WorldWideScience

Sample records for neurodegenerative syndrome subacute

  1. Capgras syndrome and its relationship to neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephs, Keith A

    2007-12-01

    Capgras syndrome is characterized by a delusional belief that a person has been replaced by an imposter. It has been described in psychiatric and neurological (neurodegenerative and nonneurodegenerative) diseases. To determine whether the clinical and demographic features of subjects with Capgras syndrome differ when the syndrome is associated with neurodegenerative compared with nonneurodegenerative diseases, and whether features differ across different neurodegenerative diseases. Retrospective study. Tertiary care medical center. Patients Forty-seven subjects with Capgras syndrome. Thirty-eight of the subjects with Capgras syndrome (81%) had a neurodegenerative disease, most commonly Lewy body disease. Capgras syndrome occurred at a younger age of onset in those with a nonneurodegenerative disease (51 vs 72 years) (P Capgras syndrome and Lewy body disease, 100% had visual hallucinations compared with only one of those with Alzheimer disease (14%). Capgras syndrome is more commonly associated with neurodegenerative diseases, especially Lewy body disease, where visual hallucinations always coexist. In the absence of a neurodegenerative disease, the onset of Capgras syndrome occurs at a significantly younger age and can be associated with psychiatric disease, cerebrovascular events, and illicit drug use.

  2. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Vykuntaraju K N; Sukanya, V; Shivananda

    2012-11-01

    A 7-year-old boy with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, receiving antiretroviral drugs for 2 years, presented with a recent onset of myoclonic jerks and cognitive deterioration. On examination, he manifested myoclonic jerks once every 10-15 seconds. His electroencephalogram indicated periodic complexes, and his cerebrospinal fluid tested positive for measles antibodies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Progressive subacute Miller-Fisher syndrome successfully treated with plasmapheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejma, Maria; Waliszewska-Prosół, Marta; Hofman, Anna; Budrewicz, Sławomir; Podemski, Ryszard; Bilińska, Małgorzata; Koszewicz, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Miller-Fisher Syndrome (MFS) is a rare acute polyneuropathy composed of the clinical triad of ataxia, areflexia and ophthalmoplegia, with a monophasic, self-limited course and spontaneous improvement. The authors present a 65-year-old man with Miller-Fisher syndrome consisting of bilateral ophthalmoplegia, trigeminal and facial nerve palsy, mild ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. The disease had a progressive, subacute course within 3 months. A high titer of anti-GQ1b antibodies was detected. As a result of plasmapheresis, complete recovery was achieved. The presented case was atypical in its clinical course and treatment. It could support the theory of the continuity between MFS, Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis (BBE), and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterizing a neurodegenerative syndrome: primary progressive apraxia of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephs, Keith A; Duffy, Joseph R; Strand, Edythe A; Machulda, Mary M; Senjem, Matthew L; Master, Ankit V; Lowe, Val J; Jack, Clifford R; Whitwell, Jennifer L

    2012-05-01

    Apraxia of speech is a disorder of speech motor planning and/or programming that is distinguishable from aphasia and dysarthria. It most commonly results from vascular insults but can occur in degenerative diseases where it has typically been subsumed under aphasia, or it occurs in the context of more widespread neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to determine whether apraxia of speech can present as an isolated sign of neurodegenerative disease. Between July 2010 and July 2011, 37 subjects with a neurodegenerative speech and language disorder were prospectively recruited and underwent detailed speech and language, neurological, neuropsychological and neuroimaging testing. The neuroimaging battery included 3.0 tesla volumetric head magnetic resonance imaging, [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose and [(11)C] Pittsburg compound B positron emission tomography scanning. Twelve subjects were identified as having apraxia of speech without any signs of aphasia based on a comprehensive battery of language tests; hence, none met criteria for primary progressive aphasia. These subjects with primary progressive apraxia of speech included eight females and four males, with a mean age of onset of 73 years (range: 49-82). There were no specific additional shared patterns of neurological or neuropsychological impairment in the subjects with primary progressive apraxia of speech, but there was individual variability. Some subjects, for example, had mild features of behavioural change, executive dysfunction, limb apraxia or Parkinsonism. Voxel-based morphometry of grey matter revealed focal atrophy of superior lateral premotor cortex and supplementary motor area. Voxel-based morphometry of white matter showed volume loss in these same regions but with extension of loss involving the inferior premotor cortex and body of the corpus callosum. These same areas of white matter loss were observed with diffusion tensor imaging analysis, which also demonstrated reduced fractional anisotropy

  5. An Atypical Presentation of Subacute Encephalopathy with Seizures in Chronic Alcoholism Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae-Kyoung; Jung, Eui Sung; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Lee, Woong-Woo; Lee, Jung-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Subacute encephalopathy with seizures in chronic alcoholism syndrome is a rare clinical manifestation in patients with chronic alcohol abuse. We report the case of a patient with chronic alcoholism who presented with partial nonconvulsive status epilepticus associated with a thalamic lesion.

  6. Subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with polycythemia vera and factor V Leiden mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simsek, S; Verheesen, RV; Haagsma, EB; Lourens, J

    We describe a 48-year-old caucasian woman with a subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome attributed to the presence of polycythaemia vera, heterozygosity for the factor V Leiden mutation and the use of an oral contraceptive pill. Two diagnostic pitfalls were encountered. First, on CT scanning of the abdomen

  7. The Progression of Posterior Cortical Atrophy to Corticobasal Syndrome: Lumping or Splitting Neurodegenerative Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Giorelli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior cortical atrophy is a clinical syndrome that is characterized by the progressive loss of visuospatial integration and is associated with neurodegenerative conditions.Case Report: We describe a 60‐year‐old female with simultanagnosia, oculomotor apraxia, and optic ataxia for which she received an initial clinical diagnosis of posterior cortical atrophy. Three years later, she developed Balint's syndrome, Gerstmann's syndrome, left alien hand syndrome, smooth asymmetric (left rigidity, cortical sensory loss, and spontaneous myoclonic jerks of the left arm, which suggested a final diagnosis of corticobasal syndrome.Discussion: This case report indicates that corticobasal syndrome may present with visuospatial deficits.

  8. The progression of posterior cortical atrophy to corticobasal syndrome: lumping or splitting neurodegenerative diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorelli, Maurizio; Losignore, Nunzia Alessandra; Bagnoli, Junia; Difazio, Pasquale; Zimatore, Giovanni Bosco

    2014-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a clinical syndrome that is characterized by the progressive loss of visuospatial integration and is associated with neurodegenerative conditions. We describe a 60-year-old female with simultanagnosia, oculomotor apraxia, and optic ataxia for which she received an initial clinical diagnosis of posterior cortical atrophy. Three years later, she developed Balint's syndrome, Gerstmann's syndrome, left alien hand syndrome, smooth asymmetric (left) rigidity, cortical sensory loss, and spontaneous myoclonic jerks of the left arm, which suggested a final diagnosis of corticobasal syndrome. This case report indicates that corticobasal syndrome may present with visuospatial deficits.

  9. Characterizing a neurodegenerative syndrome: primary progressive apraxia of speech

    OpenAIRE

    Josephs, Keith A.; Duffy, Joseph R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Machulda, Mary M.; Matthew L. Senjem; Master, Ankit V.; Lowe, Val J.; Jack, Clifford R.; Jennifer L. Whitwell

    2012-01-01

    Apraxia of speech is a disorder of speech motor planning and/or programming that is distinguishable from aphasia and dysarthria. It most commonly results from vascular insults but can occur in degenerative diseases where it has typically been subsumed under aphasia, or it occurs in the context of more widespread neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to determine whether apraxia of speech can present as an isolated sign of neurodegenerative disease. Between July 2010 and July 2011, 37 s...

  10. Neurodegenerative 'overlap' syndrome: Clinical and pathological features of Parkinson's disease, motor neuron disease, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uitti, R J; Berry, K; Yasuhara, O; Eisen, A; Feldman, H; McGeer, P L; Calne, D B

    1995-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and motor neuron disease (MND) share epidemiological, clinical, and pathological features. Few studies have reported comprehensively on individuals who demonstrate a neurodegenerative 'overlap' syndrome, comprising idiopathic parkinsonism, dementia, and motor neuron dysfunction. We describe clinical, electrophysiological, and pathological features in six patients with neurodegenerative 'overlap' syndrome. All had cardinal features of PD (duration 6-26 years), and any mixture of dementia (slowly advancing), fasciculations, hyperreflexia, Babinski signs and mild atrophy and weakness of distal muscles (slowly progressive). EMG often demonstrated a lack of denervation in conjunction with abnormal MEPs (high thresholds). Patients had either 6FD-PET or pathological studies consistent with PD. Pathological studies also demonstrated moderate numbers of neurofibrillary tangles and plaque formation, typically with sparing of motor neurons in the spinal cord. We conclude that neurodegenerative 'overlap' syndrome may represent forme frustes of traditionally accepted diagnostic categories. Patients with parkinsonism, fasciculations, hyperreflexia and mild atrophy are unlikely to demonstrate active denervation on EMG; their prognosis is better than for classical MND. Neurodegenerative overlap syndrome (clinicopathological mixtures of PD, AD, and MND) may develop in some individuals as a reflection of common etiology, pathogenesis or susceptibility.

  11. Pulmonary involvement in patients with Guillain–Barré syndrome in subacute phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meeka Khanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the pulmonary function in Guillain–Barre syndrome (GBS patients in subacute phase and find clinical correlates of pulmonary dysfunction. Methods: This was a single-center, prospective, cross-sectional, hospital-based study in GBS patients performed in Department of Neurological Rehabilitation at a tertiary care institute. Clinical examination for pulmonary function was done by measuring chest expansion. The pulmonary function tests were carried out by Spirometry kit Microquark Cosmed, Italy. Fatigue was assessed by Fatigue Severity Scale, disability status by Hughes Disability Scale (HDS, and muscle weakness by Medical Research Council sum scores. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Stata 11. The significance of P value was adjudged against an alpha of 0.05. Results: Twenty-eight patients were included with 17 (61% men and mean age of 31 years. Median duration of symptoms was 16.5 days. There were 10 (36% demyelinating and 18 (64% axonal variants. Twenty-six (93% patients scored more than 2 on HDS. All study participants reported fatigue. Twenty-two (78.6% patients had chest expansion of <2.5 cm. Spirometry showed restrictive pulmonary dysfunction in 23 (79% patients. Significant correlation was found between abnormal pulmonary function test and chest expansion (P = 0.003. Conclusion: Pulmonary dysfunction in GBS is common even during subacute phase. It needs to be identified and managed appropriately for better clinical outcome.

  12. Pulmonary Involvement in Patients with Guillain–Barré Syndrome in Subacute Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Meeka; Rawat, Nidhi; Gupta, Anupam; Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B.; Rukmani, M. R.; Sathyaprabha, T. N.; Haldar, Partha

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the pulmonary function in Guillain–Barre syndrome (GBS) patients in subacute phase and find clinical correlates of pulmonary dysfunction. Methods: This was a single-center, prospective, cross-sectional, hospital-based study in GBS patients performed in Department of Neurological Rehabilitation at a tertiary care institute. Clinical examination for pulmonary function was done by measuring chest expansion. The pulmonary function tests were carried out by Spirometry kit Microquark Cosmed, Italy. Fatigue was assessed by Fatigue Severity Scale, disability status by Hughes Disability Scale (HDS), and muscle weakness by Medical Research Council sum scores. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Stata 11. The significance of P value was adjudged against an alpha of 0.05. Results: Twenty-eight patients were included with 17 (61%) men and mean age of 31 years. Median duration of symptoms was 16.5 days. There were 10 (36%) demyelinating and 18 (64%) axonal variants. Twenty-six (93%) patients scored more than 2 on HDS. All study participants reported fatigue. Twenty-two (78.6%) patients had chest expansion of <2.5 cm. Spirometry showed restrictive pulmonary dysfunction in 23 (79%) patients. Significant correlation was found between abnormal pulmonary function test and chest expansion (P = 0.003). Conclusion: Pulmonary dysfunction in GBS is common even during subacute phase. It needs to be identified and managed appropriately for better clinical outcome. PMID:28694622

  13. Pulmonary Involvement in Patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome in Subacute Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Meeka; Rawat, Nidhi; Gupta, Anupam; Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B; Rukmani, M R; Sathyaprabha, T N; Haldar, Partha

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the pulmonary function in Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) patients in subacute phase and find clinical correlates of pulmonary dysfunction. This was a single-center, prospective, cross-sectional, hospital-based study in GBS patients performed in Department of Neurological Rehabilitation at a tertiary care institute. Clinical examination for pulmonary function was done by measuring chest expansion. The pulmonary function tests were carried out by Spirometry kit Microquark Cosmed, Italy. Fatigue was assessed by Fatigue Severity Scale, disability status by Hughes Disability Scale (HDS), and muscle weakness by Medical Research Council sum scores. Statistical analysis was performed by Stata 11. The significance of P value was adjudged against an alpha of 0.05. Twenty-eight patients were included with 17 (61%) men and mean age of 31 years. Median duration of symptoms was 16.5 days. There were 10 (36%) demyelinating and 18 (64%) axonal variants. Twenty-six (93%) patients scored more than 2 on HDS. All study participants reported fatigue. Twenty-two (78.6%) patients had chest expansion of <2.5 cm. Spirometry showed restrictive pulmonary dysfunction in 23 (79%) patients. Significant correlation was found between abnormal pulmonary function test and chest expansion (P = 0.003). Pulmonary dysfunction in GBS is common even during subacute phase. It needs to be identified and managed appropriately for better clinical outcome.

  14. Treatment of a case of subacute lumbar compartment syndrome using the Graston technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Warren I; Pfefer, Mark T

    2005-01-01

    To discuss subacute lumbar compartment syndrome and its treatment using a soft tissue mobilization technique. A patient presented with low back pain related to exercise combined with prolonged flexion posture. The symptoms were relieved with rest and lumbar extension. The patient had restrictive lumbar fascia in flexion and rotation and no neurological deficits. The restrictive lumbar posterior fascial layers and adjoining restrictive fascia (thoracic, gluteal, hamstring) were treated with a form of instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization called the Graston technique. Restoration of fascial extensibility and resolution of the complaint occurred after 6 treatment visits. The posterior spinal fascial compartments may be responsible for intermittent lower back pain. Functional clinical tests can be employed to determine whether the involved fascia is abnormally restrictive. Treatment directed at the restrictive fascia using this soft tissue technique may result in improved fascial functional testing and reduction of symptoms.

  15. [Clinical and cytogenetical study on subacute myeloid leukemia in myelodysplastic syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jing-ying; Zhang, Yan; Lu, Dao-pei; Lai, Yue-yun; He, Qi; Shi, Yan

    2005-06-01

    To discuss from the clinical and cytogenetic aspect that part of patients now diagnosed as myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) could be diagnosed early as leukemia and be classified as subacute myeloid leukemia (Sub-AML). Totally 173 patients diagnosed as MDS according to FAB or WHO criteria with complete clinical and cytogenetical data were included in this research. Among them 42 had +8 chromosome aberration, 16 had -7/7q-, and 55 had normal karyotypes and more than 0.10 blast cells in the bone marrow. Short term culture and G-banding techniques and in some specimens fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method were used to do chromosome analysis. Among the detected chromosome aberrations, +8 was the most frequent (42.8%) and then -7/7q-(15.0%); 42 patients with +8 had median blast cell count of 0.08, within a median of 18 months follow-up period 40.0% of the patients evolved to frank leukemia (FL) and the median overall survival was 20 months. 16 patients with -7/7q- had higher blast cell count of 0.135; 43.8% of them developed into FL and the median overall survival was only 10 months within a 20-month follow-up period. 55 patients had normal karyotype but a median blast cell count of 0.148; 52.7% of them patients evolved to FL and the median overall survival was 34 months. Both the +8 and -7/7q- groups have malignant leukemic cell clone, and run a subacute and progressive clinical course; it is suggested they might be classified into Sub-AML. We should keep close watch on the patients who have normal karyotype yet more than 0.10 blast cells, part of whom might suffer from early Sub-AML.

  16. Hypoxia treatment reverses neurodegenerative disease in a mouse model of Leigh syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Michele; Jain, Isha H; Goldberger, Olga; Rezoagli, Emanuele; Thoonen, Robrecht; Cheng, Kai-Hung; Sosnovik, David E; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Mootha, Vamsi K; Zapol, Warren M

    2017-05-23

    The most common pediatric mitochondrial disease is Leigh syndrome, an episodic, subacute neurodegeneration that can lead to death within the first few years of life, for which there are no proven general therapies. Mice lacking the complex I subunit, Ndufs4, develop a fatal progressive encephalopathy resembling Leigh syndrome and die at ≈60 d of age. We previously reported that continuously breathing normobaric 11% O 2 from an early age prevents neurological disease and dramatically improves survival in these mice. Here, we report three advances. First, we report updated survival curves and organ pathology in Ndufs4 KO mice exposed to hypoxia or hyperoxia. Whereas normoxia-treated KO mice die from neurodegeneration at about 60 d, hypoxia-treated mice eventually die at about 270 d, likely from cardiac disease, and hyperoxia-treated mice die within days from acute pulmonary edema. Second, we report that more conservative hypoxia regimens, such as continuous normobaric 17% O 2 or intermittent hypoxia, are ineffective in preventing neuropathology. Finally, we show that breathing normobaric 11% O 2 in mice with late-stage encephalopathy reverses their established neurological disease, evidenced by improved behavior, circulating disease biomarkers, and survival rates. Importantly, the pathognomonic MRI brain lesions and neurohistopathologic findings are reversed after 4 wk of hypoxia. Upon return to normoxia, Ndufs4 KO mice die within days. Future work is required to determine if hypoxia can be used to prevent and reverse neurodegeneration in other animal models, and to determine if it can be provided in a safe and practical manner to allow in-hospital human therapeutic trials.

  17. Subacute fat-embolism-like syndrome following high-volume intramuscular and accidental intravascular injection of mineral oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjort, Mathias; Hoegberg, Lotte Christine Groth; Jansen, Tejs

    2015-01-01

    infiltrations. Suspecting pneumonia, the patient was discharged with antibiotics. Unkown to the clinicians, the patient had self-administered a mineral oil with added anabolic steroids by intramuscular injections for cosmetic purposes. The patient had observed blood on aspiration, and then relocated the needle......Objective. We present a rare case of subacute fat-embolism-like syndrome (FES-like) following intravascular injection of mineral oil-steroid solution with delayed diagnosis, acute onset of pulmonary distress, and transient clinical deterioration. Case report. A 40-year-old man was admitted...

  18. An unusual case of acute encephalitic syndrome: Is it acute measles encephalitis or subacute sclerosing panencephalitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravindra K; Malhotra, Hardeep S; Rizvi, Imran; Kumar, Neeraj; Jain, Amita

    2017-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a late complication of measles infection and develops usually 6 to 15 years after the primary measles infection. Fulminant subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is an infrequently encountered form wherein the disease rapidly progresses to death. A six-year old male child presented with fever, abnormal movements of the left side of body followed by weakness of the left side of the body, and involuntary abnormal movements of right upper and lower limbs. On examination, he was drowsy and was unable to communicate. He had right-sided hemiballismus. He also had left-sided hemiparesis and the left plantar reflex was extensor. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed elevated protein and cells. In the serum and cerebrospinal fluid, anti-measles IgG antibodies were found to be positive. No other viral marker was noted in the cerebrospinal fluid. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed extensive damage to the right temporal, parietal, and to a lesser extent, the frontal region as well as subcortical structures of these regions. Electroencephalography revealed generalized slowing of waves. Over a period of the next 3 days, the intensity and frequency of choreiform movements markedly reduced and the patient developed periodic generalized myoclonus, which was predominantly present on the right side. The patient succumbed to his illness and died after one month. Fulminant subacute sclerosing panencephalitis may have unusual clinical manifestations such as hemiballismus. In fulminant subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, neuroimaging may show extensive cortical damage.

  19. High School Football and Late-Life Risk of Neurodegenerative Syndromes, 1956-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Pieter H H; Mandrekar, Jay; Mielke, Michelle M; Ahlskog, J Eric; Boeve, Bradley F; Josephs, Keith; Savica, Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    To assess whether athletes who played American varsity high school football between 1956 and 1970 have an increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases later in life. We identified all male varsity football players between 1956 and 1970 in the public high schools of Rochester, Minnesota, and non-football-playing male varsity swimmers, wrestlers, and basketball players. Using the medical records linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project, we ascertained the incidence of late-life neurodegenerative diseases: dementia, parkinsonism, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We also recorded medical record-documented head trauma during high school years. We identified 296 varsity football players and 190 athletes engaging in other sports. Football players had an increased risk of medically documented head trauma, especially if they played football for more than 1 year. Compared with nonfootball athletes, football players did not have an increased risk of neurodegenerative disease overall or of the individual conditions of dementia, parkinsonism, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this community-based study, varsity high school football players from 1956 to 1970 did not have an increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases compared with athletes engaged in other varsity sports. This was from an era when there was a generally nihilistic view of concussion dangers, less protective equipment, and no prohibition of spearing (head-first tackling). However, the size and strength of players from previous eras may not be comparable with that of current high school athletes. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Abnormal red cell features associated with hereditary neurodegenerative disorders: the neuroacanthocytosis syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franceschi, L. De; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Mohandas, N.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review discusses the mechanisms involved in the generation of thorny red blood cells (RBCs), known as acanthocytes, in patients with neuroacanthocytosis, a heterogenous group of neurodegenerative hereditary disorders that include chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) and McLeod

  1. Long-term (subacute) potassium treatment in congenital HERG-related long QT syndrome (LQTS2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H. L.; Alings, M.; van Olden, R. W.; Wilde, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is subdivided according to the underlying gene defect. In LQTS2, an aberrant HERG gene that encodes the potassium channel IKr leads to insufficient IKr activity and delayed repolarization, causing ECG abnormalities and torsades de pointes (TdP). Increasing serum

  2. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presenting as acute cerebellar ataxia and brain stem hyperintensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sankhyan, Naveen; Padmanabh, Hansashree; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Vyas, Sameer; Singhi, Pratibha

    2016-05-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with a characteristic clinical course. Atypical presentations may be seen in 10% of the cases. To describe the atypical clinical and radiological features of SSPE in a child form endemic country. A 5-year-old boy presented with acute-onset cerebellar ataxia without associated encephalopathy, focal motor deficits, seizures or cognitive decline. He had varicella-like illness with vesicular, itchy truncal rash erupting one month prior to the onset of these symptoms. He underwent detailed neurological assessment, relevant laboratory and radiological investigations. Neuroimaging revealed peculiar brain stem lesions involving the pons and cerebellum suggestive of demyelination. With a presumptive diagnosis of clinically isolated syndrome of demyelination, he was administered pulse methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg/day for 5 days). Four weeks later he developed myoclonic jerks. Electroencephalogram showed characteristic periodic complexes time-locked with myoclonus. CSF and serum anti-measles antibody titres were elevated (1:625). Our report highlights that subacute sclerosing panencephalitis can present atypically as isolated acute cerebellar ataxia and peculiar involvement of longitudinal and sparing of transverse pontine fibres. The predominant brainstem abnormalities in the clinical setting may mimick acute demyelinating syndrome. Hence, it is important to recognize these features of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in children, especially in the endemic countries. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Why do patients with neurodegenerative frontal syndrome fail to answer: 'In what way are an orange and a banana alike?'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, Julien; Valabrègue, Romain; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Garcin, Béatrice; Volle, Emmanuelle; Le Ber, Isabelle; Vidailhet, Marie; Dubois, Bruno; Levy, Richard

    2015-02-01

    Concept formation is the ability to create an abstract link between dissimilar objects or thoughts and is crucial for abstract and creative thinking. This process is related to the integrity of the prefrontal cortex, given the altered performances reported in patients with frontal damage, particularly those suffering from the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia. However, the cognitive mechanisms and neural bases of verbal concept formation are not clearly understood. The present study was aimed at addressing the following unresolved issues regarding concept formation in the field of neurology and cognitive neuroscience: (i) Are alterations in concept formation specific to frontotemporal dementia or are they also present in other cortical neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease? (ii) Is impaired performance in concept formation due to cortical lesions specific to frontotemporal dementia or to a cortico-subcortical frontal syndrome? and (iii) What are the cognitive mechanisms and neural bases underlying concept formation? To address these questions, we designed the Verbal Concept Formation Task, an experimental paradigm based on the similarities test. Patients presenting with severe frontal dysfunction (frontotemporal dementia, n = 18, and the Richardson form of progressive supranuclear palsy, n = 21) or with medial temporal pathology (amnestic mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease, n = 14) and healthy participants (n = 18) were given the Verbal Concept Formation Task and a large battery of neuropsychological tests. In addition, all participants underwent 3D T1-weighted MRI to analyse grey matter volume using voxel-based morphometry. Frontal patients were significantly impaired on the Verbal Concept Formation Task as compared to non-frontal participants (P = 0.00001). Global performance score was positively correlated with scores in cognitive tasks assessing executive functions and with grey matter volume in several areas, mostly

  4. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Child Suffering from Human Immunodeficiency Virus on "Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy" - Can This be Another Instance of Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Kushwaha, Suman; Manzoor, Mushbiq; Tarfarosh, Shah Faisal Ahmad

    2017-06-13

    We report a 12-year-old boy with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who presented with rapidly progressive difficulty in ambulation. The symptoms started to worsen when he was put on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Our findings show that the dynamics of HIV-related immune suppression and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have an impact on the clinical course of Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE). Slow progression is expected in children on HAART but in our case, we observe a complex interaction of the virus with the immune system and modification of disease course of SSPE with ART. The child we discuss in this case report developed rapidly progressive SSPE on HAART regime; so the possibility of SSPE to be labeled as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) should be considered.

  5. Sleep in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Alex

    2016-03-01

    Disorders of sleep are an integral part of neurodegenerative diseases and include insomnia, sleep-wake cycle disruption, excessive daytime sleepiness that may be manifested as persistent somnolence or sudden onset of sleep episodes, obstructive and central sleep apnea, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, and restless legs syndrome. The origin of these sleep disorders is multifactorial including degeneration of the brain areas that modulate sleep, the symptoms of the disease, and the effect of medications. Treatment of sleep disorders in patients with neurodegenerative diseases should be individualized and includes behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, bright light therapy, melatonin, hypnotics, waking-promoting agents, and continuous positive airway pressure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in immunized Thai children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khusiwilai, Khanittha; Viravan, Sorawit

    2011-12-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with high mortality and poor prognosis. This is caused by persistent defective measles virus infection. Clinical presentations are variable including behavioral-cognitive change, myoclonic seizure, visual problem, spasticity or abnormal movement. The authors report a case of 10 year-old boy, previously healthy with complete immunization, presenting with frequent myoclonic jerks, abnormal movements, spasticity and altered mental status. Electroencephalographic (EEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and laboratory findings are typical for SSPE.

  7. Kleefstra Syndrome in Three Adult Patients: Further Delineation of the Behavioral and Neurological Phenotype Shows Aspects of a Neurodegenerative Course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.M.; Vermeulen, K.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Kleefstra, T.

    2011-01-01

    Kleefstra syndrome (KS), previously known as the 9q subtelomeric deletion syndrome (9qSTDS) is caused by haploinsufficiency of the EHMT1 gene. Both a single mutation and 9q34 microdeletions encompassing the entire gene can be responsible for this syndrome which is characterized by intellectual

  8. Kleefstra syndrome in three adult patients: further delineation of the behavioral and neurological phenotype shows aspects of a neurodegenerative course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.; Vermeulen, K.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Kleefstra, T.

    2011-01-01

    Kleefstra syndrome (KS), previously known as the 9q subtelomeric deletion syndrome (9qSTDS) is caused by haploinsufficiency of the EHMT1 gene. Both a single mutation and 9q34 microdeletions encompassing the entire gene can be responsible for this syndrome which is characterized by intellectual

  9. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF): New facets of an old molecule for treating neurodegenerative and metabolic syndrome pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquin, Sarah; Sharma, Mukut; Gauchat, Jean-François

    2015-10-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is the most extensively studied member of the cytokine family that signal through intracellular chains of the gp130/LIFRβ receptor. The severe phenotype in patients suffering from mutations inactivating LIFRβ indicates that members of this cytokine family play key, non-redundant roles during development. Accordingly, three decades of research has revealed potent and promising trophic and regulatory activities of CNTF in neurons, oligodendrocytes, muscle cells, bone cells, adipocytes and retinal cells. These findings led to clinical trials to test the therapeutic potential of CNTF and CNTF derivatives for treating neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases. Promising results have encouraged continuation of studies for treating retinal degenerative diseases. Results of some clinical trials showed that side-effects may limit the systemically administrated doses of CNTF. Therefore, therapies being currently tested rely on local delivery of CNTF using encapsulated cytokine-secreting implants. Since the side effects of CNTF might be linked to its ability to activate the alternative IL6Rα-LIFRβ-gp130 receptor, CNTFR-specific mutants of CNTF have been developed that bind to the CNTFRα-LIFRβ-gp130 receptor. These developments may prove to be a breakthrough for therapeutic applications of systemically administered CNTF in pathologies such as multiple sclerosis or Alzheimer's disease. The "designer cytokine approach" offers future opportunities to further enhance specificity by conjugating mutant CNTF with modified soluble CNTFRα to target therapeutically relevant cells that express gp130-LIFRβ and a specific cell surface marker. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus on Electroencephalography: An Atypical Presentation of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in Two Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Pratibha; Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a neurodegenerative disease secondary to measles infection that usually has a typical presentation with progressive myoclonia, cognitive decline, and periodic slow-wave complexes on electroencephalography. We report two pediatric cases who presented with periodic myoclonic jerks and cognitive decline. In both cases, the electroencephalogram showed continuous nonconvulsive status epilepticus activity. Both had elevated measles antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid and blood. Pediatricians need to be aware of this atypical presentation of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. PMID:23094174

  11. Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus on Electroencephalography: An Atypical Presentation of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in Two Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha Singhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a neurodegenerative disease secondary to measles infection that usually has a typical presentation with progressive myoclonia, cognitive decline, and periodic slow-wave complexes on electroencephalography. We report two pediatric cases who presented with periodic myoclonic jerks and cognitive decline. In both cases, the electroencephalogram showed continuous nonconvulsive status epilepticus activity. Both had elevated measles antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid and blood. Pediatricians need to be aware of this atypical presentation of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

  12. Meditation and neurodegenerative diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newberg, Andrew B; Serruya, Mijail; Wintering, Nancy; Moss, Aleezé Sattar; Reibel, Diane; Monti, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    .... Meditation techniques present an interesting potential adjuvant treatment for patients with neurodegenerative diseases and have the advantage of being inexpensive, and easy to teach and perform...

  13. Diagnostic Value of Isolated Mentalis Versus Mentalis Plus Upper Limb Electromyography in Idiopathic REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Patients Eventually Developing a Neurodegenerative Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Arcos, Ana; Iranzo, Alex; Serradell, Mónica; Gaig, Carles; Guaita, Marc; Salamero, Manel; Santamaria, Joan

    2017-04-01

    To compare two electromyographic (EMG) montages, isolated mentalis muscle versus mentalis in combination with upper limb muscles in the baseline diagnostic video-polysomnography (V-PSG) of patients with idiopathic REM sleep behaviors disorder (IRBD) who eventually were diagnosed with a clinically defined neurodegenerative syndrome. Forty-nine patients were included. At baseline, diagnosis of RBD was based on a typical history of dream enactment behaviors plus V-PSG showing REM sleep with qualitative increased EMG activity and/or abnormal behaviors. Quantification of EMG activity (tonic, phasic and "any") in the mentalis and upper limb muscles (biceps brachii-BB, n = 36 or flexor digitorum superficialis-FDS, n = 13) was performed manually and compared with published cut-offs. Nine (18.4%) patients had either tonic or phasic EMG below the cut-offs for the isolated mentalis and four of them (11.1 %) also had values below the cut-off for the mentalis combined with BB. All 13 patients recorded with the FDS were above the mentalis combined with FDS cut-off. For the diagnosis of IRBD, sensitivity of isolated mentalis was 81.6% and of the combination of mentalis plus upper limb muscles was 91.8% (p = .03). Audiovisual analysis showed abnormal REM sleep behaviors in all nine patients with values below the cut-offs. Quantification of EMG activity in the upper limbs combined with the mentalis increases the ability to diagnose IRBD when compared with the isolated measurement of the mentalis. Detection of typical abnormal behaviors during REM sleep with audiovisual analysis is essential for the diagnosis of IRBD in patients with EMG values below the published cut-offs.

  14. [Sleep in neurodegenerative disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happe, S; Mayer, G

    2006-10-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are a group of heterogeneous, progressive disorders of varying etiology that affect one or more systems. They occur predominantly at older age, during which the structure and amount of sleep undergo changes. Neurodegenerative processes cause structural changes of the sleep/wake generators in the brainstem which result in disorders such as daytime sleepiness, insomnia, sleep-related movement and breathing disturbances, and disorders of the circadian rhythms. Some sleep disorders manifest years before the onset of neurodegenerative disorders and may serve as predictors. Polysomnography shows sleep fragmentation, tonic or phasic movements of the extremities, alteration of respiratory muscles, reduced slow wave sleep, REM sleep absence or without muscle atonia, increased arousal or wake activity, epileptiform EEG activity, and changes in sleep-related breathing. Very frequently, REM sleep behaviour disorder is associated with neurodegenerative disorders. In this overview we present symptoms, pathophysiology, and polysomnographic findings of sleep disorders in prevalent neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Child Suffering from Human Immunodeficiency Virus on “Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy” – Can This be Another Instance of Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Kushwaha, Suman; Tarfarosh, Shah Faisal Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    We report a 12-year-old boy with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who presented with rapidly progressive difficulty in ambulation. The symptoms started to worsen when he was put on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Our findings show that the dynamics of HIV-related immune suppression and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have an impact on the clinical course of Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE). Slow progression is expected in children on HAART but in our case, we observe a complex interaction of the virus with the immune system and modification of disease course of SSPE with ART. The child we discuss in this case report developed rapidly progressive SSPE on HAART regime; so the possibility of SSPE to be labeled as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) should be considered. PMID:28713662

  16. RBD and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haiyang; Huang, Jinsha; Shen, Yan; Guo, Shiyi; Wang, Luxi; Han, Chao; Liu, Ling; Ma, Kai; Xia, Yun; Li, Jie; Xu, Xiaoyun; Xiong, Nian; Wang, Tao

    2017-05-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a sleep disorder characterized by enacting one's dreams during the REM sleep, with most of the dreams being violent or aggressive, so that patients often come to see the doctor complaining hurting themselves or bed partners during sleep. Prevalence of RBD, based on population, is 0.38-2.01 %, but much higher in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, especially synucleinopathies. RBD may herald the emergence of synucleinopathies by decades, such that it may be used as an effective early marker of neurodegenerative diseases. Pharmaceutical treatment of RBD includes clonazepam, melatonin, pramipexole, and some newly reported medications. In this review, we summarized the clinical and PSG features of RBD, the pathophysiology and the therapy of it, focusing on the correlation between neurodegenerative diseases and RBD, in order to emphasize the significance of RBD as an early marker of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Malnutrition in subacute care

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Jorja Claire

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition is a significant problem across all healthcare settings because of its high prevalence and association with adverse outcomes for patients and increased healthcare costs. There is a paucity of research considering subacute patients’ nutritional status and how this changes throughout inpatient stay. Additionally, a stronger evidence base for strategies to prevent and treat malnutrition specifically in this setting is required. This thesis aimed to address these research gaps to con...

  18. Coenzyme Q10 effects in neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Spindler

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Meredith Spindler1, M Flint Beal1,2, Claire Henchcliffe1,21Department of Neurology, 2Department of Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is an essential cofactor in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and as a dietary supplement it has recently gained attention for its potential role in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders derives from animal models, studies of mitochondria from patients, identification of genetic defects in patients with neurodegenerative disease, and measurements of markers of oxidative stress. Studies of in vitro models of neuronal toxicity and animal models of neurodegenerative disorders have demonstrated potential neuroprotective effects of CoQ10. With this data in mind, several clinical trials of CoQ10 have been performed in Parkinson’s disease and atypical Parkinson’s syndromes, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer disease, Friedreich’s ataxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with equivocal findings. CoQ10 is widely available in multiple formulations and is very well tolerated with minimal adverse effects, making it an attractive potential therapy. Phase III trials of high-dose CoQ10 in large sample sizes are needed to further ascertain the effects of CoQ10 in neurodegenerative diseases.Keywords: coenzyme Q10, neurodegenerative disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, mitochondrial dysfunction

  19. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presenting as schizophrenia with an alpha coma pattern in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Ayşe; Kurt, Ayşegül Neşe Çitak; Gürkaş, Esra; Aydin, Kurşad; Serdaroğlu, Ayşe

    2014-10-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system, can present atypically with uncharacteristic electroencephalographic (EEG) features at its onset albeit typically with progressive mental deterioration, behavioral changes, and myoclonic jerks. An atypical presentation of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis can lead to a delay in diagnosis, thus hindering early treatment. Herein, we describe a 14-year-old girl who presented with insomnia, amnesia, auditory and visual hallucinations. The patient's electroencephalography on admission showed an alpha coma pattern. In spite of antipsychiatric treatment (olanzapine 20 mg/d) for 3 months, a progressive deterioration in neurologic function was observed. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis was suspected and diagnosis was confirmed by increased titers of measles antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid. The attention of pediatricians should be drawn to psychiatric symptoms as possible initial presentations of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in order to avoid needless diagnostic and treatment procedures. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Unique optical coherence tomography findings in a case of macular retinitis caused by subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Masayuki; Oishi, Akio; Kurimoto, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a rare neurodegenerative disease. The ophthalmologic findings, typically necrotizing retinitis, often precede other neurologic signs and symptoms. Ocular findings are helpful for early diagnosis, but the findings of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images in an active phase of retinitis have never been reported. We report unique findings of OCT images in a case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. A 13-year-old boy was referred to our hospital complaining of visual loss and other neurologic symptoms. The fundus examination showed necrotizing retinitis. The OCT images showed empty spaces involving all layers of retina except the inner limiting membrane and hyperreflective lesion in inner retina. The diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis was made from the blood and the spinal cerebral fluid test. This is the first report on OCT images of necrotizing retinitis in an active stage of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis case. The unique findings of OCT images as in this case help to diagnose the rare devastating disease.

  1. Sleep and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokroverty, Sudhansu

    2009-09-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in neurodegenerative diseases. Disturbed sleep can result in fatigue, irritability, morning headaches, impaired motor and cognitive skills, depression, and daytime somnolence. The major sleep complaints include insomnia, hypersomnia, parasomnia, excessive nocturnal motor activity, circadian sleep-wake rhythm disturbance, and respiratory dysrhythmia. The pathogenetic mechanisms of sleep disturbances may be secondary to direct structural alteration of the sleep-wake generating neurons or from several other indirect mechanisms. At the biochemical level, neurodegenerative diseases may be largely classified as tauopathies, alpha-synucleinopathies, and other diseases. Overnight polysomnography (PSG), Multiple Sleep Latency Test, Maintenance of Wakefulness Test, and actigraphy are some important diagnostic laboratory tests in the evaluation of sleep disturbances. Management of sleep disturbances is complex and is based primarily on the nature of the sleep disturbance. The clinical profiles, pathogenetic mechanisms, PSG findings, and management issues are discussed here with reference to some common neurodegenerative diseases. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  2. Visual spatial cognition in neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possin, Katherine L

    2010-12-01

    Visual spatial impairment is often an early symptom of neurodegenerative disease; however, this multi-faceted domain of cognition is not well-assessed by most typical dementia evaluations. Neurodegenerative diseases cause circumscribed atrophy in distinct neural networks, and accordingly, they impact visual spatial cognition in different and characteristic ways. Anatomically-focused visual spatial assessment can assist the clinician in making an early and accurate diagnosis. This article will review the literature on visual spatial cognition in neurodegenerative disease clinical syndromes, and where research is available, by neuropathologic diagnoses. Visual spatial cognition will be organized primarily according to the following schemes: bottom-up/top-down processing, dorsal/ventral stream processing, and egocentric/allocentric frames of reference.

  3. An integral approach to the etiopathogenesis of human neurodegenerative diseases (HNDDs and cancer. Possible therapeutic consequences within the frame of the trophic factor withdrawal syndrome (TFWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Meléndez Hevia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvador Harguindey1, Gorka Orive2,6, Ramón Cacabelos3, Enrique Meléndez Hevia4, Ramón Díaz de Otazu5, et al1Institute of Clinical Biology and Metabolism, Vitoria, Spain; 2Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of The Basque Country, Vitoria, Spain; 3Department of Clinical Neuroscience, EuroEspes Biomedical Research Center, Bergondo, La Coruña, Spain; 4Institute for Cellular Metabolism, Tenerife, Spain; 5Department of Pathology, Hospital Txagorritxu, Vitoria, Spain; 6Biotechnology Institute (BTI, Vitoria, SpainAbstract: A novel and integral approach to the understanding of human neurodegenerative diseases (HNDDs and cancer based upon the disruption of the intracellular dynamics of the hydrogen ion (H+ and its physiopathology, is advanced. From an etiopathological perspective, the activity and/or deficiency of different growth factors (GFs in these pathologies are studied, and their relationships to intracellular acid-base homeostasis reviewed. Growth and trophic factor withdrawal in HNDDs indicate the need to further investigate the potential utilization of certain GFs in the treatment of Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.  Platelet abnormalities and the therapeutic potential of platelet-derived growth factors in these pathologies, either through platelet transfusions or other clinical methods, are considered. Finally, the etiopathogenic mechanisms of apoptosis and antiapoptosis in HNDDs and cancer are viewed as opposite biochemical and biological disorders of cellular acid-base balance and their secondary effects on intracellular signaling pathways and aberrant cell metabolism are considered in the light of the both the seminal and most recent data available. The “trophic factor withdrawal syndrome” is described for the first time in English-speaking medical literature, as well as a Darwinian-like interpretation of cellular behavior related to specific and nonspecific

  4. Surge of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lisel V Richter-Joubert; Donovan Jacobs; Tracy Kilborn

    2017-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a poorly understood complication of measles infection, presenting in up to 1 in 2500 infected children, resulting in devastating neurocognitive outcomes and a high mortality rate...

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid nitric oxide levels in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Deniz; Yüksel, Deniz; Senbil, Nesrin; Eminzade, Sude; Kilinç, Kamer; Anlar, Banu; Gürer, Yavuz

    2009-09-01

    Oxidative damage plays a role in neurodegenerative diseases. Levels of cerebrospinal fluid nitrite and nitrate levels (oxidation products that provide an indirect estimation of nitric oxide) were investigated in relation to clinical and laboratory features in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (n = 47) and age-matched control (n = 43) groups. Significantly decreased levels of nitrite (median, 4.91 micromol/L) and nitrate (median, 6.14 micromol/L) were found in the patients. Nitrite and nitrate levels did not correlate with clinical or laboratory findings, except for presence of myoclonus. Cerebrospinal fluid nitrite levels of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis patients without myoclonic jerks were significantly higher than in those with myoclonus (median, 15.63 vs 4.34 micromol/L, respectively). The higher levels of nitrite in these patients can be explained by short disease duration and early stages of disease. Nitrate levels in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis patients with myoclonus (median, 9.26 micromol/L) were higher than in those without myoclonus (median, 4.25 micromol/L). Microbleeding resulting in conversion of nitrite to nitrate and increased production of superoxide can be suggested as possible mechanisms underlying these findings.

  6. MRI and MR spectroscopy findings of a case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis affecting the corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Mehmet; Sığırcı, Ahmet; Yakıncı, Cengiz

    2015-07-10

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a rare, slowly progressive, fatal, inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease that is seen mostly in children and young adolescents, and primarily affects the parieto-occipital lobes. The corpus callosum, cerebellum and basal ganglia are less frequently involved. MR spectroscopy (MRS) may illustrate the pathophysiological features of SSPE. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second report of MRS findings of corpus callosum involvement in a stage 3 SSPE case. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Michael H; Meatherall, Bonnie; Nikolic, Ana; Cannon, Kristine; Fonseca, Kevin; Joseph, Jeffrey T; MacDonald, Judy; Pabbaraju, Kanti; Tellier, Raymond; Wong, Sallene; Koch, Marcus W

    2016-03-01

    We present a case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis that developed in a previously healthy 29-year-old pregnant woman who had returned from a trip to rural India shortly before the onset of symptoms. She was admitted to hospital at 27 weeks' gestation with a history of cognitive decline and difficulty completing simple tasks. She had no clinical signs of infection. The working diagnosis was autoimmune encephalitis, although extensive investigations did not lead to a final classifying diagnosis. The patient became comatose and developed hypertension, and an emergency caesarean section was done at 31 weeks to deliver the child, who seemed healthy. The patient died about 6 weeks after the onset of symptoms. The patient was found to have had subacute sclerosing panencephalitis at autopsy. In this Grand Round, we review the clinical features and treatment of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, and the epidemiological and public health aspects of the case. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: clinical and demographic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Arshad; Amjad, Nida; Chand, Prem; Zaidi, Syed Sohail Zahoor; Rana, Muhammad Suleman; Ahmed, Khalid; Ibrahim, Shahnaz

    2014-08-01

    To determine the clinical and demographic characteristics of children diagnosed with Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE). Case series. The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 2000 to June 2012. A retrospective analysis was done, regarding medical charts of 43 children under the age of 16 years with a discharge diagnosis of SSPE. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded. RESULTS were expressed as percentages. Most of the 43 patients were male (72%). The average age at presentation was 8.7 years with average duration of symptoms being 100.6 days. History of measles was present in 17 patients (39.5%). All children had seizures at presentation and 65% had cognitive impairment. Most patients required poly therapy for control of seizures. Sodium valproate was the most commonly used anti-epileptic agent; Isoprinosine was tried in 22 (51%) patients. CSF for antimeasles antibodies was positive in approximately 86% of the 40 (93%) children. EEG showed burst suppression pattern in 36 (83.7%) cases. Forty-two patients (97.6%) were discharged home in a vegetative state. SSPE is progressive neurodegenerative disorder. It can be prevented by timely immunization against measles. Measles antibody in the CSF is diagnostic for SSPE and is helpful in early diagnosis. Most patients experience a gradual but progressive decline in motor and cognitive functions.

  9. SÍNDROME DE DISFUNCIÓN COGNITIVA DEL PERRO COMO MODELO DE INVESTIGACIÓN DE LAS ENFERMEDADES NEURODEGENERATIVAS DEL HUMANO Cognitive dysfunction syndrome in dog senior: a suitable model for human neurodegenerative diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Y. Gallego1

    2010-01-01

    envejecimiento de los humanos.In humans and canines, the aging process increases the risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive dysfunction syndrome in senior dogs. These pathological changes in different brain areas cause dementia syndromes, generating an apparent cognitive deficit characterized by behavioral changes such as alterations in memory and learning processes. The deleterious effects on quality of life in human patient affected by AD, promote the need to find similar pathologies affecting other species, making these, experimental models useful for the investigation of human suffering. Recently it has been suggested a close similarity between several of the clinical, anatomical and physiological characteristic of the Alzheimer’s disease and the cognitive dysfunction syndrome senior dogs, which includes the formation and accumulation of amyloid plaques, apoptosis of cholinergic neurons with a consequent reduction of the neurotransmitter acetyl - hill, progressive type cognitive deficits and alterations in the sleep-wake cycle, among others. Thus, progress in understanding the processes involved in the pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction syndrome senior dogs, and recognizing their similarities to those that occurred during the Alzheimer’s disease, has facilitated studies aimed at understanding some aspects that have not been well detailed neurodegenrativas disease in humans. Moreover, considering the high probability of getting the cognitive dysfunction syndrome senior dogs, which is identified in several canine populations, allows for the possibility of proposing the dog changes, as an optimal model for research experimentate neurodegenerative processes associated with aging in humans.

  10. Sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggi, A; Ferri, R

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this review is to provide data on sleep disturbances in three categories of neurodegenerative disorders: synucleinopathies, tauopathies, and other diseases (this heterogeneous group includes also spinocerebellar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). Analysing and knowing sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases may offer important insights into the pathomechanism of some of these diseases and calls attention to the still insufficiently known 'sleep neurology'. The identification of sleep disorders in some neurodegenerative conditions may make their diagnosis easier and earlier; for example, rapid eye movements sleep behaviour disorder may precede any other clinical manifestation of synucleinopathies by more than 10 years. © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 EFNS.

  11. Optic disc and retinal nerve fiber layer parameters as indicators of neurodegenerative brain changes in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseyinoglu, Nergiz; Ekinci, Metin; Ozben, Serkan; Buyukuysal, Cagatay; Kale, Murat Yildirim; Sanivar, Hilal Safak

    2014-03-01

    Retina is a unique part of the central nervous system (CNS) for visualizing the processes of axonal and neuronal degeneration. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows direct visualization and measurement of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, macular volume, and optic disc (OD) parameters. One of the disorders associated with atrophy in different brain regions is obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In the present study, we aimed to determine OD and RNFL changes measured by OCT for investigating the progress of neurodegeneration development in OSAS, excluding all the other conditions that can directly affect RNFL thickness and optic nerve parameters. Both eyes of 101 patients with OSAS and 20 controls were investigated by OCT. Full-night polysomnography (PSG) and ophthalmologic examination including automated visual field (VF) examination and OCT were performed in all of the patients. According to the OSAS grading, patients were grouped as mild (n=15), moderate (n=27), and severe (n=59). We found significant decrease in RNFL thickness only in the patients with severe OSAS compared with the other groups and decreased macular ganglion cell thickness in the severe OSAS group compared with the control group. VF parameters were significantly worsened in all the OSAS subgroups compared to the control group. We found different data such as normal or increased optic nerve parameters as result of subtle OD edema, which may mask possible peripapillar axonal loss. We think that evaluation of neurodegeneration in OSAS is not always possible by examining OD and RNFL because there are difficulties due to the confounding issues of cerebral atrophy and OD edema.

  12. A novel germline PIGA mutation in Ferro-Cerebro-Cutaneous syndrome: a neurodegenerative X-linked epileptic encephalopathy with systemic iron-overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Kathryn J; Margraf, Rebecca L; Carey, John C; Zhou, Holly; Newcomb, Tara M; Coonrod, Emily; Durtschi, Jacob; Mallempati, Kalyan; Kumanovics, Attila; Katz, Ben E; Voelkerding, Karl V; Opitz, John M

    2014-01-01

    Three related males presented with a newly recognized x-linked syndrome associated with neurodegeneration, cutaneous abnormalities, and systemic iron overload. Linkage studies demonstrated that they shared a haplotype on Xp21.3-Xp22.2 and exome sequencing was used to identify candidate variants. Of the segregating variants, only a PIGA mutation segregated with disease in the family. The c.328_330delCCT PIGA variant predicts, p.Leu110del (or c.1030_1032delCTT, p.Leu344del depending on the reference sequence). The unaffected great-grandfather shared his X allele with the proband but he did not have the PIGA mutation, indicating that the mutation arose de novo in his daughter. A single family with a germline PIGA mutation has been reported; affected males had a phenotype characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and severe neurologic impairment resulting in infantile lethality. In contrast, affected boys in the family described here were born without anomalies and were neurologically normal prior to onset of seizures after 6 months of age, with two surviving to the second decade. PIGA encodes an enzyme in the GPI anchor biosynthesis pathway. An affected individual in the family studied here was deficient in GPI anchor proteins on granulocytes but not erythrocytes. In conclusion, the PIGA mutation in this family likely causes a reduction in GPI anchor protein cell surface expression in various cell types, resulting in the observed pleiotropic phenotype involving central nervous system, skin, and iron metabolism. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. DNA damage in neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppedè, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.coppede@med.unipi.it; Migliore, Lucia, E-mail: lucia.migliore@med.unipi.it

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in the neurodegenerative process. • The mitochondrial DNA is more vulnerable to oxidative attack than the nuclear DNA. • Cytogenetic damage has been largely documented in Alzheimer's disease patients. • The question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of neurodegeneration is still open. • Increasing evidence links DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena. - Abstract: Following the observation of increased oxidative DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA extracted from post-mortem brain regions of patients affected by neurodegenerative diseases, the last years of the previous century and the first decade of the present one have been largely dedicated to the search of markers of DNA damage in neuronal samples and peripheral tissues of patients in early, intermediate or late stages of neurodegeneration. Those studies allowed to demonstrate that oxidative DNA damage is one of the earliest detectable events in neurodegeneration, but also revealed cytogenetic damage in neurodegenerative conditions, such as for example a tendency towards chromosome 21 malsegregation in Alzheimer's disease. As it happens for many neurodegenerative risk factors the question of whether DNA damage is cause or consequence of the neurodegenerative process is still open, and probably both is true. The research interest in markers of oxidative stress was shifted, in recent years, towards the search of epigenetic biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders, following the accumulating evidence of a substantial contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to learning, memory processes, behavioural disorders and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence is however linking DNA damage and repair with epigenetic phenomena, thereby opening the way to a very attractive and timely research topic in neurodegenerative diseases. We will address those issues in the context of Alzheimer's disease

  14. Subacute transverse myelitis with Lyme profile dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajjan, Mohammed

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transverse myelitis is a very rare neurologic syndrome with an incidence per year of 1-5 per million population. We are presenting an interesting case of subacute transverse myelitis with its MRI (magnetic resonance imaging and CSF (cerebrospinal fluid findings. Case: A 46-year-old African-American woman presented with decreased sensation in the lower extremities which started three weeks ago when she had a 36-hour episode of sore throat. She reported numbness up to the level just below the breasts. Lyme disease antibodies total IgG (immunoglobulin G and IgM (immunoglobulin M in the blood was positive. Antinuclear antibody profile was within normal limits. MRI of the cervical spine showed swelling in the lower cervical cord with contrast enhancement. Cerebrospinal fluid was clear with negative Borrelia Burgdorferi IgG and IgM. Herpes simplex, mycoplasma, coxiella, anaplasma, cryptococcus and hepatitis B were all negative. No oligoclonal bands were detected. Quick improvement ensued after she was given IV Ceftriaxone for 7 days. The patient was discharged on the 8th day in stable condition. She continued on doxycycline for 21 days. Conclusions: Transverse myelitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient presenting with acute or subacute myelopathy in association with localized contrast enhancement in the spinal cord especially if flu-like prodromal symptoms were reported. Lyme disease serology is indicated in patients with neurological symptoms keeping in mind that dissociation in Lyme antibody titers between the blood and the CSF is possible.

  15. Neurotrophin Therapy of Neurodegenerative Disorders with Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Table of Contents 1 Narrative...neurodegenerative disorders including Wernicke -Korsakoff syndrome (reviewed in Martin et al., 2005). 2. Results At E15.5, Ts16 brains are slightly

  16. Lack of repercussions of sleep apnea syndrome on recovery and attention disorders at the subacute stage after stroke: a study of 45 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre-Dognin, C; Stana, L; Jousse, M; Lucas, C; Sportouch, P; Bradai, N; Guettard, E; Vicaut, E; Yelnik, A P

    2014-12-01

    Sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) frequently occurs after a stroke. Its association with a poor prognosis is open to discussion. To study, in a physical and rehabilitation medicine (PRM) unit, the possible repercussions of SAS on neurological and functional recovery as well as attentional abilities following a stroke. Forty-five patients, all of whom had recently had a stroke without previously documented SAS, were screened using the ApneaLink(®) system. An apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) score ≥10 was considered as indicative of SAS. The NIHSS, Fugl-Meyer (FM) and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Scales were applied on admission and at two months as means of assessing neurological and functional recovery, which was expressed by the difference between the first and the second scores (delta FM, delta NIHSS, delta FIM). The Battery Attention William Lennox (BAWL) Test was given once in order to evaluate attention disorders. SAS severity was categorized according to the AHI. We compared the groups formed (mild, moderate and severe) using the same method. Twenty-eight patients (62.2%) presented AHI ≥ 10. Stroke characteristics were comparable in the SAS+ and the SAS- groups, with average post-stroke time lapse of 26 days, initial average FIM score of 71.2 points ± 26.3 and initial average NIHSS score of 8.9 ± 4.9. The demographic characteristics of the two groups were likewise comparable with the exception of age, as the SAS+ group was pronouncedly older (65.4 vs. 53.5 years). As for delta FIM, which evaluated functional recovery, it averaged 31.8 ± 20.6. Cases of SAS were found to be mild (37.1%), moderate (28.6%) or severe (34.3%). No significant difference was observed on admission or at 2 months as regards the clinical scales or the BAWL test between the two groups or according to severity, except for the NIHSS score at 2 months in the severe sub-group. This study did not demonstrate the supposed repercussions of SAS on the recovery or attentional

  17. Subacute thyroiditis--61 cases review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S C; Jap, T S; Ho, L T; Ching, K N

    1989-02-01

    To examine the hospitalized patients with available data suggesting subacute thyroiditis, we have reviewed 80 hospital charts over the last 11 years and the data demonstrated 61 patients (48 females, 13 males, Aged 22-75 years) had evidence of subacute thyroiditis clinically or pathologically. Fifty seven of those patients had the clinical manifestation of severe tenderness over the neck, and others were painless. The thyroid function test were abnormal in 53% (30/57) of cases. All had rapid sedimentation rate (46/46). The thyroid antibodies were positive in 26% (10/39) of cases. Sixteen patients received unnecessary thyroid operation and complicated with hypothyroidism with or without hypoparathyroidism in two cases. In conclusion, all patients with painful or painless goiter should be appreciated carefully with additional study such as aspiration cytology to avoid misdiagnosis and inappropriate management.

  18. Notes from the Field: Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Death - Oregon, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liko, Juventila; Guzman-Cottrill, Judith A; Cieslak, Paul R

    2016-01-15

    In 2015, the Oregon Health Authority was notified of the death of a boy with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), a rare and fatal complication of measles. The patient, aged 14 years, had reportedly been vaccinated against measles in the Philippines at age 8 months. However, the patient contracted measles at age 1 year while still in the Philippines. He had been well until 2012, when his neurodegenerative symptoms began. After the diagnosis of SSPE was made, the patient remained in home hospice care until his death. Investigators from the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Health and Science University reviewed the patient's medical records and interviewed the parents. Vaccination against measles can prevent not only acute measles and its complications, but also SSPE.

  19. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: A clinical appraisal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jagtap, Sujit Abajirao; Nair, M D; Kambale, Harsha J

    2013-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a rare chronic, progressive encephalitis affecting primarily children and young adults, caused by a persistent infection of immune resistant measles virus...

  20. Epilepsy in children with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jović, Nebojša J

    2013-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a rare, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disease of childhood and early adolescence caused by defective measles virus. The initial symptoms of SSPE usually involve regression in cognitive functioning and behavior or recurrent myoclonic jerks. Seizures revealing SSPE and epilepsy during the clinical course can occur. The aim of the study was to analyze clinical and EEG characteristics of both initially occurred seizures and epilepsy which developed in the course of the disease. Retrospective study was carried out on 19 children (14 boys, 5 girls) with SSPE diagnosed and treated at our Clinic from 1995 to 2010. Seizures revealed SSPE in our patients aged from 6.5 to 11.5 years (mean 8.6 years). SSPE onset ranged from 4.5 to 16.5 years (mean 10.05). Complete vaccination was performed in nine patients. Cognitive and behavioral decline was preceeded by 6-18 months in two children with intractable focal motor seizures with secondary generalization, one child with complex partial seizures and one with atypical absences. During the clinical course of the disease epilepsy developed in 10 (52.6%) cases, including four patients with seizures as the initial SSPE sign. It occurred mainly in the first year, while in three cases seizures appeared between 1 and 5 years of the disease evolution. Myoclonus was present independently from seizures. No significant inter-group differences were found relating to the type of SSPE progression and history of epilepsy. The only child with fulminant SSPE presented with initial seizures. Favorable seizure control was achieved in 60.0% patients. Intractable epilepsy developed in four patients. Atypical SSPE presentation can include mainly focal intractable seizures. Epilepsy developed during clinical course in 52.6% cases. No significant influence was found of the history of epilepsy on the type of SSPE progression.

  1. Epilepsy in children with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Nebojša J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a rare, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disease of childhood and early adolescence caused by defective measles virus. The initial symptoms of SSPE usually involve regression in cognitive functioning and behavior or recurrent myoclonic jerks. Seizures revealing SSPE and epilepsy during the clinical course can occur. Objective. The aim of the study was to analyze clinical and EEG characteristics of both initially occurred seizures and epilepsy which developed in the course of the disease. Methods. Retrospective study was carried out on 19 children (14 boys, 5 girls with SSPE diagnosed and treated at our Clinic from 1995 to 2010. Seizures revealed SSPE in our patients aged from 6.5 to 11.5 years (mean 8.6 years. Results. SSPE onset ranged from 4.5 to 16.5 years (mean 10.05. Complete vaccination was performed in nine patients. Cognitive and behavioral decline was preceeded by 6-18 months in two children with intractable focal motor seizures with secondary generalization, one child with complex partial seizures and one with atypical absences. During the clinical course of the disease epilepsy developed in 10 (52.6% cases, including four patients with seizures as the initial SSPE sign. It occurred mainly in the first year, while in three cases seizures appeared between 1 and 5 years of the disease evolution. Myoclonus was present independently from seizures. No significant inter-group differences were found relating to the type of SSPE progression and history of epilepsy. The only child with fulminant SSPE presented with initial seizures. Favorable seizure control was achieved in 60.0% patients. Intractable epilepsy developed in four patients. Conclusion. Atypical SSPE presentation can include mainly focal intractable seizures. Epilepsy developed during clinical course in 52.6% cases. No significant influence was found of the history of epilepsy on the type of SSPE progression.

  2. Depressive symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquero, Miquel; Martín, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are very common in chronic conditions. This is true so for neurodegenerative diseases. A number of patients with cognitive decline and dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease and related conditions like Parkinson’s disease, Lewy body disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal degeneration amongst other entities, experience depressive symptoms in greater or lesser grade at some point during the course of the illness. Depressive symptoms have a particular significance in neurological disorders, specially in neurodegenerative diseases, because brain, mind, behavior and mood relationship. A number of patients may develop depressive symptoms in early stages of the neurologic disease, occurring without clear presence of cognitive decline with only mild cognitive deterioration. Classically, depression constitutes a reliable diagnostic challenge in this setting. However, actually we can recognize and evaluate depressive, cognitive or motor symptoms of neurodegenerative disease in order to establish their clinical significance and to plan some therapeutic strategies. Depressive symptoms can appear also lately, when the neurodegenerative disease is fully developed. The presence of depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms have a negative impact on the quality-of-life of patients and caregivers. Besides, patients with depressive symptoms also tend to further decrease function and reduce cognitive abilities and also uses to present more affected clinical status, compared with patients without depression. Depressive symptoms are treatable. Early detection of depressive symptoms is very important in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, in order to initiate the most adequate treatment. We review in this paper the main neurodegenerative diseases, focusing in depressive symptoms of each other entities and current recommendations of management and treatment. PMID:26301229

  3. Pathophysiology of language, speech and emotions in neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Jones, David T; Graff-Radford, Neill R

    2014-01-01

    Studying neurodegenerative diseases has greatly expanded our knowledge of language, speech and emotion as these diseases can affect areas not typically seen with stroke or tumor. Newer imaging techniques such as voxel based morphometry), fluorodeoxyglucose (F18) positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging have allowed localization of these deficits and a greater understanding of the language network targeted by these progressive neurodegenerative illnesses. This review illustrates these important points by describing five syndromes, using clinical cases and then noting the anatomy, typical pathology, and proposed pathophysiology. The syndromes are Progressive Nonfluent Aphasia, Semantic Dementia, Logopenic Aphasia, Primary Progressive Apraxia of Speech and Dysprosody of Speech. Clinicians recognizing these syndromes using the associated clinico-anatomic patterns will lead to more accurate diagnosis and improved patient counseling and management. Further, patients may be included in appropriate clinical trials when their doctors are aware of the most likely pathology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurodegenerative proteinopathies

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    Maria Carmela Tartaglia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is described as a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease believed to result from multiple concussions. Traditionally, concussions were considered benign events and although most people recover fully, about 10% develop a post-concussive syndrome with persisting neurological, cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms. CTE was once thought to be unique to boxers, but it has now been observed in many different athletes having suffered multiple concussions as well as in military personal after repeated blast injuries. Much remains unknown about the development of CTE but its pathological substrate is usually tau, similar to that seen in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The aim of this perspective is to compare and contrast clinical and pathological CTE with the other neurodegenerative proteinopathies and highlight that there is an urgent need for understanding the relationship between concussion and the development of CTE as it may provide a window into the development of a proteinopathy and thus new avenues for treatment.

  5. The role of thiamine in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Bubko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B1 (thiamine plays an important role in metabolism. It is indispensable for normal growth and development of the organism. Thiamine has a favourable impact on a number of systems, including the digestive, cardiovascular and nervous systems. It also stimulates the brain and improves the psycho-emotional state. Hence it is often called the vitamin of “reassurance of the spirit”. Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin. It can be present in the free form as thiamine or as its phosphate esters: mono-, di- or triphosphate. The main source of thiamine as an exogenous vitamin is certain foodstuffs, but trace amounts can be synthesised by microorganisms of the large intestine. The recommended daily intake of thiamine is about 2.0 mg. Since vitamin B1 has no ability to accumulate in the organism, manifestations of its deficiency begin to appear very quickly. The chronic state of thiamine deficiency, to a large extent, because of its function, contributes to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. It was proved that supporting vitamin B1 therapy not only constitutes neuroprotection but can also have a favourable impact on advanced neurodegenerative diseases. This article presents the current state of knowledge as regards the effects of thiamine exerted through this vitamin in a number of diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Wernicke’s encephalopathy or Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and Huntington’s disease.

  6. Possible progression of subacute lupus erythematosus--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brănişteanu, Daciana Elena; Lăbonţu, Andreea; Ciobanu, Delia; Stoleriu, Gabriela; Brănişteanu, D; Oanţă, A

    2014-01-01

    Subacute lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a specific form of lupus erythematosus characterized by prevalently cutaneous manifestations usually with a good prognosis. It is more common in patients aged 15 to 70 years, and there is a female predilection. This form accounts for 10% of all lupus erythematosus cases. We present the case of a 57-year-old male patient diagnosed at age 35 with chronic psoriasiform subacute lupus erythematosus, pathologically confirmed at the Iaşi Dermatology Clinic. At the age of 54 years he had multiple ischemic strokes, followed by deterioration of general status, and at 56 years deep vein thrombosis in the right leg. The patient presented the erythematous-squamous lesions specific to psoriasiform SLE localized both on the upper third of the body and knees and associated with submucosal lesions of the lower lip, oral mucosa and appendages. The patient also presented hypo- and hyperpigmentated atrophic scar-like lesions. Laboratory tests performed during the last two admissions showed the presence of anti-ds DNA and antiphospholipid antibodies, inflammatory syndrome, and nitrogen retention syndrome. Treatment consisted of systemic and local dermatocorticoids and associated medication, emollient lotions and creams with SPF 50+, with slowly favorable progression. The peculiarity of the case lies in the chronic progression without significant systemic involvement for 19 years, and then in 2 years the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and a shift to systemic lupus erythematosus to occur.

  7. Ketogenic Diet in Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Paoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of data demonstrate the utility of ketogenic diets in a variety of metabolic diseases as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. In regard to neurological disorders, ketogenic diet is recognized as an effective treatment for pharmacoresistant epilepsy but emerging data suggests that ketogenic diet could be also useful in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer, Parkinson’s disease, and some mitochondriopathies. Although these diseases have different pathogenesis and features, there are some common mechanisms that could explain the effects of ketogenic diets. These mechanisms are to provide an efficient source of energy for the treatment of certain types of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by focal brain hypometabolism; to decrease the oxidative damage associated with various kinds of metabolic stress; to increase the mitochondrial biogenesis pathways; and to take advantage of the capacity of ketones to bypass the defect in complex I activity implicated in some neurological diseases. These mechanisms will be discussed in this review.

  8. Ketogenic Diet in Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Ernesto; Bosco, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of data demonstrate the utility of ketogenic diets in a variety of metabolic diseases as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. In regard to neurological disorders, ketogenic diet is recognized as an effective treatment for pharmacoresistant epilepsy but emerging data suggests that ketogenic diet could be also useful in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer, Parkinson's disease, and some mitochondriopathies. Although these diseases have different pathogenesis and features, there are some common mechanisms that could explain the effects of ketogenic diets. These mechanisms are to provide an efficient source of energy for the treatment of certain types of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by focal brain hypometabolism; to decrease the oxidative damage associated with various kinds of metabolic stress; to increase the mitochondrial biogenesis pathways; and to take advantage of the capacity of ketones to bypass the defect in complex I activity implicated in some neurological diseases. These mechanisms will be discussed in this review. PMID:25101284

  9. Animal models of neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Mara Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD, increases with age, and the number of affected patients is expected to increase worldwide in the next decades. Accurately understanding the etiopathogenic mechanisms of these diseases is a crucial step for developing disease-modifying drugs able to preclude their emergence or at least slow their progression. Animal models contribute to increase the knowledge on the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. These models reproduce different aspects of a given disease, as well as the histopathological lesions and its main symptoms. The purpose of this review is to present the main animal models for AD, PD, and Huntington's disease.

  10. Reward processing in neurodegenerative disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David C.; Kramer, Joel H.

    2015-01-01

    Representation of reward value involves a distributed network including cortical and subcortical structures. Because neurodegenerative illnesses target specific anatomic networks that partially overlap with the reward circuit they would be predicted to have distinct impairments in reward processing. This review presents the existing evidence of reward processing changes in neurodegenerative diseases including mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease, as well as in healthy aging. Carefully distinguishing the different aspects of reward processing (primary rewards, secondary rewards, reward-based learning, and reward-based decision-making) and using tasks that differentiate the stages of processing reward will lead to improved understanding of this fundamental process and clarify a contributing cause of behavioral change in these illnesses. PMID:24417286

  11. Molecular diagnostics of neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha eAgrawal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular diagnostics provide a powerful method to detect and diagnose various neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. The confirmation of such diagnosis allows early detection and subsequent medical counseling that help specific patients to undergo clinically important drug trials. This provides a medical pathway to have better insight of neurogenesis and eventual cure of the neurodegenerative diseases. In this short review, we present recent advances in molecular diagnostics especially biomarkers and imaging spectroscopy for neurological diseases. We describe advances made in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Huntington’s disease, and finally present a perspective on the future directions to provide a framework for further developments and refinements of molecular diagnostics to combat neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Essential Tremor: A Neurodegenerative Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Benito-Leon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Essential tremor (ET is one of the most common neurological disorders among adults, and is the most common of the many tremor disorders. It has classically been viewed as a benign monosymptomatic condition, yet over the past decade, a growing body of evidence indicates that ET is a progressive condition that is clinically heterogeneous, as it may be associated with a spectrum of clinical features, with both motor and non‐motor elements. In this review, I will describe the most significant emerging milestones in research which, when taken together, suggest that ET is a neurodegenerative condition.Methods: A PubMed search conducted in June 2014 crossing the terms “essential tremor” (ET and “neurodegenerative” yielded 122 entries, 20 of which included the term “neurodegenerative” in the article title. This was supplemented by articles in the author's files that pertained to this topic.Results/Discussion: There is an open and active dialogue in the medical community as to whether ET is a neurodegenerative disease, with considerable evidence in favor of this. Specifically, ET is a progressive disorder of aging associated with neuronal loss (reduction in Purkinje cells as well as other post‐mortem changes that occur in traditional neurodegenerative disorders. Along with this, advanced neuroimaging techniques are now demonstrating distinct structural changes, several of which are consistent with neuronal loss, in patients with ET. However, further longitudinal clinical and neuroimaging longitudinal studies to assess progression are required.

  13. Metal imaging in neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Megan W.

    2014-01-01

    Metal ions are known to play an important role in many neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and prion diseases. In these diseases, aberrant metal binding or improper regulation of redox active metal ions can induce oxidative stress by producing cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Altered metal homeostasis is also frequently seen in the diseased state. As a result, the imaging of metals in intact biological cells and tissues has been very important for understanding the role of metals in neurodegenerative diseases. A wide range of imaging techniques have been utilized, including X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM), particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), all of which allow for the imaging of metals in biological specimens with high spatial resolution and detection sensitivity. These techniques represent unique tools for advancing the understanding of the disease mechanisms and for identifying possible targets for developing treatments. In this review, we will highlight the advances in neurodegenerative disease research facilitated by metal imaging techniques. PMID:22797194

  14. Survey of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yusaku; Hashimoto, Koichi; Iinuma, Kazuie; Ohtsuka, Yoko; Ichiyama, Takashi; Kusuhara, Koichi; Nomura, Keiko; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Aiba, Hideo; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2012-12-01

    Investigators conducted a retrospective epidemiological study of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, a fatal disease caused by measles infection, over the past few years in Japan. Data on 118 cases obtained from a questionnaire sent to attending physicians were analyzed. The annual incidence of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis was approximately 0.03 cases per million from 2001 to 2005. Children infected with measles at a young age (panencephalitis, and those infected before 6 months of age showed earlier onset. Because a positive correlation was found between the prevalence of measles and the onset of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, particularly among children infected at an early age, it is vital to eradicate measles infection by vaccination.

  15. MRI in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncay, R. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Akman-Demir, G. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Goekyigit, A. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Eraksoy, M. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Barlas, M. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Tolun, R. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Guersoy, G. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive, slow virus infection of the brain, caused by the measles virus, attacking children and young adults. We investigated 15 patients with SSPE by MRI, with 5 normal and 10 pathological results. In the early period, lesions were in the grey matter and subcortical white matter. They were asymmetrical and had a predilection for the posterior parts of the hemispheres. Later, high-signal changes in deep white matter and severe cerebral atrophy were observed. Parenchymal lesions significantly correlated with the duration of disease. A significant relationship between MRI findings and clinical stage was observed in the 1st year of the disease. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Transgenic nonhuman primates for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Anthony WS

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Animal models that represent human diseases constitute an important tool in understanding the pathogenesis of the diseases, and in developing effective therapies. Neurodegenerative diseases are complex disorders involving neuropathologic and psychiatric alterations. Although transgenic and knock-in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD and Huntington's disease (HD have been created, limited representation in clinical aspects has been recognized and the rodent models lack true neurodegeneration. Chemical induction of HD and PD in nonhuman primates (NHP has been reported, however, the role of intrinsic genetic factors in the development of the diseases is indeterminable. Nonhuman primates closely parallel humans with regard to genetic, neuroanatomic, and cognitive/behavioral characteristics. Accordingly, the development of NHP models for neurodegenerative diseases holds greater promise for success in the discovery of diagnoses, treatments, and cures than approaches using other animal species. Therefore, a transgenic NHP carrying a mutant gene similar to that of patients will help to clarify our understanding of disease onset and progression. Additionally, monitoring disease onset and development in the transgenic NHP by high resolution brain imaging technology such as MRI, and behavioral and cognitive testing can all be carried out simultaneously in the NHP but not in other animal models. Moreover, because of the similarity in motor repertoire between NHPs and humans, it will also be possible to compare the neurologic syndrome observed in the NHP model to that in patients. Understanding the correlation between genetic defects and physiologic changes (e.g. oxidative damage will lead to a better understanding of disease progression and the development of patient treatments, medications and preventive approaches for high risk individuals. The impact of the transgenic NHP model in understanding the role which

  17. Familial subacute sclerosing panencephalitis associated with short latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vinod; Gupta, Vineet B; Eisenhut, Michael

    2008-03-01

    The familial recurrence of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is rare. The study of such cases and a comparison of intrafamilial with sporadic cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis may shed light on important pathogenetic factors. We report on the occurrence of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in two brothers from rural India, who contracted measles infection simultaneously at ages 3 and 11 years. They developed subacute sclerosing panencephalitis 21 and 37 months later, respectively. A diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis was based on history, electroencephalographic changes, and significantly raised levels of cerebrospinal-fluid anti-measles virus immunoglobulin G. A comparison of intrafamilial with sporadic cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis revealed that latency in familial subacute sclerosing panencephalitis involved a median of 6.4 years (range, 1.0-10.9), significantly (P panencephalitis from the Indian subcontinent. We confirmed a more rapid manifestation of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis after measles virus infection in intrafamilial compared with sporadic subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

  18. Pseudotumor cerebri secondary to subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayçiçek, Ali; Işcan, Akin; Ceçe, Hasan

    2009-05-01

    Unusual presentations are not rare in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Five patients initially diagnosed with pseudotumor cerebri were ultimately determined to have pseudotumor cerebri secondary to subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The present study retrospectively reviewed 56 cases history, neurologic symptoms, and clinical and laboratory data, as well as the outcomes. On admission, five patients (group 1) presenting with pseudotumor cerebri exhibited bilateral papilledema, and in each of them cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed small lateral ventricles, effacement of the subarachnoid space, and no mass lesion. On admission, 51 patients (group 2) had no pseudotumor cerebri findings. The year of original measles infection, the interval between measles and onset of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, and initial neurologic symptoms were similar, but length of symptoms before diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis was shorter in group 1, and the clinical stage of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis on admission was more advanced in group 2. Cerebrospinal fluid mean open pressure was 378 +/- 22 H(2)O in group 1 and 146 +/- 28 H(2)O in group 2; cerebrospinal fluid antibody was 2038 +/- 768 U/L in group 1 and was 664 +/- 214 U/L in group 2. Only three of the five patients with pseudotumor cerebri had typical periodic discharges on electroencephalographic examination. These findings suggest that subacute sclerosing panencephalitis can cause pseudotumor cerebri.

  19. Lysosomal dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Tomala

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent data advocate for the implication of lysosomes in the development of programmed cell death. Lysosomal dysfunction decreased the efficiency of autophagosome/lysosome fusion that leads to vacuolation of cells. Autophagic vacuoles containing damaged organelles and altered proteins are hallmarks in most neurodegenerative disorders. These aggregates consequently disrupt cellular homeostasis causing neuronal cell death due apoptosis or necrosis. Moreover calpain mediated or mutation inducted lysosomal rupture result in release of lysosomal cathepsins into the cytoplasm and inducing neuronal cell death. In this review we emphasize the pathophysiological mechanism connecting disrupting autophagy – lysosomal pathway and lysosomal dysfunction in neuronal cell death called lysosomal cell death.

  20. Chameleon sequences in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahramali, Golnaz; Goliaei, Bahram; Minuchehr, Zarrin; Salari, Ali

    2016-03-25

    Chameleon sequences can adopt either alpha helix sheet or a coil conformation. Defining chameleon sequences in PDB (Protein Data Bank) may yield to an insight on defining peptides and proteins responsible in neurodegeneration. In this research, we benefitted from the large PDB and performed a sequence analysis on Chameleons, where we developed an algorithm to extract peptide segments with identical sequences, but different structures. In order to find new chameleon sequences, we extracted a set of 8315 non-redundant protein sequences from the PDB with an identity less than 25%. Our data was classified to "helix to strand (HE)", "helix to coil (HC)" and "strand to coil (CE)" alterations. We also analyzed the occurrence of singlet and doublet amino acids and the solvent accessibility in the chameleon sequences; we then sorted out the proteins with the most number of chameleon sequences and named them Chameleon Flexible Proteins (CFPs) in our dataset. Our data revealed that Gly, Val, Ile, Tyr and Phe, are the major amino acids in Chameleons. We also found that there are proteins such as Insulin Degrading Enzyme IDE and GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN) with the most number of chameleons (640 and 405 respectively). These proteins have known roles in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore it can be inferred that other CFP's can serve as key proteins in neurodegeneration, and a study on them can shed light on curing and preventing neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Chameleon sequences in neurodegenerative diseases

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    Bahramali, Golnaz [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Goliaei, Bahram, E-mail: goliaei@ut.ac.ir [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Minuchehr, Zarrin, E-mail: minuchehr@nigeb.ac.ir [Department of Systems Biotechnology, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, (NIGEB), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salari, Ali [Department of Systems Biotechnology, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, (NIGEB), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-25

    Chameleon sequences can adopt either alpha helix sheet or a coil conformation. Defining chameleon sequences in PDB (Protein Data Bank) may yield to an insight on defining peptides and proteins responsible in neurodegeneration. In this research, we benefitted from the large PDB and performed a sequence analysis on Chameleons, where we developed an algorithm to extract peptide segments with identical sequences, but different structures. In order to find new chameleon sequences, we extracted a set of 8315 non-redundant protein sequences from the PDB with an identity less than 25%. Our data was classified to “helix to strand (HE)”, “helix to coil (HC)” and “strand to coil (CE)” alterations. We also analyzed the occurrence of singlet and doublet amino acids and the solvent accessibility in the chameleon sequences; we then sorted out the proteins with the most number of chameleon sequences and named them Chameleon Flexible Proteins (CFPs) in our dataset. Our data revealed that Gly, Val, Ile, Tyr and Phe, are the major amino acids in Chameleons. We also found that there are proteins such as Insulin Degrading Enzyme IDE and GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN) with the most number of chameleons (640 and 405 respectively). These proteins have known roles in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore it can be inferred that other CFP's can serve as key proteins in neurodegeneration, and a study on them can shed light on curing and preventing neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Tau imaging in neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dani, M.; Edison, P. [Imperial College London, Neurology Imaging Unit, Division of Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); Brooks, D.J. [Imperial College London, Neurology Imaging Unit, Division of Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); Aarhus University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2016-06-15

    Aggregated tau protein is a major neuropathological substrate central to the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. In AD, it has been shown that the density of hyperphosphorylated tau tangles correlates closely with neuronal dysfunction and cell death, unlike β-amyloid. Until now, diagnostic and pathologic information about tau deposition has only been available from invasive techniques such as brain biopsy or autopsy. The recent development of selective in-vivo tau PET imaging ligands including [{sup 18}F]THK523, [{sup 18}F]THK5117, [{sup 18}F]THK5105 and [{sup 18}F]THK5351, [{sup 18}F]AV1451(T807) and [{sup 11}C]PBB3 has provided information about the role of tau in the early phases of neurodegenerative diseases, and provided support for diagnosis, prognosis, and imaging biomarkers to track disease progression. Moreover, the spatial and longitudinal relationship of tau distribution compared with β - amyloid and other pathologies in these diseases can be mapped. In this review, we discuss the role of aggregated tau in tauopathies, the challenges posed in developing selective tau ligands as biomarkers, the state of development in tau tracers, and the new clinical information that has been uncovered, as well as the opportunities for improving diagnosis and designing clinical trials in the future. (orig.)

  3. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Jose; Issacson, Richard S; Koppel, Barbara S

    2010-10-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a chronic encephalitis occurring after infection with measles virus. The prevalence of the disease varies depending on uptake of measles vaccination, with the virus disproportionally affecting regions with low vaccination rates. The physiopathology of the disease is not fully understood; however, there is evidence that it involves factors that favour humoral over cellular immune response against the virus. As a result, the virus is able to infect the neurons and to survive in a latent form for years. The clinical manifestations occur, on average, 6 years after measles virus infection. The onset of SSPE is insidious, and psychiatric manifestations are prominent. Subsequently, myoclonic seizures usually lead to a final stage of akinetic mutism. The diagnosis is clinical, supported by periodic complexes on electroencephalography, brain imaging suggestive of demyelination, and immunological evidence of measles infection. Management of the disease includes seizure control and avoidance of secondary complications associated with the progressive disability. Trials of treatment with interferon, ribavirin, and isoprinosine using different methodologies have reported beneficial results. However, the disease shows relentless progression; only 5% of individuals with SSPE undergo spontaneous remission, with the remaining 95% dying within 5 years of diagnosis.

  4. Endocannabinoid system in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S; Shivakumar, Madhu; Joshi, Vikram; Subbanna, Shivakumar

    2017-09-01

    Most neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs) are characterized by cognitive impairment and other neurological defects. The definite cause of and pathways underlying the progression of these NDDs are not well-defined. Several mechanisms have been proposed to contribute to the development of NDDs. These mechanisms may proceed concurrently or successively, and they differ among cell types at different developmental stages in distinct brain regions. The endocannabinoid system, which involves cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1R) and type 2 (CB2R), endogenous cannabinoids and the enzymes that catabolize these compounds, has been shown to contribute to the development of NDDs in several animal models and human studies. In this review, we discuss the functions of the endocannabinoid system in NDDs and converse the therapeutic efficacy of targeting the endocannabinoid system to rescue NDDs. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Proton pump inhibitor-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholdt, L H; Laurinaviciene, R; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized.......Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized....

  6. Masticatory function in subacute TMD patients before and after treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, L.J.; Steenks, M.H.; Wijer, A. de; Speksnijder, C.M.; Bilt, A. van der

    2009-01-01

    Masticatory function can be impaired in temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) patients. We investigated whether treatment of subacute non-specific TMD patients may influence oral function and clinical outcome measures. Fifteen patients with subacute TMD participated in the study. We quantified

  7. Are SCN1A gene mutations responsible for genetic susceptibility to subacute sclerosing panencephalitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar

    2012-02-01

    Dravet syndrome, characterized predominantly by myoclonus, has a striking clinical resemblance to subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE). Patients with Dravet syndrome develop significant mental decline with advancing age of affected child like in SSPE. It is well established that SCN1A gene mutations are associated with Dravet syndrome. Even periodic EEG complexes have been described in Dravet syndrome. In addition to Dravet syndrome, several other types of acute and subacute encephalopathic syndromes having clinical and electroencephalographic resemblance to SSPE are associated with SCN1A gene mutations. SSPE is a devastating progressive inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system. It is caused by persistent infection of the brain by an aberrant measles virus. Only a few of a vast number of measles infected pediatric population develop SSPE. There are several reports describing presence of SSPE is close relatives and it has been described previously in sibling and twin pairs. A genetic susceptibility for development of SSPE is likely. In fact, a variety of genetic abnormalities have already been described in patients with SSPE. It can also be argued that because of striking clinical resemblance between Dravet and various epileptic and encephalopathic syndromes associated with SCN1A gene mutations and SSPE, SCN1A gene abnormalities may also be responsible for susceptibility to SSPE in measles infected children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Selenium, selenoproteins and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Bárbara Rita; Roberts, Blaine R; Bush, Ashley I; Hare, Dominic J

    2015-08-01

    It is unsurprising that our understanding of the role of selenium in neurological function is somewhat immature, considering its relatively recent discovery as an essential element to human health. Selenocysteine, the 21st amino acid, is the defining feature of the 25 selenoprotein-encoding genes so far discovered within the human genome. The low abundance of these proteins in the brain belies the integral role they play in normal neurological function, from well-characterised antioxidant activity in the periphery to poorly understood mechanisms that modulate mitochondrial function and response to brain pathology. Selenium has been identified as playing a role in several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, though its function as a 'cause or effect' of disease process remains unclear. This review discusses selenium metabolism in detail, specifically with regard to the role it plays within the central nervous system, and examines the most current literature investigating how selenium may be involved in chronic diseases of the central nervous system.

  9. Subacute effects of cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust in addition to shoulder manual therapy plus exercise intervention in individuals with subacromial impingement syndrome: a prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alexis A; Donaldson, Megan; Wassinger, Craig A; Emerson-Kavchak, Alicia J

    2017-09-01

    To determine the subacute effects of cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust in addition to shoulder non-thrust plus exercise in patients with subacromial pathology. This was a randomized, single blinded controlled trial pilot study. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01753271) and reported according to Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials requirements. Patients were randomly assigned to either shoulder treatment plus cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust or shoulder treatment-only group. Primary outcomes were average pain intensity (Numeric Pain Rating Scale) and physical function (Shoulder Pain and Disability Index) at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and patient discharge. 18 patients, mean age 43.1(15.8) years satisfied the eligibility criteria and were analyzed for follow-up data. Both groups showed statistically significant improvements in both pain and function at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and discharge. The between-group differences for changes in pain or physical function were not significant at any time point. The addition of cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust to the shoulder treatment-only group did not significantly alter improvement in pain or function in patients with subacromial pathology. Both approaches appeared to provide an equally notable benefit. Both groups improved on all outcomes and met the criteria for clinical relevance for both pain and function. 2b.

  10. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis: The Foothold in Undervaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Rebecca L; Kann, Dylan; Rassbach, Caroline E; Schwenk, Hayden T; Ritter, Jana M; Rota, Paul A; Elbers, Jorina

    2016-12-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal complication of measles infection. We present a case of a fully vaccinated 3-year-old boy who was diagnosed with and treated for autoimmune encephalitis before arriving at a diagnosis of SSPE. We discuss the challenges of diagnosing SSPE in developed countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Microbiome, probiotics and neurodegenerative diseases: deciphering the gut brain axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Susan; Lomis, Nikita; Kahouli, Imen; Dia, Si Yuan; Singh, Surya Pratap; Prakash, Satya

    2017-10-01

    The gut microbiota is essential to health and has recently become a target for live bacterial cell biotherapies for various chronic diseases including metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity and neurodegenerative disease. Probiotic biotherapies are known to create a healthy gut environment by balancing bacterial populations and promoting their favorable metabolic action. The microbiota and its respective metabolites communicate to the host through a series of biochemical and functional links thereby affecting host homeostasis and health. In particular, the gastrointestinal tract communicates with the central nervous system through the gut-brain axis to support neuronal development and maintenance while gut dysbiosis manifests in neurological disease. There are three basic mechanisms that mediate the communication between the gut and the brain: direct neuronal communication, endocrine signaling mediators and the immune system. Together, these systems create a highly integrated molecular communication network that link systemic imbalances with the development of neurodegeneration including insulin regulation, fat metabolism, oxidative markers and immune signaling. Age is a common factor in the development of neurodegenerative disease and probiotics prevent many harmful effects of aging such as decreased neurotransmitter levels, chronic inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis-all factors that are proven aggravators of neurodegenerative disease. Indeed patients with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases have a high rate of gastrointestinal comorbidities and it has be proposed by some the management of the gut microbiota may prevent or alleviate the symptoms of these chronic diseases.

  12. Epigenetics and etiology of neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata M. Gruber

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Determination of specific gene profile expression is essential for morphological and functional differentiation of cells in the human organism. The human genome consists of 25–30 thousands genes but only some of them are expressed in each cell. Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation, histone and chromatin modifications or non-coding RNA functions are also responsible for the unique gene expression patterns. It is suggested that transcriptional gene activation is related to hypomethylation and the transcriptionally non-active sequences are hypermethylated. Covalent histone modifications and DNA methylation are correlated and interacting. Chromatin modeling is regulated not only by specific enzymes but also by protein kinases or phosphatases and coactivators, such as CBP. Such interaction makes the “histone code” which with the chromatin proteins determines gene expression patterns as the response to external agents. Evidence of a major role for epigenetic modifications in neurological disease has come from three converging lines of enquiry: high conservation throughout evolution of the histone residues that are the target for epigenetic modifications; association between mutations in epigenetic components and multisystem disease syndrome in the nervous system; and broad efficacy of small-molecule epigenetic modulators, e.g. histone deacetylase inhibitors, in models of neurological diseases incurable up to now, such as Huntington’s disease, (HD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. This article is a survey of the literature concerning the characterization of gene expression patterns correlated with some neurodegenerative diseases. The processes of DNA hypomethylation and histone acetylation are emphasized. The histone deacetylases are indicated as the basis for design of potential drugs.

  13. Echocardiographic evaluation of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Çimen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a slowly progressive, inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease caused by virus infection in the central nervous system. Since there are a limited number of studies in the literature evaluating the cardiovascular functions of patients with SSPE, the present study evaluates the patients with SSPE using tissue Doppler echocardiography and compares them between the control group in order to shed some light on the subject. Methods: The study is a prospective observational study. 49 patients (17 female, 32 male with SSPE were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups: Stage 2 (n=29 and Stage 3 (n=20. Echocardiographic data were compared with a control group of 26 which is the same average age. All children underwent a detailed echocardiography, which contained an M-mode, pulse Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Sinus tachycardia ( >100 beats/min in children was detected in nineteen (38.7% patients. There were not significant differences between parameters of systolic and diastolic function of the heart. Stage 2 group, EF: 69.9±6.4; SF: 39.2±5.58; and MPI (mitral: 0.38±0.03 and MPI (tricuspid: 0.39±0.10. And in the Stage 3 group, EF: 68.5±7.0, SF: 37.8±5.34, MPI (mitral: 0.37±0.09 and MPI (tricuspid: 0.38±0.12. In the control group EF:70.96±5.54; SF:39.96±5.05 and MPI(mitral: 0.35±0.06 MPI (tricuspid:0.36±0.04 and statistically meaningful differences were not found between patients and control groups (p >0.05. Conclusion: Cardiac functions may be preserved and cardiac functions constitute no significant risks of mortality in the advanced stages of patients with Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, which is a group of chronic and bedridden patients.

  14. Sleep in Neurodevelopmental and Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagal, Suresh

    2015-06-01

    There is a close relationship between sleep and childhood neurodevelopmental/neurodegenerative disorders. Understanding the sleep issues may provide greater insight into pathophysiology and treatment of these disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Neuropathological diagnosis of neurodegenerative and dementia diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzschmar, H A; Neumann, M

    2000-09-01

    Neurodegenerative and dementing disorders such as Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease are among the most common diseases of advanced age. Despite progress in the clinical diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders, definite diagnosis for most of these disorders is still possible only by neuropathological examination of the brain. The neuropathological diagnosis and classification of neurodegenerative disorders has made clear advances in recent years, particularly due to the results of genetic and biochemical studies, resulting in the development of new disease-specific antibodies. Internationally recognized consensus criteria for most neurodegenerative disorders allow a definite and standardized diagnosis to be made. To obtain further knowledge about the etiopathogenesis, particularly with regard to new therapeutic strategies, studies with clinically and neuropathologically well-documented cases are needed. The project "Brain-Net" has therefore been established with the aim of setting up a German Brain and Tissue Bank for Diseases of the Central Nervous System. The project is funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research.

  16. Visual Spatial Cognition in Neurodegenerative Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Possin, Katherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Visual spatial impairment is often an early symptom of neurodegenerative disease; however, this multi-faceted domain of cognition is not well-assessed by most typical dementia evaluations. Neurodegenerative diseases cause circumscribed atrophy in distinct neural networks, and accordingly, they impact visual spatial cognition in different and characteristic ways. Anatomically-focused visual spatial assessment can assist the clinician in making an early and accurate diagnosis. This article will...

  17. [Subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord caused by vitamin B12 deficiency. Report of 11 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales-Gaete, Jorge; Jiménez, Paula; García, Pía; Sáez, David; Aracena, Rodrigo; González, Jorge; Lay-Son, Luis; Tenhamm, Eugenio; Figueroa, Tatiana; Chávez, Andrea; Oelker, Carolina; Vega, Luis

    2004-11-01

    Subacute combined degeneration is a clinical manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency, that we observe with unusual frequency. To report a series of eleven patients with subacute combined degeneration. Retrospective analysis of 11 patients hospitalized in a public hospital in Santiago, between March 2001 and February 2003. All had a myelopathy of more than three weeks of evolution with serum vitamin B12 levels of less than 200 pg/ml. A risk factor was identified in 10 cases and the most common was an age over 60 years old. The main presenting symptom was the presence of paresthesias. On admission, sphincter dysfunction, posterior column and pyramidal syndromes coexisted in nine patients. A level of sensitive deficit was detected in six. Ten patients had macrocytosis and eight were anemic. Serum vitamin B12 was measured in ten and in nine, it was below 200 pg/ml. The mean lapse between onset of symptoms and treatment was eight months. All received intramuscular vitamin B12 in doses on 1,000 to 10,000 IU/day. Sphincter dysfunction and propioception were the first symptoms to improve. Subacute combined degeneration must be suspected in patients older than 60 years with a subacute myelopathic syndrome and low serum vitamin B12 levels.

  18. Neurobiology of sleep disturbances in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, J-F; Petit, D; Latreille, V; Montplaisir, J

    2008-01-01

    This review presents sleep disturbances and their underlying pathophysiology in three categories of neurodegenerative disorders namely tauopathies, synucleinopathies, and Huntington's disease (HD) and prion-related diseases. Sleep abnormalities are a major and early feature of neurodegenerative disorders, especially for synucleinopathies, HD and prion-related diseases, in which the sleep-related brainstem regions are severely altered and impaired sooner than in most of the tauopathies. In synucleinopathies, HD and prion-related diseases, specific sleep disturbances, different from those observed in tauopathies, are considered as core manifestations of the disease and in some cases, as preclinical signs. For this reason, the evaluation of sleep components in these neurodegenerative disorders may be useful to make a diagnosis and to assess the efficacy of pharmacotherapy. Since sleep disruption may occur early in the course of neurodegeneration, sleep disturbance may serve as groundwork to study the efficacy of neuroprotective agents to prevent or delay the development of a full-blown neurodegenerative disorder. The cause of sleep disturbances in neurodegenerative disorders may be attributed to several factors, including age-related modifications, symptoms of the disease, comorbid conditions and the neurodegenerative process itself.

  19. Brainstem involvement in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Dileep; Singh, Maneesh Kumar; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Kohli, Neera

    2011-01-01

    The parieto-occipital region of the brain is most frequently and severely affected in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE). The basal ganglia, cerebellum and corpus callosum are less commonly involved. Brainstem involvement is rarely described in SSPE, and usually there is involvement of other regions of the brain. We describe a patient with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis with brain magnetic resonance imaging showing extensive brainstem involvement without significant involvement of other cortical structures. Though rarely described in SSPE, one should be aware of such brainstem and cerebellum involvement, and SSPE should be kept in mind when brainstem signal changes are seen in brain MRI with or without involvement of other regions of brain to avoid erroneous reporting.

  20. Multiple Complications Due to Subacute Suppurative Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Qirjazi, Brikena; Bardhyli, Dolores; Hoxhallari, Xhevair

    2012-01-01

    Subacute otitis media is a well-known pathology of ENT practice which is easily diagnosed and subsequently treated in the outpatient clinic. The rate of complications in acute otitis media is lower than in chronic otitis media. We present here the history of a young patient with subacute otitis media who developed both localized labyrinthitis and facial palsy requiring surgical treatment. We conclude that the treatment of subacute otitis media should be carefully monitored because complicatio...

  1. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Child with Recurrent Febrile Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Ayşe Kartal; Ayşegül Neşe Çıtak Kurt; Tuğba Hirfanoğlu; Kürşad Aydın; Ayşe Serdaroğlu

    2015-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a devastating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) caused by persistent mutant measles virus infection. The diagnosis of SSPE is based on characteristic clinical and EEG findings and demonstration of elevated antibody titres against measles in cerebrospinal fluid. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis can have atypical clinical features at the onset. Herein, we report an unusual case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in a child with recu...

  2. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presenting as mania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a rare, invariably fatal degenerative disease of the central nervous system developing after measles infection. Besides neurological symptoms as initial presenting symptoms, rare reports of its presentation with pure psychiatric symptoms have been reported. We here report a case of 14 year old male who initially presented with manic symptoms and then subsequently diagnosed to be suffering from SSPE. Improtance of ruling our organic conditions is emphasized.

  3. Late Onset Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis: Presenting Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Altunkaynak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis (SSPE is the late complication of measles and is characterized by seizures, myoclonus, ataxia, behavioral and personality changes, extrapyramidal dysfunctions and vision problems. A 19 year old female patient with SSPE who was followed up at psychiatry clinic with the diagnosis of atypical psychotic disorder was presented. While psychiatric signs and symptoms were dominant, she was diagnosed as SSPE.

  4. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: serial electroencephalographic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, C H

    1982-01-01

    A total of 42 EEGs from five patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis were studied. Periodic complexes were noticed in 35 (83%) of these. The interval between the complexes shortened in all patients with progression of the illness. The gradual EEG changes may reflect the increasing number of infected cells as well as an on-going accumulation of immature virus structures. The records without complexes were either from the early onset (one record) or terminal stage (six records). PMID:7086454

  5. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presenting as mania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ashish; Khandelwal, Ashish; Jain, Manish; Jiloha, R. C.

    2011-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a rare, invariably fatal degenerative disease of the central nervous system developing after measles infection. Besides neurological symptoms as initial presenting symptoms, rare reports of its presentation with pure psychiatric symptoms have been reported. We here report a case of 14 year old male who initially presented with manic symptoms and then subsequently diagnosed to be suffering from SSPE. Improtance of ruling our organic conditions is emphasized. PMID:21808475

  6. Multiple Complications Due to Subacute Suppurative Otitis Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xhevair Hoxhallari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Subacute otitis media is a well-known pathology of ENT practice which is easily diagnosed and subsequently treated in the outpatient clinic. The rate of complications in acute otitis media is lower than in chronic otitis media. We present here the history of a young patient with subacute otitis media who developed both localized labyrinthitis and facial palsy requiring surgical treatment. We conclude that the treatment of subacute otitis media should be carefully monitored because complications may occur. Surgical treatment and pressure release can be efficient for the treatment of a peripheral facial palsy in the course of acute or subacute otitis media.

  7. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in a child with recurrent febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Ayşe; Çıtak Kurt, Ayşegül Neşe; Hirfanoğlu, Tuğba; Aydın, Kürşad; Serdaroğlu, Ayşe

    2015-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a devastating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) caused by persistent mutant measles virus infection. The diagnosis of SSPE is based on characteristic clinical and EEG findings and demonstration of elevated antibody titres against measles in cerebrospinal fluid. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis can have atypical clinical features at the onset. Herein, we report an unusual case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in a child with recurrent febrile seizures. The disease progressed with an appearance of myoclonic jerks, periodic high amplitude generalized complexes on EEG, and elevated titers of measles antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid leading to the final diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

  8. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Child with Recurrent Febrile Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Kartal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a devastating disease of the central nervous system (CNS caused by persistent mutant measles virus infection. The diagnosis of SSPE is based on characteristic clinical and EEG findings and demonstration of elevated antibody titres against measles in cerebrospinal fluid. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis can have atypical clinical features at the onset. Herein, we report an unusual case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in a child with recurrent febrile seizures. The disease progressed with an appearance of myoclonic jerks, periodic high amplitude generalized complexes on EEG, and elevated titers of measles antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid leading to the final diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

  9. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid cytokine concentrations in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Omer Faruk; Ichiyama, Takashi; Anlar, Banu

    2010-06-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a neurodegenerative disease due to persistent measles virus infection. Its immunopathogenesis is unknown. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-4 concentrations were measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples from 30 SSPE patients and 19 control subjects by cytometric bead array. CSF and serum IFN-gamma, IL-12 and IL-18 levels were measured in 18 SSPE patients by ELISA. Serum IL-4 and IL-10 (p<0.001), CSF IL-4 (p<0.001) and IL-6 (p=0.049) concentrations were lower, and serum IL-2 concentrations, higher (p=0.001) in SSPE patients. Serum TNF-alpha and IL-6, CSF TNF-alpha, IL-10, and IL-2 concentrations were not different between SSPE and control groups. Serum IFN-gamma levels were higher in stage I and II than stage III patients (p<0.05), whereas there was no difference between stages in terms of other cytokines. The levels of Th2-type cytokines: IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 were suppressed in our SSPE cases. This finding, along with relatively elevated IFN-gamma and IL-2 levels, may suggest more active effector T cells compared to regulatory T cells (Treg), especially induced Treg, in early disease. High serum IL-2 concentrations might indicate peripheral Th1 activation. Discrepancies between various reports in the literature should be examined in view of the ages, stage and treatments of the patients studied. The interplay of various cytokines or cellular systems which may vary over time and between patients. Studies of treatment measures favoring the preservation of the early inflammatory response may be of interest in SSPE. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetically modified pig models for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Ida E; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease has become one of the most challenging health issues in ageing humans. One approach to combat this is to generate genetically modified animal models of neurodegenerative disorders for studying pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Owing to the genetic, anatomic, physiologic, pathologic, and neurologic similarities between pigs and humans, genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders have been attractive large animal models to bridge the gap of preclinical investigations between rodents and humans. In this review, we provide a neuroanatomical overview in pigs and summarize and discuss the generation of genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's diseases, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and ataxia-telangiectasia. We also highlight how non-invasive bioimaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET), computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and behavioural testing have been applied to characterize neurodegenerative pig models. We further propose a multiplex genome editing and preterm recloning (MAP) approach by using the rapid growth of the ground-breaking precision genome editing technology CRISPR/Cas9 and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). With this approach, we hope to shorten the temporal requirement in generating multiple transgenic pigs, increase the survival rate of founder pigs, and generate genetically modified pigs that will more closely resemble the disease-causing mutations and recapitulate pathological features of human conditions. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The impact of obesity on neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazon, Janaína Niero; de Mello, Aline Haas; Ferreira, Gabriela Kozuchovski; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza

    2017-08-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a growing health concern. The increasing incidences of these disorders have a great impact on the patients' quality of life. Although the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases are still far from being clarified, several studies look for new discoveries about their pathophysiology and prevention. Furthermore, evidence has shown a strong correlation between obesity and the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Metabolic changes caused by overweight are related to damage to the central nervous system (CNS), which can lead to neural death, either by apoptosis or cell necrosis, as well as alter the synaptic plasticity of the neuron. This review aims to show the association between neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on AD and PD, and metabolic alterations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. REM behaviour disorder and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanigni, Stefano; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Grimaldi, Daniela; Cortelli, Pietro

    2011-12-01

    Rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) is an REM sleep parasomnia characterized by enactment of dream content during REM sleep associated with loss of muscle atonia. RBD can be either idiopathic or secondary to drugs or other diseases. The best recognized association is with neurodegenerative diseases, namely alpha-synucleinopathies. RBD may represent the first feature of neurodegeneration and can be considered an early marker of these disorders. This review describes the main clinical, pathogenetic, and therapeutic features of RBD, pointing to its association with neurodegenerative diseases and emphasizing the clinical and prognostic implications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Rat Brain Biogenic Amine Levels during Acute and Subacute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rat Brain Biogenic Amine Levels during Acute and Subacute Phosphamidon Treatment with Reference to Behavioral Tolerance. ... African Research Review ... The present study examines if the levels of amine neurotransmitter substances in rat brain regions are altered during acute and sub-acute treatment with an ...

  14. Multifaceted effects of aluminium in neurodegenerative diseases: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, S; Prakash, T; Madhu, Krishna Das; Goli, Divakar

    2016-10-01

    Aluminium (Al) is the most common metal and widely distributed in our environment. Al was first isolated as an element in 1827, and its use began only after 1886. Al is widely used for industrial applications and consumer products. Apart from these it is also used in cooking utensils and in pharmacological agents, including antacids and antiperspirants from which the element usually enters into the human body. Evidence for the neurotoxicity of Al is described in various studies, but still the exact mechanism of Al toxicity is not known. However, the evidence suggests that the Al can potentiate oxidative stress and inflammatory events and finally leads to cell death. Al is considered as a well-established neurotoxin and have a link between the exposure and development of neurodegenerative diseases, including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia, Gulf war syndrome and Parkinsonism. Here, we review the detailed possible pathogenesis of Al neurotoxicity. This review summarizes Al induced events likewise oxidative stress, cell mediated toxicity, apoptosis, inflammatory events in the brain, glutamate toxicity, effects on calcium homeostasis, gene expression and Al induced Neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation. Apart from these we also discussed animal models that are commonly used for Al induced neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration studies. These models help to find out a better way to treat and prevent the progression in Al induced neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Dysregulation of Glutathione Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M. Johnson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis and alterations in glutathione-dependent enzyme activities are increasingly implicated in the induction and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Friedreich’s ataxia. In this review background is provided on the steady-state synthesis, regulation, and transport of glutathione, with primary focus on the brain. A brief overview is presented on the distinct but vital roles of glutathione in cellular maintenance and survival, and on the functions of key glutathione-dependent enzymes. Major contributors to initiation and progression of neurodegenerative diseases are considered, including oxidative stress, protein misfolding, and protein aggregation. In each case examples of key regulatory mechanisms are identified that are sensitive to changes in glutathione redox status and/or in the activities of glutathione-dependent enzymes. Mechanisms of dysregulation of glutathione and/or glutathione-dependent enzymes are discussed that are implicated in pathogenesis of each neurodegenerative disease. Limitations in information or interpretation are identified, and possible avenues for further research are described with an aim to elucidating novel targets for therapeutic interventions. The pros and cons of administration of N-acetylcysteine or glutathione as therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases, as well as the potential utility of serum glutathione as a biomarker, are critically evaluated.

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Ergurhan Kiroglu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are almost incurable, debilitating, and they might be fatal, because of limited neurogenesis in nervous system, presence of inhibitory substances and inhibition of recovery due to development of glial scar. Despite many treatment strategies of neurodegenerative diseases no full cure has been achieved. The successful results for mesenchymal stem cells applications on muscles, heart and liver diseases and the application of these cells to the damaged area in particular, hypoxia, inflammation and apoptosis promise hope of using them for neurodegenerative diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells applications constitute a vascular and neuronal phenotype in Parkinsons disease, Huntingtons disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimers disease. Stem cells release bioactive agents that lead to suppression of local immune system, reduction of free radicals, increase in angiogenesis, inhibition of fibrosis, and apoptosis. In addition, tissue stem cells, increase neuronal healing, stimulate proliferation and differentiation. These findings show that stem cells might be a hope of a cure in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and intensive work on this issue should continue.

  17. Dysregulation of Glutathione Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William M.; Wilson-Delfosse, Amy L.; Mieyal, John. J.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis and alterations in glutathione-dependent enzyme activities are increasingly implicated in the induction and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Friedreich’s ataxia. In this review background is provided on the steady-state synthesis, regulation, and transport of glutathione, with primary focus on the brain. A brief overview is presented on the distinct but vital roles of glutathione in cellular maintenance and survival, and on the functions of key glutathione-dependent enzymes. Major contributors to initiation and progression of neurodegenerative diseases are considered, including oxidative stress, protein misfolding, and protein aggregation. In each case examples of key regulatory mechanisms are identified that are sensitive to changes in glutathione redox status and/or in the activities of glutathione-dependent enzymes. Mechanisms of dysregulation of glutathione and/or glutathione-dependent enzymes are discussed that are implicated in pathogenesis of each neurodegenerative disease. Limitations in information or interpretation are identified, and possible avenues for further research are described with an aim to elucidating novel targets for therapeutic interventions. The pros and cons of administration of N-acetylcysteine or glutathione as therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases, as well as the potential utility of serum glutathione as a biomarker, are critically evaluated. PMID:23201762

  18. Subacute toxicity assessment of annatto in rat

    OpenAIRE

    Bautista, Ana Rita Pedreira Lapa; E.L.T. Moreira; Batista, Márcio Santos; Miranda, M.S.; Gomes, I. C. S.

    2004-01-01

    Texto completo:acesso restrito. p. 625-629 Increased human use of annatto (Bixa orellana L), a red yellow food colorant, demands generation of toxicity data. The toxic effects of annatto powder (bixin 27%) have been assessed following administration of a subacute regimen (4 weeks, 20 doses) in Wistar male and female rats. A full study with three dose levels was considered unnecessary since no sign of toxicity had been noted in a preliminary experiment with 1000 mg/kg body weight/day as ...

  19. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praticò, A D; Saporito, M; Iacono, O; Castellano-Chiodo, D; Pavone, P

    2011-02-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive neurological disorder of childhood and early adolescence caused by persistent defective measles virus. Clinical manifestations appear many years after the acute measles infection. The incidence of SSPE has substantially declined after the introduction of an effective vaccine. We report a case of a child with SSPE that began with atonia, dysarthria, and intellectual deterioration without the presence of any particular EEG anomalies. We have reported this girl who was affected by this severe affliction in the hope that, because of the rarity of SSPE, it would not go undiagnosed.

  20. Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Triggered by Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kolm

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The origin of collagen autoimmune diseases is not fully understood. Some studies postulate a mechanism of molecular mimicry or heterologous immunity following viral infections triggering autoimmunity. Apart from infections, other exogenous factors such as visible light or X-rays have been reported to incite autoimmunity. Case Report: We report a case of histologically and serologically confirmed subacute lupus erythematosus (SCLE following radiotherapy for breast cancer. Discussion: The close temporal and spatial correlation between radiotherapy and onset of SCLE in this patient suggests that an autoimmune reaction may have been triggered locally by functionally altering the immune system and breaking self-tolerance.

  1. Cereals Bond Trounces Subacute Rumen Acidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Akbar Nikkhah

    2015-01-01

    This perspective article provides a feasible ideology based on which modern ruminant enterprises will learn to vigilantly include mixtures of hard and soft cereal grains in optimizing rumen environment. Subacute Rumen Acidosis (SARA), variably defined as a common and economically important metabolic disease, occurs arguably when rumen pH declines below 5.8-6 for a long-lasting period of time of several hours. Prolonged SARA reduces high-producing dairy and bee...

  2. Genetic manipulation for inherited neurodegenerative diseases: myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Rare genetic diseases affect about 7% of the general population and over 7000 distinct clinical syndromes have been described with the majority being due to single gene defects. This review will provide a critical overview of genetic strategies that are being pioneered to halt or reverse disease progression in inherited neurodegenerative diseases. This field of research covers a vast area and only the most promising treatment paradigms will be discussed with a particular focus on inherited eye diseases, which have paved the way for innovative gene therapy paradigms, and mitochondrial diseases, which are currently generating a lot of debate centred on the bioethics of germline manipulation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Few patients with neurodegenerative disorders require spinal surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E.; Gottesman, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few patients with neurodegenerative disorders (ND) (e.g., Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), and Postpolio Syndrome (PPS)) require spinal surgery. Typically, their neurological symptoms and signs reflect their underlying neurologic disorders rather than structural spinal pathology reported on magnetic resonance images (MR) or computed tomographic scans (CT). Methods: The first author, a neurosurgeon, reviewed 437 spinal consultations performed over a 20-month period. Of 254 patients seen in first opinion (e.g., had not been seen by a spinal surgeon), 9 had MS, while 2 had ALS. Of 183 patients seen in second opinion (e.g., prior spinal surgeons recommended surgery), 4 had MS, 2 had ALS, and 1 had PPS. We performed this study to establish how often patients with ND, seen in first or second opinion, require spinal surgery. We focused on whether second opinions from spinal surgeons would limit the number of operations offered to these patients. Results: Two of 11 patients with ND seen in first opinion required surgery. The first patient required a C5-7 laminectomy/C2-T2 fusion, followed by a L2-S1 laminectomy/L5S1 fusion. The second patient required a L2-L3 laminectomy/diskectomy/fusion. However, none of the seven patients seen in second opinion, who were previously told by outside surgeons they needed spinal surgery, required operations. Conclusions: Few patients with neurodegenerative syndromes (MS, ALS, PPS) and reported “significant” spondyloitic spinal disease interpreted on MR/CT studies required surgery. Great caution should be exercised in offering patients with ND spinal surgery, and second opinions should be encouraged to limit “unnecessary” procedures. PMID:24843817

  4. Clinical profile of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Muhammad; Naz, Farrah; Malik, Akbar; Hamid, Haroon

    2008-08-01

    To describe the clinical manifestations of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in children. Case series. This study was conducted in the Department of Neurology at The Children's Hospital and the Institute of Child Health, Lahore, from April 2005 to April 2007. Fifty patients were diagnosed as subacute sclerosing panencephalitis during the study period. Their diagnosis was based on a detailed history, clinical examination, presence of antimeasles antibodies in Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) and typical electroencephalogram (EEG). The findings were described as average, mean and percentages. Fifty patients were included in this study. The average age of the patients was 8 years. Thirty-eight (76%) were males and 12 (24%) were females. The average duration of symptoms before presentation was 66.72 days. History of measles infection was present in 31 patients (62%) and measles vaccination in 43 patients (86%). Motor regression was present in all (100%) patients and cognition decline in 43 patients (86%). Seizures were focal (10%), generalized tonicclonic (16%) and myoclonic (74%). Burst-suppression pattern Electroencephalogram (EEG) and the antimeasles antibody in CSF were positive in 100% of patients. SSPE is an indicator of high incidence of measles infection among the paediatric population even among vaccinated children. Males are more common sufferers. SSPE can present with different types of seizures, cognition decline and motor regression being supported by suggestive EEG and presence of anti-measles antibodies in CSF.

  5. Outcome determinants of subacute low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Kaija; Malmivaara, Antti; Mutanen, Pertti; Pohjolainen, Timo; Roine, Risto; Hurri, Heikki

    2003-12-01

    Descriptive prognostic study. To identify outcome determinants of subacute low back pain. The factors predicting recovery from prolonged back pain among working adults are largely unknown. One hundred sixty-four employed patients with subacute (duration of pain 4-12 weeks) daily low back pain were recruited from primary health care to a randomized study. Data on potential predictive factors were collected before randomization. In multiple regressions using repeated measures analysis, the treatment received was adjusted when determining the impact of the predictive factors. Dependent outcome variables used were pain, perceived functional disability, generic health-related quality of life, satisfaction with care, days on sick leave, use of health care, and costs of health care consumption measured, at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. Age and intensity of pain at baseline predicted most of the outcomes. The perceived risk of not recovering was a stronger determinant of outcome than gender, education, or self-rated health status (which did not have any predictive value) or body mass index, expectations of treatment effect, satisfaction with work, or the presence of radicular symptoms below the knee (only slight predictive value). The only factors predicting the duration of sick leave were the duration of sick leave at baseline and the type of occupation. Age and intensity of pain are the strongest predictors of outcome. Accumulation of days on sick leave is predicted by the duration of sick leave at entry and the type of work, but not by pain, perceived disability, or satisfaction with work.

  6. Antidepressants and REM sleep behavior disorder: isolated side effect or neurodegenerative signal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postuma, Ronald B; Gagnon, Jean-Francois; Tuineaig, Maria; Bertrand, Josie-Anne; Latreille, Veronique; Desjardins, Catherine; Montplaisir, Jacques Y

    2013-11-01

    Antidepressants, among the most commonly prescribed medications, trigger symptoms of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) in up to 6% of users. Idiopathic RBD is a very strong prodromal marker of Parkinson disease and other synuclein-mediated neurodegenerative syndromes. It is therefore critically important to understand whether antidepressant-associated RBD is an independent pharmacologic syndrome or a sign of possible prodromal neurodegeneration. Prospective cohort study. Tertiary sleep disorders center. 100 patients with idiopathic RBD, all with diagnosis confirmed on polysomnography, stratified to baseline antidepressant use, with 45 matched controls. Of 100 patients, 27 were taking antidepressants. Compared to matched controls, RBD patients taking antidepressants demonstrated significant abnormalities of 12/14 neurodegenerative markers tested, including olfaction (P = 0.007), color vision (P = 0.004), Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale II and III (P neurodegenerative disease than those without antidepressant use (5-year risk = 22% vs. 59%, RR = 0.22, 95%CI = 0.06, 0.74). Although patients with antidepressant-associated RBD have a lower risk of neurodegeneration than patients with "purely-idiopathic" RBD, markers of prodromal neurodegeneration are still clearly present. Development of RBD with antidepressants can be an early signal of an underlying neurodegenerative disease.

  7. Antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics for inherited neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwell, Amber L; Skotte, Niels H; Bennett, C Frank; Hayden, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    The rising median age of our population and the age-dependent risk of neurodegeneration translate to exponentially increasing numbers of afflicted individuals in the coming years. Although symptomatic treatments are available for some neurodegenerative diseases, most are only moderately efficacious and are often associated with significant side effects. The development of small molecule, disease-modifying drugs has been hindered by complex pathogenesis and a failure to clearly define the rate-limiting steps in disease progression. An alternative approach is to directly target the mutant gene product or a defined causative protein. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) - with their diverse functionality, high target specificity, and relative ease of central nervous system (CNS) delivery - are uniquely positioned as potential therapies for neurological diseases. Here we review the development of ASOs for the treatment of inherited neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Transmission of Neurodegenerative Disorders Through Blood Transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    : Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios for dementia of any type, Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease in patients receiving blood transfusions from donors who were later diagnosed with any of these diseases versus patients who received blood from healthy donors. Whether...... excess occurrence of neurodegenerative disease occurred among recipients of blood from a subset of donors was also investigated. As a positive control, transmission of chronic hepatitis before and after implementation of hepatitis C virus screening was assessed. RESULTS: Among included patients, 2.......9% received a transfusion from a donor diagnosed with one of the studied neurodegenerative diseases. No evidence of transmission of any of these diseases was found, regardless of approach. The hazard ratio for dementia in recipients of blood from donors with dementia versus recipients of blood from healthy...

  9. Engineering enhanced protein disaggregases for neurodegenerative disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jackrel, Meredith E.; Shorter, James

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Protein misfolding and aggregation underpin several fatal neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). There are no treatments that directly antagonize the protein-misfolding events that cause these disorders. Agents that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native form and function could simultaneously eliminate any deleterious loss-of-function or toxic gain-of-function caused by...

  10. Synthetic prions and other human neurodegenerative proteinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nhat Tran Thanh; Narkiewicz, Joanna; Aulić, Suzana; Salzano, Giulia; Tran, Hoa Thanh; Scaini, Denis; Moda, Fabio; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-09-02

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. The common feature of these diseases is the pathological conversion of the normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into a β-structure-rich conformer-termed PrP(Sc). The latter can induce a self-perpetuating process leading to amplification and spreading of pathological protein assemblies. Much evidence suggests that PrP(Sc) itself is able to recruit and misfold PrP(C) into the pathological conformation. Recent data have shown that recombinant PrP(C) can be misfolded in vitro and the resulting synthetic conformers are able to induce the conversion of PrP(C) into PrP(Sc)in vivo. In this review we describe the state-of-the-art of the body of literature in this field. In addition, we describe a cell-based assay to test synthetic prions in cells, providing further evidence that synthetic amyloids are able to template conversion of PrP into prion inclusions. Studying prions might help to understand the pathological mechanisms governing other neurodegenerative diseases. Aggregation and deposition of misfolded proteins is a common feature of several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other disorders. Although the proteins implicated in each of these diseases differ, they share a common prion mechanism. Recombinant proteins are able to aggregate in vitro into β-rich amyloid fibrils, sharing some features of the aggregates found in the brain. Several studies have reported that intracerebral inoculation of synthetic aggregates lead to unique pathology, which spread progressively to distal brain regions and reduced survival time in animals. Here, we review the prion-like features of different proteins involved in neurodegenerative disorders, such as α-synuclein, superoxide dismutase-1, amyloid-β and tau. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic neurodegenerative consequences of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Neelima B

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious public health concern and a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Each year, an estimated 1.7 million Americans sustain TBI of which ~52,000 people die, ~275,000 people are hospitalized and 1,365,000 people are treated as emergency outpatients. Currently there are ~5.3 million Americans living with TBI. TBI is more of a disease process than of an event that is associated with immediate and long-term sensomotor, psychological and cognitive impairments. TBI is the best known established epigenetic risk factor for later development of neurodegenerative diseases and dementia. People sustaining TBI are ~4 times more likely to develop dementia at a later stage than people without TBI. Single brain injury is linked to later development of symptoms resembling Alzheimer's disease while repetitive brain injuries are linked to later development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and/or Dementia Pugilistica (DP). Furthermore, genetic background of ß-amyloid precursor protein (APP), Apolipoprotein E (ApoE), presenilin (PS) and neprilysin (NEP) genes is associated with exacerbation of neurodegenerative process after TBI. This review encompasses acute effects and chronic neurodegenerative consequences after TBI.

  12. Exosomes in the Pathology of Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howitt, Jason; Hill, Andrew F

    2016-12-23

    More than 30 years ago, two unexpected findings were discovered that challenged conventional thinking in biology. The first was the identification of a misfolded protein with transmissible properties associated with a group of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The second was the discovery of a new pathway used for the extracellular release of biomolecules, including extracellular vesicles called exosomes. Two decades later, the convergence of these pathways was shown when exosomes were found to play a significant role in both the transmission and propagation of protein aggregates in disease. Recent research has now revealed that the majority of proteins involved in neurodegenerative diseases are transported in exosomes, and that external stresses due to age-related impairment of protein quality control mechanisms can promote the transcellular flux of these proteins in exosomes. Significantly, exosomes provide an environment that can induce the conformational conversion of native proteins into aggregates that can be transmitted to otherwise aggregate-free cells in the brain. Here we review the current roles of exosomes in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Metals and neurodegenerative diseases. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Calogero Edoardo; Mostile, Giovanni; Vasta, Rosario; Rapisarda, Venerando; Signorelli, Salvatore Santo; Ferrante, Margherita; Zappia, Mario; Nicoletti, Alessandra

    2017-11-01

    Neurodegenerative processes encompass a large variety of diseases with different pathological patterns and clinical presentation such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer Disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Genetic mutations have a known causative role, but the majority of cases are likely to be probably caused by a complex gene-environment interaction. Exposure to metals has been hypothesized to increase oxidative stress in brain cells leading to cell death and neurodegeneration. Neurotoxicity of metals has been demonstrated by several in vitro and in vivo experimental studies and it is likely that each metal could be toxic through specific pathways. The possible pathogenic role of different metals has been supported by some epidemiological evidences coming from occupational and ecological studies. In order to assess the possible association between metals and neurodegenerative disorders, several case-control studies have also been carried out evaluating the metals concentration in different biological specimens such as blood/serum/plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), nail and hair, often reporting conflicting results. This review provides an overview of our current knowledge on the possible association between metals and ALS, AD and PD as main neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Early noninvasive diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danev, Stoyan I; St Stoyanov, Drozdstoy

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the contemporary trends in the pathobiochemistry of neurodegenerative disorders with respect to their early predictive diagnosis and possible treatment interventions. If we consider the current epidemiological data related to neurodegenerative disorders, medicine is going to face in the near future latent pandemic situations. The introduction puts an emphasis on the emerging importance of one major cluster of neurodegenerative disorders: diseases of the abnormal protein beta-conformation. The cluster includes such significant diseases as Alzheimer, Pick, Huntington, Parkinson disease, as well as the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (Creuzfeldt-Jakob disease). The pathogenetic mechanisms in the determination of this group of disorders are explored with an emphasis on the impairment of post-synthetic chaperone correction. The central role of a number of such protein products is discussed. In particular the pathobiochemical mechanisms concerning the formation of beta-amyloid, alpha and beta synucleins, scrapie isoform of the prion protein are presented. A new diagnostic principle allowing the early and specific diagnosis of the conformation diseases protein via amplification techniques is presented. These methods compete in sensitivity with the PCR methods and shows promises for effective treatment. In conclusion, beta-pathies are considered a suitable example for the modern concept of cluster and prototype diagnosis in medicine and especially in clinical neurosciences.

  15. Sleep disturbance in mental health problems and neurodegenerative disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, Kirstie N; Bradley, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    ... and neurodegenerative disorders. The role of primary sleep disorders such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, and REM sleep behavior disorder as potential causes or risk factors for particular mental health or neurodegenerative...

  16. Pain in Neurodegenerative Disease : Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Defrin, Ruth; Kunz, Miriam; Pickering, Gisele; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are going to increase as the life expectancy is getting longer. The management of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias, Parkinson's disease (PD) and PD related disorders, motor neuron diseases (MND), Huntington's disease (HD),

  17. Intensive training of phonological skills in progressive aphasia: a model of brain plasticity in neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, M; Espesser, R; Rey, V; Daffaure, V; Di Cristo, A; Habib, M

    2001-01-01

    Three patients with a typical syndrome of nonfluent primary progressive aphasia (Mesulam's syndrome) were trained daily with a remediation protocol including auditory exercises specifically designed to involve several aspects of phonological processing, a domain known to be specifically affected in the condition. The speech content of the exercises was based on the temporal theory of phonological processes according to which increasing the duration of formant transition should facilitate phoneme discrimination and phoneomic awareness. Significantly improved performance on the trained tasks was demonstrated in the three patients. Improvement further generalized to other tasks such as nonword repetition and reading. We conclude that such results (1) argue for using intensive focused therapy of language impairment in neurodegenerative disorders, (2) may constitute a good model of brain plasticity in neurodegenerative disorders in general, and (3) support theories of phonological processing emphasizing temporal features of the auditory signal.

  18. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presenting as neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Tushar Premraj; Singh, Maneesh Kumar; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Naphade, Pravin Umakant

    2012-12-14

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a slowly progressing inflammatory and degenerative disorder of the brain caused by a mutant measles virus. The diagnosis of SSPE is based on characteristic clinical and EEG findings (periodic complexes) and demonstration of elevated antibody titres against measles in cerebrospinal fluid. SSPE can have atypical clinical features at the onset. The authors here report a case of a 3-year-old child who presented with vision loss followed 15 months later by quadriparesis with bladder involvement. These clinical features resembled that of neuromyelitis optica. However, as the disease progressed, appearance of myoclonic jerks, periodic discharges on EEG and positive cerebrospinal fluid serology for measles led to the final diagnosis of SSPE.

  19. Basal ganglia lesions in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelson James Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The parieto-occipital region of the brain is the most frequently and severely affected in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE. The basal ganglia, cerebellum and corpus callosum are less commonly involved. We describe a patient with SSPE confirmed by neuropathology based on brain magnetic resonance imaging showing extensive basal ganglia involvement and no significant involvement of other cortical structures. Though rarely described in SSPE, clinicians should be aware of this involvement. SSPE should be kept in mind when changes in basal ganglia signal are seen on brain magnetic resonance imaging with or without involvement of other regions of the human brain to avoid erroneous etiological diagnosis of other pathologies causing rapidly progressive dementia.

  20. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Presenting with Hemidystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hepsen Mine Serin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE in an 11-year-old boy who presented with hemidystonia. Electroencephalogram (EEG revealed periodic epileptiform discharges which did not disappear with diazepam induction. His cranial magnetic resonance imaging was normal. SSPE diagnosis was considered and it was confirmed with the identification of measles antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid. SSPE is a progressive disease. Hemidystonia is not an expected presentation of SSPE. We aimed to emphasize that SSPE may present with different clinical findings such as hemidystonia. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 137-9

  1. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and chronic viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlar, Banu

    2013-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a chronic infection of the central nervous system associated with the presence of mutant measles virus in the brain. It presents as a progressive, usually fatal disease. The diagnosis is based on clinical criteria and an elevated titer of measles antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Electroencephalography and imaging studies provide supportive laboratory data. A brain biopsy is indicated only when CSF serology is negative or equivocal in a suspected case to assess the presence of inclusion bodies, measles virus antigens, or viral RNA. Among many drugs and methods tried in the treatment, the highest rate of stabilization or improvement was obtained with intraventricular human lymphoblastoid interferon-α and oral inosiplex. Further research for more available and efficient therapeutic regimens is warranted. Measles and SSPE are preventable by maintenance of high rates of immunization in the population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus presenting as poikiloderma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, R

    2012-02-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is a recognised variant of lupus erythematosus (LE), which accounts for 10-15% of all cases of cutaneous LE, occurring most commonly in young to middle-aged white women. Diagnosis is based on the detection of anti-Ro\\/SS-A antibodies in the skin and serum, characteristic clinical and histological cutaneous involvement, and relatively mild systemic involvement. Several unusual variants of SCLE have been reported including erythrodermic SCLE, SCLE with vitiligo-like lesions, acral SCLE and bullous SCLE. Poikoilodermatous SCLE is a recognised but rare variant of SCLE. There are currently only two case reports, comprising five individual cases, in the literature. We present a case of SCLE in which the main clinical findings were an extensive photodistributed poikilodermatous rash and alopecia.

  3. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in neurodegenerative disorders: a selective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayudhan, Latha; Van Diepen, Erik; Marudkar, Mangesh; Hands, Oliver; Suribhatla, Srinivas; Prettyman, Richard; Murray, Jonathan; Baillon, Sarah; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is now recognised as an important modulator of various central nervous system processes. More recently, an increasing body of evidence has accumulated to suggest antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective roles of ECS. In this review we discuss the role and therapeutic potential of ECS in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, brain ischemia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Elements of the ECS, such as fatty acid amide hydrolase or the cannabinoid receptors are now considered as promising pharmacological targets for some diseases. Although still preliminary, recent reports suggest that modulation of the ECS may constitute a novel approach for the treatment of AD. There are windows of opportunity in conditions caused by acute events such as trauma and ischemia as well in conditions that may involve altered functionality of the target receptors of the ECS, such as in AD. The ECS changes in Parkinson's disease could be compensatory as well as pathogenic of the illness process and needs further understanding and clinical studies are still in the preliminary stage. There is not enough evidence to support use of cannabinoids in treating Huntington's disease, tics and obsessive compulsive behaviour in Tourette's syndrome. Evidence on therapeutic use of cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis and ALS is currently limited. A major challenge for future research is the development of novel compounds with more selectivity for various components of the ECS which could target different neurotoxic pathways and be used in combination therapy.

  4. Subacute Thyroiditis Developed in Identical Twins Two Years Apart

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    HAMAGUCHI, Erika; NISHIMURA, Yasuyuki; KANEKO, Shuichi; TAKAMURA, Toshinari

    2005-01-01

    .... Subacute thyroiditis was diagnosed and prednisone was administered. Two years later, her identical twin sister, who lives separately, was referred to our hospital because of neck pain, low-grade fever, and palpitation...

  5. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis of the Brainstem as a Clinical Entity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pavan S. Upadhyayula; Jason Yang; John K. Yue; Joseph D. Ciacci

    2017-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a rare progressive neurological disorder of early adolescence caused by persistent infection of the measles virus, which remains prevalent worldwide despite an effective vaccine...

  6. Angiosarcoma of the Heart Presenting as Subacute Pericarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Alexandra L; Wilklow, Frank E; Olivier, John J; Joseph, Georges J; Glancy, David Luke

    2017-03-15

    A young woman, who presented with what appeared to be subacute pericarditis, was found to have primary angiosarcoma of the heart, a condition that is nearly always fatal regardless of the therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A case of fulminant subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presenting with acute myoclonic-astatic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magurano, Fabio; Marella, Gian Luca; Marchi, Antonella; Filia, Antonietta; Marsella, Luigi Tonino; Potenza, Saverio; Massa, Roberto; Bucci, Paola; Baggieri, Melissa; Nicoletti, Loredana

    2017-01-01

    The neurologic sequelae post-measles are less common than other complications measles-related and can lead to severe disability or death: primary measles encephalitis (PME), acute post-infectious measles encephalomyelitis (APME), measles inclusion body encephalitis (MIBE), and subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE). SSPE syndrome can affect people years from the acute measles virus infection, as result of the persistence of defective viral particles in brain cells. Clinical onset typically manifests with progressive intellectual deterioration, behavioral changes, and myoclonic jerks. The course of SSPE in the majority of affected children is that of a progressive worsening with fatal outcome within two years. This report described an Italian case of fulminant SSPE syndrome that led to death within few months from the initial onset.

  8. Metabolism of fat in subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio M. Canelas

    1966-03-01

    Full Text Available In 10 cases of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord the absorption, clearance and utilization of labeled fat was studied. In 4 cases disorders of the lipid metabolism were found. Although not significantly, the peripheral and dorsal funiculi syndromes were more severe in the 4 cases with impaired fat metabolism than in the normal cases, while the pyramidal syndrome was almost the same in the two groups. The whole neurological picture was also more severe in the 4 cases with disorders of fat metabolism. These results seem to indicate that the impairment of lipid metabolism evidenced in such cases bears no direct relationship with the demyelinating process in general, and would rather attend a deficiency of metabolites (probably B-complex vitamins other than vitamin B12, which play a more significant role in the preservation of the peripheral nerves.

  9. Subacute cannabinoid treatment: anticonvulsant activity and withdrawal excitability in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Karler, R.; Turkanis, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    1 The effects of subacute treatment with cannabidiol, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC), phenytoin and phenobarbitone on anticonvulsant activity and on withdrawal excitability in mice were compared in three electrically induced seizure-threshold tests. 2 In the maximal electroshock-threshold test, subacute treatment did not alter the anticonvulsant activity of cannabidiol, phenytoin or phenobarbitone, but tolerance developed to delta 9-THC. 3 In the 60 Hz electroshock-threshold test,...

  10. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: brain stem involvement in a peculiar pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senol, U. [Akdeniz University, Antalya (Turkey). Faculty of Medicine; Haspolat, S. [Akdeniz University, Antalya (Turkey). Dept. of Child Neurology; Cevikol, C. [Akdeniz University, Antalya (Turkey). Dept. of Radiodiagnostics; Saatci, I. [Hacettepe University (Turkey). Medical Faculty

    2000-12-01

    The most common pattern in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, is in the cerebral hemisphere white matter on T2-weighted images with or without atrophy. Brain-stem lesions are rare. We report brain-stem involvement in two children with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. A peculiar pattern, with involvement of the pons with extension to both middle cerebellar peduncles and substantia nigra but sparing the pontine tegmentum, is suggested. (orig.)

  11. Serial diffusion-weighted imaging in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemura, Hideaki; Aihara, Masao

    2008-06-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis may be associated with clinical features of frontal lobe dysfunction. We previously reported that frontal lobe volume falls significantly as clinical stage progresses, using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging-based brain volumetry. The hypothesis that frontal volume increases correlate with clinical improvement, however, was not tested in our previous study. Therefore, we reevaluated our patient with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, to determine whether apparent diffusion coefficient maps can characterize the clinical course of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. We studied an 8-year-old boy with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, using serial diffusion-weighted imaging magnetic resonance imaging, and measured the regional apparent diffusion coefficient. The regional apparent diffusion coefficient of the frontal lobe decreased significantly with clinical progression, whereas it increased to within normal range during clinical improvements. The apparent diffusion coefficient of the other regions did not change. These results suggest that the clinical signs of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis are attributable to frontal lobe dysfunction, and that apparent diffusion coefficient measurements may be useful in predicting the clinical course of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

  12. Sleep-disordered breathing in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaig, Carles; Iranzo, Alex

    2012-04-01

    Sleep disorders are common in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), hereditary ataxias, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Type, frequency, and severity of sleep disturbances vary depending on each of these diseases. Cell loss of the brainstem nuclei that modulates respiration, and dysfunction of bulbar and diaphragmatic muscles increase the risk for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in MSA and ALS. The most relevant SDB in MSA is stridor, whereas in ALS nocturnal hypoventilation due to diaphragmatic weakness is the most common sleep breathing abnormality. Stridor and nocturnal hypoventilation are associated with reduced survival in MSA and ALS. In contrast, sleep apnea seems not to be more prevalent in PD than in the general population. In some PD patients, however, coincidental obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can be the cause of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). SDB can also occur in some hereditary ataxias, such as stridor in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (Machado-Joseph disease). The presence of concomitant OSA in patients with AD can have deleterious effects on nocturnal sleep, may result in EDS, and might aggravate the cognitive deficits inherent to the disease. However, whether OSA is more frequent in patients with AD than in the general population is uncertain. Recognition of SDB in neurodegenerative disease is important because they are associated with significant morbidity and potential effective treatments are available.

  13. Engineering enhanced protein disaggregases for neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackrel, Meredith E; Shorter, James

    2015-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation underpin several fatal neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). There are no treatments that directly antagonize the protein-misfolding events that cause these disorders. Agents that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native form and function could simultaneously eliminate any deleterious loss-of-function or toxic gain-of-function caused by misfolded conformers. Moreover, a disruptive technology of this nature would eliminate self-templating conformers that spread pathology and catalyze formation of toxic, soluble oligomers. Here, we highlight our efforts to engineer Hsp104, a protein disaggregase from yeast, to more effectively disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with PD, ALS, and FTD. Remarkably subtle modifications of Hsp104 primary sequence yielded large gains in protective activity against deleterious α-synuclein, TDP-43, FUS, and TAF15 misfolding. Unusually, in many cases loss of amino acid identity at select positions in Hsp104 rather than specific mutation conferred a robust therapeutic gain-of-function. Nevertheless, the misfolding and toxicity of EWSR1, an RNA-binding protein with a prion-like domain linked to ALS and FTD, could not be buffered by potentiated Hsp104 variants, indicating that further amelioration of disaggregase activity or sharpening of substrate specificity is warranted. We suggest that neuroprotection is achievable for diverse neurodegenerative conditions via surprisingly subtle structural modifications of existing chaperones.

  14. Polyphenols: Multipotent Therapeutic Agents in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Khushwant S.; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Aging leads to numerous transitions in brain physiology including synaptic dysfunction and disturbances in cognition and memory. With a few clinically relevant drugs, a substantial portion of aging population at risk for age-related neurodegenerative disorders require nutritional intervention. Dietary intake of polyphenols is known to attenuate oxidative stress and reduce the risk for related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). Polyphenols exhibit strong potential to address the etiology of neurological disorders as they attenuate their complex physiology by modulating several therapeutic targets at once. Firstly, we review the advances in the therapeutic role of polyphenols in cell and animal models of AD, PD, MS, and HD and activation of drug targets for controlling pathological manifestations. Secondly, we present principle pathways in which polyphenol intake translates into therapeutic outcomes. In particular, signaling pathways like PPAR, Nrf2, STAT, HIF, and MAPK along with modulation of immune response by polyphenols are discussed. Although current polyphenol researches have limited impact on clinical practice, they have strong evidence and testable hypothesis to contribute clinical advances and drug discovery towards age-related neurological disorders. PMID:23840922

  15. MRI features of neurodegenerative Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Duverneuil, N.; Guillevin, R.; Chiras, J. [GH Pitie-Salpetriere, 47 Bd de l' Hopital, Department of Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Idbaih, A.; Hoang-Xuan, K. [GH Pitie-Salpetriere, 47 Bd de l' Hopital, Department of Neurology, Paris (France); Donadieu, J. [GH Trousseau, Department of Hematology/Oncology Pediatrics, Paris (France); Genereau, T. [Groupe d' etude des Histiocytoses langerhansiennes, Nantes (France)

    2006-09-15

    CNS complications of LCH include ''space occupying'' lesions corresponding to histiocytic granulomas and ''neurodegenerative'' presentation (ND-LCH) characterized by a progressive cerebellar ataxia. Studies analyzing specifically the MRI presentation of ND-LCH are scarce. We present here the MRIs of 13 patients registered as isolated ND-LCH. Posterior fossa was involved in 12 patients (92%), showing a symmetrical T2 hyperintensity of the cerebellar white matter areas in seven cases with a circumscribed T1 hyperintensity of the dentate nuclei in five cases, definite hyperintense T2 areas in the adjacent pontine tegmentum white matter in nine cases associated with a hyperintensity of the pontine pyramidal tracts in four cases. A cerebellar atrophy was noted in eight cases. The supratentorial region was involved in 11 patients, showing T2 hyperintense lesions in the cerebral white matter in eight cases and a discrete symmetrical T1 hyperintense signal in the globus pallidus in eight patients. A diffuse cortical atrophy was present in three cases and a marked focal atrophy of the corpus callosum in three cases. This series allows us to establish a not previously reported evocative semeiologic MR presentation to precisely orientate to the diagnosis of the pure neurodegenerative form of LCH. (orig.)

  16. Biology of Mitochondria in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lee J.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal degeneration in these familial diseases, and in the more common idiopathic (sporadic) diseases, are unresolved. Genetic, biochemical, and morphological analyses of human AD, PD, and ALS, as well as their cell and animal models, reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The varied functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and the overlying genetic variations. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial programmed cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This chapter reviews several aspects of mitochondrial biology and how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in AD, PD, and ALS. PMID:22482456

  17. Personality and social cognition in neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shany-Ur, Tal; Rankin, Katherine P

    2011-12-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases often cause focal damage to brain structures mediating social cognition and personality, resulting in altered interpersonal communication and behavior. We review recent research describing this phenomenon in various aspects of social cognition. Corresponding to their pervasive socioemotional deficits, patients with frontotemporal dementia perform poorly on laboratory-based tasks including recognizing emotions, attending to salient information that guides social behavior, representing social knowledge, comprehending others' mental states, and maintaining insight to their own difficulties. Together with poor executive and regulation mechanisms, these social cognition deficits ultimately impact behavior. Patients with logopenic and nonfluent primary progressive aphasia have some deficits recognizing emotional prosody, whereas those with the semantic variant show more widespread deficits in social comprehension. Although Alzheimer's disease patients perform poorly on some social cognition tasks, this typically reflects general cognitive impairment, and their real-life social functioning is less affected than in diseases targeting frontotemporal structures. Studies in motor diseases such as Parkinson's suggest some degradation of emotion recognition and social comprehension, which should be investigated further. We summarize recent findings concerning perception and evaluation of socioemotional information, social knowledge storage and access, advanced information processing mechanisms, and behavioral response selection and regulation across various neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Ghrelin and Neurodegenerative Disorders-a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Limin; Du, Xixun; Jiang, Hong; Xie, Junxia

    2017-03-01

    Ghrelin, the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a), is a gut-derived, orexigenic peptide hormone that primarily regulates growth hormone secretion, food intake, and energy homeostasis. With the wide expression of GHS-R1a in extra-hypothalamic regions, the physiological role of ghrelin is more extensive than solely its involvement in metabolic function. Ghrelin has been shown to be involved in numerous higher brain functions, such as memory, reward, mood, and sleep. Some of these functions are disrupted in neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and Huntington's disease (HD). This link between ghrelin and these neurodegenerative diseases is supported by numerous studies. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the most recent evidence of the novel neuromodulatory role of ghrelin in PD, AD, and HD. Moreover, the changes in circulating and/or central ghrelin levels that are associated with disease progression are also postulated to be a biomarker for clinical diagnosis and therapy.

  19. Heat shock protein 90 in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodina Anna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone with important roles in regulating pathogenic transformation. In addition to its well-characterized functions in malignancy, recent evidence from several laboratories suggests a role for Hsp90 in maintaining the functional stability of neuronal proteins of aberrant capacity, whether mutated or over-activated, allowing and sustaining the accumulation of toxic aggregates. In addition, Hsp90 regulates the activity of the transcription factor heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1, the master regulator of the heat shock response, mechanism that cells use for protection when exposed to conditions of stress. These biological functions therefore propose Hsp90 inhibition as a dual therapeutic modality in neurodegenerative diseases. First, by suppressing aberrant neuronal activity, Hsp90 inhibitors may ameliorate protein aggregation and its associated toxicity. Second, by activation of HSF-1 and the subsequent induction of heat shock proteins, such as Hsp70, Hsp90 inhibitors may redirect neuronal aggregate formation, and protect against protein toxicity. This mini-review will summarize our current knowledge on Hsp90 in neurodegeneration and will focus on the potential beneficial application of Hsp90 inhibitors in neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. The Eaton-Lambert syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-02-26

    Feb 26, 1983 ... The Eaton-Lambert syndrome is a non-metastatic manifestation of oat-cell carcinoma of the bron- chus, although it has been reported in patients with carcinoma at other sites. The clinical picture is usually on~ of subacute muscular fatiguability with weakness and wasting affecting the proximal parts.

  1. Subacute toxicity assessment of annatto in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, A R P L; Moreira, E L T; Batista, M S; Miranda, M S; Gomes, I C S

    2004-04-01

    Increased human use of annatto (Bixa orellana L), a red yellow food colorant, demands generation of toxicity data. The toxic effects of annatto powder (bixin 27%) have been assessed following administration of a subacute regimen (4 weeks, 20 doses) in Wistar male and female rats. A full study with three dose levels was considered unnecessary since no sign of toxicity had been noted in a preliminary experiment with 1000 mg/kg body weight/day as was recommended by the OECD guideline. In this study, annatto administered by gavage at a dose level of 2000 mg/kg/day decreased male body weight gain, but had no effect on either food intake or food conversion efficiency. Haematological and plasma biochemical examination as well necropsy performed at the end of administration (29th day) and observation (43rd day) periods revealed no alterations related with annatto administration. Kidney apoptosis occurred in 20% treated female rats in restricted areas without proliferation or tubular segments modification. The precise nature of apoptosis was not investigated in the present study. These findings suggest that annatto was no toxic to the rat.

  2. Subacute posttraumatic ascending myelopathy: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Wang, G

    2017-07-01

    A literature review. Our aim was to summarise the history, epidemiology, aetiological mechanism, pathological study, clinical and radiological evaluation, treatment and prognosis of subacute posttraumatic ascending myelopathy (SPAM). Medical literature on SPAM were searched in the PubMed, Medline, Ovid and Embase databases. The cases of SPAM reported in literature were analysed, and the history, epidemiology, aetiological mechanism, pathological study, clinical and radiological evaluation, treatment and prognosis of SPAM were summarised. SPAM remains a relatively rare disorder occurring within the first few weeks after spinal cord injury (SCI). The incidence rate ranges from 0.42% to 1% among all SCI. SPAM is likely to occur in young and middle-aged male patients. Risk factors of SPAM include complete injury, low blood pressure, early postoperative mobilisation and nonsurgical treatment. SPAM is well recognised according to typical clinical manifestation and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics. There is no effective therapy for this neurological deterioration. The prognosis of SPAM is poor. There is usually a slight improvement of one or more level(s) below the maximal level of deterioration. The mortality rate is approximately 10%.

  3. Neurodegenerative diseases: exercising towards neurogenesis and neuroregeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng-Tat Ang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is still no effective therapy for neurodegenerative diseases (NDD such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and Parkinson’s disease (PD despite intensive research and on-going clinical trials. Collectively, these diseases account for the bulk of health care burden associated with age-related neurodegenerative disorders. There is therefore an urgent need to further research into the molecular pathogenesis, histological differentiation, and clinical management of NDD. Importantly, there is also an urgency to understand the similarities and differences between these two diseases so as to identify the common or different upstream and downstream signaling pathways. In this review, the role iron play in NDD will be highlighted, as iron is key to a common underlying pathway in the production of oxidative stress. There is increasing evidence to suggest that oxidative stress predisposed cells to undergo damage to DNA, protein and lipid, and as such a common factor involved in the pathogenesis of AD and PD. The challenge then is to minimize elevated and uncontrolled oxidative stress levels while not affecting basal iron metabolism, as iron plays vital roles in sustaining cellular function. However, overload of iron results in increased oxidative stress due to the Fenton reaction. We discuss evidence to suggest that sustained exercise and diet restriction may be ways to slow the rate of neurodegeneration, by perhaps promoting neurogenesis or antioxidant-related pathways. It is also our intention to cover NDD in a broad sense, in the context of basic and clinical sciences to cater for both clinician’s and the scientist’s needs, and to highlight current research investigating exercise as a therapeutic or preventive measure.

  4. Neurodegenerative Diseases: Exercising Toward Neurogenesis and Neuroregeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Eng-Tat; Tai, Yee-Kit; Lo, Shun-Qiang; Seet, Raymond; Soong, Tuck-Wah

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is still no effective therapy for neurodegenerative diseases (NDD) such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) despite intensive research and on-going clinical trials. Collectively, these diseases account for the bulk of health care burden associated with age-related neurodegenerative disorders. There is therefore an urgent need to further research into the molecular pathogenesis, histological differentiation, and clinical management of NDD. Importantly, there is also an urgency to understand the similarities and differences between these two diseases so as to identify the common or different upstream and downstream signaling pathways. In this review, the role iron play in NDD will be highlighted, as iron is key to a common underlying pathway in the production of oxidative stress. There is increasing evidence to suggest that oxidative stress predisposed cells to undergo damage to DNA, protein and lipid, and as such a common factor involved in the pathogenesis of AD and PD. The challenge then is to minimize elevated and uncontrolled oxidative stress levels while not affecting basal iron metabolism, as iron plays vital roles in sustaining cellular function. However, overload of iron results in increased oxidative stress due to the Fenton reaction. We discuss evidence to suggest that sustained exercise and diet restriction may be ways to slow the rate of neurodegeneration, by perhaps promoting neurogenesis or antioxidant-related pathways. It is also our intention to cover NDD in a broad sense, in the context of basic and clinical sciences to cater for both clinician's and the scientist's needs, and to highlight current research investigating exercise as a therapeutic or preventive measure. PMID:20725635

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea and neurodegenerative diseases: A bidirectional relation

    OpenAIRE

    Christianne Martins Corrêa da Silva Bahia; João Santos Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders are common during the clinical course of the main neurodegenerative diseases. Among these disorders, obstructive sleep apnea has been extensively studied in the last decade and recent knowledge regarding its relationship with the neurodegenerative process points a bidirectional relationship. Neurodegenerative diseases can lead to functional changes in the respiratory system that facilitate the emergence of apnea. On the other hand, obstructive sleep apnea itself can lead to ac...

  6. Effects of Ashwagandha (roots of Withania somnifera) on neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuboyama, Tomoharu; Tohda, Chihiro; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases commonly induce irreversible destruction of central nervous system (CNS) neuronal networks, resulting in permanent functional impairments. Effective medications against neurodegenerative diseases are currently lacking. Ashwagandha (roots of Withania somnifera Dunal) is used in traditional Indian medicine (Ayurveda) for general debility, consumption, nervous exhaustion, insomnia, and loss of memory. In this review, we summarize various effects and mechanisms of Ashwagandha extracts and related compounds on in vitro and in vivo models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and spinal cord injury.

  7. Epigenetic Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Michael H; Moos, Walter H; Faller, Douglas V; Steliou, Kosta; Pinkert, Carl A

    2016-05-01

    Preclinical Research In this review, we discuss epigenetic-driven methods for treating neurodegenerative disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, focusing on carnitinoid antioxidant-histone deacetylase inhibitors that show an ability to reinvigorate synaptic plasticity and protect against neuromotor decline in vivo. Aging remains a major risk factor in patients who progress to dementia, a clinical syndrome typified by decreased mental capacity, including impairments in memory, language skills, and executive function. Energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction are viewed as determinants in the aging process that may afford therapeutic targets for a host of disease conditions, the brain being primary in such thinking. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a core feature in the pathophysiology of both Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and rare mitochondrial diseases. The potential of new therapies in this area extends to glaucoma and other ophthalmic disorders, migraine, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, systemic exertion intolerance disease, and chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment. An emerging and hopefully more promising approach to addressing these hard-to-treat diseases leverages their sensitivity to activation of master regulators of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes, antioxidant response elements, and mitophagy. Drug Dev Res 77 : 109-123, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The emerging role of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar eAl-Mahdawi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation primarily occurs within human cells as a 5-methylcytosine (5mC modification of the cytosine bases in CpG dinucleotides. 5mC has proven to be an important epigenetic mark that is involved in the control of gene transcription for processes such as development and differentiation. However, recent studies have identified an alternative modification, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC, which is formed by oxidation of 5mC by ten-eleven translocation (TET enzymes. The overall levels of 5hmC in the mammalian genome are approximately 10% of 5mC levels, although higher levels have been detected in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS. The functions of 5hmC are not yet fully known, but evidence suggests that 5hmC may be both an intermediate product during the removal of 5mC by passive or active demethylation processes and also an epigenetic modification in its own right, regulating chromatin or transcriptional factors involved in processes such as neurodevelopment or environmental stress response. This review highlights our current understanding of the role that 5hmC plays in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS, Friedreich ataxia (FRDA, Huntington’s disease (HD, and Parkinson’s disease (PD.

  9. Computed tomography of neurodegenerative disease in childhood. Serial CT findings and their diagnostic values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Kenkichi; Nakagawa, Yoshihiro; Hojo, Hiroatsu

    1984-12-01

    Serial computed tomographic scans were performed on seven children with neurodegenerative disorders. In two cases of white-matter diseases (Krabbe's disease and metachromatic leukodystrophy), diffuse, low-density lesions of white matter were visible in the early stage of the diseases. In one case of adrenoleukodystrophy, regional low-density lesions of the white matter around the posterior horns and peculiar high-density strip lesions were visible in the early stage. In two cases of storage-type gray-matter diseases (Tay-Sachs' and infantile Gaucher's disease), there were no abnormalities in the early stage, but diffuse cortical atrophies in the late stage. In one case of Leigh's disease, there were small, low-density lesions of the basal ganglia and multiple low-density lesions of the gray matter in the early stage. In one case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, there were no abnormalities in the early stage, but small, low-density lesions of the basal ganglia and diffuse cerebral atrophies in the late stage. Diagnostic values were recognized dominantly in two cases of adrenoleukodystrophy and Leigh's disease. In the other cases, however, serial CT scans were useful in the diagnostic process. (author).

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea and neurodegenerative diseases: A bidirectional relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianne Martins Corrêa da Silva Bahia

    Full Text Available Sleep disorders are common during the clinical course of the main neurodegenerative diseases. Among these disorders, obstructive sleep apnea has been extensively studied in the last decade and recent knowledge regarding its relationship with the neurodegenerative process points a bidirectional relationship. Neurodegenerative diseases can lead to functional changes in the respiratory system that facilitate the emergence of apnea. On the other hand, obstructive sleep apnea itself can lead to acceleration of neuronal death due to intermittent hypoxia. Considering that obstructive sleep apnea is a potentially treatable condition, its early identification and intervention could have a positive impact on the management of patients with neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Child with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Thakkar, Mayur Deepak; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a fatal infectious disease of childhood caused by persistence of the measles virus in the brain. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on subacute sclerosing panencephalitis remains elusive and rare. We report a child who developed subacute sclerosing panencephalitis following a short latency period and a rapidly progressive course with HIV co-infection.

  12. Capgras syndrome in Parkinson's disease: two new cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas, Antonino; Meloni, Mario; Mascia, Marcello Mario; Solla, Paolo; Cocco, Luigi; Muroni, Antonella; Floris, Gianluca; Di Stefano, Francesca; Marrosu, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    The Capgras syndrome (CS) is a rare psychiatric disorder. CS is classified as a delusional misidentification syndrome. Initially, CS was described in paranoid schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders. CS has also been reported in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia. To date, there are very few descriptions of the occurrence of CS in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD), with or without dementia. Considering the recent observation of two new cases in PD patients, a systematic overview of the literature published between 1976 and 2016 reporting CS in PD was conducted. The purpose of this article is to examine the phenomenon in people with PD with and without dementia, the psychopathologic context in which it happened, the role played by the dopaminergic medications and to define useful therapeutic strategies. Our CS cases occurred in two elderly patients with advanced PD and cognitive impairment, respectively, after an acute stressor event and after an increase of the total daily dose of levodopa. In light of our observations and the cases reported in the literature, we argue that CS is an acute or subacute psychotic disorder occurring mostly in PD with dementia. Besides, the increase in brain dopamine levels induced by acute stressful events and/or dopamine-enhancing medications should be considered as a possible causal mechanism of CS in patients with advanced stages of PD and cognitive decline.

  13. Tau proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Deniz; Yilmaz, Deniz; Uyar, Neval Y; Senbil, Nesrin; Gurer, Yavuz; Anlar, Banu

    2010-06-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases characterized by cytoskeletal deformation and neurofibrillary tangles are associated with altered levels of tau and related proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Neuronal or glial fibrillary tangles have been shown in 20% of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) patients. We therefore investigated CSF samples from 60 newly diagnosed SSPE and 31 neurological control patients for total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau (p-tau), and S100-B levels by ELISA. There was no difference between patient and control groups in t-tau and S100-B levels. p-Tau was lower in the SSPE group (p=0.009). Past history of measles infection, measles immunization status, latent period between measles and onset of SSPE, duration of symptoms, frequency of myoclonia, neurological deficit index, stage and progression rate of the disease, CSF glucose levels and cell counts, CSF and serum measles IgG titer, distribution of lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging were not related to t-tau, p-tau and S100-B levels. Mental status and age were negatively correlated with t-tau, and male gender and EEG abnormalities were associated with higher t-tau levels. The levels of tau proteins in our patients suggest there is no, or only scarce and immature, neurofibrillary tangle formation in SSPE. Autopsy studies showing neurofibrillary tangles might have examined older patients with longer disease and more parenchymal involvement. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: A clinical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Sujit Abajirao; Nair, M D; Kambale, Harsha J

    2013-10-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a rare chronic, progressive encephalitis affecting primarily children and young adults, caused by a persistent infection of immune resistant measles virus. The aim of the present study is to describe the clinical profile and natural history of patients with SSPE. We collected data of patients with SSPE during 2004-2010 who fulfilled Dyken's criteria. We analyzed demographical, clinical, electrophysiological, and imaging features. Study included 34 patients, 26 (76.5%) males with age of onset from 3 to 31 years. Twenty one patients were below 15 years of age formed childhood SSPE and 13 above 15 years of age constituted adult onset group. 85.3% had low-socioeconomic status. Eleven received measles vaccination and seven were unvaccinated. 59.9% patients had measles history. Most common presenting symptom was scholastic backwardness (52.5%) followed by seizures (23.5%). Three patients each had cortical blindness, macular degeneration, decreased visual acuity, and optic atrophy. Electroencephalographic (EEG) showed long interval periodic complexes and cerebrospinal fluid anti-measles antibody was positive in all. Magnetic resonance imaging was done in 70.5% with was abnormal in 52.5%. Mean incubation period of SSPE after measles was 9.6 years. The follow-up duration was 1-10 years, (average of 2 years). Only one patient died from available data of follow-up, 9 were stable and 10 deteriorated in the form of progression of staging. SSPE is common in low-socioeconomic status. The profile of adult onset did not differ from childhood onset SSPE, except for a longer interval between measles infection and presence of the ophthalmic symptom as presenting feature in adult onset group.

  15. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: A clinical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Abajirao Abajirao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a rare chronic, progressive encephalitis affecting primarily children and young adults, caused by a persistent infection of immune resistant measles virus. The aim of the present study is to describe the clinical profile and natural history of patients with SSPE. Methods: We collected data of patients with SSPE during 2004-2010 who fulfilled Dyken′s criteria. We analyzed demographical, clinical, electrophysiological, and imaging features. Results: Study included 34 patients, 26 (76.5% males with age of onset from 3 to 31 years. Twenty one patients were below 15 years of age formed childhood SSPE and 13 above 15 years of age constituted adult onset group. 85.3% had low-socioeconomic status. Eleven received measles vaccination and seven were unvaccinated. 59.9% patients had measles history. Most common presenting symptom was scholastic backwardness (52.5% followed by seizures (23.5%. Three patients each had cortical blindness, macular degeneration, decreased visual acuity, and optic atrophy. Electroencephalographic (EEG showed long interval periodic complexes and cerebrospinal fluid anti-measles antibody was positive in all. Magnetic resonance imaging was done in 70.5% with was abnormal in 52.5%. Mean incubation period of SSPE after measles was 9.6 years. The follow-up duration was 1-10 years, (average of 2 years. Only one patient died from available data of follow-up, 9 were stable and 10 deteriorated in the form of progression of staging. Conclusion: SSPE is common in low-socioeconomic status. The profile of adult onset did not differ from childhood onset SSPE, except for a longer interval between measles infection and presence of the ophthalmic symptom as presenting feature in adult onset group.

  16. The Role of Copper in Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Francis M.

    My research concerns the fundamental atomistic mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases and the methodologies by which they may be discerned. This thesis consists of three primary parts. The introductory material is the raison d'etre for this work and a critical overview of the specific physics, mathematics and algorithms used in this research. The methods are presented along with specific details in order to facilitate future replication and enhancement. With the groundwork of mechanisms and methods out of the way, we then explore a nouveau atomistic mechanism describing the onset of Parkinson's disease, a disease that has been closely linked to misfolded metalloproteins. Further exploration of neurodegeneration takes place in the following chapter, where a remedial approach to Alzheimer's disease via a simulated chelation of a metalloprotein is undertaken. Altogether, the methods and techniques applied here allow for simulated exploration of both the atomistic mechanisms of neurodegeneration and their potential remediation strategies. The beginning portion of the research efforts explore protein misfolding dynamics in the presence a copper ion. Misfolding of the human alpha-synuclein (aS) protein has been implicated as a central constituent in neurodegenerative disease. In Parkinson's disease (PD) in particular, aS is thought to be the causative participant when found concentrated into neuritic plaques. Here we propose a scenario involving the metal ion Cu2+ as the protein misfolding initiator of fibrillized aS, the chief component of neuritic plaques. From experimental results we know these misfolded proteins have a rich beta--sheet signature, a marker that we reproduce with our simulated model. This model identifies a process of structural modifications to a natively unfolded alpha-synuclein resulting in a partially folded intermediate with a well defined nucleation site. It serves as a precursor to the fully misfolded protein. Understanding the nucleation

  17. Current therapies and future perspectives in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatli, Burak; Ekici, Bariş; Ozmen, Meral

    2012-04-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a progressive neurological disorder of children and young adults caused by a measles virus that became defective by persisting in the host. According to the results of clinical trials, antiviral and/or immunomodulatory therapy can slow the progression of the disease and improve life expectancy in patients. However, its long-term effects and eventual outcome remain debatable due to conflicting results and its lack of effect on the rapidly progressive form of the disease. Possible future therapies for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis are RNAi and antiapoptotic agents, which are currently in the hypothetical and experimental stages of research.

  18. Comparative Incidence of Conformational, Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús de Pedro-Cuesta

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify incidence and survival patterns in conformational neurodegenerative disorders (CNDDs.We identified 2563 reports on the incidence of eight conditions representing sporadic, acquired and genetic, protein-associated, i.e., conformational, NDD groups and age-related macular degeneration (AMD. We selected 245 papers for full-text examination and application of quality criteria. Additionally, data-collection was completed with detailed information from British, Swedish, and Spanish registries on Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD forms, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and sporadic rapidly progressing neurodegenerative dementia (sRPNDd. For each condition, age-specific incidence curves, age-adjusted figures, and reported or calculated median survival were plotted and examined.Based on 51 valid reported and seven new incidence data sets, nine out of eleven conditions shared specific features. Age-adjusted incidence per million person-years increased from ≤1.5 for sRPNDd, different CJD forms and Huntington's disease (HD, to 1589 and 2589 for AMD and Alzheimer's disease (AD respectively. Age-specific profiles varied from (a symmetrical, inverted V-shaped curves for low incidences to (b those increasing with age for late-life sporadic CNDDs and for sRPNDd, with (c a suggested, intermediate, non-symmetrical inverted V-shape for fronto-temporal dementia and Parkinson's disease. Frequently, peak age-specific incidences from 20-24 to ≥90 years increased with age at onset and survival. Distinct patterns were seen: for HD, with a low incidence, levelling off at middle age, and long median survival, 20 years; and for sRPNDd which displayed the lowest incidence, increasing with age, and a short median disease duration.These results call for a unified population view of NDDs, with an age-at-onset-related pattern for acquired and sporadic CNDDs. The pattern linking age at onset to incidence magnitude and survival might

  19. DNA triplex structures in neurodegenerative disorder, Friedreich's ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... 3. DNA triplet repeat expansions in human genome. In the beginning of the last decade, expanded DNA-trinucleotide repeats in genes were identified as unstable and responsible for a large number of neurological disorders like FRDA, fragile X syndrome, spinocerebellar ataxia and muscular dystrophy.

  20. Quantitative Interaction Proteomics of Neurodegenerative Disease Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Hosp

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Several proteins have been linked to neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs, but their molecular function is not completely understood. Here, we used quantitative interaction proteomics to identify binding partners of Amyloid beta precursor protein (APP and Presenilin-1 (PSEN1 for Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Huntingtin (HTT for Huntington’s disease, Parkin (PARK2 for Parkinson’s disease, and Ataxin-1 (ATXN1 for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. Our network reveals common signatures of protein degradation and misfolding and recapitulates known biology. Toxicity modifier screens and comparison to genome-wide association studies show that interaction partners are significantly linked to disease phenotypes in vivo. Direct comparison of wild-type proteins and disease-associated variants identified binders involved in pathogenesis, highlighting the value of differential interactome mapping. Finally, we show that the mitochondrial protein LRPPRC interacts preferentially with an early-onset AD variant of APP. This interaction appears to induce mitochondrial dysfunction, which is an early phenotype of AD.

  1. Health benefits of methylxanthines in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñatibia-Astibia, Ainhoa; Franco, Rafael; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva

    2017-06-01

    Methylxanthines (MTXs) are consumed by almost everybody in almost every area of the world. Caffeine, theophylline and theobromine are the most well-known members of this family of compounds; they are present, inter alia, in coffee, tea, cacao, yerba mate and cola drinks. MTXs are readily absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and are able to penetrate into the central nervous system, where they exert significant psychostimulant actions, which are more evident in acute intake. Coffee has been paradigmatic, as its use was forbidden in many diseases, however, this negative view has radically changed; evidence shows that MTXs display health benefits in diseases involving cell death in the nervous system. This paper reviews data that appraise the preventive and even therapeutic potential of MTXs in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Future perspectives include the use of MTXs to advance the understanding the pathophysiology of, inter alia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), and the use of the methylxanthine chemical moiety as a basis for the development of new and more efficacious drugs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Neurodegenerative disorder risk in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder: study in 174 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Alex; Fernández-Arcos, Ana; Tolosa, Eduard; Serradell, Mónica; Molinuevo, José Luis; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Gelpi, Ellen; Vilaseca, Isabel; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Lladó, Albert; Gaig, Carles; Santamaría, Joan

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the risk for developing a defined neurodegenerative syndrome in a large cohort of idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (IRBD) patients with long follow-up. Using the Kaplan-Meier method, we estimated the disease-free survival rate from defined neurodegenerative syndromes in all the consecutive IRBD patients diagnosed and followed-up in our tertiary referal sleep center between November 1991 and July 2013. The cohort comprises 174 patients with a median age at diagnosis of IRBD of 69 years and a median follow-up of four years. The risk of a defined neurodegenerative syndrome from the time of IRBD diagnosis was 33.1% at five years, 75.7% at ten years, and 90.9% at 14 years. The median conversion time was 7.5 years. Emerging diagnoses (37.4%) were dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) in 29 subjects, Parkinson disease (PD) in 22, multiple system atrophy (MSA) in two, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in 12. In six cases, in whom postmortem was performed, neuropathological examination disclosed neuronal loss and widespread Lewy-type pathology in the brain in each case. In a large IRBD cohort diagnosed in a tertiary referal sleep center, prolonged follow-up indicated that the majority of patients are eventually diagnosed with the synucleinopathies PD, DLB and less frequently MSA. IRBD represented the prodromal period of these conditions. Our findings in IRBD have important implications in clinical practice, in the investigation of the early pathological events occurring in the synucleinopathies, and for the design of interventions with potential disease-modifying agents.

  3. Neurodegenerative disorder risk in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder: study in 174 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Iranzo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk for developing a defined neurodegenerative syndrome in a large cohort of idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (IRBD patients with long follow-up. METHODS: Using the Kaplan-Meier method, we estimated the disease-free survival rate from defined neurodegenerative syndromes in all the consecutive IRBD patients diagnosed and followed-up in our tertiary referal sleep center between November 1991 and July 2013. RESULTS: The cohort comprises 174 patients with a median age at diagnosis of IRBD of 69 years and a median follow-up of four years. The risk of a defined neurodegenerative syndrome from the time of IRBD diagnosis was 33.1% at five years, 75.7% at ten years, and 90.9% at 14 years. The median conversion time was 7.5 years. Emerging diagnoses (37.4% were dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB in 29 subjects, Parkinson disease (PD in 22, multiple system atrophy (MSA in two, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI in 12. In six cases, in whom postmortem was performed, neuropathological examination disclosed neuronal loss and widespread Lewy-type pathology in the brain in each case. CONCLUSIONS: In a large IRBD cohort diagnosed in a tertiary referal sleep center, prolonged follow-up indicated that the majority of patients are eventually diagnosed with the synucleinopathies PD, DLB and less frequently MSA. IRBD represented the prodromal period of these conditions. Our findings in IRBD have important implications in clinical practice, in the investigation of the early pathological events occurring in the synucleinopathies, and for the design of interventions with potential disease-modifying agents.

  4. Evaluation of acute and subacute toxicities of aqueous ethanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated the acute and subacute toxicities of hydro-ethanolic extract of leaves of Senna alata (L.) Roxb. in Swiss mice and Wistar albino rats. The mice were divided into 6 groups of 10 animals and each group received once by intra gastric gavages 0, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 times 1000 mg/kg dose of extract. Distilled water ...

  5. Resolving MRI abnormalities with progression of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winer, J.B. (Saint Mary' s Hospital, Birmingham (UK)); Pires, M.; Kermode, A.; Ginsberg, L. (National Hospital for Nervous Diseases, Birmingham (UK)); Rossor, M. (Saint Mary' s Hospital, Birmingham (UK) National Hospital for Nervous Diseases, Birmingham (UK))

    1991-04-01

    Serial MRI was performed on a 15 year old girl with Subacute Sclerosing Pan-encephalitis (SSPE). After a period of remission she entered a phase of progressive deterioration. A repeat MRI showed significant resolution of the previous abnormalities. Her pathology and MRI scans are discussed.

  6. Epilepsia partialis continua in children with fulminant subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravljanac, Ruzica; Jovic, Nebojsa; Djuric, Milena; Nikolic, Ljubica

    2011-12-01

    Various inflammatory diseases of central nervous system, including subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, could cause epilepsia partialis continua. Two boys with epilepsia partialis continua with onset in terminal phase of atypical subacute sclerosing panencephalitis have been reported. Children were not vaccinated against measles, and the second case had history of measles at an early age. In both cases, the onset of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis was characterized by altered behavior and cognitive decline with very fast mental and neurological deterioration. One boy was suffering from complex partial seizures and myoclonic jerks synchronous with periodic electroencephalographic pattern. Diagnosis was proved by increased titers of antimeasles antibodies in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. In terminal phase of the disease, epilepsia partialis continua of localized group of the muscles was diagnosed, with good response to intravenous infusion of midazolam. Surface electroencephalographic recordings during epilepsia partialis continua did not show the epileptic discharges. During the terminal phase of the disease, no other type of seizures and movement disorders were recognized, except epilepsia partialis continua. In spite of the treatment, period from the onset of disease to death lasted less than 3 months, suggesting very fulminant course of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

  7. High-Dose Intravenous Ribavirin Therapy for Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Shigeta, Shiro; Mori, Shuichi; Tomoda, Akemi; Shiraishi, Seiji; Miike, Teruhisa; Suzuki, Hitoshi

    2001-01-01

    Two patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) were treated safely and effectively with high doses of intravenous ribavirin combined with intraventricular alpha interferon. The ribavirin concentrations maintained in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid were higher than those which inhibit SSPE virus replication in vitro and in vivo. PMID:11181386

  8. A close look at EEG in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Nurhak; Cokar, Ozlem; Bolukbasi, Feray; Demirbilek, Veysi; Yapici, Zuhal; Yalcinkaya, Cengiz; Direskeneli, Guher Saruhan; Yentur, Sibel; Onal, Emel; Yilmaz, Gulden; Dervent, Aysin

    2013-08-01

    To define atypical clinical and EEG features of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis that may require an overview of differential diagnosis. A total of 66 EEGs belonging to 53 (17 females and 36 males) consecutive patients with serologically confirmed subacute sclerosing panencephalitis were included in this study. Patient files and EEG data were evaluated retrospectively. EEGs included in the study were sleep-waking EEGs and/or sleep-waking video-EEG records with at least 2 hours duration. Cranial MRIs of the patients taken 2 months before or after the EEG records were included. Age range at the onset of the disease was 15 to 192 months (mean age: 80.02 months). Epilepsy was diagnosed in 21 (43%) patients. Among epileptic seizures excluding myoclonic jerks, generalized tonic-clonic type constituted the majority (58%). Tonic seizures were documented during the video-EEG recordings in four patients. Epileptogenic activities were found in 56 (83%) EEG recordings. They were localized mainly in frontal (58%), posterior temporal, parietal, occipital (26%), and centrotemporal (8%) regions. Multiple foci were detected in 26 recordings (39%). Epileptiform activities in the 39 (59%) EEGs appeared as unilateral or bilateral diffuse paroxysmal discharges. Recognition of uncommon clinical and EEG findings of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, especially in countries where subacute sclerosing panencephalitis has not been eliminated yet, could be helpful in prevention of misdiagnosis and delay in the management of improvable conditions.

  9. Treatment of acute and subacute dorsal perilunate fracture dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Kucuk

    2014-04-01

    Outcomes: Results of the perilunate fracture dislocations treated in acute or subacute phase by open reduction and internal fixation via dorsal approach are satisfactory. There is a strong demand for prospective, randomized studies to compare the results of different treatment modalities. [Hand Microsurg 2014; 3(1.000: 1-7

  10. Evaluation of acute and subacute toxicity of Alstonia congensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The extract demonstrated good hypoglycaemic effects by lowering the plasma sugar level and also had some beneficial and reduction effects on cardiovascular risk factors. There was no evidence of drug-induced symptoms or death at all the doses of the extract administered in acute study but subacute results revealed a ...

  11. Acute and Subacute Toxic Study of Aqueous Leaf Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Results: For the acute toxicit test, no death and signs of poisoning were observed in the treated groups. In the subacute .... Subcute toxicity test. The animals were divided into six groups of six animals each. The treatments were given by intraperitoneal injection. Group 1 served ... produce significant changes in behavior,.

  12. Speech and Language Therapy for Aphasia following Subacute Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koyuncu, E.; Çam, P.; Altinok, N.; Çalli, D.E.; Yarbay Duman, T.; Özgirgin, N.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the time window, duration and intensity of optimal speech and language therapy applied to aphasic patients with subacute stroke in our hospital. The study consisted of 33 patients being hospitalized for stroke rehabilitation in our hospital with first stroke

  13. Acute and subacute toxicities of defatted ethanolic extract of Moringa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moringa oleifera seeds are widely accepted as a nutritional supplement. The seeds are consumed and are sold on the shelf of nature, herbal shops, pharmacy and supermarkets. They are consumed as herbal remedy for various diseases. This study was designed to evaluate the acute and sub-acute toxicity of defatted ...

  14. Virtual Reality Training for Upper Extremity in Subacute Stroke (VIRTUES)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Iris; Skouen, Jan Sture; Hofstad, Håkon

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of upper extremity virtual reality rehabilitation training (VR) to time-matched conventional training (CT) in the subacute phase after stroke. Methods: In this randomized, controlled, single-blind phase III multicenter trial, 120 participants with upper...

  15. Unusual paraneoplastic syndromes of breast carcinoma: a combination of cerebellar degeneration and Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Romics, L

    2011-06-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological disorders are rare complications of breast carcinoma. Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome (LEMS) is most commonly associated with small cell lung cancer. However, a combination of LEMS and subacute cerebellar degeneration as paraneoplastic syndromes is extremely rare, and has never been described in association with breast cancer.

  16. The clinical and pathophysiological relevance of REM sleep behavior disorder in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, Alex; Santamaria, Joan; Tolosa, Eduard

    2009-12-01

    REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by vigorous movements associated with unpleasant dreams and increased electromyographic activity during REM sleep. Polysomnography with audiovisual recording is needed to confirm the diagnosis of RBD and to exclude other sleep disorders that can mimic its symptoms including obstructive sleep apnea, nocturnal hallucinations and confusional awakenings. RBD may be idiopathic or related to neurodegenerative diseases, particularly multiple system atrophy, Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. RBD may be the first manifestation of these disorders, antedating the onset of parkinsonism, cerebellar syndrome, dysautonomia, and dementia by several years. RBD should thus be considered an integral part of the disease process. When effective, neuroprotective strategies should be considered in subjects with idiopathic RBD. Patients with other neurodegenerative diseases, though, such as spinocerebellar ataxias, may also present with RBD. When clinically required, clonazepam at bedtime is effective in decreasing the intensity of dream-enacting behaviors and unpleasant dreams in both the idiopathic and secondary forms. When part of a neurodegenerative disorder the development of RBD is thought to reflect the location and extent of the underlying lesions involving the REM sleep centers of the brain (e.g., locus subceruleus, amygdala, etc.), leading to a complex multiple neurotransmitter dysfunction that involves GABAergic, glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems. RBD is mediated neither by direct abnormal alpha-synuclein inclusions nor by striatonigral dopaminergic deficiency alone.

  17. Renin-angiotensin system gene expression and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Benjamin; Speth, Robert C; Trivedi, Malav

    2016-07-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms and altered gene expression of components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Drugs that interact with the RAS have been shown to affect the course of neurodegenerative disease, suggesting that abnormalities in the RAS may contribute to neurodegenerative disease. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies and gene expression data for 14 RAS-related proteins was carried out for five neurodegenerative diseases: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, narcolepsy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. No single nucleotide polymorphisms in any of the 14 RAS-related protein genes were significantly associated with the five neurodegenerative diseases investigated. There was an inverse association between expression of ATP6AP2, which encodes the (pro)renin receptor, and multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. An association of AGTR, which encodes the AT1 angiotensin II receptor, and Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease was also observed. To date, no single nucleotide polymorphisms in components of the RAS can be definitively linked to the neurodegenerative diseases evaluated in this study. However, altered gene expression of several components of the RAS is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases, which may indicate that the RAS contributes to the pathology of these diseases. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder and Neurodegenerative Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Michael Joseph; Schenck, Carlos Hugh

    2015-06-01

    The dream enactment of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is often the first indication of an impending α-synuclein disorder, such as Parkinson disease, multiple-system atrophy, or dementia with Lewy bodies. To provide an overview of RBD from the onset of dream enactment through the emergence of a parkinsonian disorder. Peer-reviewed articles, including case reports, case series, retrospective reviews, prospective randomized trials, and basic science investigations, were identified in a PubMed search of articles on RBD from January 1, 1986, through July 31, 2014. Under normal conditions, vivid dream mentation combined with skeletal muscle paralysis characterizes rapid eye movement sleep. In RBD, α-synuclein abnormalities in the brainstem disinhibit rapid eye movement sleep motor activity, leading to dream enactment. The behaviors of RBD are often theatrical, with complexity, aggression, and violence; fighting and fleeing actions can be injurious to patients as well as bed partners. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is distinguished from other parasomnias by clinical features and the demonstration of rapid eye movement sleep without atonia on polysomnography. Consistent with early neurodegeneration, patients with RBD demonstrate subtle motor, cognitive, and autonomic impairments. Approximately 50% of patients with spontaneous RBD will convert to a parkinsonian disorder within a decade. Ultimately, nearly all (81%-90%) patients with RBD develop a neurodegenerative disorder. Among patients with Parkinson disease, RBD predicts a non-tremor-predominant subtype, gait freezing, and an aggressive clinical course. The most commonly cited RBD treatments include low-dose clonazepam or high-dose melatonin taken orally at bedtime. Treatment of RBD can prevent injury to patients and bed partners. Because RBD is a prodromal syndrome of Parkinson disease (or related disorder), it represents a unique opportunity for developing and testing disease

  19. Tool use in neurodegenerative diseases: Planning or technical reasoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumard, Josselin; Lesourd, Mathieu; Remigereau, Chrystelle; Jarry, Christophe; Etcharry-Bouyx, Frédérique; Chauviré, Valérie; Osiurak, François; Le Gall, Didier

    2017-04-29

    Recent works showed that tool use can be impaired in stroke patients because of either planning or technical reasoning deficits, but these two hypotheses have not yet been compared in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to address the relationships between real tool use, mechanical problem-solving, and planning skills in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 32), semantic dementia (SD, n = 16), and corticobasal syndrome (CBS, n = 9). Patients were asked to select and use ten common tools, to solve three mechanical problems, and to complete the Tower of London test. Motor function and episodic memory were controlled using the Purdue Pegboard Test and the BEC96 questionnaire, respectively. A data-transformation method was applied to avoid ceiling effects, and single-case analysis was performed based on raw scores and completion time. All groups demonstrated either impaired or slowed tool use. Planning deficits were found only in the AD group. Mechanical problem-solving deficits were observed only in the AD and CBS groups. Performance in the Tower of London test was the best predictor of tool use skills in the AD group, suggesting these patients had general rather than mechanical problem-solving deficits. Episodic memory seemed to play little role in performance. Motor dysfunction tended to be associated with tool use skills in CBS patients, while tool use disorders are interpreted as a consequence of the semantic loss in SD in line with previous works. These findings may encourage caregivers to set up disease-centred interventions. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  20. Strategies for molecular imaging dementia and neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard J Schaller

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Bernhard J SchallerDepartment of Neurosurgery, University of Paris, Paris, FranceAbstract: Dementia represents a heterogeneous term that has evolved to describe the behavioral syndromes associated with a variety of clinical and neuropathological changes during continuing degenerative disease of the brain. As such, there lacks a clear consensus regarding the neuropsychological and other constituent characteristics associated with various cerebrovascular changes in this disease process. But increasing this knowledge has given more insights into memory deterioration in patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and other subtypes of dementia. The author reviews current knowledge of the physiological coupling between cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the light of state-of-the-art-imaging methods and its changes in dementia with special reference to Alzheimer’s disease. Different imaging techniques are discussed with respect to their visualizing effect of biochemical, cellular, and/or structural changes in dementia. The pathophysiology of dementia in advanced age is becoming increasingly understood by revealing the underlying basis of neuropsychological changes with current imaging techniques, genetic and pathological features, which suggests that alterations of (neurovascular regulatory mechanisms may lead to brain dysfunction and disease. The current view is that cerebrovascular deregulation is seen as a contributor to cerebrovascular pathologies, such as stroke, but also to neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease. The better understanding of these (pathophysiological mechanisms may open an approach to new interventional strategies in dementia to enhance neurovascular repair and to protect neurovascular coupling.Keywords: imaging, cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease, cerebrovascular disease, neurovascular coupling

  1. Circadian clock disruption in neurodegenerative diseases: Cause and effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Steven Musiek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Disturbance of the circadian system, manifested as disrupted daily rhythms of physiologic parameters such as sleep, activity, and hormone secretion, has long been observed as a symptom of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer Disease. Circadian abnormalities have generally been considered consequences of the neurodegeneration. Recent evidence suggests, however, that circadian disruption might actually contribute to the neurodegenerative process, and thus might be a modifiable cause of neural injury. Herein we will review the evidence implicating circadian rhythms disturbances and clock gene dysfunction in neurodegeneration, with an emphasis on future research directions and potential therapeutic implications for neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Electrodiagnostic studies in Guillain-Barre syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Meulstee (Jan)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is a monophasic (sub)acute inflammatory demyelinating predominantly motor polyradiculo-neuropathy. Clinical criteria have been proposed by Asbury (Asbury et aI., 1978; Asbury and Cornblath, 1990). GBS is a selflimiting disease, however, up to 30% of the

  3. Indian Herbs for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Naidu, Kamalakkannan Narasimha

    2016-01-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient system of medicine that is indigenous to India, is believed to be the world's oldest comprehensive health-care system and is now one of the most recognized and widely practiced disciplines of alternative medicine in the world. Medicinal herbs have been in use for treating diseases since ancient times in India. Ayurvedic therapies with medicinal herbs and herbomineral products generally provide relief without much adverse effects even after prolonged administration. Neurodegenerative disorders are a major cause of mortality and disability, and increasing life spans represent one of the key challenges of medical research. Ayurvedic medicine describes most neurodegenerative diseases and has defined a number of plants with therapeutic benefits for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases having antioxidant activities. In this chapter, the role of four important Ayurvedic medicinal plants, viz., Withania somnifera (ashwagandha), Bacopa monnieri (brahmi), Centella asiatica (gotu kola), and Mucuna pruriens (velvet bean), on neurodegenerative diseases are discussed.

  4. Hyperfixation of Tc-99m ECD in subacute cortical infarction

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    Kim, Jae Seung; Kweon, Sun Uck; Ryu, Jin Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lee, Hee Kyung [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    It has been known that hyperfixation of Tc-99m ECD (HF) is not shown in subacute cerebral infarction because the brain distribution of Tc-99m ECD reflects not only perfusion but also the metabolic status of brain tissue. However, we observed several cases with HF in the subacute pure cortical infarction. To find out the cause of HF in subacute cortical infarction. We assessed the difference in associated cerebral hemodynamics and clinical findings between the subacute cortical infarctions with and without HF. We reviewed 16 patients (63.8{+-}8.6 yr, M/F: 15/1) with pure cortical infarction not involving adjacent subcortical white matter on MRI. All patients underwent acetazolamide stress brain perfusion SPECT using Tc-99m ECD and MRI at subacute period (7.3{+-}4.4 days from ictus). Uptake of Tc-99m ECD in infarcted cortex was assessed visually comparing the contralateral side. To assess the difference in associate clinical findings between the infarctions with and without HF, rCVR of the cerebral territory including infarcted cortex, extent of Gd-enhancement on MRI. Intervals between SPECT and ictus, and the presence of associated ICA stenosis were evaluated. Infarctions were focal (n=8) or multifocal (n=8) and located in frontoparietal cortices on MRI. Twelve patients were accompanied with ipsilateral ICA stenosis. Resting SPECT showed increased cortical uptake (=HF) in 7 patients and decreased in 9. rCVR of the MCA territory was preserved in all of the 7 patients with HF, compared with 4 of the 9 patients without HF (p=0.03). Gd-enhancement was minimal in all of the 7 patients with HF, compared with of the 0 patients without HF (p=0.03). Presence of ipsilateral ICA stenosis and intervals from ictus were not different (p>0.1) Subacute cerebral cortical infarction with HF was more frequently associated with preserved rCVR and minimal destruction of the blood-brain barrier than that without HF. Our findings suggest that HF may result from luxury perfusion of

  5. Environmental Pollutants as Risk Factors for Neurodegenerative Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel eChin-Chan; Juliana eNavarro-Yepes; Betzabet eQuintanilla-Vega

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer (AD) and Parkinson (PD) have attracted attention in last decades due to their high incidence worldwide. The etiology of these diseases is still unclear; however the role of the environment, from diet to the new nanomaterials as putative risk factors has gained importance. More worryingly is the evidence that pre- and post-natal exposures to environmental factors predispose to the onset of neurodegenerative diseases in later life. Neurotoxic metal...

  6. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argye E. Hillis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We review rationale, challenges, study designs, reported results, and future directions in the use of transcranial direct cranial stimulation (tDCS in neurodegenerative disease, focusing on treatment of spelling in primary progressive aphasia (PPA. Rationale Evidence from both animal studies and human studies indicates that anodal and cathodal tDCS over the brain result in a temporary change in membrane potentials, reducing the threshold for long-term potentiation of neurons in the affected area. This may allow unaffected brain regions to assume functions of diseased regions. Challenges Special challenges in treating individuals with progressive conditions include altered goals of treatment and the possibility that participants may accumulate new deficits over the course of the treatment program that interfere with their ability to understand, retain, or cooperate with aspects of the program. The most serious challenge – particularly for single case designs - is that there may be no stable baseline against which to measure change with treatment. Thus, it is essential to demonstrate that treatment results in a statistically significant change in the slope of decline or improvement. Therefore, demonstration of a significant difference between tDCS and control (sham requires either a large number of participants or a large effect size. Designs The choice of a treatment design reflects these limitations. Group studies with a randomized, double-blind, sham control trial design (without cross-over provide the greatest power to detect a difference between intervention and control conditions, with the fewest participants. A cross-over design, in which all participants (from 1 to many receive both active and sham conditions, in randomized order, requires a larger effect size for the active condition relative to the control condition (or little to no maintenance of treatment gains or carry-over effect to show significant differences between treatment

  7. Subacute thyroiditis (de Quervain) presenting as a painless cold nodule

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    Bartels, P.C.; Boer, R.O.

    1987-09-01

    A 49-yr-old woman presented with a solid, painless, nontender nodule in the left thyroid lobe. Thyroid scintigraphy revealed a solitary cold area in the left lobe and a slightly decreased 24-hr radioactive iodine thyroid uptake (9%). Although there were no specific clinical or biochemical signs suggesting thyroiditis needle aspiration cytology showed the presence of a subacute thyroiditis. Approximately 1 mo later the entire thyroid gland was affected leading to a completely suppressed thyroid radioiodine uptake and elevated serum thyroid hormone concentrations. This case illustrates that in the early phase of the disease, subacute thyroiditis may present as a solitary, painless, cold nodule and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of such lesions.

  8. Measles-vaccinated Israeli boy with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Har-Even, Ronly; Aichenbaum, Sergio; Rabey, Jose M; Livne, Amir; Bistritzer, Tzvy

    2011-06-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a rare neurologic disorder of childhood and adolescence. We describe a 16-year-old boy who manifested the disease despite proper vaccinations. He was hospitalized because of bedwetting, involuntary limb movements, abnormal speech, and balance disturbances. Immunoglobulin G antibodies against measles were strongly positive, with a high relative cerebrospinal fluid/serum ratio. Polymerase chain reaction for measles produced negative results. Electroencephalography registered slow activity with high voltage discharges every few seconds, and with triphasic complex morphology. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse white matter changes, mostly around the posterior regions and lateral ventricles. Treatment with valproic acid, levetiracetam, carbamazepine, and intravenous immunoglobulin G was ineffective. Inosiplex and interferon-β-1a were also administrated. The patient became comatose, with generalized myoclonic jerks, and died 1 year later. An autopsy was not performed. This patient illustrates that subacute sclerosing panencephalitis should be suspected among young vaccinated subjects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Child with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Thakkar, Mayur Deepak; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a fatal infectious disease of childhood caused by persistence of the measles virus in the brain. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on subacute sclerosing panencephalitis remains elusive and rare. We report a child who developed subacute sclerosing panencephalitis following a short latency period and a rapidly progressive course with HIV co-infection. © 2016 Marshfield Clinic.

  10. Paracoccidioidomycosis: acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Lastória, Joel Carlos; de Camargo, Rosangela Maria Pires; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    The authors report aspects of paracoccidioidomycosis, acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type, in a 19-year-old female patient. Paracoccidioidomycosis, juvenile type, classically occurs in young patients, both sexes, with lymphoma-like aspects as initial presentation. However, following the natural history of the disease the lymph nodes assume patterns of infectious disease, as an abscess and fistulae. Systemic dissemination of the disease can occur and lethality and morbidity are significant in this clinical presentation. PMID:27438214

  11. Herbal hepatitis: subacute hepatic necrosis secondary to chaparral leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, M; Saibil, F

    1990-04-01

    A 33-year-old woman developed subacute hepatic necrosis after several months of ingestion of Chaparral Leaf, an herbal product. Symptoms first appeared 3 months after she began taking the tablets. The patient unwittingly carried out a clinical challenge by reducing, then increasing, the dose of pills. The public and the medical profession must be wary of all "harmless" nonprescription medications, whether purchased in pharmacies or elsewhere.

  12. Visual deterioration as presentation of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, H M; Wise, G A; Henry, J G

    1980-01-01

    A 7-year-old boy presented with deteriorating vision and macular degenerative changes. A month later he had developed unusual behaviour and increasing forgetfulness. An electroencephalogram showing periodic complexes, and high measles complement-fixation titres in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood, confirmed the diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Four months after the onset of visual symptoms he started having myoclonic jerks. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7436466

  13. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Changes on CT scan during acute relapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modi, G.; Bill, P. (Wentworth Hospital, Durban (South Africa). Dept. of Medicine); Campbell, H. (Wentworth Hospital, Durban (South Africa). Dept. of Radiology)

    1989-11-01

    A 19-year-old female patient presented in an acute state of akinetic mutism. Serological analysis of serum and cerebrospinal fluid demonstrated the presence of antibodies to measles virus. CT scan carried out during this acute phase of relapse demonstrated white matter enhancement affecting the cortical white matter of the frontal lobes and corpus callosum. These features indicate that active demyelination occurs during acute relapse in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and suggest that immunotherapy should be considered during this acute phase. (orig.).

  14. Antibodies to borna disease virus in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, Serdal; Anlar, Banu; Turan, Nuri; Yilmaz, Hüseyin; Helps, Chris R; Harbour, Dave A

    2005-09-01

    Mechanisms causing persistence and reactivation of measles virus in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) are unknown. Borna disease virus (BDV) frequently causes latent or persistent infection in the nervous system. We investigated a possible association of these viruses in SSPE. Although BDV seropositivity was similar in SSPE and control groups, SSPE patients with high antibodies to BDV had earlier and more rapid disease. The findings suggest that BDV might be involved in the course, but not in the etiopathogenesis, of SSPE.

  15. Subacute osteoporotic compression fracture: Misleading magnetic resonance appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frager, D.; Elkin, C.; Swerdlow, M.; Bloch, S.

    1988-03-01

    Three patients with benign subacute osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures are presented. T/sub 1/ weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images (SE 500/30) showed decreased vertebral signal. Because the results of the MR examination were thought to indicate malignant disease, extensive medical workups, including one biopsy, were pursued in all three patients. Routine (SE 500/30) spin-echo pulse sequences cannot definitively distinguish between benign and malignant vertebral compression fractures.

  16. Subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE due to Streptococcus gordonii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Battista

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis is an inflammatory state of the endothelium that promotes thrombus formation and tissue damage on the surface of heart valves. Recent studies have reported endocarditis mortality rates ranging from 12% to 46% (2008. The Streptococcus gordonii is a normal inhabitant of the human oral cavity. It is a component of the microbial communities responsible of plaque formation, associated with dental caries and also regarded as the main causative agent in the development of subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE.

  17. Protease production by Streptococcus sanguis associated with subacute bacterial endocarditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Straus, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    A viridans streptococcus (Streptococcus sanguis biotype II) isolated from the blood of a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis was examined for protease production. In broth culture, extracellular proteolytic enzymes were not produced by this organism until after the early exponential phase of growth, with maximal protease production occurring during the stationary phase. Four distinct proteases were isolated and purified from the supernatant fluids of stationary-phase cultures, employ...

  18. [Potentially treatable subacute forms of infection due to the HTLV-1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carod-Artal, F J; Melo, M; Alves, R; Brenner, C; del Negro, M C

    Tropical spastic paraparesis due to HTLV-I virus is diagnosed at very advanced stages, when there is spinal atrophy present and so only symptomatic treatment can be given. Early diagnosis of HTLV-I infection in unusual syndromes and the use of corticosteroids may help to slow the development of the disease. We describe two Brazilian patients who developed symptoms due to HTLV-I present for less than one year: subacute myelopathy with a sensory level and an ataxic pyramidal syndrome associated with axonal neuropathy, which partly improved after treatment with corticosteroids. A 50 year old woman presented with progressive paraparesis following pain, cramps, feeling that her legs had 'gone to sleep' and sphincter dysfunction over the previous eleven months. Spinal MR showed a diffuse spinal hypersignal at D2. The 60 year old man had developed an ataxic syndrome and axonal polyneuropathy over the previous ten months. In both patients the anti-HTLV antibodies in blood and CSF were positive on ELISA as later confirmed by Western-blot. Thorough biochemical study ruled out other infectious etiologies. Both patients were treated with corticosteroids (i.v. methylprednisolone and oral prednisone respectively) and their symptoms improved, particularly the joint pains, ataxia and the 'gone to sleep' sensation of the legs. The ataxic syndrome and myelopathy due to HTLV-I, when these have been diagnosed early, may benefit from corticosteroid treatment and progression of the disorder be prevented. The myelitic phase of HTLV-I infection is associated with diffuse myelopathy, which was unusually seen in our first patient on spinal MR.

  19. Mealtime interruptions, assistance and nutritional intake in subacute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Judi; Wilton, Anita; Collins, Jorja

    2016-09-01

    Protected mealtimes is an initiative to support increased nutritional intake for all hospitalised patients, particularly those who are malnourished. The increased focus on maximising independence of patients in the subacute setting may provide a supportive environment for implementing these strategies. The aim of the present study was to gain insight into subacute ward practices at mealtimes under usual conditions (i.e. at baseline) where no protected mealtimes policy was implemented. Participants were patients aged ≥65 years recruited from subacute care facilities at a large healthcare network in Victoria, Australia. Participants were observed at mealtimes and mid meals (i.e. morning tea, afternoon tea and supper) to determine daily energy and protein intake, provision of mealtime assistance and mealtime interruptions. Almost all participants received assistance when it was needed, with positive and negative interruptions experienced by 56.2% and 76.2% of participants, respectively. There was an energy deficit of approximately 2 MJ per day between average intake and estimated requirements. In conclusion, mealtime practices were suboptimal, with particularly high rates of negative interruptions. Protected mealtimes is one strategy that may improve the mealtime environment to support patients' dietary intake. Prospective studies are needed to evaluate its implementation and effects.

  20. EFFECT OF POSITIONAL RELEASE TECHNIQUE IN SUBJECTS WITH SUBACUTE TRAPEZITIS

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    Sweety Charles Carvalho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trapezius stretching combined with positional release technique (PRT have found effective in trapezitis, studies are limited to find which technique has shown effective over the other due to lack of control group. The purpose of the study is to find the effect of PRT on pain intensity, functional disability and range of motion in subjects with subacute trapezitis. Method: An experimental study design, selected subjects with subacute trapezitis was randomized into Study and Control group. Total 40 subjects, 20 subjects in each group; data was collected who completed the study. Control group received passive trapezius muscle stretching while Study group received positional release technique with passive trapezius muscle stretching for 8 sessions in 2 weeks. Outcome measurements such as Visual Analogue scale, Neck disability index and cervical Range of motion were measured. Results: There is statistically significant difference (p<0.05 showing improvement in means of VAS, NDI and Range of motion before and after intervention within the groups and there is statistically significant difference when the post-intervention means after 2 weeks of treatment were compared between Study and Control group. Conclusion: It is concluded that the Positional Release Technique with trapezius stretching found to be significantly more added effect than trapezius stretching alone in improving pain, functional disability and cervical movements for subjects with subacute trapezitis.

  1. Subacute and acute fasciolosis in sheep in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiss, Leticia; de Lourdes Adrien, Maria; Marcolongo-Pereira, Clairton; Assis-Brasil, Nathalia D; Sallis, Eliza S V; Riet-Correa, Franklin; Ruas, Jerônimo L; Schild, Ana Lucia

    2013-02-01

    Eight outbreaks of acute and subacute fasciolosis are reported in sheep in the municipality of Santa Vitória do Palmar, southern Brazil, in areas used for irrigated rice cultivation, which are subject to frequent flooding. Two outbreaks occurred mid-winter during July and August, and six occurred during spring and early summer. Morbidity ranged from 3 to 66.7 %, and mortality ranged from 3 to 50 %. Clinical signs included weight loss, mucosal pallor, apathy, depression, muscle tremors, and drooling; these were followed by death within approximately 24 h. Some sheep were found dead. Gross lesions were characterized by an irregular liver capsule with fibrin deposition and hemorrhages. The liver parenchyma contained hemorrhagic tracts or irregular clear areas alternated with dark hemorrhagic areas. Histologically, hemorrhagic dark red tracts of necrotic liver parenchyma and an inflammatory infiltrate were noted; these lesions coincided with the presence of immature flukes. Langhans-type giant cells, fibrous tissue, and bile duct cell proliferation were observed in subacute cases. Chronic fasciolosis is a well-known disease to farmers in southern Brazil; nevertheless, acute and subacute fasciolosis, which are more difficult to diagnose and treat, may cause important economic losses. Efficient control of fasciolosis requires integration of measures to treat infections in the definitive host, to reduce the population of snails of the genus Lymnaea, and to avoid contact between the parasite and host by appropriate pasture management.

  2. Masticatory function in subacute TMD patients before and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, L J; Steenks, M H; de Wijer, A; Speksnijder, C M; van der Bilt, A

    2009-06-01

    Masticatory function can be impaired in temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) patients. We investigated whether treatment of subacute non-specific TMD patients may influence oral function and clinical outcome measures. Fifteen patients with subacute TMD participated in the study. We quantified masticatory performance, maximum voluntary bite force, muscle activity and chewing cycle duration before and after treatment. Masticatory performance and bite force of patients were compared with the results obtained for an age- and gender-matched group of subjects without TMD complaints. Furthermore, we determined possible changes in anamnestic and clinical scores from questionnaires (mandibular function impairment questionnaire; MFIQ), pain scores and clinical outcome measures. Maximum bite force significantly increased, although the values after treatment were still significantly lower than those of the subjects without TMD complaints. The corresponding electromyography values did not show significant change after treatment. The masticatory performance of the patients remained unaltered; patients chewed significantly less efficient than controls. The average duration of chewing cycles significantly decreased after treatment. We observed a significant improvement in MFIQ scores. During the clenching and chewing tasks, the visual analogue scale scores were significantly higher than before these tasks. We may conclude that subacute temporomandibular joint disorders negatively influence chewing behaviour. Bite force, chewing cycle duration and also perceived mandibular function significantly improved after treatment, although the masticatory performance remained unaltered.

  3. MR findings of subacute necrotizing myelopathy: case report

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    Na, Dong Gyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hyun Jip; Kim, Chong Jai; Chi, Je G. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    Subacute necrotizing myelopathy(SNM) is a rare non-tumorous disease of spinal cord characterized by subacute clinical course of progressive neurological deterioration. We report MR findings of a patient with pathologically proved SNM. 1 case of pathologically proved subacute necrotizing myelopathy. The patients was a 56-year-old man with progressive motor weakness and sensory loss of the lower extremities, and urinary and fecal incontinence for 11 months. Spine MRI revealed diffuse enlargement of the thoracic spinal cord from T2 to T7 level. Signal intensity of the expanded spinal cord was isointense relative to normal cord on T1-weighted image and hyperintense on proton-density and T2-weighted images. On contrast enhanced T1-weighted image, there was diffuse homogeneous enhancement in the expanded cord lesion. MR demonstration of stable persistence of spinal cord lesion or atrophy over months or years with clinical findings of gradual progressive neurologic deterioration may be helpful in the diagnosis of SNM.

  4. {sup 18}F-FDG PET and MRS of the early stages of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in a child with a normal initial MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Yeong-Seon; Jung, Da-Eun [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Suwon, Kyungki-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho-Sung [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Suwon, Kyungki-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    In subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), conventional MRI findings have been reported. However, in the early clinical stages, imaging studies can appear normal. Moreover, with no history of infant measles infection, the diagnosis of SSPE can only be arrived at after extensive investigation that must eliminate a number of neurodegenerative diseases. We report here on {sup 18} F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) findings in a 14-year-old girl with a normal initial MRI who had not contracted measles. Although {sup 18} F-FDG PET and MRS are not specific or diagnostic for SSPE, these techniques can demonstrate substantial metabolic impairments when MRI findings show no obvious abnormalities, as is often the case in the early stages of this disease. (orig.)

  5. Recent Patent Advances For Neurodegenerative Disorders And Its Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bhavna; Sharma, Deepika

    2017-10-10

    Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the common diseases that affect our society with tremendous medical and financial burdens. As a whole, neurodegeneration affects individuals of all ages, but becomes increasingly frequent with age, coming to affect a very large share of our elderly population which is severely affecting the patient, caregivers, and enormously increasing the financial burden of the nation. These diseases share a very complex nature, which often result from combined genetic, environment and pathogenic factors. Various challenges are faced by the scientific community that researches on the pathogenesis and the therapy of neurodegenerative disorder. The review has been analysed for recent patent documents and treatment approaches for neurodegenerative disorders. The study design is based on updating the international and national literatures and an exhaustive patent search and compiling of various patented documents for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders (EP2282779 A1, US20110229555 A1) to provide information in the state of technological innovation in terms of research and development. In the present review, the authors described various neurodegenerative diseases, there treatment strategies and emphasized on various patented approaches for age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as New therapeutic approaches for treating Alzheimer disease and related disorders through a modulation of cell stress response EP2282779 A1, through combined therapies that modulate angiogenesis US20120058992 A1. The review will attract the interest of academics, researchers, students and pharmaceutical companies in the recent on-going activities in neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Increased neurofilament light chain blood levels in neurodegenerative neurological diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Gaiottino

    Full Text Available Neuronal damage is the morphological substrate of persisting neurological disability. Neurofilaments (Nf are cytoskeletal proteins of neurons and their release into cerebrospinal fluid has shown encouraging results as a biomarker for neurodegeneration. This study aimed to validate the quantification of the Nf light chain (NfL in blood samples, as a biofluid source easily accessible for longitudinal studies.We developed and applied a highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL based immunoassay for quantification of NfL in blood and CSF.Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD (30.8 pg/ml, n=20, Guillain-Barré-syndrome (GBS (79.4 pg/ml, n=19 or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS (95.4 pg/ml, n=46 had higher serum NfL values than a control group of neurological patients without evidence of structural CNS damage (control patients, CP (4.4 pg/ml, n=68, p<0.0001 for each comparison, p=0.002 for AD patients and healthy controls (HC (3.3 pg/ml, n=67, p<0.0001. Similar differences were seen in corresponding CSF samples. CSF and serum levels correlated in AD (r=0.48, p=0.033, GBS (r=0.79, p<0.0001 and ALS (r=0.70, p<0.0001, but not in CP (r=0.11, p=0.3739. The sensitivity and specificity of serum NfL for separating ALS from healthy controls was 91.3% and 91.0%.We developed and validated a novel ECL based sandwich immunoassay for the NfL protein in serum (NfL(Umea47:3; levels in ALS were more than 20-fold higher than in controls. Our data supports further longitudinal studies of serum NfL in neurodegenerative diseases as a potential biomarker of on-going disease progression, and as a potential surrogate to quantify effects of neuroprotective drugs in clinical trials.

  7. In silico studies in drug research against neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhouri, Farahnaz Rezaei; Ghasemi, Jahan B

    2017-08-22

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive neurodegenerative forms of Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cerebellar ataxias, and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy are described by slow and selective dysfunction and degeneration of neurons and axons in the central nervous system (CNS). Computer-aided or in silico design methods have matured into powerful tools for reducing the number of ligands that should be screened in experimental assays. In the present review, the authors provide a basic background about neurodegenerative diseases and in silico techniques in the drug research. Furthermore, they review the various in silico studies reported against various targets in neurodegenerative diseases, including homology modeling, molecular docking, virtual high-throughput screening, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR), hologram quantitative structure activity relationship (HQSAR), 3D pharmacophore mapping, proteochemometrics modeling (PCM), fingerprints, fragment-based drug discovery, Monte Carlo simulation, molecular dynamic (MD) simulation, quantum-mechanical methods for drug design, support vector machines, and machine learning approaches. Neurodegenerative diseases have a multifactorial pathoetiological origin, so scientists have become persuaded that a multi-target therapeutic strategy aimed at the simultaneous targeting of multiple proteins (and therefore etiologies) involved in the development of a disease is recommended in future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Preventive and therapeutic potential of ascorbic acid in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Morgana; Fraga, Daiane Bittencourt; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2017-12-01

    In this review, we summarize the involvement of ascorbic acid in neurodegenerative diseases by presenting available evidence on the behavioral and biochemical effects of this compound in animal models of neurodegeneration as well as the use of ascorbic acid as a therapeutic approach to alleviate neurodegenerative progression in clinical studies. Ascorbate, a reduced form of vitamin C, has gained interest for its multiple functions and mechanisms of action, contributing to the homeostasis of normal tissues and organs as well as to tissue regeneration. In the brain, ascorbate exerts neuromodulatory functions and scavenges reactive oxygen species generated during synaptic activity and neuronal metabolism. These are important properties as redox imbalance and abnormal protein aggregation constitute central mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases, multiple sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Indeed, several studies have indicated an association between low serum ascorbate concentrations and neurodegeneration. Moreover, ascorbic acid is a suitable candidate for supplying either antioxidant defense or modulation of neuronal and astrocytic metabolism under neurodegenerative conditions. Ascorbic acid acts mainly by decreasing oxidative stress and reducing the formation of protein aggregates, which may contribute to the reduction of cognitive and/or motor impairments observed in neurodegenerative processes. Although several studies support a possible role of ascorbic acid administration against neurodegeneration, more researches are essential to substantiate the existing results and accelerate the knowledge in this field. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Neurodegenerative Diseases: Multifactorial Conformational Diseases and Their Therapeutic Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Sheikh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are multifactorial debilitating disorders of the nervous system that affect approximately 30 millionindividuals worldwide. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis diseases are the consequence of misfolding and dysfunctional trafficking of proteins. Beside that, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and/or environmental factors strongly associated with age have also been implicated in causing neurodegeneration. After years of intensive research, considerable evidence has accumulated that demonstrates an important role of these factors in the etiology of common neurodegenerative diseases. Despite the extensive efforts that have attempted to define the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration, many aspects of these pathologies remain elusive. However, in order to explore the therapeutic interventions directed towards treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, neuroscientists are now fully exploiting the data obtained from studies of these basic mechanisms that have gone awry. The novelty of these mechanisms represents a challenge to the identification of viable drug targets and biomarkers for early diagnosis of the diseases. In this paper, we are reviewing various aspects associated with the disease and the recent trends that may have an application for the treatment of the neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from acute, sub-acute and sub-clinical staphylococcosis in rabbits

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    Rajeshkumar J. Tirpude

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus bacteria isolated from different clinical presentations of staphylococcosis in rabbits were examined for the production of various virulence factors using biochemical and immunological tests. In the total of 106 S. aureus isolates; toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, staphylococcal enterotoxin-C, DNase, α-haemolysin, β-haemolysin, δ-haemolysin, protein A and clumping factor were observed with a frequency of 33.2, 16.98, 83.96, 69.81, 36.79, 100, 78.30 and 54.72 percent, respectively. No SE-A, SE-B and SE-D producing isolates were recovered in this study. All the S. aureus isolates from acute staphylococcosis produced TSST-1, SE-C and protein A. While δ–haemolysin and clumping factor were not detected in any acute isolates, these factors were observed at a relatively higher frequency in isolates from sub-acute and sub-clinical staphylococcosis. Coagulase type III was observed more predominantly with a frequency of 45.28%, while coagulase types V and VII were not observed in any isolate. Most of the virulence factors belonged to coagulase type III followed by type VI. TSST-1 and SE-C along with coagulase types III and VI could be correlated with the acute and sub-acute staphylococcal infections in rabbits in this study.

  11. Melatonin for Sleep Disorders in Patients with Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotti, Lynn Marie; Karroum, Elias G

    2016-07-01

    In patients with neurodegenerative diseases, sleep disorders are common; they impair the quality of life for patients and caregivers and are associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Melatonin has circadian, hypnotic, and free radical-scavenging effects, and preclinical data suggest benefits of melatonin on neurodegeneration. However, randomized, controlled trials of melatonin in patients with neurodegenerative diseases have not shown strong effects. Trials in Alzheimer's patients demonstrate a lack of benefit on sleep quantity. Subjective measures of sleep quality are mixed, with possible symptomatic improvements seen only on some measures or at some time points. Benefits on cognition have not been observed across several studies. In Parkinson's patients, there may be minimal benefit on objective sleep measures, but a suggestion of subjective benefit in few, small studies. Effective treatments for the sleep disorders associated with neurodegenerative diseases are urgently needed, but current data are insufficient to establish melatonin as such a treatment.

  12. Redox Imbalance and Viral Infections in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Limongi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are essential molecules for many physiological functions and act as second messengers in a large variety of tissues. An imbalance in the production and elimination of ROS is associated with human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders. In the last years the notion that neurodegenerative diseases are accompanied by chronic viral infections, which may result in an increase of neurodegenerative diseases progression, emerged. It is known in literature that enhanced viral infection risk, observed during neurodegeneration, is partly due to the increase of ROS accumulation in brain cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of viral infection, occurring during the progression of neurodegeneration, remain unclear. In this review, we discuss the recent knowledge regarding the role of influenza, herpes simplex virus type-1, and retroviruses infection in ROS/RNS-mediated Parkinson’s disease (PD, Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS.

  13. Interaction between -Synuclein and Other Proteins in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt A. Jellinger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is a common characteristic of many neurodegenerative disorders, and the interaction between pathological/toxic proteins to cause neurodegeneration is a hot topic of current neuroscience research. Despite clinical, genetic, and experimental differences, evidence increasingly indicates considerable overlap between synucleinopathies and tauopathies or other protein-misfolding diseases. Inclusions, characteristics of these disorders, also occurring in other neurodegenerative diseases, suggest interactions of pathological proteins engaging common downstream pathways. Novel findings that have shifted our understanding in the role of pathologic proteins in the pathogenesis of Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases have confirmed correlations/overlaps between these and other neurodegenerative disorders. The synergistic effects of α-synuclein, hyperphosphorylated tau, amyloid-β, and other pathologic proteins, and the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms, including induction and spread of protein aggregates, are critically reviewed, suggesting a dualism or triad of neurodegeneration in protein-misfolding disorders, although the etiology of most of these processes is still mysterious.

  14. The Function of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajin Liao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU—a calcium uniporter on the inner membrane of mitochondria—controls the mitochondrial calcium uptake in normal and abnormal situations. Mitochondrial calcium is essential for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP; however, excessive calcium will induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Calcium homeostasis disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role and regulatory mechanism of the MCU in the development of these diseases are obscure. In this review, we summarize the role of the MCU in controlling oxidative stress-elevated mitochondrial calcium and its function in neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibition of the MCU signaling pathway might be a new target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Sleep disturbance in mental health problems and neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson KN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kirstie N Anderson1 Andrew J Bradley2,3 1Department of Neurology, Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Trust, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK; 2Eli Lilly and Company Limited, Lilly House, Basingstoke, UK; 3Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK Abstract: Sleep has been described as being of the brain, by the brain, and for the brain. This fundamental neurobiological behavior is controlled by homeostatic and circadian (24-hour processes and is vital for normal brain function. This review will outline the normal sleep–wake cycle, the changes that occur during aging, and the specific patterns of sleep disturbance that occur in association with both mental health disorders and neurodegenerative disorders. The role of primary sleep disorders such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, and REM sleep behavior disorder as potential causes or risk factors for particular mental health or neurodegenerative problems will also be discussed. Keywords: sleep, mental health, neurodegenerative disorders, cognition

  16. Stem Cells for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by neurodegenerative changes or apoptosis of neurons involved in networks, leading to permanent paralysis and loss of sensation below the site of the injury. Cell replacement therapy has provided the basis for the development of potentially powerful new therapeutic strategies for a broad spectrum of human neurological diseases. In recent years, neurons and glial cells have successfully been generated from stem cells, and extensive efforts by investigators to develop stem cell-based brain transplantation therapies have been carried out. We review here notable previously published experimental and preclinical studies involving stem cell-based cell for neurodegenerative diseases and discuss the future prospects for stem cell therapy of neurological disorders in the clinical setting. Steady and solid progress in stem cell research in both basic and preclinical settings should support the hope for development of stem cell-based cell therapies for neurological diseases.

  17. Eyelid Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative, Neurogenetic, and Neurometabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali G. Hamedani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Eye movement abnormalities are among the earliest clinical manifestations of inherited and acquired neurodegenerative diseases and play an integral role in their diagnosis. Eyelid movement is neuroanatomically linked to eye movement, and thus eyelid dysfunction can also be a distinguishing feature of neurodegenerative disease and complements eye movement abnormalities in helping us to understand their pathophysiology. In this review, we summarize the various eyelid abnormalities that can occur in neurodegenerative, neurogenetic, and neurometabolic diseases. We discuss eyelid disorders, such as ptosis, eyelid retraction, abnormal spontaneous and reflexive blinking, blepharospasm, and eyelid apraxia in the context of the neuroanatomic pathways that are affected. We also review the literature regarding the prevalence of eyelid abnormalities in different neurologic diseases as well as treatment strategies (Table 1.

  18. A multicenter study on Leigh syndrome: Disease course and predictors of survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Sofou (Kalliopi); I.F.M. de Coo (René); M.K. Isohanni (Matti); M. Ostergaard; K. Naess (Karin); L. de Meirleir (Linda); C. Tzoulis (Charalampos); J. Uusimaa (Johanna); I. de Angst (Isabel); T. Lönnqvist (Tuula); H. Pihko (Helena); K. Mankinen (Katariina); L.A. Bindoff (Laurence Albert); M. Tulinius (Már); N. Darin (Niklas)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Leigh syndrome is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, associated with primary or secondary dysfunction of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Despite the fact that Leigh syndrome is the most common phenotype of mitochondrial disorders in children, longitudinal

  19. Nanomedicine and neurodegenerative disorders: so close yet so far.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Giovanni; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Forni, Flavio; Ruozi, Barbara

    2015-07-01

    This editorial provides an overview of the main advantages of the use of nanomedicine-based approach for innovation in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Besides these aspects, a critical analysis on the main causes that slow the application of nanomedicine to brain disorders is given along with the identification of possible solutions and possible interventions. Better communication between the main players of research in this field and a detailed understanding of the most critical issues to be addressed should help in defining future directions towards the improvement and, finally, the clinical application of nanomedicine to neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Sleep disturbance in mental health problems and neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kirstie N; Bradley, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    Sleep has been described as being of the brain, by the brain, and for the brain. This fundamental neurobiological behavior is controlled by homeostatic and circadian (24-hour) processes and is vital for normal brain function. This review will outline the normal sleep-wake cycle, the changes that occur during aging, and the specific patterns of sleep disturbance that occur in association with both mental health disorders and neurodegenerative disorders. The role of primary sleep disorders such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, and REM sleep behavior disorder as potential causes or risk factors for particular mental health or neurodegenerative problems will also be discussed.

  1. Apocynin, a Low Molecular Oral Treatment for Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert A. ‘t Hart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammatory mediators secreted by activated resident or infiltrated innate immune cells have a significant impact on the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. This may imply that patients affected by a neurodegenerative disease may benefit from treatment with selective inhibitors of innate immune activity. Here we review the therapeutic potential of apocynin, an essentially nontoxic phenolic compound isolated from the medicinal plant Jatropha multifida. Apocynin is a selective inhibitor of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase Nox2 that can be applied orally and is remarkably effective at low dose.

  2. Global warming and neurodegenerative disorders: speculations on their linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Laleh; Perry, George; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is having considerable impact on biological systems. Eras of ice ages and warming shaped the contemporary earth and origin of creatures including humans. Warming forces stress conditions on cells. Therefore, cells evolved elaborate defense mechanisms, such as creation of heat shock proteins, to combat heat stress. Global warming is becoming a crisis and this process would yield an undefined increasing rate of neurodegenerative disorders in future decades. Since heat stress is known to have a degenerative effects on neurons and, conversely, cold conditions have protective effect on these cells, we hypothesize that persistent heat stress forced by global warming might play a crucial role in increasing neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Oxidative stress underlying axonal degeneration in adrenoleukodystrophy: a paradigm for multifactorial neurodegenerative diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Elena; Launay, Nathalie; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Ruiz, Montserrat; Pamplona, Reinald; Aubourg, Patrick; Ferrer, Isidre; Pujol, Aurora

    2012-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder expressed as four disease variants characterized by adrenal insufficiency and graded damage in the nervous system. X-ALD is caused by a loss of function of the peroxisomal ABCD1 fatty-acid transporter, resulting in the accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) in the organs and plasma, which have potentially toxic effects in CNS and adrenal glands. We have recently shown that treatment with a combination of antioxidants containing α-tocopherol, N-acetyl-cysteine and α-lipoic acid reversed oxidative damage and energetic failure, together with the axonal degeneration and locomotor impairment displayed by Abcd1 null mice, the animal model of X-ALD. This is the first direct demonstration that oxidative stress, which is a hallmark not only of X-ALD, but also of other neurodegenerative processes, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD), contributes to axonal damage. The purpose of this review is, first, to discuss the molecular and cellular underpinnings of VLCFA-induced oxidative stress, and how it interacts with energy metabolism and/or inflammation to generate a complex syndrome wherein multiple factors are contributing. Particular attention will be paid to the dysregulation of redox homeostasis by the interplay between peroxisomes and mitochondria. Second, we will extend this analysis to the aforementioned neurodegenerative diseases with the aim of defining differences as well as the existence of a core pathogenic mechanism that would justify the exchange of therapeutic opportunities among these pathologies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dysregulation of cholesterol balance in the brain: contribution to neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean E. Vance

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis in the brain is increasingly being linked to chronic neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Huntington’s disease (HD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease and Smith-Lemli Opitz syndrome (SLOS. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the correlation between altered cholesterol metabolism and the neurological deficits are, for the most part, not clear. NPC disease and SLOS are caused by mutations in genes involved in the biosynthesis or intracellular trafficking of cholesterol, respectively. However, the types of neurological impairments, and the areas of the brain that are most affected, differ between these diseases. Some, but not all, studies indicate that high levels of plasma cholesterol correlate with increased risk of developing AD. Moreover, inheritance of the E4 isoform of apolipoprotein E (APOE, a cholesterol-carrying protein, markedly increases the risk of developing AD. Whether or not treatment of AD with statins is beneficial remains controversial, and any benefit of statin treatment might be due to anti-inflammatory properties of the drug. Cholesterol balance is also altered in HD and PD, although no causal link between dysregulated cholesterol homeostasis and neurodegeneration has been established. Some important considerations for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases are the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier to many therapeutic agents and difficulties in reversing brain damage that has already occurred. This article focuses on how cholesterol balance in the brain is altered in several neurodegenerative diseases, and discusses some commonalities and differences among the diseases.

  5. Subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord in a Nigerian child

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-19

    Dec 19, 2015 ... Abstract: Background: Vitamin. B12 deficiency has been reported to be associated with a spectrum of neurological disorders among which is subacute combined de- generation of the spinal cord. Method: We report a case of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord secondary to vitamin B12 ...

  6. Subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord in a Nigerian child

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Vitamin B12 deficiency has been reported to be associated with a spectrum of neurological disorders among which is subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord. Method: We report a case of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency and discussed the ...

  7. Prognostic factors for disability and sick leave in patients with subacute non-malignant pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Gitte H; Pilegaard, Marc S; Vaegter, Henrik B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This systematic review aims to identify generic prognostic factors for disability and sick leave in subacute pain patients. SETTING: General practice and other primary care facilities. PARTICIPANTS: Adults (>18 years) with a subacute (≤3-month) non-malignant pain condition. Eligibility...... reporting of all factors examined. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42014008914.......OBJECTIVE: This systematic review aims to identify generic prognostic factors for disability and sick leave in subacute pain patients. SETTING: General practice and other primary care facilities. PARTICIPANTS: Adults (>18 years) with a subacute (≤3-month) non-malignant pain condition. Eligibility...... criteria were cohort studies investigating the prediction of disability or long-term sick leave in adults with a subacute pain condition in a primary care setting. 19 studies were included, referring to a total of 6266 patients suffering from pain in the head, neck, back and shoulders. PRIMARY...

  8. Midazolam or diazepam administration during electroencephalography helps to diagnose subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Kutluhan; Sahin, Derya Aydin

    2010-08-01

    Although diagnostic contribution of intravenous diazepam administration during electroencephalography (EEG) recording in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis has been known, no another drug with less potential side effects has been studied in this procedure. In this study, diazepam is compared with midazolam in 25 subacute sclerosing panencephalitis-diagnosed children and 10 children with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis-suggesting symptoms, normal EEG findings and no certain diagnosis. Neither midazolam nor diazepam affected typical periodic slow-wave complexes. However, in the patients with atypical EEG abnormalities, midazolam, like diazepam, attenuated sharp or sharp-and-slow waves, and therefore made the identification of periodic slow-wave paroxysms easier. In the patients with normal EEGs, both midazolam and diazepam revealed typical periodic complexes on EEG recording in the same 3 patients. Cerebrospinal fluid examination verified the diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The findings suggest that midazolam or diazepam administration increases the contribution of EEG recording in atypical cases with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

  9. Overnutrition Determines LPS Regulation of Mycotoxin Induced Neurotoxicity in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ian James

    2015-12-10

    Chronic neurodegenerative diseases are now associated with obesity and diabetes and linked to the developing and developed world. Interests in healthy diets have escalated that may prevent neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. The global metabolic syndrome involves lipoprotein abnormalities and insulin resistance and is the major disorder for induction of neurological disease. The effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on dyslipidemia and NAFLD indicate that the clearance and metabolism of fungal mycotoxins are linked to hypercholesterolemia and amyloid beta oligomers. LPS and mycotoxins are associated with membrane lipid disturbances with effects on cholesterol interacting proteins, lipoprotein metabolism, and membrane apo E/amyloid beta interactions relevant to hypercholesterolemia with close connections to neurological diseases. The influence of diet on mycotoxin metabolism has accelerated with the close association between mycotoxin contamination from agricultural products such as apple juice, grains, alcohol, and coffee. Cholesterol efflux in lipoproteins and membrane cholesterol are determined by LPS with involvement of mycotoxin on amyloid beta metabolism. Nutritional interventions such as diets low in fat/carbohydrate/cholesterol have become of interest with relevance to low absorption of lipophilic LPS and mycotoxin into lipoproteins with rapid metabolism of mycotoxin to the liver with the prevention of neurodegeneration.

  10. Overnutrition Determines LPS Regulation of Mycotoxin Induced Neurotoxicity in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian James Martins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic neurodegenerative diseases are now associated with obesity and diabetes and linked to the developing and developed world. Interests in healthy diets have escalated that may prevent neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. The global metabolic syndrome involves lipoprotein abnormalities and insulin resistance and is the major disorder for induction of neurological disease. The effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS on dyslipidemia and NAFLD indicate that the clearance and metabolism of fungal mycotoxins are linked to hypercholesterolemia and amyloid beta oligomers. LPS and mycotoxins are associated with membrane lipid disturbances with effects on cholesterol interacting proteins, lipoprotein metabolism, and membrane apo E/amyloid beta interactions relevant to hypercholesterolemia with close connections to neurological diseases. The influence of diet on mycotoxin metabolism has accelerated with the close association between mycotoxin contamination from agricultural products such as apple juice, grains, alcohol, and coffee. Cholesterol efflux in lipoproteins and membrane cholesterol are determined by LPS with involvement of mycotoxin on amyloid beta metabolism. Nutritional interventions such as diets low in fat/carbohydrate/cholesterol have become of interest with relevance to low absorption of lipophilic LPS and mycotoxin into lipoproteins with rapid metabolism of mycotoxin to the liver with the prevention of neurodegeneration.

  11. Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus inducing unilateral sensorimotor neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psarelis, Savvas; Georgiades, Fanourios; Ioannou, Antreas; Xenophontos, Eleni; Georgiou, Georgios; Papanicolaou, Eleni

    2017-05-01

    We describe the case of a 32-year-old male with previous history of subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) who presented with arthritis followed by a unilateral lower-limb sensorimotor impairment, without biochemical or immunological marker abnormalities. Our patient currently satisfies only three of the systemic lupus international collaborating clinics criteria. Management of such patients is challenging due to lack of examples in the literature, with this case being the first described where a seronegative patient with SCLE demonstrated neurological involvement. A brief review of the available literature is included.

  12. Atypical clinical course subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presenting as acute Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komur, Mustafa; Arslankoylu, Ali E; Okuyaz, Cetin; Kuyucu, Necdet

    2012-01-01

    We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with loss of consciousness and gait instability. The electroencephalogram (EEG) showed generalized slowing with irregular activity and cerebral magnetic imaging revealed asymmetrical nonspecific signals on basal ganglia. His second electroencephalogram revealed periodical generalized high-voltage slow wave complexes which did not disappear with diazepam induction. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) was considered and the diagnosis was confirmed with the identification of measles antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid. Our findings show that SSPE should be in mind in the differential diagnosis of meningoencephalitis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and highlight the significance of EEG in the diagnosis of unidentified cases. PMID:23248691

  13. Catatonia as presenting clinical feature of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Prabhoo; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

    2014-01-01

    Catatonia is not a usual clinical presentation of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), especially in the initial stages of illness. However, there is only one reported case of SSPE presenting as catatonia among children. In this report, however, there were SSPE-specific changes on EEG and the catatonia failed to respond to lorazepam. We describe a case of SSPE in a child presenting as catatonia that presented with clinical features of catatonia and did not have typical EEG findings when assessed at first contact. He responded to lorazepam and EEG changes emerged during the course of follow-up.

  14. Computed tomographic findings of early subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, H.; Wulff, C.H.

    1982-03-01

    Computed tomography of the brain (CT) was carried out at the early stages of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) in three children. The lateral ventricles were very small and the hemispheric sulci and interhemispheric fissures were not visible in all three patients in contrast to severe atrophy found at a later stage in one patient. The early CT abnormalities were revealed at the same time as the titres of measles antibodies in blood and cerebrospinal fluid were elevated, and the characteristic periodic complexes in the electroencephalogram established the diagnosis of SSPE. The CT changes indicating brain swelling reflect the reactive changes of this slow virus infection.

  15. Oxidant and antioxidant status in children with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caksen, Hüseyin; Ozkan, Mustafa; Cemek, Mustafa; Cemek, Fatma

    2014-11-01

    We analyzed serum alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, retinol, and ascorbic acid levels and malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione concentrations on erythrocyte and cerebrospinal fluid in 30 patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis to evaluate oxidant and antioxidant status. Serum alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, retinol, ascorbic acid levels, and erythrocyte and cerebrospinal fluid reduced glutathione concentrations were decreased; however, erythrocyte and cerebrospinal fluid malondialdehyde levels were increased in the patients. Cerebrospinal fluid malondialdehyde levels were different between clinical stages of the disease (P panencephalitis and that antioxidants were increased as defense mechanisms of the organism against oxidative damage. © The Author(s) 2013.

  16. Circadian clocks and neurodegenerative diseases: time to aggregate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Michael H; Goedert, Michel

    2013-10-01

    The major neurodegenerative diseases are characterised by a disabling loss of the daily pattern of sleep and wakefulness, which may be reflective of a compromise to the underlying circadian clock that times the sleep cycle. At a molecular level, the canonical property of neurodegenerative diseases is aberrant aggregation of otherwise soluble neuronal proteins. They can thus be viewed as disturbances of proteostasis, raising the question whether the two features - altered daily rhythms and molecular aggregation - are related. Recent discoveries have highlighted the fundamental contribution of circadian clocks to the correct ordering of daily cellular metabolic cycles, imposing on peripheral organs such as the liver a strict programme that alternates between anabolic and catabolic states. The discovery that circadian mechanisms are active in local brain regions suggests that they may impinge upon physiological and pathological elements that influence pro-neurodegenerative aggregation. This review explores how introducing the dimension of circadian time and the circadian clock might refine the analysis of aberrant aggregation, thus expanding our perspective on the cell biology common to neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Chronic sleep disturbance and neural injury: links to neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Sabra M; Videnovic, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Sleep-wake disruption is frequently observed and often one of the earliest reported symptoms of many neurodegenerative disorders. This provides insight into the underlying pathophysiology of these disorders, as sleep-wake abnormalities are often accompanied by neurodegenerative or neurotransmitter changes. However, in addition to being a symptom of the underlying neurodegenerative condition, there is also emerging evidence that sleep disturbance itself may contribute to the development and facilitate the progression of several of these disorders. Due to its impact both as an early symptom and as a potential factor contributing to ongoing neurodegeneration, the sleep-wake cycle is an ideal target for further study for potential interventions not only to lessen the burden of these diseases but also to slow their progression. In this review, we will highlight the sleep phenotypes associated with some of the major neurodegenerative disorders, focusing on the circadian disruption associated with Alzheimer's disease, the rapid eye movement behavior disorder and sleep fragmentation associated with Parkinson's disease, and the insomnia and circadian dysregulation associated with Huntington's disease.

  18. NSAIDs and cardiovascular drugs in neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D.M. Haag (Mendel)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractNeurodegenerative and cerebrovascular diseases are frequent in elderly populations and comprise primarily of dementia (mainly Alzheimer disease (AD)), Parkinson disease (PD) and stroke. The prevalence of these neurological disorders rises with older age. From 55 years to 90 years and

  19. Absence of consensus in diagnostic criteria for familial neurodegenerative diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Susan

    2012-04-01

    A small proportion of cases seen in neurodegenerative conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson\\'s disease and Alzheimer disease are familial. These familial cases are usually clinically indistinguishable from sporadic cases. Identifying familial cases is important both in terms of clinical guidance for family members and for gene discovery.

  20. Memory in neurodegenerative disease: biological, cognitive, and clinical perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tröster, Alexander I

    1998-01-01

    ... associated with Huntington's disease  .   .   21 3 Neuropathology and memory dysfunction in neurodegenerative disease...

  1. Rescue strategies in Drosophila models of neurodegenerative diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baratashvili, Madina Baratovna

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades advances in medicine have led to an extended life span of the general population, which, as a negative consequence, increased the occurrence of age-related neurodegenerative diseases. The necessity to improve the quality of life together with the urge to decrease the economic

  2. Predictive gene testing for Huntington disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedderburn, S; Panegyres, P K; Andrew, S; Goldblatt, J; Liebeck, T; McGrath, F; Wiltshire, M; Pestell, C; Lee, J; Beilby, J

    2013-12-01

    Controversies exist around predictive testing (PT) programmes in neurodegenerative disorders. This study sets out to answer the following questions relating to Huntington disease (HD) and other neurodegenerative disorders: differences between these patients in their PT journeys, why and when individuals withdraw from PT, and decision-making processes regarding reproductive genetic testing. A case series analysis of patients having PT from the multidisciplinary Western Australian centre for PT over the past 20 years was performed using internationally recognised guidelines for predictive gene testing in neurodegenerative disorders. Of 740 at-risk patients, 518 applied for PT: 466 at risk of HD, 52 at risk of other neurodegenerative disorders - spinocerebellar ataxias, hereditary prion disease and familial Alzheimer disease. Thirteen percent withdrew from PT - 80.32% of withdrawals occurred during counselling stages. Major withdrawal reasons related to timing in the patients' lives or unknown as the patient did not disclose the reason. Thirty-eight HD individuals had reproductive genetic testing: 34 initiated prenatal testing (of which eight withdrew from the process) and four initiated pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. There was no recorded or other evidence of major psychological reactions or suicides during PT. People withdrew from PT in relation to life stages and reasons that are unknown. Our findings emphasise the importance of: (i) adherence to internationally recommended guidelines for PT; (ii) the role of the multidisciplinary team in risk minimisation; and (iii) patient selection. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  3. Chronic sleep disturbance and neural injury: links to neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbott SM

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sabra M Abbott,1 Aleksandar Videnovic21Department of Neurology, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Sleep–wake disruption is frequently observed and often one of the earliest reported symptoms of many neurodegenerative disorders. This provides insight into the underlying pathophysiology of these disorders, as sleep–wake abnormalities are often accompanied by neurodegenerative or neurotransmitter changes. However, in addition to being a symptom of the underlying neurodegenerative condition, there is also emerging evidence that sleep disturbance itself may contribute to the development and facilitate the progression of several of these disorders. Due to its impact both as an early symptom and as a potential factor contributing to ongoing neurodegeneration, the sleep–wake cycle is an ideal target for further study for potential interventions not only to lessen the burden of these diseases but also to slow their progression. In this review, we will highlight the sleep phenotypes associated with some of the major neurodegenerative disorders, focusing on the circadian disruption associated with Alzheimer’s disease, the rapid eye movement behavior disorder and sleep fragmentation associated with Parkinson’s disease, and the insomnia and circadian dysregulation associated with Huntington’s disease. Keywords: sleep, neurodegeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease

  4. Pharmacological Modulation of Functional Phenotypes of Microglia in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyun Jee Song

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are the resident innate immune cells of the central nervous system that mediate brain homeostasis maintenance. Microglia-mediated neuroinflammation is a hallmark shared by various neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and multiple sclerosis. Numerous studies have shown microglial activation phenotypes to be heterogeneous; however, these microglial phenotypes can largely be categorized as being either M1 or M2 type. Although the specific classification of M1 and M2 functionally polarized microglia remains a topic for debate, the use of functional modulators of microglial phenotypes as potential therapeutic approaches for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases has garnered considerable attention. This review discusses M1 and M2 microglial phenotypes and their relevance in neurodegenerative disease models, as described in recent literature. The modulation of microglial polarization toward the M2 phenotype may lead to development of future therapeutic and preventive strategies for neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, we focus on recent studies of microglial polarization modulators, with a particular emphasis on the small-molecule compounds and their intracellular target proteins.

  5. Gene Therapy-Based Modeling of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by impairments in motor control, and cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. In this chapter, viral vector-mediated approaches used in modeling the key neuropathological features of the disease including the production of abnormal intracellular protein aggregates, neuronal dysfunction and degeneration and motor impairments in rodents are described.

  6. Molecular Chaperone Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Effects of Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchanan Maiti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The intra- and extracellular accumulation of misfolded and aggregated amyloid proteins is a common feature in several neurodegenerative diseases, which is thought to play a major role in disease severity and progression. The principal machineries maintaining proteostasis are the ubiquitin proteasomal and lysosomal autophagy systems, where heat shock proteins play a crucial role. Many protein aggregates are degraded by the lysosomes, depending on aggregate size, peptide sequence, and degree of misfolding, while others are selectively tagged for removal by heat shock proteins and degraded by either the proteasome or phagosomes. These systems are compromised in different neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, developing novel targets and classes of therapeutic drugs, which can reduce aggregates and maintain proteostasis in the brains of neurodegenerative models, is vital. Natural products that can modulate heat shock proteins/proteosomal pathway are considered promising for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Here we discuss the current knowledge on the role of HSPs in protein misfolding diseases and knowledge gained from animal models of Alzheimer’s disease, tauopathies, and Huntington’s diseases. Further, we discuss the emerging treatment regimens for these diseases using natural products, like curcumin, which can augment expression or function of heat shock proteins in the cell.

  7. Epigenetic programming of neurodegenerative diseases by an adverse environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko, Olena; Kovalchuk, Igor; Metz, Gerlinde A

    2012-03-20

    Experience and environment can critically influence the risk and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as miRNA expression, DNA methylation, and histone modifications, readily respond to experience and environmental factors. Here we propose that epigenetic regulation of gene expression and environmental modulation thereof may play a key role in the onset and course of common neurological conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and multiple sclerosis. For example, epigenetic mechanisms may mediate long-term responses to adverse experience, such as stress, to affect disease susceptibility and the course of neurodegenerative events. This review introduces the epigenetic components and their possible role in mediating neuropathological processes in response to stress. We argue that epigenetic modifications will affect neurodegenerative events through altered gene function. The study of epigenetic states in neurodegenerative diseases presents an opportunity to gain new insights into risk factors and pathogenic mechanisms. Moreover, research into epigenetic regulation of disease may revolutionize health care by opening new avenues of personalized, preventive and curative medicine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The role of extracellular vesicles in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Camelia; Hill, Andrew F

    2017-02-19

    Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, are small membranous vesicles released from many biotypes, contributing to the disease progression and spreading. These extracellular vesicles provide an important mode of cell-to-cell communication by delivering proteins, lipids and RNA to target cells. Exosomes are found associated with neurodegenerative diseases, which are characterised by progressive degeneration of neurons and often associated with misfolded protein. The common diseases include Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's diseases (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and the prion diseases. Of all neurodegenerative diseases, prion diseases are classified as the distinctive group owing to its transmissible and infectious nature of misfolded prion protein. The infectious prion particles have been demonstrated to be present in exosomes to spread prion infectivity within cells. Similarly, misfolded proteins involved in other neurodegenerative diseases such as Amyloid-β and tau in AD, α-synuclein in PD, and superoxide dismutase 1 in ALS have been demonstrated to exploit exosomes for induced spreading of misfolded proteins in a prion-like mechanism. Furthermore, RNA molecules can be taken up by the recipient cells as cargo in exosomes. These RNAs can module the expression of the target genes by repressing or inhibiting protein translation. Here we review the role of exosomes in prion diseases and other common neurodegenerative diseases, and discuss the potential of these vesicles for disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ghrelin: a link between ageing, metabolism and neurodegenerative disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Along with the increase in life expectancy over the last century comes the increased risk for development of age-related disorders, including metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. These chronic disorders share two main characteristics:

  10. Leigh-Like Syndrome Due to Homoplasmic m.8993T>G Variant with Hypocitrullinemia and Unusual Biochemical Features Suggestive of Multiple Carboxylase Deficiency (MCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Shanti; Lewis, B; Mock, D M; Said, H M; Tarailo-Graovac, M; Mattman, A; van Karnebeek, C D; Thorburn, D R; Rodenburg, R J; Christodoulou, J

    2017-01-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS), or subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy, is a genetically heterogeneous, relentlessly progressive, devastating neurodegenerative disorder that usually presents in infancy or early childhood. A diagnosis of Leigh-like syndrome may be considered in individuals who do not fulfil the stringent diagnostic criteria but have features resembling Leigh syndrome.We describe a unique presentation of Leigh-like syndrome in a 3-year-old boy with elevated 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (C5-OH) on newborn screening (NBS). Subsequent persistent plasma elevations of C5-OH and propionylcarnitine (C3) as well as fluctuating urinary markers were suggestive of multiple carboxylase deficiency (MCD). Normal enzymology and mutational analysis of genes encoding holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) and biotinidase (BTD) excluded MCD. Biotin uptake studies were normal excluding biotin transporter deficiency. His clinical features at 13 months of age comprised psychomotor delay, central hypotonia, myopathy, failure to thrive, hypocitrullinemia, recurrent episodes of decompensation with metabolic keto-lactic acidosis and an episode of hyperammonemia. Biotin treatment from 13 months of age was associated with increased patient activity, alertness, and attainment of new developmental milestones, despite lack of biochemical improvements. Whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis failed to identify any other variants which could likely contribute to the observed phenotype, apart from the homoplasmic (100%) m.8993T>G variant initially detected by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing.Hypocitrullinemia has been reported in patients with the m.8993T>G variant and other mitochondrial disorders. However, persistent plasma elevations of C3 and C5-OH have previously only been reported in one other patient with this homoplasmic mutation. We suggest considering the m.8993T>G variant early in the diagnostic evaluation of MCD-like biochemical disturbances, particularly when associated with

  11. [Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome. A rare differential diagnosis of "red eye"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäckel, M C; Glock, T; Künster, A

    2006-01-01

    Two cases of Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome, which represents an ocular manifestation of cat-scratch disease, are reported. The symptoms are subacute and include unilateral conjunctivitis and pre-auricular lymphadenopathy. Diagnosis primarily relies on the recognition of suggestive clinical signs in conjunction with positive serologic testing. In most cases, therapy is not necessary.

  12. Treatment of the Guillain-Barré syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P. Kleyweg

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is an inflammatory polyneuropathy with an incidence of 1-1.8/100,000. It is characterised by an acute or subacute onset and a progressive phase of less than four weeks, followed by a plateau phase of variable duration [106, 111]. Improvement then

  13. Subacute cannabinoid treatment: anticonvulsant activity and withdrawal excitability in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karler, R; Turkanis, S A

    1980-03-01

    1 The effects of subacute treatment with cannabidiol, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC), phenytoin and phenobarbitone on anticonvulsant activity and on withdrawal excitability in mice were compared in three electrically induced seizure-threshold tests. 2 In the maximal electroshock-threshold test, subacute treatment did not alter the anticonvulsant activity of cannabidiol, phenytoin or phenobarbitone, but tolerance developed to delta 9-THC. 3 In the 60 Hz electroshock-threshold test, the activity of delta 9-THC and cannabidiol did not change, but tolerance developed to phenobarbitone, and there was an increase in sensitivity to phenytoin. 4 In the 6 Hz electroshock-threshold test, there was an increase in sensitivity to both delta 9-THC and cannabidiol, there was tolerance to phenobarbitone, while the activity of phenytoin did not change. 5 Although tolerance developed in some of the seizure-threshold tests to delta 9-THC and phenobarbitone, tolerance to cannabidiol and phenytoin did not develop in any of the tests. 6 Hyperexcitability followed withdrawal from only delta 9-THC (6 Hz and 60 Hz electroshock-threshold tests) and phenobarbitone (maximal electroshock-threshold and 60 Hz electroshock-threshold tests). 7 The delta 9-THC withdrawal hyperexcitability suggests that the use of marihuana may jeopardize the control of seizures in epileptics.

  14. Changes of resting cerebral activities in subacute ischemic stroke patients

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    Ping Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to detect the difference in resting cerebral activities between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants, define the abnormal site, and provide new evidence for pathological mechanisms, clinical diagnosis, prognosis prediction and efficacy evaluation of ischemic stroke. At present, the majority of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies focus on the motor dysfunction and the acute stage of ischemic stroke. This study recruited 15 right-handed ischemic stroke patients at subacute stage (15 days to 11.5 weeks and 15 age-matched healthy participants. A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan was performed on each subject to detect cerebral activity. Regional homogeneity analysis was used to investigate the difference in cerebral activities between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants. The results showed that the ischemic stroke patients had lower regional homogeneity in anterior cingulate and left cerebrum and higher regional homogeneity in cerebellum, left precuneus and left frontal lobe, compared with healthy participants. The experimental findings demonstrate that the areas in which regional homogeneity was different between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants are in the cerebellum, left precuneus, left triangle inferior frontal gyrus, left inferior temporal gyrus and anterior cingulate. These locations, related to the motor, sensory and emotion areas, are likely potential targets for the neural regeneration of subacute ischemic stroke patients.

  15. Neuronal loss is an early component of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Deniz; Diren, Barış; Ulubay, Hakan; Altunbaşak, Sakir; Anlar, Banu

    2014-09-02

    We performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies in a group of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) in order to estimate the pathologic process underlying the phenotypic variability. Patients with SSPE who had MRI including DTI and MRS examinations were evaluated according to their clinical status as determined by the SSPE Scoring System and their mental age as determined by tests appropriate for age and developmental level. Comparisons of fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and metabolite ratios of frontal periventricular white matter, parieto-occipital periventricular white matter, and globus pallidus in both hemispheres were made between control and SSPE groups, and between SSPE subgroups. Control (n = 18) and SSPE (n = 39) groups differed in all DTI and MRS parameters except FA, choline (Cho), and Cho/creatine (Cr). SSPE cases had higher ADC and lower N-acetylaspartate (NAA), NAA/Cho, and NAA/Cr in all regions of interest, suggesting cell loss. Disease progression rate and neurologic deficit appeared to be associated with the degree of ADC elevation and NAA reduction: the group with severe global deterioration had the lowest NAA (230.75 ± 197.97 in forceps minor), and rapid progression was associated with acute reduction in NAA. The combination of MRS and diffusion MRI findings suggests neuronal loss can be a primary target in rapidly or subacutely progressing SSPE, and preservation or regeneration of axonal structure may be beneficial in chronic cases. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis of the Brainstem as a Clinical Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyayula, Pavan S; Yang, Jason; Yue, John K; Ciacci, Joseph D

    2017-11-07

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a rare progressive neurological disorder of early adolescence caused by persistent infection of the measles virus, which remains prevalent worldwide despite an effective vaccine. SSPE is a devastating disease with a characteristic clinical course in subcortical white matter; however, atypical presentations of brainstem involvement may be seen in rare cases. This review summarizes reports to date on brainstem involvement in SSPE, including the clinical course of disease, neuroimaging presentations, and guidelines for treatment. A comprehensive literature search was performed for English-language publications with keywords "subacute sclerosing panencephalitis" and "brainstem" using the National Library of Medicine PubMed database (March 1981-September 2017). Eleven articles focusing on SSPE of the brainstem were included. Predominant brainstem involvement remains uncharacteristic of SSPE, which may lead to misdiagnosis and poor outcome. A number of case reports have demonstrated brainstem involvement associated with other intracranial lesions commonly presenting in later SSPE stages (III and IV). However, brainstem lesions can appear in all stages, independent of higher cortical structures. The varied clinical presentations complicate diagnosis from a neuroimaging perspective. SSPE of the brainstem is a rare but important clinical entity. It may present like canonical SSPE or with unique clinical features such as absence seizures and pronounced ataxia. While SSPE generally progresses to the brainstem, it can also begin with a primary focus of infection in the brainstem. Awareness of varied SSPE presentations can aid in early diagnosis as well as guide management and treatment.

  17. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis of the Brainstem as a Clinical Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan S. Upadhyayula

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a rare progressive neurological disorder of early adolescence caused by persistent infection of the measles virus, which remains prevalent worldwide despite an effective vaccine. SSPE is a devastating disease with a characteristic clinical course in subcortical white matter; however, atypical presentations of brainstem involvement may be seen in rare cases. This review summarizes reports to date on brainstem involvement in SSPE, including the clinical course of disease, neuroimaging presentations, and guidelines for treatment. A comprehensive literature search was performed for English-language publications with keywords “subacute sclerosing panencephalitis” and “brainstem” using the National Library of Medicine PubMed database (March 1981–September 2017. Eleven articles focusing on SSPE of the brainstem were included. Predominant brainstem involvement remains uncharacteristic of SSPE, which may lead to misdiagnosis and poor outcome. A number of case reports have demonstrated brainstem involvement associated with other intracranial lesions commonly presenting in later SSPE stages (III and IV. However, brainstem lesions can appear in all stages, independent of higher cortical structures. The varied clinical presentations complicate diagnosis from a neuroimaging perspective. SSPE of the brainstem is a rare but important clinical entity. It may present like canonical SSPE or with unique clinical features such as absence seizures and pronounced ataxia. While SSPE generally progresses to the brainstem, it can also begin with a primary focus of infection in the brainstem. Awareness of varied SSPE presentations can aid in early diagnosis as well as guide management and treatment.

  18. Fever of unknown origin: subacute thyroiditis versus typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Thermidor, Marjorie; Mohan, Sowjanya; Valsamis, Ageliki S; Johnson, Diane H

    2005-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is not infrequently a diagnostic dilemma for clinicians. Common infectious causes include endocarditis and abscesses in adults, and noninfectious causes include neoplasms and certain collagen vascular diseases, for example, polymyalgia rheumatica, various vasculitides, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (adult Still's disease). Subacute thyroiditis is a rare cause of FUO. Among the infectious causes of FUO, typhoid fever is relatively uncommon. We present a case of FUO in a traveler returning from India whose initial complaints were that of left-sided neck pain and angle of the jaw pain, which initially suggested the diagnosis of subacute thyroiditis. After an extensive FUO workup, when typhoid fever is a likely diagnostic possibility, an empiric trial of anti- Salmonella therapy has diagnostic and therapeutic significance. The presence of relative bradycardia, and response to quinolone therapy, was the basis of the clinical diagnosis of typhoid fever as the explanation for this patients FUO. This case illustrates the diagnostic difficulties in assessing patients with FUO with few diagnostic findings.

  19. Speech and language therapy for aphasia following subacute stroke

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    Engin Koyuncu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the time window, duration and intensity of optimal speech and language therapy applied to aphasic patients with subacute stroke in our hospital. The study consisted of 33 patients being hospitalized for stroke rehabilitation in our hospital with first stroke but without previous history of speech and language therapy. Sixteen sessions of impairment-based speech and language therapy were applied to the patients, 30-60 minutes per day, 2 days a week, for 8 successive weeks. Aphasia assessment in stroke patients was performed with Gülhane Aphasia Test-2 before and after treatment. Compared with before treatment, fluency of speech, listening comprehension, reading comprehension, oral motor evaluation, automatic speech, repetition and naming were improved after treatment. This suggests that 16 seesions of speech and language therapy, 30-60 minutes per day, 2 days a week, for 8 successive weeks, are effective in the treatment of aphasic patients with subacute stroke.

  20. Protease production by Streptococcus sanguis associated with subacute bacterial endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, D C

    1982-01-01

    A viridans streptococcus (Streptococcus sanguis biotype II) isolated from the blood of a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis was examined for protease production. In broth culture, extracellular proteolytic enzymes were not produced by this organism until after the early exponential phase of growth, with maximal protease production occurring during the stationary phase. Four distinct proteases were isolated and purified from the supernatant fluids of stationary-phase cultures, employing a combination of ion-exchange column chromatography, gel filtration column chromatography, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All four proteases could be eluted from a diethylaminoethyl cellulose column at a sodium chloride gradient concentration of 0.25 M but were separable by gel filtration chromatography on a Sephadex G-100 column. They varied in molecular weights as determined by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis from approximately 13,000 to 230,000. All four proteases had pH optima of between 8.0 and 9.0, and two of the proteases were active against casein, human serum albumin, and gelatin but were not active against elastin and collagen. The remaining two proteases were able to degrade only casein and gelatin. These results show that S. sanguis is able to excrete maximal levels of potentially destructive enzymes when the organisms are not actively multiplying. This finding may explain some of the damage caused in heart tissue by these organisms during subacute bacterial endocarditis. Images PMID:6759404

  1. Expression patterns of micro-RNAs 146a, 181a, and 155 in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiş, Uluç; Tüfekçi, Uğur Kemal; Genç, Şermin; Çarman, Kürşat Bora; Bayram, Erhan; Topçu, Yasemin; Kurul, Semra Hız

    2015-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is caused by persistent brain infection of mutated virus, showing inflammation, neurodegeneration, and demyelination. Although many factors are emphasized in the pathogenesis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, the exact mechanism of neurodegeneration remains unknown. Micro-RNAs are small, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional levels. Micro-RNAs are essential for normal immune system development; besides they are also implicated in the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory disorders. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression patterns of micro-RNAs 146a, 181a, and 155 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. We enrolled 39 patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and 41 healthy controls. Quantitative analysis of micro-RNAs 146a, 181a, and 155 were performed using specific stem-loop primers followed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. All of 3 micro-RNAs were upregulated in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis patients. In addition, the level of micro-RNA 155 expression was higher in stage 3 patients. But, micro-RNA 146a and 181a expression levels showed no association or correlation with clinically relevant data. Alteration of peripheral blood mononuclear cell micro-RNAs in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis may shed new light on the pathogenesis of disease and may contribute to the aberrant systemic rise in mRNA levels in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Relative reticulo-rumen pH indicators for subacute ruminal acidosis detection in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villot, C; Meunier, B; Bodin, J; Martin, C; Silberberg, M

    2017-07-27

    Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) is usually characterized by abnormal and intermittent drops in rumen pH. Nevertheless, high individual animal variability in rumen pH and the difference in measurement methods for pH data acquisition decrease the sensitivity and accuracy of pH indicators for detecting SARA in ruminants. The aim of this study was to refine rumen pH indicators in long-term SARA based on individual dairy cow reticulo-rumen pH kinetics. Animal performances and rumen parameters were studied weekly in order to validate SARA syndrome and rumen pH was continuously measured using reticulo-rumen sensors. In total, 11 primiparous dairy cows were consecutively fed two different diets for 12 successive weeks: a control diet as low-starch diet (LSD; 13% starch for 4 weeks in period 1), an acidotic diet as high-starch diet (HSD; 32% starch for 4 weeks in period 2), and again the LSD diet (3 weeks in period 3). There was a 1-week dietary transition between LSD and HSD. Commonly used absolute SARA pH indicators such as daily average, area under the curve (AUC) and time spent below pHrumen, whereas the ruminal concentration of lipopolysaccharide was increased. Commonly used pH SARA indicators were not able to discriminate SARA syndrome due to high animal variability and sensor drift and noise, whereas relative pH indicators developed in this study appeared more relevant for SARA detection as assessed by receiver operating characteristic tests. This work shows that absolute pH kinetics should be corrected for drift, noise and animal variability to produce relative pH indicators that are more robust for SARA detection. These relative pH indicators could be more relevant for identifying affected animals in a herd and also for comparing SARA risk among studies.

  3. Transposable elements in TDP-43-mediated neurodegenerative disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanhe Li

    Full Text Available Elevated expression of specific transposable elements (TEs has been observed in several neurodegenerative disorders. TEs also can be active during normal neurogenesis. By mining a series of deep sequencing datasets of protein-RNA interactions and of gene expression profiles, we uncovered extensive binding of TE transcripts to TDP-43, an RNA-binding protein central to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD. Second, we find that association between TDP-43 and many of its TE targets is reduced in FTLD patients. Third, we discovered that a large fraction of the TEs to which TDP-43 binds become de-repressed in mouse TDP-43 disease models. We propose the hypothesis that TE mis-regulation contributes to TDP-43 related neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption in psychiatric and neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Katharina; Gatti, Silvia; Wettstein, Joseph G; Foster, Russell G

    2010-08-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption are frequently observed in patients with psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative disease. The abnormal sleep that is experienced by these patients is largely assumed to be the product of medication or some other influence that is not well defined. However, normal brain function and the generation of sleep are linked by common neurotransmitter systems and regulatory pathways. Disruption of sleep alters sleep-wake timing, destabilizes physiology and promotes a range of pathologies (from cognitive to metabolic defects) that are rarely considered to be associated with abnormal sleep. We propose that brain disorders and abnormal sleep have a common mechanistic origin and that many co-morbid pathologies that are found in brain disease arise from a destabilization of sleep mechanisms. The stabilization of sleep may be a means by which to reduce the symptoms of--and permit early intervention of--psychiatric and neurodegenerative disease.

  5. Sleep-wake changes and cognition in neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naismith, Sharon L; Lewis, Simon J G; Rogers, Naomi L

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing aging population, neurodegenerative disorders will become more common in clinical practice. These disorders involve multiple pathophysiological mechanisms that differentially affect cognition, mood, and physical functions. Possibly due to the involvement of common underlying neurobiological circuits, sleep and/or circadian (sleep-wake) changes are also common in this disease group. Of significance, sleep-wake changes are often a prodromal feature and are predictive of cognitive decline, psychiatric symptoms, quality of life, need for institutional care, and caregiver burden. Unfortunately, in neurodegenerative disease, few studies have included detailed polysomnography or neuropsychological assessments although some data indicate that sleep and neurocognitive features are related. Further studies are also required to address the effects of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments on cognitive functioning. Such research will hopefully lead to targeted early intervention approaches for cognitive decline in older people. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Need to improve clinical trials in rare neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puopolo, Maria; Pocchiari, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Rare neurodegenerative diseases are fatal and no therapy is available to cure or slow down the progression of disease. We report possibly weaknesses in the management of clinical studies in these diseases, ranging from poor preclinical studies, difficulties in the recruitment of patients, delay in the onset of treatment because of lack in early disease-specific biomarkers, and suboptimal design of Phase II clinical trials. The adoption of innovative statistical approaches in early Phase II trials might improve the screening of drugs in rare neurodegenerative disorders, but this implicates efforts from clinical researchers, statisticians, and regulatory people to the development of new strategies that should maintain rigorous scientific integrity together with a more ethical approach to human experimentations.

  7. Need to improve clinical trials in rare neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Puopolo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare neurodegenerative diseases are fatal and no therapy is available to cure or slow down the progression of disease. We report possibly weaknesses in the management of clinical studies in these diseases, ranging from poor preclinical studies, difficulties in the recruitment of patients, delay in the onset of treatment because of lack in early disease-specific biomarkers, and suboptimal design of Phase II clinical trials. The adoption of innovative statistical approaches in early Phase II trials might improve the screening of drugs in rare neurodegenerative disorders, but this implicates efforts from clinical researchers, statisticians, and regulatory people to the development of new strategies that should maintain rigorous scientific integrity together with a more ethical approach to human experimentations.

  8. Astrocytes in neurodegenerative diseases (I): function and molecular description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillamón-Vivancos, T; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Matías-Guiu, J

    2015-03-01

    Astrocytes have been considered mere supporting cells in the CNS. However, we now know that astrocytes are actively involved in many of the functions of the CNS and may play an important role in neurodegenerative diseases. This article reviews the roles astrocytes play in CNS development and plasticity; control of synaptic transmission; regulation of blood flow, energy, and metabolism; formation of the blood-brain barrier; regulation of the circadian rhythms, lipid metabolism and secretion of lipoproteins; and in neurogenesis. Astrocyte markers and the functions of astrogliosis are also described. Astrocytes play an active role in the CNS. A good knowledge of astrocytes is essential to understanding the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Olfaction in Neurologic and Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godoy, Maria Dantas Costa Lima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Loss of smell is involved in various neurologic and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease. However, the olfactory test is usually neglected by physicians at large. Objective The aim of this study was to review the current literature about the relationship between olfactory dysfunction and neurologic and neurodegenerative diseases. Data Synthesis Twenty-seven studies were selected for analysis, and the olfactory system, olfaction, and the association between the olfactory dysfunction and dementias were reviewed. Furthermore, is described an up to date in olfaction. Conclusion Otolaryngologist should remember the importance of olfaction evaluation in daily practice. Furthermore, neurologists and physicians in general should include olfactory tests in the screening of those at higher risk of dementia.

  10. Maillard reaction versus other nonenzymatic modifications in neurodegenerative processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Reinald; Ilieva, Ekaterina; Ayala, Victoria; Bellmunt, Maria Josep; Cacabelos, Daniel; Dalfo, Esther; Ferrer, Isidre; Portero-Otin, Manuel

    2008-04-01

    Nonenzymatic protein modifications are generated from direct oxidation of amino acid side chains and from reaction of the nucleophilic side chains of specific amino acids with reactive carbonyl species. These reactions give rise to specific markers that have been analyzed in different neurodegenerative diseases sharing protein aggregation, such as Alzheimer's disease, Pick's disease, Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Collectively, available data demonstrate that oxidative stress homeostasis, mitochondrial function, and energy metabolism are key factors in determining the disease-specific pattern of protein molecular damage. In addition, these findings suggest the lack of a "gold marker of oxidative stress," and, consequently, they strengthen the need for a molecular dissection of the nonenzymatic reactions underlying neurodegenerative processes.

  11. Potential future neuroprotective therapies for neurodegenerative disorders and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarawneh, Rawan; Galvin, James E

    2010-02-01

    The cellular mechanisms underlying neuronal loss and neurodegeneration have been an area of interest in the last decade. Although neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, and Huntington disease each have distinct clinical symptoms and pathologies, they all share common mechanisms such as protein aggregation, oxidative injury, inflammation, apoptosis, and mitochondrial injury that contribute to neuronal loss. Although cerebrovascular disease has different causes from the neurodegenerative disorders, many of the same common disease mechanisms come into play following a stroke. Novel therapies that target each of these mechanisms may be effective in decreasing the risk of disease, abating symptoms, or slowing down their progression. Although most of these therapies are experimental, and require further investigation, a few seem to offer promise.

  12. Searching for MIND: MicroRNAs in Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Christian Barbato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In few years our understanding of microRNA (miRNA biogenesis, molecular mechanisms by which miRNAs regulate gene expression, and the functional roles of miRNAs has been expanded. Interestingly, numerous miRNAs are expressed in a spatially and temporally controlled manner in the nervous system, suggesting that their posttrascriptional regulation may be particularly relevant in neural development and function. MiRNA studies in neurobiology showed their involvement in synaptic plasticity and brain diseases. In this review ,correlations between miRNA-mediated gene silencing and Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and other neurodegenerative diseases will be discussed. Molecular and cellular neurobiological studies of the miRNAs in neurodegeneration represent the exploration of a new Frontier of miRNAs biology and the potential development of new diagnostic tests and genetic therapies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Widespread Aggregation and Neurodegenerative Diseases Are Associated with Supersaturated Proteins

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    Prajwal Ciryam

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of protein solubility is a fundamental aspect of cellular homeostasis because protein aggregation is associated with a wide variety of human diseases. Numerous proteins unrelated in sequence and structure, however, can misfold and aggregate, and widespread aggregation can occur in living systems under stress or aging. A crucial question in this context is why only certain proteins appear to aggregate readily in vivo, whereas others do not. We identify here the proteins most vulnerable to aggregation as those whose cellular concentrations are high relative to their solubilities. We find that these supersaturated proteins represent a metastable subproteome involved in pathological aggregation during stress and aging and are overrepresented in biochemical processes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Consequently, such cellular processes become dysfunctional when the ability to keep intrinsically supersaturated proteins soluble is compromised. Thus, the simultaneous analysis of abundance and solubility can rationalize the diverse cellular pathologies linked to neurodegenerative diseases and aging.

  14. Outdoor Ambient Air Pollution and Neurodegenerative Diseases: the Neuroinflammation Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraj, Richard L; Rodriguez, Eric A; Wang, Yi; Block, Michelle L

    2017-06-01

    Accumulating research indicates that ambient outdoor air pollution impacts the brain and may affect neurodegenerative diseases, yet the potential underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The neuroinflammation hypothesis holds that elevation of cytokines and reactive oxygen species in the brain mediates the deleterious effects of urban air pollution on the central nervous system (CNS). Studies in human and animal research document that neuroinflammation occurs in response to several inhaled pollutants. Microglia are a prominent source of cytokines and reactive oxygen species in the brain, implicated in the progressive neuron damage in diverse neurodegenerative diseases, and activated by inhaled components of urban air pollution through both direct and indirect pathways. The MAC1-NOX2 pathway has been identified as a mechanism through which microglia respond to different forms of air pollution, suggesting a potential common deleterious pathway. Multiple direct and indirect pathways in response to air pollution exposure likely interact in concert to exert CNS effects.

  15. Neurodegenerative diseases and widespread aggregation are associated with supersaturated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciryam, Prajwal; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Morimoto, Richard I.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Summary The maintenance of protein solubility is a fundamental aspect of protein homeostasis, as aggregation is associated with cytotoxicity and a variety of human diseases. Numerous proteins unrelated in sequence and structure, however, can misfold and aggregate, and widespread aggregation can occur in living systems under stress or ageing. A crucial question in this context is why only certain proteins aggregate in vivo while others do not. We identify here the proteins most vulnerable to aggregation as those whose cellular concentrations are high relative to their solubilities. These supersaturated proteins represent a metastable sub-proteome involved in pathological aggregation during stress and ageing, and are overrepresented in biochemical processes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Consequently, such cellular processes become dysfunctional when the ability to keep intrinsically supersaturated proteins soluble is compromised. Thus, the simultaneous analysis of abundance and solubility can rationalize the diverse cellular pathologies linked to neurodegenerative diseases and aging. PMID:24183671

  16. Advances in epigenetics and epigenomics for neurodegenerative diseases.

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    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2011-10-01

    In the post-genomic era, epigenetic factors-literally those that are "over" or "above" genetic ones and responsible for controlling the expression and function of genes-have emerged as important mediators of development and aging; gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions; and the pathophysiology of complex disease states. Here, we provide a brief overview of the major epigenetic mechanisms (ie, DNA methylation, histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, and non-coding RNA regulation). We highlight the nearly ubiquitous profiles of epigenetic dysregulation that have been found in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. We also review innovative methods and technologies that enable the characterization of individual epigenetic modifications and more widespread epigenomic states at high resolution. We conclude that, together with complementary genetic, genomic, and related approaches, interrogating epigenetic and epigenomic profiles in neurodegenerative diseases represent important and increasingly practical strategies for advancing our understanding of and the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders.

  17. Yeast buddies helping to unravel the complexity of neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruhmann, Gernot; Seynnaeve, David; Zheng, Ju; Ven, Karen; Molenberghs, Sofie; Wilms, Tobias; Liu, Beidong; Winderickx, Joris; Franssens, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders have a profound effect on the quality of life of patients and their environment. However, the development of adequate therapies requires accurate understanding of the underlying disease pathogenesis. On that account, yeast models can play an important role, as they enable the elucidation of the mechanisms leading to neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, by using so-called humanized yeast systems, the findings in yeast can be interpolated to humans. In this review, we will give an overview of the current body of knowledge on the use of yeast models with regard to Huntington's, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. In addition to the results, obtained with the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we also consider the existing literature on the less common but promising fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Protein Modification by Dicarbonyl Molecular Species in Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Wesley M. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration results from abnormalities in cerebral metabolism and energy balance within neurons, astrocytes, microglia, or microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. In Alzheimer's disease, -amyloid is considered the primary contributor to neuropathology and neurodegeneration. It now is believed that certain systemic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, can contribute to neurodegeneration through the effects of chronic hyperglycemia/insulin resistance resulting in protein glycation, oxidative stress and inflammation within susceptible brain regions. Here, we present an overview of research focusing on the role of protein glycation, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the neurodegenerative process. Of special interest in this paper is the effect of methylglyoxal (MGO, a cytotoxic byproduct of glucose metabolism, elevated in neurodegenerative disease, and diabetes mellitus, on cerebral protein function and oxidative stress. How MGO interacts with amino acid residues within -amyloid, and small peptides within the brain, is also discussed in terms of the affect on protein function.

  19. An evaluation of neuropeptide Y status in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis patients.

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    Abuhandan, M; Calik, M; Almaz, V; Taskın, A; Cakmak, A; Selek, S

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the neuropeptide Y values of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The study comprised 38 patients diagnosed with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis at our clinic, who were being routinely followed-up, together with a control group of 36. Using the Risk and Haddad classification for clinical staging, 16 patients were determined as Stage II and 22 patients as Stage III. Neuropeptide Y values were measured by Enzyme Immunoassay methods. The neuropeptide Y values of the all patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis were found to be significantly high compared to the control group (ppanencephalitis.

  20. Subacute thyroiditis following influenza vaccine: a case report and literature review

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    Munther S. Momani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Subacute thyroiditis following influenza vaccination is a rarely reported condition. Here, we review this condition and report the case of a 40-year-old male who developed subacute thyroiditis following the administration of an influenza vaccine containing the (H1N1 pandemic 2009 strain. Interestingly, the patient had history of pericarditis and his HLA typing showed HLA B35. Physicians should be aware of this complication for influenza vaccine and of the relationship of HLA B35 haplotype with the susceptibility to subacute thyroiditis and other autoimmune disorders.

  1. Epidemiology of mild traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative disease

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    Gardner, Raquel C.; Yaffe, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Every year an estimated 42 million people worldwide suffer a mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) or concussion. More severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a well-established risk factor for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Recently, large epidemiological studies have additionally identified MTBI as a risk factor for dementia. The role of MTBI in risk of PD or ALS is less well established. Repet...

  2. Chronic sleep disturbance and neural injury: links to neurodegenerative disease

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott SM; Videnovic A

    2016-01-01

    Sabra M Abbott,1 Aleksandar Videnovic21Department of Neurology, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Sleep–wake disruption is frequently observed and often one of the earliest reported symptoms of many neurodegenerative disorders. This provides insight into the underlying pathophysiology of these disorders, as sleep–wake abnormalities are ofte...

  3. Connected Speech in Neurodegenerative Language Disorders: A Review.

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    Boschi, Veronica; Catricalà, Eleonora; Consonni, Monica; Chesi, Cristiano; Moro, Andrea; Cappa, Stefano F

    2017-01-01

    Language assessment has a crucial role in the clinical diagnosis of several neurodegenerative diseases. The analysis of extended speech production is a precious source of information encompassing the phonetic, phonological, lexico-semantic, morpho-syntactic, and pragmatic levels of language organization. The knowledge about the distinctive linguistic variables identifying language deficits associated to different neurodegenerative diseases has progressively improved in the last years. However, the heterogeneity of such variables and of the way they are measured and classified limits any generalization and makes the comparison among studies difficult. Here we present an exhaustive review of the studies focusing on the linguistic variables derived from the analysis of connected speech samples, with the aim of characterizing the language disorders of the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases, including primary progressive aphasia, Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A total of 61 studies have been included, considering only those reporting group analysis and comparisons with a group of healthy persons. This review first analyzes the differences in the tasks used to elicit connected speech, namely picture description, story narration, and interview, considering the possible different contributions to the assessment of different linguistic domains. This is followed by an analysis of the terminologies and of the methods of measurements of the variables, indicating the need for harmonization and standardization. The final section reviews the linguistic domains affected by each different neurodegenerative disease, indicating the variables most consistently impaired at each level and suggesting the key variables helping in the differential diagnosis among diseases. While a large amount of valuable information is already available, the review highlights the need of further work, including the development of automated methods, to

  4. Reliability of measuring regional callosal atrophy in neurodegenerative diseases

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    Jeroen Van Schependom, MSc Eng, PhD

    2016-01-01

    In summary, we have constructed an algorithm that reliably detects the CC in 3D T1 images in a fully automated way in healthy controls and different neurodegenerative diseases. Although the CC area and the circularity are the most reliable features (ICC > 0.97; the reliability of the thickness profile (ICC > 0.90; excluding the tip is sufficient to warrant its inclusion in future clinical studies.

  5. The Hsp70/Hsp90 Chaperone Machinery in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel E. Lackie; Rachel E. Lackie; Andrzej Maciejewski; Andrzej Maciejewski; Valeriy G. Ostapchenko; Jose Marques-Lopes; Wing-Yiu Choy; Martin L. Duennwald; Vania F. Prado; Vania F. Prado; Vania F. Prado; Vania F. Prado; Marco A. M. Prado; Marco A. M. Prado; Marco A. M. Prado

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the human brain is one of the critical features of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Assembles of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide—either soluble (oligomers) or insoluble (plaques) and of tau protein, which form neurofibrillary tangles, are the major hallmarks of AD. Chaperones and co-chaperones regulate protein folding and client maturation, but they also target misfolded or aggregated proteins for refolding or for degrada...

  6. Drosophila as an In Vivo Model for Human Neurodegenerative Disease

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    McGurk, Leeanne; Berson, Amit; Bonini, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    With the increase in the ageing population, neurodegenerative disease is devastating to families and poses a huge burden on society. The brain and spinal cord are extraordinarily complex: they consist of a highly organized network of neuronal and support cells that communicate in a highly specialized manner. One approach to tackling problems of such complexity is to address the scientific questions in simpler, yet analogous, systems. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been proven tremendously valuable as a model organism, enabling many major discoveries in neuroscientific disease research. The plethora of genetic tools available in Drosophila allows for exquisite targeted manipulation of the genome. Due to its relatively short lifespan, complex questions of brain function can be addressed more rapidly than in other model organisms, such as the mouse. Here we discuss features of the fly as a model for human neurodegenerative disease. There are many distinct fly models for a range of neurodegenerative diseases; we focus on select studies from models of polyglutamine disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis that illustrate the type and range of insights that can be gleaned. In discussion of these models, we underscore strengths of the fly in providing understanding into mechanisms and pathways, as a foundation for translational and therapeutic research. PMID:26447127

  7. Localization of Axonal Motor Molecules Machinery in Neurodegenerative Disorders

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    Fulvio Florenzano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Axonal transport and neuronal survival depend critically on active transport and axon integrity both for supplying materials and communication to different domains of the cell body. All these actions are executed through cytoskeleton, transport and regulatory elements that appear to be disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases. Motor-driven transport both supplies and clears distal cellular portions with proteins and organelles. This transport is especially relevant in projection and motor neurons, which have long axons to reach the farthest nerve endings. Thus, any disturbance of axonal transport may have severe consequences for neuronal function and survival. A growing body of literature indicates the presence of alterations to the motor molecules machinery, not only in expression levels and phosphorylation, but also in their subcellular distribution within populations of neurons, which are selectively affected in the course of neurodegenerative diseases. The implications of this altered subcellular localization and how this affects axon survival and neuronal death still remain poorly understood, although several hypotheses have been suggested. Furthermore, cytoskeleton and transport element localization can be selectively disrupted in some disorders suggesting that specific loss of the axonal functionality could be a primary hallmark of the disorder. This can lead to axon degeneration and neuronal death either directly, through the functional absence of essential axonal proteins, or indirectly, through failures in communication among different cellular domains. This review compares the localization of cytoskeleton and transport elements in some neurodegenerative disorders to ask what aspects may be essential for axon survival and neuronal death.

  8. Vestibular Deficits in Neurodegenerative Disorders: Balance, Dizziness, and Spatial Disorientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Thomas; Arshad, Qadeer; Seemungal, Barry M

    2017-01-01

    The vestibular system consists of the peripheral vestibular organs in the inner ear and the associated extensive central nervous system projections-from the cerebellum and brainstem to the thalamic relays to cortical projections. This system is important for spatial orientation and balance, both of critical ecological importance, particularly for successful navigation in our environment. Balance disorders and spatial disorientation are common presenting features of neurodegenerative diseases; however, little is known regarding central vestibular processing in these diseases. A ubiquitous aspect of central vestibular processing is its promiscuity given that vestibular signals are commonly found in combination with other sensory signals. This review discusses how impaired central processing of vestibular signals-typically in combination with other sensory and motor systems-may account for the impaired balance and spatial disorientation in common neurodegenerative conditions. Such an understanding may provide for new diagnostic tests, potentially useful in detecting early disease while a mechanistic understanding of imbalance and spatial disorientation in these patients may enable a vestibular-targeted therapy for such problems in neurodegenerative diseases. Studies with state of the art central vestibular testing are now much needed to tackle this important topic.

  9. Vestibular Deficits in Neurodegenerative Disorders: Balance, Dizziness, and Spatial Disorientation

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    Thomas Cronin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system consists of the peripheral vestibular organs in the inner ear and the associated extensive central nervous system projections—from the cerebellum and brainstem to the thalamic relays to cortical projections. This system is important for spatial orientation and balance, both of critical ecological importance, particularly for successful navigation in our environment. Balance disorders and spatial disorientation are common presenting features of neurodegenerative diseases; however, little is known regarding central vestibular processing in these diseases. A ubiquitous aspect of central vestibular processing is its promiscuity given that vestibular signals are commonly found in combination with other sensory signals. This review discusses how impaired central processing of vestibular signals—typically in combination with other sensory and motor systems—may account for the impaired balance and spatial disorientation in common neurodegenerative conditions. Such an understanding may provide for new diagnostic tests, potentially useful in detecting early disease while a mechanistic understanding of imbalance and spatial disorientation in these patients may enable a vestibular-targeted therapy for such problems in neurodegenerative diseases. Studies with state of the art central vestibular testing are now much needed to tackle this important topic.

  10. Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Dysfunction In Neurodegenerative Disease

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    Grazia eIsaya

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence supports a role for mitochondrial iron metabolism in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Friedreich ataxia and Parkinson disease as well as in the motor and cognitive decline associated with the aging process. Iron-sulfur enzyme deficits and regional iron accumulation have been observed in each of these conditions. In spite of significant etiological, clinical and pathological differences that exist between Friedreich ataxia and Parkinson disease, it is possible that defects in mitochondrial iron-sulfur clusters biogenesis represent a common underlying mechanism leading to abnormal intracellular iron distribution with mitochondrial iron accumulation, OXPHOS deficits and oxidative stress in susceptible cells and specific regions of the nervous system. Moreover, a similar mechanism may contribute to the age-dependent iron accumulation that occurs in certain brain regions such as the globus pallidus and the substantia nigra. Targeting chelatable iron and reactive oxygen species appear as possible therapeutic options for Friedreich ataxia and Parkinson disease, and possibly other age-related neurodegenerative conditions. However, new technology to interrogate iron-sulfur cluster synthesis in humans is needed to (i assess how defects in this pathway contribute to the natural history of neurodegenerative disorders and (ii develop treatments to correct those defects early in the disease process, before they cause irreversible neuronal cell damage.

  11. Sublethal RNA Oxidation as a Mechanism for Neurodegenerative Disease

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    Mark A. Smith

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Although cellular RNA is subjected to the same oxidative insults as DNA and other cellular macromolecules, oxidative damage to RNA has not been a major focus in investigations of the biological consequences of free radical damage. In fact, because it is largely single-stranded and its bases lack the protection of hydrogen bonding and binding by specific proteins, RNA may be more susceptible to oxidative insults than is DNA. Oxidative damage to protein-coding RNA or non-coding RNA will, in turn, potentially cause errors in proteins and/or dysregulation of gene expression. While less lethal than mutations in the genome, such sublethal insults to cells might be associated with underlying mechanisms of several chronic diseases, including neurodegenerative disease. Recently, oxidative RNA damage has been described in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and prion diseases. Of particular interest, oxidative RNA damage can be demonstrated in vulnerable neurons early in disease, suggesting that RNA oxidation may actively contribute to the onset of the disease. An increasing body of evidence suggests that, mechanistically speaking, the detrimental effects of oxidative RNA damage to protein synthesis are attenuated, at least in part, by the existence of protective mechanisms that prevent the incorporation of the damaged ribonucleotides into the translational machinery. Further investigations aimed at understanding the processing mechanisms related to oxidative RNA damage and its consequences may provide significant insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and other degenerative diseases and lead to better therapeutic strategies.

  12. Pain in Neurodegenerative Disease: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives

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    Marina de Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are going to increase as the life expectancy is getting longer. The management of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and other dementias, Parkinson’s disease (PD and PD related disorders, motor neuron diseases (MND, Huntington’s disease (HD, spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA, and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, is mainly addressed to motor and cognitive impairment, with special care to vital functions as breathing and feeding. Many of these patients complain of painful symptoms though their origin is variable, and their presence is frequently not considered in the treatment guidelines, leaving their management to the decision of the clinicians alone. However, studies focusing on pain frequency in such disorders suggest a high prevalence of pain in selected populations from 38 to 75% in AD, 40% to 86% in PD, and 19 to 85% in MND. The methods of pain assessment vary between studies so the type of pain has been rarely reported. However, a prevalent nonneuropathic origin of pain emerged for MND and PD. In AD, no data on pain features are available. No controlled therapeutic trials and guidelines are currently available. Given the relevance of pain in neurodegenerative disorders, the comprehensive understanding of mechanisms and predisposing factors, the application and validation of specific scales, and new specific therapeutic trials are needed.

  13. Role of Redox Signaling in Neuroinflammation and Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Hsi-Lung Hsieh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS, a redox signal, are produced by various enzymatic reactions and chemical processes, which are essential for many physiological functions and act as second messengers. However, accumulating evidence has implicated the pathogenesis of several human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders related to increased oxidative stress. Under pathological conditions, increasing ROS production can regulate the expression of diverse inflammatory mediators during brain injury. Elevated levels of several proinflammatory factors including cytokines, peptides, pathogenic structures, and peroxidants in the central nervous system (CNS have been detected in patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. These proinflammatory factors act as potent stimuli in brain inflammation through upregulation of diverse inflammatory genes, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, and adhesion molecules. To date, the intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying the expression of target proteins regulated by these factors are elusive. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying the intracellular signaling pathways, especially ROS, involved in the expression of several inflammatory proteins induced by proinflammatory factors in brain resident cells. Understanding redox signaling transduction mechanisms involved in the expression of target proteins and genes may provide useful therapeutic strategies for brain injury, inflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Dissecting the Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Diseases through Network Biology

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    Jose A. Santiago

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are rarely caused by a mutation in a single gene but rather influenced by a combination of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Emerging high-throughput technologies such as RNA sequencing have been instrumental in deciphering the molecular landscape of neurodegenerative diseases, however, the interpretation of such large amounts of data remains a challenge. Network biology has become a powerful platform to integrate multiple omics data to comprehensively explore the molecular networks in the context of health and disease. In this review article, we highlight recent advances in network biology approaches with an emphasis in brain-networks that have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s (AD, Parkinson’s (PD and Huntington’s diseases (HD. We discuss how integrative approaches using multi-omics data from different tissues have been valuable for identifying biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In addition, we discuss the challenges the field of network medicine faces toward the translation of network-based findings into clinically actionable tools for personalized medicine applications.

  15. Myeloid dendritic cells are potential players in human neurodegenerative diseases

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    Paola eBossù

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s (AD and Parkinson’s (PD diseases are devastating neurodegenerative disturbances wherein neuroinflammation is a chronic pathogenic process with high therapeutic potential. Major mediators of AD/PD neuroimmune processes are resident immune cells, but immune cells derived from periphery may also participate and to some extent modify neuroinflammation. Specifically, blood borne myeloid cells emerge as crucial components of AD/PD progression and susceptibility. Among these, dendritic cells (DCs are key immune orchestrators and players of brain immune surveillance: we candidate them as potential mediators of both AD and PD and as relevant cell model for unraveling myeloid cell role in neurodegeneration. Hence, we recapitulate and discuss emerging data suggesting that blood-derived DCs play a role in experimental and human neurodegenerative diseases. In humans, in particular, DCs are modified by in vitro culture with neurodegeneration-associated pathogenic factors and dysregulated in AD patients, while the levels of DC precursors are decreased in AD and PD patients’ blood, possibly as an index of their recruitment to the brain. Overall, we emphasize the need to explore the impact of DCs on neurodegeneration to uncover peripheral immune mechanisms of pathogenic importance, recognize potential biomarkers and improve therapeutic approaches for neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. The transition metals copper and iron in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Mancía, Susana; Pérez-Neri, Iván; Ríos, Camilo; Tristán-López, Luis; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Montes, Sergio

    2010-07-30

    Neurodegenerative diseases constitute a worldwide health problem. Metals like iron and copper are essential for life, but they are also involved in several neurodegenerative mechanisms such as protein aggregation, free radical generation and oxidative stress. The role of Fe and Cu, their pathogenic mechanisms and possible therapeutic relevance are discussed regarding four of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Metal-mediated oxidation by Fenton chemistry is a common feature for all those disorders and takes part of a self-amplifying damaging mechanism, leading to neurodegeneration. The interaction between metals and proteins in the nervous system seems to be a crucial factor for the development or absence of neurodegeneration. The present review also deals with the therapeutic strategies tested, mainly using metal chelating drugs. Metal accumulation within the nervous system observed in those diseases could be the result of compensatory mechanisms to improve metal availability for physiological processes. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dissecting the Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Diseases through Network Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Jose A; Bottero, Virginie; Potashkin, Judith A

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are rarely caused by a mutation in a single gene but rather influenced by a combination of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Emerging high-throughput technologies such as RNA sequencing have been instrumental in deciphering the molecular landscape of neurodegenerative diseases, however, the interpretation of such large amounts of data remains a challenge. Network biology has become a powerful platform to integrate multiple omics data to comprehensively explore the molecular networks in the context of health and disease. In this review article, we highlight recent advances in network biology approaches with an emphasis in brain-networks that have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's (AD), Parkinson's (PD) and Huntington's diseases (HD). We discuss how integrative approaches using multi-omics data from different tissues have been valuable for identifying biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In addition, we discuss the challenges the field of network medicine faces toward the translation of network-based findings into clinically actionable tools for personalized medicine applications.

  18. PREFACE: Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Annalisa

    2012-06-01

    , about 15 years after the original reports, it is clear that amyloids are special structures that occur in nature under several different guises, some good, some evil [3]. The number of diseases associated with misfolding and fibrillogenesis has steadily increased. Examples of fairly common pathologies associated with fibre formation include Alzheimer's disease (currently one of the major threats for human health in our increasingly aging world), Parkinson's disease and several rare, but not less severe, pathologies. On the other hand, it is also clear that amyloid formation is a convenient mechanism for storing peptides and/or proteins in a compact and resistant way. The number of organisms/tissues in which amyloid deposits are found is thus increasing. It is also not too far-fetched to expect that the mechanical properties of amyloids could be used in biotechnology to design new materials. Because of the importance of this topic in so many scientific fields, we have dedicated this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter to the topic of protein aggregation and disease. In the following pages we have collected two reviews and five articles that explore new and interesting developments in the field. References [1] Olby R 1994 The Path of the Double Helix: The Discovery of DNA (New York: Dover) [2] Dobson C M 2004 Principles of protein folding, misfolding and aggregation Semin. Cell Dev. Biol. 15 3-16 [3] Hammer N D, Wang X, McGuffie B A, Chapman M R 2008 Amyloids: friend or foe? J. Alzheimers Dis. 13 407-19 Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases contents Protein aggregation and misfolding: good or evil?Annalisa Pastore and Pierandrea Temussi Alzheimer's disease: biological aspects, therapeutic perspectives and diagnostic toolsM Di Carlo, D Giacomazza and P L San Biagio Entrapment of Aβ1-40 peptide in unstructured aggregatesC Corsale, R Carrotta, M R Mangione, S Vilasi, A Provenzano, G Cavallaro, D Bulone and P L San Biagio Elemental micro

  19. Case report: subacute tetraplegia in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Daniel; Heidemeier, Anke; Grigoleit, Götz Ulrich; Müllges, Wolfgang

    2017-02-10

    Clinical reasoning in Neurology is based on general associations which help to deduce the site of the lesion. However, even "golden principles" may occasionally be deceptive. Here, we describe the case of subacute flaccid tetraparesis due to motor cortical lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first report to include an impressive illustration of nearly symmetric motor cortical involvement of encephalitis on brain MRI. A 51 year old immunocompromized man developed a high-grade pure motor flaccid tetraparesis over few days. Based on clinical presentation, critical illness polyneuromyopathy was suspected. However, brain MRI revealed symmetrical hyperintensities strictly limited to the subcortical precentral gyrus. An encephalitis, possibly due to CMV infection, turned out to be the most likely cause. While recognition of basic clinical patterns is indispensable in neurological reasoning, awareness of central conditions mimicking peripheral nervous disease may be crucial to detect unsuspected, potentially treatable conditions.

  20. Subacute brachial diplegia associated with West Nile virus myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Sahar F; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2012-06-01

    Brachial diplegia is a clinical term used to describe weakness restricted to the upper extremities. We report a case of brachial diplegia associated with West Nile virus infection. A 48-year-old man developed severe painless bilateral upper extremity weakness within a few weeks of a flu-like illness. Clinical examination revealed marked periscapular, shoulder girdle, and humeral muscle atrophy and bilateral scapular winging, with near symmetrical bilateral hypotonic upper extremity weakness. This was associated with clinical signs of an encephalomyelopathy without cognitive or sensory deficits. Electrophysiological studies demonstrated a subacute disorder of motor neurons, their axons or both, involving the cervical and thoracic myotomes, with ongoing denervation. Serological studies confirmed recent West Nile virus (WNV) infection. Gradual improvement occurred following conservative supportive therapies. Progressive brachial diplegia is a rare neuromuscular presentation of WNV neuroinvasive disease. This case report adds to the clinical spectrum of WNV-induced neurologic sequelae. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Spectrophotometry of cerebrospinal fluid in subacute and chronic subdural haematomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellin, K. G.; Steiner, L.

    1974-01-01

    Spectrophotometric examinations were performed on cerebrospinal and subdural fluids in subacute (five patients) and chronic (20 patients) subdural haematomas, with special reference to the diagnostic aid of CSF spectrophotometry. Spectrophotometric xanthochromia of haemorrhagic origin was found in all CSFs examined, while definite visible xanthochromia was observed in only 28% and the CSF was judged as colourless in 52% of those cases. Characteristic bleeding patterns were found spectrophotometrically in all the 20 CSFs examined within 24 hours after lumbar puncture, haematoma patterns being detected in 90-95% of the cases. In many cases the electrophoretically separated protein fractions of CSF and subdural fluids were spectrophotometrically examined. In conclusion, CSF spectrophotometry is a simple, fast, and extremely sensitive method, which in our opinion should be used routinely in the diagnosis of suspected subdural haematomas, if lumbar puncture is not contraindicated. PMID:4140892

  2. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Toddler: Changing Epidemiological Trends

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    Roosy Aulakh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a devastating “slow virus” brain disease resulting from persistent measles virus infection of neurons. The age at presentation is usually 8 to 11 years with onset usually occurring 2–10 years after measles infection. We report a 2-and-half-year-old boy who presented with progressively increasing myoclonic jerks and subtle cognitive decline. He was diagnosed as a case of SSPE based on clinical features, typical electroencephalographic finding, and elevated cerebrospinal fluid/serum measles antibody titers. He had measles 4 months prior to onset of symptoms. This case along with review of recently published reports suggests progressively decreasing latency period between measles infection and onset of symptoms observed in cases with SSPE. Clinical implication would mean investigating for SSPE even in infants or toddlers with compatible clinical features and recent history of measles infection.

  3. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis resembling Rasmussen's encephalitis on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakkani, Ravi Kanth; Sureka, Jyoti; Panwar, Sanuj

    2015-09-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a rare, slowly progressing but invariably fatal disease that is related to a prior measles virus infection and most commonly affects paediatric patients. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for determining such changes in white matter. SSPE typically demonstrates bilateral but asymmetric periventricular and subcortical white matter involvement. We herein report a rare case of unilateral white matter involvement in a 13-year-old boy with SSPE that closely simulated Rasmussen's encephalitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an atypical presentation on MR imaging in which SSPE was a rare cause of unilateral brain parenchymal involvement in a patient with intractable seizures.

  4. Cerebral glucose metabolism in the course of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

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    Huber, M.; Herholz, K.; Pawlik, G.; Szelies, B.; Juergens, R.H.; Heiss, W.D.

    1989-01-01

    Regional cerebral glucose metabolism was studied in a 15-year-old boy with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis before and after therapy with human interferon beta, using positron emission tomography of fluorine 18-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose. At first examination, metabolism was symmetrically decreased in the thalamus, cerebellum, and all cortical areas except prerolandic motor cortex, but increased in lentiform nucleus. A computed tomographic scan was normal. Six months later, bilateral focal necrosis centered in the previously hypermetabolic putamen was demonstrated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The caudate nucleus and the superoposterior part of the putamen were spared, still showing increased metabolism. Corresponding with some clinical improvement, cortical glucose consumption rates had returned to a normal level.

  5. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) the story of a vanishing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadoth, Natan

    2012-10-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), is a devastating "slow virus" brain disease which affects young children who had measles some 6-7 years earlier. Although, the pandemic of SSPE during 1960-1980's was almost eradicated due to mass immunization, the disease is still taking the life of young children in countries where measles immunization is incomplete and in world regions where genetic polymorphism to this particular infection is present. The present review was written for the fortunate young generation of pediatricians and pediatric neurologists who probably have not seen a case of SSPE during their career, and for those who work in counties where the disease has not been eradicated. It is also a reminder that with full coverage of measles immunization this devastating disease can be fully eradicated. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis with Atypical Clinical and MRI Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buse Rahime Hasırcı

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a progressive inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system and a slow virus infection caused by aberrant measles virüs. Typical neurological manifestations include psychomotor impairment, progressive intellectual deterioration, myoclonic jerks and behavioral changes, with or without pyramidal symptoms. It usually affecting people aged 10 to 14 year. We report the case of an 17-year-old girl presenting with initial symptom of visual loss, seizures, a lack of SSPE specific EEG pattern, late onset and atypical fast progression of disease. The case highlights the importance of atypical clinical findings of SSPE at onset and also firstly disappearing, then appearing MRI findings at sequential images which can complicate the accurate diagnosis. High suspicion is needed because of its rareness.

  7. Atypical magnetic resonance imaging features in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biplab Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is rare chronic, progressive encephalitis that affects primarily children and young adults, caused by a persistent infection with measles virus. No cure for SSPE exists, but the condition can be managed by medication if treatment is started at an early stage. Methods and Results: Heterogeneity of imaging findings in SSPE is not very uncommon. But pial and gyral enhancements are very rarely noticed. Significant asymmetric onset as well as pial-gyral enhancements is not reported. Herein we present a case of 16 years adolescent of SSPE having remarkable asymmetric pial-gyral enhancements, which were misinterpreted as tubercular infection. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and treatment is encouraging in SSPE, although it is not curable with current therapy. Clinico-radiological and electrophysiological correlation is very important in diagnosis of SSPE, more gravely in patients having atypical image findings as in our index case.

  8. Fulminant adult-onset subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre, Anthony; Souraud, Jean-Baptiste; McGonigal, Aileen; Alla, Philippe; Grapperon, Jacques; Valance, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    We present the case of a young adult who developed acute encephalopathy with severe status epilepticus and rapid deterioration to vegetative state and death within 6 weeks. Although the clinical picture, MRI and EEG findings were atypical, the hypothesis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) was suggested by markedly increased intrathecal IgG synthesis in the cerebrospinal fluid, and diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of high antimeasles antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid and brain biopsy findings. Acute SSPE is an exceptionally rare and little-known form of SSPE with protean symptomatology, and this case is to our knowledge the first observation of SSPE presenting with status epilepticus in adults. Our case reinforces the need to include, even in developed countries, SSPE as a diagnostic possibility in unexplained acute encephalopathies. PMID:21686559

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell application in children with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuşkonmaz, Bariş; Uçkan, Duygu; Yalnizoğlu, Dilek; Günel, Mintaze; Karli Oğuz, Kader; Konuşkan, Bahadir; Anlar, Banu

    2015-09-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a serious, often fatal disease that responds poorly to current treatment modalities. Recently, the ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to produce neurotrophic factors and inflammatory molecules has placed them among potential treatment agents for neurological conditions. We report the results of four patients treated with MSC for SSPE. The patients were followed up clinically, and by periodical laboratory evaluations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and electroencephalography. One patient deteriorated to stage III of the disease, two patients remained in the same stage, and one died from disease progression and respiratory problems. Neurological findings and electroencephalography scores were consistent with the clinical course of the patient whereas MRI showed new inflammatory lesions in two patients. This is the first report of the application of MSC in SSPE. No benefit is demonstrated. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  10. Atypical magnetic resonance imaging features in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Biplab; Goyal, Manoj Kumar; Modi, Manish; Mehta, Sahil; Chakravarthi, Sudheer; Lal, Vivek; Vyas, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is rare chronic, progressive encephalitis that affects primarily children and young adults, caused by a persistent infection with measles virus. No cure for SSPE exists, but the condition can be managed by medication if treatment is started at an early stage. Heterogeneity of imaging findings in SSPE is not very uncommon. But pial and gyral enhancements are very rarely noticed. Significant asymmetric onset as well as pial-gyral enhancements is not reported. Herein we present a case of 16 years adolescent of SSPE having remarkable asymmetric pial-gyral enhancements, which were misinterpreted as tubercular infection. Early diagnosis and treatment is encouraging in SSPE, although it is not curable with current therapy. Clinico-radiological and electrophysiological correlation is very important in diagnosis of SSPE, more gravely in patients having atypical image findings as in our index case.

  11. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a Toddler: Changing Epidemiological Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulakh, Roosy; Tiwari, Abhimanyu

    2013-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a devastating “slow virus” brain disease resulting from persistent measles virus infection of neurons. The age at presentation is usually 8 to 11 years with onset usually occurring 2–10 years after measles infection. We report a 2-and-half-year-old boy who presented with progressively increasing myoclonic jerks and subtle cognitive decline. He was diagnosed as a case of SSPE based on clinical features, typical electroencephalographic finding, and elevated cerebrospinal fluid/serum measles antibody titers. He had measles 4 months prior to onset of symptoms. This case along with review of recently published reports suggests progressively decreasing latency period between measles infection and onset of symptoms observed in cases with SSPE. Clinical implication would mean investigating for SSPE even in infants or toddlers with compatible clinical features and recent history of measles infection. PMID:24416610

  12. Subacute bacterial endocarditis presenting as left upper quadrant abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Ta Kao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis is a microbial infection of the endocardial surface of the heart. Its symptoms and signs are varied, and include fever, heart murmur, peripheral embolism, and heart failure. The diagnosis of subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE is suggested by a history of an indolent process characterized by fever, fatigue, anorexia, and unexplained weight loss. These patients may have had an invasive procedure, such as dental work, or abused intravenous drugs prior to the diagnosis of SBE. Although uncommon, the patients may present with nonspecific symptoms caused by peripheral embolic events. Herein, we report a 25-year-old male diagnosed with SBE, who presented with the unusual symptom of sudden onset of left upper quadrant abdominal pain for 2 days. His clinical history is also discussed.

  13. Subacute liver failure by pseudocirrhotic metastatic breast cancer infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jüngst, Christoph; Krämer, Jens; Schneider, Günther; Lammert, Frank; Zimmer, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic metastases are common in the clinical course of breast cancer and typically appear as mass lesions. This report describes the case of a 70-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer and no previously known liver disease presenting with the first episode of variceal bleeding and subacute hepatic failure. Imaging studies indicated liver cirrhosis without signs of malignant focal lesions. Comprehensive diagnostic work-up was negative for specific causes of liver disease and provided no evidence for tumor recurrence. Finally transjugular liver biopsy revealed a marked diffuse desmoplastic infiltration by breast cancer cells. Malignant pseudocirrhosis is an unusual pattern of metastatic, tumor spread representing a rare but important differential diagnosis of progressive liver failure. Liver biopsy is the key procedure to establish the diagnosis as imaging studies may mimic cirrhosis.

  14. A rare pathogen for subacute osteomyelitis in adolescent: Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Necmettin; Akgul, Turgut; Arzu, Ufuk; Batıbay, Sefa Giray; Ekinci, Mehmet; Şen, Cengiz; Korkmaz, Murat

    2015-01-01

    There are various pathogens reported for osteomyelitis. Osteomyelitis is bone infection which produces pain and fever, also threatens bone instability. It can lead to nonunion. The purpose of this report was to describe a case with union delay of the tibia due to serratia marcescens osteomyelitis. Serratia marcescens is an unexpected pathogen for subacute osteomyelitis in adolescence. Because of difficulty of diagnosis, treatment can be delayed or the situation can cause complications like nonunion or loss of function. Serratia marcescens is an unexpected pathogen for subacute osteomyelitis in adolescence. Because of difficulty of diagnosis, treatment can be delayed or cause complications like nonunion or loss of function. We present a meningomyelocele female adolescent operated with distal tibia varus osteotomy for correcting ankle valgus deformity. Insufficient healing was determined at osteotomy side on radiographs. The patient's erythrocyte sedimentation rate and CRP level was slightly higher with minimal clinical inflammation. MRI examination showed abscess formation at T2 imaging. Debridement, grafting and circular external fixation was performed. Sulperazon was started for drug therapy. Union was achieved after compression and distraction osteogenesis by circular external fixator. Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of opportunistic infections like serratia and keep in mind as a probable cause of disease. Osteomyelitis is one of our main problems in orthopedics. Serratia does not come to mind as a causative factor when we learn the patient has osteomyelitis. We give treatment for the most expected pathogens like staphylococcus species firstly. This shows us the importance of bone biopsies and wound culture tests. Presented case is diagnosed as serratia osteomyelitis after culture results and given treatment with antibiotics and debridement. Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of opportunistic infections like serratia and keep in mind when diagnosing the

  15. Imaging of neurodegenerative cognitive and behavioral disorders: practical considerations for dementia clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atri, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    This chapter reviews clinical applications and imaging findings useful in medical practice relating to neurodegenerative cognitive/dementing disorders. The preponderance of evidence and consensus guidelines support an essential role of multitiered neuroimaging in the evaluation and management of neurodegenerative cognitive/dementia syndrome that range in severity from mild impairments to frank dementia. Additionally, imaging features are incorporated in updated clinical and research diagnostic criteria for most dementias, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Frontotemporal Lobar Degenerations/Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD), and Vascular Cognitive Impairment (VCI). Best clinical practices dictate that structural imaging, preferably with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) when possible and computed tomography when not, be obtained as a first-tier approach during the course of a thorough clinical evaluation to improve diagnostic confidence and assess for nonneurodegenerative treatable conditions that may cause or substantially contribute to cognitive/behavioral symptoms or which may dictate a substantial change in management. These conditions include less common structural (e.g., mass lesions such as tumors and hematomas; normal-pressure hydrocephalus), inflammatory, autoimmune and infectious conditions, and more common comorbid contributing conditions (e.g., vascular cerebral injury causing leukoaraiosis, infarcts, or microhemorrhages) that can produce a mixed dementia syndrome. When, after appropriate clinical, cognitive/neuropsychologic, and structural neuroimaging assessment, a dementia specialist remains in doubt regarding etiology and appropriate management, second-tier imaging with molecular methods, preferably with fluorodexoyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) (or single-photon emission computed tomography if PET is unavailable) can provide more diagnostic specificity (e.g., help differentiate between atypical AD and FTD as

  16. Assessment of acute and subacute toxic effects of the Saudi folk herb Retama raetam in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardi M. Algandaby

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Repeated administration of methanolic extract of RR (250 mg/kg has a low nephrotoxic subacute toxicity potential, while it might have hepatotoxic, nephrotoxic, and mutagenic effects at higher doses.

  17. Pending Laboratory Tests and the Hospital Discharge Summary in Patients Discharged To Sub-Acute Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walz, Stacy E; Smith, Maureen; Cox, Elizabeth; Sattin, Justin; Kind, Amy J. H

    2011-01-01

    ...) tests at the time of hospital discharge for general medical patients. However, the prevalence and communication of pending labs within a high-risk population, specifically those patients discharged to sub-acute care (i.e...

  18. BILATERAL SUBRETINAL FLUID AND RETINAL VASCULOPATHY ASSOCIATED WITH SUBACUTE SCLEROSING PANENCEPHALITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aniruddha; Singh, Ramandeep; Kumar, Abiraj; Dogra, Mangat R; Gupta, Amod

    2017-01-01

    To report a case of bilateral retinopathy associated with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. History and clinical examination, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. We report a rare case of unilateral, followed by bilateral retinopathy, subretinal fluid, and vasculopathy in a young boy. History of missed measles vaccination, behavioral and neurologic symptoms, and electroencephalogram suggested a diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Retinal imaging using optical coherence tomography was performed to document changes in the retinal microstructure through the natural course of the disease. Within 8 weeks, the changes progressed to retinal atrophy in both eyes. The progressive course of retinitis associated with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis can be monitored on optical coherence tomography. Retinitis is subacute sclerosing panencephalitis rapidly progressive from the acute stage to the stage of atrophy, involving full thickness of the retina.

  19. Improving the welfare of dairy goats: Feeding behaviour identifies goats at risk of subacute rumen acidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Giger-Reverdin, Sylvie; Sauvant, Daniel; Duvaux-Ponter, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Main messages: Feeding behaviour is highly variable between animals. Feeding behaviour modifies rumen pH pattern and occurrence of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA). Avoiding SARA increases animal welfare, milk production and therefore farm profit - ability.

  20. Feasibility of Delivering a Dance Intervention for SubAcute Stroke in a Rehabilitation Hospital Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Marika Demers; Patricia McKinley

    2015-01-01

    Dance can be a promising treatment intervention used in rehabilitation for individuals with disabilities to address physical, cognitive and psychological impairments. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of a modified dance intervention as an adjunct therapy designed for people with subacute stroke, in a rehabilitation setting. Using a descriptive qualitative study design, a biweekly 45-min dance intervention was offered to individuals with a subacute stroke followed...

  1. Bilateral optic neuritis--the only ocular finding in a case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Pinar Altiaylik; Ozkan, Mehpare; Sekeroglu, Hande Taylan; Kadayifcilar, Sibel; Yuksel, Deniz; Aksoy, Ayse

    2014-02-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a rare disease of central nervous system caused by defective measles virus. Chorioretinitis with macular involvement is the mostly observed ocular finding in the disease. Other reported ocular findings in the disease are cortical blindness, hemianopsia, nystagmus, extraocular muscle paresis and optic atrophy. We present a rare case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis with isolated bilateral optic neuritis as the only ocular finding without macular involvement.

  2. MR imaging findings in subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Jun; Lee, Jae Hee; Lee, Sung Yong; Chung, Sung Woo [Our Lady of Mercy Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause neurologic complications in the spinal cord, brain, and optic and peripheral nerves. Subacute combined degeneration is a rare disease of demyelinating lesions of the spinal cord, affecting mainly the posterior and lateral columns of the thoracic cord. We report the MR imaging findings of a case of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord in a patient with vitamin B12 deficiency and mega loblastic anemia. (author)

  3. Investigations on rumen and claw health of different wild ruminants related to subacute ruminal acidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Schilcher, B; Baumgartner, K; Liesegang, A

    2010-01-01

    In this study four ruminant species of Nuremberg Zoo were evaluated for subacute ruminal acidosis according to the feeding management. Parameters of microbiological fermentation of the rumen as well as rumen tissue samples were examined. Additionally, investigations on claw health, in terms of laminitis were made. Three of the four species, all grass- and roughage feeders, showed severe characteristics of subacute ruminal acidosis due to a diet high in fermentable carbohydrates and low in fib...

  4. Determining appropriateness for rehabilitation or other subacute care: is there a role for utilisation review?

    OpenAIRE

    Poulos, Christopher J; Eagar, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Background Rehabilitation and other forms of subacute care play an important role in the Australian health care system, yet there is ambiguity around clinical definitions of subacute care, how it differs from acute care, where it is best done and what resources are required. This leads to inconsistent and often poorly defined patient selection criteria as well as a lack of research into efficient models of care. Methods A literature review on the potential role of utilisation review in defini...

  5. Drug-induced extrapyramidal syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillevoort, Igor Ernesto Rudolf Maurice

    2002-01-01

    Extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS) are a group of movement disorders that result from damage in the basal ganglia and certain related thalamic and brainstem nuclei. EPS are either primary, i.e. due to a neurodegenerative disease, or secondary. Secondary forms can have different causes, the most

  6. Guillain–Barré syndrome presenting with Raynaud’s phenomenon: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Gunatilake, Sonali Sihindi Chapa; Wimalaratna, Harith

    2014-01-01

    Background Guillain–Barré syndrome is an immune mediated acute inflammatory polyradiculo-neuropathy involving the peripheral nervous system. Commonest presentation is acute or subacute flaccid ascending paralysis of limbs. Rarely autonomic dysfunction can be the presenting feature of Guillain–Barré syndrome. Raynaud’s phenomenon, although had been described in relation to many disease conditions, has not been described in association with Guillain–Barré syndrome up to date. Case presentation ...

  7. Major histocompatibility complex class I expression on neurons in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and experimental subacute measles encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogate, N.; Yamabe, Toshio; Verma, L.; Dhib-Jalbut, S. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Lack of major histocompatibility class I antigens on neurons has been implicated as a possible mechanism for viral persistence in the brain since these antigens are required for cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition of infected cells. In subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), measles virus (MV) persists in neurons, resulting in a fatal chronic infection. MHC class I mRNA expression was examined in formalin-fixed brain tissue from 6 SSPE patients by in situ hybridization. In addition MHC class I protein expression in MV-infected neurons was examined in experimental Subacute Measles Encephalitis (SME) by double immunohistochemistry. MHC class I mRNA expression was found to be upregulated in SSPE tissues studied, and in 5 out of 6 cases the expression was definitively seen on neurons. The percentage of neurons expressing MHC class I mRNA ranged between 20 to 84% in infected areas. There was no correlation between the degree of infection and expression of MHC class I molecules on neurons. Importantly, the number of neurons co-expressing MHC class I and MV antigens was markedly low, varying between 2 to 8%. Similar results were obtained in SME where 20 to 30% of the neurons expressed MHC class I but < 8% co-expressed MHC class I and MV antigens. Perivascular infiltrating cells in the infected regions in SME expressed IFN{gamma} immunoreactivity. The results suggest that MV may not be directly involved in the induction of MHC class I on neurons and that cytokines such as IFN{gamma} may play an important role. Furthermore, the paucity of neurons co-expressing MHC class I and MV antigens in SSPE and SME suggests that such cells are either rapidly cleared by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), or, alternatively, lack of co-expression of MHC class I on MV infected neurons favors MV persistence in these cells by escaping CTL recognition. 33 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases: a neurotrophic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinet, Carme; Gonzalo, Hugo; Fleitas, Catherine; Menal, Maria Jose; Egea, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophins are important neurotrophic factors involved in the survival, differentiation and function of a wide variety of neuron populations. A common feature for most neurotrophins is that they are synthesized as precursor proteins (pro-neurotrophins) that upon being processed by proteolysis render the mature active form responsible for most of their trophic functions. However, some of the pro-neurotrophin form of these proteins, such as the precursor form of NGF (pro-NGF), have been shown to induce opposite effects and trigger apoptosis on neurons through the p75NTR receptor. This suggests that the balance between the levels of proneurotrophin and neurotrophin must be tightly controlled. In this context, it has been shown that in conditions of oxidative stress due for instance to aging or the development of some neurodegenerative disease, neurotrophins are oxidatively modified at least by advanced glycation/lipoxidation end products (AGE/ALEs) which makes pro-NGF refractary to be processed. The lack of maturation and the imbalance in favor of the precursor form may change the pattern of active signaling pathways towards cell death, thus exacerbating the deleterious alterations, for instance during the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Besides that, AGE/ALEs also induce the processing of the pro-NGF receptor p75NTR by α- secretase which is followed by the processing by γ -secretase and the release of the intracellular domain of p75NTR (p75NTRICD). Once cleaved, p75NTRICD recruits two intracellular interactors, NRIF and TRAF6, which allows NRIF phosphorylation by JNK. The phosphorylated form of NRIF then translocates to the nucleus and induces the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins. In this chapter we will summarize the mechanisms by which ROS- induce protein modifications, which proteins are susceptible to be modified, how these modifications affect function and signaling and, finally, how they can be related to neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy pathology in a neurodegenerative disorders brain bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, Kevin F; Ross, Owen A; Cormier, Kerry A; Walton, Ronald L; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Johnston, Amelia E; DeSaro, Pamela; Boylan, Kevin B; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Rademakers, Rosa; Boeve, Bradley F; McKee, Ann C; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-12-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder linked to repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) and characterized by deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau at the depths of sulci. We sought to determine the presence of CTE pathology in a brain bank for neurodegenerative disorders for individuals with and without a history of contact sports participation. Available medical records of 1721 men were reviewed for evidence of past history of injury or participation in contact sports. Subsequently, cerebral cortical samples were processed for tau immunohistochemistry in cases with a documented history of sports exposure as well as age- and disease-matched men and women without such exposure. For cases with available frozen tissue, genetic analysis was performed for variants in APOE, MAPT, and TMEM106B. Immunohistochemistry revealed 21 of 66 former athletes had cortical tau pathology consistent with CTE. CTE pathology was not detected in 198 individuals without exposure to contact sports, including 33 individuals with documented single-incident TBI sustained from falls, motor vehicle accidents, domestic violence, or assaults. Among those exposed to contact sports, those with CTE pathology did not differ from those without CTE pathology with respect to noted clinicopathologic features. There were no significant differences in genetic variants for those with CTE pathology, but we observed a slight increase in MAPT H1 haplotype, and there tended to be fewer homozygous carriers of the protective TMEM106B rs3173615 minor allele in those with sports exposure and CTE pathology compared to those without CTE pathology. In conclusion, this study has identified a small, yet significant, subset of individuals with neurodegenerative disorders and concomitant CTE pathology. CTE pathology was only detected in individuals with documented participation in contact sports. Exposure to contact sports was the greatest risk factor for CTE pathology. Future

  10. Environmental Pollutants as Risk Factors for Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eChin-Chan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer (AD and Parkinson (PD have attracted attention in last decades due to their high incidence worldwide. The etiology of these diseases is still unclear; however the role of the environment, from diet to the new nanomaterials as putative risk factors has gained importance. More worryingly is the evidence that pre- and post-natal exposures to environmental factors predispose to the onset of neurodegenerative diseases in later life. Neurotoxic metals such as lead, mercury, aluminum, cadmium and arsenic, as well as some pesticides and metal-based nanoparticles have been involved in AD due to their ability to increase beta-amyloid (Aβ peptide and the phosphorylation of Tau protein (P-Tau, causing senile/amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles characteristic of AD. The exposure to lead, manganese, solvents and some pesticides has been related to hallmarks of PD such as mitochondrial dysfunction, alterations in metal homeostasis and aggregation of proteins such as α-synuclein (α-syn, which is a key constituent of Lewy bodies, a crucial factor in PD pathogenesis. Common mechanisms of environmental pollutants to increase Aβ, P-Tau, α-syn and neuronal death have been reported, including the oxidative stress mainly involved in the increase of Aβ and α-syn, and the reduced activity/protein levels of Aβ degrading enzymes such as neprilysin or insulin degrading enzyme. In addition, epigenetic mechanisms by maternal nutrient supplementation and exposure to heavy metals and pesticides have been proposed to lead phenotypic diversity and susceptibility to neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses data from epidemiological and experimental studies about the role of environmental factors in the development of idiopathic AD and PD, and their mechanisms of action.

  11. Evidence-based therapy for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Ling

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases so as to provide the best therapeutic regimens for the evidence-based treatment. Methods Search PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases with "sleep disorder or sleep disturbance", "neurodegenerative diseases", "Parkinson's disease or PD", "Alzheimer's disease or AD", "multiple system atrophy or MSA" as retrieval words. The quality of the articles were evaluated with Jadad Scale. Results A total of 35 articles, including 2 systematic reviews, 5 randomized controlled trials, 13 clinical controlled trials, 13 case series and 2 epidemiological investigation studies were included for evaluation, 13 of which were high grade and 22 were low grade articles. Clinical evidences showed that: 1 advice on sleep hygiene, careful use of dopaminergic drugs and hypnotic sedative agents should be considered for PD. Bright light therapy (BLT may improve circadian rhythm sleep disorders and clonazepam may be effective for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. However, to date, very few controlled studies are available to make a recommendation for the management of sleep disorders in PD; 2 treatments for sleep disorders in AD include drug therapy (e.g. melatonin, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, antipsychotic drugs, antidepressants and non-drug therapy (e.g. BLT, behavior therapy, but very limited evidence shows the effectiveness of these treatments; 3 the first line treatment for sleep-related breathing disorder in MSA is nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP, and clonazepam is effective for RBD in MSA; 4 there is rare evidence related to the treatment of sleep disorders in dementia with Lewy body (DLB and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Conclusion Evidence-based medicine can provide the best clinical evidence on sleep disorders' treatment in neurodegenerative

  12. The role of mitochondrial DNA mutation on neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Moon-Yong; Kim, Dong Kyu; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2015-03-13

    Many researchers have reported that oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is increased in several age-related disorders. Damage to mitochondrial constituents and mtDNA can generate additional mitochondrial dysfunction that may result in greater reactive oxygen species production, triggering a circular chain of events. However, the mechanisms underlying this vicious cycle have yet to be fully investigated. In this review, we summarize the relationship of oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction with mtDNA mutation in neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. REM behaviour disorder detection associated with neurodegenerative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempfner, Jacob; Sorensen, Gertrud; Zoetmulder, Marielle

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal skeleton muscle activity during REM sleep is characterized as REM Behaviour Disorder (RBD), and may be an early marker for different neurodegenerative diseases. Early detection of RBD is therefore highly important, and in this ongoing study a semi-automatic method for RBD detection......, a computerized algorithm has been attempted implemented. By analysing the REM and non-REM EMG activity, using advanced signal processing tools combined with a statistical classifier, it is possible to discriminate normal and abnormal EMG activity. Due to the small number of patients, the overall performance...

  14. Stem cell treatment for age-related neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurković J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The belief in the inability of neurogenesis, that is the inability to create new neurons after embryonic and early postnatal development of the central nervous system, was rejected in the mid-nineties, when the existence of neurogenesis in restricted areas of CNS adult mammals, including humans, was discovered.Transplantation of stem cells or their derivatives into respective tissues or organs is considered as one of the most promising remedies for many incurable diseases.In this review, we summarized current knowledge and present and future perspectives andchallenges regarding stem cells treatment for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, as the most common age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Inducerede pluripotente stamceller revolutionerer forskningen i neurodegenerative sygdomme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sissel Ida; Jul Knudsen, Matias; Bogetofte Thomasen, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Research into the causes of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's- and Alzheimer's disease has long been hampered by the lack of access to live disease-afflicted neurons for in vitro studies. The introduction of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has made such studies possible. iPS cells...... can be reprogrammed from somatic patient-derived cells (e.g. skin cells) and differentiated into any cell type of the body. This allows for the production of neurons, which have the genetic background of the patients and show disease-relevant phenotypes....

  16. Multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation for subacute low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Teresa J; Van Eerd, Dwayne; Irvin, Emma; Couban, Rachel; Koes, Bart W; Malmivaara, Antti; van Tulder, Maurits W; Kamper, Steven J

    2017-06-28

    Low back pain (LBP) is associated with enormous personal and societal burdens, especially when it reaches the chronic stage of the disorder (pain for a duration of more than three months). Indeed, individuals who reach the chronic stage tend to show a more persistent course, and they account for the majority of social and economic costs. As a result, there is increasing emphasis on the importance of intervening at the early stages of LBP.According to the biopsychosocial model, LBP is a condition best understood with reference to an interaction of physical, psychological, and social influences. This has led to the development of multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation (MBR) programs that target factors from the different domains, administered by healthcare professionals from different backgrounds.This review is an update of a Cochrane Review on MBR for subacute LBP, which was published in 2003. It is part of a series of reviews on MBR for musculoskeletal pain published by the Cochrane Back and Neck Group and the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group. To examine the effectiveness of MBR for subacute LBP (pain for a duration of six to 12 weeks) among adults, with a focus on pain, back-specific disability, and work status. We searched for relevant trials in any language by a computer-aided search of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO and two trials registers. Our search is current to 13 July 2016. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of adults with subacute LBP. We included studies that investigated a MBR program compared to any type of control intervention. We defined MBR as an intervention that included a physical component (e.g. pharmacological, physical therapy) in combination with either a psychological, social, or occupational component (or any combination of these). We also required involvement of healthcare professionals from at least two different clinical backgrounds with appropriate training to deliver the component for which they were

  17. Role for Genetic Anticipation in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Timshel, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anticipation (ie, an earlier age at onset in successive generations) is linked to repeat expansion in neurodegenerative syndromes, whereas its role in hereditary cancer is unclear. We assessed anticipation in Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer [HNPCC]), in which DN...... to initiate surveillance programs at young age. It should also stimulate research into the genetic mechanisms that determine age at onset and whether the genetic instability that characterizes Lynch syndrome can be linked to anticipation....

  18. Ghrelin: a link between ageing, metabolism and neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanova, I I

    2014-12-01

    Along with the increase in life expectancy over the last century comes the increased risk for development of age-related disorders, including metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. These chronic disorders share two main characteristics: 1) neuronal loss in motor, sensory or cognitive systems, leading to cognitive and motor decline; and 2) a strong correlation between metabolic changes and neurodegeneration. In order to treat them, a better understanding of their complexity is required: it is necessary to interpret the neuronal damage in light of the metabolic changes, and to find the disrupted link between the peripheral organs governing energy metabolism and the CNS. This review is an attempt to present ghrelin as part of molecular regulatory interface between energy metabolism, neuroendocrine and neurodegenerative processes. Ghrelin takes part in lipid and glucose metabolism, in higher brain functions such as sleep-wake state, learning and memory consolidation; it influences mitochondrial respiration and shows neuroprotective effect. All these make ghrelin an attractive target for development of biomarkers or therapeutics for prevention or treatment of disorders, in which cell protection and recruitment of new neurons or synapses are needed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Mitochondrial and Cell Death Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J. Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal cell death are unresolved. Morphological, biochemical, genetic, as well as cell and animal model studies reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and overlying genetic variations, triggering neurodegeneration according to a cell death matrix theory. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in putative mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This review summarizes how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to neuronal death in AD, PD, and ALS and could serve as a target for drug therapy.

  20. Cerebellum and neurodegenerative diseases: Beyond conventional magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormina, Enricomaria; Petracca, Maria; Bommarito, Giulia; Piaggio, Niccolò; Cocozza, Sirio; Inglese, Matilde

    2017-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in movement control and in cognition and cerebellar involvement is described in several neurodegenerative diseases. While conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used for brain and cerebellar morphologic evaluation, advanced MRI techniques allow the investigation of cerebellar microstructural and functional characteristics. Volumetry, voxel-based morphometry, diffusion MRI based fiber tractography, resting state and task related functional MRI, perfusion, and proton MR spectroscopy are among the most common techniques applied to the study of cerebellum. In the present review, after providing a brief description of each technique’s advantages and limitations, we focus on their application to the study of cerebellar injury in major neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease and hereditary ataxia. A brief introduction to the pathological substrate of cerebellar involvement is provided for each disease, followed by the review of MRI studies exploring structural and functional cerebellar abnormalities and by a discussion of the clinical relevance of MRI measures of cerebellar damage in terms of both clinical status and cognitive performance. PMID:29104740

  1. Perspective Insights of Exosomes in Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Critical Appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Tasleem Jan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membranous entities of endocytic origin. Their production by a wide variety of cells in eukaryotes implicates their roles in the execution of essential processes, especially cellular communication. Exosomes are secreted under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and their actions on neighboring and distant cells lead to the modulations of cellular behaviors. They also assist in the delivery of disease causing entities, such as prions, α-syn, and tau, and thus, facilitate spread to non-effected regions and accelerate the progressions of neurodegenerative diseases. The characterization of exosomes, provides information on aberrant processes, and thus, exosome analysis has many clinical applications. Because they are associated with the transport of different cellular entities across the blood-brain barrier (BBB, exosomes might be useful for delivering drugs and other therapeutic molecules to brain. Herein, we review roles played by exosomes in different neurodegenerative diseases, and the possibilities of using them as diagnostic biomarkers of disease progression, drug delivery vehicles and in gene therapy.

  2. Perspective Insights of Exosomes in Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Critical Appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Arif Tasleem; Malik, Mudasir A.; Rahman, Safikur; Yeo, Hye R.; Lee, Eun J.; Abdullah, Tasduq S.; Choi, Inho

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are small membranous entities of endocytic origin. Their production by a wide variety of cells in eukaryotes implicates their roles in the execution of essential processes, especially cellular communication. Exosomes are secreted under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and their actions on neighboring and distant cells lead to the modulations of cellular behaviors. They also assist in the delivery of disease causing entities, such as prions, α-syn, and tau, and thus, facilitate spread to non-effected regions and accelerate the progressions of neurodegenerative diseases. The characterization of exosomes, provides information on aberrant processes, and thus, exosome analysis has many clinical applications. Because they are associated with the transport of different cellular entities across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), exosomes might be useful for delivering drugs and other therapeutic molecules to brain. Herein, we review roles played by exosomes in different neurodegenerative diseases, and the possibilities of using them as diagnostic biomarkers of disease progression, drug delivery vehicles and in gene therapy. PMID:29033828

  3. Microbiota-Brain-Gut Axis and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2017-10-17

    The purposes of this review were as follows: first, to provide an overview of the gut microbiota and its interactions with the gut and the central nervous system (the microbiota-gut-brain axis) in health, second, to review the relevance of this axis to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, and, finally, to assess the potential for microbiota-targeted therapies. Work on animal models has established the microbiota-gut-brain axis as a real phenomenon; to date, the evidence for its operation in man has been limited and has been confronted by considerable logistical challenges. Animal and translational models have incriminated a disturbed gut microbiota in a number of CNS disorders, including Parkinson's disease; data from human studies is scanty. While a theoretical basis can be developed for the use of microbiota-directed therapies in neurodegenerative disorders, support is yet to come from high-quality clinical trials. In theory, a role for the microbiota-gut-brain axis is highly plausible; clinical confirmation is awaited.

  4. Autophagy as an essential cellular antioxidant pathway in neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Giordano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress including DNA damage, increased lipid and protein oxidation, are important features of aging and neurodegeneration suggesting that endogenous antioxidant protective pathways are inadequate or overwhelmed. Importantly, oxidative protein damage contributes to age-dependent accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria or protein aggregates. In addition, environmental toxins such as rotenone and paraquat, which are risk factors for the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, also promote protein oxidation. The obvious approach of supplementing the primary antioxidant systems designed to suppress the initiation of oxidative stress has been tested in animal models and positive results were obtained. However, these findings have not been effectively translated to treating human patients, and clinical trials for antioxidant therapies using radical scavenging molecules such as α-tocopherol, ascorbate and coenzyme Q have met with limited success, highlighting several limitations to this approach. These could include: (1 radical scavenging antioxidants cannot reverse established damage to proteins and organelles; (2 radical scavenging antioxidants are oxidant specific, and can only be effective if the specific mechanism for neurodegeneration involves the reactive species to which they are targeted and (3 since reactive species play an important role in physiological signaling, suppression of endogenous oxidants maybe deleterious. Therefore, alternative approaches that can circumvent these limitations are needed. While not previously considered an antioxidant system we propose that the autophagy-lysosomal activities, may serve this essential function in neurodegenerative diseases by removing damaged or dysfunctional proteins and organelles.

  5. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Risk for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richelin V. Dye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, there has been a significant amount of research investigating the risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy (HRT with regards to neurodegenerative disease. Here, we review basic science studies, randomized clinical trials, and epidemiological studies, and discuss the putative neuroprotective effects of HRT in the context of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. Findings to date suggest a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease and improved cognitive functioning of postmenopausal women who use 17β-estradiol. With regards to Parkinson’s disease, there is consistent evidence from basic science studies for a neuroprotective effect of 17β-estradiol; however, results of clinical and epidemiological studies are inconclusive at this time, and there is a paucity of research examining the association between HRT and Parkinson’s-related neurocognitive impairment. Even less understood are the effects of HRT on risk for frontotemporal dementia and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. Limits to the existing research are discussed, along with proposed future directions for the investigation of HRT and neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Reliability and validity of the de Morton Mobility Index in individuals with sub-acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Tobias; Marks, Detlef; Thiel, Christian; Grüneberg, Christian

    2018-02-04

    To establish the validity and reliability of the de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) in patients with sub-acute stroke. This cross-sectional study was performed in a neurological rehabilitation hospital. We assessed unidimensionality, construct validity, internal consistency reliability, inter-rater reliability, minimal detectable change and possible floor and ceiling effects of the DEMMI in adult patients with sub-acute stroke. The study included a total sample of 121 patients with sub-acute stroke. We analysed validity (n = 109) and reliability (n = 51) in two sub-samples. Rasch analysis indicated unidimensionality with an overall fit to the model (chi-square = 12.37, p = 0.577). All hypotheses on construct validity were confirmed. Internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94) and inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.95; 95% confidence interval: 0.92-0.97) were excellent. The minimal detectable change with 90% confidence was 13 points. No floor or ceiling effects were evident. These results indicate unidimensionality, sufficient internal consistency reliability, inter-rater reliability, and construct validity of the DEMMI in patients with a sub-acute stroke. Advantages of the DEMMI in clinical application are the short administration time, no need for special equipment and interval level data. The de Morton Mobility Index, therefore, may be a useful performance-based bedside test to measure mobility in individuals with a sub-acute stroke across the whole mobility spectrum. Implications for Rehabilitation The de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) is an unidimensional measurement instrument of mobility in individuals with sub-acute stroke. The DEMMI has excellent internal consistency and inter-rater reliability, and sufficient construct validity. The minimal detectable change of the DEMMI with 90% confidence in stroke rehabilitation is 13 points. The lack of any floor or ceiling effects on hospital admission indicates

  7. PD-1 gene polymorphism in children with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskin, Ibrahim Etem; Calık, Mustafa; Abuhandan, Mahmut; Kolsal, Ebru; Celik, Sevim Karakas; Iscan, Akın

    2013-08-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive inflammatory and degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Several factors influence the risk of chronic brain infection with the mutant measles virus. However, to date, no pathogenic mechanism that may predispose to SSPE has been determined. Studies have indicated that specific polymorphisms in certain host genes are probably involved in impairing the ability of host immune cells to eradicate the measles virus in SSPE patients. Programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), a member of the CD28 family, is a negative regulator of the immune system. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether PD-1 gene polymorphisms affect susceptibility to the development of SSPE in Turkish children. In total, 109 subjects (54 SSPE patients and 55 healthy controls) were genotyped for the PD-1.9 C/T (rs2227982) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). The distributions of T alleles in the PD-1.9 polymorphism in SSPE patients and healthy controls were 2.8 and 10.9%, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups; the 95% confidence interval (CI) was 0.06 to 0.85 and the odds ratio (OR) was 0.23 (χ(2) test). Thus, we identified an association between SSPE and the PD-1 rs2227982 gene polymorphism; the frequency of T alleles was higher in controls than in SSPE patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid apolipoprotein E levels in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Deniz; Ichiyama, Takashi; Yilmaz, Deniz; Anlar, Banu

    2012-04-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) have been shown in 20% of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) cases. NFTs contain paired helical filaments formed by hyperphosphorylated tau. The intraneuronal tau metabolism and the rate of formation of paired helical filaments can be regulated by interactions between tau and isoforms of Apolipoprotein E (Apo E). Tau binds in vitro to Apo E3, interferes with the hyperphosphorylation of tau and may reduce the formation of NFTs. We investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Apo E levels in SSPE (n=37) and age-matched control (n=38) groups. The median level of total Apo E and Apo E4 were lower in the SSPE than the control group (p<0.001 and p=0.002). On the other hand, median Apo E3 level (0.28±0.23 μg/ml) was higher in the SSPE group (p<0.001). Such elevated levels of ApoE3 might play a role in controlling the formation of NFTs in SSPE. Because NFT-associated neurodegeneration is a slow process, comparison of the long-term clinical course of SSPE cases with high and low Apo E3 levels might provide further understanding or the role of these molecules in this disease, and help the planning of neuroprotective treatment. Copyright © 2011 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Granzyme B gene polymorphism associated with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yentur, Sibel P; Aydin, Hatice Nur; Gurses, Candan; Demirbilek, Veysi; Kuru, Umit; Uysal, Serap; Yapici, Zuhal; Baris, Safa; Yilmaz, Gülden; Cokar, Ozlem; Onal, Emel; Gokyigit, Ayşen; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher

    2014-10-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a late complication of measles infection. Immune dysfunction related to genetic susceptibility has been considered in disease pathogenesis. A functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of granzyme B gene (GZMB) reported in several pathologies may also be involved in susceptibility to SSPE.  An SNP (rs8192917, G → A, R→Q) was screened in 118 SSPE patients and 221 healthy controls (HC) by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Frequencies were compared between groups. In vitro production of GZMB was measured in controls with different genotypes.  The SNP had a minor allele (G) frequency of 0.22 in patients and 0.31 in controls. GG genotype was significantly less frequent in patients (odds ratio, 0.23). G allele carriers produced relatively higher levels of GZMB, when stimulated in vitro.  These findings implicate possible effect of this genetic polymorphism in susceptibility to SSPE which needs to be confirmed in bigger populations. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Cecocentral scotoma as the initial manifestation of subacute bacterial endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Savitsky Strauss

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Danielle Savitsky Strauss, Samuel Baharestani, Julia Nemiroff, Kiran Amesur, David HowardNew York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USAIntroduction: We report a case of a 67-year-old male who presented with a cecocentral scotoma caused by a septic embolus from subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE.Methods: A 67-year-old man presented with sudden, painless decreased vision in the left eye. A dilated fundoscopic exam, Humphrey visual field test, transthoracic echocardiogram, abdominal computed tomography (CT, and blood cultures were all performed.Results: A dilated fundoscopic exam revealed temporal segmental optic disc pallor on the left, and Humphrey visual field testing demonstrated a dense left cecocentral scotoma. When the patient developed fever (103.9°F and palpitations, transthoracic echocardiogram revealed valvular vegetations, and contrast CT of the abdomen revealed an abscess in the dome of the liver likely due to an infectious thrombus. Blood cultures grew viridians group streptococci in three separate peripheral collections.Conclusion: This case illustrates that a sudden cecocentral scotoma may be the initial manifestation of SBE. Keywords: endocarditis, scotoma, streptococcal infections, visual fields

  11. Subacute (90 days) oral toxicity studies of Kombucha tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, R; Singh, M; Rao, P V; Bhattacharya, R; Kumar, P; Sugendran, K; Kumar, O; Pant, S C; Singh, R

    2000-12-01

    Kombucha tea (KT) is a popular health beverage and is used as an alternative therapy. KT is prepared by placing the kombucha culture in solution of tea and sugar and allowing to ferment. The inoculum is a fungus consisting of symbiotic colony of yeast and bacteria. KT is consumed in several countries and is believed to have prophylactic and therapeutic benefits in a wide variety of ailments, viz., intestinal disorders, arthritis, ageing and stimulation of immunological system. Though KT is used in several parts of the world its beneficial effects and adverse effects have not been scientifically evaluated. Since there are no animal toxicological data on KT, subacute oral toxicity study was carried out. Five groups of rats were maintained: (a) control group given tap water orally, (b) KT given 2 ml/kg orally, (c) plain tea (PT) given 2 ml/kg orally, (d) KT given in drinking water, 1% (v/v) and (e) PT given in drinking water, 1% (v/v). The rats were given this treatment daily for a period of 90 days. Weekly records of weight, feed intake, water intake and general behaviour were monitored. There was no significant difference in the growth of the animals as evidenced by the progressive body weight change. The organ to body weight ratio and histological evaluation did not show any toxic signs. The haematological and biochemical variables were within the clinical limits. The study indicates that rats fed KT for 90 days showed no toxic effects.

  12. Resting state brain networks and their implications in neurodegenerative disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, William S.; Yoo, Kwangsun; Kim, Jinho; Jeong, Yong

    2012-10-01

    Neurons are the basic units of the brain, and form network by connecting via synapses. So far, there have been limited ways to measure the brain networks. Recently, various imaging modalities are widely used for this purpose. In this paper, brain network mapping using resting state fMRI will be introduced with several applications including neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Parkinson's disease. The resting functional connectivity using intrinsic functional connectivity in mouse is useful since we can take advantage of perturbation or stimulation of certain nodes of the network. The study of brain connectivity will open a new era in understanding of brain and diseases thus will be an essential foundation for future research.

  13. Modelling Neurodegenerative Diseases Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are being modelled in-vitro using human patient-specific, induced pluripotent stem cells and transgenic embryonic stem cells to determine more about disease mechanisms, as well as to discover new treatments for patients. Current research in modelling Alzheimer’s disease......, frontotemporal dementia and Parkinson’s disease using pluripotent stem cells is described, along with the advent of gene-editing, which has been the complimentary tool for the field. Current methods used to model these diseases are predominantly dependent on 2D cell culture methods. Outcomes reveal that only...... some of the phenotype can be observed in-vitro, but these phenotypes, when compared to the patient, correlate extremely well. Many studies have found novel molecular mechanisms involved in the disease and therefore elucidate new potential targets for reversing the phenotype. Future research...

  14. Memory in neurodegenerative disease: biological, cognitive, and clinical perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tröster, Alexander I

    1998-01-01

    ...  . ,  . , - ,  .    .  36 4 Neurochemical aspects of memory dysfunction in neurodegenerative disease     .  87 5 Structural neuroimaging correlates...

  15. Adeno-associated viral gene delivery in neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Peter F; Marongiu, Roberta; Musatov, Sergei A; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    The advent of viral gene therapy technology has contributed greatly to the study of a variety of medical conditions, and there is increasing promise for clinical translation of gene therapy into human treatments. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors provide one of the more promising approaches to gene delivery, and have been used extensively over the last 20 years. Derived from nonpathogenic parvoviruses, these vectors allow for stable and robust expression of desired transgenes in vitro and in vivo. AAV vectors efficiently and stably transduce neurons, with some strains targeting neurons exclusively in the brain. Thus, AAV vectors are particularly useful for neurodegenerative diseases, which have led to numerous preclinical studies and several human trials of gene therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and pediatric neurogenetic disorders. Here, we describe an efficient and reliable method for the production and purification of AAV serotype 2 vectors for both in vitro and in vivo applications.

  16. Support system and method for detecting neurodegenerative disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system and a method for detection of abnormal motor activity during REM sleep, and further to systems and method for assisting in detecting neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's. One embodiment relates to a method for detection of abnormal motor activity...... during REM sleep comprising the steps of: performing polysomnographic recordings of a sleeping subject, thereby obtaining one or more electromyography (EMG) derivations, preferably surface EMG recordings, and one or more EEG derivations, and/or one or more electrooculargraphy (EOG) derivations, detecting...... one or more REM sleep stages, preferably based on the one or more EEG and/or EOG derivations, determining the level of muscle activity during the one or more REM sleep stages based on the one or more EMG derivations, wherein a subject having an increased level of muscle activity during REM sleep...

  17. Nanoparticles and Colloids as Contributing Factors in Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    This review explores the processes underlying the deleterious effects of the presence of insoluble or colloidal depositions within the central nervous system. These materials are chemically unreactive and can have a prolonged residence in the brain. They can be composed of mineral or proteinaceous materials of intrinsic or exogenous origin. Such nanoparticulates and colloids are associated with a range of slow-progressing neurodegenerative states. The potential common basis of toxicity of these materials is discussed. A shared feature of these disorders involves the appearance of deleterious inflammatory changes in the CNS. This may be due to extended and ineffective immune responses. Another aspect is the presence of excess levels of reactive oxygen species within the brain. In addition with their induction by inflammatory events, these may be further heightened by the presence of redox active transition metals to the large surface area afforded by nanoparticles and amphipathic micelles. PMID:21776226

  18. Targeting New Candidate Genes by Small Molecules Approaching Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hueng-Chuen Fan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs are among the most feared of the disorders that afflict humankind for the lack of specific diagnostic tests and effective treatments. Understanding the molecular, cellular, biochemical changes of NDs may hold therapeutic promise against debilitating central nerve system (CNS disorders. In the present review, we summarized the clinical presentations and biology backgrounds of NDs, including Parkinson’s disease (PD, Huntington’s disease (HD, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD and explored the role of molecular mechanisms, including dys-regulation of epigenetic control mechanisms, Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated protein kinase (ATM, and neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of NDs. Targeting these mechanisms may hold therapeutic promise against these devastating diseases.

  19. Codon usage biases in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Zhu, Tong-Yang; Jiang, Zheng-Xin; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Yue-Lan; Zhang, Song; Jiang, Xiong-Fei; Wang, Ting-Ting; Wang, Lin; Xia, Wen-Hao; Li, Lei; Chen, Ji-Jun; Wang, Jia-Yue; Wang, Wei-Wei; Zheng, Wei-Juan

    2010-05-01

    Establishing codon usage biases are crucial for understanding the etiology of central nervous system neurodegenerative diseases (CNSNDD) especially Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as genetic factors. G and C ending codons are strongly biased in the coding sequences of these proteins as a result of genomic GC composition constraints. On the other hand, codons that identified as translationally optimal in the major trend all end in C or G, suggesting translational selection should also be taken into consideration additional to compositional constraints. Furthermore, this investigation reveals that three common codons, CGC (Arg), AGC (Ser), and GGC (Gly), are also critical in affecting codon usage bias. They not only can offer an insight into the codon usage bias of AD and its mechanism, but also may help in the possible cures for these diseases.

  20. Extracellular Vesicles in Brain Tumors and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Ciregia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs can be classified into apoptotic bodies, microvesicles (MVs, and exosomes, based on their origin or size. Exosomes are the smallest and best characterized vesicles which derived from the endosomal system. These vesicles are released from many different cell types including neuronal cells and their functions in the nervous system are investigated. They have been proposed as novel means for intercellular communication, which takes part not only to the normal neuronal physiology but also to the transmission of pathogenic proteins. Indeed, exosomes are fundamental to assemble and transport proteins during development, but they can also transfer neurotoxic misfolded proteins in pathogenesis. The present review will focus on their roles in neurological diseases, specifically brain tumors, such as glioblastoma (GBM, neuroblastoma (NB, medulloblastoma (MB, and metastatic brain tumors and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, multiple sclerosis (MS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Huntington, and Prion diseseases highlighting their involvement in spreading neurotoxicity, in therapeutics, and in pathogenesis.

  1. Extracellular Vesicles in Brain Tumors and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciregia, Federica; Urbani, Andrea; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) can be classified into apoptotic bodies, microvesicles (MVs), and exosomes, based on their origin or size. Exosomes are the smallest and best characterized vesicles which derived from the endosomal system. These vesicles are released from many different cell types including neuronal cells and their functions in the nervous system are investigated. They have been proposed as novel means for intercellular communication, which takes part not only to the normal neuronal physiology but also to the transmission of pathogenic proteins. Indeed, exosomes are fundamental to assemble and transport proteins during development, but they can also transfer neurotoxic misfolded proteins in pathogenesis. The present review will focus on their roles in neurological diseases, specifically brain tumors, such as glioblastoma (GBM), neuroblastoma (NB), medulloblastoma (MB), and metastatic brain tumors and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, multiple sclerosis (MS), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington, and Prion diseseases highlighting their involvement in spreading neurotoxicity, in therapeutics, and in pathogenesis. PMID:28912682

  2. Acute versus subacute community-acquired meningitis: Analysis of 611 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Tarek; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2017-09-01

    Community-acquired meningitis can be classified into acute and subacute presentations by the duration of illness of ≤ or >5 days, respectively. There are currently no studies comparing the clinical features, management decisions, etiologies, and outcomes between acute and subacute presentations.It is a retrospective study of adults with community-acquired meningitis hospitalized in Houston, TX between January 2005 and January 2010. An adverse clinical outcome was defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of ≤4.A total of 611 patients were identified, of which 458 (75%) were acute and 153 subacute (25%). The most common etiologies were unknown in 418 (68.4%), viral in 94 (15.4%), bacterial in 47 (7.7%), fungal in 42 patients (6.9%), and other noninfectious etiologies in 6 (1%). Patients with subacute meningitis were more likely to be immunosuppressed or have comorbidities, had fungal etiologies, and had higher rates of hypoglycorrachia and abnormal neurological findings (P 65 years and abnormal neurological findings were predictive of an adverse clinical outcome in both acute and subacute meningitis, whereas fever was also a significant prognostic factor in acute meningitis. (P meningitis differ in regards to clinical presentations, etiologies, laboratory findings, and management decisions, but did not differ in rates of adverse clinical outcomes. Future studies including thoroughly investigated patients with new diagnostic molecular methods may show different results and outcomes.

  3. Subacute stress and chronic stress interact to decrease intestinal barrier function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauffer, Adriana; Vanuytsel, Tim; Vanormelingen, Christophe; Vanheel, Hanne; Salim Rasoel, Shadea; Tóth, Joran; Tack, Jan; Fornari, Fernando; Farré, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress increases intestinal permeability, potentially leading to low-grade inflammation and symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders. We assessed the effect of subacute, chronic and combined stress on intestinal barrier function and mast cell density. Male Wistar rats were allocated to four experimental groups (n = 8/group): 1/sham; 2/subacute stress (isolation and limited movement for 24 h); 3/chronic crowding stress for 14 days and 4/combined subacute and chronic stress. Jejunum and colon were collected to measure: transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER; a measure of epithelial barrier function); gene expression of tight junction molecules; mast cell density. Plasma corticosterone concentration was increased in all three stress conditions versus sham, with highest concentrations in the combined stress condition. TEER in the jejunum was decreased in all stress conditions, but was significantly lower in the combined stress condition than in the other groups. TEER in the jejunum correlated negatively with corticosterone concentration. Increased expression of claudin 1, 5 and 8, occludin and zonula occludens 1 mRNAs was detected after subacute stress in the jejunum. In contrast, colonic TEER was decreased only after combined stress, and the expression of tight junction molecules was unaltered. Increased mast cell density was observed in the chronic and combined stress condition in the colon only. In conclusion, our data show that chronic stress sensitizes the gastrointestinal tract to the effects of subacute stress on intestinal barrier function; different underlying cellular and molecular alterations are indicated in the small intestine versus the colon.

  4. Impact of Plant-Derived Flavonoids on Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Silvia Lima; Silva, Victor Diogenes Amaral; Dos Santos Souza, Cleide; Santos, Cleonice Creusa; Paris, Irmgard; Muñoz, Patricia; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2016-07-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders have a common characteristic that is the involvement of different cell types, typically the reactivity of astrocytes and microglia, characterizing gliosis, which in turn contributes to the neuronal dysfunction and or death. Flavonoids are secondary metabolites of plant origin widely investigated at present and represent one of the most important and diversified among natural products phenolic groups. Several biological activities are attributed to this class of polyphenols, such as antitumor activity, antioxidant, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory, among others, which give significant pharmacological importance. Our group have observed that flavonoids derived from Brazilian plants Dimorphandra mollis Bent., Croton betulaster Müll. Arg., e Poincianella pyramidalis Tul., botanical synonymous Caesalpinia pyramidalis Tul. also elicit a broad spectrum of responses in astrocytes and neurons in culture as activation of astrocytes and microglia, astrocyte associated protection of neuronal progenitor cells, neuronal differentiation and neuritogenesis. It was observed the flavonoids also induced neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells and human pluripotent stem cells. Moreover, with the objective of seeking preclinical pharmacological evidence of these molecules, in order to assess its future use in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, we have evaluated the effects of flavonoids in preclinical in vitro models of neuroinflammation associated with Parkinson's disease and glutamate toxicity associated with ischemia. In particular, our efforts have been directed to identify mechanisms involved in the changes in viability, morphology, and glial cell function induced by flavonoids in cultures of glial cells and neuronal cells alone or in interactions and clarify the relation with their neuroprotective and morphogetic effects.

  5. Adult Neurogenesis and Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Systems Biology Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgusluoglu, Emrin; Nudelman, Kelly; Nho, Kwangsik; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    New neurons are generated throughout adulthood in two regions of the brain, the olfactory bulb and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, and are incorporated into the hippocampal network circuitry; disruption of this process has been postulated to contribute to neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Known modulators of adult neurogenesis include signal transduction pathways, the vascular and immune systems, metabolic factors, and epigenetic regulation. Multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors such as neurotrophic factors, transcription factors, and cell cycle regulators control neural stem cell proliferation, maintenance in the adult neurogenic niche, and differentiation into mature neurons; these factors act in networks of signaling molecules that influence each other during construction and maintenance of neural circuits, and in turn contribute to learning and memory. The immune system and vascular system are necessary for neuronal formation and neural stem cell fate determination. Inflammatory cytokines regulate adult neurogenesis in response to immune system activation, whereas the vasculature regulates the neural stem cell niche. Vasculature, immune/support cell populations (microglia/astrocytes), adhesion molecules, growth factors, and the extracellular matrix also provide a homing environment for neural stem cells. Epigenetic changes during hippocampal neurogenesis also impact memory and learning. Some genetic variations in neurogenesis related genes may play important roles in the alteration of neural stem cells differentiation into new born neurons during adult neurogenesis, with important therapeutic implications. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of and interactions between these modulators of adult neurogenesis, as well as implications for neurodegenerative disease and current therapeutic research. PMID:26879907

  6. Melatonin in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poeggeler B

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been identified as common pathophysiological phenomena associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD and Huntington's disease (HD. As the age-related decline in the production of melatonin may contribute to increased levels of oxidative stress in the elderly, the role of this neuroprotective agent is attracting increasing attention. Melatonin has multiple actions as a regulator of antioxidant and prooxidant enzymes, radical scavenger and antagonist of mitochondrial radical formation. The ability of melatonin and its kynuramine metabolites to interact directly with the electron transport chain by increasing the electron flow and reducing electron leakage are unique features by which melatonin is able to increase the survival of neurons under enhanced oxidative stress. Moreover, antifibrillogenic actions have been demonstrated in vitro, also in the presence of profibrillogenic apoE4 or apoE3, and in vivo, in a transgenic mouse model. Amyloid-β toxicity is antagonized by melatonin and one of its kynuramine metabolites. Cytoskeletal disorganization and protein hyperphosphorylation, as induced in several cell-line models, have been attenuated by melatonin, effects comprising stress kinase downregulation and extending to neurotrophin expression. Various experimental models of AD, PD and HD indicate the usefulness of melatonin in antagonizing disease progression and/or mitigating some of the symptoms. Melatonin secretion has been found to be altered in AD and PD. Attempts to compensate for age- and disease-dependent melatonin deficiency have shown that administration of this compound can improve sleep efficiency in AD and PD and, to some extent, cognitive function in AD patients. Exogenous melatonin has also been reported to alleviate behavioral symptoms such as sundowning. Taken together, these findings suggest that melatonin

  7. Adult neurogenesis and neurodegenerative diseases: A systems biology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgusluoglu, Emrin; Nudelman, Kelly; Nho, Kwangsik; Saykin, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    New neurons are generated throughout adulthood in two regions of the brain, the olfactory bulb and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, and are incorporated into the hippocampal network circuitry; disruption of this process has been postulated to contribute to neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Known modulators of adult neurogenesis include signal transduction pathways, the vascular and immune systems, metabolic factors, and epigenetic regulation. Multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors such as neurotrophic factors, transcription factors, and cell cycle regulators control neural stem cell proliferation, maintenance in the adult neurogenic niche, and differentiation into mature neurons; these factors act in networks of signaling molecules that influence each other during construction and maintenance of neural circuits, and in turn contribute to learning and memory. The immune system and vascular system are necessary for neuronal formation and neural stem cell fate determination. Inflammatory cytokines regulate adult neurogenesis in response to immune system activation, whereas the vasculature regulates the neural stem cell niche. Vasculature, immune/support cell populations (microglia/astrocytes), adhesion molecules, growth factors, and the extracellular matrix also provide a homing environment for neural stem cells. Epigenetic changes during hippocampal neurogenesis also impact memory and learning. Some genetic variations in neurogenesis related genes may play important roles in the alteration of neural stem cells differentiation into new born neurons during adult neurogenesis, with important therapeutic implications. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of and interactions between these modulators of adult neurogenesis, as well as implications for neurodegenerative disease and current therapeutic research. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Early Diagnosis and Monitoring of Neurodegenerative Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sieni

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (ND-LCH is a rare, unpredictable consequence that may devastate the quality of life of patients cured from LCH. We prospectively applied a multidisciplinary diagnostic work-up to early identify and follow-up patients with ND-LCH, with the ultimate goal of better determining the appropriate time for starting therapy.We studied 27 children and young adults with either ND-LCH verified by structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI (group 1 or specific risk factors for (diabetes insipidus, craniofacial bone lesions, but no evidence of, neurodegenerative MRI changes (group 2. All patients underwent clinical, neurophysiological and MRI studies.Seventeen patients had MRI alterations typical for ND-LCH. Nine showed neurological impairment but only three were symptomatic; 11 had abnormal somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs, and five had abnormal brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs. MR spectroscopy (MRS showed reduced cerebellar NAA/Cr ratio in nine patients. SEPs showed sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV for predicting ND-LCH of 70.6% (95%CI, 44.0%-89.7%, 100% (69.2%-100%, 100% (73.5%-100%, and 66.7% (38.4%-88.2%, respectively. Repeated investigations in group 1 revealed increasingly abnormal EP parameters, or neurological examination, or both, in nine of fifteen patients while MRI remained unchanged in all but one patient.A targeted MRI study should be performed in all patients with risk factors for ND-LCH for early identification of demyelination. The combined use of SEPs and careful neurological evaluation may represent a valuable, low-cost, well-tolerated and easily available methodology to monitor patients from pre-symptomatic to symptomatic stages. We suggest a multidisciplinary protocol including clinical, MRS, and neurophysiological investigations to identify a population target for future therapeutic trials.

  9. Does neuroinflammation fan the flame in neurodegenerative diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAlpine Fiona E

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While peripheral immune access to the central nervous system (CNS is restricted and tightly controlled, the CNS is capable of dynamic immune and inflammatory responses to a variety of insults. Infections, trauma, stroke, toxins and other stimuli are capable of producing an immediate and short lived activation of the innate immune system within the CNS. This acute neuroinflammatory response includes activation of the resident immune cells (microglia resulting in a phagocytic phenotype and the release of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and chemokines. While an acute insult may trigger oxidative and nitrosative stress, it is typically short-lived and unlikely to be detrimental to long-term neuronal survival. In contrast, chronic neuroinflammation is a long-standing and often self-perpetuating neuroinflammatory response that persists long after an initial injury or insult. Chronic neuroinflammation includes not only long-standing activation of microglia and subsequent sustained release of inflammatory mediators, but also the resulting increased oxidative and nitrosative stress. The sustained release of inflammatory mediators works to perpetuate the inflammatory cycle, activating additional microglia, promoting their proliferation, and resulting in further release of inflammatory factors. Neurodegenerative CNS disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS, Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, Huntington's disease (HD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, tauopathies, and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD, are associated with chronic neuroinflammation and elevated levels of several cytokines. Here we review the hallmarks of acute and chronic inflammatory responses in the CNS, the reasons why microglial activation represents a convergence point for diverse stimuli that may promote or compromise neuronal survival, and the epidemiologic, pharmacologic and genetic evidence implicating neuroinflammation in the

  10. A neurodegenerative vascular burden index and the impact on cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eHeinzel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of vascular burden factors have been identified to impact vascular function and structure as indicated by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT. On the basis of their impact on IMT, vascular factors may be selected and clustered in a vascular burden index (VBI. Since many vascular factors increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD, a multifactorial neurodegenerative VBI may be related to early pathological processes in AD and cognitive decline in its preclinical stages.We investigated an elderly cohort at risk for neurodegeneration (TREND study, n = 1102 for the multifactorial influence of vascular burden factors on IMT measured by ultrasound. To create a VBI for this cohort, vascular factors and their definitions (considering medical history, medication and/or blood marker data were selected based on their statistical effects on IMT in multiple regressions including age and sex. The impact of the VBI on cognitive performance was assessed using the Trail-Making Test (TMT and the CERAD neuropsychological battery.IMT was significantly predicted by age (standardized β = .26, sex (.09; males > females and the factors included in the VBI: obesity (.18, hypertension (.14, smoking (.08, diabetes (.07, and atherosclerosis (.05, whereas other cardiovascular diseases or hypercholesterolemia were not significant. Individuals with 2 or more VBI factors compared to individuals without had an odds ratio of 3.17 regarding overly increased IMT (≥1.0 mm. The VBI showed an impact on executive control (log(TMT B-A, p = .047 and a trend towards decreased global cognitive function (CERAD total score, p = .057 independent of age, sex and education.A VBI established on the basis of IMT may help to identify individuals with overly increased vascular burden linked to decreased cognitive function indicating neurodegenerative processes. The longitudinal study of this risk cohort will reveal the value of the VBI as prodromal marker for cognitive decline and

  11. Estimating frontal and parietal involvement in cognitive estimation: a study of focal neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teagan Ann Bisbing

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We often estimate an unknown value based on available relevant information, a process known as cognitive estimation. In this study, we assess the cognitive and neuroanatomic basis for quantitative estimation by examining deficits in patients with focal neurodegenerative disease in frontal and parietal cortex. Executive function and number knowledge are key components in cognitive estimation. Prefrontal cortex has been implicated in multilevel reasoning and planning processes, and parietal cortex has been associated with number knowledge required for such estimations. We administered the Biber Cognitive Estimation Test (BCET to assess cognitive estimation in 22 patients with prefrontal disease due to behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, to 17 patients with parietal disease due to corticobasal syndrome (CBS or posterior cortical atrophy (PCA and 11 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Both bvFTD and CBS/PCA patients had significantly more difficulty with cognitive estimation than controls. MCI were not impaired on BCET relative to controls. Regression analyses related BCET performance to gray matter atrophy in right lateral prefrontal and orbital frontal cortices in bvFTD, and to atrophy in right inferior parietal cortex, right insula and fusiform cortices in CBS/PCA. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that a frontal-parietal network plays a crucial role in cognitive estimation.

  12. Neurodegenerative and Fatiguing Illnesses, Infections and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Use of Natural Supplements to Improve Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garth L. Nicolson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many chronic diseases and illnesses are associated with one or more chronic infections, dysfunction of mitochondria and reduced production of ATP. This results in fatigue and other symptoms that occur in most if not all chronic conditions and diseases. Methods: This is a review of the published literature on chronic infections in neurodegenerative diseases and fatiguing illnesses that are also typified by mitochondrial dysfunction. This contribution also reviews the use of natural supplements to enhance mitochondrial function and reduce the effects of chronic infections to improve overall function in various chronic illnesses. Results: Mitochondrial function can be enhanced by the use of various natural supplements, notably Lipid Replacement Therapy (LRT using glyerolphospholipids and other mitochondrial supplements. In various chronic illnesses that are characterized by the presence of chronic infections, such as intracellular bacteria (Mycoplasma, Borrelia, Chlamydia and other infections and viruses, LRT has proven useful in multiple clinical trials. For example, in clinical studies on chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia syndrome and other chronic fatiguing illnesses where a large majority of patients have chronic infections, LRT significantly reduced fatigue by 35-43% in different clinical trials and increased mitochondrial function. In clinical trials on patients with multiple intracellular bacterial infections and intractable fatigue LRT plus other mitochondrial supplements significantly decreased fatigue and improved mood and cognition. Conclusions: LRT formulations designed to improve mitochondrial function appear to be useful as non-toxic dietary supplements for reducing fatigue and restoring mitochondrial and other cellular membrane functions in patients with chronic illnesses and multiple chronic infections.

  13. Genetic and Transcriptomic Profiles of Inflammation in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Alzheimer, Parkinson, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Tauopathies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    López González, Irene; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Llorens, Franc; Ferrer, Isidre

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in certain inflammatory-related genes have been identified as putative differential risk factors of neurodegenerative diseases with abnormal protein aggregates, such as sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD...

  14. Subacute bacterial endocarditis and subsequent shunt nephritis from ventriculoatrial shunting 14 years after shunt implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burström, Gustav; Andresen, Morten; Bartek, Jiri Jr.

    2014-01-01

    of causing subacute bacterial endocarditis and subsequent shunt nephritis. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotics combined with ventriculoatrial shunt removal and endoscopic third ventriculocisternostomy (VCS). This case illustrates the nowadays rare, but potentially severe complication...... of subacute bacterial endocarditis and shunt nephritis. It also exemplifies the VCS as an alternative to implanting foreign shunt systems for CSF diversion....

  15. Adult fulminant subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: pathological and molecular studies--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souraud, J B; Faivre, A; Waku-Kouomou, D; Gaillard, T; Aouad, N; Meaudre, E; Wild, F T; Fouet, B; Soulard, R

    2009-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is an uncommon progressive neurological disorder caused by a persistent defective measles virus, typically affecting children. We describe a case of fulminant subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in a 25-year-old male. Brain tissue biopsy showed histologic evidence of encephalitis with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies (Cowdry Type A and B), intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, perivascular lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and gliosis. Immunohistochemical studies were positive using an anti-measles antibody. Reverse transcriptase-PCR detected measles virus RNA and phylogenetic analysis indicated a C2 genotype. The rare adult-onset form is often atypical and difficult to diagnose and should be included in the differential diagnosis of subacute "unexplained" neurological diseases and uncommon infectious disorders.

  16. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) presenting as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraya, Jatinder; Marks, Harold; Khurana, Divya; Legido, Agustin; Melvin, Joseph

    2009-07-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) typically presents with progressive mental deterioration, behavioral changes, and myoclonic jerks. Atypical presentations are not unknown and may result in diagnostic delays. A 9-year-old girl presented with poor balance and ataxia following an episode of upper respiratory tract infection. Neurological examination revealed mild hemiparesis and ataxia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed scattered areas of T2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery hyperintensities in the white matter consistent with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Despite treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulins, and plasmapheresis, progressive neurological worsening occurred. Later during the course of her illness, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis was suspected from the appearance of burst-suppression pattern on electroencephalogram, and the diagnosis confirmed by elevated titers of measles antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid. Physicians taking care of children need to be aware of atypical presentations of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and must have a high index of suspicion to prevent diagnostic delays and avoid unnecessary diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.

  17. Successful treatment of encephalopathy and myoclonus with levetiracetam in a case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel; Patel, Anup; Abou-Khalil, Bassel W; Pina-Garza, Jesus E

    2009-06-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a devastating progressive degenerative disease of the nervous system presumably caused by a persistent measles virus. Patients commonly present with myoclonia or encephalopathy. There are currently no known curative therapeutic options or effective symptomatic therapy. We treated a 12-year-old boy with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis who presented with acute encephalopathy and myoclonus. Electroencephalogram showed characteristic generalized periodic discharges. Levetiracetam produced dramatic improvement in both myoclonus and encephalopathy. The improvement was clear within 4 days. The electroencephalogram pattern showed improvement as well. Levetiracetam is a promising symptomatic therapy in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis for both the myoclonus and the encephalopathy. In this patient, it also appeared to improve the electroencephalographic pattern. We suggest that the generalized periodic discharges associated with the myoclonus contributed to the patient's encephalopathy.

  18. Clinical and Radiological Evaluation of Children with Subacute Sclerosan Panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet İrdem

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 65 children with Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis (SSPE who admittedto our clinic between September 1998 and December 2002 were retrospectively evaluated interms of clinical and radiological findings.The most common symptoms and findings at admission were myoklonia (31 patients, 47%, behaveral changes (18 patients, 27.7 % and convulsion (8 patients, 12 %. There was atrauma history initiating symptoms in 14 patients (21.5 %. Neurological symptoms presentedsignificantly earlier in patients who had measles before 2 years of age compared to others(p0.05. The clinical stage of the patients at admission was determined based on Risk veHaddad classification. The most frequent stage was IIA (21 patients, 32.2%, IIC (17patients, 26.2% and IIB (16 patients, 24.6%. At the follow-up period, 46 (71% patients wasdepended to bed. The mean time interval between SSPE initiation age and bed dependencywas 4.68 ± 4.05 months (1-17 months.Of the 31 patients who underwent cranial magnetic rezonans imaging (MRI, 15patients (48.38% had pathological findings, the most frequent findings were cortical vesubcortical lesions. Of the 24 patients who underwent cranial tomographi, 22 (91.6% werenormal. Of the remaining two, one had atrophy and the other had increase in contrast. All ofthe patients underwent rutine EEG test. Fifty-four (83.1% of these had periodic complexhigh slow wave activity.The clinical findings and Electro Encephalographi results are important parameters inthe diagnosis of SSPE. Cranial tomographi is not useful in the diagnosis of SSPE. However,cranial MRI findings is pathologic only in the half of the patients.

  19. Subacute granulomatous (de Quervain) thyroiditis: grayscale and color Doppler sonographic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frates, Mary C; Marqusee, Ellen; Benson, Carol B; Alexander, Erik K

    2013-03-01

    To describe the sonographic characteristics of subacute granulomatous (De Quervain) thyroiditis. We retrospectively identified all patients at our institution during the last 11 years who had thyroid sonography with findings suggestive of subacute granulomatous thyroiditis. We then reviewed clinical data and laboratory results to establish the clinical diagnosis. A final diagnosis of subacute granulomatous thyroiditis was made on the basis of clinical symptoms, suppressed thyrotropin, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and/or reduced or absent radionuclide uptake while hyperthyroid. Our study population consisted of 35 patients. Twenty-seven patients (79.4%) met clinical criteria for subacute thyroiditis. Symptoms included neck pain in 26 of 27 patients with subacute thyroiditis. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate ranged from 22 to 101 mm/h. In 21 cases (77.8%), sonography revealed focal, poorly defined, nonovoid areas of decreased echogenicity. Findings were bilateral in 16 patients and unilateral in 5. In the remaining 6, the gland or an entire lobe was diffusely heterogeneous. Color Doppler interrogation was performed in 20 patients. Flow was decreased to the sonographically abnormal areas in 19 (95%) and slightly increased in 1 patient. In all 9 patients who underwent radionuclide scanning, focal defects or large areas of decreased or absent uptake were found during the time of suppressed thyrotropin. Enlarged lymph nodes were noted in 16 patients (59.3%). The positive predictive value of sonography for diagnosing subacute granulomatous thyroiditis is 79.4%. The most common sonographic appearance is poorly defined regions of decreased echogenicity with decreased vascularity in the affected areas.

  20. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoem, Gry; Koht, Jeanette

    2017-10-31

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation on the X chromosome. The major signs and symptoms are tremor, ataxia and parkinsonism. Up to one in 2 000 persons over 50 years of age will develop the syndrome. There is reason to believe that too few individuals in Norway undergo testing for this condition.

  1. Subacute combined spinal cord degeneration and pancytopenia secondary to severe vitamin B12 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Cabrerizo-García

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Decreased vitamin B12 concentration does not usually result in clinical or hematological abnormalities. Subacute combined spinal cord degeneration and pancytopenia are two serious and rarely displayed consequences that appear in severe deficits. CASE REPORT: We present the case of a patient with subacute combined spinal cord degeneration and pancytopenia secondary to severe and sustained vitamin B12 deficiency. Such cases are rare nowadays and have potentially fatal consequences. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin B12 deficiency should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis in cases of blood disorders or severe neurological symptoms. Early diagnosis and treatment can avoid irreversible consequences.

  2. Acute and sub-acute toxicity study of Clerodendrum inerme, Jasminum mesnyi Hance and Callistemon citrinus

    OpenAIRE

    Bharat Bhushan; Satish Sardana; Gulshan Bansal

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study acute and sub-acute toxicity study of Clerodendrum inerme (C. inerme), Jasminum mesnyi (J. mesnyi) Hance and Callistemon citrinus (C. citrinus). Methods: The acute toxicity test was conducted in Swiss albino mice. The extracts of C. inerme, J. mesnyi Hance and C. citrinus was administered in single dose of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0 g/kg and observed for behavioral changes and mortality, if any. In sub-acute toxicity study, Wistar rats of either sex were administer...

  3. Rapidly progressive subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presenting with acute loss of vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Bariş; Calişkan, Mine; Tatli, Burak; Aydinli, Nur; Ozmen, Meral

    2011-12-01

    A 10-year-old male presented with vision loss and behavioral changes. He had midpoint pupils with no reaction to light and normal funduscopic examination. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral cortical lesions at parieto-occipital lobes. Elevated measles antibody titers in the cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Despite oral inosiplex and supportive care, patient developed generalized seizures with frequent myoclonic jerks and rapidly progressed into coma. Cortical blindness in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis can be an early indicator for fulminant course.

  4. Alien Limb Syndrome Responsive to Amantadine in a Patient with Corticobasal Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim, Francisco de Assis Aquino; Tavares Júnior, José Wagner Leonel; Morais, Arlindo A; Sales, Paulo Marcelo Gondim; Wagner, Horta Goes

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder associated with parkinsonism and alien limb syndrome. Dressing and ideomotor apraxia were reportedly responsive to amantadine. A 79-year-old female was referred for evaluation of right hemiparesis. Neurological examination showed dementia, normal ocular movements, mild facial hypomimia, and bradykinesia with right hemiparesis. Nine years later, she developed alien limb syndrome and was diagnosed with CBS. After failure to respond to several medications, alien limb syndrome markedly improved with amantadine. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a consistent response of severe, forced dystonic alien limb syndrome to amantadine in a patient with CBS.

  5. Imaging plus X: multimodal models of neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxtoby, Neil P; Alexander, Daniel C

    2017-08-01

    This article argues that the time is approaching for data-driven disease modelling to take centre stage in the study and management of neurodegenerative disease. The snowstorm of data now available to the clinician defies qualitative evaluation; the heterogeneity of data types complicates integration through traditional statistical methods; and the large datasets becoming available remain far from the big-data sizes necessary for fully data-driven machine-learning approaches. The recent emergence of data-driven disease progression models provides a balance between imposed knowledge of disease features and patterns learned from data. The resulting models are both predictive of disease progression in individual patients and informative in terms of revealing underlying biological patterns. Largely inspired by observational models, data-driven disease progression models have emerged in the last few years as a feasible means for understanding the development of neurodegenerative diseases. These models have revealed insights into frontotemporal dementia, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and other conditions. For example, event-based models have revealed finer graded understanding of progression patterns; self-modelling regression and differential equation models have provided data-driven biomarker trajectories; spatiotemporal models have shown that brain shape changes, for example of the hippocampus, can occur before detectable neurodegeneration; and network models have provided some support for prion-like mechanistic hypotheses of disease propagation. The most mature results are in sporadic Alzheimer's disease, in large part because of the availability of the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative dataset. Results generally support the prevailing amyloid-led hypothetical model of Alzheimer's disease, while revealing finer detail and insight into disease progression. The emerging field of disease progression modelling provides a natural

  6. Exploring mitochondrial system properties of neurodegenerative diseases through interactome mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasblom, James; Jin, Ke; Kassir, Sandy; Babu, Mohan

    2014-04-04

    Mitochondria are double membraned, dynamic organelles that are required for a large number of cellular processes, and defects in their function have emerged as causative factors for a growing number of human disorders and are highly associated with cancer, metabolic, and neurodegenerative (ND) diseases. Biochemical and genetic investigations have uncovered small numbers of candidate mitochondrial proteins (MPs) involved in ND disease, but given the diversity of processes affected by MP function and the difficulty of detecting interactions involving these proteins, many more likely remain unknown. However, high-throughput proteomic and genomic approaches developed in genetically tractable model prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes have proven to be effective tools for querying the physical (protein-protein) and functional (gene-gene) relationships between diverse types of proteins, including cytosolic and membrane proteins. In this review, we highlight how experimental and computational approaches developed recently by our group and others can be effectively used towards elucidating the mitochondrial interactome in an unbiased and systematic manner to uncover network-based connections. We discuss how the knowledge from the resulting interaction networks can effectively contribute towards the identification of new mitochondrial disease gene candidates, and thus further clarify the role of mitochondrial biology and the complex etiologies of ND disease. Biochemical and genetic investigations have uncovered small numbers of candidate mitochondrial proteins (MPs) involved in neurodegenerative (ND) diseases, but given the diversity of processes affected by MP function and the difficulty of detecting interactions involving these proteins, many more likely remain unknown. Large-scale proteomic and genomic approaches developed in model prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes have proven to be effective tools for querying the physical (protein-protein) and functional (gene

  7. The Hsp70/Hsp90 Chaperone Machinery in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackie, Rachel E.; Maciejewski, Andrzej; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Marques-Lopes, Jose; Choy, Wing-Yiu; Duennwald, Martin L.; Prado, Vania F.; Prado, Marco A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the human brain is one of the critical features of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Assembles of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide—either soluble (oligomers) or insoluble (plaques) and of tau protein, which form neurofibrillary tangles, are the major hallmarks of AD. Chaperones and co-chaperones regulate protein folding and client maturation, but they also target misfolded or aggregated proteins for refolding or for degradation, mostly by the proteasome. They form an important line of defense against misfolded proteins and are part of the cellular quality control system. The heat shock protein (Hsp) family, particularly Hsp70 and Hsp90, plays a major part in this process and it is well-known to regulate protein misfolding in a variety of diseases, including tau levels and toxicity in AD. However, the role of Hsp90 in regulating protein misfolding is not yet fully understood. For example, knockdown of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of Aβ misfolding leads to increased toxicity. On the other hand, the use of Hsp90 inhibitors in AD mouse models reduces Aβ toxicity, and normalizes synaptic function. Stress-inducible phosphoprotein 1 (STI1), an intracellular co-chaperone, mediates the transfer of clients from Hsp70 to Hsp90. Importantly, STI1 has been shown to regulate aggregation of amyloid-like proteins in yeast. In addition to its intracellular function, STI1 can be secreted by diverse cell types, including astrocytes and microglia and function as a neurotrophic ligand by triggering signaling via the cellular prion protein (PrPC). Extracellular STI1 can prevent Aβ toxic signaling by (i) interfering with Aβ binding to PrPC and (ii) triggering pro-survival signaling cascades. Interestingly, decreased levels of STI1 in C. elegans can also increase toxicity in an amyloid model. In this review, we will discuss the role of intracellular and extracellular STI1 and the

  8. The Hsp70/Hsp90 Chaperone Machinery in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Lackie

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the human brain is one of the critical features of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. Assembles of beta-amyloid (Aβ peptide—either soluble (oligomers or insoluble (plaques and of tau protein, which form neurofibrillary tangles, are the major hallmarks of AD. Chaperones and co-chaperones regulate protein folding and client maturation, but they also target misfolded or aggregated proteins for refolding or for degradation, mostly by the proteasome. They form an important line of defense against misfolded proteins and are part of the cellular quality control system. The heat shock protein (Hsp family, particularly Hsp70 and Hsp90, plays a major part in this process and it is well-known to regulate protein misfolding in a variety of diseases, including tau levels and toxicity in AD. However, the role of Hsp90 in regulating protein misfolding is not yet fully understood. For example, knockdown of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of Aβ misfolding leads to increased toxicity. On the other hand, the use of Hsp90 inhibitors in AD mouse models reduces Aβ toxicity, and normalizes synaptic function. Stress-inducible phosphoprotein 1 (STI1, an intracellular co-chaperone, mediates the transfer of clients from Hsp70 to Hsp90. Importantly, STI1 has been shown to regulate aggregation of amyloid-like proteins in yeast. In addition to its intracellular function, STI1 can be secreted by diverse cell types, including astrocytes and microglia and function as a neurotrophic ligand by triggering signaling via the cellular prion protein (PrPC. Extracellular STI1 can prevent Aβ toxic signaling by (i interfering with Aβ binding to PrPC and (ii triggering pro-survival signaling cascades. Interestingly, decreased levels of STI1 in C. elegans can also increase toxicity in an amyloid model. In this review, we will discuss the role of intracellular and extracellular

  9. Glycation, Glycolysis, and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Is There Any Connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muronetz, V I; Melnikova, A K; Seferbekova, Z N; Barinova, K V; Schmalhausen, E V

    2017-08-01

    This review considers the interrelation between different types of protein glycation, glycolysis, and the development of amyloid neurodegenerative diseases. The primary focus is on the role of the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in changing the concentration of carbonyl compounds - first and foremost, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and methylglyoxal. It has been suggested that various modifications of the enzyme - from the oxidation of the sulfhydryl groups of the active site to glycation with sugars - can lead to its inactivation, which causes a direct increase in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate concentration and an indirect increase in the content of other aldehydes. This "primary inactivation" of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promotes its glycation with aldehydes, including its own substrate, and a further irreversible decrease in its activity. Such a cycle can lead to numerous consequences - from the induction of apoptosis, which is activated by modified forms of the enzyme, to glycation of amyloidogenic proteins by glycolytic aldehydes. Of particular importance during the inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is an increase in the content of the glycating compound methylglyoxal, which is much more active than reducing sugars (glucose, fructose, and others). In addition, methylglyoxal is formed by two pathways - in the cascade of reactions during glycation and from glycolytic aldehydes. The ability of methylglyoxal to glycate proteins makes it the main participant in this protein modification. We consider the effect of glycation on the pathological transformation of amyloidogenic proteins and peptides - β-amyloid peptide, α-synuclein, and prions. Our primary focus is on the glycation of monomeric forms of these proteins with methylglyoxal, although most works are dedicated to the analysis of the presence of "advanced glycation end products" in the already formed aggregates and fibrils of amyloid proteins. In our

  10. Methotrexate-induced subacute neurotoxicity in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia carrying genetic polymorphisms related to folate homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagace, Jose Manuel; Caceres-Marzal, Cristina; Jimenez, Mercedes; Casado, Maria Soledad; de Murillo, Silvia Gonzalez; Gervasini, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Subacute methotrexate neurotoxicity (MTX-NT) may occur days to weeks after systemic or intrathecal (IT) MTX administration and is often manifest by stroke-like symptoms. The pathogenesis of MTX-NT has mainly been associated with cerebral folate homeostasis, but the specific mechanism leading to the development of this complication is mostly unknown and is likely to be multifactorial. Most of studies aimed to determine putative genetic determinants of this syndrome have been focused on the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). However, there are other functional polymorphisms that have also been identified in enzymes and transporters related to MTX and folate homeostasis. In this context, we carried out an extensive genetic analysis through the screening of 21 SNPs in 11 relevant genes in a five-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who developed MTX-NT. The analysis revealed the presence of numerous genetic variants that may have accounted for the neurotoxicity observed. We discuss the putative role of MTX pharmacogenetics in the pathogenesis of MTX-NT.

  11. Modelling studies on neurodegenerative disease-causing triplet ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    DM), fragile X syndrome (FraX), Huntington disease. (HD), several spinocerebellar ataxias and Friedreich ataxia have been associated with the expansion of GGC,. CAG or GAA repeats (Pearson and Sinden 1998). Actually,. GGC, CAG and GAA repeats indicate duplex repeat sequences (GGC)n–(GCC)n [also indicated as ...

  12. Heterotaxy syndrome with associated agenesis of dorsal pancreas and polysplenia: A case report

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    Syed Althaf Ali1

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterotaxy syndrome is a rare embryological disorder comprising of polysplenia, partial agenesis of dorsal pancreas, malrotation of gut, cardiac and vascular anomalies resulting from failure of development of the usual left–right asymmetry of organs. We report a rare case of heterotaxy syndrome with polysplenia, partial agenesis of dorsal pancreas and malrotation of gut in a 28 year female presenting with subacute intestinal obstruction along with imaging illustrations, brief discussion and thorough review of literature.

  13. Does Vitamin C Influence Neurodegenerative Diseases and Psychiatric Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocot, Joanna; Luchowska-Kocot, Dorota; Kiełczykowska, Małgorzata; Musik, Irena; Kurzepa, Jacek

    2017-06-27

    Vitamin C (Vit C) is considered to be a vital antioxidant molecule in the brain. Intracellular Vit C helps maintain integrity and function of several processes in the central nervous system (CNS), including neuronal maturation and differentiation, myelin formation, synthesis of catecholamine, modulation of neurotransmission and antioxidant protection. The importance of Vit C for CNS function has been proven by the fact that targeted deletion of the sodium-vitamin C co-transporter in mice results in widespread cerebral hemorrhage and death on post-natal day one. Since neurological diseases are characterized by increased free radical generation and the highest concentrations of Vit C in the body are found in the brain and neuroendocrine tissues, it is suggested that Vit C may change the course of neurological diseases and display potential therapeutic roles. The aim of this review is to update the current state of knowledge of the role of vitamin C on neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic sclerosis, as well as psychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety and schizophrenia. The particular attention is attributed to understanding of the mechanisms underlying possible therapeutic properties of ascorbic acid in the presented disorders.

  14. Neuropeptides and Microglial Activation in Inflammation, Pain, and Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Lila Carniglia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglial cells are responsible for immune surveillance within the CNS. They respond to noxious stimuli by releasing inflammatory mediators and mounting an effective inflammatory response. This is followed by release of anti-inflammatory mediators and resolution of the inflammatory response. Alterations to this delicate process may lead to tissue damage, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Chronic pain, such as inflammatory or neuropathic pain, is accompanied by neuroimmune activation, and the role of glial cells in the initiation and maintenance of chronic pain has been the subject of increasing research over the last two decades. Neuropeptides are small amino acidic molecules with the ability to regulate neuronal activity and thereby affect various functions such as thermoregulation, reproductive behavior, food and water intake, and circadian rhythms. Neuropeptides can also affect inflammatory responses and pain sensitivity by modulating the activity of glial cells. The last decade has witnessed growing interest in the study of microglial activation and its modulation by neuropeptides in the hope of developing new therapeutics for treating neurodegenerative diseases and chronic pain. This review summarizes the current literature on the way in which several neuropeptides modulate microglial activity and response to tissue damage and how this modulation may affect pain sensitivity.

  15. Autophagy and ageing: implications for age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Bernadette; Hewitt, Graeme; Korolchuk, Viktor I

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a process of lysosome-dependent intracellular degradation that participates in the liberation of resources including amino acids and energy to maintain homoeostasis. Autophagy is particularly important in stress conditions such as nutrient starvation and any perturbation in the ability of the cell to activate or regulate autophagy can lead to cellular dysfunction and disease. An area of intense research interest is the role and indeed the fate of autophagy during cellular and organismal ageing. Age-related disorders are associated with increased cellular stress and assault including DNA damage, reduced energy availability, protein aggregation and accumulation of damaged organelles. A reduction in autophagy activity has been observed in a number of ageing models and its up-regulation via pharmacological and genetic methods can alleviate age-related pathologies. In particular, autophagy induction can enhance clearance of toxic intracellular waste associated with neurodegenerative diseases and has been comprehensively demonstrated to improve lifespan in yeast, worms, flies, rodents and primates. The situation, however, has been complicated by the identification that autophagy up-regulation can also occur during ageing. Indeed, in certain situations, reduced autophagosome induction may actually provide benefits to ageing cells. Future studies will undoubtedly improve our understanding of exactly how the multiple signals that are integrated to control appropriate autophagy activity change during ageing, what affect this has on autophagy and to what extent autophagy contributes to age-associated pathologies. Identification of mechanisms that influence a healthy lifespan is of economic, medical and social importance in our 'ageing' world.

  16. Molecular Pathological Classification of Neurodegenerative Diseases: Turning towards Precision Medicine

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    Gabor G. Kovacs

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs are characterized by selective dysfunction and loss of neurons associated with pathologically altered proteins that deposit in the human brain but also in peripheral organs. These proteins and their biochemical modifications can be potentially targeted for therapy or used as biomarkers. Despite a plethora of modifications demonstrated for different neurodegeneration-related proteins, such as amyloid-β, prion protein, tau, α-synuclein, TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43, or fused in sarcoma protein (FUS, molecular classification of NDDs relies on detailed morphological evaluation of protein deposits, their distribution in the brain, and their correlation to clinical symptoms together with specific genetic alterations. A further facet of the neuropathology-based classification is the fact that many protein deposits show a hierarchical involvement of brain regions. This has been shown for Alzheimer and Parkinson disease and some forms of tauopathies and TDP-43 proteinopathies. The present paper aims to summarize current molecular classification of NDDs, focusing on the most relevant biochemical and morphological aspects. Since the combination of proteinopathies is frequent, definition of novel clusters of patients with NDDs needs to be considered in the era of precision medicine. Optimally, neuropathological categorizing of NDDs should be translated into in vivo detectable biomarkers to support better prediction of prognosis and stratification of patients for therapy trials.

  17. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Perspectives

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    Ailton Melo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases (ND increase with life expectancy. This paper reviews the role of oxidative stress (OS in ND and pharmacological attempts to fight against reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced neurodegeneration. Several mechanisms involved in ROS generation in neurodegeneration have been proposed. Recent articles about molecular pathways involved in ROS generation were reviewed. The progress in the development of neuroprotective therapies has been hampered because it is difficult to define targets for treatment and determine what should be considered as neuroprotective. Therefore, the attention was focused on researches about pharmacological targets that could protect neurons against OS. Since it is necessary to look for genes as the ultimate controllers of all biological processes, this paper also tried to identify gerontogenes involved in OS and neurodegeneration. Since neurons depend on glial cells to survive, recent articles about the functioning of these cells in aging and ND were also reviewed. Finally, clinical trials testing potential neuroprotective agents were critically reviewed. Although several potential drugs have been screened in in vitro and in vivo models of ND, these results were not translated in benefit of patients, and disappointing results were obtained in the majority of clinical trials.

  18. Infectious Agents and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Exploring the Links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Zubair; Alam, Qamre; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Jiman-Fatani, Asif Ahmad; Azhar, Esam I; Khan, Mohammad Azhar; Haque, Absarul

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that bacterial and viral infections are risk factors for various neurodegenerative diseases such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and Lyme disease (LD). However, it is still controversial how the infections play a role in neurological diseases progression. Infections in central nervous system may lead multiple damages in infected and neighboring cells. The infection leads to the activation of inflammatory processes and host immune responses, which acts as defense mechanism and also causes damage to the host neuronal functions and viability. Several bacterial and viral pathogens have been reported for neurodegeneration, such as the production and deposit of misfolded protein aggregates, oxidative stress, deficient autophagic processes, synaptopathies and neuronal death. These effects may act in combination with other factors, like aging, metabolic diseases and the genetic makeup of the host. We will focus in this review on the possible link between neurodegeneration and infections particularly Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, Mycoplasma etc. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Molecular origin of polyglutamine aggregation in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ tracts in proteins results in protein aggregation and is associated with cell death in at least nine neurodegenerative diseases. Disease age of onset is correlated with the polyQ insert length above a critical value of 35-40 glutamines. The aggregation kinetics of isolated polyQ peptides in vitro also shows a similar critical-length dependence. While recent experimental work has provided considerable insights into polyQ aggregation, the molecular mechanism of aggregation is not well understood. Here, using computer simulations of isolated polyQ peptides, we show that a mechanism of aggregation is the conformational transition in a single polyQ peptide chain from random coil to a parallel beta-helix. This transition occurs selectively in peptides longer than 37 glutamines. In the beta-helices observed in simulations, all residues adopt beta-strand backbone dihedral angles, and the polypeptide chain coils around a central helical axis with 18.5 +/- 2 residues per turn. We also find that mutant polyQ peptides with proline-glycine inserts show formation of antiparallel beta-hairpins in their ground state, in agreement with experiments. The lower stability of mutant beta-helices explains their lower aggregation rates compared to wild type. Our results provide a molecular mechanism for polyQ-mediated aggregation.

  20. PENN neurodegenerative disease research - in the spirit of Benjamin Franklin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanowski, John Q

    2008-01-01

    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) was entrepreneur, statesman, supporter of the public good as well as inventor, and his most significant invention was the University of Pennsylvania (PENN). Franklin outlined his plans for a college providing practical and classical instruction to prepare youth for real-world pursuits in his 'Proposals Relating to the Education of Youth in Pensilvania' (1749), and Franklin's spirit of learning to serve society guides PENN to the present day. This is evidenced by the series of articles in this special issue of Neurosignals, describing research conducted by seasoned and newly recruited PENN faculty, addressing consequences of the longevity revolution which defines our epoch at the dawn of this millennium. While aging affects all organ systems, the nervous system is most critical to successful aging. Thus, the articles in this special issue of Neurosignals focus on research at PENN that is designed to prevent or ameliorate aging-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This research could enhance our chances of aging successfully in the continuing longevity revolution, and the essay here provides context and background on this research.

  1. The involvement of microRNAs in neurodegenerative diseases

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    Simona eMaciotta Rolandin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs originate from loss of neurons in the central nervous system and are severely debilitating. They are worldwide spread and their incidence increases with age so that they are supposed to become more common due to extended life expectancy. Since no cure is available they have become a major challenge to neurobiology. The increasing relevance of microRNAs (miRNAs in biology has prompt the scientific society to investigate on their possible involvement in neurodegeneration with the aim to find new therapeutic targets. Indeed the idea of using miRNAs as therapeutic targets is nowadays not far from realization but important issues need to be addressed before moving towards the clinics. With the present review we aim to resume what have been so far disclose on the involvement of miRNAs in NDDs pathogenesis. Furthermore, their expression levels in peripheral tissues of patients affected by NDDs will be here reported in order to evaluate their application as biomarker of disease. Finally the discrepancy, innovation and effectiveness of data collected will be elucidated and discussed.

  2. The neuroprotective effects of caffeine in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolahdouzan, Mahshad; Hamadeh, Mazen J

    2017-04-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychostimulant in Western countries, with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), caffeine is beneficial in both men and women, in humans and animals. Similar effects of caffeine were observed in men with Parkinson's disease (PD); however, the effect of caffeine in female PD patients is controversial due to caffeine's competition with estrogen for the estrogen-metabolizing enzyme, CYP1A2. Studies conducted in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) showed protective effects of A 2 A R antagonism. A study found caffeine to be associated with earlier age of onset of Huntington's disease (HD) at intakes >190 mg/d, but studies in animal models have found equivocal results. Caffeine is protective in AD and PD at dosages equivalent to 3-5 mg/kg. However, further research is needed to investigate the effects of caffeine on PD in women. As well, the effects of caffeine in ALS, HD and Machado-Joseph disease need to be further investigated. Caffeine's most salient mechanisms of action relevant to neurodegenerative diseases need to be further explored. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Novel prion protein insert mutation associated with prolonged neurodegenerative illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, V; Collins, S; Hill, A F; Boyd, A; McLean, C A; Smith, M; Masters, C L

    2003-05-27

    Mutations in the prion protein gene (PRNP) are found in approximately 13 to 15% of persons classified as dying from a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Point and octapeptide repeat insert and deletion mutations are described in the open reading frame (ORF) of PRNP. The authors present a clinicopathologic study of a patient with a family history of a lengthy and progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with a novel large octapeptide repeat insert mutation. Neuropathologic examination, including immunohistochemistry for the prion protein, was undertaken. The ORF of PRNP was amplified by PCR, cloned, and sequenced. Homogenate of cerebral tissue underwent Western blot analysis for the prion protein before and after proteinase K treatment. The proband died after a 16-year illness commencing at age 29 years. Confident premortem clinical diagnosis was not achieved despite a brain biopsy. Autopsy examination of the brain confirmed a spongiform encephalopathy. Prion protein immunohistochemistry revealed occasional granular deposits in the cerebellar granular layer. The proband was found to harbor a novel PRNP 168 base pair (bp) insert mutation. The authors have identified a novel 168 bp octapeptide repeat insert mutation. Prion protein immunohistochemistry differs from previous cases harboring seven octapeptide repeat and other long insert mutations. Optimization of PRNP analysis, especially PCR conditions, is essential to avoid overlooking this type of mutation and delay the correct molecular genetic diagnosis.

  4. Mood, memory and movement: an age-related neurodegenerative complex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Boger, Heather; Emborg, Marina E

    2008-07-01

    The following review was constructed as a concept paper based on a recent workshop on neurodegenerative disease sponsored by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the American Geriatric Society (AGS), and the John A. Hartford Foundation. The meeting was entitled "Thinking, moving and feeling: Common underlying mechanisms? 4(th) Annual Bedside-to-Bench Conference" and had the purpose to connect current basic and clinical findings on common brain-related alterations occurring with aging such as depression, movement disorders, and cognitive decline. Many prominent researchers expressed their opinion on aging and it was revealed that age-related brain dysfunction of any kind seems to share several risk factors and/or pathways. But can something be done to actively achieve "successful aging"? In this review, based largely on the workshop and current literature, we have summarized some of the current theories for depression, movement and cognitive impairment with aging, as well as potential preventive measures. We have also summarized the emerging need for relevant animal models and how these could be developed and utilized.

  5. Recommendations for the Design of Serious Games in Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Grégory Ben-Sadoun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of Serious Games (SG in the health domain is expanding. In the field of Neurodegenerative Diseases (ND such as Alzheimer’s Disease, SG are currently employed to provide alternative solutions for patients’ treatment, stimulation, and rehabilitation. The design of SG for people with ND implies collaborations between professionals in ND and professionals in SG design. As the field is quite young, professionals specialized in both ND and SG are still rare, and recommendations for the design of SG for people with ND are still missing. This perspective paper aims to provide recommendations in terms of ergonomic choices for the design of SG aiming at stimulating people with ND, starting from the existing SG already tested in this population: “MINWii”, “Kitchen and Cooking”, and “X-Torp”. We propose to rely on nine ergonomic criteria: eight ergonomic criteria inspired by works in the domain of office automation: Compatibility, Guidance, Workload, Adaptability, Consistency, Significance of codes, Explicit control and Error management; and one ergonomic criterion related to videogame: the game rules. Perspectives derived from this proposal are also discussed.

  6. Neurodegenerative diseases, suicide and depressive symptoms in relation to EMF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlbom, A

    2001-01-01

    In 1979 the first study was published which indicated that environmental exposure to power frequency, electric and magnetic fields (EMF), might increase the risk of chronic disease. This was a study on cancer. However, this research area has gradually evolved and come also to include outcomes other than cancer. The purpose of this paper is to provide a better understanding of the literature on neurodegenerative diseases and on suicide and depressive symptoms in relation to EMF by using a meta-analysis technique. It is concluded that for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, there are relatively strong data indicating that electric utility work may be associated with an increased risk. However, EMF exposure is only one of several possible explanations to this. For Alzheimer's disease the combined data on an association with EMF are weaker than that for ALS. For suicide an overall assessment yields the conclusion that the support for an association is weak. For depressive symptoms the assessment is more complex, but the overall conclusion is nevertheless that the evidence is relatively weak. For other diseases, such as Parkinson's, there is not enough information for an assessment. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marlene; Schmutzhard, Erich

    2017-08-01

    The posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurological disorder of (sub)acute onset characterized by varied neurological symptoms, which may include headache, impaired visual acuity or visual field deficits, disorders of consciousness, confusion, seizures, and focal neurological deficits. In a majority of patients the clinical presentation includes elevated arterial blood pressure up to hypertensive emergencies. Neuroimaging, in particular magnetic resonance imaging, frequently shows a distinctive parieto-occipital pattern with a symmetric distribution of changes reflecting vasogenic edema. PRES frequently develops in the context of cytotoxic medication, (pre)eclampsia, sepsis, renal disease or autoimmune disorders. The treatment is symptomatic and is determined by the underlying condition. The overall prognosis is favorable, since clinical symptoms as well as imaging lesions are reversible in most patients. However, neurological sequelae including long-term epilepsy may persist in individual cases.

  8. Subacute toxicopathological studies of methotrexate in Wistar rats

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    N. N. Patel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A toxico-pathological study was undertaken to assess the effects of Methotrexate administration in Wistar rats by performing the hematology, serum biochemical analysis and associated histopathological changes in visceral organs. Materials and Methods: Rats in 4 treatment groups with 6 male and 6 female rats each were administered methotrexate (Group II to IV at the dose rate of 0.062, 0.125 and 0.250 mg/kg body weight respectively and distilled water (Group I as vehicle control for 28 days. Hematological parameters viz., total erythrocyte count, haemoglobin, packed cell volume, MCV, MCH and MCHC, total leukocyte count and differential leukocyte count and serum biochemical parameters viz., aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, total protein, albumin, globulin (Calculated were estimated after 28 days. Necropsy examination was performed in all sacrificed animals and gross lesions were recorded. Tissue samples (lung, liver, kidney, intestine, testes and heart were collected in 10% formalin solution for histo-pathological examination. Results: The dose dependent reduction in body weight, feed consumption, RBCs count, packed cell volume, haemoglobin, total leucocyte count, neutrophil count, total protein and albumin was observed in animals of group II, III and IV along with significant increase in lymphocyte count, AST, ALT, AKP, creatinine and BUN in animals of methotrexate treated group IV followed by group III. No significant change in monocyte, eosinophil and basophil counts were observed in any treatment groups. All the rats exposed to methotrexate at three different dose levels revealed dose dependent pathological changes characterized by degeneration, necrosis, congestion, haemorrhage and vascular changes. The main target organs affected were liver, kidney, lungs and testes. Conclusion: It can be concluded from this study that sub-acute exposure to methotrexate

  9. The Epidemiology of Subacute Sclerosan Panencephalitis in Children

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    Ahmet İrdem

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a slowly progressing viral infection ofcentral nervous system and rarely occur after a latent period following measles. Because theincidance of both diseases are in relation, the epidemiological properties of measles are themost important in preventing development of SSPE.A total of 65 children with SSPE who admitted to our clinic between September 1998and December 2002 were retrospectively evaluated.Fifty patients were male and 15 were female. Of these patients, 78.8% were the secondor later children in their family. The mean number of children per family was 5.3 ± 2.63.Sixty percent of the patients were living in urban while 40% were living in a rural area. Themean age was 6.28 ± 2.15 years for total patients; it was 6.15 ± 2.2 years for male and 6.73 ±1.98 years for female. The measles vaccine had been performed in 67.7% of patients andhad not in 20%, while it was unknown in the remaining 12.3% of the patients. The mean ageof the patients at the time of measles infection was 20.32 ± 11.41 months for boys, 27.26 ±25.28 months for female (p<0.05. There was statistically significant difference (p<0.05 inmale group to be infected by measles in early period of life when compared with femalegroup. The mean latent period between measles and SSPE was 4.31 ± 2.02 years for male,4.56 ± 1.74 years for female. The median latent period in patients admitted to our clinicbetween the year 1998 and 2002 was 4.5 years, while it was 3.5 years for patients between theyear 2001 and 2002 (p<0.05. The initial time of SSPE was 6.03 ± 2.17 years for male and6.66 ± 1,97 years for female.Crowded family life and not to perform vaccination timely for measles increase theincidence of measles as well as SSPE. Therefore, the most effective way to prevent SSPE isvaccination for measles regularly and timely.

  10. Pathology of tissue loss (white syndrome) in Acropora sp. corals from the Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Aeby, Greta S.

    2011-01-01

    We performed histological examination of 69 samples of Acropora sp. manifesting different types of tissue loss (Acropora White Syndrome-AWS) from Hawaii, Johnston Atoll and American Samoa between 2002 and 2006. Gross lesions of tissue loss were observed and classified as diffuse acute, diffuse subacute, and focal to multifocal acute to subacute. Corals with acute tissue loss manifested microscopic evidence of necrosis sometimes associated with ciliates, helminths, fungi, algae, sponges, or cyanobacteria whereas those with subacute tissue loss manifested mainly wound repair. Gross lesions of AWS have multiple different changes at the microscopic level some of which involve various microorganisms and metazoa. Elucidating this disease will require, among other things, monitoring lesions over time to determine the pathogenesis of AWS and the potential role of tissue-associated microorganisms in the genesis of tissue loss. Attempts to experimentally induce AWS should include microscopic examination of tissues to ensure that potentially causative microorganisms associated with gross lesion are not overlooked.

  11. Feasibility of Delivering a Dance Intervention for SubAcute Stroke in a Rehabilitation Hospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Marika; McKinley, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Dance can be a promising treatment intervention used in rehabilitation for individuals with disabilities to address physical, cognitive and psychological impairments. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of a modified dance intervention as an adjunct therapy designed for people with subacute stroke, in a rehabilitation setting. Using a descriptive qualitative study design, a biweekly 45-min dance intervention was offered to individuals with a subacute stroke followed in a rehabilitation hospital, over 4 weeks. The dance intervention followed the structure of an usual dance class, but the exercises were modified and progressed to meet each individual’s needs. The dance intervention, delivered in a group format, was feasible in a rehabilitation setting. A 45-min dance class of moderate intensity was of appropriate duration and intensity for individuals with subacute stroke to avoid excessive fatigue and to deliver the appropriate level of challenge. The overall satisfaction of the participants towards the dance class, the availability of space and equipment, and the low level of risks contributed to the feasibility of a dance intervention designed for individuals in the subacute stage of post-stroke recovery. PMID:25785497

  12. Feasibility of Delivering a Dance Intervention for SubAcute Stroke in a Rehabilitation Hospital Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika Demers

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dance can be a promising treatment intervention used in rehabilitation for individuals with disabilities to address physical, cognitive and psychological impairments. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of a modified dance intervention as an adjunct therapy designed for people with subacute stroke, in a rehabilitation setting. Using a descriptive qualitative study design, a biweekly 45-min dance intervention was offered to individuals with a subacute stroke followed in a rehabilitation hospital, over 4 weeks. The dance intervention followed the structure of an usual dance class, but the exercises were modified and progressed to meet each individual’s needs. The dance intervention, delivered in a group format, was feasible in a rehabilitation setting. A 45-min dance class of moderate intensity was of appropriate duration and intensity for individuals with subacute stroke to avoid excessive fatigue and to deliver the appropriate level of challenge. The overall satisfaction of the participants towards the dance class, the availability of space and equipment, and the low level of risks contributed to the feasibility of a dance intervention designed for individuals in the subacute stage of post-stroke recovery.

  13. A Rare Cause of Sub-Acute Proximal Intestinal Obstruction Due to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... a case of a 2- year old girl who presented electively for investigations of symptoms of a sub-acute proximal intestinal obstruction. Investigations revealed a partial duodenal obstruction and an exploratory laparatomy surprisingly showed a partially obstructing annular pancreas for which she underwent a bypass procedure.

  14. Injection therapy for subacute and chronic low back pain: an updated Cochrane review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staal, J.B.; Bie, R.A. de; Vet, H.C. de; Hildebrandt, J.; Nelemans, P.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). OBJECTIVE: To determine if injection therapy is more effective than placebo or other treatments for patients with subacute or chronic low back pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The effectiveness of injection therapy for low

  15. Subacute Thyroiditis Following Influenza Vaccine (Vaxigrip® in A Young Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Yueh Hsiao

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Subacute thyroiditis (SAT, also called de Quervain thyroiditis or granulomatous thyroiditis, is a self- limiting, possibly viral, and inflammatory thyroid disorder that is usually associated with thyroid pain and systemic symptoms. This report details a case of SAT possibly associated with influenza vaccine (Vaxigrip® in a young female. The diagnosis, therapeutic management and outcome are discussed.

  16. Sub-acute toxicity evaluation of ethanol extract of rheumatic tea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sub-acute toxicity profile of Rheumatic Tea Formula (RTF), a polyherbal tea consisting of Salix alba, Eucalyptus globulus and Albizia chevalieri was investigated in wistar rats of both sexes. Wistar rats were orally administered three different doses of ethanol extract of RTF for 28 days after which the effect on body weight, ...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients presenting with (sub)acute cerebellar ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Tanja [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Thomalla, Goetz [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany); Goebell, Einar [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Piotrowski, Anna [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yousem, David Mark [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Acute or subacute cerebellar inflammation is mainly caused by postinfectious, toxic, neoplastic, vascular, or idiopathic processes and can result in cerebellar ataxia. Previous magnetic resonance (MR) studies in single patients who developed acute or subacute ataxia showed varying imaging features. Eighteen patients presenting with acute and subacute onset of ataxia were included in this study. Cases of chronic-progressive/hereditary and noncerebellar causes (ischemia, multiple sclerosis lesions, metastasis, bleedings) were excluded. MR imaging findings were then matched with the clinical history of the patient. An underlying etiology for ataxic symptoms were found in 14/18 patients (postinfectious/infectious, paraneoplastic, autoimmune, drug-induced). In two of five patients without MR imaging findings and three of eight patients with minimal imaging features (cerebellar atrophy, slight signal alterations, and small areas of restricted diffusion), adverse clinical outcomes were documented. Of the five patients with prominent MR findings (cerebellar swelling, contrast enhancement, or broad signal abnormalities), two were lost to follow-up and two showed long-term sequelae. No correlation was found between the presence of initial MRI findings in subacute or acute ataxia patients and their long-term clinical outcome. MR imaging was more flagrantly positive in cases due to encephalitis. (orig.)

  18. Case Report and Molecular Analysis of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis in a South African Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardas, Eftyhia; Leary, P. M.; Yeats, Jane; Badrodien, Waseila; Kreis, Stephanie

    1999-01-01

    This is the first case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis from South Africa in which the molecular characteristics of the causative measles virus were examined. The virus found is classified as genotype D3, which has not previously been found in Africa and was last circulating in the United States before 1992. PMID:9986851

  19. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE): an insight into the diagnostic errors from a tertiary care university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashanth, L K; Taly, A B; Sinha, S; Ravi, V

    2007-06-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive disease caused by wild-type measles virus leading to premature death. Early diagnosis may help in medical interventions and counseling. The aim of this study was to ascertain diagnostic errors and their possible causes. Retrospective case record analysis of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, evaluated over a 10-year period, was performed. The following data were analyzed: initial symptoms and diagnosis, interval between onset of symptoms to diagnosis, and implications of delayed diagnosis. Among the 307 patients evaluated, initial diagnosis by various health care professionals was other than subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in 242 patients (78.8%). These included seizures, absence seizures, metachromatic leukodystrophy, Schilder's disease, cerebral palsy, hemiparkinsonism, Wilson's disease, vasculitis, spinocerebellar ataxia, motor neuron disease, nutritional amblyopia, tapetoretinal degeneration, catatonic schizophrenia, and malingering, among others. The interval between precise diagnosis and first reported symptom was 6.2 +/- 11.3 months (range, 0.2-96 months; median, 3 months). Forty-four patients (14.3%) who had symptoms for more than 1 year before the precise diagnosis had a protracted course as compared to the rest of the cohort ( P = .0001). Early and accurate diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis needs a high index of suspicion.

  20. Biocompatible lutein-polymer-lipid nanocapsules: Acute and subacute toxicity and bioavailability in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Arunkumar; Hindupur, Ravi; Vallikannan, Baskaran

    2016-12-01

    Lutein-poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-phospholipid (PL) nanocapsules were prepared (henceforth referred as lutein nanocapsules) and studied for acute, subacute oral toxicity and bioavailability of lutein in mice. Prior to examining the safety of lutein nanocapsules, particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology and interaction between lutein, PLGA and PL were studied. In acute study, mice were gavaged with a single dose of lutein nanocapsules at 0.1, 1, 10 and 100mg/kg body weight (BW) and examined for 2weeks, while in subacute study, daily mice were gavaged with a dose of 1 and 10mg/kg BW for 4weeks. Results revealed that mean size and zeta value of lutein nanocapsules were 140nm and -44mV, respectively. Acute and subacute toxicity studies did not show any mortality or treatment related adverse effect in clinical observations, ophthalmic examinations, body and organ weights. No toxicity related findings were observed in hematology, histopathology and other blood and tissue clinical chemistry parameters. In subacute study, no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of lutein nanocapsules was found to be at a dose of 10mg/kg BW. Feeding lutein nanocapsules resulted in a significant (plutein level in plasma and tissue compared to the control group. Lutein nanocapsules did not cause toxicity in mice. However, human trials are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sub-acute insulin therapy does not affect long-term visiospatial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insulin is a common hypoglycaemic agent used to treat diabetes, but it has also been reported to exert other effects on the body including modulation cognition. Reported findings on insulin effect on learning and memory are scanty and often conflicting. This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of sub-acute insulin ...

  2. Subacute oral toxicity investigation of nanoparticulate and ionic silver in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Niels; Löschner, Katrin; Bergström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Subacute toxicity of 14 nm nanoparticulate silver (Ag-NP) stabilised with polyvinylpyrrolidone and ionic silver in the form of silver acetate (Ag-acetate) was investigated in four-week-old Wistar rats. Animals received orally by gavage the following: vehicle control (10 $, 6 #); Ag-NP at doses: 2...

  3. SUBACUTE HEMATOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF THE YUCATAN SAILFIN MOLLY (POECILIA VELIFERA) EXPOSED TO CADMIUM CHLORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study focuses on the subacute hematological responses of the Yucatan sailfin molly, Poecilia velifera, exposed to cadmium chloride. Previous studies in other teleosts and mammals have suggested that exposure to cadmium chloride results in a leucocytic response. Fish were exp...

  4. Effect of sub-acute exposure to bonny light crude oil on plasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of sub-acute exposure to bonny light crude oil on plasma biochemistry and liver histopathology of albino rat. Christopher Efe Oritseweyinmi Ikanone, Oluseyi Adeboye Akinloye, Regina Ngozi Ugbaja, Samuel Olatunbosun Omotainse, Olusola Lawrence Ajayi, Tolumide Michael Shopein ...

  5. Shortened constraint-induced movement therapy in subacute stroke - no effect of using a restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogårdh, Christina; Vestling, Monika; Sjölund, Bengt H

    2009-01-01

    , no statistically significant differences between the groups were found in any measures at any point in time. CONCLUSION: In this study, no effect of using a restraint in patients with subacute stroke was found. Thus, this component in the constraint-induced therapy concept seems to be of minor importance...

  6. Acute and sub-acute toxicological assessment of the aqueous seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiments were conducted to determine the oral median lethal dose (LD50) and other gross toxicological manifestations on acute basis. In the sub-acute experiments, the animals were administered 2.5 g/kg (p.o) per day of the extract for 28 consecutive days. Animal weight and fluid intake were recorded during the 28 ...

  7. Familial occurrence of subacute thyroiditis associated with human leukocyte antigen-B35

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, AB; Roozendaal, C; Dullaart, RPF

    Subacute thyroiditis (SAT) is a spontaneously remitting inflammatory disorder of the thyroid, associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B35, and may be virally induced in genetically predisposed individuals. A 57-year-old Caucasian man presented with symptoms of hyperthyroidism as well as

  8. Case report A Rare Cause of Sub-Acute Proximal Intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KIGZ

    A Rare Cause of Sub-Acute Proximal Intestinal Obstruction Due to Annular Pancreas. Weledji EP, Ngowe M, Mokake M. Department of Surgery, Regional Hospital Buea, Cameroon. Correspondence to: E P Weledji, P.O Box 126, Limbe, Cameroon. Email:elroypat@yahoo.co.uk. Summary. Background: Annular pancreas is a ...

  9. Sub-acute toxicity study on the aqueous extract of Albizia zygia stem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sub-acute toxicity study on the aqueous extract of Albizia zygia stem bark. ... Morphological (body weight and organ weight indices), haematological {white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC), haemoglobin, haematocrit, and platelet counts}, biochemical {alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate amino transferase ...

  10. [A new case of Rowell's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schissler, C; Banea, S; Tortel, M-C; Mahé, A

    2017-04-01

    This article introduces a new case of Rowell's syndrome, a controversial entity defined by the association of lupus erythematosus and erythema multiforme. A 43-year-old woman was diagnosed with lupus erythematosus induced by esomeprazole. Because her eruption did not improve after withdrawal of the drug, hydroxychloroquine was administered. Two weeks later, the patient described new annular lesions on her chest and arms, both erosive and crusted, and some had a target-like appearance. The oral mucosa was also affected. Histology revealed sub-epidermal blistering with keratinocytic necrosis, strongly suggesting erythema multiforme. Screening for other causes of erythema multiforme proved negative. A positive outcome was achieved with corticosteroids and hydroxychloroquine. One year later, the patient was in complete remission for both lupus erythematosus and erythema multiforme. The association of lupus erythematosus and erythema multiforme first described in 1963 is known as Rowell's syndrome. While diagnostic criteria have been established in the literature, the reality of this entity is still contested. The annular lesions of subacute lupus erythematosus may be confused with the lesions of erythema multiforme. As suggested in the above section, other authors consider Rowell's syndrome to be a singular entity. Indeed, our patient developed lesions distinct from those initially suggesting subacute lupus erythematosus, in particular: the target-like aspect of the elementary lesions, mucosal involvement, a distinct histological aspect, and dissociated outcomes. Ultimately, the definition of Rowell's syndrome remains highly debated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Dynamics of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations in the acute and subacute phase of Legionnaires' disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis P C de Jager

    Full Text Available STUDY OBJECTIVE: Absolute lymphocytopenia is recognised as an important hallmark of the immune response to severe infection and observed in patients with Legionnaires' disease. To explore the immune response, we studied the dynamics of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations in the acute and subacute phase of LD. METHODS AND RESULTS: EDTA-anticoagulated blood was obtained from eight patients on the day the diagnosis was made through detection of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigen in urine. A second blood sample was obtained in the subacute phase. Multiparametric flow cytometry was used to calculate lymphocyte counts and values for B-cells, T-cells, NK cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Expression of activation markers was analysed. The values obtained in the subacute phase were compared with an age and gender matched control group. Absolute lymphocyte count (×10⁹/l, median and range significantly increased from 0.8 (0.4-1.6 in the acute phase to 1.4 (0.8-3.4 in the subacute phase. B-cell count showed no significant change, while T-cell count (×10⁶/l, median and range significantly increased in the subacute phase (495 (182-1024 versus 979 (507-2708, p = 0.012 as a result of significant increases in both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts (374 (146-629 versus 763 (400-1507, p = 0.012 and 119 (29-328 versus 224 (107-862, p = 0.012. In the subacute phase of LD, significant increases were observed in absolute counts of activated CD4+ T-cells, naïve CD4+ T-cells and memory CD4+ T-cells. In the CD8+ T-cell compartment, activated CD8+ T-cells, naïve CD8+ T-cell and memory CD8+ T-cells were significantly increased (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The acute phase of LD is characterized by absolute lymphocytopenia, which recovers in the subacute phase with an increase in absolute T-cells and re-emergence of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These observations are in line with the suggested role for T-cell activation in the immune response to LD.

  12. Cell ageing: a flourishing field for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Brites

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is viewed as an irreversible cell-cycle arrest mechanism involving a complexity of biological progressive processes and the acquisition of diverse cellular phenotypes. Several cell-intrinsic and extrinsic causes (stresses may lead to diverse cellular signaling cascades that include oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA damage, excessive accumulation of misfolded proteins, impaired microRNA processing and inflammation. Here we review recent advances in the causes and consequences of brain cell ageing, including the senescence of endothelial cells at the central nervous system barriers, as well as of neurons and glial cells. We address what makes ageing an important risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and cerebrovascular disease. In particular, we highlight the importance of defects in mitochondrial dynamics, in the cathepsin activity imbalance, in cell-cell communication, in the accumulation of misfolded and unfolded proteins and in the microRNA profiling as having potential impact on cellular ageing processes. Another important aspect is that the absence of specific senescence biomarkers has hampered the characterization of senescent cells in ageing and age-associated diseases. In accordance, the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP or secretome was shown to vary in distinct cell types and upon different stressors, and SASP heterogeneity is believed to create subsets of senenescent cells. In addition to secreted proteins, we then place extracellular vesicles (exosomes and ectosomes as important mediators of intercellular communication with pathophysiological roles in disease spreading, and as emerging targets for therapeutic intervention. We also discuss the application of engineered extracellular vesicles as vehicles for drug delivery. Finally, we summarize current knowledge on methods to rejuvenate senescent cells

  13. Understanding complexity in neurodegenerative diseases: in silico reconstruction of emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodkin, Alexey; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Balling, Rudi; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2012-01-01

    Healthy functioning is an emergent property of the network of interacting biomolecules that comprise an organism. It follows that disease (a network shift that causes malfunction) is also an emergent property, emerging from a perturbation of the network. On the one hand, the biomolecular network of every individual is unique and this is evident when similar disease-producing agents cause different individual pathologies. Consequently, a personalized model and approach for every patient may be required for therapies to become effective across mankind. On the other hand, diverse combinations of internal and external perturbation factors may cause a similar shift in network functioning. We offer this as an explanation for the multi-factorial nature of most diseases: they are "systems biology diseases," or "network diseases." Here we use neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson's disease (PD), as an example to show that due to the inherent complexity of these networks, it is difficult to understand multi-factorial diseases with simply our "naked brain." When describing interactions between biomolecules through mathematical equations and integrating those equations into a mathematical model, we try to reconstruct the emergent properties of the system in silico. The reconstruction of emergence from interactions between huge numbers of macromolecules is one of the aims of systems biology. Systems biology approaches enable us to break through the limitation of the human brain to perceive the extraordinarily large number of interactions, but this also means that we delegate the understanding of reality to the computer. We no longer recognize all those essences in the system's design crucial for important physiological behavior (the so-called "design principles" of the system). In this paper we review evidence that by using more abstract approaches and by experimenting in silico, one may still be able to discover and understand the design principles that govern behavioral

  14. Understanding complexity in neurodegenerative diseases: in silico reconstruction of emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey eKolodkin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Healthy functioning is an emergent property of the network of interacting biomolecules that comprise an organism. It follows that disease (a network shift that causes malfunction is also an emergent property, emerging from a perturbation of the network. On one hand, the biomolecular network of every individual is unique and this is evident when similar disease-producing agents cause different individual pathologies. Consequently, a personalized model and approach for every patient may be required for therapies to become effective across mankind. On the other hand, diverse combinations of internal and external perturbation factors may cause a similar shift in network functioning. We offer this as an explanation for the multi-factorial nature of most diseases: they are ‘systems biology diseases’, or ‘network diseases’. Here we focus on neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson’s disease, as an example. Because of the inherent complexity of these networks, it is difficult to understand multi-factorial diseases using simply our ‘naked brain’. When describing interactions between biomolecules through mathematical equations and integrating those equations into a mathematical model, we try to reconstruct the emergent properties of the system in silico. The reconstruction of emergence from interactions between huge numbers of macromolecules is one of the aims of systems biology. Systems biology approaches enable us to break through the limitation of the human brain to perceive the extraordinarily large number of interactions, but this also means that we delegate the understanding of reality to the computer. We no longer recognize all those essences in the system’s design crucial for important physiological behavior (the so-called ‘design principles’ of the system. In this paper we review evidence that by using more abstract approaches and by experimenting in silico, one may still be able to discover and understand the design

  15. A retrospective research of HIV-negative cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients with acute/subacute onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H; Chen, Q; Xie, Z; Wang, D; Li, M; Zhang, X; Man, Y; Lao, J; Chen, N; Zhou, L

    2016-02-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) may present as an acute, subacute, or chronic infection. It manifests as a chronic process in over 75 % of cases, but, sometimes, it presents with a more acute onset, mostly in HIV-associated patients. Until now, there has been no study performed on the clinical features of HIV-negative CM patients with acute/subacute onset. We collected 106 HIV-negative patients diagnosed with CM in our hospital during a 15-year period, analyzed their epidemiological and clinical features, as well as the outcomes, and explored the independent prognosis factors and the factors related to the survival time among them. We found that impaired consciousness (23.4 % vs. 3.4 %, p = 0.017) was more common in CM patients with acute/subacute onset, while decreased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose (51.9 % vs. 75.9 %, p = 0.026) was less common. The ratio of CSF glucose/blood glucose [odds ratio (OR) 0.04, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.004-0.262, p = 0.02], impaired consciousness (OR 5.09, 95 % CI 1.477-17.522, p = 0.01), and hospitalization length (OR 0.98, 95 % CI 0.977-0.999, p = 0.04) were indicated to be not only independent prognosis factors in HIV-negative CM patients with acute/subacute onset, but also factors significantly related to the survival time. The results of our study demonstrated that the contact history and potential history risk factors would not affect the onset process of HIV-negative CM patients, and the mortality, hospitalization length, and survival time has not been related to the onset process. However, the ratio of CSF glucose/blood glucose, consciousness level, and hospitalization length of the HIV-negative CM patients with acute/subacute onset should be of greater focus in the clinical work.

  16. Cellular and Molecular Aspects of the β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) Mode of Action within the Neurodegenerative Pathway: Facts and Controversy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudepierre, Thomas; Maignien, Thomas; Arnich, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    The implication of the cyanotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in long-lasting neurodegenerative disorders is still a matter of controversy. It has been alleged that chronic ingestion of BMAA through the food chain could be a causative agent of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and several related pathologies including Parkinson syndrome. Both in vitro and in vivo studies of the BMAA mode of action have focused on different molecular targets, demonstrating its toxicity to neuronal cells, especially motoneurons, and linking it to human neurodegenerative diseases. Historically, the hypothesis of BMAA-induced excitotoxicity following the stimulation of glutamate receptors has been established. However, in this paradigm, most studies have shown acute, rather than chronic effects of BMAA. More recently, the interaction of this toxin with neuromelanin, a pigment present in the nervous system, has opened a new research perspective. The issues raised by this toxin are related to its kinetics of action, and its possible incorporation into cellular proteins. It appears that BMAA neurotoxic activity involves different targets through several mechanisms known to favour the development of neurodegenerative processes. PMID:29271898

  17. Cellular and Molecular Aspects of the β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA Mode of Action within the Neurodegenerative Pathway: Facts and Controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Delcourt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The implication of the cyanotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA in long-lasting neurodegenerative disorders is still a matter of controversy. It has been alleged that chronic ingestion of BMAA through the food chain could be a causative agent of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and several related pathologies including Parkinson syndrome. Both in vitro and in vivo studies of the BMAA mode of action have focused on different molecular targets, demonstrating its toxicity to neuronal cells, especially motoneurons, and linking it to human neurodegenerative diseases. Historically, the hypothesis of BMAA-induced excitotoxicity following the stimulation of glutamate receptors has been established. However, in this paradigm, most studies have shown acute, rather than chronic effects of BMAA. More recently, the interaction of this toxin with neuromelanin, a pigment present in the nervous system, has opened a new research perspective. The issues raised by this toxin are related to its kinetics of action, and its possible incorporation into cellular proteins. It appears that BMAA neurotoxic activity involves different targets through several mechanisms known to favour the development of neurodegenerative processes.

  18. Prospective Belgian study of neurodegenerative and vascular dementia: APOE genotype effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelborghs, S; Dermaut, B; Goeman, J; Saerens, J; Mariën, P; Pickut, B A; Van den Broeck, M; Serneels, S; Cruts, M; Van Broeckhoven, C; De Deyn, P P

    2003-08-01

    The authors conducted a prospective study of neurodegenerative and vascular dementia in Belgium. Strict diagnostic inclusion criteria were used to include well defined patients and controls. The results of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype effect on risk and clinical characteristics are presented. APOE genotyping was performed in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n=504), frontotemporal dementia (FTD) (n=47), vascular dementia (VaD) (n=152), mixed dementia (n=132), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n=44), Parkinson's disease (PD) (n=30), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) (n=17), and multisystem atrophy (MSA)/progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) (n=12). The APOE allele frequencies of this Belgian control population (epsilon 2: 6.9%; epsilon 3: 76.2%; epsilon 4: 16.9%) did not differ from those reported for other white populations. AD, MCI, and mixed dementia patients had higher APOE epsilon 4 (32.9%, 38.6%, and 28.4% respectively) and lower APOE epsilon 3 (62.2%, 53.4%, and 66.3%) frequencies compared with controls, whereas only AD and mixed dementia patients had lower APOE epsilon 2 frequencies (4.9% and 5.3%). Apart from a borderline significant different distribution of APOE allele frequencies in VaD patients compared with controls, no other differences were detected. The influence of APOE epsilon 4 on clinical features of dementia was limited to lower age at onset in AD patients and a less pronounced negative correlation between age at onset and number of epsilon 4 alleles in MCI and mixed dementia patients. This study confirmed the risk association between APOE epsilon 4 and AD. The observation that APOE epsilon 4 is associated with mixed dementia reflected the role of AD in the aetiopathogenesis of this condition. Although MCI is an aetiologically heterogeneous syndrome, the increased APOE epsilon 4 frequencies indicated that a large proportion of the MCI patients included in the study might be predisposed to develop AD.

  19. The influence of Na+,K+-ATPase on glutamate signaling in neurodegenerative diseases and senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Fernanda Kinoshita

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Decreased Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA activity causes energy deficiency, which is commonly observed in neurodegenerative diseases. The NKA is constituted of three subunits: α, β and γ, with four distinct isoforms of the catalytic α subunit (α1-4. Genetic mutations in the ATP1A2 gene and ATP1A3 gene, encoding the α2 and α3 subunit isoforms, respectively can cause distinct neurological disorders, concurrent to impaired NKA activity. Within the central nervous system (CNS, the α2 isoform is expressed mostly in glial cells and the α3 isoform is neuron-specific. Mutations in ATP1A2 gene can result in familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM2, while mutations in the ATP1A3 gene can cause Rapid-onset dystonia-Parkinsonism (RDP and alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC, as well as the cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pescavus, optic atrophy and sensorineural hearing loss (CAPOS syndrome. Data indicates that the central glutamatergic system is affected by mutations in the α2 isoform, however further investigations are required to establish a connection to mutations in the α3 isoform, especially given the diagnostic confusion and overlap with glutamate transporter disease. The age-related decline in brain α2/3 activity may arise from changes in the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP and cGMP‐dependent protein kinase (PKG pathway. Glutamate, through nitric oxide synthase (NOS, cGMP and PKG, stimulates brain α2/3 activity, with the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor cascade able to drive an adaptive, neuroprotective response to inflammatory and challenging stimuli, including amyloid‐β. Here we review the NKA, both as an ion pump as well as a receptor that interacts with NMDA, including the role of NKA subunits mutations. Failure of the NKA-associated adaptive response mechanisms may render neurons more susceptible to degeneration over the course of aging.

  20. [Antiphospholipid syndrome and kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccatello, D; Rossi, D; Giachino, O; Bazzan, M; Mazzucco, G

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) relies on clinical and laboratory criteria, which have been recently outlined in specific consensus conferences. Renal involvement in APS is not infrequent and includes different clinical patterns. For clinical purposes a distinction can be made between large vessel and microvascular involvement. Renal artery stenosis is frequent in APS. In case of microvascular involvement with an acute clinical course a differential diagnosis with other thrombotic microangiopathic diseases has to be made, taking in account thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, malignant hypertension, drug nephrotoxicity (cyclosporin) and others. The disease is often chronic, with hypertension, different degrees of renal insufficiency and mild proteinuria. In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid antibodies the prognosis of kidney disease is generally poorer than in lupus alone. Finally, the kidney is almost invariably a target in catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome. Anticoagulation is the therapy of choice, especially in arterial stenosis and acute disease, but is probably also indicated in chronic and subacute patterns. The role of immunomodulatory therapy has to be assessed.

  1. Acute and subacute chemical-induced lung injuries: HRCT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akira, Masanori, E-mail: Akira@kch.hosp.go.jp [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, 1180 Nagasone-cho, Kita-ku, Sakai City, Osaka 591-8555 (Japan); Suganuma, Narufumi [Department of Environmental Medicine, Kochi Medical School (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Lung injury caused by chemicals includes bronchitis, bronchiolitis, chemical pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease. Each chemical induces variable pathophysiology and the situation resembles to the drug induced lung disease. The HRCT features are variable and nonspecific, however HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of the lung injuries and so we should know about HRCT features of lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by chemicals.

  2. Botulinum toxin for subacute/chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Pierre; Peloso, Paul Michael J; Lowcock, Janet; Nolan, May; Weber, Jeff; Gross, Anita; Roberts, John; Goldsmith, Charles H; Graham, Nadine; Burnie, Stephen J; Haines, Ted

    2011-07-06

    Neck disorders are common, disabling and costly. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) intramuscular injections are often used with the intention of treating neck pain. To systematically evaluate the literature on the treatment effectiveness of BoNT for neck pain, disability, global perceived effect and quality of life in adults with neck pain with or without associated cervicogenic headache, but excluding cervical radiculopathy and whiplash associated disorder. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, AMED, Index to Chiropractic Literature, CINAHL, LILACS, and EMBASE from their origin to 20 September 2010. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials in which BoNT injections were used to treat subacute or chronic neck pain. A minimum of two review authors independently selected articles, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias, using the Cochrane Back Review Group criteria. In the absence of clinical heterogeneity, we calculated standardized mean differences (SMD) and relative risks, and performed meta-analyses using a random-effects model. The quality of the evidence and the strength of recommendations were assigned an overall grade for each outcome. We included nine trials (503 participants). Only BoNT type A (BoNT-A) was used in these studies.High quality evidence suggests there was little or no difference in pain between BoNT-A and saline injections at four weeks (five trials; 252 participants; SMD pooled -0.07 (95% confidence intervals (CI) -0.36 to 0.21)) and six months for chronic neck pain. Very low quality evidence indicated little or no difference in pain between BoNT-A combined with physiotherapeutic exercise and analgesics and saline injection with physiotherapeutic exercise and analgesics for patients with chronic neck pain at four weeks (two trials; 95 participants; SMD pooled 0.09 (95% CI -0.55 to 0.73)) and six months (one trial; 24 participants; SMD -0.56 (95% CI -1.39 to 0.27)). Very low quality evidence from one trial (32 participants) showed little

  3. Association between environmental exposure to pesticides and neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parron, Tesifon [University of Almeria, Department of Neurosciences and Health Sciences, Almeria (Spain); Andalusian Council of Health at Almeria province, Almeria (Spain); Requena, Mar [Andalusian Council of Health at Almeria province, Almeria (Spain); Hernandez, Antonio F., E-mail: ajerez@ugr.es [University of Granada School of Medicine, Granada (Spain); Alarcon, Raquel [Andalusian Council of Health at Almeria province, Almeria (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Preliminary studies have shown associations between chronic pesticide exposure in occupational settings and neurological disorders. However, data on the effects of long-term non-occupational exposures are too sparse to allow any conclusions. This study examines the influence of environmental pesticide exposure on a number of neuropsychiatric conditions and discusses their underlying pathologic mechanisms. An ecological study was conducted using averaged prevalence rates of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, cerebral degeneration, polyneuropathies, affective psychosis and suicide attempts in selected Andalusian health districts categorized into areas of high and low environmental pesticide exposure based on the number of hectares devoted to intensive agriculture and pesticide sales per capita. A total of 17,429 cases were collected from computerized hospital records (minimum dataset) between 1998 and 2005. Prevalence rates and the risk of having Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and suicide were significantly higher in districts with greater pesticide use as compared to those with lower pesticide use. The multivariate analyses showed that the population living in areas with high pesticide use had an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and suicide attempts and that males living in these areas had increased risks for polyneuropathies, affective disorders and suicide attempts. In conclusion, this study supports and extends previous findings and provides an indication that environmental exposure to pesticides may affect the human health by increasing the incidence of certain neurological disorders at the level of the general population. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental exposure to pesticides and neurodegenerative-psychiatric disorders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased risk for Alzheimer's disease and suicide attempts in high exposure areas. Black

  4. Short communication: Noninvasive indicators to identify lactating dairy cows with a greater risk of subacute rumen acidosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gao, X; Oba, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate if milk urea nitrogen (MUN) and milk fat content could be used as the noninvasive indicator to identify cows with greater or lower risk of subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA...

  5. Proportions of Streptococcus sanguis, an Organism Associated with Subacute Bacterial Endocarditis, in Human Feces and Dental Plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houte, J.; Jordan, H. V.; Bellack, S.

    1971-01-01

    The relative absence of Streptococcus sanguis in human feces, in contrast to its high concentration on teeth, supports the concept of the mouth as the likely bacterial source in cases of subacute bacterial endocarditis involving this organism. PMID:5154899

  6. EFFECT OF TASK SPECIFIC MIRROR THERAPY WITH FUNCTIONAL ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON UPPER LIMB FUNCTION FOR SUBACUTE HEMIPLEGIA

    OpenAIRE

    Sumana Nagapattinam; Vinod Babu. K; Sai Kumar. N; Ayyappan. V.R

    2015-01-01

    Background: The principal target of any stroke rehabilitation is the motor impairments. Many studies have been advocated on the effect of Functional electrical stimulation and Task specific mirror therapy. Hence, the purpose of the study is to find the combined effect of task specific Mirror therapy with Functional Electrical Stimulation on upper limb function for subjects with sub-acute hemiplegia. Methods: An experimental study design, 60 subjects with sub-acute Hemiplegia randomised int...

  7. Cognitive performance in REM sleep behaviour disorder: a possible early marker of neurodegenerative disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzaghi, Michele; Sinforiani, Elena; Zucchella, Chiara; Zambrelli, Elena; Pasotti, Chiara; Rustioni, Valter; Manni, Raffaele

    2008-05-01

    Rapid eye movement [REM] sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) may herald neurodegenerative diseases. Neurobiological deficits similar to those identified in neurodegenerative diseases have been reported in idiopathic RBD. Researchers are looking for early markers supporting a possible role of RBD as a harbinger of impending neurodegenerative disease. To examine the neuropsychological functions in idiopathic RBD subjects. Should they be found to present a neuropsychological dysfunction that overlaps that reported in neurodegenerative diseases, it would be possible to consider cognitive deficits as possible early markers of an underlying degenerative process. Twenty-three subjects with idiopathic RBD (21 males, mean age 67.0+/-7.0 years) and a group of healthy controls matched for sex, age and education underwent a neuropsychological battery evaluating different cognitive domains. Considering mean values, poorer performances were observed in the Word Span (pneurodegenerative disease, but until more prolonged long-term follow-up data are available, the true neurobiological significance of cognitive deficits in RBD will remain unknown.

  8. Cannabinoids and value-based decision making: Implications for neurodegenerative disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, AM; Oleson, E.B.; Diergaarde, L.; Cheer, J.F.; Pattij, T.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, disturbances in cognitive function have been increasingly recognized as important symptomatic phenomena in neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Value-based decision making in particular is an important executive cognitive function that is not only impaired

  9. Autoimmune Aspects of Neurodegenerative and Psychiatric Diseases : A Template for innovative Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Peter; Klein, Hans C.; 't Hart, Bert A.

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases (NPDs) are today's most important group of diseases, surpassing both atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cancer in morbidity incidence. Although NPDs have a dramatic impact on our society because of their high incidence, mortality, and severe

  10. 4 Tesla Whole Body MRI MRSI System for Investigation of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weiner, Michael W

    2004-01-01

    The overall long-term goal of imaging research to be performed with this 4 Tesla Siemens/Bruker MRI system is the development of improved diagnostic methods for accurate detection of neurodegenerative...

  11. Is the Modulation of Autophagy the Future in the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ana Gonzalez-Polo, Rosa; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Yakhine-Diop, Sokhna M. S.; Rodriguez-Arribas, Mario; Gomez-Sanchez, Ruben; Bravo-San Pedro, Jose M.; Fuentes, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases involves altered activity of proteolytic systems and accumulation of protein aggregates. Autophagy is an intracellular process in which damaged organelles and long-lived proteins are degraded and recycled for maintaining normal cellular homeostasis.

  12. Selective autophagy: The new player in the fight against neurodegenerative diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Yue; Song, Ju-Xian; Wang, Sheng-Fang; Cai, Cui-Zan; Li, Min; Lu, Jia-Hong

    2017-11-16

    Autophagy is the lysosome-mediated bulk degradation of cellular components for material recycling to maintain cellular homeostasis. Autophagy was initially regarded as a nonselective process, however, recent evidence indicates that this process can in fact be highly selective, especially for targeting and degrading organelles, invading pathogens and protein aggregates. Recent studies have revealed an intrinsic connection between selective autophagy and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Given the vital roles of selective autophagy in these neurodegenerative diseases, modulation of this process is emerging as a new therapeutic strategy for neuroprotection. This review introduces the concept of selective autophagy, provides an overview of the pathological connection between selective autophagy and neurodegenerative diseases, and discusses approaches to modulate selective autophagy for therapeutic effects against neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of DNA methylation and histone modifications in neurodegenerative diseases: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.-X. Wen (Ke-Xin); J. Milic (Jelena); El-Khodor, B. (Bassem); K. Dhana (Klodian); J. Nano (Jana); Pulido, T. (Tammy); B. Kraja (Bledar); A. Zaciragic (Asija); W.M. Bramer (Wichor); J. Troup; R. Chowdhury (Rajiv); Arfam Ikram, M.; A. Dehghan (Abbas); T. Muka (Taulant); O.H. Franco (Oscar)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractImportance Epigenetic modifications of the genome, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, have been reported to play a role in neurodegenerative diseases (ND) such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Objective To systematically review studies

  14. Five-class differential diagnostics of neurodegenerative diseases using random undersampling boosting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Tong; Ledig, Christian; Guerrero, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    for distinguishing the four most common neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobe degeneration, Dementia with Lewy bodies and vascular dementia, as well as patients with subjective memory complaints. Different biomarkers including features from images (volume features, region......Differentiating between different types of neurodegenerative diseases is not only crucial in clinical practice when treatment decisions have to be made, but also has a significant potential for the enrichment of clinical trials. The purpose of this study is to develop a classification framework...

  15. Environmental pollutants as risk factors for neurodegenerative disorders: Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Chin-Chan, Miguel; Navarro-Yepes, Juliana; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer (AD) and Parkinson (PD) have attracted attention in last decades due to their high incidence worldwide. The etiology of these diseases is still unclear; however the role of the environment as a putative risk factor has gained importance. More worryingly is the evidence that pre- and post-natal exposures to environmental factors predispose to the onset of neurodegenerative diseases in later life. Neurotoxic metals such as lead, mercury, aluminum, ...

  16. The ubiquitin proteasome system in glia and its role in neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne H.P. Jansen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS is crucial for intracellular protein homeostasis and for degradation of aberrant and damaged proteins. The accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease, leading to the hypothesis that proteasomal impairment is contributing to these diseases. So far, most research related to the UPS in neurodegenerative diseases has been focused on neurons, while glial cells have been largely disregarded in this respect. However, glial cells are essential for proper neuronal functioning and adopt a reactive phenotype in neurodegenerative diseases, thereby contributing to an inflammatory response. This process is called reactive gliosis, which in turn affects UPS functioning in glial cells. In many neurodegenerative diseases, mostly neurons show accumulation and aggregation of ubiquitinated proteins, suggesting that glial cells may be better equipped to maintain proper protein homeostasis. During an inflammatory reaction, the immunoproteasome is induced in glia, which may contribute to a more efficient degradation of disease-related proteins. Here we review the role of the UPS in glial cells in various neurodegenerative diseases, and we discuss how studying glial cell functioning might provide essential information in unraveling mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Flavonoid-Based Therapies in the Early Management of Neurodegenerative Diseases12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Isha; Parihar, Priyanka; Mansuri, Mohammad Lukman; Parihar, Mordhwaj S

    2015-01-01

    During the past several years, there has been enormous progress in the understanding of the causative factors that initiate neuronal damage in various neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington disease. Preventing neuronal damage and neuronal death will have a huge clinical benefit. However, despite major advances in causative factors that trigger these neurodegenerative diseases, to date there have been no therapies available that benefit patients who suffer from these diseases. Because most neurodegenerative diseases are late-onset and remain asymptomatic for most of the phases, the therapies initiated in advanced stages of the disease have limited value to patients. It may be possible to prevent or halt the disease progression to a great extent if therapies start at the initial stage of the disease. Such therapies may restore neuronal function by reducing or even eliminating the primary stressor. Flavonoids are key compounds for the development of a new generation of therapeutic agents that are clinically effective in treating neurodegenerative diseases. Regular consumption of flavonoids has been associated with a reduced risk of neurodegenerative diseases. In addition to their antioxidant properties, these polyphenolic compounds exhibit neuroprotective properties by their interaction with cellular signaling pathways followed by transcription and translation that mediate cell function under both normal and pathologic conditions. This review focuses on human intervention studies as well as animal studies on the role of various flavonoids in the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25593144

  18. A systematic review of the validity and reliability of apathy scales in neurodegenerative conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radakovic, Ratko; Harley, Catherine; Abrahams, Sharon; Starr, John M

    2015-06-01

    There are several scales used to detect apathy in disease populations. Since apathy is a prevalent symptom in many neurodegenerative diseases, this is an especially important context in which to identify and compare scales. To provide an overview of apathy scales validated in generic and specific neurodegenerative disease populations, compare validation studies' methodological quality and the psychometric properties of the validated apathy scales. A systematic review of literature was conducted of articles published between 1980 and 2013. The final articles selected for review were rated on methodological quality and the psychometric properties of the scales used were interpreted. Sixteen articles validating apathy scales were included in the review, five in a generic neurodegenerative sample and eleven in specific neurodegenerative samples. The methodological quality of specific studies varied from poor to excellent. The highest quality, which had psychometrically favorable scales, were the dementia apathy interview and rating (DAIR) and the apathy evaluation scale-clinical version (AES-C) in Alzheimer's disease and the Lille apathy rating scale (LARS) in Parkinson's disease. Generic neurodegenerative disease validation studies were of average methodological quality and yielded inconsistent psychometric properties. Several instruments can be recommended for use in some specific neurodegenerative diseases. Other instruments should either be validated or developed to assess apathy in more generic populations.

  19. Patients' and relatives' experience of difficulties following severe traumatic brain injury: the sub-acute stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sara; Schönberger, Michael; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    was low compared to other studies using the EBIQ. Furthermore, the effects of injury severity and general level of functioning had limited impact on the subjective experience of difficulties. Implications of these findings, specifically as they pertain to the sub-acute stage are discussed Udgivelsesdato......The present study aimed to (1) identify the difficulties most frequently reported by individuals with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) at the time of discharge from a sub-acute rehabilitation brain injury unit as well as difficulties reported by their relatives, (2) compare patients......' and relatives' reports of patient difficulties, and (3) explore the role of injury severity, disability and other factors on subjective experience of difficulties. The primary measure was the European Brain Injury Questionnaire (EBIQ) administered to patients and to one of their close relatives at discharge...

  20. Ticlopidine-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ching Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Many drugs have been reported to induce lupus in a minority of patients. Ticlopidine hydrochloride inhibits platelet aggregation and is widely used for the prevention of thrombosis. There have been only a few reports of ticlopidine-induced lupus. Here, we review 13 previously reported cases and describe the case of a 71-year-old man with ticlopidine-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. His diagnosis was supported by the appearance of papulosquamous skin lesions on sun-exposed areas and detectable anti-Ro/SS-A antibodies, shortly after drug initiation as well as the gradual resolution of these symptoms after the discontinuation of ticlopidine. Our case highlights that when a patient presents with subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus-like skin lesions, ticlopidine should be considered as a potential causative agent.

  1. Brain CT and MRI findings of a long-term case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoshiba, Kazunori; Ota, Kohei; Komatsuzaki, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Itsuro; Maruyama, Shoichi

    1987-11-01

    Our study involved a long-term case (ten years) of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The case began with a 23 year-old experiencing visual deterioration. During the course of his illness, amnesia, autism and abnormal behavior were observed without any myoclonus. On the electroencephalogram, periodic synclonous discharge was shown in the early stage of his illness and subsequently disappeared. The brain CT and the MRI disclosed diffuse lesions in both cortical and subcortical areas of the cerebral hemispheres. The location and spread of lesions were more clearly revealed by the MRI than the brain CT. These findings suggest that the MRI is more useful than the brain CT in the diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

  2. Lymphocyte subsets at different stages of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: a study with monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrosu, M G; Cianchetti, C; Ennas, M G

    1986-01-01

    Lymphocyte subsets in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood were studied using monoclonal antibodies, in patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, eight of whom were at stage 2 and seven at stage 4. Eighteen subjects affected with non immunological diseases constituted the controls. Regardless of the stage, patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis had lower percentages of OKT3+ (pan-T) cells in both CSF and peripheral blood, with an increase of OKIa+ cells (B cells, macrophages and active T cells) in peripheral blood. A difference was found in the proportion of OKT4+ (helper-inducer) and OKT8+ (suppressor/cytotoxic) cells in relation to the stage, the most striking finding being a significant decrease of OKT8+ with an increase of T4/T8 ratio in peripheral blood at an early stage. PMID:2942644

  3. Measles virus–specific plasma cells are prominent in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis CSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, G.P.; Ritchie, A.M.; Gilden, D.H.; Burgoon, M.P.; Becker, D.; Bennett, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the specificity of expanded CD138+ plasma cell clones recovered from the CSF of a patient with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) for measles virus (MV). Methods IgG variable region sequences of single-antibody-secreting CD138+ cells sorted from SSPE CSF were amplified by single-cell PCR and analyzed. Human IgG1 recombinant antibodies (rAbs) were produced from four expanded CD138+ clones and assayed for immunoreactivity against MV proteins. Results Clonal expansion was a prominent feature of the SSPE plasma cell repertoire, and each of the four rAbs assayed was specific for either the MV fusion or the MV nucleocapsid protein. Conclusions Expanded plasma cell clones in the CSF of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis produce disease-relevant antibodies. Recombinant antibodies derived from CSF B cells could provide a tool to identify target antigens in idiopathic inflammatory disorders. PMID:17515543

  4. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  5. Alternative acute oral toxicity assessment under REACH based on sub-acute toxicity values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissi, Andrea; Louekari, Kimmo; Hoffstadt, Laurence; Bornatowicz, Norbert; Aparicio, Alberto Martin

    2017-01-01

    The REACH Regulation requires information on acute oral toxicity for substances produced or imported in quantities greater than one ton per year. When registering, animal testing should be used as last resort. The standard acute oral toxicity test requires use of animals. Therefore, the European Chemicals Agency examined whether alternative ways exist to generate information on acute oral toxicity. The starting hypothesis was that low acute oral toxicity can be predicted from the results of low toxicity in oral sub-acute toxicity studies. Proving this hypothesis would allow avoiding acute toxicity oral testing whenever a sub-acute oral toxicity study is required or available and indicates low toxicity. ECHA conducted an analysis of the REACH database and found suitable studies on both acute oral and sub-acute oral toxicities for 1,256 substances. 415 of these substances had low toxicity in the sub-acute toxicity study (i.e., NO(A)EL at or above the limit test threshold of 1,000 mg/kg). For 98% of these substances, low acute oral toxicity was also reported (i.e., LD50 above the classification threshold of 2,000 mg/kg). On the other hand, no correlation was found between lower NO(A)ELs and LD50. According to the REACH Regulation, this approach for predicting acute oral toxicity needs to be considered as part of a weight of evidence analysis. Therefore, additional sources of information to support this approach are presented. Ahead of the last REACH registration deadline, in 2018, ECHA estimates that registrants of about 550 substances can omit the in vivo acute oral toxicity study by using this adaptation.

  6. Obturator internus pyomyositis manifested as sciatica in a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Wei-Ching; Hsu, Jin-Yi; Chen, Michael Yu-Chih; Liang, Chung-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pyomyositis is a pyogenic infection of the skeletal muscles causing myalgia and fever in patients. Hematogenous seeding engendered by persistent bacteremia and septic embolism is usually the underlying cause of the disease. Trauma, intravenous drug use, and immunodeficiency are the main predisposing factors. Obturator internus pyomyositis with sciatica has not previously been reported. We report a rare case of a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis presenting with left buttoc...

  7. Atypical clinical and electroencephalographic pattern in a patient with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Délrio F. Silva

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe an atypical clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG pattern observed during the course of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in a 14 year-old boy. In this patient with a two weeks history of partial complex seizures, the atypical EEG pattern was characterized by an initial left temporal focus which evolved to periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs and, only during the 3rd and 4th weeks the typical bilateral and generalized periodic complexes appeared.

  8. Wild-type Measles Virus in Brain Tissue of Children with Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero, Paola Roxana; Grippo, Jorge; Viegas, Mariana

    2003-01-01

    We studied eight children who had measles at 6 to 10 months of age during the 1998 Argentine measles outbreak and in whom subacute sclerosing panencephalitis developed 4 years later. We report the genetic characterization of brain tissue–associated measles virus samples from three patients. Phylogenetic relationships clustered these viruses with the wild-type D6 genotype isolated during the 1998 outbreak. The children received measles vaccine; however, vaccinal strains were not found. PMID:14609476

  9. Role of CSF serology in follow-up of subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis patients on treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a progressive inflammatory disease of the central nervous system with poor prognosis and high mortality. No effective treatment has a proven role; oral isoprinosine and intrathecal administration of a-interferon may prolong survival. We report an unusual case of adult onset SSPE patient on treatment with significant clinical improvement, even in the absence of conversion to seronegativity in either CSF or serum, on follow-up serological examination.

  10. Effects of myofascial technique in patients with subacute whiplash associated disorders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picelli, A; Ledro, G; Turrina, A; Stecco, C; Santilli, V; Smania, N

    2011-12-01

    Whiplash associated disorders commonly affect people after a motor vehicle accident, causing a variety of disabling manifestations. Some manual and physical approaches have been proposed to improve myofascial function after traumatic injuries, in order to effectively reduce pain and functional limitation. To evaluate whether the application of the Fascial Manipulation© technique could be more effective than a conventional approach to improve cervical range of motion in patients with subacute whiplash associated disorders. Pilot randomized clinical trial. Eighteen patients with subacute whiplash associated disorders were randomized into two groups. Group A (N.=9) received three, 30-minute sessions, (every five days during a two week period) of neck Fascial Manipulation©. Group B (N.=9) received ten, 30-minute sessions (five days a week for two consecutive weeks) of neck exercises plus mobilization. Patients were evaluated before, immediately after and two weeks post-treatment. cervical active range of motion (flexion, extension, right lateral-flexion, left lateral-flexion, right rotation, and left rotation). A statistically significant improvement in neck flexion was found after treatment in favour of Group A (60.2±10.8°) compared with Group B (46.3±15.1°). No differences were found between groups for the other primary outcomes at post-treatment or follow-up. The Fascial Manipulation© technique may be a promising method to improve cervical range of motion in patients with subacute whiplash associated disorders. Myofascial techniques may be useful for improving treatment of subacute whiplash associated disorders also reducing their economic burden.

  11. Cerebral Reorganization in Subacute Stroke Survivors after Virtual Reality-Based Training: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang Xiao; Qiang Lin; Wai-Leung Lo; Yu-Rong Mao; Xin-chong Shi; Cates, Ryan S.; Shu-Feng Zhou; Dong-Feng Huang; Le Li

    2017-01-01

    Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a promising method for quantifying brain recovery and investigating the intervention-induced changes in corticomotor excitability after stroke. This study aimed to evaluate cortical reorganization subsequent to virtual reality-enhanced treadmill (VRET) training in subacute stroke survivors. Methods Eight participants with ischemic stroke underwent VRET for 5 sections per week and for 3 weeks. fMRI was conducted to quantify the activit...

  12. Neuraminidase production by a Streptococcus sanguis strain associated with subacute bacterial endocarditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Straus, D. C.; Portnoy-Duran, C

    1983-01-01

    The properties of an extracellular neuraminidase produced by a Streptococcus sanguis strain (isolated from a confirmed case of subacute bacterial endocarditis) during growth in a defined medium was examined in this investigation. This enzyme, isolated from concentrated culture supernatants of S. sanguis biotype II, was active against human alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, N-acetylneuramin lactose, bovine submaxillary mucin, and fetuin. Neuraminidase production paralleled bacterial growth in defined...

  13. Subacute Combined Degeneration of the Spinal Cord Due to Cronic Helicobacter pylori Infection. A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Márquez, Juan Camilo; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Hospital Universitario San Ignacio; de Valencia, Catalina; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Hospital Universitario San Ignacio; Ramírez, Sandra Milena; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Hospital Universitario San Ignacio; Uribe Vargas, Mario; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Hospital Universitario San Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Subacute combined degeneration is an uncommon condition. The diagnosis is established by correlating the clinical history, laboratory tests and findings on MRI. We report the case of a female patient with neurological symptoms characteristic of myelopathy with C5 sensory level. The cervical MRI shows demyelinated lesions in the posterior spinal cord. Clinically, anemia, chronic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection, as well as cyanocobalamin paraclinical deficit were also demonstrated. ...

  14. Glutathione, glutathione-related enzymes, and oxidative stress in individuals with subacute occupational exposure to lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrakowski, Michał; Pawlas, Natalia; Hudziec, Edyta; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Mikołajczyk, Agnieszka; Birkner, Ewa; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of subacute exposure to lead on the glutathione-related antioxidant defense and oxidative stress parameters in 36 males occupationally exposed to lead for 40±3.2days. Blood lead level in the examined population increased significantly by 359% due to lead exposure. Simultaneously, erythrocyte glutathione level decreased by 16%, whereas the activity of glutathione-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and leukocytes decreased by 28% and 10%, respectively. Similarly, the activity of glutathione-S-transferase in erythrocytes decreased by 45%. However, the activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes and leukocytes increased by 26% and 6%, respectively, whereas the total oxidant status value in leukocytes increased by 37%. Subacute exposure to lead results in glutathione pool depletion and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products; however, it does not cause DNA damage. Besides, subacute exposure to lead modifies the activity of glutathione-related enzymes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. EBV driven natural killer cell disease of the central nervous system presenting as subacute cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Francesca M; Flavin, Richard; Chen, Daphne; Loftus, Teresa; Looby, Seamus; McCarthy, Allan; de Gascun, Cillian; Jaffe, Elaine S; Nor, Nurul; Javadpour, Mohsen; McCabe, Dominick

    2017-11-01

    Brain biopsy in patients presenting with subacute encephalopathyis never straightforward and only undertaken when a 'treatable condition' is a realistic possibility. This 63 year old right handed, immunocompetent Caucasian woman presented with an 8 month history of rapidly progressive right-sided hearing impairment, a 4 month history of intermittent headaches, tinnitus, 'dizziness', dysphagia, nausea and vomiting, with the subsequent evolution of progressive gait ataxia and a subacute global encephalopathy. The possibility of CJD was raised. Brain biopsy was carried out. Western blot for prion protein was negative. She died 9 days later and autopsy brain examination confirmed widespread subacute infarction due to an EBV positive atypical NK/T-cell infiltrate with positivity for CD3, CD56, granzyme B, perforin and EBER with absence of CD4, CD5 and CD8 expression. Molecular studies for T-cell clonality were attempted but failed due to insufficient DNA quality. Serology was consistent with past EBV infection (EBV VCA and EBNA IgG Positive). There was no evidence of disease outside the CNS. Primary central nervous system NK/T-cell lymphoma is extremely rare. The rare reported cases all present with a discrete intracranial mass, unlike the diffuse infiltrative pattern in this case. Whilst the diffuse interstitial pattern is reminiscent of chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) seen in other organ systems such as the liver and bone marrow, the clinical presentation and epidemiologic profile are not typical for CAEBV.

  16. The effect of knee joint Mulligan taping on balance and gait in subacute stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Ki-Hoon; Cho, Hwi-Young; Lim, Chae-Gil

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of Mulligan taping on balance and gait in subacute stroke patients. [Subjects] Thirty patients with subacute stroke were randomly divided into two groups: the experimental group (n = 15) and the control group (n = 15). Mulligan taping was applied to the knee joints of participants in the experimental group while placebo taping was applied to knee joints of subjects in the control group. Biodex was used to assess their balance ability and the GAITRite System was used to test gait. All measurements were performed before and after the intervention. [Results] Dynamic standing balance of the experimental group significantly improved after taping. Gait, gait cadence, velocity, step length, and stride length also improved significantly. However, no significant differences in standing balance or gait were observed for the control group. Furthermore, significant differences in dynamic standing balance, cadence, and velocity were found between the two groups after the intervention. [Conclusion] Our results demonstrate that Mulligan taping is effective for improving balance and gait in subacute stroke patients. Thus, this technique is a potential method for actively facilitating rehabilitation programs for hemiplegia patients.

  17. The modified pulse-spray method using Urokinase in subacute and chronic thrombotic arterial occlusion

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    Kim, Youn Kil; Hahn, Seong Tae; Baek, Jee Hee; Kim, Choon Yul; Shinn, Kyung Sub [The Catholic Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the modified pulse-spray method using Urokinase(UK) in subacute and chronic thrombotic arterial occlusion. Modified pulse-spray methods using UK were performed in seven patients with subacute (1 week-1month) to chronic (1month-5years) occlusive symptoms such as limb pain, claudication and impotence. Angiographic examination revealed thrombotic occlusion of the aorta, common iliac arteries, brachial arterio-venous hemodialysis graft and femoro-popliteal bypass graft. The patients underwent thrombolysis using modified pulse-spray and additional constant infusion of UK. In the presence of underlying stenosis or organized clots, balloon angioplasty or stent placement was performed. Complete lysis was obtained in five of seven patients. For initial lysis, the mean dose of UK was 420,000 units, and the mean modified pulse-spray time was 50 minutes. Mean total dose of UK and mean total time for complete lysis were 800,000 units and 161 minutes, respectively. Thrombolysis of the femoro-popliteal bypass graft failed due to severe occlusion of the distal anastomosis. Partial lysis was achieved in one patient with aorto-illac occlusion, but further thrombolysis was stopped due to bleeding at the puncture site. The modified pulse-spray method using UK is effective in treating subacute and chronic arterial thrombotic occlusion. It augments the speed, safety and efficacy of thrombolysis. When underlying stenosis or organized clots remain after thrombolysis, ballon angioplasty or stent placement would be helpful.

  18. Cerebral toxoplasmosis mimicking subacute meningitis in HIV-infected patients; a cohort study from Indonesia.

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    A Rizal Ganiem

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-associated subacute meningitis is mostly caused by tuberculosis or cryptococcosis, but often no etiology can be established. In the absence of CT or MRI of the brain, toxoplasmosis is generally not considered as part of the differential diagnosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed cerebrospinal fluid real time PCR and serological testing for Toxoplasma gondii in archived samples from a well-characterized cohort of 64 HIV-infected patients presenting with subacute meningitis in a referral hospital in Indonesia. Neuroradiology was only available for 6 patients. At time of presentation, patients mostly had newly diagnosed and advanced HIV infection (median CD4 count 22 cells/mL, with only 17.2% taking ART, and 9.4% PJP-prophylaxis. CSF PCR for T. Gondii was positive in 21 patients (32.8%. Circulating toxoplasma IgG was present in 77.2% of patients tested, including all in whom the PCR of CSF was positive for T. Gondii. Clinically, in the absence of neuroradiology, toxoplasmosis was difficult to distinguish from tuberculosis or cryptococcal meningitis, although CSF abnormalities were less pronounced. Mortality among patients with a positive CSF T. Gondii PCR was 81%, 2.16-fold higher (95% CI 1.04-4.47 compared to those with a negative PCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with clinically suspected subacute meningitis in settings where neuroradiology is not available.

  19. Acetylcysteine in the treatment of subacute sinusitis: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahtouee, Mehrzad; Monavarsadegh, Gholamhosein; Ahmadipour, Mohammadjavad; Motieilangroodi, Mazyar; Motamed, Niloofar; Saberifard, Jamshid; Eghbali, Seyyedsajjad; Adibi, Hooman; Maneshi, Hesam; Malekizadeh, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Sinusitis is a common disease with harmful effects on the health and finances of patients and the economy of the community. It is easily treated in most of its acute stages but is associated with some management difficulties as it goes toward chronicity. Therefore, we tried to improve the treatment of subacute sinusitis by using acetylcysteine, which is a safe mucolytic and antioxidant agent. Thirty-nine adult patients with subacute sinusitis proved by computed tomography (CT) were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. They received oral amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and normal saline nasal drops for 10 days and oral pseudoephedrine for 7 days. In addition, the patients received acetylcysteine (600 mg orally, once daily) in the intervention group or placebo in the control group for 10 days. A paranasal CT scan was taken at baseline and 30 days after patients finished the treatment and was evaluated quantitatively by Lund-Mackay (LM) score. Symptoms and some aspects of quality of life also were assessed at baseline and 14 days after initiation and 30 days after termination of the treatment via the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test questionnaire. The groups showed no significant difference in LM score after treatment. A positive correlation was observed between the LM and SNOT-20 scores. We concluded that adding oral acetylcysteine to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, pseudoephedrine, and intranasal normal saline has no benefit for the treatment of subacute sinusitis.

  20. An evaluation of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis patients with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhandan, M; Cece, H; Calik, M; Karakas, E; Dogan, F; Karakas, O

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging to the diagnosis and staging of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The study comprised 26 patients diagnosed with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis at our clinic who were undergoing regular follow-up, and a control group of 18 subjects. Clinical staging was determined by Risk and Haddad classification; 12 at Stage II and 14 at Stage III. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images were taken of six areas (frontal, parieto-occipital, cerebellar, deep white matter, thalamus and basal ganglia) and by calculating the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, and a comparison was made between the stages and with the control group. The ADC values of all the areas of the subacute sclerosing panencephalitis patients were found to be significantly higher compared to the control group (p 0.05). The ADC values of all the areas of the Stage III patients were found to be significantly high compared to the Stage II values (p panencephalitis and to reveal differences between the stages.