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Sample records for neuroimaging initiative positron

  1. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 3: Continued innovation for clinical trial improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiner, Michael W. [Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Veitch, Dallas P. [Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Aisen, Paul S. [Univ. of Southern California, San Diego, CA (United States); Beckett, Laurel A. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Cairns, Nigel J. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Green, Robert C. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Harvey, Danielle [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Jack, Clifford R. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Jagust, William [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Morris, John C. [Univ. of Southern California, San Diego, CA (United States); Petersen, Ronald C. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Salazar, Jennifer [Univ. of Southern California, San Diego, CA (United States); Saykin, Andrew J. [Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Shaw, Leslie M. [Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Toga, Arthur W. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Trojanowski, John Q. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-12-05

    Overall, the goal of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is to validate biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials. ADNI-3, which began on August 1, 2016, is a 5-year renewal of the current ADNI-2 study. ADNI-3 will follow current and additional subjects with normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment, and AD using innovative technologies such as tau imaging, magnetic resonance imaging sequences for connectivity analyses, and a highly automated immunoassay platform and mass spectroscopy approach for cerebrospinal fluid biomarker analysis. A Systems Biology/pathway approach will be used to identify genetic factors for subject selection/enrichment. Amyloid positron emission tomography scanning will be standardized using the Centiloid method. The Brain Health Registry will help recruit subjects and monitor subject cognition. Multimodal analyses will provide insight into AD pathophysiology and disease progression. Finally, ADNI-3 will aim to inform AD treatment trials and facilitate development of AD disease-modifying treatments.

  2. Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2 Clinical Core: Progress and plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisen, Paul S; Petersen, Ronald C; Donohue, Michael; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the current status of the Clinical Core of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), and summarizes planning for the next stage of the project. Clinical Core activities and plans were synthesized based on discussions among the Core leaders and external advisors. The longitudinal data in ADNI-2 provide natural history data on a clinical trials population and continue to inform refinement and standardization of assessments, models of trajectories, and clinical trial methods that have been extended into sporadic preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD). Plans for the next phase of the ADNI project include maintaining longitudinal follow-up of the normal and mild cognitive impairment cohorts, augmenting specific clinical cohorts, and incorporating novel computerized cognitive assessments and patient-reported outcomes. A major hypothesis is that AD represents a gradually progressive disease that can be identified precisely in its long presymptomatic phase, during which intervention with potentially disease-modifying agents may be most useful. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Predicting episodic memory performance using different biomarkers: results from Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, María Julieta; Cohen, Gabriela; Chrem Mendez, Patricio; Campos, Jorge; Nahas, Federico E; Surace, Ezequiel I; Vazquez, Silvia; Gustafson, Deborah; Guinjoan, Salvador; Allegri, Ricardo F; Sevlever, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (Arg-ADNI) is the first ADNI study to be performed in Latin America at a medical center with the appropriate infrastructure. Our objective was to describe baseline characteristics and to examine whether biomarkers related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) physiopathology were associated with worse memory performance. Patients and methods Fifteen controls and 28 mild cognitive impairment and 13 AD dementia subjects were included. For Arg-ADNI, all biomarker parameters and neuropsychological tests of ADNI-II were adopted. Results of positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorodeoxyglucose and 11C-Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB-PET) were available from all participants. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker results were available from 39 subjects. Results A total of 56 participants were included and underwent baseline evaluation. The three groups were similar with respect to years of education and sex, and they differed in age (F=5.10, P=0.01). Mean scores for the baseline measurements of the neuropsychological evaluation differed significantly among the three groups at P0.1). Baseline amyloid deposition and left hippocampal volume separated the three diagnostic groups and correlated with the memory performance (P<0.001). Conclusion Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data revealed links between cognition, structural changes, and biomarkers. Follow-up of a larger and more representative cohort, particularly analyzing cerebrospinal fluid and brain biomarkers, will allow better characterization of AD in our country. PMID:27695331

  4. Neuro-imaging and positron emission tomography of congenital homonymous hemianopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosley, T M; Kiyosawa, M; Moster, M; Harbour, R; Zimmerman, R; Savino, P J; Sergott, R C; Alavi, A; Reivich, M

    1991-04-15

    Congenital homonymous hemianopsia is an uncommon asymptomatic visual field defect discovered typically in young adult life that is caused by a diverse group of insults to the retrochiasmal afferent visual system occurring prenatally, at birth, or during early childhood. We treated eight patients with congenital homonymous hemianopsia; seven with damage involving the optic radiations and one with an abnormality of the optic tract. We performed positron emission tomography using 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose on two patients with dense homonymous hemianopsias, lesions of the contralateral optic radiations, and largely intact occipital cortex. These studies showed minimal abnormalities in resting visual cortex glucose metabolism of the affected visual cortex.

  5. Volunteerism and self-selection bias in human positron emission tomography neuroimaging research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Lynn M; Wand, Gary S; Zhu, Shijun; Selby, Victoria

    2013-06-01

    Scientists have known for decades that persons who volunteer for behavioral research may be different from those who decline participation and that characteristics differentiating volunteers from non-volunteers may vary depending on the nature of the research. There is evidence that volunteer self-selection can impact representativeness of samples in studies involving physically or psychologically stressful procedures, such as electric shocks, sensory isolation, or drug effects. However, the degree to which self-selection influences sample characteristics in "stressful" studies involving positron emission tomography (PET) has not been evaluated. Since estimation of population parameters, robustness of findings, and validity of inferred relationships can all be impacted by volunteer bias, it is important to determine if self-selection may act as an unrecognized confound in such studies. In the present investigation, we obtained baseline data on 114 (56M, 58F) subjects who participated in a study involving completion of several self-report questionnaires and behavioral performance tasks. Participants were later given the opportunity to enroll in an [11C]raclopride PET study involving intravenous amphetamine (AMPH) administration. Demographic characteristics, personality traits, and task performance of subjects who consented to the latter study were compared with those who declined participation. Findings showed that the principal personality trait that distinguished the two groups was sensation-seeking; volunteers scored significantly higher on this dimension than non-volunteers. Males were more likely to volunteer than females. However, results of mediation analysis suggested that the relationship between gender and volunteer status was mediated by greater sensation-seeking traits in the males. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  6. The pilot European Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisoni, G.B.; Henneman, W.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In North America, the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has established a platform to track the brain changes of Alzheimer's disease. A pilot study has been carried out in Europe to test the feasibility of the adoption of the ADNI platform (pilot E-ADNI). METHODS: Sev...

  7. The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Informatics Core: A Decade in Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    The Informatics Core of the Alzheimer’s Diseases Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has coordinated data integration and dissemination for a continually growing and complex dataset in which both data contributors and recipients span institutions, scientific disciplines and geographic boundaries. This article provides an update on the accomplishments and future plans. PMID:26194316

  8. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 3: Continued innovation for clinical trial improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Weiner, MW; Veitch, DP; Aisen, PS; Beckett, LA; Cairns, NJ; Green, RC; Harvey, D.; Jack, CR; Jagust, W.; Morris, JC; Petersen, RC; Salazar, J.; Saykin, AJ; Shaw, LM; Toga, AW

    2017-01-01

    © 2016 the Alzheimer's Association Introduction The overall goal of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is to validate biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials. ADNI-3, which began on August 1, 2016, is a 5-year renewal of the current ADNI-2 study. Methods ADNI-3 will follow current and additional subjects with normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment, and AD using innovative technologies such as tau imaging, magnetic resonance imaging sequences for connec...

  9. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: A review of papers published since its inception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Aisen, Paul S.; Beckett, Laurel A.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Liu, Enchi; Morris, John C.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Mark E.; Shaw, Leslie; Shen, Li; Siuciak, Judith A.; Soares, Holly; Toga, Arthur W.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2014-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is an ongoing, longitudinal, multicenter study designed to develop clinical, imaging, genetic, and biochemical biomarkers for the early detection and tracking of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The study aimed to enroll 400 subjects with early mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 200 subjects with early AD, and 200 normal control subjects; $67 million funding was provided by both the public and private sectors, including the National Institute on Aging, 13 pharmaceutical companies, and 2 foundations that provided support through the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. This article reviews all papers published since the inception of the initiative and summarizes the results as of February 2011. The major accomplishments of ADNI have been as follows: (1) the development of standardized methods for clinical tests, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in a multicenter setting; (2) elucidation of the patterns and rates of change of imaging and CSF biomarker measurements in control subjects, MCI patients, and AD patients. CSF biomarkers are consistent with disease trajectories predicted by β-amyloid cascade (Hardy, J Alzheimers Dis 2006;9(Suppl 3):151–3) and tau-mediated neurodegeneration hypotheses for AD, whereas brain atrophy and hypometabolism levels show predicted patterns but exhibit differing rates of change depending on region and disease severity; (3) the assessment of alternative methods of diagnostic categorization. Currently, the best classifiers combine optimum features from multiple modalities, including MRI, [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, CSF biomarkers, and clinical tests; (4) the development of methods for the early detection of AD. CSF biomarkers, β-amyloid 42 and tau, as well as amyloid PET may reflect the earliest steps in AD pathology in mildly symptomatic or even nonsymptomatic subjects, and are leading candidates

  10. The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: A review of papers published since its inception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Aisen, Paul S.; Beckett, Laurel A.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Liu, Enchi; Morris, John C.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Mark E.; Shaw, Leslie; Siuciak, Judith A.; Soares, Holly; Toga, Arthur W.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2012-01-01

    The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is an ongoing, longitudinal, multicenter study designed to develop clinical, imaging, genetic and biochemical biomarkers for the early detection and tracking of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The study aimed to enroll 400 subjects with early mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 200 subjects with early AD and 200 normal controls and $67 million funding was provided by both the public and private sectors including the National Institutes on Aging, thirteen pharmaceutical companies and two Foundations that provided support through the Foundation for NIH (FNIH). This article reviews all papers published since the inception of the initiative and summarizes the results as of February, 2011. The major accomplishments of ADNI have been 1) the development of standardized methods for clinical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in a multi-center setting; 2) elucidation of the patterns and rates of change of imaging and CSF biomarker measurements in control, MCI and AD patients. CSF biomarkers are consistent with disease trajectories predicted by β amyloid (Aβ) cascade [1] and tau mediated neurodegeneration hypotheses for AD while brain atrophy and hypometabolism levels show predicted patterns but exhibit differing rates of change depending on region and disease severity; 3) the assessment of alternative methods of diagnostic categorization. Currently, the best classifiers combine optimum features from multiple modalities including MRI, FDG-PET, CSF biomarkers and clinical tests; 4) the development of methods for the early detection of AD. CSF biomarkers, Aβ42 and tau as well as amyloid PET may reflect the earliest steps in AD pathology in mildly or even non-symptomatic subjects and are leading candidates for the detection of AD in its preclinical stages; 5) the improvement of clinical trial efficiency through the identification of subjects most

  11. To differentiate Alzheimer's disease earlier: introduction of Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-gang QI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD brought about much pressure in modern aging society both economically and psychologically, so it is meaningful to carry out AD research. Being considered as the most successful multi-center, inter-disciplinary and longitudinal research in AD field, Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI has obtained outstanding achievements. In this review, we attempt to introduce the research plan of ADNI project for reference. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.04.003

  12. The Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative: perspectives of the Industry Scientific Advisory Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mark E; Siemers, Eric; Snyder, Peter J; Potter, William Z; Cole, Patricia; Soares, Holly

    2010-05-01

    The Industry Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB) consists of representatives from the private companies and nonprofit foundations participating as sponsors of Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Currently 21 companies are represented including pharmaceutical, imaging, and biotech concerns, and two foundations including the Alzheimer's Association. ISAB members meet regularly by teleconference or face-to-face at ADNI meetings and participate in the ADNI Core groups, all administered and organized by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. ISAB 'deliverables' include dissemination of information to sponsors, assisting in scientific review of protocols and results, initiation and consideration of "add-on" studies and analyses, and generation of consensus positions on industry priorities and concerns. Although positioned as an advisory body, ISAB also actively contributes to the ADNI mission of identifying biomarkers of disease progression.

  13. Impact of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, 2004 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Aisen, Paul S.; Beckett, Laurel A.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Cedarbaum, Jesse; Donohue, Michael C.; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Morris, John C.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shaw, Leslie; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) was established in 2004 to facilitate the development of effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by validating biomarkers for AD clinical trials. Methods We searched for ADNI publications using established methods. Results ADNI has (1) developed standardized biomarkers for use in clinical trial subject selection and as surrogate outcome measures; (2) standardized protocols for use across multiple centers; (3) initiated worldwide ADNI; (4) inspired initiatives investigating traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder in military populations, and depression, respectively, as an AD risk factor; (5) acted as a data-sharing model; (6) generated data used in over 600 publications, leading to the identification of novel AD risk alleles, and an understanding of the relationship between biomarkers and AD progression; and (7) inspired other public-private partnerships developing biomarkers for Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis. Discussion ADNI has made myriad impacts in its first decade. A competitive renewal of the project in 2015 would see the use of newly developed tau imaging ligands, and the continued development of recruitment strategies and outcome measures for clinical trials. PMID:26194320

  14. Initial results of a positron tomograph for prostate imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J.S.; Choong, W.S.; Moses, W.W.; Qi, J.; Hu, J.; Wang,G.C.; Wilson, D.; Oh, S.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    2004-11-29

    We present the status and initial images of a positrontomograph for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair ofexternal curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis).The distance between detector banks adjusts to allow patient access andto position the detectors as closely as possible for maximum sensitivitywith patients of various sizes. Each bank is composed of two axial rowsof 20 CTI PET Systems HR+ block detectors for a total of 80 modules inthe camera. Compared to an ECAT HR PET system operating in 3D mode, ourcamera uses about one-quarter the number of detectors and hasapproximately the same sensitivity for a central point source, becauseour detectors are close to the patient. The individual detectors areangled in the plane to point towards the prostate to minimize resolutiondegradation in that region. The detectors are read out by modified CTIdata acquisition electronics. We have completed construction of thegantry and electronics, have developed detector calibration and dataacquisition software, and are taking coincidence data. We demonstratethat we can clearly visualize a "prostate" in a simple phantom.Reconstructed images of two phantoms are shown.

  15. Brain collection, standardized neuropathologic assessment, and comorbidity in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2 participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Erin E; Perrin, Richard J; Vincent, Benjamin; Baxter, Michael; Morris, John C; Cairns, Nigel J

    2015-07-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Neuropathology Core (ADNI-NPC) facilitates brain donation, ensures standardized neuropathologic assessments, and maintains a tissue resource for research. The ADNI-NPC coordinates with performance sites to promote autopsy consent, facilitate tissue collection and autopsy administration, and arrange sample delivery to the NPC, for assessment using National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association neuropathologic diagnostic criteria. The ADNI-NPC has obtained 45 participant specimens, and neuropathologic assessments have been completed in 36 to date. Challenges in obtaining consent at some sites have limited the voluntary autopsy rate to 58%. Among assessed cases, clinical diagnostic accuracy for Alzheimer disease (AD) is 97%; however, 58% of cases show neuropathologic comorbidities. Challenges facing autopsy consent and coordination are largely resource related. The neuropathologic assessments indicate that ADNI's clinical diagnostic accuracy for AD is high; however, many AD cases have comorbidities that may impact the clinical presentation, course, and imaging and biomarker results. These neuropathologic data permit multimodal and genetic studies of these comorbidities to improve diagnosis and provide etiologic insights. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Validation of Alzheimer's disease CSF and plasma biological markers: the multicentre reliability study of the pilot European Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (E-ADNI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buerger, Katharina; Frisoni, Giovanni; Uspenskaya, Olga

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiatives ("ADNI") aim to validate neuroimaging and biochemical markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Data of the pilot European-ADNI (E-ADNI) biological marker programme of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma candidate biomarkers are reported. METHODS...

  17. Intrinsic functional component analysis via sparse representation on Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Xin; Zhu, Dajiang

    2014-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia (accounting for 60% to 80%) and is the fifth leading cause of death for those people who are 65 or older. By 2050, one new case of AD in United States is expected to develop every 33 sec. Unfortunately, there is no available effective treatment that can stop or slow the death of neurons that causes AD symptoms. On the other hand, it is widely believed that AD starts before development of the associated symptoms, so its prestages, including mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or even significant memory concern (SMC), have received increasing attention, not only because of their potential as a precursor of AD, but also as a possible predictor of conversion to other neurodegenerative diseases. Although these prestages have been defined clinically, accurate/efficient diagnosis is still challenging. Moreover, brain functional abnormalities behind those alterations and conversions are still unclear. In this article, by developing novel sparse representations of whole-brain resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signals and by using the most updated Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset, we successfully identified multiple functional components simultaneously, and which potentially represent those intrinsic functional networks involved in the resting-state activities. Interestingly, these identified functional components contain all the resting-state networks obtained from traditional independent-component analysis. Moreover, by using the features derived from those functional components, it yields high classification accuracy for both AD (94%) and MCI (92%) versus normal controls. Even for SMC we can still have 92% accuracy.

  18. Recent publications from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: Reviewing progress toward improved AD clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Michael W; Veitch, Dallas P; Aisen, Paul S; Beckett, Laurel A; Cairns, Nigel J; Green, Robert C; Harvey, Danielle; Jack, Clifford R; Jagust, William; Morris, John C; Petersen, Ronald C; Saykin, Andrew J; Shaw, Leslie M; Toga, Arthur W; Trojanowski, John Q

    2017-04-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has continued development and standardization of methodologies for biomarkers and has provided an increased depth and breadth of data available to qualified researchers. This review summarizes the over 400 publications using ADNI data during 2014 and 2015. We used standard searches to find publications using ADNI data. (1) Structural and functional changes, including subtle changes to hippocampal shape and texture, atrophy in areas outside of hippocampus, and disruption to functional networks, are detectable in presymptomatic subjects before hippocampal atrophy; (2) In subjects with abnormal β-amyloid deposition (Aβ+), biomarkers become abnormal in the order predicted by the amyloid cascade hypothesis; (3) Cognitive decline is more closely linked to tau than Aβ deposition; (4) Cerebrovascular risk factors may interact with Aβ to increase white-matter (WM) abnormalities which may accelerate Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression in conjunction with tau abnormalities; (5) Different patterns of atrophy are associated with impairment of memory and executive function and may underlie psychiatric symptoms; (6) Structural, functional, and metabolic network connectivities are disrupted as AD progresses. Models of prion-like spreading of Aβ pathology along WM tracts predict known patterns of cortical Aβ deposition and declines in glucose metabolism; (7) New AD risk and protective gene loci have been identified using biologically informed approaches; (8) Cognitively normal and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects are heterogeneous and include groups typified not only by "classic" AD pathology but also by normal biomarkers, accelerated decline, and suspected non-Alzheimer's pathology; (9) Selection of subjects at risk of imminent decline on the basis of one or more pathologies improves the power of clinical trials; (10) Sensitivity of cognitive outcome measures to early changes in cognition has been improved and

  19. ANIMA: A data-sharing initiative for neuroimaging meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Andrew T; Bzdok, Danilo; Genon, Sarah; Langner, Robert; Müller, Veronika I; Eickhoff, Claudia R; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Cieslik, Edna-Clarisse; Fox, Peter T; Laird, Angela R; Amunts, Katrin; Caspers, Svenja; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analytic techniques allow cognitive neuroscientists to pool large amounts of data across many individual task-based functional neuroimaging experiments. These methods have been aided by the introduction of online databases such as Brainmap.org or Neurosynth.org, which collate peak activation coordinates obtained from thousands of published studies. Findings from meta-analytic studies typically include brain regions which are consistently activated across studies for specific contrasts, investigating cognitive or clinical hypotheses. These regions can be subsequently used as the basis for seed-based connectivity analysis, or formally compared to neuroimaging data in order to help interpret new findings. To facilitate such approaches, we have developed a new online repository of meta-analytic neuroimaging results, named the Archive of Neuroimaging Meta-analyses (ANIMA). The ANIMA platform consists of an intuitive online interface for querying, downloading, and contributing data from published meta-analytic studies. Additionally, to aid the process of organizing, visualizing, and working with these data, we present an open-source desktop application called Volume Viewer. Volume Viewer allows users to easily arrange imaging data into composite stacks, and save these sessions as individual files, which can also be uploaded to the ANIMA database. The application also allows users to perform basic functions, such as computing conjunctions between images, or extracting regions-of-interest or peak coordinates for further analysis. The introduction of this new resource will enhance the ability of researchers to both share their findings and incorporate existing meta-analytic results into their own research.

  20. Neuroimaging of epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H.; Brinkmann, Benjamin H.; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. PMID:27430454

  1. Neuroimaging of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Initial characterization of a position-sensitive photodiode/BGO detector for PET (positron emission tomography)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.; Jackson, H.G.; Turko, B.T.; Cahoon, J.L.; Geyer, A.B.; Vuletich, T.

    1988-11-01

    We present initial results of a position-sensitive photodiode/BGO detector for high resolution, multi-layer positron emission tomography (PET). Position sensitivity is achieved by dividing the 3 mm /times/ 20 mm rectangular photosensitive area along the diagonal to form two triangular segments. Each segment was individually connected to a low-noise amplifier. The photodiodes and crystals were cooled to /minus/100/degree/C to reduce dark current and increase the BGO signal. With an amplifier peaking time of 17 ..mu..sec, the sum of the signals (511 keV photopeak) was 3200 electrons with a full width at half maximum (fwhm) of 750 electrons. The ratio of one signal to the sum determined the depth of interaction with a resolution of 11 mm fwhm. 27 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Cognitive reserve and Aβ1-42 in mild cognitive impairment (Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paula; Fernandez Suarez, Marcos; Surace, Ezequiel I; Chrem Méndez, Patricio; Martín, María Eugenia; Clarens, María Florencia; Tapajóz, Fernanda; Russo, Maria Julieta; Campos, Jorge; Guinjoan, Salvador M; Sevlever, Gustavo; Allegri, Ricardo F

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive reserve and concentration of Aβ1-42 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with mild cognitive impairment, those with Alzheimer’s disease, and in control subjects. Methods Thirty-three participants from the Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database completed a cognitive battery, the Cognitive Reserve Questionnaire (CRQ), and an Argentinian accentuation reading test (TAP-BA) as a measure of premorbid intelligence, and underwent lumbar puncture for CSF biomarker quantification. Results The CRQ significantly correlated with TAP-BA, education, and Aβ1-42. When considering Aβ1-42 levels, significant differences were found in CRQ scores; higher levels of CSF Aβ1-42 were associated with higher CRQ scores. Conclusion Reduced Aβ1-42 in CSF is considered as evidence of amyloid deposition in the brain. Previous results suggest that individuals with higher education, higher occupational attainment, and participation in leisure activities (cognitive reserve) have a reduced risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Our results support the notion that enhanced neural activity has a protective role in mild cognitive impairment, as evidenced by higher CSF Aβ1-42 levels in individuals with more cognitive reserve. PMID:26504392

  4. The pilot European Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (E-ADNI) of the European Alzheimer’s Disease Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisoni, Giovanni B; Henneman, Wouter JP; Weiner, Michael W; Scheltens, Philip; Vellas, Bruno; Reynish, Emma; Hudecova, Jaroslava; Hampel, Harald; Burger, Katharina; Blennow, Kaj; Waldemar, Gunhild; Johannsen, Peter; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Zito, Giancarlo; Rossini, Paolo M; Winblad, Bengt; Barkhof, Frederik

    2008-01-01

    Background In North-America, the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has established a platform to track the brain changes of Alzheimer’s disease. A pilot study has been carried out in Europe to test the feasibility of the adoption of the ADNI platform (pilot E-ADNI). Methods Seven academic sites of the European Alzheimer’s Disease Consortium (EADC) enrolled 19 patients with MCI, 22 with AD, and 18 older healthy persons using the ADNI clinical and neuropsychological battery. ADNI compliant MR scans, CSF and blood samples were shipped to central repositories. Medial temporal atrophy (MTA) and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) were assessed by a single rater using visual rating scales. Results Recruitment rate was 3.5 subjects per month per site. The cognitive, behavioural and neuropsychological features of the European subjects were very similar to their US counterparts. 3D T1-weighted MRI sequences were successfully performed on all subjects and CSF samples obtained from 77%, 68%, and 83% of AD, MCI, and controls. Mean MTA score showed a significant increase from controls (left, right: 0.4, 0.3) to MCI (0.9, 0.8) to AD (2.3, 2.0), while mean WMH score did not differ among the three diagnostic groups (between 0.7 and 0.9). The distribution of both MRI markers was comparable to matched US ADNI subjects. Conclusions Academic EADC centres can adopt the ADNI platform to enrol MCI and AD patients and older controls with global cognitive and structural imaging features remarkably similar to those of the US ADNI. PMID:18631976

  5. Positron lifetimes at the initial stage of pore formation in Vycor glass

    CERN Document Server

    Jasinska, B; Goworek, T

    2000-01-01

    The formation of narrow pores during leaching of Vycor glass by sulphuric acid was investigated using the positron lifetime technique. During the leaching process the pore diameter remained roughly constant (except for the case of cold leaching). The time of processing changed the total length of capillaries, but not their number; at the temperature 50 deg. C during 20 min of leaching the average leaching depth was 24 mu m.

  6. Multivariate protein signatures of pre-clinical Alzheimer's disease in the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI plasma proteome dataset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Johnstone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent Alzheimer's disease (AD research has focused on finding biomarkers to identify disease at the pre-clinical stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI, allowing treatment to be initiated before irreversible damage occurs. Many studies have examined brain imaging or cerebrospinal fluid but there is also growing interest in blood biomarkers. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI has generated data on 190 plasma analytes in 566 individuals with MCI, AD or normal cognition. We conducted independent analyses of this dataset to identify plasma protein signatures predicting pre-clinical AD. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We focused on identifying signatures that discriminate cognitively normal controls (n = 54 from individuals with MCI who subsequently progress to AD (n = 163. Based on p value, apolipoprotein E (APOE showed the strongest difference between these groups (p = 2.3 × 10(-13. We applied a multivariate approach based on combinatorial optimization ((α,β-k Feature Set Selection, which retains information about individual participants and maintains the context of interrelationships between different analytes, to identify the optimal set of analytes (signature to discriminate these two groups. We identified 11-analyte signatures achieving values of sensitivity and specificity between 65% and 86% for both MCI and AD groups, depending on whether APOE was included and other factors. Classification accuracy was improved by considering "meta-features," representing the difference in relative abundance of two analytes, with an 8-meta-feature signature consistently achieving sensitivity and specificity both over 85%. Generating signatures based on longitudinal rather than cross-sectional data further improved classification accuracy, returning sensitivities and specificities of approximately 90%. CONCLUSIONS: Applying these novel analysis approaches to the powerful and well-characterized ADNI dataset has identified sets of

  7. Neuroimaging in eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-LoberaBehavioral Sciences Institute and Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, SpainAbstract: Neuroimaging techniques have been useful tools for accurate investigation of brain structure and function in eating disorders. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and voxel-based morphometry have been the most relevant technologies in this regard. The purpose of this review is to update the existing data on neuroimaging in eating disorders. The main brain changes seem to be reversible to some extent after adequate weight restoration. Brain changes in bulimia nervosa seem to be less pronounced than in anorexia nervosa and are mainly due to chronic dietary restrictions. Different subtypes of eating disorders might be correlated with specific brain functional changes. Moreover, anorectic patients who binge/purge may have different functional brain changes compared with those who do not binge/purge. Functional changes in the brain might have prognostic value, and different changes with respect to the binding potential of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, and D2/D3 receptors may be persistent after recovering from an eating disorder.Keywords: neuroimaging, brain changes, brain receptors, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, eating disorders

  8. Neuroimaging in Iran: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ali Hossein-Zadeh

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTNeuroimaging allows noninvasive evaluation of the anatomy, physiology, and function of the brain. It is widely used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and treatment evaluation of neurological disorders as well as understanding functions of the brain in health and disease. Neuroimaging modalities include X-ray computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, positron emission tomography (PET, electroencephalography (EEG, and magnetoencephalography (MEG. This paper presents an overview of the neuroimaging research in Iran in recent years, partitioned into three categories: anatomical imaging; anatomical image analysis; and functional imaging and analysis. Published papers reflect considerable progress in development of neuroimaging infrastructure, hardware installation and software development. However, group work and research collaborations among engineers, scientists, and clinicians need significant enhancement to optimize utility of the resources and maximize productivity. This is a challenge that cannot be solved without specific plans, policies, and funding.

  9. Positron emission mammography with tomographic acquisition using dual planar detectors: initial evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark F Smith; Raymond R Raylman; Stan Majewski; Andrew G Weisenberger

    2004-05-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) with tomographic acquisition using dual planar detectors rotating about the breast can obtain complete angular sampling and has the potential to improve activity estimation compared with PEM using stationary detectors. PEM tomography (PEMT) was compared with stationary PEM for point source and compressed breast phantom studies performed with a compact dual detector system. The acquisition geometries were appropriate for the target application of PEM guidance of stereotactic core biopsy. Images were reconstructed with a three-dimensional iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm. PEMT eliminated blurring normal to the detectors seen with stationary PEM. Depth of interaction effects distorted the shape of the point spread functions for PEMT as the angular range from normal incidence of lines of response used in image reconstruction increased. Streak artifacts in PEMT for large detector rotation increments led to the development of an expression for the maximum rotation increment that maintains complete angular sampling. Studies with a compressed breast phantom were used to investigate contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) trade-offs for different sized spherical tumor models. PEMT and PEM both had advantages depending on lesion size and detector separation. The most appropriate acquisition method for specific detection or quantitation tasks requires additional investigation.

  10. Preclinical positron emission tomography scanner based on a monolithic annulus of scintillator: initial design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolin, Alexander V; Martone, Peter F; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar; Raylman, Raymond R

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) scanners designed for imaging of small animals have transformed translational research by reducing the necessity to invasively monitor physiology and disease progression. Virtually all of these scanners are based on the use of pixelated detector modules arranged in rings. This design, while generally successful, has some limitations. Specifically, use of discrete detector modules to construct PET scanners reduces detection sensitivity and can introduce artifacts in reconstructed images, requiring the use of correction methods. To address these challenges, and facilitate measurement of photon depth-of-interaction in the detector, we investigated a small animal PET scanner (called AnnPET) based on a monolithic annulus of scintillator. The scanner was created by placing 12 flat facets around the outer surface of the scintillator to accommodate placement of silicon photomultiplier arrays. Its performance characteristics were explored using Monte Carlo simulations and sections of the NEMA NU4-2008 protocol. Results from this study revealed that AnnPET's reconstructed spatial resolution is predicted to be [Formula: see text] full width at half maximum in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. Peak detection sensitivity is predicted to be 10.1%. Images of simulated phantoms (mini-hot rod and mouse whole body) yielded promising results, indicating the potential of this system for enhancing PET imaging of small animals.

  11. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the initial staging of germ cell tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hain, S.F.; O' Doherty, M.J. [Clinical PET Centre, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospitals, London (United Kingdom); Timothy, A.R.; Leslie, M.D.; Partridge, S.E. [Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospitals, London (United Kingdom); Huddart, R.A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Royal Marsden, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2000-05-01

    Testicular cancer is a rare tumour with the potential for cure at diagnosis. It is important, however, to identify those patients with metastases at presentation so as to ensure that the optimum treatment strategy is employed. Many criteria have been used to try to place patients into high- or low-risk groups, with variable success. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has the potential to identify active disease and thereby influence further management. Here we report on a retrospective study of the use of FDG-PET in the detection of metastatic testicular carcinoma at diagnosis. Thirty-one patients [13 with seminoma and 18 with non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (13 teratomas, 5 mixed)] were staged by FDG-PET scanning. The imaging was performed using a Siemens ECAT 951 scanner. All results were assessed on the basis of histology or clinical follow-up. FDG-PET scan identified metastatic disease in ten and was negative in 16; there were no false-positives and five false-negatives. There were six patients in whom FDG-PET was negative and computed tomography was regarded as suspicious but follow-up was inconclusive. The positive predictive value was 100%. The negative predictive value was 76% or 91%, depending on whether the aforementioned six cases were regarded as true-negatives or false-negatives. It may be concluded that FDG-PET is capable of detecting metastatic disease at diagnosis that is not identified by other imaging techniques. These preliminary results are sufficient to suggest that a large prospective study should be performed to evaluate the role of FDG-PET in primary staging of disease. (orig.)

  12. Reduction in coronary and peripheral vasomotor function in patients with HIV after initiation of antiretroviral therapy: a longitudinal study with positron emission tomography and flow-mediated dilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Ulrik Sloth; Wiinberg, Niels; Petersen, Claus Leth;

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the increased cardiovascular risk in patients with HIV on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are not known. Our aim was to study the endothelial function of the coronary arteries by cardiac perfusion positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with HIV initiating ART...

  13. Neuroimaging in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2014-06-28

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG sequence in huntingtin gene (HTT) on chromosome 4. HD manifests with chorea, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. Although advances in genetics allow identification of individuals carrying the HD gene, much is still unknown about the mechanisms underlying the development of overt clinical symptoms and the transitional period between premanifestation and manifestation of the disease. HD has no cure and patients rely only in symptomatic treatment. There is an urgent need to identify biomarkers that are able to monitor disease progression and assess the development and efficacy of novel disease modifying drugs. Over the past years, neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have provided important advances in our understanding of HD. MRI provides information about structural and functional organization of the brain, while PET can detect molecular changes in the brain. MRI and PET are able to detect changes in the brains of HD gene carriers years ahead of the manifestation of the disease and have also proved to be powerful in assessing disease progression. However, no single technique has been validated as an optimal biomarker. An integrative multimodal imaging approach, which combines different MRI and PET techniques, could be recommended for monitoring potential neuroprotective and preventive therapies in HD. In this article we review the current neuroimaging literature in HD.

  14. PET radioligand injection for pig neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Munk, Ole Lajord; Landau, Anne M.

    2017-01-01

    Pigs are useful models in neuroimaging studies with positron emission tomography. Radiolabeled ligands are injected intravenously at the start of the scan and in pigs, the most easily accessible route of administration is the ear vein. However, in brain studies the short distance between the brai...

  15. Neuroimaging Biomarkers for Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Brandon M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biomarkers provide clinicians with a predictable model for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of medical ailments. Psychiatry has lagged behind other areas of medicine in the identification of biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we investigated the current state of neuroimaging as it pertains to biomarkers for psychosis. Methods We reviewed systematic reviews and meta-analyses of the structural (sMRI), functional (fMRI), diffusion-tensor (DTI), Positron emission tomography (PET) and spectroscopy (MRS) studies of subjects at-risk or those with an established schizophrenic illness. Only articles reporting effect-sizes and confidence intervals were included in an assessment of robustness. Results Out of the identified meta-analyses and systematic reviews, 21 studies met the inclusion criteria for assessment. There were 13 sMRI, 4 PET, 3 MRS, and 1 DTI studies. The search terms included in the current review encompassed familial high risk (FHR), clinical high risk (CHR), First episode (FES), Chronic (CSZ), schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD), and healthy controls (HC). Conclusions Currently, few neuroimaging biomarkers can be considered ready for diagnostic use in patients with psychosis. At least in part, this may be related to the challenges inherent in the current symptom-based approach to classifying these disorders. While available studies suggest a possible value of imaging biomarkers for monitoring disease progression, more systematic research is needed. To date, the best value of imaging data in psychoses has been to shed light on questions of disease pathophysiology, especially through the characterization of endophenotypes. PMID:25883891

  16. Disease progression model for Clinical Dementia Rating–Sum of Boxes in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s subjects from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samtani MN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mahesh N Samtani, Nandini Raghavan, Gerald Novak, Partha Nandy, Vaibhav A Narayan On behalf of the Alzheimer’s disease Neuroimaging Initiative Janssen Research and Development, LLC, Raritan, New Jersey, USA Background: The objective of this analysis was to develop a nonlinear disease progression model, using an expanded set of covariates that captures the longitudinal Clinical Dementia Rating Scale–Sum of Boxes (CDR–SB scores. These were derived from the Alzheimer’s disease Neuroimaging Initiative ADNI-1 study, of 301 Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment patients who were followed for 2–3 years. Methods: The model describes progression rate and baseline disease score as a function of covariates. The covariates that were tested fell into five groups: a hippocampal volume; b serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers; c demographics and apolipoprotein Epsilon 4 (ApoE4 allele status; d baseline cognitive tests; and e disease state and comedications. Results: Covariates associated with baseline disease severity were disease state, hippocampal volume, and comedication use. Disease progression rate was influenced by baseline CSF biomarkers, Trail-Making Test part A score, delayed logical memory test score, and current level of impairment as measured by CDR–SB. The rate of disease progression was dependent on disease severity, with intermediate scores around the inflection point score of 10 exhibiting high disease progression rate. The CDR–SB disease progression rate in a typical patient, with late mild cognitive impairment and mild Alzheimer’s disease, was estimated to be approximately 0.5 and 1.4 points/year, respectively. Conclusions: In conclusion, this model describes disease progression in terms of CDR–SB changes in patients and its dependency on novel covariates. The CSF biomarkers included in the model discriminate mild cognitive impairment subjects as progressors and nonprogressors. Therefore, the model may

  17. Paul Lecoq assembles a read head made with special crystals for a PET (positron emission tomography) scanner. He is the initiator of the Crystal Clear collaboration, which aims to transfer crystals developed at CERN to applications in medical imaging.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Paul Lecoq assembles a read head made with special crystals for a PET (positron emission tomography) scanner. He is the initiator of the Crystal Clear collaboration, which aims to transfer crystals developed at CERN to applications in medical imaging.

  18. Development and Evaluation of a Multiplexed Mass Spectrometry-Based Assay for Measuring Candidate Peptide Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) CSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, Daniel S.; Wildsmith, Kristin R.; Honigberg, Lee A.; Tuefferd, Marianne; Baker, David; Raghavan, Nandini; Nairn, Angus C.; Croteau, Pascal; Schirm, Michael; Allard, Rene; Lamontagne, Julie; Chelsky, Daniel; Hoffmann, Steven; Potter, William Z.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We describe the outcome of the Biomarkers Consortium CSF Proteomics Project, a public-private partnership of government, academia, non-profit, and industry. The goal of this study was to evaluate a multiplexed mass spectrometry-based approach for the qualification of candidate Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) biomarkers using CSF samples from the AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Experimental Design Reproducibility of sample processing, analytic variability, and ability to detect a variety of analytes of interest were thoroughly investigated. Multiple approaches to statistical analyses assessed whether panel analytes were associated with baseline pathology (MCI, AD) vs. Healthy Controls (CN) or associated with progression for MCI patients, and included: (i) univariate association analyses, (ii) univariate prediction models, (iii) exploratory multivariate analyses, and (iv) supervised multivariate analysis. Results A robust targeted mass spectrometry-based approach for the qualification of candidate AD biomarkers was developed. The results identified several peptides with potential diagnostic or predictive utility, with the most significant differences observed for the following peptides for differentiating (including peptides from Hemoglobin A (HBA), Hemoglobin B (HBB), and Superoxide dismutase (SODE)) or predicting (including peptides from Neuronal pentraxin-2 (NPTX2), Neurosecretory protein VGF (VGF), and Secretogranin-2 (SCG2)) progression vs. non-progression from mild cognitive impairment to AD. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance These data provide potential insights into the biology of CSF in AD and MCI progression and provide a novel tool for AD researchers and clinicians working to improve diagnostic accuracy, evaluation of treatment efficacy, and early diagnosis. PMID:25676562

  19. Comparison of neuroimaging modalities for the prediction of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzepacz, Paula T; Yu, Peng; Sun, Jia; Schuh, Kory; Case, Michael; Witte, Michael M; Hochstetler, Helen; Hake, Ann

    2014-01-01

    In this study we compared Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) positron emission tomography (PET) amyloid imaging, fluorodeoxyglucose PET for metabolism, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for structure to predict conversion from amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's dementia using data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative cohort. Numeric neuroimaging variables generated by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-funded laboratories for each neuroimaging modality along with apolipoprotein-E genotype (n = 29) were analyzed. Performance of these biomarkers for predicting conversion from MCI to Alzheimer's dementia at 2 years was evaluated in 50 late amnestic MCI subjects, 20 of whom converted. Multivariate modeling found that among individual modalities, MRI had the highest predictive accuracy (67%) which increased by 9% to 76% when combined with PIB-PET, producing the highest accuracy among any biomarker combination. Individually, PIB-PET generated the best sensitivity, and fluorodeoxyglucose PET had the lowest. Among individual brain regions, the temporal cortex was found to be most predictive for MRI and PIB-PET. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuropathologic assessment of participants in two multi-center longitudinal observational studies: the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Nigel J; Perrin, Richard J; Franklin, Erin E; Carter, Deborah; Vincent, Benjamin; Xie, Mingqiang; Bateman, Randall J; Benzinger, Tammie; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brooks, William S; Halliday, Glenda M; McLean, Catriona; Ghetti, Bernardino; Morris, John C

    2015-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that the relatively rare autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) may be a useful model of the more frequent, sporadic, late-onset AD (LOAD). Individuals with ADAD have a predictable age at onset and the biomarker profile of ADAD participants in the preclinical stage may be used to predict disease progression and clinical onset. However, the extent to which the pathogenesis and neuropathology of ADAD overlaps with that of LOAD is equivocal. To address this uncertainty, two multicenter longitudinal observational studies, the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN), leveraged the expertise and resources of the existing Knight Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC) at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, to establish a Neuropathology Core (NPC). The ADNI/DIAN-NPC is systematically examining the brains of all participants who come to autopsy at the 59 ADNI sites in the USA and Canada and the 14 DIAN sites in the USA (eight), Australia (three), UK (one) and Germany (two). By 2014, 41 ADNI and 24 DIAN autopsies (involving nine participants and 15 family members) had been performed. The autopsy rate in the ADNI cohort in the most recent year was 93% (total since NPC inception: 70%). In summary, the ADNI/DIAN NPC has implemented a standard protocol for all sites to solicit permission for brain autopsy and to send brain tissue to the NPC for a standardized, uniform and state-of-the-art neuropathologic assessment. The benefit to ADNI and DIAN of the implementation of the NPC is very clear. The NPC provides final "gold standard" neuropathological diagnoses and data against which the antecedent observations and measurements of ADNI and DIAN can be compared. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  1. Adding Recognition Discriminability Index to the Delayed Recall Is Useful to Predict Conversion from Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer's Disease in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, María J.; Campos, Jorge; Vázquez, Silvia; Sevlever, Gustavo; Allegri, Ricardo F.; Weiner, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ongoing research is focusing on the identification of those individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who are most likely to convert to Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated whether recognition memory tasks in combination with delayed recall measure of episodic memory and CSF biomarkers can predict MCI to AD conversion at 24-month follow-up. Methods: A total of 397 amnestic-MCI subjects from Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative were included. Logistic regression modeling was done to assess the predictive value of all RAVLT measures, risk factors such as age, sex, education, APOE genotype, and CSF biomarkers for progression to AD. Estimating adjusted odds ratios was used to determine which variables would produce an optimal predictive model, and whether adding tests of interaction between the RAVLT Delayed Recall and recognition measures (traditional score and d-prime) would improve prediction of the conversion from a-MCI to AD. Results: 112 (28.2%) subjects developed dementia and 285 (71.8%) subjects did not. Of the all included variables, CSF Aβ1-42 levels, RAVLT Delayed Recall, and the combination of RAVLT Delayed Recall and d-prime were predictive of progression to AD (χ2 = 38.23, df = 14, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The combination of RAVLT Delayed Recall and d-prime measures may be predictor of conversion from MCI to AD in the ADNI cohort, especially in combination with amyloid biomarkers. A predictive model to help identify individuals at-risk for dementia should include not only traditional episodic memory measures (delayed recall or recognition), but also additional variables (d-prime) that allow the homogenization of the assessment procedures in the diagnosis of MCI.

  2. Positron Channeling

    CERN Document Server

    Badikyan, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of channeling the low-energy relativistic positrons around separate crystallographic axes with coaxial symmetry of negative ions in some types of crystals is shown. The process of annihilation of positrons with electrons of medium was studied in detail.

  3. Neuroimaging of Parkinson's disease: Expanding views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Carol P; Sundman, Mark H; Hickey, Patrick; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2015-12-01

    Advances in molecular and structural and functional neuroimaging are rapidly expanding the complexity of neurobiological understanding of Parkinson's disease (PD). This review article begins with an introduction to PD neurobiology as a foundation for interpreting neuroimaging findings that may further lead to more integrated and comprehensive understanding of PD. Diverse areas of PD neuroimaging are then reviewed and summarized, including positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging, transcranial sonography, magnetoencephalography, and multimodal imaging, with focus on human studies published over the last five years. These included studies on differential diagnosis, co-morbidity, genetic and prodromal PD, and treatments from L-DOPA to brain stimulation approaches, transplantation and gene therapies. Overall, neuroimaging has shown that PD is a neurodegenerative disorder involving many neurotransmitters, brain regions, structural and functional connections, and neurocognitive systems. A broad neurobiological understanding of PD will be essential for translational efforts to develop better treatments and preventive strategies. Many questions remain and we conclude with some suggestions for future directions of neuroimaging of PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurobiological Foundations of Acupuncture: The Relevance and Future Prospect Based on Neuroimaging Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Lijun Bai; Lixing Lao

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is currently gaining popularity as an important modality of alternative and complementary medicine in the western world. Modern neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and magnetoencephalography open a window into the neurobiological foundations of acupuncture. In this review, we have summarized evidence derived from neuroimaging studies and tried to elucidate both neurophysiological correlates and key experimental facto...

  5. Developmental neuroimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehaene-Lambertz, G. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (CEA/DSV/DRM), INSERM U562, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    Cognitive capacities, such as language, mathematics, music, etc... are highly developed in humans as compared to animals. Numerous studies have found precursors of these capacities in infants: For example, infants are able to discriminate sentences in different languages (Mehler et al., 1988), distinguish sets of objects based on their numerosity (Feigenson et al., 2002) or recognize known faces (Bushnell, 1982). These abilities are not very different from those of other animals. Monkeys are also able to discriminate two human languages (Ramus et al., 2000), two quantities of items (Hauser et al., 2002), or respond to particular faces (Parr et al., 2000). In a few years, however, children surpass these animals. To explain the development of the cognitive capacities of our species, our approach consists in studying the initial stages of cerebral organization during the first months of life in order to characterize the critical parameters that allow infants to take advantage of their environment to achieve the adults' cognitive sophistication. Thanks to the recent progress of brain imaging, it is now possible to examine cerebral functioning of the very young child in entire security. In our team, we used two complementary methods: event-related potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (f MRI). ERPs, used since numerous years in infants, consist of the recording of the brain electrical activity consecutive to the presentation of a stimulus. By using a careful experimental design, it is possible to infer the succession of processing stages that the stimulus follows and to measure their latency (Dehaene-Lambertz and Dehaene, 1994; Gliga and Dehaene-Lambertz, 2006). High-density ERPs system allows also to record even small topographical differences between conditions and thus to infer that the underlying network s involved in the tested conditions are different. With this method, we have decomposed syllable perception in infants and underscore a

  6. Neuroimaging in tuberculous meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Kumar Garg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous meningitis is a serious infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Early diagnosis is the key to success of treatment. Neuroimaging plays a crucial role in the early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis and its disabling complications. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered superior to computed tomography. Neuroimaging characteristics include leptomeningeal and basal cisternal enhancement, hydrocephalus, periventricular infarcts, and tuberculoma. Partially treated pyogenic meningitis, cryptococcal meningitis, viral encephalitis, carcinomatous, and lymphomatous meningitis may have many similar neuroimaging characteristics, and differentiation from tuberculous meningitis at times on the basis of neuroimaging characteristics becomes difficult.

  7. Neuroimaging of the Philadelphia neurodevelopmental cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Elliott, Mark A; Ruparel, Kosha; Loughead, James; Prabhakaran, Karthik; Calkins, Monica E; Hopson, Ryan; Jackson, Chad; Keefe, Jack; Riley, Marisa; Mentch, Frank D; Sleiman, Patrick; Verma, Ragini; Davatzikos, Christos; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E

    2014-02-01

    The Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (PNC) is a large-scale, NIMH funded initiative to understand how brain maturation mediates cognitive development and vulnerability to psychiatric illness, and understand how genetics impacts this process. As part of this study, 1445 adolescents ages 8-21 at enrollment underwent multimodal neuroimaging. Here, we highlight the conceptual basis for the effort, the study design, and the measures available in the dataset. We focus on neuroimaging measures obtained, including T1-weighted structural neuroimaging, diffusion tensor imaging, perfusion neuroimaging using arterial spin labeling, functional imaging tasks of working memory and emotion identification, and resting state imaging of functional connectivity. Furthermore, we provide characteristics regarding the final sample acquired. Finally, we describe mechanisms in place for data sharing that will allow the PNC to become a freely available public resource to advance our understanding of normal and pathological brain development. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-desoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography initial staging impacts on survival in Hodgkin lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juliano; J; Cerci; Camila; C; G; Linardi; Luís; F; Pracchia; José; Soares; Junior; Evelinda; Trindade; Dominique; Delbeke; Rodrigo; J; Cerci; Robert; Carr; José; C; Meneghetti; Valeria; Buccheri

    2013-01-01

    AIM:To assess the prognostic value and risk classification improvement of metabolic staging(MS)with Initial2-[18F]-fluoro-2-desoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography(FDG-PET)in initial staging of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma(HL)patients to predict 5 years overall survival(5y-OS)and event free survival(EFS).METHODS:A total of 275 patients were included in this retrospective study,155 patients were staged with conventional anatomical staging(AS),and 120 also submitted to MS(FDG-PET).Prognostic analysis compared 5y-OS and 5y-EFS of patients staged with AS and MS.Risk-adjusted models incorporated clinical risk factors,computed tomography and FDG-PET staging.RESULTS:During the follow up of 267 evaluated patients,220(122 AS and 98 MS)achieved complete remission after first-line therapy(median follow-up:70±29 mo),treatment failure occurred in 79 patients and 34 died.The 5y-EFS for early vs advanced disease in AS patients was 79.3%and 66.7%,and 85.6%and53.6%in MS patients,respectively(P<0.01).The5y-OS for early and advanced disease with AS was91.3%and 81.5%,and 97.5%and 80.7%for patients staged with MS,respectively.Cox proportional hazards analysis demonstrated that FDG-PET added signifcant prognostic information and improved risk prediction(P=0.02).CONCLUSION:Initial staging FDG-PET could be used as an accurate and independent predictor of OS and EFS in HL,with impact in 5y-EFS and OS.

  9. The impact of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2: What role do public-private partnerships have in pushing the boundaries of clinical and basic science research on Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Davis, Dorothy M; Buckholtz, Neil

    2015-07-01

    In the growing landscape of biomedical public-private-partnerships, particularly for Alzheimer's disease, the question is posed as to their value. What impacts do public-private-partnerships have on clinical and basic science research in Alzheimer's disease? The authors answer the question using the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) as a test case and example. ADNI is an exemplar of how public-private-partnerships can make an impact not only on clinical and basic science research and practice (including clinical trials), but also of how similar partnerships using ADNI as an example, can be designed to create a maximal impact within their fields. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional neuroimaging of traumatic brain injury: advances and clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irimia A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Andrei Irimia, John Darrell Van Horn USC Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Functional deficits due to traumatic brain injury (TBI can have significant and enduring consequences upon patients’ life quality and expectancy. Although functional neuroimaging is essential for understanding TBI pathophysiology, an insufficient amount of effort has been dedicated to the task of translating functional neuroimaging findings into information with clinical utility. The purpose of this review is to summarize the use of functional neuroimaging techniques – especially functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and electroencephalography – for advancing current knowledge of TBI-related brain dysfunction and for improving the rehabilitation of TBI patients. We focus on seven core areas of functional deficits, namely consciousness, motor function, attention, memory, higher cognition, personality, and affect, and, for each of these, we summarize recent findings from neuroimaging studies which have provided substantial insight into brain function changes due to TBI. Recommendations are also provided to aid in setting the direction of future neuroimaging research and for understanding brain function changes after TBI. Keywords: cognitive decline, personality change, magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging

  11. Human functional neuroimaging of brain changes associated with practice

    OpenAIRE

    GARAVAN, HUGH PATRICK

    2005-01-01

    PUBLISHED The discovery that experience-driven changes in the human brain can occur from a neural to a cortical level throughout the lifespan has stimulated a proliferation of research into how neural function changes in response to experience, enabled by neuroimaging methods such as positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Studies attempt to characterize these changes by examining how practice on a task affects the functional anatomy underlying performance. ...

  12. Differential brain processing of audiovisual sexual stimuli in men: comparative positron emission tomography study of the initiation and maintenance of penile erection during sexual arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Yasushi; Tsujimura, Akira; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Matsuoka, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Tohru; Takao, Tetsuya; Takada, Shingo; Matsumiya, Kiyomi; Osaki, Yasuhiro; Takasawa, Masashi; Oku, Naohiko; Hatazawa, Jun; Kaneko, Shigeo; Okuyama, Akihiko

    2007-07-01

    The human male psychosexual cycle consists of four phases: excitation, plateau, orgasm, and resolution. Identification of the specific neural substrates of each phase may provide information regarding the brain's pathophysiology of sexual dysfunction. We previously analyzed regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with H(2)15O-positron emission tomography (PET) during the excitation phase (initiation of penile erection) induced by audiovisual sexual stimuli (AVSS) and identified activation of the cerebellar vermis, the bilateral extrastriate cortex, and right orbitofrontal cortex, suggesting a role of cognition/emotion in the excitement phase. In the present study, we analyzed rCBF of the same six healthy volunteers during the plateau phase (maintenance of penile erection) induced by AVSS and compared the results with those of the excitation phase. Penile rigidity was monitored in real time with RigiScan Plus during PET scanning. Images were analyzed by statistical parametric mapping (SPM) software, and rCBF in the amygdala, hypothalamus, anterior cingulate, and insula was measured. During the plateau phase, primary subcortical activation was noted in the right ventral putamen, indicating motivational factors in the sexual response via the limbic reward circuit. A significant increase in rCBF in the left hypothalamus was also observed during the plateau phase. The right anterior cingulate and left insula were specifically activated during the excitation phase but not during the plateau phase. These results indicate a significant role of the ventral putamen and the hypothalamus in the plateau phase and confirm that paralimbic and limbic components of the human brain differentially coordinate the sexual response in a psychosexual phase-dependent manner.

  13. Neuroethics, neuroimaging, and disorders of consciousness: promise or peril?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fins, Joseph J

    2011-01-01

    The advent of powerful neuroimaging tools such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) has begun to redefine how we diagnose, define, and understand disorders of consciousness such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states. In my paper, I review how research using these methods is both elucidating these brain states and creating diagnostic dilemmas related to their classification as the specificity and sensitivity of traditional behavior-based assessments are weighed against sensitive but not yet fully validated neuroimaging data. I also consider how these methods are being studied as potential communication vectors for therapeutic use in subjects who heretofore have been thought to be unresponsive or minimally conscious. I conclude by considering the ethical challenges posed by novel diagnostic and therapeutic neuroimaging applications and contextualize these scientific developments against the broader needs of patients and families touched by severe brain injury.

  14. Neuroimaging and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Andria L.; Crocker, Nicole; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.

    2009-01-01

    The detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain include structural brain anomalies as well as cognitive and behavioral deficits. Initial neuroimaging studies of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed previous autopsy reports of overall reduction in brain volume and…

  15. Online open neuroimaging mass meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Kempton, Matthew J.; Williams, Steven C. R.

    We describe a system for meta-analysis where a wiki stores numerical data in a simple format and a web service performs the numerical computation. We initially apply the system on multiple meta-analyses of structural neuroimaging data results. The described system allows for mass meta-analysis, e...

  16. Neuroimaging in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahina Bano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the most common neurological disease worldwide and is second only to stroke in causing neurological morbidity. Neuroimaging plays a very important role in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with epilepsy. This review article highlights the specific role of various imaging modalities in patients with epilepsy, and their practical applications in the management of epileptic patients.

  17. Neuroimaging in dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkhof, Frederik [VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (NL). Dept. of Radiology and Image Analysis Center (IAC); Fox, Nick C. [UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom). Dementia Research Centre; VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bastos-Leite, Antonio J. [Porto Univ. (Portugal). Dept. of Medical Imaging; Scheltens, Philip [VU Univ. Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurology and Alzheimer Center

    2011-07-01

    Against a background of an ever-increasing number of patients, new management options, and novel imaging modalities, neuroimaging is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis of dementia. This up-to-date, superbly illustrated book aims to provide a practical guide to the effective use of neuroimaging in the patient with cognitive decline. It sets out the key clinical and imaging features of the wide range of causes of dementia and directs the reader from clinical presentation to neuroimaging and on to an accurate diagnosis whenever possible. After an introductory chapter on the clinical background, the available ''toolbox'' of structural and functional neuroimaging techniques is reviewed in detail, including CT, MRI and advanced MR techniques, SPECT and PET, and image analysis methods. The imaging findings in normal ageing are then discussed, followed by a series of chapters that carefully present and analyze the key imaging findings in patients with dementias. A structured path of analysis follows the main presenting feature: disorders associated with primary gray matter loss, with white matter changes, with brain swelling, etc. Throughout, a practical approach is adopted, geared specifically to the needs of clinicians (neurologists, radiologists, psychiatrists, geriatricians) working in the field of dementia, for whom this book should prove an invaluable resource. (orig.)

  18. Neuroimaging in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrooks, Erik H; Ver Hoef, Lawrence; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, the field of neuroimaging has undergone dramatic development. Specifically, of importance for clinicians and researchers managing patients with epilepsies, new methods of brain imaging in search of the seizure-producing abnormalities have been implemented, and older methods have undergone additional refinement. Methodology to predict seizure freedom and cognitive outcome has also rapidly progressed. In general, the image data processing methods are very different and more complicated than even a decade ago. In this review, we identify the recent developments in neuroimaging that are aimed at improved management of epilepsy patients. Advances in structural imaging, diffusion imaging, fMRI, structural and functional connectivity, hybrid imaging methods, quantitative neuroimaging, and machine-learning are discussed. We also briefly summarize the potential new developments that may shape the field of neuroimaging in the near future and may advance not only our understanding of epileptic networks as the source of treatment-resistant seizures but also better define the areas that need to be treated in order to provide the patients with better long-term outcomes.

  19. Neuroimaging and biomarkers in addiction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Potenza, Marc N

    2014-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies have made a significant contribution to the efforts to identify measurable indices, or biomarkers, of addictions and their treatments. Biomarkers in addiction treatment are needed to provide targets for treatment, detect treatment subgroups, predict treatment response, and broadly improve outcomes. Neuroimaging is important to biomarkers research as it relates neural circuits to both molecular mechanisms and behavior. A focus of recent efforts in neuroimaging in addiction has been to elucidate the neural correlates associated with dimensions of functioning in substance-use and related disorders, such as cue-reactivity, impulsivity, and cognitive control, among others. These dimensions of functioning have been related to addiction treatment outcomes and relapse, and therefore, a better understanding of these dimensions and their neural correlates may help to identify brain-behavior biomarkers of treatment response. This paper reviews recent neuroimaging studies that report potential biomarkers in addiction treatment related to cue-reactivity, impulsivity, and cognitive control, as well as recent advances in neuroimaging that may facilitate efforts to determine reliable biomarkers. This important initial work has begun to identify possible mediators and moderators of treatment response, and multiple promising indices are being tested.

  20. Clinical role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in post-operative follow up of gastric cancer: Initial results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Sun; Xin-Hui Su; Yong-Song Guan; Wei-Ming Pan; Zuo-Ming Luo; Ji-Hong Wei; Hua Wu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical role of 18F-fluorodeo-xyglucose positron emission and computed tomography(18F-FDG PET/CT) in detection of gastric cancer recur rence after initial surgical resection.METHODS: In the period from January 2007 to May 2008, 23 patients who had previous surgical resection of histopathologically diagnosed gastric cancer underwent a total of 25 18F-FDG PET/CT scans as follow-up visits in our center. The standard of reference for tumor recurrence consisted of histopathologic confirmation or clinical follow-up information for at least 5 mo after PET/CT examinations.RESULTS: PET/Cr was positive in 14 patients (61%)and negative in 9 (39%). When correlated with final diagnosis, which was confirmed by histopathologic evidence of tumor recurrence in 8 of the 23 patients(35%) and by clinical follow-up in 15 (65%), PET/CT was true positive in 12 patients, false positive in 2,true negative in 8 and false negative in 2. Overall,the accuracy of PET/CT was 82.6%, the negative predictive value (NPV) was 77.7%, and the positive predictive value (PPV) was 85.7%. The 2 false positive PET/CT findings were actually chronic inflammatory tissue lesions. For the two patients with false negative PET/CT, the final diagnosis was recurrence of mucinous adenocarcinoma in the anastomosis in one patient and abdominal wall metastasis in the other. Importantly,PET/CT revealed true-positive findings in 11 (47.8%)patients who had negative or no definite findings by CT. PET/CT revealed extra-abdominal metastases in 7 patients and additional esophageal carcinoma in onepatient. Clinical treatment decisions were changed in 7 (30.4%) patients after introducing PET/CT into theirconventional post-operative follow-up program.CONCLUSION: Whole body 18F-FDG PET/CT was highly effective in discriminating true recurrence in post-operative patients with gastric cancer and had important impacts on clinical decisions in a considerable portion of patients.

  1. Neuroimaging in anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Kirsten; Bandelow, Borwin; Gruber, Oliver; Wedekind, Dirk

    2009-06-01

    Neuroimaging studies have gained increasing importance in validating neurobiological network hypotheses for anxiety disorders. Functional imaging procedures and radioligand binding studies in healthy subjects and in patients with anxiety disorders provide growing evidence of the existence of a complex anxiety network, including limbic, brainstem, temporal, and prefrontal cortical regions. Obviously, "normal anxiety" does not equal "pathological anxiety" although many phenomena are evident in healthy subjects, however to a lower extent. Differential effects of distinct brain regions and lateralization phenomena in different anxiety disorders are mentioned. An overview of neuroimaging investigations in anxiety disorders is given after a brief summary of results from healthy volunteers. Concluding implications for future research are made by the authors.

  2. Neuroimaging for drug addiction and related behaviors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parvaz M. A.; Parvaz, M.A.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik,P.A.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2011-10-01

    In this review, we highlight the role of neuroimaging techniques in studying the emotional and cognitive-behavioral components of the addiction syndrome by focusing on the neural substrates subserving them. The phenomenology of drug addiction can be characterized by a recurrent pattern of subjective experiences that includes drug intoxication, craving, bingeing, and withdrawal with the cycle culminating in a persistent preoccupation with obtaining, consuming, and recovering from the drug. In the past two decades, imaging studies of drug addiction have demonstrated deficits in brain circuits related to reward and impulsivity. The current review focuses on studies employing positron emission tomography (PET), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate these behaviors in drug-addicted human populations. We begin with a brief account of drug addiction followed by a technical account of each of these imaging modalities. We then discuss how these techniques have uniquely contributed to a deeper understanding of addictive behaviors.

  3. Neuroimaging of Parkinson’s Disease: Expanding views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Carol P.; Sundman, Mark H.; Hickey, Patrick; Chen, Nankuei

    2015-01-01

    Advances in molecular and structural and functional neuroimaging are rapidly expanding the complexity of neurobiological understanding of Parkinson’s disease (PD). This review article begins with an introduction to PD neurobiology as a foundation for interpreting neuroimaging findings that may further lead to more integrated and comprehensive understanding of PD. Diverse areas of PD neuroimaging are then reviewed and summarized, including positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging, transcranial sonography, magnetoencephalography, and multimodal imaging, with focus on human studies published over the last five years. These included studies on differential diagnosis, co-morbidity, genetic and prodromal PD, and treatments from L-DOPA to brain stimulation approaches, transplantation and gene therapies. Overall, neuroimaging has shown that PD is a neurodegenerative disorder involving many neurotransmitters, brain regions, structural and functional connections, and neurocognitive systems. A broad neurobiological understanding of PD will be essential for translational efforts to develop better treatments and preventive strategies. Many questions remain and we conclude with some suggestions for future directions of neuroimaging of PD. PMID:26409344

  4. Neuroimaging and sleep medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A

    2005-06-01

    In sleep medicine, patients with sleep disorders are evaluated and treated. The primary assessment tool of the field has traditionally been polysomnography. While polysomnography has been helpful in the evaluation of some sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder, it has been less helpful in others, such as the insomnias, or sleep disorders secondary to mental disorders. These disorders are presumed to stem from some alteration in brain function that disrupts sleep. The development of functional neuroimaging methods provides a means to understand brain function in patients with sleep disorders in a manner not accessible to polysomnography. This paper summarizes functional neuroimaging findings during healthy sleep, then, reviews available studies in sleep disorders patients, and studies addressing the pharmacology of sleep and sleep disorders. Areas in which functional neuroimaging methods may be helpful in sleep medicine, and in which future development is advised, include: (1) clarification of pathophysiology; (2) aid in differential diagnosis; (3) assessment of treatment response; (4) guiding new drug development; and (5) monitoring treatment response.

  5. Transmission positron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyama, Masao [Teikyo University of Science and Technology, Uenohara, Yamanashi 409-0193 (Japan)]. E-mail: doyama@ntu.ac.jp; Kogure, Yoshiaki [Teikyo University of Science and Technology, Uenohara, Yamanashi 409-0193 (Japan); Inoue, Miyoshi [Teikyo University of Science and Technology, Uenohara, Yamanashi 409-0193 (Japan); Kurihara, Toshikazu [Institute of Materials Structure Science (IMSS), High Energy Accelerator, Research Organization (KEK), Ohno 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yoshiie, Toshimasa [Reactor Research Institute, Kyoto University, Noda, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0451 (Japan); Oshima, Ryuichiro [Research Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Osaka Prefecture University (Japan); Matsuya, Miyuki [Electron Optics Laboratory (JEOL) Ltd., Musashino 3-1-2, Akishima 196-0021 (Japan)

    2006-02-28

    Immediate and near-future plans for transmission positron microscopes being built at KEK, Tsukuba, Japan, are described. The characteristic feature of this project is remolding a commercial electron microscope to a positron microscope. A point source of electrons kept at a negative high voltage is changed to a point source of positrons kept at a high positive voltage. Positional resolution of transmission microscopes should be theoretically the same as electron microscopes. Positron microscopes utilizing trapping of positrons have always positional ambiguity due to the diffusion of positrons.

  6. [Tau Positron Emission Tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Makoto

    2017-07-01

    Accumulation of fibrillar tau protein aggregates is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative dementias, including a subgroup of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Visualization of tau lesions in the brains of living subjects enables a pathology-based diagnosis of dementing illnesses in the prodromal stage, and offers objective measures of disease progression and outcomes of disease-modifying therapies. With this rationale, diverse classes of low-molecular-weight chemicals capable of binding to a β-pleated sheet structure have been developed to be used for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) of tau pathologies. Clinical PET studies of AD patients with such tau probes have provided the following insights: (1) Tau fibrils accumulate in the hippocampal formation in an age-dependent manner that is independent of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) pathology; (2) The deposition of Aβ may trigger a spatial expansion of tau pathology, in transition from normal aging to advanced AD; and (3) Tau accumulation is intimately associated with local neuronal loss, leading to cortical atrophy and focal symptoms. In contrast, studies of FTLD have shown a limited performance of first-generation PET probes in capturing non-AD-type tau lesions. New compounds have accordingly been developed and clinically tested, proving to yield a high contrast for tau deposits with high specificity. These second-generation probes are being evaluated primarily by pharmaceutical companies, in line with their growing demands for neuroimaging-based biomarkers serving for clinical trials of anti-Aβ and anti-tau therapies. Meanwhile, a consortium flexibly linking academia and industry to facilitate the utilization of research tools, including tau PET probes, has been established in Japan, for the ultimate purpose of elucidating the molecular etiology of tauopathies and creating diagnostic and therapeutic agents based on such an understanding.

  7. Neuroimaging of consciousness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Neuropsychiatry; UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom). Sobell Dept. of Motor, Neuroscience and Movement Disorders; Nani, Andrea [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Research Group BSMHFT; Blumenfeld, Hal [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States). Depts. of Neurology, Neurobiology and Neurosurgery; Laureys, Steven (ed.) [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Cyclotron Research Centre

    2013-07-01

    An important reference work on a multidisciplinary and rapidly expanding area. Particular focus on the relevance of neuroimaging for the diagnosis and treatment of common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting consciousness. Written by world-class experts in the field. Relevant for clinicians, researchers, and scholars across different specialties. Within the field of neuroscience, the past few decades have witnessed an exponential growth of research into the brain mechanisms underlying both normal and pathological states of consciousness in humans. The development of sophisticated imaging techniques (above all fMRI and PET) to visualize and map brain activity in vivo has opened new avenues in our understanding of the pathological processes involved in common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting consciousness, such as epilepsy, coma, vegetative states, dissociative disorders, and dementia. This book presents the state of the art in neuroimaging exploration of the brain correlates of the alterations in consciousness across these conditions, with a particular focus on the potential applications for diagnosis and management. Although the book has a practical approach and is primarily targeted at neurologists, neuroradiologists, and psychiatrists, a wide range of researchers and health care professionals will find it an essential reference that explains the significance of neuroimaging of consciousness for clinical practice. Within the field of neuroscience, the past few decades have witnessed an exponential growth of research into the brain mechanisms underlying both normal and pathological states of consciousness in humans. The development of sophisticated imaging techniques (above all fMRI and PET) to visualize and map brain activity in vivo has opened new avenues in our understanding of the pathological processes involved in common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting consciousness, such as epilepsy, coma, vegetative states, dissociative disorders, and dementia. This

  8. Retrospective study on structural neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Coentre

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. No consensus between guidelines exists regarding neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis. The purpose of this study is to assess anomalies found in structural neuroimaging exams (brain computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the initial medical work-up of patients presenting first-episode psychosis. Methods. The study subjects were 32 patients aged 18–48 years (mean age: 29.6 years, consecutively admitted with first-episode psychosis diagnosis. Socio-demographic and clinical data and neuroimaging exams (CT and MRI were retrospectively studied. Diagnostic assessments were made using the Operational Criteria Checklist +. Neuroimaging images (CT and MRI and respective reports were analysed by an experienced consultant psychiatrist. Results. None of the patients had abnormalities in neuroimaging exams responsible for psychotic symptoms. Thirty-seven percent of patients had incidental brain findings not causally related to the psychosis (brain atrophy, arachnoid cyst, asymmetric lateral ventricles, dilated lateral ventricles, plagiocephaly and falx cerebri calcification. No further medical referral was needed for any of these patients. No significant differences regarding gender, age, diagnosis, duration of untreated psychosis, in-stay and cannabis use were found between patients who had neuroimaging abnormalities versus those without. Discussion. This study suggests that structural neuroimaging exams reveal scarce abnormalities in young patients with first-episode psychosis. Structural neuroimaging is especially useful in first-episode psychosis patients with neurological symptoms, atypical clinical picture and old age.

  9. Neuroimaging. Recent issues and future progresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2002-07-01

    Recent advances in the technology of non-invasive neuroimaging techniques, include X-ray CT, magnetic resonance imaging, positron CT, etc. The trend of neuroimaging is from the diagnosis of the brain structural change to the functional localization of the brain function with accurate topographical data. Brain activation studies disclosed the responsible regions in the brain for various kinds of paradigms, including motor, sensory, cognitive functions. Another aspect of brain imaging shows the pathophysiological changes of the neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease by abnormal CBF or metabolism changes. It is very important to note that the neurotransmitter receptor imaging is now available for various kinds of transmitters. We recently developed a new tracer for nicotinic type acetylcholine receptor, which might be involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease and its treatment. In the near future, we will be able to visualize the proteins in the brain such as amyloid protein, which will make us to diagnose Alzheimer's patients accurately, and with respect to neuroscience research, not only neuronal functional localizations but also relationship between them will become important to disclose the functional aspects of the brain. (author)

  10. Neuroimaging in Huntington’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2014-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG sequence in huntingtin gene (HTT) on chromosome 4. HD manifests with chorea, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. Although advances in genetics allow identification of individuals carrying the HD gene, much is still unknown about the mechanisms underlying the development of overt clinical symptoms and the transitional period between premanifestation and manifestation of the disease. HD has no cure and patients rely only in symptomatic treatment. There is an urgent need to identify biomarkers that are able to monitor disease progression and assess the development and efficacy of novel disease modifying drugs. Over the past years, neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have provided important advances in our understanding of HD. MRI provides information about structural and functional organization of the brain, while PET can detect molecular changes in the brain. MRI and PET are able to detect changes in the brains of HD gene carriers years ahead of the manifestation of the disease and have also proved to be powerful in assessing disease progression. However, no single technique has been validated as an optimal biomarker. An integrative multimodal imaging approach, which combines different MRI and PET techniques, could be recommended for monitoring potential neuroprotective and preventive therapies in HD. In this article we review the current neuroimaging literature in HD. PMID:24976932

  11. Neuroimaging Findings and Repeat Neuroimaging Value in Pediatric Chronic Ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Michael S; Chodirker, Bernard N; Bunge, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Chronic ataxia, greater than two months in duration, is encountered relatively commonly in clinical pediatric neurology practise and presents with diagnostic challenges. It is caused by multiple and diverse disorders. Our aims were to describe the neuroimaging features and the value of repeat neuroimaging in pediatric chronic ataxia to ascertain their contribution to the diagnosis and management. A retrospective charts and neuroimaging reports review was undertaken in 177 children with chronic ataxia. Neuroimaging in 130 of 177 patients was also reviewed. Nineteen patients had head computed tomography only, 103 brain magnetic resonance imaging only, and 55 had both. Abnormalities in the cerebellum or other brain regions were associated with ataxia. Neuroimaging was helpful in 73 patients with 30 disorders: It was diagnostic in 9 disorders, narrowed down the diagnostic possibilities in 14 disorders, and revealed important but non-diagnostic abnormalities, e.g. cerebellar atrophy in 7 disorders. Having a normal magnetic resonance imaging scan was mostly seen in genetic diseases or in the early course of ataxia telangiectasia. Repeat neuroimaging, performed in 108 patients, was generally helpful in monitoring disease evolution and in making a diagnosis. Neuroimaging was not directly helpful in 36 patients with 10 disorders or by definition the 55 patients with unknown disease etiology. Normal or abnormal neuroimaging findings and repeat neuroimaging are very valuable in the diagnosis and management of disorders associated with pediatric chronic ataxia.

  12. Functional neuroimaging of sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging methods provide a means to understand brain function in patients with sleep disorders. This paper summarizes functional neuroimaging findings in sleep disorders patients, and studies addressing the pharmacology of sleep and sleep disorders. Areas in which functional neuroimaging methods may be helpful in sleep medicine, and in which future development is advised, include: 1) clarification of pathophysiology; 2) aid in differential diagnosis; 3) assessment of treatment response; 4) guiding new drug development; and 5) monitoring treatment response.

  13. Neuroimaging in Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Motamedi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The assessment of the problem of seizures requires knowledge of the clinical details and features of the seizures, the functional abnormality in the brain as shown on the EEG, and the structural assessment of the brain with an MRI study optimized for epilepsy. Usually MRI or computed tomographic (CT scan should be performed in evaluating the cause of a newly diagnosed seizure disorder. MRI is preferred over CT because of its greater sensitivity and specificity for identifying small lesions."nBecause there is an option of surgical excision of the "seizure focus," which may cure the patient, the detection of a focal abnormality of the brain is important for the formulation of the reason for the seizures and the options available for treatment. Knowledge of the brain abnormalities early in the course of treating the patient greatly helps the management of each individual. The challenge to epileptologists is that the problem of epilepsy is a special one, which requires optimized protocols dedicated to it."nMRI interpretation is different when used in a screening way and when viewed in the context of other investigations. This is particularly important when the patient has partial seizures and may be considered for surgical treatment."nMost centers that deal with epilepsy spend a great deal of time in ensuring the quality of their EEG and EEG interpretation. However, unless there is a radiologist with an interest in epilepsy or an epileptologist who spends time with radiologist colleagues, it can be difficult to establish good epilepsy-focused MRI with appropriate sequences, radiography, and interpretation. MRI acquisition and interpretation need to be focused on the problem of epilepsy."nIndication"nThe American academy of neurology has published practice parameters for neuroimaging (NI studies (MRI, CT of patients having a first seizure. Emergent NI (scan immediately should be performed when a health care provider suspects a serious

  14. Functional neuroimaging of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A

    2005-03-01

    Sleep and sleep disorders have traditionally been viewed from a polysomnographic perspective. Although these methods provide information on the timing of various stages of sleep and wakefulness, they do not provide information regarding function in brain structures that have been implicated in the generation of sleep and that may be abnormal in different sleep disorders. Functional neuroimaging methods provide information regarding changes in brain function across the sleep-wake cycle that provides information for models of sleep dysregulation in a variety of sleep disorders. Early studies show reliable increases in function in limbic and anterior paralimbic cortex in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and decreases in function in higher-order cortical regions in known thalamocortical networks during non-REM sleep. Although most of the early work in this area has been devoted to the study of normal sleep mechanisms, a collection of studies in diverse sleep disorders such as sleep deprivation, depression, insomnia, dyssomnias, narcolepsy, and sleep apnea suggest that functional neuroimaging methods have the potential to clarify the pathophysiology of sleep disorders and to guide treatment strategies.

  15. 4-Repeat Tauopathy Neuroimaging Initiative - Cycle 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD); Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS); Cortical-basal Ganglionic Degeneration (CBGD); Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP); Nonfluent Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia (nfvPPA); Oligosymptomatic/Variant Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (o/vPSP)

  16. Interactive Information Visualization in Neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1998-01-01

    We describe a virtual environment for interactive visualization of 3D neuroimages. The environment is implemented in VRML and we will discuss the viability and limitation of this platform......We describe a virtual environment for interactive visualization of 3D neuroimages. The environment is implemented in VRML and we will discuss the viability and limitation of this platform...

  17. Interactive Information Visualization in Neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1998-01-01

    We describe a virtual environment for interactive visualization of 3D neuroimages. The environment is implemented in VRML and we will discuss the viability and limitation of this platform......We describe a virtual environment for interactive visualization of 3D neuroimages. The environment is implemented in VRML and we will discuss the viability and limitation of this platform...

  18. Data sharing in neuroimaging research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste ePoline

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant resources around the world have been invested in neuroimaging studies of brain function and disease. Easier access to this large body of work should have profound impact on research in cognitive neuroscience and psychiatry, leading to advances in the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric and neurological disease. A trend toward increased sharing of neuroimaging data has emerged in recent years. Nevertheless, a number of barriers continue to impede momentum. Many researchers and institutions remain uncertain about how to share data or lack the tools and expertise to participate in data sharing. The use of electronic data capture methods for neuroimaging greatly simplifies the task of data collection and has the potential to help standardize many aspects of data sharing. We review here the motivations for sharing neuroimaging data, the current data sharing landscape, and the sociological or technical barriers that still need to be addressed. The INCF Task Force on Neuroimaging Datasharing, in conjunction with several collaborative groups around the world, has started work on several tools to ease and eventually automate the practice of data sharing. It is hoped that such tools will allow researchers to easily share raw, processed, and derived neuroimaging data, with appropriate metadata and provenance records, and will improve the reproducibility of neuroimaging studies. By providing seamless integration of data sharing and analysis tools within a commodity research environment, the Task Force seeks to identify and minimize barriers to data sharing in the field of neuroimaging.

  19. Uncovering the etiology of conversion disorder: insights from functional neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejareh dar, Maryam; Kanaan, Richard AA

    2016-01-01

    Conversion disorder (CD) is a syndrome of neurological symptoms arising without organic cause, arguably in response to emotional stress, but the exact neural substrates of these symptoms and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood with the hunt for a biological basis afoot for centuries. In the past 15 years, novel insights have been gained with the advent of functional neuroimaging studies in patients suffering from CDs in both motor and nonmotor domains. This review summarizes recent functional neuroimaging studies including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET) to see whether they bring us closer to understanding the etiology of CD. Convergent functional neuroimaging findings suggest alterations in brain circuits that could point to different mechanisms for manifesting functional neurological symptoms, in contrast with feigning or healthy controls. Abnormalities in emotion processing and in emotion-motor processing suggest a diathesis, while differential reactions to certain stressors implicate a specific response to trauma. No comprehensive theory emerges from these clues, and all results remain preliminary, but functional neuroimaging has at least given grounds for hope that a model for CD may soon be found. PMID:26834476

  20. Update on neuroimaging phenotypes of mid-hindbrain malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jissendi-Tchofo, Patrice [University Hospital of Lille (CHRU), Department of Neuroradiology, MRI 3T Research, Plateforme Imagerie du vivant, IMPRT-IFR 114, Lille-Cedex (France); CHU Saint-Pierre, Radiology Department, Pediatric Neuroradiology Section, Brussels (Belgium); Severino, Mariasavina [Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Neuroradiology Unit, Genoa (Italy); Nguema-Edzang, Beatrice; Toure, Cisse; Soto Ares, Gustavo [University Hospital of Lille (CHRU), Department of Neuroradiology, MRI 3T Research, Plateforme Imagerie du vivant, IMPRT-IFR 114, Lille-Cedex (France); Barkovich, Anthony James [University of California, Neuroradiology Section, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-10-23

    Neuroimaging techniques including structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional positron emission tomography (PET) are useful in categorizing various midbrain-hindbrain (MHB) malformations, both in allowing diagnosis and in helping to understand the developmental processes that were disturbed. Brain imaging phenotypes of numerous malformations are characteristic features that help in guiding the genetic testing in case of direct neuroimaging-genotype correlation or, at least, to differentiate among MHB malformations entities. The present review aims to provide the reader with an update of the use of neuroimaging applications in the fine analysis of MHB malformations, using a comprehensive, recently proposed developmental and genetic classification. We have performed an extensive systematic review of the literature, from the embryology main steps of MHB development through the malformations entities, with regard to their molecular and genetic basis, conventional MRI features, and other neuroimaging characteristics. We discuss disorders in which imaging features are distinctive and how these features reflect the structural and functional impairment of the brain. Recognition of specific MRI phenotypes, including advanced imaging features, is useful to recognize the MHB malformation entities, to suggest genetic investigations, and, eventually, to monitor the disease outcome after supportive therapies. (orig.)

  1. Translational Perspectives for Computational Neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Klaas E; Iglesias, Sandra; Heinzle, Jakob; Diaconescu, Andreea O

    2015-08-19

    Functional neuroimaging has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of brain function. It remains challenging, however, to translate these advances into diagnostic tools for psychiatry. Promising new avenues for translation are provided by computational modeling of neuroimaging data. This article reviews contemporary frameworks for computational neuroimaging, with a focus on forward models linking unobservable brain states to measurements. These approaches-biophysical network models, generative models, and model-based fMRI analyses of neuromodulation-strive to move beyond statistical characterizations and toward mechanistic explanations of neuroimaging data. Focusing on schizophrenia as a paradigmatic spectrum disease, we review applications of these models to psychiatric questions, identify methodological challenges, and highlight trends of convergence among computational neuroimaging approaches. We conclude by outlining a translational neuromodeling strategy, highlighting the importance of openly available datasets from prospective patient studies for evaluating the clinical utility of computational models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuroimaging of autism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhoeven, Judith S.; Cock, Paul de; Lagae, Lieven [University Hospitals of the Catholic University of Leuven, Department of Pediatrics, Leuven (Belgium); Sunaert, Stefan [University Hospitals of the Catholic University of Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-01-15

    Neuroimaging studies done by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have provided important insights into the neurobiological basis for autism. The aim of this article is to review the current state of knowledge regarding brain abnormalities in autism. Results of structural MRI studies dealing with total brain volume, the volume of the cerebellum, caudate nucleus, thalamus, amygdala and the area of the corpus callosum are summarised. In the past 5 years also new MRI applications as functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging brought considerable new insights in the pathophysiological mechanisms of autism. Dysfunctional activation in key areas of verbal and non-verbal communication, social interaction, and executive functions are revised. Finally, we also discuss white matter alterations in important communication pathways in the brain of autistic patients. (orig.)

  3. Neuroimaging Informatics Tools and Resources Clearinghouse (NITRC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Neuroimaging Informatics Tools and Resources Clearinghouse (NITRC) facilitates finding and comparing neuroimaging resources for functional and structural...

  4. The emerging role of advanced neuroimaging techniques for brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowosielski, Martha; Radbruch, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Brain metastases are an increasingly encountered and frightening manifestation of systemic cancer. More effective therapeutic strategies for the primary tumor are resulting in longer patient survival on the one hand while on the other, better brain tumor detection has resulted from increased availability and development of more precise brain imaging methods. This review focuses on the emerging role of functional neuroimaging techniques; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as positron emission tomography (PET), in establishing diagnosis, for monitoring treatment response with an emphasis on new targeted as well as immunomodulatory therapies and for predicting prognosis in patients with brain metastases.

  5. Positrons in Surface Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Within the last decade powerful methods have been developed to study surfaces using bright low-energy positron beams. These novel analysis tools exploit the unique properties of positron interaction with surfaces, which comprise the absence of exchange interaction, repulsive crystal potential and positron trapping in delocalized surface states at low energies. By applying reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) one can benefit from the phenomenon of total reflection below a critical angle that is not present in electron surface diffraction. Therefore, RHEPD allows the determination of the atom positions of (reconstructed) surfaces with outstanding accuracy. The main advantages of positron annihilation induced Auger-electron spectroscopy (PAES) are the missing secondary electron background in the energy region of Auger-transitions and its topmost layer sensitivity for elemental analysis. In order to enable the investigation of the electron polarization at surfaces low-energy spin-polarized positron...

  6. Neuroimaging of central breathlessness mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattinson, Kyle T S; Johnson, Miriam J

    2014-09-01

    Breathlessness debilitates millions of people with cardiorespiratory conditions and cancer. Symptoms correlate poorly with the objective measures of disease (e.g. spirometry). Altered brain processing of respiratory sensations may contribute to this disparity. This article summarizes how functional neuroimaging works, focussing on functional MRI (FMRI) and magnetoencephalography, how neuroimaging has shed light on the central mechanisms of breathlessness and thus how it may help target new therapies. Current understanding of central neural activity in breathlessness comes mainly from a small number of studies in healthy volunteers using models of induced acute breathlessness. Parallels with neuroimaging findings in pain and fear or anxiety have been used to interpret the neuroimaging studies of breathlessness to form hypotheses. Despite the lack of recent neuroimaging studies in breathlessness, there have been methodological advances in overcoming confounders with respiratory FMRI. In addition, developing interest in the distinction of emotional from the sensory aspects of breathlessness and the use of opioids for breathlessness has driven mechanistic understandings. Neuroimaging of breathlessness remains in its infancy. However, advances in the understanding of central perception, combined with novel neuroimaging techniques, means that we are poised to increase our understanding of the brain processes of breathlessness and their modulation.

  7. Development of PowerMap: a software package for statistical power calculation in neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Karen E; Hayasaka, Satoru

    2012-10-01

    Although there are a number of statistical software tools for voxel-based massively univariate analysis of neuroimaging data, such as fMRI (functional MRI), PET (positron emission tomography), and VBM (voxel-based morphometry), very few software tools exist for power and sample size calculation for neuroimaging studies. Unlike typical biomedical studies, outcomes from neuroimaging studies are 3D images of correlated voxels, requiring a correction for massive multiple comparisons. Thus, a specialized power calculation tool is needed for planning neuroimaging studies. To facilitate this process, we developed a software tool specifically designed for neuroimaging data. The software tool, called PowerMap, implements theoretical power calculation algorithms based on non-central random field theory. It can also calculate power for statistical analyses with FDR (false discovery rate) corrections. This GUI (graphical user interface)-based tool enables neuroimaging researchers without advanced knowledge in imaging statistics to calculate power and sample size in the form of 3D images. In this paper, we provide an overview of the statistical framework behind the PowerMap tool. Three worked examples are also provided, a regression analysis, an ANOVA (analysis of variance), and a two-sample T-test, in order to demonstrate the study planning process with PowerMap. We envision that PowerMap will be a great aide for future neuroimaging research.

  8. Generation of a high-brightness pulsed positron beam for the Munich scanning positron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piochacz, Christian

    2009-11-20

    Within the present work the prerequisites for the operation of the Munich scanning positron microscope (SPM) at the high intense neutron induced positron source Munich (NEPOMUC) were established. This was accomplished in two steps: Firstly, a re-moderation device was installed at the positron beam facility NEPOMUC, which enhances the brightness of the positron beam for all connected experiments. The second step was the design, set up and initial operation of the SPM interface for the high efficient conversion of the continuous beam into a bunched beam. The in-pile positron source NEPOMUC creates a positron beam with a diameter of typically 7 mm, a kinetic energy of 1 keV and an energy spread of 50 eV. The NEPOMUC re-moderator generates from this beam a low energy positron beam (20 - 200 eV) with a diameter of less than 2 mm and an energy spread well below 2.5 eV. This was achieved with an excellent total efficiency of 6.55{+-}0.25 %. The re-moderator was not only the rst step to implement the SPM at NEPOMUc, it enables also the operation of the pulsed low energy positron beam system (PLEPS). Within the present work, at this spectrometer rst positron lifetime measurements were performed, which revealed the defect types of an ion irradiated uranium molybdenum alloy. Moreover, the instruments which were already connected to the positron beam facility bene ts considerably of the high brightness enhancement. In the new SPM interface an additional re-moderation stage enhances the brightness of the beam even more and will enable positron lifetime measurements at the SPM with a lateral resolution below 1 {mu}m. The efficiency of the re-moderation process in this second stage was 24.5{+-}4.5 %. In order to convert high efficiently the continuous positron beam into a pulsed beam with a repetition rate of 50 MHz and a pulse duration of less than 50 ps, a sub-harmonic pre-bucher was combined with two sine wave bunchers. Furthermore, the additional re-moderation stage of the

  9. Initial performance studies of a wearable brain positron emission tomography camera based on autonomous thin-film digital Geiger avalanche photodiode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtlein, Charles R; Turner, James N; Thompson, Michael O; Mandal, Krishna C; Häggström, Ida; Zhang, Jiahan; Humm, John L; Feiglin, David H; Krol, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Using analytical and Monte Carlo modeling, we explored performance of a lightweight wearable helmet-shaped brain positron emission tomography (PET), or BET camera, based on thin-film digital Geiger avalanche photodiode arrays with Lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) or [Formula: see text] scintillators for imaging in vivo human brain function of freely moving and acting subjects. We investigated a spherical cap BET and cylindrical brain PET (CYL) geometries with 250-mm diameter. We also considered a clinical whole-body (WB) LYSO PET/CT scanner. The simulated energy resolutions were 10.8% (LYSO) and 3.3% ([Formula: see text]), and the coincidence window was set at 2 ns. The brain was simulated as a water sphere of uniform F-18 activity with a radius of 100 mm. We found that BET achieved [Formula: see text] better noise equivalent count (NEC) performance relative to the CYL and [Formula: see text] than WB. For 10-mm-thick [Formula: see text] equivalent mass systems, LYSO (7-mm thick) had [Formula: see text] higher NEC than [Formula: see text]. We found that [Formula: see text] scintillator crystals achieved [Formula: see text] full-width-half-maximum spatial resolution without parallax errors. Additionally, our simulations showed that LYSO generally outperformed [Formula: see text] for NEC unless the timing resolution for [Formula: see text] was considerably smaller than that presently used for LYSO, i.e., well below 300 ps.

  10. Neuroimaging bei Schlaganfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasel Ch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Während zunächst die Differenzialdiagnosen des Schlaganfalls erfasst werden sollten, wurde sehr bald das Neuroimaging in den Dienst der Behandlung der akuten Ischämie gestellt. Hier kommt der neuroradiologischen Bildgebung eine besondere Rolle zu, da zunehmend die Auswahl von Patienten für eine bestimmte Therapie von der Bildgebung abhängt. Der Verlauf von zerebralen Ischämien ist, bedingt durch stark variierende Faktoren wie Kollateralisation, frühe Rekanalisation etc., sehr unterschiedlich. Die multimodale MR- und CTBildgebung, welche eine Kombination aus konventioneller Bildgebung des Gehirns, angiographischen Verfahren und funktionellen Messungen, wie z. B. Perfusionsmessungen, darstellt, kann jede Ischämie sehr genau charakterisieren. Wichtig ist dabei ein klares Interpretationskonzept. Bei Patienten, deren Symptombeginn eindeutig innerhalb der letzten 3–4,5 h liegt, kann die Nativ- CT, am besten in Kombination mit der CTA, als ausreichend zur Durchführung der anerkannten systemischen i.v.-Lyse sowie zur Feststellung eines Gefäßverschlusses, der einer weiteren Behandlung bedarf, angesehen werden. Im Zeitfenster 4,5 h, bei unklarem Zeitfenster oder nach frustraner i.v.-Lyse, ist, insbesondere bei einem im Weiteren geplanten endovaskulären Eingriff, die multimodale MRI mit Anwendung des „Mismatch-match“-Konzepts zwischen diffusionsgewichtetem MRI und Perfusions-MRI jedenfalls die Methode der ersten Wahl. Steht diese nicht zur Verfügung, kann alternativ das multimodale CT eingesetzt werden.

  11. [Mixed states and neuroimaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaladjian, A; Belzeaux, R; Micoulaud-Franchi, J A; Cermolacce, M; Fakra, E; Azorin, J-M

    2013-12-01

    Despite the growing number of neuroimaging studies in bipolar disorder over the past years, the brain regions involved in mood dysregulation in this disease are still poorly understood. If some neurofunctional abnormalities seem to be independent of mood state, others were preferentially associated with mania or depression, involving the amygdala and other limbic regions as well as ventral frontal regions, with a likely hemispheric lateralization of these abnormalities according to the thymic state that was examined. Very few imaging studies became interested in bipolar patients in a mixed state, making it harder to connect brain malfunction to a given mood state. However, data obtained so far support the hypothesis of a lateralization of brain abnormalities in relation to bipolar symptomatology, suggesting that neurofonctional abnormalities preferentially located in the right ventral frontal and limbic areas may underlie the depressive component, associated with abnormalities of the left similar regions for the manic component. Identification of brain dysfunctions that may explain the emergence of mixed symptoms will likely provide useful information to better understand the respective roles of each hemisphere in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Farmacognosia. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  12. Inter-rater variability of visual interpretation and comparison with quantitative evaluation of {sup 11}C-PiB PET amyloid images of the Japanese Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (J-ADNI) multicenter study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamane, Tomohiko [Saitama Medical University Saitama International Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hidaka (Japan); Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Division of Molecular Imaging, Kobe (Japan); Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Team for Neuroimaging Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ishii, Kenji; Sakata, Muneyuki [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Team for Neuroimaging Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ikari, Yasuhiko; Nishio, Tomoyuki [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Division of Molecular Imaging, Kobe (Japan); Research Association for Biotechnology, Tokyo (Japan); Ishii, Kazunari [Kinki University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Osaka, Sayama (Japan); Kato, Takashi; Ito, Kengo [National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Department of Brain Science and Molecular Imaging, Obu (Japan); Senda, Michio [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Division of Molecular Imaging, Kobe (Japan); Collaboration: J-ADNI Study Group

    2017-05-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the inter-rater variability of the visual interpretation of {sup 11}C-PiB PET images regarding the positivity/negativity of amyloid deposition that were obtained in a multicenter clinical research project, Japanese Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (J-ADNI). The results of visual interpretation were also compared with a semi-automatic quantitative analysis using mean cortical standardized uptake value ratio to the cerebellar cortex (mcSUVR). A total of 162 {sup 11}C-PiB PET scans, including 45 mild Alzheimer's disease, 60 mild cognitive impairment, and 57 normal cognitive control cases that had been acquired as J-ADNI baseline scans were analyzed. Based on visual interpretation by three independent raters followed by consensus read, each case was classified into positive, equivocal, and negative deposition (ternary criteria) and further dichotomized by merging the former two (binary criteria). Complete agreement of visual interpretation by the three raters was observed for 91.3% of the cases (Cohen κ = 0.88 on average) in ternary criteria and for 92.3% (κ = 0.89) in binary criteria. Cases that were interpreted as visually positive in the consensus read showed significantly higher mcSUVR than those visually negative (2.21 ± 0.37 vs. 1.27 ± 0.09, p < 0.001), and positive or negative decision by visual interpretation was dichotomized by a cut-off value of mcSUVR = 1.5. Significant positive/negative associations were observed between mcSUVR and the number of raters who evaluated as positive (ρ = 0.87, p < 0.0001) and negative (ρ = -0.85, p < 0.0001) interpretation. Cases of disagreement among raters showed generally low mcSUVR. Inter-rater agreement was almost perfect in {sup 11}C-PiB PET scans. Positive or negative decision by visual interpretation was dichotomized by a cut-off value of mcSUVR = 1.5. As some cases of disagreement among raters tended to show low mcSUVR, referring to quantitative method may

  13. A review of neuroimaging studies of anxiety disorders in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Shi, Shenxun

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent internationally, and constitute a substantial social and economic burden for patients, their families, and society. A number of neuroimaging studies have investigated the etiology of anxiety disorders in China in the last decade. We discuss the findings of these studies, and compare them with the results of neuroimaging studies of anxiety disorders outside China. A literature search was conducted using the Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, the Chinese Scientific and Technical Periodicals Database, the Chinese Journal Full-text Database, and PubMed, from 1989 to April 2009. We selected neuroimaging studies in which all participants and researchers were Chinese. Twenty-five studies fit our inclusion criteria. Nine studies examined general anxiety disorder (GAD) and/or panic disorder (PD), eight examined obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and eight examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Our literature review revealed several general findings. First, reduced regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was found in the frontal lobe and temporal lobe in patients with GAD and PD compared with healthy controls. Second, when viewing images with negative and positive valence, relatively increased or decreased activation was found in several brain areas in patients with GAD and PD, respectively. Third, studies with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) imaging revealed that OCD patients exhibited hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion in some brain regions compared with healthy controls. Neuroimaging studies of PTSD indicate that the hippocampal volume and the N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA) level and the NAA/creatine ratio in the hippocampus are decreased in patients relative to controls. Neuroimaging studies within and outside China have provided evidence of specific neurobiological changes associated with anxiety disorders. However, results have not been entirely consistent across different studies

  14. Traumatic brain injury, neuroimaging, and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2013-01-01

    Depending on severity, traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces immediate neuropathological effects that in the mildest form may be transient but as severity increases results in neural damage and degeneration. The first phase of neural degeneration is explainable by the primary acute and secondary neuropathological effects initiated by the injury; however, neuroimaging studies demonstrate a prolonged period of pathological changes that progressively occur even during the chronic phase. This review examines how neuroimaging may be used in TBI to understand (1) the dynamic changes that occur in brain development relevant to understanding the effects of TBI and how these relate to developmental stage when the brain is injured, (2) how TBI interferes with age-typical brain development and the effects of aging thereafter, and (3) how TBI results in greater frontotemporolimbic damage, results in cerebral atrophy, and is more disruptive to white matter neural connectivity. Neuroimaging quantification in TBI demonstrates degenerative effects from brain injury over time. An adverse synergistic influence of TBI with aging may predispose the brain injured individual for the development of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders long after surviving the brain injury.

  15. Traumatic brain injury, neuroimaging, and neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin D. Bigler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Depending on severity, traumatic brain injury (TBI induces immediate neuropathological effects that in the mildest form may be transient but as severity increases results in neural damage and degeneration. The first phase of neural degeneration is explainable by the primary acute and secondary neuropathological effects initiated by the injury; however, neuroimaging studies demonstrate a prolonged period of pathological changes that progressively occur even during the chronic phase. This review examines how neuroimaging may be used in TBI to understand (1 the dynamic changes that occur in brain development relevant to understanding the effects of TBI and how these relate to developmental stage when the brain is injured, (2 how TBI interferes with age-typical brain development and the effects of aging thereafter, and (3 how TBI results in greater frontotemporolimbic damage, results in cerebral atrophy, and is more disruptive to white matter neural connectivity. Neuroimaging quantification in TBI demonstrates degenerative effects from brain injury over time. An adverse synergistic influence of TBI with aging may predispose the brain injured individual for the development of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders long after surviving the brain injury.

  16. Neuroimaging of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Chul; Chanraud, Sandra; Sullivan, Edith V

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable evidence that neuroimaging findings can improve the early diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in clinical settings. The most distinctive neuroimaging finding of acute WE are cytotoxic edema and vasogenic edema, which are represented by bilateral symmetric hyperintensity alterations on T2-weighted MR images in the periphery of the third ventricle, periaqueductal area, mammillary bodies and midbrain tectal plate. An initial bout of WE can result in Korsakoff's syndrome (KS), but repeated bouts in conjunction with its typical comorbidity, chronic alcoholism, can result in signs of tissue degeneration in vulnerable brain regions. Chronic abnormalities identified with neuroimaging enable examination of brain damage in living patients with KS and have expanded the understanding of the neuropsychological deficits resulting from thiamine deficiency, alcohol neurotoxicity, and their comorbidity. Brain structure and functional studies indicate that the interactions involving the thalamus, mammillary bodies, hippocampus, frontal lobes, and cerebellum are crucial for memory formation and executive functions, and the interruption of these circuits by WE and chronic alcoholism can contribute substantially to the neuropsychological deficits in KS.

  17. Neuroimaging in Traumatic Brain Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Bruce; Newberg, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Summary: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common and potentially devastating clinical problem. Because prompt proper management of TBI sequelae can significantly alter the clinical course especially within 48 h of the injury, neuroimaging techniques have become an important part of the diagnostic work up of such patients. In the acute setting, these imaging studies can determine the presence and extent of injury and guide surgical planning and minimally invasive interventions. Neuroimaging a...

  18. [Modern neuroimaging of brain plasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprian, G; Seidel, S

    2010-02-01

    Modern neuroimaging methods offer new insights into the plasticity of the human brain. As the techniques of functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging are increasingly being applied in a clinical setting, the examiner is now frequently confronted with the interpretation of imaging findings related to regenerative processes in response to lesions of the central and also of the peripheral nervous system. In this article individual results of modern neuroimaging studies are discussed in the context of structural and functional plasticity of the CNS.

  19. Solvated Positron Chemistry. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.

    1979-01-01

    The reaction of the hydrated positron, eaq+ with Cl−, Br−, and I− ions in aqueous solutions was studied by means of positron The measured angular correlation curves for [Cl−, e+], [Br−, e+, and [I−, e+] bound states were in good agreement with th Because of this agreement and the fact that the ca...

  20. Positron annihilation microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canter, K.F. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Advances in positron annihilation microprobe development are reviewed. The present resolution achievable is 3 {mu}m. The ultimate resolution is expected to be 0.1 {mu}m which will enable the positron microprobe to be a valuable tool in the development of 0.1 {mu}m scale electronic devices in the future. (author)

  1. Positrons in surface physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Within the last decade powerful methods have been developed to study surfaces using bright low-energy positron beams. These novel analysis tools exploit the unique properties of positron interaction with surfaces, which comprise the absence of exchange interaction, repulsive crystal potential and positron trapping in delocalized surface states at low energies. By applying reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) one can benefit from the phenomenon of total reflection below a critical angle that is not present in electron surface diffraction. Therefore, RHEPD allows the determination of the atom positions of (reconstructed) surfaces with outstanding accuracy. The main advantages of positron annihilation induced Auger-electron spectroscopy (PAES) are the missing secondary electron background in the energy region of Auger-transitions and its topmost layer sensitivity for elemental analysis. In order to enable the investigation of the electron polarization at surfaces low-energy spin-polarized positrons are used to probe the outermost electrons of the surface. Furthermore, in fundamental research the preparation of well defined surfaces tailored for the production of bound leptonic systems plays an outstanding role. In this report, it is envisaged to cover both the fundamental aspects of positron surface interaction and the present status of surface studies using modern positron beam techniques.

  2. [(18)F]-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography Scan Should Be Obtained Early in Cases of Autoimmune Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newey, C R; Sarwal, A; Hantus, S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Autoimmune encephalitis (AE) is a clinically challenging diagnosis with nonspecific neurological symptoms. Prompt diagnosis is important and often relies on neuroimaging. We present a case series of AE highlighting the importance of an early [(18)F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scan. Methods. Retrospective review of seven consecutive cases of autoimmune encephalitis. Results. All patients had both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG-PET scans. Initial clinical presentations included altered mental status and/or new onset seizures. Six cases had serum voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibody and one had serum N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antibody. MRI of brain showed mesial temporal lobe hyperintensity in five cases of VGKC. The other two patients with VGKC or NMDA AE had restiform body hyperintensity on MRI brain or a normal MRI, respectively. Mesial temporal lobe hypermetabolism was noted in three cases on FDG-PET, despite initial unremarkable MRI. Malignancy workup was negative in all patients. Conclusion. A high index of suspicion for AE should be maintained in patients presenting with cognitive symptoms, seizures, and limbic changes on neuroimaging. In cases with normal initial brain MRI, FDG-PET can be positive. Additionally, extralimbic hyperintensity on MRI may also be observed.

  3. [18F]-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography Scan Should Be Obtained Early in Cases of Autoimmune Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Newey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Autoimmune encephalitis (AE is a clinically challenging diagnosis with nonspecific neurological symptoms. Prompt diagnosis is important and often relies on neuroimaging. We present a case series of AE highlighting the importance of an early [18F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET scan. Methods. Retrospective review of seven consecutive cases of autoimmune encephalitis. Results. All patients had both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and FDG-PET scans. Initial clinical presentations included altered mental status and/or new onset seizures. Six cases had serum voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC antibody and one had serum N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA antibody. MRI of brain showed mesial temporal lobe hyperintensity in five cases of VGKC. The other two patients with VGKC or NMDA AE had restiform body hyperintensity on MRI brain or a normal MRI, respectively. Mesial temporal lobe hypermetabolism was noted in three cases on FDG-PET, despite initial unremarkable MRI. Malignancy workup was negative in all patients. Conclusion. A high index of suspicion for AE should be maintained in patients presenting with cognitive symptoms, seizures, and limbic changes on neuroimaging. In cases with normal initial brain MRI, FDG-PET can be positive. Additionally, extralimbic hyperintensity on MRI may also be observed.

  4. [18F]-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography Scan Should Be Obtained Early in Cases of Autoimmune Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwal, A.; Hantus, S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Autoimmune encephalitis (AE) is a clinically challenging diagnosis with nonspecific neurological symptoms. Prompt diagnosis is important and often relies on neuroimaging. We present a case series of AE highlighting the importance of an early [18F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scan. Methods. Retrospective review of seven consecutive cases of autoimmune encephalitis. Results. All patients had both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG-PET scans. Initial clinical presentations included altered mental status and/or new onset seizures. Six cases had serum voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibody and one had serum N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antibody. MRI of brain showed mesial temporal lobe hyperintensity in five cases of VGKC. The other two patients with VGKC or NMDA AE had restiform body hyperintensity on MRI brain or a normal MRI, respectively. Mesial temporal lobe hypermetabolism was noted in three cases on FDG-PET, despite initial unremarkable MRI. Malignancy workup was negative in all patients. Conclusion. A high index of suspicion for AE should be maintained in patients presenting with cognitive symptoms, seizures, and limbic changes on neuroimaging. In cases with normal initial brain MRI, FDG-PET can be positive. Additionally, extralimbic hyperintensity on MRI may also be observed. PMID:27559482

  5. Structural and functional neuroimaging in intractable epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinchure Swati

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical management remains unsatisfactory in about a third of patients with epilepsy and some of them are candidates for resective epilepsy surgery. Structural and functional neuroimaging plays an important role in the identification of the precise cortical region responsible for seizures and is very crucial for a good surgical outcome. Furthermore, identification of eloquent cortical areas near the region to be resected is essential to avoid postoperative neurologic deficit. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI protocol for epilepsy can be individually tailored depending on the seizure semiology and possibly electroencephalography. New MRI techniques demonstrate the structure of the brain in fine detail, help in understanding the underlying pathology, and demonstrate functional activity of the brain with high spatial and temporal resolution. Metabolic imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET and single photon emission tomography (SPECT visualize metabolic alterations of the brain in the ictal and interictal states. In MR-negative epilepsy patients, these techniques may have localizing value. The proper use and interpretation of the findings provided by these new technologies is crucial. In this review article, we discuss various conventional and advanced MRI techniques, interpretation of various findings, and the role of functional imaging modalities, such as functional MRI, PET, and SPECT in the localization of epileptogenic substrate as well as for understanding the pathophysiology, propagation, and neurochemical correlates of epilepsy.

  6. Spin Tracking at the ILC Positron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Hartin, A; Staufenbiel, F

    2012-01-01

    In order to achieve the physics goals of future Linear Colliders, it is important that electron and positron beams are polarized. The baseline design at the International Linear Collider (ILC) foresees an e+ source based on helical undulator. Such a source provides high luminosity and polarizations. The positron source planned for ILC is based on a helical undulator system and can deliver a positron polarization of 60%. To ensure that no significant polarization is lost during the transport of the e- and e+ beams from the source to the interaction region, precise spin tracking has to be included in all transport elements which can contribute to a loss of polarization, i.e. the initial accelerating structures, the damping rings, the spin rotators, the main linac and the beam delivery system. In particular, the dynamics of the polarized positron beam is required to be investigated. In the talk recent results of positron spin tracking simulation at the source are presented. The positron yield and polarization ar...

  7. Neuroimaging findings in primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, J N; Berman Rosa, M; Gouin, J-P; Dang-Vu, T T

    2014-10-01

    State-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques have accelerated progress in the study and understanding of sleep in humans. Neuroimaging studies in primary insomnia remain relatively few, considering the important prevalence of this disorder in the general population. This review examines the contribution of functional and structural neuroimaging to our current understanding of primary insomnia. Functional studies during sleep provided support for the hyperarousal theory of insomnia. Functional neuroimaging also revealed abnormalities in cognitive and emotional processing in primary insomnia. Results from structural studies suggest neuroanatomical alterations in primary insomnia, mostly in the hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. However, these results are not well replicated across studies. A few magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies revealed abnormalities in neurotransmitter concentrations and bioenergetics in primary insomnia. The inconsistencies among neuroimaging findings on insomnia are likely due to clinical heterogeneity, differences in imaging and overall diversity of techniques and designs employed. Larger samples, replication, as well as innovative methodologies are necessary for the progression of this perplexing, yet promising area of research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional neuro-imaging as a pre-surgical tool in epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Zulfi Haneef; David K. Chen

    2014-01-01

    Functional neuro-imaging techniques are helpful in the pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy for localization of the epileptogenic zone as ancillary tools to electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or when other localization techniques are normal, non-concordant or discordant. Positron emission tomography (PET) and ictal single photon emission computed tomography (ictal SPECT) imaging are traditional tests that have been reported to have good sensitivity and specificit...

  9. Supernovae and Positron Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Milne, P A; Kinzer, R L; Leising, M D

    2002-01-01

    Radioactive nuclei, especially those created in SN explosion, have long been suggested to be important contributors of galactic positrons. In this paper we describe the findings of three independent OSSE/SMM/TGRS studies of positron annihilation radiation, demonstrating that the three studies are largely in agreement as to the distribution of galactic annihilation radiation. We then assess the predicted yields and distributions of SN-synthesized radionuclei, determining that they are marginally compatible with the findings of the annihilation radiation studies.

  10. Advanced positron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Variola, A., E-mail: variola@lal.in2p3.fr

    2014-03-11

    Positron sources are a critical system for the future lepton colliders projects. Due to the large beam emittance at the production and the limitation given by the target heating and mechanical stress, the main collider parameters fixing the luminosity are constrained by the e{sup +} sources. In this context also the damping ring design boundary conditions and the final performance are given by the injected positron beam. At present different schemes are being taken into account in order to increase the production and the capture yield of the positron sources, to reduce the impact of the deposited energy in the converter target and to increase the injection efficiency in the damping ring. The final results have a strong impact not only on the collider performance but also on its cost optimization. After a short introduction illustrating their fundamental role, the basic positron source scheme and the performance of the existing sources will be illustrated. The main innovative designs for the future colliders advanced sources will be reviewed and the different developed technologies presented. Finally the positrons-plasma R and D experiments and the futuristic proposals for positron sources will reviewed.

  11. Autismo: neuroimagem Autism: neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Zilbovicius

    2006-05-01

    and stereotyped and repetitive behaviors. Thanks to recent brain imaging studies, scientists are getting a better idea of the neural circuits involved in autism spectrum disorders. Indeed, functional brain imaging, such as positron emission tomography, single foton emission tomographyand functional MRI have opened a new perspective to study normal and pathological brain functioning. Three independent studies have found anatomical and rest functional temporal lobe abnormalities in autistic patients. These alterations are localized in the superior temporal sulcus bilaterally, an area which is critical for perception of key social stimuli. In addition, functional studies have shown hypoactivation of most areas implicated in social perception (face and voice perception and social cognition (theory of mind. These data suggest an abnormal functioning of the social brain network in autism. The understanding of the functional alterations of this important mechanism may drive the elaboration of new and more adequate social re-educative strategies for autistic patients.

  12. Neuroimaging and genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease and addiction-related degenerative brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussotte, Florence F; Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Leonardo, Cassandra D; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-06-01

    Neuroimaging offers a powerful means to assess the trajectory of brain degeneration in a variety of disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we describe how multi-modal imaging can be used to study the changing brain during the different stages of AD. We integrate findings from a range of studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Neuroimaging reveals how risk genes for degenerative disorders affect the brain, including several recently discovered genetic variants that may disrupt brain connectivity. We review some recent neuroimaging studies of genetic polymorphisms associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Some genetic variants that increase risk for drug addiction may overlap with those associated with degenerative brain disorders. These common associations offer new insight into mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and addictive behaviors, and may offer new leads for treating them before severe and irreversible neurological symptoms appear.

  13. Human fear conditioning and extinction in neuroimaging: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Sehlmeyer

    Full Text Available Fear conditioning and extinction are basic forms of associative learning that have gained considerable clinical relevance in enhancing our understanding of anxiety disorders and facilitating their treatment. Modern neuroimaging techniques have significantly aided the identification of anatomical structures and networks involved in fear conditioning. On closer inspection, there is considerable variation in methodology and results between studies. This systematic review provides an overview of the current neuroimaging literature on fear conditioning and extinction on healthy subjects, taking into account methodological issues such as the conditioning paradigm. A Pubmed search, as of December 2008, was performed and supplemented by manual searches of bibliographies of key articles. Two independent reviewers made the final study selection and data extraction. A total of 46 studies on cued fear conditioning and/or extinction on healthy volunteers using positron emission tomography or functional magnetic resonance imaging were reviewed. The influence of specific experimental factors, such as contingency and timing parameters, assessment of conditioned responses, and characteristics of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli, on cerebral activation patterns was examined. Results were summarized descriptively. A network consisting of fear-related brain areas, such as amygdala, insula, and anterior cingulate cortex, is activated independently of design parameters. However, some neuroimaging studies do not report these findings in the presence of methodological heterogeneities. Furthermore, other brain areas are differentially activated, depending on specific design parameters. These include stronger hippocampal activation in trace conditioning and tactile stimulation. Furthermore, tactile unconditioned stimuli enhance activation of pain related, motor, and somatosensory areas. Differences concerning experimental factors may partly explain the variance

  14. Imaging the attenuation coefficients of positron beams in matter: positron attenuation tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Charles [Siemens Healthcare, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-05-18

    A new positron annihilation imaging modality is described that enables nondestructive measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) of positron beams in heterogeneous materials. This positron attenuation tomography (PAT) technique utilizes a positron emission tomography (PET) system embedded within a uniform static magnetic field, such as is found in integrated PET/MRI scanners. A Ga68-generated positron beam constrained by a 3T magnetic field penetrates objects placed within the scanner. The positrons slow down and annihilate within the object. The resulting annihilation distribution is tomographically imaged by the PET camera. This image may be interpreted as a map of the product of the positron beam's flux and its LAC at each point in the volume. It is shown that under certain easily achieved conditions this image can be decomposed into separate maps of the flux and the LACs, without need for auxiliary measurements. Although these LACs may depend on both beam and material properties, a beam softening correction is demonstrated that effectively removes the dependence on beam variation, leaving a relative LAC that is characteristic of the material. Unlike x-ray, gamma-ray or other transmission techniques, PAT does not require the penetration of the beam entirely through the object. High resolution and high contrast images of positron beam LACs in objects may be produced over nearly the full range of the positron beam, which for Ga68 beta-rays in a 3T field is about 0.5 g/cm{sup 2}. The first examples of PAT images and an initial characterization of performance will be presented.

  15. Online Open Neuroimaging Mass Meta-Analysis with a Wiki

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Arup; Kempton, Matthew J.; Williams, Steven C. R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a system for meta-analysis where a wiki stores numerical data in a simple comma-separated values format and a web service performs the numerical statistical computation. We initially apply the system on multiple meta-analyses of structural neuroimaging data results. The described system...

  16. A review of neuroimaging studies of anxiety disorders in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Jing Chen, Shenxun ShiDepartment of Psychiatry, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaBackground: Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent internationally, and constitute a substantial social and economic burden for patients, their families, and society. A number of neuroimaging studies have investigated the etiology of anxiety disorders in China in the last decade. We discuss the findings of these studies, and compare them with the results of neuroimaging studies of anxiety disorders outside China.Method: A literature search was conducted using the Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, the Chinese Scientific and Technical Periodicals Database, the Chinese Journal Full-text Database, and PubMed, from 1989 to April 2009. We selected neuroimaging studies in which all participants and researchers were Chinese.Results: Twenty-five studies fit our inclusion criteria. Nine studies examined general anxiety disorder (GAD and/or panic disorder (PD, eight examined obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, and eight examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Our literature review revealed several general findings. First, reduced regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF was found in the frontal lobe and temporal lobe in patients with GAD and PD compared with healthy controls. Second, when viewing images with negative and positive valence, relatively increased or decreased activation was found in several brain areas in patients with GAD and PD, respectively. Third, studies with positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS imaging revealed that OCD patients exhibited hyperperfusion and hypoperfusion in some brain regions compared with healthy controls. Neuroimaging studies of PTSD indicate that the hippocampal volume and the N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA level and the NAA/creatine ratio in the hippocampus are decreased in patients relative to controls.Conclusion: Neuroimaging studies within and outside China have provided

  17. Applications of Neuroimaging to Disease-Modification Trials in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam S. Fleisher

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical to development of new therapies for Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the ability to detect clinical or pathological change over time. Clinical outcome measures typically used in therapeutic trials have unfortunately proven to be relatively variable and somewhat insensitive to change in this slowly progressive disease. For this reason, development of surrogate biomarkers that identify significant disease-associated brain changes are necessary to expedite treatment development in AD. Since AD pathology is present in the brain many years prior to clinical manifestation, ideally we want to develop biomarkers of disease that identify abnormal brain structure or function even prior to cognitive decline. Magnetic resonance imaging, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, new amyloid imaging techniques, and spinal fluid markers of AD all have great potential to provide surrogate endpoint measures for AD pathology. The Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI was developed for the distinct purpose of evaluating surrogate biomarkers for drug development in AD. Recent evidence from ADNI demonstrates that imaging may provide more sensitive, and earlier, measures of disease progression than traditional clinical measures for powering clinical drug trials in Alzheimer's disease. This review discusses recently presented data from the ADNI dataset, and the importance of imaging in the future of drug development in AD.

  18. Sinp 2012: aggiornamenti in neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara D'Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Molti gli aggiornamenti in neurofisiologia e neuroimaging dal congresso annuale della Società Italiana di Neuropsicologia (Sinp tenutosi a Roma a Novembre. Interessanti in modo particolare alcuni studi sui modelli anatomici funzionali nell'anosognosia per l'emiplegia e sulle funzioni della corteccia premotoria ventrale e della giunzione temporo-parietale nella regolazione del senso di "agency".

  19. Finding related functional neuroimaging volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-01-01

    We describe a content-based image retrieval technique for finding related functional neuroimaging experiments by voxelization of sets of stereotactic coordinates in Talairach space, comparing the volumes and reporting related volumes in a sorted list. Voxelization is accomplished by convolving each...

  20. Neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists: a survey of the state of current training and recommendations for trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Andreana; Hassenstab, Jason; Bangen, Katherine J

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging has gained widespread use in neuropsychological research and practice. However, there are neither established guidelines on how neuropsychologists might become competent researchers or consumers of neuroimaging data, nor any published studies describing the state of neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists. We report the results of two online surveys, one of 13 expert neuropsychologist-neuroimagers whose responses informed the formulation of a second, larger survey to neuropsychologists-at-large that were a random selection of a third of the members of the International Neuropsychological Society and American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology. A total of 237 doctoral-level neuropsychologists, or 15.3% of potential participants, provided complete responses. Most respondents (69.2%) received training in neuroimaging, mostly at the post-doctoral level, largely through independent study, clinical conferences, instruction by clinical supervisors, and individualized mentoring, on topics such as neuroimaging modalities in neurology, neuroanatomy, and the appropriate information to glean from neuroradiology reports. Of the remaining respondents who did not receive training in neuroimaging, 64.4% indicated that such training would be very or extremely beneficial to one's career as a neuropsychologist. Both neuropsychologist-neuroimagers and neuropsychologists-at-large provided specific recommendations for training. Findings from this initial effort will guide trainees who seek to develop competence in neuroimaging, and inform future formulations of neuropsychological training.

  1. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography performs better than contrast-enhanced computed tomography for metastasis evaluation in the initial staging of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Sampath; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Rana, Surinder Singh; Gupta, Rajesh; Das, Ashim; Nada, Ritambhra

    2017-07-08

    To evaluate the additional role of FDG-PET/CT to the conventional multiphasic CECT in the initial staging of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 54 patients diagnosed with pathologically proven pancreatic malignancy underwent FDG-PET/CECT. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of PET/CT and CECT for nodal and metastatic staging were calculated. The statistical difference was calculated by McNemar's test. Of 54 patients, 15 had distal metastasis. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of PET/CT and CECT for nodal staging were 33 vs 89%, 84 vs 100%, 67 vs 100%, 60 vs 90%, and 59 vs 95%, respectively, p < 0.001. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of CECT for metastatic staging were 73, 87, 69, 89, and 83%, whereas the accuracy of PET/CT was 100%, p = 0.01. By correctly characterizing unsuspected distant lesions, PET/CT could change management in 19% of patients. FDG-PET/CT can contribute to change in the management in almost one of every five patients of PA evaluated with the standard investigations during the initial staging.

  2. Building better biomarkers: brain models in translational neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Choong-Wan; Chang, Luke J; Lindquist, Martin A; Wager, Tor D

    2017-02-23

    Despite its great promise, neuroimaging has yet to substantially impact clinical practice and public health. However, a developing synergy between emerging analysis techniques and data-sharing initiatives has the potential to transform the role of neuroimaging in clinical applications. We review the state of translational neuroimaging and outline an approach to developing brain signatures that can be shared, tested in multiple contexts and applied in clinical settings. The approach rests on three pillars: (i) the use of multivariate pattern-recognition techniques to develop brain signatures for clinical outcomes and relevant mental processes; (ii) assessment and optimization of their diagnostic value; and (iii) a program of broad exploration followed by increasingly rigorous assessment of generalizability across samples, research contexts and populations. Increasingly sophisticated models based on these principles will help to overcome some of the obstacles on the road from basic neuroscience to better health and will ultimately serve both basic and applied goals.

  3. Positron emission tomography with 2-[18F]-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose for initial staging of hodgkin lymphoma: a single center experience in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Julio Cerci

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 2-[18F]-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose (FDG-PET is a well established functional imaging modality for the initial staging of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL in patients from Western Europe and North America. The reliability of FDG-PET in populations of different ethnic groups is unclear, as all investigations published to date have come from developed countries. PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of FDG-PET in the initial staging of HL patients in a Brazilian population. METHODS: Eighty-two patients with newly diagnosed HL were prospectively included in the study. All patients were staged with both conventional clinical staging (CCS methods, including computed tomography (CT and whole-body FDG-PET methods. A standard of reference for the nodal regions and the extranodal organs was determined using all available information, including the CCS methods, FDG-PET, the diagnostic histology and the follow-up examinations. The results of the CCS were then compared to the FDG-PET results. RESULTS: The sensitivity of FDG-PET was higher for nodal staging than that of CT (87.8% vs. 61.6%, respectively. FDG-PET was also more sensitive than CT in regard to evaluating the extranodal organs for lymphomatous involvement (96.2% vs. 40.0%, respectively. FDG-PET detected all 16 patients who were characterized by a positive bone marrow biopsy and identified an additional 4 patients with bone marrow disease. The incorporation of FDG-PET coupled with CCS in the staging procedure upstaged 20% (17/82 of the patients and downstaged 11% (9/82 of the patients. As a result of these changes in staging, 15% (13/82 of the patients would have received a different therapeutic regimen. CONCLUSIONS: The FDG-PET method is superior to CT for the detection of nodal and extra-nodal HL. The observation that the FDG-PET method upstaged the disease was the most common result (20% of patients brought about by the addition of PET to the staging algorithm

  4. Neuroimaging characteristics of dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B; O'Brien, John T

    2014-01-01

    This review summarises the findings and applications from neuroimaging studies in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), highlighting key differences between DLB and other subtypes of dementia. We also discuss the increasingly important role of imaging biomarkers in differential diagnosis and outline promising areas for future research in DLB. DLB shares common clinical, neuropsychological and pathological features with Parkinson's disease dementia and other dementia subtypes, such as Alzheimer's disease. Despite the development of consensus diagnostic criteria, the sensitivity for differential diagnosis of DLB in clinical practice remains low and many DLB patients will be misdiagnosed. The importance of developing accurate imaging markers in dementia is highlighted by the potential for treatments targeting specific molecular abnormalities as well as the responsiveness to cholinesterase inhibitors and marked neuroleptic sensitivity of DLB. We review various brain imaging techniques that have been applied to investigate DLB, including the characteristic nigrostriatal degeneration in DLB using positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers. Dopamine transporter loss has proven to reliably differentiate DLB from other dementias and has been incorporated into the revised clinical diagnostic criteria for DLB. To date, this remains the 'gold standard' for diagnostic imaging of DLB. Regional cerebral blood flow, 18 F-fluorodeoxygluclose-PET and SPECT have also identified marked deficits in the occipital regions with relative sparing of the medial temporal lobe when compared to Alzheimer's disease. In addition, structural, diffusion, and functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques have shown alterations in structure, white matter integrity, and functional activity in DLB. We argue that the multimodal identification of DLB-specific biomarkers has the potential to improve ante-mortem diagnosis and contribute to our

  5. Alternative positron-target design for electron-positron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donahue, R.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Nelson, W.R. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

    1991-04-01

    Current electron-positron linear colliders are limited in luminosity by the number of positrons which can be generated from targets presently used. This paper examines the possibility of using an alternate wire-target geometry for the production of positrons via an electron-induced electromagnetic cascade shower. 39 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Paans, A M J

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for measuring biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a coincidence technique. This includes also the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labelled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs on metabolism. Also deviations of normal metabolism can be measured and insight into biological processes responsible for diseases can be obtained. At present the combined PET/CT scanner is the most frequently used scanner for whole-body scanning in the field of oncology.

  7. Positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehllehner, Gerd; Karp, Joel S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2006-07-07

    The developments in positron emission tomography (PET) are reviewed with an emphasis on instrumentation for clinical PET imaging. After a brief summary of positron imaging before the advent of computed tomography, various improvements are highlighted including the move from PET scanners with septa to fully 3D scanners, changes in the preferred scintillators, efforts to improve the energy discrimination, and improvements in attenuation correction. Time-of-flight PET imaging is given special attention due to the recent revival of this technique, which promises significant improvement. Besides technical instrumentation efforts, other factors which influenced the acceptance of clinical PET are also discussed. (review)

  8. Neuroimaging for psychotherapy research: current trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Carol P; Strauman, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews neuroimaging studies that inform psychotherapy research. An introduction to neuroimaging methods is provided as background for the increasingly sophisticated breadth of methods and findings appearing in psychotherapy research. We compiled and assessed a comprehensive list of neuroimaging studies of psychotherapy outcome, along with selected examples of other types of studies that also are relevant to psychotherapy research. We emphasized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since it is the dominant neuroimaging modality in psychological research. We summarize findings from neuroimaging studies of psychotherapy outcome, including treatment for depression, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and schizophrenia. The increasing use of neuroimaging methods in the study of psychotherapy continues to refine our understanding of both outcome and process. We suggest possible directions for future neuroimaging studies in psychotherapy research.

  9. [Correlation between EEG and neuroimaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2012-01-01

    The present state of knowledge of physiological mechanisms underlying nonepileptiform EEG abnormalities is reviewed to clarify the correlation between EEG and neuroimaging. Focal and widespread slow waves, background abnormalities, and bursts of rhythmic slow activity are discussed. EEG phenomena were correlated with lesion size, location, type (white matter vs. gray matter, high density vs. low density), and mass effect. Clinical and experimental accumulated over the past five decades suggest that polymorphic slow activity is generated in cerebral cortex by layers of pyramidal cells and is probably due to partial deafferentation from subcortical areas. Unilateral background activity changes are probably thalamic dysfunction, and bilateral paroxysmal slow activity is due to abnormal thalamocortical circuits combined with cortical pathology. Paroxysmal discharges indicate the presence of epilepsy with possible brain lesion(s). The EEG is a functional test and provides us complementary information to neuroimaging studies.

  10. FUNCTIONAL NEUROIMAGING IN GERIATRIC DEPRESSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Faith M.; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Abnormalities in specific cerebral networks likely confer vulnerability that increases the susceptibility for development of geriatric depression and impact the course of symptoms. Functional neuroimaging enables the in vivo identification of alterations in cerebral function that not only characterize disease vulnerability, but also may contribute to variability in depressive symptoms and antidepressant response. Judicious use of functional neuroimaging tools can advance pathophysiological models of geriatric depression. Furthermore, due to the age-related vulnerability of specific brain systems that have been implicated in mood disorders, geriatric depression provides a logical context within which to study the role of specific functional abnormalities in both antidepressant response and key behavioral and cognitive abnormalities of mood disorders. PMID:21536165

  11. Comparative primate neuroimaging: insights into human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilling, James K

    2014-01-01

    Comparative neuroimaging can identify unique features of the human brain and teach us about human brain evolution. Comparisons with chimpanzees, our closest living primate relative, are critical in this endeavor. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to compare brain size development, brain structure proportions and brain aging. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to compare resting brain glucose metabolism. Functional MRI (fMRI) has been used to compare auditory and visual system pathways, as well as resting-state networks of connectivity. Finally, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been used to compare structural connectivity. Collectively, these methods have revealed human brain specializations with respect to development, cortical organization, connectivity, and aging. These findings inform our knowledge of the evolutionary changes responsible for the special features of the modern human mind.

  12. Preclinical PET Neuroimaging of [11C]Bexarotene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin H. Rotstein PhD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Activation of retinoid X receptors (RXRs has been proposed as a therapeutic mechanism for the treatment of neurodegeneration, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. We previously reported radiolabeling of a Food and Drug Administration-approved RXR agonist, bexarotene, by copper-mediated [11C]CO2 fixation and preliminary positron emission tomography (PET neuroimaging that demonstrated brain permeability in nonhuman primate with regional binding distribution consistent with RXRs. In this study, the brain uptake and saturability of [11C]bexarotene were studied in rats and nonhuman primates by PET imaging under baseline and greater target occupancy conditions. [11C]Bexarotene displays a high proportion of nonsaturable uptake in the brain and is unsuitable for RXR occupancy measurements in the central nervous system.

  13. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comasco, Erika; Frøkjær, Vibe; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2014-01-01

    The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuat......The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone...... fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. The present review summarizes the findings of thirty-five studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri......-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal variations on the brain....

  14. Neuroimaging Evidence of Comprehension Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Baker; Alisa Zeliger-Kandasamy; Laura U. DeWyngaert

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to synthesize the emerging neuroimaging literature that reveals how the brain responds when readers and listeners encounter texts that demand monitoring of their ongoing comprehension processes. Much of this research has been undertaken by cognitive scientists who do not frame their work in metacognitive terms, and therefore it is less likely to be familiar to psychologists who study metacognition in educational contexts. The important role of metacognition in t...

  15. Can neuroimaging disentangle bipolar disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozer, Franz; Houenou, Josselin

    2016-05-01

    Bipolar disorder heterogeneity is large, leading to difficulties in identifying neuropathophysiological and etiological mechanisms and hindering the formation of clinically homogeneous patient groups in clinical trials. Identifying markers of clinically more homogeneous groups would help disentangle BD heterogeneity. Neuroimaging may aid in identifying such groups by highlighting specific biomarkers of BD subtypes or clinical dimensions. We performed a systematic literature search of the neuroimaging literature assessing biomarkers of relevant BD phenotypes (type-I vs. II, presence vs. absence of psychotic features, suicidal behavior and impulsivity, rapid cycling, good vs. poor medication response, age at onset, cognitive performance and circadian abnormalities). Consistent biomarkers were associated with suicidal behavior, i.e. frontal/anterior alterations (prefrontal and cingulate grey matter, prefrontal white matter) in patients with a history of suicide attempts; and with cognitive performance, i.e. involvement of frontal and temporal regions, superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right thalamic radiation, and corpus callosum in executive dysfunctions. For the other dimensions and sub-types studied, no consistent biomarkers were identified. Studies were heterogeneous both in methodology and outcome. Though theoretically promising, neuroimaging has not yet proven capable of disentangling subtypes and dimensions of bipolar disorder, due to high between-study heterogeneity. We issue recommendations for future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Atomic collisions involving pulsed positrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J. P.; Bluhme, H.; Field, D.

    2000-01-01

    Conventional slow positron beams have been widely and profitably used to study atomic collisions and have been instrumental in understanding the dynamics of ionization. The next generation of positron atomic collision studies are possible with the use of charged particle traps. Not only can large...... of accelerators for producing intense positron pulses will be discussed in the context of atomic physics experiments....

  17. Positron clouds within thunderstorms

    CERN Document Server

    Dwyer, Joseph R; Hazelton, Bryna J; Grefenstette, Brian W; Kelley, Nicole A; Lowell, Alexander W; Schaal, Meagan M; Rassoul, Hamid K

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation of two isolated clouds of positrons inside an active thunderstorm. These observations were made by the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE), an array of six gamma-ray detectors, which flew on a Gulfstream V jet aircraft through the top of an active thunderstorm in August 2009. ADELE recorded two 511 keV gamma-ray count rate enhancements, 35 seconds apart, each lasting approximately 0.2 seconds. The enhancements, which were about a factor of 12 above background, were both accompanied by electrical activity as measured by a flat-plate antenna on the underside of the aircraft. The energy spectra were consistent with a source mostly composed of positron annihilation gamma rays, with a prominent 511 keV line clearly visible in the data. Model fits to the data suggest that the aircraft was briefly immersed in clouds of positrons, more than a kilometer across. It is not clear how the positron clouds were created within the thunderstorm, but it is possible they were ca...

  18. Positron implantation in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, V.J.; Lynn, K.G.; Welch, D.O.

    1993-12-31

    The Monte Carlo technique for modeling positron prior to annihilation and electron implantation in semi-infinite metals is described. Particle implantation is modelled as a multistep process, a series of collisions with the atoms of the host material. In elastic collisions with neutral atoms there is no transfer of energy. The particle loses energy by several different channels, excitation of the electron gas, ionization of the ion cores, or, at low energies, by phonon excitation. These competing scattering mechanisms have been incorporated into the Monte Carlo framework and several different models are being used. Brief descriptions of these Monte Carlo schemes, as well as an analytic model for positron implantation are included. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations are presented and compared with expermental data. Problems associated with modeling positron implantation are discuss and the need for more expermental data on energy-loss in different materials is stressed. Positron implantation in multilayers of different metals is briefly described and extensions of this work to include a study of multilayers and heterostructures is suggested.

  19. Positron excitation of neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  20. Basics of Multivariate Analysis in Neuroimaging Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeck, Christian Georg

    2010-01-01

    Multivariate analysis techniques for neuroimaging data have recently received increasing attention as they have many attractive features that cannot be easily realized by the more commonly used univariate, voxel-wise, techniques1,5,6,7,8,9. Multivariate approaches evaluate correlation/covariance of activation across brain regions, rather than proceeding on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Thus, their results can be more easily interpreted as a signature of neural networks. Univariate approaches, on the other hand, cannot directly address interregional correlation in the brain. Multivariate approaches can also result in greater statistical power when compared with univariate techniques, which are forced to employ very stringent corrections for voxel-wise multiple comparisons. Further, multivariate techniques also lend themselves much better to prospective application of results from the analysis of one dataset to entirely new datasets. Multivariate techniques are thus well placed to provide information about mean differences and correlations with behavior, similarly to univariate approaches, with potentially greater statistical power and better reproducibility checks. In contrast to these advantages is the high barrier of entry to the use of multivariate approaches, preventing more widespread application in the community. To the neuroscientist becoming familiar with multivariate analysis techniques, an initial survey of the field might present a bewildering variety of approaches that, although algorithmically similar, are presented with different emphases, typically by people with mathematics backgrounds. We believe that multivariate analysis techniques have sufficient potential to warrant better dissemination. Researchers should be able to employ them in an informed and accessible manner. The current article is an attempt at a didactic introduction of multivariate techniques for the novice. A conceptual introduction is followed with a very simple application to a diagnostic

  1. Production of Highly Polarized Positrons Using Polarized Electrons at MeV Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, D.; Adderley, P.; Adeyemi, A.; Aguilera, P.; Ali, M.; Areti, H.; Baylac, M.; Benesch, J.; Bosson, G.; Cade, B.; Camsonne, A.; Cardman, L. S.; Clark, J.; Cole, P.; Covert, S.; Cuevas, C.; Dadoun, O.; Dale, D.; Dong, H.; Dumas, J.; Fanchini, E.; Forest, T.; Forman, E.; Freyberger, A.; Froidefond, E.; Golge, S.; Grames, J.; Guèye, P.; Hansknecht, J.; Harrell, P.; Hoskins, J.; Hyde, C.; Josey, B.; Kazimi, R.; Kim, Y.; Machie, D.; Mahoney, K.; Mammei, R.; Marton, M.; McCarter, J.; McCaughan, M.; McHugh, M.; McNulty, D.; Mesick, K. E.; Michaelides, T.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Moser, D.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Muraz, J.-F.; Opper, A.; Poelker, M.; Réal, J.-S.; Richardson, L.; Setiniyaz, S.; Stutzman, M.; Suleiman, R.; Tennant, C.; Tsai, C.; Turner, D.; Ungaro, M.; Variola, A.; Voutier, E.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; PEPPo Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons experiment at the injector of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility has demonstrated for the first time the efficient transfer of polarization from electrons to positrons produced by the polarized bremsstrahlung radiation induced by a polarized electron beam in a high-Z target. Positron polarization up to 82% have been measured for an initial electron beam momentum of 8.19 MeV /c , limited only by the electron beam polarization. This technique extends polarized positron capabilities from GeV to MeV electron beams, and opens access to polarized positron beam physics to a wide community.

  2. Production of highly-polarized positrons using polarized electrons at MeV energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, D; Adeyemi, A; Aguilera, P; Ali, M; Areti, H; Baylac, M; Benesch, J; Bosson, G; Cade, B; Camsonne, A; Cardman, L S; Clark, J; Cole, P; Covert, S; Cuevas, C; Dadoun, O; Dale, D; Dong, H; Dumas, J; Fanchini, E; Forest, T; Forman, E; Freyberger, A; Froidefond, E; Golge, S; Grames, J; Guèye, P; Hansknecht, J; Harrell, P; Hoskins, J; Hyde, C; Josey, B; Kazimi, R; Kim, Y; Machie, D; Mahoney, K; Mammei, R; Marton, M; McCarter, J; McCaughan, M; McHugh, M; McNulty, D; Mesick, K E; Michaelides, T; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Moser, D; Camacho, C Muñoz; Muraz, J -F; Opper, A; Poelker, M; Réal, J -S; Richardson, L; Setiniyaz, S; Stutzman, M; Suleiman, R; Tennant, C; Tsai, C; Turner, D; Ungaro, M; Variola, A; Voutier, E; Wang, Y; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    The Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons experiment at the injector of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility has demonstrated for the first time the efficient transfer of polarization from electrons to positrons produced by the polarized bremsstrahlung radiation induced by a polarized electron beam in a high-$Z$ target. Positron polarization up to 82\\% have been measured for an initial electron beam momentum of 8.19~MeV/$c$, limited only by the electron beam polarization. This technique extends polarized positron capabilities from GeV to MeV electron beams, and opens access to polarized positron beam physics to a wide community.

  3. Consensus paper: combining transcranial stimulation with neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebner, Hartwig R; Bergmann, Til O; Bestmann, Sven

    2009-01-01

    In the last decade, combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)-neuroimaging studies have greatly stimulated research in the field of TMS and neuroimaging. Here, we review how TMS can be combined with various neuroimaging techniques to investigate human brain function. When applied during...... neuroimaging (online approach), TMS can be used to test how focal cortex stimulation acutely modifies the activity and connectivity in the stimulated neuronal circuits. TMS and neuroimaging can also be separated in time (offline approach). A conditioning session of repetitive TMS (rTMS) may be used to induce...... information obtained by neuroimaging can be used to define the optimal site and time point of stimulation in a subsequent experiment in which TMS is used to probe the functional contribution of the stimulated area to a specific task. In this review, we first address some general methodologic issues that need...

  4. Neuroimaging overuse is more common in Medicare compared with the VA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, James F; Kerr, Eve A; McCammon, Ryan J; Holleman, Rob; Langa, Kenneth M; Callaghan, Brian C

    2016-08-23

    To inform initiatives to reduce overuse, we compared neuroimaging appropriateness in a large Medicare cohort with a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) cohort. Separate retrospective cohorts were established in Medicare and in VA for headache and neuropathy from 2004 to 2011. The Medicare cohorts included all patients enrolled in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) with linked Medicare claims (HRS-Medicare; n = 1,244 for headache and 998 for neuropathy). The VA cohorts included all patients receiving services in the VA (n = 93,755 for headache and 183,642 for neuropathy). Inclusion criteria were age over 65 years and an outpatient visit for incident neuropathy or a primary headache. Neuroimaging use was measured with Current Procedural Terminology codes and potential overuse was defined using published criteria for use with administrative data. Increasingly specific appropriateness criteria excluded nontarget conditions for which neuroimaging may be appropriate. For both peripheral neuropathy and headache, potentially inappropriate imaging was more common in HRS-Medicare compared with the VA. Forty-nine percentage of all headache patients received neuroimaging in HRS-Medicare compared with 22.1% in the VA (p neuroimaging compared with 9.0% in the VA (p neuroimaging is likely less common in the VA than in a Medicare population. Better understanding the reasons for the more selective use of neuroimaging in the VA could help inform future initiatives to reduce overuse of diagnostic testing. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Neuroimaging in Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provini, Federica; Chiaro, Giacomo

    2015-09-01

    Neuroimaging studies are of crucial relevance in defining the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS). MRI studies showed no structural brain lesions and confirmed a central iron deficiency. Structural and functional studies showed an involvement of the thalamus, sensorimotor cortical areas, and cerebellum in RLS and assessed neurotransmission abnormalities in the dopaminergic and opiate systems. Finally, glutamatergic hyperactivity has been proposed as a cause of disrupted and shortened sleep in RLS. Differences among the results of the studies make it difficult to draw any definitive conclusions, thus, suggesting the need for future research.

  6. Delirium and hypovitaminosis D: neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, James A; Hategan, Ana; Ford, Jennifer; Tisi, Daniel K; Xiong, Glen L

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the frequency of neuroimaging findings of cortical atrophy and/or cerebrovascular disease in patients with delirium with hypovitaminosis D and normal vitamin D levels. Of 32 patients with delirium with hypovitaminosis D who were neuroimaged, 91.4% had neuroimaging findings, despite only five cases having a comorbid diagnosis of dementia. Similar frequencies of cortical atrophy and/or cerebrovascular disease were found in patients with delirium with normal vitamin D levels. Further research with a larger sample size is needed to compare neuroimaging findings between normal patients and patients with hypovitaminosis D with delirium.

  7. Novel designs for undulator based positron sources

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Mike; Bailey, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Proposed high energy electron-positron linear colliders require a high ux of positrons. To achieve this a number of new positron source designs have been proposed. One of these is an undulator-based positron source, which is the baseline positron source design for the International Linear Collider. The undulator-based positron source for the International Linear Collider uses a helical undulator to produce a intense photon beam that generates positrons through the pairproduction mechanism. As...

  8. Generation of monoenergetic positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Dale, J.M.; Miller, P.D. Jr.; Moak, C.D.; Pendyala, S.; Triftshaeuser, W.; Howell, R.H.; Alvarez, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many experiments have been performed in the generation and application of monoenergetic positron beams using annealed tungsten moderators and fast sources of /sup 58/Co, /sup 22/Na, /sup 11/C, and LINAC bremstrahlung. This paper will compare the degrees of success from our various approaches. Moderators made from both single crystal and polycrystal tungsten have been tried. Efforts to grow thin films of tungsten to be used as transmission moderators and brightness enhancement devices are in progress.

  9. Quality of evidence in studies evaluating neuroimaging for neurologic prognostication in adult patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, David K; Geocadin, Romergryko G; Greer, David M

    2014-02-01

    Neuroimaging has been proposed as a predictor of neurologic outcome in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. We reviewed the quality and level of evidence of the current neuroimaging literature for predicting neurologic outcome in cardiac arrest patients treated with or without therapeutic hypothermia (TH). Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane Databases were searched using the terms "cardiac arrest," "cardiopulmonary resuscitation," "brain hypoxia," "brain anoxia," "brain hypoxia-ischaemia," "neuroimaging," and "prognosis." Eligible studies were reviewed and classified by level of evidence and methodological quality as defined by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). 928 studies were identified, 84 of which met inclusion criteria: 74 were supportive of neuroimaging to predict outcome, eight unsupportive, and two equivocal. Several studies investigated more than one imaging modality: 27 investigated computed tomography (CT), 46 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 18 alternate imaging modalities, including positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. No randomized controlled trials were identified. Seven cohort and case control studies were identified, only one of which was graded "good" quality, two were "fair" and four were "poor." Neuroimaging is an evolving modality as a prognostic parameter in cardiac arrest survivors. However, the quality of the available literature is not robust, highlighting the need for higher quality studies before neuroimaging can be supported as a standard tool for prognostication in the patient population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Low energy positron injector (LEPI)

    CERN Document Server

    Antropov, V K; Korotaev, Yu V

    2003-01-01

    The LEPI for the LEP storage ring is described. A radioactive source **2**2Na is the positron source. After deceleration in a solid target, in a magnetic trap and in a gas medium to the thermal velocity the positrons are stored during approximately equals 100 s. For injection into the storage ring the positrons are extracted by a pulse electric field and accelerated to the required energy. (Edited abstract) 4 Refs.

  11. Applications of positron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakvoort, R.A.

    1993-12-23

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM).

  12. Neuroimaging in Selected Nigerian Epileptic Patients: A Decade of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neuroimaging in Selected Nigerian Epileptic Patients: A Decade of Experience. ... The study sets out to highlight the relevance of neuroimaging in the management of ... The neuroimaging was done in various centres in Nigeria and abroad.

  13. Laser Created Relativistic Positron Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Bonlie, J; Chen, C D; Chen, S N; Courtois, C; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Kruer, W; Landoas, O; Mithen, J; Murphy, C; Nilson, P; Price, D; Scheider, M; Shepherd, R; Stoeckl, C; Tabak, M; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorder, P

    2009-10-08

    Electron-positron jets with MeV temperature are thought to be present in a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena such as active galaxies, quasars, gamma ray bursts and black holes. They have now been created in the laboratory in a controlled fashion by irradiating a gold target with an intense picosecond duration laser pulse. About 10{sup 11} MeV positrons are emitted from the rear surface of the target in a 15 to 22-degree cone for a duration comparable to the laser pulse. These positron jets are quasi-monoenergetic (E/{delta}E {approx} 5) with peak energies controllable from 3-19 MeV. They have temperatures from 1-4 MeV in the beam frame in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Positron production has been studied extensively in recent decades at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science, positron emission tomography, basic antimatter science such as antihydrogen experiments, Bose-Einstein condensed positronium, and basic plasma physics. However, the experimental tools to produce very high temperature positrons and high-flux positron jets needed to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. The MeV temperature jets of positrons and electrons produced in our experiments offer a first step to evaluate the physics models used to explain some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  14. Neuroimaging procedures and related acquisitions in bipolar disorder: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Dobrea, Cristina; Palazzo, Maria Carlotta; Cremaschi, Laura; Penzo, Beatrice; Benatti, Beatrice; Camuri, Giulia; Arici, Chiara; Suppes, Trisha; Altamura, A Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic and disabling mood disorder, with significant suicide rates among psychiatric disorders. Although the pathophysiological bases of BD have not been fully elucidated yet, over the last two decades, neuroimaging research has documented specific neuroanatomic and functional abnormalities in bipolar patients. The present review was aimed to provide an updated and comprehensive overview about currently available evidence on main structural and functional alterations documented in BD by neuroimaging procedures, through a Medline research. Among the structural alterations, the most consistent ones seem to be at the level of frontal, temporal and insular cortices, amygdala and basal ganglia, having been ventriculomegaly reported as well. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings showed, in turn, biochemical alterations in several neurotransmitter systems. Functional neuroimaging data are quite heterogeneous with positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography studies showing phase-specific abnormalities of blood flow and glucose metabolism, as well as modifications of serotonin transporter density and binding. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data documented impaired neural networks involved in emotional regulation, including anterior limbic, ventral and dorsal prefrontal regions. Taken as a whole, neuroimaging data are strongly advancing the understanding of the neural bases of BD as described in the present review.

  15. Neuroimaging studies in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing FAN; Zeping XIAO

    2013-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common mental disorder of uncertain etiology.Neuroimaging studies of patients with OCD in China started to appear in the late 1990s,identifying structural abnormalities in the gray matter and white matter of the prefrontal lobe,the corpus striatum,and the thalamus.Studies using positron emission tomography (PET),functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI),and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have found increased metabolism and activation in these brain regions that are correlated with the duration,severity and cognitive symptoms of OCD.After surgery for OCD the activation in these target areas decreases.These results in China are similar to those presented in previous neuroimaging studies,including several meta-analyses from other countries.

  16. Neuroimaging studies of the hippocampus in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckers, S

    2001-01-01

    Three neuroimaging techniques, morphometric neuroimaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and functional neuroimaging, have provided evidence for abnormal hippocampal structure and function in schizophrenia. Hippocampal volume reduction is now one of the most consistent structural abnormalities found in schizophrenia: it is present at the onset of the illness and, to a lesser degree, in first-degree relatives of schizophrenic probands. Decreased levels of N-acetyl-aspartate point towards a cellular basis of such volume changes. Functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated abnormal levels of hippocampal activity at rest, during the experience of auditory hallucinations, and during the performance of memory retrieval tasks. These results of neuroimaging studies complement evidence from post-mortem and behavioral studies, which have found regionally specific abnormalities of the hippocampus and of memory function in schizophrenia.

  17. DIAGNOSIS-GUIDED METHOD FOR IDENTIFYING MULTI-MODALITY NEUROIMAGING BIOMARKERS ASSOCIATED WITH GENETIC RISK FACTORS IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaoke; Yan, Jingwen; Yao, Xiaohui; Risacher, Shannon L; Saykin, Andrew J; Zhang, Daoqiang; Shen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Many recent imaging genetic studies focus on detecting the associations between genetic markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative traits (QTs). Although there exist a large number of generalized multivariate regression analysis methods, few of them have used diagnosis information in subjects to enhance the analysis performance. In addition, few of models have investigated the identification of multi-modality phenotypic patterns associated with interesting genotype groups in traditional methods. To reveal disease-relevant imaging genetic associations, we propose a novel diagnosis-guided multi-modality (DGMM) framework to discover multi-modality imaging QTs that are associated with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its top genetic risk factor (i.e., APOE SNP rs429358). The strength of our proposed method is that it explicitly models the priori diagnosis information among subjects in the objective function for selecting the disease-relevant and robust multi-modality QTs associated with the SNP. We evaluate our method on two modalities of imaging phenotypes, i.e., those extracted from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method not only achieves better performances under the metrics of root mean squared error and correlation coefficient but also can identify common informative regions of interests (ROIs) across multiple modalities to guide the disease-induced biological interpretation, compared with other reference methods.

  18. Neuroimaging of classic neuralgic amyotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieba-Samal, Doris; Jengojan, Suren; Kasprian, Gregor; Wöber, Christian; Bodner, Gerd

    2016-12-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy (NA) often imposes diagnostic problems. Recently, MRI and high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) have proven useful in diagnosing peripheral nerve disorders. We performed a chart and imaging review of patients who were examined using neuroimaging and who were referred because of clinically diagnosed NA between March 1, 2014 and May 1, 2015. Six patients were included. All underwent HRUS, and 5 underwent MRI. Time from onset to evaluation ranged from 2 weeks to 6 months. HRUS showed segmental swelling of all clinically affected nerves/trunks. Atrophy of muscles was detected in those assessed >1 month after onset. MRI showed T2-weighted hyperintensity in all clinically affected nerves, except for the long thoracic nerve, and denervation edema of muscles. HRUS and MRI are valuable diagnostic tools in NA. This could change the diagnostic approach from one now focused on excluding other disorders to confirming NA through imaging markers. Muscle Nerve 54: 1079-1085, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Neuroimaging craving: urge intensity matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen J; Sayette, Michael A

    2015-02-01

    Functional neuroimaging has become an increasingly common tool for studying drug craving. Furthermore, functional neuroimaging studies, which have addressed an incredibly diverse array of questions regarding the nature and treatment of craving, have had a substantial impact on theoretical models of addiction. Here, we offer three points related to this sizeable and influential body of research. First, we assert that the craving most investigators seek to study represents not just a desire but a strong desire to use drugs, consistent with prominent theoretical and clinical descriptions of craving. Secondly, we highlight that, despite the clear conceptual and clinical emphasis on craving as an intense desire, brain imaging studies often have been designed explicitly in a way that reduces the ability to generate powerful cravings. We illustrate this point by reviewing the peak urge levels endorsed by participants in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of cigarette craving in nicotine-deprived versus non-deprived smokers. Thirdly, we suggest that brain responses measured during mild states of desire (such as following satiety) differ in fundamental ways from those measured during states of overpowering desire (i.e. craving) to use drugs. We support this position by way of a meta-analysis revealing that fMRI cue exposure studies using nicotine-deprived smokers have produced different patterns of brain activation to those using non-deprived smokers. Regarding brain imaging studies of craving, intensity of the urges matter, and more explicit attention to urge intensity in future work has the potential to yield valuable information about the nature of craving. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  20. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  1. Efficient Cryosolid Positron Moderators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Howell, and Mr. Roy Larsen for infrastructure and equipment support. Mrs. Karen Clayton for administrative support. Mr. Byron Allmon for critical...showing explicitly the long, bent slow positron transport tube scaled to fit onto a 4x4-foot optical table. The sharp 90° bend in this tube is intended...half-cycle RPA scan of an N2 moderator. The ≈ 0.15 cps CEM signal is clearly visible above the ≈ 0.03 cps background. The very sharp absorption lines

  2. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  3. Multi-source feature learning for joint analysis of incomplete multiple heterogeneous neuroimaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Wang, Yalin; Thompson, Paul M; Narayan, Vaibhav A; Ye, Jieping

    2012-07-02

    Analysis of incomplete data is a big challenge when integrating large-scale brain imaging datasets from different imaging modalities. In the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), for example, over half of the subjects lack cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) measurements; an independent half of the subjects do not have fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans; many lack proteomics measurements. Traditionally, subjects with missing measures are discarded, resulting in a severe loss of available information. In this paper, we address this problem by proposing an incomplete Multi-Source Feature (iMSF) learning method where all the samples (with at least one available data source) can be used. To illustrate the proposed approach, we classify patients from the ADNI study into groups with Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and normal controls, based on the multi-modality data. At baseline, ADNI's 780 participants (172AD, 397 MCI, 211 NC), have at least one of four data types: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), FDG-PET, CSF and proteomics. These data are used to test our algorithm. Depending on the problem being solved, we divide our samples according to the availability of data sources, and we learn shared sets of features with state-of-the-art sparse learning methods. To build a practical and robust system, we construct a classifier ensemble by combining our method with four other methods for missing value estimation. Comprehensive experiments with various parameters show that our proposed iMSF method and the ensemble model yield stable and promising results.

  4. Multi-Source Learning for Joint Analysis of Incomplete Multi-Modality Neuroimaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Wang, Yalin; Thompson, Paul M; Narayan, Vaibhav A; Ye, Jieping

    2012-01-01

    Incomplete data present serious problems when integrating largescale brain imaging data sets from different imaging modalities. In the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), for example, over half of the subjects lack cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) measurements; an independent half of the subjects do not have fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans; many lack proteomics measurements. Traditionally, subjects with missing measures are discarded, resulting in a severe loss of available information. We address this problem by proposing two novel learning methods where all the samples (with at least one available data source) can be used. In the first method, we divide our samples according to the availability of data sources, and we learn shared sets of features with state-of-the-art sparse learning methods. Our second method learns a base classifier for each data source independently, based on which we represent each source using a single column of prediction scores; we then estimate the missing prediction scores, which, combined with the existing prediction scores, are used to build a multi-source fusion model. To illustrate the proposed approaches, we classify patients from the ADNI study into groups with Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and normal controls, based on the multi-modality data. At baseline, ADNI's 780 participants (172 AD, 397 MCI, 211 Normal), have at least one of four data types: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), FDG-PET, CSF and proteomics. These data are used to test our algorithms. Comprehensive experiments show that our proposed methods yield stable and promising results.

  5. Design Studies of Positron Collection for the NLC(LCC-0070)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batygin, Y

    2003-11-06

    The positron source for the NLC project utilizes a 6.2 GeV electron beam interacting in a high-Z positron production target. The electromagnetic shower in the target results in large energy deposition which can cause damage to the target. Optimization of the collection system is required to insure long-term operation of the target with needed high positron yield into the 6-dimensional acceptance of the subsequent pre-damping ring. Positron tracking through the accelerating system indicates a dilution of the initial positron phase space density. Results of simulations indicate that a positron yield of 0.76 can be obtained at the injection into pre-damping ring if the beam is limited by the normalized emittances of {var_epsilon}{sub x}, {var_epsilon}{sub y} {le} 0.03 {pi} m rad, bunch length {sigma}{sub z} = 6.97 mm and energy spread {Delta}E/E = 2%. The value of positron yield can be increased by 1.15 if longitudinal focusing is utilized in 1.9 GeV booster linac. In the regime of polarized positrons injection, the polarization of 0.65 can be obtained for 6.5% of initial polarized positrons emerged from the target. The number of captured polarized positrons is increased by 9.6% keeping the value of polarization as 0.63 if longitudinal focusing in the booster linac is used.

  6. Multiple comparison procedures for neuroimaging genomewide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wen-Yu; Nichols, Thomas E; Ghosh, Debashis

    2015-01-01

    Recent research in neuroimaging has focused on assessing associations between genetic variants that are measured on a genomewide scale and brain imaging phenotypes. A large number of works in the area apply massively univariate analyses on a genomewide basis to find single nucleotide polymorphisms that influence brain structure. In this paper, we propose using various dimensionality reduction methods on both brain structural MRI scans and genomic data, motivated by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. We also consider a new multiple testing adjustment method and compare it with two existing false discovery rate (FDR) adjustment methods. The simulation results suggest an increase in power for the proposed method. The real-data analysis suggests that the proposed procedure is able to find associations between genetic variants and brain volume differences that offer potentially new biological insights. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Positron lifetime in polycrystalline gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, A.M.; Serna, J. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica del Estado Solido)

    1984-06-16

    Positron lifetimes are measured on polycrystalline gadolinium between 15 and 25 /sup 0/C taking into account the microstructure of the specimens, especially the grain sizes of untreated or annealed sheets. Results show the existence of a trapping effect of positrons in Gd due to different trapping centers such as point defects, dislocations, grain boundaries, and other defects.

  8. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  9. Positron production within our atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Positrons are commonly produced within our atmosphere by cosmic rays and the decay radioactive isotopes. Energetic positrons are also produced by pair production from the gamma rays generated by relativistic runaway electrons. Indeed, such positrons have been detected in Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs) in the inner magnetosphere by Fermi/GBM. In addition, positrons play an important role in relativistic feedback discharges (also known as dark lightning). Relativistic feedback models suggest that these discharges may be responsible for Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) and some gamma-ray glows. When producing TGFs, relativistic feedback discharges may generate large, lightning-like currents with current moments reaching hundreds of kA-km. In addition, relativistic feedback discharges also may limit the electric field that is possible in our atmosphere, affecting other mechanisms for generating runaway electrons. It is interesting that positrons, often thought of as exotic particles, may play an important role in thunderstorm processes. In this presentation, the role of positrons in high-energy atmospheric physics will be discussed. The unusual observation of positron clouds inside a thunderstorm by the ADELE instrument on an NCAR/NSF Gulfstream V aircraft will also be described. These observations illustrate that we still have much to learn about positron production within our atmosphere.

  10. Workflow-based approaches to neuroimaging analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissell, Kate

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain images requires a complex sequence of data processing steps to proceed from raw image data to the final statistical tests. Neuroimaging researchers have begun to apply workflow-based computing techniques to automate data analysis tasks. This chapter discusses eight major components of workflow management systems (WFMSs): the workflow description language, editor, task modules, data access, verification, client, engine, and provenance, and their implementation in the Fiswidgets neuroimaging workflow system. Neuroinformatics challenges involved in applying workflow techniques in the domain of neuroimaging are discussed.

  11. Amyloid positron emission tomography and cognitive reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matteo Bauckneht; Agnese Picco; Flavio Nobili; Silvia Morbelli

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease(AD) is characterized by a nonlinear progressive course and several aspects influence the relationship between cerebral amount of AD pathology and the clinical expression of the disease. Brain cognitive reserve(CR) refers to the hypothesized capacity of an adult brain to cope with brain damage in order to minimize symptomatology. CR phenomenon contributed to explain the disjunction between the degree of neurodegeneration and the clinical phenotype of AD. The possibility to track brain amyloidosis(Aβ) in vivo has huge relevance for AD diagnosis and new therapeutic approaches. The clinical repercussions of positron emission tomography(PET)-assessed Aβ load are certainly mediated by CR thus potentially hampering the prognostic meaning of amyloid PET in selected groups of patients. Similarly, amyloid PET and cerebrospinal fluid amyloidosis biomarkers have recently provided new evidence for CR. The present review discusses the concept of CR in the framework of available neuroimaging studies and specifically deals with the reciprocal influences between amyloid PET and CR in AD patients and with the potential consequent interventional strategies for AD.

  12. Neuroimaging Evidence of Comprehension Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Baker

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to synthesize the emerging neuroimaging literature that reveals how the brain responds when readers and listeners encounter texts that demand monitoring of their ongoing comprehension processes. Much of this research has been undertaken by cognitive scientists who do not frame their work in metacognitive terms, and therefore it is less likely to be familiar to psychologists who study metacognition in educational contexts. The important role of metacognition in the development and use of academic skills is widely recognized. Metacognition is typically defined as the awareness and control of one's own cognitive processes. In the domain of reading, the most important metacognitive skill is comprehension monitoring, the evaluation and regulation of comprehension. Readers who monitor their understanding realize when they have encountered difficulty making sense of the text, and they apply error correction procedures to attempt to resolve the difficulty. Metacognition depends on executive control skills that continue to develop into early adulthood, in parallel with the maturation of the executive control regions of the prefrontal cortex. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and event-related potentials (ERP have been used for some time to study neural correlates of basic reading processes such as word identification, but it is only within recent years that researchers have turned to the higher-level processes of text comprehension. The article describes illustrative studies that reveal changes in neural activity when adults apply lexical, syntactic, or semantic standards to evaluate their understanding.

  13. Learning Neuroimaging. 100 essential cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asis Bravo-Rodriguez, Francisco de [Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain). Diagnostic and Therapeutics Neuroradiology; Diaz-Aguilera, Rocio [Alto Guadalquivir Hospital, Andujar, Jaen (Spain). Dept. of Radiology; Hygino da Cruz, Luiz Celso [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). CDPI and IRM Ressonancia Magnetica

    2012-07-01

    Neuroradiology is the branch of radiology that comprises both imaging and invasive procedures related to the brain, spine and spinal cord, head, neck, organs of special sense (eyes, ears, nose), cranial and spinal nerves, and cranial, cervical, and spinal vessels. Special training and skills are required to enable the neuroradiologist to function as an expert diagnostic and therapeutic consultant and practitioner. In addition to knowledge of imaging findings, the neuroradiologist is required to learn the fundamentals of structural and functional neuroanatomy, neuropathology, and neuropathophysiology as well as the clinical manifestations of diseases of the brain, spine and spinal cord, head, neck, and organs of special sense. This book is intended as an introduction to neuroradiology and aims to provide the reader with a comprehensive overview of this highly specialized radiological subspecialty. One hundred illustrated cases from clinical practice are presented in a standard way. Each case is supported by representative images and is divided into three parts: a brief summary of the patient's medical history, a discussion of the disease, and a description of the most characteristic imaging features of the disorder. The focus is not only on common neuroradiological entities such as stroke and acute head trauma but also on less frequent disorders that the practitioner should recognize. Learning Neuroimaging: 100 Essential Cases is an ideal resource for neuroradiology and radiology residents, neurology residents, neurosurgery residents, nurses, radiology technicians, and medical students. (orig.)

  14. Neuroimaging of motor neuron diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert C; Müller, Hans-Peter

    2012-03-01

    It is agreed that conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and spine is one of the core elements in the differential diagnostic work up of patients with clinical signs of motor neuron diseases (MNDs), for example amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), to exclude MND mimics. However, the sensitivity and specificity of MRI signs in these disorders are moderate to low and do not have an evidence level higher than class IV (good clinical practice point). Currently computerized MRI analyses in ALS and other MNDs are not techniques used for individual diagnosis. However, they have improved the anatomical understanding of pathomorphological alterations in gray and white matter in various MNDs and the changes in functional networks by quantitative comparisons between patients with MND and controls at group level. For multiparametric MRI protocols, including T1-weighted three-dimensional datasets, diffusion-weighted imaging and functional MRI, the potential as a 'dry' surrogate marker is a subject of investigation in natural history studies with well defined patients. The additional value of MRI with respect to early diagnosis at an individual level and for future disease-modifying multicentre trials remains to be defined. There is still the need for more longitudinal studies in the very early stages of disease or when there is clinical uncertainty and for better standardization in the acquisition and postprocessing of computer-based MRI data. These requirements are to be addressed by establishing quality-controlled multicentre neuroimaging databases.

  15. Positron emission mammography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.

    2003-10-02

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and x-ray mammography, as well as PEM and x-ray guided biopsy). The ultimate utility of PEM may not be decided by instrument performance, but by biological and medical factors, such as the patient to patient variation in radiotracer uptake or the as yet undetermined role of PEM in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Positron Emission Mammography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, William W.

    2004-06-01

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and X-ray mammography, as well as PEM and X-ray guided biopsy). The ultimate utility of PEM may not be decided by instrument performance, but by biological and medical factors, such as the patient to patient variation in radiotracer uptake or the as yet undetermined role of PEM in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Neuroimaging Biomarkers of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders leading to dementia are common diseases that affect many older and some young adults. Neuroimaging methods are important tools for assessing and monitoring pathological brain changes associated with progressive neurodegenerative conditions. In this review, the authors describe key findings from neuroimaging studies (magnetic resonance imaging and radionucleotide imaging) in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and prodromal stages, familial and atypical AD syndromes, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with and without dementia, Parkinson’s disease with and without dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, and prion protein associated diseases (i.e., Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). The authors focus on neuroimaging findings of in vivo pathology in these disorders, as well as the potential for neuroimaging to provide useful information for differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24234359

  18. Ethics of neuroimaging after serious brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijer, Charles; Peterson, Andrew; Webster, Fiona; Graham, Mackenzie; Cruse, Damian; Fernández-Espejo, Davinia; Gofton, Teneille; Gonzalez-Lara, Laura E; Lazosky, Andrea; Naci, Lorina; Norton, Loretta; Speechley, Kathy; Young, Bryan; Owen, Adrian M

    2014-05-20

    Patient outcome after serious brain injury is highly variable. Following a period of coma, some patients recover while others progress into a vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) or minimally conscious state. In both cases, assessment is difficult and misdiagnosis may be as high as 43%. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest a solution. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography have been used to detect residual cognitive function in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Neuroimaging may improve diagnosis and prognostication. These techniques are beginning to be applied to comatose patients soon after injury. Evidence of preserved cognitive function may predict recovery, and this information would help families and health providers. Complex ethical issues arise due to the vulnerability of patients and families, difficulties interpreting negative results, restriction of communication to "yes" or "no" answers, and cost. We seek to investigate ethical issues in the use of neuroimaging in behaviorally nonresponsive patients who have suffered serious brain injury. The objectives of this research are to: (1) create an approach to capacity assessment using neuroimaging; (2) develop an ethics of welfare framework to guide considerations of quality of life; (3) explore the impact of neuroimaging on families; and, (4) analyze the ethics of the use of neuroimaging in comatose patients. Our research program encompasses four projects and uses a mixed methods approach. Project 1 asks whether decision making capacity can be assessed in behaviorally nonresponsive patients. We will specify cognitive functions required for capacity and detail their assessment. Further, we will develop and pilot a series of scenarios and questions suitable for assessing capacity. Project 2 examines the ethics of welfare as a guide for neuroimaging. It grounds an obligation to explore patients' interests, and we explore conceptual issues in the

  19. Initial Assessment of β3-Adrenoceptor-Activated Brown Adipose Tissue in Streptozotocin-Induced Type 1 Diabetes Rodent Model Using [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Aparna Baranwal; M. Reza Mirbolooki; Jogeshwar Mukherjee

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is activated by β3-adrenoceptor agonists and norepinephrine transporter (NET) blockers and is measurable using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in rats. Using the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), we investigated BAT activity in this rat model under fasting and nonfasting conditions using [18F]FDG PET/CT. Drugs that enhance BAT activity may have...

  20. Human neuroimaging as a "Big Data" science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Toga, Arthur W

    2014-06-01

    The maturation of in vivo neuroimaging has led to incredible quantities of digital information about the human brain. While much is made of the data deluge in science, neuroimaging represents the leading edge of this onslaught of "big data". A range of neuroimaging databasing approaches has streamlined the transmission, storage, and dissemination of data from such brain imaging studies. Yet few, if any, common solutions exist to support the science of neuroimaging. In this article, we discuss how modern neuroimaging research represents a multifactorial and broad ranging data challenge, involving the growing size of the data being acquired; sociological and logistical sharing issues; infrastructural challenges for multi-site, multi-datatype archiving; and the means by which to explore and mine these data. As neuroimaging advances further, e.g. aging, genetics, and age-related disease, new vision is needed to manage and process this information while marshalling of these resources into novel results. Thus, "big data" can become "big" brain science.

  1. Functional neuroimaging and childhood autism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boddaert, Nathalie [Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, Paris (France); Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, DRM, DSV, CEA, Orsay (France); Zilbovicius, Monica [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, DRM, DSV, CEA, Orsay (France); INSERM, Tours (France)

    2002-01-01

    Childhood autism is now widely viewed as being of developmental neurobiological origin. Yet, localised structural and functional brain correlates of autism have to be established. Structural brain-imaging studies performed in autistic patients have reported abnormalities such as increased total brain volume and cerebellar abnormalities. However, none of these abnormalities fully account for the full range of autistic symptoms. Functional brain imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and functional MRI (fMRI) have added a new perspective to the study of normal and pathological brain functions. In autism, functional studies have been performed at rest or during activation. However, first-generation functional imaging devices were not sensitive enough to detect any consistent dysfunction. Recently, with improved technology, two independent groups have reported bilateral hypoperfusion of the temporal lobes in autistic children. In addition, activation studies, using perceptive and cognitive paradigms, have shown an abnormal pattern of cortical activation in autistic patients. These results suggest that different connections between particular cortical regions could exist in autism. The purpose of this review is to present the main results of rest and activation studies performed in autism. (orig.)

  2. Is it possible to obtain polarized positrons during multiple Compton backscattering process?

    CERN Document Server

    Potylitsin, A P

    2003-01-01

    If a beam of unpolarized positrons (which is considered as a sum of two fractions with opposite helicities) passes through an intense circular polarized laser radiation these fractions may be separated. For high laser flash intensity each positron will interact with $k_0\\gg$1 laser photons subsequently (linear multiple compton scattering process). Due to difference in the compton cross-section for positrons polarized in opposite directions the mean final energy of each fraction will be different. It allows to get a polarized positron beam using the momentum selection (with some intensity loss). Estimations show the possibility to obtain a positron beam with 35% longitudinal polarization and 25% intensity from the initial one for focussed laser flash with total energy 5J and positron beam with energy 5 GeV.

  3. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A positron camera is a device intended to image the distribution of positron-emitting radionuclides in the...

  4. Visual systems for interactive exploration and mining of large-scale neuroimaging data archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H; Van Horn, John D

    2012-01-01

    While technological advancements in neuroimaging scanner engineering have improved the efficiency of data acquisition, electronic data capture methods will likewise significantly expedite the populating of large-scale neuroimaging databases. As they do and these archives grow in size, a particular challenge lies in examining and interacting with the information that these resources contain through the development of compelling, user-driven approaches for data exploration and mining. In this article, we introduce the informatics visualization for neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework for the graphical rendering of, and dynamic interaction with the contents of large-scale neuroimaging data sets. We describe the rationale behind INVIZIAN, detail its development, and demonstrate its usage in examining a collection of over 900 T1-anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image volumes from across a diverse set of clinical neuroimaging studies drawn from a leading neuroimaging database. Using a collection of cortical surface metrics and means for examining brain similarity, INVIZIAN graphically displays brain surfaces as points in a coordinate space and enables classification of clusters of neuroanatomically similar MRI images and data mining. As an initial step toward addressing the need for such user-friendly tools, INVIZIAN provides a highly unique means to interact with large quantities of electronic brain imaging archives in ways suitable for hypothesis generation and data mining.

  5. Visual Systems for Interactive Exploration and Mining of Large-Scale Neuroimaging Data Archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian eBowman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available While technological advancements in neuroimaging scanner engineering have improved the efficiency of data acquisition, electronic data capture methods will likewise significantly expedite the population of large-scale neuroimaging databases. As they do, a particular challenge lies in examining and interacting with the information these resources contain through the development of compelling, user-driven approaches for data exploration and mining. In this article, we introduce the Informatics Visualization for Neuroimaging (INVIZIAN program for the graphical rendering of and dynamic interaction with the contents of large-scale neuroimaging data sets. We describe the rationale behind INVIZIAN, describe its development, and demonstrate its use to examine a collection of over 900 T1-anatomical MRI image volumes from across a diverse set of clinical neuroimaging studies and drawn from a leading neuroimaging database. Using a collection of cortical surface metrics and means for examining brain similarity, INVIZIAN graphically displays brain surfaces as points in a coordinate space and enables classification of clusters of neuroanatomically similar MRI images and data mining. As an initial step toward addressing the need for such user-friendly tools, INVIZIAN provides a highly unique means to interact with large quantities of electronic brain imaging archives in ways suitable for hypothesis generation and data mining.

  6. Molecular neuroimaging in degenerative dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Bonilla, J F; Carril Carril, J M

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the limitations of structural imaging, brain perfusion and metabolism using SPECT and PET have provided relevant information for the study of cognitive decline. The introduction of the radiotracers for cerebral amyloid imaging has changed the diagnostic strategy regarding Alzheimer's disease, which is currently considered to be a "continuum." According to this new paradigm, the increasing amyloid load would be associated to the preclinical phase and mild cognitive impairment. It has been possible to observe "in vivo" images using 11C-PIB and PET scans. The characteristics of the 11C-PIB image include specific high brain cortical area retention in the positive cases with typical distribution pattern and no retention in the negative cases. This, in combination with 18F-FDG PET, is the basis of molecular neuroimaging as a biomarker. At present, its prognostic value is being evaluated in longitudinal studies. 11C-PIB-PET has become the reference radiotracer to evaluate the presence of cerebral amyloid. However, its availability is limited due to the need for a nearby cyclotron. Therefore, 18F labeled radiotracers are being introduced. Our experience in the last two years with 11C-PIB, first in the research phase and then as being clinically applied, has shown the utility of the technique in the clinical field, either alone or in combination with FDG. Thus, amyloid image is a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of dementia and it is a potentially useful method for early diagnosis and evaluation of future treatments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  7. Recent development of positron annihilation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Doyama, M

    2002-01-01

    When positron comes into solid or liquid, it moves in the matter and emitted two gamma rays at the opposite direction, by pair annihilation with electron. Each gamma ray is about 511 keV. The experiments of positron annihilation has been developed by three methods such as angular correlation between two gamma rays, energy analysis of emission gamma ray and positron lifetime. The angular correlation between two gamma rays is determined by gamma ray position detector.The energy analysis was measured by S-W analysis and Coincidence Doppler Broadening (CDB) method. Positron lifetime are determined by gamma-gamma lifetime measurement method, beta sup + -gamma lifetime measurement method and other method using waveform of photomultiplier, and determination of time and frequency of gamma-ray. Positron beam is applied to positron scattering, positron diffraction, low energy positron diffraction (LEPD), PELS, LEPSD, PAES, positron re-emission imaging microscope (PRIM) and positron channeling. The example of CDB method...

  8. Behavioral endophenotypes of drug addiction: Etiological insights from neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupp, Bianca; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in the elucidation of neurobehavioral endophenotypes associated with drug addiction made possible by the translational neuroimaging techniques magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Increasingly, these non-invasive imaging approaches have been the catalyst for advancing our understanding of the etiology of drug addiction as a brain disorder involving complex interactions between pre-disposing behavioral traits, environmental influences and neural perturbations arising from the chronic abuse of licit and illicit drugs. In this article we discuss the causal role of trait markers associated with impulsivity and novelty-/sensation-seeking in speeding the development of compulsive drug administration and in facilitating relapse. We also discuss the striking convergence of imaging findings from these behavioural traits and addiction in rats, monkeys and humans with a focus on biomarkers of dopamine neurotransmission, and highlight areas where further research is needed to disambiguate underlying causal mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'NIDA 40th Anniversary Issue'.

  9. Structural and functional neuroimaging in patients with Parkinson's disease and visual hallucinations: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenka, Abhishek; Jhunjhunwala, Ketan Ramakant; Saini, Jitender; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may develop various non-motor symptoms (NMS) during the course of the illness and psychosis is one of the common NMS of PD. Visual hallucinations (VH) are the most common manifestation of psychosis in PD. The exact pathogenesis of VH in patients with PD is not clearly understood. Presence of VH has been described to be associated with rapid cognitive decline and increased nursing home placements in PD patients. A large number of structural and functional neuroimaging studies have been conducted to understand the cerebral basis of VH in PD. Structural imaging studies (Voxel Based Morphometry) have reported grey matter atrophy in multiple regions of the brain such as primary visual cortex, visual association cortex, limbic regions, cholinergic structures such as pedunculopontine nucleus and substantia innominata, which conclude possible alterations of brain regions associated with functions such as visuospatial-perception, attention control and memory. Most functional neuroimaging studies (functional MRI, positron emission tomography and single photon emission computerized tomography) have reported altered activation, blood flow, or reduced metabolism in both dorsal and ventral visual pathways, which probably indicates an alteration in the normal bottom-top visual processing and the presence of an aberrant top-down visual processing. This review critically analyzes the published studies on the structural and functional neuroimaging in PD patients with VH.

  10. Neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease: current role in clinical practice and potential future applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Kobuti Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available 'Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia and its prevalence is expected to increase in the coming years. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is crucial for patients, clinicians and researchers. Neuroimaging techniques have provided invaluable information about Alzheimer's disease and, owing to recent advances, these methods will have an increasingly important role in research and clinical practice. The purpose of this article is to review recent neuroimaging studies of Alzheimer's disease that provide relevant information to clinical practice, including a new modality: in vivo amyloid imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computed tomography and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography are currently available for clinical use. Patients with suspected Alzheimer's disease are commonly investigated with magnetic resonance imaging because it provides detailed images of brain structure and allows the identification of supportive features for the diagnosis. Neurofunctional techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography can also be used to complement the diagnostic investigation in cases of uncertainty. Amyloid imaging is a non-invasive technique that uses positron emission tomography technology to investigate the accumulation of the β-amyloid peptide in the brain, which is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. This is a promising test but currently its use is restricted to very few specialized research centers in the world. Technological innovations will probably increase its availability and reliability, which are the necessary steps to achieve robust clinical applicability. Thus, in the future it is likely that amyloid imaging techniques will be used in the clinical evaluation of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  11. LPI: pulsed solenoid for positron focusing in LIL

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1993-01-01

    The solenoid for the initial focusing of the positrons emerging from the conversion target is mounted inside the vacuum, immediately after the target. Pulsed with a current of 6 kA for some 7 microseconds, it produces a longitudinal magnetic field of 1.5 T.

  12. Mathematical modeling and visualization of functional neuroimages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup

    This dissertation presents research results regarding mathematical modeling in the context of the analysis of functional neuroimages. Specifically, the research focuses on pattern-based analysis methods that recently have become popular within the neuroimaging community. Such methods attempt...... to predict or decode experimentally defined cognitive states based on brain scans. The topics covered in the dissertation are divided into two broad parts: The first part investigates the relative importance of model selection on the brain patterns extracted form analysis models. Typical neuroimaging data...... of model regularization parameter choices on the model generalization, the reliability of the spatial brain patterns extracted from the analysis model, and the ability of the resulting model to identify relevant brain networks defining the underlying neural encoding of the experiment. We show that known...

  13. Turner syndrome: neuroimaging findings: structural and functional.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullaney, Ronan

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of Turner syndrome can advance our understanding of the X chromosome in brain development, and the modulatory influence of endocrine factors. There is increasing evidence from neuroimaging studies that TX individuals have significant differences in the anatomy, function, and metabolism of a number of brain regions; including the parietal lobe; cerebellum, amygdala, hippocampus; and basal ganglia; and perhaps differences in "connectivity" between frontal and parieto-occipital regions. Finally, there is preliminary evidence that genomic imprinting, sex hormones and growth hormone have significant modulatory effects on brain maturation in TS.

  14. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  15. Gaussian Mixture Models and Model Selection for [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Classification in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    Full Text Available We present a method to discover discriminative brain metabolism patterns in [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET scans, facilitating the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. In the work, the term "pattern" stands for a certain brain region that characterizes a target group of patients and can be used for a classification as well as interpretation purposes. Thus, it can be understood as a so-called "region of interest (ROI". In the literature, an ROI is often found by a given brain atlas that defines a number of brain regions, which corresponds to an anatomical approach. The present work introduces a semi-data-driven approach that is based on learning the characteristics of the given data, given some prior anatomical knowledge. A Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM and model selection are combined to return a clustering of voxels that may serve for the definition of ROIs. Experiments on both an in-house dataset and data of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI suggest that the proposed approach arrives at a better diagnosis than a merely anatomical approach or conventional statistical hypothesis testing.

  16. NMF on positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bödvarsson, Bjarni; Hansen, Lars Kai; Svarer, Claus;

    2007-01-01

    In positron emission tomography, kinetic modelling of brain tracer uptake, metabolism or binding requires knowledge of the cerebral input function. Traditionally, this is achieved with arterial blood sampling in the arm or as shown in (Liptrot, M, et al., 2004) by non-invasive K-means clustering....... We propose another method to estimate time-activity curves (TAC) extracted directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Since the scaling of the basis curves is lost in the NMF the estimated TAC is scaled by a vector alpha which...

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury: Nuclear Medicine Neuroimaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Catasús, Carlos A; Vállez Garcia, David; Le Riverend Morales, Eloísa; Galvizu Sánchez, Reinaldo; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; de Vries, Erik FJ; van Waarde, Aren; Leenders, Klaus L

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an up-to-date review of nuclear medicine neuroimaging in traumatic brain injury (TBI). 18F-FDG PET will remain a valuable tool in researching complex mechanisms associated with early metabolic dysfunction in TBI. Although evidence-based imaging studies are needed, 18F-FDG PET i

  18. Ionization penalty in nonlinear Raman neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, Aleksandr A; Fedotov, Ilya V; Doronina-Amitonova, Lyubov V; Ivashkina, Olga I; Zots, Marina A; Fedotov, Andrei B; Anokhin, Konstantin V; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2011-02-15

    Light-assisted ionization accompanying coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of ultrashort laser pulses in brain tissue is shown to manifest itself in a detectable blueshift of the anti-Stokes signal. This blueshift can serve as an indicator of ionization processes in CARS-based neuroimaging.

  19. Neuroimaging resilience to stress: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werff, S J A; van den Berg, S M; Pannekoek, J N; Elzinga, B M; van der Wee, N J A

    2013-01-01

    There is a high degree of intra-individual variation in how individuals respond to stress. This becomes evident when exploring the development of posttraumatic symptoms or stress-related disorders after exposure to trauma. Whether or not an individual develops posttraumatic symptoms after experiencing a traumatic event is partly dependent on a person's resilience. Resilience can be broadly defined as the dynamic process encompassing positive adaptation within the context of significant adversity. Even though research into the neurobiological basis of resilience is still in its early stages, these insights can have important implications for the prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders. Neuroimaging studies contribute to our knowledge of intra-individual variability in resilience and the development of posttraumatic symptoms or other stress-related disorders. This review provides an overview of neuroimaging findings related to resilience. Structural, resting-state, and task-related neuroimaging results associated with resilience are discussed. There are a limited number of studies available and neuroimaging research of resilience is still in its infancy. The available studies point at brain circuitries involved in stress and emotion regulation, with more efficient processing and regulation associated with resilience.

  20. Neuroimaging resilience to stress: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J A van der Werff

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a high degree of intra-individual variation in how individuals respond to stress. This becomes evident when exploring the development of posttraumatic symptoms or stress-related disorders after exposure to trauma. Whether or not an individual develops posttraumatic symptoms after experiencing a traumatic event is partly dependent on a person’s resilience. Resilience can be broadly defined as the dynamic process encompassing positive adaptation within the context of significant adversity. Even though research into the neurobiological basis of resilience is still in its early stages, these insights can have important implications for the prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders. Neuroimaging studies contribute to our knowledge of intra-individual variability in resilience and the development of posttraumatic symptoms or other stress-related disorders. This review provides an overview of neuroimaging findings related to resilience. Structural, resting-state and task-related neuroimaging results associated with resilience are discussed. There are a limited number of studies available and neuroimaging research of resilience is still in its infancy. The available studies point at brain circuitries involved in stress and emotion regulation, with more efficient processing and regulation associated with resilience.

  1. Neuropsychiatric lupus: classification criteria in neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Tania M; Zimmermann, Nicolle; Rueda-Lopes, Fernanda; Bizzo, Bernardo C; Fonseca, Rochele P; Gasparetto, Emerson L

    2013-05-01

    This systematic review described the criteria and main evaluations methods procedures used to classify neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) patients. Also, within the evaluations methods, this review aimed to identify the main contributions of neuropsychological measurements in neuroimaging studies. A search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE and SCOPUS databases with the terms related to neuropsychiatric syndromes, systemic lupus erythematosus, and neuroimaging techniques. Sixty-six abstracts were found; only 20 were completely analyzed and included. Results indicated that the 1999 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria is the most used to classify NPSLE samples together with laboratorial, cognitive, neurological and psychiatric assessment procedures. However, the recommended ACR assessment procedures to classify NPSLE patients are being used incompletely, especially the neuropsychological batteries. Neuropsychological instruments and neuroimaging techniques have been used mostly to characterize NPSLE samples, instead of contributing to their classifications. The most described syndromes in neuroimaging studies have been seizure/cerebrovascular disease followed by cognitive dysfunctions as well as headache disorder.

  2. Neuroimaging studies of social cognition in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hironobu; Yassin, Walid; Murai, Toshiya

    2015-05-01

    Impaired social cognition is considered a core contributor to unfavorable psychosocial functioning in schizophrenia. Rather than being a unitary process, social cognition is a collection of multifaceted processes that recruit multiple brain structures, thus structural and functional neuroimaging techniques are ideal methodologies for revealing the underlying pathophysiology of impaired social cognition. Many neuroimaging studies have suggested that in addition to white-matter deficits, schizophrenia is associated with decreased gray-matter volume in multiple brain areas, especially fronto-temporal and limbic regions. However, few schizophrenia studies have examined associations between brain abnormalities and social cognitive disabilities. During the last decade, we have investigated structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, and our findings have been confirmed by us and others. By assessing different types of social cognitive abilities, structural abnormalities in multiple brain regions have been found to be associated with disabilities in social cognition, such as recognition of facial emotion, theory of mind, and empathy. These structural deficits have also been associated with alexithymia and quality of life in ways that are closely related to the social cognitive disabilities found in schizophrenia. Here, we overview a series of neuroimaging studies from our laboratory that exemplify current research into this topic, and discuss how it can be further tackled using recent advances in neuroimaging technology.

  3. Neuroimaging in childhood headache: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexiou, George A. [University of Ioannina, Department of Neurosurgery, Medical School, P.O. Box 103, Ioannina (Greece); Argyropoulou, Maria I. [University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2013-07-15

    Headache is a common complaint in children, one that gives rise to considerable parental concern and fear of the presence of a space-occupying lesion. The evaluation and diagnosis of headache is very challenging for paediatricians, and neuroimaging by means of CT or MRI is often requested as part of the investigation. CT exposes children to radiation, while MRI is costly and sometimes requires sedation or general anaesthesia, especially in children younger than 6 years. This review of the literature on the value of neuroimaging in children with headache showed that the rate of pathological findings is generally low. Imaging findings that led to a change in patient management were in almost all cases reported in children with abnormal signs on neurological examination. Neuroimaging should be limited to children with a suspicious clinical history, abnormal neurological findings or other physical signs suggestive of intracranial pathology. Well-designed prospective studies are needed to better define the clinical findings that warrant neuroimaging in children with headache. (orig.)

  4. Neuroimaging resilience to stress: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werff, S. J. A.; van den Berg, S. M.; Pannekoek, J. N.; Elzinga, B. M.; van der Wee, N. J. A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a high degree of intra-individual variation in how individuals respond to stress. This becomes evident when exploring the development of posttraumatic symptoms or stress-related disorders after exposure to trauma. Whether or not an individual develops posttraumatic symptoms after experiencing a traumatic event is partly dependent on a person's resilience. Resilience can be broadly defined as the dynamic process encompassing positive adaptation within the context of significant adversity. Even though research into the neurobiological basis of resilience is still in its early stages, these insights can have important implications for the prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders. Neuroimaging studies contribute to our knowledge of intra-individual variability in resilience and the development of posttraumatic symptoms or other stress-related disorders. This review provides an overview of neuroimaging findings related to resilience. Structural, resting-state, and task-related neuroimaging results associated with resilience are discussed. There are a limited number of studies available and neuroimaging research of resilience is still in its infancy. The available studies point at brain circuitries involved in stress and emotion regulation, with more efficient processing and regulation associated with resilience. PMID:23675330

  5. Structural Neuroimaging in Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooij, Meike W.; Smits, Marion

    2012-01-01

    The role of structural neuroimaging in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming increasingly important. As a consequence, a basic understanding of what are normal brain changes in aging is key to be able to recognize what is abnormal. The first part of this article discusses normal vers

  6. The open-source neuroimaging research enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Daniel S; Archie, Kevin A; Olsen, Timothy R; Ramaratnam, Mohana

    2007-11-01

    While brain imaging in the clinical setting is largely a practice of looking at images, research neuroimaging is a quantitative and integrative enterprise. Images are run through complex batteries of processing and analysis routines to generate numeric measures of brain characteristics. Other measures potentially related to brain function - demographics, genetics, behavioral tests, neuropsychological tests - are key components of most research studies. The canonical scanner - PACS - viewing station axis used in clinical practice is therefore inadequate for supporting neuroimaging research. Here, we model the neuroimaging research enterprise as a workflow. The principal components of the workflow include data acquisition, data archiving, data processing and analysis, and data utilization. We also describe a set of open-source applications to support each step of the workflow and the transitions between these steps. These applications include DIGITAL IMAGING AND COMMUNICATIONS IN MEDICINE viewing and storage tools, the EXTENSIBLE NEUROIMAGING ARCHIVE TOOLKIT data archiving and exploration platform, and an engine for running processing/analysis pipelines. The overall picture presented is aimed to motivate open-source developers to identify key integration and communication points for interoperating with complimentary applications.

  7. On small sample experiments in neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1998-01-01

    Most human brain imaging experiments involve a number of subjects that is unusually low by accepted statistical standards. Although there are anumber of practical reasons for using small samples in neuroimaging we need to face the question regarding whether results obtained with only a fewsubjects...

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLE EEG changes and neuroimaging abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    neuroimaging changes of the brain and EEG abnormalities in correlation to the degree of ... MRI is the method of choice to investigate ... regional gray and white matter volumes .... relation of the cerebellar affection with disease ... were mostly done on mentally retarded cases23 ... vide a certain correlation between the.

  9. Meeting Curation Challenges in a Neuroimaging Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus Whyte

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The SCARP project is a series of short studies with two aims; firstly to discover more about disciplinary approaches and attitudes to digital curation through ‘immersion’ in selected cases; secondly to apply known good practice, and where possible, identify new lessons from practice in the selected discipline areas. The study summarised here is of the Neuroimaging Group in the University of Edinburgh’s Division of Psychiatry, which plays a leading role in eScience collaborations to improve the infrastructure for neuroimaging data integration and reuse. The Group also aims to address growing data storage and curation needs, given the capabilities afforded by new infrastructure. The study briefly reviews the policy context and current challenges to data integration and sharing in the neuroimaging field. It then describes how curation and preservation risks and opportunities for change were identified throughout the curation lifecycle; and their context appreciated through field study in the research site. The results are consistent with studies of neuroimaging eInfrastructure that emphasise the role of local data sharing and reuse practices. These sustain mutual awareness of datasets and experimental protocols through sharing peer to peer, and among senior researchers and students, enabling continuity in research and flexibility in project work. This “human infrastructure” is taken into account in considering next steps for curation and preservation of the Group’s datasets and a phased approach to supporting data documentation.

  10. On small sample experiments in neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1998-01-01

    Most human brain imaging experiments involve a number of subjects that is unusually low by accepted statistical standards. Although there are anumber of practical reasons for using small samples in neuroimaging we need to face the question regarding whether results obtained with only a fewsubjects...

  11. Electron-positron outflow from black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Van Putten, M H P M

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) appear as the brightest transient phenomena in the Universe. The nature of the central engine in GRBs is a missing link in the theory of fireballs to their stellar mass progenitors. Here it is shown that rotating black holes produce electron-positron outflow when brought into contact with a strong magnetic field. The outflow is produced by a coupling of the spin of the black hole to the orbit of the particles. For a nearly extreme Kerr black hole, particle outflow from an initial state of electrostatic equilibrium has a normalized isotropic emission of $\\sim external magnetic field strength, B_c=4.4 x 10^{13}G, and M is the mass of the black hole. This initial outflow has a half-opening angle given.

  12. Neuroimaging in psychiatry: an update on neuroimaging in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Brian D; Nguyen, T; Hayhow, B; Looi, Jcl

    2016-04-01

    We offered guidance on the role of structural and functional neuroimaging modalities for the general psychiatrist and for trainees in the clinical setting. We outlined the utility of neuroimaging modalities in the clinical setting, specifically with a view to understanding the pathophysiology of manifestations of disease. Both structural and functional neuroimaging modalities have a clear role in diagnostic evaluation in the spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. Whilst the role of neuroimaging in patients with mood, anxiety and psychotic disorders is less clear, structural and functional imaging modalities have utility in the clinical setting in the form of diagnostic refinement and in understanding the pathophysiology of disorders, towards explaining manifestations and planning treatment. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  13. Neuroimaging of Central Sensitivity Syndromes: Key Insights from the Scientific Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Ceko, Marta; Gracely, John L; Gracely, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes are characterized by distressing symptoms, such as pain and fatigue, in the absence of clinically obvious pathology. The scientific underpinnings of these disorders are not currently known. Modern neuroimaging techniques promise new insights into mechanisms mediating these postulated syndromes. We review the results of neuroimaging applied to five central sensitivity syndromes: fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular joint disorder, and vulvodynia syndrome. Neuroimaging studies of basal metabolism, anatomic constitution, molecular constituents, evoked neural activity, and treatment effect are compared across all of these syndromes. Evoked sensory paradigms reveal sensory augmentation to both painful and nonpainful stimulation. This is a transformative observation for these syndromes, which were historically considered to be completely of hysterical or feigned in origin. However, whether sensory augmentation represents the cause of these syndromes, a predisposing factor, an endophenotype, or an epiphenomenon cannot be discerned from the current literature. Further, the result from cross-sectional neuroimaging studies of basal activity, anatomy, and molecular constituency are extremely heterogeneous within and between the syndromes. A defining neuroimaging "signature" cannot be discerned for any of the particular syndromes or for an over-arching central sensitization mechanism common to all of the syndromes. Several issues confound initial attempts to meaningfully measure treatment effects in these syndromes. At this time, the existence of "central sensitivity syndromes" is based more soundly on clinical and epidemiological evidence. A coherent picture of a "central sensitization" mechanism that bridges across all of these syndromes does not emerge from the existing scientific evidence.

  14. A composite multivariate polygenic and neuroimaging score for prediction of conversion to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovych, Roman; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Davatzikos, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) are characterized by widespread pathological changes in the brain. At the same time, Alzheimer's disease is heritable with complex genetic underpinnings that may influence the timing of the related pathological changes in the brain and can affect the progression from MCI to AD. In this paper, we present a multivariate imaging genetics approach for prediction of conversion to Alzheimer's disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment. We employ multivariate pattern recognition approaches to obtain neuroimaging and polygenic discriminators between the healthy individuals and AD patients. We then design, in a linear manner, a composite imaging-genetic score for prediction of conversion to Alzheimer's disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment. We apply our approach within the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and show that the integration of polygenic and neuroimaging information improves prediction of conversion to AD.

  15. Study on low-energy positron polarimetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Schälicke; G Alexander; R Dollan; K Laihem; T Lohse; S Riemann; P Starovoitov; A Ushakov

    2007-12-01

    A polarised positron source has been proposed for the design of the international linear collider (ILC). In order to optimise the positron beam, a measurement of its degree of polarisation close to the positron creation point is desired. In this contribution, methods for determining the positron polarisation at low energies are reviewed. A newly developed polarisation extension to GEANT4 will provide the basis for further polarimeter investigations.

  16. Modeling clustered activity increase in amyloid-beta positron emission tomographic images with statistical descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhi S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sepideh Shokouhi,1 Baxter P Rogers,1 Hakmook Kang,2 Zhaohua Ding,1 Daniel O Claassen,3 John W Mckay,1 William R Riddle1On behalf of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative1Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USABackground: Amyloid-beta (Aβ imaging with positron emission tomography (PET holds promise for detecting the presence of Aβ plaques in the cortical gray matter. Many image analyses focus on regional average measurements of tracer activity distribution; however, considerable additional information is available in the images. Metrics that describe the statistical properties of images, such as the two-point correlation function (S2, have found wide applications in astronomy and materials science. S2 provides a detailed characterization of spatial patterns in images typically referred to as clustering or flocculence. The objective of this study was to translate the two-point correlation method into Aβ-PET of the human brain using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB to characterize longitudinal changes in the tracer distribution that may reflect changes in Aβ plaque accumulation.Methods: We modified the conventional S2 metric, which is primarily used for binary images and formulated a weighted two-point correlation function (wS2 to describe nonbinary, real-valued PET images with a single statistical function. Using serial 11C-PiB scans, we calculated wS2 functions from two-dimensional PET images of different cortical regions as well as three-dimensional data from the whole brain. The area under the wS2 functions was calculated and compared with the mean/median of the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR. For three-dimensional data, we compared the area under the wS2 curves with the subjects’ cerebrospinal fluid measures.Results: Overall, the longitudinal changes in wS2

  17. Metabolic and clinical assessment of efficacy of cryoablation therapy on skeletal masses by {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and visual analogue scale (VAS): initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masala, Salvatore; Bartolucci, Alberto D.; Mammucari, Matteo; Simonetti, Giovanni [University Hospital Tor Vergata, Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, Rome (Italy); Schillaci, Orazio; Calabria, Ferdinando [University Hospital Tor Vergata, Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, Rome (Italy); I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Neuroradiology, Pozzilli (Italy); Policlinico Tor Vegata, Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, Rome (Italy)

    2011-02-15

    Various therapy modalities have been proposed as standard treatments in management of bone metastases. Radiation therapy remains the standard of care for patients with localized bone pain, but up to 30% of them do not experience notable pain relief. Percutaneous cryoablation is a minimally invasive technique that induces necrosis by alternately freezing and thawing a target tissue. This technique is successfully used to treat a variety of malignant and benign diseases in different sites. {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) is a single technique of imaging that provides in a ''single step'' both morphological and metabolic features of neoplastic lesions of the bone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the cryosurgical technique on secondary musculoskeletal masses according to semi-quantitative PET analysis and clinical-test evaluation with the visual analogue scale (VAS). We enrolled 20 patients with painful bone lesions (score pain that exceeded 4 on the VAS) that were non-responsive to treatment; one lesion per patient was treated. All patients underwent a PET-CT evaluation before and 8 weeks after cryotherapy; maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) was measured before and after treatment for metabolic assessment of response to therapy. After treatment, 18 patients (90%) showed considerable reduction in SUV{sub max} value (>50%) suggestive of response to treatment; only 2 patients did not show meaningful reduction in metabolic activity. Our preliminary study demonstrates that quantitative analysis provided by PET correlates with response to cryoablation therapy as assessed by CT data and clinical VAS evaluation. (orig.)

  18. Positron-acoustic shock waves associated with cold viscous positron fluid in superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M. J., E-mail: josim.phys2007@gmail.com; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2015-06-15

    A theoretical investigation is made on the positron-acoustic (PA) shock waves (SHWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma containing immobile positive ions, cold mobile positrons, and hot positrons and electrons following the kappa (κ) distribution. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is taken into account, and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PA SHWs. It is also observed that the fundamental properties of the PA SHWs are significantly modified by the effects of different parameters associated with superthermal (κ distributed) hot positrons and electrons.

  19. Functional and molecular neuroimaging of menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eComasco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The level of gonadal hormones to which the female brain is exposed considerably changes across the menopausal transition, which in turn, is likely to be of great relevance for neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, the neurobiological consequences of these hormone fluctuations and of hormone replacement therapy in the menopause have only begun to be understood. This review summarizes the findings of thirty-four studies of human brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron and single-photon computed emission tomography studies, in peri- and postmenopausal women treated with estrogen, or estrogen-progestagen replacement therapy. Seven studies using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist intervention as a model of hormonal withdrawal are also included. Cognitive paradigms are employed by the majority of studies evaluating the effect of unopposed estrogen or estrogen-progestagen treatment on peri- and postmenopausal women’s brain. In randomized-controlled trials, estrogen treatment enhances activation of fronto-cingulate regions during cognitive functioning, though in many cases no difference in cognitive performance was present. Progestagens seems to counteract the effects of estrogens. Findings on cognitive functioning during acute ovarian hormone withdrawal suggest a decrease in activation of the inferior frontal gyrus, thus essentially corroborating the findings in postmenopausal women. Studies of the cholinergic and serotonergic systems indicate these systems as biological mediators of hormonal influences on the brain. More, hormonal replacement appears to increase cerebral blood flow in cortical regions. On the other hand, studies on emotion processing in postmenopausal women are lacking. These results call for well-powered randomized-controlled multi-modal prospective neuroimaging studies as well as investigation on the related molecular mechanisms of effects of menopausal hormonal

  20. [Neuroimaging in psychiatry: multivariate analysis techniques for diagnosis and prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambeitz, J; Koutsouleris, N

    2014-06-01

    Multiple studies successfully applied multivariate analysis to neuroimaging data demonstrating the potential utility of neuroimaging for clinical diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Summary of the current state of research regarding the application of neuroimaging in the field of psychiatry. Literature review of current studies. Results of current studies indicate the potential application of neuroimaging data across various diagnoses, such as depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and dementia. Potential applications include disease classification, differential diagnosis and prediction of disease course. The results of the studies are heterogeneous although some studies report promising findings. Further multicentre studies are needed with clearly specified patient populations to systematically investigate the potential utility of neuroimaging for the clinical routine.

  1. Neuromarketing: the hope and hype of neuroimaging in business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariely, Dan; Berns, Gregory S

    2010-04-01

    The application of neuroimaging methods to product marketing - neuromarketing - has recently gained considerable popularity. We propose that there are two main reasons for this trend. First, the possibility that neuroimaging will become cheaper and faster than other marketing methods; and second, the hope that neuroimaging will provide marketers with information that is not obtainable through conventional marketing methods. Although neuroimaging is unlikely to be cheaper than other tools in the near future, there is growing evidence that it may provide hidden information about the consumer experience. The most promising application of neuroimaging methods to marketing may come before a product is even released - when it is just an idea being developed.

  2. Initial Assessment of β3-Adrenoceptor-Activated Brown Adipose Tissue in Streptozotocin-Induced Type 1 Diabetes Rodent Model Using [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Baranwal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT is activated by β3-adrenoceptor agonists and norepinephrine transporter (NET blockers and is measurable using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT in rats. Using the streptozotocin (STZ-treated rat model of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, we investigated BAT activity in this rat model under fasting and nonfasting conditions using [18F]FDG PET/CT. Drugs that enhance BAT activity may have a potential for therapeutic development in lowering blood sugar in insulin-resistant diabetes. Rats were rendered diabetic by administration of STZand confirmed by glucose measures. [18F]FDG was injected in the rats (fasted or nonfasted pretreated with either saline or β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL316,243 or the NET blocker atomoxetine for PET/CT scans. [18F]FDG metabolic activity was computed as standard uptake values (SUVs in interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT and compared across the different drug treatment conditions. Blood glucose levels > 500 mg/dL were established for the STZ-treated diabetic rats. Under fasting conditions, average uptake of [18F]FDG in the IBAT of STZ-treated diabetic rats was approximately 70% lower compared to that of normal rats. Both CL316,243 and atomoxetine activated IBAT in normal rats had an SUV > 5, whereas activation in STZ-treated rats was significantly lower. The agonist CL316,243 activated IBAT up to threefold compared to saline in the fasted STZ-treated rat. In the nonfasted rat, the IBAT activation was up by twofold by CL316243. Atomoxetine had a greater effect on lowering blood sugar levels compared to CL316,243 in the nonfasted rats. A significant reduction in metabolic activity was observed in the STZ-treated diabetic rodent model. Increased IBAT activity in the STZ-treated diabetic rat under nonfasted conditions using the β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL316,243 suggests a potential role of BAT in modulating blood sugar

  3. Initial Assessment of β3-Adrenoceptor-Activated Brown Adipose Tissue in Streptozotocin-Induced Type 1 Diabetes Rodent Model Using [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranwal, Aparna; Mirbolooki, M Reza; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is activated by β3-adrenoceptor agonists and norepinephrine transporter (NET) blockers and is measurable using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in rats. Using the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), we investigated BAT activity in this rat model under fasting and nonfasting conditions using [(18)F]FDG PET/CT. Drugs that enhance BAT activity may have a potential for therapeutic development in lowering blood sugar in insulin-resistant diabetes. Rats were rendered diabetic by administration of STZ and confirmed by glucose measures. [(18)F]FDG was injected in the rats (fasted or nonfasted) pretreated with either saline or β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL316,243 or the NET blocker atomoxetine for PET/CT scans. [(18)F]FDG metabolic activity was computed as standard uptake values (SUVs) in interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) and compared across the different drug treatment conditions. Blood glucose levels > 500 mg/dL were established for the STZ-treated diabetic rats. Under fasting conditions, average uptake of [(18)F]FDG in the IBAT of STZ-treated diabetic rats was approximately 70% lower compared to that of normal rats. Both CL316,243 and atomoxetine activated IBAT in normal rats had an SUV > 5, whereas activation in STZ-treated rats was significantly lower. The agonist CL316,243 activated IBAT up to threefold compared to saline in the fasted STZ-treated rat. In the nonfasted rat, the IBAT activation was up by twofold by CL316243. Atomoxetine had a greater effect on lowering blood sugar levels compared to CL316,243 in the nonfasted rats. A significant reduction in metabolic activity was observed in the STZ-treated diabetic rodent model. Increased IBAT activity in the STZ-treated diabetic rat under nonfasted conditions using the β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL316,243 suggests a potential role of BAT in modulating blood

  4. Mathematical modeling and visualization of functional neuroimages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup

    This dissertation presents research results regarding mathematical modeling in the context of the analysis of functional neuroimages. Specifically, the research focuses on pattern-based analysis methods that recently have become popular analysis tools within the neuroimaging community. Such methods...... attempt to predict or decode experimentally defined cognitive states based on brain scans. The topics covered in the dissertation are divided into two broad parts: The first part investigates the relative importance of model selection on the brain patterns extracted form analysis models. Typical...... influence of model regularization parameter choices on the model generalization, the reliability of the spatial brain patterns extracted from the analysis model, and the ability of the model to identify relevant brain networks defining the underlying neural encoding of the experiment. We show that known...

  5. Energy landscape analysis of neuroimaging data

    CERN Document Server

    Ezaki, Takahiro; Ohzeki, Masayuki; Masuda, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Computational neuroscience models have been used for understanding neural dynamics in the brain and how they may be altered when physiological or other conditions change. We review and develop a data-driven approach to neuroimaging data called the energy landscape analysis. The methods are rooted in statistical physics theory, in particular, the Ising model, also known as the (pairwise) maximum entropy model and Boltzmann machine. The methods have been applied to fitting electrophysiological data in neuroscience for a decade, but its use in neuroimaging data is still in its infancy. We first review the methods and discuss some algorithms and technical aspects. Then, we apply the methods to functional magnetic resonance imaging data recorded from healthy individuals to inspect the relationship between the accuracy of fitting, the size of the brain system to be analyzed, and the data length.

  6. Neuroimaging Measures as Endophenotypes in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith N. Braskie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD is moderately to highly heritable. Apolipoprotein E allele ε4 (APOE4 has been replicated consistently as an AD risk factor over many studies, and recently confirmed variants in other genes such as CLU, CR1, and PICALM each increase the lifetime risk of AD. However, much of the heritability of AD remains unexplained. AD is a complex disease that is diagnosed largely through neuropsychological testing, though neuroimaging measures may be more sensitive for detecting the incipient disease stages. Difficulties in early diagnosis and variable environmental contributions to the disease can obscure genetic relationships in traditional case-control genetic studies. Neuroimaging measures may be used as endophenotypes for AD, offering a reliable, objective tool to search for possible genetic risk factors. Imaging measures might also clarify the specific mechanisms by which proposed risk factors influence the brain.

  7. Deep learning for neuroimaging: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plis, Sergey M; Hjelm, Devon R; Salakhutdinov, Ruslan; Allen, Elena A; Bockholt, Henry J; Long, Jeffrey D; Johnson, Hans J; Paulsen, Jane S; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-01-01

    Deep learning methods have recently made notable advances in the tasks of classification and representation learning. These tasks are important for brain imaging and neuroscience discovery, making the methods attractive for porting to a neuroimager's toolbox. Success of these methods is, in part, explained by the flexibility of deep learning models. However, this flexibility makes the process of porting to new areas a difficult parameter optimization problem. In this work we demonstrate our results (and feasible parameter ranges) in application of deep learning methods to structural and functional brain imaging data. These methods include deep belief networks and their building block the restricted Boltzmann machine. We also describe a novel constraint-based approach to visualizing high dimensional data. We use it to analyze the effect of parameter choices on data transformations. Our results show that deep learning methods are able to learn physiologically important representations and detect latent relations in neuroimaging data.

  8. Neuroimaging studies of self-reflection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ying

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews some basic findings and methodological issues in neuroimaging studies of self-referential processing.As a general rule,making judgments about one's self,inclusive of personality trait adjectives or current mental states(person's prefer ences,norms,aesthetic values and feeling)uniformly generates medial prefrontal activations,regardless of stimulus materials(words or pictures)and modality(visual or auditory).Cingulate activations are also observed in association with most self-referential processing.Methodological issues include treating self-referential processing as either representing one's own personality traits or representing one's own current mental states.Finally,self-referential processing could Be considered as implement of "I think therefore I am" approach to neuroimaging the self.

  9. Neuroimaging of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Elyas Jung Haziot

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A significant increase in the incidence of cognitive impairment in HIV/AIDS patients has been continuously observed. Consequently, three classification categories of cognitive impairment have been proposed: asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI and mild neurocognitive disorder (MND, that correspond to the mild and intermediate forms, and HIV-associated dementia (HAD for the most severe cases. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND is a broad term that encompasses these three categories. Moreover, the application of neuroimaging methods has led to a major breakthrough in understanding of the neurological changes in HIV, providing greater reliability in the exclusion of associated diseases and allowing earlier diagnosis. Therefore, abnormalities and/or specific neuroimaging elements may soon be incorporated into the HAND classification criteria, which will be of great value in the management of these diseases, including in the optimization of high CNS penetration antiretroviral regimens.

  10. Energy landscape analysis of neuroimaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezaki, Takahiro; Watanabe, Takamitsu; Ohzeki, Masayuki; Masuda, Naoki

    2017-05-01

    Computational neuroscience models have been used for understanding neural dynamics in the brain and how they may be altered when physiological or other conditions change. We review and develop a data-driven approach to neuroimaging data called the energy landscape analysis. The methods are rooted in statistical physics theory, in particular the Ising model, also known as the (pairwise) maximum entropy model and Boltzmann machine. The methods have been applied to fitting electrophysiological data in neuroscience for a decade, but their use in neuroimaging data is still in its infancy. We first review the methods and discuss some algorithms and technical aspects. Then, we apply the methods to functional magnetic resonance imaging data recorded from healthy individuals to inspect the relationship between the accuracy of fitting, the size of the brain system to be analysed and the data length. This article is part of the themed issue `Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology'.

  11. Virtual brain mapping: Meta-analysis and visualization in functional neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup

    Results from functional neuroimaging such as positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance are often reported as sets of 3-dimensional coordinates in Talairach stereotactic space. By utilizing data collected in the BrainMap database and from our own small XML database we can...... automatically model and visualize several studies at once. We model a set of 3-dimensional coordinates by a voxelization step where flexible probability density models such as kernel density estimators produce a voxel-volume representation of a study, allowing us to represent all coordinate data in one single...... lists. Image-based indices can be created by singular value decomposition and by matching individual volumes against eigenimages. Individual experiments, sets of experiments as well as results from meta-analyses can be rendered as glyphs, cut-planes or isosurfaces in 3-dimensional Corner Cube...

  12. Neuroimaging and Other Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease: The Changing Landscape of Early Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this review is to provide an overview of biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD), with emphasis on neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers. We first review biomarker changes in patients with late-onset AD, including findings from studies using structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), advanced MRI techniques (diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, perfusion), positron emission tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose, amyloid tracers, and other neurochemical tracers, and CSF protein levels. Next, we evaluate findings from these biomarkers in preclinical and prodromal stages of AD including mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and pre-MCI conditions conferring elevated risk. We then discuss related findings in patients with dominantly inherited AD. We conclude with a discussion of the current theoretical framework for the role of biomarkers in AD and emergent directions for AD biomarker research. PMID:23297785

  13. Occipital headaches and neuroimaging in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Joshua J; Gelfand, Amy A; Goadsby, Peter J; Bass, Nancy

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the common thinking, as reinforced by the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta), that occipital headaches in children are rare and suggestive of serious intracranial pathology. We performed a retrospective chart review cohort study of all patients ≤18 years of age referred to a university child neurology clinic for headache in 2009. Patients were stratified by headache location: solely occipital, occipital plus other area(s) of head pain, or no occipital involvement. Children with abnormal neurologic examinations were excluded. We assessed location as a predictor of whether neuroimaging was ordered and whether intracranial pathology was found. Analyses were performed with cohort study tools in Stata/SE 13.0 (StataCorp, College Station, TX). A total of 308 patients were included. Median age was 12 years (32 months-18 years), and 57% were female. Headaches were solely occipital in 7% and occipital-plus in 14%. Patients with occipital head pain were more likely to undergo neuroimaging than those without occipital involvement (solely occipital: 95%, relative risk [RR] 10.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-77.3; occipital-plus: 88%, RR 3.7, 95% CI 1.5-9.2; no occipital pain: 63%, referent). Occipital pain alone or with other locations was not significantly associated with radiographic evidence of clinically significant intracranial pathology. Children with occipital headache are more likely to undergo neuroimaging. In the absence of concerning features on the history and in the setting of a normal neurologic examination, neuroimaging can be deferred in most pediatric patients when occipital pain is present. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Sports concussions and aging: a neuroimaging investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Sebastien; De Beaumont, Louis; Henry, Luke C; Boulanger, Yvan; Evans, Alan C; Bourgouin, Pierre; Poirier, Judes; Théoret, Hugo; Lassonde, Maryse

    2013-05-01

    Recent epidemiological and experimental studies suggest a link between cognitive decline in late adulthood and sports concussions sustained in early adulthood. In order to provide the first in vivo neuroanatomical evidence of this relation, the present study probes the neuroimaging profile of former athletes with concussions in relation to cognition. Former athletes who sustained their last sports concussion >3 decades prior to testing were compared with those with no history of traumatic brain injury. Participants underwent quantitative neuroimaging (optimized voxel-based morphometry [VBM], hippocampal volume, and cortical thickness), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS; medial temporal lobes and prefrontal cortices), and neuropsychological testing, and they were genotyped for APOE polymorphisms. Relative to controls, former athletes with concussions exhibited: 1) Abnormal enlargement of the lateral ventricles, 2) cortical thinning in regions more vulnerable to the aging process, 3) various neurometabolic anomalies found across regions of interest, 4) episodic memory and verbal fluency decline. The cognitive deficits correlated with neuroimaging findings in concussed participants. This study unveiled brain anomalies in otherwise healthy former athletes with concussions and associated those manifestations to the long-term detrimental effects of sports concussion on cognitive function. Findings from this study highlight patterns of decline often associated with abnormal aging.

  15. Neuroimaging in nuclear medicine: drug addicted brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong-An; Kim, Dae-Jin [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Addiction to illicit drugs in one of today's most important social issues. Most addictive drugs lead to irreversible parenchymal changes in the human brain. Neuroimaging data bring to light the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the abused drugs, and demonstrate that addiction is a disease of the brain. Continuous researches better illustrate the neurochemical alterations in brain function, and attempt to discover the links to consequent behavioral changes. Newer hypotheses and theories follow the numerous results, and more rational methods of approaching therapy are being developed. Substance abuse is on the rise in Korea, and social interest in the matter as well. On the other hand, diagnosis and treatment of drug addiction is still very difficult, because how the abused substance acts in the brain, or how it leads to behavioral problems in not widely known. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of drug addiction can improve the process of diagnosing addict patients, planning therapy, and predicting the prognosis . Neuroimaging approaches by nuclear medicine methods are expected to objectively judge behavioral and neurochemical changes, and response to treatment. In addition, as genes associated with addictive behavior are discovered, functional nuclear medicine images will aid in the assessment of individuals. Reviewing published literature on neuroimaging regarding nuclear medicine is expected to be of assistance to the management of drug addict patients. What's more, means of applying nuclear medicine to the care of drug addict patients should be investigated further.

  16. Neuroimaging: beginning to appreciate its complexities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parens, Erik; Johnston, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    For over a century, scientists have sought to see through the protective shield of the human skull and into the living brain. Today, an array of technologies allows researchers and clinicians to create astonishingly detailed images of our brain's structure as well as colorful depictions of the electrical and physiological changes that occur within it when we see, hear, think and feel. These technologies-and the images they generate-are an increasingly important tool in medicine and science. Given the role that neuroimaging technologies now play in biomedical research, both neuroscientists and nonexperts should aim to be as clear as possible about how neuroimages are made and what they can-and cannot-tell us. Add to this that neuroimages have begun to be used in courtrooms at both the determination of guilt and sentencing stages, that they are being employed by marketers to refine advertisements and develop new products, that they are being sold to consumers for the diagnosis of mental disorders and for the detection of lies, and that they are being employed in arguments about the nature (or absence) of powerful concepts like free will and personhood, and the need for citizens to have a basic understanding of how this technology works and what it can and cannot tell us becomes even more pressing.

  17. Functional neuroimaging in Tourette syndrome: recent perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debes NM

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanette Mol Debes, Marie Préel, Liselotte Skov Pediatric Department, Tourette Clinic, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, DenmarkAbstract: The most recent functional neuroimaging studies on Tourette syndrome (TS are reviewed in this paper. Although it can be difficult to compare functional neuroimaging studies due to differences in methods, differences in age of the included subjects, and differences in the extent to which the presence of comorbidity, medical treatment, and severity of tics are considered in the various studies; most studies show that the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit seems to be involved in the generation of tics. Changes in this circuit seem to be correlated with tic severity. Correlations have been found between the presence of tics and hypermetabolism in various brain regions. Abnormalities of GABAergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic neurotransmission in patients with TS have been suggested. During tic suppression, increased activity in the inferior frontal gyrus is seen. The premotor cortex might be involved in inhibition of motor control in subjects with TS. The right anterior insula is suggested to be a part of the urge–tic network. Several studies have shown altered motor network activations and sensorimotor gating deficits in subjects with TS. In future studies, inclusion of more well-defined subjects and further examination of premonitory urge and tic suppression is needed in order to increase the knowledge about the pathophysiology and treatment possibilities of TS. Keywords: functional neuroimaging, Tourette syndrome

  18. Monte Carlo modeling and optimization of buffer gas positron traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanović, Srđan; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2017-02-01

    Buffer gas positron traps have been used for over two decades as the prime source of slow positrons enabling a wide range of experiments. While their performance has been well understood through empirical studies, no theoretical attempt has been made to quantitatively describe their operation. In this paper we apply standard models as developed for physics of low temperature collision dominated plasmas, or physics of swarms to model basic performance and principles of operation of gas filled positron traps. The Monte Carlo model is equipped with the best available set of cross sections that were mostly derived experimentally by using the same type of traps that are being studied. Our model represents in realistic geometry and fields the development of the positron ensemble from the initial beam provided by the solid neon moderator through voltage drops between the stages of the trap and through different pressures of the buffer gas. The first two stages employ excitation of N2 with acceleration of the order of 10 eV so that the trap operates under conditions when excitation of the nitrogen reduces the energy of the initial beam to trap the positrons without giving them a chance to become annihilated following positronium formation. The energy distribution function develops from the assumed distribution leaving the moderator, it is accelerated by the voltage drops and forms beams at several distinct energies. In final stages the low energy loss collisions (vibrational excitation of CF4 and rotational excitation of N2) control the approach of the distribution function to a Maxwellian at room temperature but multiple non-Maxwellian groups persist throughout most of the thermalization. Optimization of the efficiency of the trap may be achieved by changing the pressure and voltage drops and also by selecting to operate in a two stage mode. The model allows quantitative comparisons and test of optimization as well as development of other properties.

  19. Electron-Positron Accumulator (EPA)

    CERN Document Server

    Photographic Service

    1986-01-01

    After acceleration in the low-current linac LIL-W, the electrons and positrons are accumulated in EPA to obtain a sufficient intensity and a suitable time-structure, before being passed on to the PS for further acceleration to 3.5 GeV. Electrons circulate from right to left, positrons in the other direction. Dipole bending magnets are red, focusing quadrupoles blue, sextupoles for chromaticity-control orange. The vertical tube at the left of the picture belongs to an optical transport system carrying the synchrotron radiation to detectors for beam size measurement. Construction of EPA was completed in spring 1986. LIL-W and EPA were conceived for an energy of 600 MeV, but operation was limited to 500 MeV.

  20. Efeitos cerebrais da maconha: resultados dos estudos de neuroimagem Brain effects of cannabis: neuroimaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alexandre Crippa

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A maconha é a droga ilícita mais utilizada. Apesar disto, apenas um pequeno número de estudos investigaram as conseqüências neurotóxicas de longo prazo do uso de cannabis. As técnicas de neuroimagem se constituem em poderosos instrumentos para investigar alterações neuroanatômicas e neurofuncionais e suas correlações clínicas e neuropsicológicas. Uma revisão computadorizada da literatura foi conduzida nos indexadores MEDLINE e PsycLIT entre 1966 e novembro de 2004 com os termos 'cannabis', 'marijuana', 'neuroimaging', 'magnetic resonance', 'computed tomography', 'positron emission tomography', 'single photon emission computed tomography", 'SPET', 'MRI' e 'CT'. Estudos de neuroimagem estrutural apresentam resultados conflitantes, com a maioria dos estudos não relatando atrofia cerebral ou alterações volumétricas regionais. Contudo, há uma pequena evidência de que usuários de longo prazo que iniciaram um uso regular no início da adolescência apresentam atrofia cerebral assim como redução na substância cinzenta. Estudos de neuroimagem funcional relatam aumento na atividade neural em regiões que podem estar relacionadas com intoxicação por cannabis e alteração do humor (lobos frontais mesial e orbital e redução na atividade de regiões relacionadas com funções cognitivas prejudicadas durante a intoxicação aguda. A questão crucial se efeitos neurotóxicos residuais ocorrem após o uso prolongado e regular de maconha permanece obscura, não existindo até então estudo endereçando esta questão diretamente. Estudos de neuroimagem com melhores desenhos, combinados com avaliação cognitiva, podem ser elucidativos neste aspecto.Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug. Despite this, only a small number of studies have investigated the long-term neurotoxic consequences of cannabis use. Structural and functional neuroimaging techniques are powerful research tools to investigate possible cannabis

  1. Industrial positron-based imaging: principles and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, D.J. (School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Hawkesworth, M.R. (School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Broadbent, C.J. (School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Fowles, P. (School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); Fryer, T.D. (School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)); McNeil, P.A. (School of Physics and Space Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom))

    1994-09-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has great potential as a non-invasive flow imaging technique in engineering, since 511 keV gamma-rays can penetrate a considerable thickness of (e.g.) steel. The RAL/Birmingham multiwire positron camera was constructed in 1984, with the initial goal of observing the lubricant distribution in operating aero-engines, automotive engines and gearboxes, and has since been used in a variety of industrial fields. The major limitation of the camera for conventional tomographic PET studies is its restricted logging rate, which limits the frequency with which images can be acquired. Tracking a single small positron-emitting tracer particle provides a more powerful means of observing high speed motion using such a camera. Following a brief review of the use of conventional PET in engineering, and the capabilities of the Birmingham camera, this paper describes recent developments in the Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) technique, and compares the results obtainable by PET and PEPT using, as an example, a study of axial diffusion of particles in a rolling cylinder. ((orig.))

  2. Prognostic Role of Functional Neuroimaging after Multilobar Resection in Patients with Localization-Related Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Bin Cho

    Full Text Available To investigate the usage of functional neuroimaging as a prognostic tool for seizure recurrence and long-term outcomes in patients with multilobar resection, we recruited 90 patients who received multilobar resections between 1995 and 2013 with at least 1-year follow-up (mean 8.0 years. All patients were monitored using intracranial electroencephalography (EEG after pre-surgical evaluation. Clinical data (demographics, electrophysiology, and neuroimaging were reviewed retrospectively. Surgical outcomes were evaluated at 1, 2, 5 years after surgery, and at the end of the study. After 1 year, 56 patients (62.2% became Engel class I and at the last follow-up, 47 patients (52.2% remained seizure-free. Furthermore, non-localized 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET, identifying hypometabolic areas not concordant with ictal onset zones, significantly correlated with seizure recurrence after 1 year. Non-lesional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and left-sided resection correlated with poor outcomes. In the last follow-up, non-localized PET and left-sided resection significantly correlated with seizure recurrence. Both localized PET and ictal-interictal SPECT subtraction co-registered to MR (SISCOM predicted good surgical outcomes in the last follow-up (69.2%, Engel I. This study suggests that PET and SISCOM may predict postoperative outcomes for patients after multilobar epilepsy and shows comparable long-term surgical outcomes after multilobar resection.

  3. Neurobiological foundations of acupuncture: the relevance and future prospect based on neuroimaging evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lijun; Lao, Lixing

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is currently gaining popularity as an important modality of alternative and complementary medicine in the western world. Modern neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and magnetoencephalography open a window into the neurobiological foundations of acupuncture. In this review, we have summarized evidence derived from neuroimaging studies and tried to elucidate both neurophysiological correlates and key experimental factors involving acupuncture. Converging evidence focusing on acute effects of acupuncture has revealed significant modulatory activities at widespread cerebrocerebellar brain regions. Given the delayed effect of acupuncture, block-designed analysis may produce bias, and acupuncture shared a common feature that identified voxels that coded the temporal dimension for which multiple levels of their dynamic activities in concert cause the processing of acupuncture. Expectation in acupuncture treatment has a physiological effect on the brain network, which may be heterogeneous from acupuncture mechanism. "Deqi" response, bearing clinical relevance and association with distinct nerve fibers, has the specific neurophysiology foundation reflected by neural responses to acupuncture stimuli. The type of sham treatment chosen is dependent on the research question asked and the type of acupuncture treatment to be tested. Due to the complexities of the therapeutic mechanisms of acupuncture, using multiple controls is an optimal choice.

  4. Neurobiological Foundations of Acupuncture: The Relevance and Future Prospect Based on Neuroimaging Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Bai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is currently gaining popularity as an important modality of alternative and complementary medicine in the western world. Modern neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and magnetoencephalography open a window into the neurobiological foundations of acupuncture. In this review, we have summarized evidence derived from neuroimaging studies and tried to elucidate both neurophysiological correlates and key experimental factors involving acupuncture. Converging evidence focusing on acute effects of acupuncture has revealed significant modulatory activities at widespread cerebrocerebellar brain regions. Given the delayed effect of acupuncture, block-designed analysis may produce bias, and acupuncture shared a common feature that identified voxels that coded the temporal dimension for which multiple levels of their dynamic activities in concert cause the processing of acupuncture. Expectation in acupuncture treatment has a physiological effect on the brain network, which may be heterogeneous from acupuncture mechanism. “Deqi” response, bearing clinical relevance and association with distinct nerve fibers, has the specific neurophysiology foundation reflected by neural responses to acupuncture stimuli. The type of sham treatment chosen is dependent on the research question asked and the type of acupuncture treatment to be tested. Due to the complexities of the therapeutic mechanisms of acupuncture, using multiple controls is an optimal choice.

  5. Disorders of Consciousness: Painless or Painful Conditions?—Evidence from Neuroimaging Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Pistoia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The experience of pain in disorders of consciousness is still debated. Neuroimaging studies, using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, Positron Emission Tomography (PET, multichannel electroencephalography (EEG and laser-evoked potentials, suggest that the perception of pain increases with the level of consciousness. Brain activation in response to noxious stimuli has been observed in patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS, which is also referred to as a vegetative state (VS, as well as those in a minimally conscious state (MCS. However, all of these techniques suggest that pain-related brain activation patterns of patients in MCS more closely resemble those of healthy subjects. This is further supported by fMRI findings showing a much greater functional connectivity within the structures of the so-called pain matrix in MCS as compared to UWS/VS patients. Nonetheless, when interpreting the results, a distinction is necessary between autonomic responses to potentially harmful stimuli and conscious experience of the unpleasantness of pain. Even more so if we consider that the degree of residual functioning and cortical connectivity necessary for the somatosensory, affective and cognitive-evaluative components of pain processing are not yet clear. Although procedurally challenging, the particular value of the aforementioned techniques in the assessment of pain in disorders of consciousness has been clearly demonstrated. The study of pain-related brain activation and functioning can contribute to a better understanding of the networks underlying pain perception while addressing clinical and ethical questions concerning patient care. Further development of technology and methods should aim to increase the availability of neuroimaging, objective assessment of functional connectivity and analysis at the level of individual cases as well as group comparisons. This will enable neuroimaging to truly become a clinical tool to

  6. Nonplanar positron-acoustic Gardner solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M. J., E-mail: josim.phys2007@gmail.com; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka-1342 (Bangladesh)

    2015-02-15

    Nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) positron-acoustic (PA) Gardner solitary waves (SWs) in an unmagnetized plasma system consisting of immobile positive ions, mobile cold positrons, and superthermal (kappa distributed) hot positrons and electrons are investigated. The modified Gardner equation is derived by using the reductive perturbation technique. The effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries, superthermal parameter of hot positrons and electrons, relative temperature ratios, and relative number density ratios on the PA Gardner SWs are studied by using the numerical simulations. The implications of our results in various space and laboratory plasma environments are briefly discussed.

  7. Development of an Electron-Positron Source for Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-19

    boosted frame where electric field reaches the Schwinger limit for production of electron-positron pairs from vacuum. The theoretical framework...were directed toward radiative shock hydrodynamics. Lowering the threshold for Schwinger electron-positron pair production (Stepan Bulanov

  8. Characterizing microstructural changes in ferritic steels by positron annihilation spectroscopy: Studies on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hari Babu, S., E-mail: shb@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Rajkumar, K.V. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Hussain, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kokilamedu 603 104, TN (India); Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C.S. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Positron lifetime technique probing microstructure of ferritic/martensitic steels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Correlation between positron lifetime, ultrasonic and hardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complementary nature of positron annihilation spectroscopy in probing defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Distinguishing precipitation stages by positron annihilation spectroscopy. - Abstract: Applicability of positron annihilation spectroscopy in probing the microstructural changes in ferritic steels has been investigated with thermal treatment studies on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, during 300-1273 K. Positron lifetime results are compared with those of ultrasonic velocity and hardness techniques with two initial microstructural conditions i.e., normalized and tempered condition as well as only normalized condition. In first case, positron lifetime is found to be sensitive to small changes in metal carbide precipitation which could not be probed by other two techniques. In later case, positron lifetime is found to be sensitive to defect annealing until 673 K and in distinguishing the growth and coarsening of metal carbide precipitation stages during 773-1073 K. The present study suggests that by combining positron lifetime, ultrasonic velocity and hardness measurements, it is possible to distinguish distinct microstructures occurring at different stages.

  9. LSTGEE: longitudinal analysis of neuroimaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yimei; Zhu, Hongtu; Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Gilmore, John; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2009-02-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies are essential to understanding the neural development of neuropsychiatric disorders, substance use disorders, and normal brain. Using appropriate image processing and statistical tools to analyze the imaging, behavioral, and clinical data is critical for optimally exploring and interpreting the findings from those imaging studies. However, the existing imaging processing and statistical methods for analyzing imaging longitudinal measures are primarily developed for cross-sectional neuroimaging studies. The simple use of these cross-sectional tools to longitudinal imaging studies will significantly decrease the statistical power of longitudinal studies in detecting subtle changes of imaging measures and the causal role of time-dependent covariate in disease process. The main objective of this paper is to develop longitudinal statistics toolbox, called LSTGEE, for the analysis of neuroimaging data from longitudinal studies. We develop generalized estimating equations for jointly modeling imaging measures with behavioral and clinical variables from longitudinal studies. We develop a test procedure based on a score test statistic and a resampling method to test linear hypotheses of unknown parameters, such as associations between brain structure and function and covariates of interest, such as IQ, age, gene, diagnostic groups, and severity of disease. We demonstrate the application of our statistical methods to the detection of the changes of the fractional anisotropy across time in a longitudinal neonate study. Particularly, our results demonstrate that the use of longitudinal statistics can dramatically increase the statistical power in detecting the changes of neuroimaging measures. The proposed approach can be applied to longitudinal data with multiple outcomes and accommodate incomplete and unbalanced data, i.e., subjects with different number of measurements.

  10. Neural correlates of fear: insights from neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garfinkel SN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sarah N Garfinkel,1,2 Hugo D Critchley1,2 1Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, 2Department of Psychiatry, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK Abstract: Fear anticipates a challenge to one's well-being and is a reaction to the risk of harm. The expression of fear in the individual is a constellation of physiological, behavioral, cognitive, and experiential responses. Fear indicates risk and will guide adaptive behavior, yet fear is also fundamental to the symptomatology of most psychiatric disorders. Neuroimaging studies of normal and abnormal fear in humans extend knowledge gained from animal experiments. Neuroimaging permits the empirical evaluation of theory (emotions as response tendencies, mental states, and valence and arousal dimensions, and improves our understanding of the mechanisms of how fear is controlled by both cognitive processes and bodily states. Within the human brain, fear engages a set of regions that include insula and anterior cingulate cortices, the amygdala, and dorsal brain-stem centers, such as periaqueductal gray matter. This same fear matrix is also implicated in attentional orienting, mental planning, interoceptive mapping, bodily feelings, novelty and motivational learning, behavioral prioritization, and the control of autonomic arousal. The stereotyped expression of fear can thus be viewed as a special construction from combinations of these processes. An important motivator for understanding neural fear mechanisms is the debilitating clinical expression of anxiety. Neuroimaging studies of anxiety patients highlight the role of learning and memory in pathological fear. Posttraumatic stress disorder is further distinguished by impairment in cognitive control and contextual memory. These processes ultimately need to be targeted for symptomatic recovery. Neuroscientific knowledge of fear has broader relevance to understanding human and societal behavior. As yet, only some of

  11. Utilization of Emergent Neuroimaging for Thrombolysis-Eligible Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanossian, Nerses; Fu, Katherine A; Liebeskind, David S; Starkman, Sidney; Hamilton, Scott; Villablanca, J Pablo; Burgos, Adrian M; Conwit, Robin; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2017-01-01

    Advances in diagnostic imaging of stroke include multimodal techniques such as noninvasive angiography and perfusion imaging. We aimed to characterize trends in neuroimaging utilization among acute stroke patients. Utilization of multimodal imaging for acute stroke in the community has remained largely uncharacterized despite its increased adoption at academic medical centers. We quantified neuroimaging utilization in the emergency department (ED) for 1,700 hyperacute stroke patients presenting Neuroimaging.

  12. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, R., LLNL

    1998-03-18

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center, the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques would play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of stockpile stewardship. The Livermore facilities now include the world`s highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. It was concluded that the positron microprobe under development at LLNL and other new instruments that would be relocated at LLNL at the high current keV source are an exciting step forward in providing results for the positron technique. These new data will impact a wide variety of applications.

  13. Toward a European Network of Positron Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karwasz Grzegorz P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Some applications of controlled-energy positron beams in material studies are discussed. In porous organic polysilicates, measurements of 3γ annihilation by Doppler broadening (DB method at the Trento University allowed to trace pore closing and filling by water vapor. In silicon coimplanted by He+ and H+, DB data combined with positron lifetime measurements at the München pulsed positron beam allowed to explain Si blistering. Presently measured samples of W for applications in thermonuclear reactors, irradiated by W+ and electrons, show vast changes of positron lifetimes, indicating complex dynamics of defects.

  14. A Benchmark Construction of Positron Crystal Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhomirov, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of a positron crystal undulator (CU) is addressed. The ways to assure both the maximum intensity and minimum spectral width of positron CU radiation are outlined. We claim that the minimum CU spectrum width of 3 -- 4% is reached at the positron energies of a few GeV and that the optimal bending radius of crystals planes in CU ranges from 3 to 5 critical bending radii for channeled particles. Following suggested approach a benchmark positron CU construction is devised and its functioning is illustrated using the simulation method widely tested by experimental data.

  15. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyodo, T; Wada, K; Yagishita, A; Kosuge, T; Saito, Y; Kurihara, T; Kikuchi, T; Shirakawa, A; Sanami, T; Ikeda, M; Ohsawa, S; Kakihara, K; Shidara, T, E-mail: toshio.hyodo@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps{sup -}). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a {sup 22}Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  16. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, T.; Wada, K.; Yagishita, A.; Kosuge, T.; Saito, Y.; Kurihara, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Shirakawa, A.; Sanami, T.; Ikeda, M.; Ohsawa, S.; Kakihara, K.; Shidara, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps-). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a 22Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  17. Chronic disorders of consciousness: role of neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremneva, E.; Sergeev, D.; Zmeykina, E.; Legostaeva, L.; Piradov, M.

    2017-08-01

    Chronic disorders of consciousness are clinically challenging conditions, and advanced methods of imaging for better understanding of diagnosis and prognosis are needed. Recent functional neuroradiological studies utilizing PET and fMRI demonstrated that besides widespread neuronal loss disruption of interconnection between certain cortical networks after the injury may also play the leading role in the development of behaviourally assessed unresponsiveness. Functional and structural connectivity, evaluated by neuroimaging approaches, may correlate with clinical status and may also play prognostic role. Integration of data from various diagnostic modalities is needed for further progress in this area.

  18. Neuroimaging of sleep and sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A

    2006-03-01

    Herein are presented the results of research in the area of sleep neuroimaging over the past year. Significant work has been performed to clarify the basic mechanisms of sleep in humans. New studies also extend prior observations regarding altered brain activation in response to sleep deprivation by adding information regarding vulnerability to sleep deprivation and regarding the influence of task difficulty on aberrant responses. Studies in sleep disorder medicine have yielded significant findings in insomnia, depression, and restless legs syndrome. Extensive advances have been made in the area of sleep apnea where physiologic challenges have been used to probe brain activity in the pathophysiology of sleep apnea syndrome.

  19. [Conversion disorder : functional neuroimaging and neurobiological mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, J; Piette, C; Salmon, E; Scantamburlo, G

    2017-04-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder often encountered in neurology services. This condition without organic lesions was and still is sometimes referred as an imaginary illness or feigning. However, the absence of organic lesions does not exclude the possibility of cerebral dysfunction. The etiologic mechanisms underlying this disorder remain uncertain even today.The advent of cognitive and functional imaging opens up a field of exploration for psychiatry in understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underlying mental disorders and especially the conversion disorder. This article reports several neuroimaging studies of conversion disorder and attempts to generate hypotheses about neurobiological mechanisms.

  20. Epistemological considerations on neuroimaging--a crucial prerequisite for neuroethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Christian G; Huber, Johannes

    2009-07-01

    Whereas ethical considerations on imaging techniques and interpretations of neuroimaging results flourish, there is not much work on their preconditions. In this paper, therefore, we discuss epistemological considerations on neuroimaging and their implications for neuroethics. Neuroimaging uses indirect methods to generate data about surrogate parameters for mental processes, and there are many determinants influencing the results, including current hypotheses and the state of knowledge. This leads to an interdependence between hypotheses and data. Additionally, different levels of description are involved, especially when experiments are designed to answer questions pertaining to broad concepts like the self, empathy or moral intentions. Interdisciplinary theoretical frameworks are needed to integrate findings from the life sciences and the humanities and to translate between them. While these epistemological issues are not specific for neuroimaging, there are some reasons why they are of special importance in this context: Due to their inferential proximity, 'neuro-images' seem to be self-evident, suggesting directness of observation and objectivity. This has to be critically discussed to prevent overinterpretation. Additionally, there is a high level of attention to neuroimaging, leading to a high frequency of presentation of neuroimaging data and making the critical examination of their epistemological properties even more pressing. Epistemological considerations are an important prerequisite for neuroethics. The presentation and communication of the results of neuroimaging studies, the potential generation of new phenomena and new 'dysfunctions' through neuroimaging, and the influence on central concepts at the foundations of ethics will be important future topics for this discipline.

  1. Neuroimaging for patient selection for medial temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: Part 1 Structural neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Petros; Hoffmann, Chen; Blat, Ilan; Harnof, Sagi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of part one of this review is to present the structural neuroimaging techniques that are currently used to evaluate patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and to discuss their potential to define patient eligibility for medial temporal lobe surgery. A PubMed query, using Medline and Embase, and subsequent review, was performed for all English language studies published after 1990, reporting neuroimaging methods for the evaluation of patients with TLE. The extracted data included demographic variables, population and study design, imaging methods, gold standard methods, imaging findings, surgical outcomes and conclusions. Overall, 56 papers were reviewed, including a total of 1517 patients. This review highlights the following structural neuroimaging techniques: MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging, tractography, electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography. The developments in neuroimaging during the last decades have led to remarkable improvements in surgical precision, postsurgical outcome, prognosis, and the rate of seizure control in patients with TLE. The use of multiple imaging methods provides improved outcomes, and further improvements will be possible with future studies of larger patient cohorts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Solvated Positron Chemistry. The Reaction of Hydrated Positrons with Chloride Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Shantarovich, V. P.

    1974-01-01

    The reaction of hydrated positrons (caq+ with cloride ions in aqueous solutions has been studied by means of positron annihilation angular correlation measurements. A rate constant of k = (2.5 ± 0.5) × 1010 M−1 s−1 was found. Probably the reacting positrons annihilated from an e+ Cl− bound state...

  3. Neuroimaging features of Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Nagaraj, Usha D; Pearl, Phillip L

    2015-07-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by distinctive facial dysmorphia and dwarfism. Multiple organ system involvement is typical. Various central nervous system (CNS) aberrations have been described in the pathology literature; however, the spectrum of neuroimaging manifestations is less well documented. To present neuroimaging findings from a series of eight patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome. The CT/MR database at a single academic children's hospital was searched for the terms "Cornelia," "Brachmann" and "de Lange." The search yielded 18 exams from 16 patients. Two non-CNS and six exams without available images were excluded. Ten exams from eight patients were evaluated by a board-certified neuroradiologist. All patients had skull base dysplasia, most with an unusual coronal basioccipital cleft (7/8). All brain MR exams showed microcephaly, volume loss and gyral simplification (5/5). Six patients had an absent massa intermedia. Four patients had small globe anterior segments; three had optic pathway hypoplasia. Basilar artery fenestration was present in two patients; vertebrobasilar hypoplasia was present in one patient. The inner ear vestibules were dysplastic in two patients. One patient had pachymeningeal thickening. Spinal anomalies included scoliosis, segmentation anomalies, endplate irregularities, basilar invagination, foramen magnum stenosis and tethered spinal cord. Typical imaging manifestations of Cornelia de Lange syndrome include skull base dysplasia with coronal clival cleft, cerebral and brainstem volume loss, and gyral simplification. Membranous labyrinth dysplasia, anterior segment and optic pathway hypoplasia, basilar artery fenestration, absent massa intermedia and spinal anomalies may also be present.

  4. Neuroimaging of herpesvirus infections in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskin, Henry J. [Cincinnati Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Hedlund, Gary [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Six members of the herpesvirus family cause well-described neurologic disease in children: herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2), varicella-zoster (VZV), Epstein-Barr (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6). When herpesviruses infect the central nervous system (CNS), the clinical presentation is non-specific and often confounding. The clinical urgency is often underscored by progressive neurologic deficits, seizures, or even death, and prompt diagnosis and treatment rely heavily on neuroimaging. This review focuses on the spectrum of cerebral manifestations caused by these viruses, particularly on non-congenital presentations. Recent advances in our understanding of these viruses are discussed, including new polymerase chain reaction techniques that allow parallel detection, which has improved our recognition that the herpesviruses are neurotropic and involve the CNS more often than previously thought. Evolving knowledge has also better elucidated viral neuropathology, particularly the role of VZV vasculitis in the brain, HHV-6 in febrile seizures, and herpesvirus reactivation in immunosuppressed patients. The virology, clinical course, and CNS manifestations of each virus are reviewed, followed by descriptions of neuroimaging findings when these agents infect the brain. Characteristic but often subtle imaging findings are discussed, as well as technical pearls covering appropriate use of MRI and MRI adjuncts to help differentiate viral infection from mimics. (orig.)

  5. Auditory verbal hallucinations: neuroimaging and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlken, M M; Hugdahl, K; Sommer, I E C

    2017-01-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) are a frequently occurring phenomenon in the general population and are considered a psychotic symptom when presented in the context of a psychiatric disorder. Neuroimaging literature has shown that AVH are subserved by a variety of alterations in brain structure and function, which primarily concentrate around brain regions associated with the processing of auditory verbal stimuli and with executive control functions. However, the direction of association between AVH and brain function remains equivocal in certain research areas and needs to be carefully reviewed and interpreted. When AVH have significant impact on daily functioning, several efficacious treatments can be attempted such as antipsychotic medication, brain stimulation and cognitive-behavioural therapy. Interestingly, the neural correlates of these treatments largely overlap with brain regions involved in AVH. This suggests that the efficacy of treatment corresponds to a normalization of AVH-related brain activity. In this selected review, we give a compact yet comprehensive overview of the structural and functional neuroimaging literature on AVH, with a special focus on the neural correlates of efficacious treatment.

  6. Reproducibility of neuroimaging analyses across operating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatard, Tristan; Lewis, Lindsay B; Ferreira da Silva, Rafael; Adalat, Reza; Beck, Natacha; Lepage, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Sherif, Tarek; Deelman, Ewa; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Evans, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging pipelines are known to generate different results depending on the computing platform where they are compiled and executed. We quantify these differences for brain tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness (CT) extraction, using three of the main neuroimaging packages (FSL, Freesurfer and CIVET) and different versions of GNU/Linux. We also identify some causes of these differences using library and system call interception. We find that these packages use mathematical functions based on single-precision floating-point arithmetic whose implementations in operating systems continue to evolve. While these differences have little or no impact on simple analysis pipelines such as brain extraction and cortical tissue classification, their accumulation creates important differences in longer pipelines such as subcortical tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness extraction. With FSL, most Dice coefficients between subcortical classifications obtained on different operating systems remain above 0.9, but values as low as 0.59 are observed. Independent component analyses (ICA) of fMRI data differ between operating systems in one third of the tested subjects, due to differences in motion correction. With Freesurfer and CIVET, in some brain regions we find an effect of build or operating system on cortical thickness. A first step to correct these reproducibility issues would be to use more precise representations of floating-point numbers in the critical sections of the pipelines. The numerical stability of pipelines should also be reviewed.

  7. Neuroimaging genetic approaches to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebois, Lauren A M; Wolff, Jonathan D; Ressler, Kerry J

    2016-10-01

    Neuroimaging genetic studies that associate genetic and epigenetic variation with neural activity or structure provide an opportunity to link genes to psychiatric disorders, often before psychopathology is discernable in behavior. Here we review neuroimaging genetics studies with participants who have Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Results show that genes related to the physiological stress response (e.g., glucocorticoid receptor and activity, neuroendocrine release), learning and memory (e.g., plasticity), mood, and pain perception are tied to neural intermediate phenotypes associated with PTSD. These genes are associated with and sometimes predict neural structure and function in areas involved in attention, executive function, memory, decision-making, emotion regulation, salience of potential threats, and pain perception. Evidence suggests these risk polymorphisms and neural intermediate phenotypes are vulnerabilities toward developing PTSD in the aftermath of trauma, or vulnerabilities toward particular symptoms once PTSD has developed. Work distinguishing between the re-experiencing and dissociative sub-types of PTSD, and examining other PTSD symptom clusters in addition to the re-experiencing and hyperarousal symptoms, will further clarify neurobiological mechanisms and inconsistent findings. Furthermore, an exciting possibility is that genetic associations with PTSD may eventually be understood through differential intermediate phenotypes of neural circuit structure and function, possibly underlying the different symptom clusters seen within PTSD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. High-field penning-malmberg trap: confinement properties and use in positron accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, J.H.

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation reports on the development of the 60 kG cryogenic positron trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and compares the trap`s confinement properties with other nonneutral plasma devices. The device is designed for the accumulation of up to 2{times}10{sup 9} positrons from a linear-accelerator source. This positron plasma could then be used in Bhabha scattering experiments. Initial efforts at time-of-flight accumulation of positrons from the accelerator show rapid ({approximately}100 ms) deconfinement, inconsistent with the long electron lifetimes. Several possible deconfinement mechanisms have been explored, including annihilation on residual gas, injection heating, rf noise from the accelerator, magnet field curvature, and stray fields. Detailed studies of electron confinement demonstrate that the empirical scaling law used to design the trap cannot be extrapolated into the parameter regime of this device. Several possible methods for overcoming these limitations are presented.

  9. Utility of [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the Initial Staging and Response Assessment of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulikal, Narendra; Gajjala, Sivanath Reddy; Kalawat, Teck Chand; Kottu, Radhika; Amancharla Yadagiri, Lakshmi

    2015-12-01

    In India up to 50 % of breast cancer patients still present as locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). The conventional methods of metastatic work up include physical examination, bone scan, chest & abdominal imaging, and biochemical tests. It is likely that the conventional staging underestimates the extent of initial spread and there is a need for more sophisticated staging procedure. The PET/CT can detect extra-axillary and occult distant metastases and also aid in predicting response to chemotherapy at an early point in time. To evaluate the utility of FDG PET/CT in initial staging and response assessment of patients with LABC receiving NACT. A prospective study of all biopsy confirmed female patients diagnosed with LABC receiving NACT from April 2013 to May 2014. The conventional work up included serum chemistry, CECT chest and abdomen and bone scan. A baseline whole body PET/CT was done in all patients. A repeat staging evaluation and a whole body PET/CT was done after 2/3rd cycle of NACT in non-responders and after 3/4 cycles in clinical responders. The histopathology report of the operative specimen was used to document the pathological response. The FDG PET/CT reported distant metastases in 11 of 38 patients, where as conventional imaging revealed metastases in only 6. Almost all the distant lesions detected by conventional imaging were detected with PET/CT, which showed additional sites of metastasis in 3 patients. In 2 patients, PET/CT detected osteolytic bone metastasis which were not detected by bone scan. In 5 patients PET CT detected N3 disease which were missed on conventional imaging. A total of 14 patients had second PET/CT done to assess the response to NACT and 11 patients underwent surgery. Two patients had complete pathological response. Of these 1 patient had complete metabolic and morphologic response and other had complete metabolic and partial morphologic response on second PET/CT scan. The 18 FDG PET/CT can detect more number of

  10. Neurofunctional systems. 3D reconstructions with correlated neuroimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretschmann, H.J.; Fiekert, W.; Gerke, M.; Vogt, H.; Weirich, D.; Wesemann, M. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Abt. Neuroanatomie; Weinrich, W. [Staedtisches Krankenhaus Nordstadt, Hannover (Germany). Abt. fuer Neurologie

    1998-12-31

    This book introduces, for the first time, computer-generated images of the neurofunctional systems of the human brain. These images are more accurate than drawings. The main views presented are of the medial lemniscus system, auditory system, visual system, basal ganglia, corticospinal system, and the limbic system. The arteries and sulci of the cerebral hemispheres are also illustrated by computer. These images provide a three-dimensional orientation of the intracranial space and help, for example, to assess vascular functional disturbance of the brain. Clinicians will find these images valuable for the spatial interpretation of magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET) images since many neurofunctional systems cannot be visualized as isolated structures in neuroimaging. Computer-assisted surface reconstructions of the neurofunctional systems and the cerebral arteries serve as a basis for constructing these computer-generated images. The surface reconstructions are anatomically realistic having been created from brain sections with minimal deformations. The method of computer graphics, known as ray tracing, produces digital images form these reconstructions. The computer-generated methods are explained. The computer-generated images are accompanied by illustrations and texts on neuroanatomy and clinical practice. The neurofunctional systems of the human brain are also shown in sections so that the reader can mentally reconstruct the neurofunctional systems, thus facilitating the transformation of information into textbooks and atlantes of MR and CT imaging. The aim of this book is acquaint the reader with the three-dimensional aspects of the neurofunctional systems and the cerebral arteries of the human brain using methods of computer graphics. Computer scientists and those interested in this technique are provided with basic neuroanatomic and neurofunctional information. Physicians will have a clearer understanding

  11. Bruno Touschek: From Betatrons to Electron-Positron Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Carlo; Pancheri, Giulia; Pellegrini, Claudio

    Bruno Touschek’s life as a physicist spanned the period from World War II to the 1970s. He was a key figure in the developments of electron-positron colliders and storage rings, and made important contributions to theoretical high energy physics. Storage rings, initially developed for high energy physics, are being widely used in many countries as synchrotron radiation sources and are a tool for research in physics, chemistry, biology, environmental sciences and cultural heritage studies. We describe Touschek’s life in Austria, where he was born, in Germany, where he participated in the construction of a betatron during WWII, and in Italy, where he proposed and led to completion the first electron-positron storage ring in 1960, in Frascati. We highlight how his central European culture influenced his lifestyle and work, and his main contributions to physics, such as the discovery of the Touschek effect and beam instabilities in the larger storage ring ADONE.

  12. Investigation of granular impact using positron emission particle tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy O.

    2015-04-01

    We present results from an experimental study of granular impact using a combination of high-speed video and positron emission particle tracking (PEPT). The PEPT technique exploits the annihilation of photons from positron decay to determine the position of tracer particles either inside a small granular bed or attached to the object which impacts the bed. We use dense spheres as impactors and the granular beds are comprised of glass beads which are fluidised to achieve a range of different initial packing states. For the first time, we have simultaneously investigated both the trajectory of the sphere, the motion of particles in a 3-D granular bed and particles which jump into the resultant jet, which arises from the collapse of the cavity formed by the impacting sphere.

  13. Bruno Touschek, from Betatrons to Electron-positron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, Carlo; Pellegrini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Bruno Touschek's life as a physicist spanned the period from World War II to the 1970s. He was a key figure in the developments of electron-positron colliders, storage rings, and gave important contributions to theoretical high energy physics. Storage rings, initially developed for high energy physics, are being widely used in many countries as synchrotron radiation sources and are a tool for research in physics, chemistry, biology environmental sciences and cultural heritage studies. We describe Touschek's life in Austria, where he was born, Germany, where he participated to the construction of a betatron during WWII, and Italy, where he proposed and led to completion the first electron-positron storage ring in 1960, in Frascati. We highlight how his central European culture influenced his life style and work, and his main contributions to physics, such as the discovery of the Touschek effect and beam instabilities in the larger storage ring ADONE.

  14. Distribution of Positron Annihilation Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Milne, P A

    2006-01-01

    The SPI instrument on-board the ESA/INTEGRAL satellite is engaged in a mission-long study of positron annihilation radiation from the Galaxy. Early results suggest that the disk component is only weakly detected at 511 keV by SPI. We review CGRO/OSSE, TGRS and SMM studies of 511 keV line and positronium continuum emission from the Galaxy in light of the early INTEGRAL/SPI findings. We find that when similar spatial distributions are compared, combined fits to the OSSE/SMM/TGRS data-sets produce bulge and disk fluxes similar in total flux and in B/D ratio to the fits reported for SPI observations. We further find that the 511 keV line width reported by SPI is similar to the values reported by TGRS, particularly when spectral fits include both narrow-line and broad-line components. Collectively, the consistency between these four instruments suggests that all may be providing an accurate view of positron annihilation in the Galaxy.

  15. 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron-emission tomography is cost-effective in the initial staging of non-small cell lung cancer patients in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerci, Juliano Julio, E-mail: cercijuliano@hotmail.com [PET-CT Center, Quanta - Diagnostico e Terapia, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Instituto do Coracao (InCor) - Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC-FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Takagaki, Teresa Yae [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Trindade, Evelinda; Morgado, Roberta; Morabito, Fausto; Musolino, Rafael Silva; Meneghetti, Jose Claudio; Soares Junior, Jose [Instituto do Coracao (InCor) - Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC-FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of metabolic staging (MS) with FDG-PET as compared with the conventional staging (CS) strategy in the preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials And Methods: A total of 95 patients with initial diagnosis of NSCLC were staged before undergoing treatment. The MS and CS results were compared with regard to treatment definition and incidence of futile thoracotomies with both strategies. Results: Metabolic staging with FDG-PET upstaged 48.4% and down staged 5.3% of the patients, and would lead to change in the treatment of 41% of cases. Thoracotomy was considered as futile in 47% of the patients with CS, and in 19% of the patients with MS. The cost of futile thoracotomies in eight patients with MS was R$ 79,720, while in 31 patients with CS it would be R$ 308,915. Just such saving in costs would be more than enough to cover the costs of all FDG-PETs (R$ 126,350) or FDG-PET/CTs (R$ 193,515) for the 95 patients. Conclusion: The metabolic staging with FDG-PET is more accurate than CS in patients with NSCLC. Both FDG-PET and FDG-PET/CT are cost-effective methods and their utilization is economically justifiable in the Brazilian public health system. (author)

  16. Positron Emission Mammotomography with Dual Planar Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Smith; Raymond Raylman; Stanislaw Majewski

    2003-06-29

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) is usually performed with two stationary planar detectors above and below a compressed breast. There is image blurring normal to the detectors due to the limited angular range of the lines of response. Positron emission mammotomography (PEM-T) with dual planar detectors rotating about the breast can obtain complete angular sampling and has the potential to improve activity estimation.

  17. Consequences of Dirac Theory of the Positron

    CERN Document Server

    Heisenberg, W K

    1936-01-01

    According to Dirac's theory of the positron, an electromagnetic field tends to create pairs of particles which leads to a change of Maxwell's equations in the vacuum. These changes are calculated in the special case that no real electrons or positrons are present and the field varies little over a Compton wavelength.

  18. Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 7 NIST Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials (PC database for purchase)   The EPSTAR database provides rapid calculations of stopping powers (collisional, radiative, and total), CSDA ranges, radiation yields and density effect corrections for incident electrons or positrons with kinetic energies from 1 keV to 10 GeV, and for any chemically defined target material.

  19. Slow positron beam at the JINR, Dubna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horodek Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Low Energy Positron Toroidal Accumulator (LEPTA at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR proposed for generation of positronium in flight has been adopted for positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS. The positron injector generates continuous slow positron beam with positron energy range between 50 eV and 35 keV. The radioactive 22Na isotope is used. In distinction to popular tungsten foil, here the solid neon is used as moderator. It allows to obtain the beam intensity of about 105 e+/s width energy spectrum characterized by full width at half maximum (FWHM of 3.4 eV and a tail to lower energies of about 30 eV. The paper covers the characteristic of variable energy positron beam at the LEPTA facility: parameters, the rule of moderation, scheme of injector, and transportation of positrons into the sample chamber. Recent status of the project and its development in the field of PAS is discussed. As an example, the measurement of the positron diffusion length in pure iron is demonstrated.

  20. Positron collisions with alkali-metal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gien, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The total cross sections for positron and electron collisions with potassium, sodium, lithium and rubidium are calculated, employing the modified Glauber approximation. The Modified Glauber cross sections for positron collision with potassium and sodium at low intermediate energies are found to agree reasonably well with existing experimental data.

  1. LEP - Large Electron Positron Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) is 27 km long. Its four detectors (ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, OPAL) measure precisely what happens in the collisions of electrons and positrons. These conditions only exist-ed in the Universe when it was about 10 -10 sec old.

  2. Modeling Latency and Shape Changes in Trial Based Neuroimaging Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2011-01-01

    To overcome poor signal-to-noise ratios in neuroimaging, data sets are often acquired over repeated trials that form a three-way array of spacetimetrials. As neuroimaging data contain multiple inter-mixed signal components blind signal separation and decomposition methods are frequently invoked...

  3. Turner Syndrome: Neuroimaging Findings--Structural and Functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Ronan; Murphy, Declan

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of Turner syndrome can advance our understanding of the X chromosome in brain development, and the modulatory influence of endocrine factors. There is increasing evidence from neuroimaging studies that TX individuals have significant differences in the anatomy, function, and metabolism of a number of brain regions; including…

  4. Schizophrenia: What do we know from neuroimaging research?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, M.W.M.L. van den; Bosch, M.P.C.; Zedlitz, A.M.E.E.; Hadzibeganovic, T.; Kralingen, R.B.A.S. van

    2009-01-01

    Objectives A summary of the main neuroimaging findings in the field of schizophrenia will be given in order to get a better understanding of this disorder. Methods The authors conducted an extensive literature review, using PubMed and the internet. Results Neuroimaging research on schizophrenia has

  5. Multimodal neuroimaging in presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial EEG (icEEG monitoring is critical in epilepsy surgical planning, but it has limitations. The advances of neuroimaging have made it possible to reveal epileptic abnormalities that could not be identified previously and improve the localization of the seizure focus and the vital cortex. A frequently asked question in the field is whether non-invasive neuroimaging could replace invasive icEEG or reduce the need for icEEG in presurgical evaluation. This review considers promising neuroimaging techniques in epilepsy presurgical assessment in order to address this question. In addition, due to large variations in the accuracies of neuroimaging across epilepsy centers, multicenter neuroimaging studies are reviewed, and there is much need for randomized controlled trials (RCTs to better reveal the utility of presurgical neuroimaging. The results of multiple studies indicate that non-invasive neuroimaging could not replace invasive icEEG in surgical planning especially in non-lesional or extratemporal lobe epilepsies, but it could reduce the need for icEEG in certain cases. With technical advances, multimodal neuroimaging may play a greater role in presurgical evaluation to reduce the costs and risks of epilepsy surgery, and provide surgical options for more patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.

  6. Visualization of nonlinear kernel models in neuroimaging by sensitivity maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Lund, Torben Ellegaard

    2011-01-01

    There is significant current interest in decoding mental states from neuroimages. In this context kernel methods, e.g., support vector machines (SVM) are frequently adopted to learn statistical relations between patterns of brain activation and experimental conditions. In this paper we focus......, and conclude that the sensitivity map is a versatile and computationally efficient tool for visualization of nonlinear kernel models in neuroimaging....

  7. Multimodal neuroimaging in presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Weifang; Chen, Hui; Xia, Hong; Zhou, Zhen; Mei, Shanshan; Liu, Qingzhu; Li, Yunlin

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial EEG (icEEG) monitoring is critical in epilepsy surgical planning, but it has limitations. The advances of neuroimaging have made it possible to reveal epileptic abnormalities that could not be identified previously and improve the localization of the seizure focus and the vital cortex. A frequently asked question in the field is whether non-invasive neuroimaging could replace invasive icEEG or reduce the need for icEEG in presurgical evaluation. This review considers promising neuroimaging techniques in epilepsy presurgical assessment in order to address this question. In addition, due to large variations in the accuracies of neuroimaging across epilepsy centers, multicenter neuroimaging studies are reviewed, and there is much need for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to better reveal the utility of presurgical neuroimaging. The results of multiple studies indicate that non-invasive neuroimaging could not replace invasive icEEG in surgical planning especially in non-lesional or extratemporal lobe epilepsies, but it could reduce the need for icEEG in certain cases. With technical advances, multimodal neuroimaging may play a greater role in presurgical evaluation to reduce the costs and risks of epilepsy surgery, and provide surgical options for more patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.

  8. Can Emotional and Behavioral Dysregulation in Youth Be Decoded from Functional Neuroimaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana C L Portugal

    Full Text Available High comorbidity among pediatric disorders characterized by behavioral and emotional dysregulation poses problems for diagnosis and treatment, and suggests that these disorders may be better conceptualized as dimensions of abnormal behaviors. Furthermore, identifying neuroimaging biomarkers related to dimensional measures of behavior may provide targets to guide individualized treatment. We aimed to use functional neuroimaging and pattern regression techniques to determine whether patterns of brain activity could accurately decode individual-level severity on a dimensional scale measuring behavioural and emotional dysregulation at two different time points.A sample of fifty-seven youth (mean age: 14.5 years; 32 males was selected from a multi-site study of youth with parent-reported behavioral and emotional dysregulation. Participants performed a block-design reward paradigm during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI. Pattern regression analyses consisted of Relevance Vector Regression (RVR and two cross-validation strategies implemented in the Pattern Recognition for Neuroimaging toolbox (PRoNTo. Medication was treated as a binary confounding variable. Decoded and actual clinical scores were compared using Pearson's correlation coefficient (r and mean squared error (MSE to evaluate the models. Permutation test was applied to estimate significance levels.Relevance Vector Regression identified patterns of neural activity associated with symptoms of behavioral and emotional dysregulation at the initial study screen and close to the fMRI scanning session. The correlation and the mean squared error between actual and decoded symptoms were significant at the initial study screen and close to the fMRI scanning session. However, after controlling for potential medication effects, results remained significant only for decoding symptoms at the initial study screen. Neural regions with the highest contribution to the pattern regression model

  9. Neuropathology of mild traumatic brain injury: relationship to neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Maxwell, William L

    2012-06-01

    Neuroimaging identified abnormalities associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are but gross indicators that reflect underlying trauma-induced neuropathology at the cellular level. This review examines how cellular pathology relates to neuroimaging findings with the objective of more closely relating how neuroimaging findings reveal underlying neuropathology. Throughout this review an attempt will be made to relate what is directly known from post-mortem microscopic and gross anatomical studies of TBI of all severity levels to the types of lesions and abnormalities observed in contemporary neuroimaging of TBI, with an emphasis on mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, it is impossible to discuss the neuropathology of mTBI without discussing what occurs with more severe injury and viewing pathological changes on some continuum from the mildest to the most severe. Historical milestones in understanding the neuropathology of mTBI are reviewed along with implications for future directions in the examination of neuroimaging and neuropathological correlates of TBI.

  10. Systems Biology, Neuroimaging, Neuropsychology, Neuroconnectivity and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2016-01-01

    The patient who sustains a traumatic brain injury (TBI) typically undergoes neuroimaging studies, usually in the form of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases the neuroimaging findings are clinically assessed with descriptive statements that provide qualitative information about the presence/absence of visually identifiable abnormalities; though little if any of the potential information in a scan is analyzed in any quantitative manner, except in research settings. Fortunately, major advances have been made, especially during the last decade, in regards to image quantification techniques, especially those that involve automated image analysis methods. This review argues that a systems biology approach to understanding quantitative neuroimaging findings in TBI provides an appropriate framework for better utilizing the information derived from quantitative neuroimaging and its relation with neuropsychological outcome. Different image analysis methods are reviewed in an attempt to integrate quantitative neuroimaging methods with neuropsychological outcome measures and to illustrate how different neuroimaging techniques tap different aspects of TBI-related neuropathology. Likewise, how different neuropathologies may relate to neuropsychological outcome is explored by examining how damage influences brain connectivity and neural networks. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic changes that occur following TBI and how best to capture those pathologies via different neuroimaging methods. However, traditional clinical neuropsychological techniques are not well suited for interpretation based on contemporary and advanced neuroimaging methods and network analyses. Significant improvements need to be made in the cognitive and behavioral assessment of the brain injured individual to better interface with advances in neuroimaging-based network analyses. By viewing both neuroimaging and neuropsychological processes within a systems biology

  11. New advances in fetal MR neuroimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garel, Catherine [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Paediatric Imaging, Paris (France)

    2006-07-15

    MR is now routinely and widely used in fetal neuroimaging and has proven to be valuable in the detection of many cerebral lesions, either genetically determined or acquired in utero. However, its efficiency has certain limits in the detection of diffuse white-matter abnormalities, the evaluation of fibre development and the demonstration of metabolic disorders. Moreover, conventional fetal MR imaging provides only a morphological approach to the fetal brain. New techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, proton MR spectroscopy and functional MR imaging are developing. The majority of these are not used routinely. The principles, aims, technical problems and possible applications of these techniques for imaging the fetus are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Histiocytosis: a review focusing on neuroimaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Barcessat Gabbay

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Histiocytosis is a systemic disease that usually affects the central nervous system. The aim of this study is to discuss the neuroimaging characteristics of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH, the most common of these diseases; and the non-Langerhans cells histiocytosis (NLCH, which includes entities such as hemophagocytic syndrome, Erdheim-Chester and Rosai-Dorfman diseases. Method: Literature review and illustrative cases with pathologic confirmation. Results: In LCH, the most common findings are 1 osseous lesions in the craniofacial bones and/or skull base; 2 intracranial, extra-axial changes; 3 intra-axial parenchymal changes (white and gray matter; 4 atrophy. Among the NLCH, diagnosis usually requires correlation with clinical and laboratory criteria. The spectrum of presentation includes intraparenchymal involvement, meningeal lesions, orbits and paranasal sinus involvement. Conclusion: It is important the recognition of the most common imaging patterns, in order to include LCH and NLCH in the differential diagnosis, whenever pertinent.

  13. The teen brain: insights from neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giedd, Jay N

    2008-04-01

    Few parents of a teenager are surprised to hear that the brain of a 16-year-old is different from the brain of an 8-year-old. Yet to pin down these differences in a rigorous scientific way has been elusive. Magnetic resonance imaging, with the capacity to provide exquisitely accurate quantifications of brain anatomy and physiology without the use of ionizing radiation, has launched a new era of adolescent neuroscience. Longitudinal studies of subjects from ages 3-30 years demonstrate a general pattern of childhood peaks of gray matter followed by adolescent declines, functional and structural increases in connectivity and integrative processing, and a changing balance between limbic/subcortical and frontal lobe functions, extending well into young adulthood. Although overinterpretation and premature application of neuroimaging findings for diagnostic purposes remains a risk, converging data from multiple imaging modalities is beginning to elucidate the implications of these brain changes on cognition, emotion, and behavior.

  14. [Functional neuroimaging of auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, M; Parellada, E; Fernández-Egea, E; Bernardo, M; Lomeña, F

    2003-01-01

    The neurobiological bases underlying the generation of auditory hallucinations, a distressing and paradigmatic symptom of schizophrenia, are still unknown in spite of in-depth phenomenological descriptions. This work aims to make a critical review of the latest published literature in recent years, focusing on functional neuroimaging studies (PET, SPECT, fMRI) of auditory hallucinations. Thus, the studies are classified according to whether they are sensory activation, trait and state. The two main hypotheses proposed to explain the phenomenon, external speech vs. subvocal or inner speech, are also explained. Finally, the latest unitary theory as well as the limitations the studies published are commented on. The need to continue investigating in this field, that is still underdeveloped, is posed in order to understand better the etiopathogenesis of auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia.

  15. How Shakespeare tempests the brain: neuroimaging insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidel, James L; Davis, Philip M; Gonzalez-Diaz, Victorina; Martin, Clara D; Thierry, Guillaume

    2013-04-01

    Shakespeare made extensive use of the functional shift (FS), a rhetorical device involving a change in the grammatical status of words, e.g., using nouns as verbs. Previous work using event-related brain potentials showed how FS triggers a surprise effect inviting mental re-evaluation, seemingly independent of semantic processing. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate brain activation in participants making judgements on the semantic relationship between sentences -some containing a Shakespearean FS- and subsequently presented words. Behavioural performance in the semantic decision task was high and unaffected by sentence type. However, neuroimaging results showed that sentences featuring FS elicited significant activation beyond regions classically activated by typical language tasks, including the left caudate nucleus, the right inferior frontal gyrus and the right inferior temporal gyrus. These findings show how Shakespeare's grammatical exploration forces the listener to take a more active role in integrating the meaning of what is said.

  16. Clinical relevance of positron emission tomography for initial staging and follow-up of malignant melanoma; Klinischer Stellenwert der Positronenemissionstomographie im Primaerstaging und in der Nachsorge des malignen Melanoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, R.P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin/PET-Zentrum; Rinne, D.; Kaufmann, R. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Dermatologie und Venerologie

    2000-12-01

    The incidence of melanoma is rapidly increasing (at a rate of 5 percent per year) throughout the world. In Europe, the incidence is approximately 10-12 new cases of invasive melanoma per 100,000 inhabitants. The most important prognostic factor is the stage of disease (Clark Level and vertical tumor depth (TD) according to BRESLOW) at the time of presentation. Ten year survival is 90 percent with a TD of <1.5 mm, and 65 percent with a TD of >1.5 mm; 5-year survival is 15-50 percent when there is regional lymph node involvement, and 5 percent when there is disseminated disease. Conventional diagnostic tests for staging include a chest X-ray, lymph node sonography and laboratory tests. Sentinel node biopsy is becoming an increasingly common procedure since melanoma usually metastasizes to regional lymph nodes before dissemination. CT scan of the thorax or abdomen, MRI of the brain and other tests are used only when signs or symptoms warrant. The results of a prospective study which we performed in 100 patients for staging of high risk melanoma (n=48) or for re-staging patients with suspected recurrence demonstrated that FDG whole-body PET is superior to conventional imaging techniques (X-ray, sonography, CT scan) except for the detection of brain metastases. The diagnostic accuracy of PET for the detection of metastases was 92.1% versus 55.7% for conventional imaging (p<0.001). In accordance with other publications, the recommendations of the 1997 German PET Consensus Conference and the ICP recommendations we suggest that the role of PET with FDG in melanoma is: 1) detection of occult regional nodal or distant metastatic disease at the time of initial presentation of patients with higher risk (depth >1.5 mm); and 2) detection of occult metastases in patients with recurrent disease who are being considered for surgery. PET often changes the diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic management of patients with melanoma. PET has also shown to be cost effective in diagnosis

  17. Neuroimaging in Alzheimer's disease: preclinical challenges toward clinical efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustin, Derek; Hall, Benjamin M; Annapragada, Ananth; Pautler, Robia G

    2016-09-01

    The scope of this review focuses on recent applications in preclinical and clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) toward accomplishing the goals of early detection and responses to therapy in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Driven by the outstanding efforts of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), a truly invaluable resource, the initial use of MRI in AD imaging has been to assess changes in brain anatomy, specifically assessing brain shrinkage and regional changes in white matter tractography using diffusion tensor imaging. However, advances in MRI have led to multiple efforts toward imaging amyloid beta plaques first without and then with the use of MRI contrast agents. These technological advancements have met with limited success and are not yet appropriate for the clinic. Recent developments in molecular imaging inclusive of high-power liposomal-based MRI contrast agents as well as fluorine 19 ((19)F) MRI and manganese enhanced MRI have begun to propel promising advances toward not only plaque imaging but also using MRI to detect perturbations in subcellular processes occurring within the neuron. This review concludes with a discussion about the necessity for the development of novel preclinical models of AD that better recapitulate human AD for the imaging to truly be meaningful and for substantive progress to be made toward understanding and effectively treating AD. Furthermore, the continued support of outstanding programs such as ADNI as well as the development of novel molecular imaging agents and MRI fast scanning sequences will also be requisite to effectively translate preclinical findings to the clinic.

  18. Neuroimaging features of Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, Matthew T. [Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Nagaraj, Usha D. [Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Pearl, Phillip L. [Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by distinctive facial dysmorphia and dwarfism. Multiple organ system involvement is typical. Various central nervous system (CNS) aberrations have been described in the pathology literature; however, the spectrum of neuroimaging manifestations is less well documented. To present neuroimaging findings from a series of eight patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome. The CT/MR database at a single academic children's hospital was searched for the terms ''Cornelia'', ''Brachmann'' and ''de Lange.'' The search yielded 18 exams from 16 patients. Two non-CNS and six exams without available images were excluded. Ten exams from eight patients were evaluated by a board-certified neuroradiologist. All patients had skull base dysplasia, most with an unusual coronal basioccipital cleft (7/8). All brain MR exams showed microcephaly, volume loss and gyral simplification (5/5). Six patients had an absent massa intermedia. Four patients had small globe anterior segments; three had optic pathway hypoplasia. Basilar artery fenestration was present in two patients; vertebrobasilar hypoplasia was present in one patient. The inner ear vestibules were dysplastic in two patients. One patient had pachymeningeal thickening. Spinal anomalies included scoliosis, segmentation anomalies, endplate irregularities, basilar invagination, foramen magnum stenosis and tethered spinal cord. Typical imaging manifestations of Cornelia de Lange syndrome include skull base dysplasia with coronal clival cleft, cerebral and brainstem volume loss, and gyral simplification. Membranous labyrinth dysplasia, anterior segment and optic pathway hypoplasia, basilar artery fenestration, absent massa intermedia and spinal anomalies may also be present. (orig.)

  19. Positron emission tomography basic sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, D W; Valk, P E; Maisey, M N

    2003-01-01

    Essential for students, science and medical graduates who want to understand the basic science of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), this book describes the physics, chemistry, technology and overview of the clinical uses behind the science of PET and the imaging techniques it uses. In recent years, PET has moved from high-end research imaging tool used by the highly specialized to an essential component of clinical evaluation in the clinic, especially in cancer management. Previously being the realm of scientists, this book explains PET instrumentation, radiochemistry, PET data acquisition and image formation, integration of structural and functional images, radiation dosimetry and protection, and applications in dedicated areas such as drug development, oncology, and gene expression imaging. The technologist, the science, engineering or chemistry graduate seeking further detailed information about PET, or the medical advanced trainee wishing to gain insight into the basic science of PET will find this book...

  20. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis complicating dengue infection with neuroimaging mimicking multiple sclerosis: A report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, S; Botross, N; Rusli, B N; Riad, A

    2016-11-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) complicating dengue infection is still exceedingly rare even in endemic countries such as Malaysia. Here we report two such cases, the first in an elderly female patient and the second in a young man. Both presented with encephalopathy, brainstem involvement and worsening upper and lower limb weakness. Initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was normal in the first case. Serum for dengue Ig M and NS-1 was positive in both cases. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed pleocytosis in both with Dengue IgM and NS-1 positive in the second case but not done in the first. MRI brain showed changes of perpendicular subcortical palisading white matter, callosal and brainstem disease mimicking multiple sclerosis (MS) in both patients though in the former case there was a lag between the onset of clinical symptoms and MRI changes which was only clarified on reimaging. The temporal evolution and duration of the clinical symptoms, CSF changes and neuroimaging were more suggestive of Dengue ADEM rather than an encephalitis though initially the first case began as dengue encephalitis. Furthermore in dengue encephalitis neuroimaging is usually normal or rarely edema, haemorrhage, brainstem, thalamic or focal lesions are seen. Therefore, early recognition of ADEM as a sequelae of dengue infection with neuroimaging mimicking MS and repeat imaging helped in identifying these two cases. Treatment with intravenous steroids followed by maintenance oral steroids produced good outcome in both patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identifying electrons and positrons with AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Nikolas [RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The AMS-02 experiment is a multi-purpose detector for cosmic ray particles mounted on the International Space Station. It recorded over 40 billion events since its installation in 2011. The bulk of these events are protons, which are most abundant in cosmic rays. Electrons are 100 times and positrons 1000 times less abundant. Measuring the positrons as function of energy is especially interesting, as an excess over the expected astrophysical background may hint at an additional source of positrons in the galaxy or a new phenomena responsible for the excess, e.g. dark-matter annihilation. In order to measure positrons accurately with a small uncertainty, a large proton rejection of 10{sup 6} is needed. AMS-02 offers a transition radiation detector to separate positrons from protons and an electromagnetic calorimeter allowing a precise measurement of the kinetic energy of an incoming lepton. This talk covers the general strategy of identifying electrons/positrons with AMS-02 and presents the so-obtained electron/positron fluxes that were recently published.

  2. Positron spectroscopy analysis of vacancy-solute nanoaggregates in Al-Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferragut, R. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Dipt. di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); IFIMAT, UNCentro and CICPBA, Tandil (Argentina); Ferro, G.; Biasini, M. [ENEA, Bologna (Italy); Dupasquier, A. [Inst. Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Dipt. di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Somoza, A. [IFIMAT, UNCentro and CICPBA, Tandil (Argentina)

    2004-07-01

    This work addresses the process of ageing in Al-4wt.% Cu at two temperatures (150 C, 180 C) and in conditions of secondary ageing at temperatures up to 60 C, after artificial ageing treatment at 150 C, Positron lifetime and coincidence Doppler broadening measurements are reported. The analysis shows an initial association of positron trapping sites with Cu (about 9 at.% Cu at the annihilation site) that decreases to 7/6% in the initial stages of ageing, but then increases sharply (up to 25 at.% Cu after 300 hours at 180 C). The positron lifetime also displays an initial decrease followed by a final increase. The results confirm the hypothesis that positrons are not trapped in GP[1] zones, but show that trapping occurs in GP[2] zones formed at 150 C. During secondary ageing, the vacancy-Cu association as well as the positron lifetime decrease with the ageing time. This is attributed to the formation of GP[1] zones due to residual supersaturation. (orig.)

  3. Positron annihilation lifetime study of extended defects in semiconductor glasses and polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyko, Olha [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Danylo Halytsky Lviv National Medical University, Pekarska str. 69, 79010 Lviv (Ukraine); Shpotyuk, Yaroslav [Department of Optoelectronics and Information Technologies, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Dragomanova str. 50, 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials, Scientific Research Company ' ' Carat' ' , Stryjska str. 202, 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Filipecki, Jacek [Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University in Czestochowa, Armii Krajowej al. 13/15, 42200 Czestochowa (Poland)

    2013-01-15

    The processes of atomic shrinkage in network-forming solids initiated by external influences are tested using technique of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at the example of chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors of arsenic sulphide type and acrylic polymers for dental application. Two state positron trapping is shown to be responsible for atomic shrinkage in chalcogenide glasses, while mixed trapping and ortho-positronium decaying is character for volumetric densification and stress propagation in acrylic dental polymers. At the basis of the obtained results it is concluded that correct analysis of externally-induced shrinkage in polymer networks under consideration can be developed by using original positron lifetime data treatment algorithms to compensate defect-free bulk annihilation channel within two-state positron trapping model and account for an interbalance between simultaneously co-existing positron trapping and orth-positronium related decaying channels within mixed three-state positron annihilation model (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Proceedings of the workshop on new kinds of positron sources for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clendenin, J.; Nixon, R. [eds.

    1997-06-01

    It has been very clear from the beginning of studies for future linear colliders that the conventional positron source approach, as exemplified by the SLC source, is pushing uncomfortably close to the material limits of the conversion target. Nonetheless, since this type of positron source is better understood and relatively inexpensive to build, it has been incorporated into the initial design studies for the JLC/NLC. New ideas for positron sources for linear colliders have been regularly reported in the literature and at accelerator conferences for at least a decade, and indeed the recirculation scheme associated with the VLEPP design is nearly two decades old. Nearly all the new types of positron sources discussed in this workshop come under the heading of crystals (or channeling), undulators, and Compton. Storage ring and nuclear reactor sources were not discussed. The positron source designs that were discussed have varying degrees of maturity, but except for the case of crystal sources, where proof of principle experiments have been undertaken, experimental results are missing. It is hoped that these presentations, and especially the recommendations of the working groups, will prove useful to the various linear collider groups in deciding if and when new experimental programs for positron sources should be undertaken.

  5. Enhanced electron-positron pair production by ultra intense laser irradiating a compound target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Xun; Ma, Yan-Yun; Yu, Tong-Pu; Zhao, Jun; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Gan, Long-Fei; Zhang, Guo-Bo; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Shi-Jie; Liu, Jin-Jin; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Kawata, Shigeo

    2016-12-01

    High-energy-density electron-positron pairs play an increasingly important role in many potential applications. Here, we propose a scheme for enhanced positron production by an ultra intense laser irradiating a gas-Al compound target via the multi-photon Breit-Wheeler (BW) process. The laser pulse first ionizes the gas and interacts with a near-critical-density plasma, forming an electron bubble behind the laser pulse. A great deal of electrons are trapped and accelerated in the bubble, while the laser front hole-bores the Al target and deforms its front surface. A part of the laser wave is thus reflected by the inner curved target surface and collides with the accelerated electron bunch. Finally, a large number of γ photons are emitted in the forward direction via the Compton back-scattering process and the BW process is initiated. Dense electron-positron pairs are produced with a maximum density of 6.02× {{10}27} m-3. Simulation results show that the positron generation is greatly enhanced in the compound target, where the positron yield is two orders of magnitude greater than that in only the solid slab case. The influences of the laser intensity, gas density and length on the positron beam quality are also discussed, which demonstrates the feasibility of the scheme in practice.

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on new kinds of positron sources for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clendenin, J.; Nixon, R. [eds.

    1997-06-01

    It has been very clear from the beginning of studies for future linear colliders that the conventional positron source approach, as exemplified by the SLC source, is pushing uncomfortably close to the material limits of the conversion target. Nonetheless, since this type of positron source is better understood and relatively inexpensive to build, it has been incorporated into the initial design studies for the JLC/NLC. New ideas for positron sources for linear colliders have been regularly reported in the literature and at accelerator conferences for at least a decade, and indeed the recirculation scheme associated with the VLEPP design is nearly two decades old. Nearly all the new types of positron sources discussed in this workshop come under the heading of crystals (or channeling), undulators, and Compton. Storage ring and nuclear reactor sources were not discussed. The positron source designs that were discussed have varying degrees of maturity, but except for the case of crystal sources, where proof of principle experiments have been undertaken, experimental results are missing. It is hoped that these presentations, and especially the recommendations of the working groups, will prove useful to the various linear collider groups in deciding if and when new experimental programs for positron sources should be undertaken.

  7. Demonstration of a high-field short-period superconducting helical undulator suitable for future TeV-scale linear collider positron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D J; Clarke, J A; Baynham, D E; Bayliss, V; Bradshaw, T; Burton, G; Brummitt, A; Carr, S; Lintern, A; Rochford, J; Taylor, O; Ivanyushenkov, Y

    2011-10-21

    The first demonstration of a full-scale working undulator module suitable for future TeV-scale positron-electron linear collider positron sources is presented. Generating sufficient positrons is an important challenge for these colliders, and using polarized e(+) would enhance the machine's capabilities. In an undulator-based source polarized positrons are generated in a metallic target via pair production initiated by circularly polarized photons produced in a helical undulator. We show how the undulator design is developed by considering impedance effects on the electron beam, modeling and constructing short prototypes before the successful fabrication, and testing of a final module.

  8. Prototyping of the ILC Baseline Positron Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronberg, J; Brooksby, C; Piggott, T; Abbott, R; Javedani, J; Cook, E

    2012-02-29

    The ILC positron system uses novel helical undulators to create a powerful photon beam from the main electron beam. This beam is passed through a titanium target to convert it into electron-positron pairs. The target is constructed as a 1 m diameter wheel spinning at 2000 RPM to smear the 1 ms ILC pulse train over 10 cm. A pulsed flux concentrating magnet is used to increase the positron capture efficiency. It is cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures to maximize the flatness of the magnetic field over the 1 ms ILC pulse train. We report on prototyping effort on this system.

  9. Neuroimaging of resilience to stress: current state of affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werff, Steven J A; Pannekoek, J Nienke; Stein, Dan J; van der Wee, Nic J A

    2013-09-01

    Resilience is defined as a dynamic, multidimensional process encompassing positive adaptation within the context of significant adversity. The complex nature of this construct makes it a difficult topic to study in neuroimaging research; however, in this article, we propose ways to operationalize resilience. The limited amount of structural and functional neuroimaging studies specifically designed to examine resilience have mainly focused on investigating alterations in regions of the brain involved in emotion and stress regulation circuitry. In the future, neuroimaging of resilience is expected to benefit from functional and structural connectivity approaches and the use of novel imaging task paradigms.

  10. EVALUATION OF NEUROIMAGING IN CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Hasanpour avanji

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveCerebral palsy (CP, a common static motor neurological disorder of childhood with wide spectrum of underlying etiologies, can be demonstrated with different neuro imaging techniques. We undertook this study to investigate the diagnosis of intracranial lesions in children with CP and its correlation between clinical deficits and neuroradiological findings.Materials and methodsIn this prospective hospital-based study, the data of 120 patients with CP, aged below 18 years, referring to the neurology clinic of the Ali Asghar Pediatric hospital in Tehran was studied; data on their cranial neuroimaging findings was analyzed any possible association(s between the gestational ages, prenatal history and neurological deficits were investigated.ResultsOf the 120 patients, 72 (60% were male; 75% were aged below 7 years.Common predisposing factors were prenatal asphyxia, LBW, prematurity and toxemia of pregnancy. Of the 120 cases, 90%(107 had spastic CP, with the quadriplegic type being the most common (54%, followed by spastic paraplegia (21%; twenty-four patients (20% had significant Preventricular Leucomalacia (PVL, a finding more common among those born pre-term.Sixteen patients had hemiplegic CP, 14 of whom showed unilateral lesions on brain MRI imaging. Ten (8% had extra pyramidal CP, a condition more common among term born infants, while six of the 10(72% showed significant abnormalities on the basal ganglia. Cerebral atrophy was seen in 60 (50% of patients and PVL in 20%; encephalomalacia, gliosis, middle cerebral artery infarcts, PVL and gliosis indicated hypoxia as a risk factor for CP. Extent of MRI lesions correlated with the severity of neurological deficits in CP lesions, which were more extensive in Quadriplegics and double hemiplegics rather than paraplegics, and among those delivered preterm as compared to those born at term.ConclusionRadiological findings were found to be closely related to the type of CP and the neurological

  11. Neurobiological model of obsessive-compulsive disorder: evidence from recent neuropsychological and neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Tomohiro; Okada, Kayo; Kanba, Shigenobu

    2014-08-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was previously considered refractory to most types of therapeutic intervention. There is now, however, ample evidence that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and behavior therapy are highly effective methods for treatment of OCD. Furthermore, recent neurobiological studies of OCD have found a close correlation between clinical symptoms, cognitive function, and brain function. A large number of previous neuroimaging studies using positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have identified abnormally high activities throughout the frontal cortex and subcortical structures in patients with OCD. Most studies reported excessive activation of these areas during symptom provocation. Furthermore, these hyperactivities were decreased after successful treatment using either selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or behavioral therapy. Based on these findings, an orbitofronto-striatal model has been postulated as an abnormal neural circuit that mediates symptomatic expression of OCD. On the other hand, previous neuropsychological studies of OCD have reported cognitive dysfunction in executive function, attention, nonverbal memory, and visuospatial skills. Moreover, recent fMRI studies have revealed a correlation between neuropsychological dysfunction and clinical symptoms in OCD by using neuropsychological tasks during fMRI. The evidence from fMRI studies suggests that broader regions, including dorsolateral prefrontal and posterior regions, might be involved in the pathophysiology of OCD. Further, we should consider that OCD is heterogeneous and might have several different neural systems related to clinical factors, such as symptom dimensions. This review outlines recent neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies of OCD. We will also describe several neurobiological models that have been developed recently. Advanced findings in these fields will update the

  12. Characterization of lacunar defects by positrons annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Barthe, M F; Blondiaux, G

    2003-01-01

    Among the nondestructive methods for the study of matter, the positrons annihilation method allows to sound the electronic structure of materials by measuring the annihilation characteristics. These characteristics depend on the electronic density as seen by the positon, and on the electron momentums distribution which annihilate with the positon. The positon is sensible to the coulombian potential variations inside a material and sounds preferentially the regions away from nuclei which represent potential wells. The lacunar-type defects (lack of nuclei) represent deep potential wells which can trap the positon up to temperatures close to the melting. This article describes the principles of this method and its application to the characterization of lacunar defects: 1 - positrons: matter probes (annihilation of electron-positon pairs, annihilation characteristics, positrons sources); 2 - positrons interactions in solids (implantation profiles, annihilation states, diffusion and trapping, positon lifetime spec...

  13. Polymeric membrane studied using slow positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, W.-S.; Lo, C.-H. [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Cheng, M.-L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan (China); Chen Hongmin; Liu Guang; Chakka, Lakshmi [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Nanda, D.; Tung, K.-L.; Huang, S.-H.; Lee, Kueir-Rarn; Lai, J.-Y. [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Sun Yiming [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan (China); Yu Changcheng [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Zhang Renwu [Physical Science Department, Southern Utah University, Cedar City, UT 84720 (United States); Jean, Y.C. [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)], E-mail: jeany@umkc.edu

    2008-10-31

    A radioisotope slow positron beam has been built at the Chung Yuan Christian University in Taiwan for the research and development in membrane science and technology. Doppler broadening energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime have been measured as a function of positron energy up to 30 keV in a polyamide membrane prepared by the interfacial polymerization between triethylenetetraamine (TETA) and trimesoyl chloride (TMC) on modified porous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) asymmetric membrane. The multilayer structures and free-volume depth profile for this asymmetric membrane system are obtained. Positron annihilation spectroscopy coupled with a slow beam could provide new information about size selectivity of transporting molecules and guidance for molecular designs in polymeric membranes.

  14. Radiopharmaceutical chemistry for positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, PH

    2002-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical chemistry includes the selection, preparation, and preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled compounds. This paper describes selection criteria for candidates for positron emission tomography (PET) investigations. Practical aspects of nucleophilic and electrophilic F-18-fluorination

  15. Electrical neuroimaging reveals early generator modulation to emotional words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigue, Stephanie; Michel, Christoph M; Murray, Micah M; Mohr, Christine; Carbonnel, Serge; Landis, Theodor

    2004-04-01

    Functional electrical neuroimaging investigated incidental emotional word processing. Previous research suggests that the brain may differentially respond to the emotional content of linguistic stimuli pre-lexically (i.e., before distinguishing that these stimuli are words). We investigated the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms of this apparent paradox and in particular whether the initial differentiation of emotional stimuli is marked by different brain generator configurations using high-density, event-related potentials. Such would support the existence of specific cerebral resources dedicated to emotional word processing. A related issue concerns the possibility of right-hemispheric specialization in the processing of emotional stimuli. Thirteen healthy men performed a go/no-go lexical decision task with bilateral word/non-word or non-word/non-word stimulus pairs. Words included equal numbers of neutral and emotional stimuli, but subjects made no explicit discrimination along this dimension. Emotional words appearing in the right visual field (ERVF) yielded the best overall performance, although the difference between emotional and neutral words was larger for left than for right visual field presentations. Electrophysiologically, ERVF presentations were distinguished from all other conditions over the 100-140 ms period by a distinct scalp topography, indicative of different intracranial generator configurations. A distributed linear source estimation (LAURA) of this distinct scalp potential field revealed bilateral lateral-occipital sources with a right hemisphere current density maximum. These data support the existence of a specialized brain network triggered by the emotional connotation of words at a very early processing stage.

  16. Neuroimaging the temporal dynamics of human avoidance to sustained threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlund, Michael W; Hudgins, Caleb D; Magee, Sandy; Dymond, Simon

    2013-11-15

    Many forms of human psychopathology are characterized by sustained negative emotional responses to threat and chronic behavioral avoidance, implicating avoidance as a potential transdiagnostic factor. Evidence from both nonhuman neurophysiological and human neuroimaging studies suggests a distributed frontal-limbic-striatal brain network supports avoidance. However, our understanding of the temporal dynamics of the network to sustained threat that prompts sustained avoidance is limited. To address this issue, 17 adults were given extensive training on a modified free-operant avoidance task in which button pressing avoided money loss during a sustained threat period. Subsequently, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing the avoidance task. In our regions of interest, we observed phasic, rather than sustained, activation during sustained threat in dorsolateral and inferior frontal regions, anterior and dorsal cingulate, ventral striatum and regions associated with emotion, including the amygdala, insula, substantia nigra and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis complex. Moreover, trait levels of experiential avoidance were negatively correlated with insula, hippocampal and amygdala activation. These findings suggest knowledge that one can consistently avoid aversive outcomes is not associated with decreased threat-related responses and that individuals with greater experiential avoidance exhibit reduced reactivity to initial threat. Implications for understanding brain mechanisms supporting human avoidance and psychological theories of avoidance are discussed.

  17. A review of neuroimaging findings in repetitive brain trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerte, Inga K; Lin, Alexander P; Willems, Anna; Muehlmann, Marc; Hufschmidt, Jakob; Coleman, Michael J; Green, Isobel; Liao, Huijun; Tate, David F; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Pasternak, Ofer; Bouix, Sylvain; Rathi, Yogesh; Bigler, Erin D; Stern, Robert A; Shenton, Martha E

    2015-05-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease confirmed at postmortem. Those at highest risk are professional athletes who participate in contact sports and military personnel who are exposed to repetitive blast events. All neuropathologically confirmed CTE cases, to date, have had a history of repetitive head impacts. This suggests that repetitive head impacts may be necessary for the initiation of the pathogenetic cascade that, in some cases, leads to CTE. Importantly, while all CTE appears to result from repetitive brain trauma, not all repetitive brain trauma results in CTE. Magnetic resonance imaging has great potential for understanding better the underlying mechanisms of repetitive brain trauma. In this review, we provide an overview of advanced imaging techniques currently used to investigate brain anomalies. We also provide an overview of neuroimaging findings in those exposed to repetitive head impacts in the acute/subacute and chronic phase of injury and in more neurodegenerative phases of injury, as well as in military personnel exposed to repetitive head impacts. Finally, we discuss future directions for research that will likely lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms separating those who recover from repetitive brain trauma vs. those who go on to develop CTE.

  18. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temple, Nikki; Donald, Cortny; Skora, Amanda [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Reed, Warren, E-mail: warren.reed@sydney.edu.au [Medical Image Optimisation and Perception Group, Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings.

  19. Positron-impact ionization of Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, K.K. (Jawahar Navodaya Vidyalaya, Ramchandraghat, West Tripura 799207, Tripura (India)); Singh, N.R. (Thambal Marik College, Oinam, Bishanpur, Manipur (India)); Choudhury, K.B. (Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Calcutta 700032, West Bengal (India)); Mazumdar, P.S. (Department of Physics, Manipur University, Canchipur, Imphal 795003, Manipur (India))

    1992-07-01

    In this paper we present the total cross sections for the positron-impact ionization of Na in the range 8--30 eV of the energy of the incident positron. Calculations are done by using a distorted-wave approximation incorporating the effects of screening and distortion. The present results are compared with the experimental results for the electron-impact ionization of Na.

  20. Modulation of a quantum positron acoustic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M. R.

    2015-09-01

    Amplitude modulation of a positron acoustic wave is considered in a four-component electron-positron plasma in the quantum magnetohydrodynamic regime. The important ingredients of this study are the inclusion of the particle exchange-correlation potential, quantum diffraction effects via the Bohm potential, and dissipative effect due to viscosity in the momentum balance equation of the charged carriers. A modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the evolution of the slowly varying amplitude of the quantum positron acoustic wave by employing the standard reductive perturbation technique. Detailed analysis of the linear and nonlinear dispersions of the quantum positron acoustic wave is presented. For a typical parameter range, relevant to some dense astrophysical objects, it is found that the quantum positron acoustic wave is modulationally unstable above a certain critical wavenumber. Effects of the exchange-correlation potential and the Bohm potential in the wave dynamics are also studied. It is found that the quantum effect due to the particle exchange-correlation potential is significant in comparison to the effect due to the Bohm potential for smaller values of the carrier wavenumber. However, for comparatively larger values of the carrier wavenumber, the Bohm potential effect overtakes the effect of the exchange-correlation potential. It is found that the critical wavenumber for the modulation instability depends on the ratio of the equilibrium hot electron number density and the cold positron number density and on the ratio of the equilibrium hot positron number density and the cold positron number density. A numerical result on the growth rate of the modulation instability is also presented.

  1. Undulator-based production of polarized positrons

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, G.; Barley, J; Batygin, Y.; Berridge, S.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G; Bugg, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Dollan, R.; Efremenko, Y; K. Flöttmann; Gharibyan, V.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Kolanoski, H.

    2009-01-01

    Full exploitation of the physics potential of a future International Linear Collider will require the use of polarized electron and positron beams. Experiment E166 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which an electron beam passes through a helical undulator to generate photons (whose first-harmonic spectrum extended to 7.9MeV) with circular polarization, which are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons and elect...

  2. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  3. Neuroimaging of Fear-Associated Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, John A; Liberzon, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Fear conditioning has been commonly used as a model of emotional learning in animals and, with the introduction of functional neuroimaging techniques, has proven useful in establishing the neurocircuitry of emotional learning in humans. Studies of fear acquisition suggest that regions such as amygdala, insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and hippocampus play an important role in acquisition of fear, whereas studies of fear extinction suggest that the amygdala is also crucial for safety learning. Extinction retention testing points to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex as an essential region in the recall of the safety trace, and explicit learning of fear and safety associations recruits additional cortical and subcortical regions. Importantly, many of these findings have implications in our understanding of the pathophysiology of psychiatric disease. Recent studies using clinical populations have lent insight into the changes in regional activity in specific disorders, and treatment studies have shown how pharmaceutical and other therapeutic interventions modulate brain activation during emotional learning. Finally, research investigating individual differences in neurotransmitter receptor genotypes has highlighted the contribution of these systems in fear-associated learning.

  4. Neuroimaging revolutionizes therapeutic approaches to chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borsook David

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An understanding of how the brain changes in chronic pain or responds to pharmacological or other therapeutic interventions has been significantly changed as a result of developments in neuroimaging of the CNS. These developments have occurred in 3 domains : (1 Anatomical Imaging which has demonstrated changes in brain volume in chronic pain; (2 Functional Imaging (fMRI that has demonstrated an altered state in the brain in chronic pain conditions including back pain, neuropathic pain, and complex regional pain syndromes. In addition the response of the brain to drugs has provided new insights into how these may modify normal and abnormal circuits (phMRI or pharmacological MRI; (3 Chemical Imaging (Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy or MRS has helped our understanding of measures of chemical changes in chronic pain. Taken together these three domains have already changed the way in which we think of pain – it should now be considered an altered brain state in which there may be altered functional connections or systems and a state that has components of degenerative aspects of the CNS.

  5. Sleep neuroimaging and models of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo eTagliazucchi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Human deep sleep is characterized by reduced or absent sensory activity, responsiveness to stimuli and conscious awareness. Given its ubiquity and reversible nature, it represents an attractive paradigm to study the neural changes which accompany the loss of consciousness in humans. In particular, the deepest stages of sleep can serve as an empirical test for the predictions of theoretical models relating the phenomenology of consciousness with underlying neural activity. A relatively recent shift of attention from the analysis of evoked responses towards spontaneous (or ``resting state'' activity has taken place in the neuroimaging community, together with the development of tools suitable to study distributed functional interactions. In this review we focus on recent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI studies of spontaneous activity during sleep and their relationship with theoretical models for human consciousness generation, considering the global workspace theory, the information integration theory and the dynamical core hypothesis. We discuss the venues of research opened by these results, emphasizing the need to extend the analytic methodology in order to obtain a dynamical picture of how functional interactions change over time and how their evolution is modulated during different conscious states. Finally, we discuss the need to experimentally establish absent or reduced conscious content, even when studying the deepest sleep stages.

  6. Neuroimaging in pre-motor Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Barber

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease begins long before the onset of clinical motor symptoms, resulting in substantial cell loss by the time a diagnosis can be made. The period between the onset of neurodegeneration and the development of motoric disease would be the ideal time to intervene with disease modifying therapies. This pre-motor phase can last many years, but the lack of a specific clinical phenotype means that objective biomarkers are needed to reliably detect prodromal disease. In recent years, recognition that patients with REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD are at particularly high risk of future parkinsonism has enabled the development of large prodromal cohorts in which to investigate novel biomarkers, and neuroimaging has generated some of the most promising results to date. Here we review investigations undertaken in RBD and other pre-clinical cohorts, including modalities that are well established in clinical Parkinson's as well as novel imaging methods. Techniques such as high resolution MRI of the substantia nigra and functional imaging of Parkinsonian brain networks have great potential to facilitate early diagnosis. Further longitudinal studies will establish their true value in quantifying prodromal neurodegeneration and predicting future Parkinson's.

  7. Undulator-based production of polarized positrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, G.; Barley, J.; Batygin, Y.; Berridge, S.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Bugg, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Dollan, R.; Efremenko, Y.; Flöttmann, K.; Gharibyan, V.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Kovermann, J. W.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; McDonald, K. T.; Mikhailichenko, A. A.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.; Pahl, P.; Pitthan, R.; Pöschl, R.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riemann, S.; Schälicke, A.; Schüler, K. P.; Schweizer, T.; Scott, D.; Sheppard, J. C.; Stahl, A.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D. R.; Weidemann, A.

    2009-11-01

    Full exploitation of the physics potential of a future International Linear Collider will require the use of polarized electron and positron beams. Experiment E166 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which an electron beam passes through a helical undulator to generate photons (whose first-harmonic spectrum extended to 7.9 MeV) with circular polarization, which are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons and electrons. The experiment was carried out with a 1-m-long, 400-period, pulsed helical undulator in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) operated at 46.6 GeV. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at five positron energies from 4.5 to 7.5 MeV. In addition, the electron polarization has been determined at 6.7 MeV, and the effect of operating the undulator with a ferrofluid was also investigated. To compare the measurements with expectations, detailed simulations were made with an upgraded version of G EANT4 that includes the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons with matter. The measurements agree with calculations, corresponding to 80% polarization for positrons near 6 MeV and 90% for electrons near 7 MeV.

  8. Undulator-based production of polarized positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, G. [Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Barley, J. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Batygin, Y. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Berridge, S. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Bugg, W. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Decker, F.-J. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Dollan, R. [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Efremenko, Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Floettmann, K. [DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Gharibyan, V. [DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); YerPhI, Yerevan 375036 (Armenia); Hast, C.; Iverson, R. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Kolanoski, H. [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kovermann, J.W. [RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Laihem, K. [DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Lohse, T. [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); McDonald, K.T. [Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Mikhailichenko, A.A. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Full exploitation of the physics potential of a future International Linear Collider will require the use of polarized electron and positron beams. Experiment E166 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which an electron beam passes through a helical undulator to generate photons (whose first-harmonic spectrum extended to 7.9 MeV) with circular polarization, which are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons and electrons. The experiment was carried out with a 1-m-long, 400-period, pulsed helical undulator in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) operated at 46.6 GeV. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at five positron energies from 4.5 to 7.5 MeV. In addition, the electron polarization has been determined at 6.7 MeV, and the effect of operating the undulator with a ferrofluid was also investigated. To compare the measurements with expectations, detailed simulations were made with an upgraded version of GEANT4 that includes the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons with matter. The measurements agree with calculations, corresponding to 80% polarization for positrons near 6 MeV and 90% for electrons near 7 MeV.

  9. Undulator-based production of polarized positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, G. [Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel); Barley, J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Batygin, Y. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA (US)] (and others)

    2009-05-15

    Full exploitation of the physics potential of a future International Linear Collider will require the use of polarized electron and positron beams. Experiment E166 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which an electron beam passes through a helical undulator to generate photons (whose first-harmonic spectrum extended to 7.9 MeV) with circular polarization, which are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons and electrons. The experiment was carried out with a one-meter-long, 400-period, pulsed helical undulator in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) operated at 46.6 GeV. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at five positron energies from 4.5 to 7.5 MeV. In addition, the electron polarization has been determined at 6.7MeV, and the effect of operating the undulator with a ferrofluid was also investigated. To compare the measurements with expectations, detailed simulations were made with an upgraded version of GEANT4 that includes the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons with matter. The measurements agree with calculations, corresponding to 80% polarization for positrons near 6 MeV and 90% for electrons near 7 MeV. (orig.)

  10. Neuroimaging with functional near infrared spectroscopy: From formation to interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Vega, Javier; Treviño-Palacios, Carlos G.; Orihuela-Espina, Felipe

    2017-09-01

    Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is gaining momentum as a functional neuroimaging modality to investigate the cerebral hemodynamics subsequent to neural metabolism. As other neuroimaging modalities, it is neuroscience's tool to understand brain systems functions at behaviour and cognitive levels. To extract useful knowledge from functional neuroimages it is critical to understand the series of transformations applied during the process of the information retrieval and how they bound the interpretation. This process starts with the irradiation of the head tissues with infrared light to obtain the raw neuroimage and proceeds with computational and statistical analysis revealing hidden associations between pixels intensities and neural activity encoded to end up with the explanation of some particular aspect regarding brain function.To comprehend the overall process involved in fNIRS there is extensive literature addressing each individual step separately. This paper overviews the complete transformation sequence through image formation, reconstruction and analysis to provide an insight of the final functional interpretation.

  11. Functional Neuroimaging of Motor Control inParkinson’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M; Eickhoff, Simon B; Løkkegaard, Annemette

    2014-01-01

    and yielded consistent alterations in neural activity in patients with PD. Differences in cortical activation between PD patients and healthy controls converged in a left-lateralized fronto-parietal network comprising the presupplementary motor area, primary motor cortex, inferior parietal cortex......Functional neuroimaging has been widely used to study the activation patterns of the motor network in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), but these studies have yielded conflicting results. This meta-analysis of previous neuroimaging studies was performed to identify patterns of abnormal...... movement-related activation in PD that were consistent across studies. We applied activation likelihood estimation (ALE) of functional neuroimaging studies probing motor function in patients with PD. The meta-analysis encompassed data from 283 patients with PD reported in 24 functional neuroimaging studies...

  12. Neuroimaging biomarkers in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2013-09-01

    Reviewed herein are contemporary neuroimaging methods that detect abnormalities associated with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Despite advances in demonstrating underlying neuropathology in a subset of individuals who sustain mTBI, considerable disagreement persists in neuropsychology about mTBI outcome and metrics for evaluation. This review outlines a thesis for the select use of sensitive neuroimaging methods as potential biomarkers of brain injury recognizing that the majority of individuals who sustain an mTBI recover without neuroimaging signs or neuropsychological sequelae detected with methods currently applied. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides several measures that could serve as mTBI biomarkers including the detection of hemosiderin and white matter abnormalities, assessment of white matter integrity derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and quantitative measures that directly assess neuroanatomy. Improved prediction of neuropsychological outcomes in mTBI may be achieved with the use of targeted neuroimaging markers.

  13. Addressing Confounding in Predictive Models with an Application to Neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Kristin A; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Doshi, Jimit; Davatzikos, Christos; Shinohara, Russell T

    2016-05-01

    Understanding structural changes in the brain that are caused by a particular disease is a major goal of neuroimaging research. Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) comprises a collection of tools that can be used to understand complex disease efxcfects across the brain. We discuss several important issues that must be considered when analyzing data from neuroimaging studies using MVPA. In particular, we focus on the consequences of confounding by non-imaging variables such as age and sex on the results of MVPA. After reviewing current practice to address confounding in neuroimaging studies, we propose an alternative approach based on inverse probability weighting. Although the proposed method is motivated by neuroimaging applications, it is broadly applicable to many problems in machine learning and predictive modeling. We demonstrate the advantages of our approach on simulated and real data examples.

  14. Neuroimaging findings in treatment-resistant schizophrenia: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shinichiro; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Plitman, Eric; Fervaha, Gagan; Gerretsen, Philip; Caravaggio, Fernando; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent developments in neuroimaging have advanced understanding biological mechanisms underlying schizophrenia. However, neuroimaging correlates of treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS) and superior effects of clozapine on TRS remain unclear. Methods Systematic search was performed to identify neuroimaging characteristics unique to TRS and ultra-resistant schizophrenia (i.e. clozapine-resistant [URS]), and clozapine's efficacy in TRS using Embase, Medline, and PsychInfo. Search terms included (schizophreni*) and (resistan* OR refractory OR clozapine) and (ASL OR CT OR DTI OR FMRI OR MRI OR MRS OR NIRS OR PET OR SPECT). Results 25 neuroimaging studies have investigated TRS and effects of clozapine. Only 5 studies have compared TRS and non-TRS, collectively providing no replicated neuroimaging finding specific to TRS. Studies comparing TRS and healthy controls suggest hypometabolism in the prefrontal cortex, hypermetabolism in the basal ganglia, and structural anomalies in the corpus callosum contribute to TRS. Clozapine may increase prefrontal hypoactivation in TRS although this was not related to clinical improvement; in contrast, evidence has suggested a link between clozapine efficacy and decreased metabolism in the basal ganglia and thalamus. Conclusion Existing literature does not elucidate neuroimaging correlates specific to TRS or URS, which, if present, might also shed light on clozapine's efficacy in TRS. This said, leads from other lines of investigation, including the glutamatergic system can prove useful in guiding future neuroimaging studies focused on, in particular, the frontocortical-basal ganglia-thalamic circuits. Critical to the success of this work will be precise subtyping of study subjects based on treatment response/nonresponse and the use of multimodal neuroimaging. PMID:25684554

  15. Neuroimaging findings in pediatric sports-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; Leiter, Jeff; Hall, Thomas; McDonald, Patrick J; Sawyer, Scott; Silver, Norm; Bunge, Martin; Essig, Marco

    2015-09-01

    The goal in this review was to summarize the results of clinical neuroimaging studies performed in patients with sports-related concussion (SRC) who were referred to a multidisciplinar ypediatric concussion program. The authors conducted a retrospective review of medical records and neuroimaging findings for all patients referred to a multidisciplinary pediatric concussion program between September 2013 and July 2014. Inclusion criteria were as follows: 1) age ≤ 19 years; and 2) physician-diagnosed SRC. All patients underwent evaluation and follow-up by the same neurosurgeon. The 2 outcomes examined in this review were the frequency of neuroimaging studies performed in this population (including CT and MRI) and the findings of those studies. Clinical indications for neuroimaging and the impact of neuroimaging findings on clinical decision making were summarized where available. This investigation was approved by the local institutional ethics review board. A total of 151 patients (mean age 14 years, 59% female) were included this study. Overall, 36 patients (24%) underwent neuroimaging studies, the results of which were normal in 78% of cases. Sixteen percent of patients underwent CT imaging; results were normal in 79% of cases. Abnormal CT findings included the following: arachnoid cyst (1 patient), skull fracture (2 patients), suspected intracranial hemorrhage (1 patient), and suspected hemorrhage into an arachnoid cyst (1 patient). Eleven percent of patients underwent MRI; results were normal in 75% of cases. Abnormal MRI findings included the following: intraparenchymal hemorrhage and sylvian fissure arachnoid cyst (1 patient); nonhemorrhagic contusion (1 patient); demyelinating disease (1 patient); and posterior fossa arachnoid cyst, cerebellar volume loss, and nonspecific white matter changes (1 patient). Results of clinical neuroimaging studies are normal in the majority of pediatric patients with SRC. However, in selected cases neuroimaging can provide

  16. Human Neuroimaging as a “Big Data” Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Toga, Arthur W.

    2013-01-01

    The maturation of in vivo neuroimaging has lead to incredible quantities of digital information about the human brain. While much is made of the data deluge in science, neuroimaging represents the leading edge of this onslaught of “big data”. A range of neuroimaging databasing approaches has streamlined the transmission, storage, and dissemination of data from such brain imaging studies. Yet few, if any, common solutions exist to support the science of neuroimaging. In this article, we discuss how modern neuroimaging research represents a mutifactorial and broad ranging data challenge, involving the growing size of the data being acquired; sociologial and logistical sharing issues; infrastructural challenges for multi-site, multi-datatype archiving; and the means by which to explore and mine these data. As neuroimaging advances further, e.g. aging, genetics, and age-related disease, new vision is needed to manage and process this information while marshalling of these resources into novel results. Thus, “big data” can become “big” brain science. PMID:24113873

  17. Neuroimaging in autism--from basic science to translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Christine; Murphy, Declan

    2014-02-01

    Over the past decade, human neuroimaging studies have provided invaluable insights into the neural substrates that underlie autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Although observations from multiple neuroimaging approaches converge in suggesting that changes in brain structure, functioning and connectivity are associated with ASD, the neurobiology of this disorder is complex, and considerable aetiological and phenotypic heterogeneity exists among individuals on the autism spectrum. Characterization of the neurobiological alterations that underlie ASD and development of novel pharmacotherapies for ASD, therefore, requires multidisciplinary collaboration. Consequently, pressure is growing to combine neuroimaging data with information provided by other disciplines to translate research findings into clinically useful biomarkers. So far, however, neuroimaging studies in patients with ASD have mainly been conducted in isolation, and the low specificity of neuroimaging measures has hindered the development of biomarkers that could aid clinical trials and/or facilitate patient identification. Novel approaches to acquiring and analysing data on brain characteristics are currently being developed to overcome these inherent limitations, and to integrate neuroimaging into translational research. Here, we discuss promising new studies of cortical pathology in patients with ASD, and outline how the novel insights thereby obtained could inform diagnosis and treatment of ASD in the future.

  18. Neuroimaging and neuromodulation approaches to study eating behavior and prevent and treat eating disorders and obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val-Laillet, D.; Aarts, E.; Weber, B.; Ferrari, M.; Quaresima, V.; Stoeckel, L.E.; Alonso-Alonso, M.; Audette, M.; Malbert, C.H.; Stice, E.

    2015-01-01

    Functional, molecular and genetic neuroimaging has highlighted the existence of brain anomalies and neural vulnerability factors related to obesity and eating disorders such as binge eating or anorexia nervosa. In particular, decreased basal metabolism in the prefrontal cortex and striatum as well as dopaminergic alterations have been described in obese subjects, in parallel with increased activation of reward brain areas in response to palatable food cues. Elevated reward region responsivity may trigger food craving and predict future weight gain. This opens the way to prevention studies using functional and molecular neuroimaging to perform early diagnostics and to phenotype subjects at risk by exploring different neurobehavioral dimensions of the food choices and motivation processes. In the first part of this review, advantages and limitations of neuroimaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), pharmacogenetic fMRI and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) will be discussed in the context of recent work dealing with eating behavior, with a particular focus on obesity. In the second part of the review, non-invasive strategies to modulate food-related brain processes and functions will be presented. At the leading edge of non-invasive brain-based technologies is real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) neurofeedback, which is a powerful tool to better understand the complexity of human brain–behavior relationships. rtfMRI, alone or when combined with other techniques and tools such as EEG and cognitive therapy, could be used to alter neural plasticity and learned behavior to optimize and/or restore healthy cognition and eating behavior. Other promising non-invasive neuromodulation approaches being explored are repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS). Converging evidence points at the value of

  19. Neuroimaging and neuromodulation approaches to study eating behavior and prevent and treat eating disorders and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val-Laillet, D; Aarts, E; Weber, B; Ferrari, M; Quaresima, V; Stoeckel, L E; Alonso-Alonso, M; Audette, M; Malbert, C H; Stice, E

    2015-01-01

    Functional, molecular and genetic neuroimaging has highlighted the existence of brain anomalies and neural vulnerability factors related to obesity and eating disorders such as binge eating or anorexia nervosa. In particular, decreased basal metabolism in the prefrontal cortex and striatum as well as dopaminergic alterations have been described in obese subjects, in parallel with increased activation of reward brain areas in response to palatable food cues. Elevated reward region responsivity may trigger food craving and predict future weight gain. This opens the way to prevention studies using functional and molecular neuroimaging to perform early diagnostics and to phenotype subjects at risk by exploring different neurobehavioral dimensions of the food choices and motivation processes. In the first part of this review, advantages and limitations of neuroimaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), pharmacogenetic fMRI and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) will be discussed in the context of recent work dealing with eating behavior, with a particular focus on obesity. In the second part of the review, non-invasive strategies to modulate food-related brain processes and functions will be presented. At the leading edge of non-invasive brain-based technologies is real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) neurofeedback, which is a powerful tool to better understand the complexity of human brain-behavior relationships. rtfMRI, alone or when combined with other techniques and tools such as EEG and cognitive therapy, could be used to alter neural plasticity and learned behavior to optimize and/or restore healthy cognition and eating behavior. Other promising non-invasive neuromodulation approaches being explored are repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS). Converging evidence points at the value of

  20. Neuroimaging and neuromodulation approaches to study eating behavior and prevent and treat eating disorders and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Val-Laillet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional, molecular and genetic neuroimaging has highlighted the existence of brain anomalies and neural vulnerability factors related to obesity and eating disorders such as binge eating or anorexia nervosa. In particular, decreased basal metabolism in the prefrontal cortex and striatum as well as dopaminergic alterations have been described in obese subjects, in parallel with increased activation of reward brain areas in response to palatable food cues. Elevated reward region responsivity may trigger food craving and predict future weight gain. This opens the way to prevention studies using functional and molecular neuroimaging to perform early diagnostics and to phenotype subjects at risk by exploring different neurobehavioral dimensions of the food choices and motivation processes. In the first part of this review, advantages and limitations of neuroimaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, positron emission tomography (PET, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, pharmacogenetic fMRI and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS will be discussed in the context of recent work dealing with eating behavior, with a particular focus on obesity. In the second part of the review, non-invasive strategies to modulate food-related brain processes and functions will be presented. At the leading edge of non-invasive brain-based technologies is real-time fMRI (rtfMRI neurofeedback, which is a powerful tool to better understand the complexity of human brain–behavior relationships. rtfMRI, alone or when combined with other techniques and tools such as EEG and cognitive therapy, could be used to alter neural plasticity and learned behavior to optimize and/or restore healthy cognition and eating behavior. Other promising non-invasive neuromodulation approaches being explored are repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS. Converging evidence points at

  1. Neuroimaging findings in treatment-resistant schizophrenia: A systematic review: Lack of neuroimaging correlates of treatment-resistant schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shinichiro; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Plitman, Eric; Fervaha, Gagan; Gerretsen, Philip; Caravaggio, Fernando; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in neuroimaging have advanced the understanding of biological mechanisms underlying schizophrenia. However, neuroimaging correlates of treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS) and superior effects of clozapine on TRS remain unclear. Systematic search was performed to identify neuroimaging characteristics unique to TRS and ultra-resistant schizophrenia (i.e. clozapine-resistant [URS]), and clozapine's efficacy in TRS using Embase, Medline, and PsychInfo. Search terms included (schizophreni*) and (resistan* OR refractory OR clozapine) and (ASL OR CT OR DTI OR FMRI OR MRI OR MRS OR NIRS OR PET OR SPECT). 25 neuroimaging studies have investigated TRS and effects of clozapine. Only 5 studies have compared TRS and non-TRS, collectively providing no replicated neuroimaging finding specific to TRS. Studies comparing TRS and healthy controls suggest that hypometabolism in the prefrontal cortex, hypermetabolism in the basal ganglia, and structural anomalies in the corpus callosum contribute to TRS. Clozapine may increase prefrontal hypoactivation in TRS although this was not related to clinical improvement; in contrast, evidence has suggested a link between clozapine efficacy and decreased metabolism in the basal ganglia and thalamus. Existing literature does not elucidate neuroimaging correlates specific to TRS or URS, which, if present, might also shed light on clozapine's efficacy in TRS. This said, leads from other lines of investigation, including the glutamatergic system can prove useful in guiding future neuroimaging studies focused on, in particular, the frontocortical-basal ganglia-thalamic circuits. Critical to the success of this work will be precise subtyping of study subjects based on treatment response/nonresponse and the use of multimodal neuroimaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. On the robustness of the localized spatiotemporal structures in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahajan, S.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies; Berezhiani, V.I. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies]|[Institute of Physics, Tbilisi (Russian Federation). Dept. of Plasma Physics; Miklaszewski, R. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland)

    1998-04-01

    It is shown that, in an electron-positron plasma with a small fraction of ions, large-amplitude localized spatiotemporal structures (light bullets) can be readily generated and sustained. These light bullets are found to be exceptionally robust: they can emerge from a large variety of initial field distributions and are remarkably stable.

  3. Advanced neuroimaging applied to veterans and service personnel with traumatic brain injury: state of the art and potential benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Elisabeth A; Bouix, Sylvain; Tate, David F; Lin, Alexander P; Newsome, Mary R; Taylor, Brian A; Stone, James R; Montier, James; Gandy, Samuel E; Biekman, Brian; Shenton, Martha E; York, Gerald

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains one of the most prevalent forms of morbidity among Veterans and Service Members, particularly for those engaged in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Neuroimaging has been considered a potentially useful diagnostic and prognostic tool across the spectrum of TBI generally, but may have particular importance in military populations where the diagnosis of mild TBI is particularly challenging, given the frequent lack of documentation on the nature of the injuries and mixed etiologies, and highly comorbid with other disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and substance misuse. Imaging has also been employed in attempts to understand better the potential late effects of trauma and to evaluate the effects of promising therapeutic interventions. This review surveys the use of structural and functional neuroimaging techniques utilized in military studies published to date, including the utilization of quantitative fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), volumetric analysis, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), positron emission tomography (PET), magnetoencephalography (MEG), task-based and resting state functional MRI (fMRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). The importance of quality assurance testing in current and future research is also highlighted. Current challenges and limitations of each technique are outlined, and future directions are discussed.

  4. Advanced Neuroimaging of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Gordon W; Hernandez, Maria Valdez; Thrippleton, Michael J; Doubal, Fergus N; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is characterised by damage to deep grey and white matter structures of the brain and is responsible for a diverse range of clinical problems that include stroke and dementia. In this review, we describe advances in neuroimaging published since January 2015, mainly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that, in general, are improving quantification, observation and investigation of SVD focussing on three areas: quantifying the total SVD burden, imaging brain microstructural integrity and imaging vascular malfunction. Methods to capture 'whole brain SVD burden' across the spectrum of SVD imaging changes will be useful for patient stratification in clinical trials, an approach that we are already testing. More sophisticated imaging measures of SVD microstructural damage are allowing the disease to be studied at earlier stages, will help identify specific factors that are important in development of overt SVD imaging features and in understanding why specific clinical consequences may occur. Imaging vascular function will help establish the precise blood vessel and blood flow alterations at early disease stages and, together with microstructural integrity measures, may provide important surrogate endpoints in clinical trials testing new interventions. Better knowledge of SVD pathophysiology will help identify new treatment targets, improve patient stratification and may in future increase efficiency of clinical trials through smaller sample sizes or shorter follow-up periods. However, most of these methods are not yet sufficiently mature to use with confidence in clinical trials, although rapid advances in the field suggest that reliable quantification of SVD lesion burden, tissue microstructural integrity and vascular dysfunction are imminent.

  5. A neuroimaging study in childhood autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S. I. Mullick

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood autism is now widely viewed as being of developmental neurological origin. Abnormality in neuroimaging is reported in autism.Objectives: To delineate the proportion of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and electro encephalography (EEG abnormality among the children with Autism and to assess any association of MRI and EEG changes with co morbid mental illness.Methods: It was a cross sectional descriptive study done at a child and adolescent consultation centre, Dhaka. The study was Carried out from January 2009 to December 2009. Both boys and girls were included in the study. A total of 42 children with childhood autism aged between two and 12 years partici­pated in this study. Diagnosis of autism was based on ICD-10(DCR criteria. Results: Abnormalities were found to be 35.7% in MRI and 42.9% in EEG. EEG abnormalities were found in the form of defuse slow waves activities, generalized faster activities, epileptogenic discharge and mixed discharge. The abnormalities in MRI was found in the form of diffuse cortical atrophic changes, focal cortical atrophy in frontal and temporal cortex with widening of major sulci, prominent ventricles, periventricular degeneration and abnormal basal ganglia. EEG changes were significantly associated with increased number of co-morbid illness (mental retardation, epilepsy and others. Conclusion: A number of abnom1alities that observed in the present study indicative of relations between structural and physiological dysfunctions and childhood autism. Further exploratory and in-depth researches are certainly required in this field. Intervention of autism needs to address co morbidities for better outcome.

  6. Van de Graaff based positron source production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Kasey Roy

    The anti-matter counterpart to the electron, the positron, can be used for a myriad of different scientific research projects to include materials research, energy storage, and deep space flight propulsion. Currently there is a demand for large numbers of positrons to aid in these mentioned research projects. There are different methods of producing and harvesting positrons but all require radioactive sources or large facilities. Positron beams produced by relatively small accelerators are attractive because they are easily shut down, and small accelerators are readily available. A 4MV Van de Graaff accelerator was used to induce the nuclear reaction 12C(d,n)13N in order to produce an intense beam of positrons. 13N is an isotope of nitrogen that decays with a 10 minute half life into 13C, a positron, and an electron neutrino. This radioactive gas is frozen onto a cryogenic freezer where it is then channeled to form an antimatter beam. The beam is then guided using axial magnetic fields into a superconducting magnet with a field strength up to 7 Tesla where it will be stored in a newly designed Micro-Penning-Malmberg trap. Several source geometries have been experimented on and found that a maximum antimatter beam with a positron flux of greater than 0.55x10 6 e+s-1 was achieved. This beam was produced using a solid rare gas moderator composed of krypton. Due to geometric restrictions on this set up, only 0.1-1.0% of the antimatter was being frozen to the desired locations. Simulations and preliminary experiments suggest that a new geometry, currently under testing, will produce a beam of 107 e+s-1 or more.

  7. Cylindrical and spherical positron-acoustic shock waves in nonthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, M.M.; Alam, M.S.; Mamun, A.A., E-mail: shohelplasma@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2015-06-15

    The nonlinear propagation of cylindrical and spherical positron-acoustic shock waves (PASWs) in an unmagnetized four-component plasma (containing nonthermal distributed hot positrons and electrons, cold mobile viscous positron fluid, and immobile positive ions) is investigated theoretically. The modified Burgers equation is derived by employing the reductive perturbation method. Analytically, the effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries, nonthermality of electrons and hot positrons, relative number density and temperature ratios, and cold mobile positron kinematic viscosity on the basic features (viz. polarity, amplitude, width, phase speed, etc.) of PASWs are briefly addressed. It is examined that the PASWs in nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) geometry significantly differ from those in planar geometry. The relevance of our results may be useful in understanding the basic characteristics of PASWs in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. (author)

  8. Positron sources for electron-positron colliders application to the ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    The increased demanding qualities for positron sources dedicated to e+e- colliders pushed on investigations oriented on new kinds of e+ sources. The different kinds of positron sources polarized and no polarized are considered. Their main features (intensity, emittance) are described and analysed. Comparison between the different sources is worked out. The characteristics of the positron beam available in the collision point are greatly depending on the capture device and on the positron accelerator. Different kinds of capture systems are considered and their qualities, compared. Intense positron sources which are necessary for the colliders require intense incident beams (electrons or photons). The large number of pairs created in the targets leads to important energy deposition and so, thermal heating, which associated to temperature gradients provoke mechanical stresses often destructive. Moreover, the important Coulomb collisions, can affect the atomic structure in crystal targets and the radiation resist...

  9. MR-based PET motion correction procedure for simultaneous MR-PET neuroimaging of human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Görge Ullisch

    Full Text Available Positron Emission Tomography (PET images are prone to motion artefacts due to the long acquisition time of PET measurements. Recently, simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and PET have become available in the first generation of Hybrid MR-PET scanners. In this work, the elimination of artefacts due to head motion in PET neuroimages is achieved by a new approach utilising MR-based motion tracking in combination with PET list mode data motion correction for simultaneous MR-PET acquisitions. The method comprises accurate MR-based motion measurements, an intra-frame motion minimising and reconstruction time reducing temporal framing algorithm, and a list mode based PET reconstruction which utilises the Ordinary Poisson Algorithm and avoids axial and transaxial compression. Compared to images uncorrected for motion, an increased image quality is shown in phantom as well as in vivo images. In vivo motion corrected images show an evident increase of contrast at the basal ganglia and a good visibility of uptake in tiny structures such as superior colliculi.

  10. Functional neuro-imaging as a pre-surgical tool in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneef, Zulfi; Chen, David K

    2014-03-01

    Functional neuro-imaging techniques are helpful in the pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy for localization of the epileptogenic zone as ancillary tools to electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or when other localization techniques are normal, non-concordant or discordant. Positron emission tomography (PET) and ictal single photon emission computed tomography (ictal SPECT) imaging are traditional tests that have been reported to have good sensitivity and specificity although the results are better with more expertise as is true for any technique. More recently magnetoencephalogram/magnetic source imaging (MEG/MSI), diffusion tensor imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been used in localization and functional mapping during the pre-surgical work-up of epilepsy. Newer techniques such as fMRI-EEG, functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging and near infra-red spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magneto nanoparticles hold promise for further development that could then be applied in the work-up of epilepsy surgery. In this manuscript, we review these techniques and their current position in the pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy.

  11. The role of rostral Brodmann area 6 in mental-operation tasks: an integrative neuroimaging approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakawa, Takashi; Honda, Manabu; Sawamoto, Nobukatsu; Okada, Tomohisa; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Fukuyama, Hidena; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2002-11-01

    Recent evidence indicates that classical 'motor' areas may also have cognitive functions. We performed three neuroimaging experiments to investigate the functional neuroanatomy underlying three types of nonmotor mental-operation tasks: numerical, verbal, and spatial. (i) Positron emission tomography showed that parts of the posterior frontal cortex, which are consistent with the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and the rostral part of the dorsolateral premotor cortex (PMdr), were active during all three tasks. We also observed activity in the posterior parietal cortex and cerebellar hemispheres during all three tasks. Electrophysiological monitoring confirmed that there were no skeletomotor, oculomotor or articulatory movements during task performance. (ii) Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) showed that PMdr activity during the mental-operation tasks was localized in the depths of the superior precentral sulcus, which substantially overlapped the region active during complex finger movements and was located dorsomedial to the presumptive frontal eye fields. (iii) Single-trial fMRI showed a transient increase in activity time-locked to the performance of mental operations in the pre-SMA and PMdr. The results of the present study suggest that the PMdr is important in the rule-based association of symbolic cues and responses in both motor and nonmotor behaviors.

  12. Neuroimaging in Parkinsonism: a study with magnetic resonance and spectroscopy as tools in the differential diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe Rocha [1Hospital dos Servidores do Estado, Rio de Janeiro RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: luizneurol@terra.com.br; Novis, Sergio A. Pereira; Rosso, Ana Lucia Z. [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Moreira, Denise Madeira [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Neurologia Deolindo Couto; Leite, Ana Claudia C.B. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-03-15

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism based on clinical features, sometimes may be difficult. Diagnostic tests in these cases might be useful, especially magnetic resonance imaging, a noninvasive exam, not as expensive as positron emission tomography, and provides a good basis for anatomical analysis. The magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyzes cerebral metabolism, yielding inconsistent results in parkinsonian disorders. We selected 40 individuals for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy analysis, 12 with Parkinson's disease, 11 with progressive supranuclear palsy, 7 with multiple system atrophy (parkinsonian type), and 10 individuals without any psychiatric or neurological disorders (controls). Clinical scales included Hoenh and Yahr, unified Parkinson's disease rating scale and mini mental status examination. The results showed that patients with Parkinson's disease and controls presented the same aspects on neuroimaging, with few or absence of abnormalities, and supranuclear progressive palsy and multiple system atrophy showed abnormalities, some of which statistically significant. Thus, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy could be useful as a tool in differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism. (author)

  13. Analyzing neuroimaging data with subclasses: A shrinkage approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhne, Johannes; Bartz, Daniel; Hebart, Martin N; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Among the numerous methods used to analyze neuroimaging data, Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) is commonly applied for binary classification problems. LDAs popularity derives from its simplicity and its competitive classification performance, which has been reported for various types of neuroimaging data. Yet the standard LDA approach proves less than optimal for binary classification problems when additional label information (i.e. subclass labels) is present. Subclass labels allow to model structure in the data, which can be used to facilitate the classification task. In this paper, we illustrate how neuroimaging data exhibit subclass labels that may contain valuable information. We also show that the standard LDA classifier is unable to exploit subclass labels. We introduce a novel method that allows subclass labels to be incorporated efficiently into the classifier. The novel method, which we call Relevance Subclass LDA (RSLDA), computes an individual classification hyperplane for each subclass. It is based on regularized estimators of the subclass mean and uses other subclasses as regularization targets. We demonstrate the applicability and performance of our method on data drawn from two different neuroimaging modalities: (I) EEG data from brain-computer interfacing with event-related potentials, and (II) fMRI data in response to different levels of visual motion. We show that RSLDA outperforms the standard LDA approach for both types of datasets. These findings illustrate the benefits of exploiting subclass structure in neuroimaging data. Finally, we show that our classifier also outputs regularization profiles, enabling researchers to interpret the subclass structure in a meaningful way. RSLDA therefore yields increased classification accuracy as well as a better interpretation of neuroimaging data. Since both results are highly favorable, we suggest to apply RSLDA for various classification problems within neuroimaging and beyond. Copyright © 2015

  14. Nipype: A flexible, lightweight and extensible neuroimaging data processing framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof eGorgolewski

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Current neuroimaging software offer users an incredible opportunity to analyze their data in different ways, with different underlying assumptions. Several sophisticated software packages (e.g., AFNI, BrainVoyager, FSL, FreeSurfer, Nipy, R, SPM are used to process and analyze large and often diverse (highly multi-dimensional data. However, this heterogeneous collection of specialized applications creates several issues that hinder replicable, efficient and optimal use of neuroimaging analysis approaches: 1 No uniform access to neuroimaging analysis software and usage information; 2 No framework for comparative algorithm development and dissemination; 3 Personnel turnover in laboratories often limits methodological continuity and training new personnel takes time; 4 Neuroimaging software packages do not address computational efficiency; and 5 Methods sections in journal articles are inadequate for reproducing results. To address these issues, we present Nipype (Neuroimaging in Python: Pipelines and Interfaces; http://nipy.org/nipype, an open-source, community-developed, software package and scriptable library. Nipype solves the issues by providing Interfaces to existing neuroimaging software with uniform usage semantics and by facilitating interaction between these packages using Workflows. Nipype provides an environment that encourages interactive exploration of algorithms, eases the design of Workflows within and between packages, allows rapid comparative development of algorithms and reduces the learning curve necessary to use different packages. Nipype supports both local and remote execution on multi-core machines and clusters, without additional scripting. Nipype is BSD licensed, allowing anyone unrestricted usage. An open, community-driven development philosophy allows the software to quickly adapt and address the varied needs of the evolving neuroimaging community, especially in the context of increasing demand for reproducible research.

  15. A trap-based pulsed positron beam optimised for positronium laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B. S., E-mail: ben.cooper.13@ucl.ac.uk; Alonso, A. M.; Deller, A.; Wall, T. E.; Cassidy, D. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    We describe a pulsed positron beam that is optimised for positronium (Ps) laser-spectroscopy experiments. The system is based on a two-stage Surko-type buffer gas trap that produces 4 ns wide pulses containing up to 5 × 10{sup 5} positrons at a rate of 0.5-10 Hz. By implanting positrons from the trap into a suitable target material, a dilute positronium gas with an initial density of the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup −3} is created in vacuum. This is then probed with pulsed (ns) laser systems, where various Ps-laser interactions have been observed via changes in Ps annihilation rates using a fast gamma ray detector. We demonstrate the capabilities of the apparatus and detection methodology via the observation of Rydberg positronium atoms with principal quantum numbers ranging from 11 to 22 and the Stark broadening of the n = 2 → 11 transition in electric fields.

  16. Crystal Defects and Cation Redistribution Study on Nanocrystalline Cobalt-Ferri-Chromites by Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal B. Modi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements were carried out on nanocrystalline (grain size ~60–65 nm samples of the Cr3+-substituted cobalt ferrite system with general chemical formula CoCrxFe2−xO4 (x=0.0−2.0 synthesized by the coprecipitation technique. The results indicated selective trapping of positrons in large vacancy clusters initially at the tetrahedral (A- sites and then with Cr3+-substitution up to concentration (x=0.7, at the octahedral (B- sites. The results are consistent with the cation distribution determined from X-ray diffraction line intensity calculations, which indicated partial inversion of the inverse spinel ferrite, subsequent stabilization over a range of substitution (x=0.7 to 1.7, and finally the full inversion to the normal spinel chromite (CoCr2O4, x=2.0. In the intermediate range of substitution, lattice contraction prevented a fraction of Co2+ ions released from the (B- sites from entering the tetrahedral sites, and these vacancies at the (A- sites trapped positrons. Although the samples were composed of nanocrystalline grains, only an insignificant fraction of positrons were diffused and annihilated at the grain surfaces, since the grain sizes and the thermal diffusion length of positrons nearly overlapped.

  17. Imaging the attenuation coefficients of magnetically constrained positron beams in matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Charles C.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes a method for tomographically imaging the linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) of positron beams in heterogeneous materials. A β+ ray emitter such as 68Ga, placed in a uniform 3T static magnetic field, generates a well-defined positron beam that maintains its spatial coherence over an attenuation of more than 10-3 while signaling its intensity via the annihilation radiation it generates. A positron emission tomography (PET) system embedded in the magnetic field measures the positron-electron annihilation distribution within objects illuminated by the beam. It's shown that this image can be decomposed into maps of the positron beam's flux and its material-dependent LACs without need for auxiliary measurements or transmission of the beam completely through the object. The initial implementation employs a hybrid PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner developed for medical applications. Mass thicknesses up to 0.55 g/cm2 at a spatial resolution of a few millimeters have been imaged.

  18. Acute brain injury following illicit drug abuse in adolescent and young adult patients: spectrum of neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrot, Shai; Poretti, Andrea; Tucker, Elizabeth W; Soares, Bruno P; Huisman, Thierry Agm

    2017-04-01

    The use of illicit drugs is currently a major medical problem among adolescents. Several illicit drugs have a high abuse potential and can be neurotoxic causing high morbidity and mortality. The clinical manifestation of adolescents with acute drug-induced neurotoxicity is often characterized by non-specific symptoms and findings. Early diagnosis is important to prevent death and permanent long-term neurological impairments. We report on clinical and neuroimaging findings in five adolescents with acute brain imaging following illicit drug intoxication to highlight the role of neuroimaging findings in the diagnostic work-up of pediatric acute drug-induced neurotoxicity. Our patients reveal two main neuroimaging patterns of brain injury: diffuse symmetric subcortical white matter injury with preferential cerebellar involvement (leukoencephalopathy pattern) or multiple foci of ischemic infarctions in a non-arterial territory distribution (ischemic pattern). Familiarity with these two neuroimaging patterns of findings in the evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging studies in adolescents with acutely altered mental status may suggest the correct diagnosis, narrow the differential diagnosis, and consequently allow early initiation of targeted laboratory investigations and treatment, potentially improving outcome.

  19. Nonlinear excitations for the positron acoustic shock waves in dissipative nonextensive electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Asit

    2017-03-01

    Positron acoustic shock waves (PASHWs) in unmagnetized electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasmas consisting of mobile cold positrons, immobile positive ions, q-nonextensive distributed electrons, and hot positrons are studied. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is considered and the reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the Burgers equation. Applying traveling wave transformation, the Burgers equation is transformed to a one dimensional dynamical system. All possible vector fields corresponding to the dynamical system are presented. We have analyzed the dynamical system with the help of potential energy, which helps to identify the stability and instability of the equilibrium points. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PASHWs. Furthermore, fully nonlinear arbitrary amplitude positron acoustic waves are also studied applying the theory of planar dynamical systems. It is also observed that the fundamental features of the small amplitude and arbitrary amplitude PASHWs are significantly affected by the effect of the physical parameters q e , q h , μ e , μ h , σ , η , and U. This work can be useful to understand the qualitative changes in the dynamics of nonlinear small amplitude and fully nonlinear arbitrary amplitude PASHWs in solar wind, ionosphere, lower part of magnetosphere, and auroral acceleration regions.

  20. Neurodevelopmental Precursors and Consequences of Substance Use during Adolescence: Promises and Pitfalls of Longitudinal Neuroimaging Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Diana H; Rose, Emma J; Darcey, Valerie L; Belcher, Annabelle M; VanMeter, John W

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive and emotional regulatory deficits in substance users are often attributed to misuse; however most studies do not include a substance-naïve baseline to justify that conclusion. The etiological literature suggests that pre-existing deficits may contribute to the onset and escalation of use that are then exacerbated by subsequent use. To address this, there is burgeoning interest in conducting prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging studies to isolate neurodevelopmental precursors and consequences of adolescent substance misuse, as reflected in recent initiatives such as the NIH-led Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study and the National Consortium on Alcohol and Neurodevelopment (NCANDA). To distinguish neurodevelopmental precursors from the consequences of adolescent substance use specifically, prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging studies with substance-naïve pre-adolescents are needed. The exemplar described in this article-i.e., the ongoing Adolescent Development Study (ADS)-used a targeted recruitment strategy to bolster the numbers of pre-adolescent individuals who were at increased risk of substance use (i.e., "high-risk") in a sample that was relatively small for longitudinal studies of similar phenomena, but historically large for neuroimaging (i.e., N = 135; 11-13 years of age). At baseline participants underwent MRI testing and a large complement of cognitive and behavioral assessments along with genetics, stress physiology and interviews. The study methods include repeating these measures at three time points (i.e., baseline/Wave 1, Wave 2 and Wave 3), 18 months apart. In this article, rather than outlining specific study outcomes, we describe the breadth of the numerous complexities and challenges involved in conducting this type of prospective, longitudinal neuroimaging study and "lessons learned" for subsequent efforts are discussed. While these types of large longitudinal neuroimaging studies present a number of

  1. Neuroimaging in Mental Health Care: Voices in Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L. Borgelt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Images of brain function, popularly called neuroimages, have become a mainstay of contemporary communication about neuroscience and mental health. Paralleling media coverage of neuroimaging research and the high visibility of clinics selling scans is pressure from sponsors to move basic research about brain function along the translational pathway. Indeed, neuroimaging benefit mental health care with early or tailored intervention, opportunities for education and planning, and access to resources afforded by objectification of disorder. However, risks of premature technology transfer, such as misinterpretation, misrepresentation, and increased stigmatization, could compromise patient care.Stakeholder views on neuroimaging for mental health care are a largely untapped resource of information and guidance for translational efforts. We argue that the insights of key stakeholders – researchers, healthcare providers, patients, and families - have an essential role to play upstream in professional, critical, and ethical discourse about neuroimaging in mental health. Here we integrate previously orthogonal lines of inquiry involving stakeholder research to describe the translational landscape as well as challenges on its horizon.

  2. Near-infrared neuroimaging with NinPy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary E Strangman

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been substantial recent growth in the use of non-invasive optical brain imaging in studies of human brain function in health and disease. Near-infrared neuroimaging (NIN is one of the most promising of these techniques and, although NIN hardware continues to evolve at a rapid pace, software tools supporting optical data acquisition, image processing, statistical modeling and visualization remain less refined. Python, a modular and computationally efficient development language, can support functional neuroimaging studies of diverse design and implementation. In particular, Python's easily readable syntax and modular architecture allow swift prototyping followed by efficient transition to stable production systems. As an introduction to our ongoing efforts to develop Python software tools for structural and functional neuroimaging, we discuss: (i the role of noninvasive diffuse optical imaging in measuring brain function, (ii the key computational requirements to support NIN experiments, (iii our collection of software tools to support near-infrared neuroimaging, called NinPy, and (iv future extensions of these tools that will allow integration of optical with other structural and functional neuroimaging data sources. Source code for the software discussed here will be made available at www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/Neural_SystemsGroup/software.html.

  3. Optimising neuroimaging effectiveness in a district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, M O; Wade, C; McCarron, P

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic accuracy in neurology frequently depends on clinical assessment and neuroimaging interpretation. We assessed neuroimaging discrepancy rates in reported findings between general radiologists and neuroradiologists among patients from a district general hospital (DGH). A neuroradiologist's report was sought on selected DGH patients over 28 months. Pre-planned outcomes included comparisons of primary findings (main diagnosis or abnormality), secondary findings (differential diagnoses and incidental findings) and advice from neuroradiologists for further investigations. A total of 233 patients (119 men and 114 women), mean age 47.2 (SD 17.8) years were studied: 43 had a computed tomography (CT) brain scan only, 37 had CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and 153 had only MRI scans. Discrepancies in the primary diagnosis/abnormality were identified in 33 patients (14.2%). This included 7 of 43 patients (16.3%) who had a CT brain scan as their only neuroimaging. Secondary outcomes differed in 50 patients (21.5%). Neuroradiologists recommended further neuroimaging for 29 patients (12.4%). The most common discrepancies in the primary diagnosis/abnormality were misinterpreting normal for hippocampal sclerosis and missed posterior fossa lesions. There was no evidence of temporal changes in discrepancy rates. Selecting CT and MR neuroimaging studies from general hospitals for reviewing by neuroradiologists is an important and effective way of optimising management of neurological patients.

  4. Neuroimaging in Parkinson disease: from research setting to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politis, Marios

    2014-12-01

    Over the past three decades, neuroimaging studies-including structural, functional and molecular modalities-have provided invaluable insights into the mechanisms underlying Parkinson disease (PD). Observations from multimodal neuroimaging techniques have indicated changes in brain structure and metabolic activity, and an array of neurochemical changes that affect receptor sites and neurotransmitter systems. Characterization of the neurobiological alterations that lead to phenotypic heterogeneity in patients with PD has considerably aided the in vivo investigation of aetiology and pathophysiology, and the identification of novel targets for pharmacological or surgical treatments, including cell therapy. Although PD is now considered to be very complex, no neuroimaging modalities are specifically recommended for routine use in clinical practice. However, conventional MRI and dopamine transporter imaging are commonly used as adjuvant tools in the differential diagnosis between PD and nondegenerative causes of parkinsonism. First-line neuroimaging tools that could have an impact on patient prognosis and treatment strategies remain elusive. This Review discusses the lessons learnt from decades of neuroimaging research in PD, and the promising new approaches with potential applicability to clinical practice.

  5. Monoenergetic positron beam at the reactor based positron source at FRM-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, C.; Kögel, G.; Repper, R.; Schreckenbach, K.; Sperr, P.; Straßer, B.; Triftshäuser, W.

    2002-05-01

    The principle of the in-pile positron source at the Munich research reactor FRM-II is based on absorption of high energy prompt γ-rays from thermal neutron capture in 113Cd. For this purpose, a cadmium cap is placed inside the tip of the inclined beam tube SR-11 in the moderator tank of the reactor, where an undisturbed thermal neutron flux up to 2×10 14n cm-2 s-1 is expected. Inside the cadmium cap a structure of platinum foils is placed for converting high energy γ-radiation into positron-electron pairs. Due to the negative positron work function, moderation in annealed platinum leads to emission of monoenergetic positrons. Therefore, platinum will also be used as moderator, since its moderation property seems to yield long-term stability under reactor conditions and it is much easier to handle than tungsten. Model calculations were performed with SIMION-7.0w to optimise geometry and potential of Pt-foils and electrical lenses. It could be shown that the potentials between the Pt-foils must be chosen in the range of 1-10 V to extract moderated positrons. After successive acceleration to 5 keV by four electrical lenses the beam is magnetically guided in a solenoid field of 7.5 mT resulting in a beam diameter of about 25 mm. An intensity of about 10 10 slow positrons per second is expected in the primary positron beam. Outside of the reactor shield a W(1 0 0) single crystal remoderation stage will lead to an improvement of the positron beam brilliance before the positrons are guided to the experimental facilities.

  6. The child with a cephalocele: etiology, neuroimaging, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lage, J F; Poza, M; Sola, J; Soler, C L; Montalvo, C G; Domingo, R; Puche, A; Ramón, F H; Azorín, P; Lasso, R

    1996-09-01

    We report a series of 46 children who were treated for one of the diverse forms of cranium bifidum during a period of 22 years. The purpose of the survey was to investigate pathogenetic factors involved in the development of cranial dysraphism and to analyze clinical and pathological factors that influence the patients' outcome. We also investigated the existence of associated intracranial anomalies, in a systematic way, using modern methods of neuroimaging, and related the findings to the patients' final results. The lesions were classified as encephalocele (n = 15), cranial meningocele (n = 3), atretic cephalocele (n = 26), cranium bifidum occultum (n = 1), and exencephaly (n = 1). There was an excess of the atretic form of cephaloceles in our series, a fact that probably reflects geographical variations described for cephaloceles in general. The location of the lesions was occipital in 29 children, parietal in 16, and temporal and frontobasal in one case each. In seven cases there was parental consanguinity. A familial history of malformations of the central nervous system was encountered in eight instances. Associated systemic abnormalities were present in 23 patients, while central nervous system anomalies were found in 36 children. Cephalocele repair was undertaken on 35 occasions. There were no surgical fatalities in the series. The mean follow-up time was of 7 years. Overall mortality for the whole group was of 17/46 or 36%. Twenty of the 29 survivors had no neurological sequelae, but only 18 children exhibited a competitive intelligence level. A good outcome was found to correlate well with: an average head size at birth, a normal initial neurological condition, operability of the lesions, and an absence of disorders of the neuronal migration. Neurological outcome depended also on the occurrence or not of hydrocephalus, while the intelligence level was mainly related to the absence of cerebral tissue within the sac of the malformation.

  7. Vortices in Ionization Collisions by Positron Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Navarrete, F; Fiol, J; Barrachina, R O

    2013-01-01

    The presence of vortices in the ionisation of hydrogen atoms by positrons at intermediate impact energies is investigated. The present findings show that a previously reported minima in the fully-differential cross section is the signature of a vortex in the continuum positron-electron-proton system. The behaviour of the real and imaginary parts of the complex-valued transition matrix is studied in order to determine and characterize the vortex in momentum space. The obtained information is translated to fully-differential ionisation cross sections, feasible of being measured with currently available techniques.

  8. Positronium Formation in Positron-Lithium Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程勇军; 周雅君; 刘芳

    2011-01-01

    The positronium formation process in positron scattering with atomic lithium is investigated using the coupledchannel optical method.The cross sections of positronium formation into the n =1 and n =2 levels from 2 to 60 e V are reported.The present results show reasonable agreement with the available experimental measurements and theoretical calculations.%The positronium formation process in positron scattering with atomic lithium is investigated using the coupled-channel optical method. The cross sections of positronium formation into the n = 1 and n = 2 levels from 2 to 60 e V are reported. The present results show reasonable agreement with the available experimental measurements and theoretical calculations.

  9. A compact positron annihilation lifetime spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dao-Wu; LIU Jun-Hui; ZHANG Zhi-Ming; WANG Bao-Yi; ZHANG Tian-Bao; WEI Long

    2011-01-01

    Using LYSO scintillator coupled on HAMAMATSU R9800(a fast photomultiplier)to form the small size γ-ray detectors,a compact lifetime spectrometer has been built for the positron annihilation experiments.The system time resolution FWHM=193 ps and the coincidence counting rate -8 cps/μCi were achieved.A lifetime value of 219±1 ps of positron annihilation in well annealed Si was tested,which is in agreement with the typical values published in the previous lectures.

  10. 89Zr radiochemistry for positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Gregory W; Engle, Jonathan W; Barnhart, Todd E; Nickles, R Jerry

    2011-09-01

    The positron emitting isotope (89)Zr is an ideal radionuclide for use in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). This article reviews the cyclotron physics of (89)Zr production, and the chemical separation methods for isolating it from yttrium target material. (89)Zr coordination with the bifunctional chelate desferrioxamine B is discussed, along with the common procedures for attaching the chelate to mAbs. The review is intended to detail the procedure for creating (89)Zr labeled mAbs, going from cyclotron to PET.

  11. Depolarization in the ILC Linac-to-Ring Positron Beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Riemann, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    To achieve the physics goals of future Linear Colliders, it is important that electron and positron beams are polarized. The positron source planned for the International Linear Collider (ILC) is based on a helical undulator system and can deliver a polarised beam with positron polarization of 60%. To ensure that no significant polarization is lost during the transport of the electron and positron beams from the source to the interaction region, spin tracking has to be included in all transport elements which can contribute to a loss of polarization. These are the positron source, the damping ring, the spin rotators, the main linac and the beam delivery system. In particular, the dynamics of the polarized positron beam is required to be investigated. The results of positron spin tracking and depolarization study at the Positron-Linac-To-Ring (PLTR) beamline are presented.

  12. DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ELECTRONS AND POSITRONS INTERACTING WITH DETECTOR MATERIAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEIRING, WJ; VANKLINKEN, J; WICHERS, VA

    1991-01-01

    A theory of multiple scattering, exhibiting differences between electrons and positrons in interactions with matter, is developed. Additional differences in stopping power and annihilation for positrons are briefly discussed. Experimental verification of these differences is reported for plastic sci

  13. Second-order Born approximation for the ionization of molecules by electron and positron impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Cappello, C. [Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, Institut Jean Barriol (FR2843), 1 Boulevard Arago, F-57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France); Rezkallah, Z.; Houamer, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systemes Dynamiques, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences Universite Ferhat Abbas, Setif 19000 (Algeria); Charpentier, I. [Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux UMR 7554, Ile du Saulcy, F-57045 Metz Cedex 1 (France); Hervieux, P. A. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, 23 Rue du Loess, BP 43, F-67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Ruiz-Lopez, M. F. [Nancy-University, Equipe de Chimie et Biochimie Theoriques, UMR CNRS-UHP 7565, BP 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Dey, R. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Roy, A. C. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, Belur Math 711202, West Bengal (India)

    2011-09-15

    Second-order Born approximation is applied to study the ionization of molecules. The initial and final states are described by single-center wave functions. For the initial state a Gaussian wave function is used while for the ejected electron it is a distorted wave. Results of the present model are compared with recent (e,2e) experiments on the water molecule. Preliminary results are also presented for the ionization of the thymine molecule by electrons and positrons.

  14. Neuroimaging, a new tool for investigating the effects of early diet on cognitive and brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth B Isaacs

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition is crucial to the initial development of the central nervous system, and then to its maintenance, because both depend on dietary intake to supply the elements required to develop and fuel the system. Diet in early life is often seen in the context of programming where a stimulus occurring during a vulnerable period can have long-lasting or even lifetime effects on some aspect of the organism’s structure or function. Nutrition was first shown to be a programing stimulus for growth, and then for cognitive behaviour, in animal studies that were also able to employ methods that allowed the demonstration of neural effects of early nutrition. Such research raised the question of whether nutrition could also programme cognition/brain structure in humans. Initial studies of cognitive effects were observational, usually in developing countries where the presence of confounding factors made it difficult to interpret the role of nutrition in the cognitive deficits that were seen. Attributing causality to nutrition required randomised controlled trials and these, often in developed countries, started to appear around 30 years ago. Most demonstrated convincingly that early nutrition could affect subsequent cognition. Until the advent of neuroimaging techniques that allowed in vivo examination of the brain, however, we could determine very little about the neural effects of early diet in humans. The combination of well-designed trials with neuroimaging tools means that we are now able to pose and answer questions that would have seemed impossible only recently. This review discusses various neuroimaging methods that are suitable for use in nutrition studies, while pointing out some of the limitations that they may have. The existing literature is small, but examples of studies that have used these methods are presented. Finally, some considerations that have arisen from previous studies, as well as suggestions for future research, are discussed.

  15. Machine Learning for Neuroimaging with Scikit-Learn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eAbraham

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Statistical machine learning methods are increasingly used for neuroimaging data analysis. Their main virtue is their ability to model high-dimensional datasets, e.g. multivariate analysis of activation images or resting-state time series. Supervised learning is typically used in decoding or encoding settings to relate brain images to behavioral or clinical observations, while unsupervised learning can uncover hidden structures in sets of images (e.g. resting state functional MRI or find sub-populations in large cohorts. By considering different functional neuroimaging applications, we illustrate how scikit-learn, a Python machine learning library, can be used to perform some key analysis steps. Scikit-learn contains a very large set of statistical learning algorithms, both supervised and unsupervised, and its application to neuroimaging data provides a versatile tool to study the brain.

  16. Looking inside the brain the power of neuroimaging

    CERN Document Server

    Le Bihan, Denis

    2014-01-01

    It is now possible to witness human brain activity while we are talking, reading, or thinking, thanks to revolutionary neuroimaging techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These groundbreaking advances have opened infinite fields of investigation—into such areas as musical perception, brain development in utero, and faulty brain connections leading to psychiatric disorders—and have raised unprecedented ethical issues. In Looking Inside the Brain, one of the leading pioneers of the field, Denis Le Bihan, offers an engaging account of the sophisticated interdisciplinary research in physics, neuroscience, and medicine that have led to the remarkable neuroimaging methods that give us a detailed look into the human brain. Introducing neurological anatomy and physiology, Le Bihan walks readers through the historical evolution of imaging technology—from the x-ray and CT scan to the PET scan and MRI—and he explains how neuroimaging uncovers afflictions like stroke or cancer and the workings of high...

  17. Machine learning for neuroimaging with scikit-learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Alexandre; Pedregosa, Fabian; Eickenberg, Michael; Gervais, Philippe; Mueller, Andreas; Kossaifi, Jean; Gramfort, Alexandre; Thirion, Bertrand; Varoquaux, Gaël

    2014-01-01

    Statistical machine learning methods are increasingly used for neuroimaging data analysis. Their main virtue is their ability to model high-dimensional datasets, e.g., multivariate analysis of activation images or resting-state time series. Supervised learning is typically used in decoding or encoding settings to relate brain images to behavioral or clinical observations, while unsupervised learning can uncover hidden structures in sets of images (e.g., resting state functional MRI) or find sub-populations in large cohorts. By considering different functional neuroimaging applications, we illustrate how scikit-learn, a Python machine learning library, can be used to perform some key analysis steps. Scikit-learn contains a very large set of statistical learning algorithms, both supervised and unsupervised, and its application to neuroimaging data provides a versatile tool to study the brain.

  18. When Should Neuroimaging be Applied in the Criminal Court?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    When does neuroimaging constitute a sufficiently developed technology to be put into use in the work of determining whether or not a defendant is guilty of crime? This question constitutes the starting point of the present paper. First, it is suggested that an overall answer is provided by what...... is referred to as the “ideal comparative view.” Secondly, it is—on the ground of this view—argued that the answer as to whether neuroimaging technology should be applied presupposes penal theoretical considerations. Thirdly, it is argued that the retributivist theory of punishment is not well......-suited for delivering the sort of theoretical guidance that is required for assessing the desirability of using neuroimaging in the work of the criminal court....

  19. Ischemic Stroke Treatment Trials: Neuroimaging Advancements and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vivek P; Heit, Jeremy J

    2017-06-01

    There have been significant advancements in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke in the last 2 decades. Recent trials have placed a significant emphasis on minimizing the time from symptom onset to stroke treatment by reperfusion therapies, which decreases the cerebral infarct volume and improves clinical outcomes. These clinical advances have paralleled and been aided by advances in neuroimaging. However, controversy remains regarding how much time should be spent on neuroimaging evaluation versus expediting patient treatment. In this review article, we examine the key endovascular stroke trials published in the past 25 years, and we briefly highlight the failures and successes of endovascular stroke trials performed in the past 4 years. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using time from symptom onset versus neuroimaging in determining endovascular stroke therapy candidacy.

  20. Effects of stoichiometries on the positron distribution in Si sub 1 sub - sub x sub - sub y Ge sub x C sub y alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Soudini, B; Abid, H; Sehil, M

    2003-01-01

    The effect of alloying on the positron distribution in Si sub 1 sub - sub x sub - sub y Ge sub x C sub y alloys is reported. Our computations of the thermalized positron densities are based on the independent particle method coupled with the empirical pseudopotential method to derive the positron and electron wave functions, respectively. Initial results show a clear symmetrical positron charge distribution relative to the bond centre, a quite similar situation that was found in the IV groups. Since the minimum band gaps were found to be very sensitive to the carbon as well as the germanium concentration variations, this has an immediate consequence on the positron densities, where we find a deviation from linearity. This illustrative result was an indication of the alloying effect in this system (bowing effect). (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Physics perspectives at JLab with a polarized positron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voutier Eric

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Polarized positron beams are in some respect mandatory complements to polarized electron beams. The advent of the PEPPo concept for polarized positron production opens the possibility for the developement at the Jefferson Laboratory of a continuous polarized positron beam. The benefits of such a beam for hadronic structure studies are discussed, together with the technical and technological challenges to face.

  2. Physics perspectives at JLab with a polarized positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutier, Eric J.-M. [UNIV. JOSEPH FOURNIER, GRENOBLE, France

    2014-06-01

    Polarized positron beams are in some respect mandatory complements to polarized electron beams. The advent of the PEPPo concept for polarized positron production opens the possibility for the developement at the Jefferson Laboratory of a continuous polarized positron beam. The benefits of such a beam for hadronic structure studies are discussed, together with the technical and technological challenges to face.

  3. The multilayer Fe/Hf studied with slow positron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashige, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Nakajyo, T.; Koizumi, T.; Kanazawa, I.; Komori, F.; Ito, Y.

    1997-04-01

    The positron annihilation parameter versus the incident positron energy is measured in the thin Fe films and the Fe/Hf bilayer on silica substrate, by means of the variable energetic slow-positron beam technique. We have analyzed the change in open-volume spaces and vacancy-type defects among the Fe microcrystals in these thin films with the deposition temperature.

  4. Positron Annihilation Studies of VVER Type Reactor Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Brauer, G.

    1995-01-01

    A summary of recent positron annihilation work on Russian VVER type reactor steels is presented. Thereby, special attention is paid to the outline of basic processes that might help to understand the positron behaviour in this class of industrial material. The idea of positron trapping by irradiation-induced precipitates, which are probably carbides, is discussed in detail.

  5. Positron methods for the study of defects in bulk materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1995-01-01

    The basic principles of positron annihilation physics are briefly discussed and the three most important experimental techniques used for bulk studies are described (i.e. positron lifetime, angular correlation, Doppler broadening). Several examples of the use of the positron methods are discussed...

  6. Incidental Findings in Neuroimaging: Ethical and Medicolegal Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid advances in neurosciences in the last three decades, there has been an exponential increase in the use of neuroimaging both in basic sciences and clinical research involving human subjects. During routine neuroimaging, incidental findings that are not part of the protocol or scope of research agenda can occur and they often pose a challenge as to how they should be handled to abide by the medicolegal principles of research ethics. This paper reviews the issue from various ethical (do no harm, general duty to rescue, and mutual benefits and owing) and medicolegal perspectives (legal liability, fiduciary duties, Law of Tort, and Law of Contract) with a suggested protocol of approach.

  7. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree...

  8. A compact positron annihilation lifetime spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李道武; 刘军辉; 章志明; 王宝义; 张天保; 魏龙

    2011-01-01

    Using LYSO scintillator coupled on HAMAMATSU R9800 (a fast photomultiplier) to form the small size γ-ray detectors, a compact lifetime spectrometer has been built for the positron annihilation experiments. The system time resolution FWHM=193 ps and the co

  9. Positron production in collision of heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Khriplovich, I B

    2016-01-01

    We consider the electromagnetic production of positron in collision of slow heavy nuclei, with the simultaneously produced electron captured by one of the nuclei. The cross-section of the discussed process exceeds essentially the cross-section of $e^+e^-$ production.

  10. Is positron emission tomography useful in stroke?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeReuck, J; Leys, D; DeKeyser, J

    1997-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in the study of stroke and related cerebrovascular diseases. It has shown the various stages leading to cerebral infarction and defined the significance of the ischaemic penumbra. PET scan can predict the clinical outcome of patients with acute

  11. Positron Interactions with Atoms and Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2012-01-01

    Dirac, in 1928, combining the ideas of quantum mechanics and the ideas of relativity invented the well-known relativistic wave equation. In his formulation, he predicted an antiparticle of the electron of spin n-bar/2. He thought that this particle must be a proton. Dirac published his interpretation in a paper 'A theory of electrons and protons.' It was shown later by the mathematician Hermann Weyl that the Dirac theory was completely symmetric between negative and positive particles and the positive particle must have the same mass as that of the electron. In his J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Prize Acceptance Speech, Dirac notes that 'Blackett was really the first person to obtain hard evidence for the existence of a positron but he was afraid to publish it. He wanted confirmation, he was really over cautious.' Positron, produced by the collision of cosmic rays in a cloud chamber, was detected experimentally by Anderson in 1932. His paper was published in Physical Review in 1933. The concept of the positron and its detection were the important discoveries of the 20th century. I have tried to discuss various processes involving interactions of positrons with atoms and ions. This includes scattering, bound states and resonances. It has not been possible to include the enormous work which has been carried out during the last 40 or 50 years in theory and measurements.

  12. Positron annihilation with core and valence electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Green, D G

    2015-01-01

    $\\gamma$-ray spectra for positron annihilation with the core and valence electrons of the noble gas atoms Ar, Kr and Xe is calculated within the framework of diagrammatic many-body theory. The effect of positron-atom and short-range positron-electron correlations on the annihilation process is examined in detail. Short-range correlations, which are described through non-local corrections to the vertex of the annihilation amplitude, are found to significantly enhance the spectra for annihilation on the core orbitals. For Ar, Kr and Xe, the core contributions to the annihilation rate are found to be 0.55\\%, 1.5\\% and 2.2\\% respectively, their small values reflecting the difficulty for the positron to probe distances close to the nucleus. Importantly however, the core subshells have a broad momentum distribution and markedly contribute to the annihilation spectra at Doppler energy shifts $\\gtrsim3$\\,keV, and even dominate the spectra of Kr and Xe at shifts $\\gtrsim5$\\,keV. Their inclusion brings the theoretical ...

  13. A positron moderator using porous metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bao-Yi; YU Run-Sheng; ZHAO Fa-Ru; MA Chuang-Xin; ZHANG Tian-Bao; WEI Long

    2004-01-01

    Two types of porous metal moderators (i.e. porous nickel layer and multi-wire tungsten layer) are proposed and tested on a slow positron beam line. A moderation efficiency of about 2×10-4 has been achieved, which is higher than that for W vane geometry moderator by a factor of 4.

  14. Positrons observed to originate from thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2011-05-01

    Thunderstorms are the result of warm, moist air moving rapidly upward, then cooling and condensing. Electrification occurs within thunderstorms (as noted by Benjamin Franklin), produced primarily by frictional processes among ice particles. This leads to lightning discharges; the types, intensities, and rates of these discharges vary greatly among thunderstorms. Even though scientists have been studying lightning since Franklin's time, new phenomena associated with thunderstorms are still being discovered. In particular, a recent finding by Briggs et al. [2011], based on observations by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) instrument on NASA's satellite-based Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), shows that positrons are also generated by thunderstorms. Positrons are the antimatter form of electrons—they have the same mass and charge as an electron but are of positive rather than negative charge; hence the name positron. Observations of positrons from thunderstorms may lead to a new tool for understanding the electrification and high-energy processes occurring within thunderstorms. New theories, along with new observational techniques, are rapidly evolving in this field.

  15. Positron elastic scattering from alkaline earth targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Luis A.; Assafrão, Denise; Mohallem, José R.

    2016-07-01

    A previously reported model potential approach [Poveda et al., Phys. Rev. A 87, 052702 (2013)] was extended to study low energy positron elastic scattering from beryllium and magnesium. The cross sections were computed for energies ranging from 10-5 eV up to well above the positronium formation threshold. The present results are in good agreement with previous reports, including the prediction of a p-wave resonance in the cross section for magnesium. The emergence of this shape resonance is connected to a trend observed in the evolution of the partial wave cross section in going from Be to Mg target. This trend lead us to speculate that a sharp d-wave resonance should be observed in positron elastic scattering from calcium. The positron-target binding energies are investigated in detail, both using the scattering information and by direct computation of the bound state energies using the model potentials. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2016-70120-y

  16. Positron source position sensing detector and electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Charles A.; Bradshaw, Jr., John F.; Kaufman, David E.; Chesler, David A.; Brownell, Gordon L.

    1985-01-01

    A positron source, position sensing device, particularly with medical applications, in which positron induced gamma radiation is detected using a ring of stacked, individual scintillation crystals, a plurality of photodetectors, separated from the scintillation crystals by a light guide, and high resolution position interpolation electronics. Preferably the scintillation crystals are several times more numerous than the photodetectors with each crystal being responsible for a single scintillation event from a received gamma ray. The light guide will disperse the light emitted from gamma ray absorption over several photodetectors. Processing electronics for the output of the photodetectors resolves the location of the scintillation event to a fraction of the dimension of each photodetector. Because each positron absorption results in two 180.degree. oppositely traveling gamma rays, the detection of scintillation in pairs permits location of the positron source in a manner useful for diagnostic purposes. The processing electronics simultaneously responds to the outputs of the photodetectors to locate the scintillations to the source crystal. While it is preferable that the scintillation crystal include a plurality of stacked crystal elements, the resolving power of the processing electronics is also applicable to continuous crystal scintillators.

  17. Positron analysis of defects in metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, A; Kruseman, AC; Schut, H; Mijnarends, PE; Kooi, BJ; De Hosson, JTM; Jean, YC; Eldrup, M; Schrader, DM; West, RN

    1997-01-01

    New methods are discussed to improve defect analysis. The first method employs mapping of two shape parameters, S and W, of the positron annihilation photopeak. It is demonstrated that the combined use of S and W allows to a better discrimination of defects. The other method is based on background s

  18. Positron Impact Mransitions of Atomic Sodium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Yong-Jun; ZHOU YarJun

    2011-01-01

    @@ We present a new investigation of elastic and inelastic positron-sodium scattering by using the coupled-channel optical method(CCO)at an incident energy region of 2-100eV.The ionization continuum and positronium formation channels have been included via a complex equivalent-local optical potential.The present calculations are compared with available theoretical data and our investigation indicates that the inclusion of ionization and Ps-formation channels in the present calculations has a significant effect on the cross sections of elastic and inelastic positron-sodium scattering at lower energies.%We present a new investigation of elastic and inelastic positron-sodium scattering by using the coupled-channel optical method (CCO) at an incident energy region of 2-100eV. The ionization continuum and positronium formation channels have been included via a complex equivalent-local optical potential. The present calculations are compared with available theoretical data and our investigation indicates that the inclusion of ionization and Ps-formation channels in the present calculations has a significant effect on the cross sections of elastic and inelastic positron-sodium scattering at lower energies.

  19. Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

  20. Positron emission tomography : measurement of transgene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EFJ; Vaalburg, W

    2002-01-01

    Noninvasive and repetitive imaging of transgene expression can play a pivotal role in the development of gene therapy strategies, as it offers investigators a means to determine the effectiveness of their gene transfection protocols. In the last decade, imaging of transgene expression using positron

  1. Intense positron beam as a source for production of electron-positron plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneking, M. R.; Horn-Stanja, J.; Stenson, E. V.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Saitoh, H.; Hergenhahn, U.; Niemann, H.; Paschkowski, N.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Piochacz, C.

    2016-10-01

    We aim to produce magnetically confined, short Debye length electron-positron plasma and test predicted properties for such systems. A first challenge is obtaining large numbers of positrons; a table-top experiment (system size 5 cm) with a temperature less than 5 eV requires about 1010 positrons to have more than 10 Debye lengths in the system. The NEPOMUC facility at the FRM II research reactor in Germany is one of the world's most intense positron sources. We report on characterization (using a retarding field energy analyzer with magnetic field gradient) of the NEPOMUC beam as delivered to the open beam port at various beam energies and in both the re-moderated and primary beam configurations in order to design optimal trapping (and accumulation) schemes for production of electron-positron plasma. The intensity of the re-moderated (primary) beam is in the range 2 -3 x 107 /s (1 - 5 x 108 /s). The re-moderated beam is currently the most promising for direct injection and confinement experiments; it has a parallel energy spread of 15 - 35% and the transverse energy spread is 6 - 15% of the parallel energy. We report on the implications for injection and trapping in a dipole magnetic field as well as plans for beam development, in situ re-moderation, and accumulation. We also report results demonstrating a difference in phosphor luminescent response to low energy positrons versus electrons.

  2. A CF4 based positron trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanović, Srdjan; Banković, Ana; Cassidy, David; Cooper, Ben; Deller, Adam; Dujko, Saša; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2016-11-01

    All buffer-gas positron traps in use today rely on N2 as the primary trapping gas due to its conveniently placed {{{a}}}1{{\\Pi }} electronic excitation cross-section. The energy loss per excitation in this process is 8.5 eV, which is sufficient to capture positrons from low-energy moderated beams into a Penning-trap configuration of electric and magnetic fields. However, the energy range over which this cross-section is accessible overlaps with that for positronium (Ps) formation, resulting in inevitable losses and setting an intrinsic upper limit on the overall trapping efficiency of ∼25%. In this paper we present a numerical simulation of a device that uses CF4 as the primary trapping gas, exploiting vibrational excitation as the main inelastic capture process. The threshold for such excitations is far below that for Ps formation and hence, in principle, a CF4 trap can be highly efficient; our simulations indicate that it may be possible to achieve trapping efficiencies as high as 90%. We also report the results of an attempt to re-purpose an existing two-stage N2-based buffer-gas positron trap. Operating the device using CF4 proved unsuccessful, which we attribute to back scattering and expansion of the positron beam following interactions with the CF4 gas, and an unfavourably broad longitudinal beam energy spread arising from the magnetic field differential between the source and trap regions. The observed performance was broadly consistent with subsequent simulations that included parameters specific to the test system, and we outline the modifications that would be required to realise efficient positron trapping with CF4. However, additional losses appear to be present which require further investigation through both simulation and experiment.

  3. Quantum primary rainbows in transmission of positrons through very short carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćosić, M.; Petrović, S.; Nešković, N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is devoted to a quantum mechanical consideration of the transmission of positrons of a kinetic energy of 1 MeV through very short (11, 9) single-wall chiral carbon nanotubes. The nanotube lengths are between 50 and 320 nm. The transmission process is determined by the rainbow effects. The interaction potential of a positron and the nanotube is deduced from the Molire's interaction potential of the positron and a nanotube atom using the continuum approximation. We solve numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and calculate the spatial and angular distributions of transmitted positrons. The initial positron beam is assumed to be an ensemble of non-interacting Gaussian wave packets. We generate the spatial and angular distributions using the computer simulation method. The examination is focused on the spatial and angular primary rainbows. It begins with an analysis of the corresponding classical rainbows, and continues with a detailed investigation of the amplitudes and phases of the wave functions of transmitted positrons. These analyses enable one to identify the principal and supernumerary primary rainbows appearing in the spatial and angular distributions. They also result in a detailed explanation of the way of their generation, which includes the effects of wrinkling of each wave packet during its deflection from the nanotube wall, and of its concentration just before a virtual barrier lying close to the corresponding classical rainbow. The wrinkling of the wave packets occurs due to their internal focusing. In addition, the wave packets wrinkle in a mutually coordinated way. This explanation may induce new theoretical and experimental investigations of quantum rainbows occurring in various atomic collision processes.

  4. Quantum primary rainbows in transmission of positrons through very short carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ćosić, M., E-mail: mcosic@vinca.rs; Petrović, S.; Nešković, N.

    2016-04-15

    This paper is devoted to a quantum mechanical consideration of the transmission of positrons of a kinetic energy of 1 MeV through very short (11, 9) single-wall chiral carbon nanotubes. The nanotube lengths are between 50 and 320 nm. The transmission process is determined by the rainbow effects. The interaction potential of a positron and the nanotube is deduced from the Molire’s interaction potential of the positron and a nanotube atom using the continuum approximation. We solve numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and calculate the spatial and angular distributions of transmitted positrons. The initial positron beam is assumed to be an ensemble of non-interacting Gaussian wave packets. We generate the spatial and angular distributions using the computer simulation method. The examination is focused on the spatial and angular primary rainbows. It begins with an analysis of the corresponding classical rainbows, and continues with a detailed investigation of the amplitudes and phases of the wave functions of transmitted positrons. These analyses enable one to identify the principal and supernumerary primary rainbows appearing in the spatial and angular distributions. They also result in a detailed explanation of the way of their generation, which includes the effects of wrinkling of each wave packet during its deflection from the nanotube wall, and of its concentration just before a virtual barrier lying close to the corresponding classical rainbow. The wrinkling of the wave packets occurs due to their internal focusing. In addition, the wave packets wrinkle in a mutually coordinated way. This explanation may induce new theoretical and experimental investigations of quantum rainbows occurring in various atomic collision processes.

  5. Neuroimaging and clinical neurophysiology in cluster headache and trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Lars; Sandrini, Giorgio; Perrotta, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Clinical neurophysiology and neuroimaging are two non-invasive approaches used to investigate the pathophysiological basis of primary headaches, including cluster headache (CH) and other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). Modern neuroimaging has revolutionized our understanding...

  6. 25 years of neuroimaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Bradley R.; Welsh, Robert C.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease for which a precise cause has not yet been identified. Standard CT or MRI evaluation does not demonstrate gross structural nervous system changes in ALS, so conventional neuroimaging techniques have provided little insight into the pathophysiology of this disease. Advanced neuroimaging techniques—such as structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy—allow evaluation of alterations of the nervous system in ALS. These alterations include focal loss of grey and white matter and reductions in white matter tract integrity, as well as changes in neural networks and in the chemistry, metabolism and receptor distribution in the brain. Given their potential for investigation of both brain structure and function, advanced neuroimaging methods offer important opportunities to improve diagnosis, guide prognosis, and direct future treatment strategies in ALS. In this article, we review the contributions made by various advanced neuroimaging techniques to our understanding of the impact of ALS on different brain regions, and the potential role of such measures in biomarker development. PMID:23917850

  7. Neuroimaging of aggressive and violent behaviour in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Sterzer

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a number of functional and structural neuroimaging studies have investigated the neural bases of aggressive and violent behaviour in children and adolescents. Most functional neuroimaging studies have persued the hypothesis that pathological aggression is a consequence of deficits in the neural circuits involved in emotion processing. There is converging evidence for deficient neural responses to emotional stimuli in youths with a propensity towards aggressive behaviour. In addition, recent neuroimaging work has suggested that aggressive behaviour is also associated with abnormalities in neural processes that subserve both the inhibitory control of behaviour and the flexible adaptation of behaviour in accord with reinforcement information. Structural neuroimaging studies in children and adolescents with conduct problems are still scarce, but point to deficits in brain structures in volved in the processing of social information and in the regulation of social and goal directed behaviour. The indisputable progress that this research field has made in recent years notwithstanding, the overall picture is still rather patchy and there are inconsistencies between studies that await clarification. Despite this, we attempt to provide an integrated view on the neural abnormalities that may contribute to various forms of juvenile aggression and violence, and discuss research strategies that may help to provide a more profound understanding of these important issues in the future.

  8. Memory Systems, Processing Modes, and Components: Functional Neuroimaging Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Roberto; Moscovitch, Morris

    2013-01-01

    In the 1980s and 1990s, there was a major theoretical debate in the memory domain regarding the multiple memory systems and processing modes frameworks. The components of processing framework argued for a middle ground: Instead of neatly divided memory systems or processing modes, this framework proposed the existence of numerous processing components that are recruited in different combinations by memory tasks and yield complex patterns of associations and dissociations. Because behavioral evidence was not sufficient to decide among these three frameworks, the debate was largely abandoned. However, functional neuroimaging evidence accumulated during the last two decades resolves the stalemate, because this evidence is more consistent with the components framework than with the other two frameworks. For example, functional neuroimaging evidence shows that brain regions attributed to one memory system can contribute to tasks associated with other memory systems and that brain regions attributed to the same processing mode (perceptual or conceptual) can be dissociated from each other. Functional neuroimaging evidence suggests that memory processes are supported by transient interactions between a few regions called process-specific alliances. These conceptual developments are an example of how functional neuroimaging can contribute to theoretical debates in cognitive psychology. PMID:24163702

  9. Neuroimaging Research with Children: Ethical Issues and Case Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coch, Donna

    2007-01-01

    There are few available resources for learning and teaching about ethical issues in neuroimaging research with children, who constitute a special and vulnerable population. Here, a brief review of ethical issues in developmental research, situated within the emerging field of neuroethics, highlights the increasingly interdisciplinary nature of…

  10. Functional Neuroimaging of Appetite and Gut–Brain Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Preissl, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Ultimately, eating decisions are made in the brain, based on the integration
    of multiple neural and hormonal signals. Since the early 1990s the use of
    functional
    neuroimaging techniques has continued to increase. Their application
    in the study of the regulation of food intake and gut

  11. 25 years of neuroimaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Bradley R; Welsh, Robert C; Feldman, Eva L

    2013-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease for which a precise cause has not yet been identified. Standard CT or MRI evaluation does not demonstrate gross structural nervous system changes in ALS, so conventional neuroimaging techniques have provided little insight into the pathophysiology of this disease. Advanced neuroimaging techniques--such as structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy--allow evaluation of alterations of the nervous system in ALS. These alterations include focal loss of grey and white matter and reductions in white matter tract integrity, as well as changes in neural networks and in the chemistry, metabolism and receptor distribution in the brain. Given their potential for investigation of both brain structure and function, advanced neuroimaging methods offer important opportunities to improve diagnosis, guide prognosis, and direct future treatment strategies in ALS. In this article, we review the contributions made by various advanced neuroimaging techniques to our understanding of the impact of ALS on different brain regions, and the potential role of such measures in biomarker development.

  12. Testing for difference between two groups of functional neuroimaging experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Chen, Andrew C. N.; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-01-01

    We describe a meta-analytic method that tests for the difference between two groups of functional neuroimaging experiments. We use kernel density estimation in three-dimensional brain space to convert points representing focal brain activations into a voxel-based representation. We find the maximum...

  13. Visualization of Nonlinear Classification Models in Neuroimaging - Signed Sensitivity Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup; Schmah, Tanya; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2012-01-01

    Classification models are becoming increasing popular tools in the analysis of neuroimaging data sets. Besides obtaining good prediction accuracy, a competing goal is to interpret how the classifier works. From a neuroscientific perspective, we are interested in the brain pattern reflecting...

  14. Neuroimaging findings in late-onset schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Changtae; Lim, Hyun Kook; Lee, Chang Uk

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in late-onset mental disorders. Among them, geriatric schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are significant health care risks and major causes of disability. We discussed whether late-onset schizophrenia (LOS) and late-onset bipolar (LOB) disorder can be a separate entity from early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) and early-onset bipolar (EOB) disorder in a subset of late-life schizophrenia or late-life bipolar disorder through neuroimaging studies. A literature search for imaging studies of LOS or LOB was performed in the PubMed database. Search terms used were "(imaging OR MRI OR CT OR SPECT OR DTI OR PET OR fMRI) AND (schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) AND late onset." Articles that were published in English before October 2013 were included. There were a few neuroimaging studies assessing whether LOS and LOB had different disease-specific neural substrates compared with EOS and EOB. These researches mainly observed volumetric differences in specific brain regions, white matter hyperintensities, diffusion tensor imaging, or functional neuroimaging to explore the differences between LOS and LOB and EOS and EOB. The aim of this review was to highlight the neural substrates involved in LOS and LOB through neuroimaging studies. The exploration of neuroanatomical markers may be the key to the understanding of underlying neurobiology in LOS and LOB.

  15. A single particle effective potential for interacting positron and positronium

    CERN Document Server

    Zubiaga, A; Puska, M

    2013-01-01

    We have studied small systems composed by an atom and a positron or a positronium atom. We have used many-body quantum mechanical calculations to describe the correlation effects of light particles. Explicitly correlated gaussian for the basis functions and a stochastical variational optimization method has allowed to obtain accurate wavefunctions and energies. We have discussed the chemistry of positrons in those systems by means of analyzing the densities of the light particles (electrons and positrons). During the discussion, we propose an effective potential that describes the properties of the positron in those systems, valid also when it forms a Ps cluster. The effective potential is a mean field description of the interaction of the positron that can be used to calculate the distribution of the positron and its interaction energy. This potential can be a step forward for an accurate single particle description of the positron in cases when it forms positronium, specially molecular soft matter.

  16. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at a superconducting electron accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A.; Anwand, W.; Attallah, A. G.; Dornberg, G.; Elsayed, M.; Enke, D.; Hussein, A. E. M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Liedke, M. O.; Potzger, K.; Trinh, T. T.

    2017-01-01

    The Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf operates a superconducting linear accelerator for electrons with energies up to 35 MeV and average beam currents up to 1.6 mA. The electron beam is employed for production of several secondary beams including X-rays from bremsstrahlung production, neutrons, and positrons. The secondary positron beam after moderation feeds the Monoenergetic Positron Source (MePS) where positron annihilation lifetime (PALS) and positron annihilation Doppler-broadening experiments in materials science are performed in parallel. The adjustable repetition rate of the continuous-wave electron beams allows matching of the pulse separation to the positron lifetime in the sample under study. The energy of the positron beam can be set between 0.5 keV and 20 keV to perform depth resolved defect spectroscopy and porosity studies especially for thin films.

  17. Positron Beam Propagation in a Meter Long Plasma Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, K.A.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W.B.; /UCLA; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; O' Connell, C.; Raimondi, P.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.

    2008-03-17

    Recent experiments and simulations have shown that positron beams propagating in plasmas can be focused and also create wakes with large accelerating gradients. For similar parameters, the wakes driven by positron beams are somewhat smaller compared to the case of an electron beam. Simulations have shown that the wake amplitude can be increased if the positron beam is propagated in a hollow plasma channel (Ref. 1). This paper, compares experimentally, the propagation and beam dynamics of a positron beam in a meter scale homogeneous plasma, to a positron beam hollow channel plasma. The results show that positron beams in hollow channels are less prone to distortions and deflections. Hollow channels were observed to guide the positron beam onto the channel axis. Beam energy loss was also observed implying the formation of a large wake amplitude. The experiments were carried out as part of the E-162 plasma wakefield experiments at SLAC.

  18. Experimental Study of a Positron\\\\ Source Using Channeling

    CERN Multimedia

    Gavrykov, V; Kulibaba, V; Baier, V; Beloborodov, K; Bojenok, A; Bukin, A; Burdin, S; Dimova, T; Druzhinin, V; Dubrovin, M; Seredniakov, S; Shary, V; Strakhovenko, V; Keppler, P; Major, J; Bogdanov, A V; Potylitsin, A; Vnoukov, I; Artru, X; Lautesse, P; Poizat, J-C; Remillieux, J

    2002-01-01

    Many simulations have predicted that the yield of positrons, resulting from the interaction of fast electrons in a solid target, increases if the target is a crystal oriented with a major axis parallel to the electron beam. Tests made at Orsay and Tokyo confirmed these expectations. The experiment WA 103 concerns the determination of the main characteristics (emittance, energy spread) of a crystal positron source which could replace advantageously the conventional positron converters foreseen in some linear collider projects. The main element of the set-up is a magnetic spectrometer, using a drift chamber, where the positron trajectories are reconstructed (see Figure 1) A first run has been operated in july 2000 and the first results showed, as expected, a significant enhancement in photon and positron generation along the $$ axis of the tungsten crystal. Indications about a significant increase in the number of soft photons and positrons were also gathered : this point is of importance for the positron colle...

  19. Testing for association with multiple traits in generalized estimation equations, with application to neuroimaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiwei; Xu, Zhiyuan; Shen, Xiaotong; Pan, Wei

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing need to develop and apply powerful statistical tests to detect multiple traits-single locus associations, as arising from neuroimaging genetics and other studies. For example, in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), in addition to genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), thousands of neuroimaging and neuropsychological phenotypes as intermediate phenotypes for Alzheimer's disease, have been collected. Although some classic methods like MANOVA and newly proposed methods may be applied, they have their own limitations. For example, MANOVA cannot be applied to binary and other discrete traits. In addition, the relationships among these methods are not well understood. Importantly, since these tests are not data adaptive, depending on the unknown association patterns among multiple traits and between multiple traits and a locus, these tests may or may not be powerful. In this paper we propose a class of data-adaptive weights and the corresponding weighted tests in the general framework of generalized estimation equations (GEE). A highly adaptive test is proposed to select the most powerful one from this class of the weighted tests so that it can maintain high power across a wide range of situations. Our proposed tests are applicable to various types of traits with or without covariates. Importantly, we also analytically show relationships among some existing and our proposed tests, indicating that many existing tests are special cases of our proposed tests. Extensive simulation studies were conducted to compare and contrast the power properties of various existing and our new methods. Finally, we applied the methods to an ADNI dataset to illustrate the performance of the methods. We conclude with the recommendation for the use of the GEE-based Score test and our proposed adaptive test for their high and complementary performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists: A survey of the state of current training and recommendations for trainees

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging has gained widespread use in neuropsychological research and practice. However, there are neither established guidelines on how neuropsychologists might become competent researchers or consumers of neuroimaging data, nor any published studies describing the state of neuroimaging training among neuropsychologists. We report the results of two online surveys, one of 13 expert neuropsychologist-neuroimagers, whose responses informed the formulation of a second, larger survey to neur...

  1. The Neuro-Image: Alain Resnais's Digital Cinema without the Digits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes to read cinema in the digital age as a new type of image, the neuroimage. Going back to Gilles Deleuze's cinema books and it is argued that the neuro-image is based in the future. The cinema of Alain Resnais is analyzed as a neuro-image and digital cinema .

  2. The Neuro-Image: Alain Resnais's Digital Cinema without the Digits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes to read cinema in the digital age as a new type of image, the neuroimage. Going back to Gilles Deleuze's cinema books and it is argued that the neuro-image is based in the future. The cinema of Alain Resnais is analyzed as a neuro-image and digital cinema .

  3. Calculation of Positron Distribution in the Presence of a Uniform Magnetic Field for the Improvement of Positron Emission Tomography (PET Imaging Using GEANT4 Toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mashayekhi

    2015-05-01

    Application of a magnetic field perpendicular to the positron diffusion plane prevented the scattering of positrons, and consequently, improved the intrinsic spatial resolution of PET imaging, caused by positron range effects.

  4. Nonradiative formation of the positron-helium triplet bound state

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Rienzi, Joseph; Drachman, Richard J.

    2007-02-01

    We have previously calculated the cross section for radiative formation of the interesting bound state consisting of a positron bound to helium, where the atomic electrons are in the triplet spin state. That process uses the metastable triplet helium system as target, and, as expected, it has a very small cross section. In this paper we examine a more probable process in which the state of interest is produced in an exchange rearrangement collision between a positronium atom and the singlet helium ground state: Ps+He(Se1)→PsHe+(Se3)+e- . The present calculation is done in the plane-wave Born approximation, using simple initial and final wave functions and compares post and prior forms.

  5. Wernicke's encephalopathy with chorea: Neuroimaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jivago S. Sabatini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We present a case report of motor and cognitive disorders in a 36-year-old woman with a history of twelve years of heavy alcohol abuse. The patient presented depressive symptoms over the course of one year after a loss in the family, evolving with ataxia, bradykinesia and choreiform movements. Progressive cognitive decline, sleep alterations and myalgia were also reported during the course of disease evolution. Physical examination revealed spastic paraparesis with fixed flexion of the hips and knees with important pain upon extension of these joints. Initial investigation suggested the diagnosis of thiamine deficiency by brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI.

  6. Cognitive Improvement after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Measured with Functional Neuroimaging during the Acute Period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn R Wylie

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging studies in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI have been largely limited to patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, utilizing images obtained months to years after the actual head trauma. We sought to distinguish acute and delayed effects of mild traumatic brain injury on working memory functional brain activation patterns < 72 hours after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI and again one-week later. We hypothesized that clinical and fMRI measures of working memory would be abnormal in symptomatic mTBI patients assessed < 72 hours after injury, with most patients showing clinical recovery (i.e., improvement in these measures within 1 week after the initial assessment. We also hypothesized that increased memory workload at 1 week following injury would expose different cortical activation patterns in mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, compared to those with full clinical recovery. We performed a prospective, cohort study of working memory in emergency department patients with isolated head injury and clinical diagnosis of concussion, compared to control subjects (both uninjured volunteers and emergency department patients with extremity injuries and no head trauma. The primary outcome of cognitive recovery was defined as resolution of reported cognitive impairment and quantified by scoring the subject's reported cognitive post-concussive symptoms at 1 week. Secondary outcomes included additional post-concussive symptoms and neurocognitive testing results. We enrolled 46 subjects: 27 with mild TBI and 19 controls. The time of initial neuroimaging was 48 (+22 S.D. hours after injury (time 1. At follow up (8.7, + 1.2 S.D., days after injury, time 2, 18 of mTBI subjects (64% reported moderate to complete cognitive recovery, 8 of whom fully recovered between initial and follow-up imaging. fMRI changes from time 1 to time 2 showed an increase in posterior cingulate activation in the mTBI subjects

  7. Positron annihilation in neutron-irradiated germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartenev, G.M.; Bardyshev, I.I.; Erchak, D.P.; Stel' makh, V.F.; Tsyganov, A.D.

    1979-04-01

    The annealing of radiation defects in a germanium single crystal irradiated with 10/sup 18/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ was studied by positron annihilation, ESR, and resistivity measurements. It was found that positrons are trapped by radiation defects. The intensity of the narrow component of the angular correlation of the annihilation radiation yielded the concentration of defect clusters in the irradiated sample n/sub d/approx. =3 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/. Three characteristic annealing stages were identified. At 160--200 /sup 0/C, point defects were annealed within the crystal. At 200--320 /sup 0/C, there was ''loosening'' of the clusters, and the charge state of the defects changed. At 320--550 /sup 0/C, the clusters were annealed.

  8. Study of tungsten based positron moderators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucio, O.G. de; Pérez, M.; Mendoza, U.; Morales, J.G.; Cruz, J.C. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 México DF (Mexico); DuBois, R.D. [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Positrons and how they interact with matter has a growing interest in many fields. Most of their uses require the production of slow positron beams with a well-defined energy, but since these particles are usually generated by means of a radioactive source, they are fast and with a broad distribution of energies. For this reason it is necessary to moderate them to lower energies via inelastic collisions. Then, they can be accelerated to the desired energies. This requires the use of a moderator. Tungsten is one of the most commonly used moderator materials because of its reasonable efficiency and relatively low cost. In this work we present different methods of producing transmission tungsten-based moderators, with particular interest in a combination of tungsten thin foils and grids. We also show results about the characterization of these moderators by ion beam analysis and microscopy techniques along with their relative moderation efficiencies.

  9. Cold Positrons from Decaying Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boubekeur, Lotfi [Universitate de Valencia (Spain); Dodelson, Scott [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Vives, Oscar [Universitate de Valencia (Spain)

    2012-11-01

    Many models of dark matter contain more than one new particle beyond those in the Standard Model. Often heavier particles decay into the lightest dark matter particle as the Universe evolves. Here we explore the possibilities that arise if one of the products in a (Heavy Particle) $\\rightarrow$ (Dark Matter) decay is a positron, and the lifetime is shorter than the age of the Universe. The positrons cool down by scattering off the cosmic microwave background and eventually annihilate when they fall into Galactic potential wells. The resulting 511 keV flux not only places constraints on this class of models but might even be consistent with that observed by the INTEGRAL satellite.

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of electron-positron clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Manfredi, Giovanni; Haas, Fernando; 10.1088/1367-2630/14/7/075012

    2012-01-01

    Electron-positron clusters are studied using a quantum hydrodynamic model that includes Coulomb and exchange interactions. A variational Lagrangian method is used to determine their stationary and dynamical properties. The cluster static features are validated against existing Hartree-Fock calculations. In the linear response regime, we investigate both dipole and monopole (breathing) modes. The dipole mode is reminiscent of the surface plasmon mode usually observed in metal clusters. The nonlinear regime is explored by means of numerical simulations. We show that, by exciting the cluster with a chirped laser pulse with slowly varying frequency (autoresonance), it is possible to efficiently separate the electron and positron populations on a timescale of a few tens of femtoseconds.

  11. Statistical Hadronisation in Positron-proton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Urmossy, Karoly

    2016-01-01

    We reproduce charged hadron momentum fraction distributions measured in diffractive positron-proton collisions resulting in hadronic final states with two jets of approximately equal energies. Our hadronisation model is based on microcanonical statistics and negative binomial multiplicity fluctuations. We describe the scale dependence of the fit parameters of the model with formulas obtained by approximating the exact solution of the DGLAP equation in the $\\phi^3$ theory with leading order splitting function and 1-loop coupling.

  12. The CLIC electron and positron polarized sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, Louis; Bulyak, Eugene; Chehab, Robert; Dadoun, Olivier; Gai, Wei; Gladkikh, Peter; Kamitani, Takuya; Kuriki, Masao; Liu, Wanming; Maryuama, Takashi; Omori, Tsunehiko; Poelker, Matt; Sheppard, John; Urakawa, Junji; Variola, Alessandro; Vivoli, Alessandro; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zhou, Feng; Zimmermann, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC polarized electron source is based on a DC gun where the photocathode is illuminated by a laser beam. Each micro-bunch has a charge of 6x109 e−, a width of 100 ps and a repetition rate of 2 GHz. A peak current of 10 A in the micro-bunch is a challenge for the surface charge limit of the photo-cathode. Two options are feasible to generate the 2 GHz e− bunch train: 100 ps micro-bunches can be extracted from the photo-cathode either by a 2 GHz laser system or by generating a macro-bunch using a ~200 ns laser pulse and a subsequent RF bunching system to produce the appropriate micro-bunch structure. Recent results obtained by SLAC, for the latter case, are presented. The polarized positron source is based on a positron production scheme in which polarized photons are produced by a laser Compton scattering process. The resulting circularly-polarized gamma photons are sent onto a target, producing pairs of longitudinally polarized electrons and positrons. The Compton backscattering process occurs eithe...

  13. Advances in positron and electron scattering*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limão-Vieira, Paulo; García, Gustavo; Krishnakumar, E.; Petrović, Zoran; Sullivan, James; Tanuma, Hajime

    2016-10-01

    The topical issue on Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering" combines contributions from POSMOL 2015 together with others devoted to celebrate the unprecedented scientific careers of our loyal colleagues and trusted friends Steve Buckman (Australian National University, Australia) and Michael Allan (University of Fribourg, Switzerland) on the occasion of their retirements. POSMOL 2015, the XVIII International Workshop on Low-Energy Positron and Positronium Physics and the XIX International Symposium on Electron-Molecule Collisions and Swarms, was held at Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal, from 17-20 July 2015. The international workshop and symposium allowed to achieve a very privileged forum of sharing and developing our scientific expertise on current aspects of positron, positronium and antiproton interactions with electrons, atoms, molecules and solid surfaces, and related topics, as well as electron interactions with molecules in both gaseous and condensed phases. Particular topics include studies of electron interactions with biomolecules, electron induced surface chemistry and the study of plasma processes. Recent developments in the study of swarms are also fully addressed.

  14. Electrons and Positrons in Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Panov, A D

    2013-01-01

    This review concentrates on the results obtained, over the last ten years, on the astrophysics of high-energy cosmic ray electrons and positrons. The anomalies, observed in the data of recent experiments (possible bump in the electron spectrum and the PAMELA anomaly in the positron fraction) are discussed through the systematic use of simple analytical solutions of the transport equations for cosmic ray electrons. Three main ways of explaining the origin of the anomalies are considered: the conservative way supposing the positrons to be pure secondary particles; the nearby sources like pulsars origin; and the dark matter origin. This review discusses, also, the inability to select the pulsars model or the dark matter model to explain the electron anomalies on the basis of the electron spectra with the usual large energy binning ($\\gtrsim15%$). It is argued that the signature of nearby pulsars origin of the anomalies against the dark matter origin could be the fine structure of the cosmic ray electron spectrum...

  15. Sharing privacy-sensitive access to neuroimaging and genetics data: a review and preliminary validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwate, Anand D.; Plis, Sergey M.; Turner, Jessica A.; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2014-01-01

    The growth of data sharing initiatives for neuroimaging and genomics represents an exciting opportunity to confront the “small N” problem that plagues contemporary neuroimaging studies while further understanding the role genetic markers play in the function of the brain. When it is possible, open data sharing provides the most benefits. However, some data cannot be shared at all due to privacy concerns and/or risk of re-identification. Sharing other data sets is hampered by the proliferation of complex data use agreements (DUAs) which preclude truly automated data mining. These DUAs arise because of concerns about the privacy and confidentiality for subjects; though many do permit direct access to data, they often require a cumbersome approval process that can take months. An alternative approach is to only share data derivatives such as statistical summaries—the challenges here are to reformulate computational methods to quantify the privacy risks associated with sharing the results of those computations. For example, a derived map of gray matter is often as identifiable as a fingerprint. Thus alternative approaches to accessing data are needed. This paper reviews the relevant literature on differential privacy, a framework for measuring and tracking privacy loss in these settings, and demonstrates the feasibility of using this framework to calculate statistics on data distributed at many sites while still providing privacy. PMID:24778614

  16. From neuroimaging to patients' bench: what we have learnt from trigemino-autonomic pain syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Massimo; Proietti Cecchini, Alberto; Franzini, Angelo; Messina, Giuseppe; Bussone, Gennaro

    2012-05-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are primary headaches including cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT). A number of neuroimaging studies have been conducted in last decade showing involvement of brain areas included in the pain matrix. Apart from pain matrix involvement, other neuroimaging findings data deserve special attention. The hypothalamic activation reported in the course of TAC attacks coupled with the efficacy of hypothalamic neurostimulation to treat drug-resistant TAC forms clearly indicate the posterior hypothalamus as a crucial area in TAC pathophysiology. In animal models this brain area has been shown to modulate craniofacial pain; moreover, hypothalamic activation occurs in other pain conditions, suggesting that posterior hypothalamus has a more complex role in TAC pathophysiology rather than simply being considered as a trigger. In contrast, hypothalamic activation may serve as a crucial area in terminating rather than triggering attacks. It also could lead to a central condition facilitating initiation of TAC attacks.

  17. A transformation similarity constraint for groupwise nonlinear registration in longitudinal neuroimaging studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Greg M.; Gutman, Boris A.; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Thompson, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease and other brain disorders often show a similar spatial distribution of volume change throughout the brain over time, but this information is not yet used in registration algorithms to refine the quantification of change. Here, we develop a mathematical basis to incorporate that prior information into a longitudinal structural neuroimaging study. We modify the canonical minimization problem for non-linear registration to include a term that couples a collection of registrations together to enforce group similarity. More specifically, throughout the computation we maintain a group-level representation of the transformations and constrain updates to individual transformations to be similar to this representation. The derivations necessary to produce the Euler-Lagrange equations for the coupling term are presented and a gradient descent algorithm based on the formulation was implemented. We demonstrate using 57 longitudinal image pairs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) that longitudinal registration with such a groupwise coupling prior is more robust to noise in estimating change, suggesting such change maps may have several important applications.

  18. Invited review--neuroimaging response assessment criteria for brain tumors in veterinary patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmeisl, John H; Garcia, Paulo A; Daniel, Gregory B; Bourland, John Daniel; Debinski, Waldemar; Dervisis, Nikolaos; Klahn, Shawna

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of therapeutic response using cross-sectional imaging techniques, particularly gadolinium-enhanced MRI, is an integral part of the clinical management of brain tumors in veterinary patients. Spontaneous canine brain tumors are increasingly recognized and utilized as a translational model for the study of human brain tumors. However, no standardized neuroimaging response assessment criteria have been formulated for use in veterinary clinical trials. Previous studies have found that the pathophysiologic features inherent to brain tumors and the surrounding brain complicate the use of the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) assessment system. Objectives of this review are to describe strengths and limitations of published imaging-based brain tumor response criteria and propose a system for use in veterinary patients. The widely used human Macdonald and response assessment in neuro-oncology (RANO) criteria are reviewed and described as to how they can be applied to veterinary brain tumors. Discussion points will include current challenges associated with the interpretation of brain tumor therapeutic responses such as imaging pseudophenomena and treatment-induced necrosis, and how advancements in perfusion imaging, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown promise in differentiating tumor progression from therapy-induced changes. Finally, although objective endpoints such as MR imaging and survival estimates will likely continue to comprise the foundations for outcome measures in veterinary brain tumor clinical trials, we propose that in order to provide a more relevant therapeutic response metric for veterinary patients, composite response systems should be formulated and validated that combine imaging and clinical assessment criteria.

  19. Behavioural and neuroimaging correlates of impaired self-awareness of hypo- and hyperkinesia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Franziska; Williamson, Kim L; Tahmasian, Masoud; Rochhausen, Luisa; Ellereit, Anna L; Prigatano, George P; Kracht, Lutz; Tang, Chris C; Herz, Damian M; Fink, Gereon R; Timmermann, Lars; Eggers, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    Anosognosia or impaired self-awareness of motor symptoms (ISAm) has been rarely investigated in Parkinson's disease (PD). We here studied the relationship between ISAm during periods with and without dopaminergic medication (ON- and OFF-state), and clinical, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging data to further elucidate behavioural aspects and the neurobiological underpinnings of ISAm. Thirty-one right-handed, non-demented, non-depressed PD patients were included. ISAm was evaluated using a recently developed scale that assesses awareness of dyskinesia, resting tremor, and bradykinesia. The test was applied during both ON- and OFF-states. Multiple correlation analyses between ISAm and behavioural data were conducted. In addition, imaging of glucose metabolism using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) was performed to investigate the neural basis of ISAm. A multiple regression approach was applied to investigate metabolism alterations related to ISAm. In the OFF-state, higher ISAm was associated with left-sided disease onset, older age, and shorter disease duration. Concerning FDG-PET data, there was a significant negative correlation between higher OFF-state ISAm and decreased glucose metabolism in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). In the ON-state, ISAm was not significantly correlated with clinical or behavioural data. However, there was a significant correlation between higher ISAm and an increased metabolism in the bilateral medial frontal gyrus, left IFG, right superior frontal gyrus and right precentral gyrus. The results support the role of the right hemisphere in awareness of motor symptoms in the OFF-state. In the ON-state, dopaminergic medication and dyskinesia influence ISAm and relate to metabolism changes in bilateral frontal regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Modeling Dynamic Functional Neuroimaging Data Using Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Larry R.; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Ingham, Roger J.

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to present a method for developing a path analytic network model using data acquired from positron emission tomography. Regions of interest within the human brain were identified through quantitative activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis. Using this information, a "true" or population path model was then…

  1. MENGA: A New Comprehensive Tool for the Integration of Neuroimaging Data and the Allen Human Brain Transcriptome Atlas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Rizzo

    Full Text Available Brain-wide mRNA mappings offer a great potential for neuroscience research as they can provide information about system proteomics. In a previous work we have correlated mRNA maps with the binding patterns of radioligands targeting specific molecular systems and imaged with positron emission tomography (PET in unrelated control groups. This approach is potentially applicable to any imaging modality as long as an efficient procedure of imaging-genomic matching is provided. In the original work we considered mRNA brain maps of the whole human genome derived from the Allen human brain database (ABA and we performed the analysis with a specific region-based segmentation with a resolution that was limited by the PET data parcellation. There we identified the need for a platform for imaging-genomic integration that should be usable with any imaging modalities and fully exploit the high resolution mapping of ABA dataset.In this work we present MENGA (Multimodal Environment for Neuroimaging and Genomic Analysis, a software platform that allows the investigation of the correlation patterns between neuroimaging data of any sort (both functional and structural with mRNA gene expression profiles derived from the ABA database at high resolution.We applied MENGA to six different imaging datasets from three modalities (PET, single photon emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging targeting the dopamine and serotonin receptor systems and the myelin molecular structure. We further investigated imaging-genomic correlations in the case of mismatch between selected proteins and imaging targets.

  2. Neutrinoless double positron decay and positron emitting electron capture in the interacting boson model

    CERN Document Server

    Barea, J; Iachello, F

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinoless double-$\\beta$ decay is of fundamental importance for determining the neutrino mass. Although double electron ($\\beta^-\\beta^-$) decay is the most promising mode, in very recent years interest in double positron ($\\beta^+\\beta^+$) decay, positron emitting electron capture ($EC\\beta^+$), and double electron capture ($ECEC$) has been renewed. We present here results of a calculation of nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double-$\\beta^+$ decay and positron emitting electron capture within the framework of the microscopic interacting boson model (IBM-2) for $^{58}$Ni, $^{64}$Zn, $^{78}$Kr, $^{96}$Ru, $^{106}$Cd, $^{124}$Xe, $^{130}$Ba, and $^{136}$Ce decay. By combining these with a calculation of phase space factors we calculate expected half-lives.

  3. Neuroimaging schizophrenia: a picture is worth a thousand words, but is it saying anything important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Anthony O; Buckley, Peter F; Hanna, Mona

    2013-03-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by neurostructural and neurofunctional aberrations that have now been demonstrated through neuroimaging research. The article reviews recent studies that have attempted to use neuroimaging to understand the relation between neurological abnormalities and aspects of the phenomenology of schizophrenia. Neuroimaging studies show that neurostructural and neurofunctional abnormalities are present in people with schizophrenia and their close relatives and may represent putative endophenotypes. Neuroimaging phenotypes predict the emergence of psychosis in individuals classified as high-risk. Neuroimaging studies have linked structural and functional abnormalities to symptoms; and progressive structural changes to clinical course and functional outcome. Neuroimaging has successfully indexed the neurotoxic and neuroprotective effects of schizophrenia treatments. Pictures can inform about aspects of the phenomenology of schizophrenia including etiology, onset, symptoms, clinical course, and treatment effects but this assertion is tempered by the scientific and practical limitations of neuroimaging.

  4. Generation and application of slow positrons based on a electron LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Kurihara, T

    2002-01-01

    History of slow positron in Institute of Materials Structure Science High Energy Accelerator Research Organization is explained. The principle of generation and application of intense positron beam is mentioned. Two sources of intense positron are radioactive decay of radioactive isotopes emitting positron and electron-positron pair creation. The radioactive decay method uses sup 5 sup 8 Co, sup 6 sup 4 Cu, sup 1 sup 1 C, sup 1 sup 3 N, sup 1 sup 5 O and sup 1 sup 8 F. The electron-positron pair creation method uses nuclear reactor or electron linear accelerator (LINAC). The positron experimental facility in this organization consists of electron LINAC, slow positron beam source, positron transport and experimental station. The outline of this facility is started. The intense slow positron beam is applied to research positronium work function, electron structure of surface. New method such as combination of positron lifetime measurement and slow positron beam or Auger electron spectroscopy by positron annihil...

  5. Quantitative neuroimaging in mucolipidosis type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffmann, Raphael; Mayfield, Joan; Swift, Caren; Nestrasil, Igor

    2014-02-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the MCOLN1 gene. This gene encodes the endosomal/lysosomal transient receptor potential channel protein mucolipin-1 (TRPML1). Affected patients suffer from neurodevelopmental abnormalities and progressive retinal dystrophy. In a prospective natural history study we hypothesized the presence of an additional slow cerebral neurodegenerative process. We have recruited 5 patients, tested their neurodevelopmental status, and measured cerebral regional volumes and white matter integrity using MRI yearly. Over a period of up to 3 years, MLIV patients remained neurologically stable. There was a trend for increased cortical and subcortical gray matter volumes and increased ventricular size, while white matter and cerebellar volumes decreased. Mean diffusivity (MD) was increased and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were below normal in all analyzed brain regions. There was a positive correlation between motor scores of the Vineland Scale and the FA values in the corticospinal tract (corr coef 0.39), and a negative correlation with the MD values (corr coef -0.50) in the same brain region. We conclude from these initial findings that deficiency in mucolipin-1 affects the entire brain but that there might be a selective regional cerebral neurodegenerative process in MLIV. In addition, these data suggest that diffusion-weighted imaging might be a good biomarker for following patients with MLIV. Therefore, our findings may be helpful for designing future clinical trials.

  6. Incidental Findings in Neuroimaging: Ethical and Medicolegal Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid advances in neurosciences in the last three decades, there has been an exponential increase in the use of neuroimaging both in basic sciences and clinical research involving human subjects. During routine neuroimaging, incidental findings that are not part of the protocol or scope of research agenda can occur and they often pose a challenge as to how they should be handled to abide by the medicolegal principles of research ethics. This paper reviews the issue from various ethical (do no harm, general duty to rescue, and mutual benefits and owing and medicolegal perspectives (legal liability, fiduciary duties, Law of Tort, and Law of Contract with a suggested protocol of approach.

  7. Pain perception and hypnosis: findings from recent functional neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Casale, Antonio; Ferracuti, Stefano; Rapinesi, Chiara; Serata, Daniele; Caltagirone, Saverio Simone; Savoja, Valeria; Piacentino, Daria; Callovini, Gemma; Manfredi, Giovanni; Sani, Gabriele; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Hypnosis modulates pain perception and tolerance by affecting cortical and subcortical activity in brain regions involved in these processes. By reviewing functional neuroimaging studies focusing on pain perception under hypnosis, the authors aimed to identify brain activation-deactivation patterns occurring in hypnosis-modulated pain conditions. Different changes in brain functionality occurred throughout all components of the pain network and other brain areas. The anterior cingulate cortex appears to be central in modulating pain circuitry activity under hypnosis. Most studies also showed that the neural functions of the prefrontal, insular, and somatosensory cortices are consistently modified during hypnosis-modulated pain conditions. Functional neuroimaging studies support the clinical use of hypnosis in the management of pain conditions.

  8. SchizConnect: Virtual Data Integration in Neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambite, Jose Luis; Tallis, Marcelo; Alpert, Kathryn; Keator, David B.; King, Margaret; Landis, Drew; Konstantinidis, George; Calhoun, Vince D.; Potkin, Steven G.; Turner, Jessica A.; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    In many scientific domains, including neuroimaging studies, there is a need to obtain increasingly larger cohorts to achieve the desired statistical power for discovery. However, the economics of imaging studies make it unlikely that any single study or consortia can achieve the desired sample sizes. What is needed is an architecture that can easily incorporate additional studies as they become available. We present such architecture based on a virtual data integration approach, where data remains at the original sources, and is retrieved and harmonized in response to user queries. This is in contrast to approaches that move the data to a central warehouse. We implemented our approach in the SchizConnect system that integrates data from three neuroimaging consortia on Schizophrenia: FBIRN's Human Imaging Database (HID), MRN's Collaborative Imaging and Neuroinformatics System (COINS), and the NUSDAST project at XNAT Central. A portal providing harmonized access to these sources is publicly deployed at schizconnect.org. PMID:26688837

  9. Post-stroke cognitive dysfunctions: A clinical and neuroimaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Yuryevich Emelin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging examinations were made in 65 patients (52 men and 13 women aged 65.6±10.1 years who had experienced ischemic stroke. Cognitive impairments (CI were heterogeneous; regulatory functions, attention, and counting were most significantly affected in moderate CI. In mild dementia, mainly poor attention and regulatory dysfunctions were added by clearly-cut impairments of memory, orientation, and visual-spatial function. Brain atrophy, white matter changes, and small focal gray matter damages along with focal post-stroke changes were revealed by neuroimaging in most patients. It was found that besides the volume and location of a damage focus, the signs of impaired integrated mental activity of the brain, regulatory dysfunctions in particular, should be a necessary condition for the verification of post-stroke CI.

  10. Structural Neuroimaging Findings in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Abildskov, Tracy J; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J; Black, Garrett; Christensen, Zachary P; Huff, Trevor; Wood, Dawn-Marie G; Hesselink, John R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Max, Jeffrey E

    2016-09-01

    Common neuroimaging findings in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), including sport-related concussion (SRC), are reviewed based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Common abnormalities radiologically identified on the day of injury, typically a computed tomographic scan, are in the form of contusions, small subarachnoid or intraparenchymal hemorrhages as well as subdural and epidural collections, edema, and skull fractures. Common follow-up neuroimaging findings with MRI include white matter hyperintensities, hypointense signal abnormalities that reflect prior hemorrhage, focal encephalomalacia, presence of atrophy and/or dilated Virchow-Robins perivascular space. The MRI findings from a large pediatric mTBI study show low frequency of positive MRI findings at 6 months postinjury. The review concludes with an examination of some of the advanced MRI-based image analysis methods that can be performed in the patient who has sustained an mTBI.

  11. Harnessing graphics processing units for improved neuroimaging statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Anders; Villani, Mattias; Laconte, Stephen M

    2013-09-01

    Simple models and algorithms based on restrictive assumptions are often used in the field of neuroimaging for studies involving functional magnetic resonance imaging, voxel based morphometry, and diffusion tensor imaging. Nonparametric statistical methods or flexible Bayesian models can be applied rather easily to yield more trustworthy results. The spatial normalization step required for multisubject studies can also be improved by taking advantage of more robust algorithms for image registration. A common drawback of algorithms based on weaker assumptions, however, is the increase in computational complexity. In this short overview, we will therefore present some examples of how inexpensive PC graphics hardware, normally used for demanding computer games, can be used to enable practical use of more realistic models and accurate algorithms, such that the outcome of neuroimaging studies really can be trusted.

  12. Understanding the impact of TV commercials: electrical neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiato, Giovanni; Kong, Wanzeng; Maglione, Anton Giulio; Wei, Daming

    2012-01-01

    Today, there is a greater interest in the marketing world in using neuroimaging tools to evaluate the efficacy of TV commercials. This field of research is known as neuromarketing. In this article, we illustrate some applications of electrical neuroimaging, a discipline that uses electroencephalography (EEG) and intensive signal processing techniques for the evaluation of marketing stimuli. We also show how the proper usage of these methodologies can provide information related to memorization and attention while people are watching marketing-relevant stimuli. We note that temporal and frequency patterns of EEG signals are able to provide possible descriptors that convey information about the cognitive process in subjects observing commercial advertisements (ads). Such information could be unobtainable through common tools used in standard marketing research. Evidence of this research shows how EEG methodologies could be employed to better design new products that marketers are going to promote and to analyze the global impact of video commercials already broadcast on TV.

  13. The lives and deaths of positrons in the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Guessoum, N; Gillard, W

    2005-01-01

    We reexamine in detail the various processes undergone by positrons in the ISM from their birth to their annihilation using the most recent results of positron interaction cross sections with H, H2 and He. The positrons' lives are divided into two phases: the 'in-flight' phase and the thermal phase. The first phase is treated with a Monte Carlo simulation that allows us to determine the fraction of positrons that form positronium and annihilate as well as the characteristics of the annihilation emission as a function of the medium conditions. The second phase is treated with a binary reaction rate approach, with cross sections adopted from experimental measurement or theoretical calculations. An extensive search and update of the knowledge of positron processes was thus undertaken. New reaction rates and line widths have been obtained. We investigate the treatment of the complicated interactions between positrons and interstellar dust grains. New reaction rates and widths of the line resulting from the annihi...

  14. Positrons, Positronium, Positron and Positronium Complexes in Crystal. Features of Their Properties in Phonon Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene P. Prokopev

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article, Basing on the example of ionic crystals shows that polarization of crystal framework by oppositely charged polarons (positronium atom (ps invokes the change of positronium binding energy and leads to the renormalization of electron and positron effective masses as well. Such interaction of electron and positronium atom of positron with optical phonons leads to additional repelling interaction, besides coulomb attractive. Furthermore, the existence of positronium atom with major and minor radius is possible in the atmosphere of crystal phonons.

  15. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche.

  16. Robust regression for large-scale neuroimaging studies.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    PUBLISHED Multi-subject datasets used in neuroimaging group studies have a complex structure, as they exhibit non-stationary statistical properties across regions and display various artifacts. While studies with small sample sizes can rarely be shown to deviate from standard hypotheses (such as the normality of the residuals) due to the poor sensitivity of normality tests with low degrees of freedom, large-scale studies (e.g. >100 subjects) exhibit more obvious deviations from these hypot...

  17. Partial Least Squares tutorial for analyzing neuroimaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Van Roon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Partial least squares (PLS has become a respected and meaningful soft modeling analysis technique that can be applied to very large datasets where the number of factors or variables is greater than the number of observations. Current biometric studies (e.g., eye movements, EKG, body movements, EEG are often of this nature. PLS eliminates the multiple linear regression issues of over-fitting data by finding a few underlying or latent variables (factors that account for most of the variation in the data. In real-world applications, where linear models do not always apply, PLS can model the non-linear relationship well. This tutorial introduces two PLS methods, PLS Correlation (PLSC and PLS Regression (PLSR and their applications in data analysis which are illustrated with neuroimaging examples. Both methods provide straightforward and comprehensible techniques for determining and modeling relationships between two multivariate data blocks by finding latent variables that best describes the relationships. In the examples, the PLSC will analyze the relationship between neuroimaging data such as Event-Related Potential (ERP amplitude averages from different locations on the scalp with their corresponding behavioural data. Using the same data, the PLSR will be used to model the relationship between neuroimaging and behavioural data. This model will be able to predict future behaviour solely from available neuroimaging data. To find latent variables, Singular Value Decomposition (SVD for PLSC and Non-linear Iterative PArtial Least Squares (NIPALS for PLSR are implemented in this tutorial. SVD decomposes the large data block into three manageable matrices containing a diagonal set of singular values, as well as left and right singular vectors. For PLSR, NIPALS algorithms are used because it provides amore precise estimation of the latent variables. Mathematica notebooks are provided for each PLS method with clearly labeled sections and subsections. The

  18. [Neuroimaging and Blood Biomarkers in Functional Prognosis after Stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, João Paulo; Costa, Joana Santos; Sargento-Freitas, João; Oliveira, Sandra; Mendes, Bruno; Laíns, Jorge; Pinheiro, João

    2016-11-01

    Stroke remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world and it is associated with an important long-term functional disability. Some neuroimaging resources and certain peripheral blood or cerebrospinal fluid proteins can give important information about etiology, therapeutic approach, follow-up and functional prognosis in acute ischemic stroke patients. However, among the scientific community, there is currently more interest in the stroke vital prognosis over the functional prognosis. Predicting the functional prognosis during acute phase would allow more objective rehabilitation programs and better management of the available resources. The aim of this work is to review the potential role of acute phase neuroimaging and blood biomarkers as functional recovery predictors after ischemic stroke. Review of the literature published between 2005 and 2015, in English, using the terms "ischemic stroke", "neuroimaging" e "blood biomarkers". We included nine studies, based on abstract reading. Computerized tomography, transcranial doppler ultrasound and diffuse magnetic resonance imaging show potential predictive value, based on the blood flow study and the evaluation of stroke's volume and localization, especially when combined with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Several biomarkers have been studied as diagnostic, risk stratification and prognostic tools, namely the S100 calcium binding protein B, C-reactive protein, matrix metalloproteinases and cerebral natriuretic peptide. Although some biomarkers and neuroimaging techniques have potential predictive value, none of the studies were able to support its use, alone or in association, as a clinically useful functionality predictor model. All the evaluated markers were considered insufficient to predict functional prognosis at three months, when applied in the first hours after stroke. Additional studies are necessary to identify reliable predictive markers for functional

  19. Cross-View Neuroimage Pattern Analysis for Alzheimer's Disease Staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidong eLiu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The research on staging of pre-symptomatic and prodromal phase of neurological disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease (AD, is essential for prevention of dementia. New strategies for AD staging with a focus on early detection, are demanded to optimize potential efficacy of disease-modifying therapies that can halt or slow the disease progression. Recently, neuroimaging are increasingly used as additional research-based markers to detect AD onset and predict conversion of MCI and normal control (NC to AD. Researchers have proposed a variety of neuroimaging biomarkers to characterize the patterns of the pathology of AD and MCI, and suggested that multi-view neuroimaging biomarkers could lead to better performance than single-view biomarkers in AD staging. However, it is still unclear what leads to such synergy and how to preserve or maximize. In an attempt to answer these questions, we proposed a cross-view pattern analysis framework for investigating the synergy between different neuroimaging biomarkers. We quantitatively analyzed 9 types of biomarkers derived from FDG-PET and T1-MRI, and evaluated their performance in a task of classifying AD, MCI and NC subjects obtained from the ADNI baseline cohort. The experiment results showed that these biomarkers could depict the pathology of AD from different perspectives, and output distinct patterns that are significantly associated with the disease progression. Most importantly, we found that these features could be separated into clusters, each depicting a particular aspect; and the inter-cluster features could always achieve better performance than the intra-cluster features in AD staging.

  20. Robust regression for large-scale neuroimaging studies.

    OpenAIRE

    BOKDE, ARUN

    2015-01-01

    PUBLISHED Multi-subject datasets used in neuroimaging group studies have a complex structure, as they exhibit non-stationary statistical properties across regions and display various artifacts. While studies with small sample sizes can rarely be shown to deviate from standard hypotheses (such as the normality of the residuals) due to the poor sensitivity of normality tests with low degrees of freedom, large-scale studies (e.g. >100 subjects) exhibit more obvious deviations from these hypot...

  1. Neuroimaging of Psychopathy and Antisocial Behavior: A Targeted Review

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this article is to provide a selective and targeted review of the neuroimaging literature on psychopathic tendencies and antisocial behavior and to explore the extent to which this literature supports recent cognitive neuroscientific models of psychopathy and antisocial behavior. The literature reveals that individuals who present with an increased risk for reactive, but not instrumental, aggression show increased amygdala responses to emotionally evocative stimuli. This is consis...

  2. Neuroimaging of Cerebrovascular Disease in the Aging Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ajay; Nair, Sreejit; Andrew D Schweitzer; Kishore, Sirish; Johnson, Carl E.; Comunale, Joseph P.; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease remains a significant public health burden with its greatest impact on the elderly population. Advances in neuroimaging techniques allow detailed and sophisticated evaluation of many manifestations of cerebrovascular disease in the brain parenchyma as well as in the intracranial and extracranial vasculature. These tools continue to contribute to our understanding of the multifactorial processes that occur in the age-dependent development of cerebrovascular disease. Str...

  3. Neuroimaging essentials in essential tremor: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Sarvi; Nederveen, Aart J; Booij, Jan; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Essential tremor is regarded to be a disease of the central nervous system. Neuroimaging is a rapidly growing field with potential benefits to both diagnostics and research. The exact role of imaging techniques with respect to essential tremor in research and clinical practice is not clear. A systematic review of the different imaging techniques in essential tremor is lacking in the literature. We performed a systematic literature search combining the terms essential tremor and familial tremor with the following keywords: imaging, mri, vbm, dwi, fmri, pet and spect, both in abbreviated form as well as in full form. We summarize and discuss the quality and the external validity of each study and place the results in the context of existing knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of essential tremor. A total of 48 neuroimaging studies met our search criteria, roughly divided into 19 structural and 29 functional and metabolic studies. The quality of the studies varied, especially concerning inclusion criteria. Functional imaging studies indicated cerebellar hyperactivity during rest and during tremor. The studies also pointed to the involvement of the thalamus, the inferior olive and the red nucleus. Structural studies showed less consistent results. Neuroimaging techniques in essential tremor give insight into the pathophysiology of essential tremor indicating the involvement of the cerebellum as the most consistent finding. GABAergic dysfunction might be a major premise in the pathophysiological hypotheses. Inconsistencies between studies can be partly explained by the inclusion of heterogeneous patient groups. Improvement of scientific research requires more stringent inclusion criteria and application of advanced analysis techniques. Also, the use of multimodal neuroimaging techniques is a promising development in movement disorders research. Currently, the role of imaging techniques in essential tremor in daily clinical practice is limited.

  4. Shift Invariant Multi-linear Decomposition of Neuroimaging Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai; Arnfred, Sidse M.

    2008-01-01

    We present an algorithm for multilinear decomposition that allows for arbitrary shifts along one modality. The method is applied to neural activity arranged in the three modalities space, time, and trial. Thus, the algorithm models neural activity as a linear superposition of components with a fi...... in data derived from neural activity--a problem that has caused degenerate solutions especially in modeling neuroimaging data with instantaneous multilinear decompositions. Our algorithm is available for download at www.erpwavelab.org....

  5. Extracting the size of the cosmic electron-positron anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    Auchettl, Katie; Balázs, Csaba

    2011-01-01

    We isolated the anomalous part of the cosmic electron-positron flux within a Bayesian likelihood analysis. Using 219 recent cosmic ray spectral data points, we inferred the values of selected cosmic ray propagation parameters. In the context of the propagation model coded in GalProp, we found a significant tension between the electron positron related and the rest of the fluxes. Interpreting this tension as the presence of an anomalous component in the electron-positron related data, we calcu...

  6. Simulations of pulses in a buffer gas positron trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tattersall, W; Sullivan, J P; Buckman, S J [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); White, R D; Robson, R E, E-mail: wade.tattersall@anu.edu.au [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD (Australia)

    2011-01-01

    In this study we simulate positron transport properties for various configurations of the gases and electric fields used in the Australian Positron Beamline Facility positron trap, which is based on the Surko buffer-gas trap. In an attempt to further improve the time and energy resolution of the trap and thus the associated scattering experiments, we apply a Monte-Carlo simulation procedure to a variety of possible configurations of the dumping stage of the trap.

  7. Detecting positron-atom bound states through resonant annihilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V; Gribakin, G F

    2010-11-12

    A method is proposed for detecting positron-atom bound states by observing enhanced positron annihilation due to electronic Feshbach resonances at electron-volt energies. The method is applicable to a range of open-shell transition-metal atoms which are likely to bind the positron: Fe, Co, Ni, Tc, Ru, Rh, Sn, Sb, Ta, W, Os, Ir, and Pt. Estimates of their binding energies are provided.

  8. Detecting Positron-Atom Bound States through Resonant Annihilation

    OpenAIRE

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Gribakin, G. F.

    2010-01-01

    A method is proposed for detecting positron-atom bound states by observing enhanced positron annihilation due to electronic Feshbach resonances at electron-volt energies. The method is applicable to a range of open-shell transition metal atoms which are likely to bind the positron: Fe, Co, Ni, Tc, Ru, Rh, Sn, Sb, Ta, W, Os, Ir, and Pt. Estimates of their binding energies are provided.

  9. Robust regression for large-scale neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Virgile; Da Mota, Benoit; Loth, Eva; Varoquaux, Gaël; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Brühl, Rüdiger; Butzek, Brigitte; Conrod, Patricia; Flor, Herta; Garavan, Hugh; Lemaitre, Hervé; Mann, Karl; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Schad, Daniel J; Schümann, Gunter; Frouin, Vincent; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Thirion, Bertrand

    2015-05-01

    Multi-subject datasets used in neuroimaging group studies have a complex structure, as they exhibit non-stationary statistical properties across regions and display various artifacts. While studies with small sample sizes can rarely be shown to deviate from standard hypotheses (such as the normality of the residuals) due to the poor sensitivity of normality tests with low degrees of freedom, large-scale studies (e.g. >100 subjects) exhibit more obvious deviations from these hypotheses and call for more refined models for statistical inference. Here, we demonstrate the benefits of robust regression as a tool for analyzing large neuroimaging cohorts. First, we use an analytic test based on robust parameter estimates; based on simulations, this procedure is shown to provide an accurate statistical control without resorting to permutations. Second, we show that robust regression yields more detections than standard algorithms using as an example an imaging genetics study with 392 subjects. Third, we show that robust regression can avoid false positives in a large-scale analysis of brain-behavior relationships with over 1500 subjects. Finally we embed robust regression in the Randomized Parcellation Based Inference (RPBI) method and demonstrate that this combination further improves the sensitivity of tests carried out across the whole brain. Altogether, our results show that robust procedures provide important advantages in large-scale neuroimaging group studies.

  10. Research updates in neuroimaging studies of children who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Soo-Eun

    2014-05-01

    In the past two decades, neuroimaging investigations of stuttering have led to important discoveries of structural and functional brain differences in people who stutter, providing significant clues to the neurological basis of stuttering. One major limitation, however, has been that most studies so far have only examined adults who stutter, whose brain and behavior likely would have adopted compensatory reactions to their stuttering; these confounding factors have made interpretations of the findings difficult. Developmental stuttering is a neurodevelopmental condition, and like many other neurodevelopmental disorders, stuttering is associated with an early childhood onset of symptoms and greater incidence in males relative to females. More recent studies have begun to examine children who stutter using various neuroimaging techniques that allow examination of functional neuroanatomy and interaction of major brain areas that differentiate children who stutter compared with age-matched controls. In this article, I review these more recent neuroimaging investigations of children who stutter, in the context of what we know about typical brain development, neuroplasticity, and sex differences relevant to speech and language development. Although the picture is still far from complete, these studies have potential to provide information that can be used as early objective markers, or prognostic indicators, for persistent stuttering in the future. Furthermore, these studies are the first steps in finding potential neural targets for novel therapies that may involve modulating neuroplastic growth conducive to developing and maintaining fluent speech, which can be applied to treatment of young children who stutter.

  11. The neuroimaging research process from the participants' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Richard; Peel, Elizabeth; Shaw, Rachel L; Senior, Carl

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate participants' experiences of taking part in research conducted using fMRI or MEG procedures. Forty-four participants completed a questionnaire after taking part in either fMRI or MEG experiments; the questionnaire asked about experiences of and attitudes toward fMRI/MEG. Ten follow-up interviews were conducted to enable an in-depth analysis of these attitudes and experiences. The findings were generally positive: all participants thought fMRI and MEG were safe procedures, 93% would recommend participating in neuroimaging research to their friends and family, and participants were positive about participating in future neuroimaging research. However, some negative issues were identified. Some participants reported feeling nervous prior to scanning procedures, several participants reported side-effects after taking part, a number of participants were upset at being in a confined space and some participants did not feel confident about exiting the scanner in an emergency. Several recommendations for researchers are made, including a virtual tour of the scanning equipment during the consenting process in order to better prepare potential participants for the scanning experience and to minimize the potential psychological discomfort sometimes experienced in neuroimaging research.

  12. Meta-analytic methods for neuroimaging data explained

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radua Joaquim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The number of neuroimaging studies has grown exponentially in recent years and their results are not always consistent. Meta-analyses are helpful to summarize this vast literature and also offer insights that are not apparent from the individual studies. In this review, we describe the main methods used for meta-analyzing neuroimaging data, with special emphasis on their relative advantages and disadvantages. We describe and discuss meta-analytical methods for global brain volumes, methods based on regions of interest, label-based reviews, voxel-based meta-analytic methods and online databases. Regions of interest-based methods allow for optimal statistical analyses but are affected by a limited and potentially biased inclusion of brain regions, whilst voxel-based methods benefit from a more exhaustive and unbiased inclusion of studies but are statistically more limited. There are also relevant differences between the different available voxel-based meta-analytic methods, and the field is rapidly evolving to develop more accurate and robust methods. We suggest that in any meta-analysis of neuroimaging data, authors should aim to: only include studies exploring the whole brain; ensure that the same threshold throughout the whole brain is used within each included study; and explore the robustness of the findings via complementary analyses to minimize the risk of false positives.

  13. Multimodal functional neuroimaging: integrating functional MRI and EEG/MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Liu, Zhongming

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive functional neuroimaging, as an important tool for basic neuroscience research and clinical diagnosis, continues to face the need of improving the spatial and temporal resolution. While existing neuroimaging modalities might approach their limits in imaging capability mostly due to fundamental as well as technical reasons, it becomes increasingly attractive to integrate multiple complementary modalities in an attempt to significantly enhance the spatiotemporal resolution that cannot be achieved by any modality individually. Electrophysiological and hemodynamic/metabolic signals reflect distinct but closely coupled aspects of the underlying neural activity. Combining fMRI and EEG/MEG data allows us to study brain function from different perspectives. In this review, we start with an overview of the physiological origins of EEG/MEG and fMRI, as well as their fundamental biophysics and imaging principles, we proceed with a review of the major advances in the understanding and modeling of neurovascular coupling and in the methodologies for the fMRI-EEG/MEG simultaneous recording. Finally, we summarize important remaining issues and perspectives concerning multimodal functional neuroimaging, including brain connectivity imaging.

  14. Abnormal Neuroimaging in a Case of Infant Botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Ryan J; Messacar, Kevin; Stence, Nicholas V; Press, Craig A; Carpenter, Todd C

    2015-01-01

    We present the first case of abnormal neuroimaging in a case of infant botulism. The clinical findings of the patient with constipation, bulbar weakness, and descending, symmetric motor weakness are consistent with the classic findings of infant botulism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), however, revealed restricted diffusion in the brain and enhancement of the cervical nerve roots. Traditionally, normal neuroimaging was used to help differentiate infant botulism from other causes of weakness in infants. Abnormal neuroimaging is seen in other causes of weakness in an infant including metabolic disorders and hypoxic-ischemic injury, but these diagnoses did not fit the clinical findings in this case. The explanation for the MRI abnormalities in the brain and cervical nerve roots is unclear as botulinum toxin acts at presynaptic nerve terminals and does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Possible explanations for the findings include inflammation from the botulinum toxin at the synapse, alterations in sensory signaling and retrograde transport of the botulinum toxin. The patient was treated with human botulism immune globulin and had rapid recovery in weakness. A stool sample from the patient was positive for Type A Clostridium botulinum toxin eventually confirming the diagnosis of infant botulism. The findings in this case support use of human botulism immune globulin when the clinical findings are consistent with infant botulism despite the presence of MRI abnormalities in the brain and cervical nerve roots.

  15. Positrons from dark matter annihilation in the galactic halo: uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Fornengo, N; Lineros, R; Donato, F; Salati, P

    2007-01-01

    Indirect detection signals from dark matter annihilation are studied in the positron channel. We discuss in detail the positron propagation inside the galactic medium: we present novel solutions of the diffusion and propagation equations and we focus on the determination of the astrophysical uncertainties which affect the positron dark matter signal. We show that, especially in the low energy tail of the positron spectra at Earth, the uncertainty is sizeable and we quantify the effect. Comparison of our predictions with current available and foreseen experimental data are derived.

  16. Electron- and positron-induced ionization of water molecules: Theory versus experiment at the triply differential scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P.; Purohit, G.; Champion, C.; Patidar, V.

    2014-03-01

    Triply differential cross sections for electron- and positron-induced ionization of the 3a1 orbital of the water molecule are calculated within the second-order distorted-wave Born approximation. In this context, distorted-wave functions are numerically calculated by modeling both the initial and the final channels whereas single-center Slater-type wave functions are used for describing the molecular target. A good agreement with the existing experimental data is observed. Differences in the trends of differential cross sections are observed for the electron- and positron-impact ionization.

  17. Neuroimaging diagnosis for cerebral infarction An 8-year bibliometric analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Du; Xiaoxia Yang; Hong Song; Bo Chen; Lin Li; Yue Pan; Qiong Wu; Jia Li

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To identify global research trends in neuroimaging diagnosis for cerebral infarction using a bibliometric analysis of the Web of Science.DATA RETRIEVAL:We performed a bibliometric analysis of data retrieval for neuroimaging diagnosis for cerebral infarction containing the key words "CT,magnetic resonance imaging,MRI,transcranial Doppler,transvaginal color Doppler,digital subtraction angiography,and cerebral infarction" using the Web of Science.SELECTION CRITERIA:Inclusion criteria were:(a) peer-reviewed articles on neuroimaging diagnosis for cerebral infarction which were published and indexed in the Web of Science; (b) original research articles and reviews; and (c) publication between 2004-2011.Exclusion criteria were:(a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; and (b) corrected papers or book chapters.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:(1)Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to country;(3) distribution according to institution; (4) top cited publications; (5) distribution according to journals; and (6) comparison of study results on neuroimaging diagnosis for cerebral infarction.RESULTS:Imaging has become the predominant method used in diagnosing cerebral infarction.The most frequently used clinical imaging methods were digital subtraction angiography,CT,MRI,and transcranial color Doppler examination.Digital subtraction angiography is used as the gold standard.However,it is a costly and time-consuming invasive diagnosis that requires some radiation exposure,and is poorly accepted by patients.As such,it is mostly adopted in interventional therapy in the clinic.CT is now accepted as a rapid,simple,and reliable non-invasive method for use in diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease and preoperative appraisal.Ultrasonic Doppler can be used to reflect the hardness of the vascular wall and the nature of the plaque more clearly than CT and MRI.CONCLUSION:At present,there is no unified standard of classification of cerebral infarction

  18. The prenatal origin of hemispheric asymmetry: an in utero neuroimaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprian, Gregor; Langs, Georg; Brugger, Peter C; Bittner, Mario; Weber, Michael; Arantes, Mavilde; Prayer, Daniela

    2011-05-01

    Anatomical and functional hemispheric lateralization originates from differential gene expression and leads to asymmetric structural brain development, which initially appears in the perisylvian regions by 26 gestational weeks (GWs). In this in vivo neuroimaging study, we demonstrated a predominant pattern of temporal lobe (TL) asymmetry in a large cohort of human fetuses between 18 and 37 GWs. Over two-thirds of fetuses showed a larger, left-sided TL, combined with the earlier appearance of the right superior temporal sulcus by 23 GWs (vs. 25 GWs on the left side), which was also deeper than its left counterpart in the majority of cases (94.2%). Shape analysis detected highly significant differences in the contour of the right and left TLs by 20 GWs. Thus, fetal hemispheric asymmetry can be detected in utero, opening new diagnostic possibilities for the assessment of diseases that are believed to be linked to atypical hemispheric lateralization.

  19. Positron CT findings of chronic schizophrenics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoda, Junzo; Miyazaki, Chihiro; Sugai, Yuichi (National Musashi Research Institute for Mental and Nervous Disease, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan)); Iio, Masaaki

    1983-12-01

    Positron CT images of 15 chronic schizophrenics (2 females and 13 males) were examined in contrast to 5 male controls. Average age of controls was 36 years and that of schizophrenics was 42 years. Schizophrenic cases were ill over 6 years, averaging 17 years. All were under antipsychotic drug therapy. Tracer compounds were /sup 11/C-CO/sub 2/ and /sup 11/C-glucose photosynthesised, the former being inhaled once just before and the latter being administered orally 10-15 minutes before examinations. On positron CT images of all normal controls, hyper-radioactivities in frontal regions were observed. Some asymmetries of activities were observed but not remarkable. There was no difference between the images with /sup 11/C-CO/sub 2/ and those with /sup 11/C-glucose. In schizophrenic cases, (1) 7 out of 15 cases showed hypo-activities in the frontal regions both with /sup 11/C-CO/sub 2/ and /sup 11/C-glucose. (2) With /sup 11/C-glucose, relative activities in the brain were lower than those in the soft tissues around the scalp, suggesting the lowered selective uptake of /sup 11/C-glucose by the brain. (3) With /sup 11/C-CO/sub 2/, 4 cases showed higher activities in the right temporal regions and their subcortex than the left. By consideration of relationships between these positron CT findings and clinical data such as present age, age of onset of illness, duration of illness, psychiatric symptoms, present drug amount, summed drug amount from administration, EEG and X-ray CT findings, significant correlation was recognized only between low frontal radioactivities and apathy-abulia as main symptom. Limitation on the explanation of the findings with the image alone was discussed.

  20. Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

    1962-03-01

    A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

  1. Semiempirical potentials for positron scattering by atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assafrao, Denise; Walters, H. R. J.; Arretche, Felipe; Dutra, Adriano; Mohallem, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, 29075-910, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, 89223-100, Joinville, SC (Brazil); Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, PO Box 702, 30123-970, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    We report calculations of differential and integral cross sections for positron scattering by noble gas and alkaline-earth atoms within the same methodology. The scattering potentials are constructed by scaling adiabatic potentials so that their minima coincide with the covalent radii of the target atoms. Elastic differential and integral cross sections are calculated for Ne, Ar, Be, and Mg, and the results are very close to experimental and best theoretical data. Particularly, elastic differential cross sections for Be and Mg at low energies are reported.

  2. POSITRON ANNIHILATION AND CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS ON POLYANILINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭治林; 刘皓; 等

    1994-01-01

    The positron lifetime spectra and electrical conductivities have been measured for polyaniline as a function of protonation level ([H+] from 10-7-100.8 mol/L)。We observed that (1) the short lifetime τ1,which was related to electron density in bulk,decreased with the protonation level;(2) the intermediate lifetime τ2≈360ps,almost remaining constant,whereas its intensity I2 increased with increasing protonation level which was related to the conductivity of meaterial.These results are discussed in terms of conducting island model.

  3. DHCAL with Minimal Absorber: Measurements with Positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Freund, B; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Antequera, J.Berenguer; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H.L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Morin, L.; Besson, D.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kolk, N.van der; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Corriveau, F.; Blazey, G.C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-01-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  4. Positron Emission Tomography: Its 65 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Guerra, A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.

    2016-04-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a well-established imaging technique for in vivo molecular imaging. In this review after a brief history of PET there are presented its physical principles and the technology that has been developed for bringing PET from a bench experiment to a clinical indispensable instrument. The limitations and performance of the PET tomographs are discussed, both as for the hardware and software aspects. The status of art of clinical, pre-clinical and hybrid scanners (, PET/CT and PET/MR) is reported. Finally the actual trend and the recent and future technological developments are fully illustrated.

  5. Liquid Xenon Detectors for Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Miceli, A; Benard, F; Bryman, D A; Kurchaninov, L; Martin, J P; Muennich, A; Retiere, F; Ruth, T J; Sossi, V; Stoessl, A J

    2011-01-01

    PET is a functional imaging technique based on detection of annihilation photons following beta decay producing positrons. In this paper, we present the concept of a new PET system for preclinical applications consisting of a ring of twelve time projection chambers filled with liquid xenon viewed by avalanche photodiodes. Simultaneous measurement of ionization charge and scintillation light leads to a significant improvement to spatial resolution, image quality, and sensitivity. Simulated performance shows that an energy resolution of <10% (FWHM) and a sensitivity of 15% are achievable. First tests with a prototype TPC indicate position resolution <1 mm (FWHM).

  6. Positron scattering from noble gases future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A C L; Caradonna, P; Makochekanwa, C; Slaughter, D S; Sullivan, J P; Buckman, S J [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Mitroy, J, E-mail: acj107@rsphysse.anu.edu.a [Faculty of Education Health and Science, Charles Darwin University, NT (Australia)

    2009-11-01

    Recent results for positron scattering from noble gases over an energy range from 0.5 to 60eV are presented. Measurements include the grand total ({sigma}{sub GT}), Ps formation ({sigma}{sub Ps}) and Grand total - Ps formation (({sigma}{sub GT}-P{sub s}) cross sections. Some preliminary DCS results will also be presented. Work on a formulation of modified effective range theory (MERT) is being undertaken to determine the value of the scattering length which may be useful for identifying a bound state. Plans for experiments on metal atoms will be outlined.

  7. Brain morphometry and the neurobiology of levodopa-induced dyskinesias: current knowledge and future potential for translational pre-clinical neuroimaging studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare eFinlay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine replacement therapy in the form of levodopa results in a significant proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD developing debilitating dyskinesia. This significantly complicates further treatment and negatively impacts patient quality of life. A greater understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID is therefore crucial to develop new treatments to prevent or mitigate LID. Such investigations in humans are largely confined to assessment of neurochemical and cerebrovascular blood flow changes using positron emission tomography (PET and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. However, recent evidence suggests that LID is associated with specific morphological changes in the frontal cortex and midbrain, detectable by structural MRI and voxel-based morphometry (VBM. Current human neuroimaging methods however lack sufficient resolution to reveal the biological mechanism driving these morphological changes at the cellular level. In contrast, there is a wealth of literature from well-established rodent models of LID documenting detailed post-mortem cellular and molecular measurements. The combination therefore of advanced neuroimaging methods and rodent LID models offers an exciting opportunity to bridge these currently disparate areas of research. To highlight this opportunity, in this mini-review, we provide an overview of the current clinical evidence for morphological changes in the brain associated with LID and identify potential cellular mechanisms as suggested from human and animal studies. We then suggest a framework for combining small animal MRI imaging with rodent models of LID, which may provide important mechanistic insights into the neurobiology of LID.

  8. Brain morphometry and the neurobiology of levodopa-induced dyskinesias: current knowledge and future potential for translational pre-clinical neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Clare J; Duty, Susan; Vernon, Anthony C

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine replacement therapy in the form of levodopa results in a significant proportion of patients with Parkinson's disease developing debilitating dyskinesia. This significantly complicates further treatment and negatively impacts patient quality of life. A greater understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is therefore crucial to develop new treatments to prevent or mitigate LID. Such investigations in humans are largely confined to assessment of neurochemical and cerebrovascular blood flow changes using positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, recent evidence suggests that LID is associated with specific morphological changes in the frontal cortex and midbrain, detectable by structural MRI and voxel-based morphometry. Current human neuroimaging methods however lack sufficient resolution to reveal the biological mechanism driving these morphological changes at the cellular level. In contrast, there is a wealth of literature from well-established rodent models of LID documenting detailed post-mortem cellular and molecular measurements. The combination therefore of advanced neuroimaging methods and rodent LID models offers an exciting opportunity to bridge these currently disparate areas of research. To highlight this opportunity, in this mini-review, we provide an overview of the current clinical evidence for morphological changes in the brain associated with LID and identify potential cellular mechanisms as suggested from human and animal studies. We then suggest a framework for combining small animal MRI imaging with rodent models of LID, which may provide important mechanistic insights into the neurobiology of LID.

  9. Positron annihilation spectroscopy as a tool to develop self healing in aluminium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hautakangas, S.; Schut, H. [Faculty of Applied Physics, section NPM2, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands); Zwaag, S. van der; Rivera Diaz del Castillo, P.E.J. [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Section Fundamentals of Advanced Materials, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands); Dijk, N.H. van [Faculty of Applied Physics, Section FAME, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

    2007-07-01

    Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy have been applied to probe the free volume generation (vacancies, dislocations and nano-cracks) during plastic deformation of a commercial aluminium AA2024 (T3) alloy. Aim of the total program is to study how solute atoms can be driven to the areas where initial cracking may occur in order to prevent the failure of the specimen. The phenomenon of closing the nano-crack is called Self Healing, and can provide extra strength and ductility to the alloy under some loading conditions. Plastic deformation of over-aged aluminum alloy at room temperature increases the average positron lifetime from initial value of 190 ps to 203 ps. The low momentum parameter S increases in agreement with the increase of open volume defects. The elastic deformation of the sample does not have a recordable effect on the positron annihilation data. It is also shown that the induced damage does not recover after loading the sample, i.e. the AA2024 in the T3 state is non self healing material, as expected, providing important first state result in the research of self healing Al alloys. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. The intense slow positron source concept: A theoretical perspective on a proposed INEL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowitz, H.; Abrashoff, J.D.; Landman, W.H.; Albano, R.K. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States)); Tajima, T. (Physics Department, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)); Larson, J.D. (Independence, Missouri 64052 (United States))

    1994-06-15

    An analysis has been performed of the INEL Intense Slow Positron Source (ISPS) concept. The results of the theoretical study are encouraging. A full-scale device with a monoenergetic 5 keV positron beam of [ge]10[sup 12] e[sup +]/s on a [le]0.03-cm-diameter target appears feasible and can be obtained within the existing infrastructure of INEL reactor facilities. A 30.0-cm-diameter, large area source dish, moderated at first with thin crystalline W films and later by solid Ne, is proposed as the initial device in order to explore problems with a facility scale system. A demonstration scale beam at [ge]10[sup 10] slow e[sup +]/s is proposed using a [sup 58]Co source plated on a 6-cm-diameter source dish insert, placed in a 30-cm adaptor.

  11. High density ultrashort relativistic positron beam generation by laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y. J.; Klimo, O.; Weber, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-11-01

    A mechanism of high energy and high density positron beam creation is proposed in ultra-relativistic laser-plasma interaction. Longitudinal electron self-injection into a strong laser field occurs in order to maintain the balance between the ponderomotive potential and the electrostatic potential. The injected electrons are trapped and form a regular layer structure. The radiation reaction and photon emission provide an additional force to confine the electrons in the laser pulse. The threshold density to initiate the longitudinal electron self-injection is obtained from analytical model and agrees with the kinetic simulations. The injected electrons generate γ-photons which counter-propagate into the laser pulse. Via the Breit-Wheeler process, well collimated positron bunches in the GeV range are generated of the order of the critical plasma density and the total charge is about nano-Coulomb. The above mechanisms are demonstrated by particle-in-cell simulations and single electron dynamics.

  12. 睡眠疾病的功能影像学研究进展%Functional neuroimaging of sleep disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱春; 赵军; 管一晖

    2013-01-01

    睡眠疾病严重影响着人类的日常生活和健康,然而其发病机制及病理改变尚不清楚.功能影像学为睡眠疾病的研究提供了较好的平台,该文主要就几种常见的睡眠障碍疾病的功能影像学研究进展进行综述,同时简要介绍各种疾病的临床表现、脑部结构异常及主要病理改变.%Sleep disorders may affect the health and normal life of human badly.However,the pathophysiology underlying adult sleep disorders is still unclear.Functional neuroimaging can be used to investigate whether sleep disorders are associated with specific changes in brain structure or regional activity.This paper reviews functional brain imaging findings in major intrinsic sleep disorders (i.e.,idiopathic insomnia,narcolepsy,and obstructive sleep apnea) and in abnormal motor behavior during sleep (i.e.,periodic limb movement disorder and REM sleep behavior disorder).Metabolic/functional investigations (positron emission tomography,single photon emission computed tomography,functional magnetic resonance imaging) are mainly reviewed,as well as neuroanatomical assessments (voxel-based morphometry,magnetic resonance spectroscopy).Meanwhile,here are some brief introduction of different kinds of sleep disorders.

  13. Positron annihilation spectroscopy in defects of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Fujinami, M

    2002-01-01

    Interaction of positron and defects, application to research of defects of semiconductor and defects on the surface of semiconductor are explained. Cz (Czochralski)-Si single crystal with 10 sup 1 sup 8 cm sup - sup 3 impurity oxygen was introduced defects by electron irradiation and the positron lifetime was measured at 90K after annealing. The defect size and recovery temperature were determined by the lifetime measurement. The distribution of defects in the depth direction is shown by S-E curve. The chemical state analysis is possible by CBS (Coincidence Doppler Broadening) spectra. The application to silicon-implanted (100 keV, 2x10 sup 1 sup 5 cm sup - sup 2) silicon and oxygen-implanted (180 keV, 2x10 sup 1 sup 5 cm sup - sup 2) silicon are stated. On the oxygen-implanted silicon, the main product was V2 after implantation, V sub 6 O sub 2 at 600degC and V sub 1 sub 0 O sub 6 at 800degC. (S.Y.)

  14. Electron-Positron Flows around Magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2013-11-01

    The twisted magnetospheres of magnetars must sustain a persistent flow of electron-positron plasma. The flow dynamics is controlled by the radiation field around the hot neutron star. The problem of plasma motion in the self-consistent radiation field is solved using the method of virtual beams. The plasma and radiation exchange momentum via resonant scattering and self-organize into the "radiatively locked" outflow with a well-defined, decreasing Lorentz factor. There is an extended zone around the magnetar where the plasma flow is ultra-relativistic; its Lorentz factor is self-regulated so that it can marginally scatter thermal photons. The flow becomes slow and opaque in an outer equatorial zone, where the decelerated plasma accumulates and annihilates; this region serves as a reflector for the thermal photons emitted by the neutron star. The e ± flow carries electric current, which is sustained by a moderate induced electric field. The electric field maintains a separation between the electron and positron velocities, against the will of the radiation field. The two-stream instability is then inevitable, and the induced turbulence can generate low-frequency emission. In particular, radio emission may escape around the magnetic dipole axis of the star. Most of the flow energy is converted to hard X-ray emission, which is examined in an accompanying paper.

  15. ELECTRON-POSITRON FLOWS AROUND MAGNETARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M., E-mail: amb@phys.columbia.edu [Physics Department and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    The twisted magnetospheres of magnetars must sustain a persistent flow of electron-positron plasma. The flow dynamics is controlled by the radiation field around the hot neutron star. The problem of plasma motion in the self-consistent radiation field is solved using the method of virtual beams. The plasma and radiation exchange momentum via resonant scattering and self-organize into the 'radiatively locked' outflow with a well-defined, decreasing Lorentz factor. There is an extended zone around the magnetar where the plasma flow is ultra-relativistic; its Lorentz factor is self-regulated so that it can marginally scatter thermal photons. The flow becomes slow and opaque in an outer equatorial zone, where the decelerated plasma accumulates and annihilates; this region serves as a reflector for the thermal photons emitted by the neutron star. The e {sup ±} flow carries electric current, which is sustained by a moderate induced electric field. The electric field maintains a separation between the electron and positron velocities, against the will of the radiation field. The two-stream instability is then inevitable, and the induced turbulence can generate low-frequency emission. In particular, radio emission may escape around the magnetic dipole axis of the star. Most of the flow energy is converted to hard X-ray emission, which is examined in an accompanying paper.

  16. Towards laboratory produced relativistic electron-positron pair plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Cauble, R.; Dollar, F.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Hazi, A.; Moses, E. I.; Murphy, C. D.; Myatt, J.; Park, J.; Seely, J.; Shepherd, R.; Spitkovsky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Szabo, C. I.; Tommasini, R.; Zulick, C.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2011-12-01

    We review recent experimental results on the path to producing electron-positron pair plasmas using lasers. Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the past few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 10 16 cm -3 and 10 13 cm -3, respectively. With the increasing performance of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a high-density, up to 10 18 cm -3, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter.

  17. A STUDY OF FINE PRECIPITATES IN ALLOYS BY POSITRON ANNIHILATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王景成; 尤富强; 殷俊林; 高国华; 梁玲; 段勇

    2001-01-01

    Measurements were performed using the positron annihilation technique associated with physical metallurgical techniques for several engineering alloys containing fine precipitates. It is shown that positron annihilation is an effective method to detect fine precipitates, providing a sound basis for a further intense research of these.

  18. Formation of a high intensity low energy positron string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Syresin, E. M.; Itahashi, T.; Dubinov, A. E.

    2004-05-01

    The possibility of a high intensity low energy positron beam production is discussed. The proposed Positron String Trap (PST) is based on the principles and technology of the Electron String Ion Source (ESIS) developed in JINR during the last decade. A linear version of ESIS has been used successfully for the production of intense highly charged ion beams of various elements. Now the Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) concept is under study and this opens really new promising possibilities in physics and technology. In this report, we discuss the application of the tubular-type trap for the storage of positrons cooled to the cryogenic temperatures of 0.05 meV. It is intended that the positron flux at the energy of 1-5 eV, produced by the external source, is injected into the Tubular Positron Trap which has a similar construction as the TESIS. Then the low energy positrons are captured in the PST Penning trap and are cooled down because of their synchrotron radiation in the strong (5-10 T) applied magnetic field. It is expected that the proposed PST should permit storing and cooling to cryogenic temperature of up to 5×109 positrons. The accumulated cooled positrons can be used further for various physics applications, for example, antihydrogen production.

  19. Towards laboratory produced relativistic electron–positron pair plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hui; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Cauble, R.; Dollar, F.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Hazi, A.; Moses, E. I.; Murphy, C. D.; Myatt, J.; Park, J.; Seely, J.; Shepherd, R.; Spitkovsky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Szabo, C. I.; Tommasini, R.; Zulick, C.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2011-12-01

    We review recent experimental results on the path to producing electron–positron pair plasmas using lasers. Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the past few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 1016 cm-3 and 1013 cm-3, respectively. With the increasing performance of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a high-density, up to 1018 cm-3, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter.

  20. First platinum moderated positron beam based on neutron capture

    CERN Document Server

    Hugenschmidt, C; Repper, R; Schreckenbach, K; Sperr, P; Triftshaeuser, W

    2002-01-01

    A positron beam based on absorption of high energy prompt gamma-rays from thermal neutron capture in sup 1 sup 1 sup 3 Cd was installed at a neutron guide of the high flux reactor at the ILL in Grenoble. Measurements were performed for various source geometries, dependent on converter mass, moderator surface and extraction voltages. The results lead to an optimised design of the in-pile positron source which will be implemented at the Munich research reactor FRM-II. The positron source consists of platinum foils acting as gamma-e sup + e sup - -converter and positron moderator. Due to the negative positron work function moderation in heated platinum leads to emission of monoenergetic positrons. The positron work function of polycrystalline platinum was determined to 1.95(5) eV. After acceleration to several keV by four electrical lenses the beam was magnetically guided in a solenoid field of 7.5 mT leading to a NaI-detector in order to detect the 511 keV gamma-radiation of the annihilating positrons. The posi...