WorldWideScience

Sample records for neurointerventional surgery society

  1. Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NeuroInterventional Surgery is dedicated to excellence in comprehensive, minimally-invasive care of patients with stroke, brain aneurysms, and other diseases in the head, neck and spine. In the Spotlight Physicians Call on States to ...

  2. The Role of Neurosurgeons in Neurointerventional Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yılmaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although the endovascular technique represents an important, minimally invasive approach to cerebrovascular diseases, only a few neurosurgeons are trained in both endovascular and surgical management of intracranial vascular pathologies. Our aim was to emphasize the importance of the endovascular approach in neurosurgery by analysing the cerebral digital subtraction angiography findings in our patients. Materials and Methods: We analysed 207 patients who underwent cerebral angiography between February 2011 and June 2014. They had previously been diagnosed with cerebral vascular pathology including aneurysm, arteriovenous malformation (AVM, carotid cavernous fistula, vasculitis and Moyamoya disease according to computed tomographic angiography/magnetic resonance angiography findings. Demographic data, indications for cerebral angiography, endovascular and surgical treatments, complications and results were analyzed. Results: This study included a total of 207 patients (108 males and 99 females with a mean age of 57.43±11.14 (17-83 years. A total of 234 selective angiographies were performed. The indications for procedures were as follows: cerebral aneurysm (n=118, 57%, Moyamoya disease (n=3, 1.4%, AVM (n=13, 6.3%, carotid cavernous fistula (n=2, 1%, and intracranial vascular stenosis (n=2, 1%. No pathology was found in 69 patients (33.3%. Conclusion: Cerebral angiography is important not only in the diagnosis but also in the treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. Neurointerventional surgery is a safe and minimally invasive treatment option based on meticulous protocols, however, it has not been included in the neurosurgery residency program yet. Developing training programs for endovascular neurosurgeons provididing comprehensive patient care should be considered.

  3. Expanding the social media presence of the Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery: editor's report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargen, Kyle M; Ducruet, Andrew F; Hyer, Madison; Hirsch, Joshua A; Tarr, Robert W

    2017-02-01

    The use of social media is pervasive throughout society and serves many purposes. Traditional forms of advertising are being upended as vendors recognize the unique abilities of social media platforms to target their messages to specific customers. Peer reviewed medical and professional journals are beginning to develop their own initiatives using social media to advertize unique content. We present the nascent Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery experience. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Initial hospital management of patients with emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO): report of the standards and guidelines committee of the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTaggart, Ryan A; Ansari, Sameer A; Goyal, Mayank; Abruzzo, Todd A; Albani, Barb; Arthur, Adam J; Alexander, Michael J; Albuquerque, Felipe C; Baxter, Blaise; Bulsara, Ketan R; Chen, Michael; Almandoz, Josser E Delgado; Fraser, Justin F; Frei, Donald; Gandhi, Chirag D; Heck, Don V; Hetts, Steven W; Hussain, M Shazam; Kelly, Michael; Klucznik, Richard; Lee, Seon-Kyu; Leslie-Mawzi, Thabele; Meyers, Philip M; Prestigiacomo, Charles J; Pride, G Lee; Patsalides, Athos; Starke, Robert M; Sunenshine, Peter; Rasmussen, Peter A; Jayaraman, Mahesh V

    2017-03-01

    To summarize the current literature regarding the initial hospital management of patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) secondary to emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO), and to offer recommendations designed to decrease the time to endovascular treatment (EVT) for appropriately selected patients with stroke. Using guidelines for evidenced-based medicine proposed by the Stroke Council of the American Heart Association, a critical review of all available medical literature supporting best initial medical management of patients with AIS secondary to ELVO was performed. The purpose was to identify processes of care that most expeditiously determine the eligibility of a patient with an acute stroke for interventions including intravenous fibrinolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) and EVT using mechanical embolectomy. This review identifies four elements that are required to achieve timely revascularization in ELVO. (1) In addition to non-contrast CT (NCCT) brain scan, CT angiography should be performed in all patients who meet an institutional threshold for clinical stroke severity. The use of any advanced imaging beyond NCCT should not delay the administration of IV tPA in eligible patients. (2) Activation of the neurointerventional team should occur as soon as possible, based on either confirmation of large vessel occlusion or a prespecified clinical severity threshold. (3) Additional imaging techniques, particularly those intended to physiologically select patients for EVT (CT perfusion and diffusion-perfusion mismatch imaging), may provide additional value, but should not delay EVT. (4) Routine use of general anesthesia during EVT procedures, should be avoided if possible. These workflow recommendations apply to both primary and comprehensive stroke centers and should be tailored to meet the needs of individual institutions. Patients with ELVO are at risk for severe neurologic morbidity and mortality. To achieve the best possible

  5. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Change You can help ASMBS bring coverage for bariatric surgery to all states in America through ObesityPAC Read ... and as a leader in the field of bariatric surgery. Take the IH Compensation Survey Please complete this ...

  6. American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back Specialty Laser and Energy-Based Device Use Dentistry Dermatology General Surgery Neurosurgery Obstetrics/Gynecology Oncology Ophthalmology Otolaryngology Urology Veterinary Medicine Treatments Using Lasers and Energy-Based Devices ...

  7. Introducing the International Confederation of Plastic Surgery Societies: ICOPLAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhorst, Hinne A; Badran, Hassan; Clarke, Howard M; Cooter, Rodney; Evans, Gregory R D; Kirschbaum, Julio Daniel; Koh, Kyung Suk; Lazier, Carol; Murphy, Robert X; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Piccolo, Nelson Sarto; Perks, Graeme

    2017-09-01

    This article describes the formation of the International Confederation of Plastic Surgery Societies (ICOPLAST) as a novel, transparent, dynamic, and proactive confederation of national plastic surgery societies. ICOPLAST aspires to provide a voice for the entire international community of plastic surgeons. ICOPLAST has been designed to benefit the patient, plastic surgery as a profession, and each individual plastic surgeon. Its principal objective is to enhance international communication, education, and advocacy processes to ultimately improve patient outcomes for plastic surgery patients globally. The new ICOPLAST's focus is to add true value for patients. ICOPLAST's evolution, philosophy, governance, and bylaws are explained and all societies worldwide are encouraged and cordially invited to join. An open and warm invitation is provided. Additional information is found at www.ICOPLAST.org.

  8. Student Research Society of the Pediatric Surgery Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Veselyi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Student research society of clinic of children surgery of Donetsk National Medical university named after M. Gorkyi exists since 1968. Our student research society has two main directions in activity of the students — theoretical and practical ones, and both of them are presented during meetings of research society. During a spring semester the student scientific conference is carried out. The best works are represented on University, Ukrainian and international student conferen-ces. The obligatory form of activity in student research society is the immediate involvement in diagnostic and medical manipulations. The enhancement of activity of student research society allows increase learning efficiency of children surgery students at Higher Medical School.

  9. Portuguese Society of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery/Portuguese Society of Cardiology recommendations for waiting times for cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, José; Pereira, Hélder; Sousa Uva, Miguel; Gavina, Cristina; Leite Moreira, Adelino; Loureiro, Maria José

    2015-11-01

    Appointed jointly by the Portuguese Society of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery (SPCCTV) and the Portuguese Society of Cardiology (SPC), the Working Group on Waiting Times for Cardiac Surgery was established with the aim of developing practical recommendations for clinically acceptable waiting times for the three critical phases of the care of adults with heart disease who require surgery or other cardiological intervention: cardiology appointments; the diagnostic process; and invasive treatment. Cardiac surgery has specific characteristics that are not comparable to other surgical specialties. It is important to reduce maximum waiting times and to increase the efficacy of systems for patient monitoring and tracking. The information in this document is mainly based on available clinical information. The methodology used to establish the criteria was based on studies on the natural history of heart disease, clinical studies comparing medical treatment with intervention, retrospective and prospective analyses of patients on waiting lists, and the opinions of experts and working groups. Following the first step, represented by publication of this document, the SPCCTV and SPC, as the bodies best suited to oversee this process, are committed to working together to define operational strategies that will reconcile the clinical evidence with the actual situation and with available resources. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Vena cava filter practices of a regional vascular surgery society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedell, Mark L; Nelson, Peter R; Cheatham, Michael L

    2012-07-01

    Vena cava filter (VCF) use in the United States has increased dramatically with prophylactic indications for placement and the availability of low-profile retrievable devices, which are overtaking the filter market. We surveyed the practice patterns of a large group of vascular surgeons from a regional vascular surgery society to see whether they mirrored current national trends. A 17-question online VCF survey was offered to all members of the Southern Association of Vascular Surgery. The responses were analyzed using the χ(2) goodness of fit tests. Of the 276 members surveyed, 126 (46%) responded, with 118 (93%) indicating that they placed filters during their practice. Highly significant differences were identified with each question (at least P biconical and certain retrievable filters. Given the low removal rate and lack of long-term experience with retrievable filters, routine use of these devices as permanent filters should be questioned. If used on a temporary basis, there should be a plan for filter removal at the time of implantation. Copyright © 2012 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Society of European Robotic Gynaecological Surgery (SERGS) Pilot Curriculum for robot assisted gynecological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Peter; Kimmig, Rainer; Lecuru, Fabrice; Persson, Jan; Ponce, Jordi; Degueldre, Michel; Verheijen, René

    2017-12-13

    To set forth experiences in the context of the SERGS Pilot Curriculum-the first standardized educational program for robotic use in gynecological surgery-in terms of feasibility, effectiveness and potential for certification. The Society of European Robotic Gynecological Surgery (SERGS) outlined a Pilot Curriculum for standardized education in robot-assisted laparoscopic gynecological surgery. Its feasibility and acceptance were checked in the form of a fellowship pilot program conducted at four European Centers of Excellence for robot-assisted surgery. Results and conclusions derived from this pilot program are presented. The SERGS Pilot Curriculum defines criteria for a standardized training and assessment of performance, boosts the learning curve of the candidate and increases contentment at work. Regarding face validity, it proves valuable as finally all candidates could perform the outlined procedure safely and efficiently without supervision. Due to the immense increase of robotic procedures in gynecology standardized training curricula are indispensable. This seems highly necessary to ensure patients' safety and surgical outcome. The SERGS Pilot Curriculum sets standards for a stepwise theoretical and practical training in gynecological robotic procedures. It seems feasible as instrument for accreditation as gynecologic robotic surgeon. Though as a general applicable guideline for systematic training in robot-assisted surgery, a definite curriculum should have a more definite timeline and implementation of a structured assessment of performance.

  12. Are we effectively informing patients? A quantitative analysis of on-line patient education resources from the American Society of Neuroradiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansberry, D R; Agarwal, N; Gonzales, S F; Baker, S R

    2014-07-01

    The ubiquitous use of the Internet by the public in an attempt to better understand their health care requires the on-line resources written at an appropriate level to maximize comprehension for the average user. The National Institutes of Health and the American Medical Association recommend on-line patient education resources written at a third-to-seventh grade level. We evaluated the readability of the patient education resources provided on the Web site of the American Society of Neuroradiology (http://www.asnr.org/patientinfo/). All patient education material from the ASNR Web site and the Society of Neurointerventional Surgery Web site were downloaded and evaluated with the computer software, Readability Studio Professional Edition, by using 10 quantitative readability scales: the Flesch Reading Ease, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, Coleman-Liau Index, Gunning Fog Index, New Dale-Chall, FORCAST Formula, Fry Graph, Raygor Reading Estimate, and New Fog Count. An unpaired t test was used to compare the readability level of resources available on the American Society of Neuroradiology and the Society of Neurointerventional Surgery Web sites. The 20 individual patient education articles were written at a 13.9 ± 1.4 grade level with only 5% written at Society of Neuroradiology and Society of Neurointerventional Surgery Web sites. The patient education resources on these Web sites fail to meet the guidelines of the National Institutes of Health and American Medical Association. Members of the public may fail to fully understand these resources and would benefit from revisions that result in more comprehensible information cast in simpler language. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  13. Is hair loss a reality in neuro-interventional radiology?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gavagan, L

    2012-02-01

    Reports in the literature of radiation-induced hair loss are becoming increasingly common. This work describes a retrospective dose study of patients (n = 958) undergoing diagnostic (primarily cerebral angiograms) and therapeutic (primarily cerebral embolisation) procedures in a neuro-interventional suite. A comparison of patient doses as dose area product (DAP) readings from a single-plane image intensifier system (mean DAP value of 8772 cGy cm(2)) were compared with patient doses from a flat panel biplane system (mean DAP value of 7855 cGy cm(2)). Over 80 % of patients requiring neuro-interventional procedures were found to undergo two procedures or more. An estimated 7 % of therapeutic procedures were found to reach the International Commission on Radiological Protection threshold for temporary epilation.

  14. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model: Part 1-Statistical Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Sean M; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K; Gaynor, J William; Karamlou, Tara; Welke, Karl F; Filardo, Giovanni; Han, Jane M; Kim, Sunghee; Shahian, David M; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2015-01-01

    ... after congenital cardiac operations. Included were patients of all ages undergoing cardiac operations, with or without cardiopulmonary bypass, at centers participating in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Data...

  15. Surgery Goes Social: The Extent and Patterns of Social Media Utilization by Major Trauma, Acute and Critical Care Surgery Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifeh, Jawad M; Kaafarani, Haytham M A

    2017-01-01

    The evolving influence of social media in trauma, acute, and critical care surgery (TACCS) cannot be ignored. We sought to investigate the extent and patterns of use of social networks by major regional, national and international TACCS societies. The two leading social networking sites, Facebook (FB) and Twitter (TW), were thoroughly examined for the presence of official accounts for each of the major TACCS societies. An official FB or TW account was defined as one which has a blue verified badge and/or is linked the society's official website. For societies with confirmed official accounts, the extent and patterns of use of the two platforms were systematically examined over a 2-week period through: (1) manual inspection of the societies' FB and TW pages, (2) the SQLite database containing downloaded samples of posts, and (3) the TW analytics database, symplur.com. Standardized social media metrics were calculated for each society. Posted content was categorized as being: (1) society news updates, (2) event announcements, or (3) general medical information. From a total of 64 TACCS societies, only 27 (42%) had FB and/or TW accounts. Ten out of the 12 American societies had accounts compared to 13/39 of European, 2/9 of Australasian, and 0/2 of international societies. For the societies with social media presence, the mean numbers of monthly tweets and FB posts per society were 22 and 8, respectively. We summarize the FB and TW activity of the studied TACCS societies. Most tweets/posts were society news updates and event announcements intended to the society's constituents not the general public. A text cloud was constructed to summarize the major featured topics. Less than half of the TACCS societies are currently using social media; those that do are arguably underutilizing its potential. Non-American societies in particular lag behind in their use of social networking.

  16. Operating room waste: disposable supply utilization in neurointerventional procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigante, Luigi; Moudrous, Walid; de Vries, Joost; Grotenhuis, André J; Boogaarts, Hieronymus D

    2017-12-01

    Operating rooms account for 70% of hospital waste, increasing healthcare costs and creating environmental hazards. Endovascular treatment of cerebrovascular pathologies has become prominent, and associated products highly impact the total cost of care. We investigated the costs of endovascular surgical waste at our institution. Data from 53 consecutive endovascular procedures at the Radboud UMC Nijmegen from May to December 2016 were collected. "Unused disposable supply" was defined as one-time use items opened but not used during the procedure. Two observers cataloged the unused disposable supply for each case. The cost of each item was determined from the center supply catalog, and these costs were summed to determine the total cost of unused supply per case. Thirteen diagnostic cerebral digital subtraction angiographies (DSA) (24.5%) and 40 endovascular procedures (75.5%) were analyzed. Total interventional waste was 27,299.53 € (mean 515.09 € per procedure). While total costs of unused disposable supply were almost irrelevant for DSAs, they were consistent for interventional procedures (mean 676.49 € per case). Aneurysm standard coiling had the highest impact on total interventional waste (mean 1061.55 €). Disposable interventional products had a very high impact on the surgical waste costs in the series of the neurointerventional procedures (95% of total waste). This study shows the impact of neurointerventional waste on the total care costs for cerebrovascular patients. This might reflect the tendency to anticipate needs and emergencies in neurointervention. Responsible use of disposable material can be achieved by educating operators and nurses and creating operator preference cards.

  17. Guide to research in academic global surgery: A statement of the Society of University Surgeons Global Academic Surgery Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluja, Saurabh; Nwomeh, Benedict; Finlayson, Samuel R G; Holterman, AiXuan L; Jawa, Randeep S; Jayaraman, Sudha; Juillard, Catherine; Krishnaswami, Sanjay; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Rickard, Jennifer; Weiser, Thomas G; Yang, George P; Shrime, Mark G

    2017-12-05

    Global surgery is an emerging academic discipline that is developing in tandem with numerous policy and advocacy initiatives. In this regard, academic global surgery will be crucial for measuring the progress toward improving surgical care worldwide. However, as a nascent academic discipline, there must be rigorous standards for the quality of work that emerges from this field. In this white paper, which reflects the opinion of the Global Academic Surgery Committee of the Society for University Surgeons, we discuss the importance of research in global surgery, the methodologies that can be used in such research, and the challenges and benefits associated with carrying out this research. In each of these topics, we draw on existing examples from the literature to demonstrate our points. We conclude with a call for continued, high-quality research that will strengthen the discipline's academic standing and help us move toward improved access to and quality of surgical care worldwide. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Usefulness of C-stopper Coil for Neurointervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAYASHI, Kentaro; HORIE, Nobutaka; MORIKAWA, Minoru; NAGATA, Izumi

    2014-01-01

    C-stopper coil (CSC) which are available for 0.018-inch inner diameter microcenter have been used for neurointervention such as transarterial embolization (TAE) of feeding artery. Although various shapes of pushable microcoils have been developed, microcoils are usually short to embolize the lesion and require lots of coils. The most specific feature of CSC is the extended length of 18 cm. To evaluate the usefulness of CSC, we reviewed our experience of CSC. Neurointervention using CSC was performed for 28 patients (31 treatments). Intervention procedures were TAE for dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) (n = 15), transvenous embolization for dural AVF (n = 4), parent artery occlusion for cerebral aneurysm, dissection and carotid-cavernous fistula (n = 8), TAE for epistaxis (n = 2), and preoperative embolization for tumor (n = 2). CSCs were deployed with push technique through microcatheter. CSCs were successfully placed into the lesion namely feeding artery, venous sinus, parent artery of aneurysm, or dissection. There were no major technical complications resulting in morbidity. Postoperative course was uneventful. No recanalization of the occluded vessel occurred during follow-up. Use of CSCs was safe and feasible for embolization of cerebrovascular lesion. PMID:24477060

  19. [Hundred twentieth anniversary of the Berlin Surgical Society. Significance of military surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czymek, R; Harder, K; Düsel, W

    2006-12-01

    November 22, 2006 will mark the one hundred twentieth anniversary of the oldest regional surgical society in Germany, which was founded as the Free Association of Berlin Surgeons in 1886. For years, the chairmen were also chairmen of the German Surgical Society (established 1872). Thus they made important contributions to surgery in Germany as a whole. Professors such as Ernst von Bergmann, August Bier, and Ferdinand Sauerbruch furthered the reputation of the Berlin practitioners and German surgery throughout the world. In the states of Berlin and Brandenburg, development and promotion of surgery in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries owed much to the Prussian emperor Friedrich Wilhelm I and the necessities of Prussian battlefields (military surgical training). These battlefields also caused the sharp decline in worldwide importance of Berlin surgeons at the end of World War II. The special geopolitical situation of Berlin in post-war Germany constituted a negative turning point in this region, not only for surgery. As a result of the destruction of Berlin, most records and documents of the Berlin Surgical Society were lost. Research conducted in February 2006 revealed 20 membership lists from the founding years (1893-1914) which were presumed to be lost. These lists can now help us restore part of the Society's identity and roots. New insights have been made regarding the composition of the Society. For example, the large number of military surgeons in these lists reflects the spirit of the times around 1900 and emphasizes the importance of military medicine in imperial Germany.

  20. Key Tenets of Effective Surgery Leadership: Perspectives From the Society of Surgical Chairs Mentorship Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengart, Todd K; Kent, K Craig; Bland, Kirby I; Britt, L D; Eberlein, Timothy J; Gewertz, Bruce Labe; Hunter, John G; Lillemoe, Keith D; Pellegrini, Carlos A; Schulick, Richard D; Stain, Steven Charles; Weigel, Ronald J

    2016-08-01

    This Special Communication summarizes the key points raised at the Society of Surgical Chairs mentorship panel sessions held at the 2014 and 2015 annual meetings of the society. Highlights of these expert panel discussions include senior chairs' insights into successfully dealing with increasingly complex academic medical organizations and horizontal department management expectations in the context of the arrival of the Millennial Generation into the work force. Three key tenets of effective surgery leadership that arose from these sessions deal with the importance of (1) collaboration and cooperativity, (2) humanized relationships and mentorship, and (3) operational efficiency. Overall, the panel consensus for the future of surgery leadership was optimistic while recognizing that the demands of chairmanship are considerable.

  1. Mortality Trends in Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery: An Analysis of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; He, Xia; Mayer, John E; Austin, Erle H; Quintessenza, James A; Karl, Tom R; Vricella, Luca; Mavroudis, Constantine; O'Brien, Sean M; Pasquali, Sara K; Hill, Kevin D; Husain, S Adil; Overman, David M; St Louis, James D; Han, Jane M; Shahian, David M; Cameron, Duke; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2016-10-01

    Previous analyses of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Adult Cardiac Surgery Database have demonstrated a reduction over time of risk-adjusted operative mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting. The STS Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS CHSD) was queried to assess multiinstitutional trends over time in discharge mortality and postoperative length of stay (PLOS). Since 2009, operations in the STS CHSD have been classified according to STAT (The Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery) Congenital Heart Surgery Mortality Categories. The five STAT Mortality Categories were chosen to be optimal with respect to minimizing variation within categories and maximizing variation between categories. For this study, all index cardiac operations from 1998 to 2014, inclusive, were grouped by STAT Mortality Category (exclusions: patent ductus arteriosus ligation in patients weighing less than or equal to 2.5 kg and operations that could not be assigned to a STAT Mortality Category). End points were discharge mortality and PLOS in survivors for the entire period and for 4-year epochs. The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to test the null hypothesis that the mortality was the same across epochs, by STAT Mortality Category. The analysis encompassed 202,895 index operations at 118 centers. The number of centers participating in STS CHSD increased in each epoch. Overall discharge mortality was 3.4% (6,959 of 202,895) for 1998 to 2014 and 3.1% (2,308 of 75,337) for 2011 to 2014. Statistically significant improvement in discharge mortality was seen in STAT Mortality Categories 2, 3, 4, and 5 (p values for STAT Mortality Categories 1 through 5 are 0.060, <0.001, 0.015, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively). PLOS in survivors was relatively unchanged over the same time intervals. Sensitivity analyses reveal that the finding of declining risk-stratified rates of discharge mortality over time is not simply attributable to the addition

  2. A narrative history of the International Society for Psychiatric Surgery: 1970-1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsman, Nir; Meyerson, Björn A; Lozano, Andres M

    2012-01-01

    In order to reconcile the present resurgence of psychiatric neurosurgery with the not-too-distant historic transgressions in the field, one needs to examine the era of transition from crude art to regulated science. In large part, this transition took place in the 1970s with the continued development and widespread acceptance of stereotactic techniques in functional neurosurgery and several hard-fought ideological and academic victories by proponents of the much-maligned field. Established in 1970, the International Society for Psychiatric Surgery (ISPS) sought to gather like-minded surgeons, psychiatrists and other neuroscientists to counter the rising pressure from special interest groups, as well as some in the public and medical realm, who attempted to abolish all forms of surgical management of psychiatric disease. We reviewed the archives of the ISPS, including letters from its founding members and active participants, conference proceedings and minutes from organizational meetings, from throughout its existence from 1970 to 1983. The archives provide a unique insight into the organization and objectives of the society that kept psychiatric surgery alive in the face of persistent and staunch opposition. We also outline the lessons that current and future functional neurosurgeons can learn from the ISPS, whose key figures, structure and communication, in the non-electronic era, were instrumental for the survival of psychiatric surgery during that critical period. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. What is a certified hernia center? – The example of the German Hernia Society and German Society of General and Visceral Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand eKöckerling

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To date the scientific definition Hernia Center does not exist and this term is beeing used by hospitals and private institutions as a marketing instrument. Hernia surgery has become increasingly more complex over the pass 25 years. Differenciated use of the various techniques in hernia surgery has been adopted as a taillord approach program and requires intensive engagement with, and extensive experience of, the entire field of hernia surgery. Therefore there is a need for hernia centers. A basic requirement for a credible certification process for hernia centers involves definition of requirements and there verification by hernia societies and/or non-profit organizations that are interested in assuring the best possible quality of hernia surgery. At present there are two processes for certification of hernia centers by hernia societies or non-profit organizations.

  4. INSIST-ED: Italian Society of Andrology registry on penile prosthesis surgery. First data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Pescatori

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The Italian Society of Andrology, i.e. “Società Italiana di Andrologia” (S.I.A., launched on December 2014 a prospective, multicenter, monitored and internal review board approved Registry for penile implants, the “INSIST-ED” (Italian Nationwide Systematic Inventarisation of Surgical Treatment for ED Registry. Purpose of this first report is to present a baseline data analysis of the characteristics of penile implant surgery in Italy. Material and methods: The INSIST-ED Registry is open to all surgeons implanting penile prostheses (all brands, all models in Italy, providing anonymous patient, device, surgical procedure, outcome, follow-up data, for both first and revision surgeries. A Registry project Board overviews all the steps of the project, and a Registry Monitor interacts with the Registry implanting surgeons. Results: As by April 8, 2016, 31 implanting surgeons actively joined the Registry, entering 367 surgical procedures in its database, that comprise: 310 first implants, 43 prosthesis substitutions, 14 device explants without substitution. Implanted devices account for: 288 three-component devices (81,3%, 20 two-component devices (5,4%, 45 non-hydraulic devices (12,3%. Leading primary ED etiologies in first implant surgeries resulted: former radical pelvic surgery in 111 cases (35,8%, Peyronie’s disease in 66 cases (21,3%, diabetes in 39 cases (12,6%. Two intraoperative complications have been recorded. Main reasons for 57 revision surgeries were: device failure (52,6%, erosion (19,3%, infection (12,3%, patient dissatisfaction (10,5%. Surgical settings for patients undergoing a first penile implant were: public hospitals in 251 cases (81%, private environments in 59 cases (19%. Conclusions: The INSIST-ED Registry represents the first European experience of penile prosthesis Registry. This baseline data analysis shows that: three-pieces inflatable prosthesis is the most implanted device, leading etiology of

  5. Predictors of Major Morbidity and Mortality After Pneumonectomy Utilizing The Society for Thoracic Surgeons General Thoracic Surgery Database

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shapiro, Mark; Swanson, Scott J; Wright, Cameron D; Chin, Cynthia; Sheng, Shubin; Wisnivesky, Juan; Weiser, Todd S

    2010-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study is to identify the risk factors responsible for adverse outcomes in patients after pneumonectomy utilizing The Society of Thoracic Surgeons General Thoracic Surgery Database (STS GTDB...

  6. Hand Society and Matching Program Web Sites Provide Poor Access to Information Regarding Hand Surgery Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Richard M; Klifto, Christopher S; Naik, Amish A; Sapienza, Anthony; Capo, John T

    2016-08-01

    The Internet is a common resource for applicants of hand surgery fellowships, however, the quality and accessibility of fellowship online information is unknown. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the accessibility of hand surgery fellowship Web sites and to assess the quality of information provided via program Web sites. Hand fellowship Web site accessibility was evaluated by reviewing the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) on November 16, 2014 and the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) fellowship directories on February 12, 2015, and performing an independent Google search on November 25, 2014. Accessible Web sites were then assessed for quality of the presented information. A total of 81 programs were identified with the ASSH directory featuring direct links to 32% of program Web sites and the NRMP directory directly linking to 0%. A Google search yielded direct links to 86% of program Web sites. The quality of presented information varied greatly among the 72 accessible Web sites. Program description (100%), fellowship application requirements (97%), program contact email address (85%), and research requirements (75%) were the most commonly presented components of fellowship information. Hand fellowship program Web sites can be accessed from the ASSH directory and, to a lesser extent, the NRMP directory. However, a Google search is the most reliable method to access online fellowship information. Of assessable programs, all featured a program description though the quality of the remaining information was variable. Hand surgery fellowship applicants may face some difficulties when attempting to gather program information online. Future efforts should focus on improving the accessibility and content quality on hand surgery fellowship program Web sites.

  7. The World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery: its mission and history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchervenkov, Christo I; Stellin, Giovanni; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Mavroudis, Constantine; Bernier, Pierre-Luc; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Kreutzer, Christian; Cicek, Sertac; Kinsley, Robin H; Nunn, Graham R; Jonas, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    The World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery (WSPCHS) was established in 2006 to assemble pediatric and congenital heart surgeons from all continents and regions of the world and their colleagues from related specialties dealing with pediatric and congenital heart disease. Since its birth, it has held a highly successful inaugural scientific meeting in 2007 in Washington, DC, and a World Summit on Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery Services, Education, and Cardiac Care for Children and Adults with Congenital Heart Disease in 2008 in Montreal. It currently has 549 members from 71 countries and in a short period of time has become the largest organization in the world of pediatric and congenital heart surgeons. Its brief history already seems to be a guarantee of a promising future. Projects in the areas of research, training and education, patient care, and community service will allow the Society to reach its goals. By bringing together professionals from every region of the world, the WSPCHS should play a significant role in the improvement of care for children and adults with congenital heart disease around the world.

  8. [Clinical nutrition in surgery. Guidelines of the German Society for Nutritional Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimann, A; Breitenstein, S; Breuer, J P; Gabor, S E; Holland-Cunz, S; Kemen, M; Längle, F; Rayes, N; Reith, B; Rittler, P; Schwenk, W; Senkal, M

    2014-04-01

    While enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs are the standard for perioperative management, special nutritional care has to be administered to malnourished patients and those at metabolic risk with special regard to patients with postoperative complications. Existing guidelines of the German and European societies of nutritional medicine (DGEM and ESPEN) on enteral and parenteral nutrition in surgery were merged and in accordance with the principles of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften (AWMF, German Association of the Scientific Medical Societies) and Ärztliches Zentrum für Qualität in der Medizin (AeZQ, German Agency for Quality in Medicine) revised and extended. The working group developed 41 consensus-based recommendations for perioperative nutrition. The recommendation strength is: 9x A (recommendation based on significant good quality literature containing at least one randomized controlled trial), 12x B (recommendation based on well-designed trial without randomization), 13x C (recommendation based on expert opinions and/or clinical experience of respected authorities) and 7x CCP (clinical consensus point). Even in patients without obvious malnutrition perioperative nutritional support is indicated when oral food intake is not feasible or inadequate for a longer period of time.

  9. GoPro Hero Cameras for Creation of a Three-Dimensional, Educational, Neurointerventional Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min S; Brock, Andrea; Mortimer, Vance; Taussky, Philipp; Couldwell, William T; Quigley, Edward

    2017-10-01

    Neurointerventional education relies on an apprenticeship model, with the trainee observing and participating in procedures with the guidance of a mentor. While educational videos are becoming prevalent in surgical cases, there is a dearth of comparable educational material for trainees in neurointerventional programs. We sought to create a high-quality, three-dimensional video of a routine diagnostic cerebral angiogram for use as an educational tool. A diagnostic cerebral angiogram was recorded using two GoPro HERO 3+ cameras with the Dual HERO System to capture the proceduralist's hands during the case. This video was edited with recordings from the video monitors to create a real-time three-dimensional video of both the actions of the neurointerventionalist and the resulting wire/catheter movements. The final edited video, in either two or three dimensions, can serve as another instructional tool for the training of residents and/or fellows. Additional videos can be created in a similar fashion of more complicated neurointerventional cases. The GoPro HERO 3+ camera and Dual HERO System can be used to create educational videos of neurointerventional procedures.

  10. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model: Part 2-Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; O'Brien, Sean M; Pasquali, Sara K; Gaynor, J William; Mayer, John E; Karamlou, Tara; Welke, Karl F; Filardo, Giovanni; Han, Jane M; Kim, Sunghee; Quintessenza, James A; Pizarro, Christian; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Mavroudis, Constantine; Backer, Carl L; Austin, Erle H; Fraser, Charles D; Tweddell, James S; Jonas, Richard A; Edwards, Fred H; Grover, Frederick L; Prager, Richard L; Shahian, David M; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2015-09-01

    The empirically derived 2014 Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model incorporates adjustment for procedure type and patient-specific factors. The purpose of this report is to describe this model and its application in the assessment of variation in outcomes across centers. All index cardiac operations in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2013) were eligible for inclusion. Isolated patent ductus arteriosus closures in patients weighing less than or equal to 2.5 kg were excluded, as were centers with more than 10% missing data and patients with missing data for key variables. The model includes the following covariates: primary procedure, age, any prior cardiovascular operation, any noncardiac abnormality, any chromosomal abnormality or syndrome, important preoperative factors (mechanical circulatory support, shock persisting at time of operation, mechanical ventilation, renal failure requiring dialysis or renal dysfunction (or both), and neurological deficit), any other preoperative factor, prematurity (neonates and infants), and weight (neonates and infants). Variation across centers was assessed. Centers for which the 95% confidence interval for the observed-to-expected mortality ratio does not include unity are identified as lower-performing or higher-performing programs with respect to operative mortality. Included were 52,224 operations from 86 centers. Overall discharge mortality was 3.7% (1,931 of 52,224). Discharge mortality by age category was neonates, 10.1% (1,129 of 11,144); infants, 3.0% (564 of 18,554), children, 0.9% (167 of 18,407), and adults, 1.7% (71 of 4,119). For all patients, 12 of 86 centers (14%) were lower-performing programs, 67 (78%) were not outliers, and 7 (8%) were higher-performing programs. The 2014 Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model facilitates description of outcomes

  11. Are plastic surgery advertisements conforming to the ethical codes of the american society of plastic surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilson, Sandra V; Chung, Kevin C; Greenfield, Mary Lou V H; Walters, Madonna

    2002-03-01

    Cosmetic surgeons have increasingly come under fire for using advertisements that may be deceptive or intended for the solicitation of vulnerable consumers. However, aesthetic surgery is a growing business that relies heavily on advertising to survive. To prevent the use of deceptive advertisements, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons has developed a code of ethics for its physician members. We conducted a study to determine the prevalence of cosmetic surgery advertisements considered objectionable by the lay public. These advertisements were published in the Yellow Pages of the 10 largest U.S. cities. Because all of the advertisements in this study contained the American Society of Plastic Surgeons logo, we also determined whether its members are upholding the ethical code of advertising. We asked a convenience sample of 50 participants to rate 104 advertisements using four yes/no questions derived from the code of ethics and one overall yes/no question regarding whether the advertisement was objectionable. We obtained the mean percentage of "yes" responses for each advertisement, from the total sample, for each question. We found that the study participants felt that 25 percent of the advertisements used images of persons or facsimiles that falsely and deceptively created unjustified expectations of favorable results. The participants responded that 22 percent of the advertisements appealed primarily to the layperson's fears, anxieties, or emotional vulnerabilities. In addition, 18 percent of the advertisements were considered to be objectionable. Discretion is currently left up to physicians as to the ethical nature of their advertisements. Although the majority of American Society of Plastic Surgeons members uphold the ethical code of advertising, there are still a substantial number of published advertisements that the average consumer considers to be in violation of this code.

  12. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database: 2017 Update on Outcomes and Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Mayer, John E; Mavroudis, Constantine; O'Brien, Sean M; Austin, Erle H; Pasquali, Sara K; Hill, Kevin D; Overman, David M; St Louis, James D; Karamlou, Tara; Pizarro, Christian; Hirsch-Romano, Jennifer C; McDonald, Donna; Han, Jane M; Becker, Susan; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Backer, Carl L; Fraser, Charles D; Tweddell, James S; Elliott, Martin J; Walters, Hal; Jonas, Richard A; Prager, Richard L; Shahian, David M; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2017-03-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database is the largest congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical clinical data registry in the world. It is the platform for all activities of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons related to the analysis of outcomes and the improvement of quality in this subspecialty. This report summarizes current aggregate national outcomes in congenital and pediatric cardiac surgery and reviews related activities in the areas of quality measurement, performance improvement, and transparency. The reported data about aggregate national outcomes are exemplified by an analysis of 10 benchmark operations performed from January 2012 to December 2015. This analysis documents the overall aggregate operative mortality (interquartile range among all participating programs) for the following procedural groups: off-bypass coarctation repair, 1.3% (0.0% to 1.8%); ventricular septal defect repair, 0.6% (0.0% to 0.9%); tetralogy of Fallot repair, 1.1% (0.0% to 1.4%); complete atrioventricular canal repair, 3.0% (0.0% to 4.7%); arterial switch operation, 2.7% (0.0% to 4.1%); arterial switch operation and ventricular septal defect repair, 5.3% (0.0% to 6.7%); Glenn/hemi-Fontan, 2.5% (0.0% to 4.5%); Fontan operation, 1.2% (0.0% to 1.2%); truncus arteriosus repair, 9.4% (0.0% to 16.7%); and Norwood procedure, 15.7% (8.9% to 25.0%). Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. International Society of Refractive Surgery of the American Academy of Ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... day and gain entrance to the lunch. Journal's Impact Factor Continues to Rise The Journal of Refractive Surgery ... its standing as the highest-ranked journal by impact factor in its subspecialty, including refractive surgery, cataract surgery, ...

  14. History of the International Society of Surgery/Société International de Chirurgie (ISS/SIC). I. Short story of Theodor Kocher's life and relationship to the International Society of Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebermann-Meffert, D

    2000-01-01

    With the aim of promoting progress in surgery through the friendly exchange of views and experience, the International Society of Surgery was founded in Brussels in 1902, thereby helping to overcome the narrow boundaries of that time's nationalism. At its first congress, the International Society of Surgery (ISS), otherwise known by its French name, Société Internationale de Chirurgie (SIC), already numbered 638 members, among them the most important surgeons from all over the world. Theodor Kocher (1841-1917) was the president of the first congress, held in Brussels in 1905, and was also responsible for the choice of topics. His presidential address clearly reflected the high aims the Society set for itself. Kocher's personal and professional authority, his surgical skill, which he liked so much to communicate to his colleagues, and his international thinking shaped the young Society. He remained on the international committee of the ISS until his death. Renowned surgeons from all over the globe traveled to Bern to see Kocher at work, among whom were many distinguished leaders of U.S. surgery. Thus Kocher's contribution had a great impact on the developing surgery, in particular in the United States. A short curriculum outlines the personality of this outstanding surgeon.

  15. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Public Reporting Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2017-01-01

    Three basic principles provide the rationale for the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Congenital Heart Surgery Database (CHSD) public reporting initiative: (1) Variation in congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical outcomes exist. (2) Patients and their families have the right to know the outcomes of the treatments that they will receive. (3). It is our professional responsibility to share this information with them in a format they can understand. The STS CHSD public reporting initiative facilitates the voluntary transparent public reporting of congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical outcomes using the STS CHSD Mortality Risk Model. The STS CHSD Mortality Risk Model is used to calculate risk-adjusted operative mortality and adjusts for the following variables: age, primary procedure, weight (neonates and infants), prior cardiothoracic operations, non-cardiac congenital anatomic abnormalities, chromosomal abnormalities or syndromes, prematurity (neonates and infants), and preoperative factors (including preoperative/preprocedural mechanical circulatory support [intraaortic balloon pump, ventricular assist device, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, or cardiopulmonary support], shock [persistent at time of surgery], mechanical ventilation to treat cardiorespiratory failure, renal failure requiring dialysis and/or renal dysfunction, preoperative neurological deficit, and other preoperative factors). Operative mortality is defined in all STS databases as (1) all deaths, regardless of cause, occurring during the hospitalization in which the operation was performed, even if after 30 days (including patients transferred to other acute care facilities); and (2) all deaths, regardless of cause, occurring after discharge from the hospital, but before the end of the 30th postoperative day. The STS CHSD Mortality Risk Model has good model fit and discrimination with an overall C statistics of 0.875 and 0.858 in the development sample and the validation sample

  16. Training Standards in Neuroendovascular Surgery: Program Accreditation and Practitioner Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Arthur L; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Meyers, Philip M; Jovin, Tudor G; Derdeyn, Colin P; Hoh, Brian L; Riina, Howard; Linfante, Italo; Zaidat, Osama; Turk, Aquilla; Howington, Jay U; Mocco, J; Ringer, Andrew J; Veznedaroglu, Erol; Khalessi, Alexander A; Levy, Elad I; Woo, Henry; Harbaugh, Robert; Giannotta, Steven

    2017-08-01

    Neuroendovascular surgery is a medical subspecialty that uses minimally invasive catheter-based technology and radiological imaging to diagnose and treat diseases of the central nervous system, head, neck, spine, and their vasculature. To perform these procedures, the practitioner needs an extensive knowledge of the anatomy of the nervous system, vasculature, and pathological conditions that affect their physiology. A working knowledge of radiation biology and safety is essential. Similarly, a sufficient volume of clinical and interventional experience, first as a trainee and then as a practitioner, is required so that these treatments can be delivered safely and effectively. This document has been prepared under the aegis of the Society of Neurological Surgeons and its Committee for Advanced Subspecialty Training in conjunction with the Joint Section of Cerebrovascular Surgery for the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and Congress of Neurological Surgeons, the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery, and the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology. The material herein outlines the requirements for institutional accreditation of training programs in neuroendovascular surgery, as well as those needed to obtain individual subspecialty certification, as agreed on by Committee for Advanced Subspecialty Training, the Society of Neurological Surgeons, and the aforementioned Societies. This document also clarifies the pathway to certification through an advanced practice track mechanism for those current practitioners of this subspecialty who trained before Committee for Advanced Subspecialty Training standards were formulated. Representing neuroendovascular surgery physicians from neurosurgery, neuroradiology, and neurology, the above mentioned societies seek to standardize neuroendovascular surgery training to ensure the highest quality delivery of this subspecialty within the United States. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Perioperative management of anticoagulant users scheduled for glaucoma surgery: a survey among the Brazilian Glaucoma Society members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Balbino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate and describe, among the members of the Brazilian Glaucoma Society (BGS, the practices regarding the perioperative management of anticoagulants (warfarin and aspirin use in patients scheduled for glaucoma surgery. METHODS: The active members of the Brazilian Glaucoma Society answered a questionnaire evaluating different aspects of their current perioperative management of glaucomatous patients taking warfarin or aspirin. RESULTS: A total of 52 participants returned a complete questionnaire. Warfarin or aspirin was routinely interrupted prior to glaucoma surgery by 82.7% of the respondents. The majority of the surgeons who discontinued these medications reported doing so 7 days prior to surgery and resumed their use the day after the procedure. Almost half of our interviewees reported hemorrhagic complications that could be related to anticoagulant therapy. A large number of the surgeons (86.5% preferred a particular surgical technique for anticoagulated patients; however, most of them (88.5% do not change the anesthetic planning in such patients. Finally, the majority of the participants (90.4% refer their anticoagulated patients to a preoperative appointment with a cardiologist or a general practitioner before the surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of Brazilian Glaucoma Society members participating in this study interrupt either warfarin or aspirin prior to glaucoma surgery. Although there is scant information available in the literature to offer definitive guidance, most participants from the Brazilian Glaucoma Society seem to share the same opinion when it comes to perioperative management of anticoagulant users.

  18. Lung volume reduction surgery since the National Emphysema Treatment Trial: study of Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Marquita R; Leverson, Glen E; Jaoude, Wassim Abi; Maloney, James D

    2014-12-01

    The National Emphysema Treatment Trial demonstrated that lung volume reduction surgery is an effective treatment for emphysema in select patients. With chronic lower respiratory disease being the third leading cause of death in the United States, this study sought to assess practice patterns and outcomes for lung volume reduction surgery on a national level since the National Emphysema Treatment Trial. Aggregate statistics on lung volume reduction surgery reported in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database from January 2003 to June 2011 were analyzed to assess procedure volume, preoperative and operative characteristics, and outcomes. Comparisons with published data from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial were made using chi-square and 2-sided t tests. In 8.5 years, 538 patients underwent lung volume reduction surgery, with 20 to 118 cases reported in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database per year. When compared with subjects in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial, subjects in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database were younger (P volume in 1 second was 31% versus 28% of predicted (P lung volume reduction surgery. It underscores the need for dedicated centers to increasingly address the heavy burden of chronic lower respiratory disease in the United States in a multidisciplinary fashion, particularly for preoperative evaluation and postoperative management of emphysema. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of regional congenital cardiac surgical outcomes in Florida using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Quintessenza, James A; Burke, Redmond P; Bleiweis, Mark S; Byrne, Barry J; Ceithaml, Eric L; Decampli, William M; Giroud, Jorge M; Perryman, Richard A; Rosenkranz, Eliot R; Wolff, Grace; Posner, Vicki; Steverson, Sue; Blanchard, William B; Schiebler, Gerry L

    2009-08-01

    Florida is the fourth largest state in the United States of America. In 2004, 218,045 live babies were born in Florida, accounting for approximately 1744 new cases of congenital heart disease. We review the initial experience of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database with a regional outcomes report, namely the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Florida Regional Report. Eight centres in Florida provide services for congenital cardiac surgery. The Children's Medical Services of Florida provide a framework for quality improvement collaboration between centres. All congenital cardiac surgical centres in Florida have voluntarily agreed to submit data to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons and Duke Clinical Research Institute prepared a Florida Regional Report to allow detailed regional analysis of outcomes for congenital cardiac surgery. The report of 2007 from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database includes details of 61,014 operations performed during the 4 year data harvest window, which extended from 2003 through 2006. Of these operations, 6,385 (10.5%) were performed in Florida. Discharge mortality in the data from Florida overall, and from each Florida site, with 95% confidence intervals, is not different from cumulative data from the entire Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database, both for all patients and for patients stratified by complexity. A regional consortium of congenital heart surgery centres in Florida under the framework of the Children's Medical Services has allowed for inter-institutional collaboration with the goal of quality improvement. This experience demonstrates, first, that the database maintained by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons can provide the framework for regional analysis of outcomes, and second, that voluntary regional collaborative efforts permit the pooling of data for such analysis.

  20. Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Registry evaluation of stent cell design on carotid artery stenting outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, Jeffrey; Rubin, Brian G; Landis, Gregg S; Kenwood, Christopher T; Siami, Flora S; Sicard, Gregorio A

    2011-07-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Vascular Registry (VR) collects data on outcomes of carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting (CAS). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of open vs closed cell stent design on the in-hospital and 30-day outcome of CAS. The VR collects provider-reported data on patients using a Web-based database. Data were analyzed both in-hospital and at 30 days postprocedure. The primary outcome is combined death/stroke/myocardial infarction (MI). As of October 14, 2009, there were 4337 CAS with discharge data and 2397 with 30-day data. Open cell stents (OPEN) were used in 3451 patients (79.6%), and closed cell stents (CLOSED) were used in 866 patients (20.4%). Baseline demographics showed no differences in age, gender, race, and ethnicity. However, the OPEN group had more patients with atherosclerosis (74.5% vs 67.4%; P = .0003) as the etiology of carotid artery disease. The OPEN group also had a higher prevalence of preprocedural stroke (25.8% vs 21.4%; P = .0079), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; 21.0% vs 17.6%; P = .0277), cardiac arrhythmia (14.7% vs 11.4%; P = .0108), valvular heart disease (7.4% vs 3.7%; P differences in the in-hospital or 30-day outcomes between the OPEN and CLOSED patients. Further subgroup analyses demonstrated symptomatic patients had a higher event rate than the asymptomatic cohort in both the OPEN and CLOSED groups. Among symptomatic patients, the OPEN patients had a lower (0.43% vs 1.41%; P = .0349) rate of in-hospital mortality with no difference in stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). There were no differences in 30-day event rates. In asymptomatic patients, there were also no statistically significant differences between the OPEN and CLOSED groups. After risk adjustment, there remained no statistically significant differences between groups of the primary endpoint (death/stroke/MI) during in-hospital or 30 days. In-hospital and 30-day outcomes after CAS were not

  1. Minimal Clinically Important Differences for American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society Score in Hallux Valgus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hiok Yang; Chen, Jerry Yongqiang; Zainul-Abidin, Suraya; Ying, Hao; Koo, Kevin; Rikhraj, Inderjeet Singh

    2017-05-01

    The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score is one of the most common and adapted outcome scales in hallux valgus surgery. However, AOFAS is predominantly physician based and not patient based. Although it may be straightforward to derive statistical significance, it may not equate to the true subjective benefit of the patient's experience. There is a paucity of literature defining MCID for AOFAS in hallux valgus surgery although it could have a great impact on the accuracy of analyzing surgical outcomes. Hence, the primary aim of this study was to define the Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID) for the AOFAS score in these patients, and the secondary aim was to correlate patients' demographics to the MCID. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study. A total of 446 patients were reviewed preoperatively and followed up for 2 years. An anchor question was asked 2 years postoperation: "How would you rate the overall results of your treatment for your foot and ankle condition?" (excellent, very good, good, fair, poor, terrible). The MCID was derived using 4 methods, 3 from an anchor-based approach and 1 from a distribution-based approach. Anchor-based approaches were (1) mean difference in 2-year AOFAS scores of patients who answered "good" versus "fair" based on the anchor question; (2) mean change of AOFAS score preoperatively and at 2-year follow-up in patients who answered good; (3) receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves method, where the area under the curve (AUC) represented the likelihood that the scoring system would accurately discriminate these 2 groups of patients. The distribution-based approach used to calculate MCID was the effect size method. There were 405 (90.8%) females and 41 (9.2%) males. Mean age was 51.2 (standard deviation [SD] = 13) years, mean preoperative BMI was 24.2 (SD = 4.1). Mean preoperative AOFAS score was 55.6 (SD = 16.8), with significant improvement to 85.7 (SD = 14.4) in 2 years ( P value

  2. Catheter-Directed Intra-Arterial Abciximab Administration for Acute Thrombotic Occlusions during Neurointerventional Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, I.C.; Fourie, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    Abciximab is one of a new class of platelet aggregation inhibitors that has to date been used mainly in the management of acute coronary ischaemic syndromes or during cardiac intervention for the prevention and treatment of acute vessel occlusion during and after angioplasty or stent placement. More recently, it has begun to play a similar role in neurointerventional work. Its administration during acute stent or vessel occlusions has usually been via systemic intravenous infusion. We describ...

  3. Citation classics in neurointerventional research: a bibliometric analysis of the 100 most cited articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Soo; Yoon, Dae Young; Kim, Hye Jeong; Jeon, Hong Jun; Lee, Jong Young; Cho, Byung-Moon; Lee, Kwanseop

    2017-05-01

    The number of citations that an article has received can be used to evaluate its impact on the scientific community. This study aimed to identify the 100 most cited articles in the field of neurointervention and to analyze their characteristics. We selected the 669 journals that were considered potentially to publish neurointervention articles based on the database of Journal Citation Reports. Using the Web of Science citation search tool, we identified the 100 most cited articles relevant to neurointervention within the selected journals. Each article was evaluated for several characteristics including publication year, journal, journal category, impact factor, number of citations, number of citations per year, authorship, department, institution, country, type of article, and topic. The number of citations for the top 100 articles ranged from 1912 to 170 (mean 363.4) and citations per year ranged from 271.0 to 4.1 (mean 40.0). The majority of articles were published in clinical neurology journals (63%), were published in 2000-2009 (39%), originated in the USA (45%), were original articles (95%), and dealt with endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysm (42%). The Department of Radiology, University of California School of Medicine (n=12) was the leading institution and Viñuela F (n=11) was the most prolific author. Our study presents a detailed list and analysis of the 100 most cited articles in the field of neurointervention and provides a historical perspective on the scientific progress in this field. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Acute mesenteric ischemia: guidelines of the World Society of Emergency Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Miklosh; Kashuk, Jeffry; Moore, Ernest E; Kluger, Yoram; Biffl, Walter; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Ben-Ishay, Offir; Rubinstein, Chen; Balogh, Zsolt J; Civil, Ian; Coccolini, Federico; Leppaniemi, Ari; Peitzman, Andrew; Ansaloni, Luca; Sugrue, Michael; Sartelli, Massimo; Di Saverio, Salomone; Fraga, Gustavo P; Catena, Fausto

    2017-01-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is typically defined as a group of diseases characterized by an interruption of the blood supply to varying portions of the small intestine, leading to ischemia and secondary inflammatory changes. If untreated, this process will eventuate in life threatening intestinal necrosis. The incidence is low, estimated at 0.09-0.2% of all acute surgical admissions. Therefore, although the entity is an uncommon cause of abdominal pain, diligence is always required because if untreated, mortality has consistently been reported in the range of 50%. Early diagnosis and timely surgical intervention are the cornerstones of modern treatment and are essential to reduce the high mortality associated with this entity. The advent of endovascular approaches in parallel with modern imaging techniques may provide new options. Thus, we believe that a current position paper from World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) is warranted, in order to put forth the most recent and practical recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of AMI. This review will address the concepts of AMI with the aim of focusing on specific areas where early diagnosis and management hold the strongest potential for improving outcomes in this disease process. Some of the key points include the prompt use of CT angiography to establish the diagnosis, evaluation of the potential for revascularization to re-establish blood flow to ischemic bowel, resection of necrotic intestine, and use of damage control techniques when appropriate to allow for re-assessment of bowel viability prior to definitive anastomosis and abdominal closure.

  5. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines on Perioperative Cardiac Risk Assessment and Management for Patients Who Undergo Noncardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceppe, Emmanuelle; Parlow, Joel; MacDonald, Paul; Lyons, Kristin; McMullen, Michael; Srinathan, Sadeesh; Graham, Michelle; Tandon, Vikas; Styles, Kim; Bessissow, Amal; Sessler, Daniel I; Bryson, Gregory; Devereaux, P J

    2017-01-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines Committee and key Canadian opinion leaders believed there was a need for up to date guidelines that used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system of evidence assessment for patients who undergo noncardiac surgery. Strong recommendations included: 1) measuring brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal fragment of proBNP (NT-proBNP) before surgery to enhance perioperative cardiac risk estimation in patients who are 65 years of age or older, are 45-64 years of age with significant cardiovascular disease, or have a Revised Cardiac Risk Index score ≥ 1; 2) against performing preoperative resting echocardiography, coronary computed tomography angiography, exercise or cardiopulmonary exercise testing, or pharmacological stress echocardiography or radionuclide imaging to enhance perioperative cardiac risk estimation; 3) against the initiation or continuation of acetylsalicylic acid for the prevention of perioperative cardiac events, except in patients with a recent coronary artery stent or who will undergo carotid endarterectomy; 4) against α2 agonist or β-blocker initiation within 24 hours before surgery; 5) withholding angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin II receptor blocker starting 24 hours before surgery; 6) facilitating smoking cessation before surgery; 7) measuring daily troponin for 48 to 72 hours after surgery in patients with an elevated NT-proBNP/BNP measurement before surgery or if there is no NT-proBNP/BNP measurement before surgery, in those who have a Revised Cardiac Risk Index score ≥1, age 45-64 years with significant cardiovascular disease, or age 65 years or older; and 8) initiating of long-term acetylsalicylic acid and statin therapy in patients who suffer myocardial injury/infarction after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The European Respiratory Society and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons clinical guidelines for evaluating fitness for radical treatment (surgery and chemoradiotherapy) in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Charloux, Anne; Bolliger, Chris T; Rocco, Gaetano; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Varela, Gonzalo; Licker, Marc; Ferguson, Mark K; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Clini, Enrico M; Win, Thida; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Goldman, Lee

    2009-07-01

    The European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) established a joint task force with the purpose to develop clinical evidence-based guidelines on evaluation of fitness for radical therapy in patients with lung cancer. The following topics were discussed, and are summarized in the final report along with graded recommendations: Cardiologic evaluation before lung resection; lung function tests and exercise tests (limitations of ppoFEV1; DLCO: systematic or selective?; split function studies; exercise tests: systematic; low-tech exercise tests; cardiopulmonary (high tech) exercise tests); future trends in preoperative work-up; physiotherapy/rehabilitation and smoking cessation; scoring systems; advanced care management (ICU/HDU); quality of life in patients submitted to radical treatment; combined cancer surgery and lung volume reduction surgery; compromised parenchymal sparing resections and minimally invasive techniques: the balance between oncological radicality and functional reserve; neoadjuvant chemotherapy and complications; definitive chemo and radiotherapy: functional selection criteria and definition of risk; should surgical criteria be re-calibrated for radiotherapy?; the patient at prohibitive surgical risk: alternatives to surgery; who should treat thoracic patients and where these patients should be treated?

  7. [The patient blood management concept : Joint recommendation of the German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine and the German Society of Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meybohm, P; Schmitz-Rixen, T; Steinbicker, A; Schwenk, W; Zacharowski, K

    2017-10-01

    Patient blood management is a multimodal concept that aims to detect, prevent and treat anemia, optimize hemostasis, minimize iatrogenic blood loss, and support a patient-centered decision to provide optimal use of allogeneic blood products. Although the World Health Organization (WHO) has already recommended patient blood management as a new standard in 2010, many hospitals have not implemented it at all or only in part in clinical practice. The German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine and the German Society of Surgery therefore demand that i) all professionals involved in the treatment should implement important aspects of patient blood management considering local conditions, and ii) the structural, administrative and budgetary conditions should be created in the health care system to implement more intensively many of the measures in Germany.

  8. European Society of Gynaecologic Oncology Quality Indicators for Advanced Ovarian Cancer Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querleu, Denis; Planchamp, Francois; Chiva, Luis; Fotopoulou, Christina; Barton, Desmond; Cibula, David; Aletti, Giovanni; Carinelli, Silvestro; Creutzberg, Carien; Davidson, Ben; Harter, Philip; Lundvall, Lene; Marth, Christian; Morice, Philippe; Rafii, Arash; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Rockall, Andrea; Sessa, Cristiana; van der Zee, Ate; Vergote, Ignace; du Bois, Andreas

    Objectives The surgical management of advanced ovarian cancer involves complex surgery. Implementation of a quality management program has a major impact on survival. The goal of this work was to develop a list of quality indicators (QIs) for advanced ovarian cancer surgery that can be used to audit

  9. Optimal Perioperative Care in Major Head and Neck Cancer Surgery With Free Flap Reconstruction: A Consensus Review and Recommendations From the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dort, Joseph C; Farwell, D Gregory; Findlay, Merran; Huber, Gerhard F; Kerr, Paul; Shea-Budgell, Melissa A; Simon, Christian; Uppington, Jeffrey; Zygun, David; Ljungqvist, Olle; Harris, Jeffrey

    2017-03-01

    Head and neck cancers often require complex, labor-intensive surgeries, especially when free flap reconstruction is required. Enhanced recovery is important in this patient population but evidence-based protocols on perioperative care for this population are lacking. To provide a consensus-based protocol for optimal perioperative care of patients undergoing head and neck cancer surgery with free flap reconstruction. Following endorsement by the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Society to develop this protocol, a systematic review was conducted for each topic. The PubMed and Cochrane databases were initially searched to identify relevant publications on head and neck cancer surgery from 1965 through April 2015. Consistent key words for each topic included "head and neck surgery," "pharyngectomy," "laryngectomy," "laryngopharyngectomy," "neck dissection," "parotid lymphadenectomy," "thyroidectomy," "oral cavity resection," "glossectomy," and "head and neck." The final selection of literature included meta-analyses and systematic reviews as well as randomized controlled trials where available. In the absence of high-level data, case series and nonrandomized studies in head and neck cancer surgery patients or randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews in non-head and neck cancer surgery patients, were considered. An international panel of experts in major head and neck cancer surgery and enhanced recovery after surgery reviewed and assessed the literature for quality and developed recommendations for each topic based on the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. All recommendations were graded following a consensus discussion among the expert panel. The literature search, including a hand search of reference lists, identified 215 relevant publications that were considered to be the best evidence for the topic areas. A total of 17 topic areas were identified for inclusion in the protocol for the perioperative

  10. Quality criteria in bariatric surgery: Consensus review and recommendations of the Spanish Association of Surgeons and the Spanish Society of Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabench Pereferrer, Fátima; Domínguez-Adame Lanuza, Eduardo; Ibarzabal, Ainitze; Socas Macias, María; Valentí Azcárate, Víctor; García Ruiz de Gordejuela, Amador; García-Moreno Nisa, Francisca; González Fernández, Jesús; Vilallonga Puy, Ramón; Vilarrasa García, Nuria; Sánchez Santos, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has proven to be highly effective in controlling obesity and metabolic syndrome; the results of this surgery are not only expressed in terms of weight loss, but also in terms of resolution of comorbidities, improved quality of life and complications. The different parameters used to measure these outcomes require uniformity and reference patterns. Therefore, it is essential to identify those indicators and quality criteria that are helpful in defining the «best practice» principles in bariatric surgery. In this regard, the Section of Obesity of the Spanish Association of Surgeons, in collaboration with the Spanish Society for Bariatric Surgery (SECO), present as an objective to identify the key points that define «quality» in this type of surgery. We describe the main indicators based on the published literature as well as the criteria for referral of the main comorbidities according to the evidence found and grades of recommendation. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Current Trends in Upper and Lower Eyelid Blepharoplasty Among American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossler, Andrea L; Peng, Grace L; Yoo, Donald B; Azizzadeh, Babak; Massry, Guy G

    To assess current practice patterns for management of upper and lower eyelid blepharoplasty by active American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery members. An invitation to participate in a web-based anonymous survey was sent to the active American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery membership via email. The survey consists of 34 questions, both multiple choice and free response, regarding upper and lower eyelid blepharoplasty surgery. Practice patterns for both aesthetic and functional blepharoplasty are assessed. Thirty-four percent (161/472) of American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery members polled responded to the survey. Members perform an average of 196 upper eyelid, 46 lower eyelid, and 53 four-eyelid blepharoplasty procedures per year, with 70% of cases being functional and 30% purely aesthetic. Most members prefer monitored care (71%) to local (21%) or general (8%) anesthesia. Eighty-nine percent of surgeons use topical antibiotics after surgery, erythromycin being the most common (51%). Fourteen percent of members use postoperative oral antibiotics, with cephalexin (81%) being most common. In upper eyelid blepharoplasty, orbicularis muscle is excised by 86% of respondents. Orbital fat is excised, when deemed appropriate, in 97% of cases, with nasal fat excised most commonly (88%). Less commonly, fat repositioning (36%) and adjunctive fat grafting (33%) are performed. In lower eyelid blepharoplasty, surgeons report using one or more of the following approaches: transconjunctival (96%), transcutaneous (82%), and both transconjunctival and transcutaneous (51%). Common adjunctive procedures include orbital fat excision (99%), fat repositioning (80%), and lateral canthal suspension (96%). Less common adjunctive procedures include laser skin resurfacing (36%) and chemical peels (29%). This report outlines contemporary practice patterns among active American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and

  12. Contemporary impact of state certificate-of-need regulations for cardiac surgery: an analysis using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons' National Cardiac Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSesa, Verdi J; O'Brien, Sean M; Welke, Karl F; Beland, Sarah M; Haan, Constance K; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary S; Peterson, Eric D

    2006-11-14

    Prior research using administrative data associated certificate-of-need (CON) regulation for open heart surgery with higher hospital coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) volume and lower CABG operative mortality rates in elderly patients. It is unclear whether these findings apply in a general population and after controlling for detailed clinical characteristics and region. Using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons' (STS) National Cardiac Surgery Database, we examined isolated CABG surgery volume, operative mortality, and the composite end point of operative mortality or major morbidity for the years 2000 to 2003. The presence of CON regulations for open heart surgery was ascertained from the National Directory of the American Health Policy Association and by contacting CON administrators. Results were analyzed nationally, by state, and by region (West, Northeast, Midwest, South) and were adjusted for clinical factors and both population density and region with mixed-effects hierarchical logistic regression models. During 2000 to 2003, there were 314,710 isolated CABG surgeries performed at 294 STS hospitals in CON states (n=27, including Washington, DC) and 280 512 procedures at 343 STS hospitals in non-CON states (n=24). Patient clinical characteristics were similar among CON and non-CON hospitals. States with CON regulations tended to have higher population densities and had significantly higher median hospital annual CABG volumes in each of the years 2000 to 2003 (Pnational Medicare database. CON states have significantly higher hospital CABG surgery volumes but similar mortality compared with non-CON states. CON regulation alone is not a sufficient mechanism to ensure quality of care for CABG surgery.

  13. [Postoperative excessive blood loss after cardiac surgery can be predicted with International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis scoring system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Ji; Yoon, Seung Zhoo; Joo, Beom Joon; Lee, Jung Man; Jeon, Yun-Seok; Lim, Young Jin; Lee, Jong Hwan; Ahn, Hyuk

    Prediction of postoperative excessive blood loss is useful for management of Intensive Care Unit after cardiac surgery. The aim of present study was to examine the effectiveness of International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis scoring system in patients with cardiac surgery. After obtaining approval from the institutional review board, the medical records of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery using Cardio-Pulmonary Bypass between March 2010 and February 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis score was calculated in intensive care unit and patients were divided with overt disseminated intravascular coagulation group and non-overt disseminated intravascular coagulation group. To evaluate correlation with estimated blood loss, student t-test and correlation analyses were used. Among 384 patients with cardiac surgery, 70 patients with overt disseminated intravascular coagulation group (n=20) or non-overt disseminated intravascular coagulation group (n=50) were enrolled. Mean disseminated intravascular coagulation scores at intensive care unit admission was 5.35±0.59 (overt disseminated intravascular coagulation group) and 2.66±1.29 (non-overt disseminated intravascular coagulation group) and overt disseminated intravascular coagulation was induced in 29% (20/70). Overt disseminated intravascular coagulation group had much more EBL for 24h (p=0.006) and maintained longer time of intubation time (p=0.005). In spite of limitation of retrospective design, management using International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis score in patients after cardiac surgery seems to be helpful for prediction of the post- cardio-pulmonary bypass excessive blood loss and prolonged tracheal intubation duration. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery estimation of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in the United States in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Wayne J; DeMaria, Eric J; Brethauer, Stacy A; Mattar, Samer G; Rosenthal, Raul J; Morton, John M

    2017-12-16

    Bariatric surgery, despite being the most successful long-lasting treatment for morbid obesity, remains underused as only approximately 1% of all patients who qualify for surgery actually undergo surgery. To determine if patients in need are receiving appropriate therapy, the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery created a Numbers Taskforce to specify annual rate of use for obesity treatment interventions. The objective of this study was to determine metabolic and bariatric procedure trends since 2011 and to provide the best estimate of the number of procedures performed in the United States in 2016. United States. We reviewed data from the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program, National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database, and Nationwide Inpatient Sample. In addition, data from industry and outpatient centers were used to estimate outpatient center activity. Data from 2016 were compared with the previous 5 years of data. Compared with 2015, the total number of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in 2016 increased from approximately 196,000 to 216,000. The sleeve gastrectomy trend is increasing, and it continues to be the most common procedure. The gastric bypass and gastric band trends continued to decrease as seen in previous years. The percentage of revision procedures and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch procedures increased slightly. Finally, intragastric balloons placement emerged as a significant contributor to the cumulative total number of procedures performed. There is increasing use of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in the United States from 2011 to 2016, with a nearly 10% increase noted from 2015 to 2016. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) Guidelines for Ovarian Cancer Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querleu, Denis; Planchamp, Francois; Chiva, Luis; Fotopoulou, Christina; Barton, Desmond; Cibula, David; Aletti, Giovanni; Carinelli, Silvestro; Creutzberg, Carien; Davidson, Ben; Harter, Philip; Lundvall, Lene; Marth, Christian; Morice, Philippe; Rafii, Arash; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Rockall, Andrea; Sessa, Christiana; van der Zee, Ate; Vergote, Ignace; duBois, Andreas

    Objective The aim of this study was to develop clinically relevant and evidence-based guidelines as part of European Society of Gynaecological Oncology's mission to improve the quality of care for women with gynecological cancers across Europe. Methods The European Society of Gynaecological Oncology

  16. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Integrated Health Nutritional Guidelines for the Surgical Weight Loss Patient 2016 Update: Micronutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Julie; Frank, Laura; Rabena, Rebecca; Craggs-Dino, Lillian; Isom, Kellene A; Greiman, Laura

    2017-05-01

    Optimizing postoperative patient outcomes and nutritional status begins preoperatively. Patients should be educated before and after weight loss surgery (WLS) on the expected nutrient deficiencies associated with alterations in physiology. Although surgery can exacerbate preexisting nutrient deficiencies, preoperative screening for vitamin deficiencies has not been the norm in the majority of WLS practices. Screening is important because it is common for patients who present for WLS to have at least 1 vitamin or mineral deficiency preoperatively. The focus of this paper is to update the 2008 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Nutrition in Bariatric Surgery Guidelines with key micronutrient research in laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, biliopancreatic diversion, and biliopancreatic diversion/duodenal switch. Four questions regarding recommendations for preoperative and postoperative screening of nutrient deficiencies, preventative supplementation, and repletion of nutrient deficiencies in pre-WLS patients have been applied to specific micronutrients (vitamins B1 and B12; folate; iron; vitamins A, E, and K; calcium; vitamin D; copper; and zinc). Out of the 554 articles identified as meeting preliminary search criteria, 402 were reviewed in detail. There are 92 recommendations in this update, 79 new recommendations and an additional 13 that have not changed since 2008. Each recommendation has a corresponding graded level of evidence, from grade A through D. Data continue to suggest that the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies is increasing, while monitoring of patients at follow-up is decreasing. This document should be viewed as a guideline for a reasonable approach to patient nutritional care based on the most recent research, scientific evidence, resources, and information available. It is the responsibility of the registered dietitian nutritionist and WLS program to determine

  17. Clinical practice guidelines for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient--2013 update: cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B; Timothy Garvey, W; Hurley, Daniel L; Molly McMahon, M; Heinberg, Leslie J; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B; Brethauer, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Neurointerventional research between 2003 and 2012: slow growth, high interdisciplinary collaboration, and a low level of funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J Y; Yoon, D Y; Yoon, S D; Nam, S A; Cho, B M

    2014-10-01

    Neurointerventional therapy of cerebrovascular disease is a greatly expanding field across many specialty disciplines. The goal of this study was to analyze the characteristics and trends of scientific publications that focused on neurointervention during the past decade. A bibliometric evaluation of neurointerventional research published between 2003 and 2012 was conducted by using the PubMed data base. Analyzed parameters included the year of publication, type of document, language of the article, topic, declared funding, country of origin, type of collaboration between disciplines, the first author's specialty, and subject category and the Impact Factor of the publishing journal. Between 2003 and 2012, a total of 2123 articles were published, of which 1107 (52.1%) were original articles, 1948 (91.8%) were written in English, 192 (9.0%) received funding, 661 (31.1%) were published by the United States, and 1060 (49.9%) resulted from interdisciplinary collaboration. Neurosurgery departments produced the most articles (n = 910, 42.9%), followed by radiology (n = 747, 35.2%) and neurology (n = 270, 12.7%). The time-trend analysis in the number of publications demonstrated slow growth from 2003 to 2012, with an average annual growth rate of +6.0%. The fields of neurosurgery, radiology, and neurology have contributed substantially to neurointervention research. Slow growth, high interdisciplinary collaboration, and a low level of funding are peculiar characteristics of research in this field. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. A method to reduce patient's eye lens dose in neuro-interventional radiology procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, M. J.; Wong, J. H. D.; Kadir, K. A. A.; Sani, F. M.; Ng, K. H.

    2016-08-01

    Complex and prolonged neuro-interventional radiology procedures using the biplane angiography system increase the patient's risk of radiation-induced cataract. Physical collimation is the most effective way of reducing the radiation dose to the patient's eye lens, but in instances where collimation is not possible, an attenuator may be useful in protecting the eyes. In this study, an eye lens protector was designed and fabricated to reduce the radiation dose to the patients' eye lens during neuro-interventional procedures. The eye protector was characterised before being tested on its effectiveness in a simulated aneurysm procedure on an anthropomorphic phantom. Effects on the automatic dose rate control (ADRC) and image quality are also evaluated. The eye protector reduced the radiation dose by up to 62.1% at the eye lens. The eye protector is faintly visible in the fluoroscopy images and increased the tube current by a maximum of 3.7%. It is completely invisible in the acquisition mode and does not interfere with the clinical procedure. The eye protector placed within the radiation field of view was able to reduce the radiation dose to the eye lens by direct radiation beam of the lateral x-ray tube with minimal effect on the ADRC system.

  20. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Expert Consensus for the Resuscitation of Patients Who Arrest After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Task Force on Resuscitation After Cardiac Surgery provides this professional society perspective on resuscitation in patients who arrest after cardiac surgery. This document was created using a multimodal methodology for evidence generation and includes information from existing guidelines, from the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, from our own structured literature reviews on issues particular to cardiac surgery, and from an international survey on resuscitation hosted by CTSNet. In gathering evidence for this consensus paper, searches were conducted using the MEDLINE keywords "cardiac surgery," "resuscitation," "guideline," "thoracic surgery," "cardiac arrest," and "cardiac massage." Weight was given to clinical studies in humans, although some case studies, mannequin simulations of potential protocols, and animal models were also considered. Consensus was reached using a modified Delphi method consisting of two rounds of voting until 75% agreement on appropriate wording and strength of the opinions was reached. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Workforce on Critical Care was enlisted in this process to provide a wider variety of experiences and backgrounds in an effort to reinforce the opinions provided. We start with the premise that external massage is ineffective for an arrest due to tamponade or hypovolemia (bleeding), and therefore these subsets of patients will receive inadequate cerebral perfusion during cardiac arrest in the absence of resternotomy. Because these two situations are common causes for an arrest after cardiac surgery, the inability to provide effective external cardiopulmonary resuscitation highlights the importance of early emergency resternotomy within 5 minutes. In addition, because internal massage is more effective than external massage, it should be used preferentially if other quickly reversible causes are not found. We present a protocol for the cardiac arrest situation that

  1. Current Rates of Publication for Podium and Poster Presentations at the American Society for Surgery of the Hand Annual Meetings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Abzug

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Research projects are presented at the Annual Meetings of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH. It is unknown how many achieve publication in peer-reviewed journals. We sought to determine current rates of publication of podium and poster presentations.   Methods:  All ASSH podium and poster presentations from 2000 to 2005 were reviewed, and an Internet-based search using PubMed and Google was conducted to determine whether the presented studies had been published. Times to publication and journal names were recorded. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Fisher’s exact test was conducted to compare current trends with previous trends. Results:  Of 1127 podium and poster presentations reviewed, 46% were published in peer-reviewed journals. Forty-seven percent of published presentations (242 presentations were in Journal of Hand Surgery , and 11% (59 entations were in Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery . Forty-five percent of presentations were published within 2 years and 66% within 3 years. The publication rate for podium presentations was significantly higher than that previously reported for Journal of Hand Surgery, at 54% compared with 44% (P=0.004.  Conclusions:  Currently, fewer than half of the studies presented at Annual Meetings of the ASSH achieve publication in peer-eviewed journals. Presentations are most likely to be published within 3 years, and almost half are published in Journal of Hand Surgery .

  2. Linking the congenital heart surgery databases of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society: part 2--lessons learned and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K; Austin, Erle; Gaynor, J William; Backer, Carl; Hirsch-Romano, Jennifer C; Williams, William G; Caldarone, Christopher A; McCrindle, Brian W; Graham, Karen E; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Shook, Gregory J; Poteat, Jennifer; Baxi, Maulik V; Karamlou, Tara; Blackstone, Eugene H; Mavroudis, Constantine; Mayer, John E; Jonas, Richard A; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2014-04-01

    A link has been created between the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS-CHSD) and the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society Database (CHSS-D). Five matrices have been created that facilitate the automated identification of patients who are potentially eligible for the five active CHSS studies using the STS-CHSD. These matrices are now used to (1) estimate the denominator of patients eligible for CHSS studies and (2) compare "eligible and enrolled patients" to "potentially eligible and not enrolled patients" to assess the generalizability of CHSS studies. The matrices were applied to 40 consenting institutions that participate in both the STS-CHSD and the CHSS to (1) estimate the denominator of patients that are potentially eligible for CHSS studies, (2) estimate the completeness of enrollment of patients eligible for CHSS studies among all CHSS sites, (3) estimate the completeness of enrollment of patients eligible for CHSS studies among those CHSS institutions participating in each CHSS cohort study, and (4) compare "eligible and enrolled patients" to "potentially eligible and not enrolled patients" to assess the generalizability of CHSS studies. The matrices were applied to all participants in the STS-CHSD to identify patients who underwent frequently performed operations and compare "eligible and enrolled patients" to "potentially eligible and not enrolled patients" in following five domains: (1) age at surgery, (2) gender, (3) race, (4) discharge mortality, and (5) postoperative length of stay. Completeness of enrollment was defined as the number of actually enrolled patients divided by the number of patients identified as being potentially eligible for enrollment. For the CHSS Critical Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Study (LVOTO) study, for the Norwood procedure, completeness of enrollment at centers actively participating in the LVOTO study was 34%. For the Norwood operation, discharge mortality was 15% among 227 enrolled patients

  3. The importance of patient-specific preoperative factors: an analysis of the society of thoracic surgeons congenital heart surgery database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; O'Brien, Sean M; Pasquali, Sara K; Kim, Sunghee; Gaynor, J William; Tchervenkov, Christo Ivanov; Karamlou, Tara; Welke, Karl F; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Mavroudis, Constantine; Mayer, John E; Jonas, Richard A; Edwards, Fred H; Grover, Frederick L; Shahian, David M; Jacobs, Marshall Lewis

    2014-11-01

    The most common forms of risk adjustment for pediatric and congenital heart surgery used today are based mainly on the estimated risk of mortality of the primary procedure of the operation. The goals of this analysis were to assess the association of patient-specific preoperative factors with mortality and to determine which of these preoperative factors to include in future pediatric and congenital cardiac surgical risk models. All index cardiac operations in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS-CHSD) during 2010 through 2012 were eligible for inclusion. Patients weighing less than 2.5 kg undergoing patent ductus arteriosus closure were excluded. Centers with more than 10% missing data and patients with missing data for discharge mortality or other key variables were excluded. Rates of discharge mortality for patients with or without specific preoperative factors were assessed across age groups and were compared using Fisher's exact test. In all, 25,476 operations were included (overall discharge mortality 3.7%, n=943). The prevalence of common preoperative factors and their associations with discharge mortality were determined. Associations of the following preoperative factors with discharge mortality were all highly significant (psurgery could lead to increased precision in predicting risk of operative mortality and comparison of observed to expected outcomes. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. WOCN Society and AUA Position Statement on Preoperative Stoma Site Marking for Patients Undergoing Urostomy Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadalena, Ginger; Hendren, Samantha; McKenna, Linda; Muldoon, Roberta; Netsch, Debra; Paquette, Ian; Pittman, Joyce; Ramundo, Janet; Steinberg, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Marking the optimal location for a stoma preoperatively enhances the likelihood of a patient's independence in stoma care, predictable pouching system wear times, and resumption of normal activities. Urologists and certified ostomy nurses are the optimal clinicians to select and mark stoma sites, as this skill is a part of their education, practice, and training. However, these providers are not always available, particularly in emergency situations. The purpose of this position statement, developed by the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society in collaboration with the American Urological Association and the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons, is to provide a guideline to assist clinicians (especially those who are not surgeons or WOC nurses) in selecting an effective stoma site.

  5. Risk stratification for the development of respiratory adverse events following vascular surgery using the Society of Vascular Surgery's Vascular Quality Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Elizabeth A; Fish, Larry; Chaer, Rabih A; Makaroun, Michel S; Baril, Donald T

    2017-02-01

    disease severity, degree of renal insufficiency, ambulatory status, transfer status, urgency, and operative type. The predicted compared with the actual RAE incidence were highly correlated, with a correlation coefficient of 0.943 (P surgery. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Linking the congenital heart surgery databases of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society: part 1--rationale and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K; Austin, Erle; Gaynor, J William; Backer, Carl; Hirsch-Romano, Jennifer C; Williams, William G; Caldarone, Christopher A; McCrindle, Brian W; Graham, Karen E; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Shook, Gregory J; Poteat, Jennifer; Baxi, Maulik V; Karamlou, Tara; Blackstone, Eugene H; Mavroudis, Constantine; Mayer, John E; Jonas, Richard A; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2014-04-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS-CHSD) is the largest Registry in the world of patients who have undergone congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical operations. The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society Database (CHSS-D) is an Academic Database designed for specialized detailed analyses of specific congenital cardiac malformations and related treatment strategies. The goal of this project was to create a link between the STS-CHSD and the CHSS-D in order to facilitate studies not possible using either individual database alone and to help identify patients who are potentially eligible for enrollment in CHSS studies. Centers were classified on the basis of participation in the STS-CHSD, the CHSS-D, or both. Five matrices, based on CHSS inclusionary criteria and STS-CHSD codes, were created to facilitate the automated identification of patients in the STS-CHSD who meet eligibility criteria for the five active CHSS studies. The matrices were evaluated with a manual adjudication process and were iteratively refined. The sensitivity and specificity of the original matrices and the refined matrices were assessed. In January 2012, a total of 100 centers participated in the STS-CHSD and 74 centers participated in the CHSS. A total of 70 centers participate in both and 40 of these 70 agreed to participate in this linkage project. The manual adjudication process and the refinement of the matrices resulted in an increase in the sensitivity of the matrices from 93% to 100% and an increase in the specificity of the matrices from 94% to 98%. Matrices were created to facilitate the automated identification of patients potentially eligible for the five active CHSS studies using the STS-CHSD. These matrices have a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98%. In addition to facilitating identification of patients potentially eligible for enrollment in CHSS studies, these matrices will allow (1) estimation of the denominator of patients potentially

  7. Linking the Congenital Heart Surgery Databases of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Congenital Heart Surgeons’ Society: Part 1—Rationale and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Austin, Erle; Gaynor, J. William; Backer, Carl; Hirsch-Romano, Jennifer C.; Williams, William G.; Caldarone, Christopher A.; McCrindle, Brian W.; Graham, Karen E.; Dokholyan, Rachel S.; Shook, Gregory J.; Poteat, Jennifer; Baxi, Maulik V.; Karamlou, Tara; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Mavroudis, Constantine; Mayer, John E.; Jonas, Richard A.; Jacobs, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS-CHSD) is the largest Registry in the world of patients who have undergone congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical operations. The Congenital Heart Surgeons’ Society Database (CHSS-D) is an Academic Database designed for specialized detailed analyses of specific congenital cardiac malformations and related treatment strategies. The goal of this project was to create a link between the STS-CHSD and the CHSS-D in order to facilitate studies not possible using either individual database alone and to help identify patients who are potentially eligible for enrollment in CHSS studies. Methods Centers were classified on the basis of participation in the STS-CHSD, the CHSS-D, or both. Five matrices, based on CHSS inclusionary criteria and STS-CHSD codes, were created to facilitate the automated identification of patients in the STS-CHSD who meet eligibility criteria for the five active CHSS studies. The matrices were evaluated with a manual adjudication process and were iteratively refined. The sensitivity and specificity of the original matrices and the refined matrices were assessed. Results In January 2012, a total of 100 centers participated in the STS-CHSD and 74 centers participated in the CHSS. A total of 70 centers participate in both and 40 of these 70 agreed to participate in this linkage project. The manual adjudication process and the refinement of the matrices resulted in an increase in the sensitivity of the matrices from 93% to 100% and an increase in the specificity of the matrices from 94% to 98%. Conclusion Matrices were created to facilitate the automated identification of patients potentially eligible for the five active CHSS studies using the STS-CHSD. These matrices have a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 98%. In addition to facilitating identification of patients potentially eligible for enrollment in CHSS studies, these matrices will allow (1) estimation of

  8. Guidelines for the Surgical Management of Laryngeal Cancer: Korean Society of Thyroid-Head and Neck Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Soon-Hyun; Hong, Hyun Jun; Kwon, Soon Young; Kwon, Kee Hwan; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Ryu, Junsun; Park, Jun Hee; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Lee, Guk Haeng; Lee, Sei Young; Lee, Jin Choon; Chung, Man Ki; Joo, Young Hoon; Ji, Yong Bae; Hah, Jeong Hun; Kwon, Minsu; Park, Young Min; Song, Chang Myeon; Shin, Sung-Chan; Ryu, Chang Hwan; Lee, Doh Young; Lee, Young Chan; Chang, Jae Won; Jeong, Ha Min; Cho, Jae-Keun; Cha, Wonjae; Chun, Byung Joon; Choi, Ik Joon; Choi, Hyo Geun; Lee, Kang Dae

    2017-01-01

    Korean Society of Thyroid-Head and Neck Surgery appointed a Task Force to develop clinical practice guidelines for the surgical treatment of laryngeal cancer. This Task Force conducted a systematic search of the EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and KoreaMed databases to identify relevant articles, using search terms selected according to the key questions. Evidence-based recommendations were then created on the basis of these articles. An external expert review and Delphi questionnaire were applied to reach consensus regarding the recommendations. The resulting guidelines focus on the surgical treatment of laryngeal cancer with the assumption that surgery is the selected treatment modality after a multidisciplinary discussion in any context. These guidelines do not, therefore, address non-surgical treatment such as radiation therapy or chemotherapy. The committee developed 62 evidence-based recommendations in 32 categories intended to assist clinicians during management of patients with laryngeal cancer and patients with laryngeal cancer, and counselors and health policy-makers. PMID:28043099

  9. Electronic Communication in Plastic Surgery: Guiding Principles from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Health Policy Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlin, Kyle R; Perdikis, Galen; Damitz, Lynn; Krochmal, Dan J; Kalliainen, Loree K; Bonawitz, Steven C

    2018-02-01

    With the advancement of technology, electronic communication has become an important mode of communication within plastic and reconstructive surgery. This can take the form of e-mail, text messaging, video conferencing, and social media, among others. There are currently no defined American Society of Plastic Surgeons guidelines for appropriate professional use of these technologies. A search was performed on PubMed and the Cochrane database; terms included "telemedicine," "text messaging," "HIPAA," "metadata," "video conferencing," "photo sharing," "social media," "Facebook," "Twitter," and "Instagram." Initial screening of all identified articles was performed; the level of evidence, limitations, and recommendations were evaluated and articles were reviewed. A total of 654 articles were identified in the level I screening process; after more comprehensive review, 41 articles fit inclusion criteria: social networking, 12; telemedicine, 11; text messaging, 10; metadata, four; video conferencing, three; and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, one. General themes were identified from these articles and guidelines proposed. Electronic communication can provide an efficient method of information exchange for professional purposes within plastic surgery but should be used thoughtfully and with all professional, legal, and ethical considerations.

  10. Rates of infection after spine surgery based on 108,419 procedures: a report from the Scoliosis Research Society Morbidity and Mortality Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Sansur, Charles A; Berven, Sigurd H; Fu, Kai-Ming G; Broadstone, Paul A; Choma, Theodore J; Goytan, Michael J; Noordeen, Hilali H; Knapp, Dennis R; Hart, Robert A; Donaldson, William F; Polly, David W; Perra, Joseph H; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba

    2011-04-01

    Retrospective review of a prospectively collected database. Our objective was to assess the rates of postoperative wound infection associated with spine surgery. Although wound infection after spine surgery remains a common source of morbidity, estimates of its rates of occurrence remain relatively limited. The Scoliosis Research Society prospectively collects morbidity and mortality data from its members, including the occurrence of wound infection. The Scoliosis Research Society morbidity and mortality database was queried for all reported spine surgery cases from 2004 to 2007. Cases were stratified based on factors including diagnosis, adult (≥ 21 years) versus pediatric (scoliosis, and type of kyphosis for both adult and pediatric patients. Factors associated with increased rate of infection included revision surgery (P spine surgeons, is an inherent potential complication. These data provide general benchmarks of infection rates as a basis for ongoing efforts to improve safety of care.

  11. About Neurointerventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... makes it possible for practitioners to utilize this minimally invasive technique is technology which transmits internal images of the brain or the spine on a large screen throughout the procedure allowing ...

  12. Society for Vascular Surgery limb stage and patient risk correlate with outcomes in an amputation prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, Marlin W; Ahmed, Ayman; Wu, Bian; Gasper, Warren J; Reyzelman, Alex; Vartanian, Shant M; Hiramoto, Jade S; Conte, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    Clinical decision making and accurate outcomes comparisons in advanced limb ischemia require improved staging systems. The Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System (Wound extent, Ischemia, and foot Infection [WIfI]) was designed to stratify limb outcomes based on three major factors-wound extent, ischemia, and foot infection. The Project or Ex-Vivo vein graft Engineering via Transfection III (PREVENT) III (PIII) risk score was developed to stratify patients by expected amputation-free survival (AFS) after surgical revascularization. This study was designed to prospectively assess limb and patient-based staging for predicting outcomes of hospitalized patients in an amputation prevention program. This study undertook a retrospective analysis of prospectively gathered registry data of consecutive patients with limb-threatening conditions admitted to a fully integrated vascular/podiatry service over a 16-month period. Upon admission, limb risk was stratified using the WIfI system and patient risk was categorized using PIII classification. Patients were assessed for perioperative and postdischarge outcomes, and their relationship to staging at admission was analyzed. There were 174 threatened limbs (143 hospitalized patients) stratified by WIfI stage (1%-12%, 2%-28%, 3%-24%, 4%-28%, 5%-3%, unstaged-5%) and PIII risk (34% low, 49% moderate, and 17% high risk). Diabetes and end-stage renal disease were associated with WIfI stage (P = .006 and P = .018) and PIII risk (P = .003 and P amputation. There were 119 limbs (71%) that underwent revascularization, including 108 infrainguinal reconstructions (endovascular or open revascularization). Rate of revascularization increased with WIfI stage (P procedures, minor amputations, and initial hospital duration of stay (all P procedures, there was a similar distribution of endovascular (46%) and surgical (54%) interventions. Freedom from major adverse limb events was best for

  13. Report of the 10(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand Congress (Organising Chair and Scientific Chair).

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Roohi Sharifah; Abdullah, Shalimar

    2016-10-01

    A report on the 10(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for the Surgery of the Hand and 6(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for Hand Therapists is submitted detailing the numbers of attendees participating, papers presented and support received as well the some of the challenges faced and how best to overcome them from the local conference chair and scientific chair point of view.

  14. Clinical practice guidelines for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient--2013 update: cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B; Garvey, W Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L; McMahon, M Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B; Brethauer, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    .... Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues...

  15. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John U; Kort, Smadar; Mehran, Roxana; Schoenhagen, Paul; Soman, Prem; Dehmer, Greg J; Doherty, John U; Schoenhagen, Paul; Amin, Zahid; Bashore, Thomas M; Boyle, Andrew; Calnon, Dennis A; Carabello, Blase; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Conte, John; Desai, Milind; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Ferrari, Victor A; Ghoshhajra, Brian; Mehrotra, Praveen; Nazarian, Saman; Reece, T Brett; Tamarappoo, Balaji; Tzou, Wendy S; Wong, John B; Doherty, John U; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bailey, Steven R; Bhave, Nicole M; Brown, Alan S; Daugherty, Stacie L; Dean, Larry S; Desai, Milind Y; Duvernoy, Claire S; Gillam, Linda D; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Lindsay, Bruce D; Manning, Warren J; Mehrotra, Praveen; Patel, Manesh R; Sachdeva, Ritu; Wann, L Samuel; Winchester, David E; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2017-10-20

    This document is 1 of 2 companion appropriate use criteria (AUC) documents developed by the American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas the second, companion document addresses this topic with regard to structural heart disease. Although there is clinical overlap, the documents addressing valvular and structural heart disease are published separately, albeit with a common structure. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of valvular and structural heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities. Using standardized methodology, the clinical scenarios (indications) were developed by a diverse writing group to represent patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included common applications and anticipated uses. Where appropriate, the scenarios were developed on the basis of the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. A separate, independent rating panel scored the 92 clinical scenarios in this document on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that a modality is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Midrange scores of 4 to 6 indicate that a modality may be appropriate for the clinical scenario, and scores of 1 to 3 indicate that a modality is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario. The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of these scenarios by practices that will

  16. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Multimodality Imaging in Valvular Heart Disease : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, John U; Kort, Smadar; Mehran, Roxana; Schoenhagen, Paul; Soman, Prem

    2017-12-01

    This document is 1 of 2 companion appropriate use criteria (AUC) documents developed by the American College of Cardiology, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. This document addresses the evaluation and use of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis and management of valvular heart disease, whereas the second, companion document addresses this topic with regard to structural heart disease. Although there is clinical overlap, the documents addressing valvular and structural heart disease are published separately, albeit with a common structure. The goal of the companion AUC documents is to provide a comprehensive resource for multimodality imaging in the context of valvular and structural heart disease, encompassing multiple imaging modalities.Using standardized methodology, the clinical scenarios (indications) were developed by a diverse writing group to represent patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included common applications and anticipated uses. Where appropriate, the scenarios were developed on the basis of the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines.A separate, independent rating panel scored the 92 clinical scenarios in this document on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that a modality is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Midrange scores of 4 to 6 indicate that a modality may be appropriate for the clinical scenario, and scores of 1 to 3 indicate that a modality is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario.The primary objective of the AUC is to provide a framework for the assessment of these scenarios by practices that will

  17. The effect of the perioperative blood transfusion and blood conservation in cardiac surgery Clinical Practice Guidelines of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists upon clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likosky, Donald S; FitzGerald, Daniel C; Groom, Robert C; Jones, Dwayne K; Baker, Robert A; Shann, Kenneth G; Mazer, C David; Spiess, Bruce D; Body, Simon C

    2010-06-01

    The 2007 Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists Clinical Practice Guideline for Perioperative Blood Transfusion and Blood Conservation in Cardiac Surgery was recently promulgated and has received much attention. Using a survey of cardiac anesthesiologists and perfusionists' clinical practice, we assessed the current practices of perfusion, anesthesia, and surgery, as recommended by the Guidelines and also determined the role the Guidelines had in changing these practices. Nontrainee members of the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, the American Academy of Cardiovascular Perfusion, the Canadian Society of Clinical Perfusion, and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology were surveyed using a standardized survey instrument that examined clinical practices and responses to the Guidelines. One thousand four hundred and two surveys from 1,061 institutions principally in the United States (677 institutions) and Canada (34 institutions) were returned, with a 32% response rate. There was wide distribution of the Guidelines with 78% of anesthesiologists and 67% of perfusionists reporting having read all, part, or a summary of the Guidelines. However, only 20% of respondents reported that an institutional discussion had taken place as a result of the Guidelines, and only 14% of respondents reported that an institutional monitoring group had been formed. There was wide variability in current preoperative testing, perfusion, surgical, and pharmacological practices reported by respondents. Twenty-six percent of respondents reported one or more practice changes in response to the Guidelines.The changes made were reported to be highly (9%) or somewhat effective (31%) in reducing overall transfusion rates. Only four of 38 Guideline recommendations were reported by more than 5% of respondents to have been changed in response to the Guidelines. Wide variation in clinical practices of cardiac surgery was reported. Little

  18. Effect of the perioperative blood transfusion and blood conservation in cardiac surgery clinical practice guidelines of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists upon clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likosky, Donald S; FitzGerald, Daniel C; Groom, Robert C; Jones, Dwayne K; Baker, Robert A; Shann, Kenneth G; Mazer, C David; Spiess, Bruce D; Body, Simon C

    2010-08-01

    The 2007 Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists Clinical Practice Guideline for Perioperative Blood Transfusion and Blood Conservation in Cardiac Surgery was recently promulgated and has received much attention. Using a survey of cardiac anesthesiologists and perfusionists' clinical practice, we aimed to assess the current practices of perfusion, anesthesia, and surgery, as recommended by the Guidelines, and to also determine the role the Guidelines had in changing these practices. Nontrainee members of the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, the American Academy of Cardiovascular Perfusion, the Canadian Society of Clinical Perfusion, and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology were surveyed using a standardized survey instrument that examined clinical practices and responses to the Guidelines. A total of 1402 surveys from 1061 institutions principally in the United States (677 institutions) and Canada (34 institutions) were returned, a 32% response rate. There was wide distribution of the Guidelines with 78% of anesthesiologists and 67% of perfusionists reporting having read all, part, or a summary of the Guidelines. However, only 20% of respondents reported that an institutional discussion had taken place as a result of the Guidelines, and only 14% of respondents reported that an institutional monitoring group had been formed. There was wide variability in current preoperative testing, perfusion, surgical, and pharmacological practices reported by respondents. Twenty-six percent of respondents reported 1 or more practice changes in response to the Guidelines. The changes made were reported to be highly (9%) or somewhat (31%) effective in reducing overall transfusion rates. Only 4 of 38 Guideline recommendations were reported by >5% of respondents to have been changed in response to the Guidelines. Wide variation in clinical practices of cardiac surgery was reported. Little change in clinical practices

  19. Predictive ability of the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system after first-time lower extremity revascularizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Darling (Jeremy); J.C. McCallum (John C.); P.A. Soden (Peter A.); Guzman, R.J. (Raul J.); Wyers, M.C. (Mark C.); Hamdan, A.D. (Allen D.); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); M.L. Schermerhorn (Marc)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Objective:__ The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Wound, Ischemia and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system was proposed to predict 1-year amputation risk and potential benefit from revascularization. Our goal was to evaluate the predictive ability of this scale in a

  20. Predictive ability of the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system following infrapopliteal endovascular interventions for critical limb ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Darling (Jeremy); J.C. McCallum (John C.); P.A. Soden (Peter A.); Meng, Y. (Yifan); Wyers, M.C. (Mark C.); Hamdan, A.D. (Allen D.); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); M.L. Schermerhorn (Marc)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee has composed a new threatened lower extremity classification system that reflects the three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI).

  1. Diverticular disease: guidelines of the german society for gastroenterology, digestive and metabolic diseases and the german society for general and visceral surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, Wolfgang; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Leifeld, Ludger

    2014-01-01

    Diverticular disease is one of the most common disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. 28-45% of the population develop colonic diverticula, while about 25% suffer symptoms and about 5% complications. To create formal guidelines for diagnosis and management. Six working groups with 44 participants analyzed key questions in subject areas assigned to them. Following a systematic literature search, 451 publications were included. Consensus was obtained by agreement within the working groups, two Delphi processes and a guideline conference. Targeted management of diverticular disease requires a classificatory diagnosis. A new classification was created. In addition to the clinical examination, intestinal ultrasound or computed tomography is the determining factor. Interval colonoscopy is recommended to exclude comorbidities. A low-fiber diet, obesity, lack of exercise, smoking and immunosuppression have an adverse impact on diverticulosis. This can lead to diverticulitis. Antibiotics are no longer recommended in uncomplicated diverticulitis if no risk factors such as immunosuppression are present. If close monitoring is ensured, uncomplicated diverticulitis can be treated on an outpatient basis. Complicated diverticulitis should be treated in hospital, involving broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, where necessary abscess drainage, and surgery, if possible laparoscopically. In the case of chronic relapsing diverticulitis, the risk of perforation decreases with each episode, so that surgery is no longer recommended after the second episode but only following individual assessment. New findings on diverticular disease call into question the overuse of antibiotics and excessive indications for surgery. Targeted treatment requires a precise diagnosis and intensive interdisciplinary cooperation. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Update and validation of the Society for Vascular Surgery wound, ischemia, and foot infection threatened limb classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Joseph L

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of critical limb ischemia, first defined in 1982, was intended to delineate a patient cohort with a threatened limb and at risk for amputation due to severe peripheral arterial disease. The influence of diabetes and its associated neuropathy on the pathogenesis-threatened limb was an excluded comorbidity, despite its known contribution to amputation risk. The Fontaine and Rutherford classifications of limb ischemia severity have also been used to predict amputation risk and the likelihood of tissue healing. The dramatic increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and the expanding techniques of arterial revascularization has prompted modification of peripheral arterial disease classification schemes to improve outcomes analysis for patients with threatened limbs. The diabetic patient with foot ulceration and infection is at risk for limb loss, with abnormal arterial perfusion as only one determinant of outcome. The wound extent and severity of infection also impact the likelihood of limb loss. To better predict amputation risk, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee developed a classification of the threatened lower extremity that reflects these important clinical considerations. Risk stratification is based on three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: wound, ischemia, and foot infection. This classification scheme is relevant to the patient with critical limb ischemia because many are also diabetic. Implementation of the wound, ischemia, and foot infection classification system in critical limb ischemia patients is recommended and should assist the clinician in more meaningful analysis of outcomes for various forms of wound and arterial revascularizations procedures required in this challenging, patient population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Lookup > COPD > Diagnosing and Treating COPD Surgery Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) includes two separate lung problems, emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Some people with COPD have ...

  4. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/EACTS/HVS/SCA/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for the Treatment of Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Heart Valve Society, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonow, Robert O; Brown, Alan S; Gillam, Linda D; Kapadia, Samir R; Kavinsky, Clifford J; Lindman, Brian R; Mack, Michael J; Thourani, Vinod H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bonow, Robert O; Lindman, Brian R; Beaver, Thomas M; Bradley, Steven M; Carabello, Blase A; Desai, Milind Y; George, Isaac; Green, Philip; Holmes, David R; Johnston, Douglas; Leipsic, Jonathon; Mick, Stephanie L; Passeri, Jonathan J; Piana, Robert N; Reichek, Nathaniel; Ruiz, Carlos E; Taub, Cynthia C; Thomas, James D; Turi, Zoltan G; Doherty, John U; Dehmer, Gregory J; Bailey, Steven R; Bhave, Nicole M; Brown, Alan S; Daugherty, Stacie L; Dean, Larry S; Desai, Milind Y; Duvernoy, Claire S; Gillam, Linda D; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Lindsay, Bruce D; Manning, Warren J; Mehrotra, Praveen; Patel, Manesh R; Sachdeva, Ritu; Wann, L Samuel; Winchester, David E; Allen, Joseph M

    2018-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology collaborated with the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Heart Valve Society, Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to develop and evaluate Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for the treatment of patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). This is the first AUC to address the topic of AS and its treatment options, including surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). A number of common patient scenarios experienced in daily practice were developed along with assumptions and definitions for those scenarios, which were all created using guidelines, clinical trial data, and expert opinion in the field of AS. The 2014 AHA/ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines(1) and its 2017 focused update paper (2) were used as the primary guiding references in developing these indications. The writing group identified 95 clinical scenarios based on patient symptoms and clinical presentation, and up to 6 potential treatment options for those patients. A separate, independent rating panel was asked to score each indication from 1 to 9, with 1-3 categorized as "Rarely Appropriate," 4-6 as "May Be Appropriate," and 7-9 as "Appropriate." After considering factors such as symptom status, left ventricular (LV) function, surgical risk, and the presence of concomitant coronary or other valve disease, the rating panel determined that either SAVR or TAVR is Appropriate in most patients with symptomatic AS at intermediate or high surgical risk; however, situations

  5. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*

    OpenAIRE

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mil...

  6. Results of the 2015 Scoliosis Research Society Survey on Single Versus Dual Attending Surgeon Approach for Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Justin K; Sethi, Rajiv K; Hey, Lloyd A; LaGrone, Michael O; Keefe, Malla; Aryan, Henry E; Errico, Thomas J; Deviren, Vedat; Hart, Robert A; Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank; Daubs, Michael D; Ames, Christopher P

    2017-06-15

    An electronic survey administered to Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) membership. To characterize surgeon practices and views regarding the use of two attending surgeons for adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery. The use of two experienced attending surgeons can decrease the operative time, estimated blood loss, and perioperative complication rates. However, the current practice patterns for the use of two attending surgeons remains unknown. An electronic, 27-question survey regarding single/dual attending surgeons was administered to the SRS membership. Determinants included: surgeon/practice demographics, assistant type/level of training, and questions regarding use of two attending surgeons. Overall reporting and comparisons between groups were made: US versus international, academic versus private practice, and experience 15 years. A total of 199 surgeons responded from 27 different countries. Overall and between the groups, the respondents significantly reported believing that two attending spine surgeons improves safety, decreases complications, and improves outcomes (P < 0.01). Approximately, 67.3% reported using a second attending ≤25% of the time (33.2% do not), and 24.1% use one ≥51% of the time (similar between groups); 51.1% that have a second attending feel it's limited by reimbursement and access concerns and 71.9% have difficulty getting the second attending reimbursed. 72.3% use a second attending for ALL of the following reasons (no difference between groups): "it's safer/reduces complications," "it decreases operative time," "it decreases blood loss," "it results in improved outcomes," "it's less work and stress for me." If reimbursement was equal/assured for a second attending, 67.5% would use one "more often" or "always." The respondents feel that having a second attending surgeon improves patient care, however most do not use one often. Reasons include reimbursement/access concerns and the majority would use one if reimbursement was

  7. A proposal of Brazilian Society of Surgical Oncology for standardizing cytoreductive surgery plus hypertermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy procedures in Brazil: pseudomixoma peritonei, appendiceal tumors and malignant peritoneal mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thales Paulo Batista

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cytoreductive surgery plus hypertermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has emerged as a major comprehensive treatment of peritoneal malignancies and is currently the standard of care for appendiceal epithelial neoplasms and pseudomyxoma peritonei syndrome as well as malignant peritoneal mesothelioma. Unfortunately, there are some worldwide variations of the cytoreductive surgery and hypertermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy techniques since no single technique has so far demonstrated its superiority over the others. Therefore, standardization of practices might enhance better comparisons between outcomes. In these settings, the Brazilian Society of Surgical Oncology considered it important to present a proposal for standardizing cytoreductive surgery plus hypertermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy procedures in Brazil, with a special focus on producing homogeneous data for the developing Brazilian register for peritoneal surface malignancies.

  8. The improvement of care for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease across the World: a challenge for the World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchervenkov, Christo I; Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; Bernier, Pierre-Luc; Stellin, Giovanni; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Mavroudis, Constantine; Jonas, Richard A; Cicek, Sertac M; Al-Halees, Zohair; Elliott, Martin J; Jatene, Marcelo B; Kinsley, Robin H; Kreutzer, Christian; Leon-Wyss, Juan; Liu, Jinfen; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Nunn, Graham R; Ramirez-Marroquin, Samuel; Sandoval, Nestor; Sano, Shunji; Sarris, George E; Sharma, Rajesh; Shoeb, Ayman; Spray, Thomas L; Ungerleider, Ross M; Yangni-Angate, Hervé; Ziemer, Gerhard

    2008-12-01

    The diagnosis and treatment for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease has undergone remarkable progress over the last 60 years. Unfortunately, this progress has been largely limited to the developed world. Yet every year approximately 90% of the more than 1,000,000 children who are born with congenital cardiac disease across the world receive either suboptimal care or are totally denied care.While in the developed world the focus has changed from an effort to decrease post-operative mortality to now improving quality of life and decreasing morbidity, which is the focus of this Supplement, the rest of the world still needs to develop basic access to congenital cardiac care. The World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery [http://www.wspchs.org/] was established in 2006. The Vision of the World Society is that every child born anywhere in the world with a congenital heart defect should have access to appropriate medical and surgical care. The Mission of the World Society is to promote the highest quality comprehensive care to all patients with pediatric and/or congenital heart disease, from the fetus to the adult, regardless of the patient's economic means, with emphasis on excellence in education, research and community service.We present in this article an overview of the epidemiology of congenital cardiac disease, the current and future challenges to improve care in the developed and developing world, the impact of the globalization of cardiac surgery, and the role that the World Society should play. The World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery is in a unique position to influence and truly improve the global care of children and adults with congenital cardiac disease throughout the world [http://www.wspchs.org/].

  9. Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and impairs lung function. People need to stop smoking several weeks before surgery so that the defense mechanisms of the respiratory system can recover. Doctors' evaluations The surgeon does a ...

  10. Endocrine and nutritional management of the post-bariatric surgery patient: an Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber, David; Greenway, Frank L; Kaplan, Lee M; Livingston, Edward; Salvador, Javier; Still, Christopher

    2010-11-01

    We sought to provide guidelines for the nutritional and endocrine management of adults after bariatric surgery, including those with diabetes mellitus. The focus is on the immediate postoperative period and long-term management to prevent complications, weight regain, and progression of obesity-associated comorbidities. The treatment of specific disorders is only summarized. The Task Force was composed of a chair, five additional experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. It received no corporate funding or remuneration. Bariatric surgery is not a guarantee of successful weight loss and maintenance. Increasingly, patients regain weight, especially those undergoing restrictive surgeries such as laparoscopic banding rather than malabsorptive surgeries such as Roux-en-Y bypass. Active nutritional patient education and clinical management to prevent and detect nutritional deficiencies are recommended for all patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Management of potential nutritional deficiencies is particularly important for patients undergoing malabsorptive procedures, and strategies should be employed to compensate for food intolerance in patients who have had a malabsorptive procedure to reduce the risk for clinically important nutritional deficiencies. To enhance the transition to life after bariatric surgery and to prevent weight regain and nutritional complications, all patients should receive care from a multidisciplinary team including an experienced primary care physician, endocrinologist, or gastroenterologist and consider enrolling postoperatively in a comprehensive program for nutrition and lifestyle management. Future research should address the effectiveness of intensive postoperative nutritional and endocrine care in reducing morbidity and mortality from obesity-associated chronic diseases.

  11. Bologna Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction (ASBO): 2010 Evidence-Based Guidelines of the World Society of Emergency Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background There is no consensus on diagnosis and management of ASBO. Initial conservative management is usually safe, however proper timing for discontinuing non operative treatment is still controversial. Open surgery or laparoscopy are used without standardized indications. Methods A panel of 13 international experts with interest and background in ASBO and peritoneal diseases, participated in a consensus conference during the 1st International Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery and 9th Peritoneum and Surgery Society meeting, in Bologna, July 1-3, 2010, for developing evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management of ASBO. Whenever was a lack of high-level evidence, the working group formulated guidelines by obtaining consensus. Recommendations In absence of signs of strangulation and history of persistent vomiting or combined CT scan signs (free fluid, mesenteric oedema, small bowel faeces sign, devascularized bowel) patients with partial ASBO can be managed safely with NOM and tube decompression (either with long or NG) should be attempted. These patients are good candidates for Water Soluble Contrast Medium (WSCM) with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The appearance of water-soluble contrast in the colon on X-ray within 24 hours from administration predicts resolution. WSCM may be administered either orally or via NGT (50-150 ml) both immediately at admission or after an initial attempt of conservative treatment of 48 hours. The use of WSCM for ASBO is safe and reduces need for surgery, time to resolution and hospital stay. NOM, in absence of signs of strangulation or peritonitis, can be prolonged up to 72 hours. After 72 hours of NOM without resolution surgery is recommended. Patients treated non-operatively have shorter hospital stay, but higher recurrence rate and shorter time to re-admission, although the risk of new surgically treated episodes of ASBO is unchanged. Risk factors for recurrences are age surgery when

  12. Women in surgery: little change in gender equality in Japanese medical societies over the past 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Yasuko

    2013-10-01

    Japan lags behind other industrialized nations in terms of gender equality. To improve the work environment for surgeons, the opinions of female surgeons must be respected. The Committee on Women Surgeons of the Japan Surgical Society (JSS) conducted two surveys 3 years apart of the numbers of female councilors and directors in the member societies of the Japanese Association of Medical Sciences. In the nonsurgical medical societies, although there was an increase in the number of female councilors, only one female director was named over the past 3 years. On the other hand, there were no female directors in any of the 12 surgical societies in 2011. The JSS was founded in 1899. No female surgeon has ever been elected as director and there are currently no female councilors due to the new election system. The Gender Equality Bureau of the Cabinet Office should therefore provide greater support to improve gender equality in Japan.

  13. Current Rates of Publication for Podium and Poster Presentations at the American Society for Surgery of the Hand Annual Meetings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Abzug

    2014-09-01

     Currently, fewer than half of the studies presented at Annual Meetings of the ASSH achieve publication in peer-eviewed journals. Presentations are most likely to be published within 3 years, and almost half are published in Journal of Hand Surgery

  14. Preoperative evaluation of the adult patient undergoing non-cardiac surgery: guidelines from the European Society of Anaesthesiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, Stefan; Imberger, Georgina; Carlisle, John; Diemunsch, Pierre; Fritsch, Gerhard; Moppett, Iain; Solca, Maurizio; Staender, Sven; Wappler, Frank; Smith, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of these guidelines on the preoperative evaluation of the adult non-cardiac surgery patient is to present recommendations based on available relevant clinical evidence. The ultimate aims of preoperative evaluation are two-fold. First, we aim to identify those patients for whom the

  15. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529939

  16. Medical malpractice claims related to cataract surgery complicated by retained lens fragments (an American Ophthalmological Society thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Judy E; Weber, Paul; Szabo, Aniko

    2012-12-01

    To review malpractice claims associated with retained lens fragments during cataract surgery to identify ways to improve patient outcomes. Retrospective, noncomparative, consecutive case series. Closed claims data related to cataract surgeries complicated by retained lens fragments (1989 through 2009) from an ophthalmic insurance carrier were reviewed. Factors associated with these claims and claims outcomes were analyzed. During the 21-year period, 117 (12.5%) of 937 closed claims associated with cataract surgery were related to retained lens fragments with 108 unique cataract surgeries, 97% against cataract surgeon and 3% against retinal surgeon. Twelve (11%) of 108 claims were resolved by a trial, 30 (28%) were settled, and 66 (61%) were dismissed. The defendant prevailed in 83% of trials. Indemnity payments totaling more than $3,586,000 were made in 32 (30%) of the claims (median payment, $90,000). The difference between the preoperative visual acuity and the final visual acuity was predictive of an indemnity payment (odds ratio [OR], 2.28; P=.001) and going to a trial (OR, 2.93; P=.000). Development of corneal edema was associated with an indemnity payment (OR, 3.50; P=.037). Timing of referral and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) were statistically significant in univariate analyses but not in multivariate analyses for a trial. Whereas the majority of claims were dismissed, claims associated with greater visual acuity decline, corneal edema, or elevated IOP were more likely to result in a trial or payment. Ways to reduce significant vision loss, including improved management of corneal edema and IOP, and timely referral to a subspecialist should be considered.

  17. Lens of the eye dose calculation for neuro-interventional procedures and CBCT scans of the head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhenyu; Vijayan, Sarath; Rana, Vijay; Jain, Amit; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a method to calculate lens dose for fluoroscopically-guided neuro-interventional procedures and for CBCT scans of the head. EGSnrc Monte Carlo software is used to determine the dose to the lens of the eye for the projection geometry and exposure parameters used in these procedures. This information is provided by a digital CAN bus on the Toshiba Infinix C-Arm system which is saved in a log file by the real-time skin-dose tracking system (DTS) we previously developed. The x-ray beam spectra on this machine were simulated using BEAMnrc. These spectra were compared to those determined by SpekCalc and validated through measured percent-depth-dose (PDD) curves and half-value-layer (HVL) measurements. We simulated CBCT procedures in DOSXYZnrc for a CTDI head phantom and compared the surface dose distribution with that measured with Gafchromic film, and also for an SK150 head phantom and compared the lens dose with that measured with an ionization chamber. Both methods demonstrated good agreement. Organ dose calculated for a simulated neuro-interventional-procedure using DOSXYZnrc with the Zubal CT voxel phantom agreed within 10% with that calculated by PCXMC code for most organs. To calculate the lens dose in a neuro-interventional procedure, we developed a library of normalized lens dose values for different projection angles and kVp's. The total lens dose is then calculated by summing the values over all beam projections and can be included on the DTS report at the end of the procedure.

  18. II. Vinzenz Czerny (1842-1915): grand seigneur of oncologic surgery--life, influence, and work of the Second Congress President of the ISS/SIC. International Society of Surgery/Société Internationale de Chirurgie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebermann-Meffert, D; Stein, H J; White, H

    2000-12-01

    Vinzenz Czerny, chairman and professor of surgery in Freiburg im Breisgau and in Heidelberg, Germany, is the typical example of a prominent surgeon with an elegant technique, who was also a keen observer and scientist at the turn of the nineteenth into the early twentieth century. Starting his career in Vienna, Austria, he can be looked upon as the most important disciple of Theodor Billroth. Whereas Billroth may be regarded as the father of modern gastrointestinal surgery, Czerny can be considered the father of modern surgery for intestinal malignancies and multimodal treatment. The early history of visceral cancer therapy is linked with his career. He became a surgeon of the highest rank, with great clinical skill, rare judgment, and vision who contributed essentially to the development of modern surgery. From his early education he maintained a lifelong affection for the natural sciences and was an excellent physiologist and pathologist. During his professional life he successfully built up a well deserved reputation for general and cancer surgery and for the introduction of radio- and chemotherapy into the treatment of tumors. Czerny founded and chaired the first experimental Institute for Cancer Research in Germany. Two years later, in 1908, he presided at the 2nd Congress of the International Society of Surgery/Société Internationale de Chirurgie (ISS/SIC) in Brussels, a congress that was almost entirely devoted to the etiology of visceral cancer and the progress and achievements of its treatment. Czerny left a clear legacy of opinion and methods on which the modern era of surgical cancer treatment is based.

  19. Gender-specific 30-day outcomes after carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting in the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, Jeffrey; Dillavou, Ellen D; Upchurch, Gilbert R; Osborne, Nicholas H; Kenwood, Christopher T; Siami, Flora S; White, Rodney A; Ricotta, Joseph J

    2014-03-01

    Although the optimal treatment of carotid stenosis remains unclear, available data suggest that women have higher risk of adverse events after carotid revascularization. We used data from the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Registry to determine the effect of gender on outcomes after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting (CAS). There were 9865 patients (40.6% women) who underwent CEA (n = 6492) and CAS (n = 3373). The primary end point was a composite of death, stroke, and myocardial infarction at 30 days. There was no difference in age and ethnicity between genders, but men were more likely to be symptomatic (41.6% vs 38.6%; P gender, there were no statistically significant differences in the primary end point for CEA (women, 4.07%; men, 4.06%) or CAS (women, 6.69%; men, 6.80%). There remains no difference after stratification by symptomatology and multivariate risk adjustment. In this large, real-world analysis, women and men demonstrated similar results after CEA or CAS. These data suggest that, contrary to previous reports, women do not have a higher risk of adverse events after carotid revascularization. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. WOCN Society and ASCRS Position Statement on Preoperative Stoma Site Marking for Patients Undergoing Colostomy or Ileostomy Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadalena, Ginger; Hendren, Samantha; McKenna, Linda; Muldoon, Roberta; Netsch, Debra; Paquette, Ian; Pittman, Joyce; Ramundo, Janet; Steinberg, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Marking the optimal location for a stoma preoperatively enhances the likelihood of a patient's independence in stoma care, predictable pouching system wear times, and resumption of normal activities. Colon and rectal surgeons and certified ostomy nurses are the optimal clinicians to select and mark stoma sites, as this skill is a part of their education, practice, and training. However, these providers are not always available, particularly in emergency situations. The purpose of this position statement, developed by the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society in collaboration with the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons and the American Urological Association, is to provide a guideline to assist clinicians (especially those who are not surgeons or WOC nurses) in selecting an effective stoma site.

  1. Perioperative mechanical circulatory support in children: an analysis of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascio, Christopher E; Austin, Erle H; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Jacobs, Marshall L; Wallace, Amelia S; He, Xia; Pasquali, Sara K

    2014-02-01

    Analyses of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) in pediatric heart surgery have primarily focused on single-center outcomes or narrow applications. We describe the patterns of use, patient characteristics, and MCS-associated outcomes across a large multicenter cohort. Patients (aged institutions. Of 96,596 operations (80 centers), MCS was used in 2.4%. The MCS patients were younger (13 vs 195 days, P vs 32.7%, P vs 2.9% of non-MCS patients; P institutions, with both high- and low-volume hospitals having substantial variation in MCS rates. Perioperative MCS use varied widely across centers. The MCS rates were greatest overall for the Norwood procedure and complex biventricular repairs. Although MCS can be a life-saving therapy, more than one half of MCS patients will not survive to hospital discharge, with mortality >70% for some operations. Future studies aimed at better understanding the appropriate indications, optimal timing, and management of MCS could help to reduce the variation in MCS use across hospitals and improve outcomes. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnostic and therapeutic strategy in Menière's disease. Guidelines of the French Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Society (SFORL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevoux, J; Franco-Vidal, V; Bouccara, D; Parietti-Winkler, C; Uziel, A; Chays, A; Dubernard, X; Couloigner, V; Darrouzet, V; Mom, T

    2017-12-01

    The authors present the guidelines of the French Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Society (Société française d'oto-rhino-laryngologie et de chirurgie de la face et du cou: SFORL) for diagnostic and therapeutic strategy in Menière's disease. A work group was entrusted with a review of the scientific literature on the above topic. Guidelines were drawn up, then read over by an editorial group independent of the work group. The guidelines were graded according to the literature analysis and recommendations grading guide published by the French National Agency for Accreditation and Evaluation in Health (January 2000). Menière's disease is diagnosed in the presence of the association of four classical clinical items and after eliminating differential diagnoses on MRI. In case of partial presentation, objective audiovestibular tests are recommended. Therapy comprises medical treatment and surgery, either conservative or sacrificing vestibular function. Medical treatment is based on lifestyle improvement, betahistine, diuretics or transtympanic injection of corticosteroids or gentamicin. The main surgical treatments, in order of increasing aggressiveness, are endolymphatic sac surgery, vestibular neurotomy and labyrinthectomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Training, credentialing, proctoring and medicolegal risks of robotic urological surgery: recommendations of the society of urologic robotic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Kevin C; Gautam, Gagan; Shalhav, Arieh L; Clayman, Ralph V; Ahlering, Thomas E; Albala, David M; Lee, David I; Sundaram, Chandru P; Matin, Surena F; Castle, Erik P; Winfield, Howard N; Gettman, Matthew T; Lee, Benjamin R; Thomas, Raju; Patel, Vipul R; Leveillee, Raymond J; Wong, Carson; Badlani, Gopal H; Rha, Koon H; Eggener, Scott E; Wiklund, Peter; Mottrie, Alex; Atug, Fatih; Kural, Ali R; Joseph, Jean V

    2009-09-01

    With the exponential growth of robotic urological surgery, particularly with robot assisted radical prostatectomy, guidelines for safe initiation of this technology are a necessity. Currently no standardized credentialing system exists to our knowledge to evaluate surgeon competency and safety with robotic urological surgery performance. Although proctoring is a modality by which such competency can be evaluated, other training tools and guidelines are needed to ensure that the requisite knowledge and technical skills to perform this procedure have been acquired. We evaluated the current status of proctoring and credentialing in other surgical specialties to discuss and recommend its application and implementation specifically for robot assisted radical prostatectomy. We reviewed the literature on safety and medicolegal implications of proctoring and the safe introduction of surgical procedures to develop recommendations for robot assisted radical prostatectomy proctoring and credentialing. Proctoring is an essential mechanism for robot assisted radical prostatectomy institutional credentialing and should be a prerequisite for granting unrestricted privileges on the robot. This should be differentiated from preceptoring, wherein the expert is directly involved in hands-on training. Advanced technology has opened new avenues for long-distance observation through teleproctoring. Although the medicolegal implications of an active surgical intervention by a proctor are not clearly defined, the role as an observer should grant immunity from malpractice liability. The implementation of guidelines and proctoring recommendations is necessary to protect surgeons, proctors, institutions and, above all, the patients who are associated with the institutional introduction of a robot assisted radical prostatectomy program. With no current guidelines we anticipate this article will serve as a catalyst of interorganizational discussion to initiate regulatory oversight of surgeon

  4. [Reading behavior and preferences regarding subscriptions to scientific journals : Results of a survey of members of the German Society for General and Visceral Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronellenfitsch, U; Klinger, C; Buhr, H J; Post, S

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of surgical literature is to publish the latest study results and to provide continuing medical education to readers. For optimal allocation of resources, institutional subscribers, professional societies and scientific publishers require structured data on reading and subscription preferences of potential readers of surgical literature. To obtain representative data on the preferences of German general and visceral surgeons regarding reading of and subscription to scientific journals. All members of the German Society for General and Visceral Surgery (DGAV) were invited to participate in a web-based survey. Questions were asked on the affiliation and position of the member, individual journal subscriptions, institutional access to scientific journals, preferences regarding electronic or print articles and special subscriptions for society members. Answers were descriptively analyzed. A total of 630 out of 4091 (15 %) members participated in the survey and 73 % of the respondents had at least 1 individual subscription to a scientific journal. The most frequently subscribed journal was Der Chirurg (47 % of respondents). The institutional access to journals was deemed insufficient by 48 % of respondents, predominantly in primary care hospitals and outpatient clinics. Almost half of the respondents gave sufficient importance to reading printed versions of articles for which they would pay extra fees. A group subscription for society members was perceived as advantageous as long as no relevant extra costs were incurred. This structured survey among members of the DGAV provides data on preferences regarding reading of and subscription to scientific journals. Individual subscriptions to journals are still common, possibly due to suboptimal institutional access particularly at smaller non-academic institutions. In an age of online publications it seems surprising that many respondents place a high value on printed versions. The results are relevant for

  5. Opportunistic bilateral salpingectomy during benign gynecological surgery for ovarian cancer prevention: a survey of Gynecologic Oncology Committee of Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Mikio; Nagase, Satoru; Yamagami, Wataru; Ushijma, Kimio; Tashiro, Hironori; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2017-07-01

    Recent evidence has supported the concept that epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) arises from the cells of the fallopian tube or endometrium. This study investigated current practice in Japan with respect to performing opportunistic bilateral salpingectomy (OBS) during gynecological surgery for benign disease for Ovarian Cancer Prevention. We mailed a questionnaire to 767 hospitals and clinics, comprising 628 accredited training institutions of the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology (JSOG), Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology (JSGO), or Japan Society of Gynecologic and Obstetric Endoscopy and Minimally Invasive Therapy (JSGOE) and 139 private institutions with at least one JSGOE-certified licensed gynecologic laparoscopist. Among the 767 institutions, 444 (57.9%) provided responses, including 91 (20.6%) that were both JSGOE and JSGO accredited, 71 (16.0%) that were only JSGO accredited, 88 (19.8%) that were only JSGOE accredited, and 194 (43.7%) that were unaccredited. It was found that awareness and performance of OBS largely depended on the JSGO and/or JSGOE accreditation status. OBS was only performed at 54.0% of responding institutions and just 6.8% of the institutions were willing to participate in randomized controlled trials to validate this method for reducing the incidence of ovarian cancer. The JSOG Gynecologic Tumor Committee will announce its opinion on salpingectomy for ovarian cancer prevention to all JSOG members and will develop a system for monitoring the number of OBS procedures in Japan.

  6. Standards for quality care in respiratory rehabilitation in patients with chronic pulmonary disease. Quality Healthcare Committee. Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güell, Maria Rosa; Cejudo, Pilar; Rodríguez-Trigo, Gema; Gàldiz, Juan Bautista; Casolive, Vinyet; Regueiro, Mônica; Soler-Cataluña, Juan Jose

    2012-11-01

    Respiratory rehabilitation (RR) has been shown to be effective with a high level of evidence in terms of improving symptoms, exertion capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with COPD and in some patients with diseases other than COPD. According to international guidelines, RR is basically indicated in all patients with chronic respiratory symptoms, and the type of program offered depends on the symptoms themselves. As requested by the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR), we have created this document with the aim to unify the criteria for quality care in RR. The document is organized into sections: indications for RR, evaluation of candidates, program components, characteristics of RR programs and the role of the administration in the implementation of RR. In each section, we have distinguished 5 large disease groups: COPD, chronic respiratory diseases other than COPD with limiting dyspnea, hypersecretory diseases, neuromuscular diseases with respiratory symptoms and patients who are candidates for thoracic surgery for lung resection. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. A Comparison of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery post-myopic LASIK/PRK Intraocular Lens (IOL calculator and the Ocular MD IOL calculator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available David L DeMill1, Majid Moshirfar1, Marcus C Neuffer1, Maylon Hsu1, Shameema Sikder21John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USABackground: To compare the average values of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS and Ocular MD intraocular lens (IOL calculators to assess their accuracy in predicting IOL power in patients with prior laser-in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK or photorefractive keratectomy.Methods: In this retrospective study, data from 21 eyes with previous LASIK or photorefractive keratectomy for myopia and subsequent cataract surgery was used in an IOL calculator comparison. The predicted IOL powers of the Ocular MD SRK/T, Ocular MD Haigis, and ASCRS averages were compared. The Ocular MD average (composed of an average of Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis and the all calculator average (composed of an average of Ocular MD SRK/T, Ocular MD Haigis, and ASCRS were also compared. Primary outcome measures were mean arithmetic and absolute IOL prediction error, variance in mean arithmetic IOL prediction error, and the percentage of eyes within ±0.50 and ±1.00 D.Results: The Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis averages produced mean arithmetic IOL prediction errors of 0.57 and –0.61 diopters (D, respectively, which were significantly larger than errors from the ASCRS, Ocular MD, and all calculator averages (0.11, –0.02, and 0.02 D, respectively, all P < 0.05. There was no statistically significant difference between the methods in absolute IOL prediction error, variance, or the percentage of eyes with outcomes within ±0.50 and ±1.00 D.Conclusion: The ASCRS average was more accurate in predicting IOL power than the Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis averages alone. Our methods using combinations of these averages which, when compared with the individual averages, showed a trend of decreased mean arithmetic IOL

  8. Workload and quality of life of surgeons. Results and implications of a large-scale survey by the German Society of Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrer, Thomas; Koller, Michael; Schlitt, Hans Juergen; Bauer, Hartwig

    2011-06-01

    Quality of life is of vital importance for patients undergoing surgery. However, little is known about the quality of life of surgeons who are facing a stressful and dramatically changing working environment. For this reason, this large-scale study investigated the quality of life (QL) of surgeons in Germany in the context of occupational, private, and system-related risk factors. The study population consisted of attendees (surgeons, non-surgical physicians, medical students) of the nine major annual conferences of the German Society of Surgery between 2008 and 2009. Participants filled in a single questionnaire including study-specific questions (demographic variables, professional position, and occupational situation) and a standardized quality of life instrument (Profiles of quality of life of the chronically ill, PLC). Surgeons' responses with regard to their professional situation and their quality of life were contrasted with those of the two controls (non-surgical physicians, medical students). Furthermore, PLC scores were compared with German population reference data and with reference data of several patient groups. Individuals (3,652) (2,991 surgeons, 561 non-surgical physicians, 100 medical students) participated in this study. The average age of surgeons and non-surgeons was in the low forties. In terms of professional qualifications, the majority of surgeons were residents (30%) and the majority of non-surgeons consultants in private practice (38%). Sixty-eight percent of the surgeons, only 39% of the non-surgeons worked more than 60 h per week on average (p work overload, more so than non-surgeons (74% vs. 59%, p working environment (beta = 0.057 to 0.235), lack of opportunities for continuing education (beta = 0.108 to 0.161), and inadequate salary (beta = 0.036 to 0.172). Improving the working conditions for surgeons requires a concerted action of all relevant parties, including hospital administrators, insurance companies, and

  9. Defining rates and causes of mortality associated with spine surgery: comparison of 2 data collection approaches through the Scoliosis Research Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffrey, Ellen; Smith, Justin S; Lenke, Lawrence G; Polly, David W; Chen, Ching-Jen; Coe, Jeffrey D; Broadstone, Paul A; Glassman, Steven D; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Ames, Christopher P; Shaffrey, Christopher I

    2014-04-01

    Retrospective review of prospectively collected databases. To compare 2 approaches for assessment of mortality associated with spine surgery. The Scoliosis Research Society collects morbidity and mortality data from its members. Previously, this included details for all spine cases and all complications. To reduce time burden and improve compliance, collection was changed to focus on a few major complications (death, neurological deficit, and blindness) for specific deformity diagnoses (scoliosis, spondylolisthesis, and kyphosis) and only for cases with complications. Data were extracted from the Scoliosis Research Society from 2004-2007 (detailed system) and 2009-2011 (simplified system). As an anchor for comparison, mortality rates were compared between the systems. Between 2009 and 2011, the number of deformity cases reported were 87,162, with 131 deaths (1.50/1000 cases). The mean age of these 131 patients was 50, mean American Society of Anesthesiologists grade was 2.8, 10% were smokers, and 18% had diabetes. Rates of death (per 1000 cases) were: idiopathic scoliosis (0.4), congenital scoliosis (1.3), neuromuscular scoliosis (3.6), other scoliosis (3.1), spondylolisthesis (0.6), and kyphosis (4.7). Common causes of mortality included respiratory (48), cardiac (32), sepsis (12), organ failure (9), and blood loss (7). Compared with the detailed system, the simplified system had greater surgeon compliance (79% vs. 62%, P < 0.001), greater number of deformity cases per reporting surgeon per year (139 vs. 90, P < 0.001), and modest but significantly lower mortality rates (1.50 vs. 1.80/1000 cases; P < 0.001). Causes of death were comparable between the 2 systems. On the basis of the simplified collection system, the rate of mortality for spinal deformity surgery was 1.50 per 1000 cases. Compared with the detailed system, the simplified system had significantly improved compliance and similar mortality rates. Although the simplified system is limited by less data

  10. Ongoing evolution of practice gaps in gastrointestinal and endoscopic surgery: 2014 report from the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) Continuing Education Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLemore, Elisabeth C; Paige, John T; Bergman, Simon; Hori, Yumi; Schwarz, Erin; Farrell, Timothy M

    2015-11-01

    In an effort to fulfill the charge to develop and maintain a comprehensive educational program to serve the members of the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES), the SAGES Continuing Education Committee reports a summary of findings related to the evaluation of the 2014 SAGES annual meeting. All attendees to the 2014 annual meeting had the opportunity to complete an immediate post-meeting questionnaire as part of their continuing medical education (CME) certification, and identify up to two learning themes, answer questions related to potential practice change items based on these learning themes, and complete a needs assessment for relevant learning topics for future meetings. In addition, participants in the postgraduate and hands-on courses were asked to complete questions about case volume and comfort level related to procedures/topics in those courses. All respondents to this initial survey were sent a 3-month follow-up questionnaire in which they were asked how successful they had been in the implementation of the targeted practice changes and what, if any, barriers were encountered. Descriptive statistical analysis of de-identified data was undertaken. SAGES University attendees respond to a post-test and post-activity evaluation. Response rates were 43 and 31 % for CME-eligible attendees/respondents for the immediate post-meeting and 3-month follow-up questionnaires, respectively. Top learning themes for respondents were foregut, hernia, bariatric, and colorectal. Improving minimally invasive surgical (MIS) technique and managing complications related to MIS procedures were top intended practice changes. Partial implementation was common with top barriers including lack of resources and lack of time. Desired topics for future meetings included management of complications, enhanced recovery after surgery, introduction of new procedures into clinical practice, and re-operative surgery. The SAGES 2014 annual meeting analysis

  11. Opinion survey of members of British Society of Children's Orthopaedic Surgery related to specific case scenarios in slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamjoom, Bakur A; Butler, Daniel; Thomas, Simon; Ramachandran, Manoj; Cooke, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess contemporary management of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) by surveying members of the British Society of Children's Orthopaedic Surgery (BSCOS). A questionnaire with five case vignettes was used. Two questions examined the timing of surgery for an acute unstable SCFE in a child presenting at 6 and 48 h after start of symptoms. Two further questions explored the preferred method of fixation in mild and severe stable SCFE. The final question examined the management of the contralateral normal hip. Responses were entered into an Excel spreadsheet and the data was analysed using a χ-test. The response rate was 56% (110/196). Overall, 88% (97/110) responded that if a child presented with an acute unstable SCFE within 6 h, they would treat it within 24 h of presentation, compared with 41% (45/110) for one presenting 48 h after the onset of symptoms (Pscrew fixation in situ for mild stable SCFE was advocated by 96% (106/110) with 71% (78/110) using this method for the treatment of severe stable SCFE. Corrective osteotomy is used by 2% (2/110) and 25% (28/110) of respondents for mild and severe stable SCFE, respectively (P<0.0001). Surgeons preferring osteotomy are more likely to perform an intracapsular technique. Prophylactic fixation of the contralateral normal hip was performed by 27% (30/110) of respondents. There are significant differences in opinions between BSCOS members as to the optimal management of SCFE. This reflects the variable recommendations and quality in the current scientific literature. Further research is therefore required to determine best practice and enable consensus to be reached.

  12. Carbon-fiber reinforced intramedullary nailing in musculoskeletal tumor surgery: a national multicentric experience of the Italian Orthopaedic Society (SIOT) Bone Metastasis Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccioli, Andrea; Piana, Raimondo; Lisanti, Michele; Di Martino, Alberto; Rossi, Barbara; Camnasio, Francesco; Gatti, Marco; Maniscalco, Pietro; Gherlinzoni, Franco; Spinelli, Maria Silvia; Donati, Davide Maria; Biagini, Roberto; Capanna, Rodolfo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2017-10-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced (CFR) implants have been proposed for the treatment of fractures or impending fractures of the long bones in the oncology patient. Aim of this study is to present the largest cohort of oncology patients operated by CFR nailing by the Italian Orthopaedic Society (SIOT) Bone Metastasis Study Group. 53 adult oncology patients were operated on with a CFR-PEEK nail. All the data from adjuvants therapies were collected. Bone callus formation, response to radiotherapy, relapse or progression of the osteolysis were recorded. Hardware survival and failure, breakage and need for implant revision were also analysed. Anatomical implantation of nails include humerus (n = 35), femur (n =11) and tibia (n = 7). The most frequent tumors affecting the bone were myeloma (n = 13), breast (n = 11), lung (n = 8), and renal cell cancer (n = 7). Acrylic cement reinforcement was used in 2 patients. One patient was subjected to electrochemotherapy after nail insertion. Intraoperative and early postoperative complications occurred in 13.2% and 7.54% of patients respectively. Eight patients had local progression and one developed a stress fracture proximally to the distal static screw. Radiographic union occurred in 14 patients; one screw loosening was recorded. There is currently a lack of solid evidence on the clinical use of CFR nails in oncologic patients. This is the first and largest study of CFR nailing, with the longest available follow up. Implant related complications and surgery-related morbidity should be taken into account in the decision-making process for the surgical management of these patients. These data can improve the surgeon-patient communication and guide further studies on patients' survival and complications with respect to surgery. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Safety and efficacy outcomes of infrapopliteal endovascular procedures performed in patients with critical limb ischemia according to the Society for Vascular Surgery objective performance goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Cesar; Acin, Francisco; Lopez de Maturana, Ignacio; de Haro, Joaquin; Bleda, Silvia; Paz, Belky; Esparza, Leticia

    2014-02-01

    Objective performance goals (OPGs) are a set of standardized end points generated from well documented historical controls against which new therapeutic procedures may be compared in single-arm studies. Recently, the Society for Vascular Surgery suggested a set of OPGs designed from vein bypass controls that could be used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endovascular devices applied to critical limb ischemia through a noninferiority analysis. Our aim is to analyze the results of infrapopliteal endovascular procedures performed in patients with critical limb ischemia according to these OPG end points. This is a retrospective study of 121 infrapopliteal endovascular procedures. The tibial intervention was combined with a femoropopliteal angioplasty in 70 procedures. Major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs), major adverse limb events (MALEs), and major amputations at 30 days were recorded as safety outcomes. Freedom from any MALE or perioperative death (Freedom from MALE + POD) and amputation-free survival were calculated as primary efficacy end points at both 12 months and at 8 years. The 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of all the end points were calculated to perform a noninferiority comparison using OPGs as the reference. The incidence of MACEs, MALEs, and amputation at 30 days were 5% (95% CI: 2-10% [OPG-MACE amputation 67%]) and an amputation-free survival of 78% (95% CI: 69-85% [OPG-amputation-free survival >68%]) at 12 months. Freedom from MALE + POD and amputation-free survival at 8 years decreased to 60% (95% CI: 49-69%) and to 26% (95% CI: 11-44%), respectively. Infrapopliteal endovascular procedures performed in everyday vascular surgery practice could meet the main OPG end points proposed for catheter-based treatment of critical limb ischemia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. History of the World Federation of Societies for Laser Medicine and Surgery (WFSLMS) and its Non-Profit Organization (NPO-WFSLMS): Part 1: Origins to Inaugural Meeting, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Toshio

    2014-07-01

    The first society formed to represent the "new" field of laser applications in medicine and surgery was the late Professor Kaplan's International Society for Laser Surgery and Medicine, held in Israel in 1975. Following the ISLSM lead, a large number of national and international societies were very swiftly formed. As the number grew, it became obvious that some sort of linking forum would help all these separate societies to pool the knowledge of their members for the good of the clinicians and their patients. The World Federation of Societies for Laser Medicine and Surgery was formed to attempt to fill this role. The History: At the 1996 meeting of the Greek Medical Laser Association, the first international forum of representatives from 17 international and national laser societies was convened by Professor Nick Nicolopoulos, and the seed of an idea for a centralized forum to help separate laser societies coordinate efforts and knowledge was planted. This seed was nurtured by the ISLSM as the first medical laser society, and forums were called together at each meeting of the ISLSM and the other related societies from 1997 to 2003. At the 2004 Chinese Medical Laser Society meeting, the idea of worldwide federation of laser societies crystallized into a more tangible form The Inaugural WFSLMS Congress: The convening of the first WFSLMS congress took place in Tokyo in 2005, under the leadership of Professor Kazuhiko Atsumi. At this meeting, Professor Kaplan proposed that a Medical Laser Foundation should be established and donated the first seed money for its formation. Because of the Japanese legal requirements, a foundation was impossible and so a Non-profit Organization (NPO-WFSLMS) was started, based in Japan, to oversee the work and fund the tasks of promoting laser surgery and medicine worldwide, for the good of mankind: the financing, running and holding WFSLMS congresses became one of the tasks of NPO-WFSLMS. Both the WFSLMS and NPO-WFSLMS were therefore on

  15. A questionnaire on the educational system for pancreatoduodenectomy performed in 1,134 patients in 71 institutions as members of the Japanese Society of Pancreatic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Ryuichi; Akasu, Gen; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Yasunaga, Masafumi; Kinoshita, Hisafumi

    2013-02-01

    Mastering the technique of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is a major theme in hepato-biliary-pancreatic surgery, and education for PD has not been established even in each institution. With the progression of disease, the difficulty of PD increases due to cases requiring resection of multiple organs and borderline resectable cases, and complications affecting survival also often occur. To help to improve the education of young surgeons, we clarified the institutions' principles and the status of operations performed by young surgeons. We sent questionnaires to institutions as members of the Japanese Society of Pancreatic Surgery about the institutions' educational principles in 2010 and surgeons who performed PD and patients treated by PD between January and December 2007. The PD operators were classified into two groups: postgraduate year ≤ 10 or ≥ 11, and each institution's principles, and pre-, intra-, and postoperative factors were evaluated. PD was performed by surgeons at postgraduate year ≤ 10 in 29 (40.6%) institutions. Education programs were using 29 (41.4%) institutions. High-volume centers, where the surgeons performing PD tend to be at postgraduate year ≤ 10, can provide more training. Preoperative risks were not included in the criteria for selecting cases for operations by young surgeons, and young surgeons tended to perform PD in patients with less advanced stages. The incidence of pancreatic fistula classified as International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery Grade B or C was significantly higher (P = 0.010) in the operator group at postgraduate year ≤ 10 (24.6%, 32 patients) than that at postgraduate year ≥ 11 (17.6%, 177 patients). Cumulative survival rate of pancreatic cancer or extrahepatic bile duct cancer did not significantly differ between the two operator groups. The present questionnaire showed increased opportunities of performing operations by young surgeons. Although the incidence of Grade B/C fistula is higher for

  16. American Society for Dermatologic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Please submit your evaluations on the ASDS Member App today! ASDS News Master an integrated approach to ... Limited funding is available. Get the ASDS Membership Advantage! ASDS membership is the single, most powerful means ...

  17. Trends in the Surgical Treatment for Cubital Tunnel Syndrome: A Survey of Members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Ayesha; Malarkey, Andrew R; Eschbaugh, Ryan L; Bamberger, H Brent

    2017-08-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome is the second most common compression neuropathy affecting the upper extremity. The aim of this study was to determine the preferred surgical treatment for cubital tunnel syndrome by members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH). We invited members of the ASSH research mailing list to complete our online survey. They were presented with 6 hypothetical cases and asked to choose their preferred treatment from the following options: open in situ decompression, endoscopic decompression, submuscular transposition, subcutaneous transposition, medial epicondylectomy, and conservative management. This was assessed independently and anonymously through an online survey (SurveyMonkey). 1069 responses were received. Seventy-three percent of the respondents preferred to continue conservative management when a patient presented with occasional paresthesias for greater than 6 months with a normal electromyogram (EMG) or nerve conduction velocity (NCV). Sixty-five percent picked open in situ decompression if paresthesias, weakness of intrinsics, and EMG/NCV reports of mild to moderate ulnar nerve entrapment was present. More than 50% of respondents picked open in situ decompression, as their preferred treatment when sensory loss of two-point discrimination of less than 5 or more than 10 was present in addition to the findings mentioned above. Seventy-nine percent of the respondents said their treatment algorithm would change if ulnar nerve subluxation was present. Our survey results indicate that open in situ decompression is the preferred operative procedure, if there is no ulnar nerve subluxation, among hand surgeons for cubital tunnel syndrome.

  18. The electronic cigarette. Official statement of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) on the efficacy, safety and regulation of electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Ruiz, Carlos A; Solano Reina, Segismundo; de Granda Orive, Jose Ignacio; Signes-Costa Minaya, Jaime; de Higes Martinez, Eva; Riesco Miranda, Juan Antonio; Altet Gómez, Neus; Lorza Blasco, Jose Javier; Barrueco Ferrero, Miguel; de Lucas Ramos, Pilar

    2014-08-01

    The electronic cigarette (EC) is a device formed by three basic elements: battery, atomizer and cartridge. When assembled, it looks like a cigarette. The cartridge contains different substances: propylene glycol, glycerine and, sometimes, nicotine. When the user "vapes", the battery is activated, the atomizer is heated and the liquid is drawn in and vaporized. The smoker inhales the mist produced. Various substances have been detected in this mist: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein and some heavy metals. Although these are found in lower concentrations than in cigarettes, they may still be harmful for the human body. Several surveys show that 3-10% of smokers regularly use e-cigarettes. A randomized study has shown that the efficacy of e-cigarettes for helping smokers to quit is similar to nicotine patches. Nevertheless, the study has relevant methodological limitations and reliable conclusions cannot be deduced. This report sets down the Position Statement of the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) on the efficacy and safety of e-cigarettes. This statement declares that e-cigarettes should be regulated as medicinal products. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Robotic surgery training with commercially available simulation systems in 2011: a current review and practice pattern survey from the society of urologic robotic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallas, Costas D; Davis, John W

    2012-03-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulation has the potential to standardize surgical training for robotic surgery. We sought to evaluate all commercially available VR robotic simulators. A MEDLINE(®) literature search was performed of all applicable keywords. Available VR simulators were evaluated with regard to face, content, and construct validation. Additionally, a survey was e-mailed to all members of the Endourological Society, querying the pervasiveness of VR simulators in robotic surgical training. Finally, each company was e-mailed to ask for a price quote for their respective system. There are four VR robotic surgical simulators currently available: RoSS™, dV-Trainer™, SEP Robot™, and da Vinci(®) Skills Simulator™. Each system is represented in the literature and all possess varying degrees of face, content, and construct validity. Although all systems have basic skill sets with performance analysis and metrics software, most do not contain procedural components. When evaluating the results of our survey, most respondents did not possess a VR simulator although almost all believed there to be great potential for these devices in robotic surgical training. With the exception of the SEP Robot, all VR simulators are similar in price. VR simulators have a definite role in the future of robotic surgical training. Although the simulators target technical components of training, their largest impact will be appreciated when incorporated into a comprehensive educational curriculum.

  20. Current practice in the management of acute/unstable slipped capital femoral epiphysis in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands: results of a survey of the membership of the British Society of Children's Orthopaedic Surgery and the Werkgroep Kinder Orthopaedie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witbreuk, Melinda; Besselaar, Philip; Eastwood, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to all members of the British Society for Children's Orthopaedic Surgery and the Werkgroep Kinder Orthopaedie to identify points of agreement/disagreement on the management of the acute unstable slip of the upper femoral epiphysis and to compare these European results with

  1. Management and follow-up of gallbladder polyps : Joint guidelines between the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR), European Association for Endoscopic Surgery and other Interventional Techniques (EAES), International Society of Digestive Surgery - European Federation (EFISDS) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Rebecca; Thoeni, Ruedi F; Barbu, Sorin Traian; Vashist, Yogesh K; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Dewhurst, Catherine; Arvanitakis, Marianna; Lahaye, Max; Soltes, Marek; Perinel, Julie; Roberts, Stuart Ashley

    2017-09-01

    The management of incidentally detected gallbladder polyps on radiological examinations is contentious. The incidental radiological finding of a gallbladder polyp can therefore be problematic for the radiologist and the clinician who referred the patient for the radiological examination. To address this a joint guideline was created by the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR), European Association for Endoscopic Surgery and other Interventional Techniques (EAES), International Society of Digestive Surgery - European Federation (EFISDS) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). A targeted literature search was performed and consensus guidelines were created using a series of Delphi questionnaires and a seven-point Likert scale. A total of three Delphi rounds were performed. Consensus regarding which patients should have cholecystectomy, which patients should have ultrasound follow-up and the nature and duration of that follow-up was established. The full recommendations as well as a summary algorithm are provided. These expert consensus recommendations can be used as guidance when a gallbladder polyp is encountered in clinical practice. • Management of gallbladder polyps is contentious • Cholecystectomy is recommended for gallbladder polyps >10 mm • Management of polyps polyp characteristics • Further research is required to determine optimal management of gallbladder polyps.

  2. [Diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease. Consensus document of the Bárány Society, the Japan Society for Equilibrium Research, the European Academy of Otology and Neurotology (EAONO), the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and the Korean Balance Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Escamez, José A; Carey, John; Chung, Won-Ho; Goebel, Joel A; Magnusson, Måns; Mandalà, Marco; Newman-Toker, David E; Strupp, Michael; Suzuki, Mamoru; Trabalzini, Franco; Bisdorff, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for Menière's disease jointly formulated by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society, The Japan Society for Equilibrium Research, the European Academy of Otology and Neurotology (EAONO), the Equilibrium Committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) and the Korean Balance Society. The classification includes 2 categories: definite Menière's disease and probable Menière's disease. The diagnosis of definite Menière's disease is based on clinical criteria and requires the observation of an episodic vertigo syndrome associated with low-to medium-frequency sensorineural hearing loss and fluctuating aural symptoms (hearing, tinnitus and/or fullness) in the affected ear. Duration of vertigo episodes is limited to a period between 20 min and 12h. Probable Menière's disease is a broader concept defined by episodic vestibular symptoms (vertigo or dizziness) associated with fluctuating aural symptoms occurring in a period from 20 min to 24h. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  3. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2017 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Disease : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-10-01

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes and stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing SIHD and acute coronary syndromes individually. This document presents the AUC for SIHD.Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice. These scenarios included information on symptom status; risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing; coronary disease burden; and, in some scenarios, fractional flow reserve testing, presence or absence of diabetes, and SYNTAX score. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt were affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization.A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range of 4 to 6 indicate that

  4. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2016 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-04-01

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and stable ischemic heart disease were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and in an effort to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing ACS and stable ischemic heart disease individually. This document presents the AUC for ACS. Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, presence of clinical instability or ongoing ischemic symptoms, prior reperfusion therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, fractional flow reserve testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization. A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range (4 to 6

  5. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: FULL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2 part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents the contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on published data through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2 part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the full report of part 1. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  6. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2-part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on data published through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2-part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on cardiovascular disease; and finally (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the executive summary of part 1. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  7. US experience with recombinant factor VIIa for surgery and other invasive procedures in acquired haemophilia: analysis from the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, A D; Kessler, C M; Al-Mondhiry, H A B; Gut, R Z; Cooper, D L

    2016-01-01

    Acquired haemophilia (AH) is a rare disorder caused by autoantibodies against factor VIII. The Hemostasis & Thrombosis Research Society (HTRS) Registry was used to monitor the safety of recombinant FVII (rFVIIa). This study aims to report data from the HTRS Registry regarding safety and efficacy of rFVIIa for haemostatic management of surgeries and other invasive procedures in patients with AH. For each rFVIIa-treated procedure, the initial dose, total dose, average infused dose, number of doses and treatment duration were calculated. Efficacy was assessed on a 4-point scale. Of 166 registered patients with AH, 37 patients underwent 58 procedures [30 (51%) rFVIIa-treated]. The median (range) age of all patients undergoing procedures was 70 (13-93) years; for rFVIIa-treated patients, 74 (28-89) years. Approximately 67% (39/58) of all procedures were elective. Overall, the most common procedures were endoscopy (12) and central venous access device (10); rFVIIa was used preoperatively (11), postoperatively (13) and during six follow-up procedures during ongoing postoperative rFVIIa treatment. The median (range) initial dose was 90.0 (44-187) μg kg(-1) preoperatively and 106.0 (56-270) μg kg(-1) postoperatively. For rFVIIa-treated episodes with a reported outcome, 20 (91%) were rated excellent/good or no additional agents used and 2 (9%) were rated as poor/ineffective requiring a switch to another bypassing agent. No thromboembolic events were reported. Adequate haemostasis was provided for 91% of rFVIIa-treated procedures at doses largely conforming to the package insert. No safety concerns were reported. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Variation in ventilation time after coronary artery bypass grafting: an analysis from the society of thoracic surgeons adult cardiac surgery database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; He, Xia; O'Brien, Sean M; Welke, Karl F; Filardo, Giovanni; Han, Jane M; Ferraris, Victor A; Prager, Richard L; Shahian, David M

    2013-09-01

    Short postoperative ventilation times are accepted as a marker of quality. This analysis assesses center level variation in postoperative ventilation time in a subset of patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). In 2009 and 2010, 325,129 patients in the STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Database underwent isolated CABG. Patients were excluded if they were intubated before entering the operating room, required ventilation for greater than 24 hours, or had missing data on key covariates. The final study cohort was 274,231 isolated CABG patients from 1,008 centers. Bayesian hierarchical models were used to assess between-center variation in ventilation time and to explore the effect of center-level covariates. Analyses were performed with and without adjusting for case mix. After adjusting for case mix, the ratio of median ventilator time at the 90th percentile of the center-level distribution compared with the tenth percentile was 9.0:5.0=1.8 (95% credible interval: 1.79 to 1.85). This ratio illustrates the scale of between-center differences: centers above the 90th percentile have a ventilation time of at least 1.8 times that of centers below the tenth percentile. Smaller hospital volume, presence of a residency program, and some census regions were associated with longer ventilation times. After adjustment for severity of illness, substantial inter-center variation exists in postoperative ventilation time in this subset of patients undergoing isolated CABG. This finding represents an opportunity for multi-institutional quality improvement initiatives designed to limit variations in ventilator management and achieve the shortest possible ventilation times for all patients, thus benefiting both clinical outcomes and resource utilization. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Stratification of complexity in congenital heart surgery: comparative study of the Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) method, Aristotle basic score and Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardio- Thoracic Surgery (STS-EACTS) mortality score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Paulo Ernando Ferraz; Sá, Michel Pompeu Barros de Oliveira; dos Santos, Cecília Andrade; Esmeraldo, Isaac Melo; Chaves, Mariana Leal; Lins, Ricardo Felipe de Albuquerque; Lima, Ricardo de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether stratification of complexity models in congenital heart surgery (RACHS-1, Aristotle basic score and STS-EACTS mortality score) fit to our center and determine the best method of discriminating hospital mortality. Methods Surgical procedures in congenital heart diseases in patients under 18 years of age were allocated to the categories proposed by the stratification of complexity methods currently available. The outcome hospital mortality was calculated for each category from the three models. Statistical analysis was performed to verify whether the categories presented different mortalities. The discriminatory ability of the models was determined by calculating the area under the ROC curve and a comparison between the curves of the three models was performed. Results 360 patients were allocated according to the three methods. There was a statistically significant difference between the mortality categories: RACHS-1 (1) - 1.3%, (2) - 11.4%, (3)-27.3%, (4) - 50 %, (P<0.001); Aristotle basic score (1) - 1.1%, (2) - 12.2%, (3) - 34%, (4) - 64.7%, (P<0.001); and STS-EACTS mortality score (1) - 5.5 %, (2) - 13.6%, (3) - 18.7%, (4) - 35.8%, (P<0.001). The three models had similar accuracy by calculating the area under the ROC curve: RACHS-1- 0.738; STS-EACTS-0.739; Aristotle- 0.766. Conclusion The three models of stratification of complexity currently available in the literature are useful with different mortalities between the proposed categories with similar discriminatory capacity for hospital mortality. PMID:26107445

  10. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY★

    OpenAIRE

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mil...

  11. The Society for Translational Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shugeng; Zhang, Zhongheng; Aragón, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The Society for Translational Medicine and The Chinese Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery conducted a systematic review of the literature in an attempt to improve our understanding in the postoperative management of chest tubes of patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy. Recommendati......The Society for Translational Medicine and The Chinese Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery conducted a systematic review of the literature in an attempt to improve our understanding in the postoperative management of chest tubes of patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy...

  12. A Decade’s Experience With Quality Improvement in Cardiac Surgery Using the Veterans Affairs and Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Frederick L.; Shroyer, A. Laurie W.; Hammermeister, Karl; Edwards, Fred H.; Ferguson, T. Bruce; Dziuban, Stanley W.; Cleveland, Joseph C.; Clark, Richard E.; McDonald, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Objective To review the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) national databases over the past 10 years to evaluate their relative similarities and differences, to appraise their use as quality improvement tools, and to assess their potential to facilitate improvements in quality of cardiac surgical care. Summary Background Data The VA developed a mandatory risk-adjusted database in 1987 to monitor outcomes of cardiac surgery at all VA medical centers. In 1989 the STS developed a voluntary risk-adjusted database to help members assess quality and outcomes in their individual programs and to facilitate improvements in quality of care. Methods A short data form on every veteran operated on at each VA medical center is completed and transmitted electronically for analysis of unadjusted and risk-adjusted death and complications, as well as length of stay. Masked, confidential semiannual reports are then distributed to each program’s clinical team and the associated administrator. These reports are also reviewed by a national quality oversight committee. Thus, VA data are used both locally for quality improvement and at the national level with quality surveillance. The STS dataset (217 core fields and 255 extended fields) is transmitted for each patient semiannually to the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) for warehousing, analysis, and distribution. Site-specific reports are produced with regional and national aggregate comparisons for unadjusted and adjusted surgical deaths and complications, as well as length of stay for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), valvular procedures, and valvular/CABG procedures. Both databases use the logistic regression modeling approach. Data for key processes of care are also captured in both databases. Research projects are frequently carried out using each database. Results More than 74,000 and 1.6 million cardiac surgical patients have been entered into the VA and STS databases

  13. ACCF/SCAI/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCCM/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2012 appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Bailey, Steven R; Bonow, Robert O; Chambers, Charles E; Chan, Paul S; Dehmer, Gregory J; Kirtane, Ajay J; Wann, L Samuel; Ward, R Parker

    2012-05-29

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research.

  14. A comparison of a similarity-based and a feature-based 2-D-3-D registration method for neurointerventional use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Robert A; Hipwell, John; Hawkes, David J; Noble, J Alison; Byrne, James V; Cox, Tim C

    2005-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D)-to-three-dimensional (3-D) registration can improve visualization which may aid minimally invasive neurointerventions. Using clinical and phantom studies, two state-of-the-art approaches to rigid registration are compared quantitatively: an intensity-based algorithm using the gradient difference similarity measure; and an iterative closest point (ICP)-based algorithm. The gradient difference approach was found to be more accurate, with an average registration accuracy of 1.7 mm for clinical data, compared to the ICP-based algorithm with an average accuracy of 2.8 mm. In phantom studies, the ICP-based algorithm proved more reliable, but with more complicated clinical data, the gradient difference algorithm was more robust. Average computation time for the ICP-based algorithm was 20 s per registration, compared with 14 min and 50 s for the gradient difference algorithm.

  15. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE- TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529351

  16. Laser-assisted surgery of the upper aero-digestive tract: a clarification of nomenclature. A consensus statement of the European Laryngological Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remacle, Marc; Arens, Christoph; Eldin, Mostafa Badr; Campos, Guillermo; Estomba, Carlos Chiesa; Dulguerov, Pavel; Fiz, Ivana; Hantzakos, Anastasios; Keghian, Jerôme; Mora, Francesco; Matar, Nayla; Peretti, Giorgio; Piazza, Cesare; Postma, Gregory N.; Prasad, Vyas; Sjogren, Elisabeth; Dikkers, Frederik G.

    2017-01-01

    Acronyms and abbreviations are frequently used in otorhinolaryngology and other medical specialties. CO2 laser-assisted transoral surgery of the pharynx, the larynx and the upper airway is a family of commonly performed surgical procedures termed transoral laser microsurgery (TLM). The abbreviation

  17. American Society for Enhanced Recovery (ASER) and Perioperative Quality Initiative  (POQI) joint consensus statement on perioperative fluid management within an enhanced recovery pathway for colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Robert H; Raghunathan, Karthik; Brudney, C S; Lobo, Dileep N; Martin, Daniel; Senagore, Anthony; Cannesson, Maxime; Gan, Tong Joo; Mythen, Michael Monty G; Shaw, Andrew D; Miller, Timothy E

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced recovery may be viewed as a comprehensive approach to improving meaningful outcomes in patients undergoing major surgery. Evidence to support enhanced recovery pathways (ERPs) is strong in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. There is some controversy about the adoption of specific elements in enhanced recovery "bundles" because the relative importance of different components of ERPs is hard to discern (a consequence of multiple simultaneous changes in clinical practice when ERPs are initiated). There is evidence that specific approaches to fluid management are better than alternatives in patients undergoing colorectal surgery; however, several specific questions remain. In the "Perioperative Quality Initiative (POQI) Fluids" workgroup, we developed a framework broadly applicable to the perioperative management of intravenous fluid therapy in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery within an ERP. We discussed aspects of ERPs that impact fluid management and made recommendations or suggestions on topics such as bowel preparation; preoperative oral hydration; intraoperative fluid therapy with and without devices for goal-directed fluid therapy; and type of fluid.

  18. Bologna Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction (ASBO): 2010 Evidence-Based Guidelines of the World Society of Emergency Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Catena (Fausto); S. Di Saverio (Salomone); M.D. Kelly (Michael ); W.L. Biffl (Walter); L. Ansaloni (Luca); V. Mandalà (Vincenzo); G.C. Velmahos (George ); M. Sartelli (Massimo); G. Tugnoli (Gregorio); M. Lupo (Massimo); A.D. Pinna (Antonio ); P.H. Sugarbaker (Paul ); H. van Goor (Harry); E.E. Moore (Ernest); J. Jeekel (Hans)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: There is no consensus on diagnosis and management of ASBO. Initial conservative management is usually safe, however proper timing for discontinuing non operative treatment is still controversial. Open surgery or laparoscopy are used without standardized indications.Methods: A

  19. Bologna Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction (ASBO): 2010 Evidence-Based Guidelines of the World Society of Emergency Surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catena, F.; Saverio, S. Di; Kelly, M.D.; Biffl, W.L.; Ansaloni, L.; Mandala, V.; Velmahos, G.C.; Sartelli, M.; Tugnoli, G.; Lupo, M.; Mandala, S.; Pinna, A.D.; Sugarbaker, P.H.; Goor, H. van; Moore, E.E.; Jeekel, J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no consensus on diagnosis and management of ASBO. Initial conservative management is usually safe, however proper timing for discontinuing non operative treatment is still controversial. Open surgery or laparoscopy are used without standardized indications. METHODS: A panel of

  20. Development of a New Valid, Reliable, and Internationally Applicable Assessment Tool of Residents’ Competence in Ophthalmic Surgery (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, C.; Beaver, Hilary; Gauba, Vinod; Lee, Andrew G.; Mayorga, Eduardo; Palis, Gabriela; Saleh, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To test the validity and reliability of a new tool for assessing residents’ competence in ophthalmic surgery. Changing paradigms of ophthalmic education in the United States have influenced worldwide ophthalmic education and necessitated new methods of assessing resident competence. Accordingly, a new tool for assessing residents’ competence in ophthalmic surgery (phacoemulsification) that could be applicable internationally was developed. We hypothesize that this instrument is valid and reliable. Methods: A panel of six international content experts adapted a previously published tool for assessing phacoemulsification. The tool (called the International Council of Ophthalmology’s Ophthalmology Surgical Competency Assessment Rubric, or ICO-OSCAR:phaco) was reviewed by 12 international content experts for their constructive comments, which were incorporated to ensure content validity. Ten expert cataract surgery teachers then graded six recorded phacoemulsification surgeries with the ICO-OSCAR:phaco to investigate inter-rater reliability. Results: The coefficient alpha statistic (a measure of reliability/internal consistency) for the ICO-OSCAR:phaco as a whole was 0.92, and 17 of its 20 dimensions had alpha coefficients greater than 0.70. Conclusions: The ICO-OSCAR:phaco is a valid and reliable assessment tool that could be applied internationally to satisfy the global need of new instruments to comply with emerging trends in ophthalmic education. A toolbox of similar surgical competency assessment tools is being developed. PMID:24072944

  1. Development of a new valid, reliable, and internationally applicable assessment tool of residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery (an American Ophthalmological Society thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, C; Beaver, Hilary; Gauba, Vinod; Lee, Andrew G; Mayorga, Eduardo; Palis, Gabriela; Saleh, George M

    2013-09-01

    To test the validity and reliability of a new tool for assessing residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery. Changing paradigms of ophthalmic education in the United States have influenced worldwide ophthalmic education and necessitated new methods of assessing resident competence. Accordingly, a new tool for assessing residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery (phacoemulsification) that could be applicable internationally was developed. We hypothesize that this instrument is valid and reliable. A panel of six international content experts adapted a previously published tool for assessing phacoemulsification. The tool (called the International Council of Ophthalmology's Ophthalmology Surgical Competency Assessment Rubric, or ICO-OSCAR:phaco) was reviewed by 12 international content experts for their constructive comments, which were incorporated to ensure content validity. Ten expert cataract surgery teachers then graded six recorded phacoemulsification surgeries with the ICO-OSCAR:phaco to investigate inter-rater reliability. The coefficient alpha statistic (a measure of reliability/internal consistency) for the ICO-OSCAR:phaco as a whole was 0.92, and 17 of its 20 dimensions had alpha coefficients greater than 0.70. The ICO-OSCAR:phaco is a valid and reliable assessment tool that could be applied internationally to satisfy the global need of new instruments to comply with emerging trends in ophthalmic education. A toolbox of similar surgical competency assessment tools is being developed.

  2. Drug, devices, technologies, and techniques for blood management in minimally invasive and conventional cardiothoracic surgery: a consensus statement from the International Society for Minimally Invasive Cardiothoracic Surgery (ISMICS) 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkis, Alan H; Martin, Janet; Cheng, Davy C H; Fitzgerald, David C; Freedman, John J; Gao, Changqing; Koster, Andreas; Mackenzie, G Scott; Murphy, Gavin J; Spiess, Bruce; Ad, Niv

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this consensus conference were to evaluate the evidence for the efficacy and safety of perioperative drugs, technologies, and techniques in reducing allogeneic blood transfusion for adults undergoing cardiac surgery and to develop evidence-based recommendations for comprehensive perioperative blood management in cardiac surgery, with emphasis on minimally invasive cardiac surgery. The consensus panel short-listed the potential topics for review from a comprehensive list of potential drugs, devices, technologies, and techniques. The process of short-listing was based on the need to prioritize and focus on the areas of highest importance to surgeons, anesthesiologists, perfusionists, hematologists, and allied health care involved in the management of patients who undergo cardiac surgery whether through the conventional or minimally invasive approach. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Embase databases were searched from their date of inception to May 2011, and supplemental hand searches were also performed. Detailed methodology and search strategies are outlined in each of the subsequently published systematic reviews. In general, all relevant synonyms for drugs (antifibrinolytic, aprotinin, [Latin Small Letter Open E]-aminocaproic acid, tranexamic acid [TA], desmopressin, anticoagulants, heparin, antiplatelets, anti-Xa agents, adenosine diphosphate inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid [ASA], factor VIIa [FVIIa]), technologies (cell salvage, miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuits, biocompatible circuits, ultrafiltration), and techniques (transfusion thresholds, minimally invasive cardiac or aortic surgery) were searched and combined with terms for blood, red blood cells, fresh-frozen plasma, platelets, transfusion, and allogeneic exposure. The American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology system was used to label the level of evidence and class of each recommendation. Database search identified more than 6900 articles, with 4423 full

  3. Report of the Inter-Society Commission for Heart Disease Resources. Optimal resources for cardiac surgery guidelines for program planning and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-11-01

    This updated and expanded planning guideline describes the optimal environment in which cardiac surgery can be performed effectively and safely and suggests criteria for evaluating existing facilities and for long-range hospital planning. The status of cardiac surgery is reviewed and measures are provided for assessing a hospital's ability to support a cardiac surgical service. Recommendations are given for appropriate case loads, administrative arrangements, and professional staff qualifications and relationships. The emerging role of the nurse is considered and requirements are enumerated for allied clinical supporting services. Special criteria are provided for pediatric cardiac surgical units and detailed specifications are given for the hospital's physical plant and equiptment including a protocol for checking the electrical safety of surgical suites. A data base is suggested for taking regular inventory of community cardiac surgical programs.

  4. Management of tricuspid valve regurgitation: Position statement of the European Society of Cardiology Working Groups of Cardiovascular Surgery and Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Manuel J; Rodríguez-Palomares, José; Prendergast, Bernard; De Bonis, Michele; Rosenhek, Raphael; Al-Attar, Nawwar; Barili, Fabio; Casselman, Filip; Folliguet, Thierry; Iung, Bernard; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Muneretto, Claudio; Obadia, Jean-François; Pierard, Luc; Suwalski, Piotr; Zamorano, Pepe

    2017-12-01

    Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) is a very frequent manifestation of valvular heart disease. It may be due to the primary involvement of the valve or secondary to pulmonary hypertension or to the left-sided heart valve disease (most commonly rheumatic and involving the mitral valve). The pathophysiology of secondary TR is complex and is intrinsically connected to the anatomy and function of the right ventricle. A systematic multimodality approach to diagnosis and assessment (based not only on the severity of the TR but also on the assessment of annular size, RV function and degree of pulmonary hypertension) is, therefore, essential. Once considered non-important, treatment of secondary TR is currently viewed as an essential concomitant procedure at the time of mitral (and, less frequently, aortic valve) surgery. Although the indications for surgical management of severe TR are now generally accepted (Class I), controversy persists concerning the role of intervention for moderate TR. However, there is a trend for intervention in this setting, especially at the time of surgery for left-sided heart valve disease and/or in patients with significant tricuspid annular dilatation (Class IIa). Currently, surgery remains the best approach for the interventional treatment of TR. Percutaneous tricuspid valve intervention (both repair and replacement) is still in its infancy but may become a reliable option in future, especially for high-risk patients with isolated primary TR or with secondary TR related to advanced left-sided heart valve disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. A Large-Scale Computational Analysis of Corneal Structural Response and Ectasia Risk in Myopic Laser Refractive Surgery (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupps, William Joseph; Seven, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate biomechanical strain as a structural susceptibility metric for corneal ectasia in a large-scale computational trial. Methods: A finite element modeling study was performed using retrospective Scheimpflug tomography data from 40 eyes of 40 patients. LASIK and PRK were simulated with varied myopic ablation profiles and flap thickness parameters across eyes from LASIK candidates, patients disqualified for LASIK, subjects with atypical topography, and keratoconus subjects in 280 simulations. Finite element analysis output was then interrogated to extract several risk and outcome variables. We tested the hypothesis that strain is greater in known at-risk eyes than in normal eyes, evaluated the ability of a candidate strain variable to differentiate eyes that were empirically disqualified as LASIK candidates, and compared the performance of common risk variables as predictors of this novel susceptibility marker across multiple virtual subjects and surgeries. Results: A candidate susceptibility metric that expressed mean strains across the anterior residual stromal bed was significantly higher in eyes with confirmed ectatic predisposition in preoperative and all postoperative cases (P≤.003). The strain metric was effective at differentiating normal and at-risk eyes (area under receiver operating characteristic curve ≥ 0.83, P≤.002), was highly correlated to thickness-based risk metrics (as high as R2 = 95%, Pstructural analysis of ectasia risk and provides a novel biomechanical construct for expressing structural risk in refractive surgery. Mechanical strain is an effective marker of known ectasia risk and correlates to predicted refractive error after myopic photoablative surgery. PMID:27630372

  6. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): gastrointestinal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Álvarez, C; Zabarte Martínez de Aguirre, M; Bordejé Laguna, L

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal surgery and critical illness place tremendous stress on the body, resulting in a series of metabolic changes that may lead to severe malnutrition, which in turn can increase postsurgical complications and morbidity and mortality and prolong the hospital length of stay. In these patients, parenteral nutrition is the most widely used form of nutritional support, but administration of enteral nutrition early in the postoperative period is effective and well tolerated, reducing infectious complications, improving wound healing and reducing length of hospital stay. Calorie-protein requirements do not differ from those in other critically-ill patients and depend on the patient's underlying process and degree of metabolic stress. In patients intolerant to enteral nutrition, especially if the intolerance is due to increased gastric residual volume, prokinetic agents can be used to optimize calorie intake. When proximal sutures are used, tubes allowing early jejunal feeding should be used. Pharmaconutrition is indicated in these patients, who benefit from enteral administration of arginine, omega 3 and RNA, as well as parenteral glutamine supplementation. Parenteral nutrition should be started in patients with absolute contraindication for use of the gastrointestinal tract or as complementary nutrition if adequate energy intake is not achieved through the enteral route. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Critica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC) and Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Society of Surgical Oncology–American Society for Radiation Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Stages I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Meena S. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Schnitt, Stuart J. [Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Giuliano, Armando E. [Department of Surgery, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Harris, Jay R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Khan, Seema A. [Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Horton, Janet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Klimberg, Suzanne [Department of Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Fayetteville, Arkansas (United States); Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Freedman, Gary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Houssami, Nehmat [School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Johnson, Peggy L. [Advocate in Science, Susan G. Komen, Wichita, Kansas (United States); Morrow, Monica, E-mail: morrowm@mskcc.org [Breast Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Results: Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. Conclusions: The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs.

  8. Autism Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ... more Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ...

  9. Lipids and bariatric procedures Part 2 of 2: scientific statement from the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and Obesity Medicine Association (OMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold; Kothari, Shanu N; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John M; Nguyen, Ninh T; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures generally improve dyslipidemia, sometimes substantially so. Bariatric procedures also improve other major cardiovascular risk factors. This 2-part Scientific Statement examines the lipid effects of bariatric procedures and reflects contributions from authors representing the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and the Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). Part 1 was published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology, and reviewed the impact of bariatric procedures upon adipose tissue endocrine and immune factors, adipose tissue lipid metabolism, as well as the lipid effects of bariatric procedures relative to bile acids and intestinal microbiota. This Part 2 reviews: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies, that may occur after bariatric procedures. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reexcision Surgery for Breast Cancer: An Analysis of the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) MasterySM Database Following the SSO-ASTRO "No Ink on Tumor" Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Amanda M; Mirrielees, Jennifer A; Leverson, Glen; Landercasper, Jeffrey; Greenberg, Caprice; Wilke, Lee G

    2017-01-01

    In February 2014 , the Society of Surgical Oncology and the American Society for Radiation Oncology released guidelines standardizing a negative margin after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) as "no ink on tumor" in patients with early-stage invasive cancer. We sought to determine whether reexcision rates after initial BCS decreased after guideline publication, using the ASBrS MasterySM of Breast Surgery Program. Between January 2013 and June 2015, data from the ASBrS MasterySM database was analyzed to determine reexcision rates pre and post guideline publication. Reasons for reexcision were evaluated as were the associations with patient and provider characteristics. Chi square test, Fisher's exact test, Student's t test, ANOVA, and multivariable logistic regression were used as appropriate. All analyses were performed using Microsoft Excel and SPSS, with p value ASTRO "no ink on tumor" guideline publication, a reduction in overall reexcision rates and reexcision rates for close margins after initial BCS was observed in the ASBrS MasterySM database. More widespread implementation outside this group of early adopters is anticipated with ongoing dissemination.

  11. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    within surgical societies, where mentors and role models have a significant impact on ..... al.12 suggested that although women have high self-efficacy in surgery, they .... Ling M, Young CJ, Shepherd HL, Mak C, Saw RPM. Workplace bullying ...

  12. Outcomes of Limb-Sparing Surgery Using Two Generations of Metal Endoprosthesis in 45 Dogs With Distal Radial Osteosarcoma. A Veterinary Society of Surgical Oncology Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Katherine E; Boston, Sarah E; Kung, Marvin; Dry, Sarah; Straw, Rod C; Ehrhart, Nicole P; Ryan, Stewart D

    2016-01-01

    To report outcomes in dogs with distal radial osteosarcoma (OSA) treated with metal endoprosthesis limb-sparing surgery and compare outcomes between 2 generations of endoprosthesis. Multi-institutional retrospective case series. Forty-five dogs with distal radial OSA treated with endoprosthesis and chemotherapy. Data of dogs treated with either first-generation endoprosthesis (GEN1) or second-generation endoprosthesis (GEN2) were sourced from medical records and radiographs. Surgical outcomes included postoperative lameness assessment and the presence, severity, and time to onset of complications. Oncologic outcomes included presence of local recurrence or metastasis, time to onset of local recurrence, metastasis-free interval (MFI), and survival time. Results for surgical and oncologic outcomes were compared between GEN1 and GEN2. Twenty-eight dogs received GEN1 and 17 dogs received GEN2. There were 39 complications (96%, 14 minor, 29 major) including infection (78%), implant-related complication (36%), and local recurrence (24%). Metastatic frequency was 67% and median MFI was 188 days (95% confidence interval [CI]: 126-250 days). Survival time ranged from 34 days to 6.1 years with a median of 289 days (95% CI: 207-371 days). There was no significant difference in complication severity, frequency, time to complication, MFI, or survival time between dogs receiving GEN1 and GEN2. There was no significant difference in outcomes between dogs receiving GEN1 and GEN2 for limb-sparing surgery of the radius. Metastatic frequency and survival time for metal endoprosthesis were similar to that of amputation with curative intent chemotherapy. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  13. Patterns of Performance of Oncologic Surgery by North American Pediatric Urologists: A Report from the Pediatric Urologic Oncology Working Group of the Society for Pediatric Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cost, Nicholas G; Ross, Jonathan H; Ferrer, Fernando A; Lorenzo, Armando J; Shnorhavorian, Margarett; Routh, Jonathan C; Kieran, Kathleen; Ritchey, Michael L

    2017-05-01

    Objective data on patterns of oncology practice among pediatric urologists are lacking. We reviewed surgical case logs submitted to the American Board of Urology by those self-reporting as pediatric urologists. We hypothesized that logs would reveal a low oncology volume (fewer than 5 cases) and identify orchiectomy as the most common oncology cases, and that less than 25% of logs would show nephrectomy for renal tumor. Case logs submitted for American Board of Urology certification, recertification or pediatric subspecialty certification were reviewed and standardized to represent 12-month practice. Data were collected on pediatric oncologic surgeries as noted by procedure codes linked with oncologic diagnosis codes for patients up to age 30 years. We identified 281 case logs meeting study criteria. A total of 364 oncology cases were logged and 131 logs (46.6%) listed at least 1 oncology case, while 150 (53.4%) contained no oncology cases. The 75th, 90th and 95th percentiles of oncology volume were represented by reporting 2, 3 and 4 cases, respectively. A total of 13 logs (4.6%) accounted for more than a third of all oncology cases (35.9%). The most frequent oncology case logged was orchiectomy, which was documented in 83 logs (29.5%). On Poisson regression surgeon variables associated with higher oncology volume included male gender (IRR 2.8, 95% CI 2.1-3.9), 2010 log year (IRR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.4), 2015 log year (IRR 3.7, 95% CI 2.1-6.4) and nonpediatric subspecialty certification log (IRR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.3). Few pediatric urologists perform a high volume of oncologic surgeries based on surgical case logs submitted to the American Board of Urology. A small cohort of pediatric urologists logged the majority of such cases. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mass Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian

    2017-01-01

    the negative features usually ascribed by late nineteenth-century crowd psychology to spontaneous crowds, and attributes these to the entire social fabric. However, in contrast to crowd psychology, theorists of mass society often place greater emphasis on how capitalism, technological advances, or demographic......Mass society is a societal diagnosis that emphasizes – usually in a pejorative, modernity critical manner – a series of traits allegedly associated with modern society, such as the leveling of individuality, moral decay, alienation, and isolation. As such, the notion of mass society generalizes...... developments condition such negative features, and some theorists argue that mass society produces a propensity to totalitarianism. Discussions of mass society culminated in the early and mid-twentieth century....

  15. [Safety culture in orthopedics and trauma surgery : Course concept: interpersonal competence by the German Society for Orthopaedics and Trauma (DGOU) and Lufthansa Aviation Training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doepfer, A-K; Seemann, R; Merschin, D; Stange, R; Egerth, M; Münzberg, M; Mutschler, M; Bouillon, B; Hoffmann, R

    2017-10-01

    Patient safety has become a central and measurable key factor in the routine daily medical practice. The human factor plays a decisive role in safety culture and has moved into focus regarding the reduction of treatment errors and undesired critical incidents. Nonetheless, the systematic training in communication and interpersonal competences has so far only played a minor role. The German Society of Orthopaedics and Trauma (DGOU) in cooperation with the Lufthansa Aviation Training initiated a course system for interpersonal competence. Several studies confirmed the reduction of critical incidents and costs after implementation of a regular and targeted human factor training. The interpersonal competence should be an essential component of specialist training within the framework of a 3‑column model.

  16. [Professionalization of surgical education in the daily clinical routine. Training concept of the Surgical Working Group for Teaching of the German Society of Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adili, F; Kadmon, M; König, S; Walcher, F

    2013-10-01

    For competency-oriented teaching in surgery a comprehensive medical educational training and professionalization of clinical teachers is essential. The Surgical Working Group for Teaching has therefore set itself the task of developing an appropriate training concept. In the first step the core group took stock of the most relevant educational barriers in the clinical environment. Taking into account these findings a trimodular course was devised that addressed both previous knowledge and different clinical functions of the faculty as well as modern concepts of competency-based academic teaching. The A course is designed for medical teaching of novices with a focus on collation of the medical history, clinical examination and teaching of practical skills. The B course is devised for experienced clinicians and should qualify them for competency-based teaching in complex educational scenarios, such as the operating room or ward rounds, while the C course is directed to a group of persons entrusted with the organization and administration of clinical teaching.

  17. Evolution of practice gaps in gastrointestinal and endoscopic surgery: 2012 report from the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) Continuing Education Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, John T; Farrell, Timothy M; Bergman, Simon; Selim, Niazy; Harzman, Alan E; Schwarz, Erin; Hori, Yumi; Levine, Jason; Scott, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    In an effort to fulfill its charge to develop and maintain a comprehensive educational program to serve the members of the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES), the SAGES Continuing Education Committee (CEC) reports a summary of findings related to its evaluation of the 2012 SAGES annual meeting. All attendees to the 2012 annual meeting had the opportunity to complete an immediate postmeeting questionnaire as part of their continuing medical education (CME) certification in which they identified up to two learning themes, answered questions related to potential practice change items that are based on those learning themes, and complete a needs assessment related to important learning topics for future meetings. In addition, participants in the postgraduate and hands-on courses were asked to complete questions about case volume and comfort levels related to procedures/topics in those courses. All respondents to this initial survey were sent a 3-month follow-up questionnaire in which they were asked how successfully they had implemented the intended practice changes and what, if any, barriers they encountered. Postgraduate and hands-on course participants completed case volume and comfort level questions. Descriptive statistical analysis of this deidentified data was undertaken. Response rates were 42% and 56% for CME-eligible attendees/respondents for the immediate postmeeting and 3-month follow-up questionnaires, respectively. Top learning themes for respondents were Bariatric, Hernia, Foregut, and Colorectal. Improving minimally invasive surgical (MIS) technique and managing complications related to MIS procedures were top intended practice changes. Partial implementation was common with top barriers including cost restrictions, lack of institutional support, and lack of time. The 2012 annual meeting analysis provides insight into educational needs among respondents and will help with planning content for future meetings.

  18. FOUNDING SOCIETIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henry Petroski

    2008-01-01

      [...] with the development of the railroads, the telegraph, and other marvels of the Industrial Revolution, a civil engineering society did not provide a sufficiently broad umbrella under which mining...

  19. [Robotic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Portillo, Mucio; Valenzuela-Salazar, Carlos; Quiroz-Guadarrama, César David; Pachecho-Gahbler, Carlos; Rojano-Rodríguez, Martín

    2014-12-01

    Medicine has experienced greater scientific and technological advances in the last 50 years than in the rest of human history. The article describes relevant events, revises concepts and advantages and clinical applications, summarizes published clinical results, and presents some personal reflections without giving dogmatic conclusions about robotic surgery. The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) defines robotic surgery as a surgical procedure using technology to aid the interaction between surgeon and patient. The objective of the surgical robot is to correct human deficiencies and improve surgical skills. The capacity of repeating tasks with precision and reproducibility has been the base of the robot´s success. Robotic technology offers objective and measurable advantages: - Improving maneuverability and physical capacity during surgery. - Correcting bad postural habits and tremor. - Allowing depth perception (3D images). - Magnifying strength and movement limits. - Offering a platform for sensors, cameras, and instruments. Endoscopic surgery transformed conceptually the way of practicing surgery. Nevertheless in the last decade, robotic assisted surgery has become the next paradigm of our era.

  20. Guidelines and checklists for short-term missions in global pediatric surgery: Recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics Delivery of Surgical Care Global Health Subcommittee, American Pediatric Surgical Association Global Pediatric Surgery Committee, Society for Pediatric Anesthesia Committee on International Education and Service, and American Pediatric Surgical Nurses Association, Inc. Global Health Special Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Marilyn; Drum, Elizabeth; Evans, Faye M; Fitzgerald, Tamara; Fraser, Jason; Holterman, Ai-Xuan; Jen, Howard; Kynes, J Matthew; Kreiss, Jenny; McClain, Craig D; Newton, Mark; Nwomeh, Benedict; O'Neill, James; Ozgediz, Doruk; Politis, George; Rice, Henry; Rothstein, David; Sanchez, Julie; Singleton, Mark; Yudkowitz, Francine S

    2017-11-15

    Pediatric surgeons, anesthesia providers, and nurses from North America and other high-income countries (HICs) are increasingly engaged in resource-limited areas, with short-term missions (STMs) as the most common form of involvement. However, consensus recommendations currently do not exist for STMs in pediatric general surgery and associated perioperative care. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Delivery of Surgical Care Subcommittee and American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) Global Pediatric Surgery Committee, with the American Pediatric Surgical Nurses Association, Inc. (APSNA) Global Health Special Interest Group, and the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) Committee on International Education and Service generated consensus recommendations for STMs based on extensive experience with STMs. Three distinct, but related areas were identified: 1) Broad goals of surgical partnerships between HICs- and low and middle-income countries (LMICs). A previous set of guidelines published by the Global Paediatric Surgery Network Collaborative (GPSN), was endorsed by all groups; 2) Guidelines for the conduct of STMs were developed, including planning, in-country perioperative patient care, post-trip follow-up, and sustainability; 3) travel and safety considerations critical to STM success were enumerated. A diverse group of stakeholders developed these guidelines for STMs in LMICs. These guidelines may be a useful tool to ensure safe, responsible, and ethical STMs given increasing engagement of HIC providers in this work. 5. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Guideline on allergen-specific immunotherapy in IgE-mediated allergic diseases: S2k Guideline of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI), the Society for Pediatric Allergy and Environmental Medicine (GPA), the Medical Association of German Allergologists (AeDA), the Austrian Society for Allergy and Immunology (ÖGAI), the Swiss Society for Allergy and Immunology (SGAI), the German Society of Dermatology (DDG), the German Society of Oto- Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (DGHNO-KHC), the German Society of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ), the Society for Pediatric Pneumology (GPP), the German Respiratory Society (DGP), the German Association of ENT Surgeons (BV-HNO), the Professional Federation of Paediatricians and Youth Doctors (BVKJ), the Federal Association of Pulmonologists (BDP) and the German Dermatologists Association (BVDD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaar, Oliver; Bachert, Claus; Bufe, Albrecht; Buhl, Roland; Ebner, Christof; Eng, Peter; Friedrichs, Frank; Fuchs, Thomas; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hartwig-Bade, Doris; Hering, Thomas; Huttegger, Isidor; Jung, Kirsten; Klimek, Ludger; Kopp, Matthias Volkmar; Merk, Hans; Rabe, Uta; Saloga, Joachim; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Schuster, Antje; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Sitter, Helmut; Umpfenbach, Ulrich; Wedi, Bettina; Wöhrl, Stefan; Worm, Margitta; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Kaul, Susanne; Schwalfenberg, Anja

    , Ebner C, Eng P, Friedrichs F, Fuchs T, Hamelmann E, Hartwig-Bade D, Hering T, Huttegger I, Jung K, Klimek L, Kopp MV, Merk H, Rabe U, Saloga J, Schmid-Grendelmeier P, Schuster A, Schwerk N, Sitter H, Umpfenbach U, Wedi B, Wöhrl S, Worm M, Kleine-Tebbe J. Guideline on allergen-specific immunotherapy in IgE-mediated allergic diseases - S2k Guideline of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI), the Society for Pediatric Allergy and Environmental Medicine (GPA), the Medical Association of German Allergologists (AeDA), the Austrian Society for Allergy and Immunology (ÖGAI), the Swiss Society for Allergy and Immunology (SGAI), the German Society of Dermatology (DDG), the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (DGHNO-KHC), the German Society of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ), the Society for Pediatric Pneumology (GPP), the German Respiratory Society (DGP), the German Association of ENT Surgeons (BV-HNO), the Professional Federation of Paediatricians and Youth Doctors (BVKJ), the Federal Association of Pulmonologists (BDP) and the German Dermatologists Association (BVDD). Allergo J Int 2014;23:282-319.

  2. A comparison of results of carotid endarterectomy in octogenarians and nonagenarians to younger patients from the Mid-America Vascular Study Group and the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Joseph R; Jackson, Cheryl R; Helenowski, Irene B; Verta, Michael J; Wilkinson, Julia B; Kim, Stanley; Hoel, Andrew W

    2017-06-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) reduces stroke risk in selected patients. However, CEA risk profile may be different in older patients. We compared characteristics and outcomes of octogenarians and nonagenarians with those of younger patients. Deidentified data from CEA patients were obtained from the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) database. Prior CEA, carotid artery stent, or combined CEA and coronary artery bypass were excluded, yielding 7390 CEAs in octogenarians and nonagenarians (≥80 years of age) and 35,303 CEAs in younger patients (<80 years of age). We compared post-CEA outcomes, including periprocedural cerebral ischemic events and death, and details such as operative time, bleeding, and return to surgery. Octogenarians and nonagenarians were more likely to have pre-CEA neurologic symptoms (51.4% vs 45.6%; P < .001) and to have never smoked (37.8% vs 22.0%; P < .001), and they were slightly more likely to have required urgent CEA (16.1% vs 13.4%; P < .001). Stenosis ≥70% was similar (octogenarians and nonagenarians, 94.2%; younger patients, 94.4%; P = .45). Perioperative ipsilateral neurologic events and ipsilateral stroke were slightly more common among octogenarians and nonagenarians (1.6% vs 1.1% [P < .001] and 1.2% vs 0.8% [P = .002]). Multivariate modeling (logistic regression) showed that pre-CEA neurologic symptoms (odds ratios, 1.35 [P = .005] and 1.42 [P = .007]), pre-CEA ipsilateral cortical ischemic event (odds ratios, 1.18 [P < .001] and 1.20 [P < .001]), and urgency (odds ratios, 1.75 [P < .001] and 1.67 [P < .001]) remained strong predictors of any ipsilateral neurologic event and any ipsilateral stroke, respectively. However, age ≥80 years remained a significant predictor of these outcomes (odds ratios, 1.37 [P = .003] and 1.44 [P = .004]). Kaplan-Meier estimated survival was lower for octogenarians and nonagenarians at 30 days and 1 year (98.6% vs 99.4% and 93.7% vs 97.0%; log-rank, P

  3. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  4. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  5. Robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, M; Marescaux, J

    2015-01-01

    Proficiency in minimally invasive surgery requires intensive and continuous training, as it is technically challenging for unnatural visual and haptic perceptions. Robotic and computer sciences are producing innovations to augment the surgeon's skills to achieve accuracy and high precision during complex surgery. This article reviews the current use of robotically assisted surgery, focusing on technology as well as main applications in digestive surgery, and future perspectives. The PubMed database was interrogated to retrieve evidence-based data on surgical applications. Internal and external consulting with key opinion leaders, renowned robotics laboratories and robotic platform manufacturers was used to produce state-of-the art business intelligence around robotically assisted surgery. Selected digestive procedures (oesophagectomy, gastric bypass, pancreatic and liver resections, rectal resection for cancer) might benefit from robotic assistance, although the current level of evidence is insufficient to support widespread adoption. The surgical robotic market is growing, and a variety of projects have recently been launched at both academic and corporate levels to develop lightweight, miniaturized surgical robotic prototypes. The magnified view, and improved ergonomics and dexterity offered by robotic platforms, might facilitate the uptake of minimally invasive procedures. Image guidance to complement robotically assisted procedures, through the concepts of augmented reality, could well represent a major revolution to increase safety and deal with difficulties associated with the new minimally invasive approaches. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. American Society for Surgery of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AFSH JHS ASSH Textbook Chase Library Find a Hand Surgeon Corporate Partners Login Toggle navigation For Patients ... Platform Local Journal Clubs Grants and Awards Touching Hands Project Fellowship Programs Program Directory Apply for a ...

  7. Prehospital endotracheal intubation and chest tubing does not prolong the overall resuscitation time of severely injured patients: a retrospective, multicentre study of the Trauma Registry of the German Society of Trauma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, Martin; Helm, Matthias; Lefering, Rolf; Walcher, Felix

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether prehospital endotracheal intubation (ETI) and chest tube placement is unnecessarily time consuming in severely injured patients. A retrospective, multicentre study including all adult patients (ISS ≥9; 2002-7) of the Trauma Registry of the German Society of Trauma Surgery who were not secondarily transferred to a trauma centre and received a definitive airway and a chest tube. Creating four groups: AA (n=963) receiving ETI and chest tube on scene, AB (n=1547) ETI performed in the prehospital setting but chest tubing later in the emergency department (ED) and BB (n=640) receiving both procedures in the ED. The BA collective (ETI performed in the ED, but chest tubing on scene) was excluded from the study because of the small sample size (n=41). The trauma resuscitation time (TRT), demographic data, injuries, treatment and outcome of the remaining three collectives were compared. The prehospital TRT of the AA collective was longer than the AB and BB subgroups (80±37 min vs 77±44 min 65±46 min; pchest tube placement do not prolong the total TRT of severely injured patients.

  8. A tracking system to calculate patient skin dose in real-time during neurointerventional procedures using a biplane x-ray imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, V K; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D R

    2016-09-01

    calculations are done in real-time with a typical graphic update time of 30 ms and an average vertex separation of 3 mm. With appropriate corrections applied, the Biplane-DTS was able to determine the entrance dose within 6% and the spatial distribution of the dose within 4% compared to the measurements with the ionization chamber and film for the SK150 head phantom. The cumulative dose for overlapping fields from both gantries showed similar agreement. The Biplane-DTS can provide a good estimate of the peak skin dose and cumulative skin dose distribution during biplane neurointerventional procedures. Real-time display of this information should help the physician manage patient dose to reduce the risk of radiation-induced skin injuries.

  9. Cryptozoology Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Reports of Loch Ness monsters, Bigfoot, and the Yeti spring u p from time to time, sparking scientific controversy about the veracity of these observations. Now an organization has been established to help cull, analyze, and disseminate information on the alleged creatures. The International Society of Cryptozoology, formed at a January meeting at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution, will serve as the focal point for the investigation, analysis, publication, and discussion of animals of unexpected form or size or of unexpected occurrences in time or space.

  10. Transcatheter valve implantation for patients with aortic stenosis: a position statement from the European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), in collaboration with the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vahanian, Alec; Alfieri, Ottavio R; Al-Attar, Nawwar; Antunes, Manuel J; Bax, Jeroen; Cormier, Bertrand; Cribier, Alain; De Jaegere, Peter; Fournial, Gerard; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Kovac, Jan; Ludgate, Susanne; Maisano, Francesco; Moat, Neil; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Nataf, Patrick; Pierard, Luc; Pomar, José Luis; Schofer, Joachim; Tornos, Pilar; Tuzcu, Murat; van Hout, Ben; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Walther, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    ...] . However, the risk of surgery may be higher in elderly patients with significant comorbidities. In addition, several registries show that referring physicians often do not propose surgery, as was the case in the Euro Heart Survey with 33% of patients with severe valve disease and severe symptoms not being considered for surgery [7] . Thus, despite the g...

  11. The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system predicts wound healing but not major amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers treated in a multidisciplinary setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Sherman, Ronald L; Hines, Kathryn F; Lum, Ying W; Perler, Bruce A; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2017-06-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) threatened limb classification has been shown to correlate well with risk of major amputation and time to wound healing in heterogeneous diabetic and nondiabetic populations. Major amputation continues to plague the most severe stage 4 WIfI patients, with 1-year amputation rates of 20% to 64%. Our aim was to determine the association between WIfI stage and wound healing and major amputation among patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary DFU clinic from July 2012 to December 2015 were enrolled in a prospective database. Wound healing and major amputation were compared for patients stratified by WIfI classification. There were 217 DFU patients with 439 wounds (mean age, 58.3 ± 0.8 years; 58% male, 63% black) enrolled, including 28% WIfI stage 1, 11% stage 2, 33% stage 3, and 28% stage 4. Peripheral arterial disease and dialysis were more common in patients with advanced (stage 3 or 4) wounds (P ≤ .05). Demographics of the patients, socioeconomic status, and comorbidities were otherwise similar between groups. There was a significant increase in the number of active wounds per limb at presentation with increasing WIfI stage (stage 1, 1.1 ± 0.1; stage 4, 1.4 ± 0.1; P = .03). Mean wound area (stage 1, 2.6 ± 0.6 cm2; stage 4, 15.3 ± 2.8 cm2) and depth (stage 1, 0.2 ± 0.0 cm; stage 4, 0.8 ± 0.1 cm) also increased progressively with increasing wound stage (P amputations (stage 1, 18%; stage 4, 56%) and revascularizations (stage 1, 6%; stage 4, 55%) were more common with increasing WIfI stage (P amputation (P = .99). For stage 4 wounds, the mean wound healing time was 190 ± 17 days, and risk of major amputation at 1 year was 5.7% ± 3.2%. Among patients with DFU, the WIfI classification system correlated well with wound healing but was not associated with risk of major amputation

  12. [Management of patients treated for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction in Tunisia: Preliminary results of FAST-MI Tunisia Registry from Tunisian Society of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addad, F; Gouider, J; Boughzela, E; Kamoun, S; Boujenah, R; Haouala, H; Gamra, H; Maatouk, F; Ben Khalfallah, A; Kachboura, S; Baccar, H; Ben Halima, N; Guesmi, A; Sayahi, K; Sdiri, W; Neji, A; Bouakez, A; Battikh, K; Chettaoui, R; Mourali, S

    2015-12-01

    FAST-MI Tunisian registry was initiated by the Tunisian Society of Cardiology and Cardio-vascular Surgery to assess characteristics, management, and hospital outcomes in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We prospectively collected data from 203 consecutive patients (mean age 60.3 years, 79.8 % male) with STEMI who were treated in 15 public hospitals (representing 68.2 % of Tunisian public centres treating STEMI patients) during a 3-month period at the end of 2014. The most common risk factor was tobacco (64.9 %), hypertension (38.6 %), diabetes (36.9 %) and dyslipidemia (24.6 %). Among these patients, 66 % received reperfusion therapy, 35 % with primary percutaneous coronary interventions (PAMI), 31 % with thrombolysis (28.6 % of them by pre-hospital thrombolysis). The median time from symptom onset to thrombolysis was 185 and 358 min for PAMI, respectively. The in-hospital mortality was 7.0 %. Patients enrolled in interventional centers (n=156) were more likely to receive any reperfusion therapy (19.8 % vs 44.6 %; p<0.001) than at the regional system of care with less thrombolysis (26.9 % vs 44.6 %; p=0.008) and more PAMI (52.8 % vs 8.5 %; p<0.0001). Also the in-hospital mortality was lower (6.4 % vs 9.3 %) but not significant. Preliminary results from FAST-MI in Tunisia show that the pharmaco- invasive strategy should be promoted in non-interventional centers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  13. Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Bariatric Surgery September 2017 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Durga ... Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery MedlinePlus What is bariatric surgery? Bariatric surgery helps people who are very obese ...

  14. Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Loss Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Bariatric Surgery September 2017 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Durga ... for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery MedlinePlus What is bariatric surgery? Bariatric surgery helps people who are very obese ...

  15. Thyroid Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has had a previous neck operation (thyroid surgery, parathyroid surgery, spine surgery, carotid artery surgery, etc.) and/or who has had a suspected invasive thyroid cancer should have their vocal cord function evaluated routinely before surgery. This is necessary to ...

  16. Foot Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heel Spur Surgery: Based on the condition and the nature of the disease, heel surgery can provide relief of pain ... Prior to surgery, the podiatrist will review your medical history and medical conditions. Specific diseases, illnesses, allergies, ...

  17. Foot Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foot Health Awareness Month Diabetes Awareness When is Foot Surgery Necessary? Many foot problems do not respond ... restore the function of your foot. Types of Foot Surgery Bunion Surgery: There are many different types ...

  18. Robotic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... computer station and directs the movements of a robot. Small surgical tools are attached to the robot's ...

  19. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Plastic Surgery KidsHealth / For Teens / Plastic Surgery What's in ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  20. Bologna guidelines for diagnosis and management of adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO): 2013 update of the evidence-based guidelines from the world society of emergency surgery ASBO working group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Di Saverio (Salomone); F. Coccolini (Federico); M. Galati (Marica); N. Smerieri (Nazareno); W.L. Biffl (Walter); L. Ansaloni (Luca); G. Tugnoli (Gregorio); G.C. Velmahos (George ); M. Sartelli (Massimo); C. Bendinelli (Cino); G.P. Fraga (Gustavo); M.D. Kelly (Michael ); F.A. Moore (Frederick); V. Mandala; V. Mandalà (Vincenzo); M. Masetti (Michele); E. Jovine (Elio); A.D. Pinna (Antonio ); A.B. Peitzman (Andrew); A. Leppaniemi (Ari); P.H. Sugarbaker (Paul ); H. van Goor (Harry); E.E. Moore (Ernest); J. Jeekel (Hans); F. Catena (Fausto)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In 2013 Guidelines on diagnosis and management of ASBO have been revised and updated by the WSES Working Group on ASBO to develop current evidence-based algorithms and focus indications and safety of conservative treatment, timing of surgery and indications for

  1. Transcatheter valve implantation for patients with aortic stenosis: A position statement from the European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), in collaboration with the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Vahanian (Alec); O. Alfieri (Ottavio); N. Al-Attar (Nawwar); M. Antunes (Manuel); J.J. Bax (Jeroen); B. Cormier (Bertrand); A. Cribier (Alain); P.P.T. de Jaegere (Peter); G. Fournial (Gerard); A.P. Kappetein (Arie Pieter); J. Kovac (Jan); S. Ludgate (Susanne); F. Maisano (Francesco); N. Moat (Neil); F.W. Mohr (Friedrich); P. Nataf (Patrick); L. Pié rard (Luc); J.L. Pomar (Jose); J. Schofer (Joachim); P. Tornos (Pilar); M. Tuzcu (Murat); B.A. van Hout (Ben); L.K. von Segesser (Ludwig); T. Walther (Thomas)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAims: To critically review the available transcatheter aortic valve implantation techniques and their results, as well as propose recommendations for their use and development. Methods and results: A committee of experts including European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and

  2. Citizenship in civil society?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2007-01-01

    This article seeks to provide a conceptual framework to complement and guide the empirical analysis of civil society. The core argument is that civil society must be understood, not as a category of (post)industrialized society, but as one of individualized society. Civil society is characterized by

  3. Nigerian Journal of Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Surgery publishes original articles, special articles (by invitation), reviews, case reports, correspondences and notes. Materials cited for publication will include scientific research papers read at the meetings of the Nigerian Surgical Research Society, and of the Association of Surgeons of Nigeria and ...

  4. LAPARoseome SURGERY:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laparoscopic Surgery has been rightly described as the "dawn of a new era" in surgery. It has come to stay and has altered permanently the practice and teaching of surgery as we used to know it. It is not about. "new gadgets" but a new way of practicing an old art surgery. ~ The surgical world has moved on and.

  5. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  6. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is ...

  7. Control de la glucemia en el postoperatorio de cirugía cardíaca: Informe del Consejo de Emergencias de la Sociedad Argentina de Cardiología Blood glucose control during cardiac surgery: Report of the Emergency Council of the Argentine Society of Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano N. Benzadón

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available La hiperglucemia en el postoperatorio de cirugía cardÍaca es un hallazgo frecuente asociado a peor evolución, que afecta tanto a diabéticos como no diabéticos. A pesar de las múltiples publicaciones disponibles, aún no existe un abordaje universalmente aceptado a este problema. En una iniciativa originada en el Consejo de Emergencias de la Sociedad Argentina de Cardiología, se convocó a expertos de nuestro medio con el propósito de debatir cómo debe ser el manejo de la glucemia en el paciente crítico cardiovascular. Este documento refleja lo discutido en este evento académico con la intención de resumir los principales aspectos del control de la glucemia en el postoperatorio de cirugía cardíaca.Hyperglycemia after cardiac surgery is a common finding associated with the worse outcomes affecting both diabetic and non diabetic patients. Despite the large number of publications available, there is no universally accepted approach to this problem. In an initiative of the Emergency Council of the Argentine Society of Cardiology, local experts gathered to discuss the management of hyperglycemia after adult cardiac surgery. The main objective of the present paper is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding glycemic control in postoperative cardiac surgery.

  8. Craniofacial Surgery Fellowship Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Agarwal, Divyansh; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-06-01

    Applicants for craniofacial surgery fellowships utilize Internet-based resources like the San Francisco (SF) Match to manage applications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accessibility and content of craniofacial surgery fellowship websites (CSFWs). A list of available craniofacial surgery fellowships was compiled from directories of the American Society of Craniofacial Surgery (ACSFS) and SF Match. Accessibility of CSFWs was assessed via links from these directories and a Google search. Craniofacial surgery fellowship websites were evaluated on education and recruitment content and compared via program characteristics. Twenty-four of the 28 US-based craniofacial surgery fellowship programs had a CSFW (86%). The ACSFS and SF Match databases had limited CSFW accessibility, but a Google search revealed most CSFWs had the top search result (76%). In total, CSFWs provided an average of 39% of education and recruitment variables. While most programs provided fellowship program descriptions (96%), application links (96%), and faculty listings (83%), relatively few provided rotation schedules (13%), fellow selection process information (13%), or interview dates (8%). CSFW content did not vary by program location, faculty size, accreditation status, or institutional affiliations (P > 0.05). Craniofacial surgery fellowships often lack readily accessible websites from national program lists and have limited information for interested applicants. The consistent lack of online information across programs suggests future opportunities exist to improve these educational resources.

  9. Sinus Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Health Home Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. Reproduction or republication strictly ... Terms of Use © Copyright 2018. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery 1650 Diagonal Rd Alexandria, ...

  10. Nose Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Health Home Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. Reproduction or republication strictly ... Terms of Use © Copyright 2018. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery 1650 Diagonal Rd Alexandria, ...

  11. After Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around ... the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are How long ...

  12. Turbinate surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... anesthesia with sedation, so you are asleep and pain-free during surgery. Turbinoplasty: A tool is placed in ... anesthesia with sedation, so you are asleep and pain-free during surgery. Radiofrequency or laser ablation: A thin ...

  13. Lung surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cavity, particularly after trauma Surgery to remove small balloon-like tissues (blebs) that cause lung collapse ( pneumothorax ) ... this surgery include: Failure of the lung to expand Injury to the lungs or blood vessels Need ...

  14. LAPARoseome SURGERY:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ofSurgery,. University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. SUMMARY. Laparoscopic Surgery has been rightly described as the "dawn of a new era" in surgery. It has come to stay and ... gases (CO2 and N20) require special devices for delivery to regulate ... wound, not to talk of the cosmetics that also makes the technique ...

  15. Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Don’t rely on surgery to change your life in a huge way. Make sure any doctor you consider is qualified for the surgery you’re considering and is certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. Some doctors won’t ...

  16. PLASTIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    provide correct nipple areolar complex position and shape. PLASTIC SURGERY. T Jay, K Segwapa. Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Sefako Makgatho Health Science University, Pretoria South-Africa. Corresponding author: T Jay (drtonijay@gmail.com). Background: In surgery for gynaecomastia, excision ...

  17. Cosmetic Surgery: Regulatory Challenges in a Global Beauty Market

    OpenAIRE

    Mullock, Alexandra; Griffiths, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    The market for cosmetic surgery tourism is growing with an increase in people travelling abroad for cosmetic surgery. While the reasons for seeking cosmetic surgery abroad may vary the most common reason is financial, but does cheaper surgery abroad carry greater risks? We explore the risks of poorly regulated cosmetic surgery to society generally before discussing how harm might be magnified in the context of cosmetic tourism, where the demand for cheaper surgery drives the market and makes ...

  18. Scoliosis Research Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoliosis Research Society Close Menu Member Login Become a Member Home Find a Specialist | Calendar Contact | Donate ... a Member Find a Specialist Calendar Contact Donate Scoliosis Research Society Dedicated to the optimal care of ...

  19. Reclaiming Society Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip E. Steinberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Learned societies have become aligned with commercial publishers, who have increasingly taken over the latter’s function as independent providers of scholarly information. Using the example of geographical societies, the advantages and disadvantages of this trend are examined. It is argued that in an era of digital publication, learned societies can offer leadership with a new model of open access that can guarantee high quality scholarly material whose publication costs are supported by society membership dues.

  20. The Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranya Nath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article briefly discusses various definitions and concepts of the so-called information society. The term information society has been proposed to refer to the post-industrial society in which information plays a pivotal role. The definitions that have been proposed over the years highlight five underlying characterisations of an information society: technological, economic, sociological, spatial, and cultural. This article discusses those characteristics. While the emergence of an information society may be just a figment of one’s imagination, the concept could be a good organising principle to describe and analyse the changes of the past 50 years and of the future in the 21st century.

  1. Diagnosis of stable ischemic heart disease: summary of a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association/American Association for Thoracic Surgery/Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association/Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Fihn, Stephan D; Williams, Sankey; Dallas, Paul; Owens, Douglas K; Shekelle, Paul

    2012-11-20

    The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), American Heart Association (AHA), American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to help clinicians diagnose known or suspected stable ischemic heart disease. Literature on this topic published before November 2011 was identified by using MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO, AMED, and SCOPUS. Searches were limited to human studies published in English. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations according to a translation of the ACCF/AHA grading system into ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. This guideline includes 28 recommendations that address the following issues: the initial diagnosis of the patient who might have stable ischemic heart disease, cardiac stress testing to assess the risk for death or myocardial infarction in patients diagnosed with stable ischemic heart disease, and coronary angiography for risk assessment.

  2. Obesity Slows Recovery for Heart Surgery Patients: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167721.html Obesity Slows Recovery for Heart Surgery Patients: Study They' ... Aug. 10 in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery . "Obesity is a growing problem for society that has ...

  3. Social media in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Gates, Lindsay; Mitchell, Erica L; Muhs, Bart E

    2013-04-01

    There has been a tremendous growth in the use of social media to expand the visibility of various specialties in medicine. The purpose of this paper is to describe the latest updates on some current applications of social media in the practice of vascular surgery as well as existing limitations of use. This investigation demonstrates that the use of social networking sites appears to have a positive impact on vascular practice, as is evident through the incorporation of this technology at the Cleveland Clinic and by the Society for Vascular Surgery into their approach to patient care and physician communication. Overall, integration of social networking technology has current and future potential to be used to promote goals, patient awareness, recruitment for clinical trials, and professionalism within the specialty of vascular surgery. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  5. Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do amazing things. SLS is dedicated to Improving Outcomes in Minimally Invasive Surgery. SLS is the largest ... awarded a fellowship by The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology to research and write this important ...

  6. American Pain Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychological Flexibility Might Be the Key to Better Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions APS Presents 2016 Achievement Awards APS Honors ... with Pain Persistence After Pediatric Surgery Study Shows Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Improves Functioning for People with Chronic Pain ...

  7. Civil Society and Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgård, Lars

    An illustration of how important the relationship is between civil society anbd governance. A short historic journey with four snapshots of times and situations that have provided interesting evidence about the connection between civil society and governance. My goal for the short historic journey...... is to make clear and hopefully even verify that providing knowledge about the impact of civil society and citizens’ participation on governance is one of the most urgent research tasks in the current period of time....

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws ... out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws ...

  9. Bariatric surgery insurance requirements independently predict surgery dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Kaitlin M; Mehaffey, J Hunter; Safavian, Dana; Schirmer, Bruce; Malin, Steven K; Hallowell, Peter T; Kirby, Jennifer L

    2017-05-01

    Many insurance companies have considerable prebariatric surgery requirements despite a lack of evidence for improved clinical outcomes. The hypothesis of this study is that insurance-specific requirements will be associated with a decreased progression to surgery and increased delay in time to surgery. Retrospective data collection was performed for patients undergoing bariatric surgery evaluation from 2010-2015. Patients who underwent surgery (SGY; n = 827; mean body mass index [BMI] 49.1) were compared with those who did not (no-SGY; n = 648; mean BMI: 49.4). Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to identify specific co-morbidity and insurance specific predictors of surgical dropout and time to surgery. A total of 1475 patients using 12 major insurance payors were included. Univariate analysis found insurance requirements associated with surgical drop out included longer median diet duration (no-SGY = 6 mo; SGY = 3 mo; Prequirement (odds ratio [OR] .88, Prequirements were associated with lack of patient progression to surgery in this study. In addition, delays in surgery were associated with preoperative weight gain. Although prospective and multicenter studies are needed, these findings have major policy implications suggesting insurance requirements may need to be reconsidered to improve medical care. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) KidsHealth / For Parents / Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) ... or bariatric surgery might be an option. About Bariatric Surgery Bariatric surgery had its beginnings in the 1960s, ...

  11. A student surgical society – the Cape Town experience | Favara ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    managed academic society that promotes undergraduate interest in the field of surgery at the University of Cape Town. With over 700 members in 2009, it is one of the largest student surgical societies in the world. This article describes the origins, ...

  12. Education Societies in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scottish Educational Review, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Describes origins, membership criteria, activities, and publications of the Scottish branches of six educational societies: British Association of Early Childhood Education, British Psychological Society, National Association for Gifted Children, National Council for Special Education, United Kingdom Reading Association, and Education Otherwise.…

  13. Fieldwork in Transforming Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Ed; Michailova, Snejina

    The contributors to this text discuss the personal and professional challenges of conducting fieldwork in the difficult, sometimes threatening contexts of the transforming societies of post-socialist Europe and China.......The contributors to this text discuss the personal and professional challenges of conducting fieldwork in the difficult, sometimes threatening contexts of the transforming societies of post-socialist Europe and China....

  14. Refractions of Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuzmanovic, Daniella

    The thesis investigates various perceptions of civil society among civic activists in Turkey, and how these perceptions are produced and shaped. The thesis is an anthropological contribution to studies of civil society in general, as well as to studies on political culture in Turkey....

  15. Glaciers and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagné, Karine; Rasmussen, Mattias Borg; Orlove, Ben

    2014-01-01

    toward technological methodologies. Yet, as elements of the landscape, glaciers are strongly integrated to various societies around the world in ways that exceed their role as provider of fundamental sources of water. The relation between glaciers and societies is therefore marked by processes...

  16. World Society and Globalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate discourses on globalisation and world society and to disclose the commonalities and differences of both scientific debates. In particular, it draws attention to theoretical concepts of globalisation and world society. This is considered fruitful for comprehending the complex mechanisms of…

  17. Islam dan Civil Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Sukardi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The article tries to address the concept of civil society from varied perspectives. From a historical point of view, civil society demands not only the absent domination of state but also liberates individuals from the hegemony of state. The article shows that in Indonesia and Malaysian discourse, masyarakat madani is often used to represent the term of civil society. Using this conception, major values of civil society also share with basic ideas within the Medina Treaty in the history of Islam. These ideas include egalitarianism, human rights protection, participation, law and justice enforcement and pluralism. In this frame, the question on whether or not Islam is compatible with the concept of civil society is clearly answered. Muslims could benefit such a concept to build their awareness of being progressive and adaptive to social changes.

  18. World Federation of Vascular Societies: presidential address

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik Hegaard

    2010-01-01

    The presidential address describes briefly the history of the World Federation for Vascular Societies (WFVS) and its objectives. Vascular Surgery today includes interventional procedures (open surgical and endovascular) in addition to risk factor reduction and medical treatment. It is equally imp...... throughout the world. In addition, for introduction of new treatments, training issues and dissemination of science a global organisation like the WFVS is needed.......The presidential address describes briefly the history of the World Federation for Vascular Societies (WFVS) and its objectives. Vascular Surgery today includes interventional procedures (open surgical and endovascular) in addition to risk factor reduction and medical treatment. It is equally....... Similar, in order to be able to train with relevant case mix and numbers, and in order always to have both complex open and endovascular skills on call 24 hours per day, 365 days a year, centralisation into larger units is necessary. The WFVS is important simply looking at the huge demographic differences...

  19. Outcome After Surgery for Acute Aortic Dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemtob, Raphaelle Avigael; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Holmvang, Lene

    2017-01-01

    the use of antiplatelet therapy (APT) prior to AAD surgery and patient outcome, including indications according to the European Society of Cardiology's (ESC) recent guidelines. Design A retrospective, observational study. Setting A tertiary University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Heart Centre, Copenhagen...

  20. Information society studies

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, Alistair S

    2013-01-01

    We are often told that we are ""living in an information society"" or that we are ""information workers."" But what exactly do these claims mean, and how might they be verified? In this important methodological study, Alistair S. Duff cuts through the rhetoric to get to the bottom of the ""information society thesis."" Wide-ranging in coverage, this study will be of interest to scholars in information science, communication and media studies and social theory. It is a key text for the newly-unified specialism of information society studies, and an indispensable guide to the future of this disc

  1. Climate and Ancient Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Climate, and human responses to it, have a strongly interconnected relationship. This when climate change occurs, the result of either natural or human causes, societies should react and adapt to these. But do they? If so, what is the nature of that change, and are the responses positive...... or negative for the long-term survival of social groups? In this volume, scholars from diverse disciplines including archaeology, geology and climate sciences explore scientific and material evidence for climate changes in the past, their causes, their effects on ancient societies and how those societies...

  2. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  3. Rodding Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... above-the-knee splint or lightweight plaster or fiberglass splint instead. Bracing may be used after the ... level. Potential Complications Complications from rodding surgery include risks related to:  General anesthesia,  Fractures during the procedure,  ...

  4. Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if the seizure occurs during a bath or swimming Brain damage from prolonged seizures Sudden death, a ... a candidate for epilepsy surgery, your pre-surgical evaluation may include: Baseline electroencephalogram (EEG). In this test, ...

  5. Emergency surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoneham, M; Murray, D; Foss, N

    2014-01-01

    National reports recommended that peri-operative care should be improved for elderly patients undergoing emergency surgery. Postoperative mortality and morbidity rates remain high, and indicate that emergency ruptured aneurysm repair, laparotomy and hip fracture fixation are high-risk procedures...... undertaken on elderly patients with limited physiological reserve. National audits have reported variations in care quality, data that are increasingly being used to drive quality improvement through professional guidance. Given that the number of elderly patients presenting for emergency surgery is likely...

  6. Valie EXPORT Society. Overlok

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2001-01-01

    Valie EXPORT Society asutasid 23. okt. 1999. a. Frankfurdis Kadi Estland, Killu Sukmit ja Mari Laanemets, kui olid külastanud austria naiskunstniku Valie Exporti näitust. Rühmituse aktsioonide kirjeldus

  7. Valie EXPORT Society Rooseumis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    Malmös Rooseumi Kaasaegse Kunsti Keskuses näitus "Baltic Babel". Projekt koosneb Läänemeremaade linnades tegutsevate innovatiivsete gruppide aktsioonidest. Kuraator Charles Esche. Esinejatest (Eestist Valie Export Society: Kadi Estland, Killu Sukmit)

  8. American Geriatrics Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn More Social Media Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Instagram Social Media Bar Right Menu Annual Meeting Donate to our Foundation Contact Us American Geriatrics Society 40 Fulton St., 18th Floor New York, NY ...

  9. The global knowledge society

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fedoroff, Nina V

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge societies rest on a foundation of educational and research excellence. The Internet, advances in communications technology, and the rapidly expanding global fiber optic network are necessary, but not sufficient...

  10. American Rhinologic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6th Bulgarian-Italian Rhinology Friendship Meeting Sofia Hotel Balkan, Sofia, Bulgaria, December 1-3, 2017 9.17. ... you there! Terms of Use | Site Map © 2011 American Rhinologic Society All Rights Reserved

  11. Producing Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt, Liv Egholm; Hein Jessen, Mathias

    Since the beginning of the 1990’s, civil society has attracted both scholarly and political interest as the ‘third sphere’ outside the state and the market not only a normatively privileged site of communication and ‘the public sphere’, but also as a resource for democratization processes......’ and as such dominates our way of thinking about civil society. Yet, this view hinders the understanding of how civil society is not a pre-existing or given sphere, but a sphere which is constantly produced both discursively, conceptually and practically. Through two examples; 1,the case of philanthropy in the beginning...... of the century. 2, the laws and strategies of implementing regarding the regulation of civil societal institutions (folkeoplysningsloven) since the 1970’s this paper shows how civil society in 20th century Denmark was produced both conceptually and practically and how this entailed a specific vision and version...

  12. American Society of Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Good News About Echo Marketing and Promotional Opportunities Social Media Mobile Resources About ▼ About ASE Board of Directors Committees and Councils Industry Roundtable Partners Contact Us American Society of Echocardiography 2100 Gateway Centre Boulevard, Ste. 310 ...

  13. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SAMBA Link Digital Newsletter Educational Bibliography Research IARS/Anesthesia & Analgesia SCOR About SCOR Sponsor SAMBA Meetings Affinity Sponsor Program We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, ...

  14. National Multiple Sclerosis Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have you met? d Our Healthcare Voice National Multiple Sclerosis Society International Progressive MS Alliance live from Paris ... Persist for Years October 25, 2017 View All Multiple Sclerosis News & Press View All Clinical Trial Alerts Every ...

  15. Transnationalising Civil Society?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Bak

    The paper takes a transnational perspective on developing an analytical framework for understanding how transnationalism interacts with civil society and how immigrant organisations use transnational strategies to challenge the pre-given positions of immigrants within given integration...

  16. Changing Anthropology, Changing Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Fifty years after the founding of the field of medical anthropology, the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association held its first independent meeting on September 24-27, 2009, at Yale University. PMID:20027281

  17. American Society of Hematology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Account Navigation Main Content American Society of Hematology ASH Store ASH Job Center ASH Apps Share ... youtube linkedin Research In This Section Agenda for Hematology Research Sickle Cell Priorities Lymphoma Roadmap Moonshot Initiative ...

  18. The Tranquebarian Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niklas Thode

    2015-01-01

    of this development was the establishment of the Tranquebarian Society, the third learned society east of the Cape of Good Hope. The article examines the unique assemblage of scientific networks, people, instruments, institutions, and ideas of local and global origin that converged in Tranquebar, and it investigates...... the fusion of local problems and radical ideas of enlightenment, education, and improvement that united government, mission, and merchants in Tranquebar in the quest for ‘useful knowledge’....

  19. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is ...

  20. The Society for Scandinavian Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grand, Karina Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The Society for Nordic Art & the Scandinavian Society [Selskabet for Nordisk Kunst & Skandinavisk Selskab]......The Society for Nordic Art & the Scandinavian Society [Selskabet for Nordisk Kunst & Skandinavisk Selskab]...

  1. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  2. Spirometry. Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Río, Francisco; Calle, Myriam; Burgos, Felip; Casan, Pere; Del Campo, Félix; Galdiz, Juan B; Giner, Jordi; González-Mangado, Nicolás; Ortega, Francisco; Puente Maestu, Luis

    2013-09-01

    Spirometry is the main pulmonary function test and is essential for the evaluation and monitoring of respiratory diseases. Its utility transcends the field of Respiratory Medicine, is becoming increasingly important in primary care and applications have even been described outside the field of respiratory diseases. This document is therefore intended to serve as support for all health professionals who use spirometry, providing recommendations based on the best scientific evidence available. An update of the indications and contraindications of the test is proposed. The document sets out recommendations on the requirements necessary for conventional spirometers and portable office equipment, as well as on spirometer hygiene and quality control measures. Spirometric parameters that must be considered, performance of manoeuvres, criteria for acceptability and repeatability of measurements and their quality control are defined. A proposal is also established for presentation of the results and an evaluation and interpretation is proposed according to information generated in recent years. Finally, lines of adaptation and integration of spirometry in the field of new technologies are considered. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Recent advances in urologic laparoscopic surgeries: laparoendoscopic single-site surgery, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, robotics and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Tadashi

    2013-05-01

    Laparoscopic surgery was developed at the end of the 1980s and has been utilized in almost all urologic surgical procedures. It offers the benefits of less invasiveness and earlier recovery than open surgery. The introduction of laparoendoscopic single-site surgery has offered reduced pain and improved cosmetic satisfaction to patients. Scarless nephrectomy has been realized with transvaginal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery in women. The development of surgical robots has decreased the technical difficulty of complicated procedures, shortened the learning curve, and improved perioperative outcomes relative to laparoscopic surgery. Surgical navigation using real-time sonography, augmented reality, fluorescence, or radioisotope images will improve the quality of these surgeries. © 2013 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Management of stable ischemic heart disease: summary of a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians/American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association/American Association for Thoracic Surgery/Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association/Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Fihn, Stephan D; Dallas, Paul; Williams, Sankey; Owens, Douglas K; Shekelle, Paul

    2012-11-20

    The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline with the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), American Heart Association (AHA), American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons to present the available evidence on the management of stable known or suspected ischemic heart disease. Literature on this topic published before November 2011 was identified by using MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO, AMED, and SCOPUS. Searches were limited to human studies published in English. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations according to a translation of the ACCF/AHA grading system into ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. The guideline includes 48 specific recommendations that address the following issues: patient education, management of proven risk factors (dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, physical activity body weight, and smoking), risk factor reduction strategies of unproven benefit, medical therapy to prevent myocardial infarction and death and to relieve symptoms, alternative therapy, revascularization to improve survival and symptoms, and patient follow-up.

  6. Female genital cosmetic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Dorothy; Lefebvre, Guylaine; Bouchard, Celine; Shapiro, Jodi; Blake, Jennifer; Allen, Lisa; Cassell, Krista

    2013-12-01

    To provide Canadian gynaecologists with evidence-based direction for female genital cosmetic surgery in response to increasing requests for, and availability of, vaginal and vulvar surgeries that fall well outside the traditional realm of medically-indicated reconstructions. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or MEDLINE, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in 2011 and 2012 using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words (female genital cosmetic surgery). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to May 2012. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). Recommendations 1. The obstetrician and gynaecologist should play an important role in helping women to understand their anatomy and to respect individual variations. (III-A) 2. For women who present with requests for vaginal cosmetic procedures, a complete medical, sexual, and gynaecologic history should be obtained and the absence of any major sexual or psychological dysfunction should be ascertained. Any possibility of coercion or exploitation should be ruled out. (III-B) 3. Counselling should be a priority for women requesting female genital cosmetic surgery. Topics should include normal variation and physiological changes over the lifespan, as well as the possibility of unintended consequences of cosmetic surgery to the genital area. The lack of evidence regarding outcomes and the lack of data on the

  7. Bariatric surgery patients: reasons to visit emergency department after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Sánchez, Juan A; Corujo-Vázquez, Omar; Sahai-Hernández, Mrisa

    2007-01-01

    Morbid obesity prevalence is reaching epidemic proportions in Western society. Long-term weight loss can be achieved by bariatric surgery. This surgery also has a positive impact in the reduction of obesity related co-morbid conditions. The purpose of this study is to determine the reasons that bariatric surgery patients had to visit the emergency department within a three month period after surgery. A retrospective chart review study was performed at the UPR Hospital in Carolina. Patients with the diagnosis of morbid obesity who had bariatric surgery were identified. Of the 283 patients who met the criteria, the following information was obtained: gender, age, height, weight, pre-operative BMI, obesity-related comorbid conditions, post operative length of stay (LOS), and reasons and length of stay of Emergency Department (ED) visits within a 3 month period after surgery. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Program. The same profile of gender and BMI was obtained between the population that had the surgery and the sample that visited the ED, the group of patients between 20-29 years old was more likely to visit the ED. No correlation was found between a longer post operative length of stay and an increased probability of visiting the ED. Of the population, 5% had to visit ED within a three month period. The most common post operative complications were: Abdominal Pain (46.2%), Emesis (38.5%), and Dehydration (30.8%). Other less frequent complications were nausea, DVT, pneumonia, dizziness, gastritis, infected wound and upper GI bleeding. The most common reasons that bariatric surgery patients had to visit the emergency department within a three month period after surgery were: abdominal pain, emesis, dehydration and nausea. These complications could most likely be attributed to patient poor compliance with diet, resulting in the classical symptoms of the dumping syndrome which is common in patients that have undergone

  8. Advanced information society(2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    Our modern life is full of information and information infiltrates into our daily life. Networking of the telecommunication is extended to society, company, and individual level. Although we have just entered the advanced information society, business world and our daily life have been steadily transformed by the advancement of information network. This advancement of information brings a big influence on economy, and will play they the main role in the expansion of domestic demands. This paper tries to view the image of coming advanced information society, focusing on the transforming businessman's life and the situation of our daily life, which became wealthy by the spread of daily life information and the visual information by satellite system, in the development of the intelligent city.

  9. Civil society sphericules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    the organization strategizes about and seeks to articulate amongst Tanzanian youth. Situated in the ‘perverse confluence’ (Dagnino, 2011) between neoliberal and radical democratic agendas in the communicative practices of civil society-driven media platforms, Femina navigates between identities as an NGO, a social...... movement and a media initiative. In the context of the growing literature on social networking sites and their affordances, dynamics and structures, the case of Femina illustrates how a civil society sphericule emerges within the dynamic co-evolution of new and old media platforms. The study is furthermore...... an example of the difficult shift in civil society practice, from service provision to an agenda of public service monitoring, social accountability and community engagement....

  10. Branding Cities, Changing Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    Societal changes are seldom discussed in the literature on city branding. The time element is important because it highlights the fluctuating reality of society. The city brand message freezes the place but in fact, the city branding exercise is a continuous process. Society emerges too. City...... brands are supposed to accentuate the uniqueness of the city, be built from the bottom-up and reflect the city's identity. This paper highlights three paradoxes, pointing out that city branding processes can also make cities more alike, bring about societal changes and forge new city identities. A city...

  11. Advanced information society(7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  12. Science and Society Colloquium

    CERN Multimedia

    Randi, J

    1991-01-01

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  13. Metabolic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Schauer, Philip R; Kaplan, Lee M

    2018-01-01

    The alarming rise in the worldwide prevalence of obesity is paralleled by an increasing burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metabolic surgery is the most effective means of obtaining substantial and durable weight loss in individuals with obesity. Randomized trials have recently shown the superio......The alarming rise in the worldwide prevalence of obesity is paralleled by an increasing burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metabolic surgery is the most effective means of obtaining substantial and durable weight loss in individuals with obesity. Randomized trials have recently shown...... the superiority of surgery over medical treatment alone in achieving improved glycemic control, as well as a reduction in cardiovascular risk factors. The mechanisms seem to extend beyond the magnitude of weight loss alone and include improvements in incretin profiles, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity...

  14. Intestinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrochers, André; Anderson, David E

    2016-11-01

    A wide variety of disorders affecting the intestinal tract in cattle may require surgery. Among those disorders the more common are: intestinal volvulus, jejunal hemorrhage syndrome and more recently the duodenal sigmoid flexure volvulus. Although general principles of intestinal surgery can be applied, cattle has anatomical and behavior particularities that must be known before invading the abdomen. This article focuses on surgical techniques used to optimize outcomes and discusses specific disorders of small intestine. Diagnoses and surgical techniques presented can be applied in field conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cataract surgery after refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Ayman; McLeod, Stephen D

    2010-01-01

    To review recent contributions addressing the challenge of intraocular lens (IOL) calculation in patients undergoing cataract extraction following corneal refractive surgery. Although several articles have provided excellent summaries of IOL selection in patients wherein prerefractive surgery data are available, numerous authors have recently described approaches to attempt more accurate IOL power calculations for patients who present with no reliable clinical information regarding their refractive history. Additionally, results have been reported using the Scheimpflug camera system to measure corneal power in an attempt to resolve the most important potential source of error for IOL determination in these patients. IOL selection in patients undergoing cataract surgery after corneal refractive surgery continues to be a challenging and complex issue despite numerous strategies and formulas described in the literature. Current focus seems to be directed toward approaches that do not require preoperative refractive surgery information. Due to the relative dearth of comparative clinical outcomes data, the optimal solution to this ongoing clinical problem has yet to be determined. Until such data are available, many cataract surgeons compare the results of multiple formulas to assist them in IOL selection for these patients.

  16. Big Society, Big Deal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Political leaders like to put forward guiding ideas or themes which pull their individual decisions into a broader narrative. For John Major it was Back to Basics, for Tony Blair it was the Third Way and for David Cameron it is the Big Society. While Mr. Blair relied on Lord Giddens to add intellectual weight to his idea, Mr. Cameron's legacy idea…

  17. Literacy in Traditional Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Jack, Ed.

    This series of essays derives from an interest in communications, in media and their effect upon human intercourse. Primarily, this concern with the technology of the intellect centers upon the effect of literacy on human culture, especially in 'traditional' or pre-industrial societies. In most of the essays, the effects of literacy are considered…

  18. Education for Jobless Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorkin, Alexander M.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of societies with low employment rates will present a challenge to education. Education must move away from the discourse of skills and towards the discourse of meaning and motivation. The paper considers three kinds of non-waged optional labor that may form the basis of the future economy: prosumption, volunteering, and self-design.…

  19. Rationality in Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flache, Andreas; Dijkstra, Jacob; Wright, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary theories of rational behavior in human society augment the orthodox model of rationality both by adding various forms of bounded rationality and relaxing the assumptions of self-interest and materialistic preferences. This entry discusses how these extensions of the theory of rational

  20. SOCIETY: LESSONS FORZUNIVERSITIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the interaction model of knowledge utilization is engaged to ... and organizational diversity,” (4) “social accountability and reflexivity,” and (5) ... The system of reference for knowledge production under Mode 2 is the network of ... based society characterized by increased demand for transfer and utilization of.

  1. The Civil Society Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Anheier, Helmut K.; Lester M. Salamon

    2015-01-01

    Salamon and Anheier bring the civil society sector - the plethora of private, nonprofit, and nongovernmental organizations that have emerged in recent decades - into better focus conceptually as well as empirically. They draw on the results of a major inquiry into the scope, structure, financing and role of the "nonprofit sector" in a broad cross-section of countries around the world.

  2. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... STS The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Flickr About STS Governance and Leadership ... All Events » Tweets by @STS_CTsurgery Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Flickr Footer menu Home Contact Us ...

  3. Connecting Science with Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    awareness of the important questions of our society reflected in scientific research and of the answers produced by these research activities. The CRIS2010 conference, entitled “Bringing Science to Society”, therefore seeks to highlight the role of Current Research Information Systems for communicating...

  4. MARX EMBRYOLOGY OF SOCIETY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOUTERS, A

    This article presents a new interpretation of Marx's dialectical method. Marx conceived dialectics as a method for constructing a model of society. The way this model is developed is analogous to the way organisms develop according to the German embryologist Karl Ernst von Baer, and, indeed, Marx's

  5. Japanese 2011 nationwide survey on complications from spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    IMAJO, YASUAKI; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Yone , Kazunori; Okawa, Atsushi; Otani, Koji; Ogata, Tadanori; Ozawa, Hiroshi; SHIMADA, Yoichi; Neo, Masashi; Iguchi, Tetsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Background The Japanese Society for Spine Surgery and Related Research (JSSR) previously carried out two nationwide surveys in 1994 and 2001 on complications from spine and spinal cord surgery. More than 10?years have now elapsed since 2001. Rapidly ageing populations have major impacts on society, particularly in the medical field. The purpose of this study was therefore to examine the present situation for spine surgery in Japan. Methods The JSSR research team prepared a computerized questi...

  6. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    body temperature to derive an equation for the purpose of predicting mortality in damage control surgery. It was shown to ... equation to have 100% positive predictive value (PPV) for both datasets and 24% sensitivity. The aim of the study was to .... predictive systems assess average, and not individual, risk. Increasing the ...

  7. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The management of cystic lymphangiomas is and challenging. Of all the available modalities of treatment, surgery remains the gold standard but it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Method: Retrospective analysis of 28 cases of cystic lymphangioma seen at the. Obafemi Awolowo University ...

  8. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At Surgery she had a floating gall bladder with the fundus at the left side of __the porta hepatis due to adhesions attached to the Hartmann ' s pouch. A choiecystectomy was performed, then a choledochotomy was madci in etwcen 2 stay sutures of 3—0 silk” The. Chi) stones were removed with. Dcsjardin forceps, irrigation ...

  9. ARQIOTHORACIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Palliative surgery, transposition, great arteries. Introduction. Transposition 'ol' the great arteries (TGA) was first observed by Sterro in 1672l and was subsequently described by Morgagni. (1761) 2 and Baille (r797). '1 in this severe congenital cyanotic heart disease, the aorta arises from the right ventricle and the ...

  10. Choosing surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstensson, Carina; Lohmander, L; Frobell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The objective was to understand patients' views of treatment after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and their reasons for deciding to request surgery despite consenting to participate in a randomised controlled trial (to 'cross-over'). METHODS: Thirty-four in...

  11. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    examination of the abdomen at four specific locations: the right upper quandrant, left upper quadrant, suprapubic area. Role of focused assessment with sonography for trauma as a screening tool for blunt abdominal trauma in young children after high energy trauma. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY. W Tummers,1 J van Schuppen ...

  12. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    services at public hospitals across the country are currently delivered by IMGs.6 Although some IMGs wish to stay on in the hope of entering ... accredited by the Health Professions Council of South Africa. (HPCSA), the national regulatory authority for medical licensing. The general surgery registrar programme lasts for a.

  13. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    intraperitoneal space, and infrequently at other sites.2-13. The traditional operative approach is an open surgical one to drain the cysts and remove their germinal layer by either controlled evacuation of the cystic cavity or resectional surgery. Since the first laparoscopic treatment of hydatid disease was described in 1992,14 ...

  14. TRAUMA SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of shock and who require “damage control” surgery are more likely to suffer a worse outcome, particularly when multiple physiological derangements .... Gun shot. 13. 15. Shot gun. 0. 1. Level of injury. Infrarenal. 11. 7. 0.248. Juxtarenal. 2. 7. Suprarenal. 2. 1. Retrohepatic. 2. 2. Trauma scores. RTS (mean). 7.28. 6.44. 0.095.

  15. Arthroscopic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Arthroscopic surgery (or microsurgery) is a significant breakthrough in treating knee injuries. Its applications range from basic diagnosis to arthroscopic menisectomy, although its use in some procedures is still highly controversial. Many surgeons perform the diagnostic procedure, but follow this with the conventional surgical approach.…

  16. Missionary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Rebekah

    2010-02-01

    A career in missionary surgery offers professional challenge, much opportunity, and high job satisfaction. Preparation, financial support, job requirements, and difficulties are issues to be considered. However, these are secondary in the context of seeing needy people made whole physically and spiritually. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Consumption in the Information Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherebin, V. M.; Ermakova, N. A.; Makhrova, O. N.

    2010-01-01

    The current state of the economy in the developed countries make it possible to characterize them using concepts and terms such as the postindustrial society, the new economy, the service economy, the creative economy, the posteconomic society, the information society, the knowledge society, and the consumer society. Among these terms and…

  18. l'Internet Society

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    1997-01-01

    Conference of Vinton "Vint" Gray Cerf in the Intercontinental Hostel. Vinton Gray Cerf (born June 23, 1943) is an American computer scientist who is commonly referred to as one of the "founding fathers of the Internet" for his key technical and managerial role, together with Bob Kahn, in the creation of the Internet and the TCP/IP protocols which it uses. He was also a co-founder (in 1992) of the Internet Society (ISOC) which is intended to both promote the views of ordinary users of the Internet, and also serve as an umbrella body for the technical groups developing the Internet (such as the Internet Engineering Task Force). He served as the first president of the Internet Society from 1992-1995.

  19. Discrimination in Modern Society

    OpenAIRE

    Schekach, E. V.; Щекач, Е. В.

    2013-01-01

    Issues of discrimination in modern society are examined in the article. Types of discrimination, ways of demonstration, methods of combating discrimination and inequality are described. Particular attention is paid to the legal basis and the real life stories, which serve as a material base for judgments how to prevent discrimination. Possible ways are suggested to eliminate such a negative phenomenon of society like discrimination. Статья посвящена вопросам дискриминации в современном общ...

  20. Cooking and Society

    OpenAIRE

    Teplá, Hedvika

    2012-01-01

    The bachelor thesis "Cooking and Society" focuses on cooking, a process of food preparation. The thesis analyzes cooking as a leisure activity, type of housework and it also discusses the relation between cooking and cultural identity. It focuses on the importance of national and ethnic cuisine and deals with the differences in cooking influenced by religion and social stratification. The thesis also deals with the acquisition of cooing skills and transgeneral transfer of cooking skills. It d...

  1. European Physical Society awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The winners of the 2004 Accelerator Prizes, awarded by the European Physical Society's Interdivisional Group on Accelerators (EPS-IGA), have been announced. Vladmir Shiltsev (Fermilab) and Igor Meshkov (JINR, Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna) will be presented with their awards during the 9th European Particle Accelerator Conference, EPAC'04, on 8 July 2004 in Lucerne. Both physicists will also give a talk about their work. More details on: http://epac.web.cern.ch/

  2. Society and Social Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janani Harish

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Society is the source of immense power. Over the past few centuries humanity has record­ed phenomenal growth in its collective capacity for accomplishment, as reflected in the 12-fold growth in global per capita income since 1800. The remarkable achievements in living standards, longevity, science, technology, industry, education, democracy, human rights, peace and global governance are the result of the exponential development of the capacity of society to harness human energies and convert them into social power for productive purposes. Today, humanity possesses the power and capabilities needed to fully meet the multi-dimensional challenges confronting global society. The source of this energy is people. Human energy is transformed into social power by the increasing reach, frequency and complexity of human relationships. Society is a complex living network of organized relationships between people. Its power issues from channelizing our collective energies in productive ways by means of organizing principles such as coordination, systems, specialization of function, hierarchy of authority, and integration. This immense social power remains largely underutilized. Social science needs to evolve a comprehensive, trans-disciplinary understanding of the roots of social power and the process by which it is generated, distributed and applied. This knowledge is the essential foundation for formulating effective social policies capable of eradicating forever persistent poverty, unemployment and social inequality. This article is based on a series of lectures delivered by the author in the WAAS-WUC course on “Toward a Trans-disciplinary Science of Society” at Dubrovnik on September 1-3, 2014. It traces the development of social power in different fields to show that human and social capital are inexhaustible in potential. The more we harness them, the more they grow. Unleashing, directing, channeling and converting human potential into social

  3. Leadership in Small Societies

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Younger

    2010-01-01

    Multi-agent simulation was used to study several styles of leadership in small societies. Populations of 50 and100 agents inhabited a bounded landscape containing a fixed number of food sources. Agents moved about the landscape in search of food, mated, produced offspring, and died either of hunger or at a predetermined maximum age. Leadership models focused on the collection and redistribution of food. The simulations suggest that individual households were more effective at meeting their ne...

  4. The new totalitarian society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlajki Emil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The new totalitarian society is a euphemized expression denoting the New World Order, which in itself denotes the American globalization. The underpinning of this mindset is rationality, which is characteristic of Western civilization. Christianity engendered rationality by introducing it through St. Thomas Aquinas, Aristotle, and especially formal logic. Since it is obvious that religion and logic cannot ultimately be harmonized, this combination has proven lethal in many cases throughout history. For instance, the Inquisition, which, contrary to what happened at scholastic universities, severely berated rational thinking in practice. Catholicism helped carry out genocide against the Jews, and Orthodoxy is in a certain manner tied in with Stalinism. The new totalitarian society is anchored in American Protestantism. On the whole, Christian rationalism is a sphere of science, techniques and technologies efficiently employed to promote the West to the status of a society of plenty and the conception of human rights, which turn into their opposite and irrational behavior of the worst kind. An example of such inhumanity is the attack against Yugoslavia/Serbia in 1999.

  5. Complications from international surgery tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Mark M; Alizadeh, Kaveh

    2011-08-01

    Medical tourism is an increasing trend, particularly in cosmetic surgery. Complications resulting from these procedures can be quite disruptive to the healthcare industry in the United States since patients often seek treatment and have no compensation recourse from insurance. Despite the increasing number of plastic surgery patients seeking procedures abroad, there have been little reported data concerning outcomes, follow-up, or complication rates. Through a survey of American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) members, the authors provide data on trends to help define the scope of the problem.

  6. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Oral and facial surgeons surgically treat the ... Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Oral and facial surgeons surgically treat the ...

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of ... and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of ...

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Soft Tissue Surgery Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Oral and facial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues ... and Soft Tissue Surgery Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Oral and facial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues ...

  10. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... Soon after surgery, severe pain will decrease, but you may have mild soreness for 3 to 6 months.

  11. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  12. Heart bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  13. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education ... implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education ...

  14. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corrective Jaw Surgery Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Obstructive Sleep Apnea TMJ and Facial Pain Treatment of Facial Injury Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures ...

  15. Orthognathic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard Larsen, Marie; Thygesen, Torben Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The literature shows that the indications for orthognathic surgery (OS) are often functional problems and unsatisfactory facial esthetics. This study investigated the esthetic outcomes and overall satisfaction following OS. Somatosensory change is a relatively common complication and its influence...... to sex, age, and somatosensory change. High satisfaction and improvement in facial esthetic after OS were seen. Young patients (16-25 years) and men indicated a higher degree of satisfaction than old (>25 years) patients and women. The use of social media seems to be an interesting platform...... on the level of satisfaction was studied. The social-networking web site Facebook was used to identify the study population. An online questionnaire was performed using the website SurveyMonkey. In all, 105 (9%) respondents from the Danish Facebook group about OS, called Kaebeoperation (jaw surgery), were...

  16. Telerobotic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokar Dasgupta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available With continued advances in medical robotic technology and global telecommunications, the concept of remote telerobotic surgery continues to develop. The ultimate goal of an experienced specialist operating remotely using a robot controlled by high-speed audiovisual connections has been shown to be feasible but is limited by local resources and a lack of evidence from randomised controlled trials. This article looks at the development of this exciting field and its impact on modern urology.

  17. Science, Society and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K. S.; Teich, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    Apart from the journals they produce, scientific societies play an important role in communicating scientific findings and norms to the broader society. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) includes among its goals to promote and defend the integrity of science and its use; provide a voice for science on societal issues; promote the responsible use of science in public policy; and increase public engagement with science and technology. AAAS websites and programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (http://www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/wwc/book.htm) and ScienceCareers.org (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org), provide tools for scientists to become more directly engaged in effectively communicating their findings and involved in the policy process. Education programs work to build the next generation of scientists and a science-literate public. To bridge the current communication gap between scientists, the public and policymakers, AAAS, like other scientific societies, maintains policy and outreach programs with limited budgets and staff. AAAS works to engage policymakers and provide scientific underpinning to key issues through congressional briefings, meetings, policy briefs, and media outreach. AAAS responds to challenges to accepted scientific findings and processes through op-eds, letters to government officials, resolutions, and Board statements. Some of these initiatives occur on a local level in partnership with local civic leaders, whose endorsement makes them more powerful. On a national scale, they assure that the voice of science is included in the debate. The changing media landscape presents opportunities and challenges for future AAAS endeavors.

  18. Popular Music and Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    or the Russkii Rok-Klub v Amerike (Russian Rock Club of America).   This special edition of Popular Music and Society aims to present research on contemporary popular music (broadly defined) in the former Soviet republics and their diasporas.  A central issue will be how the musical landscape has changed since...... the collapse of the Soviet Union: What present trends can be observed?  How has the Soviet context influenced the popular music of today?  How is music performed and consumed?  How has the interrelationship between cultural industry and performers developed?  How are nationalist sensibilities affecting popular...

  19. Disciplining Global Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Evans

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the puzzles of the current era is the divide between optimists and pessimists on the question of human rights. The prominence of human rights on the international political agenda sustains the optimist’s hopes for the future, while pessimists point to continued and widespread reports of civil, political, economic, social and cultural violations. This article looks at the tensions and apparent contradictions between these two approaches. Following a discussion on the construction of global human rights discourse(s, the article concludes that the pretensions of law act to mask the socioeconomic normative framework that acts to discipline global society.

  20. Disciplining Global Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Evans

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the puzzles of the current era is the divide between optimists and pessimists on the question of human rights. The prominence of human rights on the international political agenda sustains the optimist’s hopes for the future, while pessimists point to continued and widespread reports of civil, political, economic, social and cultural violations. This article looks at the tensions and apparent contradictions between these two approaches. Following a discussion on the construction of global human rights discourse(s, the article concludes that the pretensions of law act to mask the socioeconomic normative framework that acts to discipline global society.

  1. Membership in cooperative societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eba Gaminde Egia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we will analyze the practical application of one of the cooperative principles, «voluntary and free membership», referring to the entering of members in cooperative societies. We will first explain the meaning of this principle, and then bring up its normative regulation, with special emphasis on those aspects in which our autonomic laws differ, and ending with a brief reference to the economic aspect and the different ways to make contributions and their consequences.Received: 31 May 2017Accepted: 14 October 2017Published online: 22 December 2017

  2. The quality of aesthetic surgery training in plastic surgery residency: a survey among residents in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Arash; Goerke, Sebastian M; Bannasch, Holger; Arkudas, Andreas; Stark, G Björn

    2013-06-01

    The importance of providing high-quality exposure and training in aesthetic and reconstructive surgery during residency has come to the forefront of plastic surgery education. Adequate training in aesthetic surgery, however, has traditionally been challenging. The authors were interested in how these challenges were met abroad. A 17-item online survey was developed to assess the quality of training in aesthetic surgery in Germany. The survey had 3 distinct sections: demographic information, current state of aesthetic surgery training, and residents' opinions about the perceived quality of aesthetic surgery training. Only responses of senior residents were included in the final analysis. A total of 112 residents responded (30% response rate), of which 88 were senior plastic surgery residents. Ninety percent (n = 79) reported that a resident aesthetic surgery clinic was not part of their training experience. Eighty-eight percent (n = 77) reported that they did not have a dedicated aesthetic surgery rotation during their residency training. According to 69.3% (n = 61), no didactic training in aesthetic surgery was provided. Fifty-six percent (n = 49) of senior plastic surgery residents had performed only a maximum of 10 aesthetic surgery procedures at the time of the survey. Although only 43.2% of senior residents claimed to be interested in a predominantly aesthetic surgery practice, 90.9% (n = 80) felt that they require further training in aesthetic surgery (ie, fellowship). Deficiencies exist with respect to aesthetic surgery training among senior plastic surgery residents in Germany. Structural improvements in residency training with formal exposure and teaching in aesthetic surgery are warranted. The German Society of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons is actively addressing deficiencies identified with the goal of improving the quality of training.

  3. TRAUMA SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and track this epidemic. A number of socio-political changes have continued, and these will impact on the trauma patterns seen in the country. Gun control legislation has been enforced since the turn of the millennium, and there have been ongoing attempts to demilitarise society by removing assault weapons. The ongoing ...

  4. Communicating Science to Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Samuel; Muller, Jennifer; Leather, Kimberley; Morgan, William; O'Meara, Simon; Topping, David; Booth, Alastair; Llyod, Gary; Young, Dominique; Bannan, Thomas; Simpson, Emma; Percival, Carl; Allen, Grant; Clark, Elaine; Muller, Catherine; Graves, Rosemarie

    2014-05-01

    "Nothing in science has any value to society if it is not communicated." So goes the 1952 quote from Anne Roe, the noted twentieth century American psychologist and writer. She went on to say that "scientists are beginning to learn their social obligations", and now over 60 years later there is certainly evidence to support her assertions. As scientists, by communicating our research to the general public we not only better inform the tax payer where their money is being spent, but are also able to help put into context the topical environmental challenges and issues that society faces, as well as inspiring a whole new generation of future scientists. This process of communication is very much a two-way street; by presenting our work to people outside of our usual spheres of contemporaries, we expose ourselves to alternative thoughts and insights that can inspire us, as scientists, to take another look at our research from angles that we had never before considered. This work presents the results and experiences from a number of public engagement and outreach activities across the UK, in which geoscientists engaged and interacted with members of the general public. These include the design and implementation of Raspberry Pi based outreach activities for several hundred high school students; the process of running a successful podcast (http://thebarometer.podbean.com); hosting and participating in science events for thousands of members of the general public (e.g. http://www.manchestersciencefestival.com and http://sse.royalsociety.org/2013); and creating a citizen science activity that involved primary school children from across the UK. In communicating their research it is imperative that scientists interact with their audience in an effective and engaging manner, whether in an international conference, a classroom, or indeed down the pub. This work also presents a discussion of how these skills can be developed at an early stage in the careers of a research

  5. Predictors of readmission after outpatient plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioton, Lauren M; Buck, Donald W; Rambachan, Aksharananda; Ver Halen, Jon; Dumanian, Gregory A; Kim, John Y S

    2014-01-01

    Hospital readmissions have become a topic of focus for quality care measures and cost-reduction efforts. However, no comparative multi-institutional data on plastic surgery outpatient readmission rates currently exist. The authors endeavored to investigate hospital readmission rates and predictors of readmission following outpatient plastic surgery. The 2011 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was reviewed for all outpatient procedures. Unplanned readmission rates were calculated for all 10 tracked surgical specialties (i.e., general, thoracic, vascular, cardiac, orthopedics, otolaryngology, plastics, gynecology, urology, and neurosurgery). Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine predictors of readmission for plastic surgery. A total of 7005 outpatient plastic surgery procedures were isolated. Outpatient plastic surgery had a low associated readmission rate (1.94 percent) compared with other specialties. Seventy-five patients were readmitted with a complication. Multivariate regression analysis revealed obesity (body mass index ≥ 30), wound infection within 30 days of the index surgery, and American Society of Anesthesiologists class 3 or 4 physical status as significant predictors for unplanned readmission. Unplanned readmission after outpatient plastic surgery is infrequent and compares favorably to rates of readmission among other specialties. Obesity, wound infection within 30 days of the index operation, and American Society of Anesthesiologists class 3 or 4 physical status are independent predictors of readmission. As procedures continue to transition into outpatient settings and the drive to improve patient care persists, these findings will serve to optimize outpatient surgery use.

  6. Making Sense for Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heide, J. J.; Grus, M. M.; Nouwens, J. C. A. J.

    2017-09-01

    The Netherlands is a densely populated country. Cities in the metropolitan area (Randstad) will be growing at a fast pace in the coming decades1. Cities like Amsterdam and Rotterdam are being overrun by tourists. Climate change effects are noticed in cities (heavy rains for instance). Call for circular economy rises. Traffic increases. People are more self-reliant. Public space is shared by many functions. These challenges call for smart answers, more specific and directly than ever before. Sensor data is a cornerstone of these answers. In this paper we'll discuss the approaches of Dutch initiatives using sensor data as the new language to live a happy life in our cities. Those initiatives have been bundled in a knowledge platform called "Making sense for society" 1 https://www.cbs.nl/nl-nl/nieuws/2016/37/pbl-cbs-prognose-groei-steden-zet-door (in dutch)

  7. War and society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upeniece V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A discussion of effects of war on society is desirable as it can stimulate nations and their politicians to refrain in their international and non-international relations from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of the state. The prohibition of the use of force is a valid norm of customary international law and is fixed in the Charter of the United Nations. Any specific use of force can be lawful only if it is based on exceptions of this rule (action of self-defence under the Article 51 or action under specific authorization by the Security Council under Chapter VII. However the main issue is how to ensure that the other states respect this principle of non-use of force.

  8. Behaviorism and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapfl, Jon E

    2016-05-01

    A probable list of causes for the limited acceptance of behaviorism in our society is identified. This is followed by a summary review of the proposed solutions identified in other papers in this special issue of The Behavior Analyst, most of which relate to either better marketing of either the behavior analytic process or the results achieved as a consequence. One paper proposes a more broad conception of behavior analysis. This paper endorses the solutions identified in previous papers and then goes on to propose an even more broad conception of behavior analysis and makes the point that behavior analysis is unlikely to flourish unless behavior analysts understand a good deal more about the cultural and other contextual features of the environments in which they work.

  9. Libraries in Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Michael; Skouvig, Laura

    The purpose of the paper is to investigate the phenomenon of openness in relation to library development. The term openness is presented and related to library development from historical and theoretical perspectives. The paper elaborates on the differences over time on to how openness has been...... understood in a library setting. Historically, openness in form of the open shelves played a crucial role in developing the modern public library. The paper examines this openness-centred library policy as adopted by Danish public libraries in the beginning of the 20th century by applying the theories...... by Michel Foucault on discourse and power to the introduction of open shelves. Furthermore, the paper discusses current challenges facing the modern public library in coping with openness issues that follow from changes in society and advances in technology. These influences and developments are not least...

  10. Advanced information society (1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Gosei

    In considering the relationship of informationization and industrial structure, this paper analize some factors such as information revolution, informationization of industries and industrialization of information as background of informationization of Japanese society. Next, some information indicators such as, information coefficient of household which is a share of information related expenditure, information coefficient of industry which is a share of information related cost to total cost of production, and information transmission census developed by Ministry of Post and Telecommunication are introduced. Then new information indicator by Economic Planning Agency, that is, electronic info-communication indicator is showed. In this study, the information activities are defined to produce message or to supply services on process, stores or sale of message using electronic information equipment. International comparisons of information labor force are also presented.

  11. Reintegrating ghettos into society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mechlenborg, Mette

    2018-01-01

    international regeneration programmes in order to close the socio-economic gap between housing areas and residents. Based on the recent architectural evaluation of social housing renewals for the Danish National Building Foundation (Bech-Danielsen & Mechlenborg 2017) and with a Lefebvrean perspective......In 2010, the Danish government launched a ghetto strategy with 32 initiatives in order to “dissolve parallel communities” in Danish housing areas and to (re)integrate them into Danish society (Statsministeret, 2010). Despite its negative offspring in the Muhammed riots (Freiesleben 2016, Houlind...... 2016), the strategy arguably presented a strategy for revalorization of space and, thereby, a new strategic approach combining social and physical initiatives in order to permanently transform deprived housing areas in a Danish contexts. With the ghetto strategy, Denmark is aligned with similar...

  12. Nuclear Research and Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggermont, G

    2000-07-01

    In 1998, SCK-CEN took the initiative to include social sciences and humanities into its research programme. Within this context, four projects were defined, respectively on sustainability and nuclear development; transgenerational ethics related to the disposal of long-lived radioactive waste; legal aspects and liability; emergency communication and risk perception. Two reflection groups were established, on expert culture and ethical choices respectively, in order to deepen insight while creating exchange of disciplinary approaches of the committed SCK-CEN researchers and social scientists. Within the context of SCK-CEN's social sciences and humanities programme, collaborations with various universities were initiated, teams consisting of young doctorate and post-doctorate researchers and university promotors with experience in interaction processes of technology with society were established and steering committees with actors and external experts were set up for each project. The objectives and main achievements in the four projects are summarised.

  13. Science, Technology and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgstock, Martin; Burch, David; Forge, John; Laurent, John; Lowe, Ian

    1998-03-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the human, social and economic aspects of science and technology. It examines a broad range of issues from a variety of perspectives, using examples and experiences from around the world. The authors present complex issues, including the responsibilities of scientists, ethical dilemmas and controversies, the Industrial Revolution, economic issues, public policy, and science and technology in developing countries. The book ends with a thoughtful and provocative look toward the future. It features extensive guides to further reading, as well as a useful section on information searching skills. This book will provoke, engage, inform and stimulate thoughtful discussion about culture, society and science. Broad and interdisciplinary, it will be of considerable value to both students and teachers.

  14. Afghanistan, state and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kværnø, Ole

    of both governmental and nongovernmental institutions from more than 20 states. Its theme was to discuss the problems that Afghanistan faces in the wake of the U.S.-led attack on al Qaeda training camps and the Taliban government; examine the challenges confronting the NATO International Security......In June 2007, the RAND Corporation and the Royal Danish Defence College hosted a conference titled “Afghanistan: State and Society, Great Power Politics, and the Way Ahead”. The two-day event, held in Copenhagen, was attended by more than 100 politicians, scholars, academics, and representative...... Assistance Force as it coordinates nation-building activities in Afghanistan; and suggest ways to address these issues. This volume compiles 11 of the papers presented at the conference; themes include the importance of historical precedents, coordination among relevant parties, and the development of an all...

  15. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database 2016 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Shahian, David M; Prager, Richard L; Edwards, Fred H; McDonald, Donna; Han, Jane M; D'Agostino, Richard S; Jacobs, Marshall L; Kozower, Benjamin D; Badhwar, Vinay; Thourani, Vinod H; Gaissert, Henning A; Fernandez, Felix G; Wright, Cameron D; Paone, Gaetano; Cleveland, Joseph C; Brennan, J Matthew; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Brothers, Leo; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Habib, Robert H; O'Brien, Sean M; Peterson, Eric D; Grover, Frederick L; Patterson, G Alexander; Bavaria, Joseph E

    2016-12-01

    The art and science of outcomes analysis, quality improvement, and patient safety continue to evolve, and cardiothoracic surgery leads many of these advances. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) National Database is one of the principal reasons for this leadership role, as it provides a platform for the generation of knowledge in all of these domains. Understanding these topics is a professional responsibility of all cardiothoracic surgeons. Therefore, beginning in January 2016, The Annals of Thoracic Surgery began publishing a monthly series of scholarly articles on outcomes analysis, quality improvement, and patient safety. This article provides a summary of the status of the STS National Database as of October 2016 and summarizes the articles about the STS National Database that appeared in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery 2016 series, "Outcomes Analysis, Quality Improvement, and Patient Safety." Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fragmented international volunteerism: need for a global pediatric surgery network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Marilyn W

    2010-02-01

    Pediatric general surgeons volunteering internationally often work independently, some without prior assessment of the needs of those they wish to assist. Consequently, care may be inefficient, duplicated, or misdirected. A study was performed to assess whether a network for pediatric surgery volunteer work exists. A search of the Internet was performed to determine whether a pediatric surgery network exists. Worldwide pediatric surgery societies were identified and grouped by country according to income. Web sites for medical volunteer organizations were examined for links to a network of pediatric surgery volunteer work. A search of the Internet revealed no pediatric surgery volunteer network. Ninety-seven pediatric surgery societies were identified. Fifty-one of the organizations were identified as residing in low- and middle-income countries. Searching 50 Web sites for these societies revealed no existing pediatric surgery network. Of 45 Web sites for volunteer medical work, 1 surgery networking Web site was identified. Only 4 pediatric general surgery international volunteer opportunities were cited on that Web site. This study demonstrated that no pediatric surgery volunteer network exists. By identifying pediatric surgery organizations in low- and middle-income countries, it is speculated that one might link the surgeons in these regions with those wishing to volunteer their services. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ancient Hindu Society and Eliot's Ideal Christian Society

    OpenAIRE

    Bhela, Anita

    2012-01-01

    In her article "Ancient Hindu Society and Eliot's Ideal Christian Society" Anita Bhela examines the influence of Hindu thought and Hindu philosophy on T.S. Eliot's critical writings. In The Idea of a Christian Society Eliot gives a hypothetical account of an ideal society that would contribute towards the well-being of all its members, while in Notes towards the Definition of Culture he enumerates the essential conditions needed for the growth and survival of culture. Bhela argues that religi...

  18. [An opinion for a gender-equal society of surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Miki

    2014-09-01

    The number of female surgeon is continuously increasing, while the total number of surgeon is decreasing. The author has faced many difficulties while working as a pediatric surgeon and a mother of three children. Those difficulties were caused by the traditional sexual role in our society and by a fixed idea that the priority for a surgeon should be his or her profession. Here, the author addressed some suggestions which could lead the society of surgeons to a gender-equal one, and could make surgery a great appeal to female surgeons and to the young generations which consider private life as important as their professions as well. Suggestions include a change the relationship between a female surgeon and her partner, a supplement of surgeons so that hospitals could change the traditional system of surgery. The author proposed to increase female managers intentionally, so that the sense of sexual difference would be diminished and proper evolution of the society would be achieved.

  19. Minimally Invasive Heart Valve Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhout, Ismail; Morgant, Marie-Catherine; Bouchard, Denis

    2017-09-01

    Minimally invasive valve surgery represents a recent and significant advance in modern heart surgery. Indeed, many less invasive approaches for both the aortic and mitral valves have been developed in the past 2 decades. These procedures were hypothesized to result in less operative trauma, which might translate into better patient outcomes. However, this clinical benefit remains controversial in the literature. The aim of this review is to discuss the evidence surrounding minimally invasive heart valve surgery in the current era. A systematic search of the literature from 2006-2016 was performed looking for articles reporting early or late outcomes after minimally invasive valve surgery. Less invasive valve surgery is safe and provides long-term surgical outcomes similar to those of standard sternotomy. In addition, these approaches result in a reduction in overall hospital length of stay and may mitigate the risk of early morbidity-mainly postoperative bleeding, transfusions, and ventilation duration. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. What Is Heart Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart surgery that is becoming more common is robotic-assisted surgery. For this surgery, a surgeon uses a computer ... surgeon always is in total control of the robotic arms; they don't move on their own. Who Needs Heart Surgery? Heart surgery is used to treat many heart ...

  1. Cosmetic surgery reality TV viewership: relations with cosmetic surgery attitudes, body image, and disordered eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Steffanie; Thompson, J Kevin; Sarwer, David B; Cash, Thomas F

    2009-01-01

    According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (2007), the number of cosmetic procedures has increased to over 10 million in 2006, representing a 48% increase from 2000. This increase in cosmetic surgery prevalence is paralleled by a surge in reality cosmetic surgery television programming. The current study examined the relationships among cosmetic surgery reality TV viewership, cosmetic surgery attitudes, body image, and disordered eating in a sample of 2057 college women. Viewership of reality cosmetic surgery shows was significantly related to more favorable cosmetic surgery attitudes, perceived pressure to have cosmetic surgery, past attainment of a cosmetic procedure, a decreased fear of surgery, as well as overall body dissatisfaction, media internalization, and disordered eating. Although the current study is correlational, it provides a framework for future hypothesis testing and elucidates the link between contemporary media influences, body dissatisfaction, disordered eating, and cosmetic surgery attitudes. Additionally, the findings indicate that surgeons may want to assess the relevance of cosmetic surgery reality TV viewership for patients' attitudes towards and expectations about cosmetic surgery.

  2. Indicators of Information Society Measurement :

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Elwy

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The indicator of information society describe the infrastructure of information and communication technology ; as well as it’s use and it’s production in different estate of society. The importance economic and social of tic is crescent in modern society. and the presentation of tendency inform above the situation of information society . in this article we want to describe the indicator of tic in Algeria according to librarian’s vision in Mentouri university

  3. Civil Society in Fragile Contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, M. van; Verkoren, W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Policies to promote peace in conflict-torn societies increasingly include “civil society (CS) building” as an aim; however, in such settings, it is often difficult – if not impossible – to distinguish between state and society, or between “civil” and “uncivil”. Local legitimacy (representativeness

  4. Contemporary outcomes in reoperative mitral valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehaffey, Hunter J; Hawkins, Robert B; Schubert, Sarah; Fonner, Clifford; Yarboro, Leora T; Quader, Mohammed; Speir, Alan; Rich, Jeff; Kron, Irving L; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2017-10-05

    Data suggest that redo mitral valve surgery is being performed in increasing numbers, possibly with superior results according to single-centre studies. The purpose of this study is to describe outcomes of redo mitral valve surgery and identify risk-adjusted predictors of poor outcomes. All (11 973) open mitral valve cases were evaluated (2002-2016) from a regional Society of Thoracic Surgery (STS) database. Patients were stratified by primary versus redo mitral valve surgery. Mixed effects logistic regression models including hospital as a random effect were used to identify risk factors for patients undergoing redo mitral valve surgery. Of all mitral valve cases, 1096 (9.7%) had a previous mitral operation. Redo patients had higher rates of valve replacement and preoperative comorbidities resulting in more complications, operative mortalities (11.1%vs6.5%, pmitral valve surgery increased 10% per year and the observed-to-expected ratios (O/E) for operative mortality in redo mitral surgery improved from 1.44 early in the study period to 0.72 in the most recent era. Redo mitral valve surgery accounts for approximately 10% of mitral valve operations and is associated with increased risk and resource utilisation. However, as the volume of redo mitral surgery increases, outcomes have dramatically improved and are now better than predicted. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Contraception and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diczfalusy, E

    2002-12-01

    When an idea meets the exigencies of an epoch, it becomes stronger than any form of political power and it becomes the common property of humankind. Such an idea was the development of contraceptives. In retrospect, the invention of contraceptives was as fundamental for the evolution of humankind as the invention of the wheel; today more than 550 million couples are using contraceptive methods. The large-scale use of contraceptives triggered the most powerful social revolutions of a century in reproductive health and gender equity, and substantially contributed to an unparalleled demographic change, characterized by a rapid aging of populations. One of the important reasons for population aging is a significant decline in fertility rates, resulting in gradually changing population structures with fewer and fewer children and more and more elderly persons. The causes underlying these demographic changes are complex and manifold; they reflect major societal changes of historical dimensions. Many of our institutions cater increasingly for a population structure that no longer exists. There is therefore an increasing need for institutional reforms in social security, health care, housing and education. In addition, several surveys conducted in the developed world have indicated an erosion of confidence in our basic institutions, e.g. courts and justice, the Church and Parliament. Whereas modem sociologists are concerned about an increase in crime, decrease in trust and depleted social capital, one can also observe an accelerated perception of our global destiny and a re-awakening of the moral impulse with a strong demand for increased transparency in public affairs. Also, various global communities have assumed a growing importance. It can be predicted that international professional communities, such as the European Society of Contraception, will play an increasingly important future role in influencing policies in general and health policies in particular. because of

  6. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on ... without straining Chronic mouth breathing Sleep apnea (breathing problems when sleeping, including snoring) Your dentist, orthodontist and ...

  7. Laser surgery - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  8. Oophorectomy (Ovary Removal Surgery)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also be robotically assisted in certain cases. During robotic surgery, the surgeon watches a 3-D monitor and ... weeks after surgery. Those who undergo laparoscopic or robotic surgery may return to full activity sooner — as early ...

  9. Ureteral reimplantation surgery - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 or 4 small cuts in the belly. Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery, except that the ... Elsevier Saunders; 2011:560. Richstone L, Scherr DS. Robotic and laparoscopic surgery. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, Partin AW, Peters ...

  10. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Obstructive Sleep Apnea TMJ and Facial Pain Treatment of Facial Injury Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures ...

  11. Surgery for pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007649.htm Surgery for pancreatic cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... surgeries are used in the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer. Whipple procedure: This is the most common surgery ...

  12. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Access to Care Toolkit EHB Access Toolkit Bariatric Surgery Procedures Bariatric surgical procedures cause weight loss by ... minimally invasive techniques (laparoscopic surgery). The most common bariatric surgery procedures are gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, adjustable gastric ...

  13. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Soft Tissue Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Obstructive Sleep Apnea TMJ and Facial Pain Treatment of Facial Injury Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Administration of Anesthesia Administration of Anesthesia Oral ...

  14. LASIK - Laser Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Glaucoma Education Center Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic ... Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  15. What Is Refractive Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Glaucoma Education Center Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic ... Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  16. Gastric bypass surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart disease Gastric bypass surgery Laparoscopic gastric banding Obesity Obstructive sleep apnea - adults Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions Getting out of bed after surgery Weight-loss surgery - after - what to ask your doctor Weight- ...

  17. Gastric bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Y gastric bypass; Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y; Weight-loss surgery - gastric bypass; Obesity surgery - gastric bypass Patient Instructions Bathroom safety - adults Gastric bypass surgery - discharge Laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge ...

  18. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Administration of Anesthesia Administration ... Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries ...

  19. Paperless or vanishing society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner Luke, Joy

    2002-06-01

    In the 1940s color photography became available and within a few years, extremely popular. As people switched from black and white photographs made with the old metallic silver process to the new color films, pictures taken to record their lives and families began a slow disappearing act. The various color processes, coupled with the substrates they were printed on, affected their longevity, but many color photographs taken from the late 1950s through the 1970s, and even into the 1980s, faded not only when exposed to the light, but also when stored in the dark. Henry Wilhelm's excellent book 'The Permanence and Care of Color Photographs' documents this history in detail. Today we are making another transition in the storage of pictures and information. There are questions about the longevity of different types of digital storage, and also of the images printed by various types of inkjet printers, or by laser printers using colored toners. Very expensive and very beautiful works of art produced on Iris printers are appearing in art exhibitions. Some of these are referred to as Giclee prints and are offered on excellent papers. Artists are told the prints will last a lifetime; and if by change they don't it is only necessary to make another print. Henry Wilhelm has begun to test and rate these images for lightfastness; however, his test method was developed for examining longevity in colored photographs. It is of interest to find out how these prints will hold up in the tests required for fine art materials. Thus far companies producing digital inks and printers have not invested the time and money necessary to develop an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard method for evaluating the lightfastness of digital prints. However, it is possible to use ASTM D 5383, Standard Practice for Visual Determination of the Lightfastness of Art Materials by Art Technologists, to pinpoint colors that will fade in a short time, even though the test is not as

  20. CERN & Society launches donation portal

    CERN Multimedia

    Cian O'Luanaigh

    2014-01-01

    The CERN & Society programme brings together projects in the areas of education and outreach, innovation and knowledge exchange, and culture and arts, that spread the CERN spirit of scientific curiosity for the inspiration and benefit of society. Today, CERN & Society is launching its "giving" website – a portal to allow donors to contribute to various projects and forge new relationships with CERN.   "The CERN & Society initiative in its embryonic form began almost three years ago, with the feeling that the laboratory could play a bigger role for the benefit of society," says Matteo Castoldi, Head of the CERN Development Office, who, with his team, is seeking supporters and ambassadors for the CERN & Society initiative. "The concept is not completely new – in some sense it is embedded in CERN’s DNA, as the laboratory helps society by creating knowledge and new technologies – but we would like to d...

  1. Less extensive surgery compared to extensive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauszus, Finn F; Petersen, Astrid C; Neumann, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the outcome of adult granulosa cell tumor (AGCT) with respect to initial clinical findings, methods of surgery, and perioperative treatment. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective follow-up study. Setting: All hospitals in Jutland. Sample: 163 women diagnosed with AGCT. Methods: Follo...... with similar survival compared to extensive surgery, but with advancing age conservative surgery increased the risk of relapse and death....

  2. Heart bypass surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass - discharge; OPCAB - discharge; Beating heart surgery - discharge; Bypass surgery - heart - discharge; CABG - discharge; Coronary artery bypass graft - discharge; Coronary artery ...

  3. Perioperative care for the older outpatient undergoing ambulatory surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    White, Paul F; White, Lisa M; Monk, Terri; Jakobsson, Jan; Raeder, Johan; Mulroy, Michael F; Bertini, Laura; Torri, Giorgio; Solca, Maurizio; Pittoni, Giovanni; Bettelli, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    As the number of ambulatory surgery procedures continues to grow in an aging global society, the implementation of evidence-based perioperative care programs for the elderly will assume increased importance...

  4. Violence in society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Pedro de Andrade Dores

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent interest in the sociology of violence has arisen at the same time that western societies are being urged to consider the profound social crisis provoked by global financial turmoil. Social changes demand the evo- lution of sociological practices. The analysis herein proposed, based on the studies of M. Wieviorka, La Violence (2005, and of R. Collins, Violence: A Micro-sociological Theory (2008, concludes that violence is subject to sociological treatments cen- tered on the aggressors, on the struggles for power and on male gender. There is a lack of connection between prac- tical proposals for violence prevention and the sociol- ogy of violence. It is accepted that violence as a subject of study has the potential, as well as the theoretical and social centrality, to promote the debate necessary to bring social theory up to date. This process is more likely to oc- cur in periods of social transformation, when sociology is open to considering subjects that are still taboo in its study of violence, such as the female gender and the state. The rise of the sociology of violence confronts us with a dilemma. We can either collaborate with the construc- tion of a sub discipline that reproduces the limitations and taboos of current social theory, or we can use the fact that violence has become a “hot topic” as an opportunity to open sociology to themes that are taboo in social the- ory (such as the vital and harmonious character of the biological aspects of social mechanisms or the normative aspects of social settings. ResumenEl interés reciente en la sociología de la violencia ha surgido al mismo tiempo que las sociedades occidenta- les están requiriendo considerar la profunda crisis social provocada por la agitación financiera global. Los cambios sociales demandan la evolución de las prácticas socioló- gicas. El análisis aquí expuesto, basado en los estudios de M. Wieviorka, La Violence (2005, and of R. Collins

  5. Unmet need for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Kate N; Finucane, Francis M; le Roux, Carel W; Fitzgerald, Anthony P; Kearney, Patricia M

    2017-06-01

    With the rising prevalence of severe obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), bariatric surgery offers a clinical and cost-effective treatment for carefully selected patients. Despite this, the provision of surgical services varies significantly between countries. To inform health service planning by estimating the number of people who would potentially benefit from bariatric surgery. Nationally representative sample of community-dwelling older adults. We applied two separate evidence-based criteria sets for eligibility for bariatric surgery. For the first set of criteria, we considered those with body mass index≥40 kg/m2 or≥35 kg/m2 and one or more of the following: T2D, hypertension, previous myocardial infarction, or sleep apnea. For the second set of criteria, we considered patients with T2D and body mass index≥35 kg/m2, with one or more of the following: previous myocardial infarction, elevated urine albumin-creatinine ratio, retinopathy, neuropathy, or peripheral vascular disease. Prevalence estimates were applied to census figures for 2011, estimating absolute numbers meeting the criteria. Among adults aged≥50 years, 7.97% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.23, 8.78), representing 92,573 people (95% CI: 83,978, 101,981), met criteria one and 0.97% (95% CI: 0.73, 1.28), representing 11,231 people (95% CI: 8471, 14,890), met criteria two. With fewer than 1/100,000 population publicly funded surgeries taking place annually, current service provision meets much less than 0.1% of the need. While many adults who fulfill the eligibility criteria for bariatric surgery may not want or require it, the current level of need for bariatric surgical services is not being met. A strategy to develop and expand the provision of bariatric care is urgently needed. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Video-assisted thoracic surgery, lung transplantation and mediastinitis: major issues in thoracic surgery in 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borro, José M; Moreno, Ramón; Gómez, Ana; Duque, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the major issues in thoracic surgery relating to the advances made in our specialty in 2010. To do this, the 43(rd) Congress of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery held in La Coruña and the articles published in the Society's journal, Archivos de Bronconeumología, were reviewed. The main areas of interest were related to the development of video-assisted thoracic surgery, lung transplantation and descending mediastinitis. The new tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification (7(th) edition), presented last year, was still a topical issue this year. The First Forum of Thoracic Surgeons and the Update in Thoracic Surgery together with the Nurses' Area have constituted an excellent teaching program. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neumología y Cirugía Torácica. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Science communication at scientific societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braha, Jeanne

    2017-10-01

    Scientific societies can play a key role in bridging the research and practice of scientists' engagement of public audiences. Societies are beginning to support translation of science communication research, connections between scientists and audiences, and the creation of opportunities for scientists to engage publics without extensive customization. This article suggests roles, strategies, and mechanisms for scientific societies to promote and enhance their member's engagement of public audiences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Computer assisted radiology and surgery. CARS 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-06-15

    The conference proceedings include contributions to the following topics: (1) CARS Clinical Day: minimally invasive spiral surgery, interventional radiology; (2) CARS - computer assisted radiology and surgery: ophthalmology, stimulation methods, new approaches to diagnosis and therapy; (3) Computer assisted radiology 24th International congress and exhibition: computer tomography and magnetic resonance, digital angiographic imaging, digital radiography, ultrasound, computer assisted radiation therapy, medical workstations, image processing and display; (4) 14th Annual conference of the International Society for computer aided surgery; ENT-CMF head and neck surgery computer-assisted neurosurgery, cardiovascular surgery, image guided liver surgery, abdominal and laparoscopic surgery, computer-assisted orthopedic surgery, image processing and visualization, surgical robotics and instrumentation, surgical modeling, simulation and education; (5) 28th International EuroPACS meeting: image distribution and integration strategies, planning and evaluation, telemedicine and standards, workflow and data flow in radiology; (6) 11th CARS/SPIE/EuroPACS joint workshop on surgical PACS and the digital operating, management and assessment of OR systems and integration; (7) 12th International workshop on computer-aided diagnosis: special session on breast CAD, special session on thoracic CAD, special session on abdominal brain, lumbar spine CAD; (8) 16th computed Maxillofacial imaging congress: computed maxillofacial imaging in dental implantology, orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics; approaches to 3D maxillofacial imaging; surgical navigation; (9) 2nd EuroNOTES/CARS workshop on NOTES: an interdisciplinary challenge; (10) 2nd EPMA/CARS workshop on personalized medicine and ICT.; (11)poster sessions.

  9. Digital Denmark: From Information Society to Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henten, Anders; Falch, Morten

    2000-01-01

    for a welfare society. However, globalisation and the spreading use of new information and communication technologies and services challenge this position. This article examines Denmark's performance in implementing its IS 2000 plans, the background to the Digital Denmark report, and its implications......The Danish Government recently issued a new policy report, Digital Denmark, on the "conversion to a network society", as a successor to its Information Society 2000 report (1994). This is part of a new round of information society policy vision statements that are, or will be forthcoming from...... national governments everywhere. Denmark provides an interesting case study because it ranks high in the benchmark indicators of information network society developments. This position has been obtained largely by public sector initiatives and without erosion of the highly reputed Scandinavian model...

  10. Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Instruction to authors The Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery is the official Journal of the Nigerian Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons and also of the Nigerian Burn Society. Its object is to publish original articles about developments in all areas related to plastic and ...

  11. Computational Modeling in Liver Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Christ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The need for extended liver resection is increasing due to the growing incidence of liver tumors in aging societies. Individualized surgical planning is the key for identifying the optimal resection strategy and to minimize the risk of postoperative liver failure and tumor recurrence. Current computational tools provide virtual planning of liver resection by taking into account the spatial relationship between the tumor and the hepatic vascular trees, as well as the size of the future liver remnant. However, size and function of the liver are not necessarily equivalent. Hence, determining the future liver volume might misestimate the future liver function, especially in cases of hepatic comorbidities such as hepatic steatosis. A systems medicine approach could be applied, including biological, medical, and surgical aspects, by integrating all available anatomical and functional information of the individual patient. Such an approach holds promise for better prediction of postoperative liver function and hence improved risk assessment. This review provides an overview of mathematical models related to the liver and its function and explores their potential relevance for computational liver surgery. We first summarize key facts of hepatic anatomy, physiology, and pathology relevant for hepatic surgery, followed by a description of the computational tools currently used in liver surgical planning. Then we present selected state-of-the-art computational liver models potentially useful to support liver surgery. Finally, we discuss the main challenges that will need to be addressed when developing advanced computational planning tools in the context of liver surgery.

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ... more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ...

  13. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We Are Find a Surgeon News Videos Contact Administration of Anesthesia Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Facial ...

  14. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ...

  15. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. ...

  16. ANUARIO 2012: CIRUGÍA CARDÍACA EN ADULTOS. LAS REVISTAS DE LAS SOCIEDADES NACIONALES PRESENTAN UNA SELECCIÓN DE LAS INVESTIGACIONES QUE HAN IMPULSADO AVANCES RECIENTES EN CARDIOLOGÍA CLÍNICA / Almanac 2012: Adult cardiac surgery. The National Society Journals present selected research that has driven recent advances in Clinical Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Bridgewater

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Esta revisión abarca las más importantes publicaciones sobre cirugía cardíaca en adultos en los últimos años, incluida la base de la evidencia actual para la revascularización quirúrgica y el uso de la cirugía sin circulación extracorpórea, las arterias mamarias internas bilaterales y la extracción endoscópica de la vena. Se describen los cambios en la cirugía convencional de la válvula aórtica junto a los resultados de los ensayos clínicos y los registros para la implantación de válvula aórtica transcatéter, así como la introducción de métodos novedosos y menos cruentos de la cirugía convencional de reemplazo valvular aórtico. Se considera también la cirugía para la valvulopatía mitral, con énfasis en la cirugía para la insuficiencia mitral degenerativa asintomática. / Abstract This review covers the important publications in adult cardiac surgery in the last few years, including the current evidence base for surgical revascularisation and the use of off-pump surgery, bilateral internal mammary arteries and endoscopic vein harvesting. The changes in conventional aortic valve surgery are described alongside the outcomes of clinical trials and registries for transcatheter aortic valve implantation, and the introduction of less invasive and novel approaches of conventional aortic valve replacement surgery. Surgery for mitral valve disease is also considered, with particular reference to surgery for asymptomatic degenerative mitral regurgitation.

  17. No more broken hearts: weight loss after bariatric surgery returns patients' postoperative risk to baseline following coronary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baimas-George, Maria; Hennings, Dietric L; Al-Qurayshi, Zaid; Emad Kandil; DuCoin, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    The obesity epidemic is associated with a rise in coronary surgeries because obesity is a risk factor for coronary artery disease. Bariatric surgery is linked to improvement in cardiovascular co-morbidities and left ventricular function. No studies have investigated survival advantage in postoperative bariatric patients after coronary surgery. To determine if there is a benefit after coronary surgery in patients who have previously undergone bariatric surgery. National Inpatient Sample. We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of the National Inpatient Sample database from 2003 to 2010. We selected bariatric surgical patients who later underwent coronary surgery (n = 257). A comparison of postoperative complications and mortality after coronary surgery were compared with controls (n = 1442) using χ 2 tests, linear regression analysis, and multivariate logistical regression models. A subset population was identified as having undergone coronary surgery (n = 1699); of this population, 257 patients had previously undergone bariatric surgery. They were compared with 1442 controls. The majority was male (67.2%), white (82.6%), and treated in an urban environment (96.8%). Patients with bariatric surgery assumed the risk of postoperative complications after coronary surgery that was associated with their new body mass index (BMI) (BMI999.9, 95% CI .18 to>999.9, P = .07). Length of stay was significantly longer in postbariatric patients (BMIbariatric patients have a return to baseline risk of morbidity and mortality after coronary surgery. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An Assessment of the Academic Impact of Shock Society Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Daniel P; Koniaris, Leonidas G; Valsangkar, Nakul P; Lad, Neha; Bell, Teresa M; Wojcik, Brandon; Zimmers, Teresa A

    2017-11-03

    Professional society membership enhances career development and productivity by offering opportunities for networking and learning about recent advances in the field. The quality and contribution of such societies can be measured in part through the academic productivity, career status, and funding success rates of their members. Here, using Scopus, NIH RePORTER and departmental websites, we compare characteristics of the Shock Society membership to those of the top 55 NIH-funded American university and hospital-based departments of surgery. Shock Society members' mean number of publications, citations and H-indices were all significantly higher than those of non-members in surgery departments (p members also have received funding from the NIH (42.5% vs. 18.5%, p members were more likely to have NIH funding compared to non-members (OR 1.46, 95%CI 1.12-1.916). Trauma surgeons belonging to the Shock Society had a higher number of publications and greater NIH funding than those who did not (130.4 vs. 42.7, p members.

  19. [Living in a Temporary Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Warren G.

    Society is in the process of accelerated change and the institutionalization of this change through research and technology. Other factors affecting American society are an increase in affluence, an elevation of the educational level of the population, and a growing interdependence of institutions. The fact that this country is currently going…

  20. The governance of cooperative societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaiza Juanes Sobradillo

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to expose the appropriate legislation for cooperative societies to which Article 129 of the Spanish Constitution refers, deepen the analysis of the organs of management and control based on the Spanish and Basque Laws on Cooperatives and the Statute for the European Cooperative Societies.

  1. Public Libraries in postindustrial societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbeshausen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The article’s focus is on how public libraries are affected by structural changes in the wake of the transition to the knowledge society. Their attempts to match the knowledge society are illustrated by processes of sensemaking and sensegiving made in public libraries in Canada, the UK and Denmark....

  2. What is the Knowledge Society?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Dinu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This study sets out to establish conceptual delimitations, more concordant to the theoretical acquisitions with regard to the knowledge society. The author considers it opportune to situate in the center of the definition of the concept of knowledge society the problem of prevalence in the typology of resources. Thus, the knowledge society appears as a form of organization in which scientific knowledge predominates, be that informatics as well. The concordances of essence are discovered through the discerning of the functional relationship knowledge society – global society. In the spectrum of meanings specific to this highway of post-postmodernist configuration of the world, the priorities of the project of the second modernity – the paradigmatic matrix of globalization – are approached. In fact, the study argues in favor of refocusing globalization on the humane, on its distinctive values which substantiate and lend sense to the evolutions of the world. Postreferentiality is the rational expression of humanity coming back to itself.

  3. The evolving application of single-port robotic surgery in general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadan, Motaz; Curet, Myriam J; Wren, Sherry M

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the field of minimally invasive surgery have grown since the original advent of conventional multiport laparoscopic surgery. The recent development of single incision laparoscopic surgery remains a relatively novel technique, and has had mixed reviews as to whether it has been associated with lower pain scores, shorter hospital stays, and higher satisfaction levels among patients undergoing procedures through cosmetically-appeasing single incisions. However, due to technical difficulties that arise from the clustering of laparoscopic instruments through a confined working space, such as loss of instrument triangulation, poor surgical exposure, and instrument clashing, uptake by surgeons without a specific interest and expertise in cutting-edge minimally invasive approaches has been limited. The parallel use of robotic surgery with single-port platforms, however, appears to counteract technical issues associated with single incision laparoscopic surgery through significant ergonomic improvements, including enhanced instrument triangulation, organ retraction, and camera localization within the surgical field. By combining the use of the robot with the single incision platform, the recognized challenges of single incision laparoscopic surgery are simplified, while maintaining potential advantages of the single-incision minimally invasive approach. This review provides a comprehensive report of the evolving application single-port robotic surgery in the field of general surgery today. © 2013 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  4. March 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The March 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There 11 attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, thoracic surgery and radiology communities. There was a discussion of supporting the Tobacco 21 bill which had been introduced into the Arizona State Legislature. The bill was assigned to the House Commerce Committee but was not scheduled for a hearing by the Chair-Representative, Jeff Wininger from Chandler. It seems likely that the bill will be reintroduced in the future and the Arizona Thoracic Society will support the bill in the future. Three cases were presented: 1. Dr. Bridgett Ronan presented a 57-year-old man with cough and shortness of breath. His physical examination and spirometry were unremarkable. A thoracic CT scan showed large calcified and noncalcified pleural plaques and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. …

  5. Cosmetic surgery on children - professional and legal obligations in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitipornchai, Leon; Then, Shih-Ning

    2011-07-01

    Public awareness and concern about cosmetic surgery on children is increasing. Nationally and internationally questions have been raised by the media and government bodies about the appropriateness of children undergoing cosmetic surgery. Considering the rates of cosmetic surgery in comparable Western societies, it seems likely that the number of physicians in Australia who will deal with a request for cosmetic surgery for a child will continue to increase. This is a sensitive issue and it is essential that physicians understand the professional and legal obligations that arise when cosmetic surgery is proposed for a child. This article reviews the current professional and legal obligations that physicians have to competent and incompetent children for whom cosmetic surgery has been requested. A case study is used to highlight the factors that Australian primary care physicians must consider before referring and conducting cosmetic surgery on children.

  6. Earthquake science in resilient societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, T.; Clark, M. K.; Zekkos, D.; Athanasopoulos-Zekkos, A.; Willis, M.; Medwedeff, William; Knoper, Logan; Townsend, Kirk; Jin, Jonson

    2017-04-01

    Earthquake science is critical in reducing vulnerability to a broad range of seismic hazards. Evidence-based studies drawing from several branches of the Earth sciences and engineering can effectively mitigate losses experienced in earthquakes. Societies that invest in this research have lower fatality rates in earthquakes and can recover more rapidly. This commentary explores the scientific pathways through which earthquake-resilient societies are developed. We highlight recent case studies of evidence-based decision making and how modern research is improving the way societies respond to earthquakes.

  7. New York Zoological Society Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Steven P.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the institutional setting, history, and services of the New York Zoological Society Library. Topics covered include clientele; library collections and special collections; library staffing and organizational structure; computer applications; and relationships with other libraries. (11 references) (CLB)

  8. The Ambivalences of Civil Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Kaare Nielsen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the conceptual heterogeneity in the field of ‘civil society’ in the light of a distinction between positions that reflect civil society as a democratic-emancipatory category and positions that consider civil society from the perspective of the state: as an instrumental resource for the technocratic planning of the competitive nation state.The article discusses the implications and perspectives in these two different strategic scenarios for conceptualizing civil society. The argument is made that civil society in relation to democratic citizenship should basically rather be understood as a concept for specific, communicative principles for institutionalizing societal relations and organizing public experience than as an overall concept for third sector organizations.

  9. School in the knowledge society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Levinsen, Karin

    2011-01-01

      Implementation of ICT in Danish and Nordic schools gradually moves from an industrial towards an emerging knowledge society school paradigm. Simultaneously it, digital literacy and the school's physical and social organization are constantly negotiated. In schools that proactively meet the chal......  Implementation of ICT in Danish and Nordic schools gradually moves from an industrial towards an emerging knowledge society school paradigm. Simultaneously it, digital literacy and the school's physical and social organization are constantly negotiated. In schools that proactively meet...... the challenges new designs for teaching and learning emerge while teacher-student relations transform and the children and young people's competencies are resources in the processes of learning. The chapter present research based on the proactive schools and exemplifies possible outlines of the school...... in the knowledge society. Finally the findings are extrapolated into a vision of the future local global school in the knowledge society....

  10. Science in Society in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlgaard, Niels; Bloch, Carter Walter

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a special section of Science and Public Policy on science in society in Europe. Based on extensive data collected for the Monitoring Policy and Research Activities on Science in Society in Europe (MASIS) project, contributions to this special section explore pertinent issues...... related to the location, role and responsibility of science across EU member states and associated countries. By developing analytical typologies and classifying countries, the collection of papers provides a novel and detailed picture of Europe. It reveals considerable variation regarding...... the interactions of science and society at the national level, and it offers a platform for international learning. The identification of patterns and trends concerning the place of science in society may also feed into emerging European discussions about ‘responsible research and innovation’....

  11. Risk society and amoral morality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedeljković Radica M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern world is the world of change. Modernity changed all aspects of life in width and depth. The changes are so fast and so many people have impression that they are trapped in a multitude of events that they cannot understand nor control. Instead of society as a system, we are talking about society as a network of different relationships of individuals and social groups. Instead of a harmonious society as a space in which the man resides, developing their potential and needs, we are talking about society as a threatening force that destroys everything in its way as 'Moloch' (Giddens, the 'risk society' (Beck in which the doctrine produced in equal measure the conditions for prosperity, but also the risks and destruction; the simulation of society (Baudrillard which glorifies lies and deceit. Instead of society as a community, we are talking about the disappearance of society (Popper. Can we, therefore, rationally understand and express the world, the world of modernity; this world of profound change resembles the maze in which we are lost and wandering without meaning? Starting with Ulrich Beck and his theory of the risk society, the author points out that the way in which the western civilization started, which is imposed as a mandatory form for the rest of the world, leads to amoral morality. The ideology of progress, which is irrational and without a clear vision and clearly defined values, pushes us into an uncertain future of numerous risks and ever growing individualism. Thus we come to the conviction that without common values, collective values, we are lost in this world of risk. Solidarity and trust are the key values for the stable community, but they are non-existent in the risk society dominated by individualism. In the period of uncertainty in the risk society, only religion provides a healthy basis for communal living. Therefore, the way out of the crisis is not in politics, which is placed at the service of the economy, but

  12. Educating for Democratic Societies: Impediments

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen LAFER; Aydin, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    The paper offers a robust definition of democracy that focuses upon the decision making processes of democratic societies that are dependent on the ability and willingness of citizens to enter into a democratic dialectic in which informed opinions contend with one another in the public forum so that the best possible decisions can be made in regard to public policy and action. Opinion, informed and justified in reason, is to be respected in such societies and cultivated through a proper syste...

  13. Towards a cyber secure society

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Labuschagne, WA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Secure Society 4th Biennial Conference Presented by WA Labuschagne 9 October 2012 ? CSIR 2012 Slide 2 Critical Infrastructure ?Describe assets that are essential for the functioning of a society and economy (Wikipedia) ? CSIR 2012 Slide 3... in Bahrain Syria ? CSIR 2012 Slide 12 What is possible ? CSIR 2012 Slide 13 Cyber Defence Areas ? CSIR 2012 Slide 14 Network Attack Prediction Security Awareness Social Engineering Network Attack Prediction ? CSIR 2012 Slide 15 Network Attack...

  14. Finnish Society of Soil Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankinen, Katri; Hänninen, Pekka; Soinne, Helena; Leppälammi-Kujansuu, Jaana; Salo, Tapio; Pennanen, Taina

    2017-04-01

    In 1998 the organization of the International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS) was renewed to better support national activities. That was also the new start in the operation of the Finnish Society of Soil Sciences, which became affiliated to the IUSS. The society was originally established in 1971 but it remained relatively inactive. Currently, there are around 200 members in the Finnish Society of Soil Sciences. The members of the executive board cover different fields of soil science from geology to microbiology. Mission statement of the society is to promote the soil sciences and their application in Finland, to act as a forum for creation of better links between soil scientists, interested end users and the public, and to promote distribution and appreciation of general and Finnish research findings in soil science. Every second year the society organizes a national two-day long conference. In 2017 the theme 'circular economy' collected all together 57 presentations. The members of the incoming student division carried responsibility in practical co-ordination committee, acting also as session chairs. In the intervening years the society organizes a weekend excursion to neighboring areas. Lately we have explored the use of biochar in landscaping of Stockholm.

  15. [Thymus surgery in a general surgery department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Raquel; Coelho, Fátima; Pimentel, Teresa; Ribero, Rui; Matos, Novo de; Araújo, António

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of thymectomy cases between 1990-2003, in a General Surgery Department. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy in Miastenia Gravis patients. Retrospective study based on evaluation of data from Serviço de Cirurgia, Neurologia and Consult de Neurology processes, between 1990-2003, of 15 patients submitted to total thymectomy. 15 patients, aged 17 to 72, 11 female and 4 male. Miastenia Gravis was the main indication for surgery, for uncontrollable symptoms or suspicion of thymoma. In patients with myasthenia, surgery was accomplish after compensation of symptoms. There weren't post-surgery complications. Pathology were divided in thymic hyperplasia and thymoma. Miastenia patients have there symptoms diminished or stable with reduction or cessation of medical therapy. Miastenia was the most frequent indication for thymectomy. Surgery was good results, with low morbimortality, as long as the protocols are respected.

  16. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about when your child can return to school, daycare, or take part in sports. Pain after surgery ... for your child to return to school or daycare. Most often, the first few weeks after surgery ...

  17. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... don't help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for ... narrowed area or blockage. This allows blood to bypass (get around) the blockage. Sometimes people need more ...

  18. Heart bypass surgery - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100190.htm Heart bypass surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  19. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... results of stenting versus endarterectomy for carotid-artery stenosis. N Engl J Med . 2016;374(11):1021- ...

  20. Abdominal wall surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmetic surgery of the abdomen; Tummy tuck; Abdominoplasty ... Most of the time, this surgery is an elective or cosmetic procedure because it is an operation you choose to have. It is not usually needed for health reasons. Cosmetic abdomen repair ...

  1. Cosmetic ear surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  2. Hip fracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery; Osteoarthritis - hip ... You may receive general anesthesia for this surgery. This means you ... spinal anesthesia . With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  3. Lasik eye surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000525.htm Lasik eye surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lasik eye surgery permanently changes the shape of the cornea ( ...

  4. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after surgery, it should be OK to use artificial tears. Check with your provider. DO NOT wear contact lenses on the eye that had surgery, even if you have blurry vision. DO NOT use any makeup, creams, or lotions ...

  5. Smoking and surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery - quitting smoking; Surgery - quitting tobacco; Wound healing - smoking ... Tar, nicotine, and other chemicals from smoking can increase your risk of many health problems. These include heart and blood vessel problems, such as: Blood clots and aneurysms in ...

  6. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Jaw Surgery Download Download the ebook for further information Corrective jaw, or orthognathic surgery is performed by ... your treatment. Correction of Common Dentofacial Deformities ​ ​ The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  7. Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000273.htm Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had cosmetic breast surgery to change the size or shape ...

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries depending on the ... are not uncommon. Individuals with a TMJ disorder may experience a variety of symptoms, such as earaches, ...

  10. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Affairs and Humanitarian Efforts Log In Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Your spine surgeon has determined that you ...

  11. Scoliosis surgery - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007383.htm Scoliosis surgery - child To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Scoliosis surgery repairs abnormal curving of the spine ( scoliosis ). ...

  12. A History of the Council of State Neurosurgical Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Hasan A; Tumialán, Luis M; Rosenow, Joshua M; Colen, Chaim B; Stroink, Ann R; Linskey, Mark; Schirmer, Clemens M; Watridge, Clarence

    2017-01-01

    As neurological surgery evolved into its own subspecialty early in the 20th century, a need arose to create an environment for communication and education among those surgeons working in this burgeoning surgical discipline. As the socioeconomic climate in health care began to change in the United States, an unforeseen need arose that was outside the scope of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and Society of Neurological Surgeons. The capacity to understand and address the evolving socioeconomic landscape and to offer a platform for advocacy required a new entity. Grassroots efforts of neurosurgeons at the state level ultimately yielded a formal organization of state neurosurgical societies to fill this void by recognizing, understanding, and addressing socioeconomic factors affecting the practice of neurological surgery. This formal organization became the Council of State Neurosurgical Societies (CSNS). The CSNS provides a forum in which state societies can meet to identify, understand, and advocate for policies on behalf of organized neurosurgery. The purpose of this paper is to detail the history of the formation of the CSNS. By understanding this history and the need for the development of the CSNS, it is hoped that its evolving role as a voice for neurological surgeons in the modern era of health care will be made clear. Copyright © 2016 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  13. Successful linking of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database to Social Security data to examine the accuracy of Society of Thoracic Surgeons mortality data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; O'Brien, Sean M; Shahian, David M; Edwards, Fred H; Badhwar, Vinay; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Sanchez, Juan A; Morales, David L; Prager, Richard L; Wright, Cameron D; Puskas, John D; Gammie, James S; Haan, Constance K; George, Kristopher M; Sheng, Shubin; Peterson, Eric D; Shewan, Cynthia M; Han, Jane M; Bongiorno, Phillip A; Yohe, Courtney; Williams, William G; Mayer, John E; Grover, Frederick L

    2013-04-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database has been linked to the Social Security Death Master File to verify "life status" and evaluate long-term surgical outcomes. The objective of this study is explore practical applications of the linkage of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database to Social Securtiy Death Master File, including the use of the Social Securtiy Death Master File to examine the accuracy of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons 30-day mortality data. On January 1, 2008, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database began collecting Social Security numbers in its new version 2.61. This study includes all Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database records for operations with nonmissing Social Security numbers between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010, inclusive. To match records between the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database and the Social Security Death Master File, we used a combined probabilistic and deterministic matching rule with reported high sensitivity and nearly perfect specificity. Between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database collected data for 870,406 operations. Social Security numbers were available for 541,953 operations and unavailable for 328,453 operations. According to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database, the 30-day mortality rate was 17,757/541,953 = 3.3%. Linkage to the Social Security Death Master File identified 16,565 cases of suspected 30-day deaths (3.1%). Of these, 14,983 were recorded as 30-day deaths in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database (relative sensitivity = 90.4%). Relative sensitivity was 98.8% (12,863/13,014) for suspected 30-day deaths occurring before discharge and 59.7% (2120/3551) for suspected 30-day deaths occurring after discharge. Linkage to the Social Security Death Master File confirms the accuracy of

  14. On the uniqueness of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Josef E

    2005-03-01

    As the divergence between medicine and surgery increases, the author traces its beginnings not to the recent past, but as far back as the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Even at that time, physicians rarely came in physical contact with the patients and made their diagnoses from looking at flasks of urine from the patients. Skilled physicians allegedly could make approximately 1000 diagnoses from examining a flask of urine. On the other hand, barber surgeons were relatively unskilled and unrewarded, at a much lower class in society, and laid hands on the patient by draining abscesses, cauterizing, dealing with bladder stones, etc. Despite the Quincentenary of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh this year and the rendering of the first guild to the barber surgeons, this schism between medical and surgical practice has remained. The author attempts to fit this schism into medicine today by addressing continuity of care and the 80-hour workweek, stating that this schism is not a new development but has existed for many years. The proposal is made that medicine and surgery should work together as much as they can. However, if surgical patients are not well served by the lack of emphasis on continuity of care brought forth by the leadership of medicine in this country, who the author claims of intentionally distancing themselves from patient care, then surgery may need to go its own way. The patient comes first.

  15. Is society of knowledge a new type of society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramović Zoran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article author critical examines concept of society of knowledge as a new type of social whole. In keeping with the lines of leading theoretician in this field Peter Drucker. author gives main characteristic of this social type: employment, competition, mobility, organization as a locus of realization of knowledge, longlife learning, educated person. In the second part author maintains in favor of knowledge as a structural factor of every social form in the history. Concluding part contains main critical estimation that knowledge can not be taken as a typological trait for new type of society.

  16. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  17. Cavus Foot Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Toes All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Cavus Foot Surgery Page Content What is a cavus foot? A cavus or high-arched foot may have ... related problems. What are the goals of cavus foot surgery? The main goal of surgery is to ...

  18. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  19. Cosmetic Surgery: Regulatory Challenges in a Global Beauty Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Danielle; Mullock, Alex

    2017-02-28

    The market for cosmetic surgery tourism is growing with an increase in people travelling abroad for cosmetic surgery. While the reasons for seeking cosmetic surgery abroad may vary the most common reason is financial, but does cheaper surgery abroad carry greater risks? We explore the risks of poorly regulated cosmetic surgery to society generally before discussing how harm might be magnified in the context of cosmetic tourism, where the demand for cheaper surgery drives the market and makes surgery accessible for increasing numbers of people. This contributes to the normalisation of surgical enhancement, creating unhealthy cultural pressure to undergo invasive and risky procedures in the name of beauty. In addressing the harms of poorly regulated surgery, a number of organisations purport to provide a register of safe and ethical plastic surgeons, yet this arguably achieves little and in the absence of improved regulation the risks are likely to grow as the global market expands to meet demand. While the evidence suggests that global regulation is needed, the paper concludes that since a global regulatory response is unlikely, more robust domestic regulation may be the best approach. While domestic regulation may increase the drive towards foreign providers it may also have a symbolic effect which will reduce this drive by making people more aware of the dangers of surgery, both to society and individual physical wellbeing.

  20. Europeanizing civil society: how the EU shapes civil society organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Salgado, R.

    2014-01-01

    The European Union (EU) has clearly made a difference for Civil Society Organizations (CSOs). EU officials and European political entrepreneurs have been crucial in the promotion of funding and access opportunities, but they have been proven to have little capacity to create CSOs from scratch or to

  1. Civil society, political society and politics of disorder in Cambodia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, D.

    This paper questions under what conditions the social foundation necessary for the construction and sustenance of civil society are present in post-colonial social formations, and the extent to which there has been a need to develop concessionary politics to maintain a project of rule. It utilizes

  2. Inequality in nature and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Marten; van Bavel, Bas; van de Leemput, Ingrid A; van Nes, Egbert H

    2017-12-12

    Most societies are economically dominated by a small elite, and similarly, natural communities are typically dominated by a small fraction of the species. Here we reveal a strong similarity between patterns of inequality in nature and society, hinting at fundamental unifying mechanisms. We show that chance alone will drive 1% or less of the community to dominate 50% of all resources in situations where gains and losses are multiplicative, as in returns on assets or growth rates of populations. Key mechanisms that counteract such hyperdominance include natural enemies in nature and wealth-equalizing institutions in society. However, historical research of European developments over the past millennium suggests that such institutions become ineffective in times of societal upscaling. A corollary is that in a globalizing world, wealth will inevitably be appropriated by a very small fraction of the population unless effective wealth-equalizing institutions emerge at the global level. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  3. Social Power, Law and Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Casali Bahia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to discuss some aspects of the formal centers of social power. Thus, it seeks to answer how power becomes institutionalized in formal social organizations; what is the source of political power and how it is converted into institutions of governance; how legal power is generated by society and how it grows; what is the relationship between legal power and those who are governed; what is the role of the legal system and human rights in fostering the distribution of social power; and how a society has enhanced access to and equitable distribution of power in recent centuries.

  4. Broadband society and generational changes

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, Fausto

    2011-01-01

    The role generations play in accepting and shaping digital technologies, and possibly vice versa, is an increasingly relevant issue in contemporary society. For the first time in the academic debate, this volume outlines the theoretical issues and explores some results from empirical researches on the relationship between generations and the media in digital society. The first part of the book deals with the theoretical debate on generations, from Mannheim's to the revisiting of some classical notions shaped by disciplines as history, demography, marketing and sociology. The second part gather

  5. Epiretinal membrane surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamoudi, Hassan; Correll Christensen, Ulrik; La Cour, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of combined phacoemulsification-vitrectomy and sequential surgery for idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) on refractive error (RE) and macular morphology. Methods: In this prospective clinical trial, we allocated phakic eyes with ERM to (1) cataract surgery...... between the groups. Four cases (17%) in the CAT group had resolved visual complaints and improved BCVA after cataract surgery resulting in no need for PPV within the follow-up period. Conclusion: Surgery for idiopathic ERM in phakic eyes with either phaco-vitrectomy or sequential surgery are equal...... and subsequent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) (CAT group), (2) PPV and subsequent cataract surgery (VIT group) or (3) phaco-vitrectomy (COMBI group). Examinations were at baseline, one month after each surgery, and at 3 months and 12 months of follow-up. Primary outcome was the RE (the difference between predicted...

  6. Ethical issues in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterodimas, Aris; Radwanski, Henrique N; Pitanguy, Ivo

    2011-04-01

    Plastic, reconstructive, and cosmetic surgery refers to a variety of operations performed in order to repair or restore body parts to look normal or to enhance a certain structure or anatomy that is already normal. Several ethical considerations such as a patient's right for autonomy, informed consent, beneficence, and nonmalfeasance need to be given careful consideration. The principal objective of the medical profession is to render services to humanity with full respect for human dignity. Plastic surgeons should merit the confidence of patients entrusted to their care, rendering to each a full measure of service and devotion. They require an extensive amount of education and training. The increases in demand for aesthetic plastic surgery and the advocacy of practice in the media have raised concerns about the circumstances under which cosmetic surgery is ethical and permissible. Innovative research, and new technologies derived from such research, almost always raises ethical and policy concerns. Medical ethics regulate what is, and what is not, correct in promoting plastic surgery to the public. It is essential to create an educated and informed public about the ethical issues in the plastic and reconstructive surgery field. Plastic surgeons need to carefully evaluate the degree of deformity, physical and emotional maturity, and desired outcome of patients who request plastic surgery procedures. Science is a powerful force for change in modern society and plastic surgeons have a responsibility to shepherd that change with thoughtful advocacy and careful ethical scrutiny of their own behavior.

  7. Prevalence of complications in neuromuscular scoliosis surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Shallu; Wu, Chunsen; Andersen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Our objectives were primarily to review the published literature on complications in neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS) surgery and secondarily, by means of a meta-analysis, to determine the overall pooled rates (PR) of various complications associated with NMS surgery. METHODS: PubMed and Em......PURPOSE: Our objectives were primarily to review the published literature on complications in neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS) surgery and secondarily, by means of a meta-analysis, to determine the overall pooled rates (PR) of various complications associated with NMS surgery. METHODS: Pub......Med and Embase databases were searched for studies reporting the outcomes and complications of NMS surgery, published from 1997 to May 2011. We focused on NMS as defined by the Scoliosis Research Society's classification. We measured the pooled estimate of the overall complication rates (PR) using a random....... In regard to surgical complications affiliated with various surgical techniques in NMS, the level of evidence of published literature ranges between 2+ to 2-; the subsequent recommendations are level C. CONCLUSION: NMS patients have diverse and high complication rates after scoliosis surgery. High PRs...

  8. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery in Laparoscopic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leissner, Kay B; Shanahan, Jessica L; Bekker, Peter L; Amirfarzan, Houman

    2017-09-01

    As part of an effort to maximize value in the perioperative setting, a paradigm shift is underway in the way that patients are cared for preoperatively, on the day of surgery, and postoperatively-a setting collectively known as the perioperative care. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS(®)) is an evidence-based, patient-centered team approach to delivering high-quality perioperative care to surgical patients. This review focuses on anesthesiologists, with their unique purview of perioperative setting, who are important drivers of change in the delivery of valuable perioperative care. ERAS care pathways begin in the preoperative setting by both preparing the patient for the psychological stress of surgery and optimizing the patient's medical and physiologic status so the body is ready for the physical demands of surgery. Minimization of perioperative fasting is important to maintain volume status-decreasing reliance on intravenous fluid administration, and to reduce protein catabolism around the time of surgery. Intraoperative management in ERAS pathways relies on goal-directed fluid therapy and opioid-sparing multimodal analgesia. Postoperatively, early feeding and ambulation, as well as discontinuation of extraneous lines and catheters facilitate patients' functional recovery. The laparoscopic approach to surgery, when possible, compliments ERAS techniques by reducing abdominal wall trauma and the resultant milieu of inflammatory, neurohumoral, and pain responses. Anesthesiologists driving change in the perioperative setting, in collaboration with surgeons and other disciplines, can improve value in healthcare and provide optimal outcomes that matter most to patients and healthcare providers alike.

  9. Science in the Information Society

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN will host the Role of Science in the Information Society (RSIS) conference on Monday and Tuesday, focusing on how science-driven information and communication technologies can help close the digital divide. There will be an army of bodyguards at CERN at the beginning of December. CERN will not only host the official visits, but also around 500 scientists, politicians, and members of civil society who will descend on the Main Auditorium for the Role of Science in the Information Society (RSIS) conference on 8-9 December. The RSIS conference hosted by CERN is a high-profile event focusing on how to make information technologies work for the greatest human benefit - a marked change from keeping a relatively low profile so far, making its discoveries available to all with little input in how they are applied. The RSIS, held 8-9 December at CERN, will be a Summit Event of the World Summit on the Information Society taking place at Palexpo on 9-13 December. RSIS participants will apply a scientific point of...

  10. Reconstructing Death in Postmodern Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Examines interaction between emerging thanatological movement and its sociohistorical context. Notes that thanatology will take on new shape as individuals and society attempt to cope with postmodernistic forces and deconstructive mentality. Considers prospect for authentic solidarity against distress in reconstructed death system. (Author/NB)

  11. Experts in science and society

    CERN Document Server

    Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2004-01-01

    In today's complex world, we have come to rely increasingly on those who have expertise in specific areas and can bring their knowledge to bear on crucial social, political and scientific questions. Taking the viewpoint that experts are consulted when there is something important at stake for an individual, a group, or society at large, Experts in Science and Society explores expertise as a relational concept. How do experts balance their commitment to science with that to society? How does a society actually determine that a person has expertise? What personal traits are valued in an expert? From where does the expert derive authority? What makes new forms of expertise emerge? These and related questions are addressed from a wide range of areas in order to be inclusive, as well as to demonstrate similarities across areas. Likewise, in order to be culturally comparative, this volume includes examples and discussions of experts in different countries and even in different time periods. The topics include the r...

  12. Education for the Good Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Neal; Spours, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The Left is facing a crisis of its approach to education highlighted by the "education revolution" of the Coalition Government. The authors argue that it is important to step back and present a positive vision of education based on the key pillars of the Good Society--fairness, democracy, sustainability and well-being. This values-led…

  13. Socialization for the Knowledge Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Alexander O.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to give an overview and present special features of socialization of the research type that prepares young people for life in the knowledge society. Methods of cultural and historical epistemology, of hermeneutic and structural-functional analysis of social action have been used in the study, as well as elements of the…

  14. Governance and European Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kutay, Acar

    This book provides a critical analysis of the European Union’s approach to ‘governance’, focusing on the way in which civil society is incorporated within the EU decision-making process and arguing that it is not conducive to the democratisation of EU governance.\

  15. Architecture in the network society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    Under the theme Architecture in the Network Society, participants were invited to focus on the dialog and sharing of knowledge between architects and other disciplines and to reflect on, and propose, new methods in the design process, to enhance and improve the impact of information technology...

  16. Adult Learning, Economy and Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2010-01-01

    The article relates the different types of adult education, continuing education and training to an overall societal context of socio-economic modernization by focussing on the multiple functions of adult learning. Each of well known empirical categories is seen in its historical relation to mode...... embracing form which set a new framework for human participation in the new global society....

  17. Internal Conflicts in Muslim Societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashiq Ali Shah

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of psychological theories and the social dynamics of the society help identify salient attributes and processes relevant to conflict among Muslims. The psychodynamic concept of personality and frustration-aggression hypothesis account for the socialization practices in the Muslim societies, emotional instability, unfavorable evaluation of those holding a different viewpoint and venting out one's aggression on the weaker. The tendency of the Muslims to praise their sect/tribe/religious group leads to a groupthink situation that polarizes intergroup relationships. The acts of categorization in group and out group, as postulated by the social identity theory, contribute towards the distorted perception of each other. The Islamic notions of brotherhood, unity and ethnic identity as means of personal identification and social interaction seems to have been forgotten by the Muslims. Though the Western social-psychological constructs are helpful in understanding the causes of conflict among Muslims, they are not germane to Muslim societies. The group belongingness and group favouritism is not necessarily a tool of discrimination and conflict but is an essential component of one's survival in a collectivist society. The Western theories also do not address the economic and political circumstances responsible for the multitude of conflicts among Muslims.

  18. Privacy and the Connected Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Khajuria, Samant; Skouby, Knud Erik

    The Vision of the 5G enabled connected society is highly based on the evolution and implementation of Internet of Things. This involves, amongst others, a significant raise in devices, sensors and communication in pervasive interconnections as well as cooperation amongst devices and entities acro...

  19. Women otolaryngologist representation in specialty society membership and leadership positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sukgi S; Miller, Robert H

    2012-11-01

    To determine the proportion of female otolaryngologists in leadership positions relative to their number in the specialty, their membership in various otolaryngology organizations, and age. Cross-sectional analyses of otolaryngology organization membership with a subgroup analysis on female membership and leadership proportion comparing 5-year male/female cohort groups. Information on the number of members and leaders was obtained from various specialty societies by direct communication and from their Web sites between June and December 2010. The number of female and male otolaryngologists and their age distribution in 5-year age groups was obtained from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS). Statistical analyses were used to determine whether women had proportional membership and leadership representation in various specialty societies. Additionally, female representation in other leadership roles was analyzed using the male/female ratio within the 5-year cohort groups. Female otolaryngologists were found to constitute approximately 11% of practicing otolaryngologists. The American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology had a higher proportion of female members (22%) compared to five other societies. When the gender composition within each organization was taken into account, female representation in specialty society leadership positions was proportionate to their membership across all societies. When gender and age were considered, women have achieved proportionate representation in each of the specialty societies' leadership positions. There was also proportionate representation of females as program directors, American Board of Otolaryngology directors, Residency Review Committee members, and journal editors/editorial board members. Finally, fewer female chairs or chiefs of departments/divisions were seen, but when age was taken into consideration, this difference was no longer significant. Women have achieved parity in

  20. A Population-Based Analysis of Time to Surgery and Travel Distances for Brachial Plexus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Christopher J; Baty, Jack; Saeed, Mohammed J; Olsen, Margaret A; Osei, Daniel A

    2016-09-01

    Despite the importance of timely evaluation for patients with brachial plexus injuries (BPIs), in clinical practice we have noted delays in referral. Because the published BPI experience is largely from individual centers, we used a population-based approach to evaluate the delivery of care for patients with BPI. We used statewide administrative databases from Florida (2007-2013), New York (2008-2012), and North Carolina (2009-2010) to create a cohort of patients who underwent surgery for BPI (exploration, repair, neurolysis, grafting, or nerve transfer). Emergency department and inpatient records were used to determine the time interval between the injury and surgical treatment. Distances between treating hospitals and between the patient's home ZIP code and the surgical hospital were recorded. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to determine predictors for time from injury to surgery exceeding 365 days. Within the 222 patients in our cohort, median time from injury to surgery was 7.6 months and exceeded 365 days in 29% (64 of 222 patients) of cases. Treatment at a smaller hospital for the initial injury was significantly associated with surgery beyond 365 days after injury. Patient insurance type, travel distance for surgery, distance between the 2 treating hospitals, and changing hospitals between injury and surgery did not significantly influence time to surgery. Nearly one third of patients in Florida, New York, and North Carolina underwent BPI surgery more than 1 year after the injury. Patients initially treated at smaller hospitals are at risk for undergoing delayed BPI surgery. These findings can inform administrative and policy efforts to expedite timely referral of patients with BPI to experienced centers. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. October 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The October Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 10/23/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 21 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and thoracic surgery communities. A proposal was made to decrease the number of meetings from 10 to 8 per year. After a brief discussion, this was adopted. Dr. Parides will try and coordinate these changes with Tucson. Meetings were announced for December in Tucson, January in Carmel, February in Albuquerque, and April in Phoenix. A suggestion was made to have a separate area for meetings on the SWJPCC website. There were 2 cases presented-both by Nick Sparacino, a first year fellow at Good Samaritan/VA. 1. The first case was a 48 year old man admitted to podiatry for chronic diabetic foot ulcers. His preoperative chest x-ray revealed multiple pulmonary nodules. Importantly, he had a history of working in a brake pad …

  2. Robotic bariatric surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourman, Matthew M; Saber, Alan A

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a nationwide epidemic, and the only evidence-based, durable treatment of this disease is bariatric surgery. This field has evolved drastically during the past decade. One of the latest advances has been the increased use of robotics within this field. The goal of our study was to perform a systematic review of the recent data to determine the safety and efficacy of robotic bariatric surgery. The setting was the University Hospitals Case Medical Center (Cleveland, OH). A PubMed search was performed for robotic bariatric surgery from 2005 to 2011. The inclusion criteria were English language, original research, human, and bariatric surgical procedures. Perioperative data were then collected from each study and recorded. A total of 18 studies were included in our review. The results of our systematic review showed that bariatric surgery, when performed with the use of robotics, had similar or lower complication rates compared with traditional laparoscopy. Two studies showed shorter operative times using the robot for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, but 4 studies showed longer operative times in the robotic arm. In addition, the learning curve appears to be shorter when robotic gastric bypass is compared with the traditional laparoscopic approach. Most investigators agreed that robotic laparoscopic surgery provides superior imaging and freedom of movement compared with traditional laparoscopy. The application of robotics appears to be a safe option within the realm of bariatric surgery. Prospective randomized trials comparing robotic and laparoscopic outcomes are needed to further define the role of robotics within the field of bariatric surgery. Longer follow-up times would also help elucidate any long-term outcomes differences with the use of robotics versus traditional laparoscopy. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Update on cardiothoracic surgery resident job opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, David T; Kerendi, Faraz; Mettler, Brett A; Boffa, Daniel J; Mehall, John R; Merrill, Walter H; Higgins, Robert S D

    2010-06-01

    Concerns regarding ample employment opportunities for graduating cardiothoracic surgery residents may affect perceptions of the field and recruitment into residency programs. We present the results of the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association/Thoracic Surgery Directors Association (TSRA/TSDA) 2008 Resident Survey, and compare them with the 2007 TSRA/TSDA survey and the 2006 interim report of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Task Force on Job Opportunities. In April 2008, the TSRA/TSDA conducted an anonymous survey, linked to the cardiothoracic surgery resident online In-training Exam, with questions germane to resident job seeking and perceptions of the specialty. Results were compared with resident surveys from 2007 and 2006. Response rates for the 2008 and 2007 surveys were 100%, and 54.2% for 2006. Of graduating residents looking for employment, 61.6% had one or more job offers, compared with 64.6% and 83.5% from the 2007 and 2006 surveys, respectively. Of the respondents completing their job search, 24.5% entered private practice and 26.3% academia, compared with 12.1% and 30.1%, respectively, in the 2007 survey. Overall, 57.7% of all respondents had more than $50,000 education-related debt, compared with 54.2% of 2007 respondents. However, 71.5% of all 2008 respondents would recommend cardiothoracic surgery to a potential trainee, compared with 63.7% and 46.0% from 2007 and 2006 survey respondents, respectively. The 2008 survey suggests that although the majority of respondents found employment on completing residency, the percentage is less than 65%, reinforcing a need for formal networking programs or changes in residency training. Despite continued limited employment opportunities, resident impressions of cardiothoracic surgery have improved from 2006 to 2008. 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Human cloning and 'posthuman' society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Since early 1997, when the creation of Dolly the sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer was announced in Nature, numerous government reports, essays, articles and books have considered the ethical problems and policy issues surrounding human reproductive cloning. In this article, I consider what response a modern liberal society should give to the prospect of human cloning, if it became safe and practical. Some opponents of human cloning have argued that permitting it would place us on a slippery slope to a repugnant future society, comparable to that portrayed in Aldous Huxley's novel, Brave New World. I conclude that, leaving aside concerns about safety, none of the psychological or social considerations discussed in this article provides an adequate policy justification for invoking the state's coercive powers to prevent human cloning.

  5. Space Weather, Environment and Societies

    CERN Document Server

    Lilensten, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Our planet exists within a space environment affected by constantly changing solar atmosphere producing cosmic particles and electromagnetic waves. This "space weather" profoundly influences the performance of our technology because we primarily use two means for transmitting information and energy; namely, electromagnetic waves and electricity. On an everyday basis, we have developed methods to cope with the normal conditions. However, the sun remains a fiery star whose 'angry' outbursts can potentially destroy spacecrafts, kill astronauts, melt electricity transformers, stop trains, and generally wreak havoc with human activities. Space Weather is the developing field within astronomy that aims at predicting the sun’s violent activity and minimizing the impacts on our daily lives. Space Weather, Environment, and Societies explains why our technological societies are so dependent on solar activity and how the Sun disturbs the transmission of information and energy. Footnotes expand specific points and the ...

  6. Leadership in an Egalitarian Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rueden, Christopher; Gurven, Michael; Kaplan, Hillard; Stieglitz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Leadership is instrumental to resolution of collective action dilemmas, particularly in large, heterogeneous groups. Less is known about the characteristics or effectiveness of leadership in small-scale, homogeneous, and relatively egalitarian societies, in which humans have spent most of our existence. Among Tsimane’ forager-horticulturalists of Bolivia, we (1) assess traits of elected leaders under experimental and naturalistic conditions and (2) test whether leaders impact collective action outcomes. We find that elected leaders are physically strong and have more kin and other exchange partners. Their ranks on physical dominance, kin support, and trustworthiness predict how well their groups perform, but only where group members have a history of collaborative interaction. Leaders do not take more of the spoils. We discuss why physically strong leaders can be compatible with egalitarianism, and we suggest that leaders in egalitarian societies may be more motivated by maintaining an altruistic reputation than by short-term rewards of collective action. PMID:25240393

  7. between the Law and Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnar Þór Jónsson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on two basic concepts: Law and Society. Older sources do not clearly indicate that a sharp distinction was commonly drawn between the society on one hand and the law on the other. Regardless of the evolution and progress which has been made in both areas the ties between these two subjects have not been disconnected. In fact, one does not have to reflect long on the matter to understand the obvious and necessary coherence. The influence is interactive. This reciprocity means, inter alia, that rights cannot be claimed without the shouldering of corresponding duties. Comprehension of this basic strand in the concept of law demarcates the basis for our everyday existence.

  8. INFORMATION SOCIETY EVOLUTION AND EFFECTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The evolution and effects of the information society can be exemplified via many threads, both in hard and soft science, according to ones’ discipline and field. In this contribution, the speaker’s three decades of applied research acts as a vehicle to demonstrate development and impact via...... commercial product, national and international projects, and industry startups (including impactful third party research investigations) form the basis for discussion. Beyond this, a wider more generic perspective reflects on product adoption that illustrate todays’ contemporary e-society tendencies where...... recent influx and uptake of consumer-targeted artificial reality products point to society’s desire for alternative sensory experiences. Posited is how aligned with this desire there is a need for new ethical considerations in research as was found in the speaker’s research at the end of the 20th century...

  9. Leadership in an egalitarian society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rueden, Christopher; Gurven, Michael; Kaplan, Hillard; Stieglitz, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Leadership is instrumental to resolution of collective action dilemmas, particularly in large, heterogeneous groups. Less is known about the characteristics or effectiveness of leadership in small-scale, homogeneous, and relatively egalitarian societies, in which humans have spent most of our existence. Among Tsimane' forager-horticulturalists of Bolivia, we (1) assess traits of elected leaders under experimental and naturalistic conditions and (2) test whether leaders impact or differentially benefit from collective action outcomes. We find that elected leaders are physically strong and have more kin and other exchange partners. Their ranks on physical dominance, kin support, and trustworthiness predict how well their groups perform, but only where group members have a history of collaborative interaction. Leaders do not take more of the spoils. We discuss why physically strong leaders can be compatible with egalitarianism, and we suggest that leaders in egalitarian societies may be more motivated by maintaining an altruistic reputation than by short-term rewards of collective action.

  10. Ergonomics in laparoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supe Avinash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic surgery provides patients with less painful surgery but is more demanding for the surgeon. The increased technological complexity and sometimes poorly adapted equipment have led to increased complaints of surgeon fatigue and discomfort during laparoscopic surgery. Ergonomic integration and suitable laparoscopic operating room environment are essential to improve efficiency, safety, and comfort for the operating team. Understanding ergonomics can not only make life of surgeon comfortable in the operating room but also reduce physical strains on surgeon.

  11. SEBACEOUS CYSTS MINOR SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    I Gusti Ayu Agung Laksemi; Sri Maliawan; Ketut Siki Kawiyana

    2013-01-01

    Minor surgery is small surgery or localized example cut ulcers and boils, cyst excision, and suturing. Somethings that need to be considered in the preparation of the surgery is minor tools, operating rooms and operating tables, lighting, maintenance of tools and equipment, sterilization and desinfection equipment, preparation of patients and anesthesia. In general cysts is walled chamber that consist of fluid, cells and the remaining cells. Cysts are formed not due to inflammation although ...

  12. [Breast cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Georges; Berclaz, Gilles; Langer, Igor; Pittet-Cuenod, Brigitte; Delaloye, Jean-François

    2007-10-24

    Breast conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for early breast cancer. For patients who choice or need a mastectomy, breast reconstruction provides an acceptable alternative. Breast cancer surgery has been evolving through minimally invasive approaches. Sentinel node biopsy has already remplaced axillary lymph node dissection in the evaluation of the axilla. Local ablation of the tumor may be a valuable alternative to surgery in the future.

  13. Recovery Following Orthognathic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    mobility after different procedures of orthoganthic surgery. Eur J Orthod 1992;14:188-197. 4. Aragon SB, Van Sickels JE: Mandibular range of motion with...Meredeth J, Alexander JM, Mercuri LG, Brophy C: Psychological Factors in Adjustment to Orthognathic Surgery. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 1984;42:435-440. 12...Flanary C, Barwell GM, Alexander JM: Patient perceptions of orthog nathic surgery. Am J Orthod 1985;88:137-145. 13. Kehlet H: Anesthetic Technique and

  14. Ergonomics in laparoscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supe, Avinash N; Kulkarni, Gaurav V; Supe, Pradnya A

    2010-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery provides patients with less painful surgery but is more demanding for the surgeon. The increased technological complexity and sometimes poorly adapted equipment have led to increased complaints of surgeon fatigue and discomfort during laparoscopic surgery. Ergonomic integration and suitable laparoscopic operating room environment are essential to improve efficiency, safety, and comfort for the operating team. Understanding ergonomics can not only make life of surgeon comfortable in the operating room but also reduce physical strains on surgeon. PMID:20814508

  15. ROBOTIC SURGERY: BIOETHICAL ASPECTS

    OpenAIRE

    SIQUEIRA-BATISTA, Rodrigo; SOUZA, Camila Ribeiro; MAIA, Polyana Mendes; SIQUEIRA, Sávio Lana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The use of robots in surgery has been increasingly common today, allowing the emergence of numerous bioethical issues in this area. Objective: To present review of the ethical aspects of robot use in surgery. Method: Search in Pubmed, SciELO and Lilacs crossing the headings "bioethics", "surgery", "ethics", "laparoscopy" and "robotic". Results: Of the citations obtained, were selected 17 articles, which were used for the preparation of the article. It contains br...

  16. Equalitarian Societies are Economically Impossible

    OpenAIRE

    Bojin Zheng; Wenhua Du; Wanneng Shu; Jianmin Wang; Deyi Li

    2012-01-01

    The inequality of wealth distribution is a universal phenomenon in the civilized nations, and it is often imputed to the Matthew effect, that is, the rich get richer and the poor get poorer. Some philosophers unjustified this phenomenon and tried to put the human civilization upon the evenness of wealth. Noticing the facts that 1) the emergence of the centralism is the starting point of human civilization, i.e., people in a society were organized hierarchically, 2) the inequality of wealth em...

  17. Art education, Creativity and Society

    OpenAIRE

    Filip, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Title: Art education, Creativity and Society Author: Michal Filip Department: Department of Art Education Supervisor: doc. PaedDr. Pavel Šamšula, CSc. Abstract: The dissertation addresses the issue of creativity in art education. The theoretical part of the work first explains the general foundation of the social context, which plays a key role in education focused on the development of creativity. The author outlines the historical roots of the relationship between art education and creativi...

  18. [Civil bioethics in pluralistics societies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, A

    2000-01-01

    The author examines how Bioethics should be approached in a pluralist society. She argues that through the gradual discovery of shared ethical values and principles for judging which practices are humanizing and which or not, ever-more dense civil Bioethics helps bring out--in contrast to relativism and subjectivism--an ethical intersubjectiveness, the fundaments of which should be addressed by moral philosophy if it hopes to fulfill one of its main tasks.

  19. Knowledge society and digital environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara BARROSO JEREZ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The existence and extension of the digital environment has made possible the broad distribution of computer equipment, allowing greater access to information than ever before in human history. Although the consequences of this phenomenon have been analysed and the possible undesirable effects of ‘digital divides’ caused by different levels of access to the information society due to socio-economic reasons identified, there has been little study of what the digital environment supposes for the construction of knowledge and the development of the knowledge society. Although the digital environment is a powerful means of accessing information, it does not necessarily increase the possibilities of constructing knowledge and human development. This may lead to a new risk of the ‘digital divide’, tied to the growing inequality in the abilities of those who have mastered the basic capabilities and strategies needed to build knowledge, and those who are merely passive users of the information that can be accessed through the digital environment. This work explores issues related to individual differences in the capabilities needed to use the digital environment to access and construct valid knowledge, and defends that prior domain knowledge, mediate the processes involved in building knowledge from the information that all individuals access through the digital environment, defining their social role as an individual capable of participating in the development of the knowledge society.

  20. Educating for Democratic Societies: Impediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen LAFER

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers a robust definition of democracy that focuses upon the decision making processes of democratic societies that are dependent on the ability and willingness of citizens to enter into a democratic dialectic in which informed opinions contend with one another in the public forum so that the best possible decisions can be made in regard to public policy and action. Opinion, informed and justified in reason, is to be respected in such societies and cultivated through a proper system of education that teaches students how to determine the respectability of opinions offered and to formulate and articulate opinions worthy of respect. Impediments to the development of skills, knowledge, and dispositions essential to the development of opinion worthy of respect and the critique of opinion for its respect-worthiness are considered, particularly those generated by forces of economy (business, religion, and notions of state and nation. The conclusion argues for schools that are respectful of the individual capacities of students, particularly their ability to formulate unique understandings of the phenomenon that come before them and to offer to society novel ideas, in the form of opinion, that deserve the consideration of others in the democratic decision making process

  1. Pediatric refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Erin D

    2017-07-01

    Refractive surgery procedures have been performed on children since the early 1980s. This article will review this history as well as current thoughts on treating children with large refractive errors. Pediatric refractive surgery has developed slowly as very few children fit the criteria for treatment. For this reason, practice patterns are varied and publications are rare. Publications in recent years have focused on intraocular procedures over laser refractive surgery. Pediatric refractive surgery is an evolving field as surgeons try to find the best long-term treatments for these young patients.

  2. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems....

  3. Open surgery for chronic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Jason; Kelay, Arun; Mastracci, Tara M

    2016-05-01

    Chronic aortic dissection is one of the most challenging pathologies faced by aortic surgeons. The variety of presentations and the multiple comorbidities of the patients make treatment and follow-up a subject of much debate. Historical data is difficult to interpret because of the heterogeneity of the included populations, and the common tendency of authors to pool outcomes of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair secondary to degenerative pathology or connective tissue disorder with those who have an underlying dissection. As the endovascular treatment of chronic aortic dissection becomes more commonplace with the increasing use of branched and fenestrated technology, it will be important to have an historical "gold standard" to use as a comparator. This narrative review of the literature describes the challenges to interpretation of data and the available information published about chronic aortic dissection. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An investigation of the relationship between cataract surgery wait times and rates of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, William G; Ramsay, Timothy; Fergusson, Dean; Si, Francie; Pan, Irene; Su, Yinghua; Buhrmann, Ralf

    2012-02-01

    The relationship between cataract surgery wait times and rates of surgery was investigated to determine whether wait times correlate with rates of surgery. Cross-sectional study. We collected 2 Ontario registries for cataract surgeries: (i) Cancer Care Ontario wait time registry; and (ii) The Ontario Health Insurance Plan billing records. Both registries were used to determine whether wait times correlated with rates of surgery, and the data were then stratified by region of the province, priority (severity) of cases, age, and sex. The total number of surgeries performed between April 2, 2007, and March 31, 2008, was 65,520. The overall mean number of wait days was 69.8 days; the mean patient age was 72.5 years; and the surgery rate was 540.3 per 100,000 members of the population. For high-priority cases (priorities 1 and 2), there was a very weak inverse correlation (p = -0.27 and -0.21) between wait time and surgery rate, whereas the overall correlation between wait time and surgical rate was close to zero in both databases, regardless of the region, the patients' ages, and the patients' genders. This study demonstrates a very weak correlation between wait times for and rates of cataract surgery, and this should be a concern for policy makers. Further study is needed to see whether this null relationship persists over time and whether it exists for other monitored wait time procedures. Reasons for this null relationship will have to be determined and remedied as the use of wait times becomes a more widespread outcome in Canadian Healthcare. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. All rights reserved.

  5. ESPEN guideline: Clinical nutrition in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimann, Arved; Braga, Marco; Carli, Franco; Higashiguchi, Takashi; Hübner, Martin; Klek, Stanislaw; Laviano, Alessandro; Ljungqvist, Olle; Lobo, Dileep N; Martindale, Robert; Waitzberg, Dan L; Bischoff, Stephan C; Singer, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    Early oral feeding is the preferred mode of nutrition for surgical patients. Avoidance of any nutritional therapy bears the risk of underfeeding during the postoperative course after major surgery. Considering that malnutrition and underfeeding are risk factors for postoperative complications, early enteral feeding is especially relevant for any surgical patient at nutritional risk, especially for those undergoing upper gastrointestinal surgery. The focus of this guideline is to cover nutritional aspects of the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) concept and the special nutritional needs of patients undergoing major surgery, e.g. for cancer, and of those developing severe complications despite best perioperative care. From a metabolic and nutritional point of view, the key aspects of perioperative care include: • integration of nutrition into the overall management of the patient • avoidance of long periods of preoperative fasting • re-establishment of oral feeding as early as possible after surgery • start of nutritional therapy early, as soon as a nutritional risk becomes apparent • metabolic control e.g. of blood glucose • reduction of factors which exacerbate stress-related catabolism or impair gastrointestinal function • minimized time on paralytic agents for ventilator management in the postoperative period • early mobilisation to facilitate protein synthesis and muscle function The guideline presents 37 recommendations for clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessing quality in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer A.M. Nashef

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a the strong temporal, if not causal, link between the intervention and the outcome in cardiac surgery and therefore a link becomes established between operative mortality and the measurement of surgical performance. In Britain the law stipulates that data collected by any public body or using public funds must be made freely available. Tools and mechanisms we devise and develop are likely to form the models on which the quality of care is assessed in other surgical and perhaps medical specialties. Measuring professional performance should be done by the profession. To measure risk there are a number of scores as crude mortality is not enough. A very important benefit of assessing the risk of death is to use this knowledge in the determination of the indication to operate. The second benefit is in the assessment of the quality of care as risk prediction gives a standard against performance of hospitals and surgeons. Peer review and “naming and shaming” are two mechanisms to monitor quality. There are two potentially damaging outcomes from the publication of results in a league-table form: the first is the damage to the hospital; the second is to refuse to operate on high-risk patients. There is a real need for quality monitoring in medicine in general and in cardiac surgery in particular. Good quality surgical work requires robust knowledge of three crucial variables: activity, risk prediction and performance. In Europe, the three major specialist societies have agreed to establish the European Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery Institute of Accreditation (ECTSIA. Performance monitoring is soon to become imperative. If we surgeons are not on board, we shall have no control on its final destination, and the consequences may be equally damaging to us and to our patients.

  7. Palliative Surgery for Pseudomyxoma Peritonei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, J A; Jepsen, K V; Stribolt, K; Iversen, L H

    2016-06-01

    Pseudomyxoma peritonei is a rare disease causing peritoneal carcinomatosis. In patients with extensive carcinomatosis, curative treatment is unachievable. Palliative debulking therapy is the only treatment in relieving symptoms. We report our results from palliative debulking surgery at a national pseudomyxoma peritonei center in Denmark. From January 2007 to October 2012, we performed 27 palliative operations for pseudomyxoma peritonei with debulking at our institution. All patients were evaluated and found eligible for palliative treatment only. Patients were prospectively registered, while perioperative data were collected retrospectively from patient records. The majority of patients (n = 25) received an omentectomy (93%) as the primary procedure. In total, 17 (63%) received additional surgery. Median operative time was 88 min (range: 33-160 min). Median stay at the recovery ward was 6 h (2-288 h). Median hospital stay was 8 days (4-105 days). In all, 23 (85%) patients had no in-hospital complications, whereas 4 patients experienced complications (15%). Two of the complications were mild (Clavien-Dindo grade II), and two experienced severe complications (grade III and IV). Thirty-day mortality was 0%. Median survival was 3.0 years (0.2-6.2 years). Palliative debulking is a safe procedure with an acceptable morbidity and mortality offering immediate disease control. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2015.

  8. Material civilization: things and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dant, Tim

    2006-06-01

    This paper argues that although classical sociology has largely overlooked the importance of social relations with the material world in shaping the form of society, Braudel's concept of 'material civilization' is a useful way to begin to understand the sociological significance of this relationship. The limitations of Braudel's historical and general concept can be partially overcome with Elias's analysis of the connection between 'technization' and 'civilization' that allows for both a civilizing and a de-civilizing impact of emergent forms of material relation that both lengthen and shorten the chains of interdependence between the members of a society. It is suggested that the concept of the 'morality of things' employed by a number of commentators is useful in summarizing the civilizing effects of material objects and addressing their sociological significance. From the sociology of consumption the idea of materiality as a sign of social relationships can be drawn, and from the sociology of technology the idea of socio-technical systems and actor-networks can contribute to the understanding of material civilization. It is argued that the concept of 'material capital' can usefully summarize the variable social value of objects but to understand the complexity of material civilization as it unfolds in everyday life, an analysis of 'material interaction' is needed. Finally the paper suggests some initial themes and issues apparent in contemporary society that the sociological study of material civilization might address; the increased volume, functional complexity and material specificity of objects and the increased social complexity, autonomy and substitutability that is entailed. A theory of 'material civilization' is the first step in establishing a sociology of objects.

  9. The new society of organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, P F

    1992-01-01

    Managers in every organization from the largest publicly owned company to the smallest not-for-profit face the same unsettling imperative: to build change into their organization's very structure. On the one hand, this means being prepared to abandon everything that the organization does. On the other, it means constantly creating the new. Unless this process of abandonment and creation goes on without ceasing, the organization will very soon find itself obsolescent--losing performance and with it the ability to attract and hold the people on whom its performance depends. What drives this imperative is the nature of the organization itself. Every organization exists to put knowledge to work, but knowledge changes fast, with today's certainties becoming tomorrow's absurdities. That is why any knowledgeable individual must likewise acquire new knowledge every several years or also become obsolete. Familiar as the term "organization" is, we have only begun to reckon with the implications of living in a world in which the fundamental unit of society is--and must be--destabilizing. That is why questions of social responsibility now arise so often and from so many quarters. We need new ways to understand the relationship between organizations and their employees, who may in fact be unpaid volunteers, independent professionals whose organization is a network, or knowledgeable specialists who can--and often do--move on at any moment. For more than 600 years, no society has had as many competing centers of power as the one in which we now live. Drucker explains why change is--and must be--the only constant in an organization's life and explores the consequences for managers, individuals, and society overall.

  10. Prehabilitation Before Major Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Francis

    2018-01-01

    Prehabilitation is a new term for preoperative rehabilitation before major surgery. Some authors use the short form 'Prehab', though it is not so widely used. Prehabilitation involves measures to improve the physical, physiological, metabolic and psychosocial reserves in preparation for an elective surgery. This involves exercise, nutrition, education and psychosocial interventions.

  11. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of Pediatric Surgery is striving to fill an important niche that provides focus to clinical care, technical innovation and clinical research. The Annals of Pediatric Surgery has the responsibility to serve not only pediatric surgeons in the Middle East and North Africa but also should be an important conduit for scientific ...

  12. Hand Surgery: Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or asleep, depending on what you and the surgical team decide. You will not be able to see the surgery itself because a large sterile drape is placed between you and the surgeon. This is to protect the “sterile field,” the important area of your surgery, from any ...

  13. [Cognitive deterioration after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, J.; Rasmussen, L.S.

    2008-01-01

    Delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction are important and common complications after surgery. Risk factors are first of all increasing age and type of surgery, whereas the type of anaesthesia does not seem to play an important role. Mortality is higher among patients with cognitive...

  14. Robust surgery loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, Elias W.; Wullink, Gerhard; van Houdenhoven, Mark; Kazemier, Geert

    2008-01-01

    We consider the robust surgery loading problem for a hospital’s operating theatre department, which concerns assigning surgeries and sufficient planned slack to operating room days. The objective is to maximize capacity utilization and minimize the risk of overtime, and thus cancelled patients. This

  15. Weight Loss Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you cannot lose weight through diet and exercise or have serious health problems caused by obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the amount of food ...

  16. Contemporary endodontic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Richard; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2004-06-01

    During the past decade, endodontics has seen a dramatic shift in the application of periradicular surgery and the role it plays in endodontic treatment. With the introduction of enhanced magnification, periradicular ultrasonics and other associative technologies, teeth that might otherwise be extracted now have a chance for retention. This article describes the role of these advances in contemporary endodontic surgery.

  17. Safety in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for

  18. Dyschromatopsia following cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, D R; Valberg, J D

    1986-06-01

    The authors report on 19 individuals who experienced colour obscurations (dyschromatopsia) following cataract surgery. Although a transient blue discoloration (cyanopsia) might be expected following cataract surgery, an erythropsia (red vision) is more common. Symptoms generally begin after outdoor activity in bright sunlight, vary in duration and are recurrent. It is important to look for a history of drug use, migraine or cerebrovascular accidents.

  19. Annals of African Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of the Annals of African Surgery is to provide a medium for the exchange of current information between surgeons in the African region. The journal embraces surgery in all its aspects; basic science, clinical research, experimental research, surgical education. It will assist surgeons in the region to keep abreast of ...

  20. Tennis elbow surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people. Many people are able to return to sports and other activities that use the elbow within 4 to 6 months. Keeping up with recommended exercise helps ensure the problem will not return. Alternative Names Lateral epicondylitis - surgery; Lateral tendinosis - surgery; Lateral ...

  1. Mammography before and after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Tara E; Rosas, Ulysses S; Downey, John R; Miyake, Kanae K; Ikeda, Debra M; Morton, John M

    2017-03-01

    Morbidly obese women are at increased risk for breast cancer, and the majority of surgical weight-loss patients are older than 40 years old. The purpose of the present study was to determine the technical and interpretive changes in mammography following bariatric surgery. Accredited Academic Hospital. Two breast-imaging radiologists reviewed screening mammograms performed on 10 morbidly obese women undergoing bariatric surgery both pre- and postoperatively. American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR BI-RADS) density, imaging quality measurements, compression force, breast thickness, pectoral nipple line (PNL) length, and x-ray beam kilovoltage (kVp) and miliamperes per second (mAs) were recorded. The average patient age was 56 years old, with mean age at menarche of 13 years old; 70% of patients were postmenopausal (average age 49 years at menopause) and 50% had a family history of breast cancer. There was a significant reduction in both BMI (-13.2 kg/m2, Pbariatric surgery. There was a significant reduction in breast thickness (-23.8 mm), reduction in PNL length (-1.9 cm), reduction in kVp (-1.2), and reduction in mAs (-16.7) even though there was no compression force change in pre- and postoperative mammograms detected. All breast densities were fatty or scattered though there were more scattered and fewer fatty images after surgery (P = .002). Morbidly obese women can undergo quality mammograms before and after bariatric surgery; however, weight loss after bariatric surgery leads to only slightly denser mammograms. Furthermore, weight loss reduces mammographic radiation doses. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Should bariatric surgery be performed in adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamish, Andrew J; Reinehr, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Adolescent obesity has markedly increased worldwide in both its extent and prevalence in recent decades and obesity prevention strategies are failing. As a result, effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. As behavioral and pharmacological treatment approaches have only moderate effects in severe obesity, bariatric surgery has begun to emerge as a treatment option. In this debate article, we offer arguments opposing and supporting bariatric surgery in the treatment of severe obesity in adolescents. Bariatric surgery has superior therapeutic outcomes with respect to weight loss and resolution of comorbid diseases over other existing treatments. However, long-term outcomes after bariatric surgery in adolescents are only just beginning to emerge. Furthermore, the procedures are generally considered irreversible, apart from gastric banding. Most importantly, not all adolescents seem to benefit greatly from bariatric surgery and we are not yet able to reliably identify those who stand to gain the greatest benefit. The authors agree that adolescent bariatric surgery should be offered exclusively within formal adolescent obesity programs, delivered by specialist multidisciplinary child/adolescent obesity teams, and within specialist centers, in order to optimize outcomes and minimize potential detrimental effects. Patients and their family/carers must be educated regarding the benefits and risks, potential side effects, expected changes in eating behavior and the lifelong requirement for regular medical follow-up after surgery. Before embarking upon a surgical treatment pathway in adolescents with severe obesity, it may also be beneficial to ensure compliance to treatment is demonstrated, in order to minimize the risk of nutritional deficiencies and associated potential complications. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  3. Security and the networked society

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This book examines technological and social events during 2011 and 2012, a period that saw the rise of the hacktivist, the move to mobile platforms, and the ubiquity of social networks. It covers key technological issues such as hacking, cyber-crime, cyber-security and cyber-warfare, the internet, smart phones, electronic security, and information privacy. This book traces the rise into prominence of these issues while also exploring the resulting cultural reaction. The authors' analysis forms the basis of a discussion on future technological directions and their potential impact on society. T

  4. On Information Society and Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadri Yamaç

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Information society with the underlying communication technology revolution was assumed to contribute to democracy. The glittering words such as participatory  democracy, direct democracy, tele-democracy, e-government, e-democracy are now a part of our lives. However, as the computers have become the modern surveillance tools, there seems to be a frustration in the field of human rights and democracy. The heroes of the novels of George Orwell and Franz Kafka's live in all realities nowadays.Under these circumstances, the realization of democracy is not so easy.

  5. POWER, STATE AND NETWORK SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to study the main changes that the classic conception of State suffered in the last century, with special focus in the three original constituent elements: sovereignty, population and territory. This paper addresses the conceptions of power and its contemporary journey, especially in the 20th century, using the works of Foucault, Agamben, Giddens and Galbraith. Then, the thoughts of Spanish sociologist Manuel Castells, who address new technologies and network society, are elucidated. Lastly, it is shown a great concern with a possible state control using new information technologies in the 21th century.

  6. Social Power, Law and Society

    OpenAIRE

    Saulo Casali Bahia

    2016-01-01

    The article aims to discuss some aspects of the formal centers of social power. Thus, it seeks to answer how power becomes institutionalized in formal social organizations; what is the source of political power and how it is converted into institutions of governance; how legal power is generated by society and how it grows; what is the relationship between legal power and those who are governed; what is the role of the legal system and human rights in fostering the distribution of social powe...

  7. Sample design for Understanding Society

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design of the sample for “Understanding Society†. The sample consists of five components. The largest component is a newly-selected general population sample. The other four components are an ethnic minority ‘boost’ sample, a general population comparison sample, the ex-BHPS (British Household Panel Survey) sample, and the innovation panel sample. For each component, the paper outlines the design and explains the rationale behind the main features of the desig...

  8. State Phobia and Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, Mitchell; Villadsen, Kaspar

    State Phobia draws extensively upon the work of Michel Foucault to argue for the necessity of the concept of the state in political and social analysis. In so doing, it takes on not only the dominant view in the human sciences that the concept of the state is outmoded, but also the large interpre...... and political rights of individuals. Arguing that states and their cooperation remain of vital importance to resolving contemporary crises, they demonstrate the interdependence of state and civil society and the necessity of social forms of governance....

  9. Guidelines for flapless surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclar, Anthony G

    2007-07-01

    With the introduction of in-office cone beam computed tomography (CT), improved access to conventional CT scanning, and dental implant treatment planning software allowing on-the-spot 3-dimensional evaluations of potential implant sites, the use of "flapless" implant surgery has gained popularity among surgeons. Although the flapless approach was initially suggested for and embraced by novice implant surgeons, the successful use of this approach often requires advanced clinical experience and surgical judgment. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of and indications and contraindications for flapless dental implant surgery, with special emphasis on requirements for establishing or maintaining long-term health and stability of the peri-implant soft tissues. Prerequisites for surgeons wishing to use the flapless tissue punch approach in dental implant surgery are outlined and put into perspective relative to conventional open-flap surgery techniques and other minimally invasive procedures currently used in implant surgery. Procedures for single- and multiple-tooth applications are illustrated.

  10. ROBOTIC SURGERY: BIOETHICAL ASPECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    SIQUEIRA-BATISTA, Rodrigo; SOUZA, Camila Ribeiro; MAIA, Polyana Mendes; SIQUEIRA, Sávio Lana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The use of robots in surgery has been increasingly common today, allowing the emergence of numerous bioethical issues in this area. Objective: To present review of the ethical aspects of robot use in surgery. Method: Search in Pubmed, SciELO and Lilacs crossing the headings "bioethics", "surgery", "ethics", "laparoscopy" and "robotic". Results: Of the citations obtained, were selected 17 articles, which were used for the preparation of the article. It contains brief presentation on robotics, its inclusion in health and bioethical aspects, and the use of robots in surgery. Conclusion: Robotic surgery is a reality today in many hospitals, which makes essential bioethical reflection on the relationship between health professionals, automata and patients. PMID:28076489

  11. Minimally invasive orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Cory M; Kaban, Leonard B; Troulis, Maria J

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is defined as the discipline in which operative procedures are performed in novel ways to diminish the sequelae of standard surgical dissections. The goals of minimally invasive surgery are to reduce tissue trauma and to minimize bleeding, edema, and injury, thereby improving the rate and quality of healing. In orthognathic surgery, there are two minimally invasive techniques that can be used separately or in combination: (1) endoscopic exposure and (2) distraction osteogenesis. This article describes the historical developments of the fields of orthognathic surgery and minimally invasive surgery, as well as the integration of the two disciplines. Indications, techniques, and the most current outcome data for specific minimally invasive orthognathic surgical procedures are presented.

  12. Sinus surgery: optimal surgery, optimal outcome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens, Wytske J.

    2016-01-01

    Sinus surgery remains an issue of discussion. We lack data on a number of important issues. In this issue of the journal Jiang et al. show that 67 % of their patients who underwent FESS for CRS had OSAS (of which more than half moderate to severe) but only 38% complained of daytime sleepiness

  13. From Information Society to Knowledge Society: The Ontology Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Christophe

    2002-09-01

    Information society, virtual enterprise, e-business rely more and more on communication and knowledge sharing between heterogeneous actors. But, no communication is possible, and all the more so no co-operation or collaboration, if those actors do not share the same or at least a compatible meaning for the terms they use. Ontology, understood as an agreed vocabulary of common terms and meanings, is a solution to that problem. Nevertheless, although there is quite a lot of experience in using ontologies, several barriers remain which stand against a real use of ontology. As a matter of fact, it is very difficult to build, reuse and share ontologies. We claim that the ontology problem requires a multidisciplinary approach based on sound epistemological, logical and linguistic principles. This article presents the Ontological Knowledge Station (OK Station©), a software environment for building and using ontologies which relies on such principles. The OK Station is currently being used in several industrial applications.

  14. SURGERY AND CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY JOURNALS ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Schanaider

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze critically the effectiveness and value of bibliometric indicators in journals of Surgery or Cardiovacular Surgery in the context of the postgraduate programs of CAPES Medicine III. Methods: A sampling with 16 academic programs and one professional master of Medicine III, encompassing the General and Digestive System Surgery, Cardiovascular Surgery and Multidisciplinary courses with such contents, was evaluated. Thomson Reuters/ISI (JCR, Elsevier/Scopus (SJR, and also Scielo databases were used. Results: Only in seven programs, the teachers had an average of Qualis A1 articles greater than the others strata. Eleven journals in the surgical area are in stratum A1 (5% and it reaches 25% in Cardiovascular Surgery. Among the six journals with the largest number of publications Qualis A1 in area Medicine III, five are from non-specific areas. The Acta Cirúrgica Brasileira represented 58% of the publications in the stratum A2. There are some obstacles in the Qualis classification with little uniformity among the Medicine areas I, II and III. Conclusions: A permanent committee should be set to update the Qualis, composed by the three medical areas. It should be considered using other index databases and the unification of the Qualis criteria for journals in medicine. Rating criteria of multi and transdisciplinary journals need to be reviewed. It is essential an institutional financial support for national journals chosen by peers aiming to provide a full computerization process and a professional reviewer of the English language, in order to increase the impact factor.

  15. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure ... problem may cause heart failure or make heart failure worse. Heart valve surgery may be needed to repair or ...

  16. [Infections after intraocular lens surgery: implications for refractive surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneri, S; Heiligenhaus, A

    2012-09-01

    Apart from the classical indication of removing an opaque lens that is compromising vision, extraction of the crystalline lens is gaining increasing importance as a refractive procedure. This literature review which considers the present guidelines of various ophthalmological societies and recently published studies is intended to give an estimate of the incidence of postoperative endophthalmitis and evidence-based recommendations for its prophylaxis, diagnosis, and therapy. The incidence of endophthalmitis after cataract extraction is reported to be 0.04% to 0.3% in most sizeable studies. Immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery is internationally gaining popularity. It remains difficult to estimate whether or not the risk of endophthalmitis is affected with this approach. A toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS) needs to be differentiated from postoperative endophthalmitis. TASS is an acute sterile inflammation after cataract surgery. Remnants of detergents and antiseptics on the surgical instruments are supposed to be main triggers. Additionally, the inappropriate preparation of solutions and antibiotics for intracameral use is considered to be a major cause. A case of TASS was also reported after implantation of an iris-fixated anterior chamber lens in a phakic eye. The cefuroxime solution that was prophylactically used in the ESCRS study and that is recommended for routine cataract surgery is not commercially available in Germany as a ready preparation for intraoperative application. Different measures are undertaken in different countries to prevent postoperative endophthalmitis, whose values are not exactly quantifiable. Antisepsis with povidone-iodine is still considered to be the component with the best evidence. For management of acute postoperative endophthalmitis, the systemic application of antibiotics is recommended in addition to their intravitreal injection. Few case reports have been published describing an infection after the implantation

  17. [Assessment and treatment of acute pancreatitis. Position document of the Catalan Society of Gastroenterology, Catalan Society of Surgery and Catalan Society of the Pancreas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boadas, Jaume; Balsells, Joaquin; Busquets, Juli; Codina-B, Antoni; Darnell, Anna; Garcia-Borobia, Francisco; Ginés, Àngels; Gornals, Joan; Gruartmoner, Guillem; Ilzarbe, Lucas; Merino, Xavier; Oms, Lluís; Puig, Ignasi; Puig-Diví, Valentí; Vaquero, Eva; Vida, Francesc; Molero, Xavier

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing. AP is one of the gastrointestinal diseases that most frequently requires hospital admission in affected individuals. In the last few years, considerable scientific evidence has led to substantial changes in the medical and surgical treatment of this disease. New knowledge of the physiopathology of AP indicates that its severity is influenced by its systemic effects (organ failure), especially if the disease is persistent, and also by local complications (fluid collections or necrosis), especially if these become infected. Treatment should be personalized and depends on the patient's clinical status, the location of the necrosis, and disease stage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  18. Pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfmüller, Georg; Delalande, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Whereas there is no specific neurosurgical technique in pediatric epilepsy, the frequency of each type of surgery is very different from epilepsy surgery applied in adults, and reflects the underlying etiologies, which are much more diverse in children, with malformations of cortical development and tumors as the prevailing etiologies. Extensive resective or disconnective procedures for extratemporal epilepsy are more frequently performed in infants and younger children, whereas temporo-mesial resection is by far the most common surgical treatment for adults with epilepsy. More recently, less invasive techniques in children with an extensive epileptogenic zone, such as multilobar disconnection, hemispherotomy and other functional hemispherectomy variants, have been introduced in order to reduce duration of surgery, perioperative morbidity and length of hospital stay. Likewise, minimally invasive techniques are utilized, such as the endoscopic disconnection of hypothalamic hamartomas for gelastic epilepsy. This development has been encouraged with the introduction of image-guided navigation systems for the preoperative planning and during surgery. Historically, epilepsy surgery for children has been established much later than for adults. Apart from the particular aspects in perioperative management of younger infants, surgery-related morbidity as well as seizure outcome is in general similar to those in adults, depending rather on each type of surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Getting surgery right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, John R; Johnston, Janet; Finley, Edward D

    2007-09-01

    We sought to identify factors contributing to wrong-site surgery (wrong patient, procedure, side, or part). We examined all reports from all hospitals and ambulatory surgical centers--in a state that requires reporting of wrong-site surgery--from the initiation of the reporting requirement in June 2004 through December 2006. Over 30 months, there were 427 reports of near misses (253) or surgical interventions started (174) involving the wrong patient (34), wrong procedure (39), wrong side (298), and/or wrong part (60); 83 patients had incorrect procedures done to completion. Procedures on the lower extremities were the most common (30%). Common contributions to errors resulting in the initiation of wrong-site surgery involved patient positioning (20) and anesthesia interventions (29) before any planned time-out process, not verifying consents (22) or site markings (16), and not doing a proper time-out process (17). Actions involving operating surgeons contributed to 92. Common sources of successful recovery to prevent wrong-site surgery were patients (57), circulating nurses (30), and verifying consents (43). Interestingly, 31 formal time-out processes were unsuccessful in preventing "wrong" surgery. Wrong-site surgery continues to occur regularly, especially wrong-side surgery, even with formal site verification. Many errors occur before the time-out; some persist despite the verification protocol. Patients and nurses are the surgeons' best allies. Verification, starting with verification of the consent, needs to occur at multiple points before the incision.

  20. [Surgery for thoracic tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilani, T; Boudaya, M S; Zribi, H; Ouerghi, S; Marghli, A; Mestiri, T; Mezni, F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is mainly a medical disease. Surgery has been the unique therapeutic tool for a long time before the advent of specific antituberculous drugs, and the role of surgery was then confined to the treatment of the sequelae of tuberculosis and their complications. The resurgence of tuberculosis and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB combined to immunosuppressed patients represent a new challenge for tuberculosis surgery. Surgery may be indicated for a diagnostic purpose in patients with pulmonary, pleural, mediastinal or thoracic wall involvement, or with a therapeutic purpose (drainage, resection, residual cavity obliteration). Modern imaging techniques and the advent of video-assisted thoracic surgery allowed a new approach of this pathology; the majority of diagnostic interventions and selected cases requiring lung resection can be performed through a mini-invasive approach. Patients proposed for aggressive surgery may be treated with the best results thanks to a good evaluation of the thoracic lesions, of the patients' nutritional, infectious and general status combined with a good coordination between the specialized medical team for an optimal preparation to surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Transfer your ideas to society!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Science and technology labs are the ideal places for developing innovative solutions. However, inventors sometimes don’t realize that their ideas can find an application in industry, which can in turn have a technical and economic impact on society. Some researchers may think that disclosing an invention is a time-consuming process which is worth doing only in very special cases. But one thing is certain: it is always worth informing the Knowledge and Technology Transfer group, as they will give you the correct advice and support. Don’t be afraid of the paperwork… it can be highly rewarding!   Why should researchers at CERN bother to disclose their inventions to the Knowledge and Technology Transfer Group first? “Because when inventors do so, a process to transfer the technology to industry is set in motion” explains Henning Huuse, Patent Portfolio Manager in the KTT Group. To facilitate this transfer, patent protection can be a useful tool. &...

  2. Biophilic Cities and Healthy Societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Beatley

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Biophilia holds that as a species humans are innately drawn to nature and to living things. Mounting research confirms the many positive health benefits of contact with nature, and the need for daily (and hourly contact with the natural environment in order to live happy, healthy, meaningful lives. A new vision of Biophilic Cities is put forward here: cities that are nature-abundant, that seek to protect and grow nature, and that foster deep connections with the natural world. This article describes the emergence of this global movement, the new and creative ways that cities are restoring, growing and connecting with nature, and the current status and trajectory of a new global Biophilic Cities Network, launched in 2013. There remain open questions, and significant challenges, to advancing the Biophilic Cities vision, but it also presents unusual opportunities to create healthier, livable cities and societies.

  3. Architecture for the silvering society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Jonas E; Rönn, Magnus

    Abstract In the context of the universal ageing process that is currently taking place in western society, the organization of architecture competitions that deals with space for dependent ageing comes of relevance. Based on the welfare regime theory, it could be argued that this type...... space for ageing by use of architectural competitions. Three municipal architecture competitions that dealt with space for ageing (ordinary or sheltered housing) constitute the framework for this study. These were organized during the period of November 2011 to April 2012, partly sponsored...... of architecture is part of a national architectural typology. The type of welfare regime does not only supply spatial parameters to respect, but it also align architects’ the spatial visions in order to incarnate the national socio‐political ambitions. This type of space seems to have a slower pace of change...

  4. Fluidity in the networked society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin Tweddell

    2011-01-01

    In the globalized economies e-permeation has become a basic condition in our everyday lives. ICT can no longer be understood solely as artefacts and tools and computer-related literacy are no longer restricted to the ability to operate digital tools for specific purposes. The network society...... competencies. Both lifelong learning and digital literacy understood as "bildung" have emerged as central for the definitions of and standards for future key competencies. However, definitions and standards only tell us about the desired destination and outcome of digital competence building. They tell us...... nothing about how we may get there. In the educational system ICT and e-learning are becoming an everyday condition and the basic challenge for the educational system is twofold: 1) The actually making of digital literate and self-programming social actors – students and teachers; and 2) How to develop...

  5. Adolescent bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibele, Anna R; Mattar, Samer G

    2011-12-01

    Obesity has become an increasingly serious problem in pediatric and adolescent populations in the United States. Although bariatric surgery has been offered to morbidly obese adolescents for the past several decades, it remains controversial. However, the benefits of weight loss surgery in this population have been realized, particularly its long-term physical and emotional effects on adolescents. This article reviews the demographics and health implications of adolescent obesity, describes the most common adolescent bariatric surgical procedures and their outcomes, discusses the ethical issues involved in elective surgery in this population, and outlines the key components of an adolescent bariatric surgical program. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Safe Surgery Trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-15

    CDRL A001 For: Safe Surgery Trainer Prime Contract: N00014-14-C-0066 For the Period July 1, 2015 to July 31, 2015 Submitted: 15 Aug 2015...DATE 15 AUG 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2015 to 31-07-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Safe Surgery Trainer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b... Surgery Trainer ONR N00014-14-C-0066 Unclassified Unclassified Use or disclosure of the data contained on this page is subject to the restriction

  7. Single port laparoscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Henrik; Istre, Olav

    2012-01-01

    LESS, or laparo-endoscopic single site surgery, is a promising new method in minimally invasive surgery. An increasing number of surgical procedures are being performed using this technique, however, its large-scale adoption awaits results of prospective randomized controlled studies confirming...... potential benefits. Theoretically, cosmetic outcomes, postoperative pain and complication rates could be improved with use of single site surgery. This study describes introduction of the method in a private hospital in Denmark, in which 40 patients have been treated for benign gynecologic conditions...

  8. Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol facilitates faster functional patient recovery in elective cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kaluinaitė, Greta; Mačiukaitienė, Jomantė; Jakubauskaitė, Ramunė

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Fast-track cardiac surgery today is an established and safe method because of achieved early tracheal extubation that leads to decreased length of hospital stay (LOS) with no increased risk of complications. However, we hypothesized, that fast-track protocols not only improve such system-oriented outcomes as LOS or complication rate, but facilitate better patient-oriented outcomes such as functional recovery. Our fast-track protocol was based on ERAS society guidelines, which be...

  9. Do plastic surgeons have cosmetic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunluoglu, Raffi; Gurunluoglu, Aslin

    2009-12-01

    Thoughts and attitudes of plastic surgeons about having cosmetic surgery on themselves remain obscure for the most part and pose an attractive subject to study. A survey was distributed to a random sample of 2635 American Society of Plastic Surgeons member and candidate member surgeons to determine plastic surgeons' interest in both minimally invasive cosmetic procedures and cosmetic surgical procedures, selection of facility type, selection of surgeon, and their satisfaction level. There were 276 responses. Sixty-two percent of the plastic surgeons had undergone at least one type of minimally invasive cosmetic procedure. Female plastic surgeons had significantly more minimally invasive cosmetic procedures compared with male plastic surgeons (84.9 versus 57 percent; p cosmetic surgery. The most common cosmetic surgical procedure was liposuction of the trunk and/or extremity (18.6 percent). Male plastic surgeons were more likely to have a procedure than men in the general population, and female plastic surgeons were less likely to have breast augmentation than the general population. The percentage of operations conducted by a plastic surgeon was 88.2 percent. The percentage performed by a nationally known surgeon was 45.3 percent; 75.9 percent of plastic surgeons selected a surgeon who was certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. The satisfaction rate was 90 percent. The survey provides insight on the stance of American Society of Plastic Surgeons member and candidate member surgeons on the subject. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first survey designed for this purpose.

  10. Day care surgery: The norm for elective surgery | Kakande | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This has led to the concept of day care surgery. The notion of day care surgery goes back to the days of Dr. Nicoll, a surgeon and founder of modern ambulatory surgery, who published his landmark article on the surgery of infancy in 19091. He described a 10-year surgical experience at the outpatient clinic in the Glasgow ...

  11. Repetitive endoscopic sinus surgery failure: a role for radical surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, Ward J. M.; Wreesmann, Volkert B.; van der Meulen, Freerk W.; Knegt, Paul P.; Fokkens, Wytske J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is considered to be the golden standard for surgery in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. However, there is still a small group of patients unresponsive despite repetitive surgery. Radical surgery aimed at reduction of the

  12. Tendon Transfer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Muscle injury (trauma, rheumatoid arthritis) Neuromuscular disorder (cerebral palsy, stroke, traumatic brain injuries, and spinal muscle atrophy) Birth defect (infants born without certain muscle functions) SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS TREATMENT Procedure The surgery may be performed with ...

  13. Preparing for Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do the day of surgery? Remove any nail polish or acrylic nails. Do not wear make up. ... main source of fuel. If you have further questions, contact your obstetrician–gynecologist. FAQ080: Designed as an ...

  14. Advances in Refractive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Moss, Hart; Ventura, Bruna V; Padilha, Henrique; Hester, Christian; Koch, Douglas D

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review advances in the field of refractive surgery as reported in the peer-reviewed literature over the previous year. This was a literature review. We conducted a PubMed search for terms related to refractive surgery and reviewed prominent international ophthalmic journals published from May 2012 through April 2013. All pertinent articles were reviewed, and selected articles with the greatest relevance were included. Many studies over the previous year have highlighted progress in the field of refractive surgery; topics included keratoconus screening, photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis, corneal cross-linking, small-incision lenticule extraction, phakic intraocular lenses, corneal inlays, presbyopic corneal treatments, and femtosecond laser-assisted astigmatic keratotomy. The field of refractive surgery continues to provide exciting developments. Improvements in established procedures and promising new surgical options make the current climate an appealing one for refractive surgeons and patients.

  15. Transanal Minimally Invasive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBeche-Adams, Teresa; Nassif, George

    2015-01-01

    Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) was first described in 2010 as a crossover between single-incision laparoscopic surgery and transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) to allow access to the proximal and mid-rectum for resection of benign and early-stage malignant rectal lesions. The TAMIS technique can also be used for noncurative intent surgery of more advanced lesions in patients who are not candidates for radical surgery. Proper workup and staging should be done before surgical decision-making. In addition to the TAMIS port, instrumentation and set up include readily available equipment found in most operating suites. TAMIS has proven its usefulness in a wide range of applications outside of local excision, including repair of rectourethral fistula, removal of rectal foreign body, control of rectal hemorrhage, and as an adjunct in total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer. TAMIS is an easily accessible, technically feasible, and cost-effective alternative to TEM. PMID:26491410

  16. Breast Reduction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to achieve a breast size proportionate to your body. Breast reduction surgery might also help improve your self-image and self-confidence and your ability to participate in physical activities. ...

  17. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and orthodontist understand that this is a long-term commitment for you and your family, and will ... face, mouth and jaw surgery Contact Us Sitemap Terms of Use Privacy Policy © Copyright AAOMS 2008-2017 ...

  18. Mitral valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be able to store blood in the blood bank for transfusions during and after your surgery. Ask ... stroke. Valves made from human or animal tissue fail over time. They have an average lifespan of ...

  19. Retrosternal thyroid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007558.htm Retrosternal thyroid surgery To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The thyroid gland is normally located at the front of ...

  20. Types of Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems with the heart's function and valves. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ... To Expect After Heart Surgery Recovery in the Hospital You may spend a day or more in ...