; p<0.001. Overall, serotypes Ia, Ib and III constituted 75.8% and 92.5% of EOD and LOD, respectively. Risk factors for EOD included offensive draining liquor (adjusted Odds Ratio: 27.37; 95%CI: 1.94-386.50 and maternal GBS bacteriuria (aOR: 8.41; 95%CI: 1.44-49.15, which was also a risk-factor for LOD (aOR: 3.49; 95%CI: 1.17-10.40. The overall case fatality rate among cases was 18.0%. The adjusted odds for neurological sequelae at 6 months age was 13.18-fold (95%CI: 1.44-120.95 greater in cases (13.2% than controls (0.4%.The high burden of invasive GBS disease in South Africa, which is also associated with high case fatality rates and significant neurological sequelae among survivors, is partly due to the heightened risk for LOD in infants born to HIV-infected women. An effective trivalent GBS conjugate vaccine targeted at pregnant women could prevent invasive GBS disease in this setting.

  14. Burden of invasive group B Streptococcus disease and early neurological sequelae in South African infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangor, Ziyaad; Lala, Sanjay G; Cutland, Clare L; Koen, Anthonet; Jose, Lisa; Nakwa, Firdose; Ramdin, Tanusha; Fredericks, Joy; Wadula, Jeannette; Madhi, Shabir A

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. We aimed to evaluate the burden of invasive early-onset (0-6 days of life, EOD) and late-onset (7-89 days, LOD) GBS disease and subsequent neurological sequelae in infants from a setting with a high prevalence (29.5%) of HIV among pregnant women. A case-control study was undertaken at three secondary-tertiary care public hospitals in Johannesburg. Invasive cases in infants <3 months age were identified by surveillance of laboratories from November 2012 to February 2014. Neurodevelopmental screening was done in surviving cases and controls at 3 and 6 months of age. We identified 122 cases of invasive GBS disease over a 12 month period. Although the incidence (per 1,000 live births) of EOD was similar between HIV-exposed and HIV-unexposed infants (1.13 vs. 1.46; p = 0.487), there was a 4.67-fold (95%CI: 2.24-9.74) greater risk for LOD in HIV-exposed infants (2.27 vs. 0.49; p<0.001). Overall, serotypes Ia, Ib and III constituted 75.8% and 92.5% of EOD and LOD, respectively. Risk factors for EOD included offensive draining liquor (adjusted Odds Ratio: 27.37; 95%CI: 1.94-386.50) and maternal GBS bacteriuria (aOR: 8.41; 95%CI: 1.44-49.15), which was also a risk-factor for LOD (aOR: 3.49; 95%CI: 1.17-10.40). The overall case fatality rate among cases was 18.0%. The adjusted odds for neurological sequelae at 6 months age was 13.18-fold (95%CI: 1.44-120.95) greater in cases (13.2%) than controls (0.4%). The high burden of invasive GBS disease in South Africa, which is also associated with high case fatality rates and significant neurological sequelae among survivors, is partly due to the heightened risk for LOD in infants born to HIV-infected women. An effective trivalent GBS conjugate vaccine targeted at pregnant women could prevent invasive GBS disease in this setting.

  15. Devices for Ambulatory Monitoring of Sleep-Associated Disorders in Children with Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ulate-Campos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Good sleep quality is essential for a child’s wellbeing. Early sleep problems have been linked to the later development of emotional and behavioral disorders and can negatively impact the quality of life of the child and his or her family. Sleep-associated conditions are frequent in the pediatric population, and even more so in children with neurological problems. Monitoring devices can help to better characterize sleep efficiency and sleep quality. They can also be helpful to better characterize paroxysmal nocturnal events and differentiate between nocturnal seizures, parasomnias, and obstructive sleep apnea, each of which has a different management. Overnight ambulatory detection devices allow for a tolerable, low cost, objective assessment of sleep quality in the patient’s natural environment. They can also be used as a notification system to allow for rapid recognition and prompt intervention of events like seizures. Optimal monitoring devices will be patient- and diagnosis-specific, but may include a combination of modalities such as ambulatory electroencephalograms, actigraphy, and pulse oximetry. We will summarize the current literature on ambulatory sleep devices for detecting sleep disorders in children with neurological diseases.

  16. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases III: Manganese, neurological diseases, and associated pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsel, Anthony; Seneff, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an often overlooked but important nutrient, required in small amounts for multiple essential functions in the body. A recent study on cows fed genetically modified Roundup(®)-Ready feed revealed a severe depletion of serum Mn. Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup(®), has also been shown to severely deplete Mn levels in plants. Here, we investigate the impact of Mn on physiology, and its association with gut dysbiosis as well as neuropathologies such as autism, Alzheimer's disease (AD), depression, anxiety syndrome, Parkinson's disease (PD), and prion diseases. Glutamate overexpression in the brain in association with autism, AD, and other neurological diseases can be explained by Mn deficiency. Mn superoxide dismutase protects mitochondria from oxidative damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction is a key feature of autism and Alzheimer's. Chondroitin sulfate synthesis depends on Mn, and its deficiency leads to osteoporosis and osteomalacia. Lactobacillus, depleted in autism, depend critically on Mn for antioxidant protection. Lactobacillus probiotics can treat anxiety, which is a comorbidity of autism and chronic fatigue syndrome. Reduced gut Lactobacillus leads to overgrowth of the pathogen, Salmonella, which is resistant to glyphosate toxicity, and Mn plays a role here as well. Sperm motility depends on Mn, and this may partially explain increased rates of infertility and birth defects. We further reason that, under conditions of adequate Mn in the diet, glyphosate, through its disruption of bile acid homeostasis, ironically promotes toxic accumulation of Mn in the brainstem, leading to conditions such as PD and prion diseases.

  17. Neurology and international organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J

    2013-07-23

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private-public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and colleges. The continued engagement of neurologists is essential for the growing number of international organizations that can and should incorporate neurologic disease into their global agendas.

  18. Detection and analysis of Borna disease virus in Chinese patients with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Wang, Z; Zhu, D; Xu, M; Chen, X; Peng, D; Iwata, Y; Xie, P

    2009-03-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic RNA virus that is known to cause neurological disturbances in various animal species, potentially even humans. However, the association between BDV infection and human neurological disorders remains unclear. Between August 2005 and March 2006, 65 patients with neurological disorders were enrolled into our study. The presence of BDV p24 RNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was investigated by using nested reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay. Borna disease virus p24 RNA was detected from PBMCs in six patients with viral encephalitis by using nested RT-PCR assay. However, BDV p24 RNA was not detected in patients with multiple sclerosis or peripheral nerve diseases. There might be possible associations between BDV infection and human viral encephalitis.

  19. Hematopoietic Gene Therapies for Metabolic and Neurologic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Alessandra

    2017-10-01

    Increasingly, patients affected by metabolic diseases affecting the central nervous system and neuroinflammatory disorders receive hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in the attempt to slow the course of their disease, delay or attenuate symptoms, and improve pathologic findings. The possible replacement of brain-resident myeloid cells by the transplanted cell progeny contributes to clinical benefit. Genetic engineering of the cells to be transplanted (hematopoietic stem cell) may endow the brain myeloid progeny of these cells with enhanced or novel functions, contributing to therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Insomnia in central neurologic diseases--occurrence and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Geert; Jennum, Poul; Riemann, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    be a direct consequence of the disease itself or may be secondary to pain, depression, other sleep disorders or the effects of medications. Insomnia can have a significant impact on the patient's cognitive and physical function and may be associated with psychological distress and depression. Diagnosis...... antidepressants may be an effective treatment for insomnia in stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Melatonin and light treatment can stabilize the sleep-wake circadian rhythm and shorten sleep latency in dementias and PD. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be effective in treating insomnia symptoms...

  1. Pattern of neurological diseases as seen in outpatient children: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discussion and Conclusion: Epilepsy is a common disease in children. The prevailing enigma that epilepsy is rare in children is an unfounded myth making it imperative for appropriate index of clinical suspicion whenever a paediatric patient presents with unusual clinical pattern. The increased number of epileptic cases at ...

  2. Disregard of neurological impairments associated with neglected tropical diseases in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Quansah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs affect people in the bottom billion poorest in the world. These diseases are concentrated in rural areas, conflict zones and urban slums in Africa and other tropical areas. While the World Health Organization recognizes seventeen priority NTDs, the list of conditions present in Africa and elsewhere that are eligible to be classified as NTDs is much longer. Although NTDs are generally marginalized, their associated neurological burden has been almost completely disregarded. However, reports indicate that trichuriasis, schistosomiasis and hookworm infection, among others, cause impairments in memory and cognition, negatively affecting school attendance rates and educational performance particularly among children, as well as agricultural productivity among adults. Consequently, the neurological impairments have substantial influence on education and economic productivity, thus aggravating and perpetuating poverty in affected societies. However, inadequate research, policy and public health attention has been paid to the neurological burdens associated with NTDs. In order to appropriately address these burdens, we recommend the development of policy interventions that focus on the following areas: (i the introduction of training programs to develop the capacity of scientists and clinicians in research, diagnostic and treatment approaches (ii the establishment of competitive research grant schemes to fund cutting-edge research into these neurological impairments, and (iii the development of public health interventions to improve community awareness of the NTD-associated neurological problems, possibly enhancing disease prevention and expediting treatment.

  3. Research advances in treatment of neurological and psychological diseases by acupuncture at the Acupuncture Meridian Science Research Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bombi Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is an ancient therapeutic intervention that can be traced back at least 2100 years and is emerging worldwide as one of the most widely used therapies in the field of complementary and alternative medicine. Due to limitations associated with Western medicine's focus on the treatment of diseases rather than on their causes, interests are shifting to complementary and alternative medicines. The Acupuncture and Meridian Science Research Center (AMSRC was established in 2005 to elucidate the neurophysiological mechanisms of acupuncture for neurological diseases based on multidisciplinary research supported by the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology. In the AMSRC, resultant research articles have shown that acupuncture can improve neurological and psychological problems, including Parkinson's disease, pain, and depression, in animal models. Basic research studies suggest its effectiveness in treating various problems such as depression, drug addiction, epilepsy, ischemia, dementia, Parkinson's disease, and pain. We strongly believe that these effects, evident from the AMSRC research results, can play leading roles in the use of acupuncture for treating neurological diseases, based on collaboration among various academic fields such as neurophysiology, molecular genetics, and traditional Korean medicine.

  4. Research advances in treatment of neurological and psychological diseases by acupuncture at the Acupuncture Meridian Science Research Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bombi; Kim, Seung-Nam; Park, Hi-Joon; Lee, Hyejung

    2014-06-01

    Acupuncture is an ancient therapeutic intervention that can be traced back at least 2100 years and is emerging worldwide as one of the most widely used therapies in the field of complementary and alternative medicine. Due to limitations associated with Western medicine's focus on the treatment of diseases rather than on their causes, interests are shifting to complementary and alternative medicines. The Acupuncture and Meridian Science Research Center (AMSRC) was established in 2005 to elucidate the neurophysiological mechanisms of acupuncture for neurological diseases based on multidisciplinary research supported by the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology. In the AMSRC, resultant research articles have shown that acupuncture can improve neurological and psychological problems, including Parkinson's disease, pain, and depression, in animal models. Basic research studies suggest its effectiveness in treating various problems such as depression, drug addiction, epilepsy, ischemia, dementia, Parkinson's disease, and pain. We strongly believe that these effects, evident from the AMSRC research results, can play leading roles in the use of acupuncture for treating neurological diseases, based on collaboration among various academic fields such as neurophysiology, molecular genetics, and traditional Korean medicine.

  5. Specificity of Cognitive Impairment in Neurological Disease: A Methodological Critique of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Sagar

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cognitive deficits have been recognized in many neurological disorders but the specificity of the findings and the relationship to the underlying neuropathology remain obscure. Definitions of dementia have been proposed based on symptom profiles of the cognitive disorder and qualitative differences have been claimed between dementias of different aetiology. Some conditions have been claimed to show patterns of cognitive deficit that are distinguished from dementia and related to specific neuropathology or psychological processes, e.g. frontal lobe deficits in Parkinson's disease. Sometimes, a relationship has been established between certain cognitive deficits and particular neurochemical deficits which has led to the notion of specific drug treatment, e.g. cholinergic deficits and memory failure in Alzheimer's disease. However, these conclusions are often potentially flawed by methodological inadequacies. This critique presents some methodological issues relevant to the study of brain-behaviour and drug-behaviour relationships in syndromes of multiple cognitive deficit, using Parkinson's disease as the model. The following recommendations are made: rigid diagnostic criteria; representative patient groups; avoidance of arbitrary quantitative criteria to limit definitions of dementia; matching of groups for overall level of cognitive impairment in the search for qualitative cognitive differences related to neuropathology or effects of particular drugs; the use of suitable controls in patient groups, neuropsychological tests and treatment regimes; the use of specific quantitative tests of cognition, affect and motor disability; and longitudinal, compared with cross-sectional, study design.

  6. Predicting targets of compounds against neurological diseases using cheminformatic methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Katarina; Mavridis, Lazaros; Bautista-Aguilera, Oscar M.; Marco-Contelles, José; Stark, Holger; do Carmo Carreiras, Maria; Rossi, Ilaria; Massarelli, Paola; Agbaba, Danica; Ramsay, Rona R.; Mitchell, John B. O.

    2015-02-01

    Recently developed multi-targeted ligands are novel drug candidates able to interact with monoamine oxidase A and B; acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase; or with histamine N-methyltransferase and histamine H3-receptor (H3R). These proteins are drug targets in the treatment of depression, Alzheimer's disease, obsessive disorders, and Parkinson's disease. A probabilistic method, the Parzen-Rosenblatt window approach, was used to build a "predictor" model using data collected from the ChEMBL database. The model can be used to predict both the primary pharmaceutical target and off-targets of a compound based on its structure. Molecular structures were represented based on the circular fingerprint methodology. The same approach was used to build a "predictor" model from the DrugBank dataset to determine the main pharmacological groups of the compound. The study of off-target interactions is now recognised as crucial to the understanding of both drug action and toxicology. Primary pharmaceutical targets and off-targets for the novel multi-target ligands were examined by use of the developed cheminformatic method. Several multi-target ligands were selected for further study, as compounds with possible additional beneficial pharmacological activities. The cheminformatic targets identifications were in agreement with four 3D-QSAR (H3R/D1R/D2R/5-HT2aR) models and by in vitro assays for serotonin 5-HT1a and 5-HT2a receptor binding of the most promising ligand ( 71/MBA-VEG8).

  7. Molecular imaging in neurological diseases; Molekulare Bildgebung bei neurologischen Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimold, M.; Fougere, C. la [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Abteilung Nuklearmedizin und Klinische Molekulare Bildgebung, Department Radiologie, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    In neurodegeneration and in neuro-oncology, the standard imaging procedure, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), shows limited sensitivity and specificity. Molecular imaging with specific positron-emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers allows various molecular targets and metabolic processes to be assessed and is thus a valuable adjunct to MRI. Two important examples are referred to here: amino acid transport for neuro-oncological issues, and the recently approved PET tracers for detecting amyloid depositions during the preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease. This review discusses the clinical relevance and indications for the following nuclear medicine imaging procedures: amyloid PET, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET, and dopamine transporter (DaT)-SPECT for the diagnosis of dementia and the differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, in addition to amino acid PET for the diagnosis of brain tumors and somatostatin receptor imaging in meningioma. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) weist als Standardverfahren bei neurodegenerativen und neuroonkologischen Fragestellungen eine eingeschraenkte Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet auf. Die nuklearmedizinische molekulare Bildgebung mit spezifischen Positronenemissionstomographie(PET)- und single-photon-emission-computed-tomography(SPECT)-Tracern ermoeglicht die Darstellung verschiedener molekularer Targets bzw. Stoffwechselprozesse und stellt damit eine wichtige Ergaenzung zur MRT dar. Hier sei exemplarisch auf die Darstellung des Aminosaeuretransports im Rahmen neuroonkologischer Fragestellungen verwiesen, sowie auf die bereits im praeklinischen Stadium der Alzheimer-Demenz nachweisbaren Amyloidablagerungen mit hierfuer seit Kurzem zugelassenen PET-Tracern. Dieser Uebersichtsbeitrag bespricht die klinische Bedeutung bzw. die Indikationen der folgenden nuklearmedizinischen Untersuchungsverfahren: der Amyloid-PET, der {sup 18}F

  8. Solving the puzzle of neurological diseases: an interview with Huda Zoghbi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Y. Zoghbi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Huda Zoghbi's achievements in the field of neurology are internationally acclaimed. She is best known for elucidating the genetic basis of two complex neurological disorders, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and Rett syndrome, and has been honored with many prizes, including The Shaw Prize in Life Science and Medicine in 2016 and the 2017 Breakthrough Prize for Life Sciences. A diligent and creative research scientist at the bench, a respected lab mentor and founding Director of the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children's Hospital, her inspiration has always been the burning need to help patients faced with devastating neurological problems. Her pursuit of the mechanisms mediating spinocerebellar ataxia and Rett syndrome has been dogged, requiring 30 years of focused effort. As highlighted in this interview, her work is now paying dividends by starting to reveal potential therapeutic targets for these intractable and complex disorders.

  9. Representing Diversity in the Dish: Using Patient-Derived in Vitro Models to Recreate the Heterogeneity of Neurological Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla T. Ghaffari

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurological diseases, including dementias such as Alzheimer's disease (AD and fronto-temporal dementia (FTD and degenerative motor neuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, are responsible for an increasing fraction of worldwide fatalities. Researching these heterogeneous diseases requires models that endogenously express the full array of genetic and epigenetic factors which may influence disease development in both familial and sporadic patients. Here, we discuss the two primary methods of developing patient-derived neurons and glia to model neurodegenerative disease: reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, which are differentiated into neurons or glial cells, or directly converting (DC somatic cells into neurons (iNeurons or glial cells. Distinct differentiation techniques for both models result in a variety of neuronal and glial cell types, which have been successful in displaying unique hallmarks of a variety of neurological diseases. Yield, length of differentiation, ease of genetic manipulation, expression of cell-specific markers, and recapitulation of disease pathogenesis are presented as determining factors in how these methods may be used separately or together to ascertain mechanisms of disease and identify therapeutics for distinct patient populations or for specific individuals in personalized medicine projects.

  10. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in neurologic diseases--comparison with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K H; Han, M C; Kim, C W

    1987-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) imagings were compared in 121 patients with various neurologic diseases. MR was performed with either 0.15 Tesla resistive or 2.0 Tesla superconducting systems developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), using multi-slice spin echo technique with a variety of pulse sequences reflecting proton density, T1 and T2 relaxation times. MR was more advantageous in the detection of the lesions, accurate depiction of the lesion extents, and/or demonstration of anatomic details in sagittal or coronal plane in 36 of the 121 patients. These included white matter diseases, cervical cord tumors, syringomyelia, brain stem tumors, foramen magnum tumor, acute cerebellar infarction, Chiari malformation, isodense subacute subdural hematomas, cavernous hemangioma, A-V malformation with hemorrhage and some unknown pathologies. Even though 2.0T superconducting system showed greater capability of demonstrating the anatomic details and contrast discrimination between normal and abnormal tissues, the ability of MR to separate the tumor from the edema and to differentiate among different pathologic entities remained to be further evaluated. CT was superior to MR in 13 patients with acute intracranial hematomas, small calcific lesions, inflammatory granulomas or meningiomas. CT takes less time and may be preferable in very young or elderly patients. Both MR and CT gave equivalent information in the remaining patients. MR proved to complement CT in the evaluation of many disease entities and may actually supplant CT in some.

  12. Neurological disease or intellectual disability among sons of female Swedish dental personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vähäsarja, Niko; Montgomery, Scott; Sandborgh-Englund, Gunilla; Ekbom, Anders; Ekstrand, Jan; Näsman, Peggy; Naimi-Akbar, Aron

    2016-05-01

    Prenatal exposure to elemental mercury may be a potential hazard for the offspring of female dental personnel working with dental amalgam. The aim of this study was to investigate whether potential in utero exposure to mercury might have affected the development of nervous system of the sons of Swedish female dental personnel leading to an increased risk of neurological disease or intellectual disability. We used national Swedish registers to investigate risks for diseases potentially related to adverse effects on neurodevelopment. Sons of female dentists (n=1690) and dental nurses (n=10,420) were compared with cohorts consisting of sons of other female healthcare personnel. Due to changes in mercury exposure in dentistry during the study period, analyses were stratified by decade of birth. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazard models. We found no elevated risk for neurological disease, epilepsy or intellectual disability among the sons of dental personnel during any of the decades studied. HRs for neurological disease among the dental nurse cohort were even below 1.00 during the 1970s and 1980s. A low number of events resulted in uncertainty regarding results in the dentist cohort. We did not find any support for the hypothesis that mercury exposure in Swedish dentistry during the 1960s, 1970s or 1980s had any effect on the incidence of neurological disease or intellectual disability among the sons of female dental personnel. Our results imply that current use of dental amalgam should not represent an elevated risk for neurological disease or intellectual disability among the offspring of dental personnel.

  13. Association between bullous pemphigoid and neurologic diseases: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas-de-la-Asunción, E; Ruano-Ruiz, J; Rodríguez-Martín, A M; Vélez García-Nieto, A; Moreno-Giménez, J C

    2014-11-01

    In the past 10 years, bullous pemphigoid has been associated with other comorbidities and neurologic and psychiatric conditions in particular. Case series, small case-control studies, and large population-based studies in different Asian populations, mainland Europe, and the United Kingdom have confirmed this association. However, no data are available for the Spanish population. This was an observational, retrospective, case-control study with 1:2 matching. Fifty-four patients with bullous pemphigoid were selected. We compared the percentage of patients in each group with concurrent neurologic conditions, ischemic heart disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and solid tumors using univariate logistic regression. An association model was constructed with conditional multiple logistic regression. The case group had a significantly higher percentage of patients with cerebrovascular accident and/or transient ischemic attack (odds ratio [OR], 3.06; 95% CI, 1.19-7.87], dementia (OR, 5.52; 95% CI, 2.19-13.93), and Parkinson disease (OR, 5; 95% CI, 1.57-15.94). A significantly higher percentage of cases had neurologic conditions (OR, 6.34; 95% CI, 2.89-13.91). Dementia and Parkinson disease were independently associated with bullous pemphigoid in the multivariate analysis. Patients with bullous pemphigoid have a higher frequency of neurologic conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  14. Recent onset neck pain with associated neurological deficit--Pott's disease remains an important differential diagnosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bourke, M G

    2010-11-05

    The incidence of spinal tuberculosis is increasing in developed nations. In Ireland, half of all cases seen in the most recent decade for which figures are available were diagnosed in 2005-2007, the three most recent years for which there is complete data. We discuss a patient who presented with neurological complications due to destructive spinal tuberculous disease affecting the sixth cervical vertebra.

  15. The role of mitochondrial OXPHOS dysfunction in the development of neurologic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breuer, M.E.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Koene, S.; Nooteboom, M.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Smeitink, J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of neurologic disease is a complex and multi-faceted process. Several factors, such as physiology, environment and genetics may play key roles in the manifestation of the associated illnesses. During the past decades, it has become clear that, at the cellular level, mitochondria

  16. Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and Bartonella henselae bacteremia in a father and daughter with neurological disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Christopher W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii is an important, emerging, intravascular bacterial pathogen that has been recently isolated from immunocompetent patients with endocarditis, arthritis, neurological disease and vasoproliferative neoplasia. Vector transmission is suspected among dogs and wild canines, which are the primary reservoir hosts. This investigation was initiated to determine if pets and family members were infected with one or more Bartonella species. Methods PCR and enrichment blood culture in Bartonella alpha Proteobacteria growth medium (BAPGM was used to determine infection status. Antibody titers to B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotypes I-III and B. henselae were determined using a previously described indirect fluorescent antibody test. Two patients were tested sequentially for over a year to assess the response to antibiotic treatment. Results Intravascular infection with B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotype II and Bartonella henselae (Houston 1 strain were confirmed in a veterinarian and his daughter by enrichment blood culture, followed by PCR and DNA sequencing. Symptoms included progressive weight loss, muscle weakness, lack of coordination (the father and headaches, muscle pain and insomnia (the daughter. B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotype II was also sequenced from a cerebrospinal fluid BAPGM enrichment culture and from a periodontal swab sample. After repeated courses of antibiotics, post-treatment blood cultures were negative, there was a decremental decrease in antibody titers to non-detectable levels and symptoms resolved in both patients. Conclusions B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and B. henselae are zoonotic pathogens that can be isolated from the blood of immunocompetent family members with arthralgias, fatigue and neurological symptoms. Therapeutic elimination of Bartonella spp. infections can be challenging, and follow-up testing is recommended. An increasing number of arthropod

  17. Congenital and inherited neurologic diseases in dogs and cats: Legislation and its effect on purchase in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passantino, Annamaria; Masucci, Marisa

    2016-05-01

    Many of the congenital neurologic diseases can result in incapacity or death of the animal. Some of them, such as idiopathic epilepsy and hydrocephalus, exhibit breed or familial predisposition and a genetic basis was proved or suggested. Some diseases can be presumptively diagnosed after a detailed signalment (breed predisposition), history (e.g. family history because many of these defects have familial tendencies), and through physical exam; other diagnostic methods (radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, electrophysiologic tests, etc.) can provide supportive evidence for the congenital defect and help to confirm the diagnosis. Some cases can lead to civil law-suits when the lesions are congenital, but not easily recognizable, or when the lesions are hereditary but tend to became manifest only after some time (more than 12 months after the date of purchase, e.g., after the vice-free guarantee period has expired). Moreover, quite frequently an early diagnosis is not made because there are delays in consulting the veterinarian or the general practitioner veterinarian does not perceive subtle signs. This study was designed to focus on the medico-legal aspects concerning the buying and selling in Italy of dogs and cats affected by congenital and hereditary neurologic diseases that could constitute vice in these animals. While adequate provisions to regulate in detail the various aspects of pet sale have still to be drawn up by legislators, it may be helpful to involve breeders, by obliging them by contract to extend guarantees in the case of hereditary lesions, including neurologic diseases.

  18. Use of Specialized Formulas in the Enteral Nutrition of Children with Severe Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.S. Koreniuk

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The problems of nutrition of disabled children with neurological diseases — cerebral palsy and congenital anomalies of the brain were examined in the article. The features and difficulties of feeding of these patients were identified. The experience in the use of nutritive formula of full hydrolysate in the enteral feeding of the children with secondary dystrophy against the background of severe neurological pathology is presented. The efficiency of this feeding technique, a positive dynamics of nutritional status of patients were shown.

  19. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button NCHS Home Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema Recommend on Facebook ... to emergency departments with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): 6.9 million Source: National Hospital Ambulatory Medical ...

  20. The Application of Nanomaterials in Stem Cell Therapy for some Neurological Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guilong; Khan, Ahsan Ali; Wu, Hao; Chen, Lukui; Gu, Yuchun; Gu, Ning

    2017-03-28

    Stem cell therapy provides great promising therapeutic benefits for various neurological disorders. Cell transplantation has emerged as cell replacement application for nerve damage. Recently, nanomaterials obtain wide development in various industrial and medical fields, and nanoparticles have been applied to neuro-medical field for tracking and treating nervous system diseases. Combining stem cell with nanotechnology has raised more and more attentions; and it has demonstrated that it has huge effects on clinical diagnosis and therapeutics in multiple central nervous system diseases, meanwhile, improving prognosis. This review gives a brief overview of the application of nanomaterials in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. Nanoparticles not only promote stem cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro or in vivo, but also play dominant roles in stem cell imaging and tracking. Furthermore, via delivering genes or drugs, nanoparticles can participate in stem cell therapeutic applications for various neurological diseases, such as ischemic stroke, spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and gliomas. However, nanoparticles have potential cytotoxic effects on nerve cells, which are related to their physicochemical properties. Above all, nano-stem cell-based therapy as a promising strategy has the ability to affect neuronal repair and regeneration in the central nervous system. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Risk of psychiatric and neurological diseases in patients with workplace mobbing experience in Germany: a retrospective database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostev, Karel; Rex, Juliana; Waehlert, Lilia; Hog, Daniela; Heilmaier, Christina

    2014-01-01

    protect them against bullying. Sequelae of mobbing include, in particular, diseases from the neurologic-psychiatric spectrum.

  2. Neurologic Serious Adverse Events Associated with Nivolumab Plus Ipilimumab or Nivolumab Alone in Advanced Melanoma, Including a Case Series of Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, James; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Lao, Christopher D; Hodi, F Stephen; Sharfman, William; Weber, Jeffrey; Suijkerbuijk, Karijn P M; Azevedo, Sergio; Li, Hewei; Reshef, Daniel; Avila, Alexandre; Reardon, David A

    2017-06-01

    Despite unprecedented efficacy across multiple tumor types, immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy is associated with a unique and wide spectrum of immune-related adverse events (irAEs), including neurologic events ranging from mild headache to potentially life-threatening encephalitis. Here, we summarize neurologic irAEs associated with nivolumab and ipilimumab melanoma treatment, present cases of treatment-related encephalitis, and provide practical guidance on diagnosis and management. We searched a Global Pharmacovigilance and Epidemiology database for neurologic irAEs reported over an 8-year period in patients with advanced melanoma receiving nivolumab with or without ipilimumab from 12 studies sponsored by Bristol-Myers Squibb. Serious neurologic irAEs were reviewed, and relationship to nivolumab or ipilimumab was assigned. In our search of 3,763 patients, 35 patients (0.93%) presented with 43 serious neurologic irAEs, including neuropathy (n = 22), noninfective meningitis (n = 5), encephalitis (n = 6), neuromuscular disorders (n = 3), and nonspecific adverse events (n = 7). Study drug was discontinued (n = 20), interrupted (n = 8), or unchanged (n = 7). Most neurologic irAEs resolved (26/35 patients; 75%). Overall, median time to onset was 45 days (range 1-170) and to resolution was 32 days (2-809+). Median time to onset of encephalitis was 55.5 days (range 18-297); four cases resolved and one was fatal. Both oncologists and neurologists need to be aware of signs and symptoms of serious but uncommon neurologic irAEs associated with checkpoint inhibitors. Prompt diagnosis and management using an established algorithm are critical to minimize serious complications from these neurologic irAEs. With increasing use of checkpoint inhibitors in cancer, practicing oncologists need to be aware of the potential risk of neurologic immune-related adverse events and be able to provide prompt treatment of this uncommon, but potentially serious

  3. Functional progression of patients with neurological diseases in a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit: Our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madurga Revilla, P; López Pisón, J; Samper Villagrasa, P; García Íñiguez, J P; Garcés Gómez, R; Domínguez Cajal, M; Gil Hernández, I

    2017-11-23

    Neurological diseases explain a considerable proportion of admissions to paediatric intensive care units (PICU), and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. This study aims to analyse the functional progression of children with critical neurological conditions. Retrospective descriptive study of children admitted to PICU with neurological diseases over a period of 3 years (2012-2014), assessing vital and functional prognosis at PICU discharge and at one year according to the Pediatric Cerebral and Overall Performance Category scales (PCPC-POPC) and the Functional Status Scale (FSS). The results are compared with our previous data (1990-1999), and those of the international multicentre PANGEA study. A total of 266 children were studied. The mortality rate was 3%; the PRISM-III and PIM2 models did not show predictive ability. Clinically significant worsening was observed in functional health at discharge in 30% of the sample, according to POPC, 15% according to PCPC, and 5% according to FSS. After one year, functional performance improved according to PCPC-POPC, but not according to FSS. Children with no underlying neurological disease had a higher degree of functional impairment; this was prolonged over time. We observed a decrease in overall and neurocritical mortality compared with our previous data (5.60 vs. 2.1%, P=.0003, and 8.44 vs. 2.63%, P=.0014, respectively). Compared with the PANGEA study, both mortality and cerebral functional impairment in neurocritical children were lower in our study (1.05 vs. 13.32%, P<.0001, and 10.47% vs. 23.79%, P<.0001, respectively). Nearly one-third of critically ill children have neurological diseases. A significant percentage, mainly children without underlying neurological diseases, had a clinically significant functional impact at PICU discharge and after a year. Neuromonitoring and neuroprotection measures and the evaluation of functional progression are necessary to improve critical child care. Copyright

  4. Hemangiosarcoma of the liver in workers of the PVC industry and other VC-induced diseases with angiologic-dermatologic, hepatologic, radiologic and neurologic symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halama, J.; Becker-Stone, S.; Halama, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Occupational diseases resulting from exposure to vinyl chloride (VC) include angiosarcoma of the liver and other neoplasms. Among workers exposed to VC the authors have found capillary abnormalities in the extremities, with scleroderma and Raynaud syndrome, acro-osteolysis, neurological and psychiatric diseases and chromosome abnormalities, as well as abnormal liver metabolism and haematological findings.

  5. Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Different Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariacarla Ventriglia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Consistent evidence indicates the involvement of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson’s disease (PD. In the present study, we compared serum BDNF in 624 subjects: 266 patients affected by AD, 28 by frontotemporal dementia (FTD, 40 by Lewy body dementia (LBD, 91 by vascular dementia (VAD, 30 by PD, and 169 controls. Our results evidenced lower BDNF serum levels in AD, FTD, LBD, and VAD patients (P<0.001 and a higher BDNF concentration in patients affected by PD (P=0.045. Analyses of effects of pharmacological treatments suggested significantly higher BDNF serum levels in patients taking mood stabilizers/antiepileptics (P=0.009 and L-DOPA (P<0.001 and significant reductions in patients taking benzodiazepines (P=0.020. In conclusion, our results support the role of BDNF alterations in neurodegenerative mechanisms common to different forms of neurological disorders and underline the importance of including drug treatment in the analyses to avoid confounding effects.

  6. Enterovirus 71-associated hand, foot and mouth diseases with neurologic symptoms, a university hospital experience in Korea, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Kyung Cho

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD is a common viral illness in children, which is usually mild and self-limiting. However, in recent epidemics of HFMD in Asia, enterovirus 71 (EV71 has been recognized as a causative agent with severe neurological symptoms with or without cardiopulmonary involvement. HFMD was epidemic in Korea in the spring of 2009. Severe cases with complications including death have been reported. The clinical characteristics in children with neurologic manifestations of EV71 were studied in Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital. Methods : Examinations for EV71 were performed from the stools, respiratory secretion or CSF of children who presented neurologic symptoms associated with HFMD by realtime PCR. Clinical and radiologic data of the patients were collected and analyzed. Results : EV71 was isolated from the stool of 16 patients but not from respiratory secretion or CSF. Among the 16 patients, meningitis (n=10 was the most common manifestation, followed by Guillain-Barr&eacute; syndrome (n=3, meningoencephalitis (n=2, poliomyelitis-like paralytic disease (n=1, and myoclonus (n=1. Gene analysis showed that most of them were caused by EV71 subgenotype C4a, which was prevalent in China in 2008. Conclusion : Because EV71 causes severe complications and death in children, a surveillance system to predict upcoming outbreaks should be established and maintained and adequate public health measures are needed to control disease.

  7. Proton MRS in Behcet's disease with and without neurological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baysal, T.; Sarac, K.; Dusak, A. [Department of Radiology, Inonu University School of Medicine, 44069, Malatya (Turkey); Ozisik, H.I.; Ozcan, C. [Department of Neurology, Inonu University School of Medicine, 44069, Malatya (Turkey); Karlidag, R. [Department of Psychiatry, Inonu University School of Medicine, 44069, Malatya (Turkey); Baysal, O. [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Inonu University School of Medicine, 44069, Malayta (Turkey); Hazneci, E. [Department of Dermatology, Inonu University School of Medicine, 44069, Malatya (Turkey)

    2003-12-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether neurological impairment in Behcet's disease (BD) can be assessed by means of proton MRS and whether it can assist in prognosis. We used single-voxel MRS to measure metabolites in regions of normal-appearing pons, basal ganglia and periventricular white matter (PWM) in 32 patients with chronic BD patients with and without neurological deficits and 29 control subjects. Patients had significantly higher N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios in the basal ganglia than the controls. The Cho/Cr ratio in the PWM was also significantly higher in the patients. MRS enabled clear discrimination of patients and controls and also revealed spectral differences between non-neuro-Behcet's disease and neuro-Behcet's disease in the basal ganglia. MRS can be used to assess brain involvement in BD even if structural changes are absent. (orig.)

  8. Phenotype variability of infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease IMNEPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picker-Minh, Sylvie; Mignot, Cyril; Doummar, Diane; Hashem, Mais; Faqeih, Eissa; Josset, Patrice; Dubern, Béatrice; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Kraemer, Nadine; Kaindl, Angela M

    2016-04-29

    Infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease (IMNEPD) has been recently linked to biallelic mutation of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase 2 gene PTRH2. Two index patients with IMNEPD in the original report had multiple neurological symptoms such as postnatal microcephaly, intellectual disability, developmental delay, sensorineural deafness, cerebellar atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. In addition, distal muscle weakness and abnormalities of thyroid, pancreas, and liver were found. Here, we report five further IMNEPD patients with a different homozygous PTRH2 mutation, broaden the phenotypic spectrum of the disease and differentiate common symptoms and interindividual variability in IMNEPD associated with a unique mutation. We thereby hope to better define IMNEPD and promote recognition and diagnosis of this novel disease entity.

  9. Relationship between Urinary N-Desmethyl-Acetamiprid and Typical Symptoms including Neurological Findings: A Prevalence Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemima Tiwaa Marfo

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoid insecticides are nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists used worldwide. Their environmental health effects including neurotoxicity are of concern. We previously determined a metabolite of acetamiprid, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the urine of a patient, who exhibited some typical symptoms including neurological findings. We sought to investigate the association between urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and the symptoms by a prevalence case-control study. Spot urine samples were collected from 35 symptomatic patients of unknown origin and 50 non-symptomatic volunteers (non-symptomatic group, NSG, 4-87 year-old. Patients with recent memory loss, finger tremor, and more than five of six symptoms (headache, general fatigue, palpitation/chest pain, abdominal pain, muscle pain/weakness/spasm, and cough were in the typical symptomatic group (TSG, n = 19, 5-69 year-old; the rest were in the atypical symptomatic group (ASG, n = 16, 5-78 year-old. N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and six neonicotinoids in the urine were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was the most frequent and highest in TSG (47.4%, 6.0 ppb (frequency, maximum, followed by in ASG (12.5%, 4.4 ppb and in NSG (6.0%, 2.2 ppb, however acetamiprid was not detected. Thiamethoxam was detected in TSG (31.6%, 1.4 ppb, in ASG (6.3%, 1.9 ppb, but not in NSG. Nitenpyram was detected in TSG (10.5%, 1.2 ppb, in ASG (6.3%, not quantified and in NSG (2.0%, not quantified. Clothianidin was only detected in ASG (6.3%, not quantified, and in NSG (2.0%, 1.6 ppb. Thiacloprid was detected in ASG (6.3%, 0.1 ppb. The cases in TSG with detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and thiamethoxam were aged 5 to 62 years and 13 to 62 years, respectively. Detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was associated with increased prevalence of the symptoms (odds ratio: 14, 95% confidence interval: 3.5-57. Urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid can be used as a

  10. Neurologic involvement in Behcet disease. Case report; Morbus Behcet mit neurologischer Beteiligung. Ein Fallbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehner, C. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Fellner, F. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Reinhardt, F. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Neurologische Klinik mit Poliklinik; Eberhardt, K.E.W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    1997-05-01

    Morbus Behcet is a very infrequent multi-system disease caused by an immunological vasculitis affecting the arteries and veins. The disease is primarily known in Israel, Turkey, Italy, Great Britain and Japan. It may become manifest as erythema nodosum, polyarthritis, thrombophlebitis, occlusive arterial disease, pulmonary infarction, ulcerous colitis, portal hypertension, or via neurological symptoms (collateral symptoms), and it is not possible to make a clear prognosis. The most frequent signs of the neuro-Behcet syndrome, as in the case reported, is a meningoencephalitis. MRI is an essential modality for diagnosis and follow-up of the disease. In this case, the findings included meningeal irritations as well as an abduction deficit indicating involvement of the brain stem of type 1. As described in the literature, pathologic findings have been obtained by spinal fluid tests, showing increased cell number and proteins and pleocytosis of the granulocytes. (Orig./vhe) [Deutsch] Der Morbus Behcet ist eine seltene Multisystemerkrankung in Form einer immunvermittelten Vaskulitis, die Arterien und Venen betrifft. Die Erkrankung findet man ueberwiegend in Israel, der Tuerkei, Italien, Grossbritannien und Japan. Die Erkrankung ist multisystemisch, kann sich als Erythema nodosum, Polyarthritis, Thrombophlebitis, arterielle Verschlusskrankheit, Lungeninfarkt, ulzeroese Colitis, portale Hypertension oder mit neurologischen Symptomen (Nebensymptome) manifestieren, und basiert auf einer immunvermittelten Vaskulitis mit unklarer Prognose. Am haeufigsten manifestiert sich das Neuro-Behcet-Syndrom, wie beim untersuchten Patienten, in Form einer Meningoenzephalitis. Hierbei fand sich neben meningealen Reizsymptomen ein Abduktionsdefizit als Zeichen der Hirnstammbeteiligung im Sinne eines Typ 1. Wie in der Literatur beschrieben, zeigte sich ein pathologischer Liquorbefund mit Zellzahl- und Proteinerhoehung sowie granulozytaerer Pleozytose. Beim Neuro-Behcet, wie bei den anderen

  11. Injection of botulinum toxin type a to reduce saliva in patients with neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayse Manrique

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To demonstrate the effect of local injection of Botox® inpatients with neurological diseases, following our protocol for thetreatment of sialorrhea. Study design: clinical prospective study.Methods: Twenty-one patients with neurological diseases seen atthe Otorhinolaryngology of the Associação de Assistência à CriançaDeficiente. They were all submitted to local injection of Botox® insalivary glands and followed up for one year. The protocol consistsof a clinical questionnaire about inability to swallow saliva and itsrepercussions in general health and quality of life. Patients must nothave periodontal disease or intolerance to adverse effects ofanticholinergic agents and must not have used Botox® at least inthe last six months. The injection was ultrasonographically guidedand the dose was 30 U in one site of the submandibular glands, and20 U in two sites in each parotid gland. Results: Twenty-one patientswith sialorrhea resulting from several neurological diseases (chronicencephalopathy, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis,neuromuscular diseases, cerebral tumor, trauma, aged 2 to 66 yearsold, were submitted to Botox® injection in their salivary glands. Weobserved a markedly improvement of sialorrhea in all but one patient.Seventeen patients had no complaints of sialorrhea or salivaaspiration for approximately four months with good repercussion intheir quality of life. No patient presented local or systemic effectswith local injection of Botox®. Conclusion: the injection of Botox® asindicated in the present study was able to reduce sialorrhea resultingfrom several neurological conditions.

  12. Depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and in non-neurological medical illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assogna, Francesca; Fagioli, Sabrina; Cravello, Luca; Meco, Giuseppe; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Stefani, Alessandro; Imperiale, Francesca; Caltagirone, Carlo; Pontieri, Francesco E; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with neurological and non-neurological medical illnesses very often complain of depressive symptoms that are associated with cognitive and functional impairments. We compared the profile of depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with that of control subjects (CS) suffering from non-neurological medical illnesses. Methods One-hundred PD patients and 100 CS were submitted to a structured clinical interview for identification of major depressive disorder (MDD) and minor depressive disorder (MIND), according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR), criteria. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were also administered to measure depression severity. Results When considering the whole groups, there were no differences in depressive symptom frequency between PD and CS apart from worthlessness/guilt, and changes in appetite reduced rates in PD. Further, total scores and psychic and somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI did not differ between PD and CS. After we separated PD and CS in those with MDD, MIND, and no depression (NODEP), comparing total scores and psychic/somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI, we found increased total depression severity in NODEP PD and reduced severity of the psychic symptoms of depression in MDD PD, with no differences in MIND. However, the severity of individual symptom frequency of depression was not different between PD and CS in MDD, MIND, and NODEP groups. Conclusion Although MDD and MIND phenomenology in PD may be very similar to that of CS with non-neurological medical illnesses, neurological symptoms of PD may worsen (or confound) depression severity in patients with no formal/structured DSM-IV-TR, diagnosis of depressive mood disorders. Thus, a thorough assessment of depression in PD should take into consideration the different impacts of neurological manifestations on MDD, MIND, and NODEP. PMID

  13. Depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and in non-neurological medical illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assogna F

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Assogna,1 Sabrina Fagioli,1 Luca Cravello,1 Giuseppe Meco,2 Mariangela Pierantozzi,3 Alessandro Stefani,3 Francesca Imperiale,2 Carlo Caltagirone,1,3 Francesco E Pontieri,4 Gianfranco Spalletta11I.R.C.C.S. Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Neurology and Psychiatry (Parkinson’s Centre and Research Centre of Social Diseases (CIMS, University “Sapienza”, Rome, Italy; 3Department of Neuroscience, University “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Neuroscience, Mental Health and Sensory Systems, University “Sapienza”, Movement Disorder Unit, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Rome, ItalyBackground: Patients with neurological and non-neurological medical illnesses very often complain of depressive symptoms that are associated with cognitive and functional impairments. We compared the profile of depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD patients with that of control subjects (CS suffering from non-neurological medical illnesses.Methods: One-hundred PD patients and 100 CS were submitted to a structured clinical interview for identification of major depressive disorder (MDD and minor depressive disorder (MIND, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR, criteria. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were also administered to measure depression severity.Results: When considering the whole groups, there were no differences in depressive symptom frequency between PD and CS apart from worthlessness/guilt, and changes in appetite reduced rates in PD. Further, total scores and psychic and somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI did not differ between PD and CS. After we separated PD and CS in those with MDD, MIND, and no depression (NODEP, comparing total scores and psychic/somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI, we found increased total depression severity in NODEP PD and reduced severity of the psychic symptoms of

  14. EFhd2, a Protein Linked to Alzheimer's Disease and Other Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Irving E

    2016-01-01

    EFhd2 is a conserved calcium binding protein linked to different neurological disorders and types of cancer. Although, EFhd2 is more abundant in neurons, it is also found in other cell types. The physiological function of this novel protein is still unclear, but it has been shown in vitro to play a role in calcium signaling, apoptosis, actin cytoskeleton, and regulation of synapse formation. Recently, EFhd2 was shown to promote cell motility by modulating the activity of Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA. Although, EFhd2's role in promoting cell invasion and metastasis is of great interest in cancer biology, this review focusses on the evidence that links EFhd2 to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurological disorders. Altered expression of EFhd2 has been documented in AD, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and schizophrenia, indicating that Efhd2 gene expression is regulated in response to neuropathological processes. However, the specific role that EFhd2 plays in the pathophysiology of neurological disorders is still poorly understood. Recent studies demonstrated that EFhd2 has structural characteristics similar to amyloid proteins found in neurological disorders. Moreover, EFhd2 co-aggregates and interacts with known neuropathological proteins, such as tau, C9orf72, and Lrrk2. These results suggest that EFhd2 may play an important role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the understanding of EFhd2's role in health and disease could lead to decipher molecular mechanisms that become activated in response to neuronal stress and degeneration.

  15. Serum creatine kinase isoenzymes and macroenzymes in dogs with different neurologic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltrinieri, Saverio; Pintore, Laura; Balducci, Federica; Giordano, Alessia; Costabile, Annaluce; Bernardini, Marco

    2017-03-01

    Increased serum activity of CK isoenzymes and macroenzymes, and in particular of the brain isoenzyme (CK-BB) has been reported in dogs with central nervous system (CNS) disorders. However, no studies on the possible differences in serum activities of CK iso- or macroenzymes (Macro-CK1 and Macro-CK2) in different neurologic diseases are available. The aim of this study was to describe the electrophoretic distribution of CK iso- and macroenzymes in dogs with CNS disorders in order to assess whether this distribution depends on a specific neurologic disease. This study was done on sera from 45 dogs with neurologic diseases (degenerative, n = 7; idiopathic epilepsy [IE], n = 14; inflammatory, n = 16; space occupying lesions [SOL], n = 8) and from 10 clinically healthy dogs. The separation of serum CK isoenzymes and macroenzymes was performed using an automated electrophoretic method already validated in dogs. Compared with healthy dogs, dogs with CNS disorders had significantly higher total CK and CK-BB activities, and a significantly lower Macro-CK2 activity (P dogs revealed significant differences (P dogs with IE and inflammatory disorders for total CK activity, in all the subgroups for CK-BB (P dogs with IE and SOL for Macro-CK2 (P diseases cannot be differentiated based on CK-BB or Macro-CK2 activities, unless further studies allow the definition of diagnostic thresholds. © 2017 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  16. [Neurologic manifestations of Behçet disease. Review of the caseload of the Neurology and Dermatology services at the Santa Maria Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canhão, P; Ferro, J M; Freitas, J P

    1992-07-01

    Neurological involvement in a series of patients with Behçet's disease, evaluated at the Departments of Neurology and Dermatology, St. Maria Hospital is reported. Meningoencephalytic or encephalytic were the most common clinical forms, while headache, cerebellar and pyramidal signs were the most prevalent symptoms/signs. On follow-up (range 2-13 years) the majority of the patients had either a progressive or a remitting-progressive course. Magnetic ressonance imaging was the most valuable method of detecting central nervous system lesions.

  17. Newer insights to the neurological diseases among biblical characters of old testament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many people over the years have studied the Bible from a medical point of view offering diagnoses for the symptoms and signs that appear to have afflicted numerous individuals in the Bible. We review the biblical characters in the Old Testament and offer newer insights to their neurological diseases. We first look at the battle between Goliath and David. Interestingly, Goliath probably suffered from acromegaly. We propose autism as a diagnosis for Samson which would precede the first known case of autism by centuries. Isaac was a diabetic, and he probably had autonomic neuropathy. Few verses from the books of I Samuel, Psalms, and Ezekiel reveal symptoms suggestive of stroke. Jacob suffered from sciatica, and the child of the Shunnamite woman in II Kings had a subarachnoid hemorrhage. These instances among others found in the Old Testament of the Bible offer newer insights on the history of current neurological diseases.

  18. Clinical application of multi-shot diffusion EPI in neurological disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Tetsuya; Hirata, Koichi; Kubo, Jin; Yamazaki, Kaoru [Dokkyo Univ., Mibu, Tochigi (Japan). School of Medicine; Sato, Toshihiko

    1998-05-01

    Using the multi-shot EPI method we investigated the clinical application of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of neurological disease. The multi-shot method provided better susceptibility artifact-free DWI than the single-shot method particularly in the region of the posterior cranial fossa. DWI using the multi-shot EPI method readily shows the pyramidal tract extending from the internal capsule to the brainstems which is inaccessible by the conventional single-shot EPI method, and providing three-dimensional and distinct images of pyramidal tract changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or cerebral infarction with pyramidal tract disturbance. Our findings suggest that the use of DWI with the multi-shot EPI method would provide a technique for the easy diagnosis and evaluation of various neurological diseases. (author)

  19. [Peculiarities of emotional-cognitive assessment of sensations by patients with neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'eva, V N; Tkhostov, A Sh

    2009-01-01

    To study peculiarities of emotional-cognitive assessment of color sensations and sensation descriptors in patients with autonomic dystonia and cerebrovascular diseases, 70 healthy subjects and 113 patients including 27 with autonomic dystonia, 48 - with discirculatory encephalopathy and 38 - with ischemic stroke have been studied in the rehabilitation period. Clinical-neurological examination, assessment of headache intensity on the Visual-Analogous scale, anxiety and depression levels on the Hospital anxiety and depression scale, the level of mental maladaptation on an author's scale as well as a study of emotional-cognitive assessment of color sensations and sensation descriptors have been carried out. Assessments of color sensations were studied using 20 color standards, indices of positive and negative assessment of all groups of colors and colors of certain categories were determined. The relation to sensation descriptors was studied by showing a list of 50 words; indices of positive and negative ratings of different categories of descriptors (% to the total number of words listed) were determined. It has been shown that the system of assessment of color sensations is most substantially changed in patients with autonomic dystonia that appeared in the more negative, compared to healthy people, perception of cold color tones, dark tones and chromatically non-saturated colors. These changes were less represented in patients with cerebrovascular diseases and disappear after stroke. Changes in the system of sensation descriptors rating are evenly expressed in patients with autonomic dystonia and cerebrovascular diseases: patients' ratings of sensation descriptors are more negative compared to healthy people. These changes are related to the increase of anxiety and depression levels and may contribute to mental health problems of patients.

  20. Lymphatic drainage system of the brain: A novel target for intervention of neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bao-Liang; Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Tuo; Sun, Jing-Yi; Mao, Lei-Lei; Yang, Ming-Feng; Yuan, Hui; Colvin, Robert A; Yang, Xiao-Yi

    2017-09-10

    The belief that the vertebrate brain functions normally without classical lymphatic drainage vessels has been held for many decades. On the contrary, new findings show that functional lymphatic drainage does exist in the brain. The brain lymphatic drainage system is composed of basement membrane-based perivascular pathway, a brain-wide glymphatic pathway, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage routes including sinus-associated meningeal lymphatic vessels and olfactory/cervical lymphatic routes. The brain lymphatic systems function physiological as a route of drainage for interstitial fluid (ISF) from brain parenchyma to nearby lymph nodes. Brain lymphatic drainage helps maintain water and ion balance of the ISF, waste clearance, and reabsorption of macromolecular solutes. A second physiological function includes communication with the immune system modulating immune surveillance and responses of the brain. These physiological functions are influenced by aging, genetic phenotypes, sleep-wake cycle, and body posture. The impairment and dysfunction of the brain lymphatic system has crucial roles in age-related changes of brain function and the pathogenesis of neurovascular, neurodegenerative, and neuroinflammatory diseases, as well as brain injury and tumors. In this review, we summarize the key component elements (regions, cells, and water transporters) of the brain lymphatic system and their regulators as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of neurologic diseases and their resulting complications. Finally, we highlight the clinical importance of ependymal route-based targeted gene therapy and intranasal drug administration in the brain by taking advantage of the unique role played by brain lymphatic pathways in the regulation of CSF flow and ISF/CSF exchange. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Error awareness and the insula: links to neurological and psychiatric diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tilmann A; Ullsperger, Markus; Danielmeier, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Becoming aware of errors that one has committed might be crucial for strategic behavioral and neuronal adjustments to avoid similar errors in the future. This review addresses conscious error perception ("error awareness") in healthy subjects as well as the relationship between error awareness and neurological and psychiatric diseases. We first discuss the main findings on error awareness in healthy subjects. A brain region, that appears consistently involved in error awareness processes, is the insula, which also provides a link to the clinical conditions reviewed here. Then we focus on a neurological condition whose core element is an impaired awareness for neurological consequences of a disease: anosognosia for hemiplegia (AHP). The insular cortex has been implicated in both error awareness and AHP, with anterior insular regions being involved in conscious error processing and more posterior areas being related to AHP. In addition to cytoarchitectonic and connectivity data, this reflects a functional and structural gradient within the insula from anterior to posterior. Furthermore, studies dealing with error awareness and lack of insight in a number of psychiatric diseases are reported. Especially in schizophrenia, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) the performance monitoring system seems impaired, thus conscious error perception might be altered.

  2. Error awareness and the insula: links to neurological and psychiatric diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilmann A Klein

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Becoming aware of errors that one has committed might be crucial for strategic behavioral and neuronal adjustments to avoid similar errors in the future. This review addresses conscious error perception (error awareness in healthy subjects as well as the relationship between error awareness and neurological and psychiatric diseases.We first discuss the main findings on error awareness in healthy subjects. A region, that appears consistently involved in error awareness processes, is the insula, which also provides a link to the clinical conditions reviewed here. Then we focus on a neurological condition whose core element is an impaired awareness for neurological consequences of a disease: anosognosia for hemiplegia (AHP. The insular cortex has been implicated in both error awareness and AHP, with anterior insular regions being involved in conscious error processing and more posterior areas being related to AHP. In addition to cytoarchitectonic and connectivity data, this reflects a functional and structural gradient within the insula from anterior to posterior. Furthermore, studies dealing with error awareness and lack of insight in a number of psychiatric diseases are reported. Especially in schizophrenia, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and autism spectrum disorders the performance monitoring system seems impaired, thus conscious error perception might be altered.

  3. On politics and health: an epidemic of neurologic disease in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, G C

    1995-04-01

    Political decisions may cause disease. During 1992 and 1993, an epidemic of neuropathy in Cuba--largely overlooked by U.S. physicians--affected more than 50,000 persons and caused optic neuropathy, deafness, myelopathy, and sensory neuropathy. Patients with the neurologic disease responded to B group vitamins, and oral vitamin supplementation of the population curbed the epidemic. Dietary restrictions and excessive carbohydrate intake were the immediated cause of the epidemic; however, the primary cause might have been political. Political changes in eastern Europe had major repercussions on Cuba's economy and food supply. In turn, these changes compounded the effects of internal political decisions in the island, leading toward isolationism and economic dependence on the former Soviet Union. Also, for more than 30 years, the United States has maintained an economic embargo against Cuba. In 1992, the U.S. embargo was tightened by the Torricelli amendment (or the Cuba Democracy Act), which prohibited third-country subsidiaries of U.S. companies from trading with Cuba and prevented food and medicines from reaching the island; this amendment produced a virtual economic blockade. Penuries resulting from all these political events resulted in the largest epidemic of neurologic disease in this century. Physicians may need to use their influence to modify political decisions when these decisions result in adverse health consequences. The American Academy of Neurology has issued a plea to encourage physicians and other health personnel to support efforts leading to lifting of the U.S. embargo against Cuba for humanitarian reasons.

  4. Neutron activation analysis of the central nervous system tissues in neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Masayuki; Ota, Kiichiro [Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan); Sasajima, Kazuhisa

    1994-07-01

    As the diseases due to excessive metals in living bodies and the metals of their causes, Minamata disease due to Hg, itai-itai disease due to Cd, dialysis brain disease due to Al, hemochromatosis due to Fe, Wilson disease due to Cu and so on have been known. Also as the neural diseases, in which the possibility that metals take part in them is presumed, there are amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, Parkinsonism dementia and so on. In order to know the causes of the diseases due to excessive metals in living bodies and neurological diseases, the authors have measured Cu, Ca, Al, Mn, Zn and Fe in central nervous system tissues by activation analysis nondestructive method. The cases investigated were 4 cases of hepatocerebral diseases, 6 cases of ALS, 4 cases of Parkinson disease, 4 cases of Parkinsonism dementia, 4 cases of multiple sclerosis and 5 cases without CNS disease for the control. The method of measurement is described. The results for respective diseases are reported. Cu and Fe are in the relation of mirror images, and Cu formed Cu-superoxide dismutase (SOD) similarly to Zn and Mn as SOD carrier metals, and protects living bodies and CNS from oxidative stress. (K.I.).

  5. European Academy of Neurology/European Association for Palliative Care Taskforce on Neurology Consensus recommendations on palliative care for patients with chronic and progressive neurological disease - acceptability for Belgian neurologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanopdenbosch, L J; Maes, E; Oliver, D J

    2017-07-01

    A Consensus document on palliative care and neurology has made recommendations on the care of people with chronic and progressive neurological disease. This study aimed to investigate whether these recommendations are understood by, acceptable to and used in practice by neurologists in Belgium. An online survey was undertaken of 100 neurologists in Belgium, asking for their opinion on all of the recommendations in the Consensus document. Sixty-four of the neurologists replied. Overall, they expressed support for the recommendations, in particular open communication with patients, open assessment of patient and family needs, and discussion of dying. There was less understanding of the role of palliative care in the implementation of palliative care early in disease progression and the role of palliative care multidisciplinary teams. The survey shows that many of the recommendations in the European Academy of Neurology/European Association for Palliative Care Taskforce on Neurology Consensus document are understood by neurologists, and several are now seen as part of normal clinical practice. However, there is still a need to develop a more collaborative approach between neurology and palliative care services, for the benefit of patients and families. © 2017 EAN.

  6. Global, regional, and national burden of neurological disorders during 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Comparable data on the global and country-specific burden of neurological disorders and their trends are crucial for health-care planning and resource allocation. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors (GBD) Study provides such information but does not routinely aggregate results that are of interest to clinicians specialising in neurological conditions. In this systematic analysis, we quantified the global disease burden due to neurological disorders in 2015 and its relationship with country development level. We estimated global and country-specific prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), years of life lost (YLLs), and years lived with disability (YLDs) for various neurological disorders that in the GBD classification have been previously spread across multiple disease groupings. The more inclusive grouping of neurological disorders included stroke, meningitis, encephalitis, tetanus, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, motor neuron disease, migraine, tension-type headache, medication overuse headache, brain and nervous system cancers, and a residual category of other neurological disorders. We also analysed results based on the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a compound measure of income per capita, education, and fertility, to identify patterns associated with development and how countries fare against expected outcomes relative to their level of development. Neurological disorders ranked as the leading cause group of DALYs in 2015 (250·7 [95% uncertainty interval (UI) 229·1 to 274·7] million, comprising 10·2% of global DALYs) and the second-leading cause group of deaths (9·4 [9·1 to 9·7] million], comprising 16·8% of global deaths). The most prevalent neurological disorders were tension-type headache (1505·9 [UI 1337·3 to 1681·6 million cases]), migraine (958·8 [872·1 to 1055·6] million), medication overuse headache (58·5 [50·8 to 67·4 million

  7. Prevention of cerebrovascular diseases and cognitive impairment in psychiatric and neurological practice: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Merkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased life expectancy and related demographic changes, as well as lifestyle modification in the population enhance a steady rise in the incidence of disorders in middle and later life. It increases the burden of diseases and overloads healthcare systems. Therefore prevention strategies are currently on the cutting edge and becoming more and more essential. The article discusses approaches to preventing the most common mental and neurological disorders in middle and old age. It also describes cerebrovascular disease, dementia, cognitive impairment, and stroke and outlines some state-of-the-art prevention strategies.

  8. Epilepsy and other neurological diseases in the parents of children with infantile autism. A case control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, S.E.; Rich, B.; Isager, T.

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the broader phenotype of infantile autism (IA) we compared the rates and types of epilepsy and other neurological diseases in the parents of 111 consecutively admitted patients with IA with a matched control group of parents of 330 children from the general population. All...... fathers the proportion was 5.7% vs 9.7%. No single neurological disease was significantly more frequent among parents of persons with IA. Our study lent support to the notion that epilepsy and other neurological diseases are not part of the broader IA phenotype Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  9. Epilepsy and other neurological diseases in the parents of children with infantile autism. A case control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the broader phenotype of infantile autism (IA) we compared the rates and types of epilepsy and other neurological diseases in the parents of 111 consecutively admitted patients with IA with a matched control group of parents of 330 children from the general population. All...... fathers the proportion was 5.7% vs 9.7%. No single neurological disease was significantly more frequent among parents of persons with IA. Our study lent support to the notion that epilepsy and other neurological diseases are not part of the broader IA phenotype....

  10. Glia-neuron interactions in neurological diseases: Testing non-cell autonomy in a dish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Kathrin; Kaspar, Brian K

    2017-02-01

    For the past century, research on neurological disorders has largely focused on the most prominently affected cell types - the neurons. However, with increasing knowledge of the diverse physiological functions of glial cells, their impact on these diseases has become more evident. Thus, many conditions appear to have more complex origins than initially thought. Since neurological pathologies are often sporadic with unknown etiology, animal models are difficult to create and might only reflect a small portion of patients in which a mutation in a gene has been identified. Therefore, reliable in vitro systems to studying these disorders are urgently needed. They might be a pre-requisite for improving our understanding of the disease mechanisms as well as for the development of potential new therapies. In this review, we will briefly summarize the function of different glial cell types in the healthy central nervous system (CNS) and outline their implication in the development or progression of neurological conditions. We will then describe different types of culture systems to model non-cell autonomous interactions in vitro and evaluate advantages and disadvantages. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Exploiting human neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling oscillatory dynamics in brain microcircuits as a way to help uncover neurological disease mechanisms: A proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, F. K. [Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, Krembil Discovery Tower, Toronto Western Hospital, 60 Leonard Street, 7th floor, 7KD411, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8 (Canada); Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of Toronto, 200 Elizabeth Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4 (Canada); Department of Physiology, University of Toronto Medical Sciences Building, 3rd Floor, 1 King' s College Circle, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8 (Canada); Ferguson, K. A. [Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, Krembil Discovery Tower, Toronto Western Hospital, 60 Leonard Street, 7th floor, 7KD411, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8 (Canada); Department of Physiology, University of Toronto Medical Sciences Building, 3rd Floor, 1 King' s College Circle, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    There is an undisputed need and requirement for theoretical and computational studies in Neuroscience today. Furthermore, it is clear that oscillatory dynamical output from brain networks is representative of various behavioural states, and it is becoming clear that one could consider these outputs as measures of normal and pathological brain states. Although mathematical modeling of oscillatory dynamics in the context of neurological disease exists, it is a highly challenging endeavour because of the many levels of organization in the nervous system. This challenge is coupled with the increasing knowledge of cellular specificity and network dysfunction that is associated with disease. Recently, whole hippocampus in vitro preparations from control animals have been shown to spontaneously express oscillatory activities. In addition, when using preparations derived from animal models of disease, these activities show particular alterations. These preparations present an opportunity to address challenges involved with using models to gain insight because of easier access to simultaneous cellular and network measurements, and pharmacological modulations. We propose that by developing and using models with direct links to experiment at multiple levels, which at least include cellular and microcircuit, a cycling can be set up and used to help us determine critical mechanisms underlying neurological disease. We illustrate our proposal using our previously developed inhibitory network models in the context of these whole hippocampus preparations and show the importance of having direct links at multiple levels.

  12. Modeling oscillatory dynamics in brain microcircuits as a way to help uncover neurological disease mechanisms: A proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, F. K.; Ferguson, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    There is an undisputed need and requirement for theoretical and computational studies in Neuroscience today. Furthermore, it is clear that oscillatory dynamical output from brain networks is representative of various behavioural states, and it is becoming clear that one could consider these outputs as measures of normal and pathological brain states. Although mathematical modeling of oscillatory dynamics in the context of neurological disease exists, it is a highly challenging endeavour because of the many levels of organization in the nervous system. This challenge is coupled with the increasing knowledge of cellular specificity and network dysfunction that is associated with disease. Recently, whole hippocampus in vitro preparations from control animals have been shown to spontaneously express oscillatory activities. In addition, when using preparations derived from animal models of disease, these activities show particular alterations. These preparations present an opportunity to address challenges involved with using models to gain insight because of easier access to simultaneous cellular and network measurements, and pharmacological modulations. We propose that by developing and using models with direct links to experiment at multiple levels, which at least include cellular and microcircuit, a cycling can be set up and used to help us determine critical mechanisms underlying neurological disease. We illustrate our proposal using our previously developed inhibitory network models in the context of these whole hippocampus preparations and show the importance of having direct links at multiple levels.

  13. Engineered BDNF producing cells as a potential treatment for neurologic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Peter; Anderson, Johnathon D.; Yu, Abigail S.; Annett, Geralyn; Fink, Kyle D.; Nolta, Jan A.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated in wide range of neurological diseases and injury. This neurotrophic factor is vital for neuronal health, survival, and synaptic connectivity. Many therapies focus on the restoration or enhancement of BDNF following injury or disease progression. Areas covered The present review will focus on the mechanisms in which BDNF exerts its beneficial functioning, current BDNF therapies, issues and potential solutions for delivery of neurotrophic factors to the central nervous system, and other disease indications that may benefit from overexpression or restoration of BDNF. Expert opinion Due to the role of BDNF in neuronal development, maturation, and health, BDNF is implicated in numerous neurological diseases making it a prime therapeutic agent. Numerous studies have shown the therapeutic potential of BDNF in a number of neurodegenerative disease models and in acute CNS injury, however clinical translation has fallen short due to issues in delivering this molecule. The use of MSC as a delivery platform for BDNF holds great promise for clinical advancement of neurotrophic factor restoration. The ease with which MSC can be engineered opens the door to the possibility of using this cell-based delivery system to advance a BDNF therapy to the clinic. PMID:27159050

  14. Congenital and inherited neurologic diseases in dogs and cats: Legislation and its effect on purchase in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Passantino

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many of the congenital neurologic diseases can result in incapacity or death of the animal. Some of them, such as idiopathic epilepsy and hydrocephalus, exhibit breed or familial predisposition and a genetic basis was proved or suggested. Some diseases can be presumptively diagnosed after a detailed signalment (breed predisposition, history (e.g. family history because many of these defects have familial tendencies, and through physical exam; other diagnostic methods (radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, electrophysiologic tests, etc. can provide supportive evidence for the congenital defect and help to confirm the diagnosis. Some cases can lead to civil law-suits when the lesions are congenital, but not easily recognizable, or when the lesions are hereditary but tend to became manifest only after some time (more than 12 months after the date of purchase, e.g., after the vice-free guarantee period has expired. Moreover, quite frequently an early diagnosis is not made because there are delays in consulting the veterinarian or the general practitioner veterinarian does not perceive subtle signs. This study was designed to focus on the medico-legal aspects concerning the buying and selling in Italy of dogs and cats affected by congenital and hereditary neurologic diseases that could constitute vice in these animals. While adequate provisions to regulate in detail the various aspects of pet sale have still to be drawn up by legislators, it may be helpful to involve breeders, by obliging them by contract to extend guarantees in the case of hereditary lesions, including neurologic diseases.

  15. Spectrum of ocular manifestations in CLN2-associated batten (Jansky-Bielschowsky) disease correlate with advancing age and deteriorating neurological function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlin, Anton; Sondhi, Dolan; Witmer, Matthew T; Wessel, Matthew M; Mezey, Jason G; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Hackett, Neil R; Yohay, Kaleb; Kosofsky, Barry; Souweidane, Mark M; Kaplitt, Michael G; D'Amico, Donald J; Crystal, Ronald G; Kiss, Szilárd

    2013-01-01

    Late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL), one form of Batten's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting from a CLN2 gene mutation. The spectrum of ophthalmic manifestations of LINCL and the relationship with neurological function has not been previously described. Patients underwent ophthalmic evaluations, including anterior segment and dilated exams, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography. Patients were also assessed with the LINCL Neurological Severity Scale. Ophthalmic findings were categorized into one of five severity scores, and the association of the extent of ocular disease with neurological function was assessed. Fifty eyes of 25 patients were included. The mean age at the time of exam was 4.9 years (range 2.5 to 8.1). The mean ophthalmic severity score was 2.6 (range 1 to 5). The mean neurological severity score was 6.1 (range 2 to 11). Significantly more severe ophthalmic manifestations were observed among older patients (p<0.005) and patients with more severe neurological findings (p<0.03). A direct correlation was found between the Ophthalmic Severity Scale and the Weill Cornell Neurological Scale (p<0.002). A direct association was also found between age and the ophthalmic manifestations (p<0.0002), with older children having more severe ophthalmic manifestations. Ophthalmic manifestations of LINCL correlate closely with the degree of neurological function and the age of the patient. The newly established LINCL Ophthalmic Scale may serve as an objective marker of LINCL severity and disease progression, and may be valuable in the evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies for LINCL, including gene therapy.

  16. Spectrum of ocular manifestations in CLN2-associated batten (Jansky-Bielschowsky disease correlate with advancing age and deteriorating neurological function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Orlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL, one form of Batten's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting from a CLN2 gene mutation. The spectrum of ophthalmic manifestations of LINCL and the relationship with neurological function has not been previously described. METHODS: Patients underwent ophthalmic evaluations, including anterior segment and dilated exams, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography. Patients were also assessed with the LINCL Neurological Severity Scale. Ophthalmic findings were categorized into one of five severity scores, and the association of the extent of ocular disease with neurological function was assessed. RESULTS: Fifty eyes of 25 patients were included. The mean age at the time of exam was 4.9 years (range 2.5 to 8.1. The mean ophthalmic severity score was 2.6 (range 1 to 5. The mean neurological severity score was 6.1 (range 2 to 11. Significantly more severe ophthalmic manifestations were observed among older patients (p<0.005 and patients with more severe neurological findings (p<0.03. A direct correlation was found between the Ophthalmic Severity Scale and the Weill Cornell Neurological Scale (p<0.002. A direct association was also found between age and the ophthalmic manifestations (p<0.0002, with older children having more severe ophthalmic manifestations. CONCLUSIONS: Ophthalmic manifestations of LINCL correlate closely with the degree of neurological function and the age of the patient. The newly established LINCL Ophthalmic Scale may serve as an objective marker of LINCL severity and disease progression, and may be valuable in the evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies for LINCL, including gene therapy.

  17. Spectrum of Ocular Manifestations in CLN2-Associated Batten (Jansky-Bielschowsky) Disease Correlate with Advancing Age and Deteriorating Neurological Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlin, Anton; Sondhi, Dolan; Witmer, Matthew T.; Wessel, Matthew M.; Mezey, Jason G.; Kaminsky, Stephen M.; Hackett, Neil R.; Yohay, Kaleb; Kosofsky, Barry; Souweidane, Mark M.; Kaplitt, Michael G.; D’Amico, Donald J.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Kiss, Szilárd

    2013-01-01

    Background Late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL), one form of Batten’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting from a CLN2 gene mutation. The spectrum of ophthalmic manifestations of LINCL and the relationship with neurological function has not been previously described. Methods Patients underwent ophthalmic evaluations, including anterior segment and dilated exams, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography. Patients were also assessed with the LINCL Neurological Severity Scale. Ophthalmic findings were categorized into one of five severity scores, and the association of the extent of ocular disease with neurological function was assessed. Results Fifty eyes of 25 patients were included. The mean age at the time of exam was 4.9 years (range 2.5 to 8.1). The mean ophthalmic severity score was 2.6 (range 1 to 5). The mean neurological severity score was 6.1 (range 2 to 11). Significantly more severe ophthalmic manifestations were observed among older patients (p<0.005) and patients with more severe neurological findings (p<0.03). A direct correlation was found between the Ophthalmic Severity Scale and the Weill Cornell Neurological Scale (p<0.002). A direct association was also found between age and the ophthalmic manifestations (p<0.0002), with older children having more severe ophthalmic manifestations. Conclusions Ophthalmic manifestations of LINCL correlate closely with the degree of neurological function and the age of the patient. The newly established LINCL Ophthalmic Scale may serve as an objective marker of LINCL severity and disease progression, and may be valuable in the evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies for LINCL, including gene therapy. PMID:24015292

  18. Risk of psychiatric and neurological diseases in patients with workplace mobbing experience in Germany: a retrospective database analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostev, Karel

    2014-05-01

    ratios (OR representing the risk of suffering from diseases were higher in affected patients, with the highest value (4.28 for depression and the lowest value for sleep disorders (OR=2.4.Conclusion: Those who will later become the victims of bullying are more prone to suffer from diseases in general, even before this experience of mobbing has occurred, which underlines the importance of supporting (chronically ill patients to protect them against bullying. Sequelae of mobbing include, in particular, diseases from the neurologic-psychiatric spectrum.

  19. Acute blindness in dogs: sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome versus neurological disease (140 cases, 2000-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Keith W; van der Woerdt, Alexandra; Cottrill, Nancy B

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate dogs with amaurosis and compare signalment, history, ophthalmic examination and neurologic abnormalities between dogs diagnosed with sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) versus neurological disease (ND). Animals Studied-140 dogs with acute vision loss and ocular abnormalities insufficient to account for visual deficits. An electroretinogram (ERG) was performed on each dog. Medical records were reviewed and information was collected for all dogs meeting the inclusion criteria. Dogs diagnosed with SARDS were compared to those with ND based on signalment, duration of clinical signs, past medical problems, clinicopathologic findings, and ophthalmic and physical examination abnormalities. 120 dogs were diagnosed with SARDS and 20 dogs with ND based on ERG results. Mixed-breed dogs were most commonly diagnosed with SARDS as well as ND. Pure breed dogs frequently diagnosed with SARDS included the Miniature Schnauzer and Dachshund. Dogs with SARDS did not differ significantly from those with ND based on age or sex distribution. Cushing's-like symptoms were reported more frequently in SARDS dogs as well as conjunctival hyperemia and retinal vascular attenuation. Papilledema and asymmetric visual deficits were observed more frequently in dogs with ND. Dogs with ND were no more likely than SARDS dogs to have additional neurological deficits. Appreciable overlap of clinical signs exists between dogs with SARDS and dogs with ND resulting in acute vision loss. As a significant portion of dogs (14%) in the present study were diagnosed with ND, an ERG to rule out ND is indicated in dogs with amaurosis.

  20. Retrospective study of the clinical effects of acupuncture on cervical neurological diseases in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching Ming; Chang, Fang Chia; Lin, Chung Tien

    2016-09-30

    This study was conducted to evaluate new acupuncture protocols for the clinical treatment of cervical spinal cord diseases in 19 dogs. Three treatment options containing Jing-jiaji (cervical jiaji) were developed to treat neck pain, hemiparesis, and tetraparesis depending on the severity. The interval between the neurological disease onset and treatment (duration of signs), time to improvement after treatment, and recovery time were compared in dogs by body weight, age, and dry needle acupuncture (AP) with or without electro-AP (EAP). The duration of signs was longer in dogs weighing greater than 10 kg than in those weighing less than 10 kg (p< 0.05). Improvement and recovery times did not vary by body weight. Additionally, improvement and recovery times did not vary by age. The improvement and recovery times were longer in the AP+EAP group than the AP group (p< 0.05). Acupuncture with Jing-jiaji was effective in cervical spinal cord diseases in different sized dogs and in middle-aged and senior dogs. This report standardized AP treatment containing Jing-jiaji for canine cervical problems and evaluated its effects. The newly standardized AP methodology offers clinical practitioners an effective way to improve the outcomes of cervical neurological diseases in dogs.

  1. Common data elements for clinical research in mitochondrial disease: a National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaa, Amel; Rahman, Shamima; Lombès, Anne; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Sheikh, Muniza K; Alai-Hansen, Sherita; Cohen, Bruce H; Dimmock, David; Emrick, Lisa; Falk, Marni J; McCormack, Shana; Mirsky, David; Moore, Tony; Parikh, Sumit; Shoffner, John; Taivassalo, Tanja; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Tein, Ingrid; Odenkirchen, Joanne C; Goldstein, Amy

    2017-05-01

    The common data elements (CDE) project was developed by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) to provide clinical researchers with tools to improve data quality and allow for harmonization of data collected in different research studies. CDEs have been created for several neurological diseases; the aim of this project was to develop CDEs specifically curated for mitochondrial disease (Mito) to enhance clinical research. Nine working groups (WGs), composed of international mitochondrial disease experts, provided recommendations for Mito clinical research. They initially reviewed existing NINDS CDEs and instruments, and developed new data elements or instruments when needed. Recommendations were organized, internally reviewed by the Mito WGs, and posted online for external public comment for a period of eight weeks. The final version was again reviewed by all WGs and the NINDS CDE team prior to posting for public use. The NINDS Mito CDEs and supporting documents are publicly available on the NINDS CDE website ( https://commondataelements.ninds.nih.gov/ ), organized into domain categories such as Participant/Subject Characteristics, Assessments, and Examinations. We developed a comprehensive set of CDE recommendations, data definitions, case report forms (CRFs), and guidelines for use in Mito clinical research. The widespread use of CDEs is intended to enhance Mito clinical research endeavors, including natural history studies, clinical trial design, and data sharing. Ongoing international collaboration will facilitate regular review, updates and online publication of Mito CDEs, and support improved consistency of data collection and reporting.

  2. Respiratory and neurological disease in rabbits experimentally infected with equid herpesvirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitz, Fábio A; Cargnelutti, Juliana F; Anziliero, Deniz; Gonçalves, Kelley V; Masuda, Eduardo K; Weiblen, Rudi; Flores, Eduardo F

    2015-10-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is an important pathogen of horses worldwide, associated with respiratory, reproductive and/or neurological disease. A mouse model for EHV-1 infection has been established but fails to reproduce some important aspects of the viral pathogenesis. Then, we investigated the susceptibility of rabbits to EHV-1 aiming at proposing this species as an alternative model for EHV-1 infection. Weanling rabbits inoculated intranasal with EHV-1 Kentucky D (10(7) TCID50/animal) shed virus in nasal secretions up to day 8-10 post-inoculation (pi), presented viremia up to day 14 pi and seroconverted to EHV-1 (virus neutralizing titers 4 to 64). Most rabbits (75%) developed respiratory disease, characterized by serous to hemorrhagic nasal discharge and mild to severe dyspnea. Some animals (20%) presented neurological signs as circling, bruxism and opisthotonus. Six animals died during acute disease (days 3-6); infectious virus and/or viral DNA were detected in the lungs, trigeminal ganglia (TG), olfactory bulbs (OBs) and cerebral cortex/brain (CC). Histological examination showed necrohemorrhagic, multifocal to coalescent bronchointerstitial pneumonia and diffuse alveolar edema. In two rabbits euthanized at day 50 pi, latent EHV-1 DNA was detected in the OBs. Dexamethasone administration at day 50 pi resulted in virus reactivation, demonstrated by virus shedding, viremia, clinical signs, and increase in VN titers and/or by detection of virus DNA in lungs, OBs, TGs and/or CC. These results demonstrate that rabbits are susceptible to EHV-1 infection and develop respiratory and neurological signs upon experimental inoculation. Thus, rabbits may be used to study selected aspects of EHV-1 biology and pathogenesis, extending and complementing the mouse model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Replication Validity of Initial Association Studies: A Comparison between Psychiatry, Neurology and Four Somatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas-Mallet, Estelle; Button, Katherine; Boraud, Thomas; Munafo, Marcus; Gonon, François

    2016-01-01

    Context There are growing concerns about effect size inflation and replication validity of association studies, but few observational investigations have explored the extent of these problems. Objective Using meta-analyses to measure the reliability of initial studies and explore whether this varies across biomedical domains and study types (cognitive/behavioral, brain imaging, genetic and “others”). Methods We analyzed 663 meta-analyses describing associations between markers or risk factors and 12 pathologies within three biomedical domains (psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases). We collected the effect size, sample size, publication year and Impact Factor of initial studies, largest studies (i.e., with the largest sample size) and the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial studies were considered as replicated if they were in nominal agreement with meta-analyses and if their effect size inflation was below 100%. Results Nominal agreement between initial studies and meta-analyses regarding the presence of a significant effect was not better than chance in psychiatry, whereas it was somewhat better in neurology and somatic diseases. Whereas effect sizes reported by largest studies and meta-analyses were similar, most of those reported by initial studies were inflated. Among the 256 initial studies reporting a significant effect (p<0.05) and paired with significant meta-analyses, 97 effect sizes were inflated by more than 100%. Nominal agreement and effect size inflation varied with the biomedical domain and study type. Indeed, the replication rate of initial studies reporting a significant effect ranged from 6.3% for genetic studies in psychiatry to 86.4% for cognitive/behavioral studies. Comparison between eight subgroups shows that replication rate decreases with sample size and “true” effect size. We observed no evidence of association between replication rate and publication year or Impact Factor. Conclusion The differences in reliability

  4. Nested PCR for Rapid Detection of Mumps Virus in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Neurological Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Gustavo Palacios; Rodriguez, Claudia; Cisterna, Daniel; Freire, María Cecilia; Cello, Jerónimo

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a reverse transcription (RT)-nested polymerase chain reaction (n-PCR) for the detection of mumps virus RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with neurological infections. A specific 112-bp fragment was amplified by this method with primers from the nucleoprotein of the mumps virus genome. The mumps virus RT–n-PCR was capable of detecting 0.001 PFU/ml and 0.005 50% tissue culture infective dose/ml. This method was found to be specific, since no PCR product was detected in each of the CSF samples from patients with proven non-mumps virus-related meningitis or encephalitis. Mumps virus RNA was detected in all 18 CSF samples confirmed by culture to be infected with mumps virus. Positive PCR results were obtained for the CSF of 26 of 28 patients that were positive for signs of mumps virus infection (i.e., cultivable virus from urine or oropharyngeal samples or positivity for anti-mumps virus immunoglobulin M) but without cultivable virus in their CSF. Overall, mumps virus RNA was detected in CSF of 96% of the patients with a clinical diagnosis of viral central nervous system (CNS) disease and confirmed mumps virus infection, while mumps virus was isolated in CSF of only 39% of the patients. Furthermore, in a retrospective study, we were able to detect mumps virus RNA in 25 of 55 (46%) CSF samples from patients with a clinical diagnosis of viral CNS disease and negative laboratory evidence of viral infection including mumps virus infection. The 25 patients represent 12% of the 236 patients who had a clinical diagnosis of viral CNS infections and whose CSF was examined at our laboratory for a 2-year period. The findings confirm the importance of mumps virus as a causative agent of CNS infections in countries with low vaccine coverage rates. In summary, our study demonstrates the usefulness of the mumps virus RT–n-PCR for the diagnosis of mumps virus CNS disease and suggests that this assay may soon become the “gold standard

  5. RNA Structures as Mediators of Neurological Diseases and as Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat, Viachaslau; Disney, Matthew D

    2015-07-01

    RNAs adopt diverse folded structures that are essential for function and thus play critical roles in cellular biology. A striking example of this is the ribosome, a complex, three-dimensionally folded macromolecular machine that orchestrates protein synthesis. Advances in RNA biochemistry, structural and molecular biology, and bioinformatics have revealed other non-coding RNAs whose functions are dictated by their structure. It is not surprising that aberrantly folded RNA structures contribute to disease. In this Review, we provide a brief introduction into RNA structural biology and then describe how RNA structures function in cells and cause or contribute to neurological disease. Finally, we highlight successful applications of rational design principles to provide chemical probes and lead compounds targeting structured RNAs. Based on several examples of well-characterized RNA-driven neurological disorders, we demonstrate how designed small molecules can facilitate the study of RNA dysfunction, elucidating previously unknown roles for RNA in disease, and provide lead therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Single-cell molecular biology: implications for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, D M; McIntosh, T K; Eberwine, J H

    1999-12-01

    The normal functioning of the central nervous system (CNS) requires complex interactions among numerous biological components. The pathophysiology of perturbations in this system is as complex as that of neurological disease. Many methods exist to examine the biological output of dysfunctional cells from a diseased system (e.g., immunohistochemical analysis, electrophysiology, and microdialysis), with one goal being to understand the mechanisms of cell death. This understanding may allow the design of therapeutic strategies to prevent cell death and ensuing behavioral abnormalities. Analysis of messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for various genes in CNS tissue may enhance understanding of neurological disease, since cells differ in the complement and abundance of genes they express. One popular method for detecting changes in gene expression is the Northern blot technique, in which total RNA from a sample is extracted and the RNA molecules are separated by size on a denaturing gel and transferred or "blotted" onto nylon membranes that are then probed with radiolabeled DNA for subsequent autoradiograpic detection of gene expression.

  7. Isolation of Saint Louis Encephalitis Virus from a Horse with Neurological Disease in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Roberta; Costa, Erica Azevedo; Marques, Rafael Elias; Oliveira, Taismara Simas; Furtini, Ronaldo; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Quaresma; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2013-01-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is a causative agent of encephalitis in humans in the Western hemisphere. SLEV is a positive-sense RNA virus that belongs to the Flavivirus genus, which includes West Nile encephalitis virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Dengue virus and other medically important viruses. Recently, we isolated a SLEV strain from the brain of a horse with neurological signs in the countryside of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The SLEV isolation was confirmed by reverse-transcription RT-PCR and sequencing of the E protein gene. Virus identity was also confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence using commercial antibodies against SLEV. To characterize this newly isolated strain in vivo, serial passages in newborn mice were performed and led to hemorrhagic manifestations associated with recruitment of inflammatory cells into the central nervous system of newborns. In summary this is the first isolation of SLEV from a horse with neurological signs in Brazil. PMID:24278489

  8. Recent evidence for an expanded role of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Michael D; Varney, Bianca; Sundaram, Gayathri; Lennon, Matthew J; Lim, Chai K; Jacobs, Kelly; Guillemin, Gilles J; Brew, Bruce J

    2017-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan metabolism has emerged in recent years as a key regulator of the production of both neuroprotective (e.g. kynurenic and picolinic acid, and the essential cofactor NAD+) and neurotoxic metabolites (e.g. quinolinic acid, 3-hydroxykynurenine). The balance between the production of the two types of metabolites is controlled by key rate-limiting enzymes such as indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1), and in turn, molecular signals such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ), which activate the KP metabolism of tryptophan by this enzyme, as opposed to alternative pathways for serotonin and melatonin production. Dysregulated KP metabolism has been strongly associated with neurological diseases in recent years, and is the subject of increasing efforts to understand how the metabolites are causative of disease pathology. Concurrent with these endeavours are drug development initiatives to use inhibitors to block certain enzymes in the pathway, resulting in reduced levels of neurotoxic metabolites (e.g. quinolinic acid, an excitotoxin and N-Methyl-d-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonist), while in turn enhancing the bioavailability of the neuroprotective metabolites such as kynurenic acid. Neurodegenerative diseases often have a substantial autoimmune or inflammatory component; hence a greater understanding of how KP metabolites influence the inflammatory cascade is required. Additionally, challenges exist in diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and motor neurone disease (MND), which do not have reliable biomarkers. Clinical diagnosis can often be prolonged in order to exclude other diseases, and often diagnosis occurs at an advanced state of disease pathology, which does not allow a lengthy time for patient assessment and intervention therapies. This review considers the current evidence for involvement of the KP in several neurological diseases, in biomarkers of disease and also the parallels that exist in KP metabolism with what is known in other

  9. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaper, Tasso J., E-mail: tasso@bu.edu; Kramer, Mark A., E-mail: mak@bu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Rotstein, Horacio G., E-mail: horacio@njit.edu [Department of Mathematical Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases.

  10. Is it time to include ion channel diseases among cardiomyopathies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina; Thiene, Gaetano

    2005-10-01

    Heart muscle diseases are traditionally classified according to their peculiar pathophysiologic features such as "dilated," "hypertrophic," "restrictive," and "arrhythmogenic right ventricular" cardiomyopathy. The extraordinary advances accomplished in the last two decades in molecular genetics have allowed the identification of the genetic background of most of these conditions. According to the 1995 World Health Organization definition of cardiomyopathies as "diseases of the myocardium associated with cardiac dysfunction," they should include not only forms with hemodynamic dysfunction, but also conduction and rhythm disturbances. Arrhythmias are per se a sign of cardiac dysfunction and may reflect an underlying myocardial electrical disease with or without structural abnormalities as features. Nonstructural arrhythmogenic heart diseases include long and short QT syndromes, Brugada syndrome, Lènegre disease, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. These conditions are defined as "channelopathies" because they are the consequence of cardiac ion channel gene mutations. Long and short QT syndromes are mostly caused by either sodium or potassium ion channel gene mutations; Brugada syndrome and Lènegre disease are both related to a defective sodium channel gene; and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is the result of an abnormal ryanodine receptor regulating calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. These nonstructural inherited arrhythmic conditions should be regarded as cardiomyopathies because the myocyte is abnormal, although the heart is apparently intact. It is time for a new classification of cardiomyopathies taking into account the underlying gene mutations and the cellular level of expression of encoded proteins, thus distinguishing cytoskeleton (cytoskeletalopathies), desmosomal (desmosomalopathies), sarcomeric (sarcomyopathies), and ion channel (channelopathies) cardiomyopathies.

  11. The Spanish Burden of Disease 2010: Neurological, mental and substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Elvira; Garin, Noé; Ferrari, Alize J; Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Olaya, Beatriz; Sànchez-Riera, Lidia; Whiteford, Harvey A; Haro, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    We used data from the Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 to report on the burden of neuropsychiatric disorders in Spain. The summary measure of burden used in the study was the disability-adjusted life-year (DALY), which sums of the years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLLs) and the years lived with disability (YLDs). DALYs were adjusted for comorbidity and estimated with 95% uncertainty intervals. The burden of neuropsychiatric disorders accounted for 18.4% of total all-cause DALYs generated in Spain for 2010. Within this group, the top five leading causes of DALYs were: depressive disorders, Alzheimer's disease, migraine, substance-use disorders, and anxiety disorder, which accounted for 70.9% of all DALYs due to neuropsychiatric disorders. Neurological disorders represented 5.03% of total all cause YLLs, whereas mental and substance-use disorders accounted for 0.8%. Mental and substance-use disorders accounted for 22.4% of total YLDs, with depression being the most disabling disorder. Neurological disorders represented 8.3% of total YLDs. Neuropsychiatric disorders were one of the leading causes of disability in 2010. This finding contributes to our understanding of the burden of neuropsychiatric disorders in the Spanish population and highlights the importance of prioritising neuropsychiatric disorders in the Spanish public health system. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. HTLV-I infection and neurological disease in Rio de Janeiro.

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    Araujo, A de Q; Ali, A; Newell, A; Dalgleish, A G; Rudge, P

    1992-02-01

    Fifty patients with chronic neurological diseases attending a clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were examined for evidence of HTLV-I infection. Fifteen of 27 with progressive paraparesis of obscure origin had antibodies to HTLV-I in high titre in their serum samples, and 10 of 13 studied had antibodies in their cerebrospinal fluid. The clinical features of the antibody positive patients were similar to those of patients with HTLV-I associated myelopathy from other countries except that half of the Brazilian patients were white. Seven patients had multiple sclerosis and one of these had antibodies to HTLV-I in the serum. None of the eight patients with motor neuron disease and four with polymyositis had HTLV-I antibodies in their serum samples.

  13. Copper mediated neurological disorder: visions into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer and Menkes disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Anami; Dev, Kapil; Tanwar, Ranjeet S; Selwal, Krishan K; Tyagi, Pankaj K

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is a vital redox dynamic metal that is possibly poisonous in superfluous. Metals can traditionally or intricately cause propagation in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accretion in cells and this may effect in programmed cell death. Accumulation of Cu causes necrosis that looks to be facilitated by DNA damage, followed by activation of P53. Cu dyshomeostasis has also been concerned in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Menkes disease and is directly related to neurodegenerative syndrome that usually produces senile dementia. These mortal syndromes are closely related with an immense damage of neurons and synaptic failure in the brain. This review focuses on copper mediated neurological disorders with insights into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer and Menkes disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Konzo: from poverty, cassava, and cyanogen intake to toxico-nutritional neurological disease.

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    Hipólito Nzwalo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Konzo is a distinct neurological entity with selective upper motor neuron damage, characterized by an abrupt onset of an irreversible, non-progressive, and symmetrical spastic para/tetraparesis. Despite its severity, konzo remains a neglected disease. The disease is associated with high dietary cyanogen consumption from insufficiently processed roots of bitter cassava combined with a protein-deficient diet. Epidemics occur when these conditions coincide at times of severe food shortage. Up to 1993, outbreaks in poor rural areas in Africa contributed to more than 3,700 cases of konzo. The number of affected people is underestimated. From unofficial reports, the number of cases was estimated to be at least 100,000 in 2000, in contrast to the 6,788 cases reported up to 2009 from published papers.

  15. Konzo: from poverty, cassava, and cyanogen intake to toxico-nutritional neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Cliff, Julie

    2011-06-01

    Konzo is a distinct neurological entity with selective upper motor neuron damage, characterized by an abrupt onset of an irreversible, non-progressive, and symmetrical spastic para/tetraparesis. Despite its severity, konzo remains a neglected disease. The disease is associated with high dietary cyanogen consumption from insufficiently processed roots of bitter cassava combined with a protein-deficient diet. Epidemics occur when these conditions coincide at times of severe food shortage. Up to 1993, outbreaks in poor rural areas in Africa contributed to more than 3,700 cases of konzo. The number of affected people is underestimated. From unofficial reports, the number of cases was estimated to be at least 100,000 in 2000, in contrast to the 6,788 cases reported up to 2009 from published papers.

  16. Clinical NMR imaging of the brain in children: normal and neurologic disease

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    Johnson, M.A, (Hammersmith Hospital, London, England); Pennock, J.M.; Bydder, G.M.; Steiner, R.E.; Thomas, D.J.; Hayward, R.; Bryant, D.R.T.; Payne, J.A.; Levene, M.I.; Whitelaw, A.; Dubowitz, L.M.S.; Dubowitz, V.

    1983-11-01

    The results of initial clinical nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in eight normal and 52 children with a wide variety of neurologic diseases were reviewed. The high level of gray-white matter contrast available with inversion-recovery sequences provided a basis for visualizing normal myelination as well as delays or deficits in this process. The appearances seen in cases of parenchymal hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and proencephalic cysts are described. Ventricular enlargement was readily identified and marginal edema was demonstrated with spin-echo sequences. Abnormalities were seen in cerebral palsy, congenital malformations, Hallervorden-Spatz disease, aminoaciduria, and meningitis. Space-occupying lesions were identified by virtue of their increased relaxation times and mass effects. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has considerable potential in pediatric neuroradiologic practice, in some conditions supplying information not available by computed tomography or sonography.

  17. In vivo Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Experimentally Induced Neurologic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Zheng, Yong Mu; Heber-Katz, Ellen; Fraser, Nigel; Rorke, Lucy; Fu, Zhen Fang; Hanlon, Cathleen; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA in the brain tissue of rats and mice under the following experimental conditions: in rats infected with borna disease virus and rabies virus, in mice infected with herpes simplex virus, and in rats after the induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The results showed that iNOS mRNA, normally nondetectable in the brain, was present in animals after viral infection or after induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The induction of iNOS mRNA coincided with the severity of clinical signs and in some cases with the presence of inflammatory cells in the brain. The results indicate that nitric oxide produced by cells induced by iNOS may be the toxic factor accounting for cell damage and this may open the door to approaches to the study of the pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  18. Suicide in Neurologic Illness.

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    Arciniegas, David B.; Anderson, C. Alan

    2002-11-01

    The risk of attempted or completed suicide is increased in patients with migraine with aura, epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, and Huntington's disease. Contrary to the general perception that the risk of suicide among patients with Alzheimer's disease and other dementing conditions is low, several reports suggest that the risk of suicide in these patients increases relative to the general population. Some patients at risk for neurologic disorders are also at increased risk for suicide; in particular, the risk of suicide is increased among persons at risk for Huntington's disease, independent of the presence or absence of the Huntington's gene mutation. The risk of attempted or completed suicide in neurologic illness is strongly associated with depression, feelings of hopelessness or helplessness, and social isolation. Additional suicide risk factors in persons with neurologic illness include cognitive impairment, relatively younger age (under 60 years), moderate physical disability, recent onset or change in illness, a lack of future plans or perceived meaning in life, recent losses (personal, occupational, or financial), and prior history of psychiatric illness or suicidal behavior. Substance dependence, psychotic disorders, anxiety disorders, and some personality disorders (eg, borderline personality disorder) may also contribute to increased risk of suicide among persons with neurologic illnesses. Identification and aggressive treatment of psychiatric problems, especially depression, as well as reduction of modifiable suicide risk factors among patients with neurologic illness is needed to reduce the risk of attempted and completed suicide in this population.

  19. Dialectics and Implications of Natural Neurotropic Autoantibodies in Neurological Disease and Rehabilitation

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    A. B. Poletaev

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of natural idiotypic (Id-Abs and anti-idiotypic (AId-Abs autoantibodies against neuro-antigens observed in different neurological disorders is not fully understood. In particular, limited experimental evidence has been provided concerning the qualitative and quantitative serological response after acute injuries of the central nervous system or during chronic mental diseases. In this study, we analyzed the specific Id-Abs and AId-Abs serological reactivities against 4 neuro-antigens in a large population of patients with ischemic stroke, schizophrenia, as well as healthy individuals. Patients with ischemic stroke were tested at different time points following the acute stroke episode and a correlation was attempted between autoantibodies response and different patterns of functional recovery. Results showed variable and detectable Id-Abs and AId-Abs in different proportions of all three populations of subjects. Among patients with different functional recovery after ischemic stroke, a difference in time-related trends of Id-Abs and AId-Abs was encountered. Our observations suggest that changes in the production of natural neurotropic Abs may engender a positive homeostatic, beside a possible pathogenic effect, in specific neurological disorders.

  20. Neurologic Complications Associated with Sjögren’s Disease: Case Reports and Modern Pathogenic Dilemma

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    Michele Colaci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Sjögren’s syndrome (SS may be complicated by some neurological manifestations, generally sensory polyneuropathy. Furthermore, involvement of cranial nerves was described as rare complications of SS. Methods. We reported 2 cases: the first one was a 40-year-old woman who developed neuritis of the left optic nerve as presenting symptom few years before the diagnosis of SS; the second was a 54-year-old woman who presented a paralysis of the right phrenic nerve 7 years after the SS onset. An exhaustive review of the literature on patients with cranial or phrenic nerve involvements was also carried out. Results. To the best of our knowledge, our second case represents the first observation of SS-associated phrenic nerve mononeuritis, while optic neuritis represents the most frequent cranial nerve involvement detectable in this connective tissue disease. Trigeminal neuropathy is also frequently reported, whereas neuritis involving the other cranial nerves is quite rare. Conclusions. Cranial nerve injury is a harmful complication of SS, even if less commonly recorded compared to peripheral neuropathy. Neurological manifestations may precede the clinical onset of SS; therefore, in patients with apparently isolated cranial nerve involvement, a correct diagnosis of the underlying SS is often delayed or overlooked entirely; in these instances, standard clinicoserological assessment is recommendable.

  1. Dysregulation of gene expression as a cause of Cockayne syndrome neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuming; Chakravarty, Probir; Ranes, Michael; Kelly, Gavin; Brooks, Philip J; Neilan, Edward; Stewart, Aengus; Schiavo, Giampietro; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2014-10-07

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a multisystem disorder with severe neurological symptoms. The majority of CS patients carry mutations in Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), best known for its role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. Indeed, because various repair pathways are compromised in patient cells, CS is widely considered a genome instability syndrome. Here, we investigate the connection between the neuropathology of CS and dysregulation of gene expression. Transcriptome analysis of human fibroblasts revealed that even in the absence of DNA damage, CSB affects the expression of thousands of genes, many of which are neuronal genes. CSB is present in a significant subset of these genes, suggesting that regulation is direct, at the level of transcription. Importantly, reprogramming of CS fibroblasts to neuron-like cells is defective unless an exogenous CSB gene is introduced. Moreover, neuroblastoma cells from which CSB is depleted show defects in gene expression programs required for neuronal differentiation, and fail to differentiate and extend neurites. Likewise, neuron-like cells cannot be maintained without CSB. Finally, a number of disease symptoms may be explained by marked gene expression changes in the brain of patients with CS. Together, these data point to dysregulation of gene regulatory networks as a cause of the neurological symptoms in CS.

  2. Epigenetic mechanisms in the development of memory and their involvement in certain neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Reynoso, M A; Ochoa-Hernández, A B; Juárez-Vázquez, C I; Barros-Núñez, P

    Today, scientists accept that the central nervous system of an adult possesses considerable morphological and functional flexibility, allowing it to perform structural remodelling processes even after the individual is fully developed and mature. In addition to the vast number of genes participating in the development of memory, different known epigenetic mechanisms are involved in normal and pathological modifications to neurons and therefore also affect the mechanisms of memory development. This study entailed a systematic review of biomedical article databases in search of genetic and epigenetic factors that participate in synaptic function and memory. The activation of gene expression in response to external stimuli also occurs in differentiated nerve cells. Neural activity induces specific forms of synaptic plasticity that permit the creation and storage of long-term memory. Epigenetic mechanisms play a key role in synaptic modification processes and in the creation and development of memory. Changes in these mechanisms result in the cognitive and memory impairment seen in neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease) and in neurodevelopmental disorders (Rett syndrome, fragile X, and schizophrenia). Nevertheless, results obtained from different models are promising and point to potential treatments for some of these diseases. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. An Inside Job: How Endosomal Na+/H+ Exchangers Link to Autism and Neurological Disease

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    Kalyan C. Kondapalli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Autism imposes a major impediment to childhood development and a huge emotional and financial burden on society. In recent years, there has been rapidly accumulating genetic evidence that links the eNHE, a subset of Na+/H+ exchangers that localize to intracellular vesicles, to a variety of neurological conditions including autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, intellectual disability and epilepsy. By providing a leak pathway for protons pumped by the V-ATPase, eNHE determine luminal pH and regulate cation (Na+, K+ content in early and recycling endosomal compartments. Loss-of-function mutations in eNHE cause hyperacidification of endosomal lumen, as a result of imbalance in pump and leak pathways. Two isoforms, NHE6 and NHE9 are highly expressed in brain, including hippocampus and cortex. Here, we summarize evidence for the importance of luminal cation content and pH on processing, delivery and fate of cargo and on the surface expression and function of membrane receptors and neurotransmitter transporters, drawing upon insights from model organisms and mammalian cells. These studies lead to cellular models of eNHE activity in pre- and post-synaptic neurons and astrocytes, where they could impact synapse development and plasticity. The study of eNHE has provided new insight on the mechanism of autism and other debilitating neurological disorders and opened up new possibilities for therapeutic intervention.

  4. The role of nanotechnology and nano and micro-electronics in monitoring and control of cardiovascular diseases and neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadan, Vijay K.

    2007-04-01

    Nanotechnology has been broadly defined as the one for not only the creation of functional materials and devices as well as systems through control of matter at the scale of 1-100 nm, but also the exploitation of novel properties and phenomena at the same scale. Growing needs in the point-of-care (POC) that is an increasing market for improving patient's quality of life, are driving the development of nanotechnologies for diagnosis and treatment of various life threatening diseases. This paper addresses the recent development of nanodiagnostic sensors and nanotherapeutic devices with functionalized carbon nanotube and/or nanowire on a flexible organic thin film electronics to monitor and control of the three leading diseases namely 1) neurodegenerative diseases, 2) cardiovascular diseases, and 3) diabetes and metabolic diseases. The sensors developed include implantable and biocompatible devices, light weight wearable devices in wrist-watches, hats, shoes and clothes. The nanotherapeutics devices include nanobased drug delivery system. Many of these sensors are integrated with the wireless systems for the remote physiological monitoring. The author's research team has also developed a wireless neural probe using nanowires and nanotubes for monitoring and control of Parkinson's disease. Light weight and compact EEG, EOG and EMG monitoring system in a hat developed is capable of monitoring real time epileptic patients and patients with neurological and movement disorders using the Internet and cellular network. Physicians could be able to monitor these signals in realtime using portable computers or cell phones and will give early warning signal if these signals cross a pre-determined threshold level. In addition the potential impact of nanotechnology for applications in medicine is that, the devices can be designed to interact with cells and tissues at the molecular level, which allows high degree of functionality. Devices engineered at nanometer scale imply a

  5. Upcoming treatments in Parkinson's disease, including gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodnitzky, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Progress is being made in the development of three categories of therapy for Parkinson's disease: (1) Symptomatic, (2) Neuroprotective, (3) Neurorestorative. Evolving approaches to symptomatic therapy, already in clinical trials, include the use of adenosine 2(A) antagonists, novel glutamate antagonists, and serotonin receptor antagonists, the latter for the therapy of Parkinson's psychosis and/or levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Examples of promising neuroprotective therapies under evaluation include the administration of creatine, urate-inducing compounds, calcium channel blockers, and pioglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonist. Cell-based restorative therapies are not the subject of this presentation, but various forms of gene therapy have shown promise in human Parkinson's disease trials. These protocols typically involve gene transfer into the CNS through the use of viral vectors. Currently, the most advanced studies of this technique involve delivery of an adeno-associated viral vector encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase into the subthalamic nucleus. This treatment has shown modest benefit in early clinical trials. Other gene therapies, in various stages of human clinical trials, include gene transfer for the production of trophic factors, for aromatic amino acid decarboxylase alone, and most recently, a lentiviral vector transfer of an enzymatic dopamine "factory" consisting of three essential enzymes required for production for this neurotransmitter. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. IgG-index predicts neurological morbidity in patients with infectious central nervous system diseases

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    Deisenhammer Florian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prognosis assessment of patients with infectious and neoplastic disorders of the central nervous system (CNS may still pose a challenge. In this retrospective cross-sectional study the prognostic value of basic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF parameters in patients with bacterial meningitis, viral meningoencephalitis and leptomeningeal metastases were evaluated. Methods White blood cell count, CSF/serum glucose ratio, protein, CSF/serum albumin quotient and Immunoglobulin indices for IgG, IgA and IgM were analyzed in 90 patients with bacterial meningitis, 117 patients with viral meningoencephalitis and 36 patients with leptomeningeal metastases in a total of 480 CSF samples. Results In the initial spinal tap, the IgG-index was the only independent predictor for unfavorable outcome (GOS Conclusion The present study suggests that in infectious CNS diseases an elevated IgG-Index might be an additional marker for the early identification of patients at risk for neurological morbidity.

  7. Cerebrovascular diseases at the C. Mondino National Institute of Neurology: from Ottorino Rossi to the present day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micieli, Giuseppe; Martignoni, Emilia; Sandrini, Giorgio; Bono, Giorgio; Nappi, Giuseppe

    Summary This paper traces the development of research and healthcare models in the field of cerebrovascular disorders at the C. Mondino National Institute of Neurology in Pavia, Italy. It starts with a description of the original experiences of Ottorino Rossi and his thesis on atherosclerosis which date back to the beginning of the last century; it then illustrates the connections between his seminal essay and the future directions followed by research in this institute, through to the development of one of the first stroke units in Italy. In this context, we examine a large range of scientific approaches, many related to cerebrovascular diseases (such as headaches) and autonomic disorders, and some of their biological and physiological markers. The originality of an approach also based on tools of advanced technology, including information technology, is emphasised, as is the importance of passion and perseverance in the pursuit of extraordinary results in what is an extremely complex and difficult field. PMID:21729590

  8. Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound Examination in Dogs with Suspected Intracranial Hypertension Caused by Neurologic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaoka, K; Nakamura, K; Osuga, T; Morita, T; Yokoyama, N; Morishita, K; Sasaki, N; Ohta, H; Takiguchi, M

    2017-12-19

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasound examination (TCD) is a rapid, noninvasive technique used to evaluate cerebral blood flow and is useful for the detection of intracranial hypertension in humans. However, the clinical usefulness of TCD in diagnosing intracranial hypertension has not been demonstrated for intracranial diseases in dogs. To determine the association between the TCD variables and intracranial hypertension in dogs with intracranial diseases. Fifty client-owned dogs with neurologic signs. Cross-sectional study. All dogs underwent TCD of the basilar artery under isoflurane anesthesia after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Dogs were classified into 3 groups based on MRI findings: no structural diseases (group I), structural disease without MRI evidence of intracranial hypertension (group II), and structural disease with MRI evidence of intracranial hypertension (group III). The TCD vascular resistance variables (resistive index [RI], pulsatility index [PI], and the ratio of systolic to diastolic mean velocity [Sm/Dm]) were measured. Fifteen, 22, and 13 dogs were classified into groups I, II, and III, respectively. Dogs in group III had significantly higher Sm/Dm (median, 1.78; range, 1.44-2.58) than those in group I (median, 1.63; range, 1.43-1.75) and group II (median, 1.62; range, 1.27-2.10). No significant differences in RI and PI were identified among groups. Our findings suggest that increased Sm/Dm is associated with MRI findings of suspected intracranial hypertension in dogs with intracranial diseases and that TCD could be a useful tool to help to diagnose intracranial hypertension. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  9. Progressive neurological disease induced by tacrolimus in a renal transplant recipient: Case presentation

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    Hanna Michael G

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tacrolimus and cyclosporine, both calcineurin inhibitors, can cause neurological side effects. While mild symptoms such as tremor are well recognised, severe complications including seizures and encephalopathy are poorly documented following renal transplantation. Case presentation We report a 42 year old man who received a cadaver renal transplant. He received tacrolimus and prednisolone. The course was uneventful for 6 weeks when he became intermittently confused, with unsteady gait and slurred speech. Following a grand mal convulsion he was admitted. He had no focal neurological signs, cerebrospinal fluid was normal; electroencephalogram was consistent with temporal lobe partial epilepsy. The magnetic resonance imaging of brain showed widespread changes with multiple areas of low signal intensity in brain stem and cerebral hemispheres. He was readmitted 3 weeks later after further fits, despite anti-convulsant therapy. He was psychotic with visual hallucinations, and rapidly became obtunded. Although his tacrolimus blood concentration had been kept in the normal range, his symptoms improved dramatically when the tacrolimus was stopped. Conclusion Severe central nervous system toxicity from calcineurin inhibitors has been rarely reported in renal transplantation and we found only one report of tacrolimus-induced toxicity in an adult. We believe the condition is frequently undiagnosed. It is a very important diagnosis not to miss as the remedy is simple and failure may result in unnecessary brain biopsy, as well as irreversible injury.

  10. [Neurology and literature].

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    Iniesta, I

    2010-10-01

    Literature complements medical literature in the academic and clinical development of neurologists. The present article explores the contributions of writers of fiction on neurology. Literary works of fiction with particular reference to neurology. A symbiosis between writers of fiction and doctors has been well recognised. From Shakespeare to Cervantes by way of Dickens and Cela to writer - physicians such as Anton Chekhov or António Lobo Antunes have contributed through their medically informed literature to the better understanding of neurology. Some writers like Dostoevsky, Machado de Assis and Margiad Evans have written about their own experiences with disease thus bringing new insights to medicine. Furthermore, some neurological disorders have been largely based on literary descriptions. For instance, Dostoevsky's epilepsy has been retrospectively analysed by famous neurologists including Freud, Alajouanine or Gastaut, whilst his writings and biography have prompted others like Waxman and Geschwind to describe typical behavioural changes in temporal lobe epilepsy, finding their source of inspiration in Dostoevsky. Likewise, Cirignotta et al have named an unusual type of seizure after the Russian novelist. Inspired by Lewis Carroll, Todd introduced the term Alice in Wonderland Syndrome to refer to visual distortions generally associated with migraine. Writers of fiction offer a humanised perception of disease by contributing new insights into the clinical history, informing about the subjective experience of the illness and helping to eradicate the stigma associated to neurological disorders.

  11. New Perspectives on Oxidized Genome Damage and Repair Inhibition by Pro-Oxidant Metals in Neurological Diseases

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    Joy Mitra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary cause(s of neuronal death in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, are still unknown. However, the association of certain etiological factors, e.g., oxidative stress, protein misfolding/aggregation, redox metal accumulation and various types of damage to the genome, to pathological changes in the affected brain region(s have been consistently observed. While redox metal toxicity received major attention in the last decade, its potential as a therapeutic target is still at a cross-roads, mostly because of the lack of mechanistic understanding of metal dyshomeostasis in affected neurons. Furthermore, previous studies have established the role of metals in causing genome damage, both directly and via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, but little was known about their impact on genome repair. Our recent studies demonstrated that excess levels of iron and copper observed in neurodegenerative disease-affected brain neurons could not only induce genome damage in neurons, but also affect their repair by oxidatively inhibiting NEIL DNA glycosylases, which initiate the repair of oxidized DNA bases. The inhibitory effect was reversed by a combination of metal chelators and reducing agents, which underscore the need for elucidating the molecular basis for the neuronal toxicity of metals in order to develop effective therapeutic approaches. In this review, we have focused on the oxidative genome damage repair pathway as a potential target for reducing pro-oxidant metal toxicity in neurological diseases.

  12. New Perspectives on Oxidized Genome Damage and Repair Inhibition by Pro-Oxidant Metals in Neurological Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Joy; Guerrero, Erika N.; Hegde, Pavana M.; Wang, Haibo; Boldogh, Istvan; Rao, Kosagi Sharaf; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L.

    2014-01-01

    The primary cause(s) of neuronal death in most cases of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, are still unknown. However, the association of certain etiological factors, e.g., oxidative stress, protein misfolding/aggregation, redox metal accumulation and various types of damage to the genome, to pathological changes in the affected brain region(s) have been consistently observed. While redox metal toxicity received major attention in the last decade, its potential as a therapeutic target is still at a cross-roads, mostly because of the lack of mechanistic understanding of metal dyshomeostasis in affected neurons. Furthermore, previous studies have established the role of metals in causing genome damage, both directly and via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but little was known about their impact on genome repair. Our recent studies demonstrated that excess levels of iron and copper observed in neurodegenerative disease-affected brain neurons could not only induce genome damage in neurons, but also affect their repair by oxidatively inhibiting NEIL DNA glycosylases, which initiate the repair of oxidized DNA bases. The inhibitory effect was reversed by a combination of metal chelators and reducing agents, which underscore the need for elucidating the molecular basis for the neuronal toxicity of metals in order to develop effective therapeutic approaches. In this review, we have focused on the oxidative genome damage repair pathway as a potential target for reducing pro-oxidant metal toxicity in neurological diseases. PMID:25036887

  13. Progress in pediatrics in 2013: choices in allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Dascola, Carlotta Povesi; Mirra, Virginia; Sperli, Francesco; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2014-07-12

    This review will provide new information related to pathophysiology and management of specific diseases that have been addressed by selected articles published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2013, focusing on allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses in children. Recommendations for interpretation of skin prick test to foods in atopic eczema, management of allergic conjunctivitis, hypertension and breastfeeding in women treated with antiepileptic drugs and healthy breakfast have been reported. Epidemiological studies have given emphasis to high incidence of autoimmune disorders in patients with Turner syndrome, increasing prevalence of celiac disease, frequency of hypertension in adolescents, incidence and risk factor for retinopathy of prematurity. Advances in prevention include elucidation of the role of probiotics in reducing occurrence of allergies and feeding intolerance, and events of foetal life that influence later onset of diseases. Mechanistic studies suggested a role for vitamin D deficiency in asthma and type 1 diabetes and for reactivation of Varicella-Zoster virus in aseptic meningitis. Regarding diagnosis, a new mean for the diagnosis of hyperbilirubinaemia in newborns, a score for recognition of impaired nutritional status and growth and criteria for early Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome have been suggested. New therapeutic approaches consist of use of etanercept for reducing insulin dose in type 1 diabetes, probiotics in atopic eczema, and melatonin in viral infections.

  14. Noninvasive radioelectric asymmetric conveyor brain stimulation treatment improves balance in individuals over 65 suffering from neurological diseases: pilot study

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    Margotti ML

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Vania Fontani1, Salvatore Rinaldi1, Alessandro Castagna1, Matteo Lotti Margotti21Department of Neuro Psycho Physio Pathology, Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Information Technology and Statistical Analysis, Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Florence, ItalyPurpose: In the elderly population, problems with walking and balance are very common. These problems seriously affect the quality of life of the elderly. When gait and balance problems are caused by neurological disease, these problems can be more serious and difficult to handle. The aim of this pilot study was to verify the effect of a noninvasive radioelectric conveyor asymmetric brain stimulation protocol, named neuropostural optimization (NPO, to improve balance in neurological elderly.Patients and methods: Twelve patients suffering from various neurological diseases participated in this study. They were assessed with the Romberg test, which was performed on a computerized stabilometric platform before, immediately following, and 72 hours after NPO was used to improve balance.Results: The results showed that a stabilization of balance was recorded in all subjects a few minutes after administration of NPO. This stabilization increased 72 hours after treatment.Conclusion: The results show that NPO could be a valuable therapeutic approach to improve sensory-motor strategies and neurological control of balance in elderly patients suffering from various neurological diseases.Keywords: Romberg test, instability, imbalance, gait, REAC, neuropostural optimization

  15. Noninvasive radioelectric asymmetric conveyor brain stimulation treatment improves balance in individuals over 65 suffering from neurological diseases: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontani, Vania; Rinaldi, Salvatore; Castagna, Alessandro; Margotti, Matteo Lotti

    2012-01-01

    In the elderly population, problems with walking and balance are very common. These problems seriously affect the quality of life of the elderly. When gait and balance problems are caused by neurological disease, these problems can be more serious and difficult to handle. The aim of this pilot study was to verify the effect of a noninvasive radioelectric conveyor asymmetric brain stimulation protocol, named neuropostural optimization (NPO), to improve balance in neurological elderly. Twelve patients suffering from various neurological diseases participated in this study. They were assessed with the Romberg test, which was performed on a computerized stabilometric platform before, immediately following, and 72 hours after NPO was used to improve balance. The results showed that a stabilization of balance was recorded in all subjects a few minutes after administration of NPO. This stabilization increased 72 hours after treatment. The results show that NPO could be a valuable therapeutic approach to improve sensory-motor strategies and neurological control of balance in elderly patients suffering from various neurological diseases.

  16. Development of a patient reported outcome measure for fatigue in motor neurone disease: the Neurological Fatigue Index (NFI-MND

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    Gibbons Chris J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this research was to develop a disease-specific measure for fatigue in patients with motor neurone disease (MND by generating data that would fit the Rasch measurement model. Fatigue was defined as reversible motor weakness and whole-body tiredness that was predominantly brought on by muscular exertion and was partially relieved by rest. Methods Qualitative interviews were undertaken to confirm the suitability of a previously identified set of 52 neurological fatigue items as relevant to patients with MND. Patients were recruited from five U.K. MND clinics. Questionnaires were administered during clinic or by post. A sub-sample of patients completed the questionnaire again after 2-4 weeks to assess test-retest validity. Exploratory factor analyses and Rasch analysis were conducted on the item set. Results Qualitative interviews with ten MND patients confirmed the suitability of 52 previously identified neurological fatigue items as relevant to patients with MND. 298 patients consented to completing the initial questionnaire including this item set, with an additional 78 patients completing the questionnaire a second time after 4-6 weeks. Exploratory Factor Analysis identified five potential subscales that could be conceptualised as representing: 'Energy', 'Reversible muscular weakness' (shortened to 'Weakness', 'Concentration', 'Effects of heat' and 'Rest'. Of the original five factors, two factors 'Energy' and 'Weakness' met the expectations of the Rasch model. A higher order fatigue summary scale, consisting of items from the 'Energy' and 'Weakness' subscales, was found to fit the Rasch model and have acceptable unidimensionality. The two scales and the higher order summary scale were shown to fulfil model expectations, including assumptions of unidimensionality, local independency and an absence of differential item functioning. Conclusions The Neurological Fatigue Index for MND (NFI-MND is a simple, easy

  17. Neurological soft signs in aging, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer´s disease – the impact of cognitive decline and cognitive reserve

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    Nadja eUrbanowitsch; Christina eDegen; Pablo eToro; Johannes eSchröder

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Neurological soft signs (NSS), i.e. minor motor and sensory changes, are a common feature in severe psychiatric disorders. We sought to establish the frequency of NSS in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) on basis of a large population based sample and to identify their neuropsychological correlates including cognitive reserve.Methods: NSS were examined using an abbreviated version of the Heidelberg NSS Scale in 221 old participants born bet...

  18. Identification and validation of clinical predictors for the risk of neurological involvement in children with hand, foot, and mouth disease in Sarawak

    OpenAIRE

    del Sel Sylvia; Clear Daniella; Perera David; Mohan Anand; Podin Yuwana; Wong See; Ooi Mong; Chieng Chae; Tio Phaik; Cardosa Mary; Solomon Tom

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) can cause Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with neurological complications, which may rapidly progress to fulminant cardiorespiratory failure, and death. Early recognition of children at risk is the key to reduce acute mortality and morbidity. Methods We examined data collected through a prospective clinical study of HFMD conducted between 2000 and 2006 that included 3 distinct outbreaks of HEV71 to identify risk factors associated with neu...

  19. Criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: Recommendations of the Scientific Department of Cognitive Neurology and Aging of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology

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    Norberto Anízio Ferreira Frota

    Full Text Available Abstract This consensus prepared by the Scientific Department of Cognitive Neurology and Aging of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology is aimed at recommending new criteria for the diagnosis of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD in Brazil. A revision was performed of the proposals of clinical and of research criteria suggested by other institutions and international consensuses. The new proposal for the diagnosis of dementia does not necessarily require memory impairment if the cognitive or behavioral compromise affects at least two of the following domains: memory, executive function, speech, visual-spatial ability and change in personality. For the purpose of diagnosis, AD is divided into three phases: dementia, mild cognitive impairment and pre-clinical phase, where the latter only applies to clinical research. In the dementia picture, other initial forms were accepted which do not involve amnesia and require a neuroimaging examination. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers are recommended for study, but can be utilized as optional instruments, when deemed appropriate by the clinician.

  20. [Neurological sleep disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ramin

    2014-11-01

    Neurological sleep disorders are common in the general population and may have a strong impact on quality of life. General practitioners play a key role in recognizing and managing sleep disorders in the general population. They should therefore be familiar with the most important neurological sleep disorders. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the most prevalent and important neurological sleep disorders, including Restless legs syndrome (with and without periodic limb movements in sleep), narcolepsy, NREM- and REM-sleep parasomnias and the complex relationship between sleep and epilepsies. Although narcolepsy is considered as a rare disease, recent discoveries in narcolepsy research provided insight in the function of brain circuitries involved in sleep wake regulation. REM sleep behavioral parasomnia (RBD) is increasingly recognized to represent an early manifestation of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular evolving synucleinopathies. Early diagnosis may thus open new perspectives for developing novel treatment options by targeting neuroprotective substances.

  1. Neurological manifestations of Behçet's disease: Case report and literature review.

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    López Bravo, Alba; Parra Soto, Carlos; Bellosta Diago, Elena; Cecilio Irazola, Álvaro; Santos-Lasaosa, Sonia

    2017-05-22

    Neurological involvement in Behçet's disease is rare, especially at the onset. It can present in the form of parenchymal changes or as damage to the vascular structures in its nonparenchymal form. The coexistence of both kinds of manifestations in the same patient is exceptional. We report the case of a 32-year-old patient with a history of deep venous thrombosis, who was being treated for holocranial headache, apathy, and oral and genital ulcers. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintense lesions in the basal ganglia and white matter, and the vascular study evidenced venous thrombosis of the left transverse sinus. After confirming the diagnosis of Behçet's disease with parenchymal and nonparenchymal cerebral involvement, immunosuppressive and corticosteroid therapy was started, resulting in the remission of the symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  2. [Evaluation of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation effectiveness in treatment of psychiatric and neurologic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Stępień, Anna; Piusińska-Macoch, Renata; Brodacki, Bogdan; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz

    2016-06-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a treatment option with proved effectiveness especially in drug resist depression. It is used in functional brain mapping before neurosurgery operations and diagnostic of corticospinal tract transmission. Many studies are performed to evaluate rTMS using in treatment of obsessive - compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, autism, strokes, tinnitus, Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, cranial traumas. Moreover rTMS was used in treatment of multiple sclerosis, migraine, dystonia. Electromagnetical field generated by rTMS penetrate skin of the scalp and infiltrate brain tissues to a depth of 2 cm, cause neurons depolarization and generating motor, cognitive and affective effects. Depending on the stimulation frequency rTMS can stimuli or inhibit brain cortex. rTMS mechanism of action remains elusive. Probably it is connected with enhancement of neurotransmitters, modulation of signals transductions pathways in Central Nervous System, gene transcription and release of neuroprotective substances. Studies with use of animals revealed that rTMS stimulation can generate brain changes similar to those seen after electric shock therapy without provoking seizures. The aim of presenting study was to analyze actual researches evaluating rTMS use in treatment of psychiatric and neurological diseases. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  3. [A legendary neurological disease favored the refoundation of the diocese of Palencia].

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    Guerrero, A L

    2004-09-01

    At the beginning of the XI century, the diocese of Palencia, Spain, was refounded and politically empowered following the indications of Sancho III, King of Pamplona. Beginning in the XIII century orally and then after the XV century in several written documents, there is a legend that explains this historical event by the miraculous cure of the King for an apparent neurological disease. One day, when he was about 42 years old, King Sancho III was hunting near the river Carrion. Following the trail of a wild boar, he entered a ruined crypt in which the mortal remains of the martyr Saint Antolín laid. Just when he was going to kill the animal, the King abruptly suffered weakness in his right arm, which made him drop his lance. On his knees and aware of his disease, and praying sorrowfully, the King recovered the mobility of his arm and left the crypt cured. We analyzed the written documents and artistic representations that recall this legendary episode. We reviewed the political reasons, apart from mere religious events, that might have persuaded Sancho III to empower the land of Palencia. We have had the opportunity of reviewing a beautiful legend of our medieval Spain, which could correspond to one of the first ever-existing descriptions of a cardioembolic transient ischemic attack.

  4. Dysarthria and Quality of Life in neurologically healthy elderly and patients with Parkinson's disease.

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    Lirani-Silva, Camila; Mourão, Lúcia Figueiredo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2015-01-01

    To compare the speech and voice of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and neurologically healthy elderly adults (control group, CG), to find out whether these features are related to the disease or the normal aging process, and investigate the impact that dysarthria has on the Quality of Life (QoL) of these individuals. This is a cross-sectional study involving 25 individuals, 13 patients with PD and 12 CG. All the participants underwent vocal assessment, perceptual and acoustic analysis, based on "Dysarthria Assessment Protocol" and analysis of QoL using a questionnaire, "Living with Dysarthria". The data underwent statistical analysis to compare the groups in each parameter. In the assessment of dysarthria, patients with PD showed differences in prosody parameter (p=0.012), at the habitual frequency for females (p=0.025) and males (p=0.028), and the extent of intensity (p=0.039) when compared to CG. In QoL questionnaire, it was observed that patients with PD showed more negative impact on the QoL compared to CG, as indicated by the total score (p=0.005) with various aspects influencing this result. The degree of modification of speech and voice of patients with PD resembles those seen in normal aging process, with the exception of prosody and the habitual frequency, which are related to the greatest negative impact on the QoL of patients with PD.

  5. Revisiting Mitochondrial Function and Metabolism in Pluripotent Stem Cells: Where Do We Stand in Neurological Diseases?

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    Lopes, Carla; Rego, A Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are powerful cellular tools that can generate all the different cell types of the body, and thus overcome the often limited access to human disease tissues; this becomes highly relevant when aiming to investigate cellular (dys)function in diseases affecting the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated that PSC and differentiated cells show altered mitochondrial function and metabolic profiles and production of reactive oxygen species. This raises an emerging paradigm about the role of mitochondria in stem cell biology and urges the need to identify mitochondrial pathways involved in these processes. In this respect, this review focuses on the metabolic profile of PSC and how mitochondrial function can influence the reprogramming and differentiation processes. Indeed, both embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) favor the glycolytic pathway as a major source of energy production over oxidative phosphorylation. PSC mitochondria are characterized by a spherical shape, low copy number of mitochondrial DNA, and a hyperpolarized state. Indeed, mitochondria appear to have a crucial role in reprogramming iPSC, in the maintenance of a pluripotent state, and in differentiation. Moreover, an increase in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation has to occur for differentiation to succeed. Therefore, in vitro differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into neurons can be compromised if those mechanisms are impaired. Future research should shed light on how mitochondrial impairment occurring in pre differentiation neural stages (e.g., in NSC or premature neurons) may contribute for the etiopathogenesis of neurodevelopmental and neurological disorders.

  6. Application of whole exome sequencing to a rare inherited metabolic disease with neurological and gastrointestinal manifestations: a congenital disorder of glycosylation mimicking glycogen storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Rihwa; Woo, Hye In; Choe, Byung-Ho; Park, Seungman; Yoon, Yeomin; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Song, Junghan; Kim, Dong Sub; Kwon, Soonhak; Park, Hyung-Doo

    2015-04-15

    Rare inherited metabolic diseases with neurological and gastrointestinal manifestations can be misdiagnosed as other diseases or remain as disorders with indeterminate etiologies. This study aims to provide evidence to recommend the utility of whole exome sequencing in clinical diagnosis of a rare inherited metabolic disease. A 4-month-old female baby visited an outpatient clinic due to poor weight gain, repeated seizure-like episodes, developmental delay, and unexplained hepatomegaly with abnormal liver function test results. Although liver biopsy revealed moderate fibrosis with a suggested diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD), no mutations were identified either by single gene approach for GSD (G6PC and GAA) or by next generation sequencing panels for GSD (including 21 genes). Whole exome sequencing of the patient revealed compound heterozygous mutations of PMM2: c.580C>T (p.Arg194*) and c.713G>C (p.Arg238Pro) which mutations were associated with congenital disorder of glycosylation Ia (CDG-Ia: PMM2-CDG). We successfully applied exome sequencing to diagnose the first reported Korean patient with CDG-Ia, which was misdiagnosed as GSD. Whole exome sequencing may prove to be the preferred strategy for analysis of clinical features that do not readily suggest a specific diagnosis, such as those observed in inherited metabolic diseases, including CDG. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolic assessment and enteral tube feeding usage in children with acute neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, H P; Fantozzi, G

    1998-01-01

    To report on acquired experience of metabolic support for children with acute neurological diseases, emphasizing enteral tube feeding usage and metabolic assessment, and also to recommend policies aimed towards improving its implementation. Retrospective analysis. Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo. 44 patients consecutively admitted to the Pediatric ICU over a period of 3 years who were given nutrition and metabolic support for at least 72 hours. Head trauma, CNS infections and craniotomy post-operative period following tumor exeresis were the main diagnoses. Records of protein-energy intake, nutrient supply route, nitrogen balance and length of therapy. From a total of 527 days of therapy, single parenteral nutrition was utilized for 34.3% and single enteral tube feeding for 79.1% of that period. 61.4% of the children were fed exclusively via enteral tube feeding, 9.1% via parenteral and 39.5% by both routes. The enteral tube feeding was introduced upon admission and transpyloric placement was successful in 90% of the cases. Feeding was started 48 hours after ICU admission. The caloric goal was achieved on the 7th day after admission, and thereafter parenteral nutrition was interrupted. The maximum energy supply was 104.2 +/- 23.15 kcal/kg. The median length of therapy was 11 days (range 4-38). None of the patients on tube feeding developed GI tract bleeding, pneumonia or bronchoaspiration episodes and, of the 4 patients who were given exclusive TPN, 2 developed peptic ulcer. The initial urinary urea nitrogen was 7.11 g/m2 and at discharge 6.44 g/m2. The protein supply increased from 1.49 g/kg to 3.65 g/kg (p < 0.01). The nitrogen balance increased from--7.05 to 2.2 g (p < 0.01). Children with acute neurological diseases are hypercatabolic and have high urinary nitrogen losses. The initial negative nitrogen balance can be increased by more aggressive feeding regimes than the usual ones. Early tube feeding was

  8. Metabolic assessment and enteral tube feeding usage in children with acute neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitor Pons Leite

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report on acquired experience of metabolic support for children with acute neurological diseases, emphasizing enteral tube feeding usage and metabolic assessment, and also to recommend policies aimed towards improving its implementation. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. SETTING: Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo. SUBJECTS: 44 patients consecutively admitted to the Pediatric ICU over a period of 3 years who were given nutrition and metabolic support for at least 72 hours. Head trauma, CNS infections and craniotomy post-operative period following tumor exeresis were the main diagnoses. MEASUREMENTS: Records of protein-energy intake, nutrient supply route, nitrogen balance and length of therapy. RESULTS: From a total of 527 days of therapy, single parenteral nutrition was utilized for 34.3% and single enteral tube feeding for 79.1% of that period. 61.4% of the children were fed exclusively via enteral tube feeding, 9.1% via parenteral and 39.5 % by both routes. The enteral tube feeding was introduced upon admission and transpyloric placement was successful in 90% of the cases. Feeding was started 48 hours after ICU admission. The caloric goal was achieved on the 7th day after admission, and thereafter parenteral nutrition was interrupted. The maximum energy supply was 104.2 ± 23.15 kcal/kg. The median length of therapy was 11 days (range 4-38. None of the patients on tube feeding developed GI tract bleeding, pneumonia or bronchoaspiration episodes and, of the 4 patients who were given exclusive TPN, 2 developed peptic ulcer. The initial urinary urea nitrogen was 7.11 g/m2 and at discharge 6.44 g/m2. The protein supply increased from 1.49 g/kg to 3.65 g/kg (p< 0.01. The nitrogen balance increased from -7.05 to 2.2 g (p< 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Children with acute neurological diseases are hypercatabolic and have high urinary nitrogen losses. The initial negative nitrogen balance can be

  9. Epilepsy and Other Neurological Diseases in the Parents of Children with Infantile Autism. A Case Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the broader phenotype of infantile autism (IA) we compared the rates and types of epilepsy and other neurological diseases in the parents of 111 consecutively admitted patients with IA with a matched control group of parents of 330 children from the general population. All participants were screened through the nationwide Danish…

  10. Structural Correlates of Neurological Signs in Huntington’s Disease: A Quantitative Approach

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    E. A. Loh

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a genetically transmitted disorder associated with atrophy of the basal ganglia. Studies of the neuroanatomical correlates of HD have focused primarily on the anterior areas of the basal ganglia and on establishing an association between structural changes resulting from the presence and course of the illness. The objective of the present study was to assess the value of measurements of the third ventrical and lentiform regions. Computed tomographic (CT brain scan measures of the basal ganglia of patients in the “early” and “late” stages of the disease were correlated with scores on a quantified neurological examination (QNE and compared with scans of age-matched control groups. Basal ganglia atrophy was assessed by two conventional “anterior” measures: the maximal distance between the frontal horns of the lateral ventricles (FH and the minimum distance between the caudate nuclei (CC, and two measures of more “posterior” regions: the width of the third ventricle (3V, and a measure of the lentiform regions (LENTI. In the group of patients with HD, CT scan measures were strongly correlated with disease duration. Further, in the “late” group, all CT measures were significantly correlated with QNE scores, with the two “posterior” measures being equally, if not more strongly correlated with QNE scores than the conventional “anterior” measures. Separate correlations of the CT indices of atrophy and QNE scores in the “early” and “late” HD groups revealed relationships between basal ganglia atrophy and motor abnormality consistent with earlier reports.

  11. Vaccination and neurological disorders

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    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunization of children has been proven very effective in elimination of life threatening complications of many infectious diseases in developed countries. However, as vaccination-preventable infectious diseases and their complications have become rare, the interest focuses on immunization-related adverse reactions. Unfortunately, fear of vaccination-related adverse effects can led to decreased vaccination coverage and subsequent epidemics of infectious diseases. This review includes reports about possible side effects following vaccinations in children with neurological disorders and also published recommendations about vaccinating children with neurological disorders. From all international published data anyone can conclude that vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society.

  12. Intracerebroventricular gene therapy that delays neurological disease progression is associated with selective preservation of retinal ganglion cells in a canine model of CLN2 disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Rebecca E H; Jensen, Cheryl A; Pearce, Jacqueline W; Gillespie, Lauren E; Bristow, Daniel E; Katz, Martin L

    2016-05-01

    CLN2 disease is one of a group of lysosomal storage disorders called the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). The disease results from mutations in the TPP1 gene that cause an insufficiency or complete lack of the soluble lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1). TPP1 is involved in lysosomal protein degradation, and lack of this enzyme results in the accumulation of protein-rich autofluorescent lysosomal storage bodies in numerous cell types including neurons throughout the central nervous system and the retina. CLN2 disease is characterized primarily by progressive loss of neurological functions and vision as well as generalized neurodegeneration and retinal degeneration. In children the progressive loss of neurological functions typically results in death by the early teenage years. A Dachshund model of CLN2 disease with a null mutation in TPP1 closely recapitulates the human disorder with a progression from disease onset at approximately 4 months of age to end-stage at 10-11 months. Delivery of functional TPP1 to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), either by periodic infusion of the recombinant protein or by a single administration of a TPP1 gene therapy vector to the CSF, significantly delays the onset and progression of neurological signs and prolongs life span but does not prevent the loss of vision or modest retinal degeneration that occurs by 11 months of age. In this study we found that in dogs that received the CSF gene therapy treatment, the degeneration of the retina and loss of retinal function continued to progress during the prolonged life spans of the treated dogs. Eventually the normal cell layers of the retina almost completely disappeared. An exception was the ganglion cell layer. In affected dogs that received TPP1 gene therapy to the CSF and survived an average of 80 weeks, ganglion cell axons were present in numbers comparable to those of normal Dachshunds of similar age. The selective preservation of the retinal ganglion cells suggests

  13. Consensus Statement on medication use in multiple sclerosis by the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group for demyelinating diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Merino, A; Fernández, O; Montalbán, X; de Andrés, C; Oreja-Guevara, C; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, A; Arbizu, T

    2013-01-01

    Treatments for multiple sclerosis therapy are rapidly evolving. It is believed that new drugs will be approved in the near future, thereby changing current indications for treatment. In this context, the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group on demyelinating diseases, which evaluates medication use in MS, has decided to draw up a consensus statement on the current indications and guidelines for multiple sclerosis treatment. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Malnutrition and Laboratory Markers in Geriatric Patients. A Comparison of Neurologic-psychiatric, Internal and Trauma Surgical Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, F S; Becker, I; Deckert, P; Elsbernd, H; Isensee, C

    2016-04-01

    There is minimal information on malnutrition in neurologic-psychiatric patients compared to internal and trauma-surgical patients. The aim of the present study was to explore if there is a correlation of these different disease groups with the nutritional assessment and biochemical markers. Cross - sectional study. The study was done in a department of geriatric medicine with subspecialisation in neurologic diseases and stroke unit. 338 patients (m / f = 136 / 202, mean age 81.4 ± 7.3 years) were evaluated. The nutritional status was evaluated by using the short form of the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA-SF) and seven biochemical markers (hemoglobin, iron, ferritin, vitamin B 12, folic acid, albumin and cholinesterase) were measured. There were 74 (22%) patients with MNA ≤ 7 points (malnutrition), 148 (44%) patients with an MNA 8 - 11 points (risk of malnutrition) and 116 (34%) patients with an MNA ≥ 12 points (good nutritional status). The mean MNA score of the three major disease groups trauma-surgery, internal medicine and neurology-psychiatry was 9.1 ± 3.2 vs. 9.9 ± 3.1 vs. 10.0 ± 2.8 (p=0.236). There were significant differences of laboratory markers between the disease groups. A deficit of albumin, cholinesterase and hemoglobin was found more often in trauma-surgical and internal patients than in neurological-psychiatric patients (albumin: 21.4%, 15.7%, 5.3%; p=0.001; cholinesterase 16.7%, 16.9%, 6.3%; p=0.007; hemoglobin 78.6%, 61.4%, 50.0%; p=0.002). Following Mini Nutritional Assessment, the additional measurement of albumin, cholinesterase and hemoglobin allowed a more precise grading of malnutrition. There were significant differences between the disease groups. A deficit of albumin, cholinesterase and hemoglobin was found more often in multimorbid trauma-surgical and internal patients than in neurologic-psychiatric patients.

  15. The impact of the Orphan Drug Act on the development and advancement of neurological products for rare diseases: a descriptive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K A; Freeman, S N; Imoisili, M A; Coté, T R

    2010-10-01

    Many neurological diseases or conditions are rare disorders. The Orphan Drug Act (ODA) of 1983 was promulgated to promote the development of products for such conditions. In this Opinion piece, we discuss how the ODA has affected neurological diseases, note how current and future sponsors (any person(s) or entity (i.e., academic, corporate body, individual, manufacturer) that applies for an official regulatory action) of products for rare neurological diseases can take advantage of ODA incentives, identify areas of success and continuing needs, and review data that can help drive the future development of products for rare neurological conditions.

  16. Epidemiology of inflammatory neurological and inflammatory neuromuscular diseases in Tottori Prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumi, M; Nakashima, K; Nakayama, H; Takahashi, K

    1995-06-01

    We investigated the incidence of the following conditions: inflammatory neurological and neuromuscular diseases, adult meningitis and adult encephalitis in Yonago City, and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), periarteritis nodosa (PN) and HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (HAM) during the period 1988-1992 in Tottori Prefecture, Japan. The annual incidence per 100,000 population was as follows: meningitis, 4.38; encephalitis, 0.90; GBS, 1.14; PM/DM, 1.01; and PN, 0.32. The prevalence per 100,000 population CIDP, 0.81; PM/DM, 9.92; PN, 2.59; and HAM, 1.30. There were marked localization of HAM in western Tottori, and there was seasonal variation in the prevalence of meningitis, encephalitis and GBS. The mean age at onset of meningitis was lower than that for encephalitis. Comparison with reported data revealed interracial differences in the epidemiology of PM/DM and PN.

  17. Lymphatic drainage of the brain and the pathophysiology of neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Roy O; Djuanda, Effie; Yow, Hong-Yeen; Carare, Roxana O

    2009-01-01

    There are no conventional lymphatics in the brain but physiological studies have revealed a substantial and immunologically significant lymphatic drainage from brain to cervical lymph nodes. Cerebrospinal fluid drains via the cribriform plate and nasal mucosa to cervical lymph nodes in rats and sheep and to a lesser extent in humans. More significant for a range of human neurological disorders is the lymphatic drainage of interstitial fluid (ISF) and solutes from brain parenchyma along capillary and artery walls. Tracers injected into grey matter, drain out of the brain along basement membranes in the walls of capillaries and cerebral arteries. Lymphatic drainage of antigens from the brain by this route may play a significant role in the immune response in virus infections, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis. Neither antigen-presenting cells nor lymphocytes drain to lymph nodes by the perivascular route and this may be a factor in immunological privilege of the brain. Vessel pulsations appear to be the driving force for the lymphatic drainage along artery walls, and as vessels stiffen with age, amyloid peptides deposit in the drainage pathways as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Blockage of lymphatic drainage of ISF and solutes from the brain by CAA may result in loss of homeostasis of the neuronal environment that may contribute to neuronal malfunction and dementia. Facilitating perivascular lymphatic drainage of amyloid-beta (Abeta) in the elderly may prevent the accumulation of Abeta in the brain, maintain homeostasis and provide a therapeutic strategy to help avert cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs: therapeutic targets for neurological diseases and their regulation

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    Hae-Jin Kweon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular acidification occurs not only in pathologicalconditions such as inflammation and brain ischemia, but alsoin normal physiological conditions such as synaptic transmission.Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs can detect a broadrange of physiological pH changes during pathological andsynaptic cellular activities. ASICs are voltage-independent,proton-gated cation channels widely expressed throughout thecentral and peripheral nervous system. Activation of ASICs isinvolved in pain perception, synaptic plasticity, learning andmemory, fear, ischemic neuronal injury, seizure termination,neuronal degeneration, and mechanosensation. Therefore,ASICs emerge as potential therapeutic targets for manipulatingpain and neurological diseases. The activity of these channelscan be regulated by many factors such as lactate, Zn2+, andPhe-Met-Arg-Phe amide (FMRFamide-like neuropeptides byinteracting with the channel’s large extracellular loop. ASICsare also modulated by G protein-coupled receptors such asCB1 cannabinoid receptors and 5-HT2. This review focuses onthe physiological roles of ASICs and the molecularmechanisms by which these channels are regulated. [BMBReports 2013; 46(6: 295-304

  19. Maternal Antiviral Immunoglobulin Accumulates in Neural Tissue of Neonates To Prevent HSV Neurological Disease

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    Yike Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available While antibody responses to neurovirulent pathogens are critical for clearance, the extent to which antibodies access the nervous system to ameliorate infection is poorly understood. In this study on herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1, we demonstrate that HSV-specific antibodies are present during HSV-1 latency in the nervous systems of both mice and humans. We show that antibody-secreting cells entered the trigeminal ganglion (TG, a key site of HSV infection, and persisted long after the establishment of latent infection. We also demonstrate the ability of passively administered IgG to enter the TG independently of infection, showing that the naive TG is accessible to antibodies. The translational implication of this finding is that human fetal neural tissue could contain HSV-specific maternally derived antibodies. Exploring this possibility, we observed HSV-specific IgG in HSV DNA-negative human fetal TG, suggesting passive transfer of maternal immunity into the prenatal nervous system. To further investigate the role of maternal antibodies in the neonatal nervous system, we established a murine model to demonstrate that maternal IgG can access and persist in neonatal TG. This maternal antibody not only prevented disseminated infection but also completely protected the neonate from neurological disease and death following HSV challenge. Maternal antibodies therefore have a potent protective role in the neonatal nervous system against HSV infection. These findings strongly support the concept that prevention of prenatal and neonatal neurotropic infections can be achieved through maternal immunization.

  20. Brain disease, connectivity, plasticity and cognitive therapy: A neurological view of mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubrini, G; Martín-Montes, A; Díez-Ascaso, O; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2017-04-25

    Our conception of the mind-brain relationship has evolved from the traditional idea of dualism to current evidence that mental functions result from brain activity. This paradigm shift, combined with recent advances in neuroimaging, has led to a novel definition of brain functioning in terms of structural and functional connectivity. The purpose of this literature review is to describe the relationship between connectivity, brain lesions, cerebral plasticity, and functional recovery. Assuming that brain function results from the organisation of the entire brain in networks, brain dysfunction would be a consequence of altered brain network connectivity. According to this approach, cognitive and behavioural impairment following brain damage result from disrupted functional organisation of brain networks. However, the dynamic and versatile nature of these circuits makes recovering brain function possible. Cerebral plasticity allows for functional reorganisation leading to recovery, whether spontaneous or resulting from cognitive therapy, after brain disease. Current knowledge of brain connectivity and cerebral plasticity provides new insights into normal brain functioning, the mechanisms of brain damage, and functional recovery, which in turn serve as the foundations of cognitive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Progress in Pediatrics in 2012: choices in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses

    OpenAIRE

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we summarize the progresses in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses that have been published in The Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2012. The induction of Treg activity by probiotics might be effective for promoting tolerance towards food allergens. Nasal cytology is useful in patients with rhinitis for diagnosing chronic non-allergic non-infectious diseases. Atopic eczema is associated...

  2. West Nile Virus Lineage 2 in Horses and Other Animals with Neurologic Disease, South Africa, 2008-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Marietjie; Pretorius, Marthi; Fuller, James A; Botha, Elizabeth; Rakgotho, Mpho; Stivaktas, Voula; Weyer, Camilla; Romito, Marco; Williams, June

    2017-12-01

    During 2008-2015 in South Africa, we conducted West Nile virus surveillance in 1,407 animals with neurologic disease and identified mostly lineage 2 cases in horses (7.4%, 79/1,069), livestock (1.5%, 2/132), and wildlife (0.5%, 1/206); 35% were fatal. Geographic correlation of horse cases with seropositive veterinarians suggests disease in horses can predict risk in humans.

  3. Demyelinizing neurological disease after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha-inhibiting agents in a rheumatological outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theibich, Ali; Dreyer, Lene; Magyari, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Biological treatment with inhibitors of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha has dramatically improved the disease course of several chronic rheumatologic conditions. Adverse events (AEs) are primarily infections and hypersensitivity reactions. Demyelinizing neurological symptoms resembling...... multiple sclerosis (MS) have been described as a rare AE. During about 10-year use of anti TNF-alpha, the Danish Medicines Agency has recorded eight cases of MS like AEs. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of demyelinizing AEs both in the central and peripheral nervous system after...... patients who developed neurological symptoms during this time period. We found six patients with signs of demyelinizing neurological disorders: four resembling MS, one MS-like condition, and one multifocal motor neuropathy. During a relatively short time period, we found a remarkably high number...

  4. Patient with rapidly evolving neurological disease with neuropathological lesions of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Lewy body dementia, chronic subcortical vascular encephalopathy and meningothelial meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Maria Gabriella; Tiple, Dorina; Bizzarro, Alessandra; Ladogana, Anna; Colaizzo, Elisa; Capellari, Sabina; Rossi, Marcello; Parchi, Piero; Masullo, Carlo; Pocchiari, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    We report a case of rapidly evolving neurological disease in a patient with neuropathological lesions of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Lewy body dementia (LBD), chronic subcortical vascular encephalopathy and meningothelial meningioma. The coexistence of severe multiple pathologies in a single patient strengthens the need to perform accurate clinical differential diagnoses in rapidly progressive dementias. © 2016 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  5. Aspectos neurológicos da moléstia de chagas Neurological aspects of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritz Köberle

    1967-09-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Chagas related in more than two 200 cases, what he called "nervous forms" of trypanosomiasis, that is neurological manifestations from central origin (idiotism, infantilism, pseudo-bulbar paralysis, aphasia, cerebellar ataxia, atetosis, espostic or paralytic diplegia, disbasia. At that time Chagas expressed his concepts as follows: "In relation to the frequency of trypanosomiasis nervous forms we have performed many observations which allow us to state that this disease is the one which causes the largest number of organic affections of the central nervous system, in human pathology". We are plenty convinced by Chagas's statement. By experiments on animals of laboratory we have very often noticed a rather varied neurological symptomatology, being worth point out identical syndromes to those observed by Chagas. Our autopsy material non-rarely include chronic Chagas cases presenting a most varied symtomatology. Among them we have named only three cases of discerebral nanism, a rather rare affection in other parts of the world and relatively frequent in our material. The fact which we have demonstrated, i.e., a relatively great decreasing of number of nervous cells in the peripheral system could happen in the central nervous system as well. Provided that there are only two quantitative works on neuron number diminishing in the central nervous system in mice and rats we decline to go into further details about central neuropathies in man. We emphasized the necessity to perform researches on this field by means of intimate collaboration between clinicians and pathologists, as the only way to confirm on scientific basis all that was observed by the panoramic and genial vision of Carlos Chagas.

  6. The Complexity Signature: Developing a Tool to Communicate Biopsychosocial Severity of Disease for Children with Chronic Neurological Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Sandro M; Sonanini, Sebastian; Sollmann, Nico; Focke, Axel; Gerstl, Lucia; Heinen, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Aim For children with medical complexity, interdisciplinary treatment approaches are required to address the various aspects defined within the biopsychosocial model. Methods The present study identifies dimensions of the biopsychosocial model to generate a standardized visualized severity score for chronic neurological diseases in children. We demonstrate the score's applicability and usefulness in clinical practice among clinicians with and without pediatric board certification with the aid of illustrative patient cases. The results are compared by Spearman correlation coefficient. Results Nine dimensions were identified as the basis for the development of the score, which consists of five grades of severity for each of the selected neuropediatric subsections. All board-certified pediatricians would recommend the application of the severity score in clinical routine. Furthermore, a good correlation was revealed between direct and indirect (severity score) assessment. Interpretation The severity score developed in this study takes into account biopsychosocial aspects of chronic diseases while being comprehensible and easily applicable in clinical routine-a biopsychosocial signature serving as an excellent, striking communication basis within the interdisciplinary team. However, upcoming studies including more patient cases are needed for further refinement. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Enhancing CNS repair in neurological disease: challenges arising from neurodegeneration and rewiring of the network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Warrington, Arthur E; Bieber, Allan J; Rodriguez, Moses

    2011-07-01

    Repair of the central nervous system (CNS) constitutes an integral part of treating neurological disease and plays a crucial role in restoring CNS architecture and function. Distinct strategies have been developed to reconstruct the damaged neural tissue, with many tested preclinically in animal models. We review cell replacement-based repair strategies. By taking spinal cord injury, cerebral ischaemia and degenerative CNS disorders as examples for CNS repair, we discuss progress and potential problems in utilizing embryonic stem cells and adult neural/non-neural stem cells to repair cell loss in the CNS. Nevertheless, CNS repair is not simply a matter of cell transplantation. The major challenge is to induce regenerating neural cells to integrate into the neural network and compensate for damaged neural function. The neural cells confront an environment very different from that of the developmental stage in which these cells differentiate to form interwoven networks. During the repair process, one of the challenges is neurodegeneration, which can develop from interrupted innervations to/from the targets, chronic inflammation, ischaemia, aging or idiopathic neural toxicity. Neurodegeneration, which occurs on the basis of a characteristic vascular and neural web, usually presents as a chronically progressive process with unknown aetiology. Currently, there is no effective treatment to stop or slow down neurodegeneration. Pathological changes from patients with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis indicate a broken homeostasis in the CNS. We discuss how the blood-brain barrier and neural networks are formed to maintain CNS homeostasis and their contribution to neurodegeneration in diseased conditions. Another challenge is that some inhibitors produced by CNS injury do not facilitate the regenerating neural cells to incorporate into a pre-existing network. We review glial responses to CNS injury. Of note, the reactive astrocytes

  8. [Child neurology and multimedia technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    Methods of computer technology (intelligent technology, IT), such as multimedia and virtual reality, are utilized more and more in all medical fields including child neurology. Advances in the digitalization of individual medical data and multi-media technology have enabled patients to be able to obtain their own medical data by small media and to receive medical treatment at any hospitals even if they are located in distance place. Changes from a doctor oriented to patients oriented medicine is anticipated. It is necessary to store medical data from birth to adulthood and to accumulate epidemiological data of rare diseases such as metabolic diseases or degenerative diseases especially in child neurology, which highly require tele medicine and telecare at home. Moreover, IT may improve in the QOL of patients with neurological diseases and of their families. Cooperation of medicine and engineering is therefore necessary. Results of our experiments on telemedicine, telecare and virtual reality are described.

  9. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  10. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  11. The heart in Friedreich ataxia: definition of cardiomyopathy, disease severity, and correlation with neurological symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidemann, Frank; Rummey, Christian; Bijnens, Bart; Störk, Stefan; Jasaityte, Ruta; Dhooge, Jan; Baltabaeva, Aigul; Sutherland, George; Schulz, Jörg B; Meier, Thomas

    2012-04-03

    This cross-sectional study provides a practical approach for the clinical assessment of Friedreich ataxia (FA) cardiomyopathy (FA-CM). A comprehensive cardiac assessment, including standard echocardiography, color Doppler myocardial imaging, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, ECG, and exercise stress testing, was performed in 205 FA patients. To assess myocardial hypertrophy in FA-CM, the end-diastolic interventricular septal wall thickness (IVSTd) was found to be the best echocardiographic parameter compared with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging-determined left ventricular mass. With the use of this parameter, 4 groups of patients with FA-CM could be defined. Patients with normal values for IVSTd (31.7%) were classified as having no FA-CM. Patients with an IVSTd exceeding the predicted normal IVSTd were classified as having mild FA-CM (40%) if IVSTd exceeded the normal value by cardiomyopathy associated with FA based on echocardiographic IVSTd and ejection fraction data. Because no distinct interrelations between FA-CM and neurological status could be determined, regular follow-up of potential cardiac involvement in FA patients is essential in clinical practice.

  12. A somatic cell defect is associated with the onset of neurological symptoms in a lysosomal storage disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Larson, Denise M.; Wassif, Christopher A.; Yanjanin, Nicole M.; Anderson, Stacie M.; Kirby, Martha R.; Trivedi, Niraj S.; Porter, Forbes D.; Pavan, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in individuals with the lysosomal storage disorder Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) are heterogeneous, not localized to specific protein domains, and not correlated to time of onset or disease severity. We demonstrate direct correlation of the time of neurological symptom onset with the severity of lysosomal defects in NPC1 patient-derived fibroblasts. This is a novel assay for NPC1 individuals that may be predictive of NPC1 disease progression and broadly applicable to other lysosomal disorders. PMID:23850077

  13. Prevention of metabolic diseases: fruits (including fruit sugars) vs. vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jessica N; Schmidt, Kelsey A; Kratz, Mario

    2017-07-01

    To discuss recent evidence from observational and intervention studies on the relationship between fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption and metabolic disease. Observational studies have consistently demonstrated a modest inverse association between the intake of fruit and leafy green vegetables, but not total vegetables, and biomarkers of metabolic disease as well as incident type 2 diabetes mellitus. This is in contrast to limited evidence from recently published randomized controlled dietary intervention trials, which - in sum - suggests little to no impact of increased F&V consumption on biomarkers of metabolic disease. Evidence from observational studies that fruit and leafy green vegetable intake is associated with lower type 2 diabetes risk and better metabolic health could not be confirmed by dietary intervention trials. It is unclear whether this discrepancy is because of limitations inherent in observational studies (e.g., subjective dietary assessment methods, residual confounding) or due to limitations in the few available intervention studies (e.g., short duration of follow-up, interventions combining whole fruit and fruit juice, or lack of compliance). Future studies that attempt to address these limitations are needed to provide more conclusive insight into the impact of F&V consumption on metabolic health.

  14. Identification and validation of clinical predictors for the risk of neurological involvement in children with hand, foot, and mouth disease in Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Sel Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human enterovirus 71 (HEV71 can cause Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD with neurological complications, which may rapidly progress to fulminant cardiorespiratory failure, and death. Early recognition of children at risk is the key to reduce acute mortality and morbidity. Methods We examined data collected through a prospective clinical study of HFMD conducted between 2000 and 2006 that included 3 distinct outbreaks of HEV71 to identify risk factors associated with neurological involvement in children with HFMD. Results Total duration of fever ≥ 3 days, peak temperature ≥ 38.5°C and history of lethargy were identified as independent risk factors for neurological involvement (evident by CSF pleocytosis in the analysis of 725 children admitted during the first phase of the study. When they were validated in the second phase of the study, two or more (≥ 2 risk factors were present in 162 (65% of 250 children with CSF pleocytosis compared with 56 (30% of 186 children with no CSF pleocytosis (OR 4.27, 95% CI2.79–6.56, p rd or later day of febrile illness, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of ≥ 2 risk factors predictive of CSF pleocytosis were 75%(57/76, 59%(27/46, 75%(57/76 and 59%(27/46, respectively. Conclusion Three readily elicited clinical risk factors were identified to help detect children at risk of neurological involvement. These risk factors may serve as a guide to clinicians to decide the need for hospitalization and further investigation, including cerebrospinal fluid examination, and close monitoring for disease progression in children with HFMD.

  15. Identification and validation of clinical predictors for the risk of neurological involvement in children with hand, foot, and mouth disease in Sarawak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Mong How; Wong, See Chang; Mohan, Anand; Podin, Yuwana; Perera, David; Clear, Daniella; del Sel, Sylvia; Chieng, Chae Hee; Tio, Phaik Hooi; Cardosa, Mary Jane; Solomon, Tom

    2009-01-19

    Human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) can cause Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) with neurological complications, which may rapidly progress to fulminant cardiorespiratory failure, and death. Early recognition of children at risk is the key to reduce acute mortality and morbidity. We examined data collected through a prospective clinical study of HFMD conducted between 2000 and 2006 that included 3 distinct outbreaks of HEV71 to identify risk factors associated with neurological involvement in children with HFMD. Total duration of fever >or= 3 days, peak temperature >or= 38.5 degrees C and history of lethargy were identified as independent risk factors for neurological involvement (evident by CSF pleocytosis) in the analysis of 725 children admitted during the first phase of the study. When they were validated in the second phase of the study, two or more (>or= 2) risk factors were present in 162 (65%) of 250 children with CSF pleocytosis compared with 56 (30%) of 186 children with no CSF pleocytosis (OR 4.27, 95% CI2.79-6.56, p or= 38.5 degrees C and history of lethargy had the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 28%(48/174), 89%(125/140), 76%(48/63) and 50%(125/251), respectively in predicting CSF pleocytosis in children that were seen within the first 2 days of febrile illness. For those presented on the 3rd or later day of febrile illness, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of >or= 2 risk factors predictive of CSF pleocytosis were 75%(57/76), 59%(27/46), 75%(57/76) and 59%(27/46), respectively. Three readily elicited clinical risk factors were identified to help detect children at risk of neurological involvement. These risk factors may serve as a guide to clinicians to decide the need for hospitalization and further investigation, including cerebrospinal fluid examination, and close monitoring for disease progression in children with HFMD.

  16. Overstimulation of the inhibitory nervous system plays a role in the pathogenesis of neuromuscular and neurological diseases: a novel hypothesis [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Tuk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Based upon a thorough review of published clinical observations regarding the inhibitory system, I hypothesize that this system may play a key role in the pathogenesis of a variety of neuromuscular and neurological diseases. Specifically, excitatory overstimulation, which is commonly reported in neuromuscular and neurological diseases, may be a homeostatic response to inhibitory overstimulation. Involvement of the inhibitory system in disease pathogenesis is highly relevant, given that most approaches currently being developed for treating neuromuscular and neurological diseases focus on reducing excitatory activity rather than reducing inhibitory activity.

  17. A unique glycan-isoform of transferrin in cerebrospinal fluid: A potential diagnostic marker for neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Kyoka; Matsumoto, Yuka; Ito, Hiromi; Saito, Kiyoshi; Honda, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro

    2017-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is sequestered from blood by the blood-brain barrier and directly communicates with brain parenchymal interstitial fluid, leading to contain specific biomarkers of neurological diseases. CSF contains glycan isoforms of transferrin (Tf): one appears to be derived from the brain and the other from blood. CSF contains two glycan-isoforms; brain-type Tf and serum-type Tf. Glycan analysis and immunohistochemistry suggest that serum-type Tf having α2, 6sialylated glycans is derived from blood whereas brain-type Tf having GlcNAc-terminated glycans is derived from the choroid plexus, CSF producing tissue. The ratio of serum-type/brain-type Tf differentiates Alzheimer's disease from idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, which is an elderly dementia caused by abnormal metabolism of CSF. The ratios in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients were higher than those of controls and did not appear to be normally distributed. Indeed, detrended normal Quantile-Quantile plot analysis reveals the presence of an independent subgroup showing higher ratios in PD patients. The subgroup of PD shows higher levels of CSF α-synuclein than the rest, indicating that PD includes two subgroups, which differ in levels of brain-type Tf and α-synuclein. Glycosylation in central nervous system appears to be unique. The unique glycan may be a tag for glycoprotein, which is biosynthesized in the central nervous system. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neuro-glycoscience, edited by Kenji Kadomatsu and Hiroshi Kitagawa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor for the treatment of neurological diseases: a meta-analysis of 64 randomized controlled trials involving 6,297 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng; Li, Xiao-yan; Xu, Chun-ying; Zou, Li-ping

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: China is the only country where nerve growth factor is approved for large-scale use as a clinical medicine. More than 10 years ago, in 2003, nerve growth factor injection was listed as a national drug. The goal of this article is to evaluate comprehensively the efficacy and safety of nerve growth factor for the treatment of neurological diseases. DATA RETRIEVAL: A computer-based retrieval was performed from six databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Sino Med, CNKI, and the VIP database, searching from the clinical establishment of nerve growth factor for treatment until December 31, 2013. The key words for the searches were “nerve growth factor, randomized controlled trials” in Chinese and in English. DATA SELECTION: Inclusion criteria: any study published in English or Chinese referring to randomized controlled trials of nerve growth factor; patients with neurological diseases such as peripheral nerve injury, central nerve injury, cranial neuropathy, and nervous system infections; patients older than 7 years; similar research methods and outcomes assessing symptoms; and measurement of nerve conduction velocities. The meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager 5.2.3 software. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The total effective rate, the incidence of adverse effects, and the nerve conduction velocity were recorded for each study. RESULTS: Sixty-four studies involving 6,297 patients with neurological diseases were included. The total effective rate in the group treated with nerve growth factor was significantly higher than that in the control group (P factor group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P factor group was also higher than that in the control group (P factor can significantly improve nerve function in patients with nervous system disease and is safe and effective. PMID:26109961

  19. Clinical use of gadobutrol for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng KT

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth T Cheng1, Hannah Y Cheng2, Kam Leung31Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Freelance Technical Writer, New Orleans, LA, USA; 3National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI is an important clinical tool for diagnosing neurological diseases. The appropriate use of a suitable MRI contrast agent or contrast pharmaceutical is essential for CE-MRI to produce desirable diagnostic images. Currently, there are seven contrast agents (CAs or pharmaceuticals approved for clinical imaging of the central nervous system (CNS in the US, Europe, or Japan. All of the clinically approved CAs are water-soluble gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs which do not penetrate the CNS blood–brain barrier (BBB. These agents are used for imaging CNS areas without a BBB, or various pathologies, such as tumors and infection that break down the BBB and allow CAs to enter into the surrounding parenchyma. Clinically, GBCAs are most useful for detecting primary and secondary cerebral neoplastic lesions. Among these CNS GBCAs, gadobutrol (Gd-BT-DO3A, Gadovist™ is a neutral, nonionic, macrocyclic compound that showed promising results from clinical trials of CNS imaging. In comparison with other GBCAs, Gd-BT-DO3A has relatively high in vitro kinetic stability and r1 relaxivity. Gd-BT-DO3A has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in 2011 for CNS imaging. A review of available literature shows that Gd-BT-DO3A exhibits similar safety and clinical efficacy profiles to other GBCAs. Gd-BT-DO3A has the distinguishing feature that it is the only clinical agent commercially available in a formulation of 1.0 M concentration with a relatively higher in vitro T1 shortening per unit volume than other clinical GBCAs which are only

  20. Controlling the Regional Identity of hPSC-Derived Neurons to Uncover Neuronal Subtype Specificity of Neurological Disease Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Imaizumi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The CNS contains many diverse neuronal subtypes, and most neurological diseases target specific subtypes. However, the mechanism of neuronal subtype specificity of disease phenotypes remains elusive. Although in vitro disease models employing human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs have great potential to clarify the association of neuronal subtypes with disease, it is currently difficult to compare various PSC-derived subtypes. This is due to the limited number of subtypes whose induction is established, and different cultivation protocols for each subtype. Here, we report a culture system to control the regional identity of PSC-derived neurons along the anteroposterior (A-P and dorsoventral (D-V axes. This system was successfully used to obtain various neuronal subtypes based on the same protocol. Furthermore, we reproduced subtype-specific phenotypes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Alzheimer’s disease (AD by comparing the obtained subtypes. Therefore, our culture system provides new opportunities for modeling neurological diseases with PSCs.

  1. Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD detected in neurologic disorders Iraqi children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel A. Kareem

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion In the absence of newborn screening, MSUD is not uncommon in neurologically disorder patients where MSUD was still diagnosed clinically, but delayed. The importance of clinical awareness and accurate biochemical analysis were the key tools for diagnosis and the necessity for a comprehensive national newborn screening program.

  2. The rise of mortality from mental and neurological diseases in Europe, 1979-2009: Observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); M. Karanikolos (Marina); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: We studied recent trends in mortality from seven mental and neurological conditions and their determinants in 41 European countries. Methods. Age-standardized mortality rates were analysed using standard methods of descriptive epidemiology, and were related to cultural,

  3. Neurology at the bedside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Waldemar, Gunhild

    This updated and expanded new edition takes neurology trainees by the hand and guides them through the whole patient encounter - from an efficient neurological history and bedside examination through to differential diagnosis, diagnostic procedures and treatment. At each step the expert authors......, as have new chapters including neurogenetics, neurorehabilitation, neurocritical care and heuristic neurological reasoning. In addition, this second edition now includes more than 100 unique case histories. Neurology at the Bedside, Second Edition is written for neurologists in all stages of training....... Medical students, general practitioners and others with an interest in neurology will also find invaluable information here....

  4. Microglia Responses in Acute and Chronic Neurological Diseases: What Microglia-Specific Transcriptomic Studies Taught (and did Not Teach Us

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène E. Hirbec

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, microglia have been acknowledged to be key players in central nervous system (CNS under both physiological and pathological conditions. They constantly survey the CNS environment and as immune cells, in pathological contexts, they provide the first host defense and orchestrate the immune response. It is well recognized that under pathological conditions microglia have both sequential and simultaneous, beneficial and detrimental effects. Cell-specific transcriptomics recently became popular in Neuroscience field allowing concurrent monitoring of the expression of numerous genes in a given cell population. Moreover, by comparing two or more conditions, these approaches permit to unbiasedly identify deregulated genes and pathways. A growing number of studies have thus investigated microglial transcriptome remodeling over the course of neuropathological conditions and highlighted the molecular diversity of microglial response to different diseases. In the present work, we restrict our review to microglia obtained directly from in vivo samples and not cell culture, and to studies using whole-genome strategies. We first critically review the different methods developed to decipher microglia transcriptome. In particular, we compare advantages and drawbacks of flow cytometry and laser microdissection to isolate pure microglia population as well as identification of deregulated microglial genes obtained via RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq vs. microarrays approaches. Second, we summarize insights obtained from microglia transcriptomes in traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries, pain and more chronic neurological conditions including Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Alzheimer disease (AD and Multiple sclerosis (MS. Transcriptomic responses of microglia in other non-neurodegenerative CNS disorders such as gliomas and sepsis are also addressed. Third, we present a comparison of the most activated pathways in each neuropathological condition

  5. Genetics of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Mottagui-Tabar, Salim; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2004-05-01

    Neurological diseases are defined as an inappropriate function of the peripheral or central nervous system due to impaired electrical impulses throughout the brain and/or nervous system that may present with heterogeneous symptoms according to the parts of the system involved in these pathologic processes. Growing evidence on genetic components of neurological disease have been collected during recent years. Genetic studies have opened the way for understanding the underlying pathology of many neurological disorders. The outcome of current intense research into the genetics of neurological disorders will hopefully be the introduction of new diagnostic tools and the discovery of potential targets for new and more effective medications and preventive measures.

  6. [Neurological complications among patients with zoster hospitalized in Department of Infectious Diseases in Cracow in 2001-2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesiada, Grazyna; Czepiel, Jacek; Sobczyk-Krupiarz, Iwona; Mach, Tomasz; Garlicki, Aleksander

    2010-01-01

    Herpes zoster is an infectious disease caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV). After replication at the place of entry, VZV spreads via the blood into the skin and mucosa, causing the varicella. From these regions VZV migrates into the sensory ganglia where it establishes a latent infection. The aim of our study was to analyze the localization of the skin changes and correlations of neurological complications among patient with zoster. We have reviewed medical documentation of the 67 patients with herpes zoster, hospitalized in our Department during the years 2001-2006. We have studied localization of the herpes zoster changes and frequency of neurological complications among these patients. Neuralgia was less intensive and last shorter time, when antiviral treatment had been started earlier. Neuralgia, meningitis, encephalitis and complications of the eye zoster were present more often among patients over 65 years old.

  7. Chapter 38: American neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemon, Frank R

    2010-01-01

    The great formative event in the history of North America, the Civil War of 1861 to 1865, was the stimulus for the development of clinical neurology and the neurosciences. The first neurological research center on the continent was the US Army hospital at Turner's Lane, Philadelphia, PA. Silas Weir Mitchell and his colleagues described causalgia (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), phantom limb sensation, and Horner's syndrome (before Horner). The medical leader of the Northern army was William Hammond. After the conclusion of hostilities, he began a huge clinical practice in New York City. In the United States, clinical neurology began in private practice, unlike Europe, where neurology began in institutions. Hammond's textbook, which first used the term athetosis, was used by a generation of physicians who encountered patients with neurological signs and symptoms. Early in the 20th century, neurological institutions were formed around universities; probably the most famous was the Montreal Neurological Institute founded by Wilder Penfield. The US federal government sponsored extensive research into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system through the Neurological Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, later called the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. The government officially classified the final 10 years of the 20th century as the Decade of the Brain and provided an even greater level of research funding.

  8. Zika Virus-Associated Neurological Disease in the Adult: Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Encephalitis, and Myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Laura S; Barreras, Paula; Pardo, Carlos A

    2016-09-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has caused a major infection outbreak in the Americas since 2015. In parallel with the ZIKV epidemic, an increase in cases of neurological disorders which include Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), encephalitis, and myelitis have been linked to the infection. We reviewed the evidence suggesting a relationship between ZIKV and neurological disorders in adults. A search of the literature supporting such link included databases such as PubMed and the World Health Organization (WHO) surveillance system. Through June 1, 2016, 761 publications were available on PubMed using the search word "Zika." Among those publications as well as surveillance reports released by the WHO and other health organizations, 20 articles linked ZIKV with neurological complications other than microcephaly. They corresponded to population and surveillance studies (n = 7), case reports (n = 9), case series (n = 3), and case-control studies (n = 1). Articles were also included if they provided information related to possible mechanisms of ZIKV neuropathogenesis. Evidence based on epidemiological and virological information supports the hypothesis that ZIKV infection is associated with GBS. Although cases of encephalopathy and myelitis have also been linked to ZIKV infection, the evidence is scarce and there is a need for virological, epidemiological, and controlled studies to better characterize such relationship. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Effects of blood lead level on biochemical and hematological parameters in children with neurological diseases of Western Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratinidhi, Shilpa A; Patil, Arun J; Behera, Manaskumar; Patil, Maya; Ghadage, Dnyaneshwari P; Pratinidhi, Asha K

    2014-05-01

    Lead is found in small but appreciable quantities in air, soil, drinking water, and food. Exposure to such amounts of lead does not lead to acute lead toxicity but produces subtle effects particularly in children. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of blood lead level on biochemical and hematological parameters in children with neurological diseases in Western Maharashtra, India, and to estimate the blood lead level by liver and kidney function tests and hematological parameters in children with neurological disorders admitted to the pediatric ward and compare them with healthy controls. In this study, 30 children with various neurological disorders admitted to the pediatric ward of Smt. Kashibai Navale Medical College and General Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India, were compared with 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Four milliliters of venous blood was collected for estimation of blood lead level, and biochemical and hematological parameters were determined using standard methods. Blood lead level was significantly increased in the study group (pfood habits and limit hand-to-mouth activities to prevent lead intoxication.

  10. Psychiatric and neurological symptoms in patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C): Findings from the International NPC Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnot, Olivier; Gama, Clarissa S; Mengel, Eugen; Pineda, Mercè; Vanier, Marie T; Watson, Louise; Watissée, Marie; Schwierin, Barbara; Patterson, Marc C

    2017-10-09

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a rare inherited neurovisceral disease that should be recognised by psychiatrists as a possible underlying cause of psychiatric abnormalities. This study describes NP-C patients who had psychiatric manifestations at enrolment in the international NPC Registry, a unique multicentre, prospective, observational disease registry. Treating physicians' data entries describing psychiatric manifestations in NPC patients were coded and grouped by expert psychiatrists. Out of 386 NP-C patients included in the registry as of October 2015, psychiatric abnormalities were reported to be present in 34% (94/280) of those with available data. Forty-four patients were confirmed to have identifiable psychiatric manifestations, with text describing these psychiatric manifestations. In these 44 patients, the median (range) age at onset of psychiatric manifestations was 17.9 years (2.5-67.9; n = 15), while the median (range) age at NP-C diagnosis was 23.7 years (0.2-69.8; n = 34). Almost all patients (43/44; 98%) had an occurrence of ≥1 neurological manifestation at enrolment. These data show that substantial delays in diagnosis of NP-C are long among patients with psychiatric symptoms and, moreover, patients presenting with psychiatric features and at least one of cognitive impairment, neurological manifestations, and/or visceral symptoms should be screened for NP-C.

  11. The nutritional geometry of liver disease including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Stephen J; Raubenheimer, David; Cogger, Victoria C; Macia, Laurence; Solon-Biet, Samantha M; Le Couteur, David G; George, Jacob

    2018-02-01

    Nutrition has a profound effect on chronic liver disease, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Most observational studies and clinical trials have focussed on the effects of total energy intake, or the intake of individual macronutrients and certain micronutrients, such as vitamin D, on liver disease. Although these studies have shown the importance of nutrition on hepatic outcomes, there is not yet any unifying framework for understanding the relationship between diet and liver disease. The Geometric Framework for Nutrition (GFN) is an innovative model for designing nutritional experiments or interpreting nutritional data that can determine the effects of nutrients and their interactions on animal behaviour and phenotypes. Recently the GFN has provided insights into the relationship between dietary energy and macronutrients on obesity and ageing in mammals including humans. Mouse studies using the GFN have disentangled the effects of macronutrients on fatty liver and the gut microbiome. The GFN is likely to play a significant role in disentangling the effects of nutrients on liver disease, especially NAFLD, in humans. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Addison disease presenting with acute neurologic deterioration: a rare presentation yields new lessons from old observations in primary adrenal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kenneth A; Kline, Gregory A

    2010-01-01

    To report a rare case of Addison disease presenting with acute neurologic deterioration, and to discuss previous reports and illustrative clinical lessons drawn from the case. We detail the clinical presentation and sequence of events leading to diagnosis of Addison disease in a 20-year-old man whose initial symptoms were those of acute neurologic deterioration. A 20-year-old man presented with acute, rapid neurologic deterioration. The patient required intubation, but his condition responded very well to mannitol and dexamethasone. Head computed tomography showed a fourth ventricle reduced in size and basal cistern effacement, changes consistent with mild cerebral edema. Primary adrenal insufficiency was diagnosed after a low morning cortisol concentration prompted a corticotropin-stimulation test and serum aldosterone measurement (undetectable). The diagnosis was almost missed because of suspected confounders of dexamethasone and etomidate use. Subsequently, the patient tested positive for anti-21- hydroxylase antibodies. Cerebral edema rarely occurs with Addison disease and is most likely secondary to hyponatremia. Diagnosis in such cases may be complicated by resuscitative therapies; however, low cortisol levels should always be thoroughly investigated. This patient's presentation was also unique in that he maintained a normal electrolyte profile despite hypoaldosteronism, a phenomenon that may be explained by enhanced mineralocorticoid activity of exogenous cortisol. The diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency may not be suspected in the absence of classic hyperpigmentation and hyperkalemia, but should remain in the differential diagnosis of acute confusion. While the use of dexamethasone and etomidate in initial resuscitation can transiently suppress adrenal function, any unusually low cortisol level merits thorough investigation.

  13. A case of neuro-Behcet's disease: comparison of neurological symptoms with PET, SPECT, and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Wook; An, Min; Kim, So Yon; Kim, Young Jung; Cho, Min Koo; Lee, Gwon Jun; Lim, Sang Mun; Hong, Sung Woon; Choi, Chang Woon [Korea Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    We describe a 27-year-old man who developed gait disturbance and dysarthria 2 years after the onset of cardinal symptoms of Behect's disease. Position emission tomography with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose revealed severe hypometabolism in the cerebellum, in accordance with cerebellar symptoms and signs of the patients. However, single-photon emission tomography with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO and {sup 99m}Tc-ECD did not disclose significant perfusion abnormalities in the brain. Routine brain magnetic resonance imaging did not show signal abnormalities. The findings of imaging studies compared with neurological manifestations of the patient are discussed.

  14. Insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia associated diseases not included in the metabolic syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carvalheira, José B C; Saad, Mario J A

    2006-01-01

    .... In this review we describe some of these alterations emphasizing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, but also including polycistic ovary disease, hyperuricemia, chronic renal failure, heart failure...

  15. Nested PCR for Rapid Detection of Mumps Virus in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Neurological Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Poggio, Gustavo Palacios; Rodriguez, Claudia; Cisterna, Daniel; Freire, María Cecilia; Cello, Jerónimo

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a reverse transcription (RT)-nested polymerase chain reaction (n-PCR) for the detection of mumps virus RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with neurological infections. A specific 112-bp fragment was amplified by this method with primers from the nucleoprotein of the mumps virus genome. The mumps virus RT–n-PCR was capable of detecting 0.001 PFU/ml and 0.005 50% tissue culture infective dose/ml. This method was found to be specific, since no PCR pro...

  16. Headache and focal neurologic signs following exposure to spicy aroma as an initial presentation of moyamoya disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal A. Siddiqui, A.B.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is a condition of the cerebrovascular system that involves stenosis of the intracranial internal carotid arteries as well as their proximal branches, often leading to stroke in affected patients. Here we describe the case of a patient with headache and focal neurologic signs following exposure to a spicy aroma, who initially had a negative vascular work-up and a preliminary diagnosis of a complex migraine syndrome. She subsequently developed infarction of the left frontal lobe, and imaging studies revealed the diagnosis of moyamoya disease. She was treated with an encephalodurosynangiosis procedure, with notable improvement. This case highlights the importance of considering moyamoya disease in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with headaches with aura.

  17. A new clinical tool for assessing numerical abilities in neurological diseases: Numerical Activities of Daily Living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo eSemenza

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to build an instrument, the Numerical Activities of Daily Living (NADL, designed to identify the specific impairments in numerical functions that may cause problems in everyday life. These impairments go beyond what can be inferred from the available scales evaluating activities of daily living in general, and are not adequately captured by measures of the general deterioration of cognitive functions as assessed by standard clinical instruments like the MMSE and MoCA. We assessed a control group (n = 148 and a patient group affected by a wide variety of neurological conditions (n = 175, with NADL along with IADL, MMSE, and MoCA. The NADL battery was found to have satisfactory construct validity and reliability, across a wide age range. This enabled us to calculate appropriate criteria for impairment that took into account age and education. It was found that neurological patients tended to overestimate their abilities as compared to the judgment made by their caregivers, assessed with objective tests of numerical abilities.

  18. An eye-tracking controlled neuropsychological battery for cognitive assessment in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Barbara; Carelli, Laura; Solca, Federica; Lafronza, Annalisa; Pedroli, Elisa; Faini, Andrea; Zago, Stefano; Ticozzi, Nicola; Ciammola, Andrea; Morelli, Claudia; Meriggi, Paolo; Cipresso, Pietro; Lulé, Dorothée; Ludolph, Albert C; Riva, Giuseppe; Silani, Vincenzo

    2017-04-01

    Traditional cognitive assessment in neurological conditions involving physical disability is often prevented by the presence of verbal-motor impairment; to date, an extensive motor-verbal-free neuropsychological battery is not available for such purposes. We adapted a set of neuropsychological tests, assessing language, attentional abilities, executive functions and social cognition, for eye-tracking (ET) control, and explored its feasibility in a sample of healthy participants. Thirty healthy subjects performed a neuropsychological assessment, using an ET-based neuropsychological battery, together with standard "paper and pencil" cognitive measures for frontal (Frontal Assessment Battery-FAB) and working memory abilities (Digit Sequencing Task) and for global cognitive efficiency (Montreal Cognitive Assessment-MoCA). Psychological measures of anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Y-STAI-Y) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory-BDI) were also collected, and a usability questionnaire was administered. Significant correlations were observed between the "paper and pencil" screening of working memory abilities and the ET-based neuropsychological measures. The ET-based battery also correlated with the MoCA, while poor correlations were observed with the FAB. Usability aspects were found to be influenced by both working memory abilities and psychological components. The ET-based neuropsychological battery developed could provide an extensive assessment of cognitive functions, allowing participants to perform tasks independently from the integrity of motor or verbal channels. Further studies will be aimed at investigating validity and usability components in neurological populations with motor-verbal impairments.

  19. A new clinical tool for assessing numerical abilities in neurological diseases: numerical activities of daily living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, Carlo; Meneghello, Francesca; Arcara, Giorgio; Burgio, Francesca; Gnoato, Francesca; Facchini, Silvia; Benavides-Varela, Silvia; Clementi, Maurizio; Butterworth, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to build an instrument, the numerical activities of daily living (NADL), designed to identify the specific impairments in numerical functions that may cause problems in everyday life. These impairments go beyond what can be inferred from the available scales evaluating activities of daily living in general, and are not adequately captured by measures of the general deterioration of cognitive functions as assessed by standard clinical instruments like the MMSE and MoCA. We assessed a control group (n = 148) and a patient group affected by a wide variety of neurological conditions (n = 175), with NADL along with IADL, MMSE, and MoCA. The NADL battery was found to have satisfactory construct validity and reliability, across a wide age range. This enabled us to calculate appropriate criteria for impairment that took into account age and education. It was found that neurological patients tended to overestimate their abilities as compared to the judgment made by their caregivers, assessed with objective tests of numerical abilities. PMID:25126077

  20. Progressive neurologic and somatic disease in a novel mouse model of human mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Marcó

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIC (MPSIIIC is a severe lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency in activity of the transmembrane enzyme heparan-α-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase (HGSNAT that catalyses the N-acetylation of α-glucosamine residues of heparan sulfate. Enzyme deficiency causes abnormal substrate accumulation in lysosomes, leading to progressive and severe neurodegeneration, somatic pathology and early death. There is no cure for MPSIIIC, and development of new therapies is challenging because of the unfeasibility of cross-correction. In this study, we generated a new mouse model of MPSIIIC by targeted disruption of the Hgsnat gene. Successful targeting left LacZ expression under control of the Hgsnat promoter, allowing investigation into sites of endogenous expression, which was particularly prominent in the CNS, but was also detectable in peripheral organs. Signs of CNS storage pathology, including glycosaminoglycan accumulation, lysosomal distension, lysosomal dysfunction and neuroinflammation were detected in 2-month-old animals and progressed with age. Glycosaminoglycan accumulation and ultrastructural changes were also observed in most somatic organs, but lysosomal pathology seemed most severe in liver. Furthermore, HGSNAT-deficient mice had altered locomotor and exploratory activity and shortened lifespan. Hence, this animal model recapitulates human MPSIIIC and provides a useful tool for the study of disease physiopathology and the development of new therapeutic approaches.

  1. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: crossroads between neurology, psychiatry and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugalho, Paulo; Oliveira-Maia, Albino J

    2013-01-01

    Non-motor symptoms contribute significantly to Parkinson's disease (PD) related disability. Impulse control disorders (ICDs) have been recently added to the behavioural spectrum of PD-related non-motor symptoms. Such behaviours are characterized by an inappropriate drive to conduct repetitive behaviours that are usually socially inadequate or result in harmful consequences. Parkinson disease impulse control disorders (PD-ICDs) have raised significant interest in the scientific and medical community, not only because of their incapacitating nature, but also because they may represent a valid model of ICDs beyond PD and a means to study the physiology of drive, impulse control and compulsive actions in the normal brain. In this review, we discuss some unresolved issues regarding PD-ICDs, including the association with psychiatric co-morbidities such as obsessive-compulsive disorder and with dopamine related side effects, such as hallucinations and dyskinesias; the relationship with executive cognitive dysfunction; and the neural underpinnings of ICDs in PD. We also discuss the contribution of neuroscience studies based on animal-models towards a mechanistic explanation of the development of PD-ICDs, specifically regarding corticostriatal control of goal directed and habitual actions.

  2. Novel mutations affecting the Na, K ATPase alpha model complex neurological diseases and implicate the sodium pump in increased longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, Lesley J; Hrizo, Stacy L; Paul, Sarah M; Van Voorhies, Wayne A; Beitel, Greg J; Palladino, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    Mutations affecting the Na(+), K(+) ATPase alpha subunit have been implicated in at least two distinct human diseases, rapid-onset dystonia Parkinsonism (RDP), and familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM). Over 40 mutations have been mapped to the human ATP1A2 and ATP1A3 genes and are known to result in RDP, FHM or a variant of FHM with neurological complications. To develop a genetically tractable model system for investigating the role of the Na(+), K(+) ATPase in neural pathologies we performed genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster to isolate loss-of-function alleles affecting the Na(+), K(+) ATPase alpha subunit. Flies heterozygous for these mutations all exhibit reduced respiration, consistent with a loss-of-function in the major ATPase. However, these mutations do not affect all functions of the Na(+), K(+) ATPase alpha protein since embryos homozygous for these mutations have normal septate junction paracellular barrier function and tracheal morphology. Importantly, all of these mutations cause neurological phenotypes and, akin to the mutations that cause RDP and FHM, these new alleles are missense mutations. All of these alleles exhibit progressive stress-induced locomotor impairment suggesting neuromuscular dysfunction, yet neurodegeneration is observed in an allele-specific manner. Surprisingly, studies of longevity demonstrate that mild hypomorphic mutations in the sodium pump significantly improve longevity, which was verified using the Na(+), K(+) ATPase antagonist ouabain. The isolation and characterization of a series of new missense alleles of ATPalpha in Drosophila provides the foundation for further studies of these neurological diseases and the role of sodium pump impairment in animal longevity.

  3. [Interobserver reliability of the Glasgow coma scale in critically ill patients with neurological and/or neurosurgical disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sánchez, M M; Sánchez-Izquierdo, R; Sánchez-Muñoz, E I; Martínez-Yegles, I; Fraile-Gamo, M P; Arias-Rivera, S

    2014-01-01

    The Glasgow coma scale (GCS) is a common tool used for neurological assessment of critically ill patients. Despite its widespread use, the GCS has some limitations, as sometimes different observers may value differently the same response. To evaluate the interobserver agreement, among intensive care nurses with a minimum of 3 years experience, both in the overall estimate of GCS and for each of its components. Prospective observational study including 110 neurological and/or neurosurgical patients conducted in a critical care unit of 18 beds, from October 2010 until December 2012. Registered variables: Demographic characteristics, reason for admission, overall GCS and its components. The neurological evaluation was conducted by a minimum of 3 nurses. One of them applied an algorithm and consensual assessment technique and all, independently, valued response to stimuli. Interobserver agreement was measured using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for a confidence interval (CI) of 95%. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee for Clinical Trails. The intraclass correlation coefficient (confident interval) for scale was: Overall GCS: 0.989 (0.985-0.992); ocular response: 0.981 (0.974-0.986); verbal response: 0.971 (0.960-0.979); motor response: 0.987 (0.982-0.991). In our cohort of patients we observed a high level of consistency in the application of both the GCS as in each of its components. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Vanishing bone disease of chest wall and spine with kyphoscoliosis and neurological deficit: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Kumar Srivastava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanishing bone disease is an extremely rare disorder of unknown etiology characterized by idiopathic osteolysis of bone. We describe a case of vanishing bone disease of chest wall and spine with kyphoscoliosis and neurological deficit. A 17-year-old male presented with gradually progressive deformity of back and dorsal compressive myelopathy with nonambulatory power in lower limbs. Radiographs revealed absent 4 th-7 th ribs on the right side with dorsal kyphoscoliosis and severe canal narrowing at the apex. The patient was given localized radiotherapy and started on a monthly infusion of 4 mg zoledronic acid. Posterior instrumented fusion with anterior reconstruction via posterolateral approach was performed. The patient had a complete neurological recovery at 5 weeks following surgery. At 1 year, anterior nonunion was noted for which transthoracic tricortical bone grafting was done. Bone graft from the patient′s mother was used both times. At 7 months following anterior grafting, the alignment was maintained and the patient was asymptomatic; however, fusion at graft-host interface was not achieved. Bisphosphonates and radiotherapy were successful in halting the progress of osteolysis.

  6. [Assessment of the influence of rehabilitation in patients treated in a hospital rehabilitation ward due to consequences of neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liwocha, Małgorzata; Galus, Krzysztof; Kozak-Szkopek, Elzbieta; Kowal, Roman

    2013-07-01

    THE AIM OF THE STUDY was evaluation effects of rehabilitation in patients with consequences of neurological diseases. The study was conducted in the hospital department of rehabilitation. The study involved group of 30 patients consisting of 12 men aged from 48 to 76 years (mean age 64.3 +/- 7.9), and 18 women aged from 45 to 82 years (mean age 65.4 +/- 13,2). These were patients mostly after stroke, multiple sclerosis or Parkinson's disease enrolled in rehabilitation. TESTS were performed before and after 21 days rehabilitation, using the following scales and ratings: Activities of Daily Living (ADL), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale (IADL), Scale Barthel, test Tinetti, Expanded "Get-Up-and-Go" Test (ETGUG) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). RESULTS. In men, the average number of points in the scale of ADL, IADL, Barthel increased statistically significant, the results obtained in the test Tinetti, ETGUG, GSD were changed not significant statistically. In women, the average number of points in the IADL scale, Barthel scale and GDS increased, and the test ETGUG were reduced, all statistically significant. The results of the scale ADL and test Tinetti, improved statistically not significant. CONCLUSIONS. The physical rehabilitation in patients with neurological consequences had a positive impact on the ability to perform simple and complex activities of daily living, physical and mental condition. ADL, IADL, Barthel scale, GDS, test Tinetti and ETGUG can be used for evaluation of rehabilitation results.

  7. Palliative care nursing for patients with neurological diseases: what makes the difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieplinger, Anna; Kundt, Firuzan Sari; Lorenzl, Stefan

    2017-03-23

    Neurodegenerative diseases progress slowly, creating increasing physical disability with unpredictable disease trajectories. The disease's life-threatening nature often places these patients in palliative care. There are several factors that complicate the care of patients with neurodegenerative diseases in palliative care units. Owing to physical impairments, there are many communication barriers between patients and staff. Nurses are not able to duplicate the patient's meticulous daily routine leading to caregiver mistrust in the nurse's competencies. Even if the patient is hospitalised, caregivers may not take the much-needed time off to recuperate. The placement of patients with neurodegenerative diseases in palliative care is confusing, since they rarely die during in-hospital treatment but might even get better due to multidisciplinary treatment. Finally, patients and caregivers lack adequate knowledge about disease progression and available help and support programmes. Patients with neurodegenerative diseases urgently need palliative care and nurses and caregivers need better preparation to appropriately deal with these diseases.

  8. Marcel Proust's diseases and doctors: the neurological story of a life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2007-01-01

    Marcel Proust (1871-1922), one of the greatest writers of all times, suffered from asthma beginning at age 9, in an era when the illness was considered a 'nervous' disorder belonging to what Beard, in 1870, called 'neurasthenia'. Proust's father, Adrien, was himself a professor of medicine (hygiene) who had met Charcot, and who contributed to neurology with studies on aphasia, stroke, hysteria, and neurasthenia - a condition about which he, along with Gilbert Ballet, published a book in 1897. Through his father, Proust met Edouard Brissaud, the co-founder of the Revue Neurologique in 1893, and, in 1896, the author of The Hygiene of the Asthmatics, with a foreword by Adrien Proust. Shortly after his mother's death in 1905, Proust contemplated admitting himself to a private hospital to reset his irregular sleep patterns and to improve his asthma. He hesitated in his choice of care between Jules Dejerine in Paris, Henry-Auguste Widmer at Valmont, and Paul Dubois in Bern. Finally, he decided to enter Paul Sollier's clinic, in Boulogne-sur-Seine, on the advice of Brissaud, and stayed there for 6 weeks in semi-isolation. Together with Babinski, Sollier was, at that time, considered the most gifted follower of Charcot. He was a forerunner of studies on emotional memory, which strongly influenced Proust. In Proust's opus magnum work In Search of Lost Time, 'involuntary memory' indeed forms the core mechanism of the entire novel, counterbalancing the decaying effects of time. A few years before his death from complicated bronchopneumonia at age 52, Proust became terrified of developing a stroke, like his mother and father, and he consulted with Joseph Babinski, who tried to reassure him. Proust's life followed an unusual neurological itinerary, which has been largely overlooked, but which is in fact critical for an understanding of his literary work.

  9. Functional neurological disorders: imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, V

    2014-10-01

    Functional neurological disorders, also known as conversion disorder, are unexplained neurological symptoms. These symptoms are common and can be associated with significant consequences. This review covers the neuroimaging literature focusing on functional motor symptoms including motor functioning and upstream influences including self-monitoring and internal representations, voluntariness and arousal and trauma. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  10. Physical activity behavior change in persons with neurologic disorders: overview and examples from Parkinson disease and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Terry; Motl, Robert W

    2013-06-01

    Persons with chronic progressive neurologic diseases such as Parkinson disease (PD) and multiple sclerosis (MS) face significant declines in mobility and activities of daily living, resulting in a loss of independence and compromised health-related quality of life over the course of the disease. Such undesirable outcomes can be attenuated through participation in exercise and physical activity, yet there is profound and prevalent physical inactivity in persons with PD and MS that may initiate a cycle of deconditioning and worsening of disease consequences, independent of latent disease processes. This Special Interest article highlights the accruing evidence revealing the largely sedentary behaviors common among persons living with physically disabling conditions and summarizes the evidence on the benefits of physical activity in persons with PD and MS. We then examine the social cognitive theory as an approach to identifying the primary active ingredients for behavioral change and, hence, the targets of interventions for increasing physical activity levels. The design and efficacies of interventions based on the social cognitive theory for increasing physical activity in persons with PD and MS are discussed. Finally, a rationale for adopting a secondary prevention approach to delivering physical therapy services is presented, with an emphasis on the integration of physical activity behavior change interventions into the care of persons with chronic, progressive disabilities over the course of the disease.Video Abstract available (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A42) for more insights from the authors.

  11. Neurological manifestations of autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer's disease: a comparison of the published literature with the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network observational study (DIAN-OBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mengxuan; Ryman, Davis C; McDade, Eric; Jasielec, Mateusz S; Buckles, Virginia D; Cairns, Nigel J; Fagan, Anne M; Goate, Alison; Marcus, Daniel S; Xiong, Chengjie; Allegri, Ricardo F; Chhatwal, Jasmeer P; Danek, Adrian; Farlow, Martin R; Fox, Nick C; Ghetti, Bernardino; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Laske, Christopher; Martins, Ralph N; Masters, Colin L; Mayeux, Richard P; Ringman, John M; Rossor, Martin N; Salloway, Stephen P; Schofield, Peter R; Morris, John C; Bateman, Randall J

    2016-12-01

    Autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer's disease (ADAD) is a rare disorder with non-amnestic neurological symptoms in some clinical presentations. We aimed to compile and compare data from symptomatic participants in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network observational study (DIAN-OBS) with those reported in the literature to estimate the prevalences of non-amnestic neurological symptoms in participants with ADAD. We prospectively collected data from the DIAN-OBS database, which recruited participants from study centres in the USA, Europe, and Australia, between Feb 29, 2008, and July 1, 2014. We also did a systematic review of publications to extract individual-level clinical data for symptomatic participants with ADAD. We used data for age of onset (from first report of cognitive decline), disease course from onset to death, and the presence of 13 neurological findings that have been reported in association with ADAD. Using multivariable linear regression, we investigated the prevalences of various non-amnestic neurological symptoms and the contributions of age of onset and specific mutation type on symptoms. The DIAN-OBS dataset included 107 individuals with detailed clinical data (forming the DIAN-OBS cohort). Our systematic review yielded 188 publications reporting on 1228 symptomatic individuals, with detailed neurological examination descriptions available for 753 individuals (forming the published data cohort). The most prevalent non-amnestic cognitive manifestations in participants in the DIAN-OBS cohort were those typical of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, including visual agnosia (55·1%, 95% CI 45·7-64·6), aphasia (57·9%, 48·6-67·3), and behavioural changes (61·7%, 51·5-70·0). Non-amnestic cognitive manifestations were less prevalent in the published data cohort (eg, visual agnosia [5·6%, 3·9-7·2], aphasia [23·0%, 20·0-26·0], and behavioural changes [31·7%, 28·4-35·1]). Prevalence of non-cognitive neurological manifestations in

  12. Avian vacuolar myelinopathy: a newly recognized fatal neurologic disease of eagles, waterfowl, and other birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, John R.; Lewis, L.A.; Augspurger, T.; Rocke, T.E.

    2002-01-01

    Wildlife biologists and health specialists have been frustrated by a long list of negative findings in their AVM investigations, however studies continue to provide pieces of information to aid the determination of the cause and its source. Available data indicated that AVM may have been present since at least 1990, occurs in at least five states, has been documented during October through April at sites of wintering populations of birds where the exposure apparently occurs, and has killed at least 90 bald eagles. Birds with AVM have difficulty or inability to fly, swim, walk, or perch, but there has been resolution of clinical signs in some affected coots. The list of affected species continues to grow, but remains confined to wild avians, including bald eagle, American coot, great horned owl, killdeer, Canada goose, mallard, ring-necked duck and bufflehead. The effects of the AVM agent on mammals, including human beings, are unknown. A neurotoxicant of manmade or natural origin is the suspected cause of AVM because no infectious disease agents, such as viruses, bacteria, parasites and prions, have been found, and the lesion and epizootiology of AVM resemble those of toxicoses. Additionally it is documented, experimentally, that exposure to raptors can occur through ingestion of infected coots. Collaborative studies will continue in the effort to identify the cause of AVM, its geographic distribution, and the range of species susceptibility. Hopefully, this information can be used to identify measures that might be taken to reduce the impact of AVM on the wildlife resource. Multiple agencies, institutions, and individuals must rely on each other's expertise in the multidisciplinary approach to this problem, persevere in their efforts and take advantage of serendipity that presents itself during investigations of this newly recognized cause of wild bird mortality.

  13. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cerebellar Purkinje cells incorporate immunoglobulins and immunotoxins in vitro: implications for human neurological disease and immunotherapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose John W

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies reactive with intracellular neuronal proteins have been described in paraneoplastic and other autoimmune disorders. Because neurons have been thought impermeable to immunoglobulins, however, such antibodies have been considered unable to enter neurons and bind to their specific antigens during life. Cerebellar Purkinje cells - an important target in paraneoplastic and other autoimmune diseases - have been shown in experimental animals to incorporate a number of molecules from cerebrospinal fluid. IgG has also been detected in Purkinje cells studied post mortem. Despite the possible significance of these findings for human disease, immunoglobulin uptake by Purkinje cells has not been demonstrated in living tissue or studied systematically. Methods To assess Purkinje cell uptake of immunoglobulins, organotypic cultures of rat cerebellum incubated with rat IgGs, human IgG, fluorescein-conjugated IgG, and rat IgM were studied by confocal microscopy in real time and following fixation. An IgG-daunorubicin immunotoxin was used to determine whether conjugation of pharmacological agents to IgG could be used to achieve Purkinje cell-specific drug delivery. Results IgG uptake was detected in Purkinje cell processes after 4 hours of incubation and in Purkinje cell cytoplasm and nuclei by 24-48 hours. Uptake could be followed in real time using IgG-fluorochrome conjugates. Purkinje cells also incorporated IgM. Intracellular immunoglobulin did not affect Purkinje cell viability, and Purkinje cells cleared intracellular IgG or IgM within 24-48 hours after transfer to media lacking immunoglobulins. The IgG-daunomycin immunotoxin was also rapidly incorporated into Purkinje cells and caused extensive, cell-specific death within 8 hours. Purkinje cell death was not produced by unconjugated daunorubicin or control IgG. Conclusion Purkinje cells in rat organotypic cultures incorporate and clear host (rat and non

  15. Program Director Survey: Attitudes Regarding Child Neurology Training and Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Ignacio; Feist, Terri B; Gilbert, Donald L

    2016-04-01

    As a result of major clinical and scientific advances and changes in clinical practice, the role of adult neurology training for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability (NDD) certification has become controversial. The most recently approved requirements for board eligibility for child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents still include 12 months in adult neurology rotations. The objective of this study was to assess United States child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residency program directors' opinions regarding optimal residency training. The authors developed an 18-item questionnaire and contacted all 80 child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors via e-mail, using SurveyMonkey. A total of 44 program directors responded (55%), representing programs that train 78 categorical and 94 total resident positions, approximately 70% of those filled in the match. Respondents identified multiple areas where child neurology residents need more training, including genetics and neuromuscular disease. A substantial majority (73%) believed child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents need less than 12 adult neurology training months; however, most (75%) also believed adult hospital service and man-power needs (55%) and finances (34%) would pose barriers to reducing adult neurology. Most (70%) believed reductions in adult neurology training should be program flexible. A majority believed the written initial certification examination should be modified with more child neurology and fewer basic neuroscience questions. Nearly all (91%) felt the views of child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors are under-represented within the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Residency Review Committee. The requirement for 12 adult neurology months for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability certification is not consistent with the views of the majority of program

  16. [Neurology in medieval regimina sanitatis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Frutos González, V; Guerrero Peral, A L

    2011-09-01

    In medical medieval literature some works about dietetics stand out. Dietetics, as a separate branch of medicine, includes not only food or drinks, but other environmental factors influencing on health. They are known as regimina sanitatis or salutis, and specially developed in the Christian west. They generally consisted of a balance between the Galenic "six non-natural things"; factors regulating health and its protection: environment, exercise, food, sleep, bowel movements and emotions. After reviewing the sources and defining the different stages of this genre, we have considered three of the most out-standing medieval regimina, the anonymous Regimen sanitatis salernitanum, Arnaldo de Vilanova's Regimen sanitatis ad regem aragonum and Bernardo de Gordon's Tractatus of conservatione vite humane. In them we review references to neurological disease. Though not independently considered, there is a significant presence of neurological diseases in the regimina. Dietetics measures are proposed to preserve memory, nerves, or hearing, as well as for the treatment of migraine, epilepsy, stroke or dizziness. Regimina are quiet representative among medical medieval literature, and they show medieval physicians vision of neurological diseases. Dietetics was considered useful to preserve health, and therapeutics was based on natural remedies. 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. [Aetiological classification of ischaemic strokes: comparison of the new A-S-C-O classification and the classification by the Spanish Society of Neurology's Cerebrovascular Disease Study Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino García, P; García Pastor, A; García Arratibel, A; Vicente Peracho, G; Rodriguez Cruz, P M; Pérez Sánchez, J R; Díaz Otero, F; Vázquez Alén, P; Villanueva Osorio, J A; Gil Núñez, A

    2013-09-01

    The A-S-C-O classification may be better than other methods for classifying ischaemic stroke by aetiology. Our aims are to describe A-S-C-O phenotype distribution (A: atherosclerosis, S: small vessel disease, C: cardiac source, O: other causes; 1: potential cause, 2: causality uncertain, 3: unlikely to be a direct cause although disease is present) and compare them to the Spanish Society of Neurology's Cerebrovascular Disease Study Group (GEECV/SEN) classification. We will also find the degree of concordance between these classification methods and determine whether using the A-S-C-O classification delivers a smaller percentage of strokes of undetermined cause. We analysed those patients with ischaemic stroke admitted to our stroke unit in 2010 with strokes that were classified according to GEECV/SEN and A-S-C-O criteria. The study included 496 patients. The percentages of strokes caused by atherosclerosis and small vessel disease according to GEECV/SEN criteria were higher than the percentages for potential atherosclerotic stroke (A1) (14.1 vs. 11.9%; P=.16) and potential small vessel stroke (S1) (14.3 vs. 3%; P0.8 (unusual causes and O1). Our results show that GEECV/SEN and A-S-C-O classifications are neither fully comparable nor consistent. Using the A-S-C-O classification provided additional information on co-morbidities and delivered a smaller percentage of strokes classified as having an undetermined cause. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. An Acoustic Study of the Relationships among Neurologic Disease, Dysarthria Type, and Severity of Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunjung; Kent, Raymond D.; Weismer, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined acoustic predictors of speech intelligibility in speakers with several types of dysarthria secondary to different diseases and conducted classification analysis solely by acoustic measures according to 3 variables (disease, speech severity, and dysarthria type). Method: Speech recordings from 107 speakers with…

  19. Virtual reality interface devices in the reorganization of neural networks in the brain of patients with neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo

    2014-04-15

    Two key characteristics of all virtual reality applications are interaction and immersion. Systemic interaction is achieved through a variety of multisensory channels (hearing, sight, touch, and smell), permitting the user to interact with the virtual world in real time. Immersion is the degree to which a person can feel wrapped in the virtual world through a defined interface. Virtual reality interface devices such as the Nintendo® Wii and its peripheral nunchuks-balance board, head mounted displays and joystick allow interaction and immersion in unreal environments created from computer software. Virtual environments are highly interactive, generating great activation of visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems during the execution of a video game. In addition, they are entertaining and safe for the user. Recently, incorporating therapeutic purposes in virtual reality interface devices has allowed them to be used for the rehabilitation of neurological patients, e.g., balance training in older adults and dynamic stability in healthy participants. The improvements observed in neurological diseases (chronic stroke and cerebral palsy) have been shown by changes in the reorganization of neural networks in patients' brain, along with better hand function and other skills, contributing to their quality of life. The data generated by such studies could substantially contribute to physical rehabilitation strategies.

  20. Virtual reality interface devices in the reorganization of neural networks in the brain of patients with neurological diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Two key characteristics of all virtual reality applications are interaction and immersion. Systemic interaction is achieved through a variety of multisensory channels (hearing, sight, touch, and smell), permitting the user to interact with the virtual world in real time. Immersion is the degree to which a person can feel wrapped in the virtual world through a defined interface. Virtual reality interface devices such as the Nintendo® Wii and its peripheral nunchuks-balance board, head mounted displays and joystick allow interaction and immersion in unreal environments created from computer software. Virtual environments are highly interactive, generating great activation of visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems during the execution of a video game. In addition, they are entertaining and safe for the user. Recently, incorporating therapeutic purposes in virtual reality interface devices has allowed them to be used for the rehabilitation of neurological patients, e.g., balance training in older adults and dynamic stability in healthy participants. The improvements observed in neurological diseases (chronic stroke and cerebral palsy) have been shown by changes in the reorganization of neural networks in patients’ brain, along with better hand function and other skills, contributing to their quality of life. The data generated by such studies could substantially contribute to physical rehabilitation strategies. PMID:25206907

  1. NEUROLOGIC MUSIC THERAPY TRAINING FOR MOBILITY AND STABILITY REHABILITATION WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE – A PILOT STUDY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A. Bukowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease (PD is a progressive condition with gait disturbance and balance disorder as the main symptoms. Previous research studies focused on the application of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS in PD gait rehabilitation. The key hypothesis of this pilot study, however, assumes the major role of the combination of all three Neurologic Music Therapy (NMT sensorimotor techniques in improving spatio-temporal gait parameters, and postural stability in the course of PD. The 55 PD-diagnosed subjects invited to the study were divided into two groups: 30 in the experimental and 25 in the control group. Inclusion criteria included Hoehn & Yahr stage 2 or 3, the ability to walk independently without any aid and stable pharmacological treatment for the duration of the experiment. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the chosen therapy procedure the following measures were applied: Optoelectrical 3D Movement Analysis System BTS Smart for gait, and Computerized Dynamic Posturography CQ Stab for stability and balance . All measures were conducted both before and after the therapy cycle. The subjects from the experimental group attended music therapy sessions 4 times a week for 4 weeks. Therapeutic Instrumental Music Performance (TIMP, Pattern Sensory Enhancement (PSE and Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS were used in every 45-minute session for practicing daily life activities, balance, pre-gait and gait pattern. Percussion instruments, the metronome and rhythmic music were the basis for each session. The subjects from the control group were asked to stay active and perform daily life activities between the measures. The research showed that the combination of the three NMT sensorimotor techniques can be used to improve gait and other rhythmical activities in PD rehabilitation.The results demonstrated significant improvement in the majority of the spatiotemporal gait parameters in the experimental group in comparison to the control

  2. Imaging spinal cord atrophy in progressive myelopathies: HTLV-I-associated neurological disease (HAM/TSP) and multiple sclerosis (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodi, Shila; Nair, Govind; Enose-Akahata, Yoshimi; Charlip, Emily; Vellucci, Ashley; Cortese, Irene; Dwyer, Jenifer; Billioux, B Jeanne; Thomas, Chevaz; Ohayon, Joan; Reich, Daniel S; Jacobson, Steven

    2017-11-01

    Previous work measures spinal cord thinning in chronic progressive myelopathies, including human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Quantitative measurements of spinal cord atrophy are important in fully characterizing these and other spinal cord diseases. We aimed to investigate patterns of spinal cord atrophy and correlations with clinical markers. Spinal cord cross-sectional area was measured in individuals (24 healthy controls [HCs], 17 asymptomatic carriers of HTLV-1 (AC), 47 HAM/TSP, 74 relapsing-remitting MS [RRMS], 17 secondary progressive MS [SPMS], and 40 primary progressive MS [PPMS]) from C1 to T10. Clinical disability scores, viral markers, and immunological parameters were obtained for patients and correlated with representative spinal cord cross-sectional area regions at the C2 to C3, C4 to C5, and T4 to T9 levels. In 2 HAM/TSP patients, spinal cord cross-sectional area was measured over 3 years. All spinal cord regions are thinner in HAM/TSP (56 mm2 [standard deviation, 10], 59 [10], 23 [5]) than in HC (76 [7], 83 [8], 38 [4]) and AC (71 [7], 78 [9], 36 [7]). SPMS (62 [9], 66 [9], 32 [6]) and PPMS (65 [11], 68 [10], 35 [7]) have thinner cervical cords than HC and RRMS (73 [9], 77 [10], 37 [6]). Clinical disability scores (Expanded Disability Status Scale [p = 0.009] and Instituto de Pesquisas de Cananeia [p = 0.03]) and CD8+ T-cell frequency (p = 0.04) correlate with T4 to T9 spinal cord cross-sectional area in HAM/TSP. Higher cerebrospinal fluid HTLV-1 proviral load (p = 0.01) was associated with thinner spinal cord cross-sectional area. Both HAM/TSP patients followed longitudinally showed thoracic thinning followed by cervical thinning. Group average spinal cord cross-sectional area in HAM/TSP and progressive MS show spinal cord atrophy. We further hypothesize in HAM/TSP that is possible that neuroglial loss from a thoracic inflammatory process

  3. Challenges facing palliative neurology practice: A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofton, T E; Chum, M; Schulz, V; Gofton, B T; Sarpal, A; Watling, C

    2018-02-15

    This study aimed to develop a conceptual understanding of the specific characteristics of palliative care in neurology and the challenges of providing palliative care in the setting of neurological illness. The study was conducted at London Health Sciences Centre in Canada using grounded theory methodology. Qualitative thematic analysis was applied to focus group (health care providers physicians, nursing, allied health, trainees) and semi-structured interview (patient-caregiver dyads) data to explore challenges facing the delivery of palliative care in neurology. Specific characteristics of neurological disease that affect palliative care in neurology were identified: 1) timelines of disease progression, 2) barriers to communication arising from neurologic disease, 3) variability across disease progression, and 4) threat to personhood arising from functional and cognitive impairments related to neurologic disease. Moreover, three key challenges that shaped and complicated palliative care in neurology were identified: 1) uncertainty with respect to prognosis, support availability and disease trajectory, 2) inconsistency in information, attitudes and skills among care providers, care teams, caregivers and families, and 3) existential distress specific to neurological disease, including emotional, psychological and spiritual distress resulting from loss of function, autonomy and death. These challenges were experienced across groups, but manifested themselves in different ways for each group. Further research regarding prognosis, improved identification of patients with palliative care needs, developing an approach to palliative care delivery within neurology and the creation of more robust educational resources for teaching palliative neurology are expected to improve neurologists' comfort with palliative care, thereby enhancing care delivery in neurology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells in neurological disease modeling: the importance of nonhuman primate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Z

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhifang Qiu,1,2 Steven L Farnsworth,2 Anuja Mishra,1,2 Peter J Hornsby1,21Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, TX, USA; 2Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USAAbstract: The development of the technology for derivation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells from human patients and animal models has opened up new pathways to the better understanding of many human diseases, and has created new opportunities for therapeutic approaches. Here, we consider one important neurological disease, Parkinson's, the development of relevant neural cell lines for studying this disease, and the animal models that are available for testing the survival and function of the cells, following transplantation into the central nervous system. Rapid progress has been made recently in the application of protocols for neuroectoderm differentiation and neural patterning of pluripotent stem cells. These developments have resulted in the ability to produce large numbers of dopaminergic neurons with midbrain characteristics for further study. These cells have been shown to be functional in both rodent and nonhuman primate (NHP models of Parkinson's disease. Patient-specific iPS cells and derived dopaminergic neurons have been developed, in particular from patients with genetic causes of Parkinson's disease. For complete modeling of the disease, it is proposed that the introduction of genetic changes into NHP iPS cells, followed by studying the phenotype of the genetic change in cells transplanted into the NHP as host animal, will yield new insights into disease processes not possible with rodent models alone.Keywords: Parkinson's disease, pluripotent cell differentiation, neural cell lines, dopaminergic neurons, cell transplantation, animal models

  5. A consensus review on the development of palliative care for patients with chronic and progressive neurological disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliver, D. J.; Borasio, G. D.; Caraceni, A.; de Visser, M.; Grisold, W.; Lorenzl, S.; Veronese, S.; Voltz, R.

    2016-01-01

    The European Association of Palliative Care Taskforce, in collaboration with the Scientific Panel on Palliative Care in Neurology of the European Federation of Neurological Societies (now the European Academy of Neurology), aimed to undertake a review of the literature to establish an evidence-based

  6. Sarcopenia or muscle modifications in neurologic diseases: a lexical or patophysiological difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carda, S; Cisari, C; Invernizzi, M

    2013-02-01

    Sarcopenia is a condition characterized by a decrease in muscle mass and function (strength and mobility) that is frequently observed in the elderly. In people with paresis and altered mobility due to central nervous system (CNS) diseases, this definition then may not be applicable. In CNS diseases, mainly stroke and spinal cord injury, different and specific patterns of muscle loss and muscle changes have been described, due to denervation, disuse atrophy, spasticity and myosteatosis. The main observations available about these phenomena in CNS diseases are reviewed, and a broad view on the specific physiopathological mechanisms is also described. Moreover, a description of the potential pharmacological targets and treatment strategies (physical and nutritional) is provided. Since sarcopenia of the elderly and muscle modifications and muscle atrophy in CNS diseases have different mechanisms, it is probable that they do not respond equally to the same treatments.

  7. Human papillomavirus vaccination of adult women and risk of autoimmune and neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hviid, A; Svanström, H; Scheller, N M; Grönlund, O; Pasternak, B; Arnheim-Dahlström, L

    2018-02-01

    Since 2006, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have been introduced in many countries worldwide. Whilst safety studies have been reassuring, focus has been on the primary target group, the young adolescent girls. However, it is also important to evaluate safety in adult women where background disease rates and safety issues could differ significantly. We took advantage of the unique Danish and Swedish nationwide healthcare registers to conduct a cohort study comparing incidence rate ratios (RRs) of 45 preselected serious chronic diseases in quadrivalent HPV (qHPV)-vaccinated and qHPV-unvaccinated adult women 18-44 years of age. We used Poisson regression to estimate RRs according to qHPV vaccination status with two-sided 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). The study cohort comprised 3 126 790 women (1 195 865 [38%] Danish and 1 930 925 [62%] Swedish) followed for 16 386 459 person-years. Vaccine uptake of at least one dose of qHPV vaccine was 8% in the cohort: 18% amongst Danish women and 2% amongst Swedish. We identified seven adverse events with statistically significant increased risks following vaccination-Hashimoto's thyroiditis, coeliac disease, localized lupus erythematosus, pemphigus vulgaris, Addison's disease, Raynaud's disease and other encephalitis, myelitis or encephalomyelitis. After taking multiple testing into account and conducting self-controlled case series analyses, coeliac disease (RR 1.56 [95% confidence interval 1.29-1.89]) was the only remaining association. Unmasking of conditions at vaccination visits is a plausible explanation for the increased risk associated with qHPV in this study because coeliac disease is underdiagnosed in Scandinavian populations. In conclusion, our study of serious adverse event rates in qHPV-vaccinated and qHPV-unvaccinated adult women 18-44 years of age did not raise any safety issues of concern. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  8. Epidemiology of neurological disorders in India: review of background, prevalence and incidence of epilepsy, stroke, Parkinson's disease and tremors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gourie-Devi, M

    2014-01-01

    ...). Prevalence and incidence rates of common disorders including epilepsy, stroke, Parkinson's disease and tremors determined through population-based surveys show considerable variation across different...

  9. Effect of screening abdominal ultrasound examination on the decision to pursue advanced diagnostic tests and treatment in dogs with neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, N M; Zwingenberger, A L; Blair, W H; Taylor, S L; Chen, R X; Sturges, B K

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal ultrasound examinations (AUS) are commonly performed before advanced neurodiagnostics to screen for diseases that might affect diagnostic plans and prognosis. Describe the type and frequency of abnormalities found by AUS in dogs presenting with a neurological condition, identify risk factors associated with abnormalities, and evaluate treatment decisions based on findings. Seven hundred and fifty-nine hospitalized dogs. Retrospective study. Medical records of dogs presented from 2007 to 2009 for neurologic disease were searched for signalment, neuroanatomic localization, and AUS findings. Whether dogs had advanced neurodiagnostics and treatment was analyzed. Fifty-eight percent of dogs had abnormal findings on AUS. Probability of abnormalities increased with age (P dogs did not have advanced neurodiagnostics and in 1.3%, this was because of abnormal AUS. Dogs with ultrasonographic abnormalities were less likely than dogs without to have advanced neurodiagnostics (OR = 0.3 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.17, 0.52]), however, the probability of performing advanced diagnostics was high regardless of normal (OR = 0.95 [95% CI: 0.92, 0.97]) or abnormal (OR = 0.85 [95% CI: 0.81, 0.88]) AUS. Treatment was more often pursued in small dogs and less often in dogs with brain disease. Findings from screening AUS had a small negative effect on the likelihood of pursuing advanced neurodiagnostics. Although it should be included in the extracranial diagnostic workup in dogs with significant history or physical examination abnormalities, AUS is considered a low-yield diagnostic test in young dogs and dachshunds. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. Searching for neurological diseases in the Julio-Claudian dynasty of the Roman Empire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ferreira; Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni

    2018-01-01

    The gens Julia was one of the oldest families in ancient Rome, whose members reached the highest positions of power. They made history because Julius Caesar, perpetual dictator, great-uncle of the first emperor, Augustus, passed his name on to the Julio-Claudian dynasty with the emperors Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius and Nero. Descriptions of the diseases of these emperors and some of his family members may indicate diagnoses such as epilepsy, dystonia, dementia, encephalitis, neurosyphilis, peripheral neuropathies, dyslexia, migraine and sleep disorders. In the historical context of ancient Rome, the possibility of infectious diseases related to the libertine way of life is quite large. However, there is a possibility that some of these diseases occurred from genetic transmission.

  11. A critical appraisal of the mild axonal peripheral neuropathy of late neurologic Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormser, Gary P; Strle, Franc; Shapiro, Eugene D; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Auwaerter, Paul G

    2017-02-01

    In older studies, a chronic distal symmetric sensory neuropathy was reported as a relatively common manifestation of late Lyme disease in the United States. However, the original papers describing this entity had notable inconsistencies and certain inexplicable findings, such as reports that this condition developed in patients despite prior antibiotic treatment known to be highly effective for other manifestations of Lyme disease. More recent literature suggests that this entity is seen rarely, if at all. A chronic distal symmetric sensory neuropathy as a manifestation of late Lyme disease in North America should be regarded as controversial and in need of rigorous validation studies before acceptance as a documented clinical entity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of vitamin D in the brain and related neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Yılmaz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is a steroid hormone that is produced photochemicallyin epidermis. It is known that vitamin D involvedin the regulation of bone mineralization and calcium-phosphorus balance. However, in recent studies havesuggested that vitamin D may have a significant impactin the development of the cell proliferation, differentiation,neurotransmission, neuroplasticity, neurotropic andneuroprotective effects in central nervous system (CNS.For the reason of the effects, it can be considered as aneurosteroid was reported. It was discussed that the levelof vitamin D may be associated to neurodegenerativediseases such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease,multiple sclerosis (MS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS. The role of vitamin D and the mechanisms ofthese diseases will be discussed in the review. J Clin ExpInvest 2013; 4 (3: 411-415Key words: Vitamin D, neurosteroid, brain, neurologicdiseases

  13. Antibodies against oligodendrocytes in serum and CSF in multiple sclerosis and other neurological diseases: /sup 125/I-protein A studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steck, A.J. (Department of Neurology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland); Link, H. (Department of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden)

    1984-01-01

    Antibodies against oligodendrocytes were determined in pairs of unconcentrated CSF serum from 12 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 25 control patients including 10 with aseptic meningoencephalitis (AM), using a /sup 125/I-protein A microassay. Antibody levels in serum and in CSF did not differ between MS and controls. Calculating the antibody index equal to (CSF/serum antibodies against oligodendrocytes):(CSF/serum albumin) in analogy to the CSF IgG index, thereby compensating for influence of serum antibody concentration as well as altered blood-brain barrier, no evidence was obtained for intrathecal antibody production in the patients with MS. Those with AM had higher antibody index values, probably reflecting intrathecal synthesis. Antibodies against oligodendrocytes seem to be regular component of CSF and serum in neurological diseases; intrathecal antibody production is less frequent in MS than in AM.

  14. HSV-1-Based Vectors for Gene Therapy of Neurological Diseases and Brain Tumors: Part I. HSV-1 Structure, Replication and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Jacobs

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The design of effective gene therapy strategies for brain tumors and other neurological disorders relies on the understanding of genetic and pathophysiological alterations associated with the disease, on the biological characteristics of the target tissue, and on the development of safe vectors and expression systems to achieve efficient, targeted and regulated, therapeutic gene expression. The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 virion is one of the most efficient of all current gene transfer vehicles with regard to nuclear gene delivery in central nervous system-derived cells including brain tumors. HSV-1-related research over the past decades has provided excellent insight into the structure and function of this virus, which, in turn, facilitated the design of innovative vector systems. Here, we review aspects of HSV-1 structure, replication and pathogenesis, which are relevant for the engineering of HSV-1-based vectors.

  15. The Role of TREM2 in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghmoor, Faris; Noorsaeed, Ahmed; Alsaggaf, Samar; Aljohani, Waleed; Scholtzova, Henrieta; Boutajangout, Allal; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia worldwide. Late-onset AD (LOAD), is the most common form of Alzheimer's disease, representing about >95% of cases and early-onset AD represents apolipoprotein (apo) E4 allele. Recently, rare variants of TREM2 have been reported as a significant risk factor for LOAD, comparable to inheritance of apoE4. In this review we will focus on the role(s) of TREM2 in AD as well as in other neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Reliability of EEG Interactions Differs between Measures and Is Specific for Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Höller

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Alterations of interaction (connectivity of the EEG reflect pathological processes in patients with neurologic disorders. Nevertheless, it is questionable whether these patterns are reliable over time in different measures of interaction and whether this reliability of the measures is the same across different patient populations. In order to address this topic we examined 22 patients with mild cognitive impairment, five patients with subjective cognitive complaints, six patients with right-lateralized temporal lobe epilepsy, seven patients with left lateralized temporal lobe epilepsy, and 20 healthy controls. We calculated 14 measures of interaction from two EEG-recordings separated by 2 weeks. In order to characterize test-retest reliability, we correlated these measures for each group and compared the correlations between measures and between groups. We found that both measures of interaction as well as groups differed from each other in terms of reliability. The strongest correlation coefficients were found for spectrum, coherence, and full frequency directed transfer function (average rho > 0.9. In the delta (2–4 Hz range, reliability was lower for mild cognitive impairment compared to healthy controls and left lateralized temporal lobe epilepsy. In the beta (13–30 Hz, gamma (31–80 Hz, and high gamma (81–125 Hz frequency ranges we found decreased reliability in subjective cognitive complaints compared to mild cognitive impairment. In the gamma and high gamma range we found increased reliability in left lateralized temporal lobe epilepsy patients compared to healthy controls. Our results emphasize the importance of documenting reliability of measures of interaction, which may vary considerably between measures, but also between patient populations. We suggest that studies claiming clinical usefulness of measures of interaction should provide information on the reliability of the results. In addition, differences between patient

  17. Factors influencing cerebrospinal fluid and plasma HIV-1 RNA detection rate in patients with and without opportunistic neurological disease during the HAART era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleixo Agdemir W

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the central nervous system, HIV replication can occur relatively independent of systemic infection, and intrathecal replication of HIV-1 has been observed in patients with HIV-related and opportunistic neurological diseases. The clinical usefulness of HIV-1 RNA detection in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with opportunistic neurological diseases, or the effect of opportunistic diseases on CSF HIV levels in patients under HAART has not been well defined. We quantified CSF and plasma viral load in HIV-infected patients with and without different active opportunistic neurological diseases, determined the characteristics that led to a higher detection rate of HIV RNA in CSF, and compared these two compartments. Methods A prospective study was conducted on 90 HIV-infected patients submitted to lumbar puncture as part of a work-up for suspected neurological disease. Seventy-one patients had active neurological diseases while the remaining 19 did not. Results HIV-1 RNA was quantified in 90 CSF and 70 plasma samples. The HIV-1 RNA detection rate in CSF was higher in patients with neurological diseases, in those with a CD4 count lower than 200 cells/mm3, and in those not receiving antiretroviral therapy, as well as in patients with detectable plasma HIV-1 RNA. Median viral load was lower in CSF than in plasma in the total population, in patients without neurological diseases, and in patients with toxoplasmic encephalitis, while no significant difference between the two compartments was observed for patients with cryptococcal meningitis and HIV-associated dementia. CSF viral load was lower in patients with cryptococcal meningitis and neurotoxoplasmosis under HAART than in those not receiving HAART. Conclusion Detection of HIV-1 RNA in CSF was more frequent in patients with neurological disease, a CD4 count lower than 200 cells/mm3 and detectable plasma HIV-1. Median HIV-1 RNA levels were generally lower in CSF than in

  18. New Perspectives in Nuclear Neurology for the Evaluation of Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benadiba, Marcel; Luurtsema, Gert; Tumas, Vitor; Buchpigel, Carlos Alberto; Busatto, Geraldo F.

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) has not yet been completely elucidated. However, during the past few years, significant progress has been made in understanding the intra- and extracellular mechanisms by which proteins such as alpha-synuclein and neuroinflammatory molecules may

  19. Bilateral high frequency subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease: long-term neurological follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romito, L. M.; Scerrati, M.; Contarino, M. F.; Iacoangeli, M.; Bentivoglio, A. R.; Albanese, A.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: High frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is gaining recognition as a new symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). The first available long-term observations show the stability of the efficacy of this procedure in time. METHODS: Quadripolar leads were implanted

  20. Comorbidity was associated with neurologic and psychiatric diseases: a general practice-based controlled study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuyen, J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Satariano, W.A.; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.; Birkner, M.D.; Bos, G.A.M. van den; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To comprehensively examine comorbidity in unselected cohorts of patients with depression, stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease/parkinsonism (PD/PKM), dementia, migraine, and epilepsy. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used morbidity data recorded by Dutch

  1. Neurology in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chong-Tin

    2015-02-10

    Asia is important as it accounts for more than half of the world population. The majority of Asian countries fall into the middle income category. As for cultural traditions, Asia is highly varied, with many languages spoken. The pattern of neurologic diseases in Asia is largely similar to the West, with some disease features being specific to Asia. Whereas Asia constitutes 60% of the world's population, it contains only 20% of the world's neurologists. This disparity is particularly evident in South and South East Asia. As for neurologic care, it is highly variable depending on whether it is an urban or rural setting, the level of economic development, and the system of health care financing. To help remedy the shortage of neurologists, most counties with larger populations have established training programs in neurology. These programs are diverse, with many areas of concern. There are regional organizations serving as a vehicle for networking in neurology and various subspecialties, as well as an official journal (Neurology Asia). The Asian Epilepsy Academy, with its emphasis on workshops in various locations, EEG certification examination, and fellowships, may provide a template of effective regional networking for improving neurology care in the region. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Rituximab in the treatment of three coexistent neurological autoimmune diseases: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, Morvan syndrome and myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadnicka, Anna; Reilly, Mary M; Mummery, Cath; Brandner, Sebastian; Hirsch, Nicholas; Lunn, Michael P T

    2011-02-01

    A 76-year-old man with a pre-existing diagnosis of myasthenia gravis was admitted to an intensive care unit with pneumonia and type II respiratory failure. In addition, muscle weakness, widespread myokymia, neuropsychiatric disturbance and autonomic disturbance were present. Antivoltage gated potassium channel antibodies, antistriated muscle antibodies and antiacetylcholine receptor antibodies were positive. Nerve-conduction studies demonstrated findings consistent with patchy demyelination. Electromyography confirmed widespread myokymia, and there was evidence of diffuse encephalopathy on electroencephalography. Diagnoses of Morvan syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (CIDP) were made. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange and high-dose steroids were ineffective, and the patient remained dependent on mechanical ventilation. The coexistence of possibly three humorally mediated autoimmune diseases led to treatment with rituximab. Rituximab treatment was followed by an improvement in muscle strength, allowing successful weaning from mechanical ventilation, diminution in myokymia and improved cognition. At follow-up, there was reversal of the neuropsychiatric manifestations and normal muscle strength. This case suggests that rituximab may be useful in the treatment of autoimmune neurological disease refractory to other immunosuppressant therapies. Specifically, it adds further evidence for the use of rituximab in CIDP. As indications for rituximab in humorally mediated disease continue to expand, international multicentre randomised controlled trials are required to prove the effectiveness of this important emerging biological agent.

  3. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 and coronavirus-induced neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinger, Jason G; Marro, Brett S; Hosking, Martin P; Lane, Thomas E

    2013-01-05

    Inoculation with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) into the central nervous system (CNS) of susceptible strains of mice results in an acute encephalomyelitis in which virus preferentially replicates within glial cells while excluding neurons. Control of viral replication during acute disease is mediated by infiltrating virus-specific T cells via cytokine secretion and cytolytic activity, however sterile immunity is not achieved and virus persists resulting in chronic neuroinflammation associated with demyelination. CXCR2 is a chemokine receptor that upon binding to specific ligands promotes host defense through recruitment of myeloid cells to the CNS as well as protecting oligodendroglia from cytokine-mediated death in response to MHV infection. These findings highlight growing evidence of the diverse and important role of CXCR2 in regulating neuroinflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aberrant functional connectome in neurologically asymptomatic patients with end-stage renal disease.

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    Xiaofen Ma

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the topological organization of intrinsic functional brain networks in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD.Resting-state functional MRI data were collected from 22 patients with ESRD (16 men, 18-61 years and 29 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs, 19 men, 32-61 years. Whole-brain functional networks were obtained by calculating the interregional correlation of low-frequency fluctuations in spontaneous brain activity among 1,024 parcels that cover the entire cerebrum. Weighted graph-based models were then employed to topologically characterize these networks at different global, modular and nodal levels.Compared to HCs, the patients exhibited significant disruption in parallel information processing over the whole networks (P < 0.05. The disruption was present in all the functional modules (default mode, executive control, sensorimotor and visual networks although decreased functional connectivity was observed only within the default mode network. Regional analysis showed that the disease disproportionately weakened nodal efficiency of the default mode components and tended to preferentially affect central or hub-like regions. Intriguingly, the network abnormalities correlated with biochemical hemoglobin and serum calcium levels in the patients. Finally, the functional changes were substantively unchanged after correcting for gray matter atrophy in the patients.Our findings provide evidence for the disconnection nature of ESRD's brain and therefore have important implications for understanding the neuropathologic substrate of the disease from disrupted network organization perspective.

  5. Blinded by the UV light: how the focus on transcription-coupled NER has distracted from understanding the mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, P J

    2013-08-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder, with growth abnormalities, progeriod features, and sun sensitivity. CS is typically considered to be a DNA repair disorder, since cells from CS patients have a defect in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER). However, cells from UV-sensitive syndrome patients also lack TC-NER, but these patients do not suffer from the neurologic and other abnormalities that CS patients do. Also, the neurologic abnormalities that affect CS patients (CS neurologic disease) are qualitatively different from those seen in NER-deficient XP patients. Therefore, the TC-NER defect explains the sun sensitive phenotype common to both CS and UVsS, but cannot explain CS neurologic disease. However, as CS neurologic disease is of much greater clinical significance than the sun sensitivity, there is a pressing need to understand its molecular basis. While there is evidence for defective repair of oxidative DNA damage and mitochondrial abnormalities in CS cells, here I propose that the defects in transcription by both RNA polymerases I and II that have been documented in CS cells provide a better explanation for many of the severe growth and neurodevelopmental defects in CS patients than defective DNA repair. The implications of these ideas for interpreting results from mouse models of CS, and for the development of treatments and therapies for CS patients are discussed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intravenous high-dose immunotherapy: practical recommendations for use in the treatment of neurological disimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Suponeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current publication summarizes main indications and benefits of intravenous high-dose immunotherapy (IHI in the treatment of various autoimmune diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Available products of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG on the Russian market are reviewed. Tactics for choosing optimal medication for IHI based on its effectiveness and safety are analyzed. Dosage calculation and way of administration of IVIG are described, beeing of a high practical value in neurologist’s daily work.

  8. [The indication of DBS in Parkinson' disease (from a neurological standpoint)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is currently the most common therapeutic surgical treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who have failed medical management. The percentage improvement in Unified Parkinson's disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II (activities of daily living) and III (motor) scores was more than 50%. Furthermore, levodopa-induced dyskinesias are dramatically improved because STN stimulation permits an approximately 50% reduction in antiparkinsonian treatment. How should we decide an appropriate candidate for DBS? It seems that there is a little difference about indication of DBS between neurosurgeons and neurologists. Since the efficacy of DBS is the improvement in dopaminergic drug-sensitive motor symptoms, we offer surgery to patients only when medical therapy has failed; (1) severe motor fluctuations, (2) severe dyskinesia, (3) tremor uncontrollable by medications, (4) painful dystonia, (5) side-effect for medication (drug-induced psychosis, nausea, vomitting). Taking account of contraindications is important to get successful outcome of the surgery. Dementia, cognitive deficits and psychosis (not drug-induced) are not improved by DBS. When patients are not able to see experienced doctors who manage in programming and dealing with postoperative problems, they are not appropriate candidates. Though benefit to mobility is evident, a risk-benefit assessment should to be made for each patient.

  9. STRESS AS PREDISPOSING FACTOR OF SOME CHRONIC DISEASES INCLUDING PERIODONTAL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi-Nurul M Dewi-Nurul

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Stress is hypothesized as a common pathway for several related chronic diseases of man. Psychosocial stress as modified by perceptions and coping by patients can lead to physical processes. Psychoneuroimmunologic (PNI studies have suggested that psychosocial stress can alter immune function and increase vulnerability to illnesses. The patients also have high sensitivity to periodontal disease (PD. This article describes the association of stress as a physiological response to diseases such as PD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and inflammatory bowel disease. The psychosocial stress can lead to physiological processes through 1 the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis leading to glucocortico-steroid secretion; 2 the autonomic nervous system, resulting in the release of catecholamine; or 3 the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, resulting in the release of sex hormones. These processes may affect chronic diseases. It can be concluded that psychosocial stress in periodontal disease patients must be considered and social support must be provided in order to achieve an optimum periodontal therapy result.

  10. Coping with chronic neurological impairment: a contrastive analysis of Parkinson's disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, M; Freyholdt, U; Fuchs, G; Wallesch, C W

    1997-01-01

    This study aimed at a contrastive analysis of coping strategies and psychosocial alterations in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and stroke (CVA) and their relatives. Fifty-four PD and 50 CVA patients were investigated with a standardized semistructured interview to assess the severity of psychosocial changes following illness, the Freiburg Questionnaire on Coping with Illness, the Cornell Depression Scale and instruments to assess motor impairment. Psychosocial alterations were most prominent in the professional and emotional-cognitive domains. Degree of depression correlated with familial and emotional-cognitive alterations in both patient groups. Active problem-oriented coping and distraction predominated as coping styles. Religious relief and quest for sense were significantly more important for the PD patients. Coping styles did not correlate with degrees of depression, motor impairment or psychosocial alterations.

  11. The neurological effects of ghrelin in brain diseases: Beyond metabolic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qian; Du, Xixun; Li, Yong; Gong, Bing; Shi, Limin; Tang, Tingting; Jiang, Hong

    2017-02-01

    Ghrelin, a peptide released by the stomach that plays a major role in regulating energy metabolism, has recently been shown to have effects on neurobiological behaviors. Ghrelin enhances neuronal survival by reducing apoptosis, alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress, and accordingly improving mitochondrial function. Ghrelin also stimulates the proliferation, differentiation and migration of neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs). Additionally, the ghrelin is benefit for the recovery of memory, mood and cognitive dysfunction after stroke or traumatic brain injury. Because of its neuroprotective and neurogenic roles, ghrelin may be used as a therapeutic agent in the brain to combat neurodegenerative disease. In this review, we highlight the pre-clinical evidence and the proposed mechanisms underlying the role of ghrelin in physiological and pathological brain function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of disabilities of parkinsons disease patients in neurology ward of Shohaday-e-Ashayer hospital and private neurology clinics in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    parviz Bahrami

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that motor and non motor abnormalities are common in PD. Disability is influenced by factors such as age, duration of disease and treatment. Hence, diagnosis and treatment of PD should be considered before onset of disabilities.

  13. Cortical interneurons from human pluripotent stem cells: prospects for neurological and psychiatric disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Edward Arber

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical interneurons represent 20% of the cells in the cortex. These cells are local inhibitory neurons whose function is to modulate the firing activities of the excitatory projection neurons. Cortical interneuron dysfunction is believed to lead to runaway excitation underlying (or implicated in seizure-based diseases, such as epilepsy, autism and schizophrenia. The complex development of this cell type and the intricacies involved in defining the relative subtypes are being increasingly well defined. This has led to exciting experimental cell therapy in model organisms, whereby fetal-derived interneuron precursors can reverse seizure severity and reduce mortality in adult epileptic rodents. These proof-of-principle studies raise hope for potential interneuron-based transplantation therapies for treating epilepsy. On the other hand, cortical neurons generated from patient iPSCs serve as a valuable tool to explore genetic influences of interneuron development and function. This is a fundamental step in enhancing our understanding of the molecular basis of neuropsychiatric illnesses and the development of targeted treatments. Protocols are currently being developed for inducing cortical interneuron subtypes from mouse and human pluripotent stem cells. This review sets out to summarize the progress made in cortical interneuron development, fetal tissue transplantation and the recent advance in stem cell differentiation towards interneurons.

  14. A High-Performance Multiplex Immunoassay for Serodiagnosis of Flavivirus-Associated Neurological Diseases in Horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Beck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV, and tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV are flaviviruses responsible for severe neuroinvasive infections in humans and horses. The confirmation of flavivirus infections is mostly based on rapid serological tests such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs. These tests suffer from poor specificity, mainly due to antigenic cross-reactivity among flavivirus members. Robust diagnosis therefore needs to be validated through virus neutralisation tests (VNTs which are time-consuming and require BSL3 facilities. The flavivirus envelope (E glycoprotein ectodomain is composed of three domains (D named DI, DII, and DIII, with EDIII containing virus-specific epitopes. In order to improve the serological differentiation of flavivirus infections, the recombinant soluble ectodomain of WNV E (WNV.sE and EDIIIs (rEDIIIs of WNV, JEV, and TBEV were synthesised using the Drosophila S2 expression system. Purified antigens were covalently bonded to fluorescent beads. The microspheres coupled to WNV.sE or rEDIIIs were assayed with about 300 equine immune sera from natural and experimental flavivirus infections and 172 nonimmune equine sera as negative controls. rEDIII-coupled microspheres captured specific antibodies against WNV, TBEV, or JEV in positive horse sera. This innovative multiplex immunoassay is a powerful alternative to ELISAs and VNTs for veterinary diagnosis of flavivirus-related diseases.

  15. A High-Performance Multiplex Immunoassay for Serodiagnosis of Flavivirus-Associated Neurological Diseases in Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Cécile; Desprès, Philippe; Paulous, Sylvie; Vanhomwegen, Jessica; Lowenski, Steeve; Nowotny, Norbert; Durand, Benoit; Garnier, Annabelle; Blaise-Boisseau, Sandra; Guitton, Edouard; Yamanaka, Takashi; Zientara, Stéphan; Lecollinet, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) are flaviviruses responsible for severe neuroinvasive infections in humans and horses. The confirmation of flavivirus infections is mostly based on rapid serological tests such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). These tests suffer from poor specificity, mainly due to antigenic cross-reactivity among flavivirus members. Robust diagnosis therefore needs to be validated through virus neutralisation tests (VNTs) which are time-consuming and require BSL3 facilities. The flavivirus envelope (E) glycoprotein ectodomain is composed of three domains (D) named DI, DII, and DIII, with EDIII containing virus-specific epitopes. In order to improve the serological differentiation of flavivirus infections, the recombinant soluble ectodomain of WNV E (WNV.sE) and EDIIIs (rEDIIIs) of WNV, JEV, and TBEV were synthesised using the Drosophila S2 expression system. Purified antigens were covalently bonded to fluorescent beads. The microspheres coupled to WNV.sE or rEDIIIs were assayed with about 300 equine immune sera from natural and experimental flavivirus infections and 172 nonimmune equine sera as negative controls. rEDIII-coupled microspheres captured specific antibodies against WNV, TBEV, or JEV in positive horse sera. This innovative multiplex immunoassay is a powerful alternative to ELISAs and VNTs for veterinary diagnosis of flavivirus-related diseases. PMID:26457301

  16. The timed inspiratory effort: a promising index of mechanical ventilation weaning for patients with neurologic or neuromuscular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Leonardo Cordeiro; Guimarães, Fernando Silva; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the recently described timed inspiratory effort (TIE) index in comparison with 4 other previously reported indices as to the weaning outcome in patients with neurologic or neuromuscular disorders. This observational prospective study included subjects undergoing weaning from mechanical ventilation. The performance of the indices was evaluated by calculation of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves. The areas under the curve were compared using the Hanley and McNeil method. P values<.05 were considered significant. Seventy-two subjects (57±20 y old) were selected for the study. Forty-three subjects were weaned, and 21 died during the study period. The mean duration of mechanical ventilation was 22.3±19.4 d. The areas under the curve of 5 weaning predictors (TIE index, integrative weaning index, noninvasive tension-time index, maximum inspiratory pressure, and breathing frequency/tidal volume index) were significantly higher than those of the other indices. The TIE index had the largest area under the curve (0.96±0.02) in comparison with the integrative weaning index (0.82±0.05, P=.009), noninvasive tension-time index (0.80±0.05, P=.001), maximum inspiratory pressure (0.77±0.06, P=.001), and breathing frequency/tidal volume index (0.72±0.06, P=.001). In patients with neurologic or neuromuscular impairment, the TIE index had a better performance than the best weaning indices used in clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  17. Practice Parameter: treatment of nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease: report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesiewicz, T A; Sullivan, K L; Arnulf, I; Chaudhuri, K R; Morgan, J C; Gronseth, G S; Miyasaki, J; Iverson, D J; Weiner, W J

    2010-03-16

    Nonmotor symptoms (sleep dysfunction, sensory symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, mood disorders, and cognitive abnormalities) in Parkinson disease (PD) are a major cause of morbidity, yet are often underrecognized. This evidence-based practice parameter evaluates treatment options for the nonmotor symptoms of PD. Articles pertaining to cognitive and mood dysfunction in PD, as well as treatment of sialorrhea with botulinum toxin, were previously reviewed as part of American Academy of Neurology practice parameters and were not included here. A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index was performed to identify clinical trials in patients with nonmotor symptoms of PD published between 1966 and August 2008. Articles were classified according to a 4-tiered level of evidence scheme and recommendations were based on the level of evidence. Sildenafil citrate (50 mg) may be considered to treat erectile dysfunction in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) (Level C). Macrogol (polyethylene glycol) may be considered to treat constipation in patients with PD (Level C). The use of levodopa/carbidopa probably decreases the frequency of spontaneous nighttime leg movements, and should be considered to treat periodic limb movements of sleep in patients with PD (Level B). There is insufficient evidence to support or refute specific treatments for urinary incontinence, orthostatic hypotension, and anxiety (Level U). Future research should include concerted and interdisciplinary efforts toward finding treatments for nonmotor symptoms of PD.

  18. [Neurological features of decision-making deficit: Korinai syndrome in Parkinson disease and fearlessness in dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Makoto

    2012-10-01

    For patients with Parkinson disease, falls are generally attributed to postural instability. However, closer examination often shows that parkinsonian patients tend to keep falling at the same spot in their home on performing the same actions such as standing up from a chair, starting to walk, or turning at the corner and hitting the same part of the head. Each time the patients fall, their treating physicians explain the reasons for falling and tell them how to avoid falls in daily life. In spite of the repeated advice given by physicians, these patients fall in the same manner and location. When physicians question them regarding the reason for repeating the same risky actions that they had been asked to avoid, the patients answer that they clearly remembered their physician's advice but had thought that they would be able to successfully accomplish the risky actions at that time. Thus, it seems that this type of fall is partly caused by decision-making deficit. Negative-reward motor learning is known to be defective in parkinsonian patients who are being treated with dopamine agonists and are liable to indulge in risky behavior and tend to be involved in pathological gambling. The behavioral abnormalities that are caused by defective decision making and are common to pathological gambling and repeated falling in parkinsonian patients could be termed as "Korinai syndrome, " which means "syndrome involving the inability to learn by experience." In contrast, patients with dementia often show loss of fear reaction, which may result in the life-threatening inability to perceive crises. The present author performed a series of studies just after the Great East Japan Earthquake in March 2011; these studies were based on the behavior of patients with dementia during this large earthquake. The results showed that both intellectually normal elderly people and patients with mild dementia had shown evident fear reactions and could remember their own fearful experience

  19. Absence of A673T amyloid-β precursor protein variant in Alzheimer's disease and other neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Simon Kang Seng; Chong, Mei-Sian; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Hameed, Shahul; Tan, Louis; Au, Wing-Lok; Prakash, Kumar M; Pavanni, Ratnagopal; Lee, Tih-Shih; Foo, Jia-Nee; Bei, Jin-Xin; Yu, Xue-Qing; Liu, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Yi; Lee, Wei-Ling; Tan, Eng-King

    2013-10-01

    The rare variant A673T in the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) gene has been shown to reduce the risk of cognitive impairment. We genotyped the variant in 8721 Asian individuals comprising 552 with Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, 790 with Parkinson's disease, and 7379 controls. The A673T variant was absent in all of the subjects. Our finding suggests that the A673T protective variant is not relevant in our Asian population. Studies in other ethnic populations would clarify whether this variant is specific to specific races/ethnicities. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  1. Aluminum-Induced Entropy in Biological Systems: Implications for Neurological Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Shaw

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 200 years, mining, smelting, and refining of aluminum (Al in various forms have increasingly exposed living species to this naturally abundant metal. Because of its prevalence in the earth’s crust, prior to its recent uses it was regarded as inert and therefore harmless. However, Al is invariably toxic to living systems and has no known beneficial role in any biological systems. Humans are increasingly exposed to Al from food, water, medicinals, vaccines, and cosmetics, as well as from industrial occupational exposure. Al disrupts biological self-ordering, energy transduction, and signaling systems, thus increasing biosemiotic entropy. Beginning with the biophysics of water, disruption progresses through the macromolecules that are crucial to living processes (DNAs, RNAs, proteoglycans, and proteins. It injures cells, circuits, and subsystems and can cause catastrophic failures ending in death. Al forms toxic complexes with other elements, such as fluorine, and interacts negatively with mercury, lead, and glyphosate. Al negatively impacts the central nervous system in all species that have been studied, including humans. Because of the global impacts of Al on water dynamics and biosemiotic systems, CNS disorders in humans are sensitive indicators of the Al toxicants to which we are being exposed.

  2. Neurology and diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Correction of an amyotrophic dorsal face of hands due to neurological disease with autologous fat cells transplant: An original case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffenach, L; Gouzou, S; Liverneaux, P; Bruant Rodier, C; Bodin, F

    2017-06-01

    Autologous fat grafting allows the correction of many volume defects whether natural or post-traumatic. In hand surgery, the most common indication is the rejuvenation of the dorsal aspect of the hands. We present, here, an original case of amyotrophic hands lipofilling due to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. The patient had a bilateral and asymmetric amyotrophy of the intermetacarpal spaces responsible of a social handicap. Autologous fat grafting, according to Coleman's procedure, was done at the dorsal aspect of the two hands, three years apart. The adipocyte cells were taken on the medial side of the thighs, knees and on the abdomen. Five and eight years after the procedure, the results were evaluated with satisfactory results for the patient and the surgeon. Autologous fat grafting allowed the filling of the intermetacarpal spaces which last over time. The satisfaction rate was high in the patient and the surgeon. Autologous fat cells give an aesthetic correction of neurological amyotrophic hands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Antidepressants in Parkinson's disease. Recommendations by the movement disorder study group of the Neurological Association of Madrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, E; Mata, M; López-Manzanares, L; Kurtis, M; Eimil, M; Martínez-Castrillo, J C; Navas, I; Posada, I J; Prieto, C; Ruíz-Huete, C; Vela, L; Venegas, B

    2016-03-19

    Although antidepressants are widely used in Parkinson's disease (PD), few well-designed studies to support their efficacy have been conducted. These clinical guidelines are based on a review of the literature and the results of an AMN movement disorder study group survey. Evidence suggests that nortriptyline, venlafaxine, paroxetine, and citalopram may be useful in treating depression in PD, although studies on paroxetine and citalopram yield conflicting results. In clinical practice, however, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are usually considered the treatment of choice. Duloxetine may be an alternative to venlafaxine, although the evidence for this is less, and venlafaxine plus mirtazapine may be useful in drug-resistant cases. Furthermore, citalopram may be indicated for the treatment of anxiety, atomoxetine for hypersomnia, trazodone and mirtazapine for insomnia and psychosis, and bupropion for apathy. In general, antidepressants are well tolerated in PD. However, clinicians should consider the anticholinergic effect of tricyclic antidepressants, the impact of serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors on blood pressure, the extrapyramidal effects of antidepressants, and any potential interactions between monoamine oxidase B inhibitors and other antidepressants. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Lack of interleukin-1 type 1 receptor enhances the accumulation of mutant huntingtin in the striatum and exacerbates the neurological phenotypes of Huntington's disease mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chuan-En

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Huntington's disease results from expansion of a glutamine repeat (>36 glutamines in the N-terminal region of huntingtin (htt and is characterized by preferential neurodegeneration in the striatum of the brain. N171-82Q mice that express N-terminal 171 amino acids of htt with an 82-glutamine repeat show severe neurological phenotypes and die early, suggesting that N-terminal mutant htt is pathogenic. In addition, various cellular factors and genetic modifiers are found to modulate the cytotoxicity of mutant htt. Understanding the contribution of these factors to HD pathogenesis will help identify therapeutics for this disease. To investigate the role of interleukin type 1 (IL-1, a cytokine that has been implicated in various neurological diseases, in HD neurological symptoms, we crossed N171-82Q mice to type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1RI knockout mice. Mice lacking IL-1RI and expressing N171-82Q show more severe neurological symptoms than N171-82Q or IL-1RI knockout mice, suggesting that lack of IL-1RI can promote the neuronal toxicity of mutant htt. Lack of IL-1RI also increases the accumulation of transgenic mutant htt in the striatum in N171-82Q mice. Since IL-1RI signaling mediates both toxic and protective effects on neurons, its basal function and protective effects may be important for preventing the neuropathology seen in HD.

  6. Perioperative Management of Neurological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet Singh Dhallu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative care of the patients with neurological diseases can be challenging. Most important consideration is the management and understanding of pathophysiology of these disorders and evaluation of new neurological changes that occur perioperatively. Perioperative generally refers to 3 phases of surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. We have tried to address few commonly encountered neurological conditions in clinical practice, such as delirium, stroke, epilepsy, myasthenia gravis, and Parkinson disease. In this article, we emphasize on early diagnosis and management strategies of neurological disorders in the perioperative period to minimize morbidity and mortality of patients.

  7. Migraine- and dystonia-related disease-mutations of Na+/K+-ATPases: Relevance of behavioral studies in mice to disease symptoms and neurological manifestations in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttger, Pernille; Doganli, Canan; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The two autosomal dominantly inherited neurological diseases: familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2) and familial rapid-onset of dystonia-parkinsonism (Familial RDP) are caused by in vivo mutations of specific alpha subunits of the sodium–potassium pump (Na+/K+-ATPase). Intriguingly, patients...... patient symptoms and manifestations. Thus, it is interesting that mouse models targeting a specific -isoform cause different, although still comparable, phenotypes consistent with classical symptoms and other manifestations observed in FHM2 and RDP patients. This review highlights that use of mouse models...... with classical FHM2 and RDP symptoms additionally suffer from other manifestations, such as epilepsy/seizures and developmental disabilities. Recent studies of FHM2 and RDP mouse models provide valuable tools for dissecting the vital roles of the Na+/K+-ATPases, and we discuss their relevance to the complex...

  8. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Orbital Frontal Cortex in Rats Following Extended Exposure to Caffeine Reveals Extensive Changes to Protein Expression: Implications for Neurological Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Jane L; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Wearne, Travis A; Homewood, Judi; Goodchild, Ann K; Haynes, Paul A; Cornish, Jennifer L

    2016-05-06

    Caffeine is a plant-derived psychostimulant and a common additive found in a wide range of foods and pharmaceuticals. The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is rapidly activated by flavours, integrates gustatory and olfactory information, and plays a critical role in decision-making, with dysfunction contributing to psychopathologies and neurodegenerative conditions. This study investigated whether long-term consumption of caffeine causes changes to behavior and protein expression in the OFC. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8 per group) were treated for 26 days with either water or a 0.6 g/L caffeine solution. Locomotor behavior was measured on the first and last day of treatment, then again after 9 days treatment free following exposure to a mild stressor. When tested drug free, caffeine-treated animals were hyperactive compared to controls. Two hours following final behavioral testing, brains were rapidly removed and prepared for proteomic analysis of the OFC. Label free shotgun proteomics found 157 proteins differentially expressed in the caffeine-drinking rats compared to control. Major proteomic effects were seen for cell-to-cell communication, cytoskeletal regulation, and mitochondrial function. Similar changes have been observed in neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia.

  9. Practice parameter: treatment of nervous system Lyme disease (an evidence-based review): report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, J J; Shapiro, E D; Logigian, E; Belman, A L; Dotevall, L; Wormser, G P; Krupp, L; Gronseth, G; Bever, C T

    2007-07-03

    To provide evidence-based recommendations on the treatment of nervous system Lyme disease and post-Lyme syndrome. Three questions were addressed: 1) Which antimicrobial agents are effective? 2) Are different regimens preferred for different manifestations of nervous system Lyme disease? 3) What duration of therapy is needed? The authors analyzed published studies (1983-2003) using a structured review process to classify the evidence related to the questions posed. The panel reviewed 353 abstracts which yielded 112 potentially relevant articles that were reviewed, from which 37 articles were identified that were included in the analysis. There are sufficient data to conclude that, in both adults and children, this nervous system infection responds well to penicillin, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, and doxycycline (Level B recommendation). Although most studies have used parenteral regimens for neuroborreliosis, several European studies support use of oral doxycycline in adults with meningitis, cranial neuritis, and radiculitis (Level B), reserving parenteral regimens for patients with parenchymal CNS involvement, other severe neurologic symptomatology, or failure to respond to oral regimens. The number of children (> or =8 years of age) enrolled in rigorous studies of oral vs parenteral regimens has been smaller, making conclusions less statistically compelling. However, all available data indicate results are comparable to those observed in adults. In contrast, there is no compelling evidence that prolonged treatment with antibiotics has any beneficial effect in post-Lyme syndrome (Level A).

  10. Population-based epidemiological study of neurological diseases in Taiwan: I. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chien-Hsu; Tseng, Hung-Fu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the epidemiology of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and multiple sclerosis (MS) in Taiwan. Cases of CJD and MS were identified from the National Health Insurance Research Database from January 2000 to December 2005. Age- and sex-specific incidences of these diseases were estimated by dividing the incidence number by population data obtained from the Department of Statistics, Ministry of the Interior. During the study period, 79 cases of CJD, 41 women and 38 men, were identified. The average annual incidence rate was 0.63/million. Most cases were older than 60 years. There were 1,262 cases of MS. The male-to-female ratio was 0.4. The average annual incidence rate was 0.79/100,000. The incidence reached a peak at the age group of 40-60 years for females and at the age group of over 55 years for males. The prevalence of MS was 2.96/100,000 in 2005, which is higher than those of previous studies in Taiwan. The annual incidence rate of CJD in Taiwan is lower than in western countries. The annual incidence rate and prevalence of MS in Taiwan are low. The prevalence of MS in Taiwan increased in recent decades. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. A rare case of Niemann–Pick disease type C without neurological involvement in a 66-year-old patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. Greenberg

    2015-06-01

    Synopsis: An elderly female patient with confirmed NP-C and isolated splenomegaly has remained asymptomatic for neurological, cognitive, psychiatric or ophthalmologic abnormailities into her seventh decade of life.

  12. Towards Therapeutic Applications of Arthropod Venom K+-Channel Blockers in CNS Neurologic Diseases Involving Memory Acquisition and Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Christiano D. C. Gati; Mortari, Márcia R.; Elisabeth F Schwartz

    2012-01-01

    Potassium channels are the most heterogeneous and widely distributed group of ion channels and play important functions in all cells, in both normal and pathological mechanisms, including learning and memory processes. Being fundamental for many diverse physiological processes, K+-channels are recognized as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of several Central Nervous System (CNS) diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, schizophrenia, HIV-1-asso...

  13. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  14. Progress in gene therapy for neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonato, Michele; Bennett, Jean; Boulis, Nicholas M; Castro, Maria G; Fink, David J; Goins, William F; Gray, Steven J; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Wilson, Thomas J; Wolfe, John H; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2013-05-01

    Diseases of the nervous system have devastating effects and are widely distributed among the population, being especially prevalent in the elderly. These diseases are often caused by inherited genetic mutations that result in abnormal nervous system development, neurodegeneration, or impaired neuronal function. Other causes of neurological diseases include genetic and epigenetic changes induced by environmental insults, injury, disease-related events or inflammatory processes. Standard medical and surgical practice has not proved effective in curing or treating these diseases, and appropriate pharmaceuticals do not exist or are insufficient to slow disease progression. Gene therapy is emerging as a powerful approach with potential to treat and even cure some of the most common diseases of the nervous system. Gene therapy for neurological diseases has been made possible through progress in understanding the underlying disease mechanisms, particularly those involving sensory neurons, and also by improvement of gene vector design, therapeutic gene selection, and methods of delivery. Progress in the field has renewed our optimism for gene therapy as a treatment modality that can be used by neurologists, ophthalmologists and neurosurgeons. In this Review, we describe the promising gene therapy strategies that have the potential to treat patients with neurological diseases and discuss prospects for future development of gene therapy.

  15. ANALYTICAL JUSTIFICATION OF INCLUDING THE ANTIVIRAL DRUG INTO TREATMENT SCHEME FOR PATIENTS WITH SUSPECTED VIRAL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soloviov S. O

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Viruses play a leading role in human pathology development, causing a large number of infectious diseases in acute, persistent or chronic forms. Although the number of deaths caused by viral infections have decreased significantly today, they continue to be a significant factor in reducing of the population overall productivity. Viral diseases cause additional losses in community related to the duration of the course or disease or its chronization, increased use of health care, loss of working hours, premature death etc. Introduction of the new antiviral drugs into medical practice is accompanied by the emergence of questions to assess its effectiveness and including into existing clinical protocols. So the aim of this work is the development of methodology of choosing and justification of optimal treatment strategy for viral diseases that could be included into certain clinical protocols for managing patients with certain viral diseases. Methodology justification: The methodology based on the method of pharmacoeconomic analysis "cost of illness", takes into account the economic burden of viral diseases: direct costs for treating of disease, indirect costs related to the disease and intangible costs. Algorithm of treatment scheme choice depends on the cost of treatment for the patient without viral disease also as for patient with viral disease. It was proposed to use lower limit priori probability (critical prevalence of viral disease as decision rule in the choice of treatment scheme. Results: Examples of the proposed methodology use show that the choice of the optimal therapeutic scheme for patients with suspected viral disease depends on the current prevalence of this disease among patients with similar clinical symptoms of the disease and its cost, depending on the chosen strategy of therapy. The proposed methodology determines the critical level of viral infection prevalence, which comparing to the current prevalence level is

  16. β-Carboline Alkaloids and Essential Tremor: Exploring the Environmental Determinants of One of the Most Prevalent Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elan D. Louis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential tremor (ET is among the most prevalent neurological diseases, yet its etiology is not well understood. Susceptibility genotypes undoubtedly underlie many ET cases, although no genes have been identified thus far. Environmental factors are also likely to contribute to the etiology of ET. Harmane (1-methyl-9H-pyrido[3,4-β]indole is a potent, tremor-producing β-carboline alkaloid, and emerging literature has provided initial links between this neurotoxin and ET. In this report, we review this literature. Two studies, both in New York, have demonstrated higher blood harmane levels in ET cases than controls and, in one study, especially high levels in familial ET cases. Replication studies of populations outside of New York and studies of brain harmane levels in ET have yet to be undertaken. A small number of studies have explored several of the biological correlates of exposure to harmane in ET patients. Studies of the mechanisms of this putative elevation of harmane in ET have explored the role of increased dietary consumption, finding weak evidence of increased exogenous intake in male ET cases, and other studies have found initial evidence that the elevated harmane in ET might be due to a hereditarily reduced capacity to metabolize harmane to harmine (7-methoxy-1-methyl-9H-pyrido[3,4-β]-indole. Studies of harmane and its possible association with ET have been intriguing. Additional studies are needed to establish more definitively whether these toxic exposures are associated with ET and are of etiological importance.

  17. Frequency and Pathological Phenotype of Bovine Astrovirus CH13/NeuroS1 Infection in Neurologically-Diseased Cattle: Towards Assessment of Causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selimovic-Hamza, Senija; Boujon, Céline L; Hilbe, Monika; Oevermann, Anna; Seuberlich, Torsten

    2017-01-18

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has opened up the possibility of detecting new viruses in unresolved diseases. Recently, astrovirus brain infections have been identified in neurologically diseased humans and animals by NGS, among them bovine astrovirus (BoAstV) CH13/NeuroS1, which has been found in brain tissues of cattle with non-suppurative encephalitis. Only a few studies are available on neurotropic astroviruses and a causal relationship between BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 infections and neurological disease has been postulated, but remains unproven. Aiming at making a step forward towards assessing the causality, we collected brain samples of 97 cases of cattle diagnosed with unresolved non-suppurative encephalitis, and analyzed them by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, to determine the frequency and neuropathological distribution of the BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 and its topographical correlation to the pathology. We detected BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 RNA or proteins in neurons throughout all parts of the central nervous system (CNS) in 34% of all cases, but none were detected in cattle of the control group. In general, brain lesions had a high correlation with the presence of the virus. These findings show that a substantial proportion of cattle with non-suppurative encephalitis are infected with BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 and further substantiate the causal relationship between neurological disease and astrovirus infections.

  18. Identification of a Common Epitope between Enterovirus 71 and Human MED25 Proteins Which May Explain Virus-Associated Neurological Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peihu Fan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a major causative pathogen of hand, foot and mouth disease with especially severe neurologic complications, which mainly account for fatalities from this disease. To date, the pathogenesis of EV71 in the central neurons system has remained unclear. Cytokine-mediated immunopathogenesis and nervous tissue damage by virus proliferation are two widely speculated causes of the neurological disease. To further study the pathogenesis, we identified a common epitope (co-epitope between EV71 VP1 and human mediator complex subunit 25 (MED25 highly expressed in brain stem. A monoclonal antibody (2H2 against the co-epitope was prepared, and its interaction with MED25 was examined by ELISA, immunofluorescence assay and Western blot in vitro and by live small animal imaging in vivo. Additionally, 2H2 could bind to both VP1 and MED25 with the affinity constant (Kd of 10−7 M as determined by the ForteBio Octet System. Intravenously injected 2H2 was distributed in brain stem of mice after seven days of EV71 infection. Interestingly, 2H2-like antibodies were detected in the serum of EV71-infected patients. These findings suggest that EV71 infection induces the production of antibodies that can bind to autoantigens expressed in nervous tissue and maybe further trigger autoimmune reactions resulting in neurological disease.

  19. Frequency and Pathological Phenotype of Bovine Astrovirus CH13/NeuroS1 Infection in Neurologically-Diseased Cattle: Towards Assessment of Causality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senija Selimovic-Hamza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS has opened up the possibility of detecting new viruses in unresolved diseases. Recently, astrovirus brain infections have been identified in neurologically diseased humans and animals by NGS, among them bovine astrovirus (BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1, which has been found in brain tissues of cattle with non-suppurative encephalitis. Only a few studies are available on neurotropic astroviruses and a causal relationship between BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 infections and neurological disease has been postulated, but remains unproven. Aiming at making a step forward towards assessing the causality, we collected brain samples of 97 cases of cattle diagnosed with unresolved non-suppurative encephalitis, and analyzed them by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, to determine the frequency and neuropathological distribution of the BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 and its topographical correlation to the pathology. We detected BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 RNA or proteins in neurons throughout all parts of the central nervous system (CNS in 34% of all cases, but none were detected in cattle of the control group. In general, brain lesions had a high correlation with the presence of the virus. These findings show that a substantial proportion of cattle with non-suppurative encephalitis are infected with BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 and further substantiate the causal relationship between neurological disease and astrovirus infections.

  20. Frequency and Pathological Phenotype of Bovine Astrovirus CH13/NeuroS1 Infection in Neurologically-Diseased Cattle: Towards Assessment of Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selimovic-Hamza, Senija; Boujon, Céline L.; Hilbe, Monika; Oevermann, Anna; Seuberlich, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has opened up the possibility of detecting new viruses in unresolved diseases. Recently, astrovirus brain infections have been identified in neurologically diseased humans and animals by NGS, among them bovine astrovirus (BoAstV) CH13/NeuroS1, which has been found in brain tissues of cattle with non-suppurative encephalitis. Only a few studies are available on neurotropic astroviruses and a causal relationship between BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 infections and neurological disease has been postulated, but remains unproven. Aiming at making a step forward towards assessing the causality, we collected brain samples of 97 cases of cattle diagnosed with unresolved non-suppurative encephalitis, and analyzed them by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, to determine the frequency and neuropathological distribution of the BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 and its topographical correlation to the pathology. We detected BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 RNA or proteins in neurons throughout all parts of the central nervous system (CNS) in 34% of all cases, but none were detected in cattle of the control group. In general, brain lesions had a high correlation with the presence of the virus. These findings show that a substantial proportion of cattle with non-suppurative encephalitis are infected with BoAstV CH13/NeuroS1 and further substantiate the causal relationship between neurological disease and astrovirus infections. PMID:28106800

  1. Cannabinoids in neurology – Brazilian Academy of Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. D. Brucki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of cannabidiol in some neurological conditions was allowed by Conselho Regional de Medicina de São Paulo and by Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA. Specialists on behalf of Academia Brasileira de Neurologia prepared a critical statement about use of cannabidiol and other cannabis derivatives in neurological diseases.

  2. [Insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia associated diseases not included in the metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalheira, José B C; Saad, Mario J A

    2006-04-01

    In the past years, in Brazil and in developed countries, obesity has become a major public health problem. It was identified that besides DM2 and metabolic syndrome other clinical entities were associated with insulin resistance. In this review we describe some of these alterations emphasizing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, but also including polycistic ovary disease, hyperuricemia, chronic renal failure, heart failure, cognitive decline and cancer.

  3. [insulin Resistance/hyperinsulinemia Associated Diseases Not Included In The Metabolic Syndrome].

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalheira, José B C; Saad, Mario J A

    2015-01-01

    In the past years, in Brazil and in developed countries, obesity has become a major public health problem. It was identified that besides DM2 and metabolic syndrome other clinical entities were associated with insulin resistance. In this review we describe some of these alterations emphasizing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, but also including polycistic ovary disease, hyperuricemia, chronic renal failure, heart failure, cognitive decline and cancer.

  4. [Vitamin D and neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenot, Éric; Camu, William

    2013-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk of multiple sclerosis and also with a higher relapse rate as well as a higher number of MRI lesions. Elders with vitamin D deficiency have worse cognitive performance. Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease. Ischemic stroke are more frequent and more severe in patients with low vitamin D levels. Carotid atherosclerosis is more frequent and more severe in patients with vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk and worse prognosis of Parkinson's disease. In the different neurological disorders discussed herein, gene polymorphisms that could alter vitamin D metabolism are also associated with a higher incidence or a worse disease prognosis. Despite the links between vitamin D deficiency and the risks of developing neurological disorders, there is, to date, no proof that supplementation could alter the course of these diseases. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. The neurology literature 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoujah, Danya; Chang, Wan-Tsu W; Abraham, Michael K

    2017-09-06

    Emergency neurology is a complex and rapidly changing field. Its evolution can be attributed in part to increased imaging options, debates about optimal treatment, and simply the growth of emergency medicine as a specialty. Every year, a number of articles published in emergency medicine or other specialty journals should become familiar to the emergency physician. This review summarizes neurology articles published in 2016, which the authors consider crucial to the practice of emergency medicine. The articles are categorized according to disease process, with the understanding that there can be significant overlap among articles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A role for myosin Va in cerebellar plasticity and motor learning: a possible mechanism underlying neurological disorder in myosin Va disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Mariko; Kishimoto, Yasushi; Tanaka, Masahiko; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Hirashima, Naohide; Murata, Yoshiharu; Kano, Masanobu; Takagishi, Yoshiko

    2011-04-20

    Mutations of the myosin Va gene cause the neurological diseases Griscelli syndrome type 1 and Elejalde syndrome in humans and dilute phenotypes in rodents. To understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the neurological disorders in myosin Va diseases, we conducted an integrated analysis at the molecular, cellular, electrophysiological, and behavioral levels using the dilute-neurological (d-n) mouse mutant. These mice manifest an ataxic gait and clonic seizures during postnatal development, but the neurological disorders are ameliorated in adulthood. We found that smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) rarely extended into the dendritic spines of Purkinje cells (PCs) of young d-n mice, and there were few, if any, IP(3) receptors. Moreover, long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-PC synapses was abolished, consistent with our previous observations in juvenile lethal dilute mutants. Young d-n mice exhibited severe impairment of cerebellum-dependent motor learning. In contrast, adult d-n mice showed restoration of motor learning and LTD, and these neurological changes were associated with accumulation of SER and IP(3) receptors in some PC spines and the expression of myosin Va proteins in the PCs. RNA interference-mediated repression of myosin Va caused a reduction in the number of IP(3) receptor-positive spines in cultured PCs. These findings indicate that myosin Va function is critical for subsequent processes in localization of SER and IP(3) receptors in PC spines, LTD, and motor learning. Interestingly, d-n mice had defects of motor coordination from young to adult ages, suggesting that the role of myosin Va in PC spines is not sufficient for motor coordination.

  7. Management of male neurologic patients with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of fertility rely on intact neurologic function and thus neurologic diseases can result in infertility. While research into general female fertility and alterations in male semen quality is limited, we have an abundance of knowledge regarding ejaculatory dysfunction following nerve i...... the testis. Once viable sperm cells have been obtained, these are used in assisted reproductive techniques, including intravaginal insemination, intrauterine insemination, and in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection....... of treatment is assisted ejaculation, preferably by penile vibratory stimulation. If vibratory stimulation is unsuccessful, then ejaculation can almost always be induced by electroejaculation. In cases where assisted ejaculation fails, sperm can be retrieved surgically from either the epididymis or from...

  8. Acupuncture for Small Animal Neurologic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roynard, Patrick; Frank, Lauren; Xie, Huisheng; Fowler, Margaret

    2018-01-01

    Modern research on traditional Chinese veterinary medicine (TCVM), including herbal medicine and acupuncture, has made evident the role of the nervous system as a cornerstone in many of the mechanisms of action of TCVM. Laboratory models and clinical research available are supportive for the use of TCVM in the management of neurologic conditions in small animals, specifically in cases of intervertebral disk disease, other myelopathies, and painful conditions. This article is meant to help guide the use of TCVM for neurologic disorders in small animals, based on available information and recommendations from experienced TCVM practitioners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Neurologic manifestations of achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jacqueline T; Bodensteiner, John B; Butler, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the best described and most common form of the congenital short-limbed dwarfing conditions. Achondroplasia is apparent at birth and has a birth prevalence of 1 in 20000-30000 live-born infants. Achondroplasia is inherited as an autosomal dominant condition, although 80% of cases occur sporadically as new events in their families. Achondroplasia is caused, in virtually all of the cases, by a G380R mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). Patients with achondroplasia should be evaluated by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians including geneticists, neurologists, and orthopedists, since there are numerous bony and neurological complications. The most severe complication results from craniocervical stenosis and medullary and upper spinal cord compression, which can have devastating and even lethal sequelae during early childhood. In subsequent decades, including adolescence, spinal cord and nerve compression are more prominent. The neurological complications of achondroplasia have been recognized in adults for more than a century and are attributed to bony defects, connective tissue structures, or both. Similar neurological complications are now appreciated in infants, young children, and teenagers with achondroplasia. Defective connective tissue elements in achondroplasia frequently lead to ligamentous laxity, which can aggravate the complications associated with bony stenosis. Bony abnormalities are known to cause neurological morbidity and lead to a shortened lifespan. Neurological complications associated with achondroplasia are reviewed, including recommendations for the evaluation and management of these clinical problems. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. History of neurologic examination books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors).

  11. Clinical trials in neurology: design, conduct, analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravina, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    .... Clinical Trials in Neurology aims to improve the efficiency of clinical trials and the development of interventions in order to enhance the development of new treatments for neurologic diseases...

  12. Common data elements for clinical research in mitochondrial disease: a National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karaa, A.; Rahman, S.; Lombes, A.; Yu-Wai-Man, P.; Sheikh, M.K.; Alai-Hansen, S.; Cohen, B.H.; Dimmock, D.; Emrick, L.; Falk, M.J.; McCormack, S.; Mirsky, D.; Moore, T.; Parikh, S.; Shoffner, J.; Taivassalo, T.; Tarnopolsky, M.; Tein, I.; Odenkirchen, J.C.; Goldstein, A.; Koene, S.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; et al.,

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The common data elements (CDE) project was developed by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) to provide clinical researchers with tools to improve data quality and allow for harmonization of data collected in different research studies. CDEs have been

  13. Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Review of Neurologic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Grimm

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hodgkin's lymphoma is a hematolymphoid neoplasm, primarily of B cell lineage, that has unique histologic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features. Neurologic complications of Hodgkin's Lymphoma can be separated into those that result directly from the disease, indirectly from the disease, or from its treatment. Direct neurologic dysfunction from Hodgkin's Lymphoma results from metastatic intracranial spinal disease, epidural metastases causing spinal cord/cauda equina compression, leptomeningeal metastases, or intradural intramedullary spinal cord metastases. Indirect neurologic dysfunction may be caused by paraneoplastic disorders (such as paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration or limbic encephalitis and primary angiitis of the central nervous system. Hodgkin's lymphoma treatment typically includes chemotherapy or radiotherapy with potential treatment-related complications affecting the nervous system. Neurologic complications resulting from mantle-field radiotherapy include the “dropped head syndrome,” acute brachial plexopathy, and transient ischemic attacks/cerebral infarcts. Chemotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma may cause cerebral infarction (due to emboli from anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy and peripheral neuropathy.

  14. Nanotechnology based diagnostics for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurek, Nicholas S.; Chandra, Sathees B., E-mail: schandra@roosevelt.edu [Department of Biological, Chemical and Physical Sciences, Roosevelt University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Nanotechnology involves probing and manipulating matter at the molecular level. Nanotechnology based molecular diagnostics have the potential to alleviate the suffering caused by many diseases, including neurological disorders, due to the unique properties of nanomaterials. Most neurological illnesses are multifactorial conditions and many of these are also classified as neurobehavioral disorders. Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington disease, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders like Rett syndrome are some examples of neurological disorders that could be better treated, diagnosed, prevented and possibly cured using nanotechnology. In order to improve the quality of life for disease afflicted people, a wide range of nanomaterials that include gold and silica nanoparticles, quantum dots and DNA along with countless other forms of nanotechnology have been investigated regarding their usefulness in advancing molecular diagnostics. Other small scaled materials like viruses and proteins also have potential for use as molecular diagnostic tools. Information obtained from nanotechnology based diagnostics can be stored and manipulated using bioinformatics software. More advanced nanotechnology based diagnostic procedures for the acquisition of even greater proteomic and genomic knowledge can then be developed along with better ways to fight various diseases. Nanotechnology also has numerous applications besides those related to biotechnology and medicine. In this article, we will discuss and analyze many novel nanotechnology based diagnostic techniques at our disposal today. (author)

  15. Mapping the literature: palliative care within adult and child neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallara, Alexis; Meret, Anca; Saroyan, John

    2014-12-01

    Objectives of this review were to examine definitions and background of palliative care, as well as address whether there is an increased need for palliative care education among neurologists. The review also explores what literature exists regarding palliative care within general neurology and child neurology. A literature review was conducted examining use of palliative care within child neurology. More than 100 articles and textbooks were retrieved and reviewed. Expert guidelines stress the importance of expertise in palliative care among neurologists. Subspecialties written about in child neurology include that of peripheral nervous system disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, and metabolic disorders. Adult and child neurology patients have a great need for improved palliative care services, as they frequently develop cumulative physical and cognitive disabilities over time and cope with decreasing quality of life before reaching the terminal stage of their illness. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Neurological Diagnostic Tests and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of diagnostic imaging techniques and chemical and metabolic analyses to detect, manage, and treat neurological disease. Some ... performed in a doctor’s office or at a clinic. Fluoroscopy is a type of x-ray that ...

  17. Prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and occurrence of neurological symptoms in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Oxhøj, H; Andersen, P E

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease. HHT is characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and neurological symptoms.......Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease. HHT is characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and neurological symptoms....

  18. Inebilizumab, a B Cell-Depleting Anti-CD19 Antibody for the Treatment of Autoimmune Neurological Diseases: Insights from Preclinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Exaggerated or inappropriate responses by B cells are an important feature in many types of autoimmune neurological diseases. The recent success of B-cell depletion in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS has stimulated the development of novel B-cell-targeting therapies with the potential for improved efficacy. CD19 has emerged as a promising target for the depletion of B cells as well as CD19-positive plasmablasts and plasma cells. Inebilizumab (MEDI-551, an anti-CD19 antibody with enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against B cells, is currently being evaluated in MS and neuromyelitis optica. This review discusses the role of B cells in autoimmune neurological disorders, summarizes the development of inebilizumab, and analyzes the recent results for inebilizumab treatment in an autoimmune encephalitis mouse model. The novel insights obtained from these preclinical studies can potentially guide future investigation of inebilizumab in patients.

  19. Hallmarks of Treatment Aspects: Parkinson's Disease Throughout Centuries Including l-Dopa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee J; Jeon, Beom S; Jenner, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Deficit of striatal dopamine was first discovered in postmortem brain of patients with Parkinson's disease in 1960. This observation was the starting point for dopamine replacement therapy, and successful introduction of high dose l-dopa therapy in the 1969 revolutionized the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Since then, constant attempts have been made to enhance the efficacy of l-dopa and reduce motor complications by providing more continuous dopamine stimulation. This chapter traces the hallmarks of medical treatments for Parkinson's disease throughout centuries including the first description of antiparkinsonian effects of anticholinergics, the birth of apomorphine in the 1900s, then discovery of l-dopa in the 1960s, and development of dopamine agonists since the 1970s. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cotard syndrome in neurological and psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Bermudez, Jesus; Aguilar-Venegas, Luis C; Crail-Melendez, Daniel; Espinola-Nadurille, Mariana; Nente, Francisco; Mendez, Mario F

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the frequency and characteristics of Cotard syndrome among neurological and psychiatric inpatients at a tertiary referral center. All inpatients from the National Institute of Neurology of Mexico (March 2007-May 2009) requiring neuropsychiatric consultation were reviewed. Among 1,321 inpatient consultations, 63.7% had neurological disease and one (0.11%) had viral encephalitis and Cotard syndrome. Of inpatients, 36.2% had pure psychiatric disorders and three (0.62%) had Cotard syndrome, associated with psychotic depression, depersonalization, and penile retraction (koro syndrome). This review discusses potential mechanisms for Cotard syndrome, including the role of a perceptual-emotional dissociation in self-misattribution in the deliré des negations.

  1. Neurological sequelae of bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-07-01

    We reported on occurrence and impact of neurological sequelae after bacterial meningitis. We reviewed occurrence of neurological sequelae in children and adults after pneumococcal and meningococcal meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Adults with pneumococcal meningitis have the highest risk of developing focal neurological deficits, which are most commonly caused by cerebral infarction, but can also be due to cerebritis, subdural empyema, cerebral abscess or intracerebral bleeding. Focal deficits may improve during clinical course and even after discharge, but a proportion of patients will have persisting focal neurological deficits that often interfere in patient's daily life. Hearing loss occurs in a high proportion of patients with pneumococcal meningitis and has been associated with co-existing otitis. Children and adults recovering from bacterial meningitis without apparent neurological deficits are at risk for long-term cognitive deficits. Early identification of neurological sequelae is important for children to prevent additional developmental delay, and for adults to achieve successful return in society after the disease. Neurological sequelae occur in a substantial amount of patients following bacterial meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Acupuncture Alleviated the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease including Pain, Depression, and Autonomic Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Iseki, Chifumi; Furuta, Taiga; Suzuki, Masao; Koyama, Shingo; Suzuki, Keiji; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kaneko, Akiyo; Mitsuma, Tadamichi

    2014-01-01

    A woman started to feel intractable pain on her lower legs when she was 76. At the age of 78, she was diagnosed as having Parkinson’s disease (PD). The leg pain was suspected to be a symptom of PD after eliminating other causes. The patient also suffered from nonmotor symptoms, depression, anxiety, hot flashes, and paroxysmal sweating. Though the patient had received pharmacotherapy including levodopa for 5 years, she still suffered from the nonmotor symptoms and was referred to our departmen...

  3. Disruption of Cortical Arterial Network is Associated with the Severity of Transient Neurologic Events After Direct Bypass Surgery in Adult Moyamoya Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egashira, Yusuke; Yamauchi, Keita; Enomoto, Yukiko; Nakayama, Noriyuki; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Iwama, Toru

    2017-04-01

    Transient neurologic events (TNEs) frequently occur after revascularization in adult moyamoya disease (MMD). In the present study, we hypothesized that cortical arterial network disruption may be associated with TNE severity after bypass surgery. This retrospective study included 76 hemispheres in 45 consecutive adult patients with MMD who underwent direct revascularization surgery at our institution. We classified cortical arterial network disruption grade (NDG) into the following 4 categories based on angiography: NDG 0, >90% of suprasylvian cortical branches of the middle cerebral artery showed anterograde filling; NDG 1, 50%-90%; NDG 2, <50%; and NDG 3, none. TNE severity was assigned 1 of 4 grades based on symptom duration and clinical features: grade 0, none; grade 1, mild; grade 2, moderate; and grade 3, severe. We evaluated multiple clinical characteristics, including NDG, to identify factors that have a significant association with TNE severity. Of the 73 hemispheres without perioperative ischemic or hemorrhagic complications, the following degrees of TNEs were developed: grade 0, 33%; grade 1, 30%; grade 2, 22%; and grade 3, 15%. We determined that NDG and left-side surgery were significantly associated with TNE severity (P < 0.01 and P = 0.04, respectively). The NDG had excellent interobserver reliability (weighted κ value = 0.96). There were no significant correlations between TNE severity and other clinical backgrounds. NDG is useful for the prediction of severity of TNEs after revascularization. Disturbed bypass flow spreading may lead to the development of TNEs in adult MMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Azo dyes and the blood-brain barrier: Robert Aird's novel concept in chronic neurological disease (1903-2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladin, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    The well-established medical involvement of derivatives of the azo dye industry lent credibility to the 1935 announcement by Stanley Cobb of the use of vital brilliant red dye as an anticonvulsant. Although in the fullness of time clinical experience would discard this concept, nevertheless it was to give rise to Robert Aird who posited that the mechanism of action of this dye was due to its ability to decrease the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. In a very prolonged exploration of this concept, Aird concluded that blood-brain barrier permeability underlay the causation of a long list of chronic neurological conditions--a concept that was eventually abandoned. This article examines the details and the effects of this concept and its impact upon neurology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Republished: Addressing the burden of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders: key messages from Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS disorders increased by 41% between 1990 and 2010 and now accounts for one in every 10 lost years of health globally. This sobering statistic does not take into account the substantial excess mortality associated with these disorders or the social and economic consequences of MNS disorders on affected persons, their caregivers, and society. A wide variety of effective interventions, including drugs, psychological treatments, and social interventions, can prevent and treat MNS disorders. At the population-level platform of service delivery, best practices include legislative measures to restrict access to means of self-harm or suicide and to reduce the availability of and demand for alcohol. At the community-level platform, best practices include life-skills training in schools to build social and emotional competencies. At the health-care-level platform, we identify three delivery channels. Two of these delivery channels are especially relevant from a public health perspective: self-management (eg, web-based psychological therapy for depression and anxiety disorders and primary care and community outreach (eg, non-specialist health worker delivering psychological and pharmacological management of selected disorders. The third delivery channel, hospital care, which includes specialist services for MNS disorders and first-level hospitals providing other types of services (such as general medicine, HIV, or paediatric care, play an important part for a smaller proportion of cases with severe, refractory, or emergency presentations and for the integration of mental health care in other health-care channels, respectively. The costs of providing a significantly scaled up package of specified cost-effective interventions for prioritised MNS disorders in low-income and lower-middle-income countries is estimated at US$3-4 per head of population per year. Since a substantial proportion of MNS

  6. Addressing the burden of mental, neurological, and substance use disorders: key messages from Disease Control Priorities, 3rd edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikram; Chisholm, Dan; Parikh, Rachana; Charlson, Fiona J; Degenhardt, Louisa; Dua, Tarun; Ferrari, Alize J; Hyman, Steve; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Levin, Carol; Lund, Crick; Medina Mora, María Elena; Petersen, Inge; Scott, James; Shidhaye, Rahul; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Thornicroft, Graham; Whiteford, Harvey

    2016-04-16

    The burden of mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders increased by 41% between 1990 and 2010 and now accounts for one in every 10 lost years of health globally. This sobering statistic does not take into account the substantial excess mortality associated with these disorders or the social and economic consequences of MNS disorders on affected persons, their caregivers, and society. A wide variety of effective interventions, including drugs, psychological treatments, and social interventions, can prevent and treat MNS disorders. At the population-level platform of service delivery, best practices include legislative measures to restrict access to means of self-harm or suicide and to reduce the availability of and demand for alcohol. At the community-level platform, best practices include life-skills training in schools to build social and emotional competencies. At the health-care-level platform, we identify three delivery channels. Two of these delivery channels are especially relevant from a public health perspective: self-management (eg, web-based psychological therapy for depression and anxiety disorders) and primary care and community outreach (eg, non-specialist health worker delivering psychological and pharmacological management of selected disorders). The third delivery channel, hospital care, which includes specialist services for MNS disorders and first-level hospitals providing other types of services (such as general medicine, HIV, or paediatric care), play an important part for a smaller proportion of cases with severe, refractory, or emergency presentations and for the integration of mental health care in other health-care channels, respectively. The costs of providing a significantly scaled up package of specified cost-effective interventions for prioritised MNS disorders in low-income and lower-middle-income countries is estimated at US$3-4 per head of population per year. Since a substantial proportion of MNS disorders run a

  7. Relationship between intracellular Na+ concentration and reduced Na+ affinity in Na+,K+-ATPase mutants causing neurological disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toustrup-Jensen, Mads Schak; Einholm, Anja P.; Schack, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    The neurological disorders familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2), alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC), and rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism (RDP) are caused by mutations of Na+,K+-ATPase α2- and α3-isoforms, expressed in glial and neuronal cells, respectively. Although these disorders...... mutations that increase Na+ affinity were found to reduce [Na+]i. It is concluded that the Na+ affinity of the Na+,K+-ATPase is an important determinant of [Na+]i....

  8. Acute intermittent porphyria: studies of the severe homozygous dominant disease provides insights into the neurologic attacks in acute porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Constanza; Martinez-Bermejo, Antonio; Naidich, Thomas P; Kaufmann, Walter E; Astrin, Kenneth H; Bishop, David F; Desnick, Robert J

    2004-11-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), due to half-normal hydroxymethylbilane synthase activity,is characterized by acute life-threatening neurologic attacks whose etiology remains unclear. To date, only 3 patients confirmed to have homozygous dominant AIP (HD-AIP) have been described (hydroxymethylbilane synthase genotypes R167Q/R167Q and R167W/R173Q). To investigate the genetic, biochemical, clinical, and neuroradiologic features of a severely affected infant with HD-AIP. Clinical, imaging, and genotype/phenotype studies were performed. The proband, homoallelic for hydroxymethylbilane synthase mutation R167W, had approximately 1% of normal hydroxymethylbilane synthase activity, elevated porphyrins and porphyrin precursors, severe psychomotor delay, and central and peripheral neurologic manifestations. When expressed in vitro, the R167W mutant enzyme had less than 2% of normal activity but was markedly unstable, consistent with the proband's severe phenotype. Mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes were normal. Neuroradiologic studies revealed a unique pattern of deep cerebral white matter injury, with relative preservation of the corpus callosum, anterior limb of the internal capsule, cerebral gray matter, and infratentorial structures. This severely affected patient with HD-AIP expanded the phenotypic spectrum of HD-AIP. His brain magnetic resonance imaging studies suggested selective cerebral oligodendrocyte postnatal involvement in HD-AIP, whereas most structures developed prenatally were intact. These findings indicate that the neurologic manifestations result from porphyrin precursor toxicity rather than heme deficiency and suggest that porphyrin precursor toxicity is primarily responsible for the acute neurologic attacks in heterozygous AIP and other porphyrias.

  9. Measurement properties and feasibility of clinical tests to assess sit-to-stand/stand-to-sit tasks in subjects with neurological disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula F. S. Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Subjects with neurological disease (ND usually show impaired performance during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit tasks, with a consequent reduction in their mobility levels. OBJECTIVE: To determine the measurement properties and feasibility previously investigated for clinical tests that evaluate sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit in subjects with ND. METHOD: A systematic literature review following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses protocol was performed. Systematic literature searches of databases (MEDLINE/SCIELO/LILACS/PEDro were performed to identify relevant studies. In all studies, the following inclusion criteria were assessed: investigation of any measurement property or the feasibility of clinical tests that evaluate sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit tasks in subjects with ND published in any language through December 2012. The COSMIN checklist was used to evaluate the methodological quality of the included studies. RESULTS: Eleven studies were included. The measurement properties/feasibility were most commonly investigated for the five-repetition sit-to-stand test, which showed good test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient:ICC=0.94-0.99 for subjects with stroke, cerebral palsy and dementia. The ICC values were higher for this test than for the number of repetitions in the 30-s test. The five-repetition sit-to-stand test also showed good inter/intra-rater reliabilities (ICC=0.97-0.99 for stroke and inter-rater reliability (ICC=0.99 for subjects with Parkinson disease and incomplete spinal cord injury. For this test, the criterion-related validity for subjects with stroke, cerebral palsy and incomplete spinal cord injury was, in general, moderate (correlation=0.40-0.77, and the feasibility and safety were good for subjects with Alzheimer's disease. CONCLUSIONS: The five-repetition sit-to-stand test was used more often in subjects with ND, and most of the measurement

  10. Epidemiology and trend of neurological diseases associated to HIV/AIDS. Experience of Mexican patients 1995-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Crescencio, M A; Velásquez-Pérez, L; Ramírez-Crescencio, María Antonieta; Velásquez-Pérez, Leora

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the main neurological conditions associated with HIV/AIDS in Mexican patients treated at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery (NINN) in Mexico city, the main referral center for patients with disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system. An observational, transversal and descriptive analysis was performed. We reviewed the databases from the Department of Epidemiology and the medical records of patients with AIDS seen during the period from January 1st, 1995 to December 31, 2009. 320 patients were detected, the main conditions related to HIV/AIDS were brain toxoplasmosis (42%), cerebral criptoccocosis (28%), tuberculous meningitis (8.7%), linfoma no Hodking (3.75%), acute HIV infection (3.4%) and AIDS dementia complex (3%). No specific trend on morbility and mortality were detected during the period of study. In Mexico the most common neurological complications of HIV/AIDS are opportunistic infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Including information about comorbidity in estimates of disease burden: Results from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jordi; Vilagut, Gemma; Chatterji, Somnath; Heeringa, Steven; Schoenbaum, Michael; Üstün, T. Bedirhan; Rojas-Farreras, Sonia; Angermeyer, Matthias; Bromet, Evelyn; Bruffaerts, Ronny; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep Maria; Karam, Aimee N.; Kovess, Viviane; Levinson, Daphna; Liu, Zhaorui; Mora, Maria Elena Medina; Ormel, J.; Posada-Villa, Jose; Uda, Hidenori; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The methodology commonly used to estimate disease burden, featuring ratings of severity of individual conditions, has been criticized for ignoring comorbidity. A methodology that addresses this problem is proposed and illustrated here with data from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys. Although the analysis is based on self-reports about one’s own conditions in a community survey, the logic applies equally well to analysis of hypothetical vignettes describing comorbid condition profiles. Methods Face-to-face interviews in 13 countries (six developing, nine developed; n = 31,067; response rate = 69.6%) assessed 10 classes of chronic physical and 9 of mental conditions. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess overall perceived health. Multiple regression analysis with interactions for comorbidity was used to estimate associations of conditions with VAS. Simulation was used to estimate condition-specific effects. Results The best-fitting model included condition main effects and interactions of types by numbers of conditions. Neurological conditions, insomnia, and major depression were rated most severe. Adjustment for comorbidity reduced condition-specific estimates with substantial between-condition variation (.24–.70 ratios of condition-specific estimates with and without adjustment for comorbidity). The societal-level burden rankings were quite different from the individual-level rankings, with the highest societal-level rankings associated with conditions having high prevalence rather than high individual-level severity. Conclusions Plausible estimates of disorder-specific effects on VAS can be obtained using methods that adjust for comorbidity. These adjustments substantially influence condition-specific ratings. PMID:20553636

  12. Neurologic manifestations of hypothyroidism in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertalan, Abigail; Kent, Marc; Glass, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common endocrine disease in dogs. A variety of clinicopathologic abnormalities may be present; however, neurologic deficits are rare. In some instances, neurologic deficits may be the sole manifestation of hypothyroidism. Consequent ly, the diagnosis and management of the neurologic disorders associated with hypothyroidism can be challenging. This article describes several neurologic manifestations of primary hypothyroidism in dogs; discusses the pathophysiology of hypothyroidism-induced neurologic disorders affecting the peripheral and central nervous systems; and reviews the evidence for the neurologic effects of hypothyroidism.

  13. Interventional neurology: a reborn subspecialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgell, Randall C; Alshekhlee, Amer; Yavagal, Dileep R; Vora, Nirav; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2012-10-01

    Neurologists have a long history of involvement in cerebral angiography; however, the roots of neurologist involvement in therapeutic endovascular procedures have not been previously documented. As outlined in this article, it has taken the efforts of several early pioneers to lay the ground work for interventional neurology, a specialty that has become one of the fastest growing neurological subspecialties. The ground work, along with a great clinical need, has allowed the modern interventional neurologist to tackle some of the most intractable diseases, especially those affecting the cerebral vasculature. The institutionalization of interventional neurology as a subspecialty was first advocated in 1995 in an article entitled, "Interventional Neurology, a subspecialty whose time has come." The institutions created in the wake of this article have provided the framework that has allowed interventional neurology to transition from "a subspecialty whose time has come" to a subspecialty that is here to stay and thrive. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  14. [Neuropediatrics: epidemiological features and etiologies at the Dakar neurology service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, M; Sene-Diouf, F; Diop, A G; Ndao, A K; Ndiaye, M M; Ndiaye, I P

    1999-01-01

    Child neurology is a relatively young speciality of neurosciences which is at the frontier of Neurology and Paediatrics. Its development has been impulsed by the diagnosis techniques such as Neurobiology, Genetics, Neuroimaging and pedo-psychology. We conducted a retrospective survey among the in-patients from January 1980 to December 1997 in the service of Neurology of the University Hospital. Have been included children ranged from 0 to 15 years old without any racial, sexual or origin distinctive. In Neurology Department, children of 0 to 15 years old represent 10.06% of the in-patients received from 1980 to 1997. The mortality rate was 9.23%. The diseases are dominated by epilepsy and infantile encephalopathies with 31.02%, infectious diseases with 19.36% represented by tuberculosis, other bacterial, viral and parasitical etiologies, tumors with 10.36%, vascular pathology and degenerative disorders.

  15. Neurological soft signs in aging, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer´s disease – the impact of cognitive decline and cognitive reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja eUrbanowitsch

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Neurological soft signs (NSS, i.e. minor motor and sensory changes, are a common feature in severe psychiatric disorders. We sought to establish the frequency of NSS in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD on basis of a large population based sample and to identify their neuropsychological correlates including cognitive reserve.Methods: NSS were examined using an abbreviated version of the Heidelberg NSS Scale in 221 old participants born between 1930 and 1932 (63 with MCI, 15 with AD, 143 healthy old controls and 256 healthy young participants (born between 1950 and 1952 of the population-based Interdisciplinary Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ILSE. Subjects received thorough neuropsychological testing; years of school education were used as a proxy for cognitive reserve.Results: NSS scores were significantly (p<0.001 higher in the AD patients (5.6±3.11 than in the healthy old controls (2.8±1.90 and in the MCI patients (3.0±1.96. This result was confirmed after years of school education which were inversely correlated (r = - 0.25; p<0.001 with NSS were entered as a covariate. In the patients but not in the controls, NSS were significantly correlated with deficits in executive functioning and visuospatial functioning. Comparison of NSS scores between old (2.84 ± 1.9 and young (2.46 ± 1.97 controls yielded only minor, non-significant differences after education (13.86 ± 3.0 vs. 14.61 ± 2.48 years, respectively was controlled for.Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that NSS are frequently found in mild AD but not in MCI. NSS refer to frontal-executive deficits and visuospatial dysfunction rather than age per se and can be partly compensated for by cognitive reserve.

  16. Full Genome Sequence of a Novel Coxsackievirus B5 Strain Isolated from Neurological Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Patients in China

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Y. F.; Zhao, R.; Xue, Y.; Yang, Fan; Q. Jin

    2012-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5) belongs to the human enterovirus B species within the family Picornaviridae. We report the complete genome sequence of a novel CVB5 strain, CVB5/SD/09, that is associated with neurological hand, foot, and mouth disease in China. The complete genome consists of 7,399 nucleotides, excluding the 3′ poly(A) tail, and has an open reading frame that maps between nucleotide positions 744 and 7301 and encodes a 2,185-amino-acid polyprotein. Phylogenetic analysis based on diff...

  17. Extraneuronal pathology in a canine model of CLN2 neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis after intracerebroventricular gene therapy that delays neurological disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, M L; Johnson, G C; Leach, S B; Williamson, B G; Coates, J R; Whiting, R E H; Vansteenkiste, D P; Whitney, M S

    2017-04-01

    CLN2 neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis is a hereditary lysosomal storage disease with primarily neurological signs that results from mutations in TPP1, which encodes the lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1). Studies using a canine model for this disorder demonstrated that delivery of TPP1 enzyme to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by intracerebroventricular administration of an AAV-TPP1 vector resulted in substantial delays in the onset and progression of neurological signs and prolongation of life span. We hypothesized that the treatment may not deliver therapeutic levels of this protein to tissues outside the central nervous system that also require TPP1 for normal lysosomal function. To test this hypothesis, dogs treated with CSF administration of AAV-TPP1 were evaluated for the development of non-neuronal pathology. Affected treated dogs exhibited progressive cardiac pathology reflected by elevated plasma cardiac troponin-1, impaired cardiac function and development of histopathological myocardial lesions. Progressive increases in the plasma activity levels of alanine aminotransferase and creatine kinase indicated development of pathology in the liver and muscles. The treatment also did not prevent disease-related accumulation of lysosomal storage bodies in the heart or liver. These studies indicate that optimal treatment outcomes for CLN2 disease may require delivery of TPP1 systemically as well as directly to the central nervous system.

  18. NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH HYPERTENSION AND THEIR CORRECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Vakhnina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients can be caused by both brain injury and concomitant diseases. The elucidation of the causes of neurological disorders and their effective treatment contribute to hypertensive patients’ better adherence to long-term antihypertensive therapy, which normalizes blood pressure (BP and reduces the risk of cerebral complications Objective: to study of the causes of neurological disorders in hypertensive patients and the efficiency of their correction using a new dispersible vinpocetine formulation (Cavinton® Comforte in combined therapy.Patients and methods. A total of 80 patients (men (20% and women (80%; mean age 63±12.3  years with neurological complaints in the presence of hypertension were examined. All the patients were diagnosed with dyscirculatory encephalopathy or chronic brain ischemia, whether they had vascular cognitive impairment. The examination of patients revealed that the neurological complaints were mainly due to concomitant diseases, such as migraine (12%, tension-type headache (66%, and the latter concurrent with migraine (4%.Results and  discussion. The  effective treatment of concomitant diseases in  combination with antihypertensive therapy contributed to normalization of BP and regression of complaints. The most pronounced effect was noted in 40 patients whose combination therapy included Vinpocetine (Cavinton® Comforte 10 mg thrice daily.Conclusion. The therapy resulted in the less severity of both the symptoms of cerebrovascular disease (vascular cognitive impairment and comorbid neurological disorders (headache, dizziness, etc..

  19. Pharmacotherapy Pearls for the Geriatrician: Focus on Oral Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs Including Newer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, Ann J; Katz, James D

    2017-02-01

    Providing safe and effective pharmacotherapy to the geriatric patients with rheumatological disorders is an ongoing struggle for the rheumatologist and geriatrician alike. Cohesive communication and partnership can improve the care of these patients and subvert adverse outcomes. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, including methotrexate, hydroxychloroquine, sulfasalazine, and leflunomide, and the newest oral agent for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, tofacitinib, have distinctive monitoring and adverse effect profiles. This article provides the general practitioner or geriatrician with clinically relevant pearls regarding the use of these interventions in older patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Description of an oral Chagas disease outbreak in Venezuela, including a vertically transmitted case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón de; Pérez-Chacón, Gladymar; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Dickson, Sonia; Muñoz-Calderón, Arturo; Hernández, Carlos; Pérez, Yadira; Mauriello, Luciano; Moronta, Eyleen

    2017-08-01

    We describe the eleventh major outbreak of foodborne Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in urban Venezuela, including evidence for vertical transmission from the index case to her fetus. After confirming fetal death at 24 weeks of gestation, pregnancy interruption was performed. On direct examination of the amniotic fluid, trypomastigotes were detected. T. cruzi specific-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) also proved positive when examining autopsied fetal organs. Finally, microscopic fetal heart examination revealed amastigote nests. Acute orally transmitted Chagas disease can be life threatening or even fatal for pregnant women and unborn fetuses owing to vertical transmission. There is therefore an urgent need to improve national epidemiologic control measures.

  1. HSV-1-Based Vectors for Gene Therapy of Neurological Diseases and Brain Tumors: Part II. Vector Systems and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Jacobs

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Many properties of HSV-1 are especially suitable for using this virus as a vector to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system (CNS, such as Parkinson's disease or malignant gliomas. These advantageous properties include natural neurotropism, high transduction efficiency, large transgene capacity, and the ability of entering a latent state in neurons. Selective oncolysis in combination with modulation of the immune response mediated by replication-conditional HSV-1 vectors appears to be a highly promising approach in the battle against malignant glioma. Helper virus-free HSV/AAV hybrid amplicon vectors have great promise in mediating long-term gene expression in the PNS and CNS for the treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders or chronic pain. Current research focuses on the design of HSV-1-derived vectors which are targeted to certain cell types and support transcriptionally regulatable transgene expression. Here, we review the recent developments on HSV-1-based vector systems and their applications in experimental and clinical gene therapy protocols.

  2. Neurological Manifestations of Dengue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Hong Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue counts among the most commonly encountered arboviral diseases, representing the fastest spreading tropical illness in the world. It is prevalent in 128 countries, and each year >2.5 billion people are at risk of dengue virus infection worldwide. Neurological signs of dengue infection are increasingly reported. In this review, the main neurological complications of dengue virus infection, such as central nervous system (CNS, peripheral nervous system, and ophthalmic complications were discussed according to clinical features, treatment and possible pathogenesis. In addition, neurological complications in children were assessed due to their atypical clinical features. Finally, dengue infection and Japanese encephalitis were compared for pathogenesis and main clinical manifestations.

  3. [Charles Miller Fisher: the grandmaster of neurological observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutake, Toshio

    2014-11-01

    Charles Miller Fisher is widely regarded as the father of modern stroke neurology. He discovered almost all pathomechanisms of cerebral infarction, including embolism from atrial fibrillation, carotid artery disease, and lacunar infarcts and their syndromes, by the most meticulous clinico-pathological observations. Moreover, his work provided the basis for treatments such as anticoagulation, antiplatelet therapy, and carotid endarterectomy. He also contributed greatly to several topics of General Neurology; for example, migraine, normal pressure hydrocephalus, and Miller Fisher syndrome. In his late years, he tried to expand the neurological field to the more complex disorders of human behavior, including hysteria, dementia, and ill-defined pain syndromes. He thus became known as the grandmaster of refined neurological observation. His lifelong detailed studies were crucially important in helping neurologists all over the world recognize disorders and syndromes that had not previously been understood.

  4. Neurologic emergencies in HIV-negative immunosuppressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-De-Villoria, J A; Fernández-García, P; Borrego-Ruiz, P J

    HIV-negative immunosuppressed patients comprise a heterogeneous group including transplant patients, patients undergoing treatment with immunosuppressors, uremic patients, alcoholics, undernourished patients, diabetics, patients on dialysis, elderly patients, and those diagnosed with severe or neoplastic processes. Epileptic seizures, focal neurologic signs, and meningoencephalitis are neurologic syndromes that require urgent action. In most of these situations, neuroimaging tests are necessary, but the findings can be different from those observed in immunocompetent patients in function of the inflammatory response. Infectious disease is the first diagnostic suspicion, and the identification of an opportunistic pathogen should be oriented in function of the type and degree of immunosuppression. Other neurologic emergencies include ischemic stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, neoplastic processes, and pharmacological neurotoxicity. This article reviews the role of neuroimaging in HIV-negative immunodepressed patients with a neurologic complication that requires urgent management. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of the Golgi Apparatus in the Blood-Brain Barrier: Golgi Protection May Be a Targeted Therapy for Neurological Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shuwen; Liu, Hui; Qiu, Ke; You, Hong; Lei, Qiang; Lu, Wei

    2017-07-20

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects the brain from toxic material in the blood, provides nutrients for brain tissues, and screens harmful substances from the brain. The specific brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs), tight junction between endothelial cells, and astrocytes ensure proper function of the central nervous system (CNS). Pathological factors disrupt the integrity of the BBB by destroying the normal function of endothelial cells and decreasing the production of tight junction proteins or the expression of proteins specifically localized on astrocytes. Interestingly, fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus is observed in neurological diseases and is involved in the destruction of the BBB function. The Golgi acts as a processing center in which proteins are transported after being processed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Besides reprocessing, classifying, and packaging proteins, the Golgi apparatus (GA) also acts as a signaling platform and calcium pool. In this review, we summarized the current literature on the potential relationship between the Golgi and endothelial cells, tight junction, and astrocytes. The normal function of the BBB is maintained as long as the normal function and morphology of the GA are not disturbed. Furthermore, we speculate that protecting the Golgi may be a novel therapeutic approach to protect the BBB and treat neurological diseases due to BBB dysfunction.

  6. A Case of Moyamoya Disease with a Transient Neurologic Deterioration Associated with Subcortical Low Intensity on Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Magnetic Resonance Images After Bypass Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanioka, Satoru; Shiba, Masato; Umeda, Yasuyuki; Sano, Takanori; Maeda, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2016-04-01

    Moyamoya disease often is treated by revascularization surgery. In this report, we are the first to describe a case of moyamoya disease that repeatedly showed a transient subcortical low intensity (SCLI) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance images postoperatively. A 59-year-old woman presenting with repeated transient ischemia underwent right superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery anastomosis with encephalo-duro-myo-synangiosis. After the operation, the patient had a transient neurologic deterioration. Findings on magnetic resonance imaging were not particular apart from SCLI and sulcal hyperintensity on FLAIR images, but no abnormalities in cerebral blood flow on single-photon emission computed tomography with N-isopropyl [123I]-p-iodoamphetamine and no abnormalities on electroencephalogram were found. Symptoms improved in a few days, and SCLI on FLAIR images disappeared in a few months. Thereafter, when the left-sided bypass surgery was performed, similar findings occurred in the left cerebral hemisphere. The mechanisms of transient SCLI on FLAIR images remain unclear, but this finding appears to be associated with a postoperative transient neurologic deterioration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Herpes simplex virus type 1-based amplicon vectors for fundamental research in neurosciences and gene therapy of neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerusalinsky, Diana; Baez, María Verónica; Epstein, Alberto Luis

    2012-01-01

    Somatic manipulation of the nervous system without the involvement of the germinal line appears as a powerful counterpart of the transgenic strategy. The use of viral vectors to produce specific, transient and localized knockout, knockdown, ectopic expression or overexpression of a gene, leads to the possibility of analyzing both in vitro and in vivo molecular basis of neural function. In this approach, viral particles engineered to carry transgenic sequences are delivered into discrete brain regions, to transduce cells that will express the transgenic products. Amplicons are replication-incompetent helper-dependent vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), with several advantages that potentiate their use in neurosciences: (1) minimal toxicity: amplicons do not encode any virus proteins, are neither toxic for the infected cells nor pathogenic for the inoculated animals and elicit low levels of adaptive immune responses; (2) extensive transgene capacity to carry up to 150-kb of foreign DNA; i.e., entire genes with regulatory sequences could be delivered; (3) widespread cellular tropism: amplicons can experimentally infect several cell types including glial cells, though naturally the virus infects mainly neurons and epithelial cells; (4) since the viral genome does not integrate into cellular chromosomes there is low probability to induce insertional mutagenesis. Recent investigations on gene transfer into the brain using these vectors, have focused on gene therapy of inherited genetic diseases affecting the nervous system, such as ataxias, or on neurodegenerative disorders using experimental models of Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. Another group of studies used amplicons to investigate complex neural functions such as neuroplasticity, anxiety, learning and memory. In this short review, we summarize recent data supporting the potential of HSV-1 based amplicon vector model for gene delivery and modulation of gene expression in primary cultures

  8. Hip and pelvis diseases on lumbar AP radiographs including both hip joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyun Soo; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Eun A; Kim, Jeong Ho; Song, Ha Heon; Shim, Dae Moo [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    To determine the frequency of disease, and to evaluate the methods used for lumbar spine radiography in Korea. Sixty university and training hospitals were randomly selected and asked to describe the projections, film size and radiographic techniques employed for routine radiography in patients with suspected disease of the lumbar spine. Plain radiographs of 1215 patients, taken using 14x17 inch film and depicting both hip joints and the lumbar region, were analysed between March 1999 and February 2000. In 15 patients (1.2%), the radiographs revealed hip or pelvic lesion, confirmed as follows: avascular necrosis of the femoral head (n=11, with bilateral lesion in four cases); sustained ankylosing spondylitis (n=2); acetabular dysplasia (n=1); and insufficiency fracture of the pubic rami secondary to osteoporosis (n=1). In 11 or the 20 hospitals which responded, 14{sup x}17{sup f}ilm was being used for lumbar radiography, while in the other nine, film size was smaller. Plain radiography of the lumbar spine including both hip joints, may be a useful way to simultaneously evaluate lesions not only of the lumbar spine but also of the hip and/or pelvis.

  9. Acupuncture Alleviated the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease including Pain, Depression, and Autonomic Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chifumi Iseki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A woman started to feel intractable pain on her lower legs when she was 76. At the age of 78, she was diagnosed as having Parkinson’s disease (PD. The leg pain was suspected to be a symptom of PD after eliminating other causes. The patient also suffered from nonmotor symptoms, depression, anxiety, hot flashes, and paroxysmal sweating. Though the patient had received pharmacotherapy including levodopa for 5 years, she still suffered from the nonmotor symptoms and was referred to our department. We treated her with acupuncture based on the Chinese traditional medicine and electroacupuncture five times per week. After the 2-week treatment, the assessment for the symptoms was as follows; visual analogue scale (VAS score of the leg pain was 16 mm (70 mm, before, Hamilton’s rating scales for depression (HAM-D score was 9 (18, before, timed 3 m Up and Go took 20 steps in 30 sec (24 steps in 38 sec, before, and the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS Part 1 score was 13 (21, before. Autonomic symptoms, hot flashes and paroxysmal sweating, were also alleviated. Acupuncture may be a good treatment modality for nonmotor symptoms in PD.

  10. [Treatment by non-physicians of skin diseases--including potentially malignant diseases with lasers and intense pulsed light].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Ditte Maria; Wulf, Hans Christian O; Stender, Ida-Marie; Haedersdal, Merete

    2006-11-06

    Laser and IPL treatment by non-physicians raises professional concern. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate laser and IPL treatment carried out by non-physicians and to assess the level of pre-treatment information given to patients. Approached clinics were found by internet-searches and from advertisements in telephone directories and national newspapers. The target group was clinics in Zealand that offer laser or IPL treatment of pigmented lesions, pigmented nevi, sun-damaged skin, acne and/or unwanted hair growth. The investigation did not include specialised clinics run by dermatologists and plastic surgeons. By means of anonymous telephone calls the clinics were presented for standardized questions under the pretext of being a potential client. Of 28 clinics investigated, 93% offered treatment for unwanted hair growth, 75% for pigmented lesions, 50% for acne, 36% for possible actinic keratoses and 29% for pigmented nevi. Medical examination was an exception (11%). In none of the clinics were medical examinations performed by specialists in dermatology or plastic surgery. Cosmeticians or nurses generally gave the laser and IPL treatments. In 57% of the clinics patients were informed that the treatment did not have any risks. In June treatment was offered in 79% of the clinics, 18% of which mentioned that no special precautions were necessary when treating in sunny periods. Laser and IPL treatment of skin diseases, including potential malignant diseases, is carried out by non-physicians and pre-treatment information contains major errors and shortcomings.

  11. Advocacy in neurology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pauranik, Apoorva

    2008-01-01

    ...), launched the Neurological Alliance of Ireland, a nationwide coalition of patient advocacy groups and physicians and authored Standards of Care, the "blueprint" for the development of neurological...

  12. Iodobenzamide SPET in neurological and psychiatric diseases: technical aspects and clinical impact; Tomoscintigraphie cerebrale a l`iodobenzamide en pathologie neuropsychiatrique: technique et pertinence clinique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranquart, F.; Prunier-Levillion, C.; Guilloteau, D.; Toffol, B. de; Autret, A.; Besnard, J.C.; Baulieu, J.L. [Hopital Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France)

    1996-12-31

    Cerebral dopamine receptor assessment using single photon emission tomography (SPET) was recently accepted as a valuable method for a relative quantification of these receptors. We have performed 45 examinations using iodobenzamide (123-IBZM), which is a ligand for post-synaptic D2 receptors, in a variety of neurological or psychiatric diseases in which the dopaminergic system could be involved. The relative quantification of these D2 receptors was performed using different ratios with striatal, cerebellar and total tracer uptake. We observed a significant decrease in 123-IBZM striatal tracer uptake in Parkinson`s disease, supra-nuclear palsy, Alzheimer disease or Huntington disease, in comparison with control subjects (p<0.05). The present study indicates that 123-IBZM SPET could be easily performed in the different nuclear medicine departments and is useful in atypical Parkinson`s disease to access the diagnosis and drug efficacy. This could be of prognostic value in suspected or marked Huntington`s disease. (authors). 27 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  13. Neurological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus: role of antiphospholipid antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golstein, M; Meyer, O; Bourgeois, P; Palazzo, E; Nicaise, P; Labarre, C; Kahn, M F

    1993-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (APL) are associated with venous and arterial thrombosis in SLE patients. Various thrombotic and non-thrombotic neurological manifestations have been reported in SLE but whether or not they are related to the presence of APL antibodies remains uncertain. To assess the possible association between neurological involvement in SLE and APL antibodies, IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (IgG ACL) were looked for using an ELISA technique in 92 consecutive SLE patients seen over a one-year period. Other APL determinations included VDRL and lupus anticoagulant (LAC) testing using APTT and the diluted thromboplastin time. Twenty-four SLE patients presented with neurological manifestations (40 episodes): 15/24 (62.5%) were found positive for APL antibodies (11 VDRL, 8 LAC, 7 ACL antibodies) versus 22/68 patients (32%) without neurological symptoms (p < 0.01). APL antibodies antedated neurological symptoms in 13/16 cases. Neurological manifestations were subsequently divided into 3 groups: thrombotic (n = 14), psychosis and convulsions (n = 15), miscellaneous (n = 10). No correlation was found between APL antibodies and any of the 3 subgroups. Among patients with neurological SLE, APL antibodies were present in two with valvular heart disease, as well as in seven with a history of either deep vein thrombosis, livedo reticularis or miscarriage. Among 7 patients with thrombocytopenia and neurological symptoms, 6 had APL antibodies. These data suggest that APL syndrome is associated with neuro-ophthalmological manifestations of SLE regardless of whether or not the mechanism of neurological involvement is thrombotic. SLE patients with APL antibodies may be at risk for future neurological manifestations. However, it is still questionable that APL positivity has definite therapeutic consequences.

  14. Neurologic complications of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, James M; Weimer, Louis H

    2014-06-01

    This review serves as an overview of neurologic conditions associated with alcohol abuse or withdrawal, including epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnostic approach, and treatment. Frequent alcohol abuse and frank alcoholism are very common among adults in the United States. Although rates decline with each decade, as many as 10% of the elderly drink excessively. Given the ubiquitous nature of alcoholism in society, its complications have been clinically recognized for generations, with recent advances focusing on improved understanding of ethanol's biochemical targets and the pathophysiology of its complications. The chronic effects of alcohol abuse are myriad and include neurologic complications through both direct and indirect effects on the central and peripheral nervous systems. These disorders include several encephalopathic states related to alcohol intoxication, withdrawal, and related nutritional deficiencies; acute and chronic toxic and nutritional peripheral neuropathies; and myopathy. Although prevention of alcoholism and its neurologic complications is the optimal strategy, this article reviews the specific treatment algorithms for alcohol withdrawal and its related nutritional deficiency states.

  15. A mouse model for fucosidosis recapitulates storage pathology and neurological features of the milder form of the human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Heike; Damme, Markus; Stroobants, Stijn; D'Hooge, Rudi; Beck, Hans Christian; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Dierks, Thomas; Lübke, Torben

    2016-09-01

    Fucosidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase α-L-fucosidase, which leads to an impaired degradation of fucosylated glycoconjugates. Here, we report the generation of a fucosidosis mouse model, in which the gene for lysosomal α-L-fucosidase (Fuca1) was disrupted by gene targeting. Homozygous knockout mice completely lack α-L-fucosidase activity in all tested organs leading to highly elevated amounts of the core-fucosylated glycoasparagine Fuc(α1,6)-GlcNAc(β1-N)-Asn and, to a lesser extent, other fucosylated glycoasparagines, which all were also partially excreted in urine. Lysosomal storage pathology was observed in many visceral organs, such as in the liver, kidney, spleen and bladder, as well as in the central nervous system (CNS). On the cellular level, storage was characterized by membrane-limited cytoplasmic vacuoles primarily containing water-soluble storage material. In the CNS, cellular alterations included enlargement of the lysosomal compartment in various cell types, accumulation of secondary storage material and neuroinflammation, as well as a progressive loss of Purkinje cells combined with astrogliosis leading to psychomotor and memory deficits. Our results demonstrate that this new fucosidosis mouse model resembles the human disease and thus will help to unravel underlying pathological processes. Moreover, this model could be utilized to establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for fucosidosis. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. A mouse model for fucosidosis recapitulates storage pathology and neurological features of the milder form of the human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Wolf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fucosidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase α-L-fucosidase, which leads to an impaired degradation of fucosylated glycoconjugates. Here, we report the generation of a fucosidosis mouse model, in which the gene for lysosomal α-L-fucosidase (Fuca1 was disrupted by gene targeting. Homozygous knockout mice completely lack α-L-fucosidase activity in all tested organs leading to highly elevated amounts of the core-fucosylated glycoasparagine Fuc(α1,6-GlcNAc(β1-N-Asn and, to a lesser extent, other fucosylated glycoasparagines, which all were also partially excreted in urine. Lysosomal storage pathology was observed in many visceral organs, such as in the liver, kidney, spleen and bladder, as well as in the central nervous system (CNS. On the cellular level, storage was characterized by membrane-limited cytoplasmic vacuoles primarily containing water-soluble storage material. In the CNS, cellular alterations included enlargement of the lysosomal compartment in various cell types, accumulation of secondary storage material and neuroinflammation, as well as a progressive loss of Purkinje cells combined with astrogliosis leading to psychomotor and memory deficits. Our results demonstrate that this new fucosidosis mouse model resembles the human disease and thus will help to unravel underlying pathological processes. Moreover, this model could be utilized to establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for fucosidosis.

  17. Enfermidades do sistema nervoso dos ruminantes no sul do Rio Grande do Sul Neurological diseases in ruminants in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Riet-Correa

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Descrevem-se os aspectos epidemiológicos, clínicos e patológicos das enfermidades do sistema nervoso central dos ruminantes, diagnosticadas na região Sul do Rio Grande do Sul, incluindo: abiotrofia cerebelar; hipoplasia cerebelar; hipermetria hereditária; artrogripose; hipomielinogênese congênita; abscesso cerebral; listeriose; tétano; botulismo; necrose simétrica focal; raiva; leucose; encefalite por herpesvírus bovino-5; febre catarral maligna; intoxicações por Solanum fastigiatum, Claviceps paspali, Ramaria flavo-brunnescens, Halimium brasiliense e Diplodia maydis; encefalopatia hepática causada por Senecio spp. e Echium plantagineum; cetose; coenurose; e síndrome espinhal.The main epidemiological, clinical and pathologic aspects of the diseases of the nervous system in cattle in Southern Rio Grande do Sul are described, including, the following conditions: cerebellar abiotrophy; cerebellar hypoplasia; congenital hypermetria; arthrogryposis; congenital hypomyelinogenesis; brain abscess; listeriose; tetanus; botulism; focal symmetrical encephalomalacia; rabies; leucosis; encephalitis by Herpesvirus Bovine-5; bovino malignant catarrh; intoxications by Solanum fastigiatum, Claviceps paspali, Halimium brasiliense, Diplodia maydis, and Ramaria flavo-brunnescens; hepatoencephalopaty caused by Senecio spp. and Echium plantagineum; ketosis; coenurosis; and spinal syndrome.

  18. Hepatitis C virus and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 co-infection: impact on liver disease, virological markers, and neurological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espíndola, Otávio M; Vizzoni, Alexandre G; Lampe, Elisabeth; Andrada-Serpa, Maria José; Araújo, Abelardo Q C; Leite, Ana Claudia C

    2017-04-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with neurological abnormalities, such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and peripheral neuropathy (PN). Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the leading cause of chronic liver disease worldwide, and causes PN in approximately 9% of patients. Because the interplay between these potentially neuropathogenic viruses in the same individual is still poorly understood, the clinical and laboratory outcomes of co-infected patients were evaluated and compared with those of controls. The prevalence rates of neurological and laboratory abnormalities were evaluated in HCV/HTLV-1 co-infected patients (n=50), and in subjects with single HCV (n=46) or HTLV-1 (n=150) infection. A higher frequency of isolated PN was present in HCV-infected patients; this was not associated with cryoglobulinemia. No difference was found in the frequency of PN or HAM/TSP when co-infected subjects were compared to singly infected subjects. Hepatic involvement was present in HCV-infected subjects, as shown by increased levels of serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and bilirubin, in addition to thrombocytopenia. On the other hand, HCV/HTLV-1 co-infected individuals presented a better prognosis for hepatic involvement when compared with singly HCV-infected subjects. These data suggest that HCV/HTLV-1 co-infection does not mutualistically alter the outcome with regard to neurological manifestations. Nonetheless, changes in the immunological environment induced by HTLV-1 infection could lead to a reduction in hepatic damage, even without significant HCV clearance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Toxoplasmosis and Polygenic Disease Susceptibility Genes: Extensive Toxoplasma gondii Host/Pathogen Interactome Enrichment in Nine Psychiatric or Neurological Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    C. J. Carter

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is not only implicated in schizophrenia and related disorders, but also in Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, cancer, cardiac myopathies, and autoimmune disorders. During its life cycle, the pathogen interacts with ~3000 host genes or proteins. Susceptibility genes for multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, childhood obesity, Parkinson's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (P??from??8.01E ? 05??(ADHD)??to??1.22E ?...

  20. Treatment of Exudative and Vasogenic Chorioretinal Diseases Including Variants of AMD and Other CNV Related Maculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    Coats' Disease; Idiopathic Retinal Telangiectasia; Retinal Angiomatous Proliferation; Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy; Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum; Pathological Myopia; Multi-focal Choroiditis; Rubeosis Iridis; Von Hippel Lindau Disease; BEST VITELLIFORM MACULAR DYSTROPHY, MULTIFOCAL (Disorder)

  1. Neurology and literature 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2014-05-01

    Good literary fiction has the potential to move us, extend our sense of life, transform our prospective views and help us in the face of adversity. A neurological disorder is likely to be the most challenging experience a human being may have to confront in a lifetime. As such, literary recreations of illnesses have a doubly powerful effect. Study the synergies between neurology and fictional literature with particular reference to narrative based medicine (NBM). Doctors establish boundaries between the normal and the abnormal. Taking a clinical history is an act of interpretation in which the doctor integrates the science of objective signs and measurable quantities with the art of subjective clinical judgment. The more discrepancy there is between the patient's experience with the illness and the doctor's interpretation of that disease, the less likely the doctor-patient interaction is to succeed. NBM contributes to a better discernment of the meanings, thus considering disease as a biographical event rather than just a natural fact. Drawing from their own experience with disease, writers of fiction provide universal insights through their narratives, whilst neuroscientists, like Cajal, have occasionally devoted their scientific knowledge to literary narratives. Furthermore, neurologists from Alzheimer to Oliver Sacks remind us of the essential value of NBM in the clinic. Integrating NBM (the narrative of patients) and the classic holistic approach to patients with our current paradigm of evidence based medicine represents a challenge as relevant to neurologists as keeping up with technological and scientific advances. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Symptoms after mould exposure including Stachybotrys chartarum, and comparison with darkroom disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahmad, M; Manno, M; Ng, V; Ribeiro, M; Liss, G M; Tarlo, S M

    2010-02-01

    Mould-attributed symptoms have included features which overlap with unexplained syndromes such as sick building syndrome. We describe questionnaire and chart review findings in patients following exposure to moulds which include Stachybotrys and compare responses with two control groups. Thirty-two patients presented with symptoms attributed to mould exposures. Exposure identification for 25 patients had reported S tachybotrys chartarum as well as other mould (Aspergillus, Penicillium), 88% at work. The remaining seven had professionally visualized or self-reported/photographic exposure evidence only. A chart review was performed and a follow-up with a questionnaire, including questions on current health status, and nonspecific symptoms. Cough, shortness of breath and chest tightness (at presentation) were reported in 79%, 70% and 64%, respectively, and persisted >6 weeks in 91%. Skin test(s) were positive to fungal extract(s) in 30%. Seventeen returned questionnaires were obtained 3.1 (SD 0.5) years after the initial clinic assessment. Among this subgroup, persisting asthma-like symptoms and symptoms suggestive of sick building syndrome were frequent, and similar to a group previously assessed for darkroom disease among medical radiation technologists. The mould-exposed group more commonly reported they were bothered when walking in a room with carpets, complained of a chemical or metallic taste in their mouth, and had problems in concentration when compared with a control physiotherapist group (P < 0.005). Although only a minority with health concerns from indoor mould exposure had demonstrable mould-allergy, a significant proportion had asthma-like symptoms. Other symptoms were also common and persistent after the initial implicated exposure.

  3. Dermatology referrals in a neurological set up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeptara Pathak Thapa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermatology is a specialty, which not only deals with dermatological problems with outpatient but also inpatients referrals. The importances of Dermatologist in hospital setting are rising due to changing condition of medical care. Since no peer-reviewed articles are available for dermatological problems in a neurological set up, we conducted this study to know about pattern of skin disorders in neurological patients. Material and Methods: The present study was a prospective study in a neurological setup, which included data from hospital dermatology consultation request forms over a period of one year. The data included demographic profile of the patient investigation where needed, neurological diagnosis and final dermatological diagnosis. The data was analyzed using SPSS. Results: A total of 285 patients who were requested for consultation were included in the study. Face was the commonest site of involvement (19.6%. Laboratory examination of referred patients revealed abnormal blood counts in 2% cases, renal function tests in 0.7% and urine in 0.4% cases. CT scan showed abnormal findings in 65.6% patients. The most common drug used in these patients was phenytoin (29.1%. The most common dermatological diagnosis was Infection and Infestation (34.7% followed by eczema (46.6%. Drug rash was seen in 3.9% cases. Out of which one had phenytoin induced Steven Johnson syndrome. Skin biopsy was done in 5 patients. Topicals was advised in 80%. Upon discharge 10% of inpatients didn’t require any follow-up. The patients who were followed up after 4 weeks, about 48% had their symptoms resolved with topicals and oral treatment as required. About 38% required more than two follow ups due to chronic course of the diseases. Conclusions: This present study discussed about various manifestations of skin disorders in a neurological set up and emphasizes the role of dermatologist in treating skin problems both in outpatient as well as inpatient

  4. Toxoplasmosis and Polygenic Disease Susceptibility Genes: Extensive Toxoplasma gondii Host/Pathogen Interactome Enrichment in Nine Psychiatric or Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Carter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is not only implicated in schizophrenia and related disorders, but also in Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, cancer, cardiac myopathies, and autoimmune disorders. During its life cycle, the pathogen interacts with ~3000 host genes or proteins. Susceptibility genes for multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, childhood obesity, Parkinson's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (multiple sclerosis, and autism (, but not anorexia or chronic fatigue are highly enriched in the human arm of this interactome and 18 (ADHD to 33% (MS of the susceptibility genes relate to it. The signalling pathways involved in the susceptibility gene/interactome overlaps are relatively specific and relevant to each disease suggesting a means whereby susceptibility genes could orient the attentions of a single pathogen towards disruption of the specific pathways that together contribute (positively or negatively to the endophenotypes of different diseases. Conditional protein knockdown, orchestrated by T. gondii proteins or antibodies binding to those of the host (pathogen derived autoimmunity and metabolite exchange, may contribute to this disruption. Susceptibility genes may thus be related to the causes and influencers of disease, rather than (and as well as to the disease itself.

  5. Suspicion of macrolide allergy after treatment of infectious diseases including Helicobacter pylori: results of allergological testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Cornelia S; Bröcker, Eva-B; Trautmann, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Macrolides are useful in a wide range of bacterial infections including upper and lower respiratory tract, skin, and sexually transmitted diseases and are used in Helicobacter pylori eradication regimen. Skin symptoms occurring during drug therapy are mostly attributed to the antibiotic, causing considerable limitations of future therapeutic options. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to demonstrate results of diagnostic testing in cases of clinically suspected immediate and delayed macrolide hypersensitivity. A total of 125 patients with a history of immediate or delayed hypersensitivity symptoms in temporal relation to treatment with a macrolide antibiotic were studied using standardised skin tests followed by oral challenges. Selected patients with severe symptoms were further evaluated with in vitro tests. Macrolide hypersensitivity was excluded in 109 patients (87.2%) by tolerated oral challenge tests. During 113 challenges in four patients an exanthema was provoked by the suspected macrolide. Only one patient developed a positive late skin test reaction. Out of the 28 Helicobacter pylori-treated patients, one patient with clarithromycin allergy was identified, whereas in eight cases amoxicillin allergy caused the exanthema. Laboratory tests using the suspected macrolides were constantly negative. History alone leads to an over-estimation of macrolide hypersensitivity. Moreover, skin and in vitro tests seem to be not very useful in identifying hypersensitive patients. Challenge tests appear to be necessary for definitely confirming or ruling out macrolide allergy. Copyright © 2010 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Sports neurology topics in neurologic practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conidi, Francis X.; Drogan, Oksana; Giza, Christopher C.; Kutcher, Jeffery S.; Alessi, Anthony G.; Crutchfield, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sought to assess neurologists' interest in sports neurology and learn about their experience in treating sports-related neurologic conditions. A survey was sent to a random sample of American Academy of Neurology members. A majority of members (77%) see at least some patients with sports-related neurologic issues. Concussion is the most common sports-related condition neurologists treat. More than half of survey participants (63%) did not receive any formal or informal training in sports neurology. At least two-thirds of respondents think it is very important to address the following issues: developing evidence-based return-to-play guidelines, identifying risk factors for long-term cognitive-behavioral sequelae, and developing objective diagnostic criteria for concussion. Our findings provide an up-to-date view of the subspecialty of sports neurology and identify areas for future research. PMID:24790800

  7. A census of P. longum's phytochemicals and their network pharmacological evaluation for identifying novel drug-like molecules against various diseases, with a special focus on neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Neha; Singh, Vikram

    2018-01-01

    Piper longum (P. longum, also called as long pepper) is one of the common culinary herbs that has been extensively used as a crucial constituent in various indigenous medicines, specifically in traditional Indian medicinal system known as Ayurveda. For exploring the comprehensive effect of its constituents in humans at proteomic and metabolic levels, we have reviewed all of its known phytochemicals and enquired about their regulatory potential against various protein targets by developing high-confidence tripartite networks consisting of phytochemical-protein target-disease association. We have also (i) studied immunomodulatory potency of this herb; (ii) developed subnetwork of human PPI regulated by its phytochemicals and could successfully associate its specific modules playing important role in diseases, and (iii) reported several novel drug targets. P10636 (microtubule-associated protein tau, that is involved in diseases like dementia etc.) was found to be the commonly screened target by about seventy percent of these phytochemicals. We report 20 drug-like phytochemicals in this herb, out of which 7 are found to be the potential regulators of 5 FDA approved drug targets. Multi-targeting capacity of 3 phytochemicals involved in neuroactive ligand receptor interaction pathway was further explored via molecular docking experiments. To investigate the molecular mechanism of P. longum's action against neurological disorders, we have developed a computational framework that can be easily extended to explore its healing potential against other diseases and can also be applied to scrutinize other indigenous herbs for drug-design studies.

  8. Genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in humanized HIV-transgenic mice triggers HIV shedding and is associated with greater neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Briana; Fakioglu, Esra; Stefanidou, Martha; Wang, Yanhua; Dutta, Monica; Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C

    2014-02-15

    Epidemiological studies consistently demonstrate synergy between herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Higher HIV-1 loads are observed in coinfected individuals, and conversely, HIV-1 is associated with more-severe herpetic disease. A small animal model of coinfection would facilitate identification of the biological mechanisms underlying this synergy and provide the opportunity to evaluate interventions. Mice transgenic for HIV-1 provirus and human cyclin T1 under the control of a CD4 promoter (JR-CSF/hu-cycT1) were intravaginally infected with HSV-2 and evaluated for disease progression, HIV shedding, and mucosal immune responses. HSV-2 infection resulted in higher vaginal HIV loads and genital tissue expression of HIV RNA, compared with HSV-uninfected JR-CSF/hu-cycT1 mice. There was an increase in genital tract inflammatory cells, cytokines, chemokines, and interferons in response to HSV-2, although the kinetics of the response were delayed in HIV-transgenic, compared with control mice. Moreover, the JR-CSF/hu-cycT1 mice exhibited earlier and more-severe neurological disease. The latter was associated with downregulation of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor expression in neuronal tissue, a molecule with antiinflammatory, antiviral, and neuroprotective properties. JR-CSF/hu-cycT1 mice provide a valuable model to study HIV/HSV-2 coinfection and identify potential mechanisms by which HSV-2 facilitates HIV-1 transmission and HIV modulates HSV-2-mediated disease.

  9. Full genome sequence of a novel coxsackievirus B5 strain isolated from neurological hand, foot, and mouth disease patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y F; Zhao, R; Xue, Y; Yang, Fan; Jin, Q

    2012-10-01

    Coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5) belongs to the human enterovirus B species within the family Picornaviridae. We report the complete genome sequence of a novel CVB5 strain, CVB5/SD/09, that is associated with neurological hand, foot, and mouth disease in China. The complete genome consists of 7,399 nucleotides, excluding the 3' poly(A) tail, and has an open reading frame that maps between nucleotide positions 744 and 7301 and encodes a 2,185-amino-acid polyprotein. Phylogenetic analysis based on different genome region regions reveals that CVB5/SD/09 belongs to a novel CVB5 lineage, and similarity plotting and bootscanning analysis based on the whole genome of CVB5 in the present study and those available in GenBank indicate that the genome of CVB5/SD/09 has a mosaic-like structure, suggesting that recombination between different CVB5 strains may occur.

  10. [The Terminal Phase of an Intractable Neurological Disease from the Viewpoint of Nursing Care: The Importance of the Promotion of a Barrier-Free Mind for ALS Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Koko

    2015-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a particularly serious intractable neurological disease. Patients with ALS have high mortality rates if they are not put on an artificial respirator. Even with an artificial respirator, individuals with ALS are forced to witness their own physical deterioration. Because 24 hour care is usually required, an intense relationship ofter develops between patients with ALS and family caregivers. This relationship forms an invisible barrier and can impede a smooth introduction of external services. As a result, there can be a degradation in the quality of care. The purpose of this paper is to describe the voluntary efforts of patients and family caregivers in order to break down this barrier and to discuss what types of care support are available to promote barrier-free minds.

  11. Palliative care and neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  12. Advances in paediatrics in 2016: current practices and challenges in allergy, autoimmune diseases, cardiology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, infectious diseases, neonatology, nephrology, neurology, nutrition, pulmonology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Di Mauro, Dora; Mastrorilli, Carla; Montella, Silvia; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2017-09-16

    This review reports main progresses in various pediatric issues published in Italian Journal of Pediatrics and in international journals in 2016. New insights in clinical features or complications of several disorders may be useful for our better understanding. They comprise severe asthma, changing features of lupus erythematosus from birth to adolescence, celiac disease, functional gastrointestinal disorders, Moebius syndrome, recurrent pneumonia. Risk factors for congenital heart defects, Kawasaki disease have been widely investigated. New diagnostic tools are available for ascertaining brucellosis, celiac disease and viral infections. The usefulness of aCGH as first-tier test is confirmed in patients with neurodevelopmental disorders. Novel information have been provided on the safety of milk for infants. Recent advances in the treatment of common disorders, including neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, hypo-glycemia in newborns, atopic dermatitis, constipation, cyclic vomiting syndrome, nephrotic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, regurgitation, short stature, secretions in children with cerebral palsy have been reported. Antipyretics treatment has been updated by national guidelines and studies have excluded side effects (e.g. asthma risk during acetaminophen therapy). Vaccinations are a painful event and several options are reported to prevent this pain. Adverse effects due to metabolic abnormalities are reported for second generation antipsychotic drugs.

  13. Combined lithium and valproate treatment delays disease onset, reduces neurological deficits and prolongs survival in an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, H-L; Leng, Y; Ma, C-H; Zhang, J; Ren, M; Chuang, D-M

    2008-08-26

    Lithium and valproic acid (VPA) are two primary drugs used to treat bipolar disorder, and have been shown to have neuroprotective properties in vivo and in vitro. A recent study demonstrated that combined treatment with lithium and VPA elicits synergistic neuroprotective effects against glutamate excitotoxicity in cultured brain neurons, and the synergy involves potentiated inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) activity through enhanced GSK-3 serine phosphorylation [Leng Y, Liang MH, Ren M, Marinova Z, Leeds P, Chuang DM (2008) Synergistic neuroprotective effects of lithium and valproic acid or other histone deacetylase inhibitors in neurons: roles of glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition. J Neurosci 28:2576-2588]. We therefore investigated the effects of lithium and VPA cotreatment on the disease symptom onset, survival time and neurological deficits in cooper zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) G93A mutant mice, a commonly used mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The G93A ALS mice received twice daily i.p. injections with LiCl (60 mg/kg), VPA (300 mg/kg) or lithium plus VPA, starting from the 30(th) day after birth and continuing until death. We found that combined treatment with lithium and VPA produced a greater and more consistent effect in delaying the onset of disease symptoms, prolonging the lifespan and decreasing the neurological deficit scores, compared with the results of monotreatment with lithium or VPA. Moreover, lithium in conjunction with VPA was more effective than lithium or VPA alone in enhancing the immunostaining of phospho-GSK-3beta(Ser9) in brain and lumbar spinal cord sections. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of enhanced neuroprotection by a combinatorial approach using mood stabilizers in a mouse ALS model. Our results suggest that clinical trials using lithium and VPA in combination for ALS patients are a rational strategy.

  14. Genetics Health Professionals' Views on Quality of Genetic Counseling Service Provision for Presymptomatic Testing in Late-Onset Neurological Diseases in Portugal: Core Components, Specific Challenges and the Need for Assessment Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneque, M; Mendes, Á; Guimarães, L; Sequeiros, J; Skirton, H

    2015-08-01

    Quality assessment of genetic counseling practice for improving healthcare is a challenge for genetic services worldwide; however, there is scarce literature regarding quality issues in genetic counseling in the context of presymptomatic testing for late-onset neurological diseases (Paneque et al. 2012) The aims of this qualitative study were to: (1) explore the views of professionals' who provide genetic counseling services for presymptomatic testing for late-onset neurological diseases regarding relevant quality indicators for counseling practice; and (2) examine current assessment of such counseling practice for Portuguese genetic services. Quality indicators are a means of measuring either the process or outcomes of patient services, with the aim of evaluating and improving quality of care (Mainz 2003). In this study, we defined quality indicators as measurable outcomes of the counseling process that may reflect good professional practice and desi