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Sample records for neurogenic bladder management

  1. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder

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    Myers, Jeremy B.; Mayer, Erik N.; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from ...

  2. Neurogenic Bladder

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    Peter T. Dorsher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented.

  3. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jeremy B; Mayer, Erik N; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from treatment of children with congenital diseases, such as myelomeningocele. Our goal, in this review, is to present some of the common surgical options for ISD [including artificial urinary sphincters, bladder slings, bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) and urethral bulking agents] and the evidence underlying these treatments in adults with neurogenic bladder.

  4. Spontaneous Bladder Perforation in an Infant Neurogenic Bladder: Laparoscopic Management

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    Daniel Cabezalí Barbancho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bladder perforation is an uncommon event in childhood. It is usually associated with bladder augmentation. We are presenting a case of bladder rupture in an infant with neurogenic bladder without prior bladder surgery. Three days after lipomyelomeningocele excision the patient showed signs and symptoms of acute abdomen. The ultrasound exploration revealed significant amount of intraperitoneal free fluid and therefore a laparoscopic exploration was performed. A posterior bladder rupture was diagnosed and repaired laparoscopically. Currently, being 3 years old, she keeps successfully dry with clean intermittent catheterization. Neurogenic bladder voiding function can change at any time of its evolution and lead to complications. Early diagnosis of spontaneous bladder rupture is of paramount importance, so it is essential to think about it in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen.

  5. Surgical management of the neurogenic bladder and bowel

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    Mingin Gerald C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Spina bifida and myelodysplasia are associated with neurogenic abnormalities of the bladder and bowel function. All children with myelodysplasia require an evaluation of their urinary tract with ultrasound and urodynamics to confirm normal bladder and kidney function. Patients with anatomical and functional abnormalities require treatment, the mainstay being intermittent catheterization and anticholinergic medication. The treatment goals for patients with a neurogenic bladder are the preservation of the upper urinary tract, bladder and bowel continence, independence, autonomy, and facilitation of self-esteem. A minority of children will not respond to conservative therapy and will ultimately require surgical intervention. This review will discuss the surgical options for bladder augmentation, bladder neck reconstruction and closure, as well as the methods for the creation of continent catheterizable stomas. The timing, indications, and description for each procedure will be addressed. Finally, the antegrade continence enema procedure will be described for the management of refractory fecal incontinence.

  6. Neurogenic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the cause. They often include symptoms of urinary incontinence . Symptoms of overactive bladder may include: Having to ... urinary diversion) Support Groups If you are having urinary incontinence, organizations are available for further information and support. ...

  7. Management of detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia in neurogenic bladder.

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    Mahfouz, W; Corcos, J

    2011-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects 11.5 to 53.4 individuals per million of the population in developed countries each year. SCI is caused by trauma, although it can also result from myelopathy, myelitis, vascular disease or arteriovenous malformations and multiple sclerosis. Patients with complete lesions of the spinal cord between spinal cord level T6 and S2, after they recover from spinal shock, generally exhibit involuntary bladder contractions without sensation, smooth sphincter synergy, but with detrusor striated sphincter dyssynergia (DESD). Those with lesions above spinal cord level T6 may experience, in addition, smooth sphincter dyssynergia and autonomic hyperreflexia. DESD is a debilitating problem in patients with SCI. It carries a high risk of complications, and even life expectancy can be affected. Nearly half of the patients with untreated DESD will develop deleterious urologic complications, due to high intravesical pressures, resulting in urolithiasis, urinary tract infection (UTI), vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), hydronephrosis, obstructive uropathy, and renal failure. The mainstay of treatment is the use of antimuscarinics and catheterization, but in those for whom this is not possible external sphincterotomy has been a last resort option. External sphincterotomy is associated with significant risks, including haemorrhage; erectile dysfunction and the possibility of redo procedures. Over the last decade alternatives have been investigated, such as urethral stents and intrasphincteric botulinum toxin injection. In this review, we will cover neurogenic DESD, with emphasis on definition, classifications, diagnosis and different therapeutic options available.

  8. Non-Traditional Management of the Neurogenic Bladder: Tissue Engineering and Neuromodulation

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    Jane M. Lewis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with spina bifida and a neurogenic bladder have traditionally been managed with clean intermittent catheterization and pharmacotherapy in order to treat abnormal bladder wall dynamics, protect the upper urinary tract from damage, and achieve urinary continence. However, some patients will fail this therapy and require surgical reconstruction in the form of bladder augmentation surgery using reconfigured intestine or stomach to increase the bladder capacity while reducing the internal storage pressure. Despite functional success of bladder augmentation in achieving a low pressure reservoir, there are several associated complications of this operation and patients do not have the ability to volitionally void. For these reasons, alternative treatments have been sought. Two exciting alternative approaches that are currently being investigated are tissue engineering and neuromodulation. Tissue engineering aims to create new bladder tissue for replacement purposes with both “seeded” and “unseeded” technology. Advances in the fields of nanotechnology and stem cell biology have further enhanced these tissue engineering technologies. Neuromodulation therapies directly address the root of the problem in patients with spina bifida and a neurogenic bladder, namely the abnormal relationship between the nerves and the bladder wall. These therapies include transurethral bladder electrostimulation, sacral neuromodulation, and neurosurgical techniques such as selective sacral rhizotomy and artificial somatic-autonomic reflex pathway construction. This review will discuss both tissue engineering techniques and neuromodulation therapies in more detail including rationale, experimental data, current status of clinical application, and future direction.

  9. To clamp or not to clamp? Bladder management by suprapubic catheterization in patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

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    Pannek, Jürgen; Göcking, Konrad; Bersch, Ulf

    2010-10-01

    In a small subset of patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, insertion of suprapubic catheters (SPC) cannot be avoided. If SPC has to be utilized, catheter clamping and anticholinergic medication are often recommended, but evidence supporting this view is scarce. We determined the influence of anticholinergic medication and catheter clamping on urodynamic parameters and the status of the urinary tract in patients with chronic suprapubic catheterization. In a retrospective study, the results of urodynamic testing, sonographic evaluations, and urinalyses of 85 patients with chronic (>1 year) suprapubic catheterization due to neurogenic bladder dysfunction were analyzed. The 51 male and 34 female patients (mean age 55 years) were managed with an SPC for 65.3 ± 48.0 months. Forty patients had an SPC for more than 60 months. Comparing the results before SPC insertion with the last follow-up examination, no significant differences in detrusor compliance and maximum detrusor pressure were detected, whereas bladder capacity significantly decreased. In three patients, alterations of the upper urinary tract were found. The results were not significantly different between the patients using anticholinergic medication and/or catheter clamping and those who did not. According to our study, routine use of anticholinergic medication and clamping of catheter does not seem to be necessary to preserve detrusor compliance and renal function in patients with SPC and neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

  10. Neurogenic bladder in Hunter's syndrome.

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    Koyama, K; Moda, Y; Sone, A; Tanaka, H; Hino, Y

    1994-01-01

    We encountered a rare patient with Hunter's syndrome who exhibited urinary retention as a result of a neurogenic bladder, uninhibited detrusor contractions, and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Neurological findings were consistent with cervical myelopathy and cervical MR imaging showed very narrow segments at the cord level C2-4. We speculate that this Hunter's syndrome patient has cervical myelopathy and that this neurological dysfunction causes the neurogenic bladder. PMID:8014981

  11. Surgical management of functional bladder outlet obstruction in adults with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

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    Utomo, Elaine; Groen, Jan; Blok, Bertil F M

    2014-05-24

    The most common type of functional bladder outlet obstruction in patients with neurogenic bladder is detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD). The lack of co-ordination between the bladder and the external urethral sphincter muscle (EUS) in DSD can result in poor bladder emptying and high bladder pressures, which may eventually lead to progressive renal damage. To assess the effectiveness of different surgical therapies for the treatment of functional bladder outlet obstruction (i.e. DSD) in adults with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings (searched 20 February 2014), and the reference lists of relevant articles. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing a surgical treatment of DSD in adults suffering from neurogenic bladder dysfunction, with no treatment, placebo, non-surgical treatment, or other surgical treatment, alone or in combination. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We included five trials (total of 199 participants, average age of 40 years). The neurological diseases causing DSD were traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple sclerosis (MS), or congenital malformations.One trial compared placement of sphincteric stent prosthesis with sphincterotomy. For urodynamic measurements, results for postvoid residual urine volume (PVR) and cystometric bladder capacity were inconclusive and consistent with benefit of either sphincteric stent prosthesis or sphincterotomy at three, six, 12, and 24 months. Results for maximum detrusor pressure (Pdet.max) were also inconclusive at three, six, and 12 months; however, after two years, the Pdet.max after sphincterotomy was lower than after stent placement (mean difference (MD) -30 cmH2O, 95% confidence interval (CI) 8.99 to

  12. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

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    Al Taweel W

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury.Keywords: neurogenic bladder, spinal cord injury, urodynamics, intestine, intermittent catheterization

  13. Bladder management in individuals with chronic neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

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    Krebs, J; Wöllner, J; Pannek, J

    2016-08-01

    Retrospective investigation. To investigate the association of patient and injury characteristics with bladder evacuation by indwelling catheterization in patients with chronic neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). Tertiary urologic referral center. The patient database was screened for patients with chronic (>12 months) NLUTD. Patient characteristics and bladder management details were collected. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the effects of the investigated factors on bladder evacuation by indwelling catheterization. The data of 1263 patients with a median age of 47 years (range 11-89 years) and a median NLTUD duration of 15.2 years (range 1.0-63.4 years) were investigated. The most common bladder evacuation method was intermittent catheterization (IC; 41.3%) followed by triggered reflex voiding (25.7%), suprapubic catheterization (11.8%), sacral anterior root stimulation (7.3%), spontaneous voiding (7.0%), abdominal straining (5.7%) and transurethral catheterization (1.3%). Female gender, tetraplegia, an age older than 45 years and injury duration were significant (<0.001) predictors of indwelling catheterization. The odds of bladder evacuation by indwelling catheterization were increased ~2.5, 3 and 4 times in women, patients older than 45 years and tetraplegics, respectively. IC is the most common bladder evacuation method. However, the majority of individuals with NLUTD are using other evacuation methods, because factors such as functional deficiencies, mental impairment or the social situation are relevant for choosing a bladder evacuation method. Individuals at risk of indwelling catheterization can be identified based on female gender, age, injury severity and injury duration.

  14. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    OpenAIRE

    Al Taweel W; Seyam R

    2015-01-01

    Waleed Al Taweel, Raouf SeyamDepartment of Urology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete...

  15. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  16. Management of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder: challenges and solutions

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    Pannek J

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Jürgen Pannek, Jens Wöllner Neuro-Urology, Swiss Paraplegic Center, Nottwil, Switzerland Introduction: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are one of the most common morbidities in persons with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD. They are associated with a significant morbidity and mortality, and they affect the quality of life of the affected patients. Diagnosis and treatment of UTI in this group of patients are challenging. In this review, the current strategies regarding diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are summarized. Diagnostics: it is important to correctly diagnose a UTI, as treatment of bacteriuria should strictly be avoided. A UTI is defined as a combination of laboratory findings (leukocyturia and bacteriuria and symptoms. Laboratory findings without symptoms are classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria. Routine urine screening is not advised. Treatment: Only UTI should be treated; treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is not indicated. Prior to treatment, urine for a urine culture should be obtained. Antibiotic treatment for ~7 days is advised. Prevention: In recurrent UTI, bladder management should be optimized and morphologic causes for UTI should be excluded. If UTIs persist, medical prophylaxis should be considered. Currently, no prophylactic measure with evidence-based efficacy exists. Long-term antibiotic prophylaxis should be used merely as an ultimate measure. Among the various mentioned innovative approaches for UTI prevention, bacteriophages, intravesical instillations, complementary and alternative medicine techniques, and probiotics seem to be most promising. Conclusion: Recently, several promising innovative options for UTI prophylaxis have been developed which may help overcome the current therapeutic dilemma. However, further well designed studies are necessary to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these approaches. Keywords: neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, spinal cord injury, prophylaxis

  17. Neurogenic bladder evaluation and management after spinal cord injury: Current practice among urologists working in Saudi Arabia

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    Waleed Al Taweel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the current trends in the management and surveillance of the NB population secondary to spinal cord injury (SCI or myelomeningocele by certified urologist working in Saudi Arabia and to compare it to the current guidelines. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a 12-points questionnaire distributed to urologists working in Saudi Arabia and registered at the Saudi medical association. The assessment and follow-up of upper and lower urinary tract function in neurogenic bladder patients, their optimal frequency and management of related infections were the topics of inquiry. Results: Of the 272 urologists surveyed, 105 responded, yielding a response rate of 38%. Eighty-nine percent of respondents said that ultrasound was their diagnostic tool of choice for upper tract evaluation. Sixty-one percent of respondents said that they would follow their patients with a multichannel urodynamic study. Forty percent of urologists stated that they would treat asymptomatic bacteriuria. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC was the most common modality chosen for the management of neurogenic bladder in patients with emptying difficulties. Conclusion: This study confirms that most urologists in Saudi Arabia involved with neurogenic bladder management. However, more than one third of the urologists do not have urodynamic machine and only two of the reporting practitioners has a videourodynamic machine. The results emphasize the need for clear guidelines in this field of urology in Saudi Arabia. Highly specialized rehabilitation centers for neurogenic bladder secondary to SCI are required for optimal care and urologist teaching.

  18. Management of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, Jürgen; Wöllner, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common morbidities in persons with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). They are associated with a significant morbidity and mortality, and they affect the quality of life of the affected patients. Diagnosis and treatment of UTI in this group of patients are challenging. In this review, the current strategies regarding diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are summarized. it is important to correctly diagnose a UTI, as treatment of bacteriuria should strictly be avoided. A UTI is defined as a combination of laboratory findings (leukocyturia and bacteriuria) and symptoms. Laboratory findings without symptoms are classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria. Routine urine screening is not advised. Only UTI should be treated; treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria is not indicated. Prior to treatment, urine for a urine culture should be obtained. Antibiotic treatment for ~7 days is advised. In recurrent UTI, bladder management should be optimized and morphologic causes for UTI should be excluded. If UTIs persist, medical prophylaxis should be considered. Currently, no prophylactic measure with evidence-based efficacy exists. Long-term antibiotic prophylaxis should be used merely as an ultimate measure. Among the various mentioned innovative approaches for UTI prevention, bacteriophages, intravesical instillations, complementary and alternative medicine techniques, and probiotics seem to be most promising. Recently, several promising innovative options for UTI prophylaxis have been developed which may help overcome the current therapeutic dilemma. However, further well designed studies are necessary to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these approaches.

  19. Sacral Nerve Stimulation for Neurogenic Bladder.

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    Li, Lai-Fung; Ka-Kit Leung, Gilberto; Lui, Wai-Man

    2016-06-01

    Neurogenic bladder refers to dysfunction of the urinary bladder secondary to diseases of the nervous system that result in problems with urine storage, micturition, or both. The most common causes are multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Patients commonly present with recurrent UTIs, obstructive uropathies, and urinary retention. Without proper treatment, neurogenic bladder may result in nephropathy and renal failure, both of which have a significant negative impact on the health and life expectancy of patients. Restoration of lost neural function using artificial stimulators is a feasible therapeutic strategy. This article reviews the pathophysiology of neurogenic bladder and the 2 most commonly employed sacral nerve stimulation methods-the Brindley procedure and sacral neuromodulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. What do we know about neurogenic bladder prevalence and management in developing countries and emerging regions of the world?

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    Przydacz, Mikolaj; Denys, Pierre; Corcos, Jacques

    2017-09-01

    To summarize information on Neurogenic Bladder (NB) epidemiology, management and access to patient treatment in developing countries and emerging regions of the world in order to propose future interventions and help governmental as well as non-governmental organizations design their action plans. Different search methods were used to gather the maximum available data. They included strategic searches; reference checks; grey literature searches (reports, working papers, government documents, civil society information); contacting professional societies, registries, and authors; requesting unpublished data from organizations; and browsing related websites and journals. The incidence and prevalence rates of NB in developing countries are difficult to establish because epidemiological reports are few and far between. The frequency of bladder dysfunction in neurologically impaired populations can be approximately estimated in some of these countries. Similar information paucity affects diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to NB patients living in less-developed regions of the world. The assessment and management of NB seems to vary markedly between countries, and care of patients from emerging regions of the world is often inadequate. Strong concerted efforts are needed on the part of international scientific societies, non-governmental organizations and local governments to work together to change the prognosis for these patients and to improve their quality of life. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Humberto R; Hickling, Duane R

    2016-02-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥10(3) CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5-14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required.

  2. Management of urinary tract infection with intravesical amikacin may increase the risk of bladder oxidative stress in children with neurogenic bladder.

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    Amasyali, Akin Soner; Yilmaz, Dilek; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Kucukdurmaz, Faruk; Sonmez, Ferah; Erol, Haluk

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated the bladder oxidative stress in neurogenic bladder children treated with intravesical amikacin for recurrent UTI and whether urinary isoprostane f2 alpha (F2-IsoP) is a good biomarker in this particular condition. This prospectively designed controlled study was approved by the Adnan Menderes University institutional ethics committee (Adnan Menderes University, 2015/649). Between January 2016 and January 2017, twenty-six children with meningomyelocele who had been doing CIC were recruited. Serum and urine samples were collected during urinary tract infection (UTI) (group 1) and after management of UTI with intravesical amikacin (group 2) besides standard oral antibiotic treatment. While oxidative stress parameters SOD, GSH, GPX, MDA, F2-IsoP and NO were analyzed in the serum samples, only F2-IsoP was analyzed in the urine. All data were compared with 23 normal healthy control children (group 3). Median age, CIC duration and number of CIC per day of patients' group were 84 (60-147) months, 60 (30-90) months and 4 (4-6), respectively. Male-to-female ratio was 1:16. There was no statistical difference between groups in terms of serum oxidative stress parameters (p > 0.05). However, statistically significant urine F2-IsoP changes exist between groups (p = 0.011) (Fig. 1). But there were no correlations between urine F2-IsoP and disease clinical data such as CIC duration or number of CIC per day. Serum glutathione levels in group 2 were higher than group 1 and 3, as well (p = 0.023, Kruskal-Wallis test). Fig. 1 Comparison of median urinary isoprostane f2 alpha levels CONCLUSION: Higher urine F2-IsoP levels after management of UTI with intravesical amikacin may reflect increased lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in children with NB. This detrimental effect on bladder should be considered in the long-term treatment period.

  3. Bladder Management

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    ... Catheterization • Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Bladder Management [ Download this pamphlet: "Bladder Management" - (PDF, 499KB) ] The ... and medication or surgery may be helpful. Bladder Management Foley or Suprapubic Catheter A tube is inserted ...

  4. Bladder augmentation in three patients with contracted bladder caused by neurogenic bladder

    OpenAIRE

    末盛, 毅; 高橋, 省二; 夏目, 修; 山本, 雅司; 山田, 薫; 百瀬, 均; 塩見, 努

    1990-01-01

    Three patients with contracted bladder caused by neurogenic bladder underwent ileocystoplasty. The primary diagnosis was meningomyelocele for all of them. The operative procedure adopted was Goodwin's Cup-patch method. All cases have obtained increased bladder capacity with improvement of bladder compliance and have been free from urinary incontinence. They were followed up by using clean intermittent self catheterization. Ileocystoplasty combined with clean intermittent self catheterization ...

  5. [Urodynamic changes after bladder augmentation surgery in paediatric patients with myelomeningocele due to neurogenic bladder].

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    Zaragoza Torres, Raúl Ignacio; Galarza-Flores, Mario Eduardo; Gómez-Castellanos, Julio Cesar; Barrera-de León, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Augmentation cystoplasty is a successful surgical procedure for the management of neurogenic bladder in children in order to improve urodynamic parameters. The aim of this article is to describe urodynamic changes after augmentation cystoplasty in children with myelomeningocele. A descriptive cross-sectional study including children aged 8-16 years with a myelomeningocele operated on for augmentation cystoplasty surgery with sigmoid colon segments due to a neurogenic bladder from the years 2003-2013. A urodynamic study was conducted before and after the surgical procedure. Non-probabilistic sample of consecutive cases. Descriptive statistics with frequencies and percentages, medians, and ranges. Inferential intra-group comparison with the Wilcoxon test and inter-group with Mann-Whitney U. SPSS 20.0 statistical package. The study included 50 patients, of whom 25 were male and 25 were female, with a median age of 12 years (range, 6-15 years). Bladder capacity improved from 52.8% to 95.9% (p<0.001), uninhibited contractions 1.4-1.8, contraction intensity 47-8.5 (p<0.001), mean pre-surgical and post-surgical filling pressure 40.8cm H2O and 11.0cm H2O, respectively (p<0.001), mean emptying pressure 48.5 vs. 3.6cm H2O (p<0.001), and bladder accommodation 4.6 vs. 41.3cm H2O (p<0.001). Augmentation cystoplasty with sigmoid colon significantly improved urodynamic parameters, such as bladder accommodation and filling pressure in children with myelomeningocele-associated neurogenic bladder. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Preventing kidney injury in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction

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    Faezeh Javadi Larijani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of neurogenic bladder dysfunction (NBD in newborn infants is myelomeningocele. The pathophysiology almost always involves the bladder detrusor sphincter dyssynergy (DSD, which if untreated can cause severe and irreversible damage to the upper and lower urinary tracts. Early diagnosis and adequate management of NBD is critical to prevent both renal damage and bladder dysfunction and to reduce chances for the future surgeries. Initial investigation of the affected newborn infant includes a renal and bladder ultrasound, measurement of urine residual, determination of serum creatinine level, and urodynamics study. Voiding cystogram is indicated when either hydronephrosis or DSD is present. The main goal of treatment is prevention of urinary tract deterioration and achievement of continuance at an appropriate age. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC in combination with anticholinergic (oxybutynin and antibiotics are instituted in those with high filling and voiding pressures, DSD and/or high grade reflux immediately after the myelomeningocele is repaired. Botulium toxin-A injection into detrusor is a safe alternative in patients with insufficient response or significant side effects to anticholinergic (oral or intravesical instillation therapy. Surgery is an effective alternative in patients with persistent detrusor hyperactivity and/or dyssynergic detrusor sphincter despites of the CIC and maximum dosage of anticholinergic therapy. Children with NBD require care from a multidisciplinary team approach consisting of pediatricians, neurosurgeon, urologist, nephrologists, orthopedic surgeon, and other allied medical specialists.

  7. Caudal Regression Syndrome/neurogenic bladder presented as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burhan M. Edrees

    Caudal Regression Syndrome/neurogenic bladder presented as recurrent urinary tract infection. Burhan M. Edrees. Department of Pediatrics, Medical College, Umm Al-Qura University, Saudi .... The pulse rate was 129 per minute, respiratory rate was 40 per ... strated abnormalities in the structures and functions of the renal.

  8. Caudal Regression Syndrome/neurogenic bladder presented as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burhan M. Edrees

    mities within the spinal cord, brain, or nervous supply. A number of nerves and muscles mostly work together for the attainment of specified function. A very common example regarding the blad- der is, urinary incontenince. In this condition, the brain is unable to control the functions of bladder, which results in neurogenic ...

  9. Sacral Fracture Causing Neurogenic Bladder: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaji, Tatsuro; Yamada, Noboru; Iwai, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    A 76-year-old man presented with a Denis Zone III sacral fracture after a traffic accident. He also developed urinary retention and perineal numbness. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by the sacral fracture. A computed tomogram (CT) revealed that third sacral lamina was fractured and displaced into the spinal canal, but vertebral body did not displace. The fracture lines began at the center of lamina and extended bilateraly. The fracture pattern was unique....

  10. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K N Stamatiou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination.

  11. Sacral Fracture Causing Neurogenic Bladder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Sasaji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old man presented with a Denis Zone III sacral fracture after a traffic accident. He also developed urinary retention and perineal numbness. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by the sacral fracture. A computed tomogram (CT revealed that third sacral lamina was fractured and displaced into the spinal canal, but vertebral body did not displace. The fracture lines began at the center of lamina and extended bilateraly. The fracture pattern was unique. The sacrum was osteoporosis, and this fracture may be based on osteoporosis. We performed laminectomy to decompress sacral nerve roots. One month after surgery, the patient was able to urinate. Three months after surgery, his bladder function recovered normally. One year after surgery, he returned to a normal daily life and had no complaints regarding urination. One-year postoperative CT showed the decompressed third sacrum without displacement.

  12. Survey of spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder studies using the Web of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Benjing; Zhang, Yongli; Li, Yucheng; Wang, Zantao; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xiyin; Wang, Bingdong; Long, Zhixin; Wang, Feng; Song, Guo; Wang, Yan

    2012-08-15

    To identify global trends in research on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder, through a bibliometric analysis using the Web of Science. We performed a bibliometric analysis of studies on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder using the Web of Science. Data retrieval was performed using key words "spinal cord injury", "spinal injury", "neurogenic bladder", "neuropathic bladder", "neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction", "neurogenic voiding dysfunction", "neurogenic urination disorder" and "neurogenic vesicourethral dysfunction". (a) published peer-reviewed articles on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder indexed in the Web of Science; (b) type of articles: original research articles and reviews; (c) year of publication: no limitation. (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) Corrected papers and book chapters. (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to journals; (3) distribution according to subject areas; (4) distribution according to country; (5) distribution according to institution; and (6) top cited publications. There were 646 research articles addressing spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder in the Web of Science. Research on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder was found in the Science Citation Index-Expanded as of 1946. The United States, Ireland and Switzerland were the three major countries contributing to studies in spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder in the 1970s. However, in the 1990s, the United States, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Germany and Japan published more papers on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder than Switzerland, and Ireland fell off the top ten countries list. In this century, the United States ranks first in spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder studies, followed by France, the United Kingdom, Germany, Switzerland and Japan. Subject categories including urology, nephrology and clinical neurology, as well as

  13. Bibliometric profile of neurogenic bladder in the literature: a 20-year bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Qu, Bo; Shen, Yan; Su, Xiao-Jing; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Xue-Mei; Zhou, Yu-Hong; Pi, Hong-Ying

    2015-05-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a dysfunction of the lower urinary tract caused by nervous system disorder. We investigated the trends in publication of articles under the topic "neurogenic bladder" using bibliometric analysis. Articles on neurogenic bladder, published between 1995 and 2014, were retrieved from the ISI Web of Science citation database. We analyzed the search results for authors, countries, institutions, journals, and top-cited papers. A total of 1,904 articles were retrieved. There was a small increase in the number of articles on neurogenic bladder from 1995 (n = 43) to 2014 (n = 117). The USA was the leading country in the total number of articles (n = 598). However, the number of publications from China has rapidly increased, and China was ranked second in 2014. Emmanuel Chartier-Kastler (n = 65) was the most productive author, and University of Paris VI (Paris 6) (n = 61) was the most productive institution. The Journal of Urology published the greatest number of articles on this topic (n = 285). Articles on neurogenic bladder were often published in a professional journal under the category Urology & Nephrology, Neurosciences & Neurology, or Rehabilitation. Visualization analysis based on co-citation networks was conducted using CiteSpace III. Visualization analysis revealed that the hot spots in neurogenic bladder were botulinum toxin-A, prazosin, bethanechol, and afferent pathways. These findings provide new insight into the publication trends and hot spots in neurogenic bladder.

  14. Bibliometric profile of neurogenic bladder in the literature: a 20-year bibliometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic bladder is a dysfunction of the lower urinary tract caused by nervous system disorder. We investigated the trends in publication of articles under the topic "neurogenic bladder" using bibliometric analysis. Articles on neurogenic bladder, published between 1995 and 2014, were retrieved from the ISI Web of Science citation database. We analyzed the search results for authors, countries, institutions, journals, and top-cited papers. A total of 1,904 articles were retrieved. There was a small increase in the number of articles on neurogenic bladder from 1995 (n = 43 to 2014 (n = 117. The USA was the leading country in the total number of articles (n = 598. However, the number of publications from China has rapidly increased, and China was ranked second in 2014. Emmanuel Chartier-Kastler (n = 65 was the most productive author, and University of Paris VI (Paris 6 (n = 61 was the most productive institution. The Journal of Urology published the greatest number of articles on this topic (n = 285. Articles on neurogenic bladder were often published in a professional journal under the category Urology & Nephrology, Neurosciences & Neurology, or Rehabilitation. Visualization analysis based on co-citation networks was conducted using CiteSpace III. Visualization analysis revealed that the hot spots in neurogenic bladder were botulinum toxin-A, prazosin, bethanechol, and afferent pathways. These findings provide new insight into the publication trends and hot spots in neurogenic bladder.

  15. Effects of electrotherapy in treatment of neurogenic bladder in children with occult spinal dysraphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirović Dragana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Neurogenic bladder can develop as a result of various degrees of neurogenic lesion in spina bifida. The degree of bladder dysfunction depends on the level and type of spina bifida. Due to results upon complete diagnostic protocols, treatment options are applied. Objective Comparison of therapy results of patients with occult spinal dysraphism with neurogenic bladder that under-went medicamentous therapy and medicamentous with electrotherapy treatment. Methods We had 49 patients with neurogenic bladder that were treated at the University Children's Hospital in Belgrade in the period 2003-2008. The first group of children received medicamentous therapy and the second group received medicamentous therapy with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation. In both groups we evaluated 4 symptoms: daily enuresis, enuresis nocturna, urgency and frequency and 4 urodynamic parameters: lower bladder capacity, unstable contractions and residual urine and detrusor sphincter dyssynergia. Follow-up urodynamic evaluation was done after 3, 6 and 12 months respectively. Results Our findings pointed out a high statistical significance of improvement in all evaluated urodynamic parameters of neurogenic bladder (predominantly in bladder capacity in the group of children with combined therapy as well in resolution of symptoms (predominantly enuresis nocturna, urgency and frequency. Conclusion Combined therapy is more efficient in treatment of children with neurogenic bladder. Electrotherapy is non-invasive, easily applicable and has had a significant place in treatment of children with dysfunctional voiding.

  16. Neurogenic bladder and bowel in pediatric spinal cord injury patients/Pediyatrik medulla spinalis yaralanmalarinda norojen mesane ve norojen barsak

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ersoz, Murat

    2008-01-01

    .... In this review clinical practice, dissimilarities with adult patients and clinical experience about neurogenic bladder and bowel in paediatric spinal cord injury patients are presented. Anahtar Kelimeler...

  17. Augmentation cystoplasty and simultaneous ureteral reimplantation reduce high-grade vesicoureteral reflux in children with neurogenic bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Bin Wang

    2011-07-01

    Conclusion: Simultaneous ureteral reimplantation reduces postop HVUR significantly. We recommend augmentation and simultaneous ureteral reimplantation in children with HVUR and neurogenic bladder if technically feasible.

  18. Detrusor Arreflexia as an End Stage of Neurogenic Bladder in HAM/TSP?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Tannus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The HTLV-1 virus is a known agent involved in the development of HAM/TSP. Past studies have typically observed patients with autonomic dysfunction consisting of detrusor overactivity and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia, with the occasional observation of underactive detrusor or detrusor arreflexia. However, studies have not yet evaluated the progression of neurogenic bladder over time. In this paper, we describe a HAM/TSP patient with the initial development of overactive detrusor, and subsequent development of detrusor arreflexia. Given a paucity of studies characterizing the effects of HTLV-1 on the autonomic nervous system, particularly aspects controlling continence, this patient's clinical course may represent one type of end point for patients with HAM/TSP and neurogenic bladder. Further cohort or case-series studies, with particular emphasis on the progression of neurogenic bladder, are needed to evaluate the significance of this described case in relation to typical disease progression patterns.

  19. The conceptualization and development of a patient-reported neurogenic bladder symptom score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welk B

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Blayne Welk,1 Sarah A Morrow,2 Wendy Madarasz,3 Patrick Potter,4 Keith Sequeira41Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, 2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Western University, London, ON, Canada; 3St Joseph's Health Care, London Ontario, Canada; 4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Western University, London, ON, CanadaBackground: There is no single patient-reported instrument that was developed specifically to assess symptoms and bladder-related consequences for neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to identify and consolidate items for a novel measurement tool for this population.Methods: Item generation was based on a literature review of existing instruments, open-ended semistructured interviews with patients, and expert opinion. Judgment-based item reduction was performed by a multidisciplinary expert group. The proposed questionnaire was sent to external experts for review.Results: Eight neurogenic quality of life measures and 29 urinary symptom-specific instruments were identified. From these, 266 relevant items were extracted and used in the creation of the new neurogenic symptom score. Qualitative interviews with 16 adult patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction as a result of spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, or spina bifida were completed. Dominant themes included urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, urgency, and bladder spasms. Using the literature review and interview data, 25 proposed items were reviewed by 12 external experts, and the questions evaluated based on importance on a scale of 1 (not important to 5 (very important. Retained question domains had high mean importance ratings of 3.1 to 4.3 and good agreement with answer hierarchy.Conclusion: The proposed neurogenic bladder symptom score is a novel patient-reported outcome measure. Further work is underway to perform a data-based item reduction and to assess the validity and reliability of this instrument

  20. Screening for depression and anxiety in childhood neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabra, Aashish T; Feustel, Paul J; Kogan, Barry A

    2015-04-01

    Patients with chronic illnesses are known to have anxiety disorders and are likely to be depressed. Anxiety and depression (A/D) has been studied in adults with spina bifida (SB), however, no study has directly screened for A/D in pediatric patients with neurogenic bladder (NB) and their caregivers. The aims of our study were to determine the prevalence of A/D in caregivers of all children with SB and other NB dysfunction and in adolescents with validated screening measures. This was a preliminary cross-sectional screening investigation for A/D in pediatric patients with NB and their caregivers and adolescents with NB. Pediatric patients were defined as ages birth to 19 years and adolescents as ages 10 years-19 years. A caregiver was self-defined as a primary parent/guardian who took care of the pediatric patient for a majority of their time on a daily basis. We contacted 75 families by mail, of which 15 returned the consent and completed the questionnaires. Subsequently, 25 consecutive families whose children were seen for routine office appointments by the pediatric urology service at the Albany Medical Center in New York participated in person. 22 adolescents completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). 47 caregivers completed both the HADS and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Depression among adolescents: Of the 22 adolescents who completed the HADS, the median HADS score was 5.5 (Inter-quartile range (IQR): 1.75-8.75) for anxiety and 1.5 (IQR: 0-4.25) for depression; both scores were within the normal range (anxiety and 1/22 (5%) for depression. Anxiety and depression among caregivers: Of the 47 caregivers who completed the HADS and CES-D, the median HADS score was 7 (IQR: 4-11) for anxiety and 4 (IQR: 1-7) for depression; both scores were within the normal range. Individual abnormal HADS scores were seen in 23/47 (49%) for anxiety and 10/47 (21%) for depression. Abnormal CES-D scores (>15) were seen in 15/47 (32

  1. Bioimpedance based monitoring system for people with neurogenic dysfunction of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Alessandro; Rossi, Stefano; Fanucci, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Patients with impaired bladder volume sensation have the necessity to monitor bladder level in order to avoid urinary tract infections and urinary reflux that can lead to renal failure. In this paper the the effectiveness of an embedded and wearable solution for bladder volume monitoring using the bioimpedance measurement is tested. Data are streamed real-time using Bluetooth wireless technology. The bioimpedance measurements on a healthy subject prove the effectiveness of the proposed solution. In the future the system will be evaluated in real world scenarios with patients affected by spinal paralysis and bladder neurogenic dysfunction.

  2. [Pregnancy and delivery for women with congenital spinal cord defects and neurogenic bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manach, Q; Dommergues, M; Denys, P; Loiseau, K; Idiard-Chamois, B; Chartier-Kastler, E; Phé, V

    2017-10-01

    Data are scarce regarding pregnancy and delivery among women with a neurogenic bladder due to congenital spinal cord defects. To report the obstetrical and urological outcomes of women with congenital spinal cord defects and vesico-sphincteric disorders. A retrospective multicentric study included all consecutive women with a neurogenic bladder due to congenital spinal defects, who delivered between January 2005 and December 2014. The following data were collected: demographics, neuro-urological disease characteristics, urological and obstetrical history, complications during pregnancy, neonatal outcomes, and changes in urological symptoms. Overall, sixteen women, median age 29,4 years old (IQR 22-36), had a total of 20 pregnancies and 21 births (15 caesareans, 5 vaginal deliveries). Prior to the beginning of their first pregnancy, 12 patients were under intermittent self-catheterization. Symptomatic urinary tract infections during pregnancy occurred in 11 pregnancies, including 4 pyelonephritis. In 4 women, stress urinary incontinence had worsened but recovered post-partum. In 3 women, de novo clean intermittent catheterization became necessary and had to be continued post-partum. During 3 pregnancies, anticholinergic treatment had been started or increased because of urge urinary incontinence worsened. These changes were maintained after delivery. The median gestational age at birth was 39.0 weeks (IQR 37.8-39.5). There were 15 caesarean sections, of which 9 were indicated to prevent a potential aggravation of vesico-sphincteric disorders. Among the 5 pregnancies with vaginal delivery, there was no post-partum alteration of the sphincter function. Successful pregnancy outcome is possible in women with congenital spinal cord defects and vesico-sphincteric disorders but it requires managing an increased risk of urinary tract infections, caesarean section, and occasionally worsened urinary incontinence. 5. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All

  3. Onabotulinumtoxin A (Botox) in treatment of neurogenic bladder overactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrsted, Malene; Nordsten, Cecilie Bagi; Bagi, Per

    2012-01-01

    on a systematic search of the PubMed database, a review of the current literature on the use of onabotulinum toxin A (Botox®) in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity is presented. Onabotulinum toxin A proved to be highly effective in the majority of studies, even though a wide range of injection...

  4. Long-term results of bulking agent injection for persistent incontinence in cases of neurogenic bladder dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vocht, T. F.; Chrzan, R.; Dik, P.; Klijn, A. J.; de Jong, T. P. V. M.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: We evaluated the effectiveness of bladder neck injection as a supplementary treatment for persistent low pressure incontinence after unsatisfactory fascial sling procedures in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 89 patients with

  5. The effect of spinal cord-injury level on the outcome of neurogenic bladder treatment using OnabotulinumtoxinA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Al Taweel

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA injections are an effective and well-tolerated treatment for neurogenic overactive bladder that will increase patient satisfaction and improve QOL with persisted clinical efficacy for more than 8 months.

  6. Lumbosacral dysraphism as cause of neurogenic bladder: Magnetic Resonance Imaging based study from SIUT Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Saima; Faiq, Syed Muhammmad; Idrees, Muhammad Khalid

    2015-05-01

    To find the frequency and types of spinal dysraphism in patients presenting with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The cross-sectional study was conducted at the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi, from February to September 2011, and comprised patients of either gender 5-15 years of age with neurogenic bladder suspected to be due to lumbosacral dysraphism. They all had magnetic resonance imaging of lumbosacral spine. All images were reviewed by an experienced radiologist and patients were diagnosed as having spinal dysraphism and were categorised according to the radiological features. Data was analysed using SPSS 10. Of the 175 patients in the study, 96(55%) were males and 79(45%) were females with an overall mean age of 7.3±2.15 years (range: 5-15 years). Spinal bony defects were found in 110(62.8%) patients, and of these, 96(87%) had spinal dysraphism. Myelomeningocele, meningocele and sacral agenesis was found in 58(60.4%) of the 96 patient with spinal dysraphism. Spinal dysraphism is the most common cause of neurogenic bladder in children up to 15 years of age and myelomeningocele, meningocele and sacral agenesis comprised more than 60% of such cases.

  7. Augmentation enterocystoplasty without reimplantation for patients with neurogenic bladder and vesicoureteral reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chao Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR after augmentation cystoplasty alone in patients with a hypocompliant neurogenic bladder. Between January 2009 and December 2014, 29 patients with a hypocompliant bladder associated with VUR confirmed by videourodynamics (VUD preoperatively were recruited in this study. All patients had undergone bladder augmentation with a generous detubularized segment of bowel at our institution. No effort had been made to correct the existing reflux. Preoperative assessment included urinalysis, kidney function tests, ultrasonography, and videourodynamic evaluation. All patients had various degrees of VUR. The status of VUR and bladder function were studied by VUD. The mean follow-up period was 2.2 years (range 0.5–5.5 years. The VUD manifested a significant improvement of bladder capacity, diminution of intravesical pressure, and resolution of reflux after bladder augmentation. After the surgery, 24/29 (83% no longer had reflux, 3/29 (10% showed improvement in reflux, and 2/29 (7% demonstrated no change in reflux. In addition, 16/21 (76% patients had reflux Grades I-III; 100% patients with reflux Grades IV and V had complete cessation of reflux. Only one patient had symptomatic urinary infection after the surgery. Augmentation enterocystoplasty without ureteral reimplantation is thus effective and adequate for patients with high-pressure and hypocompliant neurogenic bladder. Therefore, ureteral reimplantation is not necessary when augmentation enterocystoplasty is recommended for patients with high-pressure, low-compliant bladder and VUR.

  8. Oral mucosa stem cells alleviates spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder symptoms in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Sam; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Lee, Sung-Min; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Jin, Jun-Jang; Kim, Khae-Hawn

    2014-05-13

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) deteriorates various physical functions, in particular, bladder problems occur as a result of damage to the spinal cord. Stem cell therapy for SCI has been focused as the new strategy to treat the injuries and to restore the lost functions. The oral mucosa cells are considered as the stem cells-like progenitor cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of oral mucosa stem cells on the SCI-induced neurogenic bladder in relation with apoptotic neuronal cell death and cell proliferation. The contraction pressure and the contraction time in the urinary bladder were increased after induction of SCI, in contrast, transplantation of the oral mucosa stem cells decreased the contraction pressure and the contraction time in the SCI-induced rats. Induction of SCI initiated apoptosis in the spinal cord tissues, whereas treatment with the oral mucosa stem cells suppressed the SCI-induced apoptosis. Disrupted spinal cord by SCI was improved by transplantation of the oral mucosa stem cells, and new tissues were increased around the damaged tissues. In addition, transplantation of the oral mucosa stem cells suppressed SCI-induced neuronal activation in the voiding centers. Transplantation of oral mucosa stem cells ameliorates the SCI-induced neurogenic bladder symptoms by inhibiting apoptosis and by enhancing cell proliferation. As the results, SCI-induced neuronal activation in the neuronal voiding centers was suppressed, showing the normalization of voiding function.

  9. Reconstitution of experimental neurogenic bladder dysfunction using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Masahiro; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Tono, Kayoko; Okada, Yoshinori; Masuda, Maki; Akatsuka, Akira; Hoshi, Akio; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2010-05-15

    BACKGROUND.: Postoperative neurogenic bladder dysfunction is a major complication of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer and is mainly caused by unavoidable damage to the bladder branch of the pelvic plexus (BBPP) associated with colateral blood vessels. Thus, we attempted to reconstitute disrupted BBPP and blood vessels using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells that show synchronized reconstitution capacity of vascular, muscular, and peripheral nervous systems. METHODS.: Under pentobarbital anesthesia, intravesical pressure by electrical stimulation of BBPP was measured as bladder function. The distal portion of BBPP with blood vessels was then cut unilaterally (experimental neurogenic bladder model). Measurements were performed before, immediately after, and at 4 weeks after transplantation as functional recovery. Stem cells were obtained from the right soleus and gastrocnemius muscles after enzymatic digestion and cell sorting as CD34/45 (Sk-34) and CD34/45 (Sk-DN). Suspended cells were autografted around the damaged region, whereas medium alone and CD45 cells were transplanted as control groups. To determine the morphological contribution of the transplanted cells, stem cells obtained from green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse muscles were transplanted into a nude rat model and were examined by immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy. RESULTS.: At 4 weeks after surgery, the transplantation group showed significantly higher functional recovery ( approximately 80%) than the two controls ( approximately 28% and 24%). The transplanted cells showed an incorporation into the damaged peripheral nerves and blood vessels after differentiation into Schwann cells, perineurial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and fibroblasts around the bladder. CONCLUSION.: Transplantation of multipotent Sk-34 and Sk-DN cells is potentially useful for the reconstitution of damaged BBPP.

  10. Clinical usefulness of urine cytology in the detection of bladder tumors in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pannek J

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Jürgen Pannek, Franziska Rademacher, Jens Wöllner Neuro-Urology, Swiss Paraplegic Center, Nottwil, Switzerland Introduction: Screening for bladder cancer in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction is a challenge. Cystoscopy alone is not sufficient to detect bladder tumors in this patient group. We investigated the usefulness of combined cystoscopy and urine cytology.Materials and methods: By a systematic chart review, we identified all patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction who underwent combined cystoscopy and urine cytology testing. In patients with suspicious findings either in cytology or cystoscopy, transurethral resection was performed.Results: Seventy-nine patients (age 54.8±14.3 years, 38 female, 41 male were identified; 44 of these used indwelling catheters. Cystoscopy was suspicious in 25 patients and cytology was suspicious in 17 patients. Histologically, no tumor was found in 15 patients and bladder cancer was found in 6 patients. Sensitivity for both cytology and cystoscopy was 83.3%; specificity was 43.7% for cytology and 31.2% for cystoscopy. One bladder tumor was missed by cytology and three tumors were missed by cystoscopy. If a biopsy was taken only if both findings were suspicious, four patients would have been spared the procedure, and one tumor would not have been diagnosed.Conclusion: A combination of cystoscopy and urine cytology can improve bladder tumor detection rates and lower the number of unnecessary biopsies. Keywords: bladder cancer, neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, urine cytology, cystoscopy

  11. [Giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum: a case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Shi; Quan, Chang-Yi; Li, Gang; Cai, Qi-Liang; Hu, Bin; Wang, Jiu-Wei; Niu, Yuan-Jie

    2013-02-01

    To study the etiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of a case of giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum and reviewed the relevant literature. The patient was a 37-year-old man, with urinary incontinence for 22 years and intermittent dysuria with frequent micturition for 9 years, aggravated in the past 3 months. He had received surgery for spina bifida and giant vesico-prostatic calculus. The results of preoperative routine urinary examination were as follows: WBC 17 -20/HPF, RBC 12 - 15/HPF. KUB, IVU and pelvic CT revealed spina bifida occulta, neurogenic bladder and giant prostatic calculus. The patient underwent TURP and transurethral lithotripsy with holmium-YAG laser. The prostatic calculus was carbonate apatite in composition. Urinary dynamic images at 2 weeks after surgery exhibited significant improvement in the highest urine flow rate and residual urine volume. Seventeen months of postoperative follow-up showed dramatically improved urinary incontinence and thicker urine stream. Prostate diverticulum with prostatic giant calculus is very rare, and neurogenic bladder may play a role in its etiology. Cystoscopy is an accurate screening method for its diagnosis. For the young patients and those who wish to retain sexual function, TURP combined with holmium laser lithotripsy can be employed, and intraoperative rectal examination should be taken to ensure complete removal of calculi.

  12. Giant Congenital Pelvic AVM Causing Cardiac Failure, Diplegia, and Neurogenic Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekci, Tumay; Yucel, Serap; Turgut, Eser; Soylu, Aysegul Idil

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are uncommon lesions and only a rare number of male cases have been reported. Their clinical presentations are variable and imaging modalities have an important place in diagnosis and treatment planning. We present the imaging findings of a giant congenital pelvic AVM that was diagnosed in a 30-year-old male patient eight years ago and which progressed despite follow-up and treatment, causing cardiac failure, diplegia, and neurogenic bladder. Pelvic AVMs are uncommon lesions and they can present with various symptoms based on their locations and sizes. Delays in the diagnosis and treatment can cause local and systemic complications. Imaging is very important in the diagnosis of pelvic AVM.

  13. Application of data mining techniques to explore predictors of upper urinary tract damage in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H; Lu, B; Wang, X; Zheng, L; Sun, K; Cai, W

    2017-08-17

    This study proposed a decision tree model to screen upper urinary tract damage (UUTD) for patients with neurogenic bladder (NGB). Thirty-four NGB patients with UUTD were recruited in the case group, while 78 without UUTD were included in the control group. A decision tree method, classification and regression tree (CART), was then applied to develop the model in which UUTD was used as a dependent variable and history of urinary tract infections, bladder management, conservative treatment, and urodynamic findings were used as independent variables. The urethra function factor was found to be the primary screening information of patients and treated as the root node of the tree; Pabd max (maximum abdominal pressure, >14 cmH2O), Pves max (maximum intravesical pressure, ≤89 cmH2O), and gender (female) were also variables associated with UUTD. The accuracy of the proposed model was 84.8%, and the area under curve was 0.901 (95%CI=0.844-0.958), suggesting that the decision tree model might provide a new and convenient way to screen UUTD for NGB patients in both undeveloped and developing areas.

  14. Onabotulinumtoxin A for Treating Overactive/Poor Compliant Bladders in Children and Adolescents with Neurogenic Bladder Secondary to Myelomeningocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study was performed to verify the efficacy and safety of Onabotulinumtoxin A (BTX-A in treating children with neurogenic bladder (NB secondary to myelomeningocele (MMC with detrusor overactivity/low compliance. From January 2002 to June 2011, 47 patients out of 68 with neuropathic bladder were selected (22 females, 25 males, age range 5–17 years; mean age 10.7 years at first injection. They presented overactive/poor compliant neurogenic bladders on clean intermittent catheterization, and were resistant or non compliant to pharmacological therapy. Ten patients presented second to fourth grade concomitant monolateral/bilateral vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. All patients were incontinent despite catheterization. In the majority of patients Botulinum-A toxin was administered under general/local anesthesia by the injection of 200 IU of toxin, without exceeding the dosage of 12IU/kg body weight, diluted in 20 cc of saline solution in 20 sites, except in the periureteral areas. Follow-up included clinical and ultrasound examination, urodynamics performed at 6, 12 and 24 weeks, and annually thereafter. Seven patients remained stable, 21 patients required a second injection after 6–9 months and 19 a third injection. VUR was corrected, when necessary, in the same session after the BT-A injection, by 1–3 cc of subureteral Deflux®. Urodynamic parameters considered were leak point pressure (LPP, leak point volume (LPV and specific volume at 20 cm H2O pressure. The results were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. All patients experienced a significant 66.45% average increase of LPV (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 7169 × 10 −10 and a significant 118.57% average increase of SC 20 (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 2.466 × 10 −12. The difference between preoperative and postoperative LPP resulted not significant (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 0.8858 No patient presented severe systemic complications; 38/47 patients presented slight hematuria for

  15. Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Outcomes following a Conservative Management Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Robert A; Pisansky, Andrew; Fleck, Joseph; Hoversten, Patrick; Cotter, Katherine J; Katorski, Jenna; Liberman, Daniel; Elliott, Sean P

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral palsy is characterized by motor impairment following injury to the developing brain. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction is estimated to affect at least a third of children with cerebral palsy. However there are limited data as patients transition to adulthood. We sought to describe the symptoms, sequelae and management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction in adults with cerebral palsy. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of adult patients with cerebral palsy between 2011 and 2014. Patients with prior bladder reconstruction or catheterization based bladder drainage were excluded from study. Cerebral palsy severity was determined using GMFCS (Gross Motor Function Classification System). A conservative evaluation and treatment paradigm was used. Noninvasive treatments were encouraged. Specifically clean intermittent catheterization, which is often not feasible, is avoided unless urinary retention, hydronephrosis or refractory lower urinary tract symptoms develop. There were 121 patients included in final analysis. Median age was 25 and 61 patients (50%) had GMFCS level V. Noninvasive management failed in 28 of 121 patients (23%) as defined by hydronephrosis in 9, persistent urinary retention in 10 and refractory lower urinary tract symptoms/incontinence in 9. Urethral clean intermittent catheterization was poorly tolerated. Of all patients 25% showed evidence of urolithiasis during the study period. Surgical intervention was rare and associated with significant morbidity. Adults with cerebral palsy may present with variable signs and symptoms of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. Conservative treatment was successful in more than 75% of patients. Clean intermittent catheterization was poorly tolerated in patients in whom conservative treatment failed. Surgical intervention was rarely indicated and it should be reserved for select individuals. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  16. Genetic Evaluation of E. coli Strains Isolated from Asymptomatic Children with Neurogenic Bladders

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    John Kryger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to describe the genetic profiles of E. coli that colonize asymptomatic pediatric neurogenic bladders. E. coli was isolated from 25 of 80 urine samples. Patients were excluded if they presented with symptomatic urinary tract infection or received treatment with antibiotics in the preceding three months. Multiplex PCR was performed to determine E. coli phylotype (A, B1, B2, and D and the presence of seven pathogenicity islands (PAIs and 10 virulence factors (VFs. E. coli strains were predominantly of the B1 and B2 phylotype, with few strains in the A or D phylotype. The PAIs IV536, ICFT073, and IICFT073 had the highest prevalence: 76%, 64%, and 48%, respectively. The PAIs II536, IJ96, and IIJ96 were less prevalent: 28%, 20%, and 24%, respectively. The most prevalent VF was vat (40%, while the least prevalent VFs were sfa (8% and iha (12%. None of the strains carried the VF fyuA, which is very common in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. The genetic profiles of E. coli in this cohort seem to be more similar to UPEC than to commensal E. coli. However, they appear to have reduced virulence potential that allows them to colonize asymptomatically.

  17. Simplified scoring of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis: A comparative analysis of test performance at different cut-off points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Jongen (Peter); B.F.M. Blok (Bertil); J.P. Heesakkers (John P.); M. Heerings (Marco); W.A. Lemmens (Wim A.); R. Donders (Rogier)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The Actionable questionnaire is an 8-item tool to screen patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for neurogenic bladder problems, identifying those patients who might benefit from urological referral and bladder-specific treatment. The original scoring yields a total score of 0

  18. Simplified scoring of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis : a comparative analysis of test performance at different cut-off points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Blok, Bertil F.; Heesakkers, John P.; Heerings, Marco; Lemmens, Wim A.; Donders, Rogier

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Actionable questionnaire is an 8-item tool to screen patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for neurogenic bladder problems, identifying those patients who might benefit from urological referral and bladder-specific treatment. The original scoring yields a total score of 0 to 24 with

  19. Simplified scoring of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis: a comparative analysis of test performance at different cut-off points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, P.J.; Blok, B.F.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Heerings, M.; Lemmens, W.A.J.G.; Donders, R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Actionable questionnaire is an 8-item tool to screen patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for neurogenic bladder problems, identifying those patients who might benefit from urological referral and bladder-specific treatment. The original scoring yields a total score of 0 to 24 with

  20. [Identification of pelvic autonomic nerves during partial and total mesorectal excision--influence parameters and significance for neurogenic bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneist, W; Heintz, A; Wolf, H K; Junginger, T

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the present prospective study was to determine the frequency of pelvic autonomic nerve preservation (PANP) during total mesorectal excision (TME) for rectal carcinoma, and to identify a possible link between PANP and postoperative micturition disturbances. Between March 1997 and February 2003, 229 patients with adenocarcinoma of the rectum were operated on with sphincter preservation in 178 (78%) cases. In 101 (48%) patients, the tumor did not invade the muscularis propria. To determine influence parameters on the achievement of complete PANP, a multivariate analysis was performed. The number of complete-partial-or nonidentification of the nerves (superior hypogastric plexus up to the neurovascular bundles) was documented and correlated with micturition disturbances. The pelvic autonomic nerves were identified completely in 169 (74%), partially in 25 (11%), and could not be demonstrated in 35 (15%) patients. Multivariate analysis showed multivisceral resection ( p, p<0.001), and tumor site (middle/upper third vs lower third of rectum, p= 0.011) to exert an independent influence on the achievement of complete PANP. Twenty (8.8%) patients needed a long-term urinary catheter. Preservation of the parasympathetic nerves was associated with low bladder dysfunction rates (4.1 vs 22.4%, p<0.001). To minimize the risk of postoperative micturition disturbances due to neurogenic bladder, pelvic autonomic nerves should be identified during TME. Neurogenic bladder after TME is a useful parameter to assess the quality of surgical treatment for rectal carcinoma.

  1. Efficacy of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP in men with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO and non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction

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    Jong Hyun Pyun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to compare the short-term outcomes of men who had urodynamic evidence of detrusor underactivity (DU or detrusor overactivity (DO of a non-neurogenic etiology as well as bladder outlet obstruction (BOO and who underwent Holmium Laser Enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP. A database of 322 patients who underwent HoLEP between 2010 and 2014 was analyzed. Patients were classified into three groups according to the results of a preoperative urodynamic study. Preoperative parameters such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, Quality of Life (QoL index, IPSS grade, uroflowmetry were compared with postoperative parameters measured at 6 months. There were 138 patients with BOO-only and 89 patients with BOO and detrusor dysfunction including 56 with DO and 33 with DU. The degree of improvement in IPSS-total (BOO: 10.7, DO: 8.3, DU: 7.0; p = 0.023 was greater in the BOO-only group than in the DU group. There were more patients whose IPSS grade improved in the BOO-only group (71% than in the detrusor dysfunction group (DO: 53.6% and DU: 45.5%. Postoperative IPSS-voiding (4.5 vs 7.0, and Qmax (18 vs 13.7 in the BOO-only group were significantly better than those in the DU group. Additionally, postoperative IPSS-storage (4.7 vs 6.7, and IPSS-total (9.1 vs 12.3 in the BOO-only group were significantly better than in the DO group (all p < 0.05. In conclusion, early surgical management for men with severe LUTS and associated BPH before secondary degeneration occurs may be beneficial for preserving detrusor function and yield better treatment outcomes.

  2. Preoperative renal scar as a risk factor of postoperative metabolic acidosis following ileocystoplasty in patients with neurogenic bladder.

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    Mitsui, T; Moriya, K; Kitta, T; Kon, M; Nonomura, K

    2014-04-01

    We investigated relation of preoperative renal scar to incidence of postoperative metabolic acidosis following ileocystoplasty in patients with neurogenic bladder. Thirty patients with neurogenic bladder, who underwent ileocystoplasty, were enrolled in the present study. Median age at ileocystoplasty was 13.9 years and median follow-up period after ileocystoplasty was 8.2 years. Metabolic acidosis was defined based on the outlined criteria: base excess (BE) is less than 0 mmol l(-1). Preoperative examination revealed that no apparent renal insufficiency was identified in blood analysis, although preoperative (99m)Tc-DMSA scintigraphy indicated abnormalities such as renal scar in 14 patients (47%). Incidence of postoperative metabolic acidosis was compared between patients with and without preoperative renal scar, which may reflect some extent of renal tubular damage. Postoperative metabolic acidosis was identified in 13 patients (43%). Incidence of postoperative metabolic acidosis was significantly higher in patients with renal scar (11/14, 79%) compared with patients without renal scar (2/16, 13%; Pmetabolic acidosis postoperatively. Compared with patients without preoperative renal scar, pH (Pmetabolic acidosis was significantly implicated in preoperative renal scar. If renal abnormalities are preoperatively identified in imaging tests, we need to care patients carefully regarding metabolic acidosis and subsequent comorbidities following ileocystoplasty.

  3. Semiconditional Electrical Stimulation of Pudendal Nerve Afferents Stimulation to Manage Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young-Hee; Kim, Jung Moon; Im, Hyung Tae; Lee, Kye-Wook; Kim, Sung Hoon; Hur, Dong Min

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of semiconditional electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve afferents for the neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury. Forty patients (36 males, 4 males) with spinal cord injury who had urinary incontinence and frequency, as well as felt bladder contraction with bladder filling sense or autonomic dysreflexic symptom participated in this study. Method Patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity were subdivided into complete i...

  4. Event driven electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile/clitoral nerve for management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjorback, Morten Voss; Rijkhoff, Nico; Petersen, Thor; Nohr, Mads; Sinkjaer, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of automatic event driven electrical stimulation on the dorsal penile/clitoral nerve for management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients suffering from Multiple Sclerosis. A total of 10 patients participated in the study. Detrusor pressure was recorded during physiological filling of the bladder and electrical stimulation was applied with surface electrodes whenever the detrusor pressure exceeded 10 cm H(2)O. In seven of the eight patients, where neurogenic detrusor overactivity was observed an average of 12 detrusor contractions could be inhibited by stimulation. In one patient, however, stimulation failed to inhibit the detrusor contractions. The average increase in bladder volume from first suppressed detrusor contraction until leakage was 94% (range: 22-366%). On average, the time from first suppressed contraction until leakage was 15 min and 50 sec (range: 4 min 58 sec-32 min 5 sec) with an average physiological filling rate of 8 ml/min. Urgency was effectively suppressed at the onset of stimulation. The results indicate that involuntary detrusor contractions in patients with multiple sclerosis can effectively be inhibited with event driven stimulation, hereby improving bladder capacity and reducing the number of incontinence episodes. However, the used method for detecting detrusor contractions is not suitable in a chronic setting and alternative techniques needs to be investigated if stimulation should be applied automatically.

  5. Medical management of overactive bladder

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    Sarvpreet S Ubee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB, as defined by the International Continence Society, is characterized by a symptom complex including urinary urgency with or without urge incontinence, usually associated with frequency and nocturia. OAB syndrome has an incidence reported from six European countries ranging between 12-17%, while in the United States; a study conducted by the National Overactive Bladder Evaluation program found the incidence at 17%. In Asia, the prevalence of OAB is reported at 53.1%. In about 75%, OAB symptoms are due to idiopathic detrusor activity; neurological disease, bladder outflow obstruction (BOO intrinsic bladder pathology and other chronic pelvic floor disorders are implicated in the others. OAB can be diagnosed easily and managed effectively with both non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies. The first-line treatments are lifestyle interventions, bladder training, pelvic floor muscle exercises and anticholinergic drugs. Antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for OAB symptoms; with proven efficacy, and adverse event profiles that differ somewhat.

  6. Long-term effects of repeated intradetrusor botulinum neurotoxin A injections on detrusor function in patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, Jürgen; Göcking, Konrad; Bersch, Ulf

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the influence of repeated botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) treatments on detrusor function in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (DOA) due to spinal cord lesions. In a retrospective study, urodynamic evaluations of 27 consecutive patients with neurogenic DOA due to spinal cord lesions who received at least five BoNT-A treatments were analysed. After the first BoNT-A treatment, bladder capacity, reflex volume, continence status and detrusor compliance were significantly improved and maximum detrusor pressure (P(detmax)) was significantly reduced. The mean number of BoNT-A treatments was 7.1. Compared with the results of the first treatment, the incontinence rate (seven patients) and the number of patients with an elevated P(detmax) (five patients) were slightly increased after the final BoNT-A treatment. The long-term success rate was 74%. Every fourth patient needed a major surgical intervention. There was a significant decrease in P(detmax) before BoNT-A treatments, indicating that detrusor contraction strength did not completely recover after treatment. Our study confirmed the long-term efficacy of repeated BoNT-A treatments in patients with neurogenic DOA. However, in long-term follow-up, every fourth patient required surgical interventions. Moreover, our data give the first hint that BoNT-A may lead to impaired detrusor contraction strength, which could influence future treatment options. Prospective studies are necessary to elucidate the impact of repeated BoNT-A treatments on detrusor function and the interactions with future treatment options.

  7. Chapter 4: Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) and neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Arjun; Lucas, Malcolm

    2014-07-01

    This chapter focuses on the position of botulinum toxin type A in the treatment pathway for overactive bladder (OAB) and neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction associated with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), and the recommendations of the major international guideline groups. Recommendations of different guideline groups may vary, especially when evidence is weak, often because of differences in methodology and panel composition. Relevant guidelines from the European Association of Urology, American Urological Association, and the UK National Institute for Care and Clinical Excellence were reviewed, and the recommendations that form the basis of the treatment algorithms have been discussed. Any differences between guidelines have been highlighted and special emphasis made on the position of botulinum toxin type A in these pathways. In all the reviewed guidelines, botulinum toxin type A is recommended, alongside sacral nerve neuromodulation, to treat OAB and NDO in patients who have failed oral therapy. The evidence base is consistent, but further evidence is required regarding optimal dosing regimens and injection technique. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Usefulness of classical homoeopathy for the prevention of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction: A case series

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    Jürgen Pannek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to Spinal Cord Injury (SCI, recurrent Urinary Tract Infections (UTI, is a frequently encountered clinical problem. Often, conventional preventive measures are not successful. Aims: To treat the patients of SCI suffering from recurrent UTI with classical homoeopathy as add-on to standard urologic care. Materials and Methods: After exclusion of morphological abnormalities and initiation of a standard regime for prophylaxis, all patients with a neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to SCI, with more than three symptomatic UTI/year, were offered additional homoeopathic care. Symptoms were fever, incontinence, increased spasticity, decreased bladder capacity or pain/decreased general health combined with significant bacteriuria. Descriptive statistics was used for analysis. Results: Eight patients were followed up for a median period of 15 months. Five patients remained free of UTI, whereas UTI frequency was reduced in three patients. Conclusion: Our initial experience with homoeopathic prevention of UTI as add on to standard urologic prophylactic measures is encouraging. For an evidence-based evaluation of this concept, prospective studies are required. Keys for the positive outcome of this case series are co-operation of well-qualified partners, mutual respect and the motivation to co-operate closely.

  9. Clinical guidelines for male lower urinary tract symptoms associated with non-neurogenic overactive bladder

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    Chung-Cheng Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this guideline is to direct urologists and patients regarding how to identify overactive bladder (OAB in male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS and to make an accurate diagnosis and establish treatment goals to improve the patients' quality of life (QoL. LUTS are commonly divided into storage, voiding, and postmicturition symptoms, and are highly prevalent in elderly men. LUTS can result from a complex interplay of pathophysiologic features that can include bladder dysfunction and bladder outlet dysfunction such as benign prostatic obstruction (BPO or poor relaxation of the urethral sphincter. Diagnosis of OAB in male LUTS leads to accurate diagnosis of pure OAB and bladder outlet-related OAB, and appropriate treatment in men with residual storage symptoms after treatment for LUTS.

  10. Comparison of different antibiotic protocols for asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with neurogenic bladder treated with botulinum toxin A

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    Ana Claudia Paradella

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Intravesical botulinum toxin A (BoNTA injection has been widely used for the treatment of detrusor overactivity in patients with neurogenic bladder due to spinal cord injury who do not respond to conventional treatment. There is no consensus about antibiotic prophylaxis for this procedure. We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of adult patients with spinal cord injury who underwent detrusor BoNTA injection between January of 2007 and December of 2013 in a rehabilitation hospital. Occurrence of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI was assessed in 3 groups in accordance with their use of antibiotics (prophylactic dosage, 3 days, more than 3 days for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. All patients were performing self or assisted clean intermittent bladder catheterization and underwent a rigid cystoscopy, under general or regional anesthesia with sedation, and the drug used was Botox®. A total of 616 procedures were performed during the study period. There were 11 identified cases of UTI (1.8% with a trend to a higher rate in the group that used antibiotics for longer time. This report shows that a single dose of antibiotics before the detrusor BoNTA injection is enough to prevent UTI. Randomized clinical trial should be conducted for definitive conclusions.

  11. Comparison of different antibiotic protocols for asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with neurogenic bladder treated with botulinum toxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Paradella

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical botulinum toxin A (BoNTA injection has been widely used for the treatment of detrusor overactivity in patients with neurogenic bladder due to spinal cord injury who do not respond to conventional treatment. There is no consensus about antibiotic prophylaxis for this procedure. We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of adult patients with spinal cord injury who underwent detrusor BoNTA injection between January of 2007 and December of 2013 in a rehabilitation hospital. Occurrence of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI was assessed in 3 groups in accordance with their use of antibiotics (prophylactic dosage, 3 days, more than 3 days for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. All patients were performing self or assisted clean intermittent bladder catheterization and underwent a rigid cystoscopy, under general or regional anesthesia with sedation, and the drug used was Botox®. A total of 616 procedures were performed during the study period. There were 11 identified cases of UTI (1.8% with a trend to a higher rate in the group that used antibiotics for longer time. This report shows that a single dose of antibiotics before the detrusor BoNTA injection is enough to prevent UTI. Randomized clinical trial should be conducted for definitive conclusions.

  12. Economic consequences of an implanted neuroprosthesis for bladder and bowel management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasey, G H; Dahlberg, J E

    2001-11-01

    To determine whether an implanted neuroprosthesis for bladder and bowel management is less costly than conventional techniques. Retrospective cost-identification analysis with comparison before and after implantation of the neuroprosthesis. Life-care planning interviews in patients' homes. Twelve patients with complete suprasacral spinal cord injuries and neurogenic bladder and bowel. Implantation of a neuroprosthesis for electric stimulation of the sacral nerves and posterior sacral rhizotomy. Annual costs of bladder and bowel care with and without the neuroprosthesis, projected over 10 years. Bladder and bowel care costs were reduced by over 80%, from a median of 8152 dollars a year for conventional care to a median of 948 dollars a year. With the neuroprosthesis, median annual costs for bladder supplies were reduced from 3368 dollars to 58 dollars; for medications, from 1866 dollars to 108 dollars; for medical care, from 656 dollars to 96 dollars; and for bowel care supplies, from 205 dollars to 87 dollars. After 5 years, the cumulative costs of treatment with the neuroprosthesis, including the cost of the device and its implantation and maintenance, equaled those of conventional care. Thereafter, savings from the implanted neuroprosthesis are projected to increase progressively throughout the patient's life. A neuroprosthesis implant with posterior rhizotomy greatly reduces the cost of managing the neurogenic bladder and bowel. Copyright 2001 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  13. Long-term effectiveness and complication rates of bladder augmentation in patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoen, Lisette 't; Ecclestone, Hazel; Blok, Bertil F M; Karsenty, Gilles; Phé, Véronique; Bossier, Romain; Groen, Jan; Castro-Diaz, David; Padilla Fernández, Bárbara; Del Popolo, Giulio; Musco, Stefania; Pannek, Jürgen; Kessler, Thomas M; Gross, Tobias; Schneider, Marc P; Hamid, Rizwan

    2017-09-01

    To systematically evaluate effectiveness and safety of bladder augmentation for adult neuro-urological patients. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) statement was followed for review of publications. The Medline, Embase, and Cochrane controlled trial databases and clinicaltrial.gov were searched until January 2015. No limitations were placed on date or language. Non-original articles, conference abstracts, and publications involving children and animals were excluded. Risk-of-bias and confounder assessment was performed. A total of 20 studies including 511 patients were eligible for inclusion. The level of evidence for the included studies was low, most level 4 studies with only one level 3 study. The data were narratively synthesized. Across all studies high risk-of bias and confounding was found. Primary outcomes were assessed in 16 of the 20 studies and showed improved quality of life and anatomical changes as well as stable renal function. The secondary outcomes were reported in 17 of the 20 studies and urodynamic parameters and continence all demonstrated improvement after bladder reconstruction. Long-term complications continued up to 10 years post-operatively, including bowel dysfunction in 15% of the patients, stone formation in 10%, five bladder perforations and one bladder cancer. Available studies are not plentiful and of relatively poor quality, appropriately designed prospective studies are urgently needed. Despite this, bladder augmentation appears to be a highly effective procedure at protecting the upper urinary tract and improving quality of life. However, it is associated with relatively high morbidity in both the short and long term. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A ventral root avulsion injury model for neurogenic underactive bladder studies.

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    Chang, Huiyi H; Havton, Leif A

    2016-11-01

    Detrusor underactivity (DU) is defined as a contraction of reduced strength and/or duration during bladder emptying and results in incomplete and prolonged bladder emptying. The clinical diagnosis of DU is challenging when present alone or in association with other bladder conditions such as detrusor overactivity, urinary retention, detrusor hyperactivity with impaired contractility, aging, and neurological injuries. Several etiologies may be responsible for DU or the development of an underactive bladder (UAB), but the pathobiology of DU or UAB is not well understood. Therefore, new clinically relevant and interpretable models for studies of UAB are much needed in order to make progress towards new treatments and preventative strategies. Here, we review a neuropathic cause of DU in the form of traumatic injuries to the cauda equina (CE) and conus medullaris (CM) portions of the spinal cord. Lumbosacral ventral root avulsion (VRA) injury models in rats mimic the clinical phenotype of CM/CE injuries. Bilateral VRA injuries result in bladder areflexia, whereas a unilateral lesion results in partial impairment of lower urinary tract and visceromotor reflexes. Surgical re-implantation of avulsed ventral roots into the spinal cord and pharmacological strategies can augment micturition reflexes. The translational research need for the development of a large animal model for UAB studies is also presented, and early studies of lumbosacral VRA injuries in rhesus macaques are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effectiveness of Short Term Percutaneous Tibial Nerve Stimulation for Non-neurogenic Overactive Bladder Syndrome in Adults: A Meta-analysis

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    Elita Wibisono

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to evaluate the effectiveness of short-term PTNS for non-neurogenic OAB in adults systematically by comparing with sham procedure and other treatments. Methods: we performed a systematic review of cohort study. Data sources were MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, National Library for Health, Cochrane, and google scholar from 2005 through 2015. Meta-analysis was performed using the random effects model. Heterogeneity of effects was assessed by calculating I2 statistic. Statistical analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.3 for RCT meta-analysis. Results: we analized 11 randomised controlled trial (RCT and five prospective non-comparative studies with variable success rate. Based on percentage of responders, the results were 37.3% - 81.8% in PTNS group, 0% - 20.9% in sham group, 54.8% in anti-muscarinic group, and 89.7% in multimodal group. The decrease of voiding symptoms episodes per day was found in PTNS (0.7-4.5, sham (0.3-1.5, and anti-muscarinic (0.6-2.9 groups. In meta-analysis of four RCTs, the results favour PTNS over sham procedure with overall risk ratio of 7.32(95% CI of 1.69-32.16, p=0.09, I2=54%. Conclusion: there is an evidence of effectiveness of short term PTNS in treatment of non-neurogenic OAB. PTNS is proven significantly better than sham procedure. Key words: overactive bladder, percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation, sham, anti-muscarinic, voiding symptoms.

  16. Simplified scoring of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis: a comparative analysis of test performance at different cut-off points

    OpenAIRE

    Jongen, Peter; Blok, Bertil; Heesakkers, John P.; Heerings, Marco; Lemmens, Wim A.; Donders, Rogier

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The Actionable questionnaire is an 8-item tool to screen patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for neurogenic bladder problems, identifying those patients who might benefit from urological referral and bladder-specific treatment. The original scoring yields a total score of 0 to 24 with cut-off point 6. A simplified scoring, yielding a total score of 0 to 8 with cut-off point 3, has been developed in urogynaecological patients, but has not been investigated in MS. Meth...

  17. Conditional Electrical Stimulation in Animal and Human Models for Neurogenic Bladder: Working Toward a Neuroprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C R

    2016-12-01

    Sacral neuromodulation has had a tremendous impact on the treatment of urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract symptoms for patients with neurologic conditions. This stimulation does not use real-time data from the body or input from the patient. Incorporating this is the goal of those pursuing a neuroprosthesis to enhance bladder function for these patients. Investigators have demonstrated the effectiveness of conditional (also called closed-loop) feedback in animal models as well as limited human studies. Dorsal genital nerve, pudendal nerve, S3 afferent nerve roots, S1 and S2 ganglia have all been used as targets for stimulation. Most of these have also been used as sources of afferent nerve information using sophisticated nerve electrode arrays and filtering algorithms to detect significant bladder events and even to estimate the fullness of the bladder. There are problems with afferent nerve sensing, however. Some of these include sensor migration and low signal to noise ratios. Implantable pressure sensors have also been investigated that have their own unique challenges, such as erosion and sensor drift. As technology improves, an intelligent neuroprosthesis with the ability to sense significant bladder events and stimulate as needed will evolve.

  18. Semiconditional electrical stimulation of pudendal nerve afferents stimulation to manage neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Hee; Kim, Jung Moon; Im, Hyung Tae; Lee, Kye-Wook; Kim, Sung Hoon; Hur, Dong Min

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of semiconditional electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve afferents for the neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury. Forty patients (36 males, 4 males) with spinal cord injury who had urinary incontinence and frequency, as well as felt bladder contraction with bladder filling sense or autonomic dysreflexic symptom participated in this study. Patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity were subdivided into complete injury and incomplete injury groups by ASIA classification and subdivided into tetraplegia and paraplegia groups by neurologic level of injury. Bladder function, such as bladder volumes infused to the bladder until the first occurrence of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (V(ini)) and the last contraction suppressed by electrical stimulation (V(max)) was measured by water cystometry (CMG) and compared with the results of each subgroup. Among the 40 subjects, 35 patients showed neurogenic detrusor overactivity in the CMG study. Among these 35 patients, detrusor overactivity was suppressed effectively by pudendal nerve afferent electrical stimulation in 32 patients. The infusion volume until the occurrence of the first reflex contraction (V(ini)) was 99.4±80.3 ml. The volume of saline infused to the bladder until the last contraction suppressed by semiconditional pudendal nerve stimulation (V(max)) was 274.3±93.2 ml, which was significantly greater than V(ini). In patients with good response to the pudendal nerve afferent stimulation, the bladder volume significantly increased by stimulation in all the patients. In this study, semiconditional electrical stimulation on the dorsal penile afferent nerve could effectively inhibit neurogenic detrusor overactivity and increase bladder volume in patients with spinal cord injury.

  19. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation: an effective treatment for refractory non-neurogenic overactive bladder syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellenbach, Marc; Schneider, Marc; Mordasini, Livio; Thalmann, George N; Kessler, Thomas M

    2013-10-01

    To assess the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for treating refractory overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). A consecutive series of 42 patients treated with TENS for refractory OAB was prospectively investigated at an academic tertiary referral centre. Effects were evaluated using bladder diary for at least 48 h and satisfaction assessment at baseline, after 12 weeks of TENS treatment, and at the last known follow-up. Adverse events related to TENS were also assessed. Mean age of the 42 patients (25 women, 17 men) was 48 years (range, 18-76). TENS was successful following 12 weeks of treatment in 21 (50 %) patients, and the positive effect was sustained during a mean follow-up of 21 months (range, 6-83 months) in 18 patients. Following 12 weeks of TENS treatment, mean number of voids per 24 h decreased significantly from 15 to 11 (p mean voided volume increased significantly from 160 to 230 mL (p < 0.001). In addition, TENS completely restored continence in 7 (39 %) of the 18 incontinent patients. Before TENS, all 42 patients were dissatisfied or very dissatisfied; following 12 weeks of TENS treatment, 21 (50 %) patients felt satisfied or very satisfied (p < 0.001). No adverse events related to TENS were noted. TENS seems to be an effective and safe treatment for refractory OAB warranting randomized, placebo-controlled trials.

  20. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction: Clinical management recommendations of the Neurologic Incontinence committee of the fifth International Consultation on Incontinence 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Marcus John; Apostolidis, Apostolos; Cocci, Andrea; Emmanuel, Anton; Gajewski, Jerzy B; Harrison, Simon C W; Heesakkers, John P F A; Lemack, Gary E; Madersbacher, Helmut; Panicker, Jalesh N; Radziszewski, Piotr; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Wyndaele, Jean Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of neurological disease and lower urinary tract dysfunction have been produced by the International Consultations on Incontinence (ICI). These are comprehensive guidelines, and were developed to have world-wide relevance. To update clinical management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction from the recommendations of the fourth ICI, 2009. A series of evidence reviews and updates were performed by members of the working group. The resulting guidelines were presented at the 2012 meeting of the European Association of Urology for consultation, and consequently amended to deliver evidence-based conclusions and recommendations in 2013. The current review is a synthesis of the conclusions and recommendations, including the algorithms for initial and specialized management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. The pathophysiology is categorized according to the nature of onset of neurological disease and the part(s) of the nervous system affected. Assessment requires clinical evaluation, general investigations, and specialized testing. Treatment primarily focuses on ensuring safety of the patient and optimizing quality of life. Symptom management covers conservative and interventional measures to aid urine storage and bladder emptying, along with containment of incontinence. A multidisciplinary approach to management is essential. The review offers a pragmatic review of management in the context of complex pathophysiology and varied evidence base. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:657-665, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Intravesical prostatic protrusion correlates well with storage symptoms in elderly male patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yen Lu

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: In elderly male patients with non-neurogenic OAB, more severe storage symptoms are associated with a lower maximum flow rate and a more prominent IPP, indicating that a significant cause of male non-neurogenic OAB is prostate associated.

  2. Effect of α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy on urodynamics and oxidative damage of nerve in patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Bao Ye

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy on urodynamics and oxidative damage of nerve in patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder. Methods: A total of 78 patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder were randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=39, control group received conventional therapy and observation group received conventional therapy + α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy. Before treatment and after one course of treatment, urodynamic indexes, peripheral nerve conduction latency time and serum indexes of two groups were detected respectively. Results: After one course of treatment, RUV, Pdet, FS, T and C value as well as ROS, MDA, SP, NPY and ChAT content of both groups were significantly lower than those before treatment, MFR value as well as GSH, SOD, BDNF and CNTF content was significantly higher than those before treatment, and the sensory conduction latency time of median nerve and ulnar nerve as well as motor conduction latency time of median nerve and peroneal nerve were shorter than those before treatment (P<0.05; RUV, Pdet, FS, T and C value as well as ROS, MDA, SP, NPY and ChAT content of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group, MFR value as well as GSH, SOD, BDNF and CNTF content was significantly higher than those of control group, and the sensory conduction latency time of median nerve and ulnar nerve as well as motor conduction latency time of median nerve and peroneal nerve were significantly shorter than those of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: α-lipoic acid combined with mecobalamine therapy can optimize the urodynamics in patients with diabetic neurogenic bladder and also reduce the oxidative damage of nerve, and it is an effective solution for treatment of such disease.

  3. Bladder stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the base of the bladder Enlarged prostate (BPH) Neurogenic bladder Urinary tract infection (UTI) Incomplete emptying of ... of the urine stream Pain, discomfort in the penis Signs of UTI (such as fever, pain when ...

  4. Squamous Metaplasia and Its Management in Non-malignant Bladder Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şenol Tonyalı

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To reveal possible associations between non-malignant bladder disease and malignancy by evaluating the pathologic examination results of patients who underwent cystectomy for non-malignant diseases and to suggest a point of view for disease management. Materials and Methods: Medical records of patients, who underwent cystectomy in our clinic between January 2005 and January 2015 for non-malignant diseases, were examined retrospectively. Results: A total of 14 patients were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 58.7±9.3 years. Of the patients eight of them were followed up with interstitial cystitis (IC, five with neurogenic bladder and one with hemorrhagic cystitis. Time from diagnosis to cystectomy was 6.1±5.8 years on average in IC patients, 13.8±9.8 years in neurogenic bladder patients and 10 years in hemorrhagic cystitis patients. No malignancy finding was observed according to the pathologic examination results of the cystectomy specimens. However, either chronic or active inflammation was observed in all the patients. In addition to other pathologies non-keratinized squamous metaplasia was detected in five patients. Conclusion: Patients with non-malignant diseases should be followed-up with cystoscopy and bladder biopsy as a pre-malign lesion caution. Although cystectomy and urinary diversion are surgery methods with high complication rates, they could be suggested to well-informed patients as treatment alternatives.

  5. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  6. CROATIAN UROLOGISTS' CLINICAL PRACTICE AND COMPLIANCE WITH GUIDELINES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF NON-NEUROGENIC MALE LOWER URINARY TRACT SYMPTOMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasković, Igor; Tomić, Miroslav; Nikles, Sven; Neretljak, Ivan; Milicić, Valerija

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Croatian urologists' management of non-neurogenic male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and their compliance with the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines. A cross-sectional survey included 51/179 Croatian urologists. We developed a questionnaire with questions addressing compliance with EAU guidelines. The rate of performing recommended evaluations on the initial assessment of patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH)/LUTS varied from 8.0% (serum creatinine and voiding diary) to 100.0% (physical examination, prostate specific antigen and ultrasound). The international prostate symptom score was performed by 31%, analysis of urine sediment by 83%, urine culture by 53%, and serum creatinine by 8% of surveyed urologists. Only 8% of urologists regularly used bladder diary in patients with symptoms of nocturia. Our results indicated that 97% of urologists preferred alpha blockers as the first choice of treatment; 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARI) were mostly prescribed (84%) in combination with an alpha-blocker, preferably as a continuous treatment, whilst 29% of urologists used to discontinue 5ARI after 1-2 years. Half of the Croatian urologists used antimuscarinics in the treatment of BPH/LUTS and recommended phytotherapeutic drugs in their practice. In conclusion, Croatian urologists do not completely comply with the guidelines available.

  7. E-learning for neurological bladder management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognoni, Carla; Fizzotti, Gabriella; Pistarini, Caterina; Mazzoleni, M Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Regarding the impact of visceral dysfunction on quality of life, bowel and bladder management is a very important problem. The management of the patient with neurological bladder is often a source of uncertainty for both patients and healthcare personnel. Since the need of specialized training is growing, two CME e-learning courses have been developed to provide physicians and nurses competencies for the enhancement of the daily life of the patients. The present study aims at evaluating courses attendance and outcomes. Attendance data confirm the interest for both courses. The results document a pretty good objective and subjective effectiveness of the e-learning courses but low attitude to exploit he support of an asynchronous tutor. The analysis of test results gives some hints for eventual quality improvement of the courses themselves.

  8. Laparoscopic management of bladder ectopic pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Siraj, Shahul Hameed Mohamed; Chern, Bernard Su Min

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is a potentially life-threatening condition and still the major cause of maternal mortality in the first trimester of pregnancy. It accounts for approximately 10% of maternal deaths. The involvement of the urinary tract is rare, usually occurring after the rupture of an abdominal implanted ectopic embryonic sac. We herein present a case of an ectopic pregnancy implanted in the bladder and successful laparoscopic management. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first des...

  9. The paediatric neuropathic bladder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nerves involved in the control of micturition (urination). In pathophysiological terms, a neurogenic bladder is caused by a spinal reflex arc that occurs when the bladder becomes autonomous from higher centres.[1] Paediatric neurogenic bladder dysfunction is most commonly caused by a congenital neural tube defect (NTD),.

  10. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension – management update and role of droxidopa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayan J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Joy Vijayan,1 Vijay K Sharma1,21Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, National University Health System, 2Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, SingaporeAbstract: Orthostatic hypotension (OH is defined as a significant decrease in blood pressure (BP during the first 3 minutes of standing or a head up on a tilt table. Symptoms of OH are highly variable, ranging from mild light-headedness to recurrent syncope. OH occurs due to dysfunction of one or more components of various complex mechanisms that interplay closely to maintain BP in a normal range during various physiological and associated disease states. Various biochemical and electrophysiological studies are often undertaken to assess the severity and etiology of OH. In addition to the lifestyle modifications, various medications that stimulate the adrenergic receptors or increase central blood volume are used in patients with OH. Droxidopa is a newer agent that increases the levels of norepinephrine in postganglionic sympathetic neurons. Management strategies for OH are presented, including the mechanism of action of droxidopa and various studies performed to assess its efficacy.Keywords: orthostatic hypotension, systemic blood pressure, midodrine, fludrocortisone, droxidopa

  11. A cost-utility analysis of sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS) compared with medical treatment in patients with complete spinal cord injury with a neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlière, Camille; Verpillot, Elise; Donon, Laurence; Salmi, Louis-Rachid; Joseph, Pierre-Alain; Vignes, Jean-Rodolphe; Bénard, Antoine

    2015-12-01

    Sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS) and posterior sacral rhizotomy restores the ability to urinate on demand with low residual volumes, which is a key for preventing urinary complications that account for 10% of the causes of death in patients with spinal cord injury with a neurogenic bladder. Nevertheless, comparative cost-effectiveness results on a long time horizon are lacking to adequately inform decisions of reimbursement. This study aimed to estimate the long-term cost-utility of SARS using the Finetech-Brindley device compared with medical treatment (anticholinergics+catheterization). The following study design is used for the paper: Markov model elaborated with a 10-year time horizon; with four irreversible states: (1) initial treatment, (2) year 1 of surgery for urinary complication, (3) year >1 of surgery for urinary complication, and (4) death; and reversible states: urinary calculi; Finetech-Brindley device failures. The sample consisted of theoretical cohorts of patients with a complete spinal cord lesion since ≥1 year, and a neurogenic bladder. Effectiveness was expressed as quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Costs were valued in EUR 2013 in the perspective of the French health system. A systematic review and meta-analyses were performed to estimate transition probabilities and QALYs. Costs were estimated from the literature, and through simulations using the 2013 French prospective payment system classification. Probabilistic analyses were conducted to handle parameter uncertainty. In the base case analysis (2.5% discount rate), the cost-utility ratio was 12,710 EUR per QALY gained. At a threshold of 30,000 EUR per QALY the probability of SARS being cost-effective compared with medical treatment was 60%. If the French Healthcare System reimbursed SARS for 80 patients per year during 10 years (anticipated target population), the expected incremental net health benefit would be 174 QALYs, and the expected value of perfect information (EVPI

  12. Understanding the Economic Impact of Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Zamora, Isaac D; Atiemo, Humphrey O

    2017-08-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a chronic and disabling condition associated with multiple comorbidities and a widespread economic impact. Literature on cost of care and resource utilization is sparse and heterogeneous. Nonstandardized approaches, impact perspectives, and types of costs are used to describe the economic implications of neurogenic bladder. The financial toll is difficult to ascertain due to indirect and intangible costs exacerbated by the underlying disability. Health resource utilization based on clinical manifestations of neurogenic bladder may serve as an alternative measure. Understanding the multifold economic implications and health resource utilization patterns of neurogenic bladder may guide improvement of treatment strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Recent developments in the management of bladder cancer: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Angela B

    2017-11-17

    An upsurge of advances in the management of bladder cancer has rapidly occurred over the past 2 years. In this issue, recent developments in the management of bladder cancer will be discussed, including the emerging role of immunotherapy, biomarkers, and advanced imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Newer agents for the management of overactive bladder | Epstein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anticholinergics tolterodine and oxybutynin are well established in the management of overactive bladder. However, their activity at muscarinic receptors distant from the target site (i.e., bladder) produces anticholinergic side effects leading to poor tolerability. In 2004, trospium, solifenacin, and darifenacin were ...

  15. Painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis: Aetiology, evaluation and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Rourke

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis or bladder pain syndrome (BPS is often a chronic debilitating condition characterised by predominantly storage symptoms and associated frequently with pelvic pain that varies with bladder filling. The aetiology is uncertain as the condition occurs in the absence of a urinary tract infection or other obvious pathology. Resulting discomfort may vary and ranges from abdominal tenderness to intense bladder spasms. Diagnosis and management of this syndrome may be difficult and is often made by its typical cystoscopic features. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of interstitial cystitis according to the current available best evidence and advises a multimodal approach in its management.

  16. Simplified scoring of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis: a comparative analysis of test performance at different cut-off points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Blok, Bertil F; Heesakkers, John P; Heerings, Marco; Lemmens, Wim A; Donders, Rogier

    2015-10-24

    The Actionable questionnaire is an 8-item tool to screen patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for neurogenic bladder problems, identifying those patients who might benefit from urological referral and bladder-specific treatment. The original scoring yields a total score of 0 to 24 with cut-off point 6. A simplified scoring, yielding a total score of 0 to 8 with cut-off point 3, has been developed in urogynaecological patients, but has not been investigated in MS. One-hundred-and-forty-one MS patients completed the Actionable on two occasions. We compared the test performance of the simplified scoring with cut-off point 3 with that of cut-off point 2, using the original scoring with cut-off point 6 as a gold standard. The following measures were calculated: True Positives (TP), True Negatives (TN), False Positives (FP), False Negatives (FN), Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Predictive Value (PPV), Negative Predictive Value (NPV), and Accuracy. The associations between positive test result and urological treatment, and bladder-specific drug treatment were calculated. For cut-off point 3 the outcomes (Test 1, Test 2) were: TP 43.26 %, 40.88 %; TN 29.79 %, 32.85 %; FP 0.00 %, 0.00 %; FN 26.95 %, 26.28 %; Sensitivity 0.62, 0.61; Specificity 1.00, 1.00; PPV 1.00, 1.00; NPV 0.53, 0.55; Accuracy 0.73, 0.74; and for cut-off point 2: TP 59.57 %, 59.85 %; TN 26.95 %, 31.39 %; FP 2.84 %, 1.46 %; FN 10.63 %, 7.30 %; Sensitivity 0.85, 0.89; Specificity 0.90, 0.96; PPV 0.95, 0.98; NPV 0.72, 0.81; Accuracy 0.87, 0.91. Cut-off 3 completely prevented FP outcomes, but wrongly classified 26 % of the patients as negative (FN). Cut-off 2 reduced the FN to 7-10 %, with low FP values (2.84-1.46 %). With cut-off 2, the percentage of patients screened positive was higher in the Progressive group (75.00 %) than in the Relapsing Remitting group (56.25 %) (P = 0.0331), which was not the case with cut-off 3. Only a positive test according to the original scoring was associated with both

  17. Neurogenic Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individuals speech Apraxia of speech—irregularities in the timing and inaccuracies in the movement of the muscles ... edited book with a chapter on neurogenic stuttering.) Market, K. E., Montague, J. C., Buffalo, J. C., & ...

  18. Natural biology and management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpato, Kristen R; Tyson, Mark D; Clark, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews the natural biology of noninvasive bladder cancer and its management strategies while summarizing the most recent advances in the field. RECENT FINDINGS: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has a tendency to recur and progress. Risk stratification has...... in low-risk patients. SUMMARY: NMIBC represents a variety of disease states and continues to pose management challenges. As our understanding of tumor biology improves and technology advances, achieving better outcomes through individualized care may be possible....

  19. Does optimizing bladder management equal optimizing quality of life? Correlation between health-related quality of life and urodynamic parameters in patients with spinal cord lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, Jürgen; Kullik, Bärbel

    2009-08-01

    To analyze the influence of bladder management on patient well-being by correlating the objective urodynamic results of bladder treatment with the perceived quality of life in patients with spinal cord lesions. In a prospective study, 41 consecutive patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to a spinal cord lesion who were performing intermittent self-catheterization underwent urodynamic examination and answered the German version of the Qualiveen (Coloplast A/S, Humlebaek, Denmark) questionnaire. The urodynamic results were classified as either treatment success or failure. The results of the Qualiveen questionnaire were correlated with these results. The Qualiveen scales concerning fears and feelings were significantly worse in patients with suboptimal bladder function compared with those patients with treatment success. The results of our study have demonstrated that a treatment regimen leading to favorable urodynamic data and continence correlates with better quality of life.

  20. Management of Bladder Cancer After Renal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirdag, C; Citgez, S; Talat, Z; Onal, B

    2017-03-01

    In renal transplant recipients, the risk of developing bladder cancer and rate of diagnosis of advanced staged bladder cancer are generally higher than the general population. Also, it is more challenging to treat renal transplant recipients than the regular patient population. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of radical cystectomy (RC) and urinary diversion with ileal conduit in renal transplant recipients. We identified 2 patients with prior history of renal transplantation who underwent RC and ileal conduit urinary diversion for bladder cancer. Preoperative clinical and demographic data were presented and outcomes were assessed. The RC and ileal conduit urinary diversion were performed in the first patient 56 months after renal transplantation and in the second patient 64 months after renal transplantation. Clinical staging was high-grade T2 transitional cell cancer of the bladder for patient 1 and T2 with pure squamous cell cancer of the bladder for patient 2. No perioperative or postoperative complication and no graft dysfunction occurred in either patient. Our experience demonstrated that RC with ileal conduit reconstruction in renal transplant recipients is safe and feasible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Neurogenic Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These include choral reading, singing, adaptation (repeated oral reading of the same passage) or speaking while under auditory ... in conjunction with the clients’ physicians. Some therapy techniques that help reduce the symptoms of developmental stuttering may also be effective with neurogenic ...

  2. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension in Parkinson's disease: evaluation, management, and emerging role of droxidopa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaacson SH

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Stuart H Isaacson, Julia Skettini Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center of Boca Raton, Boca Raton, FL, USA Abstract: Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH is due to failure of the autonomic nervous system to regulate blood pressure in response to postural changes due to an inadequate release of norepinephrine, leading to orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension. nOH is common in Parkinson's disease (PD. Prevalence varies throughout the course of PD, ranging from 40% to 60%, and resulting in symptomatic nOH in approximately half. Symptomatic nOH, including lightheadedness, can limit daily activities and lead to falls. Symptomatic nOH can also limit therapeutic options for treating PD motor symptoms. Clinical evaluation should routinely include symptom assessment and blood pressure measurement of supine, sitting, and 3-minute standing; 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can also be helpful. Non-pharmacological management of symptomatic nOH involves education, physical maneuvers, and adequate hydration. Current pharmacological treatment of symptomatic nOH includes salt supplement, fludrocortisone, midodrine, pyridostigmine, and other empiric medications. Despite these options, treatment of symptomatic nOH remains suboptimal, often limited by severe increases in supine blood pressure. Droxidopa, an oral prodrug converted by decarboxylation to norepinephrine, is a promising therapeutic option for symptomatic nOH in PD, improving symptoms of nOH, daily activities, falls, and standing systolic blood pressure in several recent trials. These trials demonstrated short-term efficacy and tolerability, with comparable increases in standing and supine blood pressures. Longer-term studies are ongoing to confirm durability of treatment effect. Keywords: (presyncope, norepinephrine, autonomic, lightheadedness, treatment, falls

  3. Botulinum toxin type A for the treatment of non-neurogenic overactive bladder: does using onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox(®) ) or abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport(®) ) make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Pravisha; Jackson, Benjamin L; Parkinson, Richard J

    2013-07-01

    To compare the clinical effects of two different commercially available botulinum toxin type A products, onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox(®) ; Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) and abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport(®) ; Ipsen Ltd, Slough, UK), on non-neurogenic overactive bladder (OAB). We included 207 patients, who underwent treatment with botulinum toxin type A for non-neurogenic OAB from January 2009 to June 2012 at our institution, in a prospective database that recorded details of their presentation, treatment and outcomes. In December 2009, our institution switched from using onabotulinumtoxinA to using abobotulinumtoxinA. Results from the onabotulinumtoxinA cohort (n = 101) and the abobotulinumtoxinA cohort (n = 106) were compared. Similar reductions in daytime frequency, nocturia and incontinence episodes were observed after treatment, with no difference in duration of effect. The abobotulinumtoxinA cohort had almost twice the rate of symptomatic urinary retention (23 vs 42%) requiring intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC). AbobotulinumtoxinA use was complicated by a significantly higher risk of requiring ISC. The study suggests that these two toxins are not interchangeable at the doses used. © 2013 BJU International.

  4. Evaluation of lower urinary system symptoms and neurogenic bladder in children with cerebral palsy: relationships with the severity of cerebral palsy and mental status

    OpenAIRE

    DELİALİOĞLU, Sibel ÜNSAL

    2009-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to evaluate lower urinary system symptoms, to determine bladder type in children with cerebral palsy (CP), and to determine the relationship between bladder type, and the severity of CP and mental status of the children. Materials and Methods: The study included 41 children with CP. Subjects were first asked to provide information concerning lower urinary system symptoms. Urodynamic examination was performed in 41 children with CP. The severity of CP was determined acc...

  5. Management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Umberto; Bassi, Pierfrancesco; Sava, Teodoro; Monfardini, Silvio

    2004-12-01

    Bladder cancer is rare in patients below the age of 50 years, and most patients are in their 60s and 70s. Radical cystectomy is the preferred approach for patients with localized disease in most European countries and the USA, and evidence is growing in favor of neoadjuvant, platinum-based chemotherapy for patients at high risk of local and systemic relapse. Transurethral resection (TUR) followed by radiotherapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy appears to be a reasonable alternative, particularly in the UK and Canada. However, the elderly pose several treatment dilemmas, including the increased risk of perioperative complications, the management of orthotopic neobladder or different types of urinary diversion, as well as the higher risk of adverse events caused by pelvic radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy. Multidimensional parameters such as biologic prognostic factors, performance status, functional independence, comorbidities and cognitive function of the patient should be collected in order to tailor treatment to the patient's life expectancy and preferences. Optimized integration of TUR followed by bladder removal (or radiotherapy), with or without adjunctive chemotherapy, can be recommended for otherwise healthy patients. Palliative measures, such as TUR followed by external radiotherapy alone or monochemotherapy, should be reserved for partially impaired patients with moderate comorbidities, in order to maximize the balance of benefits and toxicities. This review summarizes recent data concerning surgery, radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy for bladder cancer in the elderly, and discusses pros and cons of the currently available therapeutic options.

  6. An Investigation into the Nature of Non-Voiding Contractions Resulting from Detrusor Hyperreflexia in Neurogenic Bladders Following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    total NVC Count (although both Vehicle Alone and Para Ant appeared elevated with post-vehicle control treatment; P=0.0029 and P=0.0099 for Treatment...activity in general (abdominal wall and pelvic floor). Figure 7 illustrates these preliminary results. 0 20 40 60 Bladder Contraction Amplitude (BCA...include:  The results of SA1 have been submitted to the Society for Urodynamics, Female Pelvic Medicine and Urogenital Reconstruction (SUFU; Abstract

  7. Complex bladder-exstrophy-epispadias management: Causes of failure of initial bladder closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouame Dibi Bertin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of the initial closure of the complex bladder-exstrophy remains a challenge in pediatric surgery. This study describes a personal experience of the causes of failure of the initial closure and operative morbidity during the surgical treatment of bladder-exstrophy complex. From April 2000 to March 2014, four patients aged 16 days to 7 years and 5 months underwent complex exstrophy-epispadias repair with pelvic osteotomies. There were three males and one female. Three of them had posterior pelvic osteotomy, one had anterior innominate osteotomy. Bladder Closure: Bladder closure was performed in three layers. Our first patient had initial bladder closure with polyglactin 4/0 (Vicryl ® 4/0, concerning the last three patients, initial bladder closure was performed with polydioxanone 4/0 (PDS ® 4/0. The bladder was repaired leaving the urethral stent and ureteral stents for full urinary drainage for three patients. In one case, only urethral stent was left, ureteral drainage was not possible, because stents sizes were more important than the ureteral diameter. Out of a total of four patients, initial bladder closure was completely achieved for three patients. At the immediate postoperative follow-up, two patients presented a complete disunion of the abdominal wall and bladder despite an appropriate postoperative care. The absorbable braided silk (polyglactin used for the bladder closure was considered as the main factor in the failure of the bladder closure. The second cause of failure of the initial bladder closure was the incomplete urine drainage, ureteral catheterisation was not possible because the catheters sizes were too large compared with the diameters of the ureters. The failure of the initial bladder-exstrophy closure may be reduced by a closure with an absorbable monofilament silk and efficient urine drainage via ureteral catheterisation.

  8. Endoscopic gold fiducial marker placement into the bladder wall to optimize radiotherapy targeting for bladder-preserving management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer: feasibility and initial outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice M Garcia

    Full Text Available Bladder radiotherapy is a management option for carefully selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. However, the inability to visualize the tumor site during treatment and normal bladder movement limits targeting accuracy and increases collateral radiation. A means to accurately and reliably target the bladder during radiotherapy is needed.Eighteen consecutive patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T1-T4 elected bladder-preserving treatment with maximal transurethral resection (TUR, radiation and concurrent chemotherapy. All underwent endoscopic placement of 24-K gold fiducial markers modified with micro-tines (70 [2.9×0.9 mm.]; 19 [2.1×0.7 mm. into healthy submucosa 5-10 mm. from the resection margin, using custom-made coaxial needles. Marker migration was assessed for with intra-op bladder-filling cystogram and measurement of distance between markers. Set-up error and marker retention through completion of radiotherapy was confirmed by on-table portal imaging.Between 1/2007 and 7/2012, a total of 89 markers (3-5 per tumor site were placed into 18 patients of mean age 73.6 years. Two patients elected cystectomy before starting treatment; 16/18 completed chemo-radiotherapy. All (100% markers were visible with all on-table (portal, cone-beam CT, fluoroscopy, plain-film, and CT-scan imaging. In two patients, 1 of 4 markers placed at the tumor site fell-out (voided during the second half of radiotherapy. All other markers (80/82, 98% were present through the end of radio-therapy. No intraoperative (e.g. uncontrolled bleeding, collateral injury or post-operative complications (e.g. stone formation, urinary tract infection, post-TUR hematuria >48 hours occurred. Use of micro-tined fiducial tumor-site markers afforded a 2 to 6-fold reduction in bladder-area targeted with high-dose radiation.Placement of the micro-tined fiducial markers into the bladder was feasible and associated with excellent retention-rate and no complications

  9. Understanding bladder management on a palliative care unit: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmanis, Iris; Hay, Melissa; Shadd, Joshua; Byrne, Janette; McCallum, Sarah; Bishop, Kristen; Whitfield, Patricia; Faulds, Cathy

    2017-03-16

    Research regarding factors associated with nursing-initiated changes to bladder management at end-of-life is sparse. To explore the process of Palliative Care Unit (PCU) nurses' approach to bladder management changes. Nursing staff from one PCU in London, Canada were interviewed regarding bladder management care practices. A constructivist grounded theory was generated. Four interconnected themes emerged: humanity (compassionate support of patients); journey (making the most of a finite timeline); health condition (illness, functional decline); and context (orders, policies, supplies). These overlapping themes must be considered in light of ongoing changes which prompt recycling through the framework. While bladder management necessitates shared decision-making and individualised care, nurses' phronetic experience may serve to detect the presence of change and the need to consider other alternatives. End-of-life bladder management requires nurses to continually reconsider the significance of humanity, journey, health condition and context in light of ongoing changes.

  10. Bladder Stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the upper abdomen.Bladder Training for Urinary IncontinenceRead Article >>Family HealthBladder Training for Urinary IncontinenceBladder training is a way of learning to manage urinary incontinence. It helps you change your urination habits.Kidney ...

  11. Early treatment improves urodynamic prognosis in neurogenic voiding dysfunction: 20 years of experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia M. Costa Monteiro

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Treatment onset within the first year of life improves urodynamic prognosis in patients with neurogenic bladder and triplicates the probability of urodynamic improvement in two years. The role of neonatologists and pediatricians in early referral is extremely important.

  12. Defining and managing overactive bladder: disagreement among the experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Una J; Scott, Victoria C S; Rashid, Rezoana; Behniwal, Ajay; Wein, Alan J; Maliski, Sally L; Anger, Jennifer T

    2013-02-01

    To better understand experts' perceptions of the definition of overactive bladder (OAB) and the evaluation and treatment of OAB in women. OAB has been defined by the International Continence Society as "urinary urgency, with or without urge urinary incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia." Under the current definition, people with very different clinical conditions are included under the OAB umbrella. In the present study, 12 interviews with leading urologic, gynecologic, and geriatric practitioners in urinary incontinence and OAB were performed. Questions were asked about their perception and agreement with the current definition of OAB. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The grounded theory method was used to analyze the data. Overall, a great amount of variability was found in the definition and management of OAB. Four categories of definitions were derived from the qualitative analysis: the current OAB definition is adequate, OAB is a constellation of symptoms, OAB should include the fear of leakage, and OAB is a marketing term. Although some consensus has been reached on the evaluation, several areas have demonstrated disagreement over elements of the evaluation. Experts also believed that OAB is a chronic condition, with symptom variability, and has no cure. Managing patient expectations is essential, because OAB is challenging to treat. A focus was placed on behavioral therapy. The experts disagreed over the definition and workup of OAB. However, the experts agreed that OAB is a chronic condition with a low likelihood of cure. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the development of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Bárbara; Santos, João; Morgado, Marlene; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Gray, Susannah M Y; McCloskey, Karen D; Allen, Shelley; Cruz, Francisco; Cruz, Célia Duarte

    2015-02-04

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a well known consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI), recognizable after spinal shock, during which the bladder is areflexic. NDO emergence and maintenance depend on profound plastic changes of the spinal neuronal pathways regulating bladder function. It is well known that neurotrophins (NTs) are major regulators of such changes. NGF is the best-studied NT in the bladder and its role in NDO has already been established. Another very abundant neurotrophin is BDNF. Despite being shown that, acting at the spinal cord level, BDNF is a key mediator of bladder dysfunction and pain during cystitis, it is presently unclear if it is also important for NDO. This study aimed to clarify this issue. Results obtained pinpoint BDNF as an important regulator of NDO appearance and maintenance. Spinal BDNF expression increased in a time-dependent manner together with NDO emergence. In chronic SCI rats, BDNF sequestration improved bladder function, indicating that, at later stages, BDNF contributes NDO maintenance. During spinal shock, BDNF sequestration resulted in early development of bladder hyperactivity, accompanied by increased axonal growth of calcitonin gene-related peptide-labeled fibers in the dorsal horn. Chronic BDNF administration inhibited the emergence of NDO, together with reduction of axonal growth, suggesting that BDNF may have a crucial role in bladder function after SCI via inhibition of neuronal sprouting. These findings highlight the role of BDNF in NDO and may provide a significant contribution to create more efficient therapies to manage SCI patients. Copyright © 2015 Frias et al.

  14. Management of bladder dysfunction and satisfaction of life after spinal cord injury in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Ellen Merete; Rekand, Tiina

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is limited knowledge about bladder dysfunction and bladder management in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) after discharge from the hospital in Norway. The impact of bladder dysfunction on satisfaction of life has been rarely explored.Setting: Community-based survey from...... at the Spinal Cord Units were thoroughly followed by persons who had used catheters more than 5 years. Use of incontinence pads were associated with reduced satisfaction of life.Conclusions: The most common method of management of bladder dysfunction is clean intermittent catheterization in Norway...... Norway.Methods: An anonymous cross-sectional postal survey. A questionnaire was sent to the registered members of the Norwegian Spinal Cord Injuries Association. A total of 400 participants, with traumatic or non-traumatic SCI, received the questionnaire.Results: A total of 248 subjects (62%), 180 men...

  15. Is long-term bladder deterioration inevitable following successful isolated bladder outlet procedures in children with neuropathic bladder dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Sumit; Pippi Salle, Joao L; Lorenzo, Armando J; Braga, Luis H P; Peralta-Del Valle, Maria Helena; Bägli, Darius; Khoury, Antoine E

    2008-05-01

    Bladder decompensation is well described following artificial urinary sphincter implantation in neurogenic bladders. We evaluated the long-term results of various bladder outlet procedures in a subset of patients with neurogenic bladder and isolated outlet deficiency. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 15 consecutive patients who underwent bladder outlet procedures during a 10-year period for urinary incontinence associated with neuropathic bladder dysfunction. Postoperative success was defined as a dry interval of at least 4 hours. Preoperative evaluation showed a smooth bladder in 11 patients with vesicoureteral reflux and hydronephrosis in 2. Using the minimal acceptable capacity for age, mean percent expected bladder capacity for age was 89% +/- 25%, capacity below 20 cm H(2)O was 81% and capacity below 30 cm H(2)O was 89%. Mean preoperative expected capacity for age was 60% +/- 18%. Mean postoperative followup was 11.2 years. Postoperatively, 11 patients achieved initial dryness but 9 subsequently presented with recurrent incontinence and 2 presented with upper tract deterioration. Four cases failed the initial bladder outlet procedure. Salvage procedures included augmentation cystoplasty in all 15 patients, combined with repeat bladder outlet procedure in 4 and bladder neck closure in 2. Mean time to augmentation cystoplasty was 39.6 +/- 28 months. Isolated bladder outlet procedures for neurogenic incontinence portend a poor long-term outcome, requiring augmentation cystoplasty despite the use of anticholinergic medications and strict followup. Preoperative urodynamic evaluation does not predict the need or timing from the initial bladder outlet procedure for future augmentation cystoplasty.

  16. New and promising strategies in the management of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolo, Andrea B; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Theodorescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a complex and aggressive disease for which treatment strategies have had limited success. Improvements in detection, treatment, and outcomes in bladder cancer will require the integration of multiple new approaches, including genomic profiling, immunotherapeutics, and large randomized clinical trials. New and promising strategies are being tested in all disease states, including nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC), and metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC). Efforts are underway to develop better noninvasive urine biomarkers for use in primary or secondary detection of NMIBC, exploiting our genomic knowledge of mutations in genes such as RAS, FGFR3, PIK3CA, and TP53 and methylation pathways alone or in combination. Recent data from a large, randomized phase III trial of adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy add to our knowledge of the value of perioperative chemotherapy in patients with MIBC. Finally, bladder cancer is one of a growing list of tumor types that respond to immune checkpoint inhibition, opening the potential for new therapeutic strategies for treatment of this complex and aggressive disease.

  17. EFFECTS OF HACHIMIJIOHGAN ON BLADDER OUTLET OBSTRUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    北川, 竜一; 加納, 勝利; 西浦, 弘; 小川, 由英; 高橋, 茂喜

    1980-01-01

    The effects of Hachimijiohgan (herb) on bladder outlet obstruction were evaluated subjectively and objectively in 41 patients. These cases included 25 of prostate hypertrophy, 12 of bladder neck contracture, 2 of neurogenic bladder, 1 of irritable bladder and 1 of chronic cystitis. Administration ofHachimijiohgan resulted in some subjective and objective improvement in mild prostatic obstruction. There was no significant improvement in uroBowmetry. These findings suggest Hachimijiohgan may im...

  18. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: neurogenic etiology and manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Swapna; Nair, Prem G; Thomas, Philip; Tyagi, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-01

    To determine the type, severity and manifestation of dysphagia in patients with neurogenic etiology. Clinical documentation was done on the different etiologies, its manifestation, assessment findings and management strategies taken for patients with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia who were referred for assessment and management of dysphagia over a period of three months in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Flexible endoscopic examination was done in all the patients. The severity of dysphagia in these patients were graded based on Gugging Swallowing Screen (GUSS). A total of 53 patients with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia were evaluated by an otolaryngologist and a speech language pathologist over a period of three months. The grading of severity based on GUSS for these patients were done. There were 30 patients with recurrent laryngeal nerve injury due to various etiologies, one patient with Neurofibroma-vestibular schwanoma who underwent surgical excision, 16 patients with stroke, two patients with traumatic brain injury, two patients with Parkinsonism and two patients with myasthenia gravis. The manifestation of dysphagia was mainly in the form of prolonged masticatory time, oral transit time, and increased number of swallows required for each bolus, cricopharyngeal spasms and aspiration. Among the dysphagia patients with neurogenic etiology, dysphagia is manifested with a gradual onset and is found to have a progressive course in degenerative disorders. Morbidity and mortality may be reduced with early identification and management of neurogenic dysphagia.

  19. High risk bladder cancer : current management and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leliveld-Kors, Anna; Bastiaannet, Esther; Doornweerd, Benjamin H J; Schaapveld, Michael; de Jong, Igle J

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the pattern of care in patients with high risk non muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) in the Comprehensive Cancer Center North-Netherlands (CCCN) and to assess factors associated with the choice of treatment, recurrence and progression free survival rates. Materials and

  20. Management of congenital bladder diverticulum in children: A report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vesicoureteral refl ux (VUR). Average follow-up was four years; there is a resolution of symptoms and no diverticulum recurrence at the defi ned mean followup. Conclusion: Recurrent urinary tract infections and voiding dysfunction in pediatric population should always be evaluated for congenital bladder diverticulum.

  1. Early treatment improves urodynamic prognosis in neurogenic voiding dysfunction: 20 years of experience,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia M. Costa Monteiro

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the association between early treatment and urodynamic improvement in pediatric and adolescent patients with neurogenic bladder. Methodology: Retrospective longitudinal and observational study (between 1990 and 2013 including patients with neurogenic bladder and myelomeningocele treated based on urodynamic results. The authors evaluated the urodynamic follow-up (bladder compliance and maximum bladder capacity and pressure considering the first urodynamic improvement in two years as the outcome variable and early referral as the exposure variable, using a descriptive and multivariate analysis with logistic regression model. Results: Among 230 patients included, 52% had an early referral. The majority were diagnosed as overactive bladder with high bladder pressure (≥40 cm H2O and low bladder compliance (3 mL/cmH2O and were treated with oxybutynin and intermittent catheterization. Urodynamic follow-up results showed 68% of improvement at the second urodynamic examination decreasing bladder pressure and increasing bladder capacity and compliance. The percentage of incontinence and urinary tract infections decreased over treatment. Early referral (one-year old or less increased by 3.5 the probability of urodynamic improvement in two years (95% CI: 1.81-6.77. Conclusion: Treatment onset within the first year of life improves urodynamic prognosis in patients with neurogenic bladder and triplicates the probability of urodynamic improvement in two years. The role of neonatologists and pediatricians in early referral is extremely important.

  2. Update on the management of invasive bladder cancer 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goethuys H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hans Goethuys,1 Hein Van Poppel1,21Department of Urology, Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Genk, Belgium; 2Department of Urology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, BelgiumAbstract: Muscle-invasive bladder cancer is a deadly disease for which a number of new approaches have become available to improve prognosis. A recent review emphasized the importance of timely indication of surgery and highlighted current views regarding the adequate extent of the surgery and the importance of lymph node dissection. Furthermore, treatment using neoadjuvant and adjuvant systemic chemotherapy has become more prominent, while cystectomy and diversion should be conducted only in experienced centers. Optimal methods of urinary diversion and the use of robot-assisted laparoscopic cystectomy require further study.Keywords: bladder cancer, surgery, chemotherapy, urinary diversion

  3. NBI - plasma vaporization hybrid approach in bladder cancer endoscopic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stănescu, F; Geavlete, B; Georgescu, D; Jecu, M; Moldoveanu, C; Adou, L; Bulai, C; Ene, C; Geavlete, P

    2014-06-15

    A prospective study was performed aiming to evaluate the surgical efficacy, perioperative safety profile, diagnostic accuracy and medium term results of a multi-modal approach consisting in narrow band imaging (NBI) cystoscopy and bipolar plasma vaporization (BPV) when compared to the standard protocol represented by white light cystoscopy (WLC) and transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBT). A total of 260 patients with apparently at least one bladder tumor over 3 cm were included in the trial. In the first group, 130 patients underwent conventional and NBI cystoscopy followed by BPV, while in a similar number of cases of the second arm, classical WLC and TURBT were applied. In all non-muscle invasive bladder tumors' (NMIBT) pathologically confirmed cases, standard monopolar Re-TUR was performed at 4-6 weeks after the initial intervention, followed by one year' BCG immunotherapy. The follow-up protocol included abdominal ultrasound, urinary cytology and WLC, performed every 3 months for a period of 2 years. The obturator nerve stimulation, bladder wall perforation, mean hemoglobin level drop, postoperative bleeding, catheterization period and hospital stay were significantly reduced for the plasma vaporization technique by comparison to conventional resection. Concerning tumoral detection, the present data confirmed the NBI superiority when compared to standard WLC regardless of tumor stage (95.3% vs. 65.1% for CIS, 93.3% vs. 82.2% for pTa, 97.4% vs. 94% for pT1, 95% vs. 84.2% overall). During standard Re-TUR the overall (6.3% versus 17.4%) and primary site (3.6% versus 12.8%) residual tumors' rates were significantly lower for the NBI-BPV group. The 1 (7.2% versus 18.3%) and 2 (11.5% versus 25.8%) years' recurrence rates were substantially lower for the combined approach. NBI cystoscopy significantly improved diagnostic accuracy, while bipolar technology showed a higher surgical efficiency, lower morbidity and faster postoperative recovery. The combined

  4. Bladder neck contracture-incidence and management following contemporary robot assisted radical prostatectomy technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Singh Parihar

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: BNC was identified in 1.6% of patients in our series following RARP. Intraoperative blood loss was a significant risk factor for BNC. In 20% of BNC patients a migrated foreign body was noted at vesicourethral anastomosis. Primary management of patients with BNC following RARP should be bladder neck incision and self CIC regimen.

  5. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for urothelial urinary bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubarak Al-mansour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, updated guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder are resented. They are categorized according the stage of the disease using the TNM staging system 7 th edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting level of evidence.

  6. [FRancilian Oncogeriatric Group (FROG)'s focus on management of elderly patients with bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebriou, Djamel; Avenin, Danièle; Caillet, Philippe; Mongiat-Artus, Pierre; Durdux, Catherine; Massard, Christophe; Culine, Stéphane

    2014-09-01

    Bladder cancer is diagnosed more often in the elderly. The most effective treatment strategies are mostly very aggressive and are not applicable to all patients in a very heterogeneous population. However, effective options exist to treat the most vulnerable subjects. A multidisciplinary approach including a geriatric assessment is essential for optimal adaptation of treatment. The FRancilian Oncogeriatric Group (FROG) conducted a comprehensive literature search in order to review the applicable therapeutic options according to oncological and geriatric settings. International recommendations are essential to harmonize the management of elderly patients with bladder cancer.

  7. Advances in surgical management of muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Janet Baack; Shah, Jay B

    2017-01-01

    Bladder cancer remains a disease of the elderly with relatively few advances that have improved survival over the last 20 years. Radical cystectomy (RC) has long remained the principal treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). A literature search of PubMed was performed. The content was reviewed for continuity with the topic of surgical advances in MIBC. Articles and society guidelines were included in this review. Despite the associated morbidity, even in the elderly, RC is still a reasonable option. Modifications during RC may have a positive or negative impact on survival and quality of life. The extent of pelvic lymph node dissection is one such factor which may positively impact survival outcomes. In addition, preservation of pelvic organs, robotic surgery and the adoption of enhanced recovery after surgery principles continues to improve the postoperative recovery and quality of life in RC patients. There are some ongoing studies in many of these areas, but overall the new advances in MIBC may improve patient quality and quantity of life. The advances in surgical treatment of MIBC are important and the focus of the review here.

  8. The Use of Regenerative Medicine in the Management of Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E. Hyndman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle invasive and recurrent nonmuscle invasive bladder cancers have been traditionally treated with a radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. The urinary diversion is generally accomplished through the creation of an incontinent ileal conduit, continent catheterizable reservoir, or orthotopic neobladder utilizing small or large intestine. While radical extirpation of the bladder is often successful from an oncological perspective, there is a significant morbidity associated with enteric interposition within the genitourinary tract. Therefore, there is a great opportunity to decrease the morbidity of the surgical management of bladder cancer through utilization of novel technologies for creating a urinary diversion without the use of intestine. Clinical trials using neourinary conduits (NUC seeded with autologous smooth muscle cells are currently in progress and may represent a significant surgical advance, potentially eliminating the complications associated with the use of gastrointestinal segments in the urinary reconstruction, simplifying the surgical procedure, and greatly facilitating recovery from cystectomy.

  9. Managing neurogenic bowel dysfunction: what do patients prefer? A discrete choice experiment of patient preferences for transanal irrigation and standard bowel management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafees B

    2016-02-01

    . Conclusion: Participants with bowel dysfunction regarded “risk of FI”, “frequency of use”, and “avoiding UTIs” as the most important features of a TAI device. These preferences are valuable in informing decision makers and clinicians regarding different bowel management solutions as well as for development of future devices. Keywords: neurogenic bowel dysfunction, UK, transanal irrigation, patient preference, discrete choice

  10. [Melanosis of the urinary bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllner, J; Janzen, J; Pannek, J

    2016-01-01

    Melanosis of the bladder is rare. Only 10 cases have been described in the literature. We present the case of an 80-year-old woman with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to spinal paralysis. During the diagnostic work-up which included cystoscopy, black spots in the bladder wall were observed. Histopathological evaluation revealed a benign suburothelial melanosis. Thus, with cystoscopic suspicion of a malignancy (melanoma), a biopsy is mandatory and regular cystoscopic follow-up is recommended.

  11. Bladder calculi complicating intermittent clean catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, M A; Sonda, L P; Diokno, A C; Vidyasagar, M

    1983-10-01

    Eight male patients on clean intermittent catheterization programs for neurogenic bladder dysfunction developed vesical calculi around pubic hairs inadvertently introduced into the bladder, acting as a nidus for incrustation. In three patients, the radiographic appearance of serpentine calcifications in the pelvis was highly consistent with calcareous deposits on strands of hair. Familiarity with this radiologic appearance should suggest the diagnosis in the appropriate clinical setting and help avoid misinterpretation of these calcifications, atypical of usual bladder stones.

  12. Emerging intravesical therapies for management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Tomaszewski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey J Tomaszewski, Marc C SmaldoneDepartment of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC is the second most common urologic malignancy, and 70% of patients present with superficial or nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG is the most effective agent for preventing disease recurrence, and the only therapy able to inhibit disease progression. However, recurrence rates as high as 30% and significant local and systemic toxicity have led to increased interest in alternative intravesical therapies. In patients refractory or intolerant to BCG, BCG-interferon α2b, gemcitabine, and anthracyclines (doxorubicin, epirubicin, valrubicin have demonstrated durable clinical responses. Phase I trials investigating alternative cytotoxic agents, such as apaziquone, taxanes (docetaxel, paclitaxel, and suramin are reporting promising data. Novel immunomodulating agents have demonstrated promise as efficacious alternatives in patients refractory to BCG. Optimization of existing chemotherapeutic regimens using hyperthermia, photodynamic therapy, magnetically-targeted carriers, and liposomes remains an area of active investigation. Despite enthusiasm for new intravesical agents, radical cystectomy remains the treatment of choice for patients with NMIBC who have failed intravesical therapy and selected patients with naïve T1 tumors and aggressive features. This report provides a comprehensive review of contemporary intravesical therapy for NMIBC and refractory NMIBC, with an emphasis on emerging agents and novel treatment modalities.Keywords: transitional cell carcinoma, nonmuscle, invasive, intravesical therapy, BCG

  13. Intermittent catheterisation for long-term bladder management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Jacqui; Murphy, Catherine L; Moore, Katherine N; Fader, Mandy

    2014-09-10

    Intermittent catheterisation is a commonly recommended procedure for people with incomplete bladder emptying. There are now several designs of intermittent catheter (e.g. different lengths, 'ready to use' presentation) with different materials (e.g. PVC-free) and coatings (e.g. hydrophilic). The most frequent complication of intermittent catheterisation is urinary tract infection (UTI), but satisfaction, preference and ease of use are also important to users. It is unclear which catheter designs, techniques or strategies affect the incidence of UTI, which are preferable to users and which are most cost effective. To compare one type of catheter design versus another, one type of catheter material versus another, aseptic catheterisation technique versus clean technique, single-use (sterile) catheters versus multiple-use (clean) catheters, self-catheterisation versus catheterisation by others and any other strategies designed to reduce UTI and other complications or improve user-reported outcomes (user satisfaction, preference, ease of use) and cost effectiveness in adults and children using intermittent catheterisation for incomplete bladder emptying. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, MEDLINE in process, and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings (searched 30 September 2013), the reference lists of relevant articles and conference proceedings, and we attempted to contact other investigators for unpublished data or for clarification. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or randomised cross-over trials comparing at least two different catheter designs, catheterisation techniques or strategies. Two review authors assessed the methodological quality of trials and abstracted data. For dichotomous variables, risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals were derived for each outcome where possible. For continuous variables

  14. WITHDRAWN: Intermittent catheterisation for long-term bladder management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Jacqui; Murphy, Catherine L; Moore, Katherine N; Fader, Mandy

    2017-08-08

    Intermittent catheterisation is a commonly recommended procedure for people with incomplete bladder emptying. There are now several designs of intermittent catheter (e.g. different lengths, 'ready to use' presentation) with different materials (e.g. PVC-free) and coatings (e.g. hydrophilic). The most frequent complication of intermittent catheterisation is urinary tract infection (UTI), but satisfaction, preference and ease of use are also important to users. It is unclear which catheter designs, techniques or strategies affect the incidence of UTI, which are preferable to users and which are most cost effective. To compare one type of catheter design versus another, one type of catheter material versus another, aseptic catheterisation technique versus clean technique, single-use (sterile) catheters versus multiple-use (clean) catheters, self-catheterisation versus catheterisation by others and any other strategies designed to reduce UTI and other complications or improve user-reported outcomes (user satisfaction, preference, ease of use) and cost effectiveness in adults and children using intermittent catheterisation for incomplete bladder emptying. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, MEDLINE in process, and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings (searched 30 September 2013), the reference lists of relevant articles and conference proceedings, and we attempted to contact other investigators for unpublished data or for clarification. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or randomised cross-over trials comparing at least two different catheter designs, catheterisation techniques or strategies. Two review authors assessed the methodological quality of trials and abstracted data. For dichotomous variables, risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals were derived for each outcome where possible. For continuous variables

  15. High risk bladder cancer: current management and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Leliveld

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the pattern of care in patients with high risk non muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC in the Comprehensive Cancer Center North-Netherlands (CCCN and to assess factors associated with the choice of treatment, recurrence and progression free survival rates. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 412 patients with newly diagnosed high risk NMIBC. Clinical, demographic and follow-up data were obtained from the CCCN Cancer Registry and a detailed medical record review. Uni and multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors related to choice of treatment and 5 year recurrence and progression free survival. RESULTS: 74/412 (18% patients with high risk NMIBC underwent a transurethral resection (TUR as single treatment. Adjuvant treatment after TUR was performed in 90.7% of the patients treated in teaching hospitals versus 71.8 % in non-teaching hospitals (p 80 years OR 0.1 p = 0.001 and treatment in non-teaching hospitals (OR 0.25; p < 0.001 were associated with less adjuvant treatment after TUR. Tumor recurrence occurred in 191/392 (49% and progression in 84 /392 (21.4% patients. The mean 5-years progression free survival was 71.6% (95% CI 65.5-76.8. CONCLUSION: In this pattern of care study in high risk NMIBC, 18% of the patients were treated with TUR as single treatment. Age and treatment in non-teaching hospitals were associated with less adjuvant treatment after TUR. None of the variables sex, age, comorbidity, hospital type, stage and year of treatment was associated with 5 year recurrence or progression rates.

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis of onabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX(®)) for the management of urinary incontinence in adults with neurogenic detrusor overactivity: a UK perspective.

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    Hamid, Rizwan; Loveman, Clara; Millen, Jim; Globe, Denise; Corbell, Catherine; Colayco, Danielle; Stanisic, Sanja; Gultyaev, Dmitry

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the cost effectiveness of onabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX(®), 200 units [200 U]) for the management of urinary incontinence (UI) in adults with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) due to subcervical spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis that is not adequately managed with anticholinergic drugs (ACHDs). UK National Health Service (NHS) perspective. A Markov state-transition model was developed, which compared onabotulinumtoxinA + best supportive care (BSC) with BSC alone (comprising behavioural therapy and pads, alone or in combination with clean intermittent catheterization and possibly with ACHDs). Non-responders were eligible for invasive procedures. Health states were defined according to the reduction in UI episodes. Efficacy data and estimates of resource utilization were pooled from 468 patients on onabotulinumtoxinA in two phase III clinical trials. Drug costs (2013) and administration costs (NHS Reference Costs 2011-2012) were obtained from published sources. The time horizon of the model was 5 years, and costs and benefits were discounted at 3.5%. Scenario, one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSAs) were conducted to explore uncertainties around the assumptions. In the base case, treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA + BSC over 5 years was associated with an increase in costs of £1,689 and an increase in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) of 0.4, compared with BSC alone, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £3,850 per QALY gained. Sensitivity analyses showed that utility values had the greatest influence on model results. PSA suggests that onabotulinumtoxinA + BSC had a 100 % probability of being cost effective at a willingness to pay of <£20,000. For adult patients with NDO who are not adequately managed with ACHDs, onabotulinumtoxinA + BSC appears to be a cost-effective use of resources in the UK NHS.

  17. Aesthetic, urological, orthopaedic and functional outcomes in complex bladder exstrophy-epispadias′s management

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    Bertin Dibi Kouame

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative complications are related to the surgical procedures, of failures of initial bladder closure and influence the urological, aesthetical and orthopaedic outcomes. Materials and Methods: We reviewed four patients who underwent complex bladder exstrophy-epispadias repair over a period of 14 years. The outcomes of treatment were assessed using, aesthetic, urological and orthopaedic examination data. Orthopaedic complications were explored by a radiography of the pelvis. Results: Out of four patients who underwent bladder exstrophy surgical management, aesthetic, functional outcomes and complications in the short and long follow-up were achieved in three patients. The first patient is a male and had a good penis aspect. He has a normal erection during micturition with a good jet miction. He has a moderate urinary incontinence, which requires diaper. In the erection, his penis-measures 4 cm long and 3 cm as circumference. The second patient was a female. She had an unsightly appearance of the female external genitalia with bipartite clitoris. Urinary continence could not be assessed; she did not have the age of cleanness yet. The third patient had a significant urinary leakage due to the failure of the epispadias repair. He has a limp, a pelvic obliquity, varus and internal rotation of the femoral head. He has an inequality of limbs length. Pelvis radiograph shows the right osteotomy through the ilium bone, the left osteotomy through the hip joint at the acetabular roof. Conclusion: When, the epispadias repair is performed contemporary to initial bladder closure, its success is decisive for urinary continence. In the female, surgical revision is required after the initial bladder closure for an aesthetic appearance to the external genitalia. Innominate osteotomy must be performed with brilliancy amplifier to avoid osteotomy through to the hip joint to prevent inequality in leg length.

  18. Bladder management of patients with spinal cord injuries sustained in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

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    De-Yi Luo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study’s aim is provide an overview of the patients who suffered spinal cord injury (SCI after the magnitude 8.0 Wenchuan earthquake, including each patient’s demographic and epidemiological characteristics, bladder management status, and quality of life (QOL. We also assessed the relationships between bladder management methods, symptomatic urinary tract infection (SUTI, and QOL. Two years after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, a cross-sectional face-to-face survey was conducted on 180 patients with SCI. A self-administered questionnaire and the WHOQOL-BREF assessment were used to assess injury-related information, bladder management methods, and SUTI. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi-square test and analysis of variance. A p value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. This study found that a male-to-female ratio of approximately 1.2:1, including 98 (54.4% male patients and 82 (45.6% female patients. Thoracic-level injuries were seen in 82 patients (45.56%, 60 (33.33% patients had lumbar-level injuries, 18 (8.33% patients had thoracolumbar-level injuries, and a small number of patients had cervical- or sacral-level injuries. Sixty-two patients (34.44% demonstrated normal voiding, 65 (36.11% required manually assisted voiding, 29 (16.11% required catheterization, and 24 (13.33% used aurine-collecting apparatus. The prevalence of SUTI was 43.89%. Patients who emptied their bladder via manually assisted voiding, catheterization, or with the use of a urine-collecting apparatus demonstrated higher rates of SUTI compared with patients who voided normally (p < 0.05; the patients who required catheterization had higher rates of SUTI compared with patients who required manually assisted voiding (p < 0.05. When manually assisted voiding and catheterization were compared with the use a urine-collecting apparatus, no statistically significant differences were observed in terms of the risk of developing SUTI. The patients

  19. Psychosexual development management of bladder exstrophy epispadias in complex patients.

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    Di Grazia, M; Pellizzoni, S; Tonegatti, L G; Rigamonti, W

    2017-04-01

    Bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC) represents a spectrum of urogenital step-wise malformations: epispadias, complete exstrophy, and cloacal exstrophy. Psychosexual development in adolescent patients with BEEC may become especially problematic. At present, there are few contributions in the literature investigating the validity of psychosexual treatment in order to tackle this particularly emotional and personal development phase. The study aimed at verifying the efficacy of an intervention methodology for psychosexual support of a group of adolescents with BEEC. The main goal of the intervention program was to educate the adolescents and re-frame how they see themselves or feel about themselves, especially in relation to BEEC. In particular it was predicted that the program could: (1) improve the perception of pleasure concerning the body, particularly regarding the genital area, giving proper and specific information on pleasure, masturbation and medical history of BEEC; and (2) elicit a more relational-affective perspective on sexuality. 13 adolescent patients took part in the 1-year program. The effects of the intervention program were verified through a test-retest methodology using Sexuality Evaluation Schedule Assessment Monitoring (SESAMO). The results showed that participants changed their attitude in several psychosexual areas, more specifically: psycho-environmental situations, body experience, areas of pleasure, medical and sexual history, and motivation and conflict areas (Summary Table). This study demonstrated, for the first time, that a targeted program may significantly improve the psycho-sexual condition of adolescents with BEEC. In particular, this research showed that adolescents need to be able to discuss and tackle topics of a psychological and sexual nature, as well as receive understandable answers that can be put into practice in their everyday lives. The study had several methodological limitations, especially owing to the limited

  20. Pelvic fracture-related injuries of the bladder neck and prostate: their nature, cause and management.

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    Mundy, Anthony R; Andrich, Daniela E

    2010-05-01

    To report our experience of bladder neck injuries, which are a well recognized but rare consequence of pelvic fracture-related trauma to the lower urinary tract, as we have been unable to find any reference in the English literature to their specific nature, cause and management in adults. In the last 10 years we have treated 15 men with bladder neck injuries after pelvic fracture. Two were treated at our centre by delayed primary repair. Thirteen were initially treated elsewhere and presented to us 3 months to 5 years after their injury with intractable incontinence and various other symptoms most notably recurrent urinary infection and gross haematuria. Twelve of the injuries were at or close to the anterior midline and associated with lateral compression fractures or 'open-book' injuries. Five of them were confined to the bladder neck and prostatic urethra; the other seven extended into the subprostatic urethra. Four of these were associated with a coincidental typical rupture of the posterior urethra. All had an associated cavity involving the anterior disruption of the pelvic ring. Two of the injuries, following particularly severe trauma, were a simultaneous complete transection of the bladder neck and of the bulbo-membranous urethra with a sequestered prostate between. We have seen this in children before but not in adults. Another injury, also after particularly severe trauma, was an avulsion of the anterior aspect of the prostate. We have not seen this described before. Fourteen patients underwent lower urinary tract reconstruction and one underwent a Mitrofanoff procedure. All of the 14 had a layered reconstruction of the prostate and bladder neck and in 13, this was supplemented with an omental wrap. In all patients with an anterior midline rupture, the primary injury appeared to be to the prostate and prostatic urethra with secondary involvement of the bladder neck and the subprostatic urethra. The Mitrofanoff procedure was successful. Of the 14

  1. Management of overactive bladder review: the role of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation

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    Elita Wibisono

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB is a common condition that is experienced by around 455 million people (11% of the world population and associated with significant impact in patients’ quality of life. The first line treatments of OAB are conservative treatment and anti-muscarinic medication. For the refractory OAB patients, the treatment options available are surgical therapy, electrical stimulation, and botulinum toxin injection. Among them, percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS is a minimally invasive option that aims to stimulate sacral nerve plexus, a group of nerve that is responsible for regulation of bladder function. After its approval by food and drug administration (FDA in 2007, PTNS revealed considerable promise in OAB management. In this review, several non-comparative and comparative studies comparing PTNS with sham procedure, anti-muscarinic therapy, and multimodal therapy combining PTNS and anti-muscarinic had supportive data to this consideration.

  2. Bladder management methods and urological complications in spinal cord injury patients

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    Roop Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The optimal bladder management method should preserve renal function and minimize the risk of urinary tract complications. The present study is conducted to assess the overall incidence of urinary tract infections (UTI and other urological complications in spinal cord injury patients (SCI, and to compare the incidence of these complications with different bladder management subgroups. Materials and Methods: 545 patients (386 males and 159 females of traumatic spinal cord injury with the mean age of 35.4±16.2 years (range, 18 - 73 years were included in the study. The data regarding demography, bladder type, method of bladder management, and urological complications, were recorded. Bladder management methods included indwelling catheterization in 224 cases, clean intermittent catheterization (CIC in 180 cases, condom drainage in 45 cases, suprapubic cystostomy in 24 cases, reflex voiding in 32 cases, and normal voiding in 40 cases. We assessed the incidence of UTI and bacteriuria as the number of episodes per hundred person-days, and other urological complications as percentages. Results: The overall incidence of bacteriuria was 1.70 / hundred person-days. The overall incidenceof urinary tract infection was 0.64 / hundered person-days. The incidence of UTI per 100 person-days was 2.68 for indwelling catheterization, 0.34 for CIC, 0.34 for condom drainage, 0.56 for suprapubic cystostomy, 0.34 for reflex voiding, and 0.32 for normal voiding. Other urological complications recorded were urethral stricture (n=66, 12.1%, urethritis (n=78, 14.3%, periurethral abscess (n=45, 8.2%, epididymorchitis (n=44, 8.07%, urethral false passage (n=22, 4.03%, urethral fistula (n=11, 2%, lithiasis (n=23, 4.2%, hematuria (n=44, 8.07%, stress incontinence (n=60, 11%, and pyelonephritis (n=6, 1.1%. Clean intermittent catheterization was associated with lower incidence of urological complications, in comparison to indwelling catheterization. Conclusions

  3. A drug safety evaluation of mirabegron in the management of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Dudley; Thiagamoorthy, Ganesh; Cardozo, Linda

    2016-05-01

    Overactive Bladder (OAB) is a clinical syndrome describing the symptom complex of urgency, with or without urgency incontinence and is usually associated with frequency and nocturia. Antimuscarinics are currently the most widely prescribed drugs for OAB although persistence with medication is often limited due to lack of efficacy or intolerable adverse effects. Mirabegron is β3 adrenoreceptor agonist that is the first new drug licensed for the management of overactive bladder (OAB) in over 30 years. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the mirabegron clinical trials programme, including Phase II, III and IV studies with a particular focus on tolerability and safety. A literature search was performed in Pubmed using the key words 'mirabegron', 'overactive bladder', 'β3 adrenoceptor agonist' and 'detrusor overactivity' with no restriction on dates. The extensive clinical trial programme has shown mirabegron to be safe and efficacious in the treatment of OAB symptoms and the evidence would suggest that it offers an effective alternative to antimuscarinic therapy.

  4. The role of acupuncture in managing overactive bladder; a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, James C; Jaffe, Edward; Stone, Benjamin V; Te, Alexis E; Espinosa, Geo; Chughtai, Bilal

    2016-11-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) affects a considerable proportion of men and women in the United States and is associated with significant costs and quality of life (QoL) reduction. While medication remains a mainstay of treatment, there is increasing interest in the use of alternative medicine in the form of acupuncture. We reviewed the literature on the role of acupuncture in managing OAB. A narrative review was compiled after searching electronic databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, and EMBASE) for clinical studies involving acupuncture in treating OAB. Databases were searched from the time of inception through September 2015 by a clinician for articles reporting the results related to the use of acupuncture in OAB. Key search terms were acupuncture, overactive bladder, bladder instability, urgency, urinary incontinence. Articles in English or translated into English were included. Initial animal studies suggest several biochemical mechanisms of action underlying the effect of acupuncture on OAB suppression. The experience in humans includes two case series and six comparative trials. All studies demonstrated subjective improvement in OAB symptoms, and some reported objective improvement in urodynamic studies. Notably, some comparative trials showed the benefit of acupuncture to be comparable with antimuscarinic treatment. Despite their limitations, existing studies serve as a promising foundation for suggesting a role for acupuncture as an alternative therapy for OAB. Further well-designed studies are required to investigate optimal technique and their outcomes.

  5. Managing Patients with Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: Old Disease, New Ideas

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    Per-Uno Malmström

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Prof Per-Uno Malmström opened this symposium on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC by describing the medical and economic burden caused by the increasing incidence of bladder cancer and the lack of new therapeutic options available to address the challenges of the management of NMIBC. Prof Marko Babjuk followed with a presentation that demonstrated that risk stratification using European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and Spanish Urological Club for Oncological Treatment (CUETO risk scores remains a useful tool for determining the best individual treatment options for patients. The next presentation, given by Dr Carsten Ohlmann, described the use of mitomycin C (MMC for low and intermediate-risk patients as per the European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines. However, despite a favourable safety profile, single case reports of severe adverse events following treatment with MMC should not be dismissed. MMC should therefore be given with care, with an emphasis on performing high quality transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB. Prof Bernard Malavaud then presented details of newer diagnostic methods, such as photodynamic diagnosis (PDD and narrow band imaging (NBI, which offer better optical tumour recognition for the surgeon than the old standard of white light cystoscopy. The uptake of PDD and NBI in the future will facilitate an increase in the quality of TURB. Finally, Prof Ashish Kamat explained that recurrence of bladder cancer after bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG treatment (‘BCG failure’ needs to be more clearly defined and stratified. He stated that optimal recognition of timing with relation to BCG immunotherapy is critical to determine the next steps. For example, in the past, patients with late recurrence who may have benefitted from challenge with BCG may have been overlooked.

  6. Variant histology: role in management and prognosis of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porten, Sima P; Willis, Daniel; Kamat, Ashish M

    2014-09-01

    The true clinical significance of variant histology is controversial and diagnosis is challenging, especially in the setting of nonmuscle invasive (NMI) disease. If the presence of variant architecture in NMI identifies a high-risk population with a worse prognosis and better suited for early aggressive intervention (i.e., radical cystectomy), then treatment recommendations should reflect this notion. This review outlines the current evidence and determines whether histologic variants should change management of patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Patients with high-risk NMI tumors and variant histology should be offered early cystectomy, especially if harboring pure squamous, adenocarcinoma, sarcomatoid, plasmacytoid, or micropapillary disease. In patients with small cell disease, systemic primary chemotherapy is the ideal option followed by local therapy for primary tumor control. For squamous/glandular differentiation, nested variant, and other rare variants, intravesical therapy is an option based on standard risk stratification in patients with NMI disease. Diligence is needed in the presence of variant histology to minimize the risk of understaging as well as close surveillance to not compromise the opportunity of cure. The management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer with variant histology is challenging, largely in part to the high risk of understaging and the background of already existing controversy regarding the management of high-risk NMI disease for standard urothelial cell carcinoma (early cystectomy vs. intravesical therapy). Future studies should be focused identifying if variant architecture confers different tumor biology than that of pure urothelial carcinoma, and if this difference translates into innovations in bladder sparing therapies.

  7. Increased susceptibility to bladder inflammation in smokers: targeting the PAF-PAF receptor interaction to manage inflammatory cell recruitment.

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    Marentette, John; Kolar, Grant; McHowat, Jane

    2015-12-01

    Chronic bladder inflammation can result in a significant reduction in quality of life. Smoking remains a leading preventable risk factor in many diseases. Despite the large amount of evidence supporting the risks of smoking, roughly 45 million people in the United States remain smokers. The impact of cigarette smoking on inflammation is well established, but how smoking promotes bladder inflammation is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if cigarette smoke exposure impacts inflammatory cell adherence to bladder endothelial cells and if targeting the platelet-activating factor (PAF)-PAF receptor (PAFR) interaction could be beneficial in managing bladder inflammation. In response to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) incubation, bladder endothelial cells from human or mouse displayed increased PAF accumulation, decreased PAF-AH activity, and increased inflammatory cell adherence. Inhibition of endothelial cell calcium-independent phospholipase A2β (iPLA2β) with (S)-BEL, to block PAF production, prevented adherence of inflammatory cells. Pretreatment of inflammatory cells with PAFR antagonists, ginkgolide B or WEB2086 significantly reduced the number of adhered cells to bladder endothelium. Wild-type mice exposed to cigarette smoke displayed increased presence of inflammatory infiltration which was absent in iPLA2β(-/-) mice and those exposed to room air. In conclusion, cigarette smoke exposure increases endothelial cell PAF accumulation and increased inflammatory cell adherence. Inhibition of PAF accumulation or PAFR antagonism markedly attenuated inflammatory cell adherence to bladder endothelial cells. The results detailed in this study highlight to potential therapeutic targets for managing bladder inflammation. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  8. Complications in the management of bladder trauma in a third level hospital.

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    Echeverría-García, Fernando Enrique; García-Perdomo, Herney Andrés; Barney, Erika

    2014-05-01

    To determine the frecuency of complications during the management of bladder trauma and its associated factors in a third level reference Hospital. A cross-sectional study of adult patients admitted in a reference Hospital from January 2006 to June 2011 with the diagnosis of bladder trauma. We identified demographic variables, type of trauma (blunt, penetrating), diagnostic method, associated traumatisms, management of bladder traumatism, frequency of complications and mortality. Univariate analysis was performed with frequency tables, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Similarly, bivariate analysis was performed to explore the association between variables. We used chi-square test for categorical variables and Student's t test to compare quantitative variables. We reviewed 40 medical records, which met the eligibility criteria. The median age was 27 years (range 16-;67) and 85% (34 patients) were male. Twenty-nine patients (72.5%) had penetrating injuries, being mainly firearm projectile (96.55%) and 11 patients (27.5%) blunt injuries. Most patients had intraoperative diagnosis (67.5%), while 25%, 5% and 2% were diagnosed by CT-cystography, cystoscopy and voiding cystography respectively. 70% (28 patients) had intraperitoneal bladder injuries. Of the forty patients enrolled, thirty six (90%) underwent surgery, while only four (10%) received conservative management. A total of ten patients (25%) had some type of complication. The most frequent was persistent hematuria (40%) followed by surgical site infection (30%), orchitis (20%), urinary tract infection (10%), urine leakage through the operative site, or to the peritoneal cavity (10%). No mortality was detected. On the bivariate logistic regression model type of trauma, number of injuries, performance of cystostomy, use of perivesical drainage tube, chest trauma and small bowel trauma, no association was found with the presence of complications. The frequency of complications was 25%. The presence of

  9. Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder successfully managed with cisplatin and gemcitabine: a case report

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    El Ammari Jalal Eddine

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare variant of mucus-producing adenocarcinoma constituting approximately 0.5% to 2.0% of all primary carcinomas of the bladder. This tumor initially presents as a high-grade, high-stage lesion and diffusely invades the bladder wall without forming intraluminal growth. The patients have no specific symptoms, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor prognosis. Case presentation We report the case of a 51-year-old Moroccan Berber man consulting for gross hematuria. Ultrasonography and a computed tomography scan found a bladder tumor diffusely invading the bladder wall. A histopathological examination of the tumor chips from a transurethral resection of the bladder revealed signet-ring cell adenocarcinoma. The gastrointestinal tract exploration did not reveal any other tumor localization. A radical cystectomy and adjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine chemotherapy were therefore performed resulting in 18 months of survival without metastasis and a good quality of life within that time. Conclusion The rarity and the successful management with carboplatin and gemcitabine as adjuvant chemotherapy of this entity, which is rarely reported in the literature, are two remarkable characteristics described in this case report.

  10. Sarcopenia, a Neurogenic Syndrome?

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    Ping Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is an aging-associated condition, which is currently characterized by the loss of muscle mass and muscle strength. However, there is no consensus regarding its characterization hitherto. As the world older adult population is on the rise, the impact of sarcopenia becomes greater. Due to the lack of effective treatments, sarcopenia is still a persisting problem among the global older adults and should not be overlooked. As a result, it is vital to investigate deeper into the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of sarcopenia in order to develop more effective therapeutic interventions and to inscribe a more uniform characterization. The etiology of sarcopenia is currently found to be multifactorial, and most of the pharmacological researches are focused on the muscular factors in aging. Although the complete mechanism underlying the development of sarcopenia is still waiting to be elucidated, we propose in this article that the primary trigger of sarcopenia may be neurogenic in origin based on the intimate relationship between the nervous and muscular system, namely, the motor neuron and its underlying muscle fibers. Both of them are affected by the cellular environment and their physiological activity.

  11. Optimal management of high-risk T1G3 bladder cancer: a decision analysis.

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    Girish S Kulkarni

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Controversy exists about the most appropriate treatment for high-risk superficial (stage T1; grade G3 bladder cancer. Immediate cystectomy offers the best chance for survival but may be associated with an impaired quality of life compared with conservative therapy. We estimated life expectancy (LE and quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE for both of these treatments for men and women of different ages and comorbidity levels. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We evaluated two treatment strategies for high-risk, T1G3 bladder cancer using a decision-analytic Markov model: (1 Immediate cystectomy with neobladder creation versus (2 conservative management with intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG and delayed cystectomy in individuals with resistant or progressive disease. Probabilities and utilities were derived from published literature where available, and otherwise from expert opinion. Extensive sensitivity analyses were conducted to identify variables most likely to influence the decision. Structural sensitivity analyses modifying the base case definition and the triggers for cystectomy in the conservative therapy arm were also explored. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used to assess the joint uncertainty of all variables simultaneously and the uncertainty in the base case results. External validation of model outputs was performed by comparing model-predicted survival rates with independent published literature. The mean LE of a 60-y-old male was 14.3 y for immediate cystectomy and 13.6 y with conservative management. With the addition of utilities, the immediate cystectomy strategy yielded a mean QALE of 12.32 y and remained preferred over conservative therapy by 0.35 y. Worsening patient comorbidity diminished the benefit of early cystectomy but altered the LE-based preferred treatment only for patients over age 70 y and the QALE-based preferred treatment for patients over age 65 y. Sensitivity analyses revealed that patients

  12. Early revealing of neurogenic disorders of urination in patients with anorectal anomalies

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    Makedonsky I.O.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available 148 patients with anorectal malformations (ARM were examined. Using clinical, X-ray, ultrasound and urodynamical methods of detections, factors which can cause bladder dysfunction in anorectal malformations are revealed. It was noted that patients with high and low forms of this defect have significant percentage of neurogenec disorders of urination. Absence of anomalies of spinal column development does not exclude these children from the group of scheduled profound urologic investigation. We propose ultrasound measurement of bladder wall thickness and 4-hour monitoring of voiding, urodynamic examination as early diagnostic methods of neurogenic bladder dysfunctions. For timely revealing and treatment of neurogenic disorders of urination we recommend urologic inves¬tigation to all ARM patients. Improvement of diagnostic methods and development of algorithm of revealing mentioned pathologies against ARM with the aim to prevent com¬plications in the urinary system, being perspective in decreasing lethality and disability.

  13. Neurogenic and non neurogenic functions of endogenous neural stem cells.

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    Erica eButti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis is a lifelong process that occurs in two main neurogenic niches of the brain, namely in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricles and in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG in the hippocampus. In the 1960s, studies on adult neurogenesis have been hampered by the lack of established phenotypic markers. The precise tracing of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs was therefore, not properly feasible. After the (partial identification of those markers, it was the lack of specific tools that hindered a proper experimental elimination and tracing of those cells to demonstrate their terminal fate and commitment. Nowadays, irradia-tion, cytotoxic drugs as well as genetic tracing/ablation procedures have moved the field forward and increased our understanding of neurogenesis processes in both physiological and pathological conditions. Newly formed NPC progeny from the SVZ can replace granule cells in the olfactory bulbs of rodents, thus contributing to orchestrate sophisticated odour behaviour. SGZ-derived new granule cells, instead, integrate within the DG where they play an essential role in memory functions. Furthermore, converging evidence claim that endogenous NPCs not only exert neurogenic functions, but might also have non-neurogenic homeostatic functions by the release of different types of neuroprotective molecules. Remarkably, these non-neurogenic homeostatic functions seem to be necessary, both in healthy and diseased conditions, for example for preventing or limiting tissue damage. In this review, we will discuss the neurogenic and the non-neurogenic functions of adult NPCs both in physiological and pathological conditions.

  14. Risk factors for symptomatic urinary tract infections in individuals with chronic neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, J; Wöllner, J; Pannek, J

    2016-09-01

    Retrospective investigation. To investigate the association of patient and injury characteristics, as well as bladder management, with the occurrence of patient-reported, symptomatic urinary tract infection(s) UTI(s) in patients with chronic neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). Tertiary urologic referral center. The patient database was screened for patients with chronic (>12 months) NLUTD who had presented between 2008 and 2012. Patient characteristics, bladder evacuation management, the annual number of patient-reported, symptomatic UTIs and the type of prophylactic treatment to prevent UTIs were collected. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the effects of the investigated risk factors on the occurrence of symptomatic UTI(s) and recurrent symptomatic UTIs (⩾3 annual UTIs). The data of 1104 patients with a mean NLTUD duration of 20.3±11.6 years were investigated. The evacuation method was a significant (P⩽0.004) predictor for the occurrence of symptomatic UTI and recurrent symptomatic UTIs. The greatest annual number of symptomatic UTIs was observed in patients using transurethral indwelling catheters, and the odds of experiencing a UTI and recurrent UTIs were increased more than 10- and 4-fold, respectively. The odds of a UTI or recurrent UTIs were also increased significantly (P⩽0.014) in patients using intermittent catheterization (IC). Botulinum toxin injections into the detrusor increased the odds of a UTI ~10-fold (P=0.03). The bladder evacuation method is the main predictor for symptomatic UTIs in individuals with NLUTD. Transurethral catheters showed the highest odds of symptomatic UTI and should be avoided whenever possible.

  15. Surgical management of bladder transitional cell carcinoma in a vesicular diverticulum: case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raheem, Omer A

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of primary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of a bladder diverticum along with a literature review. A 55-year-old male presented with painless gross hematuria. A histological diagnosis of TCC within a bladder diverticulum was made following cystoscopical examination. Initially transurethral resection of bladder tumour with subsequent intravesical chemotherapy followed. As a result of recurrence and in view of bladder-sparing therapy, a distal partial cystectomy was performed. This report demonstrates that conservative bladder-sparing treatment can be achieved and subsequently followed by vigilant cystoscopy.

  16. Surgical management of bladder transitional cell carcinoma in a vesicular diverticulum: case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raheem, Omer A

    2011-08-01

    We report a case of primary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of a bladder diverticum along with a literature review. A 55-year-old male presented with painless gross hematuria. A histological diagnosis of TCC within a bladder diverticulum was made following cystoscopical examination. Initially transurethral resection of bladder tumour with subsequent intravesical chemotherapy followed. As a result of recurrence and in view of bladder-sparing therapy, a distal partial cystectomy was performed. This report demonstrates that conservative bladder-sparing treatment can be achieved and subsequently followed by vigilant cystoscopy.

  17. Current practice in the management of superficial bladder cancer in the Netherlands and Belgian Flanders: a survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, J.A.; Melissen, D.O.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because there is no national guideline for the diagnosis, therapy and follow up of (superficial) bladder cancer in the Netherlands and Belgium, the actual patient management may differ between urologists. The purpose of this study is to get insight in the current way urologists diagnose,

  18. Spontaneous rupture of bladder diverticulum after postoperative radiotherapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Kazunori; Iijima, Mitsuharu; Nozue, Masashi; Imai, Michiko; Suzuki, Sachiko; Sakahara, Harumi; Ohta, Nobutaka; Kasami, Masako [Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    We present a case of spontaneous rupture of bladder diverticulum three years after postoperative whole pelvic irradiation (50.4 Gy) for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The patient had suffered from a neurogenic bladder after hysterectomy, but excretory urography revealed no abnormalities. Bladder diverticulum was found two years later. Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder is one of the late complications associated with radiotherapy, although it is very rare. Postoperative neurogenic bladder may also be associated with rupture. We should be aware of this rare complication in patients who receive pelvic irradiation. (author)

  19. Neurogenic inflammation in human and rodent skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmelz, M; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup

    2001-01-01

    The combination of vasodilation and protein extravasation following activation of nociceptors has been termed "neurogenic inflammation." In contrast to rodents, no neurogenic protein extravasation can be elicited in healthy human skin. Dermal microdialysis has considerably increased our knowledge...... about neurogenic inflammation in human skin, including the involvement of mast cells....

  20. Droxidopa for Symptomatic Neurogenic Hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson-Myrthil, Nadia

    Droxidopa is a first-in-class, orally available, synthetic amino acid precursor of norepinephrine that received accelerated Food and Drug Administration approval in February 2014 after Orphan Drug status for a debilitating condition known as symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension. Neurogenic disorders often lead to postural hypotension as a result of poor norepinephrine release from its storage sites. Clinical data suggest increases in standing systolic blood pressure and improvements in many other markers for subjective relief in patients with symptomatic neurogenic hypotension who received droxidopa therapy over 1-2 weeks. Studies evaluating the sustained effects of droxidopa are ongoing. With minimal drug interactions (even with carbidopa use) or adverse effects, droxidopa therapy can be used safely in patients with a variety of neurologic conditions; however, more data are needed to determine its appropriate pharmacotherapeutic role. In all, droxidopa is a safe and effective medication for the treatment of orthostatic dizziness/lightheadedness, or the "feeling that you are about to black out" in adult patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension secondary to primary autonomic failure (Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and pure autonomic failure), dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency, and nondiabetic autonomic neuropathy.

  1. Bladder biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - bladder ... A bladder biopsy can be done as part of a cystoscopy . Cystoscopy is a telescopic examination of the inside of the ... informed consent form before you have a bladder biopsy. In most cases, you are asked to urinate ...

  2. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy versus cystectomy in management of stages II, and III urinary bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Osman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This phase III trial was de - signed to compare the survival benefit, surgical respectability, and toxicities among patients treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy (arm A, with those treated by radical cystectomy (arm B in the management of stage II, III urinary bladder cancer. Patients and Methods: For inclusion, patients should have pathologically proven urothelial carcinoma in urinary bladder, clinical stages from T2N0M0 to T4aN0M0, patient age less than 65 years, and performance state ≤ 2. Additionally, patients should have adequate hematological, renal, and liver functions. Arm A patients underwent 3 cycles of neoadjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine followed by radical cystectomy, while arm B patients underwent radical cystectomy directly. Results: Thirty patients had been enrolled in each arm between September 2009 and April 2014 in 3 educational institutes in Egypt. The 3 year OS (overall survival for arm A, and B were 60% and 50% respectively. The median OS for arm A was 36+ months and that for arm B was 32.5 months. The 3 year progression-free survival (PFS for arm A, and B were 57% and 43% respectively. The median PFS for arm A was 36+ months and for arm B was 28 months. A subgroup analysis was performed to correlate between 3 year OS and predetermined prognostic factors including age, tumor size, pathological stage, and the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The later was performed only in arm A. Both treatment arms were tolerated well with mild toxicities profiles. Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy achieved better survival, surgical respectability, with nearly equivalent toxicities when compared with radical cystectomy.

  3. Guideline-based management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Justin R.; Dahm, Philipp; Chang, Sam S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) represents a broad spectrum of disease, the hallmarks of which include disease recurrence and progression. Clinicians have a number of surgical and therapeutic options at their disposal when treating this disease, and the underlying evidence continues to evolve. A number of professional organizations have invested in the development of clinical practice guidelines to guide patient management. Materials and Methods: We review and summarize four major guidelines, the American Urological Association, the European Association of Urology, the International Consultation on Urological Disease and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Results: Guideline panels differed in their composition, methodological approach and structure of recommendations. Despite this, many recommendations were similar between various panels, although differences are present in panel recommendations related to initial diagnosis and treatment, adjuvant therapy and disease surveillance. Conclusions: Guideline recommendations are similar at many decision points that clinicians face when managing NMIBC, although they are far from uniform. While future prospective, well-designed studies will hopefully clarify NMIBC management, urologists ultimately must rely on a combination of evidence-based recommendations, which they should seek to integrate with patients’ values and preferences and the individual circumstances to provide the best possible patient care. PMID:26604443

  4. Guideline-based management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R Gregg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC represents a broad spectrum of disease, the hallmarks of which include disease recurrence and progression. Clinicians have a number of surgical and therapeutic options at their disposal when treating this disease, and the underlying evidence continues to evolve. A number of professional organizations have invested in the development of clinical practice guidelines to guide patient management. Materials and Methods: We review and summarize four major guidelines, the American Urological Association, the European Association of Urology, the International Consultation on Urological Disease and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Results: Guideline panels differed in their composition, methodological approach and structure of recommendations. Despite this, many recommendations were similar between various panels, although differences are present in panel recommendations related to initial diagnosis and treatment, adjuvant therapy and disease surveillance. Conclusions: Guideline recommendations are similar at many decision points that clinicians face when managing NMIBC, although they are far from uniform. While future prospective, well-designed studies will hopefully clarify NMIBC management, urologists ultimately must rely on a combination of evidence-based recommendations, which they should seek to integrate with patients' values and preferences and the individual circumstances to provide the best possible patient care.

  5. Novel augmentation ileocystoplasty technique to manage non-compliant bladders in the presence of obstructed megaureters: the "fez procedure".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayib, Abdulmalik M S; Abdel-Meguid, Taha A; Al-Sayyad, Ahmed J; Altayloni, Truki E; Khan, Mohammed K; Zugail, Ahmed S

    2015-03-01

    To show the efficacy and safety of a novel modification of Studer's neobladder, herein defined as the "fez procedure." The medical records of 21 children (mean age 9.4 ± 1.3 years) who underwent the "fez procedure" at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, to manage refractory poorly-compliant bladders and concomitantly obstructed megaureters were retrospectively reviewed. The patients had been previously managed by either preliminary cutaneous ureterostomy (17 patients) or temporary nephrostomy (four patients) to improve and stabilize the renal functions. The "fez procedure" entailed augmentation ileocystoplasty and the use of an afferent tubularized ileal loop for direct ureteroileal anastomosis. The augmented bladder together with the tubularized loop were fashioned as a "fez" with its tassel. The outcome measures were changes in cystometric capacity, bladder compliance, glomerular filtration rate, serum creatinine, technetium 99m-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid diuretic renography (T1/2), ureteral diameter, vesicoureteral reflux, febrile urinary tract infections, continence and complications. The mean study follow-up period was 52.5 ± 12.8 months. Means of changes of cystometric capacity (273.2 ± 60.9 mL) and bladder compliance (15.6 ± 4.2 mL/cm H2 O) were significant (P fez surgery," with non-significant changes in the improved glomerular filtration rate (P = 0.22) and serum creatinine (P = 0.18). None of the patients experienced ureteral restenosis, vesicoureteral reflux, febrile urinary tract infections, incontinence or significant complications. The "fez procedure" represents a versatile and successful surgical option for these selected patients, as it offers improved bladder capacity/compliance, resolution of ureteral obstruction and vesicoureteral reflux, preservation of the renal function, control of urinary tract infections and urinary continence, and acceptable morbidity. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  6. Laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder following total extra-peritoneal repair of inguinal hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Aggarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesh erosion into visceral organs is a rare complication following laparoscopic mesh repair for inguinal hernia with only 15 cases reported in English literature. We report the first case of complete laparoscopic management of mesh erosion into small bowel and urinary bladder. A 62-year-male underwent laparoscopic total extra-peritoneal repair of left inguinal hernia at another centre in April 2012. He presented to our centre 21 months later with persistent lower urinary tract infection (UTI. On evaluation mesh erosion into bowel and urinary bladder was suspected. At laparoscopy, a small bowel loop was adhered to the area of inflammation in the left lower abdomen. After adhesiolysis, mesh was seen to be eroding into small bowel. The entire infected mesh was pulled out from the pre-peritoneal space and urinary bladder wall using gentle traction. The involved small bowel segment was resected, and bowel continuity restored using endoscopic linear cutter. The resected bowel along with the mesh was extracted in a plastic bag. Intra-operative test for leak from urinary bladder was found to be negative. The patient recovered uneventfully and is doing well at 12 months follow-up with resolution of UTI. Laparoscopic approach to mesh erosion is feasible as the plane of mesh placement during laparoscopic hernia repair is closer to peritoneum than during open hernia repair.

  7. Overactive Bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overactive bladder is a condition in which the bladder squeezes urine out at the wrong time. You may have overactive bladder if you have two or more of these ... You also may have incontinence, a loss of bladder control. Nerve problems, too much fluid, or too ...

  8. Urethral versus suprapubic catheter: choosing the best bladder management for male spinal cord injury patients with indwelling catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumi, H K; Kalisvaart, J F; Ronningen, L D; Hovey, R M

    2010-04-01

    Bladder management for male patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) challenges the urologist to work around physical and social restrictions set forth by each patient. The objective of this study was to compare the complications associated with urethral catheter (UC) versus suprapubic tube (SPT) in patients with SCI. A retrospective review of records at Long Beach Veterans Hospital was carried out to identify SCI patients managed with SPT or UC. Chart review identified morbidities including urinary tract infection (UTI), bladder stones, renal calculi, urethral complications, scrotal abscesses, epididymitis, gross hematuria and cancer. Serum creatinine measurements were evaluated to determine whether renal function was maintained. In all, 179 patients were identified. There was no significant difference between the two catheter groups in any areas in which they could be compared. There were catheter-specific complications specific to each group that could not be compared. These included erosion in the UC group and urethral leak, leakage from the SPT and SPT revision in the SPT group. Average serum creatinine for the UC and SPT groups was 0.74 and 0.67 mg per 100 ml, respectively. SCI patients with a chronic catheter have similar complication rates of UTIs, recurrent bladder/renal calculi and cancer. Urethral and scrotal complications may be higher with UC; however, morbidity from SPT-specific procedures may offset benefits from SPT. Serum creatinine was maintained in both groups. Overall, bladder management for patients with chronic indwelling catheters should be selected on the basis of long-term comfort for the patient and a physician mind-set that allows flexibility in managing these challenges.

  9. Implication of ultrasound bladder parameters on treatment response in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia under medical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Thekumpadam Puthenveetil

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasound bladder parameters are useful tools for measuring the treatment response in BPH patients. Our study shows that RI and DWT significantly correlate with the treatment response in BPH patients. More importantly, pretreatment values of increased IPP and PUA determines the non-improvement of symptoms in BPH patients. Our study suggests the importance of transabdominal ultrasonography (KUB–P with Doppler for evaluating treatment responses to medical management.

  10. The Role of Interferon in the Management of BCG Refractory Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres F. Correa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thirty to forty percent of patients with high grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC fail to respond to intravesical therapy with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG. Interferon-α2B plus BCG has been shown to be effective in a subset of patients with NMIBC BCG refractory disease. Here we present a contemporary series on the effectiveness and safety of intravesical BCG plus interferon-α2B therapy in patients with BCG refractory NMIBC. Methods. From January of 2005 to April of 2014 we retrospectively found 44 patients who underwent induction with combination IFN/BCG for the management of BCG refractory NMIBC. A chart review was performed to assess initial pathological stage/grade, pathological stage/grade at the time of induction, time to IFN/BCG failure, pathological stage/grade at failure, postfailure therapy, and current disease state. Results. Of the 44 patients who met criteria for the analysis. High risk disease was found in 88.6% of patients at induction. The 12-month and 24-month recurrence-free survival were 38.6% and 18.2%, respectively. 25 (56.8% ultimately had disease recurrence. Radical cystectomy was performed in 16 (36.4% patients. Conclusion. Combination BCG plus interferon-α2B remains a reasonably safe alternative treatment for select patients with BCG refractory disease prior to proceeding to radical cystectomy.

  11. Managing neurogenic bowel dysfunction: what do patients prefer? A discrete choice experiment of patient preferences for transanal irrigation and standard bowel management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafees, Beenish; Lloyd, Andrew J; Ballinger, Rachel S; Emmanuel, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with bowel dysfunction secondary to neurological illness are managed by a range of nonsurgical methods, including dietary changes, laxatives, and suppository use to transanal irrigation (TAI). The aim of the present study was to explore individuals' preferences regarding TAI devices and furthermore investigate willingness to pay (WTP) for attributes in devices in the UK. A discrete choice experiment survey was conducted to evaluate the patients' perceived value of TAI devices. Attributes were selected based upon a literature review and input from clinicians. Interviews were conducted with three clinicians and the survey was developed and finalized with the input from both patients and professionals. The final attributes were "risk of urinary tract infections" (UTIs), "risk of fecal incontinence" (FI), "frequency of use", "time spent on toilet", "ease of use", "level of control/independence", and "cost". Participants were recruited by a patient panel of TAI device users in the UK. Data were analyzed using the conditional logit model whereby the coefficients obtained from the model provided an estimate of the (log) odds ratios (ORs) of preference for attributes. WTP was also estimated for each attribute. A total of 129 participants were included in the final analyses. Sixty two percent of the participants had suffered from three UTIs in the preceding year and 58% of patients reported currently experiencing FI using their current device. All attributes were significant predictors of choice. The most important attributes for participants were the "risk of FI", "frequency of use", and "risk of UTIs". Participants with bowel dysfunction regarded "risk of FI", "frequency of use", and "avoiding UTIs" as the most important features of a TAI device. These preferences are valuable in informing decision makers and clinicians regarding different bowel management solutions as well as for development of future devices.

  12. Treatment of the neurogenic bladder in spina bifida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Chrzan, Rafal; Klijn, Aart J.; Dik, Pieter

    2008-01-01

    Renal damage and renal failure are among the most severe complications of spina bifida. Over the past decades, a comprehensive treatment strategy has been applied that results in minimal renal scaring. In addition, the majority of patients can be dry for urine by the time they go to primary school.

  13. The overactive bladder in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerman, J S; Finkelstein, L H

    2000-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a common neurologic disorder that often affects the genitourinary system. One of the most common symptoms of multiple sclerosis is the hyperactive bladder. These patients will have symptoms that may affect their lifestyle, such as urinary incontinence, urgency, and frequency. They may also suffer from debilitating urinary tract symptoms, such as frequent or recurrent urinary tract infections and also on occasion, damage to the upper urinary tract. Fortunately, the neurogenic bladder dysfunction associated with multiple sclerosis can be treated with a reasonable chance of success. With proper treatment, related symptoms may be brought under control, allowing the physician to concentrate on the more debilitating aspects of this disease.

  14. Urethral sphincter EMG-controlled dorsal penile/clitoral nerve stimulation to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opisso, E.; Borau, A.; Rijkhoff, N. J. M.

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate whether real-time external urethral sphincter (EUS) EMG-controlled dorsal genital nerve (DGN) stimulation can suppress undesired detrusor bladder contractions in patients with both neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD). Detrusor pressure (Pdet) and EUS EMG were recorded in 12 neurogenic patients who underwent two filling cystometries. The first one was without stimulation and was intended to confirm the NDO and DSD and to set the EMG detection threshold. The second one was with real-time EMG-controlled stimulation of DGNs. Two detection methods were analyzed to detect bladder contractions. The first method was a Kurtosis-scaled root mean square (RMS) detector and was used on-line. The second was a simple RMS detector and was used off-line. Of 12 patients included, 10 patients showed both NDO and DSD. In nine of these ten patients relevant EMG concomitant to detrusor activity was detected and stimulation could suppress at least one detrusor contraction. The second filling compared to the first one showed an increase of 84% in bladder capacity (p = 0.002) and a decrease of 106% in Pdet (p = 0.002). Nine false-positive detections occurred during the ten fillings with electrical stimulation. The mean increases of both time and Pdet between stimulation and bladder contraction onsets for method 1 were 1.8 s and 4 cmH2O and for method 2 were 0.9 s and 2 cmH2O, respectively. This study shows that EUS EMG can be used in real time to detect the onset of a bladder contraction. In combination with DGN stimulation has been shown to be feasible to suppress undesired bladder contractions and in turn to increase bladder capacity in subjects with both NDO and DSD.

  15. Bladder Retraining

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a better voiding pattern around the clock. Do Kegel Exercises Help People with IC? Some bladder retraining programs recommend practicing Kegel exercises as part of bladder retraining. Kegel exercises ...

  16. Bladder Wall Telangiectasia in a Patient with Ataxia-Telangiectasia and How to Manage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Deniz Aygün

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T is a rare neurodegenerative, inherited disease causing severe morbidity. Oculocutaneous telangiectasias are almost constant findings among the affected cases as telangiectasia is considered the main clinical finding for diagnosis. Vascular abnormalities in organs have been reported infrequently but bladder wall telangiectasias are extremely rare. We aimed to report recurrent hemorrhage from bladder wall telangiectasia in a 9-year-old boy with A-T who had received intravenous cyclophosphamide for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Since A-T patients are known to be more susceptible to chemical agents, we suggested that possibly cyclophosphamide was the drug which induced bladder wall injury in this patient.

  17. Bladder exstrophy repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder birth defect repair; Everted bladder repair; Exposed bladder repair; Repair of bladder exstrophy ... Bladder exstrophy repair involves two surgeries. The first surgery is to repair the bladder. The second one ...

  18. Using the Native Afferent Nervous System to Sense Bladder Fullness: State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Lauren E; Tai, Changfeng; Chermansky, Christopher J

    2016-12-01

    The regulation of micturition involves complex neurophysiologic pathways, and its understanding has grown immensely over the past decade. Alternative approaches and applied technologies in the treatment of bladder dysfunction have minimized the complications that result from neurogenic bladder. The use of natural bladder mechanoreceptors and electroneneurographic (ENG) signal recordings from afferent nerves to chronically monitor bladder volume is a promising concept, but the technology to accomplish this has proven to be a great biomedical engineering challenge. The focus of this paper will be to describe the current state of ENG signal recording as a method to detect bladder fullness.

  19. [Therapy of overactive bladder (OAB)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosch, M; Mager, R; Gust, K; Brandt, M; Borgmann, H; Haferkamp, A

    2015-04-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a symptom complex which is present in approximately 17% of the European population. It is observed in the presence or absence of incontinence (wet or dry) and is associated with a high degree of psychological stress as well as high costs for the healthcare system. Myogenic, urothelial and neurogenic factors lead to frequently unknown changes of muscular, neural and connective tissue. For the definition, etiology and diagnostics of the disease the previous continuing medical education (CME) article "Diagnosis of overactive bladder (OAB)" should be consulted. In recent years some improvements have been made in OAB-related research, in terms of pathophysiological models and new pharmacological approaches with the development of new therapeutic agents. Besides classical substances, recently approved agents are increasingly being used for the therapy of OAB. Furthermore, non-pharmaceutical approaches and surgical techniques still play an important role in the therapy of OAB.

  20. Management of congenital bladder diverticulum in children: A report of seven cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Khemakhem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of the study is to present the author′s experience with congenital bladder diverticula in seven pediatric patients at a developing world tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Records of seven patients diagnosed and treated as congenital bladder diverticulum, from January 1998 to December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed for age, sex, clinical symptoms, investigative work-up, operative notes, and postoperative follow-up. Results: All patients were males. Age at presentation ranged from six months to six years (mean three years and six months. All were manifested postnatally by urinary tract infection in four cases, bladder retention in three cases and abdominal pain in two cases. Diagnosis was suggested by ultrasound and confirmed by voiding cystourethrography (VCUG in all cases and urethrocystoscopy in three cases. Open surgical excision of diverticulum was done in all the patients associated with ureteral reimplantation in four patients with VCUG-documented high-grade vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. Average follow-up was four years; there is a resolution of symptoms and no diverticulum recurrence at the defined mean follow-up. Conclusion: Recurrent urinary tract infections and voiding dysfunction in pediatric population should always be evaluated for congenital bladder diverticulum. Investigations such as abdominal ultrasound, VCUG and nuclear renal scanning, form an important part of preoperative diagnostic work-up and postoperative follow up. Diverticulectomy with ureteral reimplantation in case of high-grade reflux, provides good results without recurrence.

  1. Management of congenital bladder diverticulum in children: A report of seven cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemakhem, Rachid; Ghorbel, Sofiane; Jlidi, Said; Nouira, Faouzi; Louati, Héla; Douira, Wiem; Chennoufi, Faouzia; Bellagha, Ibtisem; Chaouachi, Béji

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to present the author's experience with congenital bladder diverticula in seven pediatric patients at a developing world tertiary care center. Records of seven patients diagnosed and treated as congenital bladder diverticulum, from January 1998 to December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed for age, sex, clinical symptoms, investigative work-up, operative notes, and postoperative follow-up. All patients were males. Age at presentation ranged from six months to six years (mean three years and six months). All were manifested postnatally by urinary tract infection in four cases, bladder retention in three cases and abdominal pain in two cases. Diagnosis was suggested by ultrasound and confirmed by voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) in all cases and urethrocystoscopy in three cases. Open surgical excision of diverticulum was done in all the patients associated with ureteral reimplantation in four patients with VCUG-documented high-grade vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Average follow-up was four years; there is a resolution of symptoms and no diverticulum recurrence at the defined mean follow-up. Recurrent urinary tract infections and voiding dysfunction in pediatric population should always be evaluated for congenital bladder diverticulum. Investigations such as abdominal ultrasound, VCUG and nuclear renal scanning, form an important part of preoperative diagnostic work-up and postoperative follow up. Diverticulectomy with ureteral reimplantation in case of high-grade reflux, provides good results without recurrence.

  2. Development of a wearable microwave bladder monitor for the management and treatment of urinary incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krewer, F.; Morgan, F.; Jones, E.; Glavin, M.; O'Halloran, M.

    2014-05-01

    Urinary incontinence is defined as the inability to stop the flow of urine from the bladder. In the US alone, the annual societal cost of incontinence-related care is estimated at 12.6 billion dollars. Clinicians agree that those suffering from urinary incontinence would greatly benefit from a wearable system that could continually monitor the bladder, providing continuous feedback to the patient. While existing ultrasound-based solutions are highly accurate, they are severely limited by form-factor, battery size, cost and ease of use. In this study the authors propose an alternative bladder-state sensing system, based on Ultra Wideband (UWB) Radar. As part of an initial proof-of-concept, the authors developed one of the first dielectrically and anatomically-representative Finite Difference Time Domain models of the pelvis. These models (one male and one female) are derived from Magnetic Resonance images provided by the IT'IS Foundation. These IT'IS models provide the foundation upon which an anatomically-plausible bladder growth model was constructed. The authors employed accurate multi-pole Debye models to simulate the dielectric properties of each of the pelvic tissues. Two-dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulations were completed for a range of bladder volumes. Relevant features were extracted from the FDTD-derived signals using Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and then classified using a k-Nearest-Neighbour and Support Vector Machine algorithms (incorporating the Leave-one-out cross-validation approach). Additionally the authors investigated the effects of signal fidelity, noise and antenna movement relative to the target as potential sources of error. The results of this initial study provide strong motivation for further research into this timely application, particularly in the context of an ageing population.

  3. Botulinum toxin injections for adults with overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, James B; Vincent, Michael; Herbison, G Peter; Wilson, David Iain; Wilson, Don

    2011-12-07

    Overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) is a common condition with a significant negative impact on quality of life characterised by urgency with or without urge incontinence, frequency and nocturia.  Intravesical botulinum toxin is being increasingly used to treat severe overactive bladder refractory to standard management.  An increasing body of literature is forming that supports this technique as effective, well tolerated, and safe.  This review is a substantial update of the 2007 review of the same title. The objective was to compare intravesical botulinum toxin with other treatments for neurogenic and idiopathic overactive bladder in adults. The hypothesis to be addressed were whether intravesical injection of botulinum toxin was better than placebo or no treatment; pharmacological and other non-pharmacological interventions; whether higher doses of botulinum toxin were better than lower doses; whether botulinum toxin in combination with other treatments was better than other treatments alone; whether one formulation of botulinum toxin is better than another; and whether one injection technique was better than another. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials Register (searched 23 February 2010). The Register contains trials identified from MEDLINE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings. Additionally, all reference lists of selected trials and relevant review papers were searched. No limitations were placed on the searches. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of treatment for OAB in adults in which at least one management arm involved intravesical injection of botulinum toxin were included. Participants had either neurogenic OAB or idiopathic OAB with or without stress incontinence. Comparison interventions could include no intervention, placebo, lifestyle modification, bladder retraining, pharmacological treatments, surgery, bladder

  4. The treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients with neurogenic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, William O.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) related to compromise of the nervous system is an increasingly common occurrence. This may be due to the multifactorial nature of ED, the myriad of disorders affecting the neurotransmission of erectogenic signals, and improved awareness and diagnosis of ED. Nevertheless, neurogenic ED remains poorly understood and characterized. Disease related factors such as depression, decreased physical and mental function, the burden of chronic illness, and loss of independence may preclude sexual intimacy and lead to ED as well. The amount of data regarding treatment options in subpopulations of differing neurologic disorders remains scarce except for men with spinal cord injury. The treatment options including phosphodiesterase inhibitors, intracavernosal or intraurethral vasoactive agents, vacuum erection devices (VED) and penile prosthetic implantation remain constant. This review discusses the options in specific neurologic conditions, and briefly provides insight into new and future developments that may reshape the management of neurogenic ED. PMID:26904415

  5. Effects of Radiation Therapy on Established Neurogenic Heterotopic Ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chan Ho; Shim, Su Jung; Kim, Hyun Jung; Yang, Hyuna; Kang, Youn Joo

    2016-12-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is frequently seen on rehabilitation units after spinal cord injuries, fractures, brain injuries, and limb amputations. Currently, there is no effective treatment for HO other than prophylaxis with anti-inflammatory medications, irradiation, and bisphosphonate administration. These prophylactic treatments are not effective for managing ectopic bone once it has formed. Here we describe three cases of established neurogenic HO treated with radiation therapy (RT). All patients had decreased serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone-specific ALP levels with decreased pain but increased range of motion immediately after RT. Post-treatment X-rays revealed no further growth of the HO. All patients maintained clinical and laboratory improvements 4 or 6 months after the RT. Our results suggest that RT is safe and effective in decreasing pain and activity of neurogenic HO.

  6. Treatment of neurogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie

    2011-12-01

    Central or neurogenic diabetes insipidus results from a deficiency in antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or arginine-vasopressin (AVP). Treatment is based on replacement therapy with the hormone analog desmopressin (d-DAVP). d-DAVP can be administered subcutaneously to infants or patients with postoperative or posttraumatic brain injury being monitored for transient diabetes insipidus. Intranasal and oral forms are also available. The recently introduced lyophilisate, which melts under the tongue, has replaced the tablet form (recently withdrawn from the market in France) and provides better bioavailability. Irrespective of the mode of administration, it is usually the patient who finds the effective minimal dose necessary for a normal life, i.e. without excessive polyuria, particularly at night. Patient education is necessary to avoid the risk of water intoxication and hyponatremia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. [Anesthesia management of laparoscopic radical cystectomy and orthotopic bladder surgery with a robotic-assisted surgical system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Hong; Mi, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jing; Jin, Chao-Hai; Yuan, Wei-Xiu; Liu, Yi; Ni, Li-Ya; Bo, Lu-Long; Deng, Xiao-Ming

    2013-10-18

    To summarize anesthesia management of laparoscopic radical cystectomy and orthotopic bladder surgery with a robotic surgical system. In the study of 10 cases of bladder cancer, the robot-assisted radical cystectomy+expand lymphadenectomy+orthotopic bladder surgery with 60 degrees of Trendelenburg surgical position, was inserted into the manipulator under the video system monitor positioning, to complete the removal of the diseased tissue dissection and orthotopic ileal neobladder intra-abdominal. The respiratory parameters, hemodynamic parameters, arterial blood gas analysis were monitored and the waking time, intake and output, and intraoperative concurrent recorded. All the patients were operated successfully. The intraoperative blood loss was (342.9 ± 303.4) mL; the peak airway pressure increased after trendelenburg and high pneumoperitoneum; the mean arterial pressure heart rate and central venous pressure increased compared with the endotracheal intubation 15 minutes after two cases of the disease popularity abdominal end-expiratory CO2 partial pressure more than 50 mmHg, and PaCO2 higher than 60 mmHg in the arterial blood gas. When the respiratory parameters were adjusted, the hyperventilation showed no improvement, and when the pressure was reduced to less than 15 mmHg, the pneumoperitoneum improved; when metabolic acidosis occured in 2 patients, sodium bicarbonate post-correction was given; during surgery, 2 patients potassium rose to more than 5.5 mmol/L, gluconate and insulin were given; 5 patients developed multiple subcutaneous emphysema, of whom 1 was confined to the chest and abdomen, and 1 showed significant sense of gripping the snow from face to feet, associated with hypercapnia and temperature drop; the wake time (withdrawal to the extubation time) was (94.2 ± 35.6) min. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy + orthotopic bladder surgery is a newly-performed clinical surgery. Because of the huge machines, long time pneumoperitoneum and over

  8. New developments in the management of overactive bladder: focus on mirabegron and onabotulinumtoxinA

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson KE

    2013-01-01

    Karl-Erik Andersson Institute of Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, and Department of Urology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston Salem, NC, USA Abstract: In the last few years, much new information has been generated on the pathophysiology, possible therapeutic targets, and pharmacologic treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). Antimuscarinic drugs are still first-line pharmacologic treatment for OAB and often have good initial response rates, but adver...

  9. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin in the management of superficial bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kapoor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guιrin (BCG is the mainstay of superficial bladder cancer treatment. We performed a literature search through Medline/Pubmed using key words ′Bacillus Calmette-Guιrin′, ′intravesical′, ′bladder neoplasm′ and ′immunotherapy′ for published data in the English language from 1970 to 2007 to review the current status of intravesical therapy and practice recommendations. The exact mechanism of action of intravesical BCG is yet to be elucidated. However, it appears that it is mediated by the local immune response, mainly through T-helper cell response. It reduces the recurrence rate by an average of 40% and progression by more than 20% in papillary tumors over the patients without BCG therapy. However, progression prevention is seen only in series which have used maintenance therapy at least for one year. It is effective in CIS of bladder with a response rate of more than 40% and prevention of progression in one-fourth patients. Most acceptable dose, induction treatment and maintenance therapy protocols are discussed. However, these are yet to be confirmed in large randomized trials. Intravesical BCG is well tolerated in most of the patients with mild to moderate side-effects in induction therapy; however, most patients do not complete maintenance therapy due to side-effects which is the most common concern at the present time.

  10. Multilingualism and acquired neurogenic speech disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired neurogenic communication disorders can affect language, speech, or both. Although neurogenic speech disorders have been researched for a considerable time, much of this work has been restricted to a few languages (mainly English, with German, French, Japanese and Chinese also represented). Further, the work has concentrated on monolingual speakers. In this account, I aim to outline the main acquired speech disorders, and give examples of research into multilingual aspects of this top...

  11. Inosine Improves Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity following Spinal Cord Injury.

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    Yeun Goo Chung

    Full Text Available Neurogenic detrusor overactivity and the associated loss of bladder control are among the most challenging complications of spinal cord injury (SCI. Anticholinergic agents are the mainstay for medical treatment of detrusor overactivity. However, their use is limited by significant side effects such that a search for new treatments is warranted. Inosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside with neuroprotective, neurotrophic and antioxidant effects that is known to improve motor function in preclinical models of SCI. However, its effect on lower urinary tract function has not been determined. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of systemic administration of inosine on voiding function following SCI and to delineate potential mechanisms of action. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent complete spinal cord transection, or cord compression by application of an aneurysm clip at T8 for 30 sec. Inosine (225 mg/kg or vehicle was administered daily via intraperitoneal injection either immediately after injury or after a delay of 8 wk. At the end of treatment, voiding behavior was assessed by cystometry. Levels of synaptophysin (SYP, neurofilament 200 (NF200 and TRPV1 in bladder tissues were measured by immunofluorescence imaging. Inosine administration decreased overactivity in both SCI models, with a significant decrease in the frequency of spontaneous non-voiding contractions during filling, compared to vehicle-treated SCI rats (p<0.05, including under conditions of delayed treatment. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated increased levels of the pan-neuronal marker SYP and the Adelta fiber marker NF200, but decreased staining for the C-fiber marker, TRPV1 in bladder tissues from inosine-treated rats compared to those from vehicle-treated animals, including after delayed treatment. These findings demonstrate that inosine prevents the development of detrusor overactivity and attenuates existing overactivity following SCI, and may

  12. Neurostimulation for Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction

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    J. Worsøe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Loss of normal bowel function caused by nerve injury, neurological disease or congenital defects of the nervous system is termed neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD. It usually includes combinations of fecal incontinence, constipation, abdominal pain and bloating. When standard treatment of NBD fails surgical procedures are often needed. Neurostimulation has also been investigated, but no consensus exists about efficacy or clinical use. Methods. A systematic literature search of NBD treated by sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS, sacral nerve stimulation (SNS, peripheral nerve stimulation, magnetic stimulation, and nerve re-routing was made in Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library. Results. SARS improves bowel function in some patients with complete spinal cord injury (SCI. Nerve re-routing is claimed to facilitate defecation through mechanical stimulation of dermatomes in patients with complete or incomplete SCI or myelomeningocele. SNS can reduce NBD in selected patients with a variety of incomplete neurological lesions. Peripheral stimulation using electrical stimulation or magnetic stimulation may represent non-invasive alternatives. Conclusion. Numerous methods of neurostimulation to treat NBD have been investigated in pilot studies or retrospective studies. Therefore, larger controlled trials with well-defined inclusion criteria and endpoints are recommended before widespread clinical use of neurostimulation against NBD.

  13. Management of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder in dogs: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, Christopher M; Knapp, Deborah W

    2015-08-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), also referred to as urothelial carcinoma, is the most common form of urinary bladder cancer in dogs, affecting tens of thousands of dogs worldwide each year. Canine TCC is usually a high grade invasive cancer. Problems associated with TCC include urinary tract obstruction, distant metastases in >50% of affected dogs, and clinical signs that are troubling both to the dogs and to their owners. Risk factors for TCC include exposure to older types of flea control products and lawn chemicals, obesity, female sex, and a very strong breed-associated risk. This knowledge is allowing pet owners to take steps to reduce the risk of TCC in their dog. The diagnosis of TCC is made by histopathology of tissue biopsies obtained by cystoscopy, surgery, or catheter. Percutaneous aspirates and biopsies should be avoided due to the risk of tumor seeding. TCC is most commonly located in the trigone region of the bladder precluding complete surgical resection. Medical treatment is the mainstay for TCC therapy in dogs. Although TCC is not usually curable in dogs, multiple drugs have activity against it. Approximately 75% of dogs respond favorably to TCC treatment and can enjoy several months to a year or more of good quality life. Many promising new therapies for TCC are emerging and with the close similarity between TCC in dogs and high grade invasive bladder cancer in humans, new treatment strategies found to be successful in canine studies are expected to help dogs and to be subsequently translated to humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor of the Bladder: 2 Rare Cases Managed with Laparoscopic Partial Cystectomy

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    Sofia Santos Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT of the bladder are reported here. Both patients were male and presented with macroscopic hematuria; in the first case terminal hematuria was associated with irritative voiding symptoms. The second case was a smoker with hematuria unresponsive to medical treatment and anemia. Clinical presentation, pathological features, treatment, and prognosis are discussed. Due to rarity of this pathological condition, there are no guidelines concerning treatment and follow-up. We present our follow-up scheme and highlight the use of laparoscopic partial cystectomy as a successful treatment approach.

  15. Role of tolterodine in the management of postoperative catheter-related bladder discomfort: Findings in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijani, K H; Akanmu, N O; Olatosi, J O; Ojewola, R W

    2017-04-01

    Patient discomfort secondary to an indwelling urethral catheter in the post operative period can be very distressing. These symptoms resemble the overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome. Muscarinic receptor blockers have been successful in the management of OAB. However, information on the use of these drugs in the management of the postoperative catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD) in sub-Saharan Africa is still relatively sparse. To assess the efficacy of preoperative oral tolterodine in the management of CRBD in surgical patients in the immediate postoperative period. This was a double-blind placebo-controlled study consisting of 56 patients in each arm who underwent general anesthesia. Each patient was given oral tolterodine or placebo 1 hour before the induction of anesthesia. The patient was later assessed at the recovery room at intervals after recovery from anesthesia. The presence of CRBD was noted and graded. The overall incidence of CRBD in both the tolterodine group and the control were 85.7% and 91.1%, respectively. Overall, tolterodine prophylaxis (TP) was associated with an absolute risk reduction (ARR) of 5.4%, relative risk reduction (RRR) of 5.8%, and a number needed to treat (NNT) of 19. The incidence of moderate-to-severe CRBD in the tolterodine and control groups were 10.7% and 78%, respectively, with an ARR of 74.5% with TP. TP does not significantly reduce the incidence of CRBD in the immediate postoperative period but appears to be efficient in the reduction of the severity of postoperative CRBD.

  16. [Botulinium toxin and idiopathic overactive bladder: Multicentric contempory management in Bourgogne].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, A; Tourlonias, B; Cormier, L; Mourey, E; Koutlidis, N; Delorme, E; Pasquale, J; Kermarec, I; Foahom-Kamwa, A-D; Bonniaud, V

    2018-01-09

    Since 2014, OnabotulinumtoxinA Botox ® (Allergan, Inc., Irvine, USA) represents a new therapeutic option for second-line treatment of idiopathic overactive bladder. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate practices of surgeons using onabotulinium toxin (BoNTA) in this indication. All urogynecology centers of the country were asked in order to list all patients who were treated since marketing autorisation. Patient symptoms, previous treatments, paraclinic evaluations, data of surgery and the characteristics of the follow up were collected and analyzed. Six centers used BoNTA and five have accepted to participate. Ninety-seven patients have been identified. Sixty-eight first injections (70 %) were carried out with the strict frameworf of the marketing autorisation (urinary frequency, urinary urgency, urinary incontinence). All patients had at least two symptoms. In 69 %, Botulinum toxin was a second-line treatment after the failure of tibial neuromodulation or sacral neuromodulation. Urodynamic evaluation was carried out for 91 % of patients. The search for a post-void residual volume was observed for 59 % of patients during the follow up. In our country, BoNTA injections for idiopathic overactive bladder are mainly effected after tibial neuromodulation or sacral neuromodulation failure. Diagnostic, operating and outcome evaluation practices are still very heterogeneous pleading for a greater standardization of this new therapy in this indication. 3. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical usefulness of ultrasound assessment of detrusor wall thickness in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to spinal cord injury: urodynamics made easy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, Jürgen; Bartel, Peter; Göcking, Konrad; Frotzler, Angela

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of sonographic measurement of detrusor wall thickness (DWT) for the prediction of risk factors in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) due to spinal cord injury (SCI). In a prospective study, 60 consecutive patients with NLUTD due to SCI presenting for routine urodynamic assessment at a specialized SCI center underwent additional measurement of DWT at varying bladder volumes. Results of urodynamic testing were classified into favorable and unfavorable. DWT at maximum capacity was used to calculate a possible cutoff value for favorable urodynamic results. Urodynamic results were favorable in 48 patients and unfavorable in 12 patients. A DWT of 0.97 mm or less can safely (sensitivity 91.7 %, specificity 63.0 %) be used as a cutoff point for the absence of risk factors for renal damage. According to our results, DWT may be useful as an additional risk assessment for renal damage in patients with NLUTD due to SCI. However, as other parameters required for bladder management, especially detrusor overactivity, cannot be evaluated by this technique, it cannot replace urodynamic testing.

  18. Effects of different bladder management methods on the quality of life in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkoç, Y; Ersöz, M; Yıldız, N; Erhan, B; Alaca, R; Gök, H; Zinnuroğlu, M; Özçete, Z A; Tunç, H; Kaya, K; Alemdaroğlu, E; Sarıgül, M; Konukçu, S; Gündüz, B; Bardak, A N; Özcan, S; Demir, Y; Güneş, S; Uygunol, K

    2013-03-01

    Multi-center, cross-sectional study. To investigate the effects of different bladder management methods on the quality of life (QoL) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Turkey. Consecutive SCI patients (n=195, 74.4% males), for whom at least 6 months had elapsed since the injury, were included and evaluated in five groups: normal spontaneous micturition (NSM), micturition with assisted maneuvers (MAM), aseptic intermittent catheterization by patient (IC-P), aseptic IC by an attendant/caregiver (IC-A) and indwelling catheterization. The King's Health Questionnaire was used to evaluate the patients' QoL. The bladder management groups were similar regarding age, time elapsed since injury, education level, marital and occupational status. There was no difference among the groups in general health perception, personal relationships and sleep/energy domain scores. While the NSM group had generally the lowest scores, that is, better QoL, the IC-A group had the highest scores, that is, poorer QoL, in most of the domains. When the patients were grouped according to the frequency of urinary incontinence or American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grades, no difference was found in the domain scores of the groups except the symptom severity domain scores. No significant difference was found between paraplegic and tetraplegic patients in the King's Health Questionnaire domains. The QoL was notably affected in SCI patients in IC-A group and negative effects on emotional status, physical and social activity limitations were observed, as well.

  19. Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema (A Case Report

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    Funda Gümüş

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a life threatening complication of severe central nervous system injury. The most common cause of neurogenic pulmonary edema is subarachnoid hemorrhage followed by head trauma and epilepsy. The rare causes are cervical spine trauma, multiplesclerosis, cerebellar hemorrhage and intracranial tumors. Neurogenic pulmonary edema is characterized by an increase in extravascular lung water in patients who have sustained a sudden change in neurologic condition. The exact pathophysiology is unclear but it probably involves an adrenergic response to the central nervous system injury which leads to increased catecholamine, pulmonary hydrostatic pressure and increased lung capillary permeability. The presenting symptoms are nonspecific and often include dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, hypoxemia, pinkfroty secretion, bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and crackles. These symptoms start within minutes or hours and resolves 48-72 hours that typically for neurogenic pulmonary edema. Basic principles of treatment, surgical decompression, reduce intracranial pressure, controlled ventilation with suplemental oxygen, positive end expiratory pressure and diuresis. We report a case with neurogenic pulmonary edema that occured after head trauma. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 59-62

  20. An implantable neuroprosthesis for restoring bladder and bowel control to patients with spinal cord injuries: a multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasey, G H; Grill, J H; Korsten, M; U, H S; Betz, R; Anderson, R; Walter, J

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of an implanted neuroprosthesis for management of the neurogenic bladder and bowel in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Prospective study comparing bladder and bowel control before and at 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation of the neuroprosthesis. Six US hospitals specializing in treatment of SCI. Twenty-three neurologically stable patients with complete suprasacral SCIs. Implantation of an externally controlled neuroprosthesis for stimulating the sacral nerves and posterior sacral rhizotomy. Ability to urinate more than 200mL on demand and a resulting postvoid residual volume of less than 50mL. At 1-year follow-up, 18 of 21 patients could urinate more than 200mL with the neuroprosthesis, and 15 of 21 had postvoid volumes less than 50mL (median, 15mL). Urinary tract infection, catheter use, reflex incontinence, anticholinergic drug use, and autonomic dysreflexia were substantially reduced. At 1-year follow-up, 15 of 17 patients reduced the time spent with bowel management. Neural stimulation and posterior rhizotomy is a safe and effective method of bladder and bowel management after suprasacral SCI. Copyright 2001 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  1. Management of postoperative radiation injury of the urinary bladder by hyperbaric oxygen (HBO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peusch-Dreyer, D.; Dreyer, K.H. [Zentrum fuer Tauch- und Ueberdruckmedizin (ZETUeM), Bremen (Germany); Mueller, C.D. [Druckkammerzentrum Magdeburg (Germany); Carl, U. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Universitaet Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Aim: In many case reports the success of treatment of late complications of radiotherapy with hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) has been shown. This synopsis attempts to review HBO in the treatment of chronic radiation injury of the bladder. Patients and methods: Three female patients who had developed urge-incontinence after a Wertheim operation and combined brachy-teletherapy with cobalt-60 and afterloading and did not respond to various drug therapies, were treated with HBO to a maximum of 40 applications. Results: In all patients HBO haltered and inverted the dynamic process underlying chronic bladder changes after irradiation. Rationales for the HBO are the reduction of tissue hypoxia and the induction of neoangiogenesis. Conclusions: There are no prospective trials up to date showing the benefit of HBO to urinary disorders caused by radiation cystitis. The positive results of our retrospective study should encourage clinicians to initiate prospective studies with the use of HBO in the treatment of radiation cystitis. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Ueber die erfolgreiche Anwendung der hyperbaren Sauerstofftherapie (HBO) zur Behandlung von Strahlenspaetkomplikationen ist in zahlreichen Publikationen berichtet worden. Ziel dieser Arbeit ist es, den Einsatz der HBO bei der Behandlung von Miktionsbeschwerden bei chronisch radiogenen Harnblasenschaeden zu bewerten. Patienten und Methode: Drei Patientinnen, die nach einer kombinierten Brachyteletherapie mit Kobalt 60 und Afterloading nach Wertheim-Operation unter einer medikamentoes nicht zu beeinflussenden Urge-Inkontinenz litten, wurden der HBO mit maximal 40 Behandlungen zugefuehrt. Ergebnisse: Die HBO war bei allen Patientinnen in der Lage, den dynamischen Krankheitsprozess der Strahlenzystitis aufzuhalten und teilweise umzukehren. Grundlage hierfuer ist die Beseitigung der Gewebshypoxie. Dieses wiederum stellt die Voraussetzung fuer eine Neovaskularisation im bestrahlten Gewebe dar. Schlussfolgerung: Prospektive Studien

  2. Synostosis Between Pubic Bones due to Neurogenic, Heterotopic Ossification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenic, heterotopic ossification is characterised by the formation of new, extraosseous (ectopic bone in soft tissue in patients with neurological disorders. A 33-year-old female, who was born with spina bifida, paraplegia, and diastasis of symphysis pubis, had indwelling urethral catheter drainage and was using oxybutynin bladder instillations. She was prescribed diuretic for swelling of feet, which aggravated bypassing of catheter. Hence, suprapubic cystostomy was performed. Despite anticholinergic therapy, there was chronic urine leak around the suprapubic catheter and per urethra. Therefore, the urethra was mobilised and closed. After closure of the urethra, there was no urine leak from the urethra, but urine leak persisted around the suprapubic catheter. Cystogram confirmed the presence of a Foley balloon inside the bladder; there was no urinary fistula. The Foley balloon ruptured frequently, leading to extrusion of the Foley catheter. X-ray of abdomen showed heterotopic bone formation bridging the gap across diastasis of symphysis pubis. CT of pelvis revealed heterotopic bone lying in close proximity to the balloon of the Foley catheter; the sharp edge of heterotopic bone probably acted like a saw and led to frequent rupture of the balloon of the Foley catheter. Unique features of this case are: (1 temporal relationship of heterotopic bone formation to suprapubic cystostomy and chronic urine leak; (2 occurrence of heterotopic ossification in pubic region; (3 complications of heterotopic bone formation viz. frequent rupture of the balloon of the Foley catheter by the irregular margin of heterotopic bone and difficulty in insertion of suprapubic catheter because the heterotopic bone encroached on the suprapubic track; (4 synostosis between pubic bones as a result of heterotopic ossification..Common aetiological factors for neurogenic, heterotopic ossification, such as forceful manipulation, trauma, or spasticity, were absent in this

  3. Prostatic Artery Embolization as an Alternative to Indwelling Bladder Catheterization to Manage Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in Poor Surgical Candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rampoldi, Antonio; Barbosa, Fabiane, E-mail: fabiane001@hotmail.com [Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Department of Interventional Radiology (Italy); Secco, Silvia [Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Department of Urology (Italy); Migliorisi, Carmelo [Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Department of Interventional Radiology (Italy); Galfano, Antonio; Prestini, Giovanni [Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Department of Urology (Italy); Harward, Sardis Honoria [Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice (United States); Trapani, Dario Di [Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Department of Urology (Italy); Brambillasca, Pietro Maria; Ruggero, Vercelli; Solcia, Marco [Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Department of Interventional Radiology (Italy); Carnevale, Francisco Cesar [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Department of Interventional Radiology (Brazil); Bocciardi, Aldo Massimo [Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Department of Urology (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    PurposeTo prospectively assess discontinuation of indwelling bladder catheterization (IBC) and relief of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) following prostate artery embolization (PAE) in poor surgical candidates.MethodsPatients ineligible for surgical intervention were offered PAE after at least 1 month of IBC for management of urinary retention secondary to BPH; exclusion criteria for PAE included eligibility for surgery, active bladder cancer or known prostate cancer. Embolization technical and clinical success were defined as bilateral prostate embolization and removal of IBC, respectively. Patients were followed for at least 6 months and evaluated for International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life, prostate size and uroflowmetric parameters.ResultsA total of 43 patients were enrolled; bilateral embolization was performed in 33 (76.7%), unilateral embolization was performed in 8 (18.6%), and two patients could not be embolized due to tortuous and atherosclerotic pelvic vasculature (4.7%). Among the patients who were embolized, mean prostate size decreased from 75.6 ± 33.2 to 63.0 ± 23.2 g (sign rank p = 0.0001, mean reduction of 19.6 ± 17.3%), and IBC removal was achieved in 33 patients (80.5%). Clavien II complications were reported in nine patients (21.9%) and included urinary tract infection (three patients, 7.3%) and recurrent acute urinary retention (six patients, 14.6%). Nine patients (22.0%) experienced post-embolization syndrome.ConclusionsPAE is a safe and feasible for the relief of LUTS and IBC in highly comorbid patients without surgical treatment options.

  4. Characterization of the spectrum of hemodynamic profiles in trauma patients with acute neurogenic shock☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Richard L.; Baker, Stephen D.; Sterling, Sarah A.; Porter, John M; Jones, Alan E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neurogenic shock considered a distributive type of shock secondary to loss of sympathetic outflow to the peripheral vasculature. In this study, we examine the hemodynamic profiles of a series of trauma patients with a diagnosis of neurogenic shock. Methods Hemodynamic data were collected on a series of trauma patients determined to have spinal cord injuries with neurogenic shock. A well-established integrated computer model of human physiology was used to analyze and categorize the hemodynamic profiles from a system analysis perspective. A differentiation between these categories was presented as the percent of total patients. Results Of the 9 patients with traumatic neurogenic shock, the etiology of shock was decrease in peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) in 3 (33%; 95% confidence interval, 12%–65%), loss of vascular capacitance in 2 (22%; 6%–55%) and mixed peripheral resistance and capacitance responsible in 3 (33%; 12%–65%), and purely cardiac in 1 (11%; 3%–48%). The markers of sympathetic outflow had no correlation to any of the elements in the patients' hemodynamic profiles. Conclusions Results from this study suggest that hypotension of neurogenic shock can have multiple mechanistic etiologies and represents a spectrum of hemodynamic profiles. This understanding is important for the treatment decisions in managing these patients. PMID:23566731

  5. Characterization of the spectrum of hemodynamic profiles in trauma patients with acute neurogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Richard L; Baker, Stephen D; Sterling, Sarah A; Porter, John M; Jones, Alan E

    2013-08-01

    Neurogenic shock considered a distributive type of shock secondary to loss of sympathetic outflow to the peripheral vasculature. In this study, we examine the hemodynamic profiles of a series of trauma patients with a diagnosis of neurogenic shock. Hemodynamic data were collected on a series of trauma patients determined to have spinal cord injuries with neurogenic shock. A well-established integrated computer model of human physiology was used to analyze and categorize the hemodynamic profiles from a system analysis perspective. A differentiation between these categories was presented as the percent of total patients. Of the 9 patients with traumatic neurogenic shock, the etiology of shock was decrease in peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) in 3 (33%; 95% confidence interval, 12%-65%), loss of vascular capacitance in 2 (22%; 6%-55%) and mixed peripheral resistance and capacitance responsible in 3 (33%; 12%-65%), and purely cardiac in 1 (11%; 3%-48%). The markers of sympathetic outflow had no correlation to any of the elements in the patients' hemodynamic profiles. Results from this study suggest that hypotension of neurogenic shock can have multiple mechanistic etiologies and represents a spectrum of hemodynamic profiles. This understanding is important for the treatment decisions in managing these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Central neurogenic hyperventilation: a case report and discussion of pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarulli, Andrew W; Lim, Chun; Bui, Jonathan D; Saper, Clifford B; Alexander, Michael P

    2005-10-01

    Central neurogenic hyperventilation is a rare condition with poorly understood pathophysiology. To describe a patient with central neurogenic hyperventilation caused by an infiltrative brainstem lymphoma. Based on analysis of this patient and other case reports, we propose that central neurogenic hyperventilation is uniquely the result of infiltrative tumors that stimulate pontine respiratory centers and central chemoreceptors.

  7. Neurogenic Stuttering and Lateralized Motor Deficits Induced by Tranylcypromine

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    J. D. Duffy

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of neurogenic stuttering induced by the monoamine oxidase inhibitor tranylcypromine is described. The association of neurogenic stuttering with acquired lateralized motor deficits in the patient described is discussed with reference to current theories regarding the pathogenesis of neurogenic stuttering.

  8. Leiomyoma of Bladder

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    Sudhakar P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of leiomyoma of urinary bladder, a rare benign tumor, is presented. The patient was a 45-year-old woman with long duration history of dysuria. Intravenous urography (IVU, ultrasound (US, computed tomography (CT and biopsy diagnosed this case accurately. The clinical presentation, imaging findings and management of this benign tumor are discussed.

  9. An artificial somatic-autonomic reflex pathway procedure for bladder control in children with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chuan-Guo; Du, Mao-Xin; Li, Bing; Liu, Zhao; Chen, Ming; Chen, Zhao-Hui; Cheng, Ping; Xue, Xiao-Nan; Shapiro, Ellen; Lepor, Herbert

    2005-06-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a major problem for children with spina bifida. Despite rigorous pharmacological and surgical treatment, incontinence, urinary tract infections and upper tract deterioration remain problematic. We have previously demonstrated the ability to establish surgically a skin-central nervous system-bladder reflex pathway in patients with spinal cord injury with restoration of bladder storage and emptying. We report our experience with this procedure in 20 children with spina bifida. All children with spina bifida and neurogenic bladder underwent limited laminectomy and a lumbar ventral root (VR) to S3 VR microanastomosis. The L5 dorsal root was left intact as the afferent branch of the somatic-autonomic reflex pathway after axonal regeneration. All patients underwent urodynamic evaluation before and after surgery. Preoperative urodynamic studies revealed 2 types of bladder dysfunction- areflexic bladder (14 patients) and hyperreflexic bladder with detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia (6). All children were incontinent. Of the 20 patients 17 gained satisfactory bladder control and continence within 8 to 12 months after VR microanastomosis. Of the 14 patients with areflexic bladder 12 (86%) showed improvement. In these cases bladder capacity increased from 117.28 to 208.71 ml, and mean maximum detrusor pressure increased from 18.35 to 32.57 cm H2O. Five of the 6 patients with hyperreflexic bladder demonstrated improvement, with resolution of incontinence. Urodynamic studies in these cases revealed a change from detrusor hyperreflexia with detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia and high detrusor pressure to nearly normal storage and synergic voiding. In these cases mean bladder capacity increased from 94.33 to 177.83 ml, and post-void residual urine decreased from 70.17 to 23.67 ml. Overall, 3 patients failed to exhibit any improvement. The artificial somatic-autonomic reflex arc procedure is an effective and safe treatment to restore bladder

  10. Human papillomavirus-related basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder associated with genital tract human papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginori, Alessandro; Barone, Aurora; Santopietro, Rosa; Barbanti, Gabriele; Cecconi, Filippo; Tripodi, Sergio Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is a biologically aggressive neoplasm mainly found in the head and neck region. Recently, four cases of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder have been reported, and three of them occurred in patients with neurogenic bladder, repeated catheterizations and human papillomavirus infection of the urinary tract. To the best of our knowledge, none of the patients affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder described in the literature had documented genital involvement by human papillomavirus. Herein, we describe the case of a woman with neurogenic bladder affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder and by a concomitant genital tract human papillomavirus infection. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  11. Use of botulinum toxin in individuals with neurogenic detrusor overactivity: State of the art review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsenmeyer, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injection into the bladder wall has been shown to be an effective alternative to anticholinergic (antimuscarinic) medications and more invasive surgery in those with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and urinary incontinence who are not tolerating anticholinergic medications. In August 2011, Botox® (onabotulinumtoxinA) received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for this use. Clinically, intradetrusor injection of BoNT has been found to decrease urinary incontinence and improve quality of life. Its impact on urodynamic parameters is an increase in the maximum cystometric (bladder) capacity and decrease in the maximum detrusor pressures. The most common side effects are urinary tract infections and urinary retention. There have been rare reports and a black box warning of distant spread of BoNT. BoNT has gained popularity because of its effectiveness and long duration of action, relative ease of administration, easy learning curve, reproducibility of results on repeated administration, and low incidence of complications. Objective To discuss the structure and function, mechanisms of action, clinical and urodynamic studies, injection technique, potential beneficial and adverse effects, and potential areas of research of BoNT. Methods Literature search focused on botulinum toxin in MEDLINE/PubMed. Search terms included botulinum toxin, neurogenic bladder, NDO, botox bladder, botox spinal cord injury, botox, FDA, botox side effects. All papers identified were English language, full-text papers. In addition, English abstracts of non-English papers were noted. The reference list of identified articles was also searched for further papers. Conclusion Botulinum toxin is an alternative treatment for individuals with NDO who fail to tolerate anticholinergic medications. Its popularity has increased because of the literature, which has supported its effectiveness, safety, easy

  12. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grants Bladder Cancer Think Tank Bladder Cancer Research Network Bladder Cancer Genomics Consortium Get Involved Ways to ... us? Who we are The Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN) is a community of patients, caregivers, survivors, ...

  13. New developments in the management of overactive bladder: focus on mirabegron and onabotulinumtoxinA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson KE

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Karl-Erik Andersson Institute of Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, and Department of Urology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston Salem, NC, USA Abstract: In the last few years, much new information has been generated on the pathophysiology, possible therapeutic targets, and pharmacologic treatment of overactive bladder (OAB. Antimuscarinic drugs are still first-line pharmacologic treatment for OAB and often have good initial response rates, but adverse effects and decreasing efficacy cause long-term compliance problems, prompting a search for new therapeutic alternatives. Mirabegron and onabotulinumtoxinA, two drugs with different mechanisms of action, and with adverse effect profiles different from those of antimuscarinics, were recently approved for treatment of OAB. However, their place in the treatment of this disorder has not yet been established. In this short review, the mechanisms of action, clinical efficacy, and safety profiles of these drugs are discussed and compared with those of the current gold standard, antimuscarinic agents. Keywords: antimuscarinics, mirabegron, onabotulinumtoxinA

  14. Patient controlled versus automatic stimulation of pudendal nerve afferents to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opisso, E; Borau, A; Rodríguez, A; Hansen, J; Rijkhoff, N J M

    2008-10-01

    We investigated whether patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity can sense the onset of bladder contraction and in turn suppress the contraction by electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile-clitoral nerve. A total of 67 patients with different neurological disorders were recruited to undergo 3 filling cystometries. The first cystometry was done without stimulation. The second cystometry was performed with automatic controlled stimulation based on detrusor pressure. The third cystometry was done with patient controlled stimulation using a push button. Four females and 13 males underwent all 3 fillings. Compared to cystometry 1 average bladder capacity for cystometries 2 and 3 was 60% higher. Compared to peak pressure for cystometry 1 average peak pressure during suppressed contractions for cystometries 2 and 3 was 49% and 26% lower, respectively. The average delay of the onset of stimulation during cystometry 3 with respect to cystometry 2 was 5.7 seconds. The study shows that patient controlled genital nerve stimulation is as effective as automatic controlled stimulation to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Thus, patient controlled stimulation is feasible in select patients, although patients must be trained in the technique.

  15. Treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord injured patients by conditional electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J; Media, S; Nøhr, M; Biering-Sørensen, F; Sinkjaer, T; Rijkhoff, N J M

    2005-06-01

    The feasibility of automatic event driven electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile/clitoral nerve in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) was evaluated in individuals with spinal cord injury. The study included 2 women and 14 men older than 18 years with NDO, bladder capacity below 500 ml and complete or incomplete suprasacral spinal cord injury. Detrusor pressure (Pdet) was recorded during ordinary, natural bladder filling. In a similar subsequent recording Pdet was used to trigger electrical stimulation when pressure exceeded 10 cm H2O. Of the 16 patients enrolled in this study 13 had increased bladder capacity together with a storage pressure decrease as a result of automatic, event driven electrical stimulation. In 2 patients stimulation could not inhibit the first undesired contraction, leakage occurred and finally 1 could not tolerate stimulation. During stimulated filling Pdet never exceeded 55 cm H2O. Thus, storage pressure was sufficiently low to prevent kidney damage. An average bladder capacity increase of 53% was achieved. This study demonstrates the feasibility of automatic, event driven electrical stimulation in the treatment of NDO. Although the setup in this experiment is not suitable in a clinical setting, the treatment modality is promising and it warrants further investigation.

  16. [Bladder lithiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylla, C; Fall, P A; Ndoye, A; Diao, B; Diallo, A B; Gueye, S M; Ba, M; Diagne, B A

    2001-01-01

    to study the particularities of the bladder lithiasis in our countries. This was a retrospective study of 94 cases (62 men and 32 women) of bladder lithiasis over a period of 13 years. The lithogenic factors; clinic, paraclinic and therapeutic aspects have been studied. Morphoconstitutional analysis has been carded out in collaboration with Cristal Laboratory (St Cloud hospital center in France). mean age was 24.2+/-20.7 years old. The principals mains of consultation were: dysuria (n =36), mictionnal pain (n = 28), hematuria (n = 15). Facilitating factors have been found in 27% of cases. In 10 cases, there was an association bladdder lithiasis and bladdder-vaginal fistula. Radiologic test was dominated by intraveinous urographic (53.19 of cases). The metabolic test showed hypercalcemia and cristalluria in 2 cases. In 7,45 % of cases, we have founding a renal failure. An urinary tract infection have been noticed in 42 % of cases. Open surgery has been the main treatement (96 %) associating in 15 % of cases the treatement of an uropathy. In one case the bladder lithiasis weighed 1120 g. The morphologic and spectrophotometric analysis of the lithiasis have been achieved in 13 % of cases showing the predominance of struvite. the bladder lithiasis is still common in our countries; it could be good for us to access endoorporeals and extracorporeals therapeutic equipements in orderto reduce the indications of open surgery.

  17. Delayed cystectomy for T 1 G 3 TCC of urinary bladder managed initially by TURBT & intravesical immunotherapy (BCG + interferon rationale & our result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N K Mohanty

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the role of conservative management for this subgroup with TURBT and intravesical immunotherapy; and delayed cystectomy for progressive disease with an aim to salvage bladder. Patients & Methods: Between Jan.1996 to Dec.2002, 66 patients (15% of pT 1 G 3 , out of a total 440 patients of superficial bladder cancer treated in this department were subjected to low dose BCG (40mg and Interferon 3 million IU intravesically with maintenance therapy after complete TURBT and followed up for average 60 months. The mean tumor free interval was 26 months & 18 months in superficial recurrences & muscle progression disease respectively. Delayed cystectomy being preserved only for disease progression patients and the mean period of delayed cystectomy was 24 months (18-30 months. Results: 19 patients (29% had no tumor recurrence, 35 patients (53% showed superficial recurrence and 12 patients (18% progressed to higher stage at end of five year follow up thereby giving a disease progression free interval of 60 months in 82% of our patients. Five patients of disease progression group died due to metastatic disease process and 7 patients are alive after delayed cystectomy at the end of follow up. Side effects from intravesical therapy were confined to local irritative symptoms only. Conclusion: Our data only confirms the benefit of adjuvant intravesical low dose immunotherapy in management of pT 1 G 3 tumor after TURBT with bladder salvage in 82% of patients, simultaneously not compromising the survival rate.

  18. Microglia from neurogenic and non-neurogenic regions display differential proliferative potential and neuroblast support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Paul Marshall

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microglia isolated from the neurogenic subependymal zone (SEZ and hippocampus (HC are capable of massive in vitro population expansion that is not possible with microglia isolated from non-neurogenic regions. We asked if this regional heterogeneity in microglial proliferative capacity is cell intrinsic, or is conferred by interaction with respective neurogenic or non-neurogenic niches. By combining SEZ and cerebral cortex (CTX primary tissue dissociates to generate heterospatial cultures, we find that exposure to the SEZ environment does not enhance CTX microglia expansion; however, the CTX environment exerts a suppressive effect on SEZ microglia expansion. Furthermore, addition of purified donor SEZ microglia to either CTX- or SEZ-derived cultures suppresses the expansion of host microglia, while the addition of donor CTX microglia enhances the over-all microglia yield. These data suggest that SEZ and CTX microglia possess intrinsic, spatially restricted characteristics that are independent of their in vitro environment, and that they represent unique and functionally distinct populations. Finally, we determined that the repeated supplementation of neurogenic SEZ cultures with expanded SEZ microglia allows for sustained levels of inducible neurogenesis, provided that the ratio of microglia to total cells remains within a fairly narrow range.

  19. The Effect of Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Management of Overactive Bladder in the Pediatric Population; A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Roshdibonab

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In traditional medicine and recent years, nerve stimulation has been introduced as a replacement therapy for managing several disorders such as overactive bladder. However, there is still controversy in this regard. Therefore, the present meta-analysis aimed to assess the effectiveness of electrical nerve stimulation in treatment of overactive bladder.Methods: The present systematic review and meta-analysis attempted to gather the evidence existing in Medline, Embase, Scopus, Web of Sciences and CINHAL databases until the end of October 2017. Summarization of the articles was done by 2 independent researchers and finally, pooled effect size was reported as standardized mean difference (SMD or overall odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence interval (95% CI. In all analyses p

  20. Management of Open Lower Extremity Wounds With Concomitant Fracture Using a Porcine Urinary Bladder Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Bruce A; Geiger, Scott E; Deigni, Oliver A; Watson, John Tracy

    2016-11-01

    Open wounds of the distal third of the leg and foot with exposed bone, fractures, and hardware are challenging wounds for which to achieve stable coverage. The orthopedic advances in lower extremity fracture management over the last 30 years have allowed a rethinking of the standard operative approach to close these complex wounds. The ability of extracellular matrix (ECM) products to facilitate constructive remodeling of a wound seemed a reasonable approach for treatment, especially in patients who are often poor surgical candidates for more advanced reconstructive procedures. The authors reviewed 9 patients with 11 open fractures of the leg, ankle, or foot treated with a newer ECM wound healing device to total closure. The clinical course and patient management are reviewed. The authors conclude that newer ECM products can provide a reasonable method of management for patients who have wounds with exposed hardware, distal leg wounds, and open foot fractures compared to prolonged negative pressure wound therapy or complex reconstructive operative procedures.

  1. Bladder injuries frequently missed in polytrauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanweer Karim

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Tanweer Karim, Margaret Topno, Vinod Sharma, Raymond Picardo, Ankur HastirSurgery, MGM Medical College, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, IndiaAbstract: Bladder injuries are very common in patients who have had road traffic accidents. The method of diagnosis and management of such injuries is well established and accepted. However, trauma to the bladder can be associated with other life-threatening injuries which are frequently missed, and often diagnosed during laparotomy for other reasons. The aim of this study was to diagnose bladder injury in polytrauma patients as early as possible, taking into consideration the fact that these patients are hemodynamically unstable and require rapid evaluation and management. In order to achieve our objective, we used bedside sonography with retrograde instillation of normal saline to diagnose bladder injury in addition to use of the conventional retrograde cystogram.Keywords: bladder injury, bladder rupture, retrograde cystogram

  2. Management of Open Distal Lower Extremity Wounds With Exposed Tendons Using Porcine Urinary Bladder Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Scott E; Deigni, Olivier A; Watson, John Tracy; Kraemer, Bruce A

    2016-09-01

    Open wounds of the distal third of the leg and foot with an exposed tendon present a challenge in wound management and in attaining stable, durable coverage. The mobility of the tendon often leads to chronic inflammation that impedes wound closure, while the desiccation of the exposed tendon leads to progressive tendon necrosis. For the authors' cases, the ability of extracellular matrix (ECM) products to modulate wound bed inflammation and facilitate constructive remodeling of a wound seemed a reasonable approach in treating these wounds, especially in patients who are often poor surgical candidates for more advanced reconstructive procedures. The authors reviewed 13 patients who had open wounds of the distal third of the leg and/or foot that had associated tendon involvement in the wound (Achilles, 6; tibialis anterior, 6; and peroneal, 1). Patients' wounds were treated to total closure. The clinical course and patient management is reviewed herein. The authors found newer ECM products can provide a more optimal method of management of patients with exposed tendons, as compared to prolonged negative pressure wound therapy. Furthermore, the authors conclude the use of newer ECM products yields a more stable, less scarred, reconstructed wound that more closely resembles normal foot and ankle appearance compared to other more complex reconstructive operative procedures.

  3. Evaluating Variations of Bladder Volume Using an Ultrasound Scanner in Rectal Cancer Patients during Chemoradiation: Is Protocol-Based Full Bladder Maintenance Using a Bladder Scanner Useful to Maintain the Bladder Volume?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong In Yoon

    RT by protocol-based management using a bladder scan.

  4. Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bladder Control Problems in Women (Urinary Incontinence) Kegel Exercises Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder) Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder) What ... a vaginal pessary, or surgery. Pelvic floor, or Kegel, exercises involve strengthening pelvic floor muscles. Strong pelvic ...

  5. Nerve growth factor does not seem to be a biomarker for neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Jörg; Pavlicek, David; Stoyanov, Jivko; Pannek, Jürgen; Wöllner, Jens

    2017-03-01

    To prospectively investigate the association of bladder function with the nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration in the urine of individuals with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) after spinal cord injury (SCI). Individuals with chronic SCI and NLUTD presenting for a routine urologic examination at a tertiary urologic referral center were recruited for the study. Patient characteristics, the current bladder evacuation method and urodynamic parameters were collected. As controls, individuals with normal bladder function were recruited from the staff of a SCI rehabilitation center. The urinary NGF concentration was measured in triplicates by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay with a minimal sensitivity of 10 pg/ml. The data of 10 and 37 individuals with normal bladder function and NLUTD, respectively, were analyzed. The urinary NGF concentration was below 10 pg/ml in all investigated samples. The urinary NGF concentration did not differentiate between individuals with normal bladder function and those with NLUTD. At least in patients with SCI, the urinary NGF concentration does not seem to be a clinically relevant biomarker for NLUTD. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:659-662, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Urinary bladder rupture during voiding cystourethrography

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    Kyong Ok Lee

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG is a commonly performed diagnostic procedure for the evaluation of vesicoureteral reflux with urinary tract infection or congenital renal diseases in children. The procedure is relatively simple and cost-effective, and complications are very rare. The iatrogenic complication of VCUG range from discomfort, urinary tract infection to bacteremia, as well as bladder rupture. Bladder rupture is a rare complication of VCUG, and only a few cases were reported. Bladder rupture among healthy children during VCUG is an especially uncommon event. Bladder rupture associated with VCUG is usually more common in chronically unused bladders like chronic renal failure. Presented is a case of bladder rupture that occurred during a VCUG in a healthy 9-monthold infant, due to instilled action of dye by high pressure. This injury completely healed after 7 days of operation, and it was confirmed with a postoperative cystography. The patient’s bladder volume, underlying disease, velocity of the contrast media instilled, catheter size, and styles of instillation are important factors to prevent bladder rupture during VCUG. Management of bladder rupture should be individualized, but the majority of infants are treated with the operation. In conclusion, bladder rupture is a rare complication, however, delicate attention is needed in order to prevent more dire situations.

  7. Superficial Bladder Cancer Therapy

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    Emmanuel Schenkman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer treatment remains a challenge despite significant improvements in preventing disease progression and improving survival. Intravesical therapy has been used in the management of superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder (i.e. Ta, T1, and carcinoma in situ with specific objectives which include treating existing or residual tumor, preventing recurrence of tumor, preventing disease progression, and prolonging survival. The initial clinical stage and grade remain the main determinant factors in survival regardless of the treatment. Prostatic urethral mucosal involvement with bladder cancer can be effectively treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG intravesical immunotherapy. Intravesical chemotherapy reduces short-term tumor recurrence by about 20%, and long-term recurrence by about 7%, but has not reduced progression or mortality. Presently, BCG immunotherapy remains the most effective treatment and prophylaxis for TCC (Ta, T1, CIS and reduces tumor recurrence, disease progression, and mortality. Interferons, Keyhole-limpet hemocyanin (KLH, bropirimine and Photofrin-Photodynamic Therapy (PDT are under investigation in the management of TCC and early results are encouraging. This review highlights and summarizes the recent advances in therapy for superficial TCC.

  8. [Bladder augmentation in children: experience with 15 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nortes, L; Zambudio, G A

    1996-07-01

    From 1993 to 1995 bladder augmentation was performed in 11 female and 4 male patients from 1 to 13 years old (average age 6.7 years). Indications included neurogenic bladder, extrophy and epispadias with small bladder. A ventriculoperitoneal shunt had been performed in 6 patients for hydrocephalus. We used 22 segments since 5 patients had 2 segments. Segments included sigmoid in 12 cases, stomach in 5, small bowel in 1, cecum and appendix in 2. We have used the AMS-800 artificial urinary sphincter in 7 patients. Upper tracts and renal function have remained stable in these patients. Continence was achieved in 7 of 9 cases with augmentation, and in 6 of those patients with artificial urinary sphincter. The most common complication was leaks and the hematuria-dysuria syndrome when stomach was used.

  9. Primary mucinous adenocarcinoma in a defunctionalized urinary bladder: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mode Donald G

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Malignancies are rare in defunctionalized bladders and are thought to arise from metaplasia secondary to chronic inflammation. Transitional cell and squamous cell carcinomas are the most common but there are three reported cases of mucinous adenocarcinoma. Case presentation We report a 57-year-old Caucasian man presenting with penile discharge for 30 years following ileal conduit surgery for neurogenic bladder, and who was found to have primary mucinous adenocarcinoma of his defunctionalized bladder. Conclusion Although urinary diversion without cystectomy is less common in current urologic practice, there are many patients with longstanding defunctionalized bladders. While there are no established surveillance protocols, defunctionalized bladder patients with urethral discharge should be evaluated.

  10. Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Per-Uno; Agrawal, Sachin; Bläckberg, Mats

    2017-01-01

    The management of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has evolved from the first reports on bladder endoscopy and transurethral resection to the introduction of adjuvant intravesical treatment. However, disease recurrence and progression remain an ongoing risk, placing a heavy burden...

  11. NEOADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY FOR BLADDER CARCINOMA IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To evaluate the impact of preoperative accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of bladder carcinoma in Egyptian patients. Patients and Methods Between December 1996 and February 2000, 104 Egyptian patients with pathologically proven infiltrative bladder carcinoma were enrolled in ...

  12. Innervation of reconstructed bladder above the level of spinal cord injury for inducing micturition by contractions of the abdomen-to-bladder reflex arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haodong; Hou, Chunlin; Chen, Aimin; Xu, Zhen

    2010-05-01

    To establish an artificial bladder reflex arc in dogs via an abdominal reflex pathway above the level of spinal cord injury to reinnervate the neurogenic bladder and restore controllable micturition. Ten beagles were used in the experiment. We anastomosed the proximal end of the right T12 ventral root and distal end of the right S2 ventral root by performing autogenous nerve grafting to build an abdomen-to-bladder reflex, whereas the right T12 dorsal root was kept intact. The early function of the reflex arc was evaluated by performing electrophysiological studies as well as by the measurement of intravesicular pressure and histological examination. Single focal stimulation of the right T12 intercostal nerves elicited evoked action potentials at the right vesicular plexus before and after horizontal spinal cord transaction between the L4 and S3 levels. Bladder contraction was successfully initiated by trains of stimuli targeting the right T12 intercostal nerves. The bladder pressures and amplitude of the complex action potentials at the bladder smooth muscles were unchanged after paraplegia was induced; they were comparable to those of the control. Prominent axonal sprouting was observed in the distal part of the nerve graft. Our data showed the effectiveness of bladder innervation above the level of spinal cord injury in inducing micturition by abdomen-to-bladder reflex contractions and, therefore, might provide a new clinical approach for restoring bladder function in individuals with paraplegia.

  13. Destruction of the bladder by single dose Mitomycin C for low-stage transitional cell carcinoma (TCC)--avoidance, recognition, management and consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmamoun, Mamoun H; Christmas, Tim J; Woodhouse, Christopher R J

    2014-05-01

    To identify a cohort of patients under our care who have had significant and in some cases irreparable damage to their bladders after Mitomycin C (MMC) instillation. To highlight the importance of avoidance and recognition of bladder perforations during transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT) and explore the issue of consent regarding MMC given the serious complications that may occur after its instillation. Patients referred to our tertiary centre for a second opinion to manage their complications after a suspected MMC leak was identified from the departmental database between January 2000 and December 2010. After collection of all the records, we established a cohort of six patients. All patients had their initial tumour resection elsewhere and were referred for specialist management thereafter. Details of the operating surgeon and cystoscopic findings were known only in half of the cases. Retrospective analysis of their notes including documentation from the referring centre was undertaken. This included a review of all the histology and imaging. All patients had immediate severe pelvic pain on instillation of the MMC. Four of the six continue to have chronic pelvic pain. Two patients had urinary retention and three had severe lower urinary tract symptoms. One patient developed a frozen pelvis. Initial treatment was with an indwelling catheter for a period of 2-52 weeks to aid healing. Two patients had reconstructive surgery, one with success and the other with failure, as an intestinal patch failed to close the fistula and he continues with a catheter. One patient had an ileal conduit. No patient was warned of such complications. Although rare, prophylactic MMC can have devastating consequences. Patients should be aware of such major risks. Strong emphasis should be placed on the quality of the initial TURBT coupled with the judgement of an experienced surgeon before to MMC instillation. The real clinical benefit could be reviewed and intravesical MMC

  14. Monomelic neurogenic syndromes: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Mamede; Swash, Michael

    2007-12-15

    Monomelic neurogenic syndromes are rare. Their classification and prognostic features have not been addressed in the European population. A prospective study of 17 patients with monomelic neurogenic amyotrophy, of upper or lower limb onset, with progression limited to one limb for three or more years. Clinical and neurophysiological studies were performed in the subsequent 3 or more years. Fifteen patients were of European origin and two were Asian. Those presenting with proximal monomelic weakness or with involvement of the posterior compartment of the lower leg showed no further progression after the initial period of development of the syndrome. Brisk reflexes in wasted muscles did not predict progression. Electromyographic signs of denervation in the opposite limb at presentation did not predict later progression. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) features of corticospinal dysfunction were a useful predictor of subsequent progression (p=0.01). One patient with lower limb onset developed conduction block with weakness in an upper limb nine years after presentation, and this upper limb weakness responded to IVIg therapy. This adult-onset European group of patients is different as compared with juvenile-onset Asian cases. The clinical syndromes appear heterogeneous, but neurophysiological investigations, in particular TMS, can be helpful in determining prognosis. Multifocal motor neuropathy should be considered when there is progression, even years after onset.

  15. Delayed Diagnosis of Iatrogenic Bladder Perforation in a Neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinette S. Birs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iatrogenic bladder injuries have been reported in the neonate during umbilical artery/vein catheterization, voiding cystourethrogram, urinary catheterizations, and overwhelming hypoxic conditions. Patients with iatrogenic bladder perforations can present with acute abdomen indicating urinary peritonitis, septic-uremic shock, or subtle symptoms like abdominal distension, pain, hematuria, uremia, electrolyte imbalances, and/or difficulty urinating. The following neonatal case report of perforated bladder includes a review of the signs, symptoms, diagnostic tools, and management of bladder injury in neonates.

  16. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Treating Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Tobias; Schneider, Marc P; Bachmann, Lucas M; Blok, Bertil F M; Groen, Jan; Hoen, Lisette A 't; Castro-Diaz, David; Padilla Fernández, Bárbara; Del Popolo, Giulio; Musco, Stefania; Hamid, Rizwan; Ecclestone, Hazel; Karsenty, Gilles; Phé, Véronique; Pannek, Jürgen; Kessler, Thomas M

    2016-06-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a promising therapy for non-neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and might also be a valuable option in patients with an underlying neurological disorder. We systematically reviewed all available evidence on the efficacy and safety of TENS for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. The review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement. After screening 1943 articles, 22 studies (two randomised controlled trials, 14 prospective cohort studies, five retrospective case series, and one case report) enrolling 450 patients were included. Eleven studies reported on acute TENS and 11 on chronic TENS. In acute TENS and chronic TENS, the mean increase of maximum cystometric capacity ranged from 69ml to 163ml and from 4ml to 156ml, the mean change of bladder volume at first detrusor overactivity from a decrease of 13ml to an increase of 175ml and from an increase of 10ml to 120ml, a mean decrease of maximum detrusor pressure at first detrusor overactivity from 18 cmH20 to 72 cmH20 and 8 cmH20, and a mean decrease of maximum storage detrusor pressure from 20 cmH20 to 58 cmH2O and from 3 cmH20 to 8 cmH2O, respectively. In chronic TENS, a mean decrease in the number of voids and leakages per 24h ranged from 1 to 3 and from 0 to 4, a mean increase of maximum flow rate from 2ml/s to 7ml/s, and a mean change of postvoid residual from an increase of 26ml to a decrease of 85ml. No TENS-related serious adverse events have been reported. Risk of bias and confounding was high in most studies. Although preliminary data suggest TENS might be effective and safe for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, the evidence base is poor and more reliable data from well-designed randomised controlled trials are needed to make definitive conclusions. Early data suggest that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation might be effective and safe for

  17. Presentation of neurogenic shock within the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Matthew Pritam; Wrenn, Paul; O'Donnell, Andrew David

    2017-03-01

    Injury to the spinal cord can result in loss of sympathetic innervation causing a drop in BP and HR, this condition is known as neurogenic shock. There is debate among the literature on how and when neurogenic shock presents and what values of HR and BP should be used to define it. Previous studies do not take into account multiple prehospital and emergency department recordings. To improve understanding of how neurogenic shock presents in humans, allowing better identification and treatment. The Trauma Audit and Research Network database for an adult major trauma centre was used to isolate patients with a spinal cord injury. Qualifying patients had all available BPs and HRs collated into a database. Patients with neurogenic shock were isolated, allowing data analysis. Out of 3069 trauma patients, 33 met the inclusion criteria, of which 15 experienced neurogenic shock. 87% of the patients who had neurogenic shock experienced it within 2 hours of injury. Neurogenic shock below the T6 level was less common (p=0.009); however, there were still four cases in the cohort. More patients with complete spinal cord injury had neurogenic shock (p=0.039). Neurogenic shock is variable and unpredictable. It can present in the prehospital environment and without warning in a patient with previously normal vital signs. The medical team should be aware of it in all patients with spinal cord injury regardless of injury level. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Buccally Administered Intranasal Desmopressin Acetate for the Treatment of Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus in Infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smego, Allison R; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2016-05-01

    The treatment of neurogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) in infancy is challenging and complicated by fluid overload and dehydration. Therapy with subcutaneous (SC), intranasal (IN), or oral tablet desmopressin acetate (1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin [DDAVP]) remains difficult to titrate in infants. Assess the efficacy and safety of buccally administered IN DDAVP for the management of infants with neurogenic DI. Retrospective review of clinical and laboratory data of 15 infants (mean age, 4.5 mo) with neurogenic DI treated at a tertiary care center. Treatment was with diluted IN DDAVP formulation (10 mcg/mL) administered buccally via a tuberculin syringe to the buccal mucosa. After initial DDAVP titration of 2-3 days, IN DDAVP doses ranged from 1 to 5 mcg twice daily given buccally. Mean serum sodium concentration at DI diagnosis was 159 ± 6.6 mmol/L (range, 151-178) and improved to 142 ± 3.5 mmol/L (range, 137-147) with the buccally administered IN DDAVP. Normal sodium concentrations were established without major fluctuations. Serum sodium was then maintained in the outpatient setting at a mean of 145.7 ± 4.8 mmol/L (mean duration of follow-up, 11 mo). Buccally administered IN formulation of DDAVP provides a practical and safe treatment alternative for neurogenic DI in infancy. Our approach avoided severe hypo- and hypernatremia during DDAVP titration and ongoing outpatient management of DI. The possibility for smaller dosage increments and ease of administration make IN DDAVP administered buccally preferable over other DDAVP treatment options in infants.

  19. Hydronephrosis and renal failure following inadequate management of neuropathic bladder in a patient with spinal cord injury: Case report of a preventable complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidyanathan Subramanian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Condom catheters are indicated in spinal cord injury patients in whom intravesical pressures during storage and voiding are safe. Unmonitored use of penile sheath drainage can lead to serious complications. Case report A 32-year old, male person, sustained complete paraplegia at T-11 level in 1985. He had been using condom catheter. Eleven years after sustaining spinal injury, intravenous urography showed no radio-opaque calculus, normal appearances of kidneys, ureters and bladder. Blood urea and Creatinine were within reference range. A year later, urodynamics revealed detrusor pressure of 100 cm water when detrusor contraction was initiated by suprapubic tapping. This patient was advised intermittent catheterisation and take anti-cholinergic drug orally; but, he wished to continue penile sheath drainage. Nine years later, this patient developed bilateral hydronephrosis and renal failure. Indwelling urethral catheter drainage was established. Five months later, ultrasound examination of urinary tract revealed normal kidneys with no evidence of hydronephrosis. Conclusion Spinal cord injury patients with high intravesical pressure should not have penile sheath drainage as these patients are at risk for developing hydronephrosis and renal failure. Intermittent catheterisation along with antimuscarinic drug should be the preferred option for managing neuropathic bladder.

  20. [Disorders of bladder emptying following Burch colposuspension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bödeker, J; Casanova, M; Zingg, E

    1989-08-01

    Forty patients with recurrence urinary stress incontinence (RUSI) were evaluated before and after Burch-colposuspension for voiding difficulties. Thirty-two (80%) patients were cured. Seven females developed an urge incontinence in the postoperative course, one female an urge plus stress incontinence. Residual urine was found in 6 of 7 patients with urge incontinence, in 5 patients a urinary tract infection. Four patients with urge incontinence after colposuspension were insulin dependent diabetics. In 18 patients residual urine was found in the postoperative course, only 6 patients were symptomatic with urge and urinary tract infection. We see a limited indication for Burch colposuspension in RUSI with reduction in vaginal mobility, detrusor hypocontractility, detrusor instability and in diseases predisposing to neurogenic bladder disorders.

  1. Intradetrusor injections of onabotulinum toxin A (Botox®) 300 U or 200 U versus abobotulinum toxin A (Dysport®) 750 U in the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity: A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyronnet, Benoit; Castel-Lacanal, Evelyne; Roumiguie, Mathieu; Even, Lucie; Marque, Philippe; Soulié, Michel; Rischmann, Pascal; Game, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    To compare the outcomes of the first intradetrusor injections of abobotulinum toxin 750 U and onabotulinum toxin 200 and 300 U in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). A retrospective case-control study was conducted including 211 NDO patients treated in three consecutives eras with onabotulinum toxin 300 U (2004-2006; 80 patients), abobotulinum toxin 750 U (2007-2011; 78 patients) or onabotulinum toxin 200 U (2011-2014; 53 patients). Urodynamic and clinical parameters were compared between groups. The primary endpoint was the rates of success defined as the combination of urgency, urinary incontinence, and detrusor overactivity resolution. When comparing abobotulinum toxin to onabotulinum toxin any doses (200 or 300 U; n = 133), success rates were similar (65.4% vs. 55.6%; P = 0.16). Patients treated with abobotulinum toxin 750 U had higher success rate (65.4% vs. 41.5%; P = 0.007) compared to those who received onabotulinum toxin 200 U. In contrast, there were similar success rates in abobotulinum toxin 750 U and onabotulinum toxin 300 U groups (65.4% vs. 65%; P = 0.91) but with a trend towards longer interval between the first and the second injection in the onabotulinum toxin 300 U group (12.4 vs. 9.3 months; P = 0.09). Intradetrusor injections of abobotulinum toxin 750 U for NDO provided better outcomes than injections of onabotulinum toxin 200 U. Success rates of abobotulinum toxin 750 U and onabotulinum toxin 300 U were similar but interval between injections tended to be longer with onabotulinum toxin 300 U. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:734-739, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Subject-controlled stimulation of dorsal genital nerve to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opisso, Eloy; Borau, Albert; Rijkhoff, Nico J M

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the effects of subject controlled dorsal genital nerve (DGN) electrical stimulation on neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) in subjects at home. Subjects underwent a 5-day study at home with DGN stimulation. Stimulation was provided with surface electrodes placed either on the dorsal penile shaft in males and on or close to the clitoris in females. The days 1 and 5 were with no stimulation whereas days 2-4 were with stimulation. Two urodynamic studies were performed at the beginning and at the end of the study. A bladder diary was obtained. Eleven subjects with NDO and with urge incontinence were included. One subject stopped the protocol before the end of the 5-day trial and two did not undergo the second urodynamic study. The subjects showed a statistically significant increase in bladder capacities compared to baseline (P = 0.047). Mean volume per day voided significantly increased over the study within the subjects. Differences between day 1 and day 5 were statistically significant (P = 0.028). The feasibility and the globally positive outcomes of the study indicate that the stimulation of the dorsal genital nerve can be an option for the treatment of the NDO. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Experience with glycerin for antegrade continence enema in patients with neurogenic bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, David I; Balsara, Zarine R; Routh, Jonathan C; Ross, Sherry S; Wiener, John S

    2013-02-01

    Malone antegrade continence enemas are used in the management of neurogenic bowel to attain fecal continence. Several different irrigation solutions have been described but glycerin, an osmotic laxative that promotes peristalsis, has rarely been mentioned or studied. We assessed clinical outcomes in our patients with a Malone antegrade continence enema using glycerin based irrigation. We retrospectively reviewed patients with neurogenic bowel who underwent a Malone antegrade continence enema procedure between 1997 and 2011. Glycerin diluted with tap water followed by a tap water flush is our preferred irrigation protocol. Bowel regimen outcomes examined included fecal continence, emptying time, leakage from stoma, enema volume, frequency and independence. Of the 23 patients with followup greater than 6 months 19 used glycerin based irrigation. Average age at surgery was 8.8 years. Patients using glycerin instilled a median of 30 ml (mean 29) glycerin and 50 ml (131) tap water. Fecal continence rate was 95% and stoma leakage rate was 16%, and only 16% of patients required daily irrigation. Glycerin is a viable and effective alternative irrigant for antegrade enemas of neurogenic bowel, with an excellent fecal continence rate. The volume of irrigant needed is typically less than 90 ml, which is much less than in published reports using tap water alone. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bladder catheterization, male (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with and inflatable balloon tip) into the urinary bladder. This procedure is performed for urinary obstruction, following ... or for any other problem in which the bladder needs to be kept empty (decompressed) and urinary ...

  5. Discrepancy Between European Association of Urology Guidelines and Daily Practice in the Management of Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of a European Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricksen, Kees; Aziz, Atiqullah; Bes, Perrine; Chun, Felix K-H; Dobruch, Jakub; Kluth, Luis A; Gontero, Paolo; Necchi, Andrea; Noon, Aidan P; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Rink, Michael; Roghmann, Florian; Rouprêt, Morgan; Seiler, Roland; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Qvick, Brian; Babjuk, Marek; Xylinas, Evanguelos

    2017-10-23

    The European Association of Urology (EAU) non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) guidelines are meant to help minimise morbidity and improve the care of patients with NMIBC. However, there may be underuse of guideline-recommended care in this potentially curable cohort. To assess European physicians' current practice in the management of NMIBC and evaluate its concordance with the EAU 2013 guidelines. Initial 45-min telephone interviews were conducted with 20 urologists to develop a 26-item questionnaire for a 30-min online quantitative interview. A total of 498 physicians with predefined experience in treatment of NMIBC patients, from nine European countries, completed the online interviews. Descriptive statistics of absolute numbers and percentages of the use of diagnostic tools, risk group stratification, treatment options chosen, and follow-up regimens were used. Guidelines are used by ≥87% of physicians, with the EAU guidelines being the most used ones (71-100%). Cystoscopy (60-97%) and ultrasonography (42-95%) are the most used diagnostic techniques. Using EAU risk classification, 40-69% and 88-100% of physicians correctly identify all the prognostic factors for low- and high-risk tumours, respectively. Re-transurethral resection of the bladder tumour (re-TURB) is performed in 25-75% of low-risk and 55-98% of high-risk patients. Between 21% and 88% of patients received a single instillation of chemotherapy within 24h after TURB. Adjuvant intravesical treatment is not given to 6-62%, 2-33%, and 1-20% of the patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk NMIBC, respectively. Patients with low-risk NMIBC are likely to be overmonitored and those with high-risk NMIBC undermonitored. Our study is limited by the possible recall bias of the selected physicians. Although most European physicians claim to apply the EAU guidelines, adherence to them is low in daily practice. Our survey among European physicians investigated discrepancies between guidelines and

  6. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Child Cope With a Parent's Suicide? Ultrasound: Bladder KidsHealth > For Parents > Ultrasound: Bladder Print A A A What's in this article? ... en español Ultrasonido: vejiga What It Is A bladder ultrasound is a safe and painless test that ...

  7. Hereditary bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2008-01-01

    First degree relatives of patients with bladder cancer have a two-fold increased risk of bladder cancer but high-risk bladder cancer families are extremely rare. There is no clear Mendelian inheritance pattern that can explain the increased familial risk. This makes classical linkage studies for the

  8. A study of brain MRI findings and clinical response of bladder empting failure in brain bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakoda, Keiichi (Yamashina Aiseikai Hospital, Kyoto (Japan)); Watanabe, Kousuke

    1993-02-01

    In 45 patients (38 males and 7 females; average age:78 years) with brain bladder, who did not have any peripheral neuropathies and spinal disturbance, cerebral findings of MRI (1.5 T) T[sub 2] enhanced image were analyzed in comparison with those of 7 control patients with normal urination after BPH operations. Patients with neurogenic bladder were divided into three groups as follows: 33 patients with a chief complaint of urinary disturbance (Group I), 9 patients with urinary incontinence (Group II) and 3 patients with balanced bladder (Group III). High frequency of lacune (24%) of the globus pallidus and low signalling of the corpus striatum (30%) was found in Group I patients, but low frequency in other Group patients and control patients. Furthermore, pathologic changes with various grades in the globus pallidus were observed in 91% of Group I patients. In the treatment of urinary disturbance, a high improvement rate of micturition disorder (77%) was obtained in patients treated with a combination of dantrolene and TURp (TUIbn for females). However, patients who had clear lacune of the globus pallidus showed the low improvement rate. It should be possible that the globus pallidus contributes to control the movement of the external sphincter and the pelvic base muscles as well as other striated muscles. Moreover, lacune was rarely found in the urination center of the brain-stem on MRI. (author).

  9. Pathogenesis of bladder exstrophy: A new hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K V, Satish Kumar; Mammen, Abraham; Varma, Karthikeya K

    2015-12-01

    Classical bladder exstrophy affects 1 in 30 000 live births. Results of surgical treatment from different institutions employing various surgical techniques are not uniform, thus there is a need for a consensus on the best technique for bladder exstrophy repair. Surgical correction in bladder exstrophy would be more effective if the exact pathogenetic mechanism was deduced and the procedure was directed to correct the cause, which is responsible for the defect. The anatomy of exstrophy shows that the infraumbilical abdominal wall, the anterior wall of the bladder, and the urethra are split, with splayed out genitalia and musculature along with pubic diastasis. There is no tissue loss and hence embryological defect is unlikely to be the cause of bladder exstrophy. Thus there is a need to examine pathogenesis of bladder exstrophy. A literature search was made of the various hypotheses for cause of bladder exstrophy, and attempts were made to propose a new hypothesis. The present hypothesis is also the basis for a technique of mobilization of pelvic musculature, done in two stages. The functional outcomes of 38 children with bladder exstrophy managed over a period of 10 years were reviewed. At a mean follow-up of 4.5 years (range 2.5-8 years), 82% of patients were functionally continent. The exact embryopathogenesis of bladder exstrophy is unknown. In this study a new hypothesis is proposed, with the aim of tailoring the surgical procedure to correct this defect. Bladder exstrophy epispadias complex (BEEC) is a deformative disruption occurring after embryogenic phase and pubic diastasis, and is central to exstrophy development. A working hypothesis can be formulated in line with our observation so that future experiments based this new hypothesis can aim to elucidate the exact pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reconstructive bladder surgery in genitourinary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narmada Prasad Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genitourinary tuberculosis (GUTB occurs in 15-20% cases of pulmonary tuberculosis with a prevalence of 400 per 100,000 population. Reconstructive surgery for GUTB is required for cases with grossly distorted and dysfunctional anatomy that are unlikely to regress with chemotherapy alone. In the recent past, there has been a tremendous increase in the variety of reconstructive procedures for the urinary bladder, used in the management of GUTB. Augmentation cystoplasty includes the goals of increasing bladder capacity, while retaining as much of bladder as possible. Various bowel segments (from the stomach to the sigmoid colon have been used for bladder reconstruction. The choice of material for reconstruction is purely the surgeon′s prerogative--his skill, the ease, the mobility and length of mesentery (allowing bowel to reach the bladder neck without tension and maintaining an adequate blood supply. The presence or absence of concomitant reflux is of considerable importance. In the former, an ileocystoplasty with implantation of ureter to the proximal end of the isolated ileal loop and anastomosis of the distal end of the ileal loop to the bladder neck and trigone is advocated. In the latter case, the ureterovesical valve is preserved and colocystoplasty is preferred, wherein the sigmoid colon on being opened along its antimesentric border is joined to the trigone and bladder neck and then to itself to form a capacious pouch. Gastrocystoplasty reduces the risk of acidosis but is associated with complications like hypochloremic alkalosis and ′hematuria-dysuria′ syndrome. Orthotopic neobladder reconstruction is a feasible option, suitable in cases of tubercular thimble bladder with a markedly reduced capacity (as little as 15 ml, where an augmentation alone may be associated with anastomatic narrowing or poor relief of symptoms. In this article, we review the various bladder reconstruction options used for the surgical management of GUTB

  11. Overactive Bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... operations to treat other forms of incontinence Excess consumption of caffeine or alcohol Declining cognitive function due to aging, ... Get regular, daily physical activity and exercise. Limit consumption of caffeine and alcohol. Quit smoking. Manage chronic conditions, such ...

  12. Giant bladder diverticulum : A rare cause of bladder outlet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant bladder diverticula are rare causes of bladder outlet obstruction in children and have rarely been reported. In this paper, we present three children with giant bladder diverticula who presented with bladder outlet obstruction within a year. Micturating cystourethrogram is important for investigating bladder outlet ...

  13. Neuropeptides, neurogenic inflammation and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birklein, Frank; Schmelz, Martin

    2008-06-06

    This review explains symptoms and nature of neuropeptide signaling and its importance for clinical symptoms of CRPS. Neurogenic inflammation regularly accompanies excitation of primary afferent nociceptors. It has two major components-plasma extravasation and vasodilatation. The most important mediators are the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). After peripheral trauma immune reaction (e.g. cytokines) and the attempts of the tissue to regenerate (e.g. growth factors) sensitize nociceptors and amplify neurogenic inflammation. This cascade of events has been demonstrated in rat models of CRPS. Clinical findings in these animals strongly resemble clinical findings in CRPS, and can be prevented by anti-cytokine and anti-neuropeptide treatment. In CRPS patients, there is meanwhile also plenty of evidence that neurogenic inflammation contributes to clinical presentation. Increased cytokine production was demonstrated, as well as facilitated neurogenic inflammation. Very recently even "non-inflammatory" signs of CRPS (hyperhidrosis, cold skin) have been linked to neuropeptide signaling. Surprisingly, there was even moderately increased neurogenic inflammation in unaffected body regions. This favors the possibility that CRPS patients share genetic similarities. The future search for genetic commonalities will help us to further unravel the "mystery" CRPS.

  14. A microchannel neuroprosthesis for bladder control after spinal cord injury in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Daniel J; Zhu, Lan; Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Minev, Ivan R; Musick, Katherine M; Mosse, Charles A; Craggs, Michael; Donaldson, Nicholas; Lacour, Stéphanie P; McMahon, Stephen B; Fawcett, James W

    2013-11-06

    A severe complication of spinal cord injury is loss of bladder function (neurogenic bladder), which is characterized by loss of bladder sensation and voluntary control of micturition (urination), and spontaneous hyperreflexive voiding against a closed sphincter (detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia). A sacral anterior root stimulator at low frequency can drive volitional bladder voiding, but surgical rhizotomy of the lumbosacral dorsal roots is needed to prevent spontaneous voiding and dyssynergia. However, rhizotomy is irreversible and eliminates sexual function, and the stimulator gives no information on bladder fullness. We designed a closed-loop neuroprosthetic interface that measures bladder fullness and prevents spontaneous voiding episodes without the need for dorsal rhizotomy in a rat model. To obtain bladder sensory information, we implanted teased dorsal roots (rootlets) within the rat vertebral column into microchannel electrodes, which provided signal amplification and noise suppression. As long as they were attached to the spinal cord, these rootlets survived for up to 3 months and contained axons and blood vessels. Electrophysiological recordings showed that half of the rootlets propagated action potentials, with firing frequency correlated to bladder fullness. When the bladder became full enough to initiate spontaneous voiding, high-frequency/amplitude sensory activity was detected. Voiding was abolished using a high-frequency depolarizing block to the ventral roots. A ventral root stimulator initiated bladder emptying at low frequency and prevented unwanted contraction at high frequency. These data suggest that sensory information from the dorsal root together with a ventral root stimulator could form the basis for a closed-loop bladder neuroprosthetic.

  15. Tibial Nerve Stimulation for Treating Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marc P; Gross, Tobias; Bachmann, Lucas M; Blok, Bertil F M; Castro-Diaz, David; Del Popolo, Giulio; Groen, Jan; Hamid, Rizwan; Karsenty, Gilles; Pannek, Jürgen; Hoen, Lisette 't; Kessler, Thomas M

    2015-11-01

    Tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) is a promising therapy for non-neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and might also be a valuable option for patients with an underlying neurological disorder. We systematically reviewed all available evidence on the efficacy and safety of TNS for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). The review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement. After screening 1943 articles, 16 studies (4 randomized controlled trials [RCTs], 9 prospective cohort studies, 2 retrospective case series, and 1 case report) enrolling 469 patients (283 women and 186 men) were included. Five studies reported on acute TNS and 11 on chronic TNS. In acute and chronic TNS, the mean increase of maximum cystometric capacity ranged from 56 to 132mL and from 49 to 150mL, and the mean increase of bladder volume at first detrusor overactivity ranged from 44 to 92mL and from 93 to 121mL, respectively. In acute and chronic TNS, the mean decrease of maximum detrusor pressure during the storage phase ranged from 5 to 15cm H2O and from 4 to 21cm H2O, respectively. In chronic TNS, the mean decrease in number of voids per 24h, in number of leakages per 24h, and in postvoid residual ranged from 3 to 7, from 1 to 4, and from 15 to 55mL, respectively. No TNS-related adverse events have been reported. Risk of bias and confounding was high in most studies. Although preliminary data of RCTs and non-RCTs suggest TNS might be effective and safe for treating NLUTD, the evidence base is poor, derived from small, mostly noncomparative studies with a high risk of bias and confounding. More reliable data from well-designed RCTs are needed to reach definitive conclusions. Early data suggest tibial nerve stimulation might be effective and safe for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, but more reliable evidence is required. Copyright © 2015 European Association of Urology. Published by

  16. Targeting canine bladder transitional cell carcinoma with a human bladder cancer-specific ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine if a human bladder cancer-specific peptide named PLZ4 can target canine bladder cancer cells. Experimental Design The binding of PLZ4 to five established canine invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC cell lines and to normal canine bladder urothelial cells was determined using the whole cell binding assay and an affinitofluorescence assay. The WST-8 assay was performed to determine whether PLZ4 affected cell viability. In vivo tumor-specific homing/targeting property and biodistribution of PLZ4 was performed in a mouse xenograft model via tail vein injection and was confirmed with ex vivo imaging. Results PLZ4 exhibited high affinity and specific dose-dependent binding to canine bladder TCC cell lines, but not to normal canine urothelial cells. No significant changes in cell viability or proliferation were observed upon incubation with PLZ4. The in vivo and ex vivo optical imaging study showed that, when linked with the near-infrared fluorescent dye Cy5.5, PLZ4 substantially accumulated at the canine bladder cancer foci in the mouse xenograft model as compared to the control. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance PLZ4 can specifically bind to canine bladder cancer cells. This suggests that the preclinical studies of PLZ4 as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic agent can be performed in dogs with naturally occurring bladder cancer, and that PLZ4 can possibly be developed in the management of canine bladder cancer.

  17. Capsaicin-induced neurogenic inflammation in the skin in patients with symptoms induced by odorous chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Helle; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Mosbech, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Intradermal injection of capsaicin induces the axonal release of neuropeptides, vasodilatation and flare, e.g. neurogenic inflammation. The spatial profile of neurogenic inflammation in the skin has been studied in various experimental models. Polarization spectroscopy imaging introduced recently...

  18. Uncoupling neurogenic gene networks in the Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, William A; Goyal, Yogesh; Yamaya, Kei; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Levine, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    The EGF signaling pathway specifies neuronal identities in the Drosophila embryo by regulating developmental patterning genes such as intermediate neuroblasts defective (ind). EGFR is activated in the ventral midline and neurogenic ectoderm by the Spitz ligand, which is processed by the Rhomboid protease. CRISPR/Cas9 was used to delete defined rhomboid enhancers mediating expression at each site of Spitz processing. Surprisingly, the neurogenic ectoderm, not the ventral midline, was found to be the dominant source of EGF patterning activity. We suggest that Drosophila is undergoing an evolutionary transition in central nervous system (CNS)-organizing activity from the ventral midline to the neurogenic ectoderm. © 2017 Rogers et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. The effect of semiconditional dorsal penile nerve electrical stimulation on capacity and compliance of the bladder with deformity in spinal cord injury patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y-H; Kim, S-H; Kim, J M; Im, H T; Choi, I S; Lee, K W

    2012-04-01

    Bladder capacity, bladder compliance, the volume of the first overactive contraction, maximal volume during cystometry (CMG) and the vesicoureteral reflux, bladder wall deformity before and after semiconditional stimulation on DPN. To evaluate the effect of the semiconditional electrical stimulation on dorsal penile nerve (DPN) to improve the complicated bladder function in male with spinal cord injury (SCI). Semiconditional stimulation system and urodynamic laboratory in a university hospital. Six men (age, 33-59 years) with SCI incurred from 38 to 156 months before this study. semiconditional stimulation parameters were set during CMG and semiconditional stimulation on DPN by surface electrodes via Empi Focus stimulator was applied from 14 to 28 days, at home. Parameters about bladder function were measured before and after stimulation applied. All parameters for bladder after semiconditional stimulation were increased. Also, the vesicoureteral reflux and bladder wall deformity was improved in five of six patients. Semiconditional electrical stimulation on DPN effectively suppresses neurogenic detrusor overactivity and distend the bladder physiologically in the SCI patient with a complicated bladder. The bladder capacity and compliance as well as the bladder wall deformity were improved as a result of this treatment.

  20. Routine bladder biopsies in men with bladder outlet obstruction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, T.; Kortmann, B.B.M.; Holm, N.R.; Smedts, F.; Nordling, J.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Rosette, J.J.M.H.C. de la

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish whether routine evaluation of light microscopic changes in bladder biopsies in men with graded bladder outlet obstruction correlates with urodynamic parameters and to evaluate the performance of two pathologists in bladder biopsy interpretation. METHODS: In 63 consecutive

  1. Influence of bladder lithiasis on lower urinary tract dynamics in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vírseda-Chamorro, M; Salinas-Casado, J; Barroso-Manso, Á; Gutiérrez-Martín, P; Fuertes, M E

    2017-08-01

    A prospective and a case-matched control study. To study the lower urinary tract dysfunction associated with bladder lithiasis in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Toledo (Spain). We have carried out a urodynamic study in 30 patients with SCI with lithiasis in their bladder before and 3 months after bladder endoscopic lithotripsy. This second study was compared with the urodynamic findings of a different group of 30 patients with SCI, without a history of bladder lithiasis, paired with cases by gender and date of urodynamic study. We have found that the prevalence of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) was significantly different after bladder lithotripsy, although the cystomanometric capacity was significantly increased. A group of patients with lithiasis showed a maximum flow rate, a voiding maximum detrusor pressure and the detrusor contractility parameter Wmax lower than that in controls. On the other hand, a voiding abdominal straining was found to be significantly greater than that in controls. Bladder lithiasis affects the presence of NDO in patients with SCI. Patients with SCI who develop bladder lithiasis present a lower detrusor contractility power compared with those who do not.

  2. Discerning neurogenic vs. non-neurogenic postnatal lateral ventricular astrocytes via activity-dependent input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena W. Adlaf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Throughout development, neural stem cells (NSCs give rise to differentiated neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes which together modulate perception, memory, and behavior in the adult nervous system. To understand how NSCs contribute to postnatal/adult brain remodeling and repair after injury, the lateral ventricular (LV neurogenic niche in the rodent postnatal brain serves as an excellent model system. It is a specialized area containing self-renewing GFAP+ astrocytes functioning as NSCs generating new neurons throughout life. In addition to this now well-studied regenerative process, the LV niche also generates astrocytes, playing an important role for glial scar formation after cortical injury. While LV NSCs can be clearly distinguished from their neuroblast and oligodendrocyte progeny via molecular markers, the astrocytic identity of NSCs has complicated their distinction from terminally-differentiated astrocytes in the niche. Our current models of postnatal/adult LV neurogenesis do not take into account local astrogenesis, or the possibility that cellular markers may be similar between non-dividing GFAP+ NSCs and their differentiated astrocyte daughters. Postnatal LV neurogenesis is regulated by NSC-intrinsic mechanisms interacting with extracellular/niche-driven cues. It is generally believed that these local effects are responsible for sustaining neurogenesis, though behavioral paradigms and disease states have suggested possibilities for neural circuit-level modulation. With recent experimental findings that neuronal stimulation can directly evoke responses in LV NSCs, it is possible that this exciting property will add a new dimension to identifying postnatal/adult NSCs. Here, we put forth a notion that neural circuit-level input can be a distinct characteristic defining postnatal/adult NSCs from non-neurogenic astroglia.

  3. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has ex...... can be challenging, and misdiagnosis as a psychological problem, overactive bladder, or chronic urinary infection has plagued patients with the problem....

  4. Probiotics for preventing urinary tract infection in people with neuropathic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Swee-Ling; Boswell-Ruys, Claire L; Lee, Bon San B; Simpson, Judy M; Clezy, Kate R

    2017-09-08

    Neuropathic or neurogenic bladder describes a process of dysfunctional voiding as the result of injury in the brain, spinal cord or nerves innervating the bladder. People with neuropathic bladder, such as from spinal cord injury (SCI), are at significant risk of morbidity from urinary tract infections (UTI). Effective methods to prevent UTI in people with SCI have been sought for many years. Probiotics (micro-organisms that exert beneficial health effects in the host) have been recommended for bacterial interference of the urological tract to reduce colonisation by uropathogen and to manage the dual problems of infection and antibiotic resistance. This review looked at the benefits and harms of probiotics in preventing symptomatic UTI in people with neuropathic bladder compared with placebo, no therapy, or non-antibiotic prophylaxis (cranberry juice, methenamine hippurate, topical oestrogen). We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialised Register up to 10 March 2017 through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. Studies in the Specialised Register are identified through searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE, conference proceedings, the International Clinical Trials Register (ICTRP) Search Portal, and ClinicalTrials.gov. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs and cross-over RCTs looking at the use of probiotics for the prophylaxis of UTI in people with neuropathic bladders was considered for inclusion. Men, women and children of all ages with neuropathic bladders from neurological injury such as suprapontine, supra sacral and sacral aetiologies was included. All bladder management types, including reflex voiding, time voiding, indwelling and intermittent catheterization were eligible for this review.Studies comparing probiotics to placebo, no treatment or other non-antibiotic prophylaxis was included. Studies comparing probiotics with antibiotics or in combination with antibiotics were

  5. Bladder Control Problems in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Incontinence) Bladder Control Problems in Women (Urinary Incontinence) Kegel Exercises Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder) Bladder Infection (Urinary Tract ... Pelvic floor muscle exercises. Pelvic floor muscle, or Kegel, exercises involve strengthening pelvic floor muscles. Strong pelvic ...

  6. Bladder Control Problems in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Incontinence) Bladder Control Problems in Women (Urinary Incontinence) Kegel Exercises Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder) Bladder Infection (Urinary Tract ... Pelvic floor muscle exercises. Pelvic floor muscle, or Kegel, exercises involve strengthening pelvic floor muscles. Strong pelvic ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Bladder Cancer Screening Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  8. A critical review of recent clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of non-neurogenic male lower urinary tract symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Michael Erlano; Mendoza, Jonathan; See, Manuel; Esmena, Ednalyn; Aguila, Dean; Silangcruz, Jan Michael; Reyes, Buenaventura Jose; Luna, Saturnino; Morales, Marcelino

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We provide an overview of the quality of recent clinical clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for non-neurogenic male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and summarize the recommendations for their diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Methods: We systematically searched recent (2008–2013) CPGs for non-neurogenic male LUTS. Eligible CPGs were assessed and appraised using Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) tool by a CPG-appraisal group. The appraisal scores for each guideline were summarized according to each domain and in total. A recommendation summary was made across the guidelines for diagnostics, conservative management, medical, minimally invasive therapy, and surgical management. Results: A total of 8 guidelines were considered. According to AGREE II appraisal of guidelines, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), American Urological Association (AUA) and European Association of Urology (EAU) consistently scored high on the guideline domains assessed. Recommendations on diagnostics, conservative management, medical, and surgical management were consistent among the top 3 guidelines. However, we noted a discrepancy in recommending minimally invasive therapy as an alternative management of moderate to severe or bothersome non-neurogenic male LUTS secondary to benign prostatic enlargement (BPE); the NICE guideline, in particular, does not recommend using minimally invasive therapy. Conclusion: The quality of recent CPGs on non-neurogenic male LUTS was appraised and summarized. The guidelines from NICE, AUA and EAU were considered highly compliant to the AGREE II proposition for guideline formation and development. PMID:26279717

  9. Resection rectopexy--laparoscopic neuromapping reveals neurogenic pathways to the lower segment of the rectum: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneist, Werner; Kauff, Daniel W; Naumann, Gert; Lang, Hauke

    2013-04-01

    Nerve sparing in functional pelvic floor surgery is strongly recommended as intraoperative damage to the autonomic nerves may predispose to persistent or worsened anorectal and urogenital function. The aim of this study was to investigate the intraoperative neural topography above the pelvic floor in patients undergoing laparoscopic resection rectopexy in combination with electrophysiologic neuromapping. Ten consecutive female patients underwent laparoscopic resection rectopexy for rectal prolapse. Intraoperative identification of pelvic autonomic nerves was carried out with a novel intraoperative neuromonitoring system based on electric stimulation under simultaneous electromyography of the internal anal sphincter and manometry of the bladder. Neuromonitoring results were compared to patients' preoperative anorectal and urogenital function and their functional results at the 3-month follow-up. Laparoscopy in combination with electrophysiologic neuromapping revealed neurogenic pathways to the lower segment of the rectum during surgical mobilization. In all procedures, intraoperative neuromonitoring finally confirmed functional nerve integrity to the internal anal sphincter and the bladder. Patients with preoperatively diagnosed fecal incontinence were continent at the 3-month follow-up. The Wexner score improved in median from preoperative 4 (range 1-18) to 1 (range 0-3) at follow-up (p = 0.012). Cleveland Clinical Constipation Score improved in median from 10 (range 5-17) to 3 (range 1-7; p = 0.005). In none of the investigated patients a new onset of urinary dysfunction did occur. No change in sexual function was observed. Laparoscopy in combination with electrophysiologic neuromapping during nerve-sparing resection rectopexy identified and preserved neurogenic pathways heading to the lower segment of the rectum above the level of the pelvic floor.

  10. Synchronously detected secondary signet ring cell urinary bladder malignancy from the stomach masquerading as genitourinary tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sidhartha; Manikandan, Ramanitharan; Dorairajan, Lalgudi Narayanan; Badhe, Bhavana

    2015-01-01

    Secondary bladder neoplasms are very rare and represent 1% of all malignant bladder tumours. Among secondary bladder tumours, metastasis from the stomach accounts for about 4% of cases. These secondary tumours are generally detected during follow-up of patients already treated for gastric cancer. We report a case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder from an occult primary poorly differentiated signet ring cell type gastric carcinoma masquerading clinically as genitourinary tuberculosis. Our case illustrates the importance of obtaining a bladder biopsy in suspected chronic inflammatory conditions such as urinary tract tuberculosis before starting medical management to avoid the serious consequences of missing a bladder malignancy. PMID:25618874

  11. The pattern of autonomic tone disorder and its correction in children with overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Morozov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system dysregulation is one of the leading components in the pathogenesis of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. These disorders lead to diverse changes in the functions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems with disordered release of mediators (norepinephrine, acetylcholine, hormones of the adrenal cortex and other endocrine glands, a number of biologically active substances (polypeptides, prostaglandins, as well as to the impaired sensitivity of vascular a- and p-adrenoceptors. Children with dysuria concurrently develop visceral, CNS, and circulatory system dysfunctions and metabolic disturbances. The paper describes the clinical trial of children with overactive bladder, which demonstrates the autonomic tone in these patients (и=44. The findings point to the important involvement of the autonomic nervous system in the pathogenesis of the disease and provide a rationale for the incorporation of vegetotropic drugs normalizing the autonomic nervous system into the combination therapy of overactive bladder.

  12. Mapping of potential neurogenic niche in the human temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Barreto Nogueira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ are known neurogenic niches in adult mammals. Nonetheless, the existence of neurogenic niches in adult humans is controversial. We hypothesized that mapping neurogenic niches in the human temporal lobe could clarify this issue. Neurogenic niches and neurogenesis were investigated in 28 temporal lobes via immunostaining for nestin and doublecortin (DCX, respectively. Nestin was observed in a continuous layer formed by the SVZ, the subpial zone of the medial temporal lobe and the SGZ, terminating in the subiculum. In the subiculum, remarkable DCX expression was observed through the principal efferent pathway of the hippocampus to the fimbria. A possible explanation for the results is that the SVZ, the subpial zone of the medial temporal lobe and the SGZ form a unit containing neural stem cells that differentiate into neurons in the subiculum. Curiously, the area previously identified as the human rostral migratory stream may in truth be the fornix, which contains axons that originate in the subiculum. This study suggests that neurogenesis may occur in an orchestrated manner in a broad area of the human temporal lobe.

  13. Neurogenic inflammation and allergy | Mostafa | Egyptian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (The). Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 2 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Neurogenic inflammation and ...

  14. Bladder necrosis: 'A man without a bladder'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosschieter, Judith; Oudshoorn, Frederik H K; Meuleman, Eric J H; Nieuwenhuijzen, Jakko A

    2018-02-17

    Since the use of antibiotics, bladder necrosis has become a rare condition. We report a case of bladder necrosis in a 90-year-old man following urinary retention. After insertion of a transurethral catheter (TUC), 2 L of urine was evacuated. In the following days, the TUC became intermittently blocked. Adequate bladder drainage could not be obtained despite intensive rinsing and placement of a suprapubic catheter. On surgical exploration necrosis of almost the entire bladder wall, except for the trigone, was encountered. Surgical debridement of the non-viable bladder wall without opening the abdominal cavity was conducted, and a TUC was placed in the Retzius cavity to ensure evacuation of urine. Since the patient was haemodynamically unstable, construction of a urinary diversion was waived and urinary drainage of the Retzius cavity by the TUC was accepted, resulting in adequate urinary drainage without compromising renal function. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Afferent fibers of the pudendal nerve modulate sympathetic neurons controlling the bladder neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, André; Schmid, Daniel M; Curt, Armin; Knapp, Peter A; Schurch, Brigitte

    2003-01-01

    Pudendal nerve stimulation is known to have a potential modulative effect on bladder function. However, even if its efficiency has been established for various neurogenic and non-neurogenic bladder dysfunctions, the underlying neuronal mechanism, and the involved pathways in humans remain unknown. In this prospective study we focused on the effects of pudendal nerve stimulation in complete spinal cord injured patients to identify neuromodulative processes that occur on spinal level. Twenty complete spinal male presenting with upper motor neuron lesion and neurogenic incontinence underwent pudendal nerve stimulation. Bladder, bladder neck (BN), and external urethral sphincter (EUS) pressures were continuously recorded with a three channel microtip pressure transducer catheter. Fifty six pudendal stimulations using biphasic rectangular impulses (0.2 ms, 10 Hz) with intensities up to 100 mA were applied to the dorsal penile nerve. In six patients, 18 stimulations were repeated after intravenous (i.v.) administration of 7 mg phentolamine. Mean BN and EUS pressure increased during stimulation significantly (P stimulation significantly (P nerve stimulation evoked somatic responses in the EUS and autonomic responses in the smooth muscle sphincter controlling the BN. Longer latencies of the BN responses and the sensitivity to the alpha-blocking agent phentolamine suggest that sympathetic alpha-adrenergic fibers are involved. Somatic afferent fibers of the pudendal nerve are supposed to project on sympathetic thoracolumbar neurons to the BN and modulate their function. This neuromodulative effect works exclusively at the spinal level and appears to be at least partly responsible for BN competence and at least continence. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has...

  17. DWI as an Imaging Biomarker for Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshida, Soichiro; Takahara, Taro; Kwee, Thomas C.; Waseda, Yuma; Kobayashi, Shuichiro; Fujii, Yasuhisa

    OBJECTIVE. DWI has been increasingly applied in the management of bladder cancer. In this article, we discuss the role of DWI as an imaging biomarker for bladder cancer. CONCLUSION. The DWI signal is derived from the motion of water molecules, which represents the physiologic characteristics of the

  18. Bladder perforation and development of a vesico - vaginal fistula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conservative management by continuous bladder drainage was not successful. A low-pressure cystogram done on day eight revealed a bladder leakage. On day 21, a repeat low-pressure cystogram showed a vesico-vaginal fistula. A successful transvesical repair by laparotomy was undertaken on day 23. The possible ...

  19. Factors that influence the urodynamic results of botulinum toxin in the treatment of neurogenic hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Martín, P; Vírseda-Chamorro, M; Salinas Casado, J; Gómez-Rodríguez, A; Esteban-Fuertes, M

    2015-05-01

    To determine the urodynamic efficacy and factors that influence the urodynamic results of treatment of neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity with intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). A retrospective study was conducted with a cohort of 70 patients composed of 40 men and 30 women with stable SCI (mean age, 39 ± 13.3 years) who underwent an intradetrusor injection of 300 IUs of BTX-A. A urodynamic study was conducted prior to the injection and 6 ± 4.3 months after the treatment. New urodynamic studies were subsequently performed up to an interval of 16 ± 12.2 months. The BTX-A significantly increased (p treatment and lesion age showed no influence in terms of the increase in bladder capacity. The indwelling urinary catheter (IUC) was the only statistically significant negative factor. The urodynamic effect of BTX-A is maintained for a considerable time interval. The IUC negatively influences the result of the treatment. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Electrical stimulation of sacral dermatomes in multiple sclerosis patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjorback, M V; Van Rey, F S; Rijkhoff, N J M; Nøhr, M; Petersen, T; Heesakkers, J P

    2007-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile/clitoral nerve (DPN) has been shown to suppress detrusor contractions in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). However, the long-term use of surface electrodes in the genital region may not be well tolerated and may introduce hygienic challenges. The aim of this study was to assess whether electrical stimulation of the sacral dermatomes could suppress detrusor contractions in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with NDO, hereby providing an alternative to DPN stimulation. A total of 14 MS patients (8 M, 6 F) with low bladder capacity (stimulation was applied. In the second and third filling electrical stimulation of either the DPN or sacral dermatomes was applied automatically whenever the detrusor pressure exceeded 10 cmH2O. The control filling showed detrusor overactivity in 12 of the 14 patients. In 10 of the 12 patients one or more detrusor contractions could be suppressed with DPN stimulation. Electrical stimulation of the sacral dermatomes failed to suppress detrusor contractions in all patients. Although therapeutic effects may be present from stimulation of the sacral dermatomes, we were unable to demonstrate any acute effects during urodynamics. For this reason stimulation of the sacral dermatomes is not an option in a system that relies on the acute suppression of a detrusor contraction. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. An experimental study of artificial murine bladder reflex arc established by abdominal reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Wu; Zhao, Yu-Wu; Hou, Chun-Lin; Ni, Wei-Feng; Rui, Bi-Yu; Guo, Shang-Chun; Zheng, Xian-You; Dai, Ke-Rong

    2011-02-01

    The neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by spinal cord injury is difficult to treat clinically. The aim of this research was to establish an artificial bladder reflex arc in rats through abdominal reflex pathway above the level of spinal cord injury, reinnervate the neurogenic bladder and restore bladder micturition. The outcome was achieved by intradural microanastomosis of the right T13 ventral root to S2 ventral root with autogenous nerve grafting, leaving the right T13 dorsal root intact. Long-term function of the reflex arc was assessed from nerve electrophysiological data and intravesical pressure tests during 8 months postoperation. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracing was performed to observe the effectiveness of the artificial reflex. Single stimulus (3 mA, 0.3 ms pulses, 20 Hz, 5-second duration) on the right T13 dorsal root resulted in evoked action potentials, raised intravesical pressures and bladder smooth muscle, compound action potential recorded from the right vesical plexus before and after the spinal cord transaction injury between L5 and S4 segmental in 12 Sprague-Dawley rats. There were HRP labelled cells in T13 ventral horn on the experimental side and in the intermediolateral nucleus on both sides of the L6-S4 segments after HRP injection. There was no HRP labelled cell in T13 ventral horn on the control side. Using the surviving somatic reflex above the level of spinal cord injury to reconstruct the bladder autonomous reflex arc by intradural microanastomosis of ventral root with a segment of autologous nerve grafting is practical in rats and may have clinical applications for humans.

  2. 3D vision on robot assisted brachytherapy catheter implantation in bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, G.A.H.J.; Steen-Banasik, E. van der; Wieringa F.P.

    2012-01-01

    Using strict criteria, solitary muscle invasive bladder cancer can be managed favorably in a bladder sparing manner with brachytherapy. Hollow catheters for afterloading radiotherapy are placed in the bladder wall. Until now, this is performed by open surgery. We replaced open surgery by laparoscopy

  3. Multiple failed closure of bladder in children with vesical exstrophy: Safety and efficacy of temporary ileal patch augmentation in assisting bladder closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolar Venkatesh Satish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The surgical approach to small bladder template in exstrophy bladder is difficult. Previously, many of these children underwent ureterosigmoidostomy and in recent times, the trend is to do a delayed primary closure. We have used ileal patch as a temporary cover for these small bladders with a view to encourage bladder growth and early results are encouraging. Materials and Methods: In five of the 45 children with bladder exstrophy managed by radical soft-tissue mobilization over 10 years, primary bladder closure was not possible due to repeated failed closures. A detubularized ileum was used to patch the bladder initially and after 4 months the patch was excised and bladder closure with sphincter repair was done in second stage. Results: In five children (three girls and two boys the mean age at initial bladder closure was 14 months and mean age at ileal patch was 22 months. In four patients, the bladder grew facilitating closure and in one patient it failed. There were no complications with the use of gut in patch. Conclusion: A temporary ileal patch seems promising in managing failed bladder closure in exstrophy patients. Long-term studies are needed before such a technique can be used in all patients with failed primary bladder closures.

  4. Congenital bladder diverticulum with benign bladder wall lesion resembling rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    David K-C Mak; Ruth Wragg; Eva Macharia; Karan Parashar

    2010-01-01

    Congenital bladder diverticula in children are uncommon and rarely present with bladder outlet obstruction. We present a case highlighting an interesting association between a congenital bladder diverticulum and a benign inflammatory bladder wall lesion mimicking a rhabdomyosarcoma. Open surgery was required as different imaging modalities and cystoscopy were insufficient to exclude a malignant process.

  5. Systemic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma initially presenting as a bladder mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary bladder lymphomas are rare lesions which may be primary bladder lymphomas or part of systemic lymphoma with bladder involvement. We report a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL in a 73-year-old female who presented with bladder tumor which on evaluation revealed NHL with extensive systemic involvement. The management of such an advanced case is discussed here with literature review.

  6. Mandatory role of proteinase-activated receptor 1 in experimental bladder inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Carole A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general, inflammation plays a role in most bladder pathologies and represents a defense reaction to injury that often times is two edged. In particular, bladder neurogenic inflammation involves the participation of mast cells and sensory nerves. Increased mast cell numbers and tryptase release represent one of the prevalent etiologic theories for interstitial cystitis and other urinary bladder inflammatory conditions. The activity of mast cell-derived tryptase as well as thrombin is significantly increased during inflammation. Those enzymes activate specific G-protein coupled proteinase-activated receptors (PARs. Four PARs have been cloned so far, and not only are all four receptors highly expressed in different cell types of the mouse urinary bladder, but their expression is altered during experimental bladder inflammation. We hypothesize that PARs may link mast cell-derived proteases to bladder inflammation and, therefore, play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of cystitis. Results Here, we demonstrate that in addition to the mouse urinary bladder, all four PA receptors are also expressed in the J82 human urothelial cell line. Intravesical administration of PAR-activating peptides in mice leads to an inflammatory reaction characterized by edema and granulocyte infiltration. Moreover, the inflammatory response to intravesical instillation of known pro-inflammatory stimuli such as E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, substance P, and antigen was strongly attenuated by PAR1-, and to a lesser extent, by PAR2-deficiency. Conclusion Our results reveal an overriding participation of PAR1 in bladder inflammation, provide a working model for the involvement of downstream signaling, and evoke testable hypotheses regarding the role of PARs in bladder inflammation. It remains to be determined whether or not mechanisms targeting PAR1 gene silencing or PAR1 blockade will ameliorate the clinical manifestations of cystitis.

  7. Vardenafil decreases bladder afferent nerve activity in unanesthetized, decerebrate, spinal cord-injured rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr-Roussel, Delphine; Oger, Stephanie; Caisey, Stéphanie; Sandner, Peter; Bernabé, Jacques; Alexandre, Laurent; Giuliano, Francois

    2011-02-01

    Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is) improve storage symptoms in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients, despite a lack of effect on peak urinary flow rate. Moreover, vardenafil improves urodynamic parameters in spinal cord-injured (SCI) patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). SCI rats also display NDO characterized by nonvoiding contractions (NVCs) during bladder filling, resulting in an increased bladder afferent nerve firing (BANF). We postulated that vardenafil could improve urodynamic parameters by reducing BANF. The effect of vardenafil has been investigated on intravesical pressure by cystometry experiments while recording BANF in response to bladder filling. Complete T7-T8 spinalization was performed in 15 female adult Sprague-Dawley rats (250-275 g). At 21-29 d postspinalization, fine filaments were dissected from the L6 dorsal roots and placed across a bipolar electrode. Bladder afferent nerve fibers were identified by electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve and bladder distension. SCI rats were decerebrated before cystometry experiments. Bladders were filled to determine the maximal bladder filling volume (BFV) for each rat. Then, after bladder stabilization at 75% of maximal BFV, saline (n=7) or vardenafil 1 mg/kg (n=8) was delivered intravenously. NVCs and BANF were recorded for 45 min. In all SCI rats, BANF was already present and regular at resting conditions (26.2±4.1 spikes per second). During bladder filling, intravesical pressure (IVP) slowly increased with transient NVCs superimposed. Concomitantly, BANF progressively increased up to 2.4-fold at maximal BFV (2.08±0.24 ml). After stabilization at submaximal BFV, BANF was increased by 186±37%. Vardenafil injection induced an immediate decrease in NVCs compared to saline (pdecerebrate, SCI rats. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism of action by which PDE5-Is improve storage symptoms in SCI patients. Copyright © 2010 European Association of Urology

  8. Ten years′ experience with adjuvant intravesical immunotherapy in management of superficial transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N K Mohanty

    2001-01-01

    The author reviews his experience of 10 years in man-agement of these malignancies with intravesical immu-notherapy and concludes that a low dose BCG (60mg with Interferon α-2b (5 million IU has shown to be very effective in reducing tumor recurrences, prolonging dis-ease-progression-free interval with a very low toxicity in such patients. To achieve this a periodic maintenance dose therapy is absolutely necessary.

  9. Overactive bladder [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. Wallace

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder syndrome is highly prevalent, and increasingly so with aging. It is characterized by the presence of urinary urgency, and can be associated with incontinence, increased voiding frequency, and nocturia. Assessment needs to exclude serious medical disorders that might present with similar symptoms, and a bladder diary is an invaluable part of understanding the presentation. Initial management is conservative, comprising education, bladder training, and advice on fluid intake. Drug therapy options include antimuscarinic medications and beta-3 adrenergic receptor agonists. Persistent overactive bladder syndrome, despite initial therapy, requires a review of the patient’s understanding of conservative management and compliance, and adjustment of medications. For refractory cases, specialist review and urodynamic testing should be considered; this may identify detrusor overactivity or increased filling sensation, and needs to exclude additional factors, such as stress incontinence and voiding dysfunction. Botulinum neurotoxin-A bladder injections can be used in severe overactivity, provided the patient is able and willing to do intermittent self-catheterisation, which is necessary in about 5% of treated patients. Sacral nerve stimulation and tibial nerve stimulation are other approaches. Major reconstructive surgery, such as augmentation cystoplasty, is rarely undertaken in modern practice but remains a possibility in extreme cases.

  10. [Radiotherapy of bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riou, O; Chauvet, B; Lagrange, J-L; Martin, P; Llacer Moscardo, C; Charissoux, M; Lauche, O; Aillères, N; Fenoglietto, P; Azria, D

    2016-09-01

    Surgery (radical cystectomy) is the standard treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Radiochemotherapy has risen as an alternative treatment option to surgery as part as organ-sparing combined modality treatment or for patients unfit for surgery. Radiochemotherapy achieves 5-year bladder intact survival of 40 to 65% and 5-year overall survival of 40 to 50% with excellent quality of life. This article introduces the French recommendations for radiotherapy of bladder cancer: indications, exams, technique, dosimetry, delivery and image guidance. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Paraganglioma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Priyadarshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder are tumors of chromaffin tissue originating from the sympathetic innervations of the urinary bladder wall and are extremely rare. Being functional, in most of the cases they are recognized by their characteristic presentation of hypertensive crisis and postmicturition syncope. A silent presentation of a bladder paraganglioma is very unusual but quite dangerous as they are easily misdiagnosed and adequate peri-operative attention is not provided. Here, we are presenting one such silent paraganglioma in adult women who presented with only a single episode of hematuria and severe hypertensive crisis occur during its trans-urethral resection.

  12. Amyloidosis in the bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou-Jensen, Katrine Skydsgaard; Dahl, Claus; Pilt, Anette Pedersen

    2014-01-01

    Amyloidosis refers to a number of diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of misfolded proteins, called amyloid fibrils, in the tissues and organs of the body. Amyloidosis in the bladder is a generally localized, rare condition, with approximately 200 cases reported in the literature....... This report presents three cases of amyloidosis in the bladder, two of which had coexisting transitional cell carcinoma. Evaluation for systemic disease is recommended in patients with newly discovered amyloidosis, even if first recognized in an area with the localized form, as in the bladder....

  13. Bladder function in patients with dystonia undergoing deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordasini, Livio; Kessler, Thomas M; Kiss, Bernhard; Schüpbach, Michael; Pollo, Claudio; Kaelin-Lang, Alain

    2014-09-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction is well described in Parkinson's disease and has a major impact on quality of live. In contrast, little is known about the extent of urinary symptoms in other movement disorders such as dystonia and about the role of the basal ganglia in bladder control.. A consecutive series of 11 patients with severe dystonia undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus internus was prospectively enrolled. Bladder function was assessed by the International Prostate Symptom Score and urodynamic investigation (UDI) before DBS surgery and afterwards in the conditions with and without DBS. In UDI before DBS surgery, detrusor overactivity was found in 36% (4/11) of dystonia patients. With pallidal DBS ON, maximum flow rate significantly decreased, post-void residual significantly increased and detrusor overactivity disappeared.. Pathological urodynamic changes can be found in a relevant percentage of dystonia patients. Pallidal DBS has a relaxing effect on detrusor function indicating a role of the basal ganglia in lower urinary tract control. Thus, a better understanding on how subcortical networks influence lower urinary tract function might open new therapeutic perspectives.. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Modulation of nerve-evoked contractions by β3-adrenoceptor agonism in human and rat isolated urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouget, Céline; Rekik, Moèz; Camparo, Philippe; Botto, Henry; Rischmann, Pascal; Lluel, Philippe; Palea, Stefano; Westfall, Timothy D

    2014-02-01

    Activation of β3-adrenoceptors has been shown to have a direct relaxant effect on urinary bladder smooth muscle from both rats and humans, however there are very few studies investigating the effects of β3-adrenoceptor agonists on nerve-evoked bladder contractions. Therefore in the current study, the role of β3-adrenoceptors in modulating efferent neurotransmission was evaluated. The effects of β3-adrenoceptor agonism on neurogenic contractions induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were compared with effects on contractions induced by exogenous acetylcholine (Ach) and αβ-methylene adenosine triphosphate (αβ-meATP) in order to determine the site of action. Isoproterenol inhibited EFS-induced neurogenic contractions of human bladder (pD2=6.79; Emax=65%). The effect of isoproterenol was selectively inhibited by the β3-adrenoceptor antagonist L-748,337 (pKB=7.34). Contractions induced by exogenous Ach (0.5-1μM) were inhibited 25% by isoproterenol (3μM) while contractions to 10Hz in the same strip were inhibited 67%. The selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL-316,243 inhibited EFS-induced neurogenic contractions of rat bladder (pD2=7.83; Emax=65%). The effects of CL-316,243 were inhibited in a concentration dependent manner by L-748,337 (pA2=6.42). Contractions induced by exogenous Ach and αβ-meATP were significantly inhibited by CL-316,243, 29% and 40%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the activation of β3-adrenoceptors inhibits neurogenic contractions of both rat and human urinary bladder. Contractions induced by exogenously applied parasympathetic neurotransmitters are also inhibited by β3-agonism however the effect is clearly less than on neurogenic contractions (particularly in human), suggesting that in addition to a direct effect on smooth muscle, activation of prejunctional β3-adrenoceptors may inhibit neurotransmitter release. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Interspinous process implantation for the treatment of neurogenic intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyrani, Nasser; Picinic Norheim, Elizabeth; Elaine Ku, Yeelan; Nick Shamie, Arya

    2012-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a disabling medical condition in which narrowing of the spinal canal compresses the spinal cord and nerves causing a condition called neurogenic intermittent claudication (NIC). Decompressive spine surgery is the standard of care for patients who fail to improve with conservative management. However, oftentimes, patients who suffer from LSS are elderly individuals with multiple co-morbidities who cannot withstand the risks of decompressive surgery. X-Stop, a novel and minimally invasive FDA approved interspinous process implant, has come into the scene as an alternative to decompressive surgery, and can be inserted under local anesthetic with minimal blood loss. Despite its growing support in medical literature as an effective and conservative treatment of NIC, X-Stop remains a fairly new form of treatment. The aim of this study is to assess the clinical efficacy of its use. Fifty consecutive patients with at least two-year follow-up had a confirmed diagnosis of NIC secondary to LSS by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and subsequently received an X-Stop implant. Subjects' ages ranged from 64 to 95 with a mean age of 79, while the gender distribution comprised of 23 males and 27 females. Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ) was used to assess patient outcome measures in three domains: physical function (PF), patient satisfaction (PS), and symptom severity (SS). The visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess trends in pain with a scale from 0-10, with 0 defined as "pain-free" and 10 designated as "the worst pain imaginable". Compared to pre-op scores, PF, SS, and VAS scores for back, buttock and leg pain had a significant mean decrease at 6, 12, 24 months post-op (P 38) and 74% (17.23) were achieved at six months, 12 months, and 24 months respectively. X-Stop is a safe and effective treatment for NIC that provides marked relief of symptoms with sustained beneficial outcomes at up to two years of follow

  16. Bladder Diseases - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bladder Diseases URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bladderdiseases.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  17. Neurogenic contraction and relaxation of human penile deep dorsal vein

    OpenAIRE

    Segarra, Gloria; Medina, Pascual; Domenech, Cristina; Martínez León, Juan B; Vila, José M.; Aldasoro, Martin; Lluch, Salvador

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize neurogenic and pharmacological responses of human penile deep dorsal vein and to determine whether the responses are mediated by nitric oxide from neural or endothelial origin.Ring segments of human penile deep dorsal vein were obtained from 22 multiorgan donors during procurement of organs for transplantation. The rings were suspended in organ bath chambers for isometric recording of tension. We then studied the contractile and relaxant respon...

  18. [Autonomic provocative tests in the differential diagnostics of neurogenic syncope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bort, A A; Lar'kin, V I

    2014-01-01

    To study the autonomic provision of orthostatic test in patients with neurogenic syncope. We examined 70 patients, aged from 18 to 56 years. Autonomic response was recorded by means of the autonomic index - minute volume of blood. The most informative indices were the minute volume of blood in the translation in orthostasis, minute the maximum volume of blood in the first half of orthostasis, the average minute volume of blood in the first half of the orthostasis.

  19. Peripheral tumor and tumor-like neurogenic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Evandro [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultation et Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Aubert, Sébastien, E-mail: sebastien.aubert@chru-lille.fr [Institut de Pathologie, Centre de Biologie-Pathologie, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Wavreille, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.wavreille@chru-lille.fr [Service d’Orthopédie B, Hôpital R Salengro, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Gheno, Ramon; Canella, Clarissa [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultation et Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Cotten, Anne, E-mail: anne.cotten@chru-lille.fr [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultation et Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU de Lille, 59037 Lille (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neoplasms of neurogenic origin account for about 12% of all benign and 8% of all malignant soft tissue neoplasms. Traumatic neuroma, Morton neuroma, lipomatosis of a nerve, nerve sheath ganglion, perineurioma, benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNST) are included in this group of pathologies. Clinical and radiologic evaluation of patients with neurogenic tumors and pseudotumors often reveals distinctive features. In this context, advanced imaging techniques, especially ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) play an important role in the characterization of these lesions. Imaging findings such as location of a soft tissue mass in the region of a major nerve, nerve entering or exiting the mass, fusiform shape, abnormalities of the muscle supplied by the nerve, split-fat sign, target sign and fascicular appearance should always evoke a peripheric nerve sheath neoplasm. Although no single imaging finding or combination of findings allows definitive differentiation between benign from malign peripheric neurogenic tumors, both US and MR imaging may show useful features that can lead us to a correct diagnosis and improve patient treatment. Traumatic neuromas and Morton neuromas are commonly associated to an amputation stump or are located in the intermetatarsal space. Lipomatosis of a nerve usually appears as a nerve enlargement, with thickened nerve fascicles, embedded in evenly distributed fat. Nerve sheath ganglion has a cystic appearance and commonly occurs at the level of the knee. Intraneural perineuroma usually affects young people and manifests as a focal and fusiform nerve enlargement. In this article, we review clinical characteristics and radiologic appearances of these neurogenic lesions, observing pathologic correlation, when possible.

  20. In silico Therapeutics for Neurogenic Hypertension and Vasovagal Syncope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojić, Tijana; Perović, Vladimir R.; Glišić, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Neurocardiovascular diseases (NCVD) are the leading cause of death in the developed world and will remain so till 2020. In these diseases the pathologically changed nervous control of cardiovascular system has the central role. The actual NCV syndromes are neurogenic hypertension, representing the sympathetically mediated disorder, and vasovagal syncope, which is the vagally mediated disorders. Vasovagal syncope, the disease far from its etiological treatment, could benefit from recruiting and application of antimuscarinic drugs used in other parasympathetic disorders. The informational spectrum method (ISM), a method widely applied for the characterization of protein-protein interactions in the field of immunology, endocrinology and anti HIV drug discovery, was applied for the first time in the analysis of neurogenic hypertension and vasovagal syncope therapeutic targets. In silico analysis revealed the potential involvement of apelin in neurogenic hypertension. Applying the EIIP/ISM bioinformatics concept in investigation of drugs for treatment of vasovagal syncope suggests that 78% of tested antimuscarinic drugs could have anti vasovagal syncope effect. The presented results confirm that ISM is a promissing method for investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying pathophysiological proceses of NCV syndromes and discovery of therapeutics targets for their treatment. PMID:26834545

  1. Functional outcome of supratrigonal cystectomy and augmentation ileocystoplasty in adult patients with refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Jörg; Bartel, Peter; Pannek, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the functional outcome after supratrigonal cystectomy and augmentation ileocystoplasty in adult patients with refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). Retrospective follow-up investigation in a single spinal cord injury rehabilitation center. In 29 patients, urodynamic data before and after supratrigonal cystectomy and augmentation ileocystoplasty, clinical outcome and post-operative complications were evaluated. The median age of the 29 patients at the time of surgery was 31 years, a median 14 years after NLUTD had occurred. At the last follow-up visit (median 2.4, range 0.4-9.0 years post-operatively), 20/29 patients (69%) were continent compared to 2/29 pre-operatively (P = 0.001). Furthermore, 16 patients required no or less detrusor relaxation therapy after augmentation ileocystoplasty. Augmentation cystoplasty resulted in a significant (P = 0.001) increase in the median bladder capacity (from 240 ml to 500 ml) and compliance (from 13 ml/cm H2 O to 50 ml/cm H2 O). The median maximum detrusor pressure had decreased significantly (P = 0.001) from 38 cm H2 O to 15 cm H2 O. Significantly (P = 0.001) fewer patients presented with a risk for renal damage (1 vs. 15 with maximum detrusor pressure >40 cm H2 O and 1 vs. 12 with detrusor compliance <20 ml/cm H2 O) at the last follow-up. The following complications were observed in 11/29 (38%) patients: paralytic and obstructive ileus, impaired bowel function, bladder stones, dehiscence, metabolic acidosis and autonomic dysreflexia. Protection of renal function, adequate bladder capacity and low detrusor pressure can be achieved using supratrigonal cystectomy and augmentation ileocystoplasty in patients suffering from refractory NLUTD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Clinical course of a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence symptoms followed at a tertiary center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Lebl

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To characterize a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence followed-up in a tertiary center. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 50 medical records of children who had attained bladder control or minimum age of 5 years, using a structured protocol that included lower urinary tract dysfunction symptoms, comorbidities, associated manifestations, physical examination, voiding diary, complementary tests, therapeutic options, and clinical outcome, in accordance with the 2006 and 2014 International Children's Continence Society standardizations. Results: Female patients represented 86.0% of this sample. Mean age was 7.9 years and mean follow-up was 4.7 years. Urgency (56.0%, urgency incontinence (56.0%, urinary retention (8.0%, nocturnal enuresis (70.0%, urinary tract infections (62.0%, constipation (62.0%, and fecal incontinence (16.0% were the most prevalent symptoms and comorbidities. Ultrasound examinations showed alterations in 53.0% of the cases; the urodynamic study showed alterations in 94.7%. At the last follow-up, 32.0% of patients persisted with urinary incontinence. When assessing the diagnostic methods, 85% concordance was observed between the predictive diagnosis of overactive bladder attained through medical history plus non-invasive exams and the diagnosis of detrusor overactivity achieved through the invasive urodynamic study. Conclusions: This subgroup of patients with clinical characteristics of an overactive bladder, with no history of urinary tract infection, and normal urinary tract ultrasound and uroflowmetry, could start treatment without invasive studies even at a tertiary center. Approximately one-third of the patients treated at the tertiary level remained refractory to treatment.

  3. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injury - bladder and urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... Types of bladder injuries include: Blunt trauma (such as a blow to the body) Penetrating wounds (such as bullet or stab wounds) The ...

  4. How frequent are overactive bladder symptoms in women with urodynamic verification of an overactive bladder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniel, Ahmet Özgür; Ergenoğlu, Mete Ahmet; Meseri, Reci; Aşkar, Niyazi; Itil, Ismail Mete

    2012-01-01

    To determine the relationship between overactive bladder symptoms and urodynamic verification of overactive bladder. Between June 2011 and November 2011, 159 patients underwent urodynamics (UDS) at our urogynecology unit in the Ege University Hospital. Of these, 95 patients who complained of urgency, did not have any overt neurological diseases, bladder outlet obstruction and did not take any medication affecting the lower urinary tract function were evaluated. SPSS (ver. 15.0) was used to evaluate the data and the chi-square test and t test for independent samples were used for analysis. The mean age was found to be 54.5±12. Frequency was the most frequent symptom in women with overactive bladder (OAB) (82.1%), nocturia (57.8%) and (57.8%) urgency urinary incontinence followed in frequency. Detrusor over activity incidence was found to be 38.9%. There was no significant relationship between the presence of detrusor over activity (DOA) and OAB symptoms. Leak at urodynamics was found in 46.3% and there is no significant association with detrusor overactivity. Total bladder capacity was found to be significantly lower in women who had DOA (p=0.000). It appears that overactive bladder symptoms do not predict detrusor over activity. Urodynamic investigation is not mandatory in the initial management of women with only OAB symptoms.

  5. The role of a combined regimen with intravesical chemotherapy and hyperthermia in the management of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, R.; Witjes, J.A.; Inman, B.A.; Leibovitch, I.; Laufer, M.; Nativ, O.; Colombo, R.

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT: Due to the suboptimal clinical outcomes of current therapies for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), the search for better therapeutic options continues. One option is chemohyperthermia (C-HT): microwave-induced hyperthermia (HT) with intravesical chemotherapy, typically mitomycin C

  6. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Grace

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bladder cancer is the commonest malignancy of the urinary tract. In this review, we look at the latest developments in the diagnosis and management of this condition. Cystoscopy and urine cytology are the most important tools in the diagnosis and follow-up of bladder cancer. Various alternatives have been investigated, either to reduce the frequency of cystoscopy, or improve its sensitivity for detection of tumors. These include urine-based markers and point-of-care tests. Narrow-band imaging and photodynamic diagnosis/blue-light cystoscopy have shown promise in improving detection and reducing recurrence of bladder tumors, by improving the completion of bladder resection when compared with standard resection in white light. The majority of patients with a new diagnosis of bladder cancer have non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, which requires adjuvant intravesical chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy. Recent developments in post-resection intravesical regimens are discussed. For patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, both laparoscopic radical cystectomy and robot-assisted radical cystectomy have been shown to reduce peri-operative morbidity, while being oncologically equivalent to open radical cystectomy in the medium term. Bladder-preserving strategies entail resection and chemoradiation, and in selected patients give equivalent results to surgery. The development, advantages, and disadvantages of these newer approaches are also discussed.

  7. Optogenetic Modulation of Urinary Bladder Contraction for Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hong; Hong, Jin Ki; Jang, Ja Yun; An, Jieun; Lee, Kyu-Sung; Kang, Tong Mook; Shin, Hyun Joon; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis

    2017-01-01

    As current clinical approaches for lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction such as pharmacological and electrical stimulation treatments lack target specificity, thus resulting in suboptimal outcomes with various side effects, a better treatment modality with spatial and temporal target-specificity is necessary. In this study, we delivered optogenetic membrane proteins, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR), to bladder smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of mice using either the Cre-loxp transgenic system or a viral transfection method. The results showed that depolarizing ChR2-SMCs with blue light induced bladder contraction, whereas hyperpolarizing NpHR-SMCs with yellow light suppressed PGE2-induced overactive contraction. We also confirmed that optogenetic contraction of bladder smooth muscles in this study is not neurogenic, but solely myogenic, and that optogenetic light stimulation can modulate the urination in vivo. This study thus demonstrated the utility of optogenetic modulation of smooth muscle as a means to actively control the urinary bladder contraction with spatial and temporal accuracy. These features would increase the efficacy of bladder control in LUT dysfunctions without the side effects of conventional clinical therapies.

  8. Experience with different botulinum toxins for the treatment of refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano M. Gomes

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To report our experience with the use of the botulinum toxin-A (BoNT/A formulations Botox® and Prosigne® in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO. MATERIALS AND METHODS: At a single institution, 45 consecutive patients with refractory urinary incontinence due to NDO received a single intradetrusor (excluding the trigone treatment with botulinum toxin type A 200 or 300 units. Botox was used for the first 22 patients, and Prosigne for the subsequent 23 patients. Evaluations at baseline and week 12 included assessment of continence and urodynamics. Safety evaluations included monitoring of vital signs, hematuria during the procedure, hospital stay, and spontaneous adverse event reports. RESULTS: A total of 42 patients were evaluated (74% male; mean age, 34.8 years. Significant improvements from baseline in maximum cystometric capacity (MCC, maximum detrusor pressure during bladder contraction, and compliance were observed in both groups (P < 0.05. Improvement in MCC was significantly greater with Botox versus Prosigne (+103.3% vs. +42.2%; P = 0.019. Continence was achieved by week 12 in 16 Botox recipients (76.2% and 10 Prosigne recipients (47.6%; P = 0.057. No severe adverse events were observed. Mild adverse events included 2 cases of transient hematuria on the first postoperative day (no specific treatment required, and 3 cases of afebrile urinary tract infection. CONCLUSIONS: Botox and Prosigne produce distinct effects in patients with NDO, with a greater increase in MCC with Botox. Further evaluation will be required to assess differences between these formulations.

  9. Botulinum toxin A for the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Deffontaines-Rufin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO is common in patients who suffer from multiple sclerosis (MS. When the usual pharmacological treatment fails, botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A injections can be proposed. The safety and efficacy of this treatment are already well known, but only a few studies focus on its use in patients with MS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-one patients with MS underwent their first BTX-A injection for refractory NDO. They had clinical and urodynamic cystometry assessment before and three months after injection. The patients were divided in three groups according to treatment efficacy: full success (total urinary continence, no overactive detrusor, improvement, or total failure (urge incontinence and overactive detrusor. RESULTS: 77% of the patients had clinical improvement or full success of the treatment with a reduction of their urgency and incontinence. Significant urodynamic improvement after treatment was shown on different parameters: volume at first involuntary bladder contraction (p = 0.0000001, maximum cystometric capacity (p = 0.0035, maximum detrusor pressure (p = 0.0000001. 46% of the patients were in the "full success" group. 31% of the patients had a partial improvement. 23% of the patients had no efficacy of the treatment. Duration of MS was a predictive factor of treatment failure (p = 0.015. CONCLUSIONS: Despite that a full success was obtained in 46% of the cases, BTX-A injection therapy failed to treat refractory NDO in 23% of patients suffering from MS. Duration of the disease was a predictive factor for an inefficient treatment. The injection therapy should be considered as soon as oral anticholinergic drugs fail to reduce NDO.

  10. Pseudotumoral Malacoplakia of the Bladder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ra

    dilatation on the right side and a solid bladder mass 10 cm in diameter suspicious of bladder cancer. Transurethral resection of the tumor was incomplete, due to the large volume of the bladder mass. Histological examination of the resected .... essential steps in the killing of bacteria by phagocytosis13. Alterations in the ...

  11. Curative effect assessment of bandage contact lens in neurogenic keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Zhao Sun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the curative effect of bandage contact lens in neurogenic keratitis.METHODS:Twenty cases of neurogenic keratitis were studied attheDepartment of Ophthalmology, the first Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, between October 2012 and June 2013. These included 13 males and 7 females, aged from 35 to 88y. Patients were voluntarily divided into an experimental group (lens wearing group, n=10 and control group (drug therapy, n=10. In experimental group patients wore silicone hydrogel bandage soft contact lens. Both groups used the following eyedrops:0.5% levofloxacin TID; 0.5% Sodium carboxymethyl cellulose QID; fibroblast growth factor BID; ganciclovir BID [cases complicated with herpes simplex virus (HSV]; compound tropicamide BID (cases concurrent hypopyon. The healing time of corneal ulcer and complication rates were observed in the two groups.RESULTS: The healing time of corneal ulcer in the experimental group was 10.80±4.44d versus 46.70±13.88d in the control group (P<0.05. No complications occurred in the experimental group, except for the lens falling off twice in one case, the patient recovered eight days after rewearing the lens. While in the control group, all cases vascularized, 2 cases were complicated with descemetocele that recovered with amniotic membrane transplantation and 1 case was complicated with corneal perforation that recovered by autologous conjunctival flap covering.CONCLUSION: Bandage contact lens is a safe and effective method of treating neurogenic keratitis and significantly shortened the healing time of corneal ulcer.

  12. Sacral neuromodulation in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllner, J; Krebs, J; Pannek, J

    2016-02-01

    This is a retrospective chart analysis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD). This study was conducted in a spinal cord injury rehabilitation center in Switzerland. The charts of all patients who underwent SNM (testing and/or permanent implantation) because of NLUTD at our institution between 2007 and 2013 were evaluated. Treatment outcomes and complications were recorded. A total of 50 patients, 30 women and 20 men, with a mean age of 46 (±14) years, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The most frequent cause for SNM was spinal cord injury in 35 patients (70%). Median duration of the underlying disease was 9.5 (±9.3) years. In all, 35 patients (70%) received a permanent implant. The complication rate was 16% (8/50). At the last follow-up, SNM was in use in 32 patients. In 26 patients with SNM because of detrusor overactivity, voiding frequency per 24 h was significantly reduced from 9 to 6, and daily pad use rate was significantly improved (2.6 versus 0.6 pads per 24h). On comparing urodynamic assessment of detrusor function before and under SNM, no significant suppression of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) was detected. In nine patients with chronic neurogenic urinary retention, median postvoid residual urine was significantly reduced from 370 to 59 ml. In all, 94% of the patients were either very satisfied or satisfied with SNM. SNM might be an additional therapy option in carefully selected patients with NLUTD. On the basis of our results, urodynamic evaluation before SNM is mandatory, as the procedure does not seem to be suited to significantly alleviate NDO.

  13. Clinical and Treatment Features of Orbital Neurogenic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Bingöl Kızıltunç

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and treatment features of orbital neurogenic tumors. Material and Method: The records of 35 patients with orbital neurogenic tumors who were diagnosed and treated at Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, between 1998 and 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Results: Orbitotomy via a cutaneous approach was performed in 21 (60% cases and orbitotomy via a transconjunctival approach was performed in 7 (20% cases. Three (8% cases had been operated at different centers. Four (12% cases were diagnosed clinically. Total excisional biopsy was performed in 11 (31.4% cases, subtotal excisional biopsy was performed in 7 (20%, and incisional biopsy was performed in 10 (28.6% cases. 14 (40% 35 cases were diagnosed as meningioma, 12 (34% as peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and 9 (26% cases were diagnosed as optic nerve glioma. Six (43% meningioma cases were optic nerve sheath meningioma, 5 (36% were sphenoid wing meningioma, 2 (14% were ectopic meningioma, and 1 (7% was perisellar meningioma. Six (50% of peripheral nerve sheath tumors were schwannoma, 2 (16% were solitary neurofibroma, 4 (34% were plexiform neurofibroma. External beam radiotherapy was performed in 15 (42.8% cases, cyberknife radiosurgery in 1 (2.8% , chemotherapy in 1 (2.8%, and enucleation ( because of neovascular glaucoma and vitreous hemorrhage was performed in 1 (2.8% case. Discussion: The most common orbital neurogenic tumors are meningioma, peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and optic nerve glioma. For meningioma and glioma, external beam radiotherapy is required; for schwannoma and solitary neurofibroma, total excisional biopsy is the preferred treatment. The success of visual and anatomic results are high after treatment. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 335-9

  14. Neurogenic mucosal bicarbonate secretion in guinea pig duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, G; Fang, X; Wang, G D; Liu, S; Wang, X Y; Xia, Y; Wood, J D

    2013-02-01

    To test a hypothesis that: (i) duodenal pH and osmolarity are individually controlled at constant set points by negative feedback control centred in the enteric nervous system (ENS); (ii) the purinergic P2Y(1) receptor subtype is expressed by non-cholinergic secretomotor/vasodilator neurons, which represent the final common excitatory pathway from the ENS to the bicarbonate secretory glands. Ussing chamber and pH-stat methods investigated involvement of the P2Y(1) receptor in neurogenic stimulation of mucosal bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)) secretion in guinea pig duodenum. ATP increased HCO(3)(-) secretion with an EC(50) of 160 nM. MRS2179, a selective P2Y(1) purinergic receptor antagonist, suppressed ATP-evoked HCO(3)(-) secretion by 47% and Cl(-) secretion by 63%. Enteric neuronal blockade by tetrodotoxin or exposure to a selective vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, VPAC(1)) receptor antagonist suppressed ATP-evoked HCO(3)(-) secretion by 61 and 41%, respectively, and Cl- by 97 and 70% respectively. Pretreatment with the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine did not alter ATP-evoked HCO3(-) or Cl(-) secretion. Whereas acid directly stimulates the mucosa to release ATP and stimulate HCO(3)(-) secretion in a cytoprotective manner, neurogenically evoked HCO(3)(-) secretion accounts for feedback control of optimal luminal pH for digestion. ATP stimulates duodenal HCO(3)(-) secretion through an excitatory action at purinergic P2Y(1) receptors on neurons in the submucosal division of the ENS. Stimulation of the VIPergic non-cholinergic secretomotor/vasodilator neurons, which are one of three classes of secretomotor neurons, accounts for most, if not all, of the neurogenic secretory response evoked by ATP. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Left-sided gall bladder: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrungoo R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Left-sided gall bladder without situs inversus viscerum is a rare albeit recognized clinical entity. We report our experience of two cases of left-sided gall bladder in two women aged 36 and 48 who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for chronic calculous cholecystitis. Left-sided gall bladder may provide an unusual surprise to the surgeons during laparoscopy as routine pre-operative studies may not always detect the anomaly. Awareness of the unpredictable confluence of the cystic duct into the common bile duct (CBD and selective use of intraoperative cholangiography aid in the safe laparoscopic management of this unusual entity.

  16. Simultaneous augmentation cystoplasty and cuff only artificial urinary sphincter in children and young adults with neurogenic urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viers, B R; Elliott, D S; Kramer, S A

    2014-04-01

    We review our experience with artificial urinary sphincter and augmentation cystoplasty in patients with neurogenic bladder. This is the largest known series to specifically evaluate cuff only artificial urinary sphincter at augmentation cystoplasty. A total of 18 males underwent simultaneous artificial urinary sphincter and augmentation cystoplasty at our institution between 1982 and 2012, of whom 13 (72%) underwent cuff only artificial urinary sphincter. Outcomes included urinary continence, emptying modality, artificial urinary sphincter status, complications and additional procedures. Of the patients undergoing augmentation cystoplasty and cuff only artificial urinary sphincter 10 (77%) were initially continent. Average time of continence was 52.9 months. Four patients (31%) required no additional procedures and remained continent. Urinary incontinence developed in 3 patients (23%) immediately postoperatively and in 6 (46%) subsequently. Ultimately 9 patients (69%) required conversion to complete artificial urinary sphincter at a mean of 36.9 months postoperatively. Overall 12 patients (92%) were continent at followup. There were no artificial sphincter specific complications in patients undergoing the cuff only procedure with conversion to complete artificial urinary sphincter. After conversion to complete artificial urinary sphincter 3 patients (23%) experienced artificial sphincter specific complications. Reoperation was performed in 10 patients (77%), for 13 total procedures (1.3 per patient). There were no complications with cuff only artificial urinary sphincter and 6 complications with complete artificial urinary sphincter (p = 0.025). Finally, patients undergoing cuff only artificial urinary sphincter requiring revision were younger than those not requiring revision (15.6 vs 30.8 years, p = 0.026). Simultaneous cuff only artificial urinary sphincter and augmentation cystoplasty appears safe and efficacious in patients with neurogenic bladder, with fewer

  17. [Pelvic floor muscles training, electrical stimulation, bladder training and lifestyle interventions to manage lower urinary tract dysfunction in multiple sclerosis: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, L; Tombal, B; Castille, Y; Opsomer, R-J; Detrembleur, C

    2014-03-01

    To assess the effectiveness of conservative therapeutic approaches in a multiple sclerosis population. Review was performed in PubMed, PEDro, Scopus and Cochrane Library using combinations of the following keywords: multiple sclerosis; bladder dysfunction; overactive bladder; detrusor hyperreflexia; urge incontinence; urgency; stress incontinence; pelvic floor muscle; biofeedback; PTNS; tibial nerve; bladder training; physical therapy; physiotherapy; conservative treatment and behavioral therapy. Six randomized articles including 289 patients were selected. Four papers exhibited strong scores for the methodological quality assessment. The parameters always significantly improved concerned: number of incontinence episodes (decreased from 64% to 86% after treatment versus before treatment), quality of life (P≤0.001), severity of irritative symptoms (decreased by more than 50% after treatment versus before treatment), and nocturia (P=0.035 to Purinary disorders in multiple sclerosis populations with mild disability. However, the analyses are based on six studies within only four showed good methodological quality. No strong conclusions regarding treatment approaches can be drawn from this review. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. A One Year Prospective Study of Neurogenic Stuttering Following Stroke: Incidence and Co-Occurring Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theys, C.; van Wieringen, A.; Sunaert, S.; Thijs, V.; De Nil, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    In this prospective study, data on incidence, stuttering characteristics, co-occurring speech disorders, and recovery of neurogenic stuttering in a large sample of stroke participants were assessed. Following stroke onset, 17 of 319 participants (5.3%; 95% CI, 3.2-8.3) met the criteria for neurogenic stuttering. Stuttering persisted in at least…

  19. Detrusor underactivity and the underactive bladder: a new clinical entity? A review of current terminology, definitions, epidemiology, aetiology, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Nadir I; Chapple, Christopher R; Abrams, Paul; Dmochowski, Roger; Haab, François; Nitti, Victor; Koelbl, Heinz; van Kerrebroeck, Philip; Wein, Alan J

    2014-02-01

    Detrusor underactivity (DU) is a common cause of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in both men and women, yet is poorly understood and underresearched. To review the current terminology, definitions, and diagnostic criteria in use, along with the epidemiology and aetiology of DU, as a basis for building a consensus on the standardisation of current concepts. The Medline and Embase databases were searched for original articles and reviews in the English language pertaining to DU. Search terms included underactive bladder, detrusor underactivity, impaired detrusor contractility, acontractile detrusor, detrusor failure, detrusor areflexia, raised PVR [postvoid residual], and urinary retention. Selected studies were assessed for content relating to DU. A wide range of terminology is applied in contemporary usage. The only term defined by the standardisation document of the International Continence Society (ICS) in 2002 was the urodynamic term detrusor underactivity along with detrusor acontractility. The ICS definition provides a framework, considering the urodynamic abnormality of contraction and how this affects voiding; however, this is necessarily limited. DU is present in 9-48% of men and 12-45% of older women undergoing urodynamic evaluation for non-neurogenic LUTS. Multiple aetiologies are implicated, affecting myogenic function and neural control mechanisms, as well as the efferent and afferent innervations. Diagnostic criteria are based on urodynamic approximations relating to bladder contractility such as maximum flow rate and detrusor pressure at maximum flow. Other estimates rely on mathematical formulas to calculate isovolumetric contractility indexes or urodynamic "stop tests." Most methods have major disadvantages or are as yet poorly validated. Contraction strength is only one aspect of bladder voiding function. The others are the speed and persistence of the contraction. The term detrusor underactivity and its associated symptoms and signs remain

  20. Stages of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through the urethra and leaves the body. Enlarge Anatomy of the male urinary system (left panel) and female urinary system (right panel) showing the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. Urine is made in the renal tubules and collects in the renal pelvis of ...

  1. Neurogenic muscle hypertrophy in a 12-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutelija Fattorini, Matija; Gagro, Alenka; Dapic, Tomislav; Krakar, Goran; Marjanovic, Josip

    2017-01-01

    Muscular hypertrophy secondary to denervation is very rare, but well-documented phenomena in adults. This is the first report of a child with neurogenic unilateral hypertrophy due to S1 radiculopathy. A 12-year-old girl presented with left calf hypertrophy and negative history of low back pain or trauma. The serum creatinine kinase level and inflammatory markers were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging showed muscle hypertrophy of the left gastrocnemius and revealed a protruded lumbar disc at the L5-S1 level. The protruded disc abuts the S1 root on the left side. Electromyography showed mild left S1 radiculopathy. Passive stretching and work load might clarify the origin of neurogenic hypertrophy but there is still a need for further evidence. Clinical, laboratory, magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography findings showed that S1 radiculopathy could be a cause of unilateral calf swelling in youth even in the absence of a history of back or leg pain. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-Neurogenic Language Disorders: A Preliminary Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Mario F

    Few publications deal with non-neurogenic language disorders (NNLDs), distinct from psychogenic speech disorders such as psychogenic dysphonia or stuttering. NNLDs are alterations in language owing to psychosomatic preoccupations, conversion disorder, psychiatric disorders, or other psychological reasons. To identify and classify the range of NNLDs and their characteristics. This review summarizes the literature on disturbances in language, broadly defined as the use of symbols for communication, which may have a psychogenic or psychiatric etiology. The literature suggests a classification for NNLDs that includes psychogenic aphasia with dysgrammatism; psychogenic "lalias" including oxylalia and agitolalia, palilalia and echolalia, xenolalia, glossolalia, and coprolalia; psychologically-mediated word usage; psychotic language; and psychogenic forms of the foreign accent syndrome. Clinicians and researchers have insufficiently emphasized the presence of NNLDs, their characteristics, and their identification. Yet, these disorders may be the first or predominant manifestation of a psychologically-mediated illness. There are 2 steps to recognition. The first is to know how to distinguish NNLDs from the manifestations of neurogenic language impairments after a neurological evaluation. The second step is awareness of specific associated and examination features that suggest the presence of a NNLD. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurogenic gene regulatory pathways in the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng; Angerer, Lynne M; Angerer, Robert C

    2016-01-15

    During embryogenesis the sea urchin early pluteus larva differentiates 40-50 neurons marked by expression of the pan-neural marker synaptotagmin B (SynB) that are distributed along the ciliary band, in the apical plate and pharyngeal endoderm, and 4-6 serotonergic neurons that are confined to the apical plate. Development of all neurons has been shown to depend on the function of Six3. Using a combination of molecular screens and tests of gene function by morpholino-mediated knockdown, we identified SoxC and Brn1/2/4, which function sequentially in the neurogenic regulatory pathway and are also required for the differentiation of all neurons. Misexpression of Brn1/2/4 at low dose caused an increase in the number of serotonin-expressing cells and at higher dose converted most of the embryo to a neurogenic epithelial sphere expressing the Hnf6 ciliary band marker. A third factor, Z167, was shown to work downstream of the Six3 and SoxC core factors and to define a branch specific for the differentiation of serotonergic neurons. These results provide a framework for building a gene regulatory network for neurogenesis in the sea urchin embryo. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Leiomyoma of the bladder. Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Rosenblatt

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of leiomyoma of the bladder consideringdiagnosis, treatment and literature review. A leiomyoma of thebladder was diagnosed in a 60-year-old woman based on physicalexamination, urinary tract imaging (ultrasonography, computedtomography and magnetic resonance imaging andcystourethroscopy with biopsy of the lesion. Cystourethroscopyshowed a bladder tumor covered by normal epithelium.Management included complete transurethral resection with norelapse after a seven-month follow-up.

  5. Chemotherapy for bladder cancer: treatment guidelines for neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Donat, S Machele; Bellmunt, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    chemotherapy. Systemic cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is the only current modality that has been shown in phase 3 trials to improve survival in responsive patients with advanced urothelial cancer. A panel of international experts has formulated grade A through D recommendations for the management......To determine the optimal use of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and metastatic setting in patients with advanced urothelial cell carcinoma, a consensus conference was convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Société Internationale d'Urologie (SIU) to critically review...... the published literature on chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. This article reports the development of international guidelines for the treatment of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Bladder preservation is also discussed...

  6. Initial experience with the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity with a new β-3 agonist (mirabegron) in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllner, J; Pannek, J

    2016-01-01

    It is a retrospective chart analysis. In patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) due to spinal cord injury (SCI), neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) can cause both deterioration of the upper urinary tract and urinary incontinence. Antimuscarinic treatment is frequently discontinued due to side effects or lack of efficacy, whereas injection of onabotulinumtoxin into the detrusor is a minimally invasive procedure with risks of urinary retention, infection and haematuria. Mirabegron, a new β-3 agonist, is a potential new agent for treatment of NDO. Aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of mirabegron in SCI patients with NLUTD. Swiss Paraplegic Center, Nottwil, Switzerland. A retrospective chart analysis of SCI patient treated with mirabegron. Fifteen patients with NDO were treated with mirabegron for a period of at least 6 weeks. Significant reduction of the frequency of bladder evacuation per 24 h (8.1 vs 6.4, P=0.003), and of incontinence episodes per 24 h (2.9 vs 1.3, P=0.027) was observed. Furthermore, we observed improvements in bladder capacity (from 365  to 419 ml), compliance (from 28 to 45 ml cm(-1) H(2)0) and detrusor pressure during storage phase (45.8  vs 30 cm H(2)0). At follow-up, 9/15 patients were satisfied with the therapy, 4/15 reported side effects (3 × aggravation of urinary incontinence, 1 × constipation). Mirabegron may evolve as an alternative in the treatment of NDO. We observed improvements in urodynamic and clinical parameters. Due to the limited number of patients and the retrospective nature of the study, prospective, placebo-controlled studies are necessary.

  7. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Fan Hsieh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA and European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder.

  8. Definition and symptoms of underactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan D. Uren

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underactive bladder (UAB is a symptom syndrome reflecting the urodynamic observation of detrusor underactivity (DU, a voiding contraction of reduced strength and/or duration, leading to prolonged or incomplete bladder emptying. An International Continence Society Working Group has described UAB as characterised by a slow urinary stream, hesitancy and straining to void, with or without a feeling of incomplete bladder emptying and dribbling, often with storage symptoms. Since DU often coexists with bladder outlet obstruction, or storage dysfunction (detrusor overactivity or incontinence, the exact contribution of the DU to the presenting complaints can be difficult to establish. The presence of voiding and post voiding lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS is implicitly expected in UAB, but a reduced sensation of fullness is reported by some patients, and storage LUTS are also an important factor in many affected patients. These may result from a postvoid residual, but often they do not. The storage LUTS are often the key driver in leading the patient to seek healthcare input. Nocturia is particularly common and bothersome, but what the role of DU is in all the range of influences on nocturia has not been established. Qualitative research has established a broad impact on everyday life as a result of these symptoms. In general, people appear to manage the voiding LUTS relatively well, but the storage LUTS may be problematic.

  9. Bladder cancer: molecular determinants of personalized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Tortora, Giampaolo; Cheng, Liang; Moch, Holger; Scarpelli, Marina; Reymundo, Carlos; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular and genetic studies have provided new perspectives on the histologic classification of bladder tumors. Recent developments in the field of molecular mutational pathway analyses based on next generation sequencing technology together with classic data derived from the description of mutations in the FGFR3 (fibroblast growth factor receptor 3) gene, mutations on TP53 gene, and cDNA technology profiling data gives support to a differentiated taxonomy of bladder cancer. All these changes are behind the use of non-traditional approach to therapy of bladder cancer patients and are ready to change our daily practice of uro-oncology. The observed correlation of some molecular alterations with tumor behavior and the identification of their targets at cellular level might support the use of molecular changes together with morphological data to develop new clinical and biological strategies to manage patients with urothelial cancer. The current review provides comprehensive data to support personalized therapy for bladder cancer based on an integrated approach including pathologic and clinical features and molecular biology.

  10. Urology and nephrology update: bladder and kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, David C; Fox, Cara-Louise

    2014-01-01

    It has been estimated that bladder and kidney cancers would be diagnosed in approximately 140,000 Americans in 2013, with approximately 30,000 dying from these cancers. Urinary tract cancers affect men more commonly than they do women, and the median age at diagnosis is 65 years. Major risk factors for these cancers include tobacco smoking, certain chemical exposures, family history, age, and obesity. Unexplained hematuria in adults should be evaluated to exclude bladder and kidney cancer. Staging of bladder and kidney cancer should be based on the TNM staging system, which, along with tumor grade, provides important treatment and prognostic information. Urothelial cell carcinoma is the most common type of bladder cancer; it also can occur in the kidneys or ureters. Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer. Treatment options for bladder cancer vary widely, depending on the grade of the cancer. Early non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer may be removed cystoscopically and/or treated with intravesical immunotherapy or chemotherapy, whereas patients with muscle-invasive bladder tumors typically require surgery. Management of kidney cancer is almost always surgical, unless the patient is too ill to undergo surgery or chooses palliative care. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  11. Bladder Pain Syndrome International Consultation on Incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, P.; Lin, A.; Nordling, J.

    2010-01-01

    cytology and cystoscopy are recommended if clinically indicated. Treatment progresses from conservative management through various oral and intravesical therapies, with most surgical therapies reserved for unresponsive cases. Pain management is critical throughout the treatment process. The consultation......Aims of Study: The Bladder Pain Syndrome Committee of the International Consultation on Incontinence was assigned the task by the consultation of reviewing the syndrome, formerly known as interstitial cystitis, in a comprehensive fashion. This included the topics of definition, nomenclature...... possible, existing evidence was assessed and a level of recommendation was developed according to the Oxford system of classification. Results: The consultation decided to refer to the condition as "bladder pain syndrome" (BPS) because the designation is more descriptive of the clinical condition...

  12. Vesicoureteral reflux and bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Lee, Yong Seung; Im, Young Jae; Han, Sang Won

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between vesicoureteral reflux and bladder dysfunction is inseparable and has long been emphasized. However, the primary concern of all physicians treating patients with vesicoureteral reflux is the prevention of renal scarring and eventual deterioration of renal function. Bladder dysfunction, urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux are the three important factors which are closely related to each other and contribute to the formation of renal scar. Especially, there is ongoing discussion regarding the role of bladder dysfunction in the prognosis of both medically and surgically treated vesicoureteral reflux. The effect of bladder dysfunction on VUR is mostly via inadequate sphincter relaxation during infancy which is closer to immature bladder dyscoordination rather than true dysfunction. But after toilet training, functional obstruction caused by voluntary sphincter constriction during voiding is responsible through elevation in bladder pressure, thus distorting the architecture of bladder and ureterovesical junction. Reports suggest that voiding phase abnormalities in lower urinary tract dysfunction contributes to lower spontaneous resolution rate of VUR. However, filling phase abnormalities such as involuntary detrusor contraction can also cause VUR even in the absence of dysfunctional voiding. With regards to the effect of bladder dysfunction on treatment, meta-analysis reveals that the cure rate of VUR following endoscopic treatment is less in children with bladder bowel dysfunction but there is no difference for open surgery. The pathophysiology of bladder dysfunction associated with UTI can be explained by the 'milk-back' of contaminated urine back into the bladder and significant residual urine resulting from functional outlet obstruction. In addition, involuntary detrusor contraction can decrease perfusion of the bladder mucosa thus decreasing mucosal immunity and creating a condition prone to UTI. In terms of renal scarring

  13. Change in Management Based on Pathologic Second Opinion Among Bladder Cancer Patients Presenting to a Comprehensive Cancer Center: Implications for Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchey, Adam M; Manimala, Neil J; Dickinson, Shohreh; Dhillon, Jasreman; Agarwal, Gautum; Lockhart, Jorge L; Spiess, Philippe E; Sexton, Wade J; Pow-Sang, Julio M; Gilbert, Scott M; Poch, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the incidence and degree of change from a pathologic second opinion of bladder biopsies at a Comprehensive Cancer Center that were initially performed at referring community hospitals. The secondary objective was to determine the impact the potential changes would have on a patient's treatment. Dedicated genitourinary pathologists reviewed 1191 transurethral biopsies of the bladder and/or prostatic urethra from 2008 to 2013. Major and minor treatment changes were defined as altering recommendations for cystectomy, systemic chemotherapy, or primary cancer diagnosis, and alterations in intravesical regimens, respectively. There were 326/1191 patients (27.4%) with a pathologic change on second opinion: grade (62/1191, 5.2%), stage (115/1191, 9.7%), muscle in the specimen (29/1191, 2.4%), presence or absence of carcinoma in situ (34/1191, 2.9%). Outside pathology did not address the presence or absence of lymphovascular invasion in 620/759 (81.7%) of invasive cases (≥cT1), of which 35/620 (5.6%) had lymphovascular invasion. There were 212 mixed, variant, or nonurothelial histologies detected in 199/1191 (16.7%) patients, with 114/212 (53.7%) resulting in reclassification by our pathologists. Potential treatment alterations accounted for 182/1191 (15.3%) of cases, with 141/1191 (11.8%) imparting major changes. There were 82/1191 (6.8%) changes in recommendation for a radical cystectomy, 38/1191 (3.2%) had a complete change in primary tumor type, and 21/1191 (1.8%) for change in chemotherapy regimen. The amount and degree of pathologic changes and its potential impact on treatment emphasize the importance of bladder cancer patients having their histology reviewed by genitourinary-dedicated pathologists. In our cohort, 15.3% of patients could see a treatment alteration, with 11.8% being a major change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bladder neck disease and kidney damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mudoni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary bladder neck obstruction (PBNO was first described in men by Marion in 1933. The precise cause of PBNO has not been clearly elucidated. This paper review the theories on etiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation and treatments for PBNO. Also this paper focuses on management of patients with complications like acute urine retention, hydroureteronephrosis and severe renal failure. The treatment options for men and women with PBNO include careful clinical evaluation, pharmacotherapy with alpha-blockers and surgical intervention.

  15. Using Mitrofanoff's principle and Monti's technique as a surgical option for bladder augmentation with a continent stoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Antonio CP

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hydronephrosis, reflux and renal failure are serious complications that occur in patients with neurogenic bladder associated with myelomeningocele. When the bladder compliance is lost, it is imperative to carry out surgery aimed at reducing bladder storage pressure. An ileocystoplasty, and for patients not suitable for intermittent catheterization, using the Mitrofanoff principle to form a continent stoma and the subsequent closure of the bladder neck, can be used. We report here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, an association between two previously described techniques (the Mitrofanoff principle and the technique of Monti, that can solve the problem of a short appendix in obese patients. Case presentation A 33-year-old male Caucasian patient with myelomeningocele and neurogenic bladder developed low bladder compliance (4.0 mL/cm H2O while still maintaining normal renal function. A bladder augmentation (ileocystoplasty with continent derivation principle (Mitrofanoff was performed. During surgery, we found that the patient's appendix was too short and was insufficient to reach the skin. We decided to make an association between the Mitrofanoff conduit and the ileal technique of Monti, through which we performed an anastomosis of the distal stump of the appendix to the bladder (with an antireflux valve. Later, the proximal stump of the appendix was anastomosed to an ileal segment of 2.0 cm that was open longitudinally and reconfigured transversally (Monti technique, modeled by a 12-Fr urethral catheter, and finally, the distal stump was sutured at the patient's navel. After the procedure, a suprapubic cystostomy (22 Fr and a Foley catheter (10 Fr through the continent conduit were left in place. The patient had recovered well and was discharged on the tenth day after surgery. He remained with the Foley catheter (through the conduit for 21 days and cystostomy for 30 days. Six months after surgery he was

  16. Neurogenic claudication secondary to degenerative spondylolisthesis: is fusion always necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, W J; Mohamed, Mohamed; Bhojak, Manesh; Wilby, Martin

    2016-12-01

    This study examines the efficacy and long-term safety of a midline sparing decompression for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). We specifically looked at the rate of re-operation with a lumbar fusion. Of the patients that did require a secondary fusion procedure, we examined retrospectively any risk factors (both clinical and radiological) that could have been identified pre-operatively to predict the necessity of a primary fusion procedure. Data was collected prospectively within a single surgeon practice at our institution. All patients had a diagnosis of neurogenic claudication secondary to DS. Radiological and clinical risk factors that could have predicted the requirement of a fusion procedure were retrospectively analysed. This is a study of 70 patients (46F:24M). The median age at surgery was 68 years. All patients had a diagnosis of neurogenic claudication and were treated with a mid-line sparing decompression. Following the primary procedure, patients' VAS and ODI scores for both leg and back pain improved significantly both at short-term follow-up (mean seven months) and sustained at long-term follow-up (range 16-57 months, mean 33 months; p < 0.0001 Wilcoxon matched pair ranks). Eight (11%) patients had symptom progression and required a further fusion procedure. We found that if on the pre-operative MRI, the patient had a facet joint angle of greater than 60°, and a preserved disc height (greater than 7 mm) this would increase the likelihood of the requirement for fusion. Of the patients that required a secondary fusion procedure, 6/8 patients (75%) had sagittal facets, hyperlordosis and a preserved disc height pre-operatively. A primary decompression using a midline sparing osteotomy is an effective procedure for the treatment of neurogenic claudication caused by DS. The second message is that on inspection of the pre-operative imaging, sagittally placed facet joints, a hyperlordosis and a preserved disc height then a fusion

  17. Increasing bladder capacity by foot stimulation in rats with spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqing; Liao, Limin; Wang, Zhaoxia; Li, Xing; Du, Wenjuan

    2017-09-15

    This study was to explore the possibility that foot stimulation increased bladder capacity(BC) in rats with neurogenic bladder secondary to T10 spinal cord injuries. In 20 awake rats (stimulation group) with T10 spinal cord injuries, 5 repeat cystometrograms (CMGs) were recorded. The 1st and 2nd CMGs were performed without stimulation. The 3rd, 4th, and 5th CMGs were done separately with 1 T, 2 T, and 4 T stimulation, respectively, through a pair of pad electrodes on the skin of the hind foot. In the control group of 20 rats, 5 repeat CMGs were recorded without foot stimulation. The threshold (T) was the minimal stimulation intensity to induce an observable toe twitch. In the stimulation group, foot stimulation with 2 T significantly increased the BC an additional 68.9% ± 20.82% (p stimulation with 4 T increased the BC an additional 120.9% ± 24.82% (p stimulation group, but the 4th (2 T) and 5th (4 T) CMGs were significantly increased (p stimulation of the foot was effective in inhibiting reflex bladder activity and increasing bladder capacity in spinal cord injury rats.

  18. The Epigenetics of Kidney Cancer and Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Amanda M.; Cairns, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Summary This review focuses on the epigenetic alterations of aberrant promoter hypermethylation of genes, histone modifications or RNA interference in cancer cells. The current knowledge of hypermethylation of allele(s) in classical tumor suppressor genes in inherited and sporadic cancer, candidate tumor suppressor and other cancer genes is summarized gene by gene. Global and array-based studies of tumor cell hypermethylation are discussed. The importance of standardization of scoring of the methylation status of a gene is highlighted. The histone marks associated with hypermethylated genes, and the microRNAs with dysregulated expression, in kidney or bladder tumor cells are also discussed. Kidney cancer has the highest mortality rate of the genitourinary cancers. There are management issues with the high recurrence rate of superficial bladder cancer while muscle invasive bladder cancer has a poor prognosis. These clinical problems are the basis for translational application of gene hypermethylation to the diagnosis and prognosis of kidney and bladder cancer. PMID:22126150

  19. Endobronchial neurogenic tumor: A combination of traumatic neuroma and neurofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Tandon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic neuromas are uncommon and benign lesions arising from a peripheral nerve injury during surgery. Here we describe a case with histopathologic features of both a traumatic neuroma and neurofibroma in a patient without integumentary physical exam findings nor prior surgical history. A 54 year old male was admitted for surgical debridement of a foot ulcer. During pre-operative evaluation and review of imaging multiple CT scans revealed a stable, 4 mm endobronchial lesion in the left lower lobe. Given history of nicotine abuse, bronchoscopy was performed. Bronchoscopy showed a pearly, polypoid lesion. Histopathological results showed strong positivity for S-100 protein and spindle cell proliferation. Repeat CT chest showed no new lesions in the bronchial tree. The rarity of this case is noted not only by the limited number of bronchial neurogenic tumors, but the combined features in this case of a traumatic neuroma and neurofibroma which has not been described.

  20. Neurogenic cardiomyopathy in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesdangsakonwut, S; Sunden, Y; Yamada, K; Nishizono, A; Sawa, H; Umemura, T

    2015-05-01

    Cardiomyopathies have been rarely described in rabbits. Here we report myocardial necrosis of the ventricular wall in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies. Myocardial lesions were found only in rabbits with brain lesions, and the severity of the cardiac lesions was proportional to that of the brain lesions. Neither the frequency nor the cumulative dose of anesthesia was related to the incidence or the severity of the myocardial lesions. The myocardial lesions were characterized by degeneration and/or necrosis of myocardial cells and were accompanied by contraction band necrosis, interstitial fibrosis, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. The brain lesions due to rabies virus infection were most prominent in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus, brainstem, and medulla. Rabies virus antigen was not found in the hearts of any rabbits. Based on these findings, the myocardial lesions were classified as neurogenic cardiomyopathy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Suprapubic Bladder Aspiration in Neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Akierman, Albert R.

    1987-01-01

    Suprapubic bladder aspiration in neonates is a simple, safe, and useful technique for collection of sterile urine. The procedure can be performed in the hospital or office. Neither sedation nor local anesthetic is required. Suprapubic bladder aspiration of urine is the preferred method of collecting urine for culture in septic neonates. The technique is also indicated to verify urinary tract infection in neonates. Suprapubic bladder aspiration is contraindicated in the presence of abdominal d...

  2. Cystoscopic enucleation of bladder leiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan A Barayan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting a rare case of bladder leiomyoma. A 61-year-old female patient was found to have a bladder mass during a work up of lower urinary tract symptoms. After full investigation, she underwent transurethral excision of the mass. The histopathology revealed typical feature of bladder leiomyoma. No recurrence was seen after a follow-up period of 12 months.

  3. Treatment Options by Stage (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Bladder Cancer Screening Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  4. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  5. Urinary diversion and bladder reconstruction/replacement using intestinal segments for intractable incontinence or following cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, June D; Nabi, Ghulam; Dublin, Norman; McClinton, Samuel; Neal, David E; Pickard, Robert; Yong, Sze M

    2012-02-15

    Surgery performed to improve or replace the function of the diseased urinary bladder has been carried out for over a century. Main reasons for improving or replacing the function of the urinary bladder are bladder cancer, neurogenic bladder dysfunction, detrusor overactivity and chronic inflammatory diseases of the bladder (such as interstitial cystitis, tuberculosis and schistosomiasis). There is still much uncertainty about the best surgical approach. Options available at the present time include: (1) conduit diversion (the creation of various intestinal conduits to the skin) or continent diversion (which includes either a rectal reservoir or continent cutaneous diversion), (2) bladder reconstruction and (3) replacement of the bladder with various intestinal segments. To determine the best way of improving or replacing the function of the lower urinary tract using intestinal segments when the bladder has to be removed or when it has been rendered useless or dangerous by disease. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials Register (searched 28 October 2011), which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and CINAHL, and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings, and the reference lists of relevant articles. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of surgery involving transposition of an intestinal segment into the urinary tract. Trials were evaluated for appropriateness for inclusion and for risk of bias by the review authors. Three review authors were involved in the data extraction. Data were combined in a meta-analysis when appropriate. Five trials met the inclusion criteria with a total of 355 participants. These trials addressed only five of the 14 comparisons pre-specified in the protocol. One trial reported no statistically significant differences in the incidence of upper urinary tract infection, uretero-intestinal stenosis and renal deterioration in

  6. Pain during ice water test distinguishes clinical bladder hypersensitivity from overactivity disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bountra Chas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bladder cooling reflex (BCR i.e. uninhibited detrusor contractions evoked by intravesical instillation of cold saline, is a segmental reflex believed to be triggered by menthol sensitive cold receptors in the bladder wall, with the afferent signals transmitted by C fibres. The BCR is a neonatal reflex that becomes suppressed by descending signals from higher centres at approximately the time when the child gains full voluntary control of voiding. It re-emerges in adults with neurogenic detrusor overactivity as a consequence of loss of central descending inhibition, resulting from conditions such as spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis. We have recently shown an increase of nerve fibres expressing the cool and menthol receptor TRPM8 in both overactive (IDO and painful bladder syndrome (PBS, but its functional significance is unknown. We have therefore studied the bladder cooling reflex and associated sensory symptoms in patients with PBS and overactivity disorders. Methods The BCR, elicited by ice water test (IWT was performed in patients with painful bladder syndrome (PBS, n = 17, idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO, n = 22, neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO, n = 4 and stress urinary incontinence (as controls, n = 21. The IWT was performed by intravesical instillation of cold saline (0 – 4°C. A positive IWT was defined as presence of uninhibited detrusor contraction evoked by cold saline, associated with urgency or with fluid expulsion. Patients were asked to report and rate any pain and cold sensation during the test. Results A positive IWT was observed in IDO (6/22, 27.3% and NDO (4/4, 100% patients, but was negative in all control and PBS patients. Thirteen (76.5% PBS patients reported pain during the IWT, with significantly higher pain scores during ice water instillation compared to the baseline (P = 0.0002, or equivalent amount of bladder filling (100 mls with saline at room temperature (P = 0.015. None

  7. Estrous cycle dependent fluctuations of regulatory neuropeptides in the lower urinary tract of female rats upon colon-bladder cross-sensitization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qing Pan

    Full Text Available Co-morbidity of bladder, bowel, and non-specific pelvic pain symptoms is highly prevalent in women. Little evidence is present on modulation of pelvic pain syndromes by sex hormones, therefore, the objective of this study was to clarify the effects of hormonal fluctuations within the estrous cycle on regulatory neuropeptides in female rats using a model of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The estrous cycle in female rats (Sprague-Dawley, 230-250 g was assessed by vaginal smears and weight of uterine horns. Neurogenic bladder dysfunction was induced by a single inflammatory insult to the distal colon. Protein expression of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP, substance P (SP, nerve growth factor (NGF, and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the pelvic organs, sensory ganglia and lumbosacral spinal cord was compared in rats in proestrus (high estrogen vs diestrus (low estrogen. Under normal physiological conditions, concentration of SP and CGRP was similar in the distal colon and urinary bladder during all phases of the estrous cycle, however, acute colitis induced a significant up-regulation of CGRP content in the colon (by 63% and urinary bladder (by 54%, p≤0.05 to control of rats in proestrus. These changes were accompanied by a significant diminution of CGRP content in L6-S2 DRG after colonic treatment, likely associated with its release in the periphery. In rats with high estrogen at the time of testing (proestrus, experimental colitis caused a significant up-regulation of BDNF colonic content from 26.1±8.5 pg/ml to 83.4±32.5 pg/ml (N = 7, p≤0.05 to control and also induced similar effects on BDNF in the urinary bladder which was also up-regulated by 5-fold in rats in proestrus (p≤0.05 to respective control. Our results demonstrate estrous cycle dependent fluctuations of regulatory neuropeptides in the lower urinary tract upon colon-bladder cross-sensitization, which may contribute to pain fluctuations in female patients

  8. Urothelium update: how the bladder mucosa measures bladder filling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, D.A.W.; Schalken, J.A.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.

    2017-01-01

    AIM: This review critically evaluates the evidence on mechanoreceptors and pathways in the bladder urothelium that are involved in normal bladder filling signalling. METHODS: Evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies on (i) signalling pathways like the adenosine triphosphate pathway, cholinergic

  9. Bladder leiomyoma: Presentation, evaluation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, Nazih; Sakr, Ghazi

    2013-03-01

    Bladder leiomyomas are benign mesenchymal neoplasms and very rare urinary tumours that represent methods and surgical management, updated to 2012. We retrospectively reviewed articles published in the USA, Europe and Asia, from 1953 to date, using PubMed, Medscape, Medline and the several major journals. We report areas of controversies and well-established guidelines. We reviewed 36 articles that confirmed, with a high level of evidence-based medicine, that the male to female ratio is equal, the cause of bladder leiomyomas remains unknown, and their most common presentation is obstructive uropathy; endovesical tumours are the most common. Their radiological diagnosis can be made by ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Complete surgical resection is a very effective treatment, associated with almost no recurrence. In symptomatic patients a complete surgical resection can give a very good outcome, with almost no recurrence.

  10. [Comparative analysis of the potentiative effect of noradrenaline on the neurogenic vasoconstriction diminished by various factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iartsev, V N; Karachentsev, O V; Dvoretskiĭ, D P

    2015-01-01

    The effect of 0.03-1.0 μM noradrenaline on the neurogenic response to electrical field stimulation of the juvenile rat tail artery segment in control conditions, after cooling from 36 to 25 degrees C, and after solution pH decrease from 7.4 to 6.6 was studied. Noradrenaline was shown to potentiate neurogenic vasoconstriction diminished by low temperature or low pH. Decrease in neurogenic vasoconstriction being equal, low dose noradrenaline was most effective at low temperature and high dose noradrenaline was most effective at low pH. 1.0 μM noradrenaline was equally effective in both cases. Increase in the neurogenic tone of the rat tail artery evoked by noradrenaline at low temperature and acidosis may contribute to decrease in heat emission at low ambient temperature in vivo.

  11. Surgical treatment of neurogenic stress urinary incontinence: A systematic review of quality assessment and surgical outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farag, F.; Koens, M.J.; Sievert, K.D.; Ridder, D. de; Feitz, W.; Heesakkers, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are many opinions but little firm knowledge about the optimal treatment of neurogenic stress urinary incontinence (NSUI). OBJECTIVE: To scrutinize the quality and surgical outcomes of the available treatment modalities in the published literature. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A systematic

  12. Botulinum toxin in the management of lower urinary tract dysfunction: contemporary update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Francisco; Silva, Carlos

    2004-11-01

    To review the most recent experience concerning the application of botulinum toxin in the human lower urinary tract. Botulinum toxin was initially applied in the bladder of patients with spinal neurogenic detrusor overactivity and urinary incontinence, or in the urethra in cases of detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia. A large multicentric European study fully confirmed the initial expectancy in the former condition. In addition, the application of botulinum toxin was extended to the treatment of other urological disorders including non-neurogenic detrusor overactivity, non-relaxing urethral sphincter and detrusor underactivity. Interesting reports on the injection of botulinum toxin into the prostate of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia are also reviewed. Bladder injection of botulinum toxin is not yet an approved treatment for lower urinary tract dysfunction. Nevertheless, available data suggest that in the near future the toxin will become a standard therapeutic option in incontinent patients with neurogenic and non-neurogenic forms of overactive bladder, who do not respond to or do not tolerate anticholinergic medication. In addition, it might be expected that urethral botulinum toxin injections improve bladder emptying in patients with dysfunctional voiding problems besides detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia.

  13. The incidence, spectrum and outcomes of traumatic bladder injuries within the Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urry, R J; Clarke, D L; Bruce, J L; Laing, G L

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of the incidence, spectrum and outcomes of traumatic bladder injury in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, and to identify the current optimal investigation and management of patients with traumatic bladder injuries. The Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service (PMTS) trauma registry was interrogated retrospectively for all traumatic bladder injuries between 1 January 2012 and 31 October 2014. Of 8129 patients treated by the PMTS over the study period, 58 patients (0.7% or 6.5 cases per 1,000,000 population per year) had bladder injuries, 65% caused by penetrating trauma and 35% by blunt trauma. The majority (60%) were intraperitoneal bladder ruptures (IBRs), followed by 22% extraperitoneal bladder ruptures (EBRs). There was a high rate of associated injury, with blunt trauma being associated with pelvic fracture and penetrating trauma being associated with rectum and small intestine injuries. The mortality rate was 5%. Most bladder injuries were diagnosed at surgery or by computed tomography (CT) scan. All IBRs were managed operatively, as well as 38% of EBRs; the remaining EBRs were managed by catheter drainage and observation. In the majority of operative repairs, the bladder was closed in two layers, and was drained with only a urethral catheter. Most patients (91%) were managed definitively by the surgeons on the trauma service. Traumatic bladder rupture caused by blunt or penetrating trauma is rare and mortality is due to associated injuries. CT scan is the investigative modality of choice. In our environment IBR is more common than EBR and requires operative management. Most EBRs can be managed non-operatively, and then require routine follow-up cystography. Simple traumatic bladder injuries can be managed definitively by trauma surgeons. A dedicated urological surgeon should be consulted for complex injuries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intravesical Explosion Resulting in Bladder Rupture During Transurethral Resection of Bladder Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chih-Chiao; Chang, Huang-Kuang; Chen, Marcelo; Hsu, Jong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Explosion in the bladder during transurethral resection of a bladder tumor is an extremely rare complication of urologic surgery. The damage to the bladder can range from small mucosa tears to bladder rupture. A case of intravesical explosion with extensive intraperitoneal bladder rupture during transurethral resection of a bladder tumor is described. The literature is reviewed, and the mechanism of bladder rupture, as well as the possible preventive measures are discussed.

  15. Clinical usefulness of urodynamic assessment for maintenance of bladder function in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosseir, Michael; Hinkel, Andreas; Pannek, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of spinal cord lesions cause neurogenic bladder disorders. Detrusor hyperreflexia presents a major risk factor for renal damage in these patients. We evaluated the long-term results of patients with spinal cord injury treated at our institution. Eighty spinal cord injury patients (60 male, 20 female; mean age 29.6 years) with at least one follow-up visit a year for a minimum of five consecutive years, were included in this retrospective analysis. Follow-up included urodynamic evaluation, sonography of the upper and lower urinary tract, urine examination, and evaluation of renal function. Treatment modifications were based on the urodynamic findings. Mean follow-up was 67.3 months (range 60-103 months). At initial presentation, 51 patients performed intermittent catheterization, 7 had indwelling catheters, 10 utilized reflex voiding, 2 patients presented with a Brindley stimulator, 10 patients used abdominal straining. At the end of our study, no patient had signs of renal damage. To achieve that goal, 8 patients underwent sphincterotomy, 3 received a Brindley stimulator, 3 underwent bladder augmentation, one Kock pouch was performed, and 12 patients were treated with botulinum-A-toxin injections in the detrusor. Twenty-two patients received intravesical anticholinergic therapy. In merely three patients, treatment was not modified during the entire follow-up. In the long term, treatment strategy of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury had to be modified in almost all patients. 18.8% underwent surgery. For protection of the upper urinary tract and maintenance of continence, regular urodynamic follow-up is warranted. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Postmortem MRI of bladder agenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Brendan R. [St George' s Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Weber, Martin A. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Bockenhauer, Detlef [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Nephrology, London (United Kingdom); Hiorns, Melanie P.; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    We report a 35-week preterm neonate with bladder agenesis and bilateral dysplastic kidneys. A suprapubic catheter was inadvertently inserted into one of the larger inferior cysts of the left dysplastic kidney. A postmortem MRI scan was performed with the findings being confirmed on autopsy. We are unaware of another postmortem MRI study demonstrating bladder agenesis. (orig.)

  17. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more about the genes and chromosome associated with bladder cancer FGFR3 HRAS RB1 TP53 TSC1 chromosome 9 Related Information ... Radvanyi F. Novel fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutations in bladder cancer previously identified in non-lethal skeletal disorders. Eur ...

  18. Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    W. Mahfouz

    issues with primary human urothelial and bladder muscle cells [22]. Naturally derived materials and acellular .... being able to dif- ferentiate into connective tissues, skeletal muscle cells, and cells of the vascular system [57]. ... hypertrophy in a cryo-injured rodent bladder model [60]. AFPS cells represent a new class of stem ...

  19. The Danish Bladder Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Erik; Larsson, Heidi Jeanet; Nørgaard, Mette

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Bladder Cancer Database (DaBlaCa-data) is to monitor the treatment of all patients diagnosed with invasive bladder cancer (BC) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: All patients diagnosed with BC in Denmark from 2012 onward were included in the study. Results...

  20. Prospective evaluation of Peristeen® transanal irrigation system with the validated neurogenic bowel dysfunction score sheet in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Maryellen S; Dorgalli, Crystal; McLorie, Gordon; Khoury, Antoine E

    2017-03-01

    To determine the ability of Peristeen® transanal irrigation system to reduce symptoms of neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD) in patients using the validated neurogenic bowel dysfunction scoring system for the pediatric population. Patients 3-21 years with NBD whose current bowel program was unsuccessful were given the Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction (NBoDS) score sheet before initiating Peristeen®, and at 2 weeks, 2 months, and 6 months after. All patients were started on Peristeen® with tap water (20 ml/kg) per daily irrigation. Mean and paired t-tests were completed. 24 patients were enrolled and had follow-up. Mean age was 10.5 years (range 3-21 years), 25%, 50%, 25% had thoracic, lumbar and sacral level lesions respectively. Mean NBoDS score at initiation of Peristeen® was 20.21 (±5.56), n = 24. The mean score after two weeks of use was 12.75 (±4.40), n = 24. There was a statistically significant decrease of 7.46 (95%CI, 5.07-9.84) points, t(23) = 6.47, P irrigation system provides a significant reduction in NBoDS scores in pediatric patients with NBD. Peristeen® should be considered when other conservative bowel management options have been unsuccessful. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:632-635, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Bladder cancer mortality after spinal cord injury over 4 decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Laura S; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Lloyd, L Keith

    2015-06-01

    We estimate bladder cancer mortality in people with spinal cord injury compared to the general population. Data and statistics were retrieved from the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center and the National Center for Health Statistics. The mortality experience of the 45,486 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury treated at a Spinal Cord Injury Model System or Shriners Hospital was compared to the general population using a standardized mortality ratio. The standardized mortality ratio data were further stratified by age, gender, race, time since injury and injury severity. Our study included 566,532 person-years of followup between 1960 and 2009, identified 10,575 deaths and categorized 99 deaths from bladder cancer. The expected number of deaths from bladder cancer would have been 14.8 if patients with spinal cord injury had the same bladder cancer mortality as the general population. Thus, the standardized mortality ratio is 6.7 (95% CI 5.4-8.1). Increased mortality risk from bladder cancer was observed for various ages, races and genders, as well as for those injured for 10 or more years and with motor complete injuries. Bladder cancer mortality was not significantly increased for ventilator users, those with motor incomplete injuries or those injured less than 10 years. Individuals with a spinal cord injury can potentially live healthier and longer by reducing the incidence and mortality of bladder cancer. Study findings highlight the need to identify at risk groups and contributing factors for bladder cancer death, leading to the development of prevention, screening and management strategies. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuge O

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Oliver Fuge,1 Nikhil Vasdev,1 Paula Allchorne,2 James SA Green2 1Department of Urology, Lister Hospital, Stevenage, UK; 2Department of Urology, Bartshealth NHS Trust, Whipps Cross Rd, London, UK Abstract: It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest

  3. Mesh erosion into urinary bladder following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Singh Sandhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with advantages, evolving surgical techniques bring unique complications. A young male developed urinary symptoms a few months after undergoing laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. On evaluation, mesh erosion into the urinary bladder was found. Removal of mesh with repair of bladder was done. A vesico-cutaneous fistula resulted which was managed with repeat surgery. We review all such cases reported in literature; discuss the etiopathogenesis, presentation, management and possible preventive measures. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the 12th case being reported.

  4. Neurogenic contraction and relaxation of human penile deep dorsal vein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra, Gloria; Medina, Pascual; Domenech, Cristina; Martínez León, Juan B; Vila, José M; Aldasoro, Martin; Lluch, Salvador

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize neurogenic and pharmacological responses of human penile deep dorsal vein and to determine whether the responses are mediated by nitric oxide from neural or endothelial origin.Ring segments of human penile deep dorsal vein were obtained from 22 multiorgan donors during procurement of organs for transplantation. The rings were suspended in organ bath chambers for isometric recording of tension. We then studied the contractile and relaxant responses to electrical field stimulation and to vasoactive agents.Electrical field stimulation (0.5–2 Hz) and noradrenaline (3×10−10–3×10−5 M) caused frequency- and concentration-dependent contractions that were of greater magnitude in veins denuded of endothelium. The inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME, 10−4 M) increased the adrenergic responses only in rings with endothelium.In preparations contracted with noradrenaline in the presence of guanethidine (10−6 M) and atropine (10−6 M), electrical stimulation induced frequency-dependent relaxations. This neurogenic relaxation was prevented by L-NAME, methylene blue (3×10−5 M) and tetrodotoxin (10−6 M), but was unaffected by removal of endothelium.Acetylcholine (10−8–3×10−5 M) and substance P (3×10−11–3×10−7 M) induced endothelium-dependent relaxations. In contrast, sodium nitroprusside (10−9–3×10−5 M) and papaverine (10−8–3×10−5 M) caused endothelium-independent relaxations.The results provide functional evidence that the human penile deep dorsal vein is an active component of the penile vascular resistance through the release of nitric oxide from both neural and endothelial origin. Dysfunction in any of these sources of nitric oxide should be considered in some forms of impotence. PMID:9690872

  5. Chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ashish M; Lamm, Donald L

    2002-02-01

    The data presented herein, although highly supportive for a protective role of various nutrients against bladder cancer, are far from definitive. Many authorities question the validity of current recommendations for nutritional chemoprevention against bladder cancer. The reason for the wide variations reported in epidemiologic studies lies in the nature of observational studies. Dietary studies are limited in their conclusions because the protection afforded by the consumption of a particular nutrient may be multifactorial, with different components of the food exerting potential chemopreventive effects. Furthermore, measuring levels of nutrients in the food intake of populations is confounded by factors that might affect these levels and also the incidence of cancer. For example, vitamin A can come from animal or vegetarian sources. Because animal fat has been identified as a potential carcinogen in man, depending on the source of the vitamin, varying levels of protection might be deduced. In addition, chemoprevention studies using dietary supplements are expected to have mild effects, and large studies would be required to confirm statistical significance. Even with agents such as intravesical chemotherapy, only half the studies achieve statistical significance [29]. Prospective randomized trials with a large sample size, longer follow-up, and an extended duration of treatment are needed to clarify the association between micronutrients and cancer protection. With these caveats in mind, several recommendations can be made. Simple measures, such as drinking more fluids (especially water), can have a profound impact on the incidence of bladder cancer. Vitamins are being extensively studied in chemopreventive trials for different cancers. There is strong evidence for a chemoprotective effect of vitamin A in bladder cancer. The authors recommend 32,000 IU/day of vitamin A initially, with lower doses (24,000 IU) for persons less than 50 kg. Because liver toxicity is a

  6. [Bladder dysfunction and surgery in the small pelvis. Therapeutic possibilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönberger, B

    2003-12-01

    The more extensive a surgical procedure in a small pelvis, the higher the risk for the lower urinary tract with its nerve supply and nerve plexus. This concerns mainly the sympathetic chains, the parasympathetic structures and, rarely, the visceral supply of the pelvic floor. Direct trauma to the bladder and its vascular supply as well as indirect injury by displacement of the bladder need to be seriously considered. Problems with micturition and impaired storage capacity of the bladder are the result. Complete urodynamic examination and follow-up can help in differentiating between temporary and persisting disturbances and in taking therapeutical decisions. The most evident postoperative complication is disturbed micturition, managed initially by suprapubic urinary diversion, followed as soon as possible by intermittent self-catheterisation. This is the only way to avoid overstretching of the bladder, recurring urinary tract infection and damage to the upper urinary tract. Restoration of spontaneous micturition can be supported by drug treatment with parasympatholytics and/or alpha-blockers if the measured bladder pressure and residual urine are within tolerable limits. For electrostimulation of micturition, intravesical therapy, although timeconsuming, is best suited because it can easily be done on an outpatient basis. More promising seems bilateral sacral neuromodulation, which, however, is a rather complicated and expensive procedure. Surgical procedures to reduce the voiding resistance of the bladder involve the risk of postoperative incontinence because the sphincter function in those patients is often disturbed too. Persisting problems with bladder storage capacity as a result of tumor surgery in the small pelvis are frequently secondary to retention of urine (overflow incontinence). In these cases, regular evacuation of the bladder by intermittent self-catheterisation can lead to social acceptance. Reduced bladder compliance and lowering of the urethral

  7. [Bladder reinnervation with creation of a "somato-autonomic" reflex pathway in spinal cord injured or spina bifida, a new way for treatment?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhaud, F-X; Caremel, R; Leroi, A-M; Grise, P

    2011-09-01

    The restoration of physiological micturition is a major objective for patients presenting a medullary injury, which is not possible with current treatment. Several recent studies have purposed some techniques for bladder reinnervation. Their purpose was to begin a voluntary micturition by the stimulation of an artificial reflex arc created by the anastomosis of a somatic root with a root innervating the bladder. We searched on Medline and Cochrane for articles in English. The keywords used were: bladder reinnervation, spinal cord injury neurogenic bladder, reflex pathway for micturition. These studies reported a variable efficacy as high as 85% of the treated patients. These patients could begin micturition voluntarily, associated with a significant improvement observed in their postoperative urodynamic evaluation. In fact, an improvement of the detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia and/or bladder overactivity was reported, and the patients presented a better quality of life by the control of their micturition associated with an improvement in continence with no need for intermittent catheterisation. However, these results were variable from one study to the other, and certain results seem difficult to explain notably concerning the abolition of bladder overactivity and the improvement of the detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia. Further experimental studies are still required, notably with animals to confirm the encouraging results of these initial studies, and to better understand the mechanism before possible routine patient use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Myopathy in CRPS-I: disuse or neurogenic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsman, Natalie M; Geertzen, Jan H B; Dijkstra, Pieter U; van den Dungen, Jan J A M; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A

    2009-08-01

    The diagnosis Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is based on clinical symptoms, including motor symptoms. Histological changes in muscle tissue may be present in the chronic phase of CRPS-I. Aim of this study was to analyze skeletal muscle tissue from amputated limbs of patients with CRPS-I, in order to gain more insight in factors that may play a role in changes in muscles in CRPS-I. These changes may be helpful in clarifying the pathophysiology of CRPS-I. Fourteen patients with therapy resistant and longstanding CRPS-I, underwent an amputation of the affected limb. In all patients histological analysis showed extensive changes in muscle tissue, such as fatty degeneration, fibre atrophy and nuclear clumping, which was not related to duration of CRPS-I prior to amputation. In all muscles affected, both type 1 and type 2 fibre atrophy was found, without selective type 2 fibre atrophy. In four patients, type grouping was observed, indicating a sequence of denervation and reinnervation of muscle tissue. In two patients even large group atrophy was present, suggesting new denervation after reinnervation. Comparison between subgroups in arms and legs showed no difference in the number of changes in muscle tissue. Intrinsic and extrinsic muscles were affected equally. Our findings show that in the chronic phase of CRPS-I extensive changes can be seen in muscle tissue, not related to duration of CRPS-I symptoms. Signs of neurogenic myopathy were present in five patients.

  9. Bedside lung ultrasound: a case of neurogenic pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenkov, Vladimir V; Kovalev, Alexey N; Gorbunov, Vyacheslav V

    2013-06-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is an acute life-threatening complication associated with many forms of central nervous system injury. NPE usually appears within minutes to hours after injury and has a high mortality rate if not recognized and treated appropriately. Lung ultrasound quickly provides at the bedside relevant information on the state of aeration and ventilation of the lung. We describe a case report of acute respiratory insufficiency after posterior cranial fossa surgery. The patient underwent a subtotal meningiomectomy. Postoperative course was complicated by respiratory failure with unstable hemodynamic parameters. The pulmonary edema was suspected, and sonography examination was performed. Lung ultrasound showed typical signs for non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Transthoracic echocardiography showed preserved left ventricle systolic function, but signs of the severe hypovolemia were found. We corrected for the preload and ventilator support settings. Within 24 h, her respiratory status improved with a resolution of the pulmonary edema. Lung ultrasound at the bedside can provide accurate information on lung status in neurocritically ill patients with acute respiratory failure. The addition of transthoracic echocardiography to lung sonography provides an additive insight on the eventual pulmonary involvement. Lung ultrasound has the potential to become a reference tool for bedside dynamic respiratory monitoring in the Neuro ICU.

  10. Neurogenic vestibular evoked potentials using a tone pip auditory stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, E S; Zamba-Papanicolaou, E; Pantziaris, M; Kleopas, K; Kyriakides, T; Papacostas, S; Pattichis, C; Iliopoulos, I; Piperidou, C

    2004-01-01

    To obtain neurogenic vestibular evoked potentials (NVESTEPs) with surface scalp recording using a tone pip auditory stimulus. Fourteen neurologically normal volunteers (Age range 26-45 years, 10 females and 4 males), and two patients with sensorineural hearing loss and possible multiple sclerosis respectively, were examined. Two channel recordings were obtained, the first channel being P3 referred to Fpz, and the second channel being P4 referred to Fpz. A 1 kHz tone pip stimulus with two cycles was delivered via headphones monoaurally with contralateral masking noise. A consistent negative wave with a mean absolute latency of 4.72 msec was obtained, which we have named N5. 25% of the ears tested had better responses at the ipsilateral parietal electrode. In the patient with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, NVESTEPs was present, suggesting that the NVESTEP is not a cochlear response. In the patient with possible multiple sclerosis, an abnormal NVESTEP response and a normal BAEP response were found. Use of a tone-pip rather than a click auditory stimulus allows a lower click intensity to be used in the production of NVESTEP responses, leads to a shorter testing time, and is therefore more comfortable for the patient. This study adds to our impression that the NVESTEP may be a physiological response that can be used to assess the vestibular system and is different from the BAEP response. Further testing in patients with symptoms of dizziness and with disorders specific for the vestibular nerve is required.

  11. Compilation of a preliminary checklist for the differential diagnosis of neurogenic stuttering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariska Lundie

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurogenic stuttering (NS is the most frequently occurring acquired form of stuttering in children and adults. This form of stuttering is primarily caused by neurological incidents. Owing to controversies with regard to similarities between developmental stuttering (DS and NS symptomatology, differential diagnosis is problematic. Differential diagnosis will guide the appropriate management of persons who stutter (PWS.Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe and highlight the characteristics of NS in order to compile a preliminary checklist for accurate diagnosis and intervention.Method: An explorative, applied mixed method, multiple case study research design was followed. Purposive sampling was used to select four participants. A comprehensive assessment battery was compiled for data collection.Results: The results revealed a distinct pattern of core stuttering behaviours in NS, although discrepancies existed regarding stuttering severity and frequency. It was also found that DS and NS can co-occur. The case history and the core stuttering pattern are important considerations during differential diagnosis, as these are the only consistent characteristics in people with NS.Conclusion: It is unlikely that all the symptoms of NS are present in an individual. The researchers scrutinised the findings of this study and the findings of previous literature to compile a potentially workable checklist.

  12. Compilation of a preliminary checklist for the differential diagnosis of neurogenic stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundie, Mariska; Erasmus, Zandria; Zsilavecz, Ursula; Van der Linde, Jeannie

    2014-06-27

    Neurogenic stuttering (NS) is the most frequently occurring acquired form of stuttering in children and adults. This form of stuttering is primarily caused by neurological incidents. Owing to controversies with regard to similarities between developmental stuttering (DS) and NS symptomatology, differential diagnosis is problematic. Differential diagnosis will guide the appropriate management of persons who stutter (PWS). The aim of this study was to describe and highlight the characteristics of NS in order to compile a preliminary checklist for accurate diagnosis and intervention. An explorative, applied mixed method, multiple case study research design was followed. Purposive sampling was used to select four participants. A comprehensive assessment battery was compiled for data collection. The results revealed a distinct pattern of core stuttering behaviours in NS, although discrepancies existed regarding stuttering severity and frequency. It was also found that DS and NS can co-occur. The case history and the core stuttering pattern are important considerations during differential diagnosis, as these are the only consistent characteristics in people with NS. It is unlikely that all the symptoms of NS are present in an individual. The researchers scrutinised the findings of this study and the findings of previous literature to compile a potentially workable checklist.

  13. Expression and functional role of Rho-kinase in rat urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibberley, Alexandra; Chen, Zunxuan; Hu, Erding; Hieble, J Paul; Westfall, Timothy D

    2003-03-01

    (1) The involvement of Rho-kinase (ROCK) in the contractile mechanisms mediating smooth muscle contraction of the rat urinary bladder was investigated using expression studies and the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. (2) Both isoforms of ROCK (ROCK I and ROCK II) were detected in high levels in rat urinary bladder. (3) Y-27632 (10 micro M) significantly attenuated contractions of rat urinary bladder strips evoked by the G-protein coupled receptor agonists carbachol (58.1+/-10.5% at 0.3 micro M) and neurokinin A (68.6+/-12.7% at 1 micro M) without affecting contractions to potassium chloride (10-100 mM). In addition, basal tone was reduced by 47.8+/-2.0% by 10 micro M Y-27632 in the absence of stimulation. (4) Contractions of urinary bladder strips evoked by the P2X receptor agonist alpha,beta-methylene ATP (alpha,beta-mATP; 10 micro M) were also attenuated by Y-27632 (30.0+/-7.2% at 10 micro M). (5) Y-27632 (10 micro M) significantly attenuated contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation (2-16 Hz). The effect of Y-27632 on the tonic portion of the neurogenic response (4-16 Hz) was not significantly different from the effect of atropine (1 micro M) alone. (6) While the mechanism underlying the ability of Y-27632 to inhibit alpha,beta-mATP-evoked contractions remains undetermined, the results of the present study clearly demonstrate a role for ROCK in the regulation of rat urinary bladder smooth muscle contraction and tone.

  14. Virtual 3D bladder reconstruction for augmented medical records from white light cystoscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Kristen L.; Zlatev, Dimitar V.; Angst, Roland; Liao, Joseph C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2016-02-01

    Bladder cancer has a high recurrence rate that necessitates lifelong surveillance to detect mucosal lesions. Examination with white light cystoscopy (WLC), the standard of care, is inherently subjective and data storage limited to clinical notes, diagrams, and still images. A visual history of the bladder wall can enhance clinical and surgical management. To address this clinical need, we developed a tool to transform in vivo WLC videos into virtual 3-dimensional (3D) bladder models using advanced computer vision techniques. WLC videos from rigid cystoscopies (1280 x 720 pixels) were recorded at 30 Hz followed by immediate camera calibration to control for image distortions. Video data were fed into an automated structure-from-motion algorithm that generated a 3D point cloud followed by a 3D mesh to approximate the bladder surface. The highest quality cystoscopic images were projected onto the approximated bladder surface to generate a virtual 3D bladder reconstruction. In intraoperative WLC videos from 36 patients undergoing transurethral resection of suspected bladder tumors, optimal reconstruction was achieved from frames depicting well-focused vasculature, when the bladder was maintained at constant volume with minimal debris, and when regions of the bladder wall were imaged multiple times. A significant innovation of this work is the ability to perform the reconstruction using video from a clinical procedure collected with standard equipment, thereby facilitating rapid clinical translation, application to other forms of endoscopy and new opportunities for longitudinal studies of cancer recurrence.

  15. Bladder Capacity is a Biomarker for a Bladder Centric versus Systemic Manifestation in Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stephen J; Zambon, João; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Langefeld, Carl D; Matthews, Catherine A; Badlani, Gopal; Bowman, Heather; Evans, Robert J

    2017-02-12

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome presents a significant clinical challenge due to symptom heterogeneity and the myriad associated comorbid medical conditions. We recently reported that diminished bladder capacity may represent a specific interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome subphenotype. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between anesthetic bladder capacity, and urological and nonurological clinical findings in a cohort of patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome who had undergone therapeutic urinary bladder hydrodistention. This is a retrospective chart review of prospectively collected data on women diagnosed with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome between 2011 and 2015 who underwent bladder hydrodistention. Assessments in each patient included a detailed history and physical examination, ICPI (Interstitial Cystitis Problem Index), ICSI (Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index) and PUF (Pelvic Pain and Urgency/Frequency Patient Symptom Scale). Bladder capacity was determined during bladder hydrodistention with the patient under general anesthesia. Mean age was 45.8 years and mean bladder capacity was 857 ml in the 110 enrolled patients. We found a significant inverse correlation between bladder capacity and scores on 3 gold standard interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome metrics, including ICPI (p = 0.0014), ICSI (p = 0.0022) and PUF (p = 0.0009) as well as urination frequency (p = 0.0025). Women with higher bladder capacity were significantly more likely to report depression (p = 0.0059) and irritable bowel syndrome (p = 0.022). Low bladder capacity while under anesthesia was significantly associated with high symptom scores on 3 validated interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome questionnaires as well as with urinary frequency. However, it was not associated with depression or other common systemic pain problems. These results suggest that low bladder capacity is a marker for a bladder

  16. [Sacral nerve root cysts--a rare cause of bladder dysfunction. Case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümpers, P; Wiesemann, E; Becker, H; Haubitz, B; Dengler, R; Zermann, D-H

    2006-09-01

    Asymptomatic cysts of the sacral nerve roots display a prevalence of 5 % and are occasionally demonstrated by MRI of the spine. Depending on their size and localization, arachnoid cysts may cause sacral or perineal pain, radicular sensomotory symptoms and neurogenic bladder and bowel dysfunction by compression of the nerve roots. We report on a case of a recently developed neurogenic bladder dysfunction. MRI of the spine demonstrated two large, liquor-filled cysts of 2.5 and 3 cm diameter, bilaterally localized at the nerve roots S2/3. Neurological and urological examinations confirmed the diagnosis of symptomatic nerve root cysts at the level S2/3, resulting in detrusor areflexia. A microsurgical excision of the cysts ameliorated the patient's pain symptoms. However, the detrusor areflexia did not improve. Tarlov cysts are predominantly regarded an asymptomatic incidental feature of CT and MRI scans of the spine. The case of our patient, as well as the so far published reports indicate, however, that a Tarlov cyst may cause a variety of neurological and urological symptoms. Nerve root cysts should be seriously considered and not excluded at an early stage, especially when coincident with persistent neurological and urological symptoms.

  17. Bladder Control and Nerve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bladder, and infection. How do you do Kegel exercises? Kegel exercises strengthen the muscles that hold up the ... keep it closed. The first step in doing Kegel exercises is to find the right muscles. Imagine ...

  18. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  19. The CNS and bladder dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstege, Gert; Griffiths, Derek J.

    2012-01-01

    The brain's role in the development and maintenance of bladder control is critical, although its precise role in patient-reported complaints such as urgency and urine leakage is unknown. Functional brain imaging studies have advanced our knowledge of brain activity during the micturition cycle, showing multiple neuronal circuits involved as parts of a ‘brain-bladder control network.’ Yet, new advances need to be made in order to incorporate this knowledge into existing models of neuroanatomy and of clinical syndromes of bladder dysfunction and related clinical practice. This short article explains why and how brain imaging methods are poised to achieve that goal and decode the role of the brain in widely prevalent clinical conditions related to bladder dysfunction. PMID:23091564

  20. Bladder and urethral repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 100002.htm Bladder and urethral repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  1. Deep Sequencing of Urinary RNAs for Bladder Cancer Molecular Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Mandy L Y; Mach, Kathleen E; Sinha, Rahul; Wu, Fan; Trivedi, Dharati R; Altobelli, Emanuela; Jensen, Kristin C; Sahoo, Debashis; Lu, Ying; Liao, Joseph C

    2017-07-15

    Purpose: The majority of bladder cancer patients present with localized disease and are managed by transurethral resection. However, the high rate of recurrence necessitates lifetime cystoscopic surveillance. Developing a sensitive and specific urine-based test would significantly improve bladder cancer screening, detection, and surveillance.Experimental Design: RNA-seq was used for biomarker discovery to directly assess the gene expression profile of exfoliated urothelial cells in urine derived from bladder cancer patients (n = 13) and controls (n = 10). Eight bladder cancer specific and 3 reference genes identified by RNA-seq were quantitated by qPCR in a training cohort of 102 urine samples. A diagnostic model based on the training cohort was constructed using multiple logistic regression. The model was further validated in an independent cohort of 101 urines.Results: A total of 418 genes were found to be differentially expressed between bladder cancer and controls. Validation of a subset of these genes was used to construct an equation for computing a probability of bladder cancer score (PBC) based on expression of three markers (ROBO1, WNT5A, and CDC42BPB). Setting PBC = 0.45 as the cutoff for a positive test, urine testing using the three-marker panel had overall 88% sensitivity and 92% specificity in the training cohort. The accuracy of the three-marker panel in the independent validation cohort yielded an AUC of 0.87 and overall 83% sensitivity and 89% specificity.Conclusions: Urine-based molecular diagnostics using this three-marker signature could provide a valuable adjunct to cystoscopy and may lead to a reduction of unnecessary procedures for bladder cancer diagnosis. Clin Cancer Res; 23(14); 3700-10. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Mortality after bladder augmentation in children with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Konrad M; Misseri, Rosalia; Whittam, Benjamin; Adams, Cyrus M; Kirkegaard, Jordan; King, Shelly; Kaefer, Martin; Rink, Richard C; Cain, Mark P

    2015-02-01

    Renal failure has been a leading cause of death for children with spina bifida. Although improvements in management have increased survival, current data on mortality are sparse. Bladder augmentation, a modern intervention to preserve renal function, carries risks of morbidity and mortality. We determined long-term mortality and causes of death in patients with spina bifida treated with bladder augmentation. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with spina bifida who underwent bladder augmentation between 1979 and 2013. Those born before 1972 or older than 21 years at augmentation were excluded. Demographic and surgical data were collected. Outcomes were obtained from medical records, death records and the Social Security Death Index. Fisher exact and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests and Kaplan-Meier plots were used for analysis. Of 888 patients in our bladder reconstruction database 369 with spina bifida met inclusion criteria. Median followup was 10.8 years. A total of 28 deaths (7.6%) occurred. The leading causes of mortality were nonurological infections (ventriculoperitoneal shunt related, decubitus ulcer fasciitis, etc) and pulmonary disease. Two patients (0.5%) died of renal failure. No patient died of malignancy or bladder perforation. Patients with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt had a higher mortality rate than those without a shunt (8.9% vs 1.5%, p = 0.04). Previously reported mortality rates of 50% to 60% in patients with spina bifida do not appear to apply in children who have undergone bladder augmentation. On long-term followup leading causes of death in patients with spina bifida after bladder augmentation were nonurological infections rather than complications associated with augmentation or renal failure. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Carotid body overactivity induces respiratory neurone channelopathy contributing to neurogenic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-07-15

    Why sympathetic activity rises in neurogenic hypertension remains unknown. It has been postulated that changes in the electrical excitability of medullary pre-sympathetic neurones are the main causal mechanism for the development of sympathetic overactivity in experimental hypertension. Here we review recent data suggesting that enhanced sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension is, at least in part, dependent on alterations in the electrical excitability of medullary respiratory neurones and their central modulation of sympatho-excitatory networks. We also present results showing a critical role for carotid body tonicity in the aetiology of enhanced central respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension. We propose a novel hypothesis of respiratory neurone channelopathy induced by carotid body overactivity in neurogenic hypertension that may contribute to sympathetic excess. Moreover, our data support the notion of targeting the carotid body as a potential novel therapeutic approach for reducing sympathetic vasomotor tone in neurogenic hypertension. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  4. Non-neurogenic SVZ-like niche in dolphins, mammals devoid of olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolisi, Roberta; Cozzi, Bruno; Bonfanti, Luca

    2017-08-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been implicated in brain plasticity and brain repair. In mammals, it is mostly restricted to specific brain regions and specific physiological functions. The function and evolutionary history of mammalian adult neurogenesis has been elusive so far. The largest neurogenic site in mammals (subventricular zone, SVZ) generates neurons destined to populate the olfactory bulb. The SVZ neurogenic activity appears to be related to the dependence of the species on olfaction since it occurs at high rates throughout life in animals strongly dependent on this function for their survival. Indeed, it dramatically decreases in humans, who do not depend so much on it. This study investigates whether the SVZ neurogenic site exists in mammals devoid of olfaction and olfactory brain structures, such as dolphins. Our results demonstate that a small SVZ-like region persists in these aquatic mammals. However, this region seems to have lost its neurogenic capabilities since neonatal stages. In addition, instead of the typical newly generated neuroblasts, some mature neurons were observed in the dolphin SVZ. Since cetaceans evolved from terrestrial ancestors, non-neurogenic SVZ may indicate extinction of adult neurogenesis in the absence of olfactory function, with the retention of an SVZ-like anatomical region either vestigial or of still unknown role.

  5. Encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter: what are the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary bladder catheter encrustations are known complications of long-term urinary catheterisation, which is commonly seen in clinical practice. These encrustations can impede deflation of the balloon and therefore cause problems in the removal of the catheter. The options in managing an encrusted and incarcerated ...

  6. Overactive Bladder and Continence Guidelines: implementation, inaction or frustration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagg, A.; Cardozo, L.; Chapple, C.; Diaz, D.C.; Ridder, D. de; Espuna-Pons, M.; Haab, F.; Kelleher, C.; Kolbl, H.; Milsom, I.; Kerrebroeck, P. van; Vierhout, M.E.; Kirby, M.

    2008-01-01

    Guidelines for the management of continence and overactive bladder are generally available across Europe. For a majority of countries, these have been adopted by professional societies in either urology or gynaecology for local use. There has, however, been little monitoring of formal implementation

  7. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X...... or larger (> 2 base pairs) alterations in repeat length. All six tumors were low stage (Ta-T1), suggesting that these alterations can occur early in bladder tumorigenesis....

  8. [Transurethral enucleation of bladder paraganglioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedalino, Marco; Manini, Claudia; Vella, Riccardo; Di Primio, Otello; Piras, Dorino; Cagnazzi, Eugenio; Vercesi, Enrico; Gaetano, Marino

    2011-10-01

    Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder is a rare neoplasm that derives from ganglion cells located in the bladder wall and may morphologically simulate a urothelial carcinoma. The authors present the case of a vesical paraganglioma incidentally detected by ultrasound, and entirely removed by transurethral approach from detrusorial wall. Conventional approaches include surgery (partial cystectomy) or laparoscopic procedures, with inspection by transurethral endoscopy; in this case we wanted to avoid the combined approach considering the lesion diameter and the possibility of an easy removal.

  9. In vivo fluorescence imaging of an orthotopic rat bladder tumor model indicates differential uptake of intravesically instilled near-infrared labeled 2-deoxyglucose analog by neoplastic urinary bladder tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Daqing; Davis, Carole A.; Hurst, Robert E.; Slaton, Joel W.

    2017-02-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most expensive cancers to manage due to frequent recurrences requiring life-long surveillance and treatment. A near-infrared labeled 2-deoxy-d-glucose probe IRDye800CW-DG targeting glucose metabolism pathway has shown to enhance the sensitivity of diagnosing several types of cancers as tested on tumor models not including bladder tumor. This pilot study has explored differential uptake of intravesically administered IRDye800CW-DG in an orthotopic rat bladder tumor model. Twenty-five female Fischer rats were randomly grouped to four conditions: no-tumor-control (n=3), no-tumor-control intravesically instilled with IRDye800CWDG (n=6), rats bearing GFP-labeled AY-27 rat bladder urothelial cell carcinoma cells and washed with saline (n=5), and rats bearing AY-27 tumors and intravesically instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=11). Near-infrared fluorescence was measured from the opened bladder wall of anesthetized rat at an excitation wavelength of 750nm and an emission wavelength of 776nm, by using an in-house fluorescence imaging system. There is no statistically significant difference of the peak fluorescence intensity among the no-tumor-control bladders (n=3), the no-tumorcontrol bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=6), and the GFP-labeled AY-27 treated bladders washed by saline (n=5). When compared to that of the no-tumor-control bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=6), the fluorescence intensity of GFP-labeled AY-27 treated bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG and with histology confirmed neoplastic bladder tissue (n=11) was remarkably more intense (3.34 fold of over the former) and was also statistically significant (purinary bladder tissues suggests the potential for cystoscopy-adaptation to enhance diagnosis and guiding surgical management of flat urinary bladder cancer.

  10. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  11. Bladder Dysfunction and Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Sillén

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this overview the influence of functional bladder disturbances and of its treatment on the resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in children is discussed. Historically both bladder dysfunction entities, the overactive bladder (OAB and the dysfunctional voiding (DV, have been described in conjunction with VUR. Treatment of the dysfunction was also considered to influence spontaneous resolution in a positive way. During the last decades, however, papers have been published which could not support these results. Regarding the OAB, a prospective study with treatment of the bladder overactivity with anticholinergics, did not influence spontaneous resolution rate in children with a dysfunction including also the voiding phase, DV and DES (dysfunctional elimination syndrome, most studies indicate a negative influence on the resolution rate of VUR in children, both before and after the age for bladder control, both with and without treatment. However, a couple of uncontrolled studies indicate that there is a high short-term resolution rate after treatment with flow biofeedback. It should be emphasized that the voiding phase dysfunctions (DV and DES are more severe than the genuine filling phase dysfunction (OAB, with an increased frequency of UTI and renal damage in the former groups. To be able to answer the question if treatment of bladder dysfunction influence the resolution rate of VUR in children, randomized controlled studies must be performed.

  12. Interstitial cystitis: painful bladder syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R F Sholan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis, or painful bladder syndrome, is a chronic inflammatory disease of a bladder of unknown etiology. It negatively affects the quality of life, causes depressive disorders, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction. Despite numerous studies, the etiology of interstitial cystitis is still unclear and it’s considered as painful bladder syndrome with multifactorial origin. According to the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 470/100 000 people (60/100 000 men, 850/100 000 women are diagnosed with interstitial cystitis. Diagnosis of the disease is difficult and is substantially based on clinical symptoms. Pelvic pain, urinary urgency, frequency and nocturia are the basic complaints in this pathology. The diagnosis requires exclusion of diseases with similar manifestations. So interstitial cystitis is frequently misdiagnosed as urinary tract infection, overactive bladder, urethral obstruction or diverticulosis, chronic prostatitis, bladder cancer, vulvodynia, endometriosis, and chronic pelvic pain. Etiopathogenesis of the disease is uncertain, which makes etiologic treatment impossible. Currently scientific discussions on the causes of disease continue as well as different treatment regimens are offered, but are often ineffective, palliative and temporary. The treatment for intersticial cystitis should focus on restoring normal bladder function, prevention of relapse of symptoms and improvement of patients’ quality of life. The literature review presents current view on the terminology, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis.

  13. Skeletal metastases from recurrent paraganglioma of the urinary bladder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Goyal

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Paragangliomas arising from the urinary bladder are extremely rare. Most of them are benign, and are curable with surgical resection alone, but about 10% are malignant and may metastasise to regional nodes or distant sites. We present the case of a 45 year male patient who had a recurrent paraganglioma of the urinary bladder with vertebral metastases. The patient was managed using a combination of palliative chemotherapy with carboplatin, etoposide and zoledronate and radiotherapy to the spine. However, the patient′s general condition rapidly deteriorated while on systemic treatment. This case demonstrates the unusually aggressive course that this disease may occasionally take.

  14. PET/Computed Tomography in Renal, Bladder, and Testicular Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Choyke, Peter L

    2015-07-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Hybrid imaging with PET/computed tomography (CT) is having a broad impact in oncology, and in recent years PET/CT is beginning to have an impact in urooncology. In both bladder and renal cancers, there is a need to study the efficacy of other tracers than F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), particularly tracers with limited renal excretion. Thus, new tracers are being introduced. This review focuses on the clinical role of FDG and other PET agents in renal, bladder, and testicular cancers. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. PET/CT in renal, bladder and testicular cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Physician, Chief; Choyke, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Hybrid imaging with PET/CT is having a broad impact in oncology, and in recent years PET/CT is beginning to have an impact in uro-oncology as well. In both bladder and renal cancer there is a need to study the efficacy of other tracers than F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), particularly tracers with only limited renal excretion. Thus, new tracers are being introduced in these malignancies. This review focuses on the clinical role of FDG and other PET agents in renal, bladder and testicular cancer. PMID:26099672

  16. Bladder Injury From Penetrating Trauma of the Inner Thigh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P. Cestare

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a unique case of bladder injury from a penetrating upper leg wound. The patient's initial presentation did not suggest genitourinary injury, however the patient had a relatively late episode of gross hematuria that prompted further investigation. Based on findings of bladder laceration, the patient was managed conservatively and did well. To our knowledge an injury with this particular trajectory and mechanism has not been described previously in the literature. It stands as a reminder that genitourinary trauma can have many points of origin and that a high index of suspicion is necessary during evaluation of these patients.

  17. Mitomycin C Intravesical Chemotherapy in Conjunction With Synergo® Radiofrequency-Induced Hyperthermia for Treatment of Carcinoma in Situ Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Patients Unresponsive to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, With or Without Papillary Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-04

    Bladder Cancer; Bladder Neoplasm; Bladder Tumors; Cancer of Bladder; Cancer of the Bladder; Malignant Tumor of Urinary Bladder; Neoplasms, Bladder; Urinary Bladder Cancer; Carcinoma in Situ of Bladder; Papillary Carcinoma of Bladder (Diagnosis); BCG-Unresponsive Bladder Cancer

  18. Overactive bladder – 18 years – part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Truzzi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Abstract: Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals – including both genders and almost all age groups. The possibility of establishing the diagnosis just from clinical data made patients' access to specialized care easier. Physiotherapy resources have been incorporated into the urological daily practice. A number of more selective antimuscarinic drugs with consequent lower adverse event rates were released. Recently, a new class of oral drugs, beta-adrenergic agonists has become part of the armamentarium for Overactive Bladder. Botulinum toxin injections in the bladder and sacral neuromodulation are routine modalities of treatment for refractory cases. During the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder, a comprehensive review of the literature related to the evolution of the concept, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management was conducted. This text corresponds to the first part of the review Overactive Bladder 18-years.

  19. Overactive bladder – 18 years – part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G.; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, José Antonio; Castaño, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; López, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Abstract: Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals – including both genders and almost all age groups. The possibility of establishing the diagnosis just from clinical data made patients' access to specialized care easier. Physiotherapy resources have been incorporated into the urological daily practice. A number of more selective antimuscarinic drugs with consequent lower adverse event rates were released. Recently, a new class of oral drugs, beta-adrenergic agonists has become part of the armamentarium for Overactive Bladder. Botulinum toxin injections in the bladder and sacral neuromodulation are routine modalities of treatment for refractory cases. During the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder, a comprehensive review of the literature related to the evolution of the concept, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management was conducted. This text corresponds to the first part of the review Overactive Bladder 18-years. PMID:27176184

  20. Artificial intelligence and bladder cancer arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, P J; Catto, J W F; Abbod, M F; Linkens, D A; Herr, A; Pilarsky, C; Wissmann, C; Stoehr, R; Denzinger, S; Knuechel, R; Hamdy, F C; Hartmann, A

    2007-01-01

    Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer is a heterogenous disease whose management is dependent upon the risk of progression to muscle invasion. Although the recurrence rate is high, the majority of tumors are indolent and can be managed by endoscopic means alone. The prognosis of muscle invasion is poor and radical treatment is required if cure is to be obtained. Progression risk in non-invasive tumors is hard to determine at tumor diagnosis using current clinicopathological means. To improve the accuracy of progression prediction various biomarkers have been evaluated. To discover novel biomarkers several authors have used gene expression microarrays. Various statistical methods have been described to interpret array data, but to date no biomarkers have entered clinical practice. Here, we describe a new method of microarray analysis using neurofuzzy modeling (NFM), a form of artificial intelligence, and integrate it with artificial neural networks (ANN) to investigate non-muscle invasive bladder cancer array data (n=66 tumors). We develop a predictive panel of 11 genes, from 2800 expressed genes, that can significantly identify tumor progression (average Logrank p = 0.0288) in the analyzed cancers. In comparison, this panel appears superior to those genes chosen using traditional analyses (average Logrank p = 0.3455) and tumor grade (Logrank, p = 0.2475) in this non-muscle invasive cohort. We then analyze panel members in a new non-muscle invasive bladder cancer cohort (n=199) using immunohistochemistry with six commercially available antibodies. The combination of 6 genes (LIG3, TNFRSF6, KRT18, ICAM1, DSG2 and BRCA2) significantly stratifies tumor progression (Logrank p = 0.0096) in the new cohort. We discuss the benefits of the transparent NFM approach with respect to other reported methods.

  1. Longitudinal Study of Bladder Continence in Patients with Spina Bifida in the National Spina Bifida Patient Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tiebin; Ouyang, Lijing; Thibadeau, Judy; Wiener, John S; Routh, Jonathan C; Castillo, Heidi; Castillo, Jonathan; Freeman, Kurt A; Sawin, Kathleen J; Smith, Kathryn; Van Speybroeck, Alexander; Valdez, Rodolfo

    2017-11-11

    Achieving bladder continence in individuals with spina bifida is a lifetime management goal. We investigated bladder continence status through time and factors associated with this status in patients with spina bifida. We used National Spina Bifida Patient Registry data collected from 2009 through 2015 and applied generalized estimating equation models to analyze factors associated with bladder continence status. This analysis included 5,250 participants with spina bifida in a large, multi-institutional patient registry who accounted for 12,740 annual clinic visit records during the study period. At last followup mean age was 16.6 years, 22.4% of participants had undergone bladder continence surgery, 92.6% used some form of bladder management and 45.8% reported bladder continence. In a multivariable regression model the likelihood of bladder continence was significantly greater in those who were older, were female, were nonHispanic white, had a nonmyelomeningocele diagnosis, had a lower level of lesion, had a higher mobility level and had private insurance. Continence surgery history and current management were also associated with continence independent of all other factors (adjusted OR and 95% CI 1.9, 1.7-2.1 and 3.8, 3.2-4.6, respectively). The association between bladder management and continence was stronger for those with a myelomeningocele diagnosis (adjusted OR 4.6) than with nonmyelomeningocele (adjusted OR 2.8). In addition to demographic, social and clinical factors, surgical intervention and bladder management are significantly and independently associated with bladder continence status in individuals with spina bifida. The association between bladder management and continence is stronger in those with myelomeningocele. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Potentiative effects of noradrenaline on the neurogenic vasoreactivity diminished by cooling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iartsev, V N; Karachentseva, O V; Dvoretskiĭ, D P

    2013-08-01

    The effect of 0.03--1.0 μM noradrenaline on the response to electrical field stimulation of the juvenile rat tail artery segment at 36 degrees C and after cooling to 25 degrees C was studied. At 25 degrees C, the neurogenic vasoconstriction was inhibited, but low dose noradrenaline potentiate the constriction. This potentiation was greater at 25 degrees C than at 36 degrees C, following spontaneous decline in the constriction counteracted by noradrenaline. At low temperature, the potentiative effects of noradrenaline were greater at high frequency of electrical field stimulation. The phenomenon of increase in the noradrenaline-evoked potentiation of neurogenic vasoconstriction inhibited by cold may be of importance for thermoregulation. It could provide restoration of diminished effectiveness of the neurogenic contractile signal thus leading to low heat emission at low temperature.

  3. Bladder hamartoma: a unique cause of urinary retention in a child with Goldenhar syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Ahmed; Gayaparsad, Keshree; Engelbrecht, Matthys J; Moshokoa, Evelyn M

    2013-01-01

    The bladder hamartoma is an extremely rare entity. We report on its presence in a 5-year-old boy with Goldenhar syndrome. Most probably, this is the first report of a bladder hamartoma presenting with obstruction of the bladder outlet resulting in urinary retention. The obstructive lesion was resected endoscopically. This proved to be curative for the lesion, since the follow-up voiding cysto-urethrogram revealed only a negligible post-void residual volume. Although urogenital anomalies have a well-known correlation with the Goldenhar syndrome, the existence of the bladder hamartoma found in association with this syndrome, according to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously reported in the world literature. With this report being only the 11 th described case of bladder hamartoma, we highlight on the management options for this exceptional histological finding. The incidence, screening, treatment decisions and important urogenital associations of the Goldenhar syndrome are also discussed.

  4. Bladder hamartoma: A unique cause of urinary retention in a child with goldenhar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Adam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The bladder hamartoma is an extremely rare entity. We report on its presence in a 5-year-old boy with Goldenhar syndrome. Most probably, this is the first report of a bladder hamartoma presenting with obstruction of the bladder outlet resulting in urinary retention. The obstructive lesion was resected endoscopically. This proved to be curative for the lesion, since the follow-up voiding cysto-urethrogram revealed only a negligible post-void residual volume. Although urogenital anomalies have a well-known correlation with the Goldenhar syndrome, the existence of the bladder hamartoma found in association with this syndrome, according to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously reported in the world literature. With this report being only the 11 th described case of bladder hamartoma, we highlight on the management options for this exceptional histological finding. The incidence, screening, treatment decisions and important urogenital associations of the Goldenhar syndrome are also discussed.

  5. The effect of penile vibratory stimulation on male fertility potential, spasticity and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Læssøe, Line; Sønksen, J

    2005-01-01

    Present the possibility for treatment of male infertility, spasticity, and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) individuals with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS).......Present the possibility for treatment of male infertility, spasticity, and neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) individuals with penile vibratory stimulation (PVS)....

  6. Neurogenic differentiation from adipose-derived stem cells and application for autologous transplantation in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Jiang, Hui; Liu, Xin-wei; Chen, Jian-Ting; Xiang, Liang-Bi; Zhou, Da-Peng

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue have the capacity to differentiate into endodermal, mesoderm and ectodermal cell lineages in vitro, which are an ideal engraft in tissue-engineered repair. In this study, mouse adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were isolated from subcutaneous fat. The markers of ADSCs, CD13, CD29, CD44, CD71, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD166, Nestin, GFAP and MAP-2 were detected by immunofluorescence assays. The ADSCs were cultured in cocktail factors (including ATRA, GGF-2, bFGF, PDGF and forskolin) for neurogenic differentiation. The neurogenic cells markers, Nestin, GFAP and MAP-2 were analyzed using immunofluorescence and real-time PCR after dramatic changes in morphology. Neurogenic cells from ADSCs were autologous transplanted into the mouse of spinal cord injury for observation neurogenic cells colonization in spinal cord. The result demonstrated that the mouse ADSCs were positive for the CD13, CD29, CD44, CD71, CD73, CD90, CD105 and CD166 but negative for neurogenic cell markers, MAP-2, GFAP and Nestin. After neurogenic differentiation, the neurogenic cells were positive for neurogenic cell special markers, gene expression level showed a time-lapse increase, and the cells were successful colonized into spinal cord. In conclusion, our research shows that a population of neuronal cells can be specifically generated from ADSCs and that induced cells may allow for participation in tissue-repair.

  7. Measurement of lower limb blood flow in patients with neurogenic claudication using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, G F; Ashcroft, G P; Roditi, G H; Hutchison, J D; Evans, N T; Mikecz, P; Chaloner, F; Dodd, M; Leonard, C; Porter, R W

    1995-02-15

    Ten subjects (seven with neurogenic claudication and three control subjects) underwent examination of lower limb muscle blood flow before and after exercise using positron emission tomography. To investigate the hypothesis that lower limb muscle ischemia was the origin of symptoms in neurogenic claudication. Patients with neurogenic claudication secondary to spinal stenosis experience lower limb discomfort after exercise similar to that of ischemic claudication. However, they do not have clinical evidence of peripheral vascular disease. The authors postulated that the lower limb discomfort in patients with neurogenic claudication may arise from muscle ischemia due to inadequate dilatation of arterioles in response to exercise, this itself arising secondary to sympathetic dysfunction due to spinal stenosis. Using O15-labeled water and positron emission tomography measured thigh and leg muscle blood flow response to exercise bilaterally in seven patients with unilateral neurogenic claudication and three control subjects were measured. The average values obtained for mid-thigh and mid-calf muscle perfusion at rest were 2.57 ml/min/100 g tissue (2.23-3.90) and 2.39 ml/min/100 g tissue (2.03-3.46), respectively. The average values obtained from mid-thigh and mid-calf perfusion after exercise were 4.41 ml/min/100 g tissue (2.8-6.0) and 4.87 ml/min/100 g (2.2-11.7). We found no difference in muscle perfusion between symptomatic and asymptomatic limbs in this group of patients. These studies suggest that muscle ischemia is not the origin of symptoms in most patients with neurogenic claudication.

  8. [Leiomyosarcoma of the urinary bladder treated using laparoscopic cystectomy and bladder replacement by enterocystoplasty: about a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbethe, Dimitri; Moudouni, Said; Dahami, Zacharia; Lakmichi, Mohamed Amine; Sarf, Ismael

    2017-01-01

    Our study aims to report a new case of leiomyosarcoma of the urinary bladder, a rare tumor, and to propose a new therapeutic approach, given the non-consensual nature of its treatment. A 31-year old patient, with no particular previous history, presented with total haematuria with clot formation. The clinical and paraclinical assessment showed a voluminous solid tumor mass occupying the apex of urinary bladder and extending to the right lateral wall, with infiltrating appearance, without lymph node involvement or invasion of local or distal organs. Surgical management was based on total laparoscopic cystectomy and bladder replacement by enterocystoplasty. The postoperative course was uneventful. Radiological examinations at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months showed no recurrence. Thus, adaptive surgery should be proposed on a case-by-case basis, to improve the quality of life of patients suffering from this condition.

  9. Elective bladder-sparing treatment for muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendínez-Cano, G; Rico-López, J; Moreno, S; Fernández Parra, E; González-Almeida, C; Camacho Martínez, E

    2014-01-01

    Radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for localised muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We offer a bladder-sparing treatment with TURB +/- Chemotherapy+Radiotherapy to selected patients as an alternative. We analyze, retrospectively, 30 patients diagnosed with MIBC from March 1991 to October 2010. The mean age was 62.7 years (51-74). All patients were candidates for a curative treatment, and underwent strict selection criteria: T2 stage, primary tumor, solitary lesion smaller than 5cm with a macroscopic disease-free status after TURB, negative random biopsy without hydronephrosis. Staging CT evaluation was normal. Restaging TURB or tumor bed biopsy showed a disease-free status or microscopic muscle invasion. 14 patients underwent TURB alone, 13 TURB+Chemotherapy and 3 TURB+Chemotherapy+Radiotherapy. The mean follow up was 88.7 months (19-220). 14 patients remained disease free (46.6%), 10 had recurrent non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (33%). 81.3% complete clinical response. 71% bladder preserved at 5-years. Overall, 5-years survival rate was 79% and 85% cancer-specific survival rate. Although radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for localised MIBC, in strictly selected cases, bladder-sparing treatment offers an alternative with good long term results. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. A Case of Neuro-Behcet's Disease Presenting with Central Neurogenic Hyperventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhachroum, Ayham M; Saeed, Saba; Kaur, Jaspreet; Shams, Tanzila; DeGeorgia, Michael A

    2016-03-11

    Behcet's disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder usually characterized by the triad of oral ulcers, genital ulcers, and uveitis. Central to the pathogenesis of Behcet's disease is an autoimmune vasculitis. Neurological involvement, so called "Neuro-Behcet's disease", occurs in 10-20% of patients, usually from a meningoencephalitis or venous thrombosis. We report the case of a 46-year-old patient with Neuro-Behcet's disease who presented with central neurogenic hyperventilation as a result of brainstem involvement from venulitis. To the best of our knowledge, central neurogenic hyperventilation has not previously been described in a patient with Neuro-Behcet's disease.

  11. Does diabetes mellitus-induced bladder remodeling affect lower urinary tract function? ICI-RS 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner-Hermanns, Ruth; Daneshgari, Firouz; Vahabi, Bahareh; Birder, Lori; Oelke, Matthias; Chacko, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    Due to an increase in aging population and changing eating habits diabetes mellitus (DM) type II is a rapidly increasing condition worldwide. Although not so detrimental as other co-morbidities, uropathy contributes to a significantly reduced quality-of-life in those affected. The purpose of this ICS-RS report is to highlight clinical and basic research data to outline directions for further research and possible treatment approaches. This report is based on a think tank presentation and discussion at the ICI-RS 2011, original research data and literature research. Clinical and experimental data confirm that detrusor overactivity, both neurogenic and myogenic, and changes in transmitter regulation leading to a hyper- excitability of the detrusor are the major findings in diabetic neuropathic bladders. These findings seem to be related to an earlier stage of DM, whereas detrusor underactivity appears to be linked to later stages of DM. Detrusor smooth muscle cells seem to be modulated directly by hyperglycemia. Data support the theory that hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress in the detrusor smooth muscle and that micro- and macrovascular events are also responsible for urologic complications of DM. DM causes bladder remodelling leading to uropathy in a mulitfactorial way. Future research should focus on the effects of DM as a function of time and develop novel animal models looking at defined aspects as well as interaction of different aspects- such as oxidative stress in neurogenic, myogenic and urothelial components and the role of inflammation and hypoxia caused by vascular complications. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Long-term functional outcome in patients with neurogenic dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, G; Prosiegel, M; Yassouridis, A

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective cohort study was: (1) to document and investigate long-term post-treatment outcome focusing on swallowing disability; and (2) to reveal variables predicting successful functional follow-up results in 63 patients with neurogenic dysphagia. All patients were admitted to an inpatient neurologic rehabilitation unit. Information was gathered through chart review and questionnaires. Functional outcome was categorized according to the degree of feeding status: (1) total tube feeding; (2) oral and tube feeding combined; (3) oral feeding with compensation; and (4) total oral feeding. 'Improvement' was determined as a positive shift in the type of feeding, 'deterioration' as a negative shift and 'no change' was defined as remaining at the same nutritional level. The safety of feeding was assessed by tracking the occurrence of pneumonia. Seventy percent of the patients achieved an improved immediate outcome after therapy. During long-term follow-up examinations, 43% of all patients showed further improvement, 57% did not show any change in their feeding ability and no deterioration was reported for any patient. Comparisons of the relative frequencies of the feeding modalities before and after therapy revealed a significant reduction in tube feeders and a significant increase in oral feeders with compensation during inpatient-treatment. The outpatient-interval showed a significant shift in total oral feeders without compensations but no significant improvement within the tube feeders and within the partial oral feeders. The improvement in nutritional status was not associated with an increased risk of pneumonia. Additional comparisons of the relative frequencies of the compensatory strategies indicated a significant reduction in all treatment techniques at final follow-up. Using logistic regression, predictors of successful post-discharge outcome involved a decreasing pre-treatment interval and unexpectedly low Barthel-ADL mobility scores. As a

  13. [Use of oral anticholinergic therapy in children under 1 years of age with high risk bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque Mialdea, R; Martín-Crespo, R; Hernández, E; Sánchez, O; Cañizo, A; Fernández, A; Aparicio, C; Blanco, T; Cebrían, J

    2005-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of the treatment with oral anticholinergic agents (Oxybutin clorure) in patients under 1 year old, and who aree carriers of high risk bladder secondary to neurological illness as well as no neurological one. Since 1989, we have indicated treatment with anticholinergic agents to 16 patients: 9 patients had neurogenic bladder secondary to: myelomeningocele (n=7) and sacrocoxigeal teratoma (n=2). Others 7 patients had non neurogenic bladder secondary to: posterior urethral valvulas (n=1), valvula-like syndrome (n=4), post-surgery of neonatal giant bladder diverticulum (n=1) and Prune-Belly syndrome (n=1). The urodinamic study was performed during the first six months of life, being "high risk bladder" defined according to the parameters of compliance vesical and pressure of leak at point (PER). Five of the patients showed neonatal cronic renal failure (CRF), who were treated by cutaneus temporary derivation. All patients at treatment with anticholinergic agents at a 0.2 mg/kg/day dose was established; other early adjunctive treatment prior to the closure of the urinary derivation in children with CRF(n=5); or as a part of the conservative treatment (n=3), alone or associate to intermittent bladder catheterization (IBC) (n=8). During the treatment with anticholinergic agents, the cardiac frequency was controlled by EKG registration in 6 patients, being the rest of the children clinicaly controled (skin colour, mouth dryness, cardiac frequency and intestinal function). In all the cases, the minimum duration of the treatment was one year, until the functional stabilization of the urinary tract. It is to underline the absence of secondary complications which would have caused the suspension or the reduction of the treatment at long term. Conventional studies of urologicals image and urodinamic studies, showed the stabilization of the urinary tract and also the preservation of kidney function and not only was demonstrated in those

  14. One-stage posttraumatic bladder reconstruction and soft-tissue coverage of the lower abdomen or perineum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Hung; Lin, Chih-Hung

    2010-01-01

    Mutilating injury on pelvis may be complicated by urinary bladder ruptures and soft-tissue avulsion of the lower abdominal wall or perineum. With retraction of the avulsed abdominal wall or perineum, as well as bladder tissue loss secondary to trauma or infection, direct closure the injured bladder often leads to excessive tension, resulting in ischemia and eventual failure of repair. The authors successfully managed 4 patients with such injuries using the pedicled vastus lateralis myocutaneous flap. No major complications occurred and intact bladders were confirmed with cystograms. Three (75%) of them were able to void normally within 1 year. It is concluded that the pedicled vastus lateralis myocutaneous flap is an ideal option for posttraumatic bladder reconstruction and soft-tissue coverage of the lower abdomen or perineum; whereas the undersurface of the muscle serves as a substitute for the missing bladder wall, the remaining part of the muscle, as well as the subcutaneous fat, provide sufficient bulk for dead space obliteration.

  15. Bladder Morphology Using 2 Different Catheter Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-10

    Urologic Injuries; Urologic Diseases; Bladder Infection; Urinary Tract Infections; Mucosal Inflammation; Mucosal Infection; Bladder Injury; Catheter-Related Infections; Catheter Complications; Catheter; Infection (Indwelling Catheter); Pelvic Floor Disorders; Urinary Incontinence

  16. Automatic bladder irrigation after vaginal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, G; Holt, E

    1975-12-01

    Comparing Cystomatic irrigation of the bladder with conventional gravity drainage, there was no decrease in immediate urinary infection rates nor was there any obvious improvement in the speed of recovery of bladder function.

  17. Chronic Bladder Infection: Is There a Cure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a woman and I've had a chronic bladder infection for four years. My doctor keeps giving ... factors make women more likely to get recurrent bladder infections, a type of urinary tract infection (UTI). ...

  18. Sciatic nerve compression by neurogenic heterotopic ossification: use of CT to determine surgical indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salga, Marjorie [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Jourdan, Claire [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Handi-Resp, (EA4047), Versailles (France); Durand, Marie-Christine [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Neurophysiology, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Hangard, Chloe; Carlier, Robert-Yves [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Medical Imaging, Garches (France); Denormandie, Philippe [Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Garches (France); Genet, Francois [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Military Medical Service, Hopital d' Instruction des Armees Percy, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clamart (France)

    2014-09-14

    To describe the characteristics of neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) based on clinical tests, electroneuromyography (ENMG) and CT in a database of patients with lesions of the central nervous system who required sciatic nerve neurolysis along with posterior hip NHO resection, and to determine the respective roles of ENMG and CT in the management of posterior hip NHOs in patients who are unable to communicate or express pain. The consistency of the ENMG results with clinical findings, CT results and macroscopic signs of lesions was retrospectively assessed after sciatic nerve neurolysis and ablation of 55 posterior hip NHOs. Sciatic nerve neurolysis was necessary in 55 cases (47.4 %; 55 out of 116). CT showed contact of the NHO with the nerve in all cases: 5 in contact with no deflection, 3 in contact with deflection, 21 moulded into a gutter and 26 entrapped in the NHO. There were clinical signs of sciatic nerve lesion in 21.8 % of cases (12 out of 55). ENMG showed signs of sciatic nerve lesions in only 55.6 % (10 out of 18), only 4 of whom presented with clinical signs of a nerve lesion. No significant relationship was found between clinical symptoms and ENMG findings of sciatic nerve compression (n = 13, p = 0.77). Nerve compression by NHO is likely an underdiagnosed condition, particularly in patients who are unable to communicate. Diagnosis of sciatic compression by NHO should be based on regular clinical examinations and CT. ENMG is not sufficiently sensitive to be used alone for surgical decision-making. (orig.)

  19. Parents of children with neurogenic bowel dysfunction: their experiences of using transanal irrigation with their child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, C; Bray, L; Driver, C; Harris, V

    2014-11-01

    Neurogenic bowel dysfunction in children is a lifelong condition often resulting in the need for active bowel management programmes, such as transanal irrigation. Parents are central in the decision-making process to initiate and carry out treatments until such a time their child becomes independent. Minimal research has focussed on examining parents' experiences of undertaking transanal irrigation with their child. This study aimed to explore parents' experiences of learning about and using irrigation with their child and how parents motivated their children to become independent. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with parents with experience of using transanal irrigation with their child. Interviews were undertaken by a parent researcher. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Eighteen telephone interviews (16 mothers, 1 father and 1 carer) were conducted. Parents shared how they had negotiated getting started and using transanal irrigation with their child. They discussed a sense of success derived from their confidence in using and mastering irrigation, the process of making decisions to continue or stop using irrigation and how they motivated themselves and their child to continue with the irrigation regime. Challenges included minimizing their child's distress during the irrigation procedure and how they negotiated and moved towards their child becoming independent. Despite the emotional difficulty parents experienced as a result of the invasive nature of transanal irrigation most parents reported an improvement in their child's faecal continence which positively impacted on the child and family's lives. The child's physical ability and emotional readiness to develop independent irrigation skills in the future concerned some parents. The experiences shared by parents in this study has the capacity to inform transanal irrigation nursing and medical care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Diagnostic value of "dysphagia limit" for neurogenic dysphagia: 17 years of experience in 1278 adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogdu, Ibrahim; Kiylioglu, Nefati; Tarlaci, Sultan; Tanriverdi, Zeynep; Alpaydin, Sezin; Acarer, Ahmet; Baysal, Leyla; Arpaci, Esra; Yuceyar, Nur; Secil, Yaprak; Ozdemirkiran, Tolga; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2015-03-01

    Neurogenic dysphagia (ND) is a prevalent condition that accounts for significant mortality and morbidity worldwide. Screening and follow-up are critical for early diagnosis and management which can mitigate its complications and be cost-saving. The aims of this study are to provide a comprehensive investigation of the dysphagia limit (DL) in a large diverse cohort and to provide a longitudinal assessment of dysphagia in a subset of subjects. We developed a quantitative and noninvasive method for objective assessment of dysphagia by using laryngeal sensor and submental electromyography. DL is the volume at which second or more swallows become necessary to swallow the whole amount of bolus. This study represents 17 years experience with the DL approach in assessing ND in a cohort of 1278 adult subjects consisting of 292 healthy controls, 784 patients with dysphagia, and 202 patients without dysphagia. A total of 192 of all patients were also reevaluated longitudinally over a period of 1-19 months. DL has 92% sensitivity, 91% specificity, 94% positive predictive value, and 88% negative predictive value with an accuracy of 0.92. Patients with ALS, stroke, and movement disorders have the highest sensitivity (85-97%) and positive predictive value (90-99%). The clinical severity of dysphagia has significant negative correlation with DL (r=-0.67, pdysphagia and it can be performed in an EMG laboratory. Our study provides specific quantitative features of DL test that can be readily utilized by the neurologic community and nominates DL as an objective and robust method to evaluate dysphagia in a wide range of neurologic conditions. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modifying factors in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Shoji; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Nakanishi, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Ryohei; Imaida, Katsumi

    1983-01-01

    N-Butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is a potent carcinogen in the urinary bladder of animals. The BBN model of bladder cancer is an excellent model of human urinary bladder cancer and has already led to a greater knowledge of its pathogenesis. In our studies, histogenesis and morphological characteristics of BBN urinary bladder cancer were analyzed in different animal species such as rats, mice, hamsters and guinea pigs and also in different rat strains. Papillary or nodular hyperplas...

  2. Bladder cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, D L; Thor, D E; Stogdill, V D; Radwin, H M

    1982-11-01

    A randomized controlled prospective evaluation of intravesical and percutaneous bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy was done in 57 patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. In addition, 9 patients at high risk for tumor recurrence were treated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin produced a self-limited cystitis and 1 complication (hydronephrosis) of immunotherapy was observed. Of the 57 randomized patients 54 were followed for 3 to 30 months. Tumor recurrence was documented in 13 of 26 controls (50 per cent) and only 6 of 28 patients (21 per cent) treated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (p equals 0.027, chi-square). The interval free of disease was prolonged significantly with bacillus Calmette-Guerin treatment (p equals 0.014, generalized Wilcoxon test). Importantly, a simple purified protein derivative skin test distinguished those patients who responded to bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy from those who did not. Only 1 of 17 treated patients (6 per cent) whose purified protein derivative test converted from negative to positive had tumor recurrence compared to 5 recurrences (38 per cent) among the 13 patients whose test remained negative or had been positive before treatment (p equals 0.022, chi-square). Bacillus Calmette-Guerin was given to 10 patients with stage B transitional cell carcinoma who were not candidates for cystectomy and 7 are free of disease. Of 5 patients with carcinoma in situ 3 remain free of tumor after bacillus Calmette-Guerin treatment and 5 of 6 who had multiple recurrences after intravesical chemotherapy responded favorably to bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy.

  3. Neurogenic detrusor overactivity is associated with decreased expression and function of the large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+-activated K(+ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiril L Hristov

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from a variety of neurological diseases such as spinal cord injury, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis often develop neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO, which currently lacks a universally effective therapy. Here, we tested the hypothesis that NDO is associated with changes in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM large conductance Ca(2+-activated K(+ (BK channel expression and function. DSM tissue samples from 33 patients were obtained during open bladder surgeries. NDO patients were clinically characterized preoperatively with pressure-flow urodynamics demonstrating detrusor overactivity, in the setting of a clinically relevant neurological condition. Control patients did not have overactive bladder and did not have a clinically relevant neurological disease. We conducted quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR, perforated patch-clamp electrophysiology on freshly-isolated DSM cells, and functional studies on DSM contractility. qPCR experiments revealed that DSM samples from NDO patients showed decreased BK channel mRNA expression in comparison to controls. Patch-clamp experiments demonstrated reduced whole cell and transient BK currents (TBKCs in freshly-isolated DSM cells from NDO patients. Functional studies on DSM contractility showed that spontaneous phasic contractions had a decreased sensitivity to iberiotoxin, a selective BK channel inhibitor, in DSM strips isolated from NDO patients. These results reveal the novel finding that NDO is associated with decreased DSM BK channel expression and function leading to increased DSM excitability and contractility. BK channel openers or BK channel gene transfer could be an alternative strategy to control NDO. Future clinical trials are needed to evaluate the value of BK channel opening drugs or gene therapies for NDO treatment and to identify any possible adverse effects.

  4. Tumour cell expansion in bladder epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.J. Rebel (Annemarie)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBladder cancer is common in western society. The major problem of patients with superficial bladder cancer is the high recurrence rate and multifocality of these tumours. In 70 % of the patients superficial bladder cancer recurs after local resection of the tumour within 15 years. The

  5. Rectal impalement with bladder perforation: A review from a single institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir Benjelloun, EI; Ahallal, Youness; Khatala, Khalid; Souiki, Tarik; Kamaoui, Iman; Taleb, Khalid Ati

    2013-01-01

    Context: Impalement injuries of the rectum with bladder perforation have been rarely reported. Such lesions have been associated with increased postoperative morbidity. A well-conducted preoperative evaluation of the lesions tends to prevent such complications. Aims: To increase awareness about patients with rectal impalement that involve bladder injuries and to examine the significance of thorough clinical examination and complementary investigation for these patients’ management. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively, we identified three patients with rectal impalement and bladder perforation treated in University Hospital Hassan II, Fez, Morocco. We recorded the symptoms, subsequent management, and further follow-up for each patient. All available variables of published cases were reviewed and analyzed. Results: Evident urologic symptoms were present in only one patient. Bladder perforation was suspected in two other patients on the basis of anterior rectal perforation in digital exam. Retrograde uroscanner could definitely confirm the diagnosis of bladder perforation. Fecal and urine diversion was the basis of the treatment. No postoperative complications were noted. We have reviewed 14 previous reports. They are presented mainly with urine drainage through the rectum. Radiologic investigation (retrograde cystography and retrograde uroscanner) confirmed bladder perforation in 10 patients (71.4%). Unnecessary laparotomy was performed in six patients (42.8%). Fecal diversion and urinary bladder decompression using urethral catheter were the most performed procedures in bladder perforation [6/14 patients (42.8%)]. No specific postoperative complications were reported. Conclusions: A high index of clinical suspicion is required to make the diagnosis of bladder perforation while assessing patients presenting with rectal impalement. Meticulous preoperative assessment is the clue of successful management. PMID:24311904

  6. Electrical stimulation of sacral dermatomes in multiple sclerosis patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fjorback, M.V.; Rey, F. van; Rijkhoff, N.J.M.; Nohr, M.; Petersen, T.; Heesakkers, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: Transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile/clitoral nerve (DPN) has been shown to suppress detrusor contractions in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). However, the long-term use of surface electrodes in the genital region may not be well tolerated and may

  7. [A swollen, painless calf caused by neurogenic muscle (pseudo)-hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Zwarts, M.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2003-01-01

    Neurogenic muscle (pseudo) hypertrophy of the calf was diagnosed in a 60-year-old man, who presented with chronic, painless and unilateral calf enlargement caused by a chronic S1 radiculopathy due to a lumbar disc hernia in the L5-S1 interspace. The differential diagnosis of a swelling of the calf

  8. Directly reprogramming fibroblasts into adipogenic, neurogenic and hepatogenic differentiation lineages by defined factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Jin, Yu-Qing; Gao, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    The reprogramming of adult cells into pluripotent cells or directly into alternative adult cell types represents a great potential technology for regenerative medicine. In the present study, the potential of key developmental adipogenic, neurogenic and hepatogenic regulators to reprogram human fibroblasts into adipocytes, neurocytes and hepatocytes was investigated. The results demonstrated that direct reprogramming of octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)β activated C/EBPα and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ expression, inducing the conversion of fibroblasts into adipocytes. Similarly, direct reprogramming of the transcription factors sex determining region-box 2, trans-acting T-cell specific transcription factor (GATA-3) and neurogenic differentiation 1 in fibroblasts may induce neurogenic differentiation through hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) transfection. Moreover, hepatogenic differentiation was induced by combining the direct reprogramming of Oct4, GATA-3, hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox α and forkhead box protein A2 in fibroblasts. These results demonstrate that specific transcription factors and reprogramming factors are able to directly reprogram fibroblasts into adipogenic, neurogenic and hepatogenic differentiation lineages by HVJ-E transfection. PMID:28587331

  9. Neurogenic pulmonary edema due to ventriculo-atrial shunt dysfunction: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ana Sofia; Menezes, Sónia; Silva, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary edema is caused by the accumulation of fluid within the air spaces and the interstitium of the lung. Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical syndrome characterized by the acute onset of pulmonary edema following a significant central nervous system insult. It may be a less-recognized consequence of raised intracranial pressure due to obstructive hydrocephalus by blocked ventricular shunts. It usually appears within minutes to hours after the injury and has a high mortality rate if not recognized and treated appropriately. We report a patient with acute obstructive hydrocephalus due to ventriculo-atrial shunt dysfunction, proposed to urgent surgery for placement of external ventricular drainage, who presented with neurogenic pulmonary edema preoperatively. She was anesthetized and supportive treatment was instituted. At the end of the procedure the patient showed no clinical signs of respiratory distress, as prompt reduction in intracranial pressure facilitated the regression of the pulmonary edema. This report addresses the importance of recognition of neurogenic pulmonary edema as a possible perioperative complication resulting from an increase in intracranial pressure. If not recognized and treated appropriately, neurogenic pulmonary edema can lead to acute cardiopulmonary failure with global hypoperfusion and hypoxia. Therefore, awareness of and knowledge about the occurrence, clinical presentation and treatment are essential. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Neurogenic claudication by epidural lipomatosis: A case report and review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Kurt (Erkan); S.H. Bakker-Niezen (S.)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractEpidural lipomatosis is most frequently seen in patients on chronic steroid treatment. Only twelve cases of idiopathic spinal epidural lipomatosis have been described. In this report we present an additional case of this condition in a middle-aged male presenting with neurogenic

  11. A step-wise approach to sperm retrieval in men with neurogenic anejaculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Ohl, Dana A; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Normal fertility is dependent on intravaginal delivery of semen through ejaculation. This process is highly dependent on an intact ejaculatory reflex arc, which can be disrupted through any type of trauma or disease causing damage to the CNS and/or peripheral nerves. Neurogenic anejaculation...

  12. Neurogenic Language Disorders in Children. International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, Franco, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Language disorders in children are one of the most frequent causes of difficulties in communication, social interaction, learning and academic achievement. It has been estimated that over 5% of children present with some kind of language disorder. This volume illustrates the state of the art in neurogenic language disorders in children. The most…

  13. Metastatic primary adenocarcinoma of the bladder in a twenty-five years old woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Valerio

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary adenocarcinoma of the bladder is a rare tumor. The classification between primary vesical and urachal is debated. We present the case of a young female who presented clinicopathological features of a metastatic urachal adenocarcinoma, but the histological result revealed primary adenocarcinoma of the bladder contrary to expectancy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case of a metastatic adenocarcinoma of the bladder in a 25 years old female. This case emphasizes the challenge for urologists to recognize and manage this aggressive tumor in the setting described.

  14. Granular cell tumors of the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayani Naila

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granular cell tumors (GCTs are extremely rare lesions of the urinary bladder with only nine cases being reported in world literature of which one was malignant. Generally believed to be of neural origin based on histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural studies; they mostly follow a clinically benign course but are commonly mistaken for malignant tumors since they are solid looking, ulcerated tumors with ill-defined margins. Materials and methods We herein report two cases of GCTs, one benign and one malignant, presenting with gross hematuria in a 14- and a 47-year-old female, respectively. Results Histopathology revealed characteristic GCTs with positive immunostaining for neural marker (S-100 and negative immunostaining for epithelial (cytokeratin, Cam 5.2, AE/A13, neuroendocrine (neuron specific enolase, chromogranin A, and synaptophysin and sarcoma (desmin, vimentin markers. The benign tumor was successfully managed conservatively with transurethral resection alone while for the malignant tumor, radical cystectomy, hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, anterior vaginectomy, plus lymph node dissection was done. Both cases show long-term disease free survival. Conclusion We recommend careful pathologic assessment for establishing the appropriate diagnosis and either a conservative or aggressive surgical treatment for benign or localized malignant GCT of the urinary bladder, respectively.

  15. Molecular basis of urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hussain, Turki O; Akhtar, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a relatively common and potentially life-threatening neoplasm. The diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma usually entails a lifelong surveillance to detect recurrent disease. In recent years, significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis in urinary bladder. An early step in the process of carcinoma development is establishment of a premalignant abnormal urothelial patch that may give rise to various types of urothelial carcinoma and may provide a fertile ground for development of multifocal synchronous and metachronous tumors. Two distinct molecular pathways are involved. Low-grade papillary carcinoma is associated with mutation in the FGFR3 or in some cases mutations in RAS genes. High-grade in situ/muscle-invasive carcinoma on the other hand is characterized by alteration of p53 and pRB. Loss of function of these key genes, which play a crucial role in the control of cell cycle, leads to accumulation of additional mutations and deletions of genes resulting in an aggressive phenotype. It is hoped that a thorough understanding of the molecular basis of urothelial cancer will facilitate early diagnosis and will lead to development of new modalities for the management and treatment of these carcinomas.

  16. Switch to Abobotulinum toxin A may be useful in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity when intradetrusor injections of Onabotulinum toxin A failed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottet, Florie; Peyronnet, Benoit; Boissier, Romain; Reiss, Bénédicte; Previnaire, Jean G; Manunta, Andrea; Kerdraon, Jacques; Ruffion, Alain; Lenormand, Loïc; Perrouin Verbe, Brigitte; Gaillet, Sarah; Gamé, Xavier; Karsenty, Gilles

    2018-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of switching to a different brand of botulinum toxin A (BTA, from Botox® to Dysport®) in case of failure of intradetrusor injections (IDI) of Botox® in the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The charts of all patients who underwent a switch to IDI of Dysport® after failure of an IDI of Botox® at six departments of neurourology were retrospectively reviewed. The main outcomes of interest were the bladder diary data and four urodynamic parameters: maximum cystometric capacity (MCC), maximum detrusor pressure (PDET max), and volume at first uninhibited detrusor contraction (UDC). Fifty-seven patients were included. After the first injection of Dysport®, no adverse events were reported. A significant decrease in number of urinary incontinence episodes per day was observed in 52.63% of patients (P switch from (56.14%). After a median follow up of 21 months, 87% of responders to BTA switch were still treated successfully with BTA. Most patients refractory to Botox® (56.14%) draw benefits from the switch to Dysport®. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Neurogenética en el Perú, ejemplo de investigación traslacional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mazzetti

    Full Text Available La neurogenética es una disciplina emergente en el Perú que vincula la investigación básica con la práctica clínica. El Centro de Investigación Básica en Neurogenética, es el único centro en el Perú dedicado a la atención especializada de enfermedades neurogenéticas. La investigación en esta área está estrechamente ligada a la enfermedad de Huntington, desde la genotipificación del gen HTT por PCR, hasta los actuales estudios de haplogrupos en esta enfermedad. La investigación en otras enfermedades monogénicas permitió la implementación de metodologías alternativas para la genotipificación del síndrome X frágil y distrofia miotónica tipo 1. Esfuerzos colaborativos nacionales e internacionales han permitido conocer nuevas variantes genéticas en enfermedades complejas, como la enfermedad de Parkinson y Alzheimer. El entrenamiento multidisciplinario y la mentoría fomentan la formación de nuevos especialistas en neurogenética, permitiendo el crecimiento sostenido de esta disciplina en el país. El impulso de la investigación en el Perú ha impulsado el crecimiento de la investigación en neurogenética; sin embargo, las limitaciones en infraestructura, tecnología y capacitación aún son un reto para el crecimiento de investigación en esta disciplina

  18. [Surgical treatment of urinary bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatkin, N A; Martov, A G; Darenkov, S P; Kamalov, A A; Kudriavtsev, Iu V

    1999-01-01

    Ultrasonic transabdominal and transrectal investigations, computed tomography, endoscopic photodynamic studies, polyfocal biopsy of the urinary bladder were used in examination of 1238 patients which were diagnosed to have urinary bladder cancer. 894 patients underwent transurethral resection of the bladder. Morphologically, cancer of the urinary bladder has an inductory effect on intact parts of the bladder mucosa. This means that even most radical resection does not eliminate grounds for a new tumor growth. Radical cystectomy was performed in diffuse papillomatosis, multiple stage T2 tumors of high-grade malignancy, tumors at stage T3, T4, Nx, MO, in rapid recurrent tumors after conservative or operative treatment.

  19. General Information about Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through the urethra and leaves the body. Enlarge Anatomy of the male urinary system (left panel) and female urinary system (right panel) showing the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. Urine is made in the renal tubules and collects in the renal pelvis of ...

  20. Mullerianosis of the Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjini Kudva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mullerianosis of the urinary bladder is a rare and morphologically complex tumor-like lesion, composed of several types of mullerian lesions like endometriosis, endocervicosis, and endosalpingiosis. This disease occurs in women of reproductive age group. Implantative and metaplastic origins have been suggested in the pathogenesis.

  1. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X chr...

  2. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  3. The pear-shaped bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambos, M A; Bosniak, M A; Lefleur, R S; Madayag, M A

    1977-01-01

    The tear-drop or pear-shaped bladder was originally described in cases of pelvic hematoma. It may also be seen, however, with a variety of other entities, including pelvic lipomatosis, inferior vena cava occlusion, lymphocysts, and enlarged pelvic lymph nodes. Pertinent radiographic findings of these conditions are reviewed.

  4. The burden of bladder cancer care: direct and indirect costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossanen, Matthew; Gore, John L

    2014-09-01

    Bladder cancer is a common, complex, and costly disease. Every year in the USA, bladder cancer is responsible for 70 ,000 diagnosed cases and over 15, 000 deaths. Once diagnosed, patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) are committed to a lifetime of invasive procedures and potential hospitalizations that result in substantial direct and indirect costs. Bladder cancer is the most costly cancer among the elderly, estimated at nearly $4 billion per year, and has the highest cost of any cancer when categorized on a per patient basis. The direct economic cost of NMIBC is fueled by the need for lifelong cystoscopic examination and variations in treatment algorithms. This fiscal burden is further compounded by the indirect impact on psychological health and quality of life of patients and their families. Despite the development of new technologies, such as novel urinary biomarkers and innovative cystoscopic methods, no alternative to cystoscopic surveillance has been established. The management of patients with NMIBC is responsible for a substantial financial burden with indirect costs that extend beyond quantifiable direct costs.

  5. Giant bladder diverticulum: A rare cause of bladder outlet obstruction in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Appeadu-Mensah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant bladder diverticula are rare causes of bladder outlet obstruction in children and have rarely been reported. [1] In this paper, we present three children with giant bladder diverticula who presented with bladder outlet obstruction within a year. Micturating cystourethrogram is important for investigating bladder outlet obstruction in children and was used to confirm the diagnosis in all the patients. The relationship between the diverticula and ureters varied, with the ureters running either through the wall of the diverticulum and opening directly into the bladder, or opening into the diverticulum. In one patient, there was a recurrence, which was excised successfully. Excision is important to reduce the risk of recurrence.

  6. Solifenacin is able to improve the irritative symptoms after transurethral resection of bladder tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhensheng; Cao, Zhi; Xu, Chuanliang; Wang, Haifeng; Zhang, Chao; Pan, Anyin; Wei, Rongchao; Peng, Song; Guo, Fei; Wang, Lei; Sun, Yinghao

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of solifenacin in the management of irritative symptoms after transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBTs) with subsequent intravesical chemotherapy. A total of 116 patients undergoing TURBT were randomly allocated into 2 groups, 58 patients in each group. Group 1 patients received solifenacin 5 mg, 6 hours before surgery and 5 mg per day, after surgery for 2 weeks, whereas group 2 patients received a placebo. Patients with low-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer received immediate postoperative instillation of epirubicin. Patients with medium- or high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer received postoperative instillation twice within 2 weeks, once immediately following the operation and once on the eighth postoperative day. All patients completed bladder diaries before surgery, on the 1st, 7th, and 14th days after removal of the catheter with overactive bladder symptom scores completed preoperatively, and on the 7th and 14th days. Additionally, the incidence and severity of catheter-related bladder discomfort were recorded at 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the surgery. The incidence and the severity of catheter-related bladder discomfort in group 1, compared with group 2, were significantly reduced (Pmanagement of irritative symptoms after TURBT with subsequent intravesical chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. HAMLET treatment delays bladder cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Hou, Yuchuan; Svensson, Majlis; Holmqvist, Bo; Svanborg, Catharina

    2010-04-01

    HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that kills different types of cancer cells. Recently we observed a rapid reduction in human bladder cancer size after intravesical HAMLET treatment. In this study we evaluated the therapeutic effect of HAMLET in the mouse MB49 bladder carcinoma model. Bladder tumors were established by intravesical injection of MB49 cells into poly L-lysine treated bladders of C57BL/6 mice. Treatment groups received repeat intravesical HAMLET instillations and controls received alpha-lactalbumin or phosphate buffer. Effects of HAMLET on tumor size and putative apoptotic effects were analyzed in bladder tissue sections. Whole body imaging was used to study HAMLET distribution in tumor bearing mice compared to healthy bladder tissue. HAMLET caused a dose dependent decrease in MB49 cell viability in vitro. Five intravesical HAMLET instillations significantly decreased tumor size and delayed development in vivo compared to controls. TUNEL staining revealed selective apoptotic effects in tumor areas but not in adjacent healthy bladder tissue. On in vivo imaging Alexa-HAMLET was retained for more than 24 hours in the bladder of tumor bearing mice but not in tumor-free bladders or in tumor bearing mice that received Alexa-alpha-lactalbumin. Results show that HAMLET is active as a tumoricidal agent and suggest that topical HAMLET administration may delay bladder cancer development. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Modifying factors in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Shoji; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Nakanishi, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Ryohei; Imaida, Katsumi

    1983-01-01

    N-Butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is a potent carcinogen in the urinary bladder of animals. The BBN model of bladder cancer is an excellent model of human urinary bladder cancer and has already led to a greater knowledge of its pathogenesis. In our studies, histogenesis and morphological characteristics of BBN urinary bladder cancer were analyzed in different animal species such as rats, mice, hamsters and guinea pigs and also in different rat strains. Papillary or nodular hyperplasia (PN hyperplasia) is found to be a preneoplastic lesion of the rat urinary bladder. Therefore, the promoting and inhibitory effects of various chemicals in two-stage urinary bladder carcinogenesis were judged by measuring PN hyperplasia in rats. Dose-dependent and organ-specific effects of the urinary bladder promoter, saccharin, in the induction of PN hyperplasia were shown in rats after initiation by BBN. The promoting effect of saccharin was seen more clearly in the urinary bladder of rats after potent initiation. A strain difference in susceptibility of the urinary bladder to the promoter was also shown. These results suggest that the above various factors may also have modifying activities on urinary bladder carcinogenesis in man. PMID:6832095

  9. Exogenous glycosaminoglycans coat damaged bladder surfaces in experimentally damaged mouse bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurst Robert E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstital cystitis is often treated with exogenous glycosaminoglycans such as heparin, chondroitin sulphate (Uracyst, hyaluronate (Cystistat or the semi-synthetic pentosan polysulphate (Elmiron. The mechanism of action is presumed to be due to a coating of the bladder surface to replace the normally present chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate lost as a result of the disease. This study used fluorescent labelled chondroitin sulphate to track the distribution of glycosaminoglycans administered intravesically to mouse bladder that had been damaged on the surface. Methods The surfaces of mouse bladders were damaged by 3 mechanisms – trypsin, 10 mM HCl, and protamine sulphate. Texas Red-labeled chondroitin sulphate was instilled into the bladders of animals with damaged bladders and controls instilled only with saline. Bladders were harvested, frozen, and sectioned for examination by fluorescence. Results The normal mouse bladder bound a very thin layer of the labelled chondroitin sulphate on the luminal surface. Trypsin- and HCl-damaged bladders bound the labelled chondroitin sulphate extensively on the surface with little penetration into the bladder muscle. Protamine produced less overt damage, and much less labelling was seen, presumably due to loss of the label as it complexed with the protamine intercalated into the bladder surface. Conclusion Glycosaminoglycan administered intravesically does bind to damaged bladder. Given that the changes seen following bladder damage resemble those seen naturally in interstitial cystitis, the mechanisms proposed for the action of these agents is consistent with a coating of damaged bladder.

  10. Effects of ethanol treatment on the neurogenic and endothelium-dependent relaxation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle in the mouse

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aydinoglu, Fatma; Yilmaz, Sakir N; Coskun, Banu; Daglioglu, Nebile; Ogulener, Nuran

    2008-01-01

    .... The neurogenic- and endothelium-dependent relaxation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle and the degenerative effect of subacute ethanol treatment on the endothelial cells of corpus cavernosum was investigated in mice...

  11. Where are we with bladder preservation for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in 2017?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodson Wade Smelser

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Bladder preservation is often considered for quality of life considerations or in the setting of multiple medical comorbidities, and this remains oncologically appropriate even in 2016 in highly selected patients with muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

  12. Postoperative bladder catheterization based on individual bladder capacity: A randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Tammo A.; Rosier, Peter F. W. M.; Moons, Karel G. M.; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P. A.; Van Roon, Eric N.; Kalkman, Cor J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Untreated postoperative urinary retention can result in permanent lower urinary tract dysfunction and can be prevented by timely bladder catheterization. The author hypothesized that the incidence of postoperative bladder catheterization can be decreased by using the patient's own

  13. Postoperative bladder catheterization based on individual bladder capacity : a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Tammo A; Rosier, Peter F W M; Moons, Karel G M; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P A; van Roon, Eric N; Kalkman, Cor J

    BACKGROUND: Untreated postoperative urinary retention can result in permanent lower urinary tract dysfunction and can be prevented by timely bladder catheterization. The author hypothesized that the incidence of postoperative bladder catheterization can be decreased by using the patient's own

  14. [NORADRENALINE-EVOKED RESTORATION OF THE NEUROGENIC VASOREACTIVITY DIMINISHED BY ACIDOSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yartsev, V N; Karachentseva, O V

    2015-09-01

    The effect of 0.03-1.0 μM noradrenaline on the neurogenic contractile response to electrical field stimulation of the juvenile rat tail artery segment in control conditions and after the solution pH decrease from 7.4 to 6.6 was studied. Acidosis were shown to inhibit this response significantly at all frequencies of stimulation used (3, 5, 10, and 40 Hz). Noradrenaline potentiated neurogenic vasoconstriction diminished spontaneously or by low pH. The potentiative effect of noradrenaline in acidic solution was more pronounced at higher frequencies of stimulation and noradrenaline concentrations. This phenomenon can, at least in part, account for blood flow redistribution from less important organs to vital ones during exercise which is characterized by acidosis, augmented sympathetic nerve activity and increased levels of noradrenaline.

  15. A Case of Neuro-Behcet’s Disease Presenting with Central Neurogenic Hyperventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhachroum, Ayham M.; Saeed, Saba; Kaur, Jaspreet; Shams, Tanzila; De Georgia, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 46 Final Diagnosis: Central hyperventilation Symptoms: Hyperventilation Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Neurology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Behcet’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder usually characterized by the triad of oral ulcers, genital ulcers, and uveitis. Central to the pathogenesis of Behcet’s disease is an autoimmune vasculitis. Neurological involvement, so called “Neuro-Behcet’s disease”, occurs in 10–20% of patients, usually from a meningoencephalitis or venous thrombosis. Case Report: We report the case of a 46-year-old patient with Neuro-Behcet’s disease who presented with central neurogenic hyperventilation as a result of brainstem involvement from venulitis. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, central neurogenic hyperventilation has not previously been described in a patient with Neuro-Behcet’s disease. PMID:26965646

  16. Orthotopic neo- bladder in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettini, Manlio

    2010-12-01

    Radical cystectomy is the most effective treatment madality for high grade urinary bladder carcinoma and orthotopic reconstruction is the better urinary diversion modality also in women. From 2002 to 2007 we performed 14 radical cystectomies followed by orthotopic reconstruction in women aged between 47 and 68 years (mean age 56) affected by urinary bladder carcinoma. Our reconstructive technique requires the preparation of two strips of the recti muscles fascia, the sectioning of the bladder neck and, when the uterus is present, hysteroannessiectomy and cystectomy en block leaving intact the lateral and inferior vaginal walls. The pelvic floor is stabilized by a colposacropexis with a prosthesis and placing an omental flap over the prosthesis. The orthotopic reconstruction is achieved via a neobladder according to the Padovana technique. The ureters are anastomized to the neobladder and splinted with single J stents. The pathological examination demonstrated in all patients the presence of a high grade carcinoma (G3): more specifically 4 patients had a full thickness intramural infiltration (T2), 2 patients had involvment of the perivescical fat (T3) ad 8 patients were in T1 stage. Lymphnodes were negative for tumour (NO). In 8 patients blood transfusions were necessary to treat post surgical anemia. No significant intra-, peri- or post operative complications were noted. The mean follow-up was 45 months: a patient died for diffuse metastatic disease after 11 months. The remaining patients are still alive and report normal lifestyle: 10 with normal micturition and 4 with urinary retention treated with intermittent self-catetherization. Two patients report nocturnal incontinence treated with hourly micturition and one pad. The five patients who had normal preoperative sexual intercourse resumed a normal sexual activity. The possibility to orthotopically recontruct the female urinary bladder has been established long time after the introduction of orthotopic

  17. Scrotal Herniation of Bladder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hamidi Madani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Inguinal bladder hernia is a rare clinical condition, with 1–3% of all inguinal hernias involving the bladder. Any portion of the bladder may herniate, from a small portion or a diverticulum to most of the bladder. We present a 55-year-old male with an intermittent right scrotal mass of 6 months’ duration. The mass lesion protruded through the right inguinal canal before voiding and reduced after that. Scrotal sonography revealed a hypoechoic lesion in the scrotum that stretched cranially to the intra-abdominal portion of the bladder. Excretory urography showed a duplicated system in the left kidney and deviation of the left orifice to the right side of the trigon. Finally, cystography illustrated herniation of the bladder to the right scrotum. Surgical repair of the hernia was done with mesh. Follow-up cystography one month postoperatively revealed no herniation.

  18. Epitheloid hemangioendothelioma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narmada P Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Epitheloid hemangioendothelioma is an uncommon vascular neoplasm and has an unpredictable clinical behavior. It is characterized by round or spindle-shaped endothelial cells with cytoplasmic vacuolation. Most often, epitheloid hemangioendothelioma arise from the soft tissues of the upper and lower extremities and it has borderline malignant potential. We describe the first reported case of epitheloid hemangioendothelioma in the urinary bladder, which was treated by transurethral resection. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry.

  19. The vascular and neurogenic factors associated with erectile dysfunction in patients after pelvic fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Guan; Sun Wendong; Shengtian Zhao; Tongyan Liu; Yuqiang Liu; Xiulin Zhang; Mingzhen Yuan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication of pelvic fractures. To identify the vascular and neurogenic factors associated with ED, 120 patients admitted with ED after traumatic pelvic fracture between January 2009 and June 2013 were enrolled in this study. All patients answered the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) questionnaire. Nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) testing confirmed the occurrence of ED in 96 (80%) patients on whom penile duplex ultrasound and ...

  20. Notch receptor expression in neurogenic regions of the adult zebrafish brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa de Oliveira-Carlos

    Full Text Available The adult zebrash brain has a remarkable constitutive neurogenic capacity. The regulation and maintenance of its adult neurogenic niches are poorly understood. In mammals, Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance both in embryonic and adult CNS. To better understand how Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance during adult neurogenesis in zebrafish we analysed Notch receptor expression in five neurogenic zones of the adult zebrafish brain. Combining proliferation and glial markers we identified several subsets of Notch receptor expressing cells. We found that 90 [Formula: see text] of proliferating radial glia express notch1a, notch1b and notch3. In contrast, the proliferating non-glial populations of the dorsal telencephalon and hypothalamus rarely express notch3 and about half express notch1a/1b. In the non-proliferating radial glia notch3 is the predominant receptor throughout the brain. In the ventral telencephalon and in the mitotic area of the optic tectum, where cells have neuroepithelial properties, notch1a/1b/3 are expressed in most proliferating cells. However, in the cerebellar niche, although progenitors also have neuroepithelial properties, only notch1a/1b are expressed in a high number of PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. In this region notch3 expression is mostly in Bergmann glia and at low levels in few PCNA [Formula: see text] cells. Additionally, we found that in the proliferation zone of the ventral telencephalon, Notch receptors display an apical high to basal low gradient of expression. Notch receptors are also expressed in subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells. We suggest that the partial regional heterogeneity observed for Notch expression in progenitor cells might be related to the cellular diversity present in each of these neurogenic niches.

  1. Giant Leiomyosarcoma of the Urinary Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, José G A; Klojda, Carlos A B; Araújo, Claudio P De; Pires, Lucas A S; Babinski, Marcio A

    2016-05-01

    The bladder leiomyosarcoma is a rare and agressive mesenchymal tumour, and adult women of reproductive age have a higher incidence of developing the bladder leiomyosarcoma. The pathophysiology of the disease is not certain, and its main symptoms are hematuria, dysuria and abdominal pain. There are not a considerable amount of cases described in the literature. We report a case of a giant leiomyosarcoma of the urinary bladder in a 31-year-old woman.

  2. Bladder Tumor Diagnosis—Improved Excretory Cystograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar, Arjan D.

    1967-01-01

    The correct precystoscopic diagnosis of bladder tumor was made in 20 of 23 patients with this disease, among more than 1,000 persons studied by double-dose excretory urography. There was no increase in the incidence of untoward effects. Double-dose excretory urography with delayed bladder films is recommended as the primary urographic procedure in all patients with gross or microscopic hematuria in whom bladder tumor is suspected. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:6044290

  3. Neurogenic heterotopic ossification: epidemiology and morphology on conventional radiographs in an early neurological rehabilitation population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seipel, R.; Langner, S.; Lippa, M.; Kuehn, J.P.; Hosten, N. [Ernst Moritz Arndt Universitaet Greifswald, Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Greifswald (Germany); Platz, T. [An-Institut der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, BDH-Klinik Greifswald GmbH, Neurologisches Rehabilitationszentrum und Querschnittgelaehmtenzentrum, Greifswald (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    To retrospectively evaluate neurogenic heterotopic ossification in an early neurological rehabilitation population (phases B and C) with respect to epidemiology and morphology on conventional radiographs. Over a 4-year period, 1,463 patients treated at a clinic for early neurological rehabilitation were evaluated for clinical symptoms of neurogenic heterotopic ossification. In case of clinical suspicion, plain radiographs of the expected sites were obtained. If heterotopic ossification was detected, the initial and subsequent radiographs were retrospectively analyzed for sites, size, and morphology. Immature lesions were categorized as small (<10 mm) or large (10-100 mm). The prevalence rate of neurogenic heterotopic ossification was 2.05%. The condition was most common in young male adults. The hip was the most common site accounting for more than half of the cases. Two or more ossifications were seen in 56.7% of the affected patients with approximately two-thirds showing bilateral symmetric involvement of corresponding joint regions. The size of ossifications strongly varied interindividually. Small immature lesions demonstrated less progression in size than large lesions during maturation (P < 0.05). Standard radiographs, as a fast and inexpensive technique, allow the expected size progression of heterotopic ossifications during maturation to be estimated, which is relevant in terms of therapeutic decisions, patient mobilization, and neurological rehabilitation. (orig.)

  4. The sea urchin animal pole domain is a Six3-dependent neurogenic patterning center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng; Yaguchi, Junko; Yaguchi, Shunsuke; Angerer, Robert C; Angerer, Lynne M

    2009-04-01

    Two major signaling centers have been shown to control patterning of sea urchin embryos. Canonical Wnt signaling in vegetal blastomeres and Nodal signaling in presumptive oral ectoderm are necessary and sufficient to initiate patterning along the primary and secondary axes, respectively. Here we define and characterize a third patterning center, the animal pole domain (APD), which contains neurogenic ectoderm, and can oppose Wnt and Nodal signaling. The regulatory influence of the APD is normally restricted to the animal pole region, but can operate in most cells of the embryo because, in the absence of Wnt and Nodal, the APD expands throughout the embryo. We have identified many constituent APD regulatory genes expressed in the early blastula and have shown that expression of most of them requires Six3 function. Furthermore, Six3 is necessary for the differentiation of diverse cell types in the APD, including the neurogenic animal plate and immediately flanking ectoderm, indicating that it functions at or near the top of several APD gene regulatory networks. Remarkably, it is also sufficient to respecify the fates of cells in the rest of the embryo, generating an embryo consisting of a greatly expanded, but correctly patterned, APD. A fraction of the large group of Six3-dependent regulatory proteins are orthologous to those expressed in the vertebrate forebrain, suggesting that they controlled formation of the early neurogenic domain in the common deuterostome ancestor of echinoderms and vertebrates.

  5. Congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy in megaconial myopathy due to a mutation in CHKB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Gago, Manuel; Dacruz-Alvarez, David; Pintos-Martínez, Elena; Beiras-Iglesias, Andrés; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta gene (CHKB) mutations have been identified in Megaconial Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (MDCMC) patients, a very rare inborn error of metabolism with 21 cases reported worldwide. We report the case of a Spanish boy of Caucasian origin who presented a generalized congenital muscular hypotonia, more intense at lower limb muscles, mildly elevated creatine kinase (CK), serum aspartate transaminase (AST) and lactate. Electromyography (EMG) showed neurogenic potentials in the proximal muscles. Histological studies of a muscle biopsy showed neurogenic atrophy with enlarged mitochondria in the periphery of the fibers, and complex I deficiency. Finally, genetic analysis showed the presence of a homozygous mutation in the gene for choline kinase beta (CHKB: NM_005198.4:c.810T>A, p.Tyr270(∗)). We describe here the second Spanish patient whit mutation in CHKB gene, who despite having the same mutation, presented an atypical aspect: congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy progressing to a combined neuropathic and myopathic phenotype (mixed pattern). Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhanced Dentate Neurogenesis after Brain Injury Undermines Long-Term Neurogenic Potential and Promotes Seizure Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Neuberger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal dentate gyrus is a focus of enhanced neurogenesis and excitability after traumatic brain injury. Increased neurogenesis has been proposed to aid repair of the injured network. Our data show that an early increase in neurogenesis after fluid percussion concussive brain injury is transient and is followed by a persistent decrease compared with age-matched controls. Post-injury changes in neurogenesis paralleled changes in neural precursor cell proliferation and resulted in a long-term decline in neurogenic capacity. Targeted pharmacology to restore post-injury neurogenesis to control levels reversed the long-term decline in neurogenic capacity. Limiting post-injury neurogenesis reduced early increases in dentate excitability and seizure susceptibility. Our results challenge the assumption that increased neurogenesis after brain injury is beneficial and show that early post-traumatic increases in neurogenesis adversely affect long-term outcomes by exhausting neurogenic potential and enhancing epileptogenesis. Treatments aimed at limiting excessive neurogenesis can potentially restore neuroproliferative capacity and limit epilepsy after brain injury.

  7. SPOT14-Positive Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells in the Hippocampus Respond Dynamically to Neurogenic Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlen Knobloch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs in the adult brain is tightly controlled to prevent exhaustion and to ensure proper neurogenesis. Several extrinsic stimuli affect NSPC regulation. However, the lack of unique markers led to controversial results regarding the in vivo behavior of NSPCs to different stimuli. We recently identified SPOT14, which controls NSPC proliferation through regulation of de novo lipogenesis, selectively in low-proliferating NSPCs. Whether SPOT14-expressing (SPOT14+ NSPCs react in vivo to neurogenic regulators is not known. We show that aging is accompanied by a marked disappearance of SPOT14+ NSPCs, whereas running, a positive neurogenic stimulus, increases proliferation of SPOT14+ NSPCs. Furthermore, transient depletion of highly proliferative cells recruits SPOT14+ NSPCs into the proliferative pool. Additionally, we have established endogenous SPOT14 protein staining, reflecting transgenic SPOT14-GFP expression. Thus, our data identify SPOT14 as a potent marker for adult NSPCs that react dynamically to positive and negative neurogenic regulators.

  8. Quality of Life Outcomes for Bladder Cancer Patients Undergoing Bladder Preservation with Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Michael A; Goenka, Anuj

    2015-11-01

    For patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, the decision to undergo radical cystectomy or bladder preservation treatment must incorporate survival differences, toxicity, and quality of life. Our objective was to review patient-reported outcomes for bladder preservation treatment with a focus on patients eligible for radical cystectomy, for whom a comparison of patient-reported outcomes is most relevant. Peer-reviewed, English-language manuscripts in MEDLINE and PubMed databases were examined from 1996 through 2014. Subject headings included quality of life, bladder cancer, bladder sparing, bladder preservation, radiation, and radiotherapy. Prospective and retrospective studies of patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing bladder preservation with radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer were included. Two prospective studies and four retrospective studies were identified. Several weaknesses from these studies were identified including small sample sizes, variable time points of assessment, variation in treatment regimens, and failure to use validated or condition-specific questionnaires. From the available data, bladder preservation appears to result to similar or better general quality of life compared to radical cystectomy with satisfactory urinary and sexual function reported in most series. In general, bladder preservation resulted in more gastrointestinal symptoms than radical cystectomy. This is one of the first reviews on the subject of patient-reported outcomes for bladder preservation in muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Although the data are limited, this review may provide a framework for developing well-designed, prospective comparisons of treatment for this patient cohort.

  9. Bladder wash cytology, quantitative cytology, and the qualitative BTA test in patients with superficial bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, H. G.; van Balken, M. R.; Schamhart, D. H.; Peelen, P.; de Reijke, T.; Debruyne, F. M.; Schalken, J. A.; Witjes, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Two new methods for the detection of transitional tumor cells in bladder wash (karyometry: QUANTICYT) and voided urine material (BARD BTA test) were compared with bladder wash cytology for the prediction of histology and tumor recurrence. Bladder wash material and voided urine were sampled from 138

  10. A bladder diverticulum model in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Süleyman; Kuzdan, Özgür; Özaydın, Seyithan; Başdaş, Cemile Beşik; Özaydın, İpek; Erdoğan, Cankat; Sander, Serdar

    2016-10-01

    Shuttling of some of the bladder volume into the bladder diverticulum (BD) can cause urinary retention, lower urinary tract dysfunction, infection, and stone formation. This experimental study is the first to create a rabbit BD to study micturition physiology (urodynamics and pathology) that mimics clinical findings. The study included 16 New Zealand adult male rabbits in the BD group and 16 sham-operated controls. BD creation consisted of a lower midline laparotomy and bladder entry via the spacing between the detrusor muscle fibers and the mucosa, posterolaterally from the bladder wall. The detrusor was excised to provide a mucosal prolapsus, creating a narrow BD neck (Figure). The sham group underwent bladder exposure with a midline incision. All rabbits underwent urodynamic study preoperatively and postoperatively, consisting of postmicturition residue (PMR), maximum bladder capacity (MBC), voiding detrusor pressure (VPdet), filling detrusor pressure (FPdet), compliance, and urine flow (Qflow). The animals were then sacrificed and their bladders assessed for pathology and stone formation. Preoperative MBC, Pdet, and Qmax were within reference ranges. No animals had PMR or urinary tract infections (UTIs). The BD group showed urodynamic and pathologic bladder changes, including decreased (28%) cystometric bladder capacity and compliance (Sham: 26.8 ± 0.4; BD: 4.46 ± 1.08, p = 0.0001) and increased post-void residual PMR (8.3 ± 2.4 mL). Pathology revealed increased bladder detrusor thickness correlated with urodynamic findings of increased filling detrusor pressures (Sham: 1.58 ± 0.2; BD: 4.89 ± 0.93, p = 0.0001). Urodynamics revealed intermittent BD bladder contraction during the filling phases. Eight BD group rabbits had UTIs; five had stone formation (4-9 mm). In the literature, it has not been determined whether lower urinary tract disorders (LUTD) could cause diverticula, or if a congenital diverticula could be reason for LUTD. Anatomical

  11. Bladder volume estimation from electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlebusch, Thomas; Nienke, Steffen; Santos, Susana Aguiar; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitous knowledge of bladder volume is of great interest to patients whose perception of bladder volume is impaired. A promising approach to provide frequent bladder volume estimates to the patient are automatic and noninvasive measurements by electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Previous studies have shown a linear correlation of abdominal electrical impedance and bladder volume. In this article, we present two methods to extract a volume estimate from EIT measurements. One method is based on the global impedance from a reconstructed image, the second method is based on a singular value decomposition of the raw voltage measurement vector. A performance evaluation in presence of noise is performed.

  12. Bladder sensory physiology: neuroactive compounds and receptors, sensory transducers, and target-derived growth factors as targets to improve function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Eric J.; Merrill, Liana

    2014-01-01

    Urinary bladder dysfunction presents a major problem in the clinical management of patients suffering from pathological conditions and neurological injuries or disorders. Currently, the etiology underlying altered visceral sensations from the urinary bladder that accompany the chronic pain syndrome, bladder pain syndrome (BPS)/interstitial cystitis (IC), is not known. Bladder irritation and inflammation are histopathological features that may underlie BPS/IC that can change the properties of lower urinary tract sensory pathways (e.g., peripheral and central sensitization, neurochemical plasticity) and contribute to exaggerated responses of peripheral bladder sensory pathways. Among the potential mediators of peripheral nociceptor sensitization and urinary bladder dysfunction are neuroactive compounds (e.g., purinergic and neuropeptide and receptor pathways), sensory transducers (e.g., transient receptor potential channels) and target-derived growth factors (e.g., nerve growth factor). We review studies related to the organization of the afferent limb of the micturition reflex and discuss neuroplasticity in an animal model of urinary bladder inflammation to increase the understanding of functional bladder disorders and to identify potential novel targets for development of therapeutic interventions. Given the heterogeneity of BPS/IC and the lack of consistent treatment benefits, it is unlikely that a single treatment directed at a single target in micturition reflex pathways will have a mass benefit. Thus, the identification of multiple targets is a prudent approach, and use of cocktail treatments directed at multiple targets should be considered. PMID:24760999

  13. Testing of Alternative Materials for Advanced Suit Bladders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Orndoff, Evelyne; Makinen, Janice; Tang, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Several candidate advanced pressure bladder membrane materials have been developed for NASA Johnson Space Center by DSM Biomedical for selective permeability of carbon dioxide and water vapor. These materials were elasthane and two other formulations of thermoplastic polyether polyurethane. Each material was tested in two thicknesses for permeability to carbon dioxide, oxygen and water vapor. Although oxygen leaks through the suit bladder would amount to only about 60 cc/hr in a full size suit, significant amounts of carbon dioxide would not be rejected by the system to justify its use. While the ratio of carbon dioxide to oxygen permeability is about 48 to 1, this is offset by the small partial pressure of carbon dioxide in acceptable breathing atmospheres of the suit. Humidity management remains a possible use of the membranes depending on the degree to which the water permeability is inhibited by cations in the sweat. Tests are underway to explore cation fouling from sweat.

  14. Carcinoma-in-situ bladder -an early indication for cystectomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Kumar

    2002-01-01

    All patients diagnosed to have CIS bladder histolo-gically in Harrogate District Hospital from August 94 to August 99 were included in the study. All data con-cerning the management, treatment and subsequent fol-low-up were collected from the patients′ records and analysed in a systematic way. A total of 20 patients were included in the study. Analysis showed that there was no age or sex predilection and the age group ranged from 36 to 75. It occurs either alone or with papillary bladder tumour. It is found to be poor prognostic indi-cator for subsequent ttunour recurrence. Mitomvcin was the least effective and BCG is the most effective form of intravesical treatment. Failure on BCG therapy is an earlvpredictorforaggressive treatment i.e. Radical Cys-tectomy. Eventually 1/3 of all patients diagnosed to have CIS progressed to muscle invasive disease requiring radical treatment.

  15. [Treatment of infiltrating nonmetastatic bladder cancers in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintens, H; Guy, L; Mazerolles, C; Théodore, C; Amsellem, D; Roupret, M; Wallerand, H; Roy, C; Saint, F; Bernardini, S; Lebret, T; Soulié, M; Pfister, C

    2009-11-01

    Total cystectomy is the reference treatment for infiltrating nonmetastatic bladder cancers. With the progress in anesthesia and postoperative intensive care, this treatment can be applied to a population of elderly subjects provided there is a strict oncological and geriatric evaluation of the patient. Recent series reporting total cystectomies in subjects over 75 years of age report comparable morbidity and mortality rates to the general population. Strategies to preserve the vesical reservoir can be indicated in selected cases. Their objectives are to guarantee local control and follow-up identical to radical cystectomy, while preserving a functional bladder and good quality of life. The strategies including transurethral resection with radiochemotherapy are analyzed. Thus, with multidisciplinary consensus and adapted management, elderly patients with significant comorbidities should not be automatically excluded from access to effective treatment of these cancers. (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. The Use of Biomarkers for Bladder Cancer Diagnosis and Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubmüller, Bernhard; Roupret, Morgan; Briganti, Alberto; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer - a propensity that is associated with high recurrence and mortality rates. Various molecular alterations are reflected by diverse cellular morphological manifestations and vast tumor heterogeneity. Many biomarkers have been described that have undergone clinical trials and are approved for clinical use, but most still remain investigational. The question how molecular markers can support surveillance of different patient groups is still a matter of controversy. However, it can be expected that major advancement in the understanding of molecular pathways involved in urothelial carcinogenesis will enable improved patient management. The scope of this review is to discuss the established diagnostic tests and urinary biomarkers and their application for screening and surveillance of bladder cancer.

  17. Bladder Rupture and Urine Fistula Between-Bladder and Supracondylary Pin Tract After Pelvis Fracture: A Case Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zekeriya Oztemur

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important complications of pelvic fractures is bladder rupture. Potential complications of pelvic fractures caused by bladder ruptures are vesicovaginal, vesicorectal, vesicouterine and urethrorectal fistulas...

  18. Detrusor wraparound for bladder neck reconstruction in cohort of children with bladder exstrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Ashraf T

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the outcome of the detrusor wraparound bladder neck technique of bladder neck reconstruction in 28 children with bladder exstrophy. The records of all patients with bladder exstrophy who underwent detrusor wraparound bladder neck were reviewed. A total of 28 consecutive patients were identified and included 21 boys and 7 girls, with a mean age at surgery of 8.3 years. All patients had undergone previous exstrophy closure (17 staged and 11 complete). Of the 28 patients, 8 (29%) had undergone previous endoscopic injection of a bulking agent at the bladder neck. At surgery, 13 patients (46%) required concomitant ileocystoplasty and a continent outlet. Continence was defined as complete dryness with no urine leakage either through the urethra or the continent outlet. The mean follow-up duration was 31 months (range 13-48). All augmented patients were continent using clean intermittent catheterization through the outlet. Complete dryness was achieved in 20 (71%) of 28 patients. However, the continence rate was only 47% in the nonaugmented group compared with 100% in the augmented group. Six of the incontinent children underwent bladder neck injection using a bulking agent but dryness was achieved in only 1 (17%). The detrusor wraparound bladder neck technique is a viable option for bladder neck reconstruction for incontinent children after exstrophy closure. However, bladder augmentation and continent outlet construction are the pillars of optimal success. Injection of bulking agent at the bladder neck for failure has had poor success. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer: bladder volume variation and its relation to margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muren, Ludvig; Redpath, Anthony Thomas; Lord, Hannah

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To control and account for bladder motion is a major challenge in radiotherapy (RT) of bladder cancer. This study investigates the relation between bladder volume variation and margins in conformal and image-guided RT (IGRT) for this disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The cor......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To control and account for bladder motion is a major challenge in radiotherapy (RT) of bladder cancer. This study investigates the relation between bladder volume variation and margins in conformal and image-guided RT (IGRT) for this disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS......: The correlation between the relative bladder volume (RBV, defined as repeat scan volume/planning scan volume) and the margins required to account for internal motion was first studied using a series of 20 bladder cancer patients with weekly repeat CT scanning during treatment. Both conformal RT (CRT) and IGRT...... were simulated; in the latter translational movement of the bladder was accounted for by isocentre shifting. Further analysis of bladder volumes and margins was performed using a second series of eight patients with twice-weekly repeat CT scanning. In an attempt to control bladder volume variation...

  20. Giant bladder lithiasis: case report and bibliographic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego Vilar, Daniel; Beltran Persiva, José; Pérez Mestre, Mateo; Povo Martin, Iván José; Miralles Aguado, Jaume; Garau Perelló, Carmen; De Francia, Jose Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Urinary lithiasis is a very frequent urological disease but bladder lithiasis is very uncommon.Patients usually refer voiding symptoms and hematuria. The diagnosis is made after imaging tests. We report a clinical case describing a giant bladder stone and perform a bibliographic review. A 43 year old man with the diagnosis of giant bladder stone (more than 10 cm diameter). We searched Medline using the terms: giant bladder stone, giant bladder lithiasis, bladder lithiasis, giant bladder lithiasis. We made the diagnosis of giant bladder stone after a simple kidney, ureter and bladder (KUB) X Ray. The treatment for this patient was a cystolithotomy. We found more than 230 reports at Medline and chose the most referred ones and the last 10 years reports. Giant bladder lithiasis is a very rare pathology. The gold standard for diagnosis is cystoscopy but sometimes with a KUB Xray or an ultrasound is enough. Because of its size, cistolitotomy is the correct treatment for giant bladder stone.

  1. Static postural stability in women with stress urinary incontinence: Effects of vision and bladder filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, Daria; Stania, Magdalena; Słomka, Kajetan; Błaszczak, Edward; Taradaj, Jakub; Dolibog, Patrycja; Juras, Grzegorz

    2017-11-01

    This case-control study was designed to compare static postural stability between women with stress urinary incontinence and continent women and it was hypothesized that women with incontinence aged around 50 years also have balance disorders. Eighteen women with incontinence and twelve women without incontinence aged 50-55 years participated in two 60-s trials of each of four different testing conditions: eyes open/full bladder, eyes open/empty bladder, eyes closed/full bladder, eyes closed/empty bladder. The center of foot pressure (COP): sway range, root mean square, velocity (in the antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions), and COP area were recorded. The stabilograms were decomposed into rambling and trembling components. The groups of women with and without incontinence differed during the full bladder condition in antero-posterior COP sway range, COP area, and rambling trajectory (range in the antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions, root mean square in the antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions and velocity in the antero-posterior direction). The women with incontinence had more difficulty controlling their postural balance than continent women while standing with a full bladder. Therefore, developing therapeutic management focused on strengthening the women's core muscles and improving their postural balance seems advisable. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Leiomyoma of Urinary Bladder Presenting with Febrile Urinary Tract Infection: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Ra'ed Ghassan; Murshidi, Mujalli Mhailan; Abu Shahin, Nisreen; Murshidi, Muayyad Mujalli

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas of urinary bladder constitute only about 0.43% of all bladder tumors. Only about 250 cases were reported in English literature. This is the first reported case of bladder leiomyoma to present with febrile urinary tract infection. We report a case of a 37- year old male who presented with febrile urinary tract infection. Imaging showed a bladder lesion. This lesion was managed by transurethral resection. Pathologic diagnosis was bladder leiomyoma. Although bladder leiomyomas are benign, they can cause serious sequelae, including serious urinary tract infections as the case we present here shows. This is why it is important to early diagnose and treat this condition. This case highlights the importance of early introduction of imaging in patients presenting with severe urinary tract infections. Failure to diagnose this lesion as the underlying cause of infection may have easily led to recurrence of similar severe life-threatening infections. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Bladder exstrophy associated with complete urethral duplication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.E. Mensah

    ees.elsevier.com/afju · www.sciencedirect.com. Case report. Bladder exstrophy associated with complete urethral duplication: Bladder can be augmented with dorsal urethral mucosa. J.E. Mensaha,∗. , K.N. Ampadua, M.Y. Kyeia, B. Edusieb.

  4. Laparoscopic Bladder -Conserving Surgery: Case Series | Kahie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This intervention optimizes the advantages of minimal access surgery, upholds quality of life, improves patient's body image and preserves function. Methods: We present our experience in this series of three patients with bladder tumours who underwent laparoscopic bladder-conserving surgery at Grey's Hospital. Results: ...

  5. Bladder dysfunction in advanced Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, Kristian; Nielsen, Kurt K

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients often have lower urinary tract symptoms. Seventy-four percent of patients with early-to-moderate disease report more than one bladder disturbance symptom. Severe bladder symptoms are reported in 27-39% of PD patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  6. Autonomic nervous control of the urinary bladder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ochodnicky, P.; Uvelius, B.; Andersson, K.-E.; Michel, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of the urinary bladder function. Under physiological circumstances, noradrenaline, acting mainly on β(3) -adrenoceptors in the detrusor and on α(1) (A) -adrenoceptors in the bladder outflow tract, promotes urine storage, whereas

  7. The Molecular Pathogenesis of Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G. van Tilborg (Angela)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe bladder is a hollow organ in the small pelvis. It stores urine that is produced when the kidneys filter the blood. Four different layers, the epithelium, lamina propria, muscularis, and connective tissue, define the bladder wall. The epithelium consists of 7 to 10 cell layers

  8. Bladder pressure sensors in an animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koldewijn, E. L.; van Kerrebroeck, P. E.; Schaafsma, E.; Wijkstra, H.; Debruyne, F. M.; Brindley, G. S.

    1994-01-01

    Urinary incontinence due to detrusor hyperreflexia might be inhibited on demand if changes in bladder pressure could be detected by sensors and transferred into pudendal nerve electrostimulation. The aim of this study is to investigate how the bladder wall reacts on different sensor implants.

  9. Full-thickness endometriosis of the bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Jens Jørgen; Kristensen, Jens; Hartwell, Dorthe

    2014-01-01

    referral centres in Denmark for surgical treatment of stage III and IV endometriosis. POPULATION: Thirty-one women with deep infiltrating bladder endometriosis. METHODS: All women presenting in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology with deep infiltrating bladder endometriosis between March 2002...

  10. Trigonalgia: An overlooked cause of bladder pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S. Aminu

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... Review. Trigonalgia: An overlooked cause of bladder pain. S. Aminu. George Eliot Hospital, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, UK. Received 5 February 2015; accepted 19 May 2015. Available online ... Abstract. Bladder pain is a cause of chronic pelvic pain, which constitutes a common presentation in urology out-.

  11. Role of TREK-1 potassium channel in bladder overactivity after partial bladder outlet obstruction in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Salah A; Hatton, William J; Han, Junguk; Hennig, Grant W; Britton, Fiona C; Koh, Sang Don

    2010-02-01

    Mouse models of partial bladder outlet obstruction cause bladder hypertrophy. Expression of a number of ion channels is altered in hypertrophic detrusor muscle, resulting in bladder dysfunction. We determined whether mechanosensitive TREK-1 channels are present in the murine bladder and whether their expression is altered in partial bladder outlet obstruction, resulting in abnormal filling responses. Partial bladder outlet obstruction was surgically induced in CD-1 mice and the mice recovered for 14 days. Cystometry was done to evaluate bladder pressure responses during filling at 25 microl per minute in partial bladder outlet obstruction mice and sham operated controls. TREK-1 channel expression was determined at the mRNA and protein levels by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively, and localized in the bladder wall using immunohistochemistry. Obstructed bladders showed about a 2-fold increase in weight vs sham operated bladders. TREK-1 channel protein expression on Western blots from bladder smooth muscle strip homogenates was significantly decreased in obstructed mice. Immunohistochemistry revealed a significant decrease in TREK-1 channel immunoreactivity in detrusor smooth muscle in obstructed mice. On cystometry the TREK-1 channel blocker L-methioninol induced a significant increase in premature contractions during filling in sham operated mice. L-methioninol had no significant effect in obstructed mice, which showed an overactive detrusor phenotype. TREK-1 channel down-regulation in detrusor myocytes is associated with bladder overactivity in a murine model of partial bladder outlet obstruction. Copyright 2010 American Urological Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The FGFR3 mutation is related to favorable pT1 bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rhijn, Bas W G; van der Kwast, Theo H; Liu, Liyang; Fleshner, Neil E; Bostrom, Peter J; Vis, André N; Alkhateeb, Sultan S; Bangma, Chris H; Jewett, Michael A S; Zwarthoff, Ellen C; Zlotta, Alexandre R; Bapat, Bharati

    2012-01-01

    Stage pT1 bladder cancer comprises a heterogeneous group of tumors for which different management options are advocated. FGFR3 mutations are linked to favorable (low grade/stage) pTa bladder cancer while altered P53 is common in cases of high grade, muscle invasive (pT2 or greater) bladder cancer. We determined the frequency of FGFR3 mutations and P53 alterations in patients with pT1 bladder cancer and correlated these data to histopathological variables and clinical outcomes. We included 132 patients with primary pT1 bladder cancer from a total of 2 academic centers. A uropathologist reviewed the slides for grade and confirmed the pT1 diagnosis. FGFR3 mutation status was examined by SNaPshot® analysis and P53 expression was determined by standard immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate analyses were used to assess progression. FGFR3 mutations were detected in 37 of 132 pT1 bladder cancer cases (28%) and altered P53 was seen in 71 (54%). Only 8% of patients had the 2 molecular alterations (p = 0.001). FGFR3 mutation correlated with lower grade and altered P53 correlated with high grade pT1 bladder cancer. Median followup was 6.5 years. FGFR3 mutation status and carcinoma in situ were significant for predicting progression on univariate and multivariate analyses but P53 status was not. FGFR3 mutations selectively identify patients with pT1 bladder cancer who have favorable disease characteristics. Further study may confirm that FGFR3 identifies those who would benefit from a conservative approach to the disease. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Urodynamics of artificial urinary bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiakov, B K; Fadeev, V A; Novikov, A I; Zuban', O N; Atmadzhev, D N; Sergeev, A V; Kirichenko, O A; Burlaka, O O

    2006-01-01

    Radical cystectomy with creation of orthotopic reservoir from various segments of gastrointestinal tract was made in 120 patients (99 males, 21 females, age 37-74 years) with muscular-invasive cancer of the urinary bladder (UB) in 1996-2004. Replacement of UB was made according to the Studer and Hautmann method in 38 and 27 patients, respectively. S-cystoplasty was performed in 31 patients. The gastric segment was used for creation of the reservoir in 24 patients. Three patients died. Three to twelve month follow-up recorded the best functional results in patients after Studer cystoplasty.

  14. Spectroscopic Imaging of Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Gandour-Edwards, R; Ramsamooj, R; deVere White, R

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of developing bladder cancer detection methods using intrinsic tissue optical properties is the focus of this investigation. In vitro experiments have been performed using polarized elastic light scattering in combination with tissue autofluorescence in the NIR spectral region under laser excitation in the green and red spectral regions. The experimental results obtained from a set of tissue specimens from 25 patients reveal the presence of optical fingerprint characteristics suitable for cancer detection with high contrast and accuracy. These photonic methods are compatible with existing endoscopic imaging modalities which make them suitable for in-vivo application.

  15. NOTCH pathway inactivation promotes bladder cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraver, Antonio; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J.; Cash, Timothy P.; Mendez-Pertuz, Marinela; Dueñas, Marta; Maietta, Paolo; Martinelli, Paola; Muñoz-Martin, Maribel; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Cañamero, Marta; Roncador, Giovanna; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Grivas, Dimitrios; de la Pompa, Jose Luis; Valencia, Alfonso; Paramio, Jesús M.; Real, Francisco X.; Serrano, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    NOTCH signaling suppresses tumor growth and proliferation in several types of stratified epithelia. Here, we show that missense mutations in NOTCH1 and NOTCH2 found in human bladder cancers result in loss of function. In murine models, genetic ablation of the NOTCH pathway accelerated bladder tumorigenesis and promoted the formation of squamous cell carcinomas, with areas of mesenchymal features. Using bladder cancer cells, we determined that the NOTCH pathway stabilizes the epithelial phenotype through its effector HES1 and, consequently, loss of NOTCH activity favors the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Evaluation of human bladder cancer samples revealed that tumors with low levels of HES1 present mesenchymal features and are more aggressive. Together, our results indicate that NOTCH serves as a tumor suppressor in the bladder and that loss of this pathway promotes mesenchymal and invasive features. PMID:25574842

  16. α1A-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonism Improves Erectile and Cavernosal Responses in Rats With Cavernous Nerve Injury and Enhances Neurogenic Responses in Human Corpus Cavernosum From Patients With Erectile Dysfunction Secondary to Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Salamanca, Juan I; La Fuente, José M; Martínez-Salamanca, Eduardo; Fernández, Argentina; Pepe-Cardoso, Augusto J; Louro, Nuno; Carballido, Joaquín; Angulo, Javier

    2016-12-01

    Cavernous nerve injury (CNI) in rats and radical prostatectomy (RP) in men result in loss of nitrergic function and increased adrenergic-neurogenic contractions of cavernosal tissue. To evaluate the modulation of the α-adrenergic system as a strategy to relieve erectile dysfunction (ED) and functional cavernosal alterations induced by CNI. A non-selective α-blocker (phentolamine 1 mg/kg daily), a selective α1A-blocker (silodosin [SILOD] 0.1 mg/kg daily), or vehicle was orally administered for 4 weeks after bilateral crush CNI (BCNI). Erectile and neurogenic responses of the corpus cavernosum (CC) were evaluated. The acute effects of SILOD also were evaluated in vivo (0.03 mg/kg intravenously) and ex vivo (10 nmol/L). The effects of SILOD and tadalafil (TAD) on nitrergic relaxations were determined in human CC from patients with ED with a vascular etiology or ED secondary to RP. Erectile responses in vivo in rats and neurogenic contractions and relaxations of rat and human CC. Long-term treatment with SILOD significantly improved erectile responses and allowed for the potentiation of erectile responses by acute treatment with TAD (0.3 mg/kg intravenously) in rats with BCNI. SILOD partly recovered nitrergic relaxations and normalized neurogenic contractions in CC from rats with BCNI. Long-term treatment with SILOD partly prevented BCNI-induced decreases in neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression. Acute administration of SILOD (0.03 mg/kg intravenously) improved erectile responses in vivo and potentiated nitrergic relaxation and decreased neurogenic contractions ex vivo in CC from rats with BCNI. In human CC from patients with ED with a vascular etiology, TAD (30 nmol/L), SILOD (10 nmol/L), or their combination increased nitrergic relaxations. Potentiation by TAD was lost in human CC from patients with ED after RP but was recovered after co-treatment with SILOD. α-Adrenergic modulation, especially selective α1A-blockade, improves erectile and cavernosal

  17. A crucial role for the cortico-striato-cortical loop in the pathogenesis of stroke-related neurogenic stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theys, Catherine; De Nil, Luc; Thijs, Vincent; van Wieringen, Astrid; Sunaert, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Neurogenic stuttering is an acquired speech disorder characterized by the occurrence of stuttering-like dysfluencies following brain damage. Because the onset of stuttering in these patients is associated with brain lesions, this condition provides a unique opportunity to study the neural processes underlying speech dysfluencies. Lesion localizations of 20 stroke subjects with neurogenic stuttering and 17 control subjects were compared using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping. The results showed nine left-hemisphere areas associated with the presence of neurogenic stuttering. These areas were largely overlapping with the cortico-basal ganglia-cortical network comprising the inferior frontal cortex, superior temporal cortex, intraparietal cortex, basal ganglia, and their white matter interconnections through the superior longitudinal fasciculus and internal capsule. These results indicated that stroke-induced neurogenic stuttering is not associated with neural dysfunction in one specific brain area but can occur following one or more lesion throughout the cortico-basal ganglia-cortical network. It is suggested that the onset of neurogenic stuttering in stroke subjects results from a disintegration of neural functions necessary for fluent speech. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  18. Systematic review of bladder cancer outcomes in patients with spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rove, K O; Husmann, D A; Wilcox, D T; Vricella, G J; Higuchi, T T

    2017-10-01

    In patients with congenital bladder anomalies, bladder augmentation is used as a last resort to reduce intravesical pressure, but concerns about malignant transformation in augmented patients were first raised in the 1980s. The best evidence to date indicates that augmentation does not appear to increase the risk of bladder cancer in spina bifida patients. To date, oncologic outcomes from patients with spina bifida with and without augmentation have only been available in small case reports. To systematically evaluate factors in myelomeningocele patients with bladder cancer, including bladder augmentation, that contribute to overall survival (OS). A systematic review using PubMed was conducted by cross referencing terms 'myelomeningocele,' 'cystoplasty,' 'bladder cancer' and respective synonyms according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Inclusion criteria were studies with patients with an underlying diagnosis of myelomeningocele and bladder cancer with data on age, stage, and mortality status. Studies were excluded for spinal cord injury, history of tuberculosis or schistosomiasis, or prior ureterosigmoidostomy. Fifty-two patients were identified from 28 studies with a median age at bladder cancer diagnosis of 41 years (range 13-73); 37 (71%) presented with stage III or IV bladder cancer. Overall survival at 1 year and 2 years was 48.5% and 31.5%, respectively. Overall survival was different between those with and without augmentation (P = 0.009) by log-rank analysis. No between-group differences in OS were seen based on age, management with indwelling catheter, diversion with ileal conduit or being on a surveillance program. Only stage remained a significant predictor of OS on multivariate analysis (HR 2.011, 95% CI 1.063-3.804, P = 0.032). Secondary analysis was performed after removing patients with gastric augmentation (n = 8), and no difference in OS was seen between patients with (n = 8

  19. Lymphoma of the Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Kodzo-Grey Venyo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lymphoma of the urinary bladder (LUB is rare. Aims. To review the literature on LUB. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results. LUB can be either primary or secondary. The tumour has female predominance; most cases occur in middle-age women. Secondary LUB occurs in 10% to 25% of leukemias/lymphomas and in advanced-stage systemic lymphoma. Less than 100 cases have been reported. MALT typically affects adults older than 60 years; 75% are female. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is also common and may arise from transformation of MALT. LUB presents with haematuria, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, and abdominal or back pain. Macroscopic examination of LUBs show large discrete tumours centred in the dome or lateral walls of the bladder. Positive staining of LUB varies by the subtype of lymphoma; B-cell lymphomas are CD20 positive. MALT lymphoma is positively stained for CD20, CD19, and FMC7 and negatively stained for CD5, CD10, and CD11c. LUB stains negatively with Pan-keratin, vimentin, CK20, and CK7. MALT lymphoma exhibits t(11; 18(q21: 21. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the MALT type of LUB with no recurrence. Conclusions. LUB is diagnosed by its characteristic morphology and immunohistochemical characteristics. Radiotherapy is a useful treatment.

  20. Lymphoma of the Urinary Bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venyo, Anthony Kodzo-Grey

    2014-01-01

    Background. Lymphoma of the urinary bladder (LUB) is rare. Aims. To review the literature on LUB. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results. LUB can be either primary or secondary. The tumour has female predominance; most cases occur in middle-age women. Secondary LUB occurs in 10% to 25% of leukemias/lymphomas and in advanced-stage systemic lymphoma. Less than 100 cases have been reported. MALT typically affects adults older than 60 years; 75% are female. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is also common and may arise from transformation of MALT. LUB presents with haematuria, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, and abdominal or back pain. Macroscopic examination of LUBs show large discrete tumours centred in the dome or lateral walls of the bladder. Positive staining of LUB varies by the subtype of lymphoma; B-cell lymphomas are CD20 positive. MALT lymphoma is positively stained for CD20, CD19, and FMC7 and negatively stained for CD5, CD10, and CD11c. LUB stains negatively with Pan-keratin, vimentin, CK20, and CK7. MALT lymphoma exhibits t(11; 18)(q21: 21). Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the MALT type of LUB with no recurrence. Conclusions. LUB is diagnosed by its characteristic morphology and immunohistochemical characteristics. Radiotherapy is a useful treatment. PMID:24511310