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Sample records for neurodegeneration chronic inflammation

  1. Implanted neural electrodes cause chronic, local inflammation that is correlated with local neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, George C.; Rees, Howard D.; Levey, Allan I.; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2009-10-01

    Prosthetic devices that are controlled by intracortical electrodes recording one's 'thoughts' are a reality today, and no longer merely in the realm of science fiction. However, widespread clinical use of implanted electrodes is hampered by a lack of reliability in chronic recordings, independent of the type of electrodes used. One major hypothesis has been that astroglial scar electrically impedes the electrodes. However, there is a temporal discrepancy between stabilization of scar's electrical properties and recording failure with recording failure lagging by 1 month. In this study, we test a possible explanation for this discrepancy: the hypothesis that chronic inflammation, due to the persistent presence of the electrode, causes a local neurodegenerative state in the immediate vicinity of the electrode. Through modulation of chronic inflammation via stab wound, electrode geometry and age-matched control, we found that after 16 weeks, animals with an increased level of chronic inflammation were associated with increased neuronal and dendritic, but not axonal, loss. We observed increased neuronal and dendritic loss 16 weeks after implantation compared to 8 weeks after implantation, suggesting that the local neurodegenerative state is progressive. After 16 weeks, we observed axonal pathology in the form of hyperphosphorylation of the protein tau in the immediate vicinity of the microelectrodes (as observed in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies). The results of this study suggest that a local, late onset neurodegenerative disease-like state surrounds the chronic electrodes and is a potential cause for chronic recording failure. These results also inform strategies to enhance our capability to attain reliable long-term recordings from implantable electrodes in the CNS.

  2. Progressive inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration after traumatic brain or spinal cord injury.

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    Faden, Alan I; Wu, Junfang; Stoica, Bogdan A; Loane, David J

    2016-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been linked to dementia and chronic neurodegeneration. Described initially in boxers and currently recognized across high contact sports, the association between repeated concussion (mild TBI) and progressive neuropsychiatric abnormalities has recently received widespread attention, and has been termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Less well appreciated are cognitive changes associated with neurodegeneration in the brain after isolated spinal cord injury. Also under-recognized is the role of sustained neuroinflammation after brain or spinal cord trauma, even though this relationship has been known since the 1950s and is supported by more recent preclinical and clinical studies. These pathological mechanisms, manifested by extensive microglial and astroglial activation and appropriately termed chronic traumatic brain inflammation or chronic traumatic inflammatory encephalopathy, may be among the most important causes of post-traumatic neurodegeneration in terms of prevalence. Importantly, emerging experimental work demonstrates that persistent neuroinflammation can cause progressive neurodegeneration that may be treatable even weeks after traumatic injury. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. Insights into Mechanisms of Chronic Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail B. Diack

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and prion diseases are characterised by the accumulation of abnormal conformers of a host encoded protein in the central nervous system. The process leading to neurodegeneration is still poorly defined and thus development of early intervention strategies is challenging. Unique amongst these diseases are Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases, which have the ability to transmit between individuals. The infectious nature of these diseases has permitted in vivo and in vitro modelling of the time course of the disease process in a highly reproducible manner, thus early events can be defined. Recent evidence has demonstrated that the cell-to-cell spread of protein aggregates by a “prion-like mechanism” is common among the protein misfolding diseases. Thus, the TSE models may provide insights into disease mechanisms and testable hypotheses for disease intervention, applicable to a number of these chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. DNA damage in nasal and brain tissues of canines exposed to air pollutants is associated with evidence of chronic brain inflammation and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Maronpot, Robert R; Torres-Jardon, Ricardo; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Schoonhoven, Robert; Acuña-Ayala, Hilda; Villarreal-Calderón, Anna; Nakamura, Jun; Fernando, Reshan; Reed, William; Azzarelli, Biagio; Swenberg, James A

    2003-01-01

    Acute, subchronic, or chronic exposures to particulate matter (PM) and pollutant gases affect people in urban areas and those exposed to fires, disasters, and wars. Respiratory tract inflammation, production of mediators of inflammation capable of reaching the brain, systemic circulation of PM, and disruption of the nasal respiratory and olfactory barriers are likely in these populations. DNA damage is crucial in aging and in age-associated diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. We evaluated apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in nasal and brain genomic DNA, and explored by immunohistochemistry the expression of nuclear factor NFkappaB p65, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2), metallothionein I and II, apolipoprotein E, amyloid precursor protein (APP), and beta-amyloid(1-42) in healthy dogs naturally exposed to urban pollution in Mexico City. Nickel (Ni) and vanadium (V) were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Forty mongrel dogs, ages 7 days-10 years were studied (14 controls from Tlaxcala and 26 exposed to urban pollution in South West Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC)). Nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium were found to be early pollutant targets. Olfactory bulb and hippocampal AP sites were significantly higher in exposed than in control age matched animals. Ni and V were present in a gradient from olfactory mucosa > olfactory bulb > frontal cortex. Exposed dogs had (a) nuclear neuronal NFkappaB p65, (b) endothelial, glial and neuronal iNOS, (c) endothelial and glial COX2, (d) ApoE in neuronal, glial and vascular cells, and (e) APP and beta amyloid(1-42) in neurons, diffuse plaques (the earliest at age 11 months), and in subarachnoid blood vessels. Increased AP sites and the inflammatory and stress protein brain responses were early and significant in dogs exposed to urban pollution. Oil combustion PM-associated metals Ni and V were detected in the brain. There was an acceleration of Alzheimer

  5. Chronic neurodegeneration after traumatic brain injury: Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or persistent neuroinflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faden, Alan I; Loane, David J

    2015-01-01

    It has long been suggested that prior traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases the subsequent incidence of chronic neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Among these, the association with Alzheimer disease has the strongest support. There is also a long-recognized association between repeated concussive insults and progressive cognitive decline or other neuropsychiatric abnormalities. The latter was first described in boxers as dementia pugilistica, and has received widespread recent attention in contact sports such as professional American football. The term chronic traumatic encephalopathy was coined to attempt to define a "specific" entity marked by neurobehavioral changes and the extensive deposition of phosphorylated tau protein. Nearly lost in the discussions of post-traumatic neurodegeneration after traumatic brain injury has been the role of sustained neuroinflammation, even though this association has been well established pathologically since the 1950s, and is strongly supported by subsequent preclinical and clinical studies. Manifested by extensive microglial and astroglial activation, such chronic traumatic brain inflammation may be the most important cause of post-traumatic neurodegeneration in terms of prevalence. Critically, emerging preclinical studies indicate that persistent neuroinflammation and associated neurodegeneration may be treatable long after the initiating insult(s).

  6. Inflammation in Chronic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruilong; Liang, Helena; Clarke, Elizabeth; Jackson, Christopher; Xue, Meilang

    2016-12-11

    Non-healing chronic wounds present a major biological, psychological, social, and financial burden on both individual patients and the broader health system. Pathologically extensive inflammation plays a major role in the disruption of the normal healing cascade. The causes of chronic wounds (venous, arterial, pressure, and diabetic ulcers) can be examined through a juxtaposition of normal healing and the rogue inflammatory response created by the common components within chronic wounds (ageing, hypoxia, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and bacterial colonisation). Wound bed care through debridement, dressings, and antibiotics currently form the basic mode of treatment. Despite recent setbacks, pharmaceutical adjuncts form an interesting area of research.

  7. Post-traumatic neurodegeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Daniel H; Goldstein, Lee E; Kiernan, Patrick T; Stein, Thor D; McKee, Ann C

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity around the world. Concussive and subconcussive forms of closed-head injury due to impact or blast neurotrauma represent the most common types of TBI in civilian and military settings. It is becoming increasingly evident that TBI can lead to persistent, long-term debilitating effects, and in some cases, progressive neurodegeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The epidemiological literature suggests that a single moderate-to-severe TBI may be associated with accelerated neurodegeneration and increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or motor neuron disease. However, the pathologic phenotype of these post-traumatic neurodegenerations is largely unknown and there may be pathobiological differences between post-traumatic disease and the corresponding sporadic disorder. By contrast, the pathology of CTE is increasingly well known and is characterized by a distinctive pattern of progressive brain atrophy and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau neurofibrillary and glial tangles, dystrophic neurites, 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) neuronal and glial aggregates, microvasculopathy, myelinated axonopathy, neuroinflammation, and white matter degeneration. Clinically, CTE is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory deficits, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and most often progress slowly over decades. Although research on the long-term effects of TBI is advancing quickly, the incidence and prevalence of post-traumatic neurodegeneration and CTE are unknown. Critical knowledge gaps include elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms, identification of genetic risk factors, and clarification of relevant variables-including age at exposure to trauma, history of prior and subsequent head trauma, substance use, gender, stress, and comorbidities-all of which may contribute to risk profiles and the development of post

  8. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chronic Disease Aplastic Anemia & Myelodysplastic Syndromes Anemia of Inflammation & Chronic Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a ... other organs to fail. What is anemia of inflammation and chronic disease (AI/ACD)? Anemia of inflammation ...

  9. Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    chronic neuronal cell loss, glial activation, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) measure of β-amyloid and hyper-phosphorylated tau protein...Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0195 TITLE: Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury...30 Jun 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After TBI 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1

  10. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anemia of inflammation and chronic disease is a type of anemia that commonly occurs with chronic, or long term, ... inflammation and chronic disease (AI/ACD) is a type of anemia that commonly occurs with chronic illnesses, infections, cancer, ...

  11. Chronic inflammation and cardiovascular risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: Chronic inflammation and cardiovascular risk. 18. Vol 52 No 1. SA Fam Pract 2010. SA Fam Pract 2010;52(1): 18. Much evidence points towards inflammation as a key regulatory process linking cardiovascular risk factors for atherosclerosis and its complications to an altered arterial biology.1 Systemic inflammatory ...

  12. Chronic Inflammation in cancer development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele eMulthoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory mediators exert pleiotropic effects in the development of cancer. On the one hand, inflammation favors carcinogenesis, malignant transformation, tumor growth, invasion and metastatic spread; on the other hand inflammation can stimulate immune effector mechanisms that might limit tumor growth. The link between cancer and inflammation depends on intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Both pathways result in the activation of transcription factors such as NF-B, STAT-3, and HIF-1 and in accumulation of tumorigenic factors in tumor and microenvironment. STAT-3 and NF-B interact at multiple levels and thereby boost tumor-associated inflammation which can suppress anti-tumor immune responses. These factors also promote tumor growth, progression and metastatic spread. IL-1, IL-6, TNF and PGHS-2 are key mediators of an inflammatory milieu by modulating the expression of tumor-promoting factors. In this review we concentrate on the crucial role of pro-inflammatory mediators in inflammation-driven carcinogenesis and outline molecular mechanisms of IL-1 signaling in tumors. In addition, we elucidate the dual roles of stress proteins as danger signals in the development of anti-cancer immunity and anti-apoptotic functions.

  13. Chronic Inflammation Links Cancer and Parkinson’s disease

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    Zhiming eLi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of genetic studies suggest that the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD and cancer share common genes, pathways, and mechanisms. Despite a disruption in a wide range of similar biological processes, the end result is very different: uncontrolled proliferation and early neurodegeneration. Thus, the links between the molecular mechanisms that cause PD and cancer remain to be elucidated. We propose that chronic inflammation in neurons and tumors contributes to a microenvironment that favors the accumulation of DNA mutations and facilitates disease formation. This article appraises the key role of microglia, establishes the genetic role of COX2 and CARD15 in PD and cancer, and discusses prevention and treatment with this new perspective in mind. We examine the evidence that chronic inflammation is an important link between cancer and PD.

  14. Insulin resistance and chronic inflammation

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    Natalia Matulewicz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a condition of reduced biological response to insulin. Growing evidence indicates the role of the chronic low-grade inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Adipose tissue in obesity is characterized by increased lipolysis with the excessive release of free fatty acids, and is also a source of proinflammatory cytokines. Both these factors may inhibit insulin action. Proinflammatory cytokines exert their effect by stimulating major inflammatory NFκB and JNK pathways within the cells. Inflammatory processes in other insulin responsive tissues may also play a role in inducing insulin resistance. This paper is an overview of the chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, liver and endothelial cells during the development of insulin resistance.

  15. Susceptibility to chronic inflammation: an update.

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    Nasef, Noha Ahmed; Mehta, Sunali; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2017-03-01

    Chronic inflammation is defined by the persistence of inflammatory processes beyond their physiological function, resulting in tissue destruction. Chronic inflammation is implicated in the progression of many chronic diseases and plays a central role in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease. As such, this review aims to collate some of the latest research in relation to genetic and environmental susceptibilities to chronic inflammation. In the genetic section, we discuss some of the updates in cytokine research and current treatments that are being developed. We also discuss newly identified canonical and non-canonical genes associated with chronic inflammation. In the environmental section, we highlight some of the latest updates and evidence in relation to the role that infection, diet and stress play in promoting inflammation. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the latest research to build on our current understanding of chronic inflammation. It highlights the complexity associated with chronic inflammation, as well as provides insights into potential new targets for therapies that could be used to treat chronic inflammation and consequently prevent disease progression.

  16. The Role of Microglia in Diabetic Retinopathy: Inflammation, Microvasculature Defects and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, which appears in one third of all diabetic patients and is a prominent cause of vision loss. First discovered as a microvascular disease, intensive research in the field identified inflammation and neurodegeneration to be part of diabetic retinopathy. Microglia, the resident monocytes of the retina, are activated due to a complex interplay between the different cell types of the retina and diverse pathological pathways. The trigger for developing diabetic retinopathy is diabetes-induced hyperglycemia, accompanied by leukostasis and vascular leakages. Transcriptional changes in activated microglia, mediated via the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) and extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways, results in release of various pro-inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, caspases and glutamate. Activated microglia additionally increased proliferation and migration. Among other consequences, these changes in microglia severely affected retinal neurons, causing increased apoptosis and subsequent thinning of the nerve fiber layer, resulting in visual loss. New potential therapeutics need to interfere with these diabetic complications even before changes in the retina are diagnosed, to prevent neuronal apoptosis and blindness in patients. PMID:29301251

  17. Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0195 TITLE: Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration after Traumatic Brain Injury...Purpose: The purpose of this project is to develop a radically different strategy to reduce brain glutamate excitotoxicity and treat TBI. We will...objective of reducing blood levels of glutamate. This will produce a brain -to-blood gradient of glutamate which will enhance the removal of excess

  18. Imaging chronic traumatic brain injury as a risk factor for neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Deborah M; Geary, Elizabeth K; Moynihan, Michael; Alexander, Aristides; Pennington, Michelle; Glang, Patrick; Schulze, Evan T; Dretsch, Michael; Pacifico, Anthony; Davis, Matthew L; Stevens, Alan B; Huang, Jason H

    2014-06-01

    Population-based studies have supported the hypothesis that a positive history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with an increased incidence of neurological disease and psychiatric comorbidities, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These epidemiologic studies, however, do not offer a clear definition of that risk, and leave unanswered the bounding criteria for greater lifetime risk of neurodegeneration. Key factors that likely mediate the degree of risk of neurodegeneration include genetic factors, significant premorbid and comorbid medical history (e.g. depression, multiple head injuries and repetitive subconcussive impact to the brain, occupational risk, age at injury, and severity of brain injury). However, given the often-described concerns in self-report accuracy as it relates to history of multiple TBIs, low frequency of patient presentation to a physician in the case of mild brain injuries, and challenges with creating clear distinctions between injury severities, disentangling the true risk for neurodegeneration based solely on population-based studies will likely remain elusive. Given this reality, multiple modalities and approaches must be combined to characterize who are at risk so that appropriate interventions to alter progression of neurodegeneration can be evaluated. This article presents data from a study that highlights uses of neuroimaging and areas of needed research in the link between TBI and neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Source of Chronic Inflammation in Aging

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    Fumihiro Sanada

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a complex process that results from a combination of environmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors. A chronic pro-inflammatory status is a pervasive feature of aging. This chronic low-grade inflammation occurring in the absence of overt infection has been defined as “inflammaging” and represents a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The low-grade inflammation persists even after reversing pro-inflammatory stimuli such as LDL cholesterol and the renin–angiotensin system (RAS. Recently, several possible sources of chronic low-grade inflammation observed during aging and age-related diseases have been proposed. Cell senescence and dysregulation of innate immunity is one such mechanism by which persistent prolonged inflammation occurs even after the initial stimulus has been removed. Additionally, the coagulation factor that activates inflammatory signaling beyond its role in the coagulation system has been identified. This signal could be a new source of chronic inflammation and cell senescence. Here, we summarized the factors and cellular pathways/processes that are known to regulate low-grade persistent inflammation in aging and age-related disease.

  20. Chronic inflammation and cardiovascular risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treated patients who not only achieved LDL-cholesterol levels below 1.8 mmol/L but who also achieved CRP levels below. 2 mg/L.2. The Jupiter trial tested this hypothesis prospectively. Maximum treatment benefit occurred with reduction of both LDL-cholesterol and CRP levels.3 Is there a future of targeting inflammation in.

  1. Chronic high levels of the RCAN1-1 protein may promote neurodegeneration and Alzheimer disease.

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    Ermak, Gennady; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2013-09-01

    The RCAN1 gene encodes three different protein isoforms: RCAN1-4, RCAN1-1L, and RCAN1-1S. RCAN1-1L is the RCAN1 isoform predominantly expressed in human brains. RCAN1 proteins have been shown to regulate various other proteins and cellular functions, including calcineurin, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT), stress adaptation, ADP/ATP exchange in mitochondria, and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP). The effects of increased RCAN1 gene expression seem to depend both on the specific RCAN1 protein isoform(s) synthesized and on the length of time the level of each isoform is elevated. Transiently elevated RCAN1-4 and RCAN1-1L protein levels, lasting just a few hours, can be neuroprotective under acute stress conditions, including acute oxidative stress. We propose that, by transiently inhibiting the phosphatase calcineurin, RCAN1-4 and RCAN1-1L may reinforce and extend protective stress-adaptive cell responses. In contrast, prolonged elevation of RCAN1-1L levels is associated with the types of neurodegeneration observed in several diseases, including Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome. RCAN1-1L levels can also be increased by multiple chronic stresses and by glucocorticoids, both of which can cause neurodegeneration. Although increasing levels of RCAN1-1L for just a few months has no overtly obvious neurodegenerative effect, it does suppress neurogenesis. Longer term elevation of RCAN1-1L levels (for at least 16 months), however, can lead to the first signs of neurodegeneration. Such neurodegeneration may be precipitated by (RCAN1-1L-mediated) prolonged calcineurin inhibition and GSK-3β induction/activation, both of which promote tau hyperphosphorylation, and/or by (RCAN1-1L-mediated) effects on the mitochondrial ANT, diminished ATP/ADP ratio, opening of the mtPTP, and mitochondrial autophagy. We propose that RCAN1-1L operates through various molecular mechanisms, primarily dependent upon

  2. Exacerbation of CNS inflammation and neurodegeneration by systemic LPS treatment is independent of circulating IL-1 beta and IL-6

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Carol L

    2011-05-17

    Abstract Background Chronic neurodegeneration comprises an inflammatory response but its contribution to the progression of disease remains unclear. We have previously shown that microglial cells are primed by chronic neurodegeneration, induced by the ME7 strain of prion disease, to synthesize limited pro-inflammatory cytokines but to produce exaggerated responses to subsequent systemic inflammatory insults. The consequences of this primed response include exaggerated hypothermic and sickness behavioural responses, acute neuronal death and accelerated progression of disease. Here we investigated whether inhibition of systemic cytokine synthesis using the anti-inflammatory steroid dexamethasone-21-phosphate was sufficient to block any or all of these responses. Methods ME7 animals, at 18-19 weeks post-inoculation, were challenged with LPS (500 μg\\/kg) in the presence or absence of dexamethasone-21-phosphate (2 mg\\/kg) and effects on core-body temperature and systemic and CNS cytokine production and apoptosis were examined. Results LPS induced hypothermia and decreased exploratory activity. Dexamethasone-21-phosphate prevented this hypothermia, markedly suppressed systemic IL-1β and IL-6 secretion but did not prevent decreased exploration. Furthermore, robust transcription of cytokine mRNA occurred in the hippocampus of both ME7 and NBH (normal brain homogenate) control animals despite the effective blocking of systemic cytokine synthesis. Microglia primed by neurodegeneration were not blocked from the robust synthesis of IL-1β protein and endothelial COX-2 was also robustly synthesized. We injected biotinylated LPS at 100 μg\\/kg and even at this lower dose this could be detected in blood plasma. Apoptosis was acutely induced by LPS, despite the inhibition of the systemic cytokine response. Conclusions These data suggest that LPS can directly activate the brain endothelium even at relatively low doses, obviating the need for systemic cytokine stimulation to

  3. Exacerbation of CNS inflammation and neurodegeneration by systemic LPS treatment is independent of circulating IL-1β and IL-6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham Colm

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neurodegeneration comprises an inflammatory response but its contribution to the progression of disease remains unclear. We have previously shown that microglial cells are primed by chronic neurodegeneration, induced by the ME7 strain of prion disease, to synthesize limited pro-inflammatory cytokines but to produce exaggerated responses to subsequent systemic inflammatory insults. The consequences of this primed response include exaggerated hypothermic and sickness behavioural responses, acute neuronal death and accelerated progression of disease. Here we investigated whether inhibition of systemic cytokine synthesis using the anti-inflammatory steroid dexamethasone-21-phosphate was sufficient to block any or all of these responses. Methods ME7 animals, at 18-19 weeks post-inoculation, were challenged with LPS (500 μg/kg in the presence or absence of dexamethasone-21-phosphate (2 mg/kg and effects on core-body temperature and systemic and CNS cytokine production and apoptosis were examined. Results LPS induced hypothermia and decreased exploratory activity. Dexamethasone-21-phosphate prevented this hypothermia, markedly suppressed systemic IL-1β and IL-6 secretion but did not prevent decreased exploration. Furthermore, robust transcription of cytokine mRNA occurred in the hippocampus of both ME7 and NBH (normal brain homogenate control animals despite the effective blocking of systemic cytokine synthesis. Microglia primed by neurodegeneration were not blocked from the robust synthesis of IL-1β protein and endothelial COX-2 was also robustly synthesized. We injected biotinylated LPS at 100 μg/kg and even at this lower dose this could be detected in blood plasma. Apoptosis was acutely induced by LPS, despite the inhibition of the systemic cytokine response. Conclusions These data suggest that LPS can directly activate the brain endothelium even at relatively low doses, obviating the need for systemic cytokine

  4. Systemic Inflammation and the Brain: novel roles of genetic, molecular, and environmental cues as drivers of neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman eSankowski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The nervous and immune systems have evolved in parallel from the early bilaterians, in which innate immunity and a central nervous system coexisted for the first time, to jawed vertebrates and the appearance of adaptive immunity. The central nervous system (CNS feeds from, and integrates efferent signals in response to, somatic and autonomic sensory information. The CNS receives input also from the periphery about inflammation and infection. Cytokines, chemokines, damage-associated soluble mediators of systemic inflammation can also gain access to the CNS via blood flow. In response to systemic inflammation, those soluble mediators can access directly through the circumventricular organs, as well as open the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The resulting translocation of inflammatory mediators can interfere with neuronal and glial well-being, leading to a break of balance in brain homeostasis. This in turn results in cognitive and behavioral manifestations commonly present during acute infections -including anorexia, malaise, depression, and decreased physical activity- collectively known as the sickness behavior (SB. While SB manifestations are transient and self-limited, under states of persistent systemic inflammatory response the cognitive and behavioral changes can become permanent. For example, cognitive decline is almost universal in sepsis survivors, and a common finding in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Here, we review recent genetic evidence suggesting an association between neurodegenerative disorders and persistent immune activation; clinical and experimental evidence indicating previously unidentified immune-mediated pathways of neurodegeneration; and novel immunomodulatory targets and their potential relevance for neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Chronic Hypertension Leads to Neurodegeneration in the TgSwDI Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

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    Kruyer, Anna; Soplop, Nadine; Strickland, Sidney; Norris, Erin H

    2015-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies link vascular disorders, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and stroke, with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hypertension, specifically, is an important modifiable risk factor for late-onset AD. To examine the link between midlife hypertension and the onset of AD later in life, we chemically induced chronic hypertension in the TgSwDI mouse model of AD in early adulthood. Hypertension accelerated cognitive deficits in the Barnes maze test (Phypertension induced hippocampal neurodegeneration at an early age in this mouse line (43% reduction in the dorsal subiculum; P<0.05), establishing this as a useful research model of AD with mixed vascular and amyloid pathologies. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Neurodegeneration after mild and repetitive traumatic brain injury: Chronic traumatic encepalopathy

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    Stanescu Ioana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE. Although research on the long-term effects of TBI is advancing quickly, the incidence and prevalence of post-traumatic neurodegeneration and CTE are unknown. The incidence and prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the genetic risk factors critical to its development are currently under research. CTE can be diagnosed only by post mortem neuropathological examination of the brain. Great efforts are being made to better understand the clinical signs and symptoms of CTE, obtained in most cases retrospectively from families of affected persons.Patients with CTE are described as having behavioral, mood, cognitive and motor impairments, occurring after a long latency from the traumatic events. Recent pathogenetic studies have provided new insights to CTE mechanisms, offering important clues in understanding neurodegenerative process and relations between physical factors and pathologic protein deposition. Further research is needed to better identify the genetic and environmental risk factors for CTE, as well as rehabilitation and treatment strategies.

  7. PROGRESSION VARIANTS OF CHRONIC SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATION

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    E. Y. Gusev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Fourteen groups of patients have been investigated and divided into 2 classes. The first class included the following cohorts of patients: relatively healthy persons, age 18 to 55 yrs (n = 50; elderly persons 60 yrs old, as well as senior persons (n = 22; persons with chronic adnexitis, women in their 1st trimester of pregnancy (n = 16; climacteric syndrome (n = 16; autoimmune thyroiditis (n = 29. The second class of patients included following cohorts: elderly persons with chronic cardiac insufficiency (CCI II-III stage (n=49; valvular cardiac disease (rheumatism, n = 15; psoriatic arthritis (n = 12; reactive arthritis (n = 17; antiphospholipid syndrome, a sub-group in the 1st trimester of pregnancy (n = 5; systemic lupus erythematosus (n=49; decompensated atherosclerosis of femoral artery (n = 38; end-stage renal disease (n = 42. Plasma cytokines (TNFαα, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, acute-phase C-reactive protein (CRP, cortisol, troponin I, myoglobin, D-dimers, interleukin-2 soluble receptor (IL-2sR, and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP were determined in all the patients, by means of immune chemiluminescent technique (Immulite; Siemens Medical Solutions Diagnostics, USA. The integral indices of systemic inflammatory reaction (SIR have been calculated, i.e., a Reactivity Coefficient (RC and a Reactivity Level (RL. In the patients belonging to Class 1 cohorts, an absence of chronic systemic inflammation features was revealed, despite of some signs of systemic inflammatory response. Meanwhile, a majority of Class 2 patients have shown the signs of chronic systemic inflammation stage I to III.

  8. Systemic inflammation and neurodegeneration in a mouse model of multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settembre, Carmine; Annunziata, Ida; Spampanato, Carmine; Zarcone, Daniela; Cobellis, Gilda; Nusco, Edoardo; Zito, Ester; Tacchetti, Carlo; Cosma, Maria Pia; Ballabio, Andrea

    2007-03-13

    Sulfatases are involved in several biological functions such as degradation of macromolecules in the lysosomes. In patients with multiple sulfatase deficiency, mutations in the SUMF1 gene cause a reduction of sulfatase activities because of a posttranslational modification defect. We have generated a mouse line carrying a null mutation in the Sumf1 gene. Sulfatase activities are completely absent in Sumf1(-/-) mice, indicating that Sumf1 is indispensable for sulfatase activation and that mammals, differently from bacteria, have a single sulfatase modification system. Similarly to multiple sulfatase deficiency patients, Sumf1(-/-) mice display frequent early mortality, congenital growth retardation, skeletal abnormalities, and neurological defects. All examined tissues showed progressive cell vacuolization and significant lysosomal storage of glycosaminoglycans. Sumf1(-/-) mice showed a generalized inflammatory process characterized by a massive presence of highly vacuolated macrophages, which are the main site of lysosomal storage. Activated microglia were detected in the cerebellum and brain cortex associated with remarkable astroglyosis and neuronal cell loss. Between 4 and 6 months of age, we detected a strong increase in the expression levels of inflammatory cytokines and of apoptotic markers in both the CNS and liver, demonstrating that inflammation and apoptosis occur at the late stage of disease and suggesting that they play an important role in both the systemic and CNS phenotypes observed in lysosomal disorders. This mouse model, in which the function of an entire protein family has been silenced, offers a unique opportunity to study sulfatase function and the mechanisms underlying lysosomal storage diseases.

  9. SOCS and inflammation in chronic renal failure

    OpenAIRE

    Rastmanesh, M.M.

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in renal patients and a major health concern in western countries per se. Recent studies point to the important role of inflammation as an underlying cause of atherosclerosis. Importantly medicines that suppress inflammation lower the incidence of atherosclerosis as well. This indicates the importance of molecules that are able to control inflammation. Inflammation in renal patients is characterized by increased plasma levels of in...

  10. Curcumin, Inflammation, and Chronic Diseases: How Are They Linked?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan He

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It is extensively verified that continued oxidative stress and oxidative damage may lead to chronic inflammation, which in turn can mediate most chronic diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, neurological, inflammatory bowel disease and pulmonary diseases. Curcumin, a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric, shows strong anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities when used as a remedy for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. How oxidative stress activates inflammatory pathways leading to the progression of chronic diseases is the focus of this review. Thus, research to date suggests that chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and most chronic diseases are closely linked, and the antioxidant properties of curcumin can play a key role in the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammation diseases.

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging chronic lymphocytic inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malviya, Gaurav; De Vries, Erik F. J.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Signore, Alberto

    In the last few decades, a number of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging inflammation have been proposed that differ in their specificity and mechanism of uptake in inflamed foci as compared to the traditional inflammation imaging agents. Radiolabelled cytokines represent a reliable tool for the

  12. SOCS and inflammation in chronic renal failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rastmanesh, M.M.

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in renal patients and a major health concern in western countries per se. Recent studies point to the important role of inflammation as an underlying cause of atherosclerosis. Importantly medicines that suppress inflammation lower the

  13. Neurodegeneration severity can be predicted from early microglia alterations monitored in vivo in a mouse model of chronic glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Bosco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microglia serve key homeostatic roles, and respond to neuronal perturbation and decline with a high spatiotemporal resolution. The course of all chronic CNS pathologies is thus paralleled by local microgliosis and microglia activation, which begin at early stages of the disease. However, the possibility of using live monitoring of microglia during early disease progression to predict the severity of neurodegeneration has not been explored. Because the retina allows live tracking of fluorescent microglia in their intact niche, here we investigated their early changes in relation to later optic nerve neurodegeneration. To achieve this, we used the DBA/2J mouse model of inherited glaucoma, which develops progressive retinal ganglion cell degeneration of variable severity during aging, and represents a useful model to study pathogenic mechanisms of retinal ganglion cell decline that are similar to those in human glaucoma. We imaged CX3CR1+/GFP microglial cells in vivo at ages ranging from 1 to 5 months by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO and quantified cell density and morphological activation. We detected early microgliosis at the optic nerve head (ONH, where axonopathy first manifests, and could track attenuation of this microgliosis induced by minocycline. We also observed heterogeneous and dynamic patterns of early microglia activation in the retina. When the same animals were aged and analyzed for the severity of optic nerve pathology at 10 months of age, we found a strong correlation with the levels of ONH microgliosis at 3 to 4 months. Our findings indicate that live imaging and monitoring the time course and levels of early retinal microgliosis and microglia activation in glaucoma could serve as indicators of future neurodegeneration severity.

  14. Immunosuppression associated with chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingzhi; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to cancer development via multiple mechanisms. One potential mechanism is that chronic inflammation can generate an immunosuppressive microenvironment that allows advantages for tumor formation and progression. The immunosuppressive environment in certain chronic inflammatory diseases and solid cancers is characterized by accumulation of proinflammatory mediators, infiltration of immune suppressor cells and activation of immune checkpoint pathways in effector T cells. In this review, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of how immunosuppression contributes to cancer and how proinflammatory mediators induce the immunosuppressive microenvironment via induction of immunosuppressive cells and activation of immune checkpoint pathways. PMID:26354776

  15. Chronic Progressive Neurodegeneration in a transgenic mouse model of Prion disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Fainstein

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases present pathologically with progressive structural destruction of neurons and accumulation of mis-folded proteins specific for each condition leading to brain atrophy and functional disability. Many animal models exert deposition of pathogenic protein without accompanying neurodegeneration pattern. The lack of a comprehensive model hinders the efforts to develop treatment. We performed longitudinal quantification of cellular, neuronal and synaptic density, as well as of neurogenesis in brains of mice, mimicking for genetic Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease as compared to age matched wild type mice. Mice exhibited a neurodegenerative process indicated by progressive reduction in cortical neurons and synapses, starting at age of 4-6 months, in accordance with neurologic disability. This was accompanied by significant decrease in subventricular/subependymal zone neurogenesis. Although increased hippocampal neurogenesis was detected in mice, a neurodegenerative process of CA1 and CA3 regions associated with impaired hippocampal-dependent memory function was observed. In conclusion, mice exhibit pathological neurodegeneration concomitant with progressive neurological disease, indicating these mice can serve as a model for neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. [Chronic mild inflammation links obesity, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis and diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andel, M; Polák, J; Kraml, P; Dlouhý, P; Stich, V

    2009-01-01

    Chronic low grade inflammation is relatively new concept in metabolic medicine. This concept describes the relations between the inflammation and adipose tissue, insulin resistence, atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Macrophages and lymphocytes deposed in adipose tissue produce proinflammatory cytokines which directly or through the CRP liver secretion are targeting endothelial cells, hepatocytes and beta cells of Langerhans islets of pancreas. The dysfunction of these cells follows often further disturbances and in case of beta cells - the cell death. The connection between the adipose tissue insulin resistence, atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes was earlier described with endocrine and metabolic descriptors. The concept of chronic low grade inflammation creates also another description of multilateral connections in metabolic syndome. The salicylates and the drugs related to them seem to have some glucose lowering properties. The recent development in the field ofchronic low grade inflammation represents also certain therapeutic hope for antiinflammatory intervention in type 2 diabetes.

  17. Adipocyte Death and Chronic Inflammation in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Masashi; Sakaue, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Cell death is closely linked to many diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune diseases, and metabolic disorders. Increased adipocyte death has been reported during the development of obesity. Adipocyte death may be caused by excessive stress during obesity-related adipose tissue remodeling. Adipose tissue macrophages are key players in obesity-related inflammation and systemic insulin resistance. Accumulating evidence suggests that adipocyte death is involved in immune cell function and initiates inflammation through an interaction with macrophages; however, the precise mechanisms remain largely unknown. This review focuses on the contribution of dead cells (particularly dead adipocytes in adipose tissue) to the pathophysiological conditions associated with obesity. J. Med. Invest. 64: 193-196, August, 2017.

  18. Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress Paradigm Established Effects of Pro- and Anti-inflammatory Cytokine on Neurodegeneration-Linked Depressive States in Hamsters with Brain Endothelial Damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Ennio; Fazzari, Gilda; Mele, Maria; Alò, Raffaella; Zizza, Merylin; Jiao, Wei; Di Vito, Anna; Barni, Tullio; Mandalà, Maurizio; Canonaco, Marcello

    2017-10-01

    The mechanisms by which inflammation affects the different emotional moods are only partially known. Previous works have pointed to stress hormones like glucocorticoids plus the vascular factor endothelin-1 as key factors evoking stressful states especially in relation to endothelial dysfunctions. With this work, it was our intention to establish the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression variations towards depression-like behaviors and consequently the development of neurodegeneration events caused by endothelial damages in the hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). Such a rodent, which is considered a valuable animal model to test depression and anxiety states, exhibited a variety of depression-like behaviors including reduction in sucrose consumption, locomotion, and exploration (p < 0.01) following exposure to unpredictable chronic mild stress. Contextually, a tight correlation between unpredictable chronic mild stress-induced depressive states and expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines was detected as shown by marked expression levels (p < 0.01) of IL-1β and NF-kB in the hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex. Even the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 supplied notably significant (p < 0.001) expression levels in the same areas of resilient hamsters. Application of hemodynamic and endothelial functional studies pointed to altered arterial endothelial activities in depressed with respect to resilient animals. Moreover, evident damaged neuronal fields in the above areas of depressed hamsters allowed us to correlate such a behavioral phenomenon to the upregulation of IL-1β and NF-κB. Overall, the differing roles of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines on depressive states, especially in view of brain endothelial damages, may provide novel therapeutic measures against mood disorders linked to neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Pathogenesis of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Role and Mechanisms of Chronic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Hermouet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs are a heterogeneous group of clonal diseases characterized by the excessive and chronic production of mature cells from one or several of the myeloid lineages. Recent advances in the biology of MPNs have greatly facilitated their molecular diagnosis since most patients present with mutation(s in the JAK2, MPL, or CALR genes. Yet the roles played by these mutations in the pathogenesis and main complications of the different subtypes of MPNs are not fully elucidated. Importantly, chronic inflammation has long been associated with MPN disease and some of the symptoms and complications can be linked to inflammation. Moreover, the JAK inhibitor clinical trials showed that the reduction of symptoms linked to inflammation was beneficial to patients even in the absence of significant decrease in the JAK2-V617F mutant load. These observations suggested that part of the inflammation observed in patients with JAK2-mutated MPNs may not be the consequence of JAK2 mutation. The aim of this paper is to review the different aspects of inflammation in MPNs, the molecular mechanisms involved, the role of specific genetic defects, and the evidence that increased production of certain cytokines depends or not on MPN-associated mutations, and to discuss possible nongenetic causes of inflammation.

  20. Pathogenesis of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Role and Mechanisms of Chronic Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot-Corbel, Edith; Gardie, Betty

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a heterogeneous group of clonal diseases characterized by the excessive and chronic production of mature cells from one or several of the myeloid lineages. Recent advances in the biology of MPNs have greatly facilitated their molecular diagnosis since most patients present with mutation(s) in the JAK2, MPL, or CALR genes. Yet the roles played by these mutations in the pathogenesis and main complications of the different subtypes of MPNs are not fully elucidated. Importantly, chronic inflammation has long been associated with MPN disease and some of the symptoms and complications can be linked to inflammation. Moreover, the JAK inhibitor clinical trials showed that the reduction of symptoms linked to inflammation was beneficial to patients even in the absence of significant decrease in the JAK2-V617F mutant load. These observations suggested that part of the inflammation observed in patients with JAK2-mutated MPNs may not be the consequence of JAK2 mutation. The aim of this paper is to review the different aspects of inflammation in MPNs, the molecular mechanisms involved, the role of specific genetic defects, and the evidence that increased production of certain cytokines depends or not on MPN-associated mutations, and to discuss possible nongenetic causes of inflammation. PMID:26538820

  1. Effects of L-DOPA/benserazide co-treatment on colonic excitatory cholinergic motility and enteric inflammation following dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, C; Antonioli, L; Colucci, R; Tirotta, E; Gentile, D; Ippolito, C; Segnani, C; Levandis, G; Cerri, S; Blandini, F; Barocelli, E; Ballabeni, V; Bernardini, N; Blandizzi, C; Fornai, M

    2017-09-01

    The mainstay therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) relies on L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) plus a DOPA-decarboxylase inhibitor. However, their effects on colonic dysmotility and inflammation observed in PD are undetermined. This study examined the effects of L-DOPA plus benserazide (BE) on colonic motility and inflammation in rats with central nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation. Neurodegeneration was induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). 6-OHDA animals were treated orally with L-DOPA/BE for 28 days, starting 28 days after 6-OHDA injection. At the end of treatment, in vivo colonic transit was evaluated by a radiologic assay. Electrically stimulated (ES) cholinergic contractions were recorded in vitro from colonic preparations, while acetylcholine release was measured in the incubation medium. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression as well as eosinophil and mast cell density were examined in the colonic wall by immunohistochemistry. Colonic TNF and IL-1β levels were also assayed. 6-OHDA animals displayed: 1) decrease in in vivo colonic transit; 2) impairment of ES-stimulated cholinergic contractions; 3) decreased acetylcholine release from myenteric nerves; 4) decrease in ChAT and increase in GFAP myenteric immunopositivity; 5) increase in eosinophil and mast cell density; 6) increase in TNF and IL-1β levels. Treatment with L-DOPA/BE elicited an improvement of in vivo and in vitro colonic motor activity, a normalization of acetylcholine release, ChAT immunopositivity, as well as pro-inflammatory cytokine patterns, ganglionic GFAP levels, eosinophil and mast cell density. Under dopaminergic nigrostriatal denervation, treatment with L-DOPA/BE ameliorated colonic motility through a normalization of myenteric cholinergic neurotransmission, along with an improvement of colonic inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Metallothionein reduces central nervous system inflammation, neurodegeneration, and cell death following kainic acid-induced epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Florit, Sergi; Giralt, Mercedes

    2005-01-01

    We examined metallothionein (MT)-induced neuroprotection during kainic acid (KA)-induced excitotoxicity by studying transgenic mice with MT-I overexpression (TgMT mice). KA induces epileptic seizures and hippocampal excitotoxicity, followed by inflammation and delayed brain damage. We show for th...

  3. PET imaging of acute and chronic inflammation in living mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Qizhen; Cai, Weibo; Li, Zi-Bo; Chen, Kai; He, Lina; Chen, Xiaoyuan [Stanford University School of Medicine, The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States); Li, Hui-Cheng; Hui, Mizhou [AmProtein Corporation, Camarillo, CA (United States)

    2007-11-15

    In this study, we evaluated the 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced acute and chronic inflammation in living mice by PET imaging of TNF-{alpha} and integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} expression. TPA was topically applied to the right ear of BALB/c mice every other day to create the inflammation model. {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-etanercept and {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-E{l_brace}E[c(RGDyK)]{sub 2}{r_brace}{sub 2} were used for PET imaging of TNF-{alpha} and integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} expression in both acute and chronic inflammation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, ex vivo autoradiography, direct tissue sampling, and immunofluorescence staining were also performed to confirm the non-invasive PET imaging results. The ear thickness increased significantly and the TNF-{alpha} level more than tripled after a single TPA challenge. MicroPET imaging using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-etanercept revealed high activity accumulation in the inflamed ear, reaching 11.1 {+-} 1.3, 13.0 {+-} 2.0, 10.9 {+-} 1.4, 10.2 {+-} 2.2%ID/g at 1, 4, 16, and 24 h post injection, respectively (n = 3). Repeated TPA challenges caused TPA-specific chronic inflammation and reduced {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-etanercept uptake due to lowered TNF-{alpha} expression. {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-E{l_brace}E[c(RGDyK)]{sub 2}{r_brace}{sub 2} uptake in the chronically inflamed ears (after four and eight TPA challenges) was significantly higher than in the control ears and those after one TPA challenge. Immunofluorescence staining revealed increased integrin {beta}{sub 3} expression, consistent with the non-invasive PET imaging results using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-E{l_brace}E[c(RGDyK)]{sub 2}{r_brace}{sub 2} as an integrin {alpha}{sub v} {beta}{sub 3}-specific radiotracer. Biodistribution and autoradiography studies further confirmed the quantification capability of microPET imaging. Successful PET imaging of TNF- {alpha} expression in acute inflammation and integrin {alpha}{sub v} {beta}{sub 3} expression in chronic inflammation provides

  4. Parainflammation, chronic inflammation, and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is an adaptive response of the immune system to noxious insults to maintain homeostasis and restore functionality. The retina is considered an immune-privileged tissue as a result of its unique anatomic and physiologic properties. During aging, the retina suffers from a low-grade chronic oxidative insult, which sustains for decades and increases in level with advancing age. As a result, the retinal innate-immune system, particularly microglia and the complement system, undergoes low levels of activation (parainflammation). In many cases, this parainflammatory response can maintain homeostasis in the healthy aging eye. However, in patients with age-related macular degeneration, this parainflammatory response becomes dysregulated and contributes to macular damage. Factors contributing to the dysregulation of age-related retinal parainflammation include genetic predisposition, environmental risk factors, and old age. Dysregulated parainflammation (chronic inflammation) in age-related macular degeneration damages the blood retina barrier, resulting in the breach of retinal-immune privilege, leading to the development of retinal lesions. This review discusses the basic principles of retinal innate-immune responses to endogenous chronic insults in normal aging and in age-related macular degeneration and explores the difference between beneficial parainflammation and the detrimental chronic inflammation in the context of age-related macular degeneration. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  5. Chronic Inflammation and  T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan S Fay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial tissues of the skin, lungs, reproductive tract, and intestines are the largest physical barriers the body has to protect against infection. Epithelial tissues are woven with a matrix of immune cells programmed to mobilize the host innate and adaptive immune responses. Included among these immune cells are  T cells that are unique in their TCR usage, location, and functions in the body. Stress reception by  T cells as a result of traumatic epithelial injury, malignancy, and/or infection induces  T cell activation. Once activated,  T cells function to repair tissue, induce inflammation, recruit leukocytes, and lyse cells. Many of these functions are mediated via the production of cytokines and growth factors upon  T cell activation. Pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases involve  T cells; some of which are exacerbated by their presence, while others are improved.  T cells require a delicate balance between their need for acute inflammatory mediators to function normally and the detrimental impact imparted by chronic inflammation. This review will focus on the recent progress made in understanding how epithelial  T cells influence the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and how a balance between acute and chronic inflammation impacts  T cell function. Future studies will be important to understand how this balance is achieved.

  6. Gut inflammation in chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirchgessner Annette

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a debilitating disease characterized by unexplained disabling fatigue and a combination of accompanying symptoms the pathology of which is incompletely understood. Many CFS patients complain of gut dysfunction. In fact, patients with CFS are more likely to report a previous diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, a common functional disorder of the gut, and experience IBS-related symptoms. Recently, evidence for interactions between the intestinal microbiota, mucosal barrier function, and the immune system have been shown to play a role in the disorder's pathogenesis. Studies examining the microecology of the gastrointestinal (GI tract have identified specific microorganisms whose presence appears related to disease; in CFS, a role for altered intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of the disease has recently been suggested. Mucosal barrier dysfunction promoting bacterial translocation has also been observed. Finally, an altered mucosal immune system has been associated with the disease. In this article, we discuss the interplay between these factors in CFS and how they could play a significant role in GI dysfunction by modulating the activity of the enteric nervous system, the intrinsic innervation of the gut. If an altered intestinal microbiota, mucosal barrier dysfunction, and aberrant intestinal immunity contribute to the pathogenesis of CFS, therapeutic efforts to modify gut microbiota could be a means to modulate the development and/or progression of this disorder. For example, the administration of probiotics could alter the gut microbiota, improve mucosal barrier function, decrease pro-inflammatory cytokines, and have the potential to positively influence mood in patients where both emotional symptoms and inflammatory immune signals are elevated. Probiotics also have the potential to improve gut motility, which is dysfunctional in many CFS patients.

  7. Immunological Mechanisms Underlying Chronic Pelvic Pain and Prostate Inflammation in Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breser, María L; Salazar, Florencia C; Rivero, Viginia E; Motrich, Rubén D

    2017-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is the most common urologic morbidity in men younger than 50 years and is characterized by a diverse range of pain and inflammatory symptoms, both in type and severity, that involve the region of the pelvis, perineum, scrotum, rectum, testes, penis, and lower back. In most patients, pain is accompanied by inflammation in the absence of an invading infectious agent. Since CP/CPPS etiology is still not well established, available therapeutic options for patients are far from satisfactory for either physicians or patients. During the past two decades, chronic inflammation has been deeply explored as the cause of CP/CPPS. In this review article, we summarize the current knowledge regarding immunological mechanisms underlying chronic pelvic pain and prostate inflammation in CP/CPPS. Cumulative evidence obtained from both human disease and animal models indicate that several factors may trigger chronic inflammation in the form of autoimmunity against prostate, fostering chronic prostate recruitment of Th1 cells, and different other leukocytes, including mast cells, which might be the main actors in the consequent development of chronic pelvic pain. Thus, the local inflammatory milieu and the secretion of inflammatory mediators may induce neural sensitization leading to chronic pelvic pain development. Although scientific advances are encouraging, additional studies are urgently needed to establish the relationship between prostatitis development, mast cell recruitment to the prostate, and the precise mechanisms by which they would induce pelvic pain.

  8. Chronic Inflammation and Cytokines in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauben Landskron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute inflammation is a response to an alteration induced by a pathogen or a physical or chemical insult, which functions to eliminate the source of the damage and restore homeostasis to the affected tissue. However, chronic inflammation triggers cellular events that can promote malignant transformation of cells and carcinogenesis. Several inflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α, IL-6, TGF-β, and IL-10, have been shown to participate in both the initiation and progression of cancer. In this review, we explore the role of these cytokines in important events of carcinogenesis, such as their capacity to generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, their potential mutagenic effect, and their involvement in mechanisms for epithelial mesenchymal transition, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Finally, we will provide an in-depth analysis of the participation of these cytokines in two types of cancer attributable to chronic inflammatory disease: colitis-associated colorectal cancer and cholangiocarcinoma.

  9. Oral microbiome link to neurodegeneration in glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Astafurov

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a progressive optic nerve degenerative disease that often leads to blindness. Local inflammatory responses are implicated in the pathology of glaucoma. Although inflammatory episodes outside the CNS, such as those due to acute systemic infections, have been linked to central neurodegeneration, they do not appear to be relevant to glaucoma. Based on clinical observations, we hypothesized that chronic subclinical peripheral inflammation contributes to neurodegeneration in glaucoma.Mouthwash specimens from patients with glaucoma and control subjects were analyzed for the amount of bacteria. To determine a possible pathogenic mechanism, low-dose subcutaneous lipopolysaccharide (LPS was administered in two separate animal models of glaucoma. Glaucomatous neurodegeneration was assessed in the retina and optic nerve two months later. Changes in gene expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 signaling pathway and complement as well as changes in microglial numbers and morphology were analyzed in the retina and optic nerve. The effect of pharmacologic blockade of TLR4 with naloxone was determined.Patients with glaucoma had higher bacterial oral counts compared to control subjects (p<0.017. Low-dose LPS administration in glaucoma animal models resulted in enhancement of axonal degeneration and neuronal loss. Microglial activation in the optic nerve and retina as well as upregulation of TLR4 signaling and complement system were observed. Pharmacologic blockade of TLR4 partially ameliorated the enhanced damage.The above findings suggest that the oral microbiome contributes to glaucoma pathophysiology. A plausible mechanism by which increased bacterial loads can lead to neurodegeneration is provided by experiments in animal models of the disease and involves activation of microglia in the retina and optic nerve, mediated through TLR4 signaling and complement upregulation. The finding that commensal bacteria may play a role in the development and

  10. Accumulation of plasma cells in inflamed sites: effects of antigen, nonspecific microbial activators, and chronic inflammation.

    OpenAIRE

    Mallison, S M; Smith, J. P.; Schenkein, H. A.; Tew, J G

    1991-01-01

    Plasma cells are common in chronically inflamed sites, including periodontal lesions. The aim of this study was to determine which factors contribute to this local accumulation of plasma cells. Specifically, we sought to evaluate the effects of specific antigen and nonspecific activators from an infectious agent associated with chronic inflammation (Fusobacterium nucleatum, an organism prominent in chronic periodontal lesions) and the effect of the chronic inflammation itself. Chronic inflamm...

  11. Effects of dietary fiber intake on inflammation in chronic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lottenberg,Ana Maria Pita; Fan,Patricia Luriko Tomita; Buonacorso,Vivian

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic diseases such as obesity, type-2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases are associated with inflammation due the increase of TNF-α, IL-6 and C-reactive protein concentrations. Occidental life style, specially related to the changes in food habits as observed in the past years, have an important role in the development of these diseases. Among the life style changes identified as having an impact in the development of diseases, is the decrease in dietary...

  12. Serum Autoantibodies in Chronic Prostate Inflammation in Prostate Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Schlick

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is frequently observed on histological analysis of malignant and non-malignant prostate specimens. It is a suspected supporting factor for prostate diseases and their progression and a main cause of false positive PSA tests in cancer screening. We hypothesized that inflammation induces autoantibodies, which may be useful biomarkers. We aimed to identify and validate prostate inflammation associated serum autoantibodies in prostate cancer patients and evaluate the expression of corresponding autoantigens.Radical prostatectomy specimens of prostate cancer patients (N = 70 were classified into high and low inflammation groups according to the amount of tissue infiltrating lymphocytes. The corresponding pre-surgery blood serum samples were scrutinized for autoantibodies using a low-density protein array. Selected autoantigens were identified in prostate tissue and their expression pattern analyzed by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. The identified autoantibody profile was cross-checked in an independent sample set (N = 63 using the Luminex-bead protein array technology.Protein array screening identified 165 autoantibodies differentially abundant in the serum of high compared to low inflammation patients. The expression pattern of three corresponding antigens were established in benign and cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry and qPCR: SPAST (Spastin, STX18 (Syntaxin 18 and SPOP (speckle-type POZ protein. Of these, SPAST was significantly increased in prostate tissue with high inflammation. All three autoantigens were differentially expressed in primary and/or castration resistant prostate tumors when analyzed in an inflammation-independent tissue microarray. Cross-validation of the inflammation autoantibody profile on an independent sample set using a Luminex-bead protein array, retrieved 51 of the significantly discriminating autoantibodies. Three autoantibodies were significantly upregulated in both screens, MUT, RAB11B and

  13. Serum Autoantibodies in Chronic Prostate Inflammation in Prostate Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlick, Bettina; Massoner, Petra; Lueking, Angelika; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Blattner, Mirjam; Schaefer, Georg; Marquart, Klaus; Theek, Carmen; Amersdorfer, Peter; Zielinski, Dirk; Kirchner, Matthias; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Rubin, Mark A.; Müllner, Stefan; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Klocker, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is frequently observed on histological analysis of malignant and non-malignant prostate specimens. It is a suspected supporting factor for prostate diseases and their progression and a main cause of false positive PSA tests in cancer screening. We hypothesized that inflammation induces autoantibodies, which may be useful biomarkers. We aimed to identify and validate prostate inflammation associated serum autoantibodies in prostate cancer patients and evaluate the expression of corresponding autoantigens. Methods Radical prostatectomy specimens of prostate cancer patients (N = 70) were classified into high and low inflammation groups according to the amount of tissue infiltrating lymphocytes. The corresponding pre-surgery blood serum samples were scrutinized for autoantibodies using a low-density protein array. Selected autoantigens were identified in prostate tissue and their expression pattern analyzed by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. The identified autoantibody profile was cross-checked in an independent sample set (N = 63) using the Luminex-bead protein array technology. Results Protein array screening identified 165 autoantibodies differentially abundant in the serum of high compared to low inflammation patients. The expression pattern of three corresponding antigens were established in benign and cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry and qPCR: SPAST (Spastin), STX18 (Syntaxin 18) and SPOP (speckle-type POZ protein). Of these, SPAST was significantly increased in prostate tissue with high inflammation. All three autoantigens were differentially expressed in primary and/or castration resistant prostate tumors when analyzed in an inflammation-independent tissue microarray. Cross-validation of the inflammation autoantibody profile on an independent sample set using a Luminex-bead protein array, retrieved 51 of the significantly discriminating autoantibodies. Three autoantibodies were significantly upregulated in both screens, MUT

  14. Prophylactic liraglutide treatment prevents amyloid plaque deposition, chronic inflammation and memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Paula L; Jalewa, Jaishree; Hölscher, Christian

    2015-10-15

    Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously, we have shown that the diabetes drug liraglutide is protective in middle aged and in old APP/PS1 mice. Here, we show that liraglutide has prophylactic properties. When injecting liraglutide once-daily ip. in two months old mice for 8 months, the main hallmarks of AD were much reduced. Memory formation in object recognition and Morris water maze were normalised and synapse loss and the loss of synaptic plasticity was prevented. In addition, amyloid plaque load, including dense core congophilic plaques, was much reduced. Chronic inflammation (activated microglia) was also reduced in the cortex, and neurogenesis was enhanced in the dentate gyrus. The results demonstrate that liraglutide may protect from progressive neurodegeneration that develops in AD. The drug is currently in clinical trials in patients with AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Opposing functions of IKKβ during acute and chronic intestinal inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann, Lars; Nebelsiek, Tim; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Dann, Sara M.; Mages, Jörg; Lang, Roland; Robine, Sylvie; Kagnoff, Martin F.; Schmid, Roland M.; Karin, Michael; Arkan, Melek C.; Greten, Florian R.

    2008-01-01

    NF-κB is a key transcriptional regulator of inflammatory responses, but also controls expression of prosurvival genes, whose products protect tissues from damage and may thus act indirectly in an antiinflammatory fashion. The variable importance of these two distinct NF-κB-controlled responses impacts the potential utility of NF-κB inhibition as a treatment strategy for intractable inflammatory conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease. Here, we show in murine models that inhibition of IKKβ-dependent NF-κB activation exacerbates acute inflammation, but attenuates chronic inflammatory disease in the intestinal tract. Acute ulcerating inflammation is aggravated because of diminished NF-κB-mediated protection against epithelial cell apoptosis and delayed mucosal regeneration secondary to reduced NF-κB-dependent recruitment of inflammatory cells that secrete cytoprotective factors. In contrast, in IL-10-deficient mice, which serve as a model of chronic T cell-dependent colitis, ablation of IKKβ in the intestinal epithelium has no impact, yet IKKβ deficiency in myeloid cells attenuates inflammation and prolongs survival. These results highlight the striking context and tissue dependence of the proinflammatory and antiapoptotic functions of NF-κB. Our findings caution against the therapeutic use of IKKβ/NF-κB inhibitors in acute inflammatory settings dominated by cell loss and ulceration. PMID:18815378

  16. Opposing functions of IKKbeta during acute and chronic intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann, Lars; Nebelsiek, Tim; Fingerle, Alexander A; Dann, Sara M; Mages, Jörg; Lang, Roland; Robine, Sylvie; Kagnoff, Martin F; Schmid, Roland M; Karin, Michael; Arkan, Melek C; Greten, Florian R

    2008-09-30

    NF-kappaB is a key transcriptional regulator of inflammatory responses, but also controls expression of prosurvival genes, whose products protect tissues from damage and may thus act indirectly in an antiinflammatory fashion. The variable importance of these two distinct NF-kappaB-controlled responses impacts the potential utility of NF-kappaB inhibition as a treatment strategy for intractable inflammatory conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease. Here, we show in murine models that inhibition of IKKbeta-dependent NF-kappaB activation exacerbates acute inflammation, but attenuates chronic inflammatory disease in the intestinal tract. Acute ulcerating inflammation is aggravated because of diminished NF-kappaB-mediated protection against epithelial cell apoptosis and delayed mucosal regeneration secondary to reduced NF-kappaB-dependent recruitment of inflammatory cells that secrete cytoprotective factors. In contrast, in IL-10-deficient mice, which serve as a model of chronic T cell-dependent colitis, ablation of IKKbeta in the intestinal epithelium has no impact, yet IKKbeta deficiency in myeloid cells attenuates inflammation and prolongs survival. These results highlight the striking context and tissue dependence of the proinflammatory and antiapoptotic functions of NF-kappaB. Our findings caution against the therapeutic use of IKKbeta/NF-kappaB inhibitors in acute inflammatory settings dominated by cell loss and ulceration.

  17. Neurotrophins in chronic allergic airway inflammation and remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renz, Harald; Kiliç, Ayşe

    2012-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the production of allergen-specific IgE antibodies, TH2 inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. Airway remodeling represents the disease-limiting stage during disease progression, and the underlying cellular molecular network resulting in airway remodeling are still poorly defined. In addition to the well-established TH2-dependent inflammatory response, several lines of investigation reveal that this regulation in the peripheral central nervous system contributes to disease development, exacerbation and progression. Several members of the neurotrophin family (e.g. nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor) are important transmitters of signals between the immune and the nervous system. Recent data indicate that NGF contributes to the development of airway remodeling in an inflammation and TGF-independent manner. These and other data open the opportunity to therapeutically interfere also on this level of regulation as a novel approach. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. IL-17 in Chronic Inflammation: From Discovery to Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beringer, Audrey; Noack, Melissa; Miossec, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a cytokine which elicits protection against extracellular bacterial and fungal infections and which plays important roles in inflammation. However, when produced in excess, it contributes to chronic inflammation associated with many inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. This has made IL-17 an attractive therapeutic target. The present review describes the structure of the IL-17 family, the IL-17 receptor complex, and the cells producing IL-17. The contributions of IL-17 to disease as well as new IL-17-based treatment options are discussed. Finally, the results of IL-17 or IL-17 receptor inhibitors in clinical trials are detailed. With a fruitful outlook, drug registration has now been granted for psoriasis psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, and also bears great potential in a growing number of conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiovascular Disease and Chronic Inflammation in End Stage Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD is one of the most severe diseases worldwide. In patients affected by CKD, a progressive destruction of the nephrons is observed not only in structuralbut also in functional level. Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease of large and medium-sized arteries. It is characterized by the deposition of lipids and fibrous elements and is a common complication of the uremic syndrome because of the coexistence of a wide range of risk factors. High blood pressure, anaemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, high oxidative stress are some of the most common factors that cause cardiovascular disease and atherogenesis in patients suffering from End Stage Kidney Disease (ESRD. At the same time, the inflammatory process constitutes a common element in the apparition and development of CKD. A wide range of possible causes can justify the development of inflammation under uremic conditions. Such causes are oxidative stress, oxidation, coexistentpathological conditions as well as factors that are due to renal clearance techniques. Patients in ESRD and coronary disease usually show increased acute phase products. Pre-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-a, and acute phase reactants, such as CRP and fibrinogen, are closely related. The treatment of chronic inflammation in CKD is of high importance for the development ofthe disease as well as for the treatment of cardiovascular morbidity.Conclusions: The treatment factors focus on the use of renin-angiotensic system inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid, statins and anti-oxidant treatment in order to prevent the action of inflammatorycytokines that have the ability to activate the mechanisms of inflammation.

  20. Biomarkers of inflammation in persons with chronic tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulovic, Miroslav; Bauman, William A; Wecht, Jill M; LaFountaine, Michael; Kahn, Nighat; Hobson, Joshua; Singh, Kamaldeep; Renzi, Christopher; Yen, Christina; Schilero, Gregory J

    2015-05-14

    In addition to lung volume restriction, individuals with chronic tetraplegia exhibit reduced airway caliber and bronchodilator responsiveness similar to persons with asthma. In asthma, airflow obstruction is closely linked to airway inflammation. Conversely, little is known regarding the airway inflammatory response in tetraplegia. To compare levels of biomarkers of inflammation in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) and serum in subjects with chronic tetraplegia, mild asthma, and able-bodied controls.Prospective, observational pilot study. Thirty-four subjects participated: tetraplegia (n = 12), asthma (n = 12), controls (n = 10). Biomarkers in EBC [8-isoprostane (8-IP), leukotriene B4 (LT-B4), prostaglandin E2 (PG-E2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6)] and serum (8-IP, LT-B4, TNF-α, IL-6) were determined using commercially available EIA kits (Cayman Chemical Company, Ann Arbor, MI). Separate, one-way ANOVA with Bonferroni's post-hoc analyses were performed to determine group differences in demographic and dependent variables [EBC and serum biomarkers, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), pulmonary function parameters, and specific airway conductance (sGaw)]. The tetraplegia group had significantly elevated 8-IP levels in EBC compared to the asthma (68 ± 38 versus 21 ± 13 pg ml(-1); p tetraplegia group (15 ± 6; p = 0.08). Levels of serum biomarkers did not differ significantly among groups. Through analysis of EBC, levels of 8-IP were significantly elevated compared to levels found in individuals with mild asthma and healthy controls. Further studies are needed to extend upon these preliminary findings that suggest the presence of airway inflammation in subjects with chronic tetraplegia, and how this relates to pulmonary dysfunction in this population.

  1. Chronic Lymphocytic Inflammation Specifies the Organ Tropism of Prions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikenwalder, Mathias; Zeller, Nicolas; Seeger, Harald; Prinz, Marco; Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Schwarz, Petra; Ruddle, Nancy H.; Weissmann, Charles; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2005-02-01

    Prions typically accumulate in nervous and lymphoid tissues. Because proinflammatory cytokines and immune cells are required for lymphoid prion replication, we tested whether inflammatory conditions affect prion pathogenesis. We administered prions to mice with five inflammatory diseases of the kidney, pancreas, or liver. In all cases, chronic lymphocytic inflammation enabled prion accumulation in otherwise prion-free organs. Inflammatory foci consistently correlated with lymphotoxin up-regulation and ectopic induction of FDC-M1+ cells expressing the normal cellular prion protein PrPC. By contrast, inflamed organs of mice lacking lymphotoxin-α or its receptor did not accumulate the abnormal isoform PrPSc, nor did they display infectivity upon prion inoculation. By expanding the tissue distribution of prions, chronic inflammatory conditions may act as modifiers of natural and iatrogenic prion transmission.

  2. Effects of dietary fiber intake on inflammation in chronic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Pita Lottenberg

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases such as obesity, type-2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases are associated with inflammation due the increase of TNF-α, IL-6 and C-reactive protein concentrations. Occidental life style, specially related to the changes in food habits as observed in the past years, have an important role in the development of these diseases. Among the life style changes identified as having an impact in the development of diseases, is the decrease in dietary fiber consumption. Some studies have shown the negative relationship between fiber ingestion and inflammatory markers in chronic diseases. Dietary fibers have an important and a well-known role in different physiologic functions such as intestinal peristalsis, weight reduction by acting on satiety mechanisms, preventing colon cancer, reducing cholesterol and post-prandial glycaemia.

  3. The role of exercise-induced myokines in muscle homeostasis and the defense against chronic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Claus; Pedersen, Bente K

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, neurodegeneration, and tumour growth. Regular exercise offers protection against type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, colon cancer, breast cancer, and dementia. Evidence suggests that the protective...

  4. Correlation between volume overload, chronic inflammation, and left ventricular dysfunction in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muzamil Olamide; Duarte, Raquel; Dix-Peek, Therese; Vachiat, Ahmed; Naidoo, Sagren; Dickens, Caroline; Grinter, Sacha; Manga, Pravin; Naicker, Saraladevi

    Fluid overload is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, potentially driving chronic inflammation and left ventricular dysfunction. We investigated the association between volume overload, chronic inflammation, and left ventricular dysfunction across subgroups of CKD patients. The study included 160 participants, comprising peritoneal dialysis (PD), hemodialysis (HD), stage-3 CKD patients, and age- and sex-matched controls (40 in each group). Fluid status was assessed using a body composition monitor (BCM); serum endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), C-reactive protein (CRP). and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were measured as markers of inflammation. Echocardiography was done to assess left ventricular dimension and function. Endotoxemia and volume overload were common across the spectrum of CKD patients and were aggravated by worsening kidney function. Among HD cohorts, postdialysis endotoxemia was increased among patients with dialysis-induced hemodynamic instability and was also closely related to ultrafiltration volume. Endotoxin, IL-6, CRP, and LBP levels were elevated in patients with volume overload compared to euvolemic patients (p < 0.05). Patients with elevated circulating endotoxemia had higher left ventricular mass index (LVMI) compared to patients with lower endotoxin levels. Fluid overload correlated with endotoxin levels, IL-6, and LVMI; while LVMI correlated weakly with LBP and CRP. CKD patients typically presented with significant endotoxemia and overt volume overload, which may contribute significantly to chronic low-grade inflammation and left ventricular dysfunction. An additive contribution from hemodialysis treatment may strongly enhance the severity of endotoxemia in HD patients.

  5. Chronic inflammation in psoriasis and obesity: implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamminga, E A; van der Lely, A J; Neumann, H A M; Thio, H B

    2006-01-01

    A recent study has shown an indisputable relationship between psoriasis and obesity. Obesity leads to a higher risk in developing psoriasis and a poorer long-term clinical outcome of psoriasis. Furthermore, loosing weight may improve the psoriasis. A network of pro-inflammatory cytokines (especially tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha)) is believed to play an important role in the pathophysiology of both obesity and psoriasis. The chronic low-level inflammation- as seen in obesity--may contribute to the extent of psoriatic lesions in obese patients. TNF-alpha in obesity is presumed to be derived from inflammatory cells (macrophages) in the adipose tissue and in psoriasis from activated T cells. Several drugs, such as peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma agonists and TNF-alpha blocking agents, that target the pro-inflammatory pathways involved in both psoriasis and obesity have proven their benefit in the treatment of these entities. Furthermore, changes in levels of metabolic hormones as ghrelin and leptin in obesity may also play a role in the pathogenesis of deterioration of psoriasis by their potency to release pro-inflammatory mediators (e.g. interleukin (IL) 6 and TNF-alpha). We hypothesize that the treatment of obese psoriasis patient could be focused on reducing the obesity-induced inflammation. Reducing this obesity-induced inflammation may finally lead to a better clinical outcome. Weight loss could lead to a less inflammatory state by reducing concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-6, leptin and improving insulin sensitivity.

  6. Chronic inflammation and autoimmunity as risk factors for the development of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbæk, Mette Vestergaard; Sørensen, Anders Lindholm; Hasselbalch, Hans K

    2016-01-01

    . Controls were 231 unmatched chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL) subjects diagnosed at one of the departments between 2003 and 2012. Subjects with a history of chronic inflammation or autoimmune disorders were retrieved and odds ratios (ORs) calculated. 16.1% of CMML subjects and 6.5% of CLL subjects presented...... with a history of chronic inflammatory or autoimmune conditions. This was significantly associated with an increased risk of CMML (adjusted OR 3.24, 95% CI: 1.5–7.0). At individual levels, this association was statistically significant for polymyalgia rheumatica and ITP (p values

  7. Bioactive Compounds Isolated from Microalgae in Chronic Inflammation and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talero, Elena; García-Mauriño, Sofía; Ávila-Román, Javier; Rodríguez-Luna, Azahara; Alcaide, Antonio; Motilva, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    The risk of onset of cancer is influenced by poorly controlled chronic inflammatory processes. Inflammatory diseases related to cancer development include inflammatory bowel disease, which can lead to colon cancer, or actinic keratosis, associated with chronic exposure to ultraviolet light, which can progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Chronic inflammatory states expose these patients to a number of signals with tumorigenic effects, including nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) activation, pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins release and ROS production. In addition, the participation of inflammasomes, autophagy and sirtuins has been demonstrated in pathological processes such as inflammation and cancer. Chemoprevention consists in the use of drugs, vitamins, or nutritional supplements to reduce the risk of developing or having a recurrence of cancer. Numerous in vitro and animal studies have established the potential colon and skin cancer chemopreventive properties of substances from marine environment, including microalgae species and their products (carotenoids, fatty acids, glycolipids, polysaccharides and proteins). This review summarizes the main mechanisms of actions of these compounds in the chemoprevention of these cancers. These actions include suppression of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, stimulation of antimetastatic and antiangiogenic responses and increased antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:26437418

  8. Epithelial NEMO links innate immunity to chronic intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenci, Arianna; Becker, Christoph; Wullaert, Andy; Gareus, Ralph; van Loo, Geert; Danese, Silvio; Huth, Marion; Nikolaev, Alexei; Neufert, Clemens; Madison, Blair; Gumucio, Deborah; Neurath, Markus F; Pasparakis, Manolis

    2007-03-29

    Deregulation of intestinal immune responses seems to have a principal function in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. The gut epithelium is critically involved in the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis-acting as a physical barrier separating luminal bacteria and immune cells, and also expressing antimicrobial peptides. However, the molecular mechanisms that control this function of gut epithelial cells are poorly understood. Here we show that the transcription factor NF-kappaB, a master regulator of pro-inflammatory responses, functions in gut epithelial cells to control epithelial integrity and the interaction between the mucosal immune system and gut microflora. Intestinal epithelial-cell-specific inhibition of NF-kappaB through conditional ablation of NEMO (also called IkappaB kinase-gamma (IKKgamma)) or both IKK1 (IKKalpha) and IKK2 (IKKbeta)-IKK subunits essential for NF-kappaB activation-spontaneously caused severe chronic intestinal inflammation in mice. NF-kappaB deficiency led to apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, impaired expression of antimicrobial peptides and translocation of bacteria into the mucosa. Concurrently, this epithelial defect triggered a chronic inflammatory response in the colon, initially dominated by innate immune cells but later also involving T lymphocytes. Deficiency of the gene encoding the adaptor protein MyD88 prevented the development of intestinal inflammation, demonstrating that Toll-like receptor activation by intestinal bacteria is essential for disease pathogenesis in this mouse model. Furthermore, NEMO deficiency sensitized epithelial cells to tumour-necrosis factor (TNF)-induced apoptosis, whereas TNF receptor-1 inactivation inhibited intestinal inflammation, demonstrating that TNF receptor-1 signalling is crucial for disease induction. These findings demonstrate that a primary NF-kappaB signalling defect in intestinal epithelial cells disrupts immune homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract

  9. DNA methylation signatures of chronic low-grade inflammation are associated with complex diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Ligthart (Symen); Marzi, C. (Carola); Aslibekyan, S. (Stella); Mendelson, M.M. (Michael M.); K.N. Conneely (Karen N.); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); Colicino, E. (Elena); L. Waite (Lindsay); R. Joehanes (Roby); W. Guan (Weihua); J. Brody (Jennifer); C.E. Elks (Cathy); R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); M.A. Jhun (Min A.); Agha, G. (Golareh); J. Bressler (Jan); C.K. Ward-Caviness (Cavin K.); B.H. Chen (Brian); T. Huan (Tianxiao); K.M. Bakulski (Kelly M.); E. Salfati (Elias); Fiorito, G. (Giovanni); S. Wahl (Simone); K. Schramm (Katharina); Sha, J. (Jin); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); Just, A.C. (Allan C.); J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); N. Sotoodehnia (Nona); L.C. Pilling (Luke); J.S. Pankow (James); Tsao, P.S. (Phil S.); Liu, C. (Chunyu); W. Zhao (Wei); S. Guarrera (Simonetta); Michopoulos, V.J. (Vasiliki J.); Smith, A.K. (Alicia K.); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); D. Melzer (David); Vokonas, P. (Pantel); M. Fornage (Myriam); H. Prokisch (Holger); J.C. Bis (Joshua); A.Y. Chu (Audrey); C. Herder (Christian); H. Grallert (Harald); C. Yao (Chen); S. Shah (Sonia); A.F. McRae (Allan F.); H. Lin; S. Horvath (Steve); Fallin, D. (Daniele); A. Hofman (Albert); N.J. Wareham (Nick); K.L. Wiggins (Kerri); A.P. Feinberg (Andrew P.); J.M. Starr (John); P.M. Visscher (Peter); J. Murabito (Joanne); Kardia, S.L.R. (Sharon L.R.); D. Absher (Devin); E.B. Binder (Elisabeth); A. Singleton (Andrew); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A. Peters (Annette); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); G. Matullo; Schwartz, J.D. (Joel D.); E.W. Demerath (Ellen); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); Meurs, J.B.J. (Joyce B.J.); O.H. Franco (Oscar); Y.D. Chen (Y.); D. Levy (Daniel); S.T. Turner (Stephen); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); K.J. Ressler (Kerry); J. Dupuis (Josée); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); Ong, K.K. (Ken K.); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); W. Koenig (Wolfgang); D.K. Arnett (Donna); A.A. Baccarelli (Andrea A.); E.J. Benjamin (Emelia); A. Dehghan (Abbas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Chronic low-grade inflammation reflects a subclinical immune response implicated in the pathogenesis of complex diseases. Identifying genetic loci where DNA methylation is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation may reveal novel pathways or therapeutic targets for

  10. Association of current smoking with airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asymptomatic smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, BWM; ten Hacken, NHT; Rutgers, B; Postma, DS; Timens, W

    2005-01-01

    Background: Inflammation in the airways and lung parenchyma underlies fixed airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The exact role of smoking as promoting factor of inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is not clear, partly because studies often do not

  11. Green tea polyphenols avert chronic inflammation-induced myocardial fibrosis of female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Green tea proposes anti-inflammatory properties which may attenuate chronic inflammation-induced fibrosis of vessels. This study evaluated whether green tea polyphenols (GTP) can avert fibrosis or vascular disruption along with mechanisms in rats with chronic inflammation. Treatments: Fo...

  12. Physical Activity Protects the Human Brain against Metabolic Stress Induced by a Postprandial and Chronic Inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruimboom, Leo; Raison, Charles L.; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that chronic systemic low-grade inflammation is at the root of many, if not all, typically Western diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome. While much focus has been given to sedentary lifestyle as a cause of chronic inflammation, it is less often

  13. Salt Intake Is Associated with Inflammation in Chronic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Azak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Heart Failure (CHF is highly prevalent and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. It has been well established that excessive intake of sodium chloride (salt induced hypertension in some populations. Although salt seems to induce cardiovascular diseases through elevation of blood pressure, it has also been indicated that salt can induce cardiovascular diseases independently from blood pressure elevation. Objectives: The present study aimed to evaluate the association between salt consumption and inflammation in CHF patients. Patients and Methods: This study was conducted on 86 patients between 18 and 65 years old who were diagnosed with New York Heart Association (NYHA functional class I and II heart failure. Salt intake was calculated by using 24 hour urine sodium excretion. Besides, the association between inflammation and daily salt intake was evaluated regarding C - reactive protein (CPR, High sensitive CRP (HsCPR, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR, and ferritin and fibrinogen levels using Pearson correlation analysis. Results: Our results showed a statistically significant difference between the low (n = 41 and high (n = 45 salt intake groups in terms of serum HsCRP levels (5.21 ± 2.62 vs. 6.36 ± 2.64 (P < 0.048. Additionally, a significant correlation was observed between the amount of salt consumption and HsCRP levels. In this study, daily salt consumption of the enrolled patients was 8.53 gram/day. The medications and even the blood pressures were similar in the two groups, but daily pill count, prevalence of hypertension, and coronary heart disease were higher in the high salt intake group; however, the differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.065. Also, no significant difference was observed between the groups concerning the inflammation markers, such as CRP, ESR, ferritin, and fibrinogen. Conclusions: Neurohumoral and inflammatory factors are thought to contribute to high mortality

  14. Chronic administration of Abarema cochliacarpos attenuates colonic inflammation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Silene da Silva

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by a chronic clinical course of relapse and remission associated with self-destructive inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Active extracts from plants have emerged as natural potential candidates for its treatment. Abarema cochliacarpos (Gomes Barneby & Grimes, Fabaceae (Barbatimão, is a native medicinal plant in to Brazil. Previously we have demonstrated in an acute colitis model a marked protective effect of a butanolic extract, so we decided to assess its anti-inflammatory effect in a chronic ulcerative colitis model induced by trinitrobenzensulfonic acid (TNBS. Abarema cochliacarpos (150 mg/day, v.o. was administered for fourteen consecutive days. This treatment decreased significantly macroscopic damage as compared with TNBS. Histological analysis showed that the extract improved the microscopic structure. Myeloperoxidase activity (MPO was significantly decreased. Study of cytokines showed that TNF-α was diminished and IL-10 level was increased after Abarema cochliacarpos treatment. In order to elucidate inflammatory mechanisms, expression of cyclooxygenase (COX-2 and nitric oxide synthase (iNOS were studied showing a significant downregulation. In addition, there was reduction in the JNK and p-38 activation. Finally, IκB degradation was blocked by Abarema cochliacarpos treatment being consistent with an up-regulation of the NF-kappaB-binding activity. These results reinforce the anti-inflammatory effects described previously suggesting that Abarema cochliacarpos could provide a source for the search for new anti-inflammatory compounds useful in ulcerative colitis treatment.

  15. Angiogenesis: From Chronic Liver Inflammation to Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Sanz-Cameno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, new information relating to the potential relevance of chronic hepatic inflammation to the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has been generated. Persistent hepatocellular injury alters the homeostatic balance within the liver; deregulation of the expression of factors involved in wound healing may lead to the evolution of dysplastic lesions into transformed nodules. Progression of such nodules depends directly on the development and organization of a vascular network, which provides the nutritional and oxygen requirements to an expanding nodular mass. Angiogenic stimulation promotes intense structural and functional changes in liver architecture and physiology, in particular, it facilitates transformation of dysplasia to nodular lesions with carcinogenic potential. HCC depends on the growth and spreading of vessels throughout the tumor. Because these vascular phenomena correlate with disease progression and prognosis, therapeutic strategies are being developed that focus on precluding vascular expansion in these tumors. Accordingly, an in-depth study of factors that promote and support pathological angiogenesis in chronic hepatic diseases may provide insights into methods of preventing the development of HCC and/or stimulating the regression of established HCC.

  16. Stunting is characterized by chronic inflammation in Zimbabwean infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Prendergast

    and that low-grade chronic inflammation may impair infant growth.

  17. Chronic inflammation imposes aberrant cell fate in regenerating epithelia through mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Craig S; Odermatt, Pascal D; Azzolin, Luca; Hohnel, Sylke; Wagner, Erwin F; Fantner, Georg E; Lutolf, Matthias P; Barrandon, Yann; Piccolo, Stefano; Radtke, Freddy

    2016-02-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with a variety of pathological conditions in epithelial tissues, including cancer, metaplasia and aberrant wound healing. In relation to this, a significant body of evidence suggests that aberration of epithelial stem and progenitor cell function is a contributing factor in inflammation-related disease, although the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we have delineated the effect of chronic inflammation on epithelial stem/progenitor cells using the corneal epithelium as a model tissue. Using a combination of mouse genetics, pharmacological approaches and in vitro assays, we demonstrate that chronic inflammation elicits aberrant mechanotransduction in the regenerating corneal epithelium. As a consequence, a YAP-TAZ/β-catenin cascade is triggered, resulting in the induction of epidermal differentiation on the ocular surface. Collectively, the results of this study demonstrate that chronic inflammation and mechanotransduction are linked and act to elicit pathological responses in regenerating epithelia.

  18. The oral cavity and age: a site of chronic inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Bäck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aging may be accompanied by a low grade chronic up-regulation of inflammatory mediators. A variety of endogenous locally released mediators as well as inflammatory cells have been reported in the human oral cavity. The aim of this investigation was to determine the presence of different classes of inflammatory mediators in human saliva and correlate the levels with age. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Unstimulated whole buccal salivary samples were obtained in the morning from 94 healthy volunteers within 30 minutes after waking. None of the participants had taken aspirin in the week prior to the saliva collection. Lysozyme activity, eicosanoid levels (prostaglandin E(2 and leukotriene B(4 and MMP-9 activity were measured. The antimicrobial activity (lysozyme activity was not correlated with age whereas PGE(2 levels were markedly correlated with age (r = 0.29; P40 years demonstrated a significant increase in the mean values for PGE(2 and MMP-9 activity with age. In addition, significant correlations were observed between LTB(4 and PGE(2 (r = 0.28; P<0.05; n = 56 and between LTB(4 levels and MMP-9 activity in smokers (r = 0.78; P<0.001; n = 15. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of significant levels and activity of inflammatory mediators in saliva suggests that the oral cavity of healthy subjects may be in a constant low state of inflammation associated with age.

  19. Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the Aspect of Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation (Pathophysiological ParaInflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Nita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The products of oxidative stress trigger chronic low-grade inflammation (pathophysiological parainflammation process in AMD patients. In early AMD, soft drusen contain many mediators of chronic low-grade inflammation such as C-reactive protein, adducts of the carboxyethylpyrrole protein, immunoglobulins, and acute phase molecules, as well as the complement-related proteins C3a, C5a, C5, C5b-9, CFH, CD35, and CD46. The complement system, mainly alternative pathway, mediates chronic autologous pathophysiological parainflammation in dry and exudative AMD, especially in the Y402H gene polymorphism, which causes hypofunction/lack of the protective complement factor H (CFH and facilitates chronic inflammation mediated by C-reactive protein (CRP. Microglial activation induces photoreceptor cells injury and leads to the development of dry AMD. Many autoantibodies (antibodies against alpha beta crystallin, alpha-actinin, amyloid, C1q, chondroitin, collagen I, collagen III, collagen IV, elastin, fibronectin, heparan sulfate, histone H2A, histone H2B, hyaluronic acid, laminin, proteoglycan, vimentin, vitronectin, and aldolase C and pyruvate kinase M2 and overexpression of Fcc receptors play role in immune-mediated inflammation in AMD patients and in animal model. Macrophages infiltration of retinal/choroidal interface acts as protective factor in early AMD (M2 phenotype macrophages; however it acts as proinflammatory and proangiogenic factor in advanced AMD (M1 and M2 phenotype macrophages.

  20. Viruses and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Miranda-Saksena, Monica; Saksena, Nitin K

    2013-05-31

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are chronic degenerative diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), which affect 37 million people worldwide. As the lifespan increases, the NDs are the fourth leading cause of death in the developed countries and becoming increasingly prevalent in developing countries. Despite considerable research, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Although the large majority of studies do not show support for the involvement of pathogenic aetiology in classical NDs, a number of emerging studies show support for possible association of viruses with classical neurodegenerative diseases in humans. Space does not permit for extensive details to be discussed here on non-viral-induced neurodegenerative diseases in humans, as they are well described in literature.Viruses induce alterations and degenerations of neurons both directly and indirectly. Their ability to attack the host immune system, regions of nervous tissue implies that they can interfere with the same pathways involved in classical NDs in humans. Supporting this, many similarities between classical NDs and virus-mediated neurodegeneration (non-classical) have been shown at the anatomic, sub-cellular, genomic and proteomic levels suggesting that viruses can explain neurodegenerative disorders mechanistically. The main objective of this review is to provide readers a detailed snapshot of similarities viral and non-viral neurodegenerative diseases share, so that mechanistic pathways of neurodegeneration in human NDs can be clearly understood. Viruses can guide us to unveil these pathways in human NDs. This will further stimulate the birth of new concepts in the biological research, which is needed for gaining deeper insights into the treatment of human NDs and delineate mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration.

  1. Chronic inflammation-enhanced atherosclerosis: can we consider it as a new clinical syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharz, Eugene Joseph

    2012-03-01

    Incidence of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic autoimmune disorder like rheumatoid arthritis is much higher than in general population. Cardiovascular events (e.g. myocardial infarction or stroke) are caused by premature accelerated development of atherosclerosis. Chronic inflammation-enhanced atherosclerosis syndrome is proposed as a separate syndrome occurring in patients suffering of chronic inflammation. It is suggested that atherosclerosis as an inflammatory disease and long-lasting extravascular inflammation have common mechanisms resulting in an increase in atherosclerosis and its sequellae, cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of aging immune system on neurodegeneration and potential immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhanfeng; Zhao, Yang; Ruan, Linhui; Zhu, Linnan; Jin, Kunlin; Zhuge, Qichuan; Su, Dong-Ming; Zhao, Yong

    2017-10-01

    The interaction between the nervous and immune systems during aging is an area of avid interest, but many aspects remain unclear. This is due, not only to the complexity of the aging process, but also to a mutual dependency and reciprocal causation of alterations and diseases between both the nervous and immune systems. Aging of the brain drives whole body systemic aging, including aging-related changes of the immune system. In turn, the immune system aging, particularly immunosenescence and T cell aging initiated by thymic involution that are sources of chronic inflammation in the elderly (termed inflammaging), potentially induces brain aging and memory loss in a reciprocal manner. Therefore, immunotherapeutics including modulation of inflammation, vaccination, cellular immune therapies and "protective autoimmunity" provide promising approaches to rejuvenate neuroinflammatory disorders and repair brain injury. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries linking the aging immune system with the development of neurodegeneration. Additionally, we discuss potential rejuvenation strategies, focusing aimed at targeting the aging immune system in an effort to prevent acute brain injury and chronic neurodegeneration during aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. No Influence of Type 2 Diabetes on Chronic Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Obese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Florinela CĂTOI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity per se carries the features of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress that interrelate in a complex network and exert an important role in the onset of several complications such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. On the other hand, it seems that hyperglycemia per se as well as insulin resistance (independent of hyperglycemia, both induce increased oxidative stress. The aim of our study was to analyze proinflammatory and oxidative stress markers in obese patients with and without type 2 diabetes and to verify the hypothesis that type 2 diabetes associated with obesity would promote a higher chronic inflammation and oxidative stress state as compared to obesity alone. We found no differences between the two groups of patients regarding chronic inflammation and oxidative stress markers. Therefore we may conclude that there is no influence of type 2 diabetes on chronic inflammation and oxidative stress in obese patients.

  4. Histologic and biochemical alterations predict pulmonary mechanical dysfunction in aging mice with chronic lung inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Massa, Christopher B.; Groves, Angela M.; Jaggernauth, Smita U.; Laskin, Debra L.; Gow, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Both aging and chronic inflammation produce complex structural and biochemical alterations to the lung known to impact work of breathing. Mice deficient in surfactant protein D (Sftpd) develop progressive age-related lung pathology characterized by tissue destruction/remodeling, accumulation of foamy macrophages and alteration in surfactant composition. This study proposes to relate changes in tissue structure seen in normal aging and in chronic inflammation to altered lung mechanics using a ...

  5. Ab interno laser sclerostomy in aphakic patients with glaucoma and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R P; Javitt, J C

    1990-08-15

    Five patients with aphakia, glaucoma, and chronic inflammation were treated with ab interno sclerostomy by using the continuous wave Nd:YAG laser focused through a sapphire probe. After a follow-up period of 24 to 28 months, three of five patients had good intraocular pressure control. The sclerostomy failed in one patient when it was occluded by vitreous. The second failure was attributed to closure of the sclerostomy because of chronic intraocular inflammation.

  6. Accumulation of plasma cells in inflamed sites: effects of antigen, nonspecific microbial activators, and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallison, S M; Smith, J P; Schenkein, H A; Tew, J G

    1991-11-01

    Plasma cells are common in chronically inflamed sites, including periodontal lesions. The aim of this study was to determine which factors contribute to this local accumulation of plasma cells. Specifically, we sought to evaluate the effects of specific antigen and nonspecific activators from an infectious agent associated with chronic inflammation (Fusobacterium nucleatum, an organism prominent in chronic periodontal lesions) and the effect of the chronic inflammation itself. Chronic inflammation (14 to 17 days) was induced in horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-immune rabbits by subcutaneous injection of 50 microliters of sterile alum in several sites in their backs. Controls included sites injected with saline or more acute sites examined after 3 days of alum inflammation. Sites were challenged with HRP (the antigen), sonicated F. nucleatum (the nonspecific activator), or both together to see whether F. nucleatum has an adjuvant effect. Three days after challenge, HRP-specific antibody-forming cells (AFC) were enumerated after peroxidase histochemistry. In noninflamed sites or sites with acute inflammation, virtually no HRP-specific AFC were evident. In contrast, chronic inflammation alone was sufficient to elicit a specific AFC response (congruent to 10 cells per mm2). Addition of either F. nucleatum or HRP to the chronic lesion about doubled the number of HRP-specific AFC. However, a dramatic 8- to 15-fold (80 to 150/mm2) increase was seen in chronically inflamed sites challenged with antigen and activator together. Interestingly, the activator did not have this adjuvant effect in the acute sites or in normal skin. In short, accumulation of plasma cells in inflamed sites is promoted by chronic inflammation, activators of microbial origin, and specific antigen. This milieu can be expected to develop in some periodontal lesions and could help explain why gingival crevicular fluid from some sites may contain extraordinary levels of locally produced specific antibodies

  7. Perspectives on chronic inflammation in essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera, and myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans K

    2012-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality of patients with the chronic Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera, and primary myelofibrosis are mainly caused by cardiovascular diseases, thrombohemorrhagic complications, and bone marrow failure because...... of "premature atherosclerosis," clonal evolution, and second cancer in patients with MPNs. Chronic inflammation may both initiate clonal evolution and catalyze its expansion from early disease stage to the myelofibrotic burnt-out phase. Furthermore, chronic inflammation may also add to the severity...... of cardiovascular disease burden by accelerating the development of atherosclerosis, which is well described and recognized in other chronic inflammatory diseases. A link between chronic inflammation, atherosclerosis, and second cancer in MPNs favors early intervention at the time of diagnosis (statins...

  8. [Role of chronic inflammation in adipose tissue in the pathophysiology of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganami, Takayoshi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2013-02-01

    Obesity may be viewed as a chronic low-grade inflammatory disease as well as a metabolic disease. Evidence has accumulated suggesting that chronic inflammation in adipose tissue leads to dramatic changes in number and cell type of stromal cells during the course of obesity, which is referred to as"adipose tissue remodeling". Among stromal cells, macrophages in obese adipose tissue are considered to be crucial for adipose tissue inflammation, which results in dysregulated adipocytokine production and ectopic fat accumulation. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying adipose tissue inflammation would contribute to the identification of novel therapeutic strategies to prevent or treat obesity-induced metabolic derangements.

  9. Chronic inflammation as a promotor of mutagenesis in essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and myelofibrosis. A human inflammation model for cancer development?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans K

    2013-01-01

    -risk microenvironment for induction of mutations due to the persistent inflammation-induced oxidative damage to DNA in hematopoietic cells. Alterations in the epigenome induced by the chronic inflammatory drive may likely elicit a "epigenetic switch" promoting persistent inflammation. The perspectives of chronic......The Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are acquired stem cell neoplasms, in which a stem cell lesion induces an autonomous proliferative advantage. In addition to the JAK2V617 mutation several other mutations have been described. Recently chronic inflammation has been...... inflammation as the driver of mutagenesis in MPNs are discussed, including early intervention with interferon-alpha2 and potent anti-inflammatory agents (e.g. JAK1-2 inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, DNA-hypomethylators and statins) to disrupt the self-perpetuating chronic inflammation state...

  10. Chronic Inflammation in an Anophthalmic Socket due to a Room Temperature Vulcanized Silicone Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Galindo-Ferreiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Two case reports are used to illustrate the signs and symptoms, complications and treatments of chronic socket inflammation due to intraorbital implants. The ophthalmic examination, surgeries and treatments are documented. Two anophthalmic cases that underwent enucleation and multiple orbital surgeries to enhance the anophthalmic socket volume developed pain, intense discharge and contracted cavities with chronic inflammation in the socket which was nonresponsive to medical therapy. Computed tomography indicated a hypodense foreign body in both cases causing an intense inflammatory reaction. The implants were removed by excisional surgery and a room temperature vulcanized silicone implant was retrieved in both cases. Socket inflammation resolved in both cases after implant removal. An intraorbital inflammatory reaction against an intraorbital implant can cause chronic socket inflammation in patients with a history of multiple surgeries. Diagnosis requires imaging and the definitive treatment is implant removal.

  11. Behavioural treatments for chronic systemic inflammation: effects of dietary weight loss and exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklas, Barbara J; You, Tongjian; Pahor, Marco

    2005-04-26

    Persistent low-grade inflammation, as indicated by higher circulating levels of inflammatory mediators such as C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha, is a strong risk factor for several chronic diseases. There are data indicating that decreasing energy intake and increasing physical activity may be effective therapies for reducing overall inflammation. Evidence is strong that circulating levels of inflammatory markers are elevated with total and abdominal obesity, possibly owing to a higher secretion rate of cytokines by adipose tissue in obese people. Moreover, very-low-energy dietary weight loss reduces both circulating markers of inflammation and adipose-tissue cytokine production. Data from several large population-based cohorts show an inverse association between markers of systemic inflammation and physical activity or fitness status; small-scale intervention studies support that exercise training diminishes inflammation. Dietary weight loss plus exercise is likely more effective than weight reduction alone in reducing inflammation. To date, data from randomized, controlled trails designed to definitively test the effects of weight loss or exercise training, or both, on inflammation are limited. Future studies are required to define the amount of weight loss needed for clinically meaningful reductions of inflammation; in addition, fully powered and controlled studies are necessary to clarify the effect of exercise training on chronic, systemic inflammation.

  12. Substance P at the Nexus of Mind and Body in Chronic Inflammation and Affective Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, Melissa A.

    2007-01-01

    For decades, research has demonstrated that chronic diseases characterized by dysregulation of inflammation are particularly susceptible to exacerbation by stress and emotion. Likewise, rates of depression and anxiety are overrepresented in individuals suffering from chronic inflammatory disease. In recent years, substance P has been implicated in…

  13. Inflammation and premature aging in advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooman, Jeroen P; Dekker, Marijke J; Usvyat, Len A; Kotanko, Peter; van der Sande, Frank M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Shiels, Paul G; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Systemic inflammation in end-stage renal disease is an established risk factor for mortality and a catalyst for other complications, which are related to a premature aging phenotype, including muscle wasting, vascular calcification, and other forms of premature vascular disease, depression, osteoporosis, and frailty. Uremic inflammation is also mechanistically related to mechanisms involved in the aging process, such as telomere shortening, mitochondrial dysfunction, and altered nutrient sensing, which can have a direct effect on cellular and tissue function. In addition to uremia-specific causes, such as abnormalities in the phosphate-Klotho axis, there are remarkable similarities between the pathophysiology of uremic inflammation and so-called "inflammaging" in the general population. Potentially relevant, but still somewhat unexplored in this respect, are abnormal or misplaced protein structures, as well as abnormalities in tissue homeostasis, which evoke danger signals through damage-associated molecular patterns, as well as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Systemic inflammation, in combination with the loss of kidney function, can impair the resilience of the body to external and internal stressors by reduced functional and structural tissue reserves, and by impairing normal organ crosstalk, thus providing an explanation for the greatly increased risk of homeostatic breakdown in this population. In this review, the relationship between uremic inflammation and a premature aging phenotype, as well as potential causes and consequences, are discussed. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Water-soluble phenol TS-13 combats acute but not chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshchikova, Elena; Tkachev, Victor; Lemza, Anna; Sharkova, Tatyana; Kandalintseva, Natalya; Vavilin, Valentin; Safronova, Olga; Zenkov, Nikolay

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of the synthetic water-soluble phenolic antioxidant TS-13 (sodium 3-(4'-methoxyphenyl)propyl thiosulfonate), an inducer of the redox-dependent Keap1/Nrf2/ARE signaling system, in experimental models of acute and chronic inflammation. Acute local inflammation was induced by intraplantar carrageenan injection into rat hind paws, and acute systemic inflammation was modeled by intravenous zymosan injection (in rats) or LPS-induced endotoxic shock (in mice). Chronic inflammation was investigated in rat models of air pouch and collagen-induced arthritis. The effects of TS-13 treatment were estimated by changes in the intensity of inflammation (paw edema, liver infiltration, animal survival, exudation, and clinical score of arthritis) and by the effects on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by leukocytes from peripheral blood and inflammatory exudates. We found the significant increase in expression of mRNA, content of protein and activity of a well-characterized Nrf2 target enzyme glutathione S-transferase P1, as well as nuclear extract protein binding to the ARE consensus sequence in liver of mice fed with diet containing TS-13. TS-13 markedly attenuated carrageenan-induced paw edema, reduced blood granulocyte number and volume density of liver infiltrates in the systemic zymosan-induced inflammation model, and increased mice survival after lipopolysaccharide-induced septic shock. However, TS-13 administration did not influence cell and protein exudation into air pouches and suppressed clinical manifestation of collagen-induced polyarthritis only at early stages. Nevertheless, TS-13 inhibited the generation of ROS by leukocytes in all inflammation models. The data suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of Keap1/Nrf2/ARE system are more prominent against acute innate-mediated inflammation than chronic immune inflammation. This narrows the potential therapeutic efficacy of ARE inducers in inflammation treatment.

  15. Restorative effect of endurance exercise on behavioral deficits in the chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease with severe neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Yuen-Sum

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal models of Parkinson's disease have been widely used for investigating the mechanisms of neurodegenerative process and for discovering alternative strategies for treating the disease. Following 10 injections with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP, 25 mg/kg and probenecid (250 mg/kg over 5 weeks in mice, we have established and characterized a chronic mouse model of Parkinson's disease (MPD, which displays severe long-term neurological and pathological defects resembling that of the human Parkinson's disease in the advanced stage. The behavioral manifestations in this chronic mouse model of Parkinson's syndrome remain uninvestigated. The health benefit of exercise in aging and in neurodegenerative disorders including the Parkinson's disease has been implicated; however, clinical and laboratory studies in this area are limited. In this research with the chronic MPD, we first conducted a series of behavioral tests and then investigated the impact of endurance exercise on the identified Parkinsonian behavioral deficits. Results We report here that the severe chronic MPD mice showed significant deficits in their gait pattern consistency and in learning the cued version of the Morris water maze. Their performances on the challenging beam and walking grid were considerably attenuated suggesting the lack of balance and motor coordination. Furthermore, their spontaneous and amphetamine-stimulated locomotor activities in the open field were significantly suppressed. The behavioral deficits in the chronic MPD lasted for at least 8 weeks after MPTP/probenecid treatment. When the chronic MPD mice were exercise-trained on a motorized treadmill 1 week before, 5 weeks during, and 8–12 weeks after MPTP/probenecid treatment, the behavioral deficits in gait pattern, spontaneous ambulatory movement, and balance performance were reversed; whereas neuronal loss and impairment in cognitive skill, motor coordination, and

  16. IL-17 is not essential for inflammation and chronic pelvic pain development in an experimental model of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motrich, Ruben D; Breser, María L; Sánchez, Leonardo R; Godoy, Gloria J; Prinz, Immo; Rivero, Virginia E

    2016-03-01

    Pain and inflammation in the absence of infection are hallmarks in chronic prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) patients. The etiology of CP/CPPS is unclear, and autoimmunity has been proposed as a cause. Experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) models have long been used for studying CP/CPPS. Herein, we studied prostate inflammation induction and chronic pelvic pain development in EAP using IL-12p40-KO, IL-4-KO, IL-17-KO, and wild-type (C57BL/6) mice. Prostate antigen (PAg) immunization in C57BL/6 mice induced specific Th1 and Th17 immune responses and severe prostate inflammation and cell infiltration, mainly composed of CD4 T cells and macrophages. Moreover, chronic pelvic pain was evidenced by increased allodynia responses. In immunized IL-17-KO mice, the presence of a prominent PAg-specific Th1 immune response caused similar prostate inflammation and chronic pelvic pain. Furthermore, markedly high PAg-specific Th1 immune responses, exacerbated prostate inflammation, and chronic pelvic pain were detected in immunized IL-4-KO mice. Conversely, immunized IL-12p40-KO mice developed PAg-specific Th2 immune responses, characterized by high IL-4 secretion and neither infiltration nor damage in the prostate. As observed in wild-type control animals, IL12p40-KO mice did not evidence tactile allodynia responses. Our results suggest that, as in patients, chronic pelvic pain is a consequence of prostate inflammation. After PAg immunization, a Th1-associated immune response develops and induces prostate inflammation and chronic pelvic pain. The absence of Th1 or Th2 cytokines, respectively, diminishes or enhances EAP susceptibility. In addition, IL-17 showed not to be essential for pathology induction and chronic pelvic pain development.

  17. Immune biomarkers for chronic inflammation related complications in non-cancerous and cancerous diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirow, Yaron; Baniyash, Michal

    2017-08-01

    Chronic inflammation arising in a diverse range of non-cancerous and cancerous diseases, dysregulates immunity and exposes patients to a variety of complications. These include immunosuppression, tissue damage, cardiovascular diseases and more. In cancer, chronic inflammation and related immunosuppression can directly support tumor growth and dramatically reduce the efficacies of traditional treatments, as well as novel immune-based therapies, which require a functional immune system. Nowadays, none of the immune biomarkers, regularly used by clinicians can sense a developing chronic inflammation, thus complications can only be detected upon their appearance. This review focuses on the necessity for such immune status biomarkers, which could predict complications prior to their appearance. Herein we bring examples for the use of cellular and molecular biomarkers in diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up of patients suffering from various cancers, for prediction of response to immune-based anti-cancer therapy and for prediction of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes patients. Monitoring such biomarkers is expected to have a major clinical impact in addition to unraveling of the entangled complexity underlying dysregulated immunity in chronic inflammation. Thus, newly discovered biomarkers and those that are under investigation are projected to open a new era towards combating the silent damage induced by chronic inflammation.

  18. Myocyte enhancer factor 2D provides a cross-talk between chronic inflammation and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hai-Xing; Shi, Lin; Zhang, Yong; Zhu, Yi-Chun; Bai, Chun-Xue; Wang, Xiang-Dong; Zhou, Jie-Bai

    2017-03-24

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Patients with chronic respiratory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are exposed to a higher risk of developing lung cancer. Chronic inflammation may play an important role in the lung carcinogenesis among those patients. The present study aimed at identifying candidate biomarker predicting lung cancer risk among patients with chronic respiratory diseases. We applied clinical bioinformatics tools to analyze different gene profile datasets with a special focus on screening the potential biomarker during chronic inflammation-lung cancer transition. Then we adopted an in vitro model based on LPS-challenged A549 cells to validate the biomarker through RNA-sequencing, quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction, and western blot analysis. Bioinformatics analyses of the 16 enrolled GSE datasets from Gene Expression Omnibus online database showed myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) level significantly increased in COPD patients coexisting non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Inflammation challenge increased MEF2D expression in NSCLC cell line A549, associated with the severity of inflammation. Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase inhibition could reverse the up-regulation of MEF2D in inflammation-activated A549. MEF2D played a critical role in NSCLC cell bio-behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, and movement. Inflammatory conditions led to increased MEF2D expression, which might further contribute to the development of lung cancer through influencing cancer microenvironment and cell bio-behaviors. MEF2D might be a potential biomarker during chronic inflammation-lung cancer transition, predicting the risk of lung cancer among patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

  19. Patterns of chronic inflammation in extensively treated patients with arachnoiditis and chronic intractable pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilello, John A; Tennant, Forest S

    2017-01-01

    To use biomarkers to gain insight into and gauge the residual (post-treatment) level of inflammation in two groups of intensively treated patients with severe chronic pain. Three study groups were analyzed, and included: (i) patients (n = 90) with chronic intractable pain (CIP), (ii) patients (n = 26) with chronic pain and MRI-documented arachnoiditis (ARC) and (iii) normal subjects without a diagnosis of chronic pain (n = 86). We determined and compared the serum concentrations of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin (A1AT), Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor receptor type 2 (sTNFR2) in each of the patient populations studied. Patients treated for ARC or CIP had higher serum levels of A1AT and MPO than normal untreated subjects without a diagnosis of chronic pain. ARC patients had an A1AT mean serum concentration of 167.9 ± 41.9 mg/dL as compared to 148.9 ± 35.2 mg/dL for normal subjects (p = 0.023). CIP patients had the highest mean serum A1AT level 183.6 ± 39.2 mg/dL with p values of <0.0001 or 0.08 when compared to normal subjects or ARC patients respectively. ARC patients had an MPO mean serum concentration of 344.6 ± 227.9 ng/mL as compared to 188.2 ± 107.5 ng/mL for normal subjects (p = < 0.0001). CIP patients had a similar mean serum MPO level of 352.3 ± 164 ng/mL with p values of <0.0001 or 0.85 when compared to normal subjects or ARC patients respectively. In addition, we noted a difference in the pattern of MPO expression in patients with ARC in that 34% had levels of MPO at normal or below and 31% had levels 2-fold or greater than normal. This data supports the concept that in centralized pain, sites of neuroinflammation elaborate MPO and other inflammatory factors which may not be completely cleared from the system despite extensive and complex treatment regimens.

  20. Effect of chronic cold stress on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Susmita; Kaur, Jyotdeep

    2005-09-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of chronic cold stress on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and inflammation. Male Wistar rats were subjected to cold exposure for three weeks. At the end of the cold exposure, intestinal cell proliferation, luminal nitrite and protein levels, intestinal myeloperoxidase activity and mast cell numbers were evaluated. Severely compromised proliferation rate of the crypt-base cells was observed under chronic stress conditions. Cells isolated from stressed rats showed a decreased DNA content in villus and lower villus cell fractions and an increased DNA content in the crypt cells, as compared to controls. Chronic cold stress resulted in increased luminal nitrite, luminal protein levels, and intestinal myeloperoxidase activity. The number of mast cells was significantly elevated under chronic stress conditions. Chronic cold stress resulted in a compromised intestinal epithelial cell proliferation rate and induced inflammation in the rat small intestine, through the combined action of nitric oxide, neutrophils and mast cells.

  1. N-acetylcysteine (NAC ameliorates Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 induced chronic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Gao

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation results when the immune system responds to trauma, injury or infection and the response is not resolved. It can lead to tissue damage and dysfunction and in some cases predispose to cancer. Some viruses (including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV can induce inflammation, which may persist even after the infection has been controlled or cleared. The damage caused by inflammation, can itself act to perpetuate the inflammatory response. The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 of EBV is a pro-inflammatory factor and in the skin of transgenic mice causes a phenotype of hyperplasia with chronic inflammation of increasing severity, which can progress to pre-malignant and malignant lesions. LMP1 signalling leads to persistent deregulated expression of multiple proteins throughout the mouse life span, including TGFα S100A9 and chitinase-like proteins. Additionally, as the inflammation increases, numerous chemokines and cytokines are produced which promulgate the inflammation. Deposition of IgM, IgG, IgA and IgE and complement activation form part of this process and through genetic deletion of CD40, we show that this contributes to the more tissue-destructive aspects of the phenotype. Treatment of the mice with N-acetylcysteine (NAC, an antioxidant which feeds into the body's natural redox regulatory system through glutathione synthesis, resulted in a significantly reduced leukocyte infiltrate in the inflamed tissue, amelioration of the pathological features and delay in the inflammatory signature measured by in vivo imaging. Reducing the degree of inflammation achieved through NAC treatment, had the knock on effect of reducing leukocyte recruitment to the inflamed site, thereby slowing the progression of the pathology. These data support the idea that NAC could be considered as a treatment to alleviate chronic inflammatory pathologies, including post-viral disease. Additionally, the model described can be used to effectively monitor and

  2. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronically colonized with Haemophilus influenzae during stable disease phase have increased airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufvesson, Ellen; Bjermer, Leif; Ekberg, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Some patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) show increased airway inflammation and bacterial colonization during stable phase. The aim of this study was to follow COPD patients and investigate chronic colonization with pathogenic bacteria during stable disease phase, and relate these findings to clinical parameters, inflammatory pattern, lung function, and exacerbations. Forty-three patients with COPD were included while in a stable state and followed up monthly until exacerbation or for a maximum of 6 months. The patients completed the Clinical COPD Questionnaire and Medical Research Council dyspnea scale questionnaires, and exhaled breath condensate was collected, followed by spirometry, impulse oscillometry, and sputum induction. Ten patients were chronically colonized (ie, colonized at all visits) with Haemophilus influenzae during stable phase. These patients had higher sputum levels of leukotriene B4 (Pchronically colonized patients. The difference in airway inflammation seen during stable phase in patients chronically colonized with H. influenzae was not observed during exacerbations. Some COPD patients who were chronically colonized with H. influenzae during stable phase showed increased airway inflammation and reduced lung volumes when compared with non-chronically colonized patients.

  3. Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst-Hansen, Thomas

    Inflammation is an intricate response relying on the activation and response of both the innate immune system and the infected tissue to remove a threat. The pro-inflammatory NF-kappaB pathway has been studied extensively, among others because of its key role in regulation of inflammation. However...

  4. Chronic Inflammation in Obesity and the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosário Monteiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome is disturbing. The activation of inflammatory pathways, used normally as host defence, reminds the seriousness of this condition. There is probably more than one cause for activation of inflammation. Apparently, metabolic overload evokes stress reactions, such as oxidative, inflammatory, organelle and cell hypertrophy, generating vicious cycles. Adipocyte hypertrophy, through physical reasons, facilitates cell rupture, what will evoke an inflammatory reaction. Inability of adipose tissue development to engulf incoming fat leads to deposition in other organs, mainly in the liver, with consequences on insulin resistance. The oxidative stress which accompanies feeding, particularly when there is excessive ingestion of fat and/or other macronutrients without concomitant ingestion of antioxidant-rich foods/beverages, may contribute to inflammation attributed to obesity. Moreover, data on the interaction of microbiota with food and obesity brought new hypothesis for the obesity/fat diet relationship with inflammation. Beyond these, other phenomena, for instance psychological and/or circadian rhythm disturbances, may likewise contribute to oxidative/inflammatory status. The difficulty in the management of obesity/metabolic syndrome is linked to their multifactorial nature where environmental, genetic and psychosocial factors interact through complex networks.

  5. Adaptations in responsiveness of brainstem pain-modulating neurons in acute compared with chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Daniel R; Heinricher, Mary M

    2013-06-01

    Despite similar behavioral hypersensitivity, acute and chronic pain have distinct neural bases. We used intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant to directly compare activity of pain-modulating neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in acute vs chronic inflammation. Heat-evoked and von Frey-evoked withdrawal reflexes and corresponding RVM neuronal activity were recorded in lightly anesthetized animals either during the first hour after complete Freund's adjuvant injection (acute) or 3 to 10 days later (chronic). Thermal and modest mechanical hyperalgesia during acute inflammation were associated with increases in the spontaneous activity of pain-facilitating ON-cells and suppression of pain-inhibiting OFF-cells. Acute hyperalgesia was reversed by RVM block, showing that the increased activity of RVM ON-cells is necessary for acute behavioral hypersensitivity. In chronic inflammation, thermal hyperalgesia had resolved but mechanical hyperalgesia had become pronounced. The spontaneous discharges of ON- and OFF-cells were not different from those in control subjects, but the mechanical response thresholds for both cell classes were reduced into the innocuous range. RVM block in the chronic condition worsened mechanical hyperalgesia. These studies identify distinct contributions of RVM ON- and OFF-cells to acute and chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia. During early immune-mediated inflammation, ON-cell spontaneous activity promotes hyperalgesia. After inflammation is established, the antinociceptive influence of OFF-cells is dominant, yet the lowered threshold for the OFF-cell pause allows behavioral responses to stimuli that would normally be considered innocuous. The efficacy of OFF-cells in counteracting sensitization of ascending transmission pathways could therefore be an important determining factor in development of chronic inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  6. Liver stiffness measurement-based scoring system for significant inflammation related to chronic hepatitis B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Zhu Hong

    Full Text Available Liver biopsy is indispensable because liver stiffness measurement alone cannot provide information on intrahepatic inflammation. However, the presence of fibrosis highly correlates with inflammation. We constructed a noninvasive model to determine significant inflammation in chronic hepatitis B patients by using liver stiffness measurement and serum markers.The training set included chronic hepatitis B patients (n = 327, and the validation set included 106 patients; liver biopsies were performed, liver histology was scored, and serum markers were investigated. All patients underwent liver stiffness measurement.An inflammation activity scoring system for significant inflammation was constructed. In the training set, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of the fibrosis-based activity score were 0.964, 91.9%, and 90.8% in the HBeAg(+ patients and 0.978, 85.0%, and 94.0% in the HBeAg(- patients, respectively. In the validation set, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of the fibrosis-based activity score were 0.971, 90.5%, and 92.5% in the HBeAg(+ patients and 0.977, 95.2%, and 95.8% in the HBeAg(- patients. The liver stiffness measurement-based activity score was comparable to that of the fibrosis-based activity score in both HBeAg(+ and HBeAg(- patients for recognizing significant inflammation (G ≥3.Significant inflammation can be accurately predicted by this novel method. The liver stiffness measurement-based scoring system can be used without the aid of computers and provides a noninvasive alternative for the prediction of chronic hepatitis B-related significant inflammation.

  7. Chronic inflammation around painless partially erupted third molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Mikael; Ventä, Irja; Hyrkäs, Tapio; Ma, Jian; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2003-03-01

    We sought to assess the histologic host response in chronic, symptomless pericoronitis. Gingival mucosal (n = 20) and dental follicle (n = 20) samples were collected during extraction from patients with pericoronitis and clinically healthy control subjects. Antibodies-recognizing macrophages (CD68), natural killer cells (CD56), T cells (CD2), helper T cells (CD4), suppressor/cytotoxic T cells (CD8), and neutrophils (lactoferrin) were applied in a labelled streptavidin-biotin method by using a DAKO TechMate staining robot. Macrophage was the most numerous kind of cell in pericoronitis, but CD2+ T lymphocytes, with a normal CD4/CD8 ratio, were also increased (P pericoronitis is a chronic/smoldering, rather than an acute/purulent, infection. Because of the chronic and often symptomless nature of pericoronitis, various long-term sequelae may result, which may lead to the need for extraction.

  8. Comprehensive Genetic Characterization of Intraprostatic Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer in African American Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0379 TITLE: Comprehensive genetic characterization of intraprostatic chronic inflammation and prostate cancer in...DATES COVERED 1 Sep 2016 – 31 Aug 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Comprehensive Genetic Characterization of Intraprostatic Chronic...combined with both clinical and experimental genetic data produced by this study may empower patients and doctors to make personalized treatment decisions

  9. Toll-like receptors and chronic inflammation in rheumatic diseases: new developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, L.A.B.; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.; Dinarello, C.A.; O'Neill, L.; Netea, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, new developments have been reported on the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in chronic inflammation in rheumatic diseases. The inhibitory function of TLR10 has been demonstrated. Receptors that enhance the function of TLRs, and several TLR inhibitors, have been identified.

  10. Antioxidant Effect of Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima on Chronic Inflammation Induced by Freund's Complete Adjuvant in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Rebolledo, Gabriel Alfonso; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; García-Rodríguez, Rosa Virginia; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán A; Hernández-Reyes, Ana Gabriela; Martínez-Galero, Elizdath

    2015-08-01

    One of the major mechanisms in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation is the excessive production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, and therefore, oxidative stress. Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima has marked antioxidant activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as anti-inflammatory activity in certain experimental models, the latter activity being mediated probably by the antioxidant activity of this cyanobacterium. In the present study, chronic inflammation was induced through injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA) in rats treated daily with Spirulina (Arthrospira) maxima for 2 weeks beginning on day 14. Joint diameter, body temperature, and motor capacity were assessed each week. On days 0 and 28, total and differential leukocyte counts and serum oxidative damage were determined, the latter by assessing lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content. At the end of the study, oxidative damage to joints was likewise evaluated. Results show that S. maxima favors increased mobility, as well as body temperature regulation, and a number of circulating leukocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes in specimens with CFA-induced chronic inflammation and also protects against oxidative damage in joint tissue as well as serum. In conclusion, the protection afforded by S. maxima against development of chronic inflammation is due to its antioxidant activity.

  11. Green tea polyphenols attenuate deterioration of bone microarchitecture in female rats with systemic chronic inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Our previous study demonstrated that green tea polyphenols (GTP) benefit bone health in female rats with chronic inflammation, because of GTP’s antioxidant capacity. The current study further evaluates whether GTP can restore bone microstructure along with related mechanism in rats wit...

  12. Histidine-rich glycoprotein promotes macrophage activation and inflammation in chronic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartneck, M.; Fech, V.; Ehling, J.; Govaere, O.; Warzecha, K.T.; Hittatiya, K.; Vucur, M.; Gautheron, J.; Luedde, T.; Trautwein, C.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Roskams, T.; Jahnen-Dechent, W.; Tacke, F.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen- and injury-related danger signals as well as cytokines released by immune cells influence the functional differentiation of macrophages in chronic inflammation. Recently, the liver-derived plasma protein, histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG), was demonstrated, in mouse tumor models, to

  13. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection in mice induces chronic lung inflammation, iBALT formation, and fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupelli, Madhulika; Shimada, Kenichi; Chiba, Norika; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Jones, Heather D; Peterson, Ellena; Chen, Shuang; Arditi, Moshe; Crother, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) lung infection can induce chronic lung inflammation and is associated with not only acute asthma but also COPD exacerbations. However, in mouse models of CP infection, most studies have investigated specifically the acute phase of the infection and not the longer-term chronic changes in the lungs. We infected C57BL/6 mice with 5 × 10(5) CP intratracheally and monitored inflammation, cellular infiltrates and cytokine levels over time to investigate the chronic inflammatory lung changes. While bacteria numbers declined by day 28, macrophage numbers remained high through day 35. Immune cell clusters were detected as early as day 14 and persisted through day 35, and stained positive for B, T, and follicular dendritic cells, indicating these clusters were inducible bronchus associated lymphoid tissues (iBALTs). Classically activated inflammatory M1 macrophages were the predominant subtype early on while alternatively activated M2 macrophages increased later during infection. Adoptive transfer of M1 but not M2 macrophages intratracheally 1 week after infection resulted in greater lung inflammation, severe fibrosis, and increased numbers of iBALTS 35 days after infection. In summary, we show that CP lung infection in mice induces chronic inflammatory changes including iBALT formations as well as fibrosis. These observations suggest that the M1 macrophages, which are part of the normal response to clear acute C. pneumoniae lung infection, result in an enhanced acute response when present in excess numbers, with greater inflammation, tissue injury, and severe fibrosis.

  14. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection in mice induces chronic lung inflammation, iBALT formation, and fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhulika Jupelli

    Full Text Available Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP lung infection can induce chronic lung inflammation and is associated with not only acute asthma but also COPD exacerbations. However, in mouse models of CP infection, most studies have investigated specifically the acute phase of the infection and not the longer-term chronic changes in the lungs. We infected C57BL/6 mice with 5 × 10(5 CP intratracheally and monitored inflammation, cellular infiltrates and cytokine levels over time to investigate the chronic inflammatory lung changes. While bacteria numbers declined by day 28, macrophage numbers remained high through day 35. Immune cell clusters were detected as early as day 14 and persisted through day 35, and stained positive for B, T, and follicular dendritic cells, indicating these clusters were inducible bronchus associated lymphoid tissues (iBALTs. Classically activated inflammatory M1 macrophages were the predominant subtype early on while alternatively activated M2 macrophages increased later during infection. Adoptive transfer of M1 but not M2 macrophages intratracheally 1 week after infection resulted in greater lung inflammation, severe fibrosis, and increased numbers of iBALTS 35 days after infection. In summary, we show that CP lung infection in mice induces chronic inflammatory changes including iBALT formations as well as fibrosis. These observations suggest that the M1 macrophages, which are part of the normal response to clear acute C. pneumoniae lung infection, result in an enhanced acute response when present in excess numbers, with greater inflammation, tissue injury, and severe fibrosis.

  15. Effects of chronic inflammation on energy metabolism and growth performance in weanling piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moon, H.K.; Han, I.K.; Gentry, J.L.; Parmentier, H.K.; Schrama, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of a chronic inflammation (cell-mediated immune response) on energy metabolism and growth performance was assessed in weanling piglets. Twenty four barrows of 4 wk of age were assigned to one of two immunization treatments : Control group [CON: immunized with Incomplete Freund's Adjuvant

  16. The role of vitamin K in chronic aging diseases: inflammation, cardiovascular disease and osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin K is an enzyme cofactor required for the carboxylation of vitamin K dependent proteins, several of which have been implicated in diseases of aging. Inflammation is recognized as a crucial component of many chronic aging diseases, and evidence suggests vitamin K has an anti-inflammatory actio...

  17. Fatigue in chronic inflammation - a link to pain pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louati, Karine; Berenbaum, Francis

    2015-10-05

    Fatigue is a frequent symptom in several inflammatory diseases, particularly in rheumatic diseases. Elements of disease activity and cognitive and behavior aspects have been reported as causes of fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Fatigue could be associated with activity of inflammatory rheumatism. Indeed, biologic agents targeting inflammatory cytokines are effective in fatigue. Fatigue is also associated with pain and depressive symptoms. Different pathways could be involved in fatigue and interact: the immune system with increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 and -6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha), dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and neurological phenomena involving the central and autonomic nervous systems. A pro-inflammatory process could be involved in pain and behavioral symptoms. Inflammation could be a common link between fatigue, pain, and depression.

  18. Obesity-induced chronic inflammation in C57Bl6J mice, a novel risk factor in the progression of renal AA amyloidosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Heijden, R.A.; Sheedfar, F.; Bijzet, J.; Hazenberg, B.P.; Koonen, D.P.; Heeringa, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Compelling evidence links obesity induced systemic inflammation to the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This systemic inflammation may result from exacerbated adipose inflammation. Besides the known detrimental effects of typical pro-inflammatory factors secreted by the

  19. Low-grade inflammation and its relation to obesity and chronic degenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Castro

    2017-04-01

    Obesity causes low-grade chronic inflammation. Adipose tissue, in addition to its function of storing energy reserves in the form of triglycerides, has important functions as an endocrine organ, producing a variety of molecules called adipocytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IFNγ, TNFα, leptin and resistin. The production of these molecules by adipocytes, coupled with the destruction of these cells, induces the inflammation to become chronic, and influences other systems by altering their functions, which leads to different diseases. Understanding the relationship between the different components of lifestyle and the production of adipocytokines involved in the development of chronic degenerative diseases, will allow us to address the problem and hence reduce the morbidity and mortality caused by these diseases.

  20. Neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Laura L; Tizabi, Yousef

    2013-02-01

    Neurodegeneration and depression are two common co-morbid conditions, particularly within the aging population. Research has linked neuroinflammation as a major contributing factor to both of these diseases. The key to neuroinflammation effects on neurodegeneration and depression appears to lie within the dysregulation of the control and release of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. This can come from an internal or external insult to the system, or from changes in the individual due to aging that culminate in immune dysregulation. The need to reduce neuroinflammation has led to extensive research into neuroprotectants. We discuss the efficacy found with nicotine, alcohol, resveratrol, curcumin, and ketamine. Our main focus will be on what research tells us about the connections between neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and depression, and the hope that neuroprotectants research gives people suffering from neurodegeneration and depression stemming from neuroinflammation. We will conclude by making suggestions for future research in this area.

  1. Inflammation mediators in employees in chronic exposure to neurotoxicants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Bodienkova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this work is to perform comparative estimation of cytokines levels in chlorinated hydrocarbons and metallic mercury exposure in employees in the dynamics of neurologic disorders formation. Material and Methods: The contents of cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, TNF-α, INF-γ were determined in blood sera using the method of hardphasic immunoferment analysis. The significance of different average values was assessed using the parametric and non-parametric criteria - Student (in normal distribution and Mann-Whitney tests taking into account the Bonferonni correction (non-difference from normal distribution. Results: It was shown that, a number of inflammation mediators with the dominance, depending on the expositional toxicant and expression of neurological deficiency, take part in the neurointoxication development. Healthy employees show pro-inflammatory responses with different expression degree, which dominate in the immune regulation processes regardless of the expositional factors (metallic mercury vapors and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Conclusions: The production intensity and interconnection between the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines may change in the occupational injuries of the nervous system development process. The decrease in the serum concentrations of cytokines along with the increase of clinical manifestation severity may prove dysregulation of the immune system, which promotes maintaining of pathological process and progradient process of neurointoxication. The most obvious is the imbalance of cytokines in the employees exposed to metallic mercury (in all the examined groups that increases neurointoxication in the distant period.

  2. Pro-calcitonin and inflammation in chronic hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Trimarchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Procalcitonin (PCT has emerged as a marker of infection, a frequent complication in hemodialysis (HD. We analyzed PCT levels in chronic non-acutely infected HD subjects, assessed its correlation with inflammatory and nutritional markers and propose a PCT reference value for non-infected HD patients.In an observational cross-sectional study, 48 chronic HD patients and 36 controls were analyzed. Variables: age, gender, time on HD; diabetes; vascular access, PCT, C-reactive protein (CRP, albumin, malnutrition inflammatory score (MIS, hematocrit, leukocyte count, and body mass index (BMI. Subsequently, control (G1, n = 36, 43% vs. non-infected patients (G2, n = 48, 57% groups were compared. In control subjects (G1, age: 54.3 ± 13.7 years, range (r: 30-81; males: 19 (53%; median PCT 0.034 ng/ml (r: 0.02-0.08; median CRP 0.80 mg/dl (r: 0.36-3.9; p95 PCT level: 0.063 ng/ml. In G2, age: 60.2 ± 15.2 years; males 32 (67%, time on HD: 27.0 ± 24.4; diabetics: 19 (32%; median PCT: 0.26 ng/ml (r: 0.09-0.82; CRP: 1.1 mg/dl (r: 0.5-6.2; p95 PCT level: 0.8 ng/ml. In control subjects, PCT and CRP were significantly lower than in G2: PCT: 0.034 vs. 0.26 ng/ml, p = 0.0001; CRP: 0.8 vs. 1.1 mg/dl, p = 0.0004. PCT-CRP correlation in G2: ρ = 0.287, p = 0.048. PCT and CRP concentrations are elevated in chronic non-acutely infected HD subjects, independently of infection, diabetes and vascular access. A p95 PCT level of 0.8 ng/ml may be considered as the upper normal reference value in non-acutely infected HD subjects. The PCT cut-off level in HD is yet to be determined in HD.

  3. An important role of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in chronic skin inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Zgraggen

    Full Text Available Inflammatory angiogenesis and vascular remodeling play key roles in the chronic inflammatory skin disease psoriasis, but little is known about the molecular mediators of vascular activation. Based on the reported elevated mRNA levels of the angiogenic chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 in psoriasis, we investigated the relevance of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in two experimental models of chronic psoriasis-like skin inflammation. The cutaneous expression of both SDF-1 and CXCR4 was upregulated in the inflamed skin of K14-VEGF-A transgenic mice and in imiquimod-induced skin inflammation, with expression of CXCR4 by blood vessels and macrophages. Treatment with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 potently inhibited skin inflammation in both models, associated with reduced inflammatory angiogenesis and inflammatory cell accumulation, including dermal CD4+ cells and intraepidermal CD8+ T cells. Similar anti-inflammatory effects were seen after treatment with a neutralizing anti-SDF-1 antibody. In vitro, inhibition of CXCR4 blocked SDF-1-induced chemotaxis of CD11b+ splenocytes, in agreement with the reduced number of macrophages after in vivo CXCR4 blockade. Our results reveal an important role of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in skin inflammation and inflammatory angiogenesis, and they indicate that inhibition of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis might serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic inflammatory skin diseases.

  4. Topical cyclosporine a 1% for the treatment of chronic ocular surface inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragam, Ashwinee; Kolomeyer, Anton M; Kim, Jason S; Nayak, Natasha V; Fang, Christina; Kim, Eliott; Chu, David S

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the use of topical cyclosporine A (CsA) 1% emulsion in the treatment of chronic ocular surface inflammation (OSI). We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with various forms of OSI treated with topical CsA 1% from 2001 to 2012. Twenty-nine patients (52 eyes) with various forms of OSI, including epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (n=14), chronic follicular conjunctivitis (n=12), Thygeson superficial punctate keratopathy (n=2), and vernal keratoconjunctivitis (n=1), were included. Twenty-seven patients had inflammation refractory to prior therapies. Twenty-four patients received concurrent medications with CsA 1%. Twenty-three of 24 patients on concurrent corticosteroids (CS) were able to taper their use while receiving CsA 1%. Thirteen patients experienced ocular discomfort with CsA 1%; one patient discontinued therapy all together as a result of these side effects; another switched to CsA 0.5% with improvement of adverse symptoms. Inflammation was controlled in 22 (92%) of the 24 patients who received CsA 1% for at least 2 months in duration. Topical CsA 1% helps to control inflammation and spares CS use in patients with chronic OSI.

  5. Chronic gastrointestinal inflammation induces anxiety-like behavior and alters central nervous system biochemistry in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F; Foster, Jane A; Macri, Joseph; Potter, Murray; Huang, Xiaxing; Malinowski, Paul; Jackson, Wendy; Blennerhassett, Patricia; Neufeld, Karen A; Lu, Jun; Khan, Waliul I; Corthesy-Theulaz, Irene; Cherbut, Christine; Bergonzelli, Gabriela E; Collins, Stephen M

    2010-12-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies have associated gastrointestinal inflammation and infection with altered behavior. We investigated whether chronic gut inflammation alters behavior and brain biochemistry and examined underlying mechanisms. AKR mice were infected with the noninvasive parasite Trichuris muris and given etanercept, budesonide, or specific probiotics. Subdiaphragmatic vagotomy was performed in a subgroup of mice before infection. Gastrointestinal inflammation was assessed by histology and quantification of myeloperoxidase activity. Serum proteins were measured by proteomic analysis, circulating cytokines were measured by fluorescence activated cell sorting array, and serum tryptophan and kynurenine were measured by liquid chromatography. Behavior was assessed using light/dark preference and step-down tests. In situ hybridization was used to assess brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the brain. T muris caused mild to moderate colonic inflammation and anxiety-like behavior that was associated with decreased hippocampal BDNF messenger RNA (mRNA). Circulating tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ, as well as the kynurenine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, were increased. Proteomic analysis showed altered levels of several proteins related to inflammation and neural function. Administration of etanercept, and to a lesser degree of budesonide, normalized behavior, reduced cytokine and kynurenine levels, but did not influence BDNF expression. The probiotic Bifidobacterium longum normalized behavior and BDNF mRNA but did not affect cytokine or kynurenine levels. Anxiety-like behavior was present in infected mice after vagotomy. Chronic gastrointestinal inflammation induces anxiety-like behavior and alters central nervous system biochemistry, which can be normalized by inflammation-dependent and -independent mechanisms, neither of which requires the integrity of the vagus nerve. Copyright © 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc

  6. Chronic systemic inflammation in dialysis patients: an update on causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiang; Axelsson, Jonas; Stenvinkel, Peter; Lindholm, Bengt

    2004-01-01

    Despite marked improvements in dialysis technology during the last 20 years, the age-adjusted mortality rate in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients treated by dialysis is still unacceptably high and comparable to that of many cancer patients with metastases. The main cause of the increased mortality in ESRD patients is cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is twice as common and advances at twice the rate already in patients with early stages of chronic kidney disease as compared to the general population. Although traditional risk factors for CVD are common in dialysis patients, they can only in part explain the very high prevalence of CVD in this patient group. Recent evidence demonstrates that chronic inflammation, a non-traditional risk factor which is a commonly observed in dialysis patients, may cause progressive atherosclerotic CVD and malnutrition, itself an important risk factor for the development of CVD, by several pathogenetic mechanisms. The causes of inflammation in dialysis are multifactorial and include both dialysis-related and unrelated factors. While the long-term effects of chronic inflammation may be most important in the pathogenesis of CVD, the acute-phase reaction may also cause vascular damage by several pathogenic mechanisms. Indeed, it seems logical to speculate that suppression of the vicious cycle of malnutrition, inflammation, and atherosclerosis (MIA syndrome) in ESRD would improve survival and decrease co-morbidity in dialysis patients. As there are currently no established guidelines for the treatment of chronic inflammation in ESRD patients, more studies on the long-term effects of various anti-inflammatory treatment strategies on the nutritional and cardiovascular status, as well as outcome in this patient group, are clearly warranted and will be helpful in identifying precisely which pathways are most involved in the pathogenic process.

  7. Airway Inflammation in Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps and Asthma: The United Airways Concept Further Supported

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Kåre; Bachert, Claus; Konge, Lars

    2015-01-01

    ) bronchial inflammation exists in all CRSwNP patients irrespective of clinical asthma status. Methods We collected biopsies from nasal polyps, inferior turbinates and bronchi of 27 CRSwNP patients and 6 controls. All participants were evaluated for lower airway disease according to international guidelines......Background It has been established that patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) often have co-existing asthma. Objective We aimed to test two hypotheses: (i) upper and lower airway inflammation in CRSwNP is uniform in agreement with the united airways concept; and (ii...

  8. Airway Inflammation in Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps and Asthma: The United Airways Concept Further Supported

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Kåre; Bachert, Claus; Konge, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been established that patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) often have co-existing asthma. Objective We aimed to test two hypotheses: (i) upper and lower airway inflammation in CRSwNP is uniform in agreement with the united airways concept; and (ii...... cytokines measured, IL-13 was significantly increased in bronchial biopsies from CRSwNP patients with, but not without asthma. Conclusion Our findings support the united airways concept; however, we did not find evidence for subclinical bronchial inflammation in CRSwNP patients without asthma. Finally...

  9. Chronic Low Dose Chlorine Exposure Aggravates Allergic Inflammation and Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Activates Inflammasome Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae-Hoon; Park, Da-Eun; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic clinical studies suggested that chronic exposure to chlorine products is associated with development of asthma and aggravation of asthmatic symptoms. However, its underlying mechanism was not clearly understood. Studies were undertaken to define the effects and mechanisms of chronic low-dose chlorine exposure in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Methods Six week-old female BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA in the presence and absence of chronic low dose chlorine exposure of naturally vaporized gas of 5% sodium hypochlorite solution. Airway inflammation and AHR were evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell recovery and non-invasive phlethysmography, respectively. Real-time qPCR, Western blot assay, and ELISA were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expressions of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators. Human A549 and murine epithelial (A549 and MLE12) and macrophage (AMJ2-C11) cells were used to define the responses to low dose chlorine exposure in vitro. Results Chronic low dose chlorine exposure significantly augmented airway inflammation and AHR in OVA-sensitized and challenged mice. The expression of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 and proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β and IL-33 were significantly increased in OVA/Cl group compared with OVA group. The chlorine exposure also activates the major molecules associated with inflammasome pathway in the macrophages with increased expression of epithelial alarmins IL-33 and TSLP in vitro. Conclusion Chronic low dose exposure of chlorine aggravates allergic Th2 inflammation and AHR potentially through activation of inflammasome danger signaling pathways. PMID:25202911

  10. Platelet oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in chronic spontaneous urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajappa, Medha; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Sundar, Indhumathi; Munisamy, Malathi; Ananthanarayanan, P H; Thappa, Devinder Mohan; Toi, Pampa Ch

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies implicate the role of immune-inflammatory responses in chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU). Although it is well known that platelets release inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species upon activation, their role in CSU is poorly characterized. The present study was designed to evaluate platelet oxidative stress [platelet malondialdehyde (MDA), platelet superoxide dismutase (SOD), platelet glutathione peroxidase (GPx)] and systemic inflammatory markers [plasma Interleukin-6 (IL-6), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP)] in patients with CSU and their association with disease severity. Forty-five patients with CSU and 45 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Severity grading was completed according to the urticaria severity score (USS). Autologous plasma skin test (APST) was done in all patients with CSU. Platelet MDA, SOD and GPx and inflammatory markers plasma IL-6 and hs-CRP were assayed in all study participants. In patients with CSU, platelet SOD and GPx were significantly lowered, while platelet MDA levels were significantly elevated in comparison to healthy controls. Both IL-6 and hs-CRP were significantly elevated in patients with CSU and correlated with platelet oxidative stress parameters (pstress in patients with CSU.

  11. Inflammation, Diabetes, and Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of Aerobic Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Gobbis Shiraishi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The persistent inflammatory state is common in diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD. These patients present exercise intolerance and increased arterial stiffness. Long-term aerobic exercise has been associated with better arterial compliance, antidiabetic and antiinflammatory benefits. We assessed the hypothesis that in patients with diabetes and CKD, better aerobic capacity is associated with less inflammatory state and arterial stiffness. Thirty-nine CKD patients (17 in hemodialysis were evaluated. According to CKD etiology two patient groups were obtained: group of diabetics (GD was formed by 11 patients and nondiabetics (GND formed by 28 patients. Central blood pressure and arterial stiffness were evaluated by Sphygmocor device. Carotida intima-media thickness (CA-IMT was evaluated by ultrasonography. Aerobic capacity was measured by estimated VO2max according to treadmill test by Bruce protocol. The GD showed a higher frequency of C-reactive protein above laboratory cutoff (P=0.044, higher frequency of male gender, and a non significant higher value of VO2max (P=0.099. The CA-IMT was similar. Only better aerobic capacity was associated with lower frequency of high C-reactive protein when adjusted to diabetes and gender in a logistic regression model. In conclusion, aerobic capacity was associated with inflammatory state, in CKD patients, independently of diabetes presence.

  12. Increased arterial inflammation in individuals with stage 3 chronic kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takx, Richard A.P. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); MacNabb, Megan H.; Emami, Hamed; Abdelbaky, Amr; Lavender, Zachary R. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Singh, Parmanand [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); New York Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College, Division of Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Di Carli, Marcelo; Taqueti, Viviany; Foster, Courtney [Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Radiology, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Mann, Jessica; Comley, Robert A.; Weber, Chek Ing Kiu [F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., Basel (Switzerland); Tawakol, Ahmed [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiology Division, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    While it is well known that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for the development and progression of atherosclerosis, it is not known whether arterial inflammation is increased in mild CKD. The aim of this study was to compare arterial inflammation using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with CKD and in matched controls. This retrospective study included 128 patients undergoing FDG PET/CT imaging for clinical indications, comprising 64 patients with stage 3 CKD and 64 control patients matched by age, gender, and cancer history. CKD was defined according to guidelines using a calculated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Arterial inflammation was measured in the ascending aorta as FDG uptake on PET. Background FDG uptake (venous, subcutaneous fat and muscle) were recorded. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) was assessed using the CT images. The impact of CKD on arterial inflammation and CAC was then assessed. Arterial inflammation was higher in patients with CKD than in matched controls (standardized uptake value, SUV: 2.41 ± 0.49 vs. 2.16 ± 0.43; p = 0.002). Arterial SUV correlated inversely with eGFR (r = -0.299, p = 0.001). Venous SUV was also significantly elevated in patients with CKD, while subcutaneous fat and muscle tissue SUVs did not differ between groups. Moreover, arterial SUV remained significantly elevated in patients with CKD compared to controls after correcting for muscle and fat background, and also remained significant after adjusting for clinical risk factors. Further, CKD was associated with arterial inflammation (SUV) independent of the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis (CAC). Moderate CKD is associated with increased arterial inflammation beyond that of controls. Further, the increased arterial inflammation is independent of presence of subclinical atherosclerosis. Current risk stratification tools may underestimate the presence of atherosclerosis in patients with CKD and thereby the risk of

  13. Mediators of low-grade chronic inflammation in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda-Ojeda, Miriam; Murri, Mora; Insenser, María; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F

    2013-01-01

    Chronic low-grade subclinical inflammation has been increasingly recognized as an interposer in the endocrine, metabolic and reproductive disturbances that characterize the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Abdominal adiposity and obesity are often present in PCOS. Mounting evidence indicates that adipose tissue is involved in innate and adaptive immune responses. Continuous release of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, acute phase proteins, and adipokines perpetuates the inflammatory condition associated with obesity in women with PCOS, possibly contributing to insulin resistance and other long-term cardiometabolic risk factors. Genetic variants in the genes encoding inflammation-related mediators underlie the development of PCOS and their interaction with environmental factors may contribute to the heterogeneous clinical phenotype of this syndrome. In the future, strategies ameliorating inflammation may prove useful for the management of PCOS and associated conditions.

  14. Sepsis Pathophysiology, Chronic Critical Illness, and Persistent Inflammation-Immunosuppression and Catabolism Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, Juan C; Gentile, Lori F; Mathias, Brittany J; Efron, Philip A; Brakenridge, Scott C; Mohr, Alicia M; Moore, Frederick A; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2017-02-01

    To provide an appraisal of the evolving paradigms in the pathophysiology of sepsis and propose the evolution of a new phenotype of critically ill patients, its potential underlying mechanism, and its implications for the future of sepsis management and research. Literature search using PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. Sepsis remains one of the most debilitating and expensive illnesses, and its prevalence is not declining. What is changing is our definition(s), its clinical course, and how we manage the septic patient. Once thought to be predominantly a syndrome of over exuberant inflammation, sepsis is now recognized as a syndrome of aberrant host protective immunity. Earlier recognition and compliance with treatment bundles has fortunately led to a decline in multiple organ failure and in-hospital mortality. Unfortunately, more and more sepsis patients, especially the aged, are suffering chronic critical illness, rarely fully recover, and often experience an indolent death. Patients with chronic critical illness often exhibit "a persistent inflammation-immunosuppression and catabolism syndrome," and it is proposed here that this state of persisting inflammation, immunosuppression and catabolism contributes to many of these adverse clinical outcomes. The underlying cause of inflammation-immunosuppression and catabolism syndrome is currently unknown, but there is increasing evidence that altered myelopoiesis, reduced effector T-cell function, and expansion of immature myeloid-derived suppressor cells are all contributory. Although newer therapeutic interventions are targeting the inflammatory, the immunosuppressive, and the protein catabolic responses individually, successful treatment of the septic patient with chronic critical illness and persistent inflammation-immunosuppression and catabolism syndrome may require a more complementary approach.

  15. Treatment of periodontal diseases reduces chronic systemic inflammation in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siribamrungwong, Monchai; Puangpanngam, Kutchaporn

    2012-01-01

    Evidences suggest that chronic systemic inflammation is associated with increasing mortality in maintenance hemodialysis patients due to atherosclerosis and malnutrition. Periodontal diseases are treatable sources of systemic inflammation in hemodialysis patients. We therefore evaluated the effect of periodontal treatment in maintenance hemodialysis patients. Periodontal diseases were evaluated in 30 stable maintenance hemodialysis patients by using clinical periodontal status by plaque index (PI) and periodontal disease index (PDI). Hematologic, biochemical, nutritional, and dialysis-related parameters as well as highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), a sensitive systemic inflammatory marker, were analyzed before and after periodontal therapy. Maintenance hemodialysis patients had high prevalence of periodontal disease (63%). At baseline, hs-CRP positively correlated with clinical periodontal status (PI, r = 0.74, p periodontal therapy (duration 6 ± 2 weeks), the PI and PDI significantly declined from 2.13 to 1.48 (p = 0.001) and 3.53 to 2.52 (p = 0.001), respectively, while hs-CRP significantly declined from 3.8 to 0.6 mg/L (p periodontal treatment. Periodontitis is an important source of chronic inflammation. Treatment of periodontal diseases can improve systemic inflammation, nutritional status, and erythropoietin responsiveness in the hemodialysis population.

  16. Eosinophilic airway inflammation: role in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Leena; Brightling, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    The chronic lung diseases, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common affecting over 500 million people worldwide and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Asthma is typically associated with Th2-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation, in contrast to neutrophilic inflammation observed commonly in COPD. However, there is increasing evidence that the eosinophil might play an important role in 10–40% of patients with COPD. Consistently in both asthma and COPD a sputum eosinophilia is associated with a good response to corticosteroid therapy and tailored strategies aimed to normalize sputum eosinophils reduce exacerbation frequency and severity. Advances in our understanding of the multistep paradigm of eosinophil recruitment to the airway, and the consequence of eosinophilic inflammation, has led to the development of new therapies to target these molecular pathways. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of eosinophilic trafficking, the tools to assess eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthma and COPD during stable disease and exacerbations and review current and novel anti-eosinophilic treatments. PMID:26770668

  17. A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Fransén-Pettersson

    Full Text Available Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders.

  18. Fatty acids and chronic low grade inflammation associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Aoife A; Connaughton, Ruth M; Lyons, Claire L; McMorrow, Aoibheann M; Roche, Helen M

    2016-08-15

    The metabolic syndrome is a group of obesity associated metabolic conditions that result in increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Global increases in obesity rates have led to an increase in metabolic syndrome resulting in a demand for increased understanding of the mechanisms involved. This review examines the relationship between adipose tissue biology, lipid metabolism and chronic low grade inflammation relating to obesity and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. PATHOGENESIS AND CLINICAL FEATURES OF ANEMIA OF INFLAMMATION IN CHILDREN, DURING CHRONIC HBV INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    INOYATOVA FLORA ILYASOVNA; IKRAMOVA NODIRA ANVAROVNA; INOGAMOVA GULNOZA ZAXIDJANOVNA

    2016-01-01

    Examination of 125 children with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and concomitant anemia has ascertained the frequency of refractory variants of anemia (52.5%). The disease progressed seriously on the background of anemia, that was indicated the prevalence of CHB with severe activity forms (71.4%). The pathognomonic symptoms of anemic processes were revealed. Two pathogenetic variants of the anemia inflammation genesis at children with CHB are being considered: the first is defined by veritable iron...

  20. The role of omega-3 fatty acids contained in olive oil on chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardhana; Surachmanto, Eko S; Datau, E A

    2011-04-01

    Nowadays, people have been eating lots of unhealthy dietary excesses, that make them have chronic inflammatory diseases or known as chronic diseases. Countless millions of people worldwide can not help eating selectively massive quantities of unhealthy foods, until they become sick, often mortality. The omega-6 fatty acids account for the majority of PUFA (Poly Unsaturated Fatty Acids) in the food supply. They are the pre-dominant PUFA in all diets, especially the western diets, which produce pro-inflammatory metabolic products. The persistent antigenic or cytotoxic effects will lead to chronic inflammation. Olive tree is native to the Mediterranean basin and parts of Asia Minor. Its compression-extracted oil from the fruit has a wide range of therapeutic and culinary applications. It had been used as aphrodisiacs, emollients, laxatives, nutritives, sedatives, and tonics. In the later part of the 20th century, several studies had revealed that the olives in the Mediteranian diet is linked to a reduced incidence of degenerative diseases. It is one of phytomedicine which has omega-3 fatty acid as its constituent, may inhibit inflammation composing chronic inflammatory process in many chronic diseases, such as coronary artery disease, rheumatoid arthritis, hypertension, and even cancer.

  1. Synergistic Effect of Green Tea Polyphenols and Vitamin D on Chronic Inflammation-Induced Bone Loss in Female Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our recent study demonstrated a bone-protective role of green tea polyphenols (GTPs), extracted from green tea, in chronic inflammation-induced bone loss of female rats through reduction of inflammation and oxidative stress. This study further examines effects of GTPs in conjunction with vitamin D (...

  2. Cerebellar white matter inflammation and demyelination in chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanscher, B.; Sørensen, P. S.; Juhler, M.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, demyelination, inflammation, immunology, neuropathology......Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, demyelination, inflammation, immunology, neuropathology...

  3. Lifestyle Behaviors, Perceived Stress, and Inflammation of Individuals With Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch Kelly, Debra; Lyon, Debra E; Periera, Deidre; Garvan, Cynthia; Wingard, John

    Stress is a potent immunomodulator contributing to chronic conditions. Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a life-threatening late effect of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation associated with stress and exaggerated immune response that may be associated to lifestyle behaviors. The aim of this study is to explore associations among lifestyle behaviors, perceived stress, and inflammation of individuals with cGVHD. A secondary analysis from a prospective observational study of 24 adults (≥18 years) with cGVHD was conducted. Demographic, clinical, and symptom data were assessed using medical records and validated self-report measures; inflammatory markers were assessed using multiplex and enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays from plasma. Spiritual growth and total perceived stress were correlated (P factor) were associated (P Perceived stress and inflammatory markers were not associated. Individuals did not routinely engage in assessed health-promoting lifestyle behaviors. Associations in this sample were noted among lifestyle behaviors, perceived stress, and inflammation. Given these promising findings, further research with a larger sample size is needed to test these associations. Activity, nutrition, stress management, and social support interventions may reduce stress and inflammation. Particularly, connecting with one's higher-self may reduce levels of perceived stress. Finding ways to engage survivors in healthy lifestyle behaviors should be explored. Information from this study allows nurses to be informed about the role of lifestyle behaviors on inflammation and stress to provide anticipatory guidance to HCT survivors regarding lifestyle choices that may mitigate inflammation and stress to promote positive health outcomes.

  4. Intestinal microbiota, microbial translocation, and systemic inflammation in chronic HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Duy M; Volpe, Gretchen E; Duffalo, Chad; Bhalchandra, Seema; Tai, Albert K; Kane, Anne V; Wanke, Christine A; Ward, Honorine D

    2015-01-01

    Despite effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), patients with chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have increased microbial translocation and systemic inflammation. Alterations in the intestinal microbiota may play a role in microbial translocation and inflammation. We profiled the fecal microbiota by pyrosequencing the gene encoding 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and measured markers of microbial translocation and systemic inflammation in 21 patients who had chronic HIV infection and were receiving suppressive ART (cases) and 16 HIV-uninfected controls. The fecal microbial community composition was significantly different between cases and controls. The relative abundance of Proteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Enterobacteriales, Enterobacteriaceae, Erysipelotrichi, Erysipelotrichales, Erysipelotrichaceae, and Barnesiella was significantly enriched in cases, whereas that of Rikenellaceae and Alistipes was depleted. The plasma soluble CD14 level (sCD14) was significantly higher and the endotoxin core immunoglobulin M (IgM) level lower in cases, compared with controls. There were significant positive correlations between the relative abundances of Enterobacteriales and Enterobacteriaceae and the sCD14 level; the relative abundances of Gammaproteobacteria, Enterobacteriales, and Enterobacteriaceae and the interleukin 1β (IL-1β) level; the relative abundances of Enterobacteriales and Enterobacteriaceae and the interferon γ level; and the relative abundances of Erysipelotrichi and Barnesiella and the TNF-α level. There were negative correlations between endotoxin core IgM and IL-1β levels. Patients who have chronic HIV infection and are receiving suppressive ART display intestinal dysbiosis associated with increased microbial translocation and significant associations between specific taxa and markers of microbial translocation and systemic inflammation. This was an exploratory study, the findings of which need to be confirmed. © The Author 2014

  5. Chronic Mild Prenatal Stress Exacerbates the Allergen-Induced Airway Inflammation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo J. Nogueira

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chronic mild prenatal stress on leukocyte infiltration into the airways was investigated in rat offspring. The chronic prenatal stress consisted of transitory and variable changes in the rat's living conditions. Offspring at adult age were actively sensitized (day 0 and intratracheally challenged (day 14 with ovalbumin. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in the offspring at 48 h after intratracheal challenge with ovalbumin. A significant increase in total leukocyte infiltration was observed in the nonstressed offspring group and this was associated with a marked recruitment of eosinophils without a significant effect on the influx of neutrophils and mononuclear cells. In the prenatal stressed offspring, the counts of both total leukocyte and eosinophils, as well as mononuclear cells, was increased by 50% compared to the non-stressed offspring. We provide here the first experimental evidence that chronic mild unpredictable prenatal stress produces a marked increase in the allergen-induced airway inflammation in the rat offspring.

  6. Enteric neurodegeneration in ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, M; Cowen, T; Koch, T R

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this article is to review the clinical presentation and neurobiology of degeneration of the enteric nervous system with emphasis on human data where available. Constipation, incontinence and evacuation disorders are frequently encountered in the ageing population. Healthy lower gastrointestinal function is essential for successful ageing as it is critical to maintaining independence and autonomy to pursue further activity. One clinical expression of enteric neurodegeneration is constipation. However, the aetiology may be multifactorial as disturbances of epithelial, muscle or neural function may all result from neurodegeneration. There is evidence of loss of excitatory (e.g. cholinergic) enteric neurons and interstitial cells of Cajal, whereas inhibitory (including nitrergic) neurons appear unaffected. Understanding neurodegeneration in the enteric nervous system is key to developing treatments to reverse it. Neurotrophins have been shown to accelerate colonic transit and relieve constipation in the medium term; they are also implicated in maintenance programmes in adult enteric neurons through a role in antioxidant defence. However, their effects in ageing colon require further study. There is evidence that 5-HT(2) and 5-HT(4) mechanisms are involved in development, maintenance and survival of enteric neurons. Further research is needed to understand and potentially reverse enteric neurodegeneration.

  7. Chronic mucosal inflammation/inflammatory bowel disease-like inflammation after intestinal transplantation: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Cal S; Zasloff, Michael A; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the similarities between inflammatory bowel disease and the state of the intestine allograft after transplantation. The mutant nucleotide-binding oligomerization protein 2 (NOD2) gene, which encodes for an intracellular protein that serves as an innate immune system microbial sensor in macrophages, dendritic cells, and certain intestinal epithelial cells, has been recognized as a risk factor in Crohn's disease. Similarly, recent studies have also highlighted the contribution the NOD2 mutation may have on intestinal failure itself. More specifically, in intestinal transplant recipients with the NOD2 mutation, the discovery of the reduced ability to prevent bacterial clearance, increased enterocyte stress response, and failure of key downstream expression of important cytokines and growth factors have been implicated as major factors in intestinal transplant outcomes, namely graft loss and septic death. Treatment strategies with anti tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, similar to inflammatory bowel disease, have been employed in intestinal transplantation with promising results. In intestinal transplantation, there is evidence that the classical alloimmunity pathways that lead toward graft dysfunction and eventual graft loss may, in fact, be working in concert with a disordered innate immune system to produce a state of chronic inflammation not unlike that seen in inflammatory bowel disease.

  8. MULTIPOTENT MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELLS OF BONE MARROW IN THERAPY OF CHRONIC INFLAMMATION OF THE MURINE OVARIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkova N. А.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The research aim was to investigate the influence and localization of cryopreserved bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells when intravenousy administered into the animals with chronic ovary inflammation. The results of histological examination showed a reparative activation with a tendency to morphology normalization of ovarian tissue on the background of inflammatory manifestation extinction in the experimental animals under condition of cell therapy. To the 21st day in the control group with physiological solution administration, total number of follicles relative to intact animals (18.3 ± 4.52% was reduced (7.4 ± 2.18%, and 85.3 ± 5.2% oocytes had the signs of apoptosis (Annexin+. In the experimental group the number of follicles was significantly increased to the amount of 15.3 ± 1.8%, and the one of apoptotic oocytes declined (5.7 ± 0.8% versus the control. Fluorescent microscopy of cryostatic ovary slices of the animals treated with PKH-26 labeled cells showed the presence of diffuse distribution of luminescent objects which were of small cell conglomerates shape. Cryopreserved bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells under condition of intravenous administration in the animals with chronic ovary inflammation were established to cause a modulating effect on inflammation course, induce the folliculogenesis recovery and being revealed in the ovaries of experimental animals to the 10th and 21st days of therapy.

  9. Airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a true paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Mathew Suji; Myers, Stephen; Walters, Eugene Haydn; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh

    2017-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is primarily an airway condition, which mainly affects cigarette smokers and presents with shortness of breath that is progressive and poorly reversible. In COPD research, there has been a long held belief that airway disease progression is due to inflammation. Although this may be true in the airway lumen with innate immunity activated by the effect of smoke or secondary to infection, the accurate picture of inflammatory cells in the airway wall, where the pathophysiological COPD remodeling occurs, is uncertain and debatable. Areas covered: The current review provides a comprehensive literature survey of the changes in the main inflammatory cells in human COPD patients and focuses on contrarian views that affect the prevailing dogma on inflammation. The review also delves into the role of oxidative stress and inflammasomes in modulating the immune response in COPD. Further, the effects of inflammation in affecting the epithelium, fibroblasts, and airway remodeling are discussed. Expert commentary: Inflammation as a driving force for airway wall damage and remodelling in early COPD is at the very least 'oversimplified' and is likely to be misleading. This has serious implications for rational thinking about the illness, including pathogenesis and designing therapy.

  10. Mechanical stress as the common denominator between chronic inflammation, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel eLevy Nogueira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of common diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and cancer are currently poorly understood. Inflammation is a common risk factor for cancer and AD. Recent data, provided by our group and from others, demonstrate that increased pressure and inflammation are synonymous. There is a continuous increase in pressure from inflammation to fibrosis and then cancer. This in line with the numerous papers reporting high interstitial pressure in cancer. But most authors focus on the role of pressure in the lack of delivery of chemotherapy in the center of the tumor. Pressure may also be a key factor in carcinogenesis. Increased pressure is responsible for oncogene activation and cytokine secretion. Accumulation of mechanical stress plays a key role in the development of diseases of old age such as cardiomyopathy, atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis. Growing evidence suggest also a possible link between mechanical stress in the pathogenesis of AD. The aim of this review is to describe environmental and endogenous mechanical factors possibly playing a pivotal role in the mechanism of chronic inflammation, AD and cancer.

  11. Evolutionary medicine and bone loss in chronic inflammatory diseases--A theory of inflammation-related osteopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Rainer H; Cutolo, Maurizio; Pacifici, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Bone loss is typical in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases, pemphigus vulgaris, and others. It is also typical in transplantation-related inflammation and during the process of aging. While we recognized that bone loss is tightly linked to immune system activation or inflamm-aging in the form of acute, chronic active, or chronic smoldering inflammation, bone loss is typically discussed to be an "accident of inflammation." Extensive literature search in PubMed central. Using elements of evolutionary medicine, energy regulation, and neuroendocrine regulation of homeostasis and immune function, we work out that bone waste is an adaptive, evolutionarily positively selected program that is absolutely necessary during acute inflammation. However, when acute inflammation enters a chronic state due to the inability to terminate inflammation (e.g., in autoimmunity or in continuous immunity against microbes), the acute program of bone loss is a misguided adaptive program. The article highlights the complexity of interwoven pathways of osteopenia. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Roles of Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation in the Development of Ectopic Fat Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern of fat distribution is a major determinant for metabolic homeostasis. As a depot of energy, the storage of triglycerides in adipose tissue contributes to the normal fat distribution. Decreased capacity of fat storage in adipose tissue may result in ectopic fat deposition in nonadipose tissues such as liver, pancreas, and kidney. As a critical biomarker of metabolic complications, chronic low-grade inflammation may have the ability to affect the process of lipid accumulation and further lead to the disorder of fat distribution. In this review, we have collected the evidence linking inflammation with ectopic fat deposition to get a better understanding of the underlying mechanism, which may provide us with novel therapeutic strategies for metabolic disorders.

  13. Noninvasive scoring system for significant inflammation related to chronic hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mei-Zhu; Ye, Linglong; Jin, Li-Xin; Ren, Yan-Dan; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Ru-Mian; Fang, Kuangnan; Pan, Jin-Shui

    2017-03-01

    Although a liver stiffness measurement-based model can precisely predict significant intrahepatic inflammation, transient elastography is not commonly available in a primary care center. Additionally, high body mass index and bilirubinemia have notable effects on the accuracy of transient elastography. The present study aimed to create a noninvasive scoring system for the prediction of intrahepatic inflammatory activity related to chronic hepatitis B, without the aid of transient elastography. A total of 396 patients with chronic hepatitis B were enrolled in the present study. Liver biopsies were performed, liver histology was scored using the Scheuer scoring system, and serum markers and liver function were investigated. Inflammatory activity scoring models were constructed for both hepatitis B envelope antigen (+) and hepatitis B envelope antigen (-) patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and area under the curve were 86.00%, 84.80%, 62.32%, 95.39%, and 0.9219, respectively, in the hepatitis B envelope antigen (+) group and 91.89%, 89.86%, 70.83%, 97.64%, and 0.9691, respectively, in the hepatitis B envelope antigen (-) group. Significant inflammation related to chronic hepatitis B can be predicted with satisfactory accuracy by using our logistic regression-based scoring system.

  14. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea: overlaps in pathophysiology, systemic inflammation, and cardiovascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Walter T

    2012-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome represent two of the most prevalent chronic respiratory disorders in clinical practice, and cardiovascular diseases represent a major comorbidity in each disorder. The two disorders coexist (overlap syndrome) in approximately 1% of adults but asymptomatic lower airway obstruction together with sleep-disordered breathing is more prevalent. Although obstructive sleep apnea syndrome has similar prevalence in COPD as the general population, and vice versa, factors such as body mass index and smoking influence relationships. Nocturnal oxygen desaturation develops in COPD, independent of apnea\\/hypopnea, and is more severe in the overlap syndrome, thus predisposing to pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, upper airway flow limitation contributes to nocturnal desaturation in COPD without apnea\\/hypopnea. Evidence of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea, involving C-reactive protein and IL-6, in addition to nuclear factor-kappaB-dependent pathways involving tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-8, provides insight into potential basic interactions between both disorders. Furthermore, oxidative stress develops in each disorder, in addition to activation and\\/or dysfunction of circulating leukocytes. These findings are clinically relevant because systemic inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and the cell\\/molecular pathways involved are similar to those identified in COPD and sleep apnea. However, the pathophysiological and clinical significance of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea is not proven, and thus, studies of patients with the overlap syndrome should provide insight into the mechanisms of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea, in addition to potential relationships with cardiovascular disease.

  15. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces cardiac inflammation and dysfunction in a rat obstructive sleep apnea model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qin; Bian, Yeping; Yu, Fuchao; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Guanghao; Li, Yang; Song, Songsong; Ren, Xiaomei; Tong, Jiayi

    2016-11-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia is considered to play an important role in cardiovascular pathogenesis during the development of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We used a well-described OSA rat model induced with simultaneous intermittent hypoxia. Male Sprague Dawley rats were individually placed into plexiglass chambers with air pressure and components were electronically controlled. The rats were exposed to intermittent hypoxia 8 hours daily for 5 weeks. The changes of cardiac structure and function were examined by ultrasound. The cardiac pathology, apoptosis, and fibrosis were analyzed by H&E staining, TUNNEL assay, and picosirius staining, respectively. The expression of inflammation and fibrosis marker genes was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. Chronic intermittent hypoxia/low pressure resulted in significant increase of left ventricular internal diameters (LVIDs), end-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), and blood lactate level and marked reduction in ejection fraction and fractional shortening. Chronic intermittent hypoxia increased TUNNEL-positive myocytes, disrupted normal arrangement of cardiac fibers, and increased Sirius stained collagen fibers. The expression levels of hypoxia induced factor (HIF)-1α, NF-kB, IL-6, and matrix metallopeptidase 2 (MMP-2) were significantly increased in the heart of rats exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia. In conclusion, the left ventricular function was adversely affected by chronic intermittent hypoxia, which is associated with increased expression of HIF-1α and NF-kB signaling molecules and development of cardiac inflammation, apoptosis and fibrosis. © 2016 by the Journal of Biomedical Research. All rights reserved.

  16. Positive relationship between p42.3 gene and inflammation in chronic non-atrophic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Cui, Yun; Fu, Qing Yan; Lu, You Yong; Fang, Jing Yuan; Chen, Xiao Yu

    2015-10-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a typical type of inflammation-related tumor. The p42.3 gene is shown to be highly expressed in GC, but its association with gastritis remains unknown. We aimed to explore the relationship between gastric inflammation and p42.3 gene in vitro and in vivo. Normal gastric epithelial cells (GES-1) were treated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Total cell mRNA and protein were extracted and collected, and polymerase chain reaction and Western blot were performed to determine the relative expression of p42.3 gene. In total, 291 biopsy samples from patients with chronic non-atrophic gastritis were collected and immunohistochemistry was used to measure the p42.3 protein expression. The association between p42.3 protein expression and the clinicopathological characteristics of these patients were analyzed. Both H. pylori and TNF-α significantly enhanced the p42.3 protein expression in GES-1 cells in a time and dose-dependent manner. In addition, p42.3 gene expression was positively associated with the severity of gastric mucosal inflammation and H. pylori infection (P = 0.000). Its expression was significantly more common in severe gastric inflammation and in H. pylori-infected cases. p42.3 gene expression is associated with gastric mucosal inflammation that can be upregulated by TNF-α and H. pylori infection. © 2015 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Leukocyte telomere length in major depression: correlations with chronicity, inflammation and oxidative stress--preliminary findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen M Wolkowitz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Depression is associated with an unusually high rate of aging-related illnesses and early mortality. One aspect of "accelerated aging" in depression may be shortened leukocyte telomeres. When telomeres critically shorten, as often occurs with repeated mitoses or in response to oxidation and inflammation, cells may die. Indeed, leukocyte telomere shortening predicts early mortality and medical illnesses in non-depressed populations. We sought to determine if leukocyte telomeres are shortened in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD, whether this is a function of lifetime depression exposure and whether this is related to putative mediators, oxidation and inflammation.Leukocyte telomere length was compared between 18 unmedicated MDD subjects and 17 controls and was correlated with lifetime depression chronicity and peripheral markers of oxidation (F2-isoprostane/Vitamin C ratio and inflammation (IL-6. Analyses were controlled for age and sex.The depressed group, as a whole, did not differ from the controls in telomere length. However, telomere length was significantly inversely correlated with lifetime depression exposure, even after controlling for age (p<0.05. Average telomere length in the depressed subjects who were above the median of lifetime depression exposure (≥9.2 years' cumulative duration was 281 base pairs shorter than that in controls (p<0.05, corresponding to approximately seven years of "accelerated cell aging." Telomere length was inversely correlated with oxidative stress in the depressed subjects (p<0.01 and in the controls (p<0.05 and with inflammation in the depressed subjects (p<0.05.These preliminary data indicate that accelerated aging at the level of leukocyte telomeres is proportional to lifetime exposure to MDD. This might be related to cumulative exposure to oxidative stress and inflammation in MDD. This suggest that telomere shortening does not antedate depression and is not an intrinsic feature. Rather, telomere shortening

  18. Inhalation of progesterone inhibits chronic airway inflammation of mice exposed to ozone.

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    Fei, Xia; Bao, Wuping; Zhang, Pengyu; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Guoqing; Zhang, Yingying; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Min

    2017-05-01

    Chronic ozone exposure leads to a model of mice with lung inflammation, emphysema and oxidative stress. Progesterone plays an important role in attenuating the neuroinflammation. We assume that progesterone will reduce the chronic airway inflammation exposed to ozone and evaluate whether combination of progesterone with glucocorticoids results in synergistic effects. C57/BL6 mice were exposed to ozone (2.5ppm, 3h) 12 times over 6 weeks, and were administered with progesterone (0.03 or 0.3mg/L; inhaled) alone or combined with budesonide (BUD) (0.2g/L) after each exposure until the tenth week. Mice were studied 24h after final exposure, cells and inflammatory mediators were assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lungs used for evaluation of glucocorticoids receptors (GR), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation and nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) activation. Exposure to ozone resulted in a marked lung neutrophilia. Moreover, in ozone-exposed group, the levels of oxidative stress-related interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, activated NF-κB and p38MAPK, airway inflammatory cells infiltration density, mean linear intercept (Lm) were greatly increased, FEV25 and glucocorticoids receptors (GR) were markedly decreased. Comparable to BUD, progesterone treatment dose-dependently led to a significant reduction of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, activated NF-κB and p38MAPK, and an increase of FEV25 and GR. Progesterone combined with BUD resulted in dramatic changes, compared to monotherapy of BUD or progesterone. Therefore, these results demonstrate that chronic ozone exposure has profound airway inflammatory effects counteracted by progesterone and progesterone acts synergistically with glucocorticoids in attenuating the airway inflammation dose-dependently. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Adipose tissue deficiency and chronic inflammation in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

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    Bai Xue

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2DM is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is progressive and involves multiple tissues. Goto-Kakizaki (GK rats are a polygenic model with elevated blood glucose, peripheral insulin resistance, a non-obese phenotype, and exhibit many degenerative changes observed in human T2DM. As part of a systems analysis of disease progression in this animal model, this study characterized the contribution of adipose tissue to pathophysiology of the disease. We sacrificed subgroups of GK rats and appropriate controls at 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks of age and carried out a gene array analysis of white adipose tissue. We expanded our physiological analysis of the animals that accompanied our initial gene array study on the livers from these animals. The expanded analysis included adipose tissue weights, HbA1c, additional hormonal profiles, lipid profiles, differential blood cell counts, and food consumption. HbA1c progressively increased in the GK animals. Altered corticosterone, leptin, and adiponectin profiles were also documented in GK animals. Gene array analysis identified 412 genes that were differentially expressed in adipose tissue of GKs relative to controls. The GK animals exhibited an age-specific failure to accumulate body fat despite their relatively higher calorie consumption which was well supported by the altered expression of genes involved in adipogenesis and lipogenesis in the white adipose tissue of these animals, including Fasn, Acly, Kklf9, and Stat3. Systemic inflammation was reflected by chronically elevated white blood cell counts. Furthermore, chronic inflammation in adipose tissue was evident from the differential expression of genes involved in inflammatory responses and activation of natural immunity, including two interferon regulated genes, Ifit and Iipg, as well as MHC class II genes. This study demonstrates an age specific failure to accumulate adipose tissue in the GK rat and the presence of chronic

  20. Adhesive capsulitis: An age related symptom of metabolic syndrome and chronic low-grade inflammation?

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    Pietrzak, Max

    2016-03-01

    Adhesive capsulitis (AC) is very poorly understood, particularly it's underlying etiology. Obesity and metabolic syndrome, which are strongly associated with chronic low grade inflammation, are becoming increasingly understood to underlie a raft of morbid states including upper limb pain syndromes, diabetes (DM), cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and central nervous system dysfunction and degeneration. Notwithstanding age, two of the strongest established risk factors for AC are DM and CVD. The hypothesis argues that similar to DM and CVD, the inflammation and capsular fibrosis seen in AC is precipitated by metabolic syndrome and chronic low grade inflammation. These pathophysiological mechanisms are highly likely to be perpetuated by upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production, sympathetic dominance of autonomic balance, and neuro-immune activation. The hypothesis predicts and describes how these processes may etiologically underpin and induce each sub-classification of AC. An improved understanding of the etiology of AC may lead to more accurate diagnosis, improved management, treatment outcomes, and reduce or prevent pain, disability and suffering associated with the disease. The paper follows on with a discussion of similarities between the pathophysiology of AC to general systemic inflammatory control mechanisms whereby connective tissue (CT) fibrosis is induced as a storage depot for leukocytes and chronic inflammatory cells. The potential role of hyaluronic acid (HA), the primary component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and CT, in the pathophysiology of AC is also discussed with potential treatment implications. Lastly, a biochemical link between physical and mental health through the ECM is described and the concept of a periventricular-limbic central driver of CT dysfunction is introduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

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    Varsha Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases. Major source of oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS is related to mitochondria as an endogenous source. Although there is ample evidence from tissues of patients with neurodegenerative disorders of morphological, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities in mitochondria, it is still not very clear whether the oxidative stress itself contributes to the onset of neurodegeneration or it is part of the neurodegenerative process as secondary manifestation. This paper begins with an overview of how oxidative stress occurs, discussing various oxidants and antioxidants, and role of oxidative stress in diseases in general. It highlights the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The last part of the paper describes the role of oxidative stress causing deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 hyperactivity associated with neurodegeneration.

  2. A PAF receptor antagonist inhibits acute airway inflammation and late-phase responses but not chronic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in a primate model of asthma

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    R. H. Gundel

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the effects of a PAF receptor antagonist, WEB 2170, on several indices of acute and chronic airway inflammation and associated changes in lung function in a primate model of allergic asthma. A single oral administration WEB 2170 provided dose related inhibition of the release of leukotriene C4 (LTC4 and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2 recovered and quantified in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid obtained during the acute phase response to inhaled antigen. In addition, oral WEB 2170 treatment in dual responder primates blocked the acute influx of neutrophils into the airways as well as the associated late-phase airway obstruction occurring 6 h after antigen inhalation. In contrast, a multiple dosing regime with WEB 2170 (once a day for 7 consecutive days failed to reduce the chronic airway inflammation (eosinophilic and associated airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled methacholine that is characteristic of dual responder monkeys. Thus, we conclude that the generation of PAF following antigen inhalation contributes to the development of lipid mediators, acute airway inflammation and associated late-phase airway obstruction in dual responder primates; however, PAF does not play a significant role in the maintenance of chronic airway inflammation and associated airway hyperresponsiveness in this primate model.

  3. VEGFR-3 blocking deteriorates inflammation with impaired lymphatic function and different changes in lymphatic vessels in acute and chronic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Lei; Zhao, Jing; Qin, Li; Cao, Jing-Li

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies show inflammation-associated lymphangiogenesis (IAL) induced by vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR-3) pathway has a close relationship with chronic intestinal inflammation, and antilymphatic signaling pathways may repress IAL. However, whether the biologic function of lymphatic vessel is the same in severe acute intestinal inflammation still remain unknown. C57BL/6 mice were administered with 5% of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days to establish severe acute colitis (SAC) model. Chronic colitis (CC) model was established by three cycles of 2% DSS for 5 days following water for 5 days. Mice were treated with VEGFR-3 antibody once daily in SAC group, or once every 3 days in CC group. The colon inflammation, submucosal edema, lymphatic vessel (LV) density, LV size, lymph flow, cytokines and immune cells infiltration were detected. Both acute and chronic colitis resulted in a significant aggravation of colon inflammation in anti-VEGFR-3-treated mice, compared with PBS-treated colitis mice. Meanwhile, this was accompanied with decreased lymph drainage, increased submucosal edema, inflammatory cells infiltration and cytokines levels. In acute intestinal inflammation, significantly distorted and enlarged lymphatics were found but the LV number remained unchanged; not only significantly distorted and enlarged lymphatics but reduced LV number were found in chronic colitis. Blocking VEGFR-3 in acute and chronic colitis leads to deterioration of colon inflammation with impaired lymphatic function and different changes in LVs. In the therapy targeting VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 pathway for lymphangiogenesis, the phrase and severity of intestinal inflammation should be taken into account.

  4. Periodontal Disease: A Covert Source of Inflammation in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

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    Gener Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of atherosclerotic complications (myocardial infarction, stroke, and sudden death is increased in end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients, especially in haemodialysis patients. Increasing evidence suggests that both in general population and in dialysis patients, systemic inflammation plays a dominant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic complications. In general population, also, evidence shows that moderate to severe periodontitis can contribute to inflammatory burden by increasing serum CRP levels and may increase the prevalence of atherosclerotic events. Moreover, the results of some new interventional studies reveal that effective phase I periodontal therapy may decrease serum CRP levels, the most important acute phase protein, monitored as a systemic marker of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction as well, used as an initial predictor of atherosclerotic events. Considering that moderate to severe periodontal diseases have a higher prevalence in CKD and in dialysis population and that periodontal examination is not part of the standard medical assessment, destructive periodontitis might be an ignored source of systemic inflammation in end-stage renal disease patients and may add to the chronic inflammatory status in CKD.

  5. Effect of nintedanib on airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine chronic asthma model.

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    Lee, Hwa Young; Hur, Jung; Kim, In Kyoung; Kang, Ji Young; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Lee, Sook Young; Kwon, Soon Suk; Kim, Young Kyoon; Rhee, Chin Kook

    Nintedanib is a multi-tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor recently approved for treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Although angiogenesis is a key process involved in airway structural changes in patients with bronchial asthma, the effect of nintedanib targeting the angiokinase pathway on airway inflammation and remodeling has not been evaluated. We used a 3-month ovalbumin (OVA) challenge mouse model of airway remodeling. Nintedanib was orally administrated during the challenge period, and the effects were examined based on the percentage of airway inflammatory cells, airway hyper-reactivity (AHR), peribronchial goblet cell hyperplasia, total lung collagen and smooth muscle area. The expression of growth factor receptors was analyzed in mice lung tissues. The OVA challenged group showed a significant increase in airway eosinophilic inflammation, elevated Th2 cytokines, AHR, and airway remodeling compared to those in the control group. The airway remodeling process, as evaluated by goblet cell hyperplasia, total lung collagen level, and airway smooth muscle area, was suppressed by nintedanib compared to that by OVA. Nintedanib effectively suppressed the phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor/ platelet derived growth factor subunit2/fibroblast growth factor3 receptors in the mice lung. Nintedanib effectively ameliorated airway inflammation and remodeling in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. These results suggest that nintedanib could be a new treatment agent targeting airway remodeling in patients with severe asthma.

  6. Chronic inflammation-elicited liver progenitor cell conversion to liver cancer stem cell with clinical significance.

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    Li, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Cheng; Xiang, Dai-Min; Qu, Le; Sun, Wen; Lu, Xin-Yuan; Zhou, Teng-Fei; Chen, Shu-Zhen; Ning, Bei-Fang; Cheng, Zhuo; Xia, Ming-Yang; Shen, Wei-Feng; Yang, Wen; Wen, Wen; Lee, Terence Kin Wah; Cong, Wen-Ming; Wang, Hong-Yang; Ding, Jin

    2017-12-01

    The substantial heterogeneity and hierarchical organization in liver cancer support the theory of liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs). However, the relationship between chronic hepatic inflammation and LCSC generation remains obscure. Here, we observed a close correlation between aggravated inflammation and liver progenitor cell (LPC) propagation in the cirrhotic liver of rats exposed to diethylnitrosamine. LPCs isolated from the rat cirrhotic liver initiated subcutaneous liver cancers in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice, suggesting the malignant transformation of LPCs toward LCSCs. Interestingly, depletion of Kupffer cells in vivo attenuated the LCSC properties of transformed LPCs and suppressed cytokeratin 19/Oval cell 6-positive tumor occurrence. Conversely, LPCs cocultured with macrophages exhibited enhanced LCSC properties. We further demonstrated that macrophage-secreted tumor necrosis factor-α triggered chromosomal instability in LPCs through the deregulation of ubiquitin D and checkpoint kinase 2 and enhanced the self-renewal of LPCs through the tumor necrosis factor receptor 1/Src/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway, which synergistically contributed to the conversion of LPCs to LCSCs. Clinical investigation revealed that cytokeratin 19/Oval cell 6-positive liver cancer patients displayed a worse prognosis and exhibited superior response to sorafenib treatment. Our results not only clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammation-mediated LCSC generation but also provide a molecular classification for the individualized treatment of liver cancer. (Hepatology 2017;66:1934-1951). © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  7. Changing glucocorticoid action: 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in acute and chronic inflammation

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    Chapman, Karen E.; Coutinho, Agnes E.; Zhang, Zhenguang; Kipari, Tiina; Savill, John S.; Seckl, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of cortisone in the 1940s and its early success in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, glucocorticoids have remained the mainstay of anti-inflammatory therapies. However, cortisone itself is intrinsically inert. To be effective, it requires conversion to cortisol, the active glucocorticoid, by the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1). Despite the identification of 11β-HSD in liver in 1953 (which we now know to be 11β-HSD1), its physiological role has been little explored until recently. Over the past decade, however, it has become apparent that 11β-HSD1 plays an important role in shaping endogenous glucocorticoid action. Acute inflammation is more severe with 11β-HSD1-deficiency or inhibition, yet in some inflammatory settings such as obesity or diabetes, 11β-HSD1-deficiency/inhibition is beneficial, reducing inflammation. Current evidence suggests both beneficial and detrimental effects may result from 11β-HSD1 inhibition in chronic inflammatory disease. Here we review recent evidence pertaining to the role of 11β-HSD1 in inflammation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘CSR 2013’. PMID:23435016

  8. Anti-inflammatory activity of Terminalia paniculata bark extract against acute and chronic inflammation in rats.

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    Talwar, Sahil; Nandakumar, K; Nayak, Pawan G; Bansal, Punit; Mudgal, Jayesh; Mor, Vijay; Rao, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna; Lobo, Richard

    2011-03-24

    Terminalia paniculata Roxb. (Family-Combretaceae) is a wild tree commonly used in traditional ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of inflammation of parotid glands and in menstrual disorders. To explore the folk use of Terminalia paniculata on pharmacological grounds to evaluate the scientific basis of anti-inflammatory activity. The anti-inflammatory activity of Terminalia paniculata was studied against carrageenan-induced hind paw edema, air pouch inflammation and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis in rats. The aqueous extract of Terminalia paniculata bark (TPW) was administered at the concentrations of 100, 200 and 400mg/kg body weight. TPW showed significant (p400mg/kg) also reduced the carrageenan-induced leukocyte migration (50.92 ± 5.71%) and myeloperoxidase activity (49.31 ± 5.24%) in air pouch exudates. TPW (200mg/kg) exhibits anti-rheumatic and analgesic activities by improving the altered haematological milieu (ESR, CRP, RF, WBC, RBC and Hb) and also by inhibiting the flexion scores and radiographic changes in CFA-induced arthritis. This extract also had significant (p<0.05) effects on the occurrence of secondary lesions compared to CFA control. Terminalia paniculata bark may be a potential preventive or therapeutic candidate for the treatment of chronic inflammation and arthritis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Adipose tissue dysfunction, adipokines, and low-grade chronic inflammation in polycystic ovary syndrome.

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    Spritzer, Poli Mara; Lecke, Sheila B; Satler, Fabíola; Morsch, Debora M

    2015-05-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a complex condition that affects women of reproductive age, is characterized by ovulatory dysfunction and androgen excess. Women with PCOS present higher prevalence of obesity, central adiposity, and dyslipidemia, and face increased risk of type 2 diabetes. PCOS is closely linked to functional derangements in adipose tissue. Adipocytes seem to be prone to hypertrophy when exposed to androgen excess, as experienced by women with PCOS, and both adipose tissue hypertrophy and hyperandrogenism are related to insulin resistance. Hypertrophic adipocytes are more susceptible to inflammation, apoptosis, fibrosis, and release of free fatty acids. Disturbed secretion of adipokines may also impact the pathophysiology of PCOS through their influence on metabolism and on sex steroid secretion. Chronic low-grade inflammation in PCOS is also related to hyperandrogenism and to the hypertrophy of adipocytes, causing compression phenomena in the stromal vessels, leading to adipose tissue hypoperfusion and altered secretion of cytokines. Lifestyle changes are the first-line intervention for reducing metabolic risks in PCOS and the addition of an insulin-sensitizing drug might be required. Nevertheless, there is not sufficient evidence in favor of any specific pharmacologic therapies to directly oppose inflammation. Further studies are warranted to identify an adipokine that could serve as an indirect marker of adipocyte production in PCOS, representing a reliable sign of metabolic alteration in this syndrome. © 2015 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  10. Sub-chronic lung inflammation after airway exposures to Bacillus thuringiensis biopesticides in mice

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    Barfod Kenneth K

    2010-09-01

    exposures to commercial Bt based biopesticides can induce sub-chronic lung inflammation in mice, which may be the first step in the development of chronic lung diseases. Inhalation of Bt aerosols does not induce airway irritation, which could explain why workers may be less inclined to use a filter mask during the application process, and are thereby less protected from exposure to Bt spores.

  11. Influence of chronic moderate sleep restriction and exercise on inflammation and carcinogenesis in mice.

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    Zielinski, Mark R; Davis, J Mark; Fadel, James R; Youngstedt, Shawn D

    2012-05-01

    The effects of chronic moderate sleep restriction and exercise training on carcinogenesis were examined in adenomatous polyposis coli multiple intestinal neoplasma (APC Min(+/-)) mice, a genetic strain which is predisposed to developing adenomatous polyposis. The mice were randomized to one of four 11 week treatments in a 2×2 design involving sleep restriction (by 4 h/day) vs. normal sleep and exercise training (1h/day) vs. sedentary control. Wild-type control mice underwent identical experimental treatments. Compared with the wild-type mice, APC Min(+/-) mice had disrupted hematology and enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production from peritoneal exudate cells. Among the APC Min(+/-) mice, consistent interactions of sleep loss and exercise were found for measures of polyp formation, inflammation, and hematology. Sleep loss had little effect on these variables under sedentary conditions, but sleep loss had clear detrimental effects under exercise conditions. Exercise training resulted in improvements in these measures under normal sleep conditions, but exercise tended to elicit no effect or to exacerbate the effects of sleep restriction. Significant correlations of inflammation with polyp burden were observed. Among wild-type mice, similar, but less consistent interactions of sleep restriction and exercise were found. These data suggest that the benefits of exercise on carcinogenesis and immune function were impaired by chronic moderate sleep restriction, and that harmful effects of sleep restriction were generally realized only in the presence of exercise. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Diethylcarbamazine Reduces Chronic Inflammation and Fibrosis in Carbon Tetrachloride- (CCl4- Induced Liver Injury in Mice

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    Sura Wanessa Santos Rocha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of DEC on the CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice. Chronic inflammation was induced by i.p. administration of CCl4 0.5 μL/g of body weight through two injections a week for 6 weeks. DEC (50 mg/kg was administered by gavage for 12 days before finishing the CCl4 induction. Histological analyses of the DEC-treated group exhibited reduced inflammatory process and prevented liver necrosis and fibrosis. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analyses of the DEC-treated group showed reduced COX-2, IL1β, MDA, TGF-β, and αSMA immunopositivity, besides exhibiting decreased IL1β, COX-2, NFκB, IFNγ, and TGFβ expressions in the western blot analysis. The DEC group enhanced significantly the IL-10 expression. The reduction of hepatic injury in the DEC-treated group was confirmed by the COX-2 and iNOS mRNA expression levels. Based on the results of the present study, DEC can be used as a potential anti-inflammatory drug for chronic hepatic inflammation.

  13. Low-grade chronic inflammation perpetuated by modern diet as a promoter of obesity and osteoporosis.

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    Ilich, Jasminka Z; Kelly, Owen J; Kim, Youjin; Spicer, Maria T

    2014-06-01

    Some of the universal characteristics of pre-agricultural hominin diets are strikingly different from the modern human diet. Hominin dietary choices were limited to wild plant and wild animal foods, while the modern diet includes more than 70 % of energy consumed from refined sugars, refined vegetable oils, and highly processed cereals and dairy products. The modern diet, with higher intake of fat has also resulted in a higher ratio of omega-6 (n-6) to omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), contributing to low-grade chronic inflammation (LGCI) and thus promoting the development of many chronic diseases, including obesity and osteoporosis. In this review, we describe the changes in modern diet, focusing on the kind and amount of consumed fat; explain the shortcomings of the modern diet with regard to inflammatory processes; and delineate the reciprocity between adiposity and inflammatory processes, with inflammation being a common link between obesity and osteoporosis. We present the evidence that overconsumption of n-6 PUFA coupled with under-consumption of n-3 PUFA results in LGCI and, along with the increased presence of reactive oxygen species, leads to a shift in mesenchymal stem cells (precursors for both osteoblasts and adipocytes) lineage commitment toward increased adipogenesis and suppressed osteoblastogenesis. In turn, high n-6 to n-3 PUFA ratios in the modern diet, coupled with increased synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines due to adiposity, propagate obesity and osteoporosis by increasing or maintaining LGCI.

  14. Toxicogenomic analysis of susceptibility to inhaled urban particulate matter in mice with chronic lung inflammation

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    Yauk Carole L

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals with chronic lung disease are at increased risk of adverse health effects from airborne particulate matter. Characterization of underlying pollutant-phenotype interactions may require comprehensive strategies. Here, a toxicogenomic approach was used to investigate how inflammation modifies the pulmonary response to urban particulate matter. Results Transgenic mice with constitutive pulmonary overexpression of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α under the control of the surfactant protein C promoter and wildtype littermates (C57BL/6 background were exposed by inhalation for 4 h to particulate matter (0 or 42 mg/m3 EHC-6802 and euthanized 0 or 24 h post-exposure. The low alveolar dose of particles (16 μg did not provoke an inflammatory response in the lungs of wildtype mice, nor exacerbate the chronic inflammation in TNF animals. Real-time PCR confirmed particle-dependent increases of CYP1A1 (30–100%, endothelin-1 (20–40%, and metallothionein-II (20–40% mRNA in wildtype and TNF mice (p Conclusion Our data support the hypothesis that health effects of acute exposure to urban particles are dominated by activation of specific physiological response cascades rather than widespread changes in gene expression.

  15. Systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer: common driver of pulmonary cachexia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceelen, Judith J M; Langen, Ramon C J; Schols, Annemie M W J

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a putative role of systemic inflammation as a driver of pulmonary cachexia induced by either chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or nonsmall cell lung cancer is reviewed. Gaps in current translational research approaches are discussed and alternative strategies are proposed to provide new insights. Activation of the ubiquitin proteasome system has generally been considered a cause of pulmonary cachexia, but current animal models lack specificity and evidence is lacking in nonsmall cell lung cancer and conflicting in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Recent studies have shown activation of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in both nonsmall cell lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Myonuclear loss, as a consequence of increased apoptotic events in myofibers, has been suggested in cancer-cachexia-associated muscle atrophy. Plasma transfer on myotube cultures can be used to detect early inflammatory signals in patients and presence of atrophy-inducing activity within the circulation. Comparative clinical research between nonsmall cell lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in different disease stages is useful to unravel disease-specific versus common denominators of pulmonary cachexia.

  16. Association of Mucosal Organisms with Patterns of Inflammation in Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

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    Thanit Chalermwatanachai

    Full Text Available Chronic rhinosinusitis is a multifactorial process disease in which bacterial infection or colonization may play an important role in the initiation or persistence of inflammatory response. The association between mucosal bacteria presence and inflammatory patterns has only been partially explored.To demonstrate specific mucosal microorganisms possible association with inflammatory patterns.We collected nasal polyps or sinus tissues from a clinical selection of six patient groups with defined sinus disease using tissue biomarkers. In the tissues, we detected bacteria using peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH.After reviewing a total of 115 samples (15-20 samples per group, the mucosal presence of Staphylococcus aureus was correlated with IL-5 and SE-IgE positive chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and nasal polyps from cystic fibrosis patients. Chronic rhinosinusitis without nasal polyps with TNFα >20 pg/ml was associated with the mucosal presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.This study identifies the relationship between intramucosal microbes and inflammatory patterns, suggesting that bacteria may affect the type of inflammation in chronic rhinosinusitis. Additional investigation is needed to further identify the nature of the relationship.

  17. Autoimmune priming, tissue attack and chronic inflammation - the three stages of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmdahl, Rikard; Malmström, Vivianne; Burkhardt, Harald

    2014-06-01

    Extensive genome-wide association studies have recently shed some light on the causes of chronic autoimmune diseases and have confirmed a central role of the adaptive immune system. Moreover, better diagnostics using disease-associated autoantibodies have been developed, and treatment has improved through the development of biologicals with precise molecular targets. Here, we use rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as a prototype for chronic autoimmune disease to propose that the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases could be divided into three discrete stages. First, yet unknown environmental challenges seem to activate innate immunity thereby providing an adjuvant signal for the induction of adaptive immune responses that lead to the production of autoantibodies and determine the subsequent disease development. Second, a joint-specific inflammatory reaction occurs. This inflammatory reaction might be clinically diagnosed as the earliest signs of the disease. Third, inflammation is converted to a chronic process leading to tissue destruction and remodeling. In this review, we discuss the stages involved in RA pathogenesis and the experimental approaches, mainly involving animal models that can be used to investigate each disease stage. Although we focus on RA, it is possible that a similar stepwise development of disease also occurs in other chronic autoimmune settings such as multiple sclerosis (MS), type 1 diabetes, and systemic lupus erythematosus. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Histologic and biochemical alterations predict pulmonary mechanical dysfunction in aging mice with chronic lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Christopher B; Groves, Angela M; Jaggernauth, Smita U; Laskin, Debra L; Gow, Andrew J

    2017-08-01

    Both aging and chronic inflammation produce complex structural and biochemical alterations to the lung known to impact work of breathing. Mice deficient in surfactant protein D (Sftpd) develop progressive age-related lung pathology characterized by tissue destruction/remodeling, accumulation of foamy macrophages and alteration in surfactant composition. This study proposes to relate changes in tissue structure seen in normal aging and in chronic inflammation to altered lung mechanics using a computational model. Alterations in lung function in aging and Sftpd -/- mice have been inferred from fitting simple mechanical models to respiratory impedance data (Zrs), however interpretation has been confounded by the simultaneous presence of multiple coexisting pathophysiologic processes. In contrast to the inverse modeling approach, this study uses simulation from experimental measurements to recapitulate how aging and inflammation alter Zrs. Histologic and mechanical measurements were made in C57BL6/J mice and congenic Sftpd-/- mice at 8, 27 and 80 weeks of age (n = 8/group). An anatomic computational model based on published airway morphometry was developed and Zrs was simulated between 0.5 and 20 Hz. End expiratory pressure dependent changes in airway caliber and recruitment were estimated from mechanical measurements. Tissue elements were simulated using the constant phase model of viscoelasticity. Baseline elastance distribution was estimated in 8-week-old wild type mice, and stochastically varied for each condition based on experimentally measured alteration in elastic fiber composition, alveolar geometry and surfactant composition. Weighing reduction in model error against increasing model complexity allowed for identification of essential features underlying mechanical pathology and their contribution to Zrs. Using a maximum likelihood approach, alteration in lung recruitment and diminished elastic fiber density were shown predictive of mechanical alteration at

  19. Chronic granulomatous inflammation in teleost fish Piaractus mesopotamicus: histopathology model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson G Manrique

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study evaluated the cell kinetic and formation of granuloma during chronic inflammation induced by Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG in the skeletal muscle of Piaractus mesopotamicus, as a histopathology model to study innate immunity. Materials and methods. Sixty fish were divided in two groups: BCG-inoculated and non-inoculated fish and the inflammatory response analyzed 3, 7, 14, 21 and 33 days post-inoculation (DPI by histopathology after hematoxylin-eosin and Ziehl-Neelsen staining. Results. 3 DPI of BCG showed a diffuse inflammatory reaction mostly composed by mononuclear cells. The inflammation continued diffuse 7 DPI initiating the cellular organization surrounding the inoculum and have continued at 14 DPI with discrete presence of epithelioid-like type cells with acidophilic cytoplasm and floppy chromatin. Higher cellular organization (21 DPI surrounding the granuloma with intense peripheral mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate and nevertheless, an increase in the number of fibroblasts and macrophage-like cells was observed. The inflammatory process became less diffuse 33 DPI with formation of small amount of granuloma surrounded by the same type of reaction found in bigger granuloma. Both the young and old granuloma presented typical characteristic around the inoculum composed by a layer of epithelioid-like type cells, besides macrophages, some lymphocytes and abundant fibroblasts. Conclusions. This study showed the feasibility in the use of pacus to study chronic granulomatous inflammatory response induced by BCG, characterized by changes in the kinetics of inflammatory cells in skeletal muscle classifying as immune-epithelioid type, similar to granulomatous inflammation caused by M. marinum in teleost fish.

  20. Chronic allergic pulmonary inflammation is aggravated in angiotensin-(1-7) Mas receptor knockout mice.

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    Magalhães, Giselle S; Rodrigues-Machado, Maria Glória; Motta-Santos, Daisy; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A; Barcelos, Lucíola S; Campagnole-Santos, Maria José

    2016-12-01

    The angiotensin-(1-7) [ANG-(1-7)]/Mas receptor pathway is currently recognized as a counterbalancing mechanism of the renin-angiotensin system in different pathophysiological conditions. We have previously described that treatment with ANG-(1-7) attenuates lung inflammation and remodeling in an experimental model of asthma. In the present study, we investigated whether lack of the Mas receptor could alter the inflammatory response in a model of chronic allergic lung inflammation induced by ovalbumin (OVA). Mas receptor wild-type (MasWT) and knockout (MasKO) mice were subjected to four doses of OVA (20 μg/mice ip) with a 14-day interval. At the 21st day, nebulization with OVA (1%) was started, three times per week until the 46th day. Control groups received saline (0.9% ip) and were nebulized with saline (0.9%). MasWT-OVA developed a modest inflammatory response and minor pulmonary remodeling to OVA challenge. Strikingly, MasKO-OVA presented a significant increase in inflammatory cell infiltrate, increase in extracellular matrix deposition, increase in thickening of the alveolar parenchyma, increase in thickening of the smooth muscle layer of the pulmonary arterioles, increase in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in the lungs, characteristic of chronic asthma. Additionally, MasKO-OVA presented an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation compared with MasWT-OVA. Furthermore, MasKO-OVA showed a worse performance in a test of maximum physical exercise compared with MasWT-OVA. Our study shows that effects triggered by the Mas receptor are important to attenuate the inflammatory and remodeling processes in a model of allergic lung inflammation in mice. Our data indicate that impairment of the ANG-(1-7)/Mas receptor pathway may lead to worsening of the pathophysiological changes of asthma. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Metabolic syndrome criteria as predictors of insulin resistance, inflammation and mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients.

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    Vogt, Barbara Perez; Souza, Priscilla L; Minicucci, Marcos Ferreira; Martin, Luis Cuadrado; Barretti, Pasqual; Caramori, Jacqueline Teixeira

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic syndrome are characterized by overlapping disorders, including glucose intolerance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and, in some cases, obesity. However, there are no specific criteria for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in CKD. Metabolic syndrome can also be associated with increased risk of mortality. Some traditional risk factors may protect dialysis patients from mortality, known as "reverse epidemiology." Metabolic syndrome might undergo reverse epidemiology. The objectives were to detect differences in frequency and metabolic characteristics associated with three sets of diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome, to evaluate the accuracy of insulin resistance (IR) and inflammation to identify patients with metabolic syndrome, and to investigate the effects of metabolic syndrome by three sets of diagnostic criteria on mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients. An observational study was conducted. Diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome proposed by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), and Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome (HMetS) statement were applied to 98 hemodialysis patients. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 51%, 66.3%, and 75.3% according to NCEP ATP III, IDF, and HMetS criteria, respectively. Diagnosis of metabolic syndrome by HMetS was simultaneously capable of revealing both inflammation and IR, whereas NCEP ATP III and IDF criteria were only able to identify IR. Mortality risk increased in the presence of metabolic syndrome regardless of the criteria used. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis varies according to the diagnostic criteria used. IR and inflammation predict metabolic syndrome only when diagnosed by HMetS criteria. HMetS was the diagnostic criteria that can predict the highest risk of mortality.

  2. Histologic and biochemical alterations predict pulmonary mechanical dysfunction in aging mice with chronic lung inflammation.

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    Christopher B Massa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Both aging and chronic inflammation produce complex structural and biochemical alterations to the lung known to impact work of breathing. Mice deficient in surfactant protein D (Sftpd develop progressive age-related lung pathology characterized by tissue destruction/remodeling, accumulation of foamy macrophages and alteration in surfactant composition. This study proposes to relate changes in tissue structure seen in normal aging and in chronic inflammation to altered lung mechanics using a computational model. Alterations in lung function in aging and Sftpd -/- mice have been inferred from fitting simple mechanical models to respiratory impedance data (Zrs, however interpretation has been confounded by the simultaneous presence of multiple coexisting pathophysiologic processes. In contrast to the inverse modeling approach, this study uses simulation from experimental measurements to recapitulate how aging and inflammation alter Zrs. Histologic and mechanical measurements were made in C57BL6/J mice and congenic Sftpd-/- mice at 8, 27 and 80 weeks of age (n = 8/group. An anatomic computational model based on published airway morphometry was developed and Zrs was simulated between 0.5 and 20 Hz. End expiratory pressure dependent changes in airway caliber and recruitment were estimated from mechanical measurements. Tissue elements were simulated using the constant phase model of viscoelasticity. Baseline elastance distribution was estimated in 8-week-old wild type mice, and stochastically varied for each condition based on experimentally measured alteration in elastic fiber composition, alveolar geometry and surfactant composition. Weighing reduction in model error against increasing model complexity allowed for identification of essential features underlying mechanical pathology and their contribution to Zrs. Using a maximum likelihood approach, alteration in lung recruitment and diminished elastic fiber density were shown predictive of mechanical

  3. Bronchial Secretory Immunoglobulin A Deficiency Correlates With Airway Inflammation and Progression of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

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    Cates, Justin M.; Lawson, William E.; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Milstone, Aaron P.; Massion, Pierre P.; Ocak, Sebahat; Ware, Lorraine B.; Lee, Jae Woo; Bowler, Russell P.; Kononov, Alexey V.; Randell, Scott H.; Blackwell, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Although airway inflammation can persist for years after smoking cessation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the mechanisms of persistent inflammation are largely unknown. Objectives: We investigated relationships between bronchial epithelial remodeling, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) expression, secretory IgA (SIgA), airway inflammation, and mural remodeling in COPD. Methods: Lung tissue specimens and bronchoalveolar lavage were obtained from lifetime nonsmokers and former smokers with or without COPD. Epithelial structural changes were quantified by morphometric analysis. Expression of pIgR was determined by immunostaining and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry was performed for IgA, CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, and cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus antigens. Total IgA and SIgA were measured by ELISA and IgA transcytosis was studied using cultured human bronchial epithelial cells. Measurements and Main Results: Areas of bronchial mucosa covered by normal pseudostratified ciliated epithelium were characterized by pIgR expression with SIgA present on the mucosal surface. In contrast, areas of bronchial epithelial remodeling had reduced pIgR expression, localized SIgA deficiency, and increased CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte infiltration. In small airways (<2 mm), these changes were associated with presence of herpesvirus antigens, airway wall remodeling, and airflow limitation in patients with COPD. Patients with COPD had reduced SIgA in bronchoalveolar lavage. Air–liquid interface epithelial cell cultures revealed that complete epithelial differentiation was required for normal pIgR expression and IgA transcytosis. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that epithelial structural abnormalities lead to localized SIgA deficiency in COPD airways. Impaired mucosal immunity may contribute to persistent airway inflammation and progressive airway remodeling in COPD. PMID:21512171

  4. Chronic antidepressant treatments resulted in altered expression of genes involved in inflammation in the rat hypothalamus.

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    Alboni, Silvia; Benatti, Cristina; Montanari, Claudia; Tascedda, Fabio; Brunello, Nicoletta

    2013-12-05

    To gain insight into the possible immune targets of antidepressant, we evaluated the expression of several inflammatory mediators in the hypothalamus of rats chronically (28 days) treated with the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (5mg/kg, i.p.) or the tricyclic compound imipramine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). We focused our attention on the hypothalamus as it plays a key role in determining many of the somatic symptoms experienced by depressed patients. This brain region, critical also for expression of motivated behaviours, participates in the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and in stress response as well as coordinates physiological functions such as sleep and food intake that have been found altered in a high percentage of depressed patients. Notably, hypothalamus is a key structure for brain cytokine expression and function as it integrates signals from the neuro, immune, endocrine systems. By means of quantitative Real Time PCR experiments we demonstrated that a chronic treatment with either fluoxetine or imipramine resulted in a reduction of IL-6 and IFN-γ mRNAs and increased IL-4 mRNA expression in the rat hypothalamus. Moreover, we demonstrated that hypothalamic expression of members of IL-18 system was differentially affected by chronic antidepressant treatments. Chronically administered fluoxetine decreased IL-8 and CX3CL1 hypothalamic expression, while a chronic treatment with imipramine decreased p11 mRNA. Our data suggest that a shift in the balance of the inflammation toward an anti-inflammatory state in the hypothalamus may represent a common mechanism of action of both the chronic treatments with fluoxetine and imipramine. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Inflammation and nutritional status assessment by malnutrition inflammation score and its outcome in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

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    Jagadeswaran, D; Indhumathi, E; Hemamalini, A J; Sivakumar, V; Soundararajan, P; Jayakumar, M

    2018-01-09

    Malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome (MICS), hyperhomocysteinemia, calcium and phosphate levels derangement have been predicted as important contributing factors for the progression of cardiovascular burden. Among patients with earlier stage of CKD, hypoalbuminaemia and inflammation deliberated as non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors, which add more burden to circulatory disease, mortality and rapid advancement to CKD stage 5. The aim of the study is to evaluate inflammation and nutritional status of CKD patients not on dialysis using Malnutrition inflammation score (MIS) and to verify the association with mortality in the follow-up period. In this prospective cohort study 129 (66 males, 63 females) pre-dialysis CKD patients enrolled between June 2013 to August 2014 and censored until March 2017. Malnutrition and Inflammation assessed using Malnutrition inflammation score. Blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, albumin, Interleukin - 6, highly sensitive C reactive protein (hsCRP), total cholesterol and anthropometric data were analyzed. The Malnutrition inflammation score in pre-dialysis CKD patients ranged from 0 to 18 with the median score of two. During 36 or more months of follow-up, there were 30 (23.2%) deaths, 35 (27%) patients initiated on hemodialysis, one (0.7%) patient was initiated on peritoneal dialysis, two (1.4%) patients underwent renal transplantation and two (1.4%) patients were lost for follow-up. In this study, 33% had varying degree of malnutrition and inflammation. Patients who had MIS ≥7 had significant increase in IL-6 (p = 0.003) and HsCRP levels (p nutritional status and inflammation using MIS regularly to prevent malnutrition and its associated complications through appropriate medical and nutritional intervention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  6. Interleukin-33 Drives Activation of Alveolar Macrophages and Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Asthma

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    Melissa M. Bunting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of interleukin-33 (IL-33 in airway inflammation in an experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, which reproduces many of the features of the human disease. Systemically sensitized female BALB/c mice were challenged with a low mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks to induce chronic asthmatic inflammation and then received a single moderate-level challenge to trigger acute airway inflammation simulating an asthmatic exacerbation. The inflammatory response and expression of cytokines and activation markers by alveolar macrophages (AM were assessed, as was the effect of pretreatment with a neutralizing antibody to IL-33. Compared to chronically challenged mice, AM from an acute exacerbation exhibited significantly enhanced expression of markers of alternative activation, together with enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and of cell surface proteins associated with antigen presentation. In parallel, there was markedly increased expression of both mRNA and immunoreactivity for IL-33 in the airways. Neutralization of IL-33 significantly decreased both airway inflammation and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines by AM. Collectively, these data indicate that in this model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, IL-33 drives activation of AM and has an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation.

  7. Chronic exposure to biomass fuel smoke and markers of endothelial inflammation.

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    Caravedo, M A; Herrera, P M; Mongilardi, N; de Ferrari, A; Davila-Roman, V G; Gilman, R H; Wise, R A; Miele, C H; Miranda, J J; Checkley, W

    2016-10-01

    Indoor smoke exposure may affect cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk via lung-mediated inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial inflammation. We sought to explore the association between indoor smoke exposure from burning biomass fuels and a selected group of markers for endothelial inflammation. We compared serum concentrations of amyloid A protein, E-selectin, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and VCAM-1, von Willebrand factor (vWF), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in 228 biomass-exposed vs. 228 non-exposed participants living in Puno, Peru. Average age was 56 years (s.d. = 13), average BMI was 26.5 kg/m(2) (s.d. = 4.4), 48% were male, 59.4% completed high school, and 2% reported a physician diagnosis of CVD. In unadjusted analysis, serum levels of soluble ICAM-1 (330 vs. 302 ng/ml; P < 0.001), soluble VCAM-1 (403 vs. 362 ng/ml; P < 0.001), and E-selectin (54.2 vs. 52.7 ng/ml; P = 0.05) were increased in biomass-exposed vs. non-exposed participants, respectively, whereas serum levels of vWF (1148 vs. 1311 mU/ml; P < 0.001) and hs-CRP (2.56 vs. 3.12 mg/l; P < 0.001) were decreased, respectively. In adjusted analyses, chronic exposure to biomass fuels remained positively associated with serum levels of soluble ICAM-1 (P = 0.03) and VCAM-1 (P = 0.05) and E-selectin (P = 0.05), and remained negatively associated with serum levels of vWF (P = 0.02) and hs-CRP (P < 0.001). Daily exposure to biomass fuel smoke was associated with important differences in specific biomarkers of endothelial inflammation and may help explain accelerated atherosclerosis among those who are chronically exposed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Keloid and Hypertrophic Scars Are the Result of Chronic Inflammation in the Reticular Dermis

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    Rei Ogawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Keloids and hypertrophic scars are caused by cutaneous injury and irritation, including trauma, insect bite, burn, surgery, vaccination, skin piercing, acne, folliculitis, chicken pox, and herpes zoster infection. Notably, superficial injuries that do not reach the reticular dermis never cause keloidal and hypertrophic scarring. This suggests that these pathological scars are due to injury to this skin layer and the subsequent aberrant wound healing therein. The latter is characterized by continuous and histologically localized inflammation. As a result, the reticular layer of keloids and hypertrophic scars contains inflammatory cells, increased numbers of fibroblasts, newly formed blood vessels, and collagen deposits. Moreover, proinflammatory factors, such as interleukin (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α are upregulated in keloid tissues, which suggests that, in patients with keloids, proinflammatory genes in the skin are sensitive to trauma. This may promote chronic inflammation, which in turn may cause the invasive growth of keloids. In addition, the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in pathological scars suggests that, rather than being skin tumors, keloids and hypertrophic scars are inflammatory disorders of skin, specifically inflammatory disorders of the reticular dermis. Various external and internal post-wounding stimuli may promote reticular inflammation. The nature of these stimuli most likely shapes the characteristics, quantity, and course of keloids and hypertrophic scars. Specifically, it is likely that the intensity, frequency, and duration of these stimuli determine how quickly the scars appear, the direction and speed of growth, and the intensity of symptoms. These proinflammatory stimuli include a variety of local, systemic, and genetic factors. These observations together suggest that the clinical differences between keloids and hypertrophic scars merely reflect differences in the intensity, frequency

  9. Soy isoflavones avert chronic inflammation-induced bone loss and vascular disease

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    Lightfoot Stan A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence from epidemiological, clinical and animal studies suggests a link may exist between low bone density and cardiovascular disease, with inflammatory mediators implicated in the pathophysiology of both conditions. This project examined whether supplementation with soy isoflavones (IF, shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, could prevent tissue expression of TNF-α and the development of skeletal pathology in an animal model of chronic inflammation. Methods Eight-week old, intact, female C57BL/6J mice were used. In Phase 1, a lipopolysaccharide (LPS-dose response study (0, 0.133, 1.33 and 13.3 μg/d was conducted to determine the LPS dose to use in Phase 2. The results indicated the 1.33 μg LPS/d dose produced the greatest decrease in lymphocytes and increase in neutrophils. Subsequently, in Phase 2, mice were randomly assigned to one of six groups (n = 12–13 per group: 0 or 1.33 μg LPS/d (placebo or LPS in combination with 0, 126 or 504 mg aglycone equivalents of soy IF/kg diet (Control, Low or High dose IF. Mice were fed IF beginning 2 wks prior to the 30-d LPS study period. Results At the end of the study, no differences were detected in final body weights or uterine weights. In terms of trabecular bone microarchitecture, μCT analyses of the distal femur metaphysis indicated that LPS significantly decreased trabecular bone volume (BV/TV and number (TbN, and increased separation (TbSp. Trabecular bone strength (i.e. total force and stiffness were also compromised in response to LPS. The High IF dose provided protection against these detrimental effects on microarchitecture, but not biomechanical properties. No alterations in trabecular thickness (TbTh, or cortical bone parameters were observed in response to the LPS or IF. Immunohistomchemical staining showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α was up-regulated by LPS in the endothelium of small myocardial arteries and arterioles as well as the tibial

  10. Acute and chronic effects of treatment with mesenchymal stromal cells on LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation, emphysema and atherosclerosis development.

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    P Padmini S J Khedoe

    Full Text Available COPD is a pulmonary disorder often accompanied by cardiovascular disease (CVD, and current treatment of this comorbidity is suboptimal. Systemic inflammation in COPD triggered by smoke and microbial exposure is suggested to link COPD and CVD. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC possess anti-inflammatory capacities and MSC treatment is considered an attractive treatment option for various chronic inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we investigated the immunomodulatory properties of MSC in an acute and chronic model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced inflammation, emphysema and atherosclerosis development in APOE*3-Leiden (E3L mice.Hyperlipidemic E3L mice were intranasally instilled with 10 μg LPS or vehicle twice in an acute 4-day study, or twice weekly during 20 weeks Western-type diet feeding in a chronic study. Mice received 0.5x106 MSC or vehicle intravenously twice after the first LPS instillation (acute study or in week 14, 16, 18 and 20 (chronic study. Inflammatory parameters were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and lung tissue. Emphysema, pulmonary inflammation and atherosclerosis were assessed in the chronic study.In the acute study, intranasal LPS administration induced a marked systemic IL-6 response on day 3, which was inhibited after MSC treatment. Furthermore, MSC treatment reduced LPS-induced total cell count in BAL due to reduced neutrophil numbers. In the chronic study, LPS increased emphysema but did not aggravate atherosclerosis. Emphysema and atherosclerosis development were unaffected after MSC treatment.These data show that MSC inhibit LPS-induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation in the acute study, whereas MSC treatment had no effect on inflammation, emphysema and atherosclerosis development in the chronic study.

  11. Chronic Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Nrf2 Activation and Inflammation in the Hippocampus Accompany Heightened Systemic Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in an Animal Model of Gulf War Illness.

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    Shetty, Geetha A; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Upadhya, Dinesh; Bates, Adrian; Attaluri, Sahithi; Shuai, Bing; Kodali, Maheedhar; Shetty, Ashok K

    2017-01-01

    Memory and mood dysfunction are the key symptoms of Gulf war illness (GWI), a lingering multi-symptom ailment afflicting >200,000 veterans who served in the Persian Gulf War-1. Research probing the source of the disease has demonstrated that concomitant exposures to anti-nerve gas agent pyridostigmine bromide (PB), pesticides, and war-related stress are among the chief causes of GWI. Indeed, exposures to GWI-related chemicals (GWIR-Cs) and mild stress in animal models cause memory and mood impairments alongside reduced neurogenesis and chronic low-level inflammation in the hippocampus. In the current study, we examined whether exposure to GWIR-Cs and stress causes chronic changes in the expression of genes related to increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and inflammation in the hippocampus. We also investigated whether GWI is linked with chronically increased activation of Nrf2 (a master regulator of antioxidant response) in the hippocampus, and inflammation and enhanced oxidative stress at the systemic level. Adult male rats were exposed daily to low-doses of PB and pesticides (DEET and permethrin), in combination with 5 min of restraint stress for 4 weeks. Analysis of the hippocampus performed 6 months after the exposure revealed increased expression of many genes related to oxidative stress response and/or antioxidant activity (Hmox1, Sepp1, and Srxn1), reactive oxygen species metabolism (Fmo2, Sod2, and Ucp2) and oxygen transport (Ift172 and Slc38a1). Furthermore, multiple genes relevant to mitochondrial respiration (Atp6a1, Cox6a1, Cox7a2L, Ndufs7, Ndufv1, Lhpp, Slc25a10, and Ucp1) and neuroinflammation (Nfkb1, Bcl6, Csf2, IL6, Mapk1, Mapk3, Ngf, N-pac, and Prkaca) were up-regulated, alongside 73-88% reduction in the expression of anti-inflammatory genes IL4 and IL10, and nuclear translocation and increased expression of Nrf2 protein. These hippocampal changes were associated with elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines

  12. Chronic Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Nrf2 Activation and Inflammation in the Hippocampus Accompany Heightened Systemic Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in an Animal Model of Gulf War Illness

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    Geetha A. Shetty

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Memory and mood dysfunction are the key symptoms of Gulf war illness (GWI, a lingering multi-symptom ailment afflicting >200,000 veterans who served in the Persian Gulf War-1. Research probing the source of the disease has demonstrated that concomitant exposures to anti-nerve gas agent pyridostigmine bromide (PB, pesticides, and war-related stress are among the chief causes of GWI. Indeed, exposures to GWI-related chemicals (GWIR-Cs and mild stress in animal models cause memory and mood impairments alongside reduced neurogenesis and chronic low-level inflammation in the hippocampus. In the current study, we examined whether exposure to GWIR-Cs and stress causes chronic changes in the expression of genes related to increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and inflammation in the hippocampus. We also investigated whether GWI is linked with chronically increased activation of Nrf2 (a master regulator of antioxidant response in the hippocampus, and inflammation and enhanced oxidative stress at the systemic level. Adult male rats were exposed daily to low-doses of PB and pesticides (DEET and permethrin, in combination with 5 min of restraint stress for 4 weeks. Analysis of the hippocampus performed 6 months after the exposure revealed increased expression of many genes related to oxidative stress response and/or antioxidant activity (Hmox1, Sepp1, and Srxn1, reactive oxygen species metabolism (Fmo2, Sod2, and Ucp2 and oxygen transport (Ift172 and Slc38a1. Furthermore, multiple genes relevant to mitochondrial respiration (Atp6a1, Cox6a1, Cox7a2L, Ndufs7, Ndufv1, Lhpp, Slc25a10, and Ucp1 and neuroinflammation (Nfkb1, Bcl6, Csf2, IL6, Mapk1, Mapk3, Ngf, N-pac, and Prkaca were up-regulated, alongside 73–88% reduction in the expression of anti-inflammatory genes IL4 and IL10, and nuclear translocation and increased expression of Nrf2 protein. These hippocampal changes were associated with elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and

  13. Thioredoxin-1 protects against neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression in a mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Naoya; Hoshino, Yuma; Marumo, Satoshi; Kiyokawa, Hirofumi; Sato, Susumu; Kinose, Daisuke; Uno, Kazuko; Muro, Shigeo; Hirai, Toyohiro; Yodoi, Junji; Mishima, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are characterized by acute enhancement of airway neutrophilic inflammation under oxidative stress and can be involved in emphysema progression. However, pharmacotherapy against the neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression associated with exacerbation has not been established. Thioredoxin-1 has anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties and it can ameliorate neutrophilic inflammation through anti-chemotactic effects and prevent cigarette smoke (CS)-induced emphysema. We aimed to determine whether thioredoxin-1 can suppress neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression in a mouse model of COPD exacerbation and if so, to reveal the underlying mechanisms. Mice were exposed to CS and then challenged with polyinosine-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)], an agonist for virus-induced innate immunity. Airway neutrophilic inflammation, oxidative stress and lung apoptosis were enhanced in smoke-sensitive C57Bl/6, but not in smoke-resistant NZW mice. Exposure to CS and poly(I:C) challenge accelerated emphysema progression in C57Bl/6 mice. Thioredoxin-1 suppressed neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression. Poly(I:C) caused early neutrophilic inflammation through keratinocyte-derived chemokine and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) release in the lung exposed to CS. Late neutrophilic inflammation was caused by persistent GM-CSF release, which thioredoxin-1 ameliorated. Thioredoxin-1 enhanced pulmonary mRNA expression of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1), and the suppressive effects of thioredoxin-1 on prolonged GM-CSF release and late neutrophilic inflammation disappeared by inhibiting MKP-1. Using a mouse model of COPD exacerbation, we demonstrated that thioredoxin-1 ameliorated neutrophilic inflammation by suppressing GM-CSF release, which prevented emphysema progression. Our findings deepen understanding of the mechanisms underlying the regulation of neutrophilic

  14. Thioredoxin-1 protects against neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression in a mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Tanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are characterized by acute enhancement of airway neutrophilic inflammation under oxidative stress and can be involved in emphysema progression. However, pharmacotherapy against the neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression associated with exacerbation has not been established. Thioredoxin-1 has anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties and it can ameliorate neutrophilic inflammation through anti-chemotactic effects and prevent cigarette smoke (CS-induced emphysema. We aimed to determine whether thioredoxin-1 can suppress neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression in a mouse model of COPD exacerbation and if so, to reveal the underlying mechanisms. RESULTS: Mice were exposed to CS and then challenged with polyinosine-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C], an agonist for virus-induced innate immunity. Airway neutrophilic inflammation, oxidative stress and lung apoptosis were enhanced in smoke-sensitive C57Bl/6, but not in smoke-resistant NZW mice. Exposure to CS and poly(I:C challenge accelerated emphysema progression in C57Bl/6 mice. Thioredoxin-1 suppressed neutrophilic inflammation and emphysema progression. Poly(I:C caused early neutrophilic inflammation through keratinocyte-derived chemokine and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF release in the lung exposed to CS. Late neutrophilic inflammation was caused by persistent GM-CSF release, which thioredoxin-1 ameliorated. Thioredoxin-1 enhanced pulmonary mRNA expression of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1, and the suppressive effects of thioredoxin-1 on prolonged GM-CSF release and late neutrophilic inflammation disappeared by inhibiting MKP-1. CONCLUSION: Using a mouse model of COPD exacerbation, we demonstrated that thioredoxin-1 ameliorated neutrophilic inflammation by suppressing GM-CSF release, which prevented emphysema progression. Our findings deepen understanding of the mechanisms

  15. Obesity-induced DNA released from adipocytes stimulates chronic adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Sachiko; Fukuda, Daiju; Higashikuni, Yasutomi; Tanaka, Kimie; Hirata, Yoichiro; Murata, Chie; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-Ri; Sato, Fukiko; Bando, Masahiro; Yagi, Shusuke; Soeki, Takeshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Imoto, Issei; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Shimabukuro, Michio; Sata, Masataka

    2016-03-01

    Obesity stimulates chronic inflammation in adipose tissue, which is associated with insulin resistance, although the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here we showed that obesity-related adipocyte degeneration causes release of cell-free DNA (cfDNA), which promotes macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue via Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), originally known as a sensor of exogenous DNA fragments. Fat-fed obese wild-type mice showed increased release of cfDNA, as determined by the concentrations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in plasma. cfDNA released from degenerated adipocytes promoted monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression in wild-type macrophages, but not in TLR9-deficient (Tlr9 (-/-) ) macrophages. Fat-fed Tlr9 (-/-) mice demonstrated reduced macrophage accumulation and inflammation in adipose tissue and better insulin sensitivity compared with wild-type mice, whereas bone marrow reconstitution with wild-type bone marrow restored the attenuation of insulin resistance observed in fat-fed Tlr9 (-/-) mice. Administration of a TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotide to fat-fed wild-type mice reduced the accumulation of macrophages in adipose tissue and improved insulin resistance. Furthermore, in humans, plasma ssDNA level was significantly higher in patients with computed tomography-determined visceral obesity and was associated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), which is the index of insulin resistance. Our study may provide a novel mechanism for the development of sterile inflammation in adipose tissue and a potential therapeutic target for insulin resistance.

  16. Effect of paricalcitol on endothelial function and inflammation in type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thethi, Tina K; Bajwa, Muhammad A; Ghanim, Husam; Jo, Chanhee; Weir, Monica; Goldfine, Allison B; Umpierrez, Guillermo; Desouza, Cyrus; Dandona, Paresh; Fang-Hollingsworth, Ying; Raghavan, Vasudevan; Fonseca, Vivian A

    2015-04-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have impaired endothelial function. Vitamin D and its analogs may play a role in regulation of endothelial function and inflammation. We studied effects of paricalcitol compared to placebo on endothelial function and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with T2DM and CKD. A double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 60 patients with T2DM and stage 3 or 4 CKD. Paricalcitol 1 mcg or placebo was administered orally once daily for three months. Brachial artery flow mediated dilatation (FMD), nitroglycerine mediated dilation (NMD), and plasma concentrations of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor -α and interleukin-6, highly-sensitive C-reactive protein; endothelial surface proteins, intercellular adhesion molecule -1 and monocyte chemo attractant protein-1, and plasma glucose, insulin, free fatty acids, and urinary isoprostane were measured at baseline and end of three months. 27 patients in the paricalcitol group and 28 patients in the control group completed the study, though analysis of FMD at both time points was possible in 23 patients in each group. There was no significant difference in the change in FMD, NMD or the biomarkers examined after paricalcitol or placebo treatment. Treatment with paricalcitol at this dose and duration did not affect brachial artery FMD or biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress. The lack of significance may be due to the fact that the study patients had advanced CKD and that effects of paricalcitol are not additive to the effects of glycemic, lipid and anti-hypertensive therapies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Chronic urticaria in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis: Significance of severity of thyroid gland inflammation

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    Mustafa Gulec

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a clear association between autoimmune thyroiditis (AT and chronic urticaria/angioedema (CUA. However, not all patients with AT demonstrate urticaria. Aims: The aim of the study was to investigate in which patients with AT did CUA become a problem. A sensitive inflammation marker, neopterine (NP was used to confirm whether the severity of inflammation in the thyroid gland was responsible for urticaria or not. Methods: Neopterine levels were assessed in patients with AT with urticaria and without urticaria. Furthermore, levels were compared in relation to pre and post levothyroxine treatment. Twenty-seven patients with urticaria (Group 1 and 28 patients without urticaria (Group 2 were enrolled in the study. A course of levothyroxine treatment was given to all patients, and urine neopterine levels before and after the trial were obtained. Results: All patients completed the trial. Mean age in Group 1 and Group 2 was similar (35.70 ± 10.86 years and 38.36 ± 10.38 years, respectively (P=0.358. Pre-treatment urine neopterine levels were significantly higher in Group 1 (P=0.012. Post-treatment levels decreased in each group, as expected. However, the decrease in the neopterine level was insignificant in the patients of Group 2 (P=0.282. In Group 1, a significant decrease in post-treatment neopterine levels (P=0.015 was associated with the remission of urticaria. Conclusion: In patients with CUA and AT, pre-treatment elevated levels of NP, and its decrease with levothyroxine treatment along with symptomatic relief in urticaria, may be evidence of the relationship between the degree of inflammation in thyroid and presence of urticaria.

  18. Mediators of Inflammation and Angiogenesis in Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria: Are They Potential Biomarkers of the Disease?

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    Ilaria Puxeddu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU, different pathophysiological mechanisms, potentially responsible for the development of the disease, have been recently described. It is likely that the activation of skin mast cells with consequent release of histamine and other proinflammatory mediators is responsible for vasodilation in the lesional skin of CSU. However, the underlying causes of mast cell activation in the disease are largely unknown and remain to be identified. Thus, in this review, we discuss new insights in the pathogenesis of CSU, focusing on inflammation and angiogenesis. The understanding of these mechanisms will enable the identification of biomarkers useful for the diagnosis, follow-up, and management of CSU and will allow the development of novel, more specific, and patient-tailored therapies.

  19. [Understanding and treatment strategy of the pathogenesis of periodontal disease based on chronic inflammation].

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    Murakami, Tomohiko

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged inflammation continuously promotes the infiltration of macrophages in the organization and chronically induces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF and IL-1. In periodontal tissues, these inflammatory cytokines enhance the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts, which cause destruction of the alveolar bone. Therefore, inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production leads to the prevention or treatment of periodontal disease. IL-1 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that strongly enhances the bone-resorbing activity of osteoclasts. Elucidation of mechanisms for the production of IL-1 is critical for understanding the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. This paper reviews recent findings of the molecular mechanisms regulating IL-1 production and focuses on inflammasome.

  20. Does gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA influence the development of chronic inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis?

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    Bridges S Louis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have demonstrated a role for spinal p38 MAP kinase (MAPK in the development of chronic inflammation and peripheral arthritis and a role for GABA in the inhibition of p38 MAPK mediated effects. Integrating these data suggests that GABA may play a role in downregulating mechanisms that lead to the production of proinflammatory agents such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 – agents implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Genetic studies have also associated RA with members of the p38 MAPK pathway. Hypothesis We propose a hypothesis for an inefficient GABA signaling system that results in unchecked proinflammatory cytokine production via the p38 MAPK pathway. This model also supports the need for increasing research in the integration of immunology and neuroscience.

  1. Chronic inflammation and neutrophil activation as possible causes of joint diseases in ballet dancers.

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    Borges, Leandro da Silva; Bortolon, José Ricardo; Santos, Vinicius Coneglian; de Moura, Nivaldo Ribeiro; Dermargos, Alexandre; Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda; Gorjão, Renata; Pithon-Curi, Tania Cristina; Hatanaka, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we investigated the effects of a ballet class on the kinetic profiles of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, cytokines, complement component 3 (C3), and the concentrations of immunoglobulin (Ig), IgA and IgM, in ballerinas. We also verified neutrophil death and ROS release. Blood samples were taken from 13 dancers before, immediately after, and 18 hours after a ballet class. The ballet class increased the plasma activities of CK-total (2.0-fold) immediately after class, while the activities of CK-cardiac muscle (1.0-fold) and LDH (3.0-fold) were observed to increase 18 hours after the class. Levels of the TNF-α , IL-1β, IgG, and IgA were not affected under the study conditions. The exercise was found to induce neutrophil apoptosis (6.0-fold) 18 hours after the ballet class. Additionally, immediately after the ballet class, the neutrophils from the ballerinas were found to be less responsive to PMA stimulus. Ballet class was found to result in inflammation in dancers. The inflammation caused by the ballet class remained for 18 hours after the exercise. These findings are important in preventing the development of chronic lesions that are commonly observed in dancers, such as those with arthritis and synovitis.

  2. Chronic Inflammation and Neutrophil Activation as Possible Causes of Joint Diseases in Ballet Dancers

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    Leandro da Silva Borges

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we investigated the effects of a ballet class on the kinetic profiles of creatine kinase (CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activities, cytokines, complement component 3 (C3, and the concentrations of immunoglobulin (Ig, IgA and IgM, in ballerinas. We also verified neutrophil death and ROS release. Blood samples were taken from 13 dancers before, immediately after, and 18 hours after a ballet class. The ballet class increased the plasma activities of CK-total (2.0-fold immediately after class, while the activities of CK-cardiac muscle (1.0-fold and LDH (3.0-fold were observed to increase 18 hours after the class. Levels of the TNF-α, IL-1β, IgG, and IgA were not affected under the study conditions. The exercise was found to induce neutrophil apoptosis (6.0-fold 18 hours after the ballet class. Additionally, immediately after the ballet class, the neutrophils from the ballerinas were found to be less responsive to PMA stimulus. Conclusion. Ballet class was found to result in inflammation in dancers. The inflammation caused by the ballet class remained for 18 hours after the exercise. These findings are important in preventing the development of chronic lesions that are commonly observed in dancers, such as those with arthritis and synovitis.

  3. Elevated [11C]-D-deprenyl uptake in chronic Whiplash Associated Disorder suggests persistent musculoskeletal inflammation.

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    Clas Linnman

    Full Text Available There are few diagnostic tools for chronic musculoskeletal pain as structural imaging methods seldom reveal pathological alterations. This is especially true for Whiplash Associated Disorder, for which physical signs of persistent injuries to the neck have yet to be established. Here, we sought to visualize inflammatory processes in the neck region by means Positron Emission Tomography using the tracer (11C-D-deprenyl, a potential marker for inflammation. Twenty-two patients with enduring pain after a rear impact car accident (Whiplash Associated Disorder grade II and 14 healthy controls were investigated. Patients displayed significantly elevated tracer uptake in the neck, particularly in regions around the spineous process of the second cervical vertebra. This suggests that whiplash patients have signs of local persistent peripheral tissue inflammation, which may potentially serve as a diagnostic biomarker. The present investigation demonstrates that painful processes in the periphery can be objectively visualized and quantified with PET and that (11C-D-deprenyl is a promising tracer for these purposes.

  4. Biliverdin Rescues the HO-2 Null Mouse Phenotype of Unresolved Chronic Inflammation Following Corneal Epithelial Injury.

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    Bellner, Lars; Wolstein, Jesse; Patil, Kiran A; Dunn, Michael W; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal

    2011-05-17

    PURPOSE. The heme oxygenase system (HO-1 and HO-2) represents an intrinsic cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory pathway based on its ability to modulate leukocyte migration and to inhibit the expression of inflammatory cytokines and proteins by its products biliverdin/bilirubin and carbon monoxide. Corneal injury in HO-2 null mice leads to impaired healing and chronic inflammatory complications, including ulceration and neovascularization. The authors examined whether topically administered biliverdin can counteract the effects of HO deficiency in a corneal epithelial injury model. METHODS. HO-2 null mice were treated with biliverdin 1 hour before epithelial injury and twice a day thereafter. Reepithelialization and neovascularization were assessed by fluorescein staining and vital microscopy, respectively, and were quantified by image analysis. Inflammation was quantified by histology and Gr-1-specific immunofluorescence, and oxidative stress was assessed by DHE fluorescence. RESULTS. Treatment with biliverdin accelerated wound closure, inhibited neovascularization and reduced epithelial defects. It also reduced inflammation, as evidenced by a reduction in the appearance of inflammatory cells and the expression levels of inflammatory and oxidant proteins, including KC and NOXs. CONCLUSIONS. The results clearly show that biliverdin, directly or through its metabolism to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase-the expression of which is increased after injury-rescues the aberrant inflammatory phenotype, further underscoring the importance of the HO system in the cornea for the execution of an ordered inflammatory and reparative response.

  5. Systemic biomarkers of inflammation and haemostasis in patients with chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis

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    Rødland Ernst

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate mediators of inflammation and haemostasis in patients with chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA, a locally, destructive process of the lung due to invasion by Aspergillus species. Methods Measurements of selected biomarkers in 10 patients with CNPA and 19 healthy, matched controls were performed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and multiplex methodology. The gene expressions of relevant biomarkers were analyzed with real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Results Increased concentrations of circulating mediators of inflammation interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, RANTES, TNF-α, ICAM-1 and mediators involved in endothelial activation and thrombosis (vWF, TF and PAI-1 were observed in patients with CNPA. The concentration of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was increased both in plasma and in PBMC in the patient population. The gene expression of CD40L was decreased in PBMC from the patient group, accompanied by decreased concentrations of soluble (s CD40L in the circulation. Conclusions The proinflammatory response against Aspergillus may be counteracted by reduced CD40L and sCD40L, as well as increased IL-10, which may compromise the immune response against Aspergillus in patients with CNPA.

  6. A Potential Role for Acrolein in Neutrophil-Mediated Chronic Inflammation.

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    Noerager, Brett D; Xu, Xin; Davis, Virginia A; Jones, Caleb W; Okafor, Svetlana; Whitehead, Alicia; Blalock, J Edwin; Jackson, Patricia L

    2015-12-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) are key mediators of inflammatory processes throughout the body. In this study, we investigated the role of acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde that is ubiquitously present in the environment and produced endogenously at sites of inflammation, in mediating PMN-mediated degradation of collagen facilitating proline-glycine-proline (PGP) production. We treated peripheral blood neutrophils with acrolein and analyzed cell supernatants and lysates for matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and prolyl endopeptidase (PE), assessed their ability to break down collagen and release PGP, and assayed for the presence of leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) and its ability to degrade PGP. Acrolein treatment induced elevated production and functionality of collagen-degrading enzymes and generation of PGP fragments. Meanwhile, LTA4H levels and triaminopeptidase activity declined with increasing concentrations of acrolein thereby sparing PGP from enzymatic destruction. These findings suggest that acrolein exacerbates the acute inflammatory response mediated by neutrophils and sets the stage for chronic pulmonary and systemic inflammation.

  7. Inhibition of G0/G1 Switch 2 Ameliorates Renal Inflammation in Chronic Kidney Disease.

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    Matsunaga, Naoya; Ikeda, Eriko; Kakimoto, Keisuke; Watanabe, Miyako; Shindo, Naoya; Tsuruta, Akito; Ikeyama, Hisako; Hamamura, Kengo; Higashi, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kondo, Hideaki; Yoshida, Yuya; Matsuda, Masaki; Ogino, Takashi; Tokushige, Kazutaka; Itcho, Kazufumi; Furuichi, Yoko; Nakao, Takaharu; Yasuda, Kaori; Doi, Atsushi; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Aramaki, Hironori; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ojida, Akio; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health problem, and novel therapies to treat CKD are urgently needed. Here, we show that inhibition of G0/G1 switch 2 (G0s2) ameliorates renal inflammation in a mouse model of CKD. Renal expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2) was increased in response to p65 activation in the kidneys of wild-type 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx) mice. Moreover, 5/6Nx Clk/Clk mice, which carry homozygous mutations in the gene encoding circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK), did not exhibit aggravation of apoptosis or induction of F4/80-positive cells. The renal expression of G0s2 in wild-type 5/6Nx mice was important for the transactivation of Ccl2 by p65. These pathologies were ameliorated by G0s2 knockdown. Furthermore, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of G0s2 expression was identified by high-throughput chemical screening, and the inhibitor suppressed renal inflammation in 5/6Nx mice. These findings indicated that G0s2 inhibitors may have applications in the treatment of CKD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Persistent inflammation immunosuppression catabolism syndrome: a special type of chronic critical illness].

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    Ding, Renyu; Ma, Xiaochun

    2016-07-01

    After the concept of "chronic critical illness (CCI)" was proposed, the new concept persistent inflammation immunosuppression catabolism syndrome (PICS) is present recently. Patients with PICS are manifested by fast decreasing body weight, poor nutritional status, long-term immunosuppression and repeated nosocomial infections. These patients are faced with great challenges of persistent inflammation, acquired immunosuppression and high catabolism, which finally results in repeated nosocomial infections, prolonged hospital stay and increased mortality. At present, main problems of PICS diagnosis standard include varying length of ICU stay, difference in normal C reactive protein value, poor value of nutrition indexes, absence of clinical verification. Though associated pathophysiology mechanism is not clear, PICS is preventable and magageable with certain therapy, including early comprehensive prevention and treatment focused on infection control for CCI patients to stop the progression of PICS, application of immune modulator to improve immune function and prognosis of patients, and reasonable nutritional support and treatment. Besides, through the analysis of the association between PICS and CCI, authors draw a conclusion that PICS is a new phenotype of CCI, and immune paralysis is its main feature.

  9. Chronic Inflammation in Immune Aging: Role of Pattern Recognition Receptor Crosstalk with the Telomere Complex?

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    Shyam Sushama Jose

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Age-related decline in immunity is characterized by stem cell exhaustion, telomere shortening, and disruption of cell-to-cell communication, leading to increased patient risk of disease. Recent data have demonstrated that chronic inflammation exerts a strong influence on immune aging and is closely correlated with telomere length in a range of major pathologies. The current review discusses the impact of inflammation on immune aging, the likely molecular mediators of this process, and the various disease states that have been linked with immunosenescence. Emerging findings implicate NF-κB, the major driver of inflammatory signaling, in several processes that regulate telomere maintenance and/or telomerase activity. While prolonged triggering of pattern recognition receptors is now known to promote immunosenescence, it remains unclear how this process is linked with the telomere complex or telomerase activity. Indeed, enzymatic control of telomere length has been studied for many decades, but alternative roles of telomerase and potential influences on inflammatory responses are only now beginning to emerge. Crosstalk between these pathways may prove to be a key molecular mechanism of immunosenescence. Understanding how components of immune aging interact and modify host protection against pathogens and tumors will be essential for the design of new vaccines and therapies for a wide range of clinical scenarios.

  10. Diet and Inflammation: Possible Effects on Immunity, Chronic Diseases, and Life Span.

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    Ricordi, Camillo; Garcia-Contreras, Marta; Farnetti, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation negatively impacts all physiological functions, causing an array of degenerative conditions including diabetes; cancer; cardiovascular, osteo-articular, and neurodegenerative diseases; autoimmunity disorders; and aging. In particular, there is a growing knowledge of the role that gene transcription factors play in the inflammatory process. Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes represent multifactorial conditions resulting from improper balances of hormones and gene expression. In addition, these conditions have a strong inflammatory component that can potentially be impacted by the diet. It can reduce pro-inflammatory eicosanoids that can alter hormonal signaling cascades to the modulation of the innate immune system and gene transcription factors. Working knowledge of the impact of how nutrients, especially dietary fatty acids and polyphenols, can impact these various molecular targets makes it possible to develop a general outline of an anti-inflammatory diet that offers a unique, nonpharmacological approach in treating obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Several important bioactive dietary components can exert their effect through selected inflammatory pathways that can affect metabolic and genetic changes. In fact, dietary components that can modulate glucose and insulin levels, as well as any other mediator that can activate nuclear factor-kB, can also trigger inflammation through common pathway master switches.

  11. Colorectal Oncogenesis and Inflammation in a Rat Model Based on Chronic Inflammation due to Cycling DSS Treatments

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    Åsa Håkansson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is known to be linked with development of colorectal cancer, and the aim was to assess the malignant potential and degree of inflammation in a dextran-sulphate-sodium-(DSS- induced cyclic colonic tumour model (CTM in rats and to compare it with the azoxymethane-(AOM- induced CTM model. Tumours developed in both groups, although, in the DSS group, the colonic mucosa appeared edematous and the number of haemorrhagic erosions and quantity of dysplastic lesions were higher as well as the mucosal concentration of myeloperoxidase and faecal viable count of Enterobacteriaceae. The livers were affected as evaluated by steatosis, parenchymal loss, haemorrhage, and inflammatory infiltrations, and higher proportions of acetate and lower proportions of butyrate in colonic content were found. The DSS model seems to mimic the clinical situation and may be valuable for investigation of inflammation-related dysplasia and colon cancer, as well as for altered liver function by endogenous inflammatory mediators.

  12. Lung inflammation biomarkers and lung function in children chronically exposed to arsenic

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    Olivas-Calderón, Edgar, E-mail: edgar_olivascalderon@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, Biomedical Research Center, School of Medicine, University of Coahuila, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); School of Medicine, University Juarez of Durango, Gomez Palacio, Durango (Mexico); Recio-Vega, Rogelio, E-mail: rrecio@yahoo.com [Department of Environmental Health, Biomedical Research Center, School of Medicine, University of Coahuila, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Gandolfi, A. Jay, E-mail: gandolfi@pharmacy.arizona.edu [Southwest Environmental Health Science Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Lantz, R. Clark, E-mail: lantz@email.arizona.edu [Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); González-Cortes, Tania, E-mail: taniagc2201@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, Biomedical Research Center, School of Medicine, University of Coahuila, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Gonzalez-De Alba, Cesar, E-mail: cesargonzalezalba@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, Biomedical Research Center, School of Medicine, University of Coahuila, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Froines, John R., E-mail: jfroines@ucla.edu [Center for Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Espinosa-Fematt, Jorge A., E-mail: dr.jorge.espinosa@gmail.com [School of Medicine, University Juarez of Durango, Gomez Palacio, Durango (Mexico)

    2015-09-01

    Evidence suggests that exposure to arsenic in drinking water during early childhood or in utero has been associated with an increase in respiratory symptoms or diseases in the adulthood, however only a few studies have been carried out during those sensitive windows of exposure. Recently our group demonstrated that the exposure to arsenic during early childhood or in utero in children was associated with impairment in the lung function and suggested that this adverse effect could be due to a chronic inflammation response to the metalloid. Therefore, we designed this cross-sectional study in a cohort of children associating lung inflammatory biomarkers and lung function with urinary As levels. A total of 275 healthy children were partitioned into four study groups according with their arsenic urinary levels. Inflammation biomarkers were measured in sputum by ELISA and the lung function was evaluated by spirometry. Fifty eight percent of the studied children were found to have a restrictive spirometric pattern. In the two highest exposed groups, the soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products' (sRAGE) sputum level was significantly lower and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) concentration was higher. When the biomarkers were correlated to the urinary arsenic species, negative associations were found between dimethylarsinic (DMA), monomethylarsonic percentage (%MMA) and dimethylarsinic percentage (%DMA) with sRAGE and positive associations between %DMA with MMP-9 and with the MMP-9/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) ratio. In conclusion, chronic arsenic exposure of children negatively correlates with sRAGE, and positively correlated with MMP-9 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 levels, and increases the frequency of an abnormal spirometric pattern. Arsenic-induced alterations in inflammatory biomarkers may contribute to the development of restrictive lung diseases. - Highlights: • First study in children evaluating lung inflammatory biomarkers and As levels

  13. [Cardiac markers in different degrees of chronic kidney disease: influence of inflammation and previous heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Borja; Goicoechea, Marian; García de Vinuesa, Soledad; Verde, Eduardo; Verdalles, Ursula; Yuste, Claudia; Reque, Javier; Luño, José

    2012-06-30

    Troponin T (TnT), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and its precursor (NT-proBNP) are useful markers of acute coronary events and heart failure. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of chronic renal failure, inflammation and heart disease in these biomarkers. In 266 patients with different stages of chronic renal diseases, the following parameters were measured: cardiac markers (TnT, BNP and NT-proBNP), renal function, inflammatory markers (hsCRP, fibrinogen, albumin, uric acid and white blood cells). We recorded the cardiovascular history. Ventricular dysfunction and left ventricular hypertrophy were assessed by echocardiography. A significant correlation between cardiac markers and inflammatory parameters such as fibrinogen, hsCRP and albumin was found. Age (OR 1.05, P = .021), serum albumin (OR: 0.06, P=.006), ischemic heart disease (OR: 8.17, P=.0092) and renal failure (OR: 1.67, P=.05) were predictors of higher BNP levels. Age (OR 1.05, P=.0097), serum albumin (OR: 0.12, P=.001), ischemic heart disease (OR: 3.43, P=.034), renal failure (OR: 1, 65, P=.036) and heart failure (OR: 4.33, P=.0312) were predictors of elevated NT-proBNP. Previous ischemic heart disease alone increased TnT levels (OR: 6.51, P=.0012). Age, previous cardiac disease and inflammation increase cardiac marker levels in patients with different stages of renal disease, but the degree of renal failure is an important factor influencing NT-proBNP levels. However, ischemic heart disease alone increases the levels of TnT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. The Relationship Between Chronic Inflammation and Glucidic-Lipidic Profile Disorders in Kidney Transplant Recipients

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    Tarța I.D.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic inflammation has a proven role in atherogenesis, lipid profile parameters being related to cytokine production. In kidney transplant recipients, interleukin 6 (IL-6 is significantly associated with graft-related outcomes and also alterations of cholesterol and triglyceride metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between chronic inflammation and glucidic-lipidic metabolism disorders in a group of patients with kidney transplantation as renal replacement therapy. Methods: A prospective observational study which enrolled thirtysix non-diabetic kidney transplant recipients was conducted in the Nephrology and Peritoneal Dialysis Department, County Clinic Hospital of Tirgu Mures. The study group was divided as following: recipients with serum IL-6 concentration higher than 3.8 pg/ml (group A and IL-6 within the normal range (group B. Results: Allograft recipients with higher serum IL-6 had significant higher erytrocyte sedimentation rate(ESR, p=0.0067. Patients with over-the-range levels of IL-6 had significant higher levels of serum cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol respectively (p=0.0242 and p=0.0081. Serum Apo-B was also significant higher in Group A than Group B. Protein excretion was significant higher in patients from group A (p=0.0013. No statistical significant relationship could be proven between elevated levels of IL-6 and hbA1c, insulin and glycosuria disturbances in the two groups. Also, we found no statistical significant association between resistivity and pulsatility indices (both hilum and intragraft or carotid intima media thickness. Conclusion: Serum interleukin 6 is related to lipid profile disorders and less to glucidic metabolism anomalies in non-diabetic kidney transplant recipients.

  15. Cytotoxic T cells modulate inflammation and endogenous opioid analgesia in chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddack-Werncke, Uta; Busch-Dienstfertig, Melanie; González-Rodríguez, Sara; Maddila, Santhosh Chandar; Grobe, Jenny; Lipp, Martin; Stein, Christoph; Müller, Gerd

    2017-02-06

    This study examined the development of chronic pain, a cardinal symptom of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in mice with antigen- and collagen-induced arthritis (ACIA). Since the role of CD8(+) T cells in arthritis is controversial, we investigated the consequences of CD8-depletion on arthritis development and opioid modulation of pain in this novel model of chronic autoimmune arthritis. Disease severity in control and CD8-depleted animals was determined by histological assessment of knee-joint sections and measurement of autoantibody formation. Pain was evaluated by measuring mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in von Frey and Hargreaves tests, respectively. The production and release of endogenous opioids and inflammatory cytokines was assessed in immunoassays. In ACIA, mice display persistent mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia for more than 2 months after induction of arthritis. The blockade of peripheral opioid receptors with naloxone-methiodide (NLXM) transiently increased thermal hyperalgesia, indicating that endogenous opioid peptides were released in the arthritic joint to inhibit pain. CD8(+) T cell depletion did not affect autoantibody formation or severity of joint inflammation, but serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-17 were increased. The release of opioid peptides from explanted arthritic knee cells and the NLXM effect were significantly reduced in the absence of CD8(+) T cells. We have successfully modeled the development of chronic pain, a hallmark of RA, in ACIA. Furthermore, we detected a yet unknown protective role of CD8(+) T cells in chronic ACIA since pro-inflammatory cytokines rose and opioid peptide release decreased in the absence of these cells.

  16. Characterisation of cochlear inflammation in mice following acute and chronic noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Winston J T; Thorne, Peter R; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress has been established as the key mechanism of the cochlear damage underlying noise-induced hearing loss, however, emerging evidence suggests that cochlear inflammation may also be a major contributor. This study aimed to improve our understanding of the cochlear inflammatory response associated with acute and chronic noise exposure. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to acute traumatic noise (100 dBSPL, 8-16 kHz for 24 h) and their cochleae collected at various intervals thereafter, up to 7 days. Using quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, changes in expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β), chemokines (CCL2) and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) were studied. All gene transcripts displayed similar dynamics of expression, with an early upregulation at 6 h post-exposure, followed by a second peak at 7 days. ICAM-1 immunoexpression increased significantly in the inferior region of the spiral ligament, peaking 24 h post-exposure. The early expression of proinflammatory mediators likely mediates the recruitment and extravasation of inflammatory cells into the noise-exposed cochlea. The occurrence of the latter expression peak is not clear, but it may be associated with reparative processes initiated in response to cochlear damage. Chronic exposure to moderate noise (90 dBSPL, 8-16 kHz, 2 h/day, up to 4 weeks) also elicited an inflammatory response, reaching a maximum after 2 weeks, suggesting that cochlear damage and hearing loss associated with chronic environmental noise exposure may be linked to inflammatory processes in the cochlea. This study thus provides further insight into the dynamics of the cochlear inflammatory response induced by exposure to acute and chronic noise.

  17. Relative contribution of health-related behaviours and chronic diseases to the socioeconomic patterning of low-grade inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccio, Marialaura; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; Pounis, George; De Curtis, Amalia; Costanzo, Simona; Persichillo, Mariarosaria; Cerletti, Chiara; Donati, Maria Benedetta; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    2017-06-01

    To test the association of low-grade inflammation with socioeconomic status (SES) and determine the relative contribution of prevalent chronic diseases and health-related behaviours in explaining such association. Cross-sectional analysis on 19,867 subjects (age ≥35, 48.1% men) recruited within the Moli-sani study from 2005 to 2010 (Italy). A score of low-grade inflammation, including platelet and leukocyte counts, the granulocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio, and C-reactive protein was applied. SES was measured by education, household income, and occupational social class. Low SES was associated with elevated levels of low-grade inflammation. Health behaviours (including adiposity, smoking, physical activity, and Mediterranean diet adherence) explained 53.5, 53.9, and 84.9% of the association between social class, income, and education with low-grade inflammation, respectively. Adiposity and body mass index showed a prominent role, while prevalent chronic diseases and conditions only marginally attenuated SES inequalities in inflammation. Low-grade inflammation was socioeconomically patterned in a large Mediterranean population. Potentially modifiable behavioural factors explained the greatest part of this association with a leading contribution of adiposity, body mass index, and physical activity.

  18. [Clinical observation on abdominal cluster-needling combined with sacro-iliac-needling for treatment of chronic pelvic inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jian-Yun; Ou, Lan-Fang; Li, Fu; Chen, Hong; Huang, Chao-Hua

    2005-07-01

    To observe therapeutic effect of abdominal cluster-needling combined with sacro-iliac-needling on chronic pelvic inflammation. One hundred and ten cases of pelvic inflammation were randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group. The treatment group of 70 cases were treated by abdominal cluster-needling combined with sacro-iliac-needling; the control group of 40 cases were treated by oral administration of Fuyankang tablet. Their therapeutic effects were compared. The cured rate and the total effective rate were 75.7% and 97.1% in the treatment group, and 37.5% and 85.0% in the control group, respectively, with significant difference between the two groups (P sacro-iliac-needling is significantly better than that in the control group for chronic pelvic inflammation.

  19. High intensity interval training favourably affects antioxidant and inflammation mRNA expression in early-stage chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Patrick S; Briskey, David R; Scanlan, Aaron T; Coombes, Jeff S; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2015-12-01

    Increased levels of oxidative stress and inflammation have been linked to the progression of chronic kidney disease. To reduce oxidative stress and inflammation related to chronic kidney disease, chronic aerobic exercise is often recommended. Data suggests high intensity interval training may be more beneficial than traditional aerobic exercise. However, appraisals of differing modes of exercise, along with explanations of mechanisms responsible for observed effects, are lacking. This study assessed effects of eight weeks of high intensity interval training (85% VO2max), versus low intensity exercise (45-50% VO2max) and sedentary behaviour, in an animal model of early-stage chronic kidney disease. We examined kidney-specific mRNA expression of genes related to endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity (glutathione peroxidase 1; Gpx1, superoxide dismutase 1; Sod1, and catalase; Cat) and inflammation (kidney injury molecule 1; Kim1 and tumour necrosis factor receptor super family 1b; Tnfrsf1b), as well as plasma F2-isoprostanes, a marker of lipid peroxidation. Compared to sedentary behaviour, high intensity interval training resulted in increased mRNA expression of Sod1 (p=0.01) and Cat (pintensity exercise, high intensity interval training resulted in increased mRNA expression of Cat (phigh intensity interval training was superior to sedentary behaviour and low intensity exercise as high intensity interval training beneficially influenced expression of genes related to endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity and inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Protective actions of green tea polyphenols and alfacalcidol on bone microstructure in female rats with chronic inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the effects of green tea polyphenols (GTP) and alfacalcidol on bone microstructure and strength along with possible mechanisms in rats with chronic inflammation. A 12-week study using a 2 (no GTP vs. 0.5%, w/v GTP in drinking water) × 2 (no alfacalcidol vs. 0.05 ug/kg alfacal...

  1. Green tea polyphenols mitigate bone loss of female rats in a chronic inflammation-induced bone loss model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to explore bioavailability, efficacy, and molecular mechanisms of green tea polyphenols (GTP) related to preventing bone loss in rats with chronic inflammation. A 2 (placebo vs. lipopolysaccharide, LPS) × 2 (no GTP vs. 0.5% GTP in drinking water) factorial design using ...

  2. Differential Effects of Sepsis and Chronic Inflammation on Diaphragm Muscle Fiber Type, Thyroid Hormone Metabolism, and Mitochondrial Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloise, Flavia F.; van der Spek, Anne H.; Surovtseva, Olga V.; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania Maria; Fliers, Eric; Boelen, Anita

    2016-01-01

    The diaphragm is the main respiratory muscle, and its function is compromised during severe illness. Altered local thyroid hormone (TH) metabolism may be a determinant of impaired muscle function during illness. This study investigates the effects of bacterial sepsis and chronic inflammation on

  3. The role of chronic inflammation in the development of gastrointestinal cancers: reviewing cancer prevention with natural anti-inflammatory intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho-Jae; Park, Jong-Min; Han, Young Min; Gil, Hong Kwon; Kim, Jinhyung; Chang, Ji Young; Jeong, Migyeong; Go, Eun-Jin; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators alter the local environment of tumors, known as the tumor microenvironment. Mechanistically, chronic inflammation induces DNA damage, but understanding this hazard may help in the search for new chemopreventive agents for gastrointestinal (GI) cancer which attenuate inflammation. In the clinic, GI cancer still remains a major cause of cancer-associated mortality, chemoprevention with anti-inflammatory agents is thought to be a realistic approach to reduce GI cancer. Proton pump inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor necrosis factor-alpha, anti-sense targeted smad7 and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents have been investigated for their potential to prevent inflammation-based GI cancer. Besides these, a wide variety of natural products have also shown potential for the prevention of GI cancer. In this review, the authors will provide insights to explain the mechanistic connection between inflammation and GI cancer, as well as describe a feasible cancer prevention strategy based on anti-inflammatory treatments.

  4. Synergistic effects of green tea polyphenols and alphacalcidol on chronic inflammation-induced bone loss in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C-L; Yeh, J K; Cao, J J; Tatum, O L; Dagda, R Y; Wang, J-S

    2010-11-01

    Studies suggest that green tea polyphenols (GTP) or alphacalcidol is promising agent for preventing bone loss. Findings that GTP supplementation plus alphacalcidol administration increased bone mass via a decrease of oxidative stress and inflammation suggest a significant role of GTP plus alphacalcidol in bone health of patients with chronic inflammation. Studies have suggested that green tea polyphenols (GTP) or alphacalcidol are promising dietary supplements for preventing bone loss in women. However, the mechanism(s) related to the possible osteo-protective role of GTP plus D(3) in chronic inflammation-induced bone loss is not well understood. This study evaluated bioavailability, efficacy, and related mechanisms of GTP in combination with alphacalcidol in conserving bone loss in rats with chronic inflammation. A 12-week study of 2 (no GTP vs. 0.5% GTP in drinking water) × 2 (no alphacalcidol vs. 0.05 μg/kg alphacalcidol, 5×/week) factorial design in lipopolysaccharide-administered female rats was performed. In addition, a group receiving placebo administration was used to compare with a group receiving lipopolysaccharide administration only to evaluate the effect of lipopolysaccharide. Lipopolysaccharide administration resulted in lower values for bone mass, but higher values for serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, and mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and cyclooxygenase-2 in spleen. GTP supplementation increased urinary epigallocatechin and epicatechin concentrations. Both GTP supplementation and alphacalcidol administration resulted in a significant increase in bone mass, but a significant decrease in serum TRAP levels, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels, and mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and cyclooxygenase-2 in spleen. A synergistic effect of GTP and alphacalcidol was observed in these parameters. Neither GTP nor alphacalcidol affected femoral bone area or serum osteocalcin. We

  5. Topical antiinflammatory activity of phytosterols isolated from Eryngium foetidum on chronic and acute inflammation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M D; Sáenz, M T; Gómez, M A; Fernández, M A

    1999-02-01

    Eryngium foetidum L. (Apiaceae) is a Caribbean endemic plant, used in folk medicine for the treatment of several antiinflammatory disorders. A preliminary phytochemical study showed that the hexane extract is rich in terpenic compounds. Chromatographic fractionation of this extract yielded: alpha-cholesterol, brassicasterol, campesterol, stigmasterol (as the main component, 95%) clerosterol, beta-sitosterol, delta 5-avenasterol, delta (5)24-stigmastadienol and delta 7-avenasterol. The topical antiinflammatory activity of the hexane extract and of stigmasterol was evaluated by auricular oedema, induced by 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA), in the mouse, using single and multiple applications of the phlogistic agent. Both reduced the oedema in a similar proportion in the two model assays (acute and chronic). Meloperoxidase activity was strongly reduced by both the extract and the compound, in the acute but not the chronic model. These results indicate that the leaves of Eryngium foetidum L may be effective against topical inflammation processes. Stigmasterol also exerts a significant topical antiinflammatory activity although it cannot be considered to be a major antiinflammatory agent, therefore other bioactive components are probably involved in the activity of the hexane extract.

  6. Correlation of alkaline phosphatase activity to clinical parameters of inflammation in smokers suffering from chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishakha Grover

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Current clinical periodontal diagnostic techniques emphasize the assessment of clinical and radiographic signs of periodontal diseases which can provide a measure of history of disease. Hence, new methodologies for early identification and determination of periodontal disease activity need to be explored which will eventually result in expedited treatment. Aim: To evaluate the correlation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF to clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation in smokers with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Study population included 15 smoker male patients in the age group of 35–55 years suffering from moderate generalized chronic periodontitis with history of smoking present. Following parameters were evaluated at baseline, 1 month and 3 months after scaling and root planing: plaque index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth (PD, relative attachment level (RAL, and GCF ALP activity. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent variables for measurements over time were analyzed by using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: A statistically significant reduction in all the clinical parameters and GCF ALP activity was observed from baseline to 1 month and 3 months. A correlation was observed between change in GCF ALP activity and PD reduction as well as gain in RAL at 3 months. Conclusion: The present study emphasizes that total ALP activity could be used as a marker for periodontal disease activity in smokers. Estimation of changes in the levels of this enzyme has a potential to aid in the detection of progression of periodontal disease and monitoring the response to periodontal therapy.

  7. The Prevalence of Oral Inflammation Among Denture Wearing Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłowska, D; Rubinsztajn, R; Chazan, R; Swoboda-Kopeć, E; Kostrzewa-Janicka, J; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E

    2015-01-01

    Oral inflammation is an important contributor to the etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which can impact patient's health status. Previous studies indicate that people with poor oral health are at higher risk for nosocomial pneumonia. Denture wearing is one promoting factor in the development of mucosal infections. Colonization of the denture plaque by Gram-negative bacteria, Candida spp., or other respiratory pathogens, occurring locally, may be aspirated to the lungs. The studies showed that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients treated with combinations of medicines with corticosteroids more frequently suffer from Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Treatment of oral candidiasis in patients with COPD constitutes a therapeutic problem. Therefore, it is essential to pay attention to the condition of oral mucosal membrane and denture hygiene habits. The guidelines for care and maintenance of dentures for COPD patients are presented in this paper. The majority of patients required improvement of their prosthetic and oral hygiene. Standard oral hygiene procedures in relation to dentures, conducted for prophylaxis of stomatitis complicated by mucosal infection among immunocompromised patients, are essential to maintain healthy oral tissues. The elimination of traumatic denture action in dental office, compliance with oral and denture hygiene, proper use and storage of prosthetic appliances in a dry environment outside the oral cavity can reduce susceptibility to infection. Proper attention to hygiene, including brushing and rinsing the mouth, may also help prevent denture stomatitis in these patients.

  8. Vaccination promotes TH1-like inflammation and survival in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Hougen, H P; Cryz, S J

    1995-01-01

    In a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis (CF) we studied whether the inflammatory response could be altered by vaccination. Rats were immunized with either a depolymerized alginate toxin A conjugate (D-ALG toxin A), purified alginate, an O-polysacc......In a rat model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection mimicking cystic fibrosis (CF) we studied whether the inflammatory response could be altered by vaccination. Rats were immunized with either a depolymerized alginate toxin A conjugate (D-ALG toxin A), purified alginate, an O......-polysaccharide toxin A conjugate, or sterile saline. After challenge none of the rats immunized with D-ALG toxin A died, in contrast to the other two vaccine groups combined (p = 0.03). A significant reduction in the severity of the macroscopic lung inflammation was seen in rats immunized with D-ALG toxin A, compared...... with the other three groups (p = 0.009). The histopathologic response in the control rats was dominated by numerous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) surrounding the alginate beads. In contrast, the histopathologic response in rats immunized with D-ALG toxin A changed within the first week after challenge from...

  9. C-Reactive protein in adults with chronic spinal cord injury: increased chronic inflammation in tetraplegia vs paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, A E; Buchholz, A C; Martin Ginis, K A

    2008-09-01

    Cross-sectional. In community-dwelling adults with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), to (1) quantify C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk; (2) determine factors associated with CRP. Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. We examined CVD risk factors in 69 participants. Measurements included length, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, percent fat mass (bioelectrical impedance analysis) and fasting blood parameters (high-sensitivity CRP, lipids, insulin, glucose, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)). Mean CRP of the group was 3.37+/-2.86 mg-l(-1), consistent with the American Heart Association (AHA) definition of high risk of CVD. CRP was 74% higher in persons with tetraplegia (4.31+/-2.97) than those with paraplegia (2.47+/-2.47 mg l(-1), P=0.002), consistent with high CVD risk. Participants with high CRP (3.1-9.9 mg l(-1)) had greater waist circumference, BMI, percent fat mass and HOMA values than those with lower CRP (< or =3.0 mg l(-1), all P<0.05). LogCRP was independently correlated with waist circumference (r=0.612), logTriglycerides (r=0.342), logInsulin (r=0.309) and logHOMA (r=0.316, all P<0.05). Only level of lesion and waist circumference remained significantly associated with logCRP when variables with significant bivariate correlations were included in multiple regression analysis. Mean CRP values in this sample of adults with chronic SCI were consistent with the AHA classification of high CVD risk, especially those of persons with tetraplegia. Level of lesion and waist circumference are independently associated with CRP in this population.

  10. Darbepoetin alpha reduces oxidative stress and chronic inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions of apo E deficient mice in experimental renal failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Arend

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is very important in patients with chronic renal failure. This occurs even in mild impairment of renal function and may be related to oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. The nephrectomized apo E knockout mouse is an accepted model for evaluating atherosclerosis in renal dysfunction. Erythropoietin derivates showed anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, this study evaluates the effects of Darbepoetin on markers of oxidative stress and chronic inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions in apo E knockout mice with renal dysfunction. METHODS: Apo E knockout mice underwent unilateral (Unx, n = 20 or subtotal (Snx, n = 26 nephrectomy or sham operation (Sham, n = 16. Mice of each group were either treated with Darbepoetin or saline solution, a part of Snx mice received a tenfold higher dose of Darbepoetin. The aortic plaques were measured and morphologically characterized. Additional immunhistochemical analyses were performed on tissue samples taken from the heart and the aorta. RESULTS: Both Unx and Snx mice showed increased expression of markers of oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. While aortic plaque size was not different, Snx mice showed advanced plaque stages when compared to Unx mice. Darbepoetin treatment elevated hematocrit and lowered Nitrotyrosin as one marker of oxidative stress, inflammation in heart and aorta, plaque stage and in the high dose even plaque cholesterol content. In contrast, there was no influence of Darbepoetin on aortic plaque size; high dose Darbepoetin treatment resulted in elevated renal serum parameters. CONCLUSION: Darbepoetin showed some protective cardiovascular effects irrespective of renal function, i.e. it improved plaque structure and reduced some signs of oxidative stress and chronic inflammation without affecting plaque size. Nevertheless, the dose dependent adverse effects must be considered as high Darbepoetin treatment

  11. [Can the treatment with L-carnitine improve the inflammation in chronic hemodialysis patients?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazi, G; Meriggioli, M; Donati, G

    2004-01-01

    Inflammation in patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD) is related to malnutrition and atherosclerosis; anemia is also often present in these patients. It has been demonstrated that l-carnitina treatment, in addition to reducing the need for erythropoietin (EPO), improves nutritional parameters and cardiac performance. To evaluate the effect of l-carnitine on the inflammatory pathology in patients on chronic HD, we studied 11 patients with no sure signs of malnutrition, flogistic and infective pathologies and with C-reactive protein (CRP) <2 mg/dL. We evaluated at baseline, after 6 and 12 months CRP, serum albumin, hemoglobin (Hb),nPCR and EPO weekly requirement. We observed a reduction in CRP (from 0.88 +/- 0.65 to 0.42 +/- 0.17 mg/dL after 6 months and to 0.50 + 0.36 mg/dL after 12 months), an increase in serum albumin (from 10.9 +/- 1.23 to 2.08 +/- 1.88 and to 11.8 +/- 1.15 g/dL) and an increase in nPCR (from 0.96 +/- 0.09 to 1.15 +/- 0.2 and to 1.16 +/- 0.18 g/kg/die); EPO weekly requirement decreased (from 7363 +/- 2941 to 5909 +/- 3207 units after 6 months and to 5363 +/- 3139 units after 12 months). These results seem to underline a positive effect of l-carnitine on the inflammatory pathology of patients on chronic hemodialytic treatment.

  12. Chronic inflammation and angiogenic signaling axis impairs differentiation of dental-pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Michael; Chun, Crystal; Strojny, Chelsee; Narayanan, Raghuvaran; Bartholomew, Amelia; Sundivakkam, Premanand; Alapati, Satish

    2014-01-01

    Dental-pulp tissue is often exposed to inflammatory injury. Sequested growth factors or angiogenic signaling proteins that are released following inflammatory injury play a pivotal role in the formation of reparative dentin. While limited or moderate angiogenesis may be helpful for dental pulp maintenance, the induction of significant level of angiogenesis is probably highly detrimental. Hitherto, several studies have addressed the effects of proinflammatory stimuli on the survival and differentiation of dental-pulp stem cells (DPSC), in vitro. However, the mechanisms communal to the inflammatory and angiogenic signaling involved in DPSC survival and differentiation remain unknown. Our studies observed that short-term exposure to TNF-α (6 and 12 hours [hrs]) induced apoptosis with an upregulation of VEGF expression and NF-κB signaling. However, long-term (chronic) exposure (14 days) to TNF-α resulted in an increased proliferation with a concomitant shortening of the telomere length. Interestingly, DPSC pretreated with Nemo binding domain (NBD) peptide (a cell permeable NF-κB inhibitor) significantly ameliorated TNF-α- and/or VEGF-induced proliferation and the shortening of telomere length. NBD peptide pretreatment significantly improved TNF-α-induced downregulation of proteins essential for differentiation, such as bone morphogenic proteins (BMP)-1 & 2, BMP receptor isoforms-1&2, trasnforming growth factor (TGF), osteoactivin and osteocalcin. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB signaling markedly increased the mineralization potential, a process abrogated by chronic exposure to TNF-α. Thus, our studies demonstrated that chronic inflammation mediates telomere shortening via NF-κB signaling in human DPSC. Resultant chromosomal instability leads to an emergence of increased proliferation of DPSC, while negatively regulating the differentiation of DPSC, in vitro.

  13. Montelukast versus Dexamethasone Treatment in a Guinea Pig Model of Chronic Pulmonary Neutrophilic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Kawy, Hala S

    2016-08-01

    Airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is refractory to corticosteroids and hence COPD treatment is hindered and insufficient. This study assessed the effects of oral treatment with Montelukast (10 and 30 mg/kg) or dexamethasone (20 mg/kg) for 20 days on COPD model induced by chronic exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Six groups of male guinea pigs were studied. Group 1: naïve group, group 2: exposed to saline nebulization. Groups 3, 4, 5, and 6: exposed to 9 nebulizations of LPS (30 μg/ml) for 1 hour, 48 hours apart with or without treatment with Montelukast or dexamethasone. Airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to methacholine (MCh), histopathological study and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as lung tissue analyses were performed 48 hours after the final exposure to LPS (day 20). LPS-induced pulmonary dysfunction was associated with increased neutrophil count, leukotriene (LT) B4, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in BALF. Moreover, there was an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) level and a decrease in histone deacetylases(HDAC) activity in the lung tissue. Both Montelukast (10 or 30 mg /kg) and dexamethasone significantly reduced neutrophil count in BALF and inflammatory cells in lung parenchyma as well as TNF-α, and MDA levels. However, dexamethasone was more effective (p Montelukast, at a dose of 30 mg /kg, significantly reduced specific airway resistance after the 9th LPS exposure, attenuated AHR to MCh, decreased LTB4 and increased HDAC activity in comparison to dexamethasone. These results suggest that treatment with Montelukast can be useful in chronic airway inflammatory diseases including COPD poorly responsive to glucocorticoids.

  14. Occurrence of hypermutable Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients is associated with the oxidative stress caused by chronic lung inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Riis, Bente; Pressler, Tacjana

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by chronic lung inflammation in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is characterized by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) liberated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). We formulated the hypothesis that oxidation...... the 1st and up to the 25th year of their chronic lung infection. The level of oxidized guanine moiety 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), which is a frequently investigated DNA oxidative lesion, was measured. Hypermutable P. aeruginosa isolates were found in the sputum bacterial population of 54...

  15. Involvement and role of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis in animal models of chronic pain and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomholt, Signe F; Harbuz, Michael S; Blackburn-Munro, Gordon; Blackburn-Munro, Ruth E

    2004-03-01

    Hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis changes have been reported in several disease states, including major depressive disorder, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and various other conditions associated with chronic pain. These observations suggest that stress and the HPA axis may play important roles in the pathology of these diseases. In order to contribute to a better understanding of the role that chronic stress may play in human pathology, this review article explores the involvement of the HPA axis in those animal models of chronic pain and inflammation that entail persistent rather than intermittent stress. Copyright 2004 Taylor and Francis Ltd.

  16. Apple Polysaccharide inhibits microbial dysbiosis and chronic inflammation and modulates gut permeability in HFD-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Qian; Zang, Yue; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Nan; Wang, Yifei; Xu, Xiaotao; Liu, Li; Mei, Qibing

    2017-06-01

    The saying "An apple a day keeps the doctor away" has been known for over 150 years, and numerous studies have shown that apple consumption is closely associated with reduced risks of chronic diseases. It has been well accepted that dysbiosis is the reflection of various chronic diseases. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of apple polysaccharides (AP) on gut dysbiosis. High-fat diet (HFD) fed rats were treated for 14 weeks with AP. The microbiota composition, microbiota-generated short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), gut permeability and chronic inflammation were analyzed. AP treatment showed higher abundance of Bacteroidetes and Lactobacillus while lower Firmicutes and Fusobacteium. AP significantly increased total SCFAs level that contributed by acetic acid and isobutyric acid. Moreover, AP dramatically alleviated dysbiosis-associated gut permeability and chronic inflammation with decreased plasma LBP, up-regulation of Occludin, down-regulation of tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), chemokine ligand 1 (CXCL-1) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β). The potential mechanism is due to the fact that AP reduces gut permeability, which involves the induction of autophagy in goblet cells. Therefore, AP exerts health benefits through inhibiting gut dysbiosis and chronic inflammation and modulating gut permeability in HFD-induced dysbiosis rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction Precedes Cognitive Decline and Neurodegeneration in Diabetic Insulin Resistant Mouse Model: An Implication for Causal Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryusuke Takechi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic insulin resistance and pro-diabetic diet are reported to increase dementia risk through unknown mechanisms. Emerging evidence suggests that the integrity of blood-brain barrier (BBB is central to the onset and progression of neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment. Therefore, the current study investigated the effect of pro-diabetic diets on cognitive dysfunction in association to BBB integrity and its putative mechanisms. In C57BL/6J mice chronically ingested with a diet enriched in fat and fructose (HFF, Morris Water Maze (MWM test indicated no significant cognitive decline after 4 weeks of HFF feeding compared to low-fat (LF fed control. However, at this stage, BBB dysfunction accompanied by heightened neuroinflammation in cortex and hippocampal regions was already evident. After 24 weeks, HFF fed mice showed significantly deteriorated cognitive function concomitant with substantial neurodegeneration, which both showed significant associations with increased BBB permeability. In addition, the data indicated that the loss of BBB tight junctions was significantly associated with heightened inflammation and leukocyte infiltration. The data collectively suggest that in mice maintained on pro-diabetic diet, the dysfunctional BBB associated to inflammation and leukocyte recruitment precedes the neurodegeneration and cognitive decline, possibly indicating causal association.

  18. Chronic subclinical inflammation after phakic intraocular lenses implantation: Comparison between Artisan and Artiflex models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Hedayatfar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare chronic subclinical inflammation induced after implantation of Artisan vs. Artiflex phakic intraocular lenses (pIOLs. Methods: This prospective, comparative, non-randomized study included consecutive patients with moderate to high myopia who underwent Artisan or Artiflex pIOL implantation with standard surgery and postoperative care. Anterior chamber flare was assessed quantitatively using laser flare photometry (LFP at baseline, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 2 years after surgery. Results: PIOLs were implanted in 72 eyes (40 patients; Artisan pIOLs in 16 eyes (Artisan group and Artiflex pIOLs in 56 eyes (Artiflex group. The mean preoperative anterior chamber flare was 6.5 ± 2.3 (range, 4.2–9.5 photons per millisecond (ph/ms and 4.2 ± 0.9 (range, 2.5–11.7 ph/ms in Artisan and Artiflex groups, respectively (P = 0.400. In spite of early postoperative rise, the flare value returned to preoperative levels 6 months after pIOL implantation and remained stable up to 2 years. The amount of flare was not statistically different between Artisan and Artiflex groups in any postoperative follow-up (all P > 0.05. The trend in flare changes was not different between the studied groups (ANCOVA, P = 0.815. Conclusion: The inflammatory response induced by implantation of either type of Artisan and Artiflex pIOLs is short-lived without statistically significant difference between the two models. Keywords: Subclinical inflammation, Flare, Phakic intraocular lens, Artisan, Artiflex

  19. Nutrition disorder and systemic inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirić, Zorica; Stanković, Ivana; Pejčić, Tatjana; Ristić, Lidija; Rančić, Milan; Radović, Milan; Nastasijević-Borovec, Desa

    2013-08-01

    To detect nutrition disorders (underweight and obesity) in patients with chronic obstructive disease (COPD) and presence of systemic inflammation by determination of inflammatory mediators serum values C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and leptin. The examination involved 85 patients with COPD. Nutrition categories were defined by body mass index (BMI). Fat free mass (FFM) was evaluated by mid upper-arm circumference (MUAC) and fat mass (FM) by tricipital skin-fold thickness (TFS). Values of TNF-α and leptin were measured by standardized ELISA kits and, CRP by latex turbidimetry. There were 14 (16.5%) underweight patients, 28 (32.9%) normal, 28 (32.9%) pre-obese and 15 (17.6%) obese. Values of MUAC and TSF were significantly different among the nutrition categories (p=0.000). The lowest MUAC and TSF values were in the underweight, and the highest in the obese. There was no significant difference of CRP and TNF-α among nutrition categories. Leptin of the underweight and normal nutrition was significantly different from leptin of the pre-obese and obese (p=0.000). The highest CRP and the lowest TNF-α and leptin were in the underweight patients. The obese had the lowest CRP (although increased as compared to normal values) and the highest leptin, while the pre-obese had the highest TNF-α. Two basic nutrition disorders (underweight and obesity) were manifested in COPD patients. The inflammatory profile differs between underweight COPD patients and obese. Probably that happens due to systemic inflammation, and in part due to dysfunction of adipose tissue.

  20. Metabolic Syndrome as a Factor Affecting Systemic Inflammation in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsztajn, R; Przybyłowski, T; Maskey-Warzęchowska, M; Paplińska-Goryca, M; Nejman-Gryz, P; Karwat, K; Chazan, R

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a systemic disease which may be associated with other comorbidities. The aim of the study was to estimate the incidence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in COPD patients and to assess its impact on systemic inflammation and lung function. MS was diagnosed in accordance with the recommendations of the Polish Forum for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases. The study group consisted of 267 patients with stable COPD in all stages of severity. All patients underwent spirometry with bronchial reversibility testing and 6 min walk test (6MWT). The following blood tests were evaluated: lipid profile, glucose and C-reactive protein as well as serum concentration of IL-6, leptin, adiponectin, and endothelin. MS was diagnosed in 93 patients (35.8%). No differences were observed in the incidence of MS in relation to airflow limitation severity (mild; moderate; severe and very severe: 38.9; 36.3; 35.2 and 25.0%, respectively). FEV 1 (% predicted), FVC (% predicted), 6MWT distance (6MWD), age, and the number of pack-years were similar in patients with and without MS. MS was more frequent in males than females (38.7 vs. 28.4%, p > 0.05). Serum concentrations of IL-6, endothelin, leptin, and CRP were higher in the MS group, contrary to adiponectin concentration which was lower (p COPD patients, but there were no differences in its frequency between patients with different severity of airflow limitation. We conclude that MS, as a comorbidity, occurs in all COPD stages and affects systemic inflammation. MS incidence does not depend on COPD severity.

  1. Evaluation of the effect of Neptune Krill Oil on chronic inflammation and arthritic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Luisa

    2007-02-01

    a) To evaluate the effect of Neptune Krill Oil (NKO) on C-reactive protein (CRP) on patients with chronic inflammation and b) to evaluate the effectiveness of NKO on arthritic symptoms. Randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study. Ninety patients were recruited with confirmed diagnosis of cardiovascular disease and/or rheumatoid arthritis and/or osteoarthritis and with increased levels of CRP (>1.0 mg/dl) upon three consecutive weekly blood analysis. Group A received NKO (300 mg daily) and Group B received a placebo. CRP and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis score were measured at baseline and days 7, 14 and 30. After 7 days of treatment NKO reduced CRP by 19.3% compared to an increase by 15.7% observed in the placebo group (p = 0.049). After 14 and 30 days of treatment NKO further decreased CRP by 29.7% and 30.9% respectively (p < 0.001). The CRP levels of the placebo group increased to 32.1% after 14 days and then decreased to 25.1% at day 30. The between group difference was statistically significant; p = 0.004 at day 14 and p = 0.008 at day 30. NKO showed a significant reduction in all three WOMAC scores. After 7 days of treatment, NKO reduced pain scores by 28.9% (p = 0.050), reduced stiffness by 20.3% (p = 0.001) and reduced functional impairment by 22.8% (p = 0.008). The results of the present study clearly indicate that NKO at a daily dose of 300 mg significantly inhibits inflammation and reduces arthritic symptoms within a short treatment period of 7 and 14 days.

  2. Pathway-focused genetic evaluation of immune and inflammation related genes with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeevan, Mangalathu S; Dimulescu, Irina; Murray, Janna; Falkenberg, Virginia R; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2015-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests immune and inflammatory alterations are important in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). This study was done to explore the association of functionally important genetic variants in inflammation and immune pathways with CFS. Peripheral blood DNA was isolated from 50 CFS and 121 non-fatigued (NF) control participants in a population-based study. Genotyping was performed with the Affymetrix Immune and Inflammation Chip that covers 11K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) following the manufacturer's protocol. Genotyping accuracy for specific genes was validated by pyrosequencing. Golden Helix SVS software was used for genetic analysis. SNP functional annotation was done using SPOT and GenomePipe programs. CFS was associated with 32 functionally important SNPs: 11 missense variants, 4 synonymous variants, 11 untranslated regulatory region (UTR) variants and 6 intronic variants. Some of these SNPs were in genes within pathways related to complement cascade (SERPINA5, CFB, CFH, MASP1 and C6), chemokines (CXCL16, CCR4, CCL27), cytokine signaling (IL18, IL17B, IL2RB), and toll-like receptor signaling (TIRAP, IRAK4). Of particular interest is association of CFS with two missense variants in genes of complement activation, rs4151667 (L9H) in CFB and rs1061170 (Y402H) in CFH. A 5' UTR polymorphism (rs11214105) in IL18 also associated with physical fatigue, body pain and score for CFS case defining symptoms. This study identified new associations of CFS with genetic variants in pathways including complement activation providing additional support for altered innate immune response in CFS. Additional studies are needed to validate the findings of this exploratory study. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. A gut microbiota-targeted dietary intervention for amelioration of chronic inflammation underlying metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shuiming; Fei, Na; Pang, Xiaoyan; Shen, Jian; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Baorang; Zhang, Menghui; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Chenhong; Li, Min; Sun, Lifeng; Xue, Zhengsheng; Wang, Jingjing; Feng, Jie; Yan, Feiyan; Zhao, Naisi; Liu, Jiaqi; Long, Wenmin; Zhao, Liping

    2014-02-01

    Chronic inflammation induced by endotoxin from a dysbiotic gut microbiota contributes to the development of obesity-related metabolic disorders. Modification of gut microbiota by a diet to balance its composition becomes a promising strategy to help manage obesity. A dietary scheme based on whole grains, traditional Chinese medicinal foods, and prebiotics (WTP diet) was designed to meet human nutritional needs as well as balance the gut microbiota. Ninety-three of 123 central obese volunteers (BMI ≥ 28 kg m(-2) ) completed a self-controlled clinical trial consisting of 9-week intervention on WTP diet followed by a 14-week maintenance period. The average weight loss reached 5.79 ± 4.64 kg (6.62 ± 4.94%), in addition to improvement in insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, and blood pressure. Pyrosequencing of fecal samples showed that phylotypes related to endotoxin-producing opportunistic pathogens of Enterobacteriaceae and Desulfovibrionaceae were reduced significantly, while those related to gut barrier-protecting bacteria of Bifidobacteriaceae increased. Gut permeability, measured as lactulose/mannitol ratio, was decreased compared with the baseline. Plasma endotoxin load as lipopolysaccharide-binding protein was also significantly reduced, with concomitant decrease in tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and an increase in adiponectin. These results suggest that modulation of the gut microbiota via dietary intervention may enhance the intestinal barrier integrity, reduce circulating antigen load, and ultimately ameliorate the inflammation and metabolic phenotypes. © 2013 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology pubished by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  4. Proteinuria: an ignored marker of inflammation and cardiovascular disease in chronic hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trimarchi H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hernán Trimarchi1, Alexis Muryan2, Mariana Dicugno2, Pablo Young3, Mariano Forrester1, Fernando Lombi1, Vanesa Pomeranz1, Romina Iriarte1, María Soledad Raña1, Mirta Alonso21Nephrology, 2Biochemistry, 3Internal Medicine Services, Hospital Británico de Buenos Aires, ArgentinaBackground: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis (HD patients, the main etiologies being diabetes and hypertension. Cardiac and inflammatory biomarkers are usually employed to assess risk or damage, or during follow-up. Proteinuria is considered a strong predictor of morbidity, a cause of inflammation, oxidative stress, hemodynamic alteration, and progression of chronic kidney disease. However, proteinuria is rarely considered in the clinical assessment of HD patients.Methods: This was a concurrent, cohort-observational, cross-sectional study in which 52 chronic HD subjects were divided into three groups according to the degree of proteinuria: Group (G A: <1 g/day, n = 25; GB: 1–3 g/day, n = 13; GC: >3 g/day, n = 14. Baseline hemoglobin, albuminemia, cholesterol, body mass index, Malnutrition-Inflammatory Score, pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, troponin T, C-reactive protein (CRP, and ultrafiltration rates were analyzed.Results: There was no difference between groups in terms of baseline age, gender, hypertension, cause of renal failure, hemoglobin, cholesterol, albumin, CRP levels, cardiac biomarkers, adiponectin, body mass index, or Malnutrition-Inflammatory Score. Time on HD: GA, 34.56 ± 23.3 (range [r]: 6–88; GB, 25.15 ± 19.40 (r: 6–58; GC, 18.21 ± 9.58 (r: 6–74 months; P = 0.048. Proteinuria: GA, 0.33 ± 0.30 (r: 0.0–0.88; GB, 1.66 ± 0.54 (r: 1.03–2.75; GC, 7.18 ± 2.80 (r: 3.04–21.5 g/day; P < 0.001. Mean ultrafiltration rates were significantly different: GA, 2.80 ± 0.73; GB: 1.85 ± 0.96 liters/session; P = 0.003. Fourteen diabetic patients were identified (27%: GA, 3 (12%; GB, 3 (23%; GC, 8 (57

  5. Distribution of inflammation and association between active and chronic alterations within the endometrium of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogado Pascottini, O; Hostens, M; Dini, P; Vandepitte, J; Ducatelle, R; Opsomer, G

    2016-10-01

    Objectives of this study were twofold: (i) to assess the association between polymorphonuclear (PMN) counts and chronic alterations within the bovine endometrium and (ii) to determine the distribution of inflammation throughout the endometrium of clinically healthy dairy cows. Holstein-Friesian cows (n = 32) from a single dairy farm were selected for this experiment. Before slaughtering, a complete reproductive examination was performed to discard any type of clinical disease. After slaughtering, reproductive tracts were collected, and the endometrium was sampled at 8 pre-defined locations. At each location, endometrial biopsies (EBs) and cytology (CY) samples were harvested. Histopathology samples were stained with haematoxylin-eosin (EB-HE) and naphthol-AS-D-chloroacetate-esterase (EB-naphthol), while CY samples were stained with Wright-Giemsa. In the EB-HE samples, parameters assessed were epithelium height, mononuclear cells infiltration, lymphocytic aggregates, periglandular fibrosis, angiosclerosis and haemorrhage. In EB-naphthol and CY slides, PMNs counts were evaluated. Binomial logistic regression was used to assess the association between the number of PMNs present in both the EB-naphthol and CY samples and alterations identified in the EB-HE samples and to analyse the distribution of the histopathological alterations (EB-HE). A Poisson mixed-effect model was used to analyse the distribution of PMNs within the endometrium. A significant positive association was found between the PMN counts and the mononuclear cells infiltration. The presence of erythrocytes was associated with higher odds to detect PMNs in the stratum compactum. Significantly, higher infiltration of PMNs and mononuclear cells were detected in the uterine body and the right horn region. Concluding, CY is a technique that allows the evaluation of PMN counts and therefore only evaluates active inflammation. A complete assessment of endometrial health can only be obtained using EB. To

  6. Selective preservation of bone marrow mature recirculating but not marginal zone B cells in murine models of chronic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Traggiai

    Full Text Available Inflammation promotes granulopoiesis over B lymphopoiesis in the bone marrow (BM. We studied B cell homeostasis in two murine models of T cell mediated chronic inflammation, namely calreticulin-deficient fetal liver chimeras (FLC, which develop severe blepharitis and alopecia due to T cell hyper responsiveness, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD caused by injection of CD4(+ naïve T cells into lymphopenic mice. We show herein that despite the severe depletion of B cell progenitors during chronic, peripheral T cell-mediated inflammation, the population of BM mature recirculating B cells is unaffected. These B cells are poised to differentiate to plasma cells in response to blood borne pathogens, in an analogous fashion to non-recirculating marginal zone (MZ B cells in the spleen. MZ B cells nevertheless differentiate more efficiently to plasma cells upon polyclonal stimulation by Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands, and are depleted during chronic T cell mediated inflammation in vivo. The preservation of mature B cells in the BM is associated with increased concentration of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF in serum and BM plasma. MIF produced by perivascular dendritic cells (DC in the BM provides a crucial survival signal for recirculating B cells, and mice treated with a MIF inhibitor during inflammation showed significantly reduced mature B cells in the BM. These data indicate that MIF secretion by perivascular DC may promote the survival of the recirculating B cell pool to ensure responsiveness to blood borne microbes despite loss of the MZ B cell pool that accompanies depressed lymphopoiesis during inflammation.

  7. Association among stress, hypocortisolism, systemic inflammation, and disease severity in chronic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Rosin; Rajappa, Medha; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Kattimani, Shivanand; Archana, Mony; Munisamy, Malathi; Revathy, Gunaseelan; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2016-04-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is an immune-mediated disease characterized by wheals for at least 6 weeks. The role of stress and the correlation of stress, hypocortisolism, and inflammatory markers are not well understood. To estimate C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-18, and cortisol levels in patients with CU and to explore their association with disease severity and stress. Forty-five patients with CU and 45 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Disease severity was assessed by the urticaria activity score (UAS) and stress by Presumptive Stressful Life Events (PSLE) and Daily Hassles and Uplifts Scale-Revised (DHUS-R) scoring. IL-18 and high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) were estimated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits and cortisol levels by chemiluminescence. We observed significant systemic inflammation (increased hs-CRP and IL-18 levels) and stress scores, whereas there was a lowering of basal cortisol levels in patients with CU compared with controls. This finding was more pronounced with increasing disease severity and autoimmune disease, except for stress scores, which did not vary between patients with positive and negative autologous plasma skin test results. We further observed that patients with CU with hypocortisolism had higher levels of hs-CRP and IL-18 and higher PSLE and DHUS-R scores compared with those without hypocortisolism. The hs-CRP level, IL-18 level, PSLE score, DHUS-R score, and duration of the symptoms are significantly positively correlated with UAS, whereas the cortisol level is significantly negatively correlated with UAS. Cortisol has a significant negative correlation with PSLE score, DHUS-R score, and the duration of the disease. CU is associated with systemic inflammation and stress, along with a significant lower basal cortisol, especially with severe disease and autoimmune urticaria. Thus, chronic stress may precipitate the vicious cycle in the pathogenesis of CU

  8. Increased serum inflammatory markers in the absence of clinical and skeletal muscle inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piehl-Aulin, Karin; Jones, Ian; Lindvall, Björn; Magnuson, Anders; Abdel-Halim, Samy M

    2009-01-01

    Muscle wasting and cachexia are common occurrences in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The current study aimed to investigate markers of inflammation in the circulation and skeletal muscle that might be associated with development of muscle wasting. Three groups of patients with mild, moderate and severe COPD and matched healthy controls were recruited. Serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP), IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, cortisol, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), leptin and ghrelin were analysed. Skeletal muscle inflammation was investigated microscopically using a panel of antibodies and standard staining for inflammatory cell infiltration. All COPD patients were clinically stable, with no sign of inflammation and normal CRP values. Compared to controls, significantly increased hs-CRP levels were observed in all COPD patient groups. Significant rises in IL-6 levels were first observed in moderate COPD, while IL-8 levels were significantly elevated at the late severe stage. Circulating levels of TNF-alpha, cortisol, IGF-1, leptin and ghrelin were similar to control levels. No microscopic signs of skeletal muscle inflammation were observed. Our results identify hs-CRP as an early marker of inflammation that is significantly increased in the circulation even in mild COPD. Serum interleukin levels appear to be increased with disease progress. These changes were manifested in the absence of any clinical signs of disease exacerbation, evidence of skeletal muscle inflammation or hormonal changes.

  9. Development and validation of an animal model of prostate inflammation-induced chronic pelvic pain: evaluating from inflammation of the prostate to pain behavioral modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic prostatitis/Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS is the most common type of prostatitis. Due to the lack of a suitable animal model partly, the pathogenesis for this condition is obscure. In the current study we developed and validated an animal model for nonbacterial prostatitis and prostate inflammation-induced chronic pelvic pain in rats with the use of intraprostatic injection of λ-carrageenan. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250-350 g were used for the experiments. After intraprostatic injection of 3% λ-carrageenan, at different time points(after 24 h, 7 d, 14 d and 30 d of injection, radiant heat and von Frey filaments were applied to the scrotum of rats to measure the heat and mechanical thresholds respectively. Then the prostate was removed for histology, and cyclooxygenase (COX 2 protein expression was determined by Western-blot. Evans blue(50 mg/kg was also injected intravenously to assess for plasma protein extravasation at different time points after injection of λ-carrageenan. RESULTS: Compared to control group, inflamed animals showed a significant reduction in mechanical threshold (mechanical allodynia at 24 h and 7d(p = 0.022,0.046, respectively, and a significant reduction in heat threshold (thermal hyperalgesia at 24 h, 7d and 14 d(p = 0.014, 0.018, 0.002, respectively in the scrotal skin. Significant increase of inflammatory cell accumulation, COX2 expression and Evans blue extravasation were observed at 24 h, 7d and 14 d after injection. CONCLUSIONS: Intraprostatic λ-carrageenan injection induced neurogenic prostatitis and prostate inflammation pain, which lasted at least 2 weeks. The current model is expected to be a valuable preclinical tool to study the neurobiological mechanisms of male chronic pelvic pain.

  10. Neural plasticity in the gastrointestinal tract: chronic inflammation, neurotrophic signals, and hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Tieftrunk, Elke; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2013-04-01

    Neural plasticity is not only the adaptive response of the central nervous system to learning, structural damage or sensory deprivation, but also an increasingly recognized common feature of the gastrointestinal (GI) nervous system during pathological states. Indeed, nearly all chronic GI disorders exhibit a disease-stage-dependent, structural and functional neuroplasticity. At structural level, GI neuroplasticity usually comprises local tissue hyperinnervation (neural sprouting, neural, and ganglionic hypertrophy) next to hypoinnervated areas, a switch in the neurochemical (neurotransmitter/neuropeptide) code toward preferential expression of neuropeptides which are frequently present in nociceptive neurons (e.g., substance P/SP, calcitonin-gene-related-peptide/CGRP) and of ion channels (TRPV1, TRPA1, PAR2), and concomitant activation of peripheral neural glia. The functional counterpart of these structural alterations is altered neuronal electric activity, leading to organ dysfunction (e.g., impaired motility and secretion), together with reduced sensory thresholds, resulting in hypersensitivity and pain. The present review underlines that neural plasticity in all GI organs, starting from esophagus, stomach, small and large intestine to liver, gallbladder, and pancreas, actually exhibits common phenotypes and mechanisms. Careful appraisal of these GI neuroplastic alterations reveals that--no matter which etiology, i.e., inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic/malignant, or degenerative--neural plasticity in the GI tract primarily occurs in the presence of chronic tissue- and neuro-inflammation. It seems that studying the abundant trophic and activating signals which are generated during this neuro-immune-crosstalk represents the key to understand the remarkable neuroplasticity of the GI tract.

  11. Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori does not provoke major systemic inflammation in healthy adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Berg, Gabriele; Fröhlich, M

    1999-01-01

    with H. pylori was unrelated to C-reactive protein and the leukocyte count, regardless of CagA status. There was an inverse relation between H. pylori infection and serum albumin. The adjusted OR (95% CI) of an albumin level in the bottom versus the top third were 2.2 (1.5-3.1) and 2.0 (1......It has been suggested that chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), in particular infection with virulent strains producing the cytotoxin-associated protein CagA, may increase the risk of coronary heart disease by generation of a persistent low-grade inflammatory stimulus. We...... assessed the relation between serological markers of H. pylori infection and various markers of systemic inflammation in a population-based sample of 1834 men and women aged 18-88. A total of 39.3% of the sample had a positive IgG response, and among these a slight majority was CagA positive. Infection...

  12. Hyperglycemia Aggravates Hepatic Ischemia Reperfusion Injury by Inducing Chronic Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

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    Yihan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate whether hyperglycemia will aggravate hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury (HIRI and the underlying mechanisms. Methods. Control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to partial hepatic ischemia reperfusion. Liver histology, transferase, inflammatory cytokines, and oxidative stress were assessed accordingly. Similarly, BRL-3A hepatocytes were subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R after high (25 mM or low (5.5 mM glucose culture. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and activation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells (NF-κB were determined. Results. Compared with control, diabetic rats presented more severe hepatic injury and increased hepatic inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress. HIRI in diabetic rats could be ameliorated by pretreatment of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC or apocynin. Excessive ROS generation and consequent Nrf2 and NF-κB translocation were determined after high glucose exposure. NF-κB translocation and its downstream cytokines were further increased in high glucose cultured group after H/R. While proper regulation of Nrf2 to its downstream antioxidases was observed in low glucose cultured group, no further induction of Nrf2 pathway by H/R after high glucose culture was identified. Conclusion. Hyperglycemia aggravates HIRI, which might be attributed to chronic oxidative stress and inflammation and potential malfunction of antioxidative system.

  13. Type I IFNs Regulate Inflammation, Vasculopathy, and Fibrosis in Chronic Cutaneous Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Tracy A; Morehouse, Chris; Brohawn, P Zachary; Groves, Christopher; Colonna, Marco; Yao, Yihong; Sanjuan, Miguel; Coyle, Anthony J

    2016-07-01

    Type I IFNs play a critical role in the immune response to viral infection and may also drive autoimmunity through modulation of monocyte maturation and promotion of autoreactive lymphocyte survival. Recent demonstrations of type I IFN gene signatures in autoimmune diseases, including scleroderma, led us to investigate the pathological role of IFNs in a preclinical model of sclerodermatous graft-versus-host disease. Using a neutralizing Ab against the type I IFN receptor IFNAR1, we observed a marked reduction in dermal inflammation, vasculopathy, and fibrosis compared with that seen in the presence of intact IFNAR1 signaling. The ameliorative effects of IFNAR1 blockade were restricted to the skin and were highly associated with inhibition of chronic vascular injury responses and not due to the inhibition of the T or B cell alloresponse. Inhibition of IFNAR1 normalized the overexpression of IFN-inducible genes in graft-versus-host disease skin and markedly reduced dermal IFN-α levels. Depletion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells, a major cellular source of type I IFNs, did not reduce the severity of fibrosis or type I IFN gene signature in the skin. Taken together, these studies demonstrate an important role for type I IFN in skin fibrosis, and they provide a rationale for IFNAR1 inhibition in scleroderma. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Microbiota alterations in acute and chronic gastrointestinal inflammation of cats and dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honneffer, Julia B; Minamoto, Yasushi; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is the collection of the living microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses) inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract. Novel bacterial identification approaches have revealed that the gastrointestinal microbiota of dogs and cats is, similarly to humans, a highly complex ecosystem. Studies in dogs and cats have demonstrated that acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are associated with alterations in the small intestinal and fecal microbial communities. Of interest is that these alterations are generally similar to the dysbiosis observed in humans with IBD or animal models of intestinal inflammation, suggesting that microbial responses to inflammatory conditions of the gut are conserved across mammalian host types. Studies have also revealed possible underlying susceptibilities in the innate immune system of dogs and cats with IBD, which further demonstrate the intricate relationship between gut microbiota and host health. Commonly identified microbiome changes in IBD are decreases in bacterial groups within the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, and increases within Proteobacteia. Furthermore, a reduction in the diversity of Clostridium clusters XIVa and IV (i.e., Lachnospiraceae and Clostridium coccoides subgroups) are associated with IBD, suggesting that these bacterial groups may play an important role in maintenance of gastrointestinal health. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the functional changes associated with intestinal dysbiosis in dogs and cats. PMID:25469017

  15. Chronic Lymphocytic Inflammation with Pontine Perivascular Enhancement Responsive to Steroids, with Cranial and Caudal Extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Mubasher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 23-year-old lady presented with vertigo and imbalance in walking, blurring of vision, diplopia, and headache, in addition to numbness in the lower limbs over a period of six days. On examination patient had nystagmus, ataxia, positive Romberg test, and hyperreflexia. MRI examination of the brain and spinal cord showed evidence of faint bright signal intensity foci in T2/FLAIR involving bilateral cerebral hemispheres, subcortical deep white matter, bilateral thalami, posterior pons and left brachium pontis, and basal ganglia, with small nodular enhancement that aligned along curvilinear structures; those lesions also were apparent along the spinal cord at multiple levels. The clinical and radiological features suggested CLIPPERS (chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids syndrome. Symptoms improved dramatically with high dose oral corticosteroids. Our report addresses the radiological and clinical pattern of a case of CLIPPERS rhombencephalitis, with added superior and inferior extension to involve the brain and spinal cord, which is to emphasize the importance of raising the awareness of this disease and the combined role of radiologist and physicians for the diagnosis of this potentially treatable entity, responsive to glucocorticosteroid immunosuppression.

  16. Enhancing CNS repair in neurological disease: challenges arising from neurodegeneration and rewiring of the network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Warrington, Arthur E; Bieber, Allan J; Rodriguez, Moses

    2011-07-01

    Repair of the central nervous system (CNS) constitutes an integral part of treating neurological disease and plays a crucial role in restoring CNS architecture and function. Distinct strategies have been developed to reconstruct the damaged neural tissue, with many tested preclinically in animal models. We review cell replacement-based repair strategies. By taking spinal cord injury, cerebral ischaemia and degenerative CNS disorders as examples for CNS repair, we discuss progress and potential problems in utilizing embryonic stem cells and adult neural/non-neural stem cells to repair cell loss in the CNS. Nevertheless, CNS repair is not simply a matter of cell transplantation. The major challenge is to induce regenerating neural cells to integrate into the neural network and compensate for damaged neural function. The neural cells confront an environment very different from that of the developmental stage in which these cells differentiate to form interwoven networks. During the repair process, one of the challenges is neurodegeneration, which can develop from interrupted innervations to/from the targets, chronic inflammation, ischaemia, aging or idiopathic neural toxicity. Neurodegeneration, which occurs on the basis of a characteristic vascular and neural web, usually presents as a chronically progressive process with unknown aetiology. Currently, there is no effective treatment to stop or slow down neurodegeneration. Pathological changes from patients with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis indicate a broken homeostasis in the CNS. We discuss how the blood-brain barrier and neural networks are formed to maintain CNS homeostasis and their contribution to neurodegeneration in diseased conditions. Another challenge is that some inhibitors produced by CNS injury do not facilitate the regenerating neural cells to incorporate into a pre-existing network. We review glial responses to CNS injury. Of note, the reactive astrocytes

  17. Protection against chronic hypoperfusion-induced retinal neurodegeneration by PARP inhibition via activation of PI-3-kinase Akt pathway and suppression of JNK and p38 MAP kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mester, Laszlo; Szabo, Aliz; Atlasz, Tamas; Szabadfi, Krisztina; Reglodi, Dora; Kiss, Peter; Racz, Boglarka; Tamas, Andrea; Gallyas, Ferenc; Sumegi, Balazs; Hocsak, Eniko; Gabriel, Robert; Kovacs, Krisztina

    2009-07-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation is considered as a major regulator of cell death in various pathophysiological conditions, however, no direct information is available about its role in chronic hypoperfusion-induced neuronal death. Here, we provide evidence for the protective effect of PARP inhibition on degenerative retinal damage induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO), an adequate chronic hypoperfusion murine model. We found that BCCAO in adult male Wistar rats led to severe degeneration of all retinal layers that was attenuated by a carboxaminobenzimidazol-derivative PARP inhibitor (HO3089) administered unilaterally into the vitreous body immediately following carotid occlusion and then 4 times in a 2-week-period. Normal morphological structure of the retina was preserved and the thickness of the retinal layers was increased in HO3089-treated eyes compared to the BCCAO eyes. For Western blot studies, HO3089 was administered immediately after BCCAO and retinas were removed 4 h later. According to Western blot analysis utilizing phosphorylation-specific primary antibodies, besides activating poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) synthesis, BCCAO induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). HO3089 inhibited PAR synthesis, and decreased the phosphorylation of these proapoptotic MAPKs. In addition, HO3089 treatment induced phosphorylation, that is activation, of the protective Akt/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling pathways. These data indicate that PARP activation has a major role in mediating chronic hypoperfusion-induced neuronal death, and inhibition of the enzyme prevents the pathological changes both in the morphology and the kinase signaling cascades involved. These results identify PARP inhibition as a possible molecular target in the clinical management of chronic hypoperfusion-induced neurodegenerative diseases

  18. Adipose inflammation initiates recruitment of leukocytes to mouse femoral artery: role of adipo-vascular axis in chronic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumihiko Hagita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although inflammation within adipose tissues is known to play a role in metabolic syndrome, the causative connection between inflamed adipose tissue and atherosclerosis is not fully understood. In the present study, we examined the direct effects of adipose tissue on macro-vascular inflammation using intravital microscopic analysis of the femoral artery after adipose tissue transplantation. METHODS AND RESULTS: We obtained subcutaneous (SQ and visceral (VIS adipose tissues from C57BL/6 mice fed normal chow (NC or a high fat diet (HF, then transplanted the tissues into the perivascular area of the femoral artery of recipient C57/BL6 mice. Quantitative intravital microscopic analysis revealed an increase in adherent leukocytes after adipose tissue transplantation, with VIS found to induce significantly more leukocyte accumulation as compared to SQ. Moreover, adipose tissues from HF fed mice showed significantly more adhesion to the femoral artery. Simultaneous flow cytometry demonstrated upregulation of CD11b on peripheral granulocyte and monocytes after adipose tissue transplantation. We also observed dominant expressions of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, and chemokines MCP-1 and MIP-1β in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF of these adipose tissues as well as sera of recipient mice after transplantation. Finally, massive accumulations of pro-inflammatory and dendritic cells were detected in mice with VIS transplantation as compared to SQ, as well as in HF mice as compared to those fed NC. CONCLUSION: Our in vivo findings indicate that adipose tissue stimulates leukocyte accumulation in the femoral artery. The underlying mechanisms involve upregulation of CD11b in leukocytes, induction of cytokines and chemokines, and accumulation of pro-inflammatory cells in the SVF.

  19. Proteinuria: an ignored marker of inflammation and cardiovascular disease in chronic hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimarchi, Hernán; Muryan, Alexis; Dicugno, Mariana; Young, Pablo; Forrester, Mariano; Lombi, Fernando; Pomeranz, Vanesa; Iriarte, Romina; Raña, María Soledad; Alonso, Mirta

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients, the main etiologies being diabetes and hypertension. Cardiac and inflammatory biomarkers are usually employed to assess risk or damage, or during follow-up. Proteinuria is considered a strong predictor of morbidity, a cause of inflammation, oxidative stress, hemodynamic alteration, and progression of chronic kidney disease. However, proteinuria is rarely considered in the clinical assessment of HD patients. This was a concurrent, cohort-observational, cross-sectional study in which 52 chronic HD subjects were divided into three groups according to the degree of proteinuria: Group (G) A: GB: 1-3 g/day, n = 13; GC: >3 g/day, n = 14. Baseline hemoglobin, albuminemia, cholesterol, body mass index, Malnutrition-Inflammatory Score, pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, troponin T, C-reactive protein (CRP), and ultrafiltration rates were analyzed. There was no difference between groups in terms of baseline age, gender, hypertension, cause of renal failure, hemoglobin, cholesterol, albumin, CRP levels, cardiac biomarkers, adiponectin, body mass index, or Malnutrition-Inflammatory Score. Time on HD: GA, 34.56 ± 23.3 (range [r]: 6-88); GB, 25.15 ± 19.40 (r: 6-58); GC, 18.21 ± 9.58 (r: 6-74) months; P = 0.048. Proteinuria: GA, 0.33 ± 0.30 (r: 0.0-0.88); GB, 1.66 ± 0.54 (r: 1.03-2.75); GC, 7.18 ± 2.80 (r: 3.04-21.5) g/day; P GB: 1.85 ± 0.96 liters/session; P = 0.003. Fourteen diabetic patients were identified (27%): GA, 3 (12%); GB, 3 (23%); GC, 8 (57%); P = 0.009. A positive and significant correlation was observed between diabetes and proteinuria >3 g/day: rho 0.438, P = 0.027. Although troponin T, pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, adiponectin, and CRP were not different among groups, the positive correlation between troponin T and CRP elevated significantly as proteinuria increased: GA, rho 377, P = 0.063; GB, rho 663, P = 0.013; GC, rho 687, P = 0.007. In chronic HD

  20. Hepcidin-dependent and hepcidin-independent regulation of erythropoiesis in a mouse model of anemia of chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Jacqueline M; Yates, Saiah C; Femnou, Laurette K; McCranor, Bryan J; Cheadle, Chris; Xue, Qian-Li; Vaulont, Sophie; Civin, Curt I; Walston, Jeremy D; Roy, Cindy N

    2014-05-01

    Increased hepcidin antimicrobial peptide correlates with hypoferremia and anemia in various disease states, but its requirement for anemia of inflammation has not been adequately demonstrated. Anemia of inflammation is usually described as normocytic and normochromic, while diseases associated with over expression of hepcidin, alone, are often microcytic and hypochromic. These differences in erythrocyte parameters suggest anemia in many inflammatory states may not be fully explained by hepcidin-mediated iron sequestration. We used turpentine-induced sterile abscesses to model chronic inflammation in mice with targeted disruption of Hepcidin 1 [Hepc1 (-/-)] or its positive regulator, Interleukin-6 [IL-6 (-/-)], to determine whether these genes are required for features characteristic of anemia of inflammation. Although hemoglobin levels did not decline in Hepc1 (-/-) mice with sterile abscesses, erythrocyte numbers were significantly reduced compared to untreated Hepc1 (-/-) mice. In contrast, both hemoglobin concentration and erythrocyte number declined significantly in wild type and IL-6 (-/-) mice with sterile abscesses. Both Hepc1 (-/-) and IL-6 (-/-) mice had increased erythrocyte mean cell volume and mean cell hemoglobin following sterile abscesses, while wild types had no change. Thus, IL-6 (-/-) mice with sterile abscesses exhibit an intermediate phenotype between wild type and Hepc1 (-/-). Our results demonstrate the requirement of Hepc1 for the development of anemia in this rodent model. Simultaneously, our results demonstrate hepcidin-independent effects of inflammation on the suppression of erythropoiesis. Our results suggest chronic anemia associated with inflammation may benefit from interventions protecting erythrocyte number in addition to anti-hepcidin interventions aimed at enhancing iron availability. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Chronic Inflammation-Related Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Around the Area of Thoracotomy After Decortication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Metin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall tumors consist 5% of all tumors in the thorax. Lymphomas compose of less than 5% of all primary chest wall malignancy.Sixty three years old patient who had an operation for pleural thickness two years ago admitted with complaint of left-sided chest pain.Following the detection of mass lesion radiologically at the place of previous operation area, the patient was operated based on needle biopsy result suggesting Ewing /PNET or pulmonary originated tumor. After the operation, pathological examination confirmed chronic inflammation-related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Since it has been rarely reported in the literature, we aimed to present the case of chronic inflammation-related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma developed within such a short time as two years on the ground of surgical incision scar tissue together with our radiologic, surgical, and pathological findings.

  2. Neurodegeneration in accelerated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Moren

    2016-11-01

    The growing proportion of elderly people represents an increasing economic burden, not least because of age-associated diseases that pose a significant cost to the health service. Finding possible interventions to age-associated disorders therefore have wide ranging implications. A number of genetically defined accelerated aging diseases have been characterized that can aid in our understanding of aging. Interestingly, all these diseases are associated with defects in the maintenance of our genome. A subset of these disorders, Cockayne syndrome, Xeroderma pigmentosum group A and ataxia-telangiectasia, show neurological involvement reminiscent of what is seen in primary human mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondria are the power plants of the cells converting energy stored in oxygen, sugar, fat, and protein into ATP, the energetic currency of our body. Emerging evidence has linked this organelle to aging and finding mitochondrial dysfunction in accelerated aging disorders thereby strengthens the mitochondrial theory of aging. This theory states that an accumulation of damage to the mitochondria may underlie the process of aging. Indeed, it appears that some accelerated aging disorders that show neurodegeneration also have mitochondrial dysfunction. The mitochondrial alterations may be secondary to defects in nuclear DNA repair. Indeed, nuclear DNA damage may lead to increased energy consumption, alterations in mitochondrial ATP production and defects in mitochondrial recycling, a term called mitophagy. These changes may be caused by activation of poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase 1 (PARP1), an enzyme that responds to DNA damage. Upon activation PARP1 utilizes key metabolites that attenuate pathways that are normally protective for the cell. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of PARP1 or reconstitution of the metabolites rescues the changes caused by PARP1 hyperactivation and in many cases reverse the phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. This implies that modulation

  3. Angiotensin-(1-7) attenuates airway remodelling and hyperresponsiveness in a model of chronic allergic lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, G S; Rodrigues-Machado, M G; Motta-Santos, D; Silva, A R; Caliari, M V; Prata, L O; Abreu, S C; Rocco, P R M; Barcelos, L S; Santos, R A S; Campagnole-Santos, M J

    2015-05-01

    A long-term imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators leads to airway remodelling, which is strongly correlated to most of the symptoms, severity and progression of chronic lung inflammation. The Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]/Mas receptor axis of the renin-angiotensin system is associated with attenuation of acute and chronic inflammatory processes. In this study, we investigated the effects of Ang-(1-7) treatment in a model of chronic allergic lung inflammation. Mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA; 4 injections over 42 days, 14 days apart) and were challenged three times per week (days 21-46). These mice received Ang-(1-7) (1 μg·h(-1) , s.c.) by osmotic mini-pumps, for the last 28 days. Histology and morphometric analysis were performed in left lung and right ventricle. Airway responsiveness to methacholine, analysis of Ang-(1-7) levels (RIA), collagen I and III (qRT-PCR), ERK1/2 and JNK (Western blotting), IgE (elisa), cytokines and chemokines (elisa multiplex), and immunohistochemistry for Mas receptors were performed. Infusion of Ang-(1-7) in OVA-sensitized and challenged mice decreased inflammatory cell infiltration and collagen deposition in the airways and lung parenchyma, and prevented bronchial hyperresponsiveness. These effects were accompanied by decreased IgE and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mas receptors were detected in the epithelium and bronchial smooth muscle, suggesting a site in the lung for the beneficial actions of Ang-(1-7). Ang-(1-7) exerted beneficial attenuation of three major features of chronic asthma: lung inflammation, airway remodelling and hyperresponsiveness. Our results support an important protective role of Ang-(1-7) in lung inflammation. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Anti-inflammatory and Analgesic Activities of Topical Formulations of Pterocarpus Santalinus Powder in Rat Model of Chronic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhande, Priti Pravin; Gupta, Amit O; Jain, Sourav; Dawane, Jayshree Shriram

    2017-07-01

    The incidence of arthritis is quite high and there is a need for the search of natural products to halt the progression of disease or provide symptomatic relief without significant adverse effects. This study aimed at evaluating the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of topical Pterocarpus santalinus in an animal model of chronic inflammation. Albino rats of either sex were divided into five groups of six rats each (Group I - Control, Group II -Gel base, Group III -P. santalinus paste, Group IV -P. santalinus gel, Group V- Diclofenac gel). Chronic inflammation was induced on day 0 by injecting 0.1 ml Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) in sub-plantar tissue of left hind paw of the rats. Topical treatment was started from day 12 till day 28. Body weight and paw volume (Plethysmometer) were assessed on day 0, 12 and 28. Pain assessment was done using Randall and Selitto paw withdrawal method. Data was analysed using GraphPad Prism version 5. Unpaired students t-test and ANOVA followed by Tukey's test was used for comparison among groups. Only topical P.santalinus gel significantly reduced the body weight (p=0.02) due to reduction in inflammatory oedema of the left limb. P. santalinus gel also showed significant reduction (p=0.03) in paw volume of rats compared to the other groups. There was significant reduction in pain threshold (gm/sec) due to chronic inflammation, with all the study drugs (psantalinus gel, this reduction was less (p<0.001). Gel showed significant anti-inflammatory and mild analgesic activity on topical application in rat model of chronic inflammation.

  5. Association of lifecourse socioeconomic status with chronic inflammation and type 2 diabetes risk: the Whitehall II prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Stringhini

    Full Text Available Socioeconomic adversity in early life has been hypothesized to "program" a vulnerable phenotype with exaggerated inflammatory responses, so increasing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in adulthood. The aim of this study is to test this hypothesis by assessing the extent to which the association between lifecourse socioeconomic status and type 2 diabetes incidence is explained by chronic inflammation.We use data from the British Whitehall II study, a prospective occupational cohort of adults established in 1985. The inflammatory markers C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 were measured repeatedly and type 2 diabetes incidence (new cases was monitored over an 18-year follow-up (from 1991-1993 until 2007-2009. Our analytical sample consisted of 6,387 non-diabetic participants (1,818 women, of whom 731 (207 women developed type 2 diabetes over the follow-up. Cumulative exposure to low socioeconomic status from childhood to middle age was associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in adulthood (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.96, 95% confidence interval: 1.48-2.58 for low cumulative lifecourse socioeconomic score and HR = 1.55, 95% confidence interval: 1.26-1.91 for low-low socioeconomic trajectory. 25% of the excess risk associated with cumulative socioeconomic adversity across the lifecourse and 32% of the excess risk associated with low-low socioeconomic trajectory was attributable to chronically elevated inflammation (95% confidence intervals 16%-58%.In the present study, chronic inflammation explained a substantial part of the association between lifecourse socioeconomic disadvantage and type 2 diabetes. Further studies should be performed to confirm these findings in population-based samples, as the Whitehall II cohort is not representative of the general population, and to examine the extent to which social inequalities attributable to chronic inflammation are reversible.

  6. Nav1.9 Channel Contributes to Mechanical and Heat Pain Hypersensitivity Induced by Subacute and Chronic Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane Lolignier; Muriel Amsalem; François Maingret; Françoise Padilla; Mélanie Gabriac; Eric Chapuy; Alain Eschalier; Patrick Delmas; Jérôme Busserolles

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation is known to be responsible for the sensitization of peripheral sensory neurons, leading to spontaneous pain and invalidating pain hypersensitivity. Given its role in regulating neuronal excitability, the voltage-gated Nav1.9 channel is a potential target for the treatment of pathological pain, but its implication in inflammatory pain is yet not fully described. In the present study, we examined the role of the Nav1.9 channel in acute, subacute and chronic inflammatory pain using ...

  7. Chronic Stress, Inflammation, and Glucose Regulation in U.S. Hispanics from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurley, Jessica L.; Mills, Paul J.; Roesch, Scott C.; Carnethon, Mercedes; Giacinto, Rebeca E.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Teng, Yanping; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Llabre, Maria M.; Penedo, Frank J.; Schneiderman, Neil; Gallo, Linda C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes prevalence is rising rapidly, and diabetes disproportionately affects Hispanics and other underserved groups. Chronic stress may contribute to diabetes risk, but few studies have examined this relationship in U.S. Hispanics. We examined associations of chronic stress with fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Hispanics without diabetes, and also assessed indirect effects of stress through inflammation (CRP). Participants were 3923 men and women, aged 18-74, without diabetes, from the four U.S. field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)-Sociocultural Ancillary study. Participants completed a measure of chronic life stress and a physical exam with oral glucose tolerance test. In a multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for demographic and health covariates, higher chronic stress was related to higher fasting glucose (standardized regression coefficient: β=.09, pstress through inflammation. Findings suggest that higher chronic stress is associated with poorer glucose regulation in Hispanics, prior to the onset of a clinical diabetes diagnosis. PMID:25898909

  8. Chronic stress, inflammation, and glucose regulation in U.S. Hispanics from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurley, Jessica L; Mills, Paul J; Roesch, Scott C; Carnethon, Mercedes; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Isasi, Carmen R; Teng, Yanping; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Llabre, Maria M; Penedo, Frank J; Schneiderman, Neil; Gallo, Linda C

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes prevalence is rising rapidly, and diabetes disproportionately affects Hispanics and other underserved groups. Chronic stress may contribute to diabetes risk, but few studies have examined this relationship in U.S. Hispanics. We examined associations of chronic stress with fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Hispanics without diabetes, and also assessed indirect effects of stress through inflammation (CRP). Participants were 3,923 men and women, aged 18-74, without diabetes, from the four U.S. field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary study. Participants completed a measure of chronic life stress and a physical exam with oral glucose tolerance test. In a multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for demographic and health covariates, higher chronic stress was related to higher fasting glucose (standardized regression coefficient: β = .09, p stress through inflammation. Findings suggest that higher chronic stress is associated with poorer glucose regulation in Hispanics, prior to the onset of a clinical diabetes diagnosis. © 2015 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  9. Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation in Childhood Obesity Is Associated with Decreased IL-10 Expression by Monocyte Subsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael T Mattos

    Full Text Available Chronic low-grade inflammation is related to the development of comorbidities and poor prognosis in obesity. Monocytes are main sources of cytokines and play a pivotal role in inflammation. We evaluated monocyte frequency, phenotype and cytokine profile of monocyte subsets, to determine their association with the pathogenesis of childhood obesity. Children with obesity were evaluated for biochemical and anthropometric parameters. Monocyte subsets were characterized by flow cytometry, considering cytokine production and activation/recognition molecules. Correlation analysis between clinical parameters and immunological data delineated the monocytes contribution for low-grade inflammation. We observed a higher frequency of non-classical monocytes in the childhood obesity group (CO than normal-weight group (NW. All subsets displayed higher TLR4 expression in CO, but their recognition and antigen presentation functions seem to be diminished due to lower expression of CD40, CD80/86 and HLA-DR. All subsets showed a lower expression of IL-10 in CO and correlation analyses showed changes in IL-10 expression profile. The lower expression of IL-10 may be decisive for the maintenance of the low-grade inflammation status in CO, especially for alterations in non-classical monocytes profile. These cells may contribute to supporting inflammation and loss of regulation in the immune response of children with obesity.

  10. Asbestos-Induced Cellular and Molecular Alteration of Immunocompetent Cells and Their Relationship with Chronic Inflammation and Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Maeda, Megumi; Lee, Suni; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Shoko; Hatayama, Tamayo; Kojima, Yoko; Tabata, Rika; Kishimoto, Takumi; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Otsuki, Takemi

    2012-01-01

    Asbestos causes lung fibrosis known as asbestosis as well as cancers such as malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer. Asbestos is a mineral silicate containing iron, magnesium, and calcium with a core of SiO2. The immunological effect of silica, SiO2, involves the dysregulation of autoimmunity because of the complications of autoimmune diseases found in silicosis. Asbestos can therefore cause alteration of immunocompetent cells to result in a decline of tumor immunity. Additionally, due to its physical characteristics, asbestos fibers remain in the lung, regional lymph nodes, and the pleural cavity, particularly at the opening sites of lymphatic vessels. Asbestos can induce chronic inflammation in these areas due to the production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. As a consequence, immunocompetent cells can have their cellular and molecular features altered by chronic and recurrent encounters with asbestos fibers, and there may be modification by the surrounding inflammation, all of which eventually lead to decreased tumor immunity. In this paper, the brief results of our investigation regarding reduction of tumor immunity of immunocompetent cells exposed to asbestos in vitro are discussed, as are our findings concerned with an investigation of chronic inflammation and analyses of peripheral blood samples derived from patients with pleural plaque and mesothelioma that have been exposed to asbestos. PMID:22500091

  11. Mechanisms of disease: chronic inflammation and cancer in the pancreas--a potential role for pancreatic stellate cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algül, Hana; Treiber, Matthias; Lesina, Marina; Schmid, Roland M

    2007-08-01

    Late diagnosis and ineffective therapeutic options mean that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most lethal forms of human cancer. The identification of genetic alterations facilitated the launch of the Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasm nomenclature, a standardized classification system for pancreatic duct lesions, but the factors that contribute to the development of such lesions and their progression to high-grade neoplasia remain obscure. Age, smoking, obesity and diabetes confer increased risk of PDA, and the presence of chronic pancreatitis is a consistent risk factor for pancreatic cancer. It is hypothesized that chronic inflammation generates a microenvironment that contributes to malignant transformation in the pancreas, as is known to occur in other organs. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the main mediator of fibrogenesis during chronic pancreatitis, but their contribution to the development of PDA has not been elucidated. Data now suggest that PSCs might assume a linking role in inflammation-associated carcinogenesis through their ability to communicate with inflammatory cells, acinar cells, and pancreatic cancer cells in a complicated network of interactions. In this Review, the role of PSCs in the process of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis is discussed and new potential treatment options evaluated.

  12. Periodontal-induced chronic inflammation triggers macrophage secretion of Ccl12 to inhibit fibroblast-mediated cardiac wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeon-Pennell, Kristine Y; Iyer, Rugmani Padmanabhan; Ero, Osasere K; Cates, Courtney A; Flynn, Elizabeth R; Cannon, Presley L; Jung, Mira; Shannon, De'Aries; Garrett, Michael R; Buchanan, William; Hall, Michael E; Ma, Yonggang; Lindsey, Merry L

    2017-09-21

    Chronic inflammatory diseases, such as periodontal disease, associate with adverse wound healing in response to myocardial infarction (MI). The goal of this study was to elucidate the molecular basis for impaired cardiac wound healing in the setting of periodontal-induced chronic inflammation. Causal network analysis of 168 inflammatory and extracellular matrix genes revealed that chronic inflammation induced by a subseptic dose of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exacerbated infarct expression of the proinflammatory cytokine Ccl12. Ccl12 prevented initiation of the reparative response by prolonging inflammation and inhibiting fibroblast conversion to myofibroblasts, resulting in diminished scar formation. Macrophage secretion of Ccl12 directly impaired fibronectin and collagen deposition and indirectly stimulated collagen degradation through upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2. In post-MI patients, circulating LPS levels strongly associated with the Ccl12 homologue monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1). Patients with LPS levels ≥ 1 endotoxin units (EU)/ml (subseptic endotoxemia) at the time of hospitalization had increased end diastolic and systolic dimensions compared with post-MI patients with healing environment through Ccl12-dependent mechanisms.

  13. IL-13Rα1 expression in dopaminergic neurons contributes to their oxidative stress-mediated loss following chronic peripheral treatment with LPS

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Brad E.; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; Nomura, Daniel K.; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Saar, Indrek; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Bartfai, Tamas; Maher, Pamela; Sugama, Shuei; Conti, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation and its mediators, including cytokines and reactive oxigen species, are believed to contribute to neurodegeneration. In the mouse brain, we found that the interleukin 13 receptor alpha 1 chain (IL-13Rα1) was expressed in the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta which are preferentially lost in human Parkinson’s disease (PD). Mice deficient for Il13ra1 exhibited resistance to loss of DA neurons in a model of chronic peripheral inflammation using bacteria...

  14. Inflammation, demyelination, and degeneration - recent insights from MS pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Christine; Wegner, Christiane; Brück, Wolfgang

    2011-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system which responds to anti-inflammatory treatments in the early disease phase. However, the pathogenesis of the progressive disease phase is less well understood, and inflammatory as well as neurodegenerative mechanisms of tissue damage are currently being discussed. This review summarizes current knowledge on the interrelation between inflammation, demyelination, and neurodegeneration derived from the study of human autopsy and biopsy brain tissue and experimental models of MS. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Lower grade chronic inflammation is associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongxia; Wang, Zhenshan; Xue, Xin; Zhang, Ping; Yang, Chunmei; Su, Benli

    2014-06-01

    To investigate whether the existence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is associated with low grade chronic inflammation. Fifty-four patients hospitalized for poor glycemic control from 12/2008 to 12/2009 were divided into 2 groups, OSAS group (T2DM with OSAS, 27 cases) and NOSAS group (T2DM without OSAS, 27 cases). The control group consisted of 26 people from a health check-up program without diabetes and OSAS. Biochemical indexes were analyzed in central laboratory of the hospital. Serum tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), lipopolysaccharides (LPS), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI) levels were determined with commercial ELISA kits. Apnea hypopnea index (AHI), the lowest pulse oxygen saturation (LSpO₂) at night were measured with a portable home sleep monitor. Homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), AHI in OSAS group were higher than those in NOSAS group and control group [for HOMA-IR, 2.7 ± 1.5 vs 1.7 ± 0.9 vs 1.2 ± 0.7, and for AHI, (17.0 ± 13.0) vs (3.4 ± 1.3) vs (3.2 ± 1.2) per hour], and LSpO₂ was lower than that in NOSAS group and control group [(78 ± 11)% vs (87 ± 4)% vs (89 ± 6)%]. Compared with normal control, levels of TNF-α [(0.73 ± 0.19) vs (1.97 ± 0.13) vs (1.09 ± 0.29) ng/ml], LPS [(50 ± 11) vs (303 ± 70) vs (171 ± 49) pg/ml], MCP [(302 ± 41) vs (514 ± 122) vs (473 ± 134) pg/ml] and PAI [(0.89 ± 0.25) vs (2.27 ± 0.85) vs (1.59 ± 0.13) ng/ml] in patients with OSAS and with NOSAS group increased significantly. Pearson univariate correlation analysis revealed that TNF-α and PAI were both positively associated with HOMA-IR, FBG and AHI, and negatively with LSpO₂, LPS, MCP were both associated positively with FBG and AHI, and negatively with LSpO₂. Multiple linear regression stepwise analysis found that TNF-α and LPS were independently associated with AHI and FBG, MCP with LSpO₂, PAI with both AHI

  16. Joint prognostic effect of obesity and chronic systemic inflammation in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manasi S; Fogelman, David R; Raghav, Kanwal Pratap Singh; Heymach, John V; Tran, Hai T; Jiang, Zhi-Qin; Kopetz, Scott; Daniel, Carrie R

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is strongly linked with chronic systemic inflammation, and each has been linked with disease progression and survival in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The authors investigated the joint prognostic effects of obesity and circulating cytokines in patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC), an understudied patient group. In 242 chemotherapy-naive patients with mCRC, the authors measured a multiplex cytokine panel and abstracted clinicopathological features, height, and weight from medical records. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the date of mCRC diagnosis until the date of death from any cause and evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models. Cut points for cytokines were determined by restricted cubic spline regression. In multivariable models, elevated interleukin (IL)-8, IL-2 receptor alpha, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) emerged as significant predictors of poor OS (hazard ratio [HR] and 95% confidence interval [95% CI] for above vs below the (referent) knot point: 2.5 [95% CI, 1.7-3.7], 1.9 [95% CI, 1.3-2.7], and 2.2 [95% CI, 1.6-3.1], respectively; all PObesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) ) was not found to be associated with OS, but appeared to modify the relationships observed with IL-8 and LDH, which were associated with a significant 4-fold and 5-fold risk of death, respectively, in obese patients compared with a 2-fold risk of death in nonobese patients (P for interaction of .06 and .04, respectively). Similar results emerged from joint effects analysis, in which obese patients with high IL-8 (or LDH) experienced the highest risk of death. Although obesity itself was not found to be independently associated with survival in patients with mCRC, the adverse prognostic significance of LDH and IL-8 was found to be enhanced in obese patients. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  17. Mammalian Antimicrobial Peptides: Promising Therapeutic Targets Against Infection and Chronic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Pujarini; Das, Santasabuj

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are integral components of the host innate immune system and functional throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. AMPs are short cationic molecules and lethal against a wide range of bacteria, viruses, fungi, yeast and protozoa due to their membranolytic effects on the negatively-charged microbial membranes. In addition, they exert multiple immunomodulatory roles like chemotaxis, modulation of cytokine and chemokine expression, leukocyte activation etc. Since AMPs suffer loss of microbicidal properties under serum and tissue environments, their capacity to modulate the immune system may predominates under the physiological conditions. Discovery of new antibiotics is lagging far behind the rapidly spreading drug resistance among the microorganisms. Both natural and synthetic AMPs have shown promise as 'next generation antibiotics' due to their unique mode of action, which minimises the chance of development of microbial resistance. In addition, they have therapeutic potential against non-infectious diseases like chronic inflammation and cancer. Many of the synthetic AMPs are currently undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of debilitating diseases, such as catheter-related infections, diabetic foot ulcers, chemotherapy-associated infections etc. Some of them have already entered the market as topical preparations. In this review, we synopsise the current literature of natural and synthetic AMPs in different infectious and inflammatory diseases of human microfloral habitats, especially the gastrointestinal, respiratory and genitourinary tracts and the skin. We also discuss the classification of AMPs, their mode action and antimicrobial spectrum, including the pathogen evasion mechanisms. In short, we tried to present the locus standi of AMPs in relation to human diseases and highlight the most promising synthetic peptides emerging from the clinical trials. Finally, we focused on the limitations and hurdles in terms of cost of

  18. Pharmacological characterisation of anti-inflammatory compounds in acute and chronic mouse models of cigarette smoke-induced inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mok Joanie

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candidate compounds being developed to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are typically assessed using either acute or chronic mouse smoking models; however, in both systems compounds have almost always been administered prophylactically. Our aim was to determine whether the prophylactic effects of reference anti-inflammatory compounds in acute mouse smoking models reflected their therapeutic effects in (more clinically relevant chronic systems. Methods To do this, we started by examining the type of inflammatory cell infiltrate which occurred after acute (3 days or chronic (12 weeks cigarette smoke exposure (CSE using female, C57BL/6 mice (n = 7-10. To compare the effects of anti-inflammatory compounds in these models, mice were exposed to either 3 days of CSE concomitant with compound dosing or 14 weeks of CSE with dosing beginning after week 12. Budesonide (1 mg kg-1; i.n., q.d., roflumilast (3 mg kg-1; p.o., q.d. and fluvastatin (2 mg kg-1; p.o., b.i.d. were dosed 1 h before (and 5 h after for fluvastatin CSE. These dose levels were selected because they have previously been shown to be efficacious in mouse models of lung inflammation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF leukocyte number was the primary endpoint in both models as this is also a primary endpoint in early clinical studies. Results To start, we confirmed that the inflammatory phenotypes were different after acute (3 days versus chronic (12 weeks CSE. The inflammation in the acute systems was predominantly neutrophilic, while in the more chronic CSE systems BALF neutrophils (PMNs, macrophage and lymphocyte numbers were all increased (p Conclusions These results demonstrate that the acute, prophylactic systems can be used to identify compounds with therapeutic potential, but may not predict a compound's efficacy in chronic smoke exposure models.

  19. Effects of Alprazolam, Zolpidem and Zopiclone, and of chronic inflammation on peripheral experimental algesia in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdrîncă, Mihaela; Muţiu, Gabriela; Bogdan, Maria; Dobjanschi, Luciana; Antonescu, Angela; Moş, Ioana; Mureşan, Mariana; Zdrîncă, M; Antonescu, Andreea

    2011-01-01

    In the literature, there are some data which indicate that benzodiazepines and other chemical compounds with the same mechanism of action (Diazepam, Chlordiazepoxide, Lorazepam, Zopiclone, etc.) also have other effects. We investigated the effects of experimental chronic inflammation under the administration of some tranquilizers and hypnotics on peripheral algesia induced in rats by "writhing test". Chronic inflammation was induced by "cotton wool granuloma" technique. The "writhing test" consisted in intraperitoneal injection of an irritant agent (acetic acid 0.0025%, 0.4 mL). The animal reacts with a characteristic stretching behavior called writhing. A writhe is indicated by stretching of the abdomen with simultaneous stretching of at least one hind limb. Then, the animals were placed individually into glass beakers and 5 minutes were allowed to elapse. The rats were then observed for a period of 10 minutes and the number of writhes is recorded for each animal. Three drugs were administered by gastric probe: Alprazolam 1 mg/kg, Zolpidem 10 mg/kg and Zopiclone 10 mg/kg. Alprazolam is a triazolobenzodiazepine derivative used as a tranquilizer. Zolpidem is an imidazopyridine with marked sedative-hypnotic effect and it has the same mechanism of action like benzodiazepines. Zopiclone is a cyclopyrrolone with sedative-hypnotic effect used as hypnotic and acts like benzodiazepines. After that, the animals were sacrificed and the weight of cotton wool granuloma was determined. In the same time, the histopatological aspect of granulomatous inflammation was studied. It was found that experimental proliferative inflammation under the action of these drugs was accompanied by a peripheral analgesic activity in "writhing test". The mechanisms of these effects are not fully elucidated. Some explanations are: they act as agonists or antagonists on algesia and inflammation mediators and they have a stimulating effect on peripheral ω3-benzodiazepine receptors ("peripheral

  20. The VEGF-C/VEGFR3 signaling pathway contributes to resolving chronic skin inflammation by activating lymphatic vessel function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagura, Asami; Asai, Jun; Maruyama, Kazuichi; Takenaka, Hideya; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Katoh, Norito

    2014-02-01

    The functions of lymphatic vessels are to drain the protein-rich lymph from the extracellular space, to maintain normal tissue pressure, and to mediate the immune response, particularly in inflammatory conditions. To evaluate the function of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C/VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-3 signaling pathway in chronic skin inflammation. We used adenovirus-mediated VEGF-C or VEGFR3-immunoglobulin (Ig) production and investigated the effects of VEGF-C/VEGFR3 signaling on the resolution of inflammation using the experimental chronic contact hypersensitivity (CHS) reaction mouse model. VEGF-C gene transfer promoted significant reduction of ear swelling and ear weight in CHS reaction-induced skin inflammation. Although, there was no significant difference in the number of lymphatic vessels, the number of infiltrating CD11b-positive inflammatory cells was significantly reduced in the VEGF-C group, which suggested that VEGF-C upregulated the drainage of interstitial fluid and inflammatory cells via lymphatic vessels. Furthermore, blockade of VEGFR3 expression resulted in a significant delay in the recovery from CHS reaction-induced skin inflammation. Lymphatic vessel size was enlarged and a significant increase of infiltrating CD11b inflammatory cells was observed in mice with VEGFR3-Ig gene transfer compared to control mice. These results suggested that blockade of VEGFR3 inhibited the drainage function of the lymphatic system. This study provides evidence that VEGF-C/VEGFR3 signaling plays an important role in the resolution of skin inflammation; the regulation of lymphatic function may have a great therapeutic potential in inflammatory skin diseases. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. IL-17 receptor A and adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency in siblings with recurrent infections and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellmann, Florence; Angelini, Federica; Wassenberg, Jacqueline; Perreau, Matthieu; Arenas Ramirez, Natalia; Simon, Gregoire; Boyman, Onur; Demaria, Olivier; Christen-Zaech, Stephanie; Hohl, Daniel; Belfiore, Marco; von Scheven-Gete, Annette; Gilliet, Michel; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Perrin, Yannick; Beck Popovic, Maya; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Beckmann, Jacques S; Martinet, Danielle; Hofer, Michaël

    2016-04-01

    Data on patients affected by chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis underscore the preponderant role of IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) in preserving mucocutaneous immunity. Little is known about the role of adenosine deaminase (ADA) 2 in regulation of immune responses, although recent reports linked ADA2 deficiency with inflammation and vasculitis. We sought to investigate the mechanisms of chronic inflammation and vasculitis in a child lacking IL-17RA and ADA2 to identify therapeutic targets. We report a family with 2 siblings who have had recurrent mucocutaneous infections with Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus and chronic inflammatory disease and vasculitis since early childhood, which were refractory to classical treatments. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis showed that both siblings are homozygous for a 770-kb deletion on chr22q11.1 encompassing both IL17RA and cat eye critical region 1 (CECR1). Immunologic studies were carried out by means of flow cytometry, ELISA, and RIA. As expected, in the affected child we found a lack of IL-17RA expression, which implies a severe malfunction in the IL-17 signaling pathway, conferring susceptibility to recurrent mucocutaneous infections. Surprisingly, we detected an in vitro and in vivo upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, notably IL-1β and TNF-α, which is consistent with the persistent systemic inflammation. This work emphasizes the utility of whole-genome analyses combined with immunologic investigation in patients with unresolved immunodeficiency. This approach is likely to provide an insight into immunologic pathways and mechanisms of disease. It also provides molecular evidence for more targeted therapies. In addition, our report further corroborates a potential role of ADA2 in modulating immunity and inflammation. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. PET-scan shows peripherally increased neurokinin 1 receptor availability in chronic tennis elbow: visualizing neurogenic inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Peterson

    Full Text Available In response to pain, neurokinin 1 (NK1 receptor availability is altered in the central nervous system. The NK1 receptor and its primary agonist, substance P, also play a crucial role in peripheral tissue in response to pain, as part of neurogenic inflammation. However, little is known about alterations in NK1 receptor availability in peripheral tissue in chronic pain conditions and very few studies have been performed on human beings. Ten subjects with chronic tennis elbow were therefore examined by positron emission tomography (PET with the NK1 specific radioligand [(11C]GR205171 before and after treatment with graded exercise. The radioligand signal intensity was higher in the affected arm as compared with the unaffected arm, measured as differences between the arms in volume of voxels and signal intensity of this volume above a reference threshold set as 2.5 SD above mean signal intensity of the unaffected arm before treatment. In the eight subjects examined after treatment, pain ratings decreased in all subjects but signal intensity decreased in five and increased in three. In conclusion, NK1 receptors may be activated, or up-regulated in the peripheral, painful tissue of a chronic pain condition. This up-regulation does, however, have moderate correlation to pain ratings. The increased NK1 receptor availability is interpreted as part of ongoing neurogenic inflammation and may have correlation to the pathogenesis of chronic tennis elbow.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00888225 http://clinicaltrials.gov/

  3. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    causing Huntington's disease. Single-strand breaks are common DNA lesions and are associated with the neurodegenerative diseases, ataxia-oculomotor apraxia-1 and spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy-1. DNA double-strand breaks are toxic lesions and two main pathways exist for their repair......: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage...

  4. Predictive model for inflammation grades of chronic hepatitis B: Large-scale analysis of clinical parameters and gene expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weichen; Ma, Yanyun; Zhang, Jun; Hu, Jingyi; Zhang, Menghan; Wang, Yi; Li, Yi; Wu, Lijun; Pan, Yida; Zhang, Yitong; Zhang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Xinxin; Zhang, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jiming; Li, Hai; Lu, Lungen; Jin, Li; Wang, Jiucun; Yuan, Zhenghong; Liu, Jie

    2017-11-01

    Liver biopsy is the gold standard to assess pathological features (eg inflammation grades) for hepatitis B virus-infected patients although it is invasive and traumatic; meanwhile, several gene profiles of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) have been separately described in relatively small hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected samples. We aimed to analyse correlations among inflammation grades, gene expressions and clinical parameters (serum alanine amino transaminase, aspartate amino transaminase and HBV-DNA) in large-scale CHB samples and to predict inflammation grades by using clinical parameters and/or gene expressions. We analysed gene expressions with three clinical parameters in 122 CHB samples by an improved regression model. Principal component analysis and machine-learning methods including Random Forest, K-nearest neighbour and support vector machine were used for analysis and further diagnosis models. Six normal samples were conducted to validate the predictive model. Significant genes related to clinical parameters were found enriching in the immune system, interferon-stimulated, regulation of cytokine production, anti-apoptosis, and etc. A panel of these genes with clinical parameters can effectively predict binary classifications of inflammation grade (area under the ROC curve [AUC]: 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.77-0.93), validated by normal samples. A panel with only clinical parameters was also valuable (AUC: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.65-0.86), indicating that liquid biopsy method for detecting the pathology of CHB is possible. This is the first study to systematically elucidate the relationships among gene expressions, clinical parameters and pathological inflammation grades in CHB, and to build models predicting inflammation grades by gene expressions and/or clinical parameters as well. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Reduction of brain mitochondrial β-oxidation impairs complex I and V in chronic alcohol intake: the underlying mechanism for neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Haorah

    Full Text Available Neuropathy and neurocognitive deficits are common among chronic alcohol users, which are believed to be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in the brain. The specific type of brain mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (mRCC that are adversely affected by alcohol abuse has not been studied. Thus, we examined the alterations of mRCC in freshly isolated mitochondria from mice brain that were pair-fed the ethanol (4% v/v and control liquid diets for 7-8 weeks. We observed that alcohol intake severely reduced the levels of complex I and V. A reduction in complex I was associated with a decrease in carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (cPT1 and cPT2 levels. The mitochondrial outer (cPT1 and inner (cPT2 membrane transporter enzymes are specialized in acylation of fatty acid from outer to inner membrane of mitochondria for ATP production. Thus, our results showed that alterations of cPT1 and cPT2 paralleled a decrease β-oxidation of palmitate and ATP production, suggesting that impairment of substrate entry step (complex I function can cause a negative impact on ATP production (complex V function. Disruption of cPT1/cPT2 was accompanied by an increase in cytochrome C leakage, while reduction of complex I and V paralleled a decrease in depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ, monitored by JC-1 fluorescence and ATP production in alcohol intake. We noted that acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC, a cofactor of cPT1 and cPT2 prevented the adverse effects of alcohol while coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 was not very effective against alcohol insults. These results suggest that understanding the molecular, biochemical, and signaling mechanisms of the CNS mitochondrial β-oxidation such as ALC can mitigate alcohol related neurological disorders.

  6. Vaccination promotes TH1-like inflammation and survival in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. A new prophylactic principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Cryz, S J; Hougen, H P

    1997-01-01

    the chronic lung infection with P. aeruginosa after a one-year period (median) of intermittent colonization. Therefore, prevention of the onset of the chronic infection or prevention of the dominance of the inflammation by PMNs would be important goals for a vaccine strategy against P. aeruginosa in CF....... In a rat model of acute P. aeruginosa pneumonia we studied whether it was possible to improve the initial bacterial clearance and diminish the inflammatory response by vaccination prior to challenge with free, live P. aeruginosa. The vaccines studied were PAO 579 sonicate, O-polysaccharide toxin A (TA......) conjugate, depolymerized alginate (3064) TA conjugate (D-ALG TA), or P. aeruginosa alginate (6680 + 8839). The vaccines could, however, not improve the very efficient natural clearance of P. aeruginosa from the lungs of the rats. In a rat model of chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection we found that none...

  7. Common mechanisms involved in Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes: a key role of chronic bacterial infection and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklossy, Judith; McGeer, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    Strong epidemiologic evidence and common molecular mechanisms support an association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2-diabetes. Local inflammation and amyloidosis occur in both diseases and are associated with periodontitis and various infectious agents. This article reviews the evidence for the presence of local inflammation and bacteria in type 2 diabetes and discusses host pathogen interactions in chronic inflammatory disorders. Chlamydophyla pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori and spirochetes are demonstrated in association with dementia and brain lesions in AD and islet lesions in type 2 diabetes. The presence of pathogens in host tissues activates immune responses through Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. Evasion of pathogens from complement-mediated attack results in persistent infection, inflammation and amyloidosis. Amyloid beta and the pancreatic amyloid called amylin bind to lipid bilayers and produce Ca(2+) influx and bacteriolysis. Similarly to AD, accumulation of amylin deposits in type 2 diabetes may result from an innate immune response to chronic bacterial infections, which are known to be associated with amyloidosis. Further research based on an infectious origin of both AD and type 2 diabetes may lead to novel treatment strategies. PMID:26961231

  8. Effect of Gum Arabic on Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Adenine–Induced Chronic Renal Failure in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Badreldin H.; Al-Husseni, Isehaq; Beegam, Sumyia; Al-Shukaili, Ahmed; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Schierling, Simone; Queisser, Nina; Schupp, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease in humans, and in chronic renal failure (CRF) in rats. The aim of this work was to study the role of inflammation and oxidative stress in adenine-induced CRF and the effect thereon of the purported nephroprotective agent gum arabic (GA). Rats were divided into four groups and treated for 4 weeks as follows: control, adenine in feed (0.75%, w/w), GA in drinking water (15%, w/v) and adenine+GA, as before. Urine, blood and kidneys were collected from the rats at the end of the treatment for analysis of conventional renal function tests (plasma creatinine and urea concentration). In addition, the concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and the oxidative stress markers glutathione and superoxide dismutase, renal apoptosis, superoxide formation and DNA double strand break frequency, detected by immunohistochemistry for γ-H2AX, were measured. Adenine significantly increased the concentrations of urea and creatinine in plasma, significantly decreased the creatinine clearance and induced significant increases in the concentration of the measured inflammatory mediators. Further, it caused oxidative stress and DNA damage. Treatment with GA significantly ameliorated these actions. The mechanism of the reported salutary effect of GA in adenine-induced CRF is associated with mitigation of the adenine-induced inflammation and generation of free radicals. PMID:23383316

  9. Initiation and propagation of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haass, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Although substantial progress has been made in understanding the molecular and pathological bases of neurodegeneration, there have been few successes in the clinic and a number of fundamental questions remain unanswered. Is this skepticism misplaced, or do the words of Sir Isaac Newton hold true, that "what we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean"?

  10. Neurodegeneration in the diabetic eye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simó, Rafael; Hernández, Cristina; Bandello, F

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), one of the leading causes of preventable blindness, has been considered a microcirculatory disease of the retina. However, there is emerging evidence to suggest that retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of DR, which participates in the develop...

  11. Decreases in colonic and systemic inflammation in chronic HIV infection after IL-7 administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irini Sereti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART, some HIV-infected persons maintain lower than normal CD4(+ T-cell counts in peripheral blood and in the gut mucosa. This incomplete immune restoration is associated with higher levels of immune activation manifested by high systemic levels of biomarkers, including sCD14 and D-dimer, that are independent predictors of morbidity and mortality in HIV infection. In this 12-week, single-arm, open-label study, we tested the efficacy of IL-7 adjunctive therapy on T-cell reconstitution in peripheral blood and gut mucosa in 23 ART suppressed HIV-infected patients with incomplete CD4(+ T-cell recovery, using one cycle (consisting of three subcutaneous injections of recombinant human IL-7 (r-hIL-7 at 20 µg/kg. IL-7 administration led to increases of both CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cells in peripheral blood, and importantly an expansion of T-cells expressing the gut homing integrin α4β7. Participants who underwent rectosigmoid biopsies at study baseline and after treatment had T-cell increases in the gut mucosa measured by both flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. IL-7 therapy also resulted in apparent improvement in gut barrier integrity as measured by decreased neutrophil infiltration in the rectosigmoid lamina propria 12 weeks after IL-7 administration. This was also accompanied by decreased TNF and increased FOXP3 expression in the lamina propria. Plasma levels of sCD14 and D-dimer, indicative of systemic inflammation, decreased after r-hIL-7. Increases of colonic mucosal T-cells correlated strongly with the decreased systemic levels of sCD14, the LPS coreceptor - a marker of monocyte activation. Furthermore, the proportion of inflammatory monocytes expressing CCR2 was decreased, as was the basal IL-1β production of peripheral blood monocytes. These data suggest that administration of r-hIL-7 improves the gut mucosal abnormalities of chronic HIV infection and attenuates the systemic inflammatory and coagulation

  12. Association between leisure time physical activity and markers of chronic inflammation related to coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdaet, D; Dendale, P; De Bacquer, D; Delanghe, J; Block, P; De Backer, G

    2004-10-01

    Some markers of chronic inflammation have been recognized as predictors of cardiovascular risk in apparently healthy subjects and in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). High sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) appears to be the most useful marker in clinical settings. Several studies reported associations between inflammatory markers and other cardiovascular risk factors, such as age, obesity, cholesterol levels, the presence of diabetes mellitus, physical activity, social level and smoking habits. We focussed on the association between C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen and leisure time physical activity (LTPA). This report deals with the results observed in a sub-sample of the BELSTRESS study. 892 male subjects, free from clinical CHD and major ECG abnormalities, working in the same environment, aged 35-59 years, were selected. A questionnaire was used to estimate the level of leisure time physical activity. Associations between CRP, SAA, fibrinogen and leisure time physical activity were evaluated through univariate and multivariate methods. Subjects taking statins or other lipid lowering medication were excluded from the study. Regular leisure time physical activity is associated with reductions of several cardiovascular risk factors, such as body mass index (BMI), waist hip ratio and the lipid profile. Smokers and low educated subjects had a lower physical activity status. Age adjustment did not alter the means of inflammatory parameters according to the levels of leisure time physical activity. After correction for personal characteristics (BMI, current smoking status, educational level, presence of diabetes and alcohol consumption) no significant relation was found between leisure time physical activity and levels of inflammatory markers. The differences of CRP and fibrinogen according to the level of physical activity, found in bivariate analysis, seem to be explained by linked differences in BMI, or related to current smoking

  13. HIV Impairs Lung Epithelial Integrity and Enters the Epithelium to Promote Chronic Lung Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran A Brune

    Full Text Available Several clinical studies show that individuals with HIV are at an increased risk for worsened lung function and for the development of COPD, although the mechanism underlying this increased susceptibility is poorly understood. The airway epithelium, situated at the interface between the external environment and the lung parenchyma, acts as a physical and immunological barrier that secretes mucins and cytokines in response to noxious stimuli which can contribute to the pathobiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. We sought to determine the effects of HIV on the lung epithelium. We grew primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE cells and primary lung epithelial cells isolated from bronchial brushings of patients to confluence and allowed them to differentiate at an air- liquid interface (ALI to assess the effects of HIV on the lung epithelium. We assessed changes in monolayer permeability as well as the expression of E-cadherin and inflammatory modulators to determine the effect of HIV on the lung epithelium. We measured E-cadherin protein abundance in patients with HIV compared to normal controls. Cell associated HIV RNA and DNA were quantified and the p24 viral antigen was measured in culture supernatant. Surprisingly, X4, not R5, tropic virus decreased expression of E-cadherin and increased monolayer permeability. While there was some transcriptional regulation of E-cadherin, there was significant increase in lysosome-mediated protein degradation in cells exposed to X4 tropic HIV. Interaction with CXCR4 and viral fusion with the epithelial cell were required to induce the epithelial changes. X4 tropic virus was able to enter the airway epithelial cells but not replicate in these cells, while R5 tropic viruses did not enter the epithelial cells. Significantly, X4 tropic HIV induced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK. We demonstrate that HIV

  14. Prescribing Optimal Nutrition and Physical Activity as “First-Line” Interventions for Best Practice Management of Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation Associated with Osteoarthritis: Evidence Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Dean

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress underlie chronic osteoarthritis. Although best-practice guidelines for osteoarthritis emphasize self-management including weight control and exercise, the role of lifestyle behavior change to address chronic low-grade inflammation has not been a focus of first-line management. This paper synthesizes the literature that supports the idea in which the Western diet and inactivity are proinflammatory, whereas a plant-based diet and activity are anti-inflammatory, and that low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress underlying osteoarthritis often coexist with lifestyle-related risk factors and conditions. We provide evidence-informed recommendations on how lifestyle behavior change can be integrated into “first-line” osteoarthritis management through teamwork and targeted evidence-based interventions. Healthy living can be exploited to reduce inflammation, oxidative stress, and related pain and disability and improve patients’ overall health. This approach aligns with evidence-based best practice and holds the promise of eliminating or reducing chronic low-grade inflammation, attenuating disease progression, reducing weight, maximizing health by minimizing a patient’s risk or manifestations of other lifestyle-related conditions hallmarked by chronic low-grade inflammation, and reducing the need for medications and surgery. This approach provides an informed cost effective basis for prevention, potential reversal, and management of signs and symptoms of chronic osteoarthritis and has implications for research paradigms in osteoarthritis.

  15. DNA Repair Deficiency in Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Stevnsner, Tinna

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby causing Huntington’s disease. Single-strand breaks are common DNA lesions and are associated with the neurodegenerative diseases, ataxia-oculomotor apraxia-1 and spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy-1. DNA double-strand breaks are toxic lesions and two main pathways exist for their repair: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage may be linked with the age-associated neurodegenerative disorders Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Mutation in the WRN protein leads to the premature aging disease Werner syndrome, a disorder that features neurodegeneration. In this article we review the evidence linking deficiencies in the DNA repair pathways with neurodegeneration. PMID:21550379

  16. Cell-specific Activation of the Nrf2 Antioxidant Pathway Increases Mucosal Inflammation in Acute but Not in Chronic Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstgrasser, Alexandra; Melhem, Hassan; Leonardi, Irina; Atrott, Kirstin; Schäfer, Matthias; Werner, Sabine; Rogler, Gerhard; Frey-Wagner, Isabelle

    2017-04-01

    The transcription factor Nrf2 is a major modulator of the cellular antioxidant response. Oxidative burst of infiltrating macrophages leads to a massive production of reactive oxygen species in inflamed tissue of inflammatory bowel disease patients. This oxidative burst contributes to tissue destruction and epithelial permeability, but it is also an essential part of the antibacterial defence. We therefore investigated the impact of the Nrf2 orchestrated antioxidant response in both acute and chronic intestinal inflammation. To study the role of Nrf2 overexpression in mucosal inflammation, we used transgenic mice conditionally expressing a constitutively active form of Nrf2 [caNrf2] either in epithelial cells or in the myeloid cell lineage. Acute colitis was induced by dextran sulphate sodium [DSS] in transgenic and control animals, and changes in gene expression were evaluated by genome-wide expression studies. Long-term effects of Nrf2 activation were studied in mice with an IL-10-/- background. Expression of caNrf2 either in epithelial cells or myeloid cells resulted in aggravation of DSS-induced acute colitis. Aggravation of inflammation by caNrf2 was not observed in the IL-10-/- model of spontaneous chronic colitis, where even a trend towards reduced prolapse rate was observed. Our findings show that a well-balanced redox homeostasis is as important in epithelial cells as in myeloid cells during induction of colitis. Aggravation of acute DSS colitis in response to constitutive Nrf2 expression emphasises the importance of tight regulation of Nrf2 during the onset of intestinal inflammation.

  17. The beneficial role of anti-inflammatory dietary ingredients in attenuating markers of chronic low-grade inflammation in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panickar, Kiran S; Jewell, Dennis E

    2015-08-01

    Aging in humans is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation (systemic), and this condition is sometimes referred to as "inflammaging". In general, canines also age similarly to humans, and such aging is associated with a decline in mobility, joint problems, weakened muscles and bones, reduced lean body mass, cancer, increased dermatological problems, decline in cognitive ability, reduced energy, decreased immune function, decreased renal function, and urinary incontinence. Each of these conditions is also associated with an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines. An inflammatory state characterized by an increase in pro-inflammatory markers including but not restricted to tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, IL-1β, and C-reactive protein (CRP) is believed to contribute to or worsen a general decline in biological mechanisms responsible for physical function with aging. Nutritional management of inflammation in aging dogs is important in maintaining health. In particular, natural botanicals have bioactive components that appear to have robust anti-inflammatory effects and, when included in the diet, may contribute to a reduction in inflammation. While there are scientific data to support the anti-inflammatory effects and the efficacy of such bioactive molecules from botanicals, the clinical data are limited and more studies are needed to validate the efficacy of these ingredients. This review will summarize the role of dietary ingredients in reducing inflammatory molecules as well as review the evidence available to support the role of diet and nutrition in reducing chronic low-grade systemic inflammation in animal and human studies with a special reference to canines, where possible.

  18. Are PTH levels related to oxidative stress and inflammation in chronic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Jaqueto

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Patients at end stage renal disease have higher levels of inflammation and oxidative stress than the general population. Many factors contribute to these issues, and the parathyroid hormone (PTH is also implicated. Objective: The study was conducted in order to assess the relationship between PTH levels and inflammation and oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients. Methods: Cross-sectional study with patients of two hemodialysis facilities in Londrina, Brazil. Patients with other conditions known to generate oxidative stress and inflammation were excluded. Blood levels of PTH and biochemical parameters of inflammation (interleukins 1 and 6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and oxidative stress (total plasma antioxidant capacity, malonic dialdehyde, lipid hydroperoxidation, advanced oxidation protein products, quantification of nitric oxide metabolites, and 8-isoprostane were measured before a dialysis session. Then, we made correlation analyses between PTH levels - either as the continuous variable or categorized into tertiles-, and inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers. Results: PTH did not show any correlation with the tested inflammation and oxidative stress parameters, nor as continuous variable neither as categorical variable. Conclusion: In this descriptive study, the results suggest that the inflammation and oxidative stress of hemodialysis patients probably arise from mechanisms other than secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  19. [The relationship between pulmonary arterial and small airway inflammation in smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Qifang; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Zhong, Xiaoning; Zhang, Jianquan; He, Zhiyi

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between pulmonary arterial and small airway inflammation in smokers with normal lung function and smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients requiring lung resection for peripheral lung cancer were divided into group A (nonsmokers with normal lung function, n = 10), group B (smokers with normal lung function, n = 13) and group C (smokers with stable COPD, n = 10). Normal pulmonary tissue was obtained more than 5 cm away from cancer lesion. The pathomorphological changes of the pulmonary muscularized arteries (MA) and small airways were observed by HE and Victoria blue-Van Gieson's stains.Lymphocytes infiltrated in the MA and small airways were observed by immunohistochemical methods. The characteristics and the correlations between pulmonary arterial inflammation and small airway inflammation were analyzed. The thickness of MA wall in the three groups was (119 ± 11), (139 ± 25) and (172 ± 28) µm respectively. The total small airway pathology score was (49 ± 10), (101 ± 34) and (163 ± 36) respectively. The score in group B and C was significantly higher than that in group A (P 0.05). The infiltration of CD(+)(3)T-lymphocytes and CD(+)(8)T-lymphocytes in the whole layer of MA was positively correlated with the total small airway pathology score respectively (r = 0.431,0.633, P arteries and small airways is the same kind of inflammation, mainly in the adventitia of pulmonary arteries and small airways. They are a part of pulmonary inflammation in COPD and promote the development of COPD.

  20. Inhibition of chronic prostate inflammation by hyaluronic acid through an immortalized human prostate stromal cell line model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Che Liu

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is the most common urologic disease among elderly men. A well-established in vitro cell model is required to determine the therapeutic mechanism of BPH inflammation. In this study, we attempted to establish an immortalized human prostate stromal cell line by transfecting with HPV-16 E6/E7 and designated as ihPSC. No significant difference was found in fibroblast-like morphology between primary hPSC and ihPSC. The ihPSC possessed a significantly higher cell proliferation rate than primary hPSC. The prostate-specific markers and proteins including cytoskeleton (α-SMA and vimentin and smooth muscle (calponin, especially the androgen receptor (AR were also examined in ihPSC, almost identical to the primary hPSC. To create an in vitro model featuring chronic prostatic inflammation, ihPSC was stimulated with IFN-γ+IL-17 and then treated with the high molecular weight hyaluronic acid hylan G-F 20 as an alternative strategy for inhibiting BPH inflammation. Hylan G-F 20 could dose-dependently diminish the inflammation-induced proliferation in ihPSC. The enhanced expressions of inflammatory molecules including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2, inducible nitrogen oxide synthase (iNOS, and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 were all abolished by hylan G-F 20. For inflammatory signaling, hylan G-F 20 can also diminish the IFN-γ+IL-17-increased expression of iNOS and p65 in ihPSC. These findings suggest that ihPSC could provide a mechanism-based platform for investigating prostate inflammation. The hylan G-F 20 showed strong anti-inflammatory effects by decreasing inflammatory cytokines and signalings in the ihPSC, indicating its therapeutic potentials in BPH treatment in the future.

  1. Effect of statins on chronic inflammation and nutrition status in renal dialysis patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Deng, Jin; Wu, Qiaoyuan; Liao, Yunhua; Huo, Dongmei; Yang, Zhenhua

    2012-08-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) may have an adjunctive effect on chronic inflammation and nutrition status in renal dialysis patients. Therefore, we performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials to assess the effect of statins on chronic inflammation and nutrition status in dialysis patients. The randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of statins versus placebo or no treatment for renal dialysis patients were searched from PubMed, EMbase and Cochran Central Register of Controlled Trials. We screened relevant studies according to predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria, evaluated the quality of the included studies, and performed meta-analyses by using the Cochrane Collaboration's Revman 5.1 software. We identified nine trials including 3098 patients. Meta-analysis showed statins can significantly decrease the serum C-reactive protein (CRP) (SMD, -0.54; 95% confidence interval (CI), -1.04 to -0.05; P = 0.03) and high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) level (SMD, -0.72; 95% CI, -1.14 to -0.31; P = 0.0007) of dialysis patients compared with that of the control group. However, statins did not differ significantly from the control group in increasing the serum Alb level (SMD, -0.13; 95% CI, -0.42 to 0.15; P = 0.37). Statins can improve the chronic inflammation status reflected by the decreasing of serum CRP and hs-CRP levels, whereas there is no conclusive evidence that it can improve the nutrition status. However, this result needs to be further confirmed in more high-quality randomized clinical trials. © 2012 The Authors. Nephrology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  2. A food-based approach that targets interleukin-6, a key regulator of chronic intestinal inflammation and colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sido, Abigail; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Kim, Sung Woo; Eriksson, Elisabeth; Shen, Frank; Li, Qunhua; Bhat, Vadiraja; Reddivari, Lavanya; Vanamala, Jairam K P

    2017-05-01

    Studies have shown a causal link between high-calorie diet (HCD) and colon cancer. However, molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. To understand etiology of HCD-induced colon carcinogenesis, we screened 10 pathways linked to elevated colonic cell proliferation and chronic inflammation in an HCD-consuming human-relevant pig model. We observed elevated colonic mucosal interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in HCD-consuming pigs compared to standard diet controls (SD, P=.04), and IL-6 strongly correlated with Ki-67 proliferative index and zone, early biomarkers of colon cancer risk (r=0.604 and 0.743 and P=.017 and .002, respectively). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that HCD consumption altered IL-6 signaling pathway proteins (PI3KR4, IL-1α, Mapk10, Akt3, PIK3CG, PIK3R5, Map2k2). Furthermore, these proteins also correlated with Ki-67 proliferative index/zone. Anti-IL-6 therapeutics are available for treating colon cancer; however, they are expensive and induce negative side effects. Thus, whole foods could be a better way to combat low-grade chronic colonic inflammation and colon cancer. Whole plant foods have been shown to decrease chronic diseases due to the potential of anti-inflammatory dietary compounds acting synergistically. We observed that supplementation of HCD with anthocyanin-containing purple-fleshed potatoes (10% w/w), even after baking, suppressed HCD-induced IL-6 expression (P=.03) and the IL-6-related proteins IL-1α and Map2k1 (P≤.1). Our results highlight the importance of IL-6 signaling in diet-linked induction/prevention of colonic inflammation/cancer and demonstrate the potential of a food-based approach to target IL-6 signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chronic calf pain caused by fibroma-induced chronic inflammation around the tibial and peroneal nerves that was misdiagnosed as centralized neuropathic pain: A case report.

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    Jiyoung, Park; Seong-Ho, Ok; Yeol, Han Jeong; Miyeong, Park; Hui, Seo Eun; A, Kim Yeon

    2017-12-28

    The etiology of calf pain varies widely; therefore, it is difficult to diagnose and requires careful history taking and physical examination by primary care unit physicians. Because ultrasonography is easy to perform, cheap, and readily available with physicians during a routine consultation, it is the first choice of modality for the evaluation of calf pain. However, simple inflammation around the nerve should also be considered as a possible etiology. Here we describe a 35-year-old man with chronic pain in the right calf that was actually caused by fibroma-induced chronic inflammation around the tibial and peroneal nerves but misdiagnosed as centralized neuropathic pain. The patient presented with chronic pain and a tingling sensation in the right calf. He had a slowly growing tibial nerve neurilemmoma that was excised at 28 years of age; however, the pain and tingling sensation persisted. He visited several hospitals for 7 years and was misdiagnosed with peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. At 35 years of age, he visited our hospital for further evaluation. Ultrasonography revealed a mass in the popliteal region, which was excised and confirmed to be a fibroma via histopathological analysis. Severe inflammation was observed in the operative field. His symptoms finally ameliorated after this surgery. The findings from this case suggest that ultrasonography should be used as the primary modality for the evaluation of calf pain. Although the features of unresolved calf pain are similar to those of neuropathic pain, more curable etiologies should be considered. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Nav1.9 channel contributes to mechanical and heat pain hypersensitivity induced by subacute and chronic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Lolignier

    Full Text Available Inflammation is known to be responsible for the sensitization of peripheral sensory neurons, leading to spontaneous pain and invalidating pain hypersensitivity. Given its role in regulating neuronal excitability, the voltage-gated Nav1.9 channel is a potential target for the treatment of pathological pain, but its implication in inflammatory pain is yet not fully described. In the present study, we examined the role of the Nav1.9 channel in acute, subacute and chronic inflammatory pain using Nav1.9-null mice and Nav1.9 knock-down rats. In mice we found that, although the Nav1.9 channel does not contribute to basal pain thresholds, it plays an important role in heat pain hypersensitivity induced by subacute paw inflammation (intraplantar carrageenan and chronic ankle inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant-induced monoarthritis. We showed for the first time that Nav1.9 also contributes to mechanical hypersensitivity in both models, as assessed using von Frey and dynamic weight bearing tests. Consistently, antisense-based Nav1.9 gene silencing in rats reduced carrageenan-induced heat and mechanical pain hypersensitivity. While no changes in Nav1.9 mRNA levels were detected in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs during subacute and chronic inflammation, a significant increase in Nav1.9 immunoreactivity was observed in ipsilateral DRGs 24 hours following carrageenan injection. This was correlated with an increase in Nav1.9 immunolabeling in nerve fibers surrounding the inflamed area. No change in Nav1.9 current density could be detected in the soma of retrolabeled DRG neurons innervating inflamed tissues, suggesting that newly produced channels may be non-functional at this level and rather contribute to the observed increase in axonal transport. Our results provide evidence that Nav1.9 plays a crucial role in the generation of heat and mechanical pain hypersensitivity, both in subacute and chronic inflammatory pain models, and bring new elements for the

  5. Nav1.9 channel contributes to mechanical and heat pain hypersensitivity induced by subacute and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolignier, Stéphane; Amsalem, Muriel; Maingret, François; Padilla, Françoise; Gabriac, Mélanie; Chapuy, Eric; Eschalier, Alain; Delmas, Patrick; Busserolles, Jérôme

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation is known to be responsible for the sensitization of peripheral sensory neurons, leading to spontaneous pain and invalidating pain hypersensitivity. Given its role in regulating neuronal excitability, the voltage-gated Nav1.9 channel is a potential target for the treatment of pathological pain, but its implication in inflammatory pain is yet not fully described. In the present study, we examined the role of the Nav1.9 channel in acute, subacute and chronic inflammatory pain using Nav1.9-null mice and Nav1.9 knock-down rats. In mice we found that, although the Nav1.9 channel does not contribute to basal pain thresholds, it plays an important role in heat pain hypersensitivity induced by subacute paw inflammation (intraplantar carrageenan) and chronic ankle inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant-induced monoarthritis). We showed for the first time that Nav1.9 also contributes to mechanical hypersensitivity in both models, as assessed using von Frey and dynamic weight bearing tests. Consistently, antisense-based Nav1.9 gene silencing in rats reduced carrageenan-induced heat and mechanical pain hypersensitivity. While no changes in Nav1.9 mRNA levels were detected in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) during subacute and chronic inflammation, a significant increase in Nav1.9 immunoreactivity was observed in ipsilateral DRGs 24 hours following carrageenan injection. This was correlated with an increase in Nav1.9 immunolabeling in nerve fibers surrounding the inflamed area. No change in Nav1.9 current density could be detected in the soma of retrolabeled DRG neurons innervating inflamed tissues, suggesting that newly produced channels may be non-functional at this level and rather contribute to the observed increase in axonal transport. Our results provide evidence that Nav1.9 plays a crucial role in the generation of heat and mechanical pain hypersensitivity, both in subacute and chronic inflammatory pain models, and bring new elements for the understanding of its

  6. Microglia are involve in pain related behaviors during the acute and chronic phase of arthritis inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Nasseri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Pain is one of the main protests of inflammatory diseases, hence, understanding the mechanisms which involved in the induction and persistence of pain is essential. Microglia is a contributing factor in the onset and maintenance of inflammation. Increased microglial   activation increases the level of central pro-inflammatory cytokines and the development of central sensitization following inflammation. The aim of this study was evaluate the relation of spinal microglia activity with pain related behaviors during Complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA-induced inflammation.Materials and Methods: Inflammation caused by subcutaneous injection of Complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA in a single dose to the animals right hind paw. The edema and hyperalgesia caused by inflammation, respectively are measured by Plethysmometer and Radiant Heat, on days 0,7,14 and 21. Spinal Iba-1 protein expression was detected by Western blotting. Minocycline hydrochloride (Sigma, U.S.A was administered i.p. at a dose of 40mg/kg daily.Results: Our study findings indicated that CFA injection to right hindpaw of rats increased paw volume and hyperalgesia significantly during different stages of study, while Minocycline treatment significantly reduced paw volume and hyperalgesia. CFA injection into the right hindpaw of the rat increases the expression of molecules Ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule -1 (Iba-1 on different days of study, while Minocycline administration reduced spinal Iba-1 expression significantly compared to the CFA group.Conclusion: The results of this study indicated the significant roles of microglia activation in deterioration of pain related behaviors during different stages of CFA-induced inflammation. The steady injection of Minocycline (as a microglia inhibitor could reduce the inflammatory symptoms.Keywords: Inflammation, pain, microglia, minocycline

  7. Differential role of lipocalin-2 during immune-complex mediated acute and chronic inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Machiah, Deepa; Aitken, Jesse D; Putty, Kalyani; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Chassaing, Benoit; Parkos, Charles A; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Lipocalin-2 (Lcn2) is an innate immune protein expressed by a variety of cells and is highly upregulated during several pathological conditions including immune-complex (IC) mediated inflammatory/autoimmune disorders. However, the function of Lcn2 during IC-mediated inflammation is largely unknown. Therefore our objective was to investigate the role of Lcn2 in IC-mediated diseases. Methods The upregulation of Lcn2 was determined by ELISA in three different mouse models of IC-mediated autoimmune disease: systemic lupus erythematosus, collagen-induced arthritis and serum-induced arthritis. The in vivo role of Lcn2 during IC-mediated inflammation was investigated using Lcn2 knockout (Lcn2KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates. Results Lcn2 levels were significantly elevated in all the three autoimmune disease models. Further, in an acute skin inflammation model, Lcn2KO mice demonstrated a 50% reduction in inflammation with histopathological analysis revealing strikingly reduced immune cell infiltration compared to WT mice. Administration of recombinant Lcn2 to Lcn2KO mice restored inflammation to levels observed in WT mice. Neutralization of Lcn2 using a monoclonal antibody significantly reduced inflammation in WT mice. In contrast, Lcn2KO mice developed more severe serum-induced arthritis compared to WT mice. Histological analysis revealed extensive tissue and bone destruction with significantly reduced neutrophil infiltration but considerably more macrophage migration in Lcn2KO mice when compared to WT. Conclusion These results demonstrate that Lcn2 may regulate immune cell recruitment to the site of inflammation, a process essential for the controlled initiation, perpetuation and resolution of inflammatory processes. Thus, Lcn2 may present a promising target in the treatment of IC-mediated inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. PMID:23280250

  8. Mild traumatic brain injury: a risk factor for neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Recently, it has become clear that head trauma can lead to a progressive neurodegeneration known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Although the medical literature also implicates head trauma as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, these findings are predominantly based on clinical diagnostic criteria that lack specificity. The dementia that follows head injuries or repetitive mild trauma may be caused by chronic traumatic encephalopathy, alone or in conjunction with other neurodegenerations (for example, Alzheimer's disease). Prospective longitudinal studies of head-injured individuals, with neuropathological verification, will not only improve understanding of head trauma as a risk factor for dementia but will also enhance treatment and prevention of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20587081

  9. Cell death biomarker M65 is a useful indicator of liver inflammation and fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B: A cross-sectional study of diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xinhuan; Wei, Hongshan; Lin, Wei; Hu, Zhongjie; Zhang, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Cell death markers, M65 and M30, have been suggested to be sensitive markers of liver inflammation and fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic hepatitis C. Our aim was to investigate whether these markers were useful in diagnosing liver inflammation and fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B (CHB).We examined 186 patients with CHB; 18 sex- and age-matched healthy subjects were controls. The blood samples were collected from CHB patients within 1 week before or after liver biopsy. According to METAVIR score system, liver inflammation was graded from A0 to A3, and fibrosis from F0 to F4.Serum M65 and M30 levels were in parallel with the grades of liver inflammation. M65, not M30, increased significantly in patients with severe inflammation and normal alanine aminotransferase. M65 is one of the independent predictors of severe liver inflammation (≥A2). The levels of M65 and M30 levels significantly increased in parallel with the degree of inflammation in F1 patients, whereas they showed no statistical difference between different stages of fibrosis in A1 patients.Serum M65 is a useful indicator of liver inflammation in CHB patients. Serum M65, not M30, is valuable in the grading of liver fibrosis.

  10. Neurodegeneration and sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Gavin A; Castellani, Rudolph J; McCrory, Paul

    2015-06-01

    The recent interest in concussion in sport has resulted in significant media focus about chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), although a direct causative link(s) between concussion and CTE is not established. Typically, sport-related CTE occurs in a retired athlete with or without a history of concussion(s) who presents with a constellation of cognitive, mood, and/or behavioral symptoms and who has postmortem findings of tau deposition within the brain. There are many confounding variables, however, that can account for brain tau deposition, including genetic mutations, drugs, normal aging, environmental factors, postmortem brain processing, and toxins. To understand the roles of such factors in neurodegenerative diseases that may occur in athletes, this article reviews some neurodegenerative diseases that may present with similar findings in nonathletes. The article also reviews pathological changes identified with normal aging, and reviews the pathological findings of CTE in light of all these factors. While many of these athletes have a history of exposure to head impacts as a part of contact sport, there is insufficient evidence to establish causation between sports concussion and CTE. It is likely that many of the cases with neuropathological findings represent the normal aging process, the effects of opiate abuse, or a variant of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Whether particular genetic causes may place athletes at greater risk of neurodegenerative disease is yet to be determined.

  11. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation improves clinical features and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nascimento ESP

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Eloisa Sanches Pereira do Nascimento,1 Luciana Maria Malosá Sampaio,1 Fabiana Sobral Peixoto-Souza,1 Fernanda Dultra Dias,1 Evelim Leal Freitas Dantas Gomes,1 Flavia Regina Greiffo,2 Ana Paula Ligeiro de Oliveira,2 Roberto Stirbulov,3 Rodolfo Paula Vieira,2 Dirceu Costa11Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation (LARESP, 2Laboratory of Pulmonary and Exercise Immunology (LABPEI, Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 3Department of Pneumology, Santa Casa University Hospital, São Paulo, SP, BrazilAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a respiratory disease characterized by chronic airflow limitation that leads beyond the pulmonary changes to important systemic effects. COPD is characterized by pulmonary and systemic inflammation. However, increases in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in plasma are found even when the disease is stable. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves physical exercise capacity and quality of life and decreases dyspnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (HBPR program improves exercise tolerance in COPD patients, as well as health-related quality of life and systemic inflammation. This prospective study was conducted at the Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil. After anamnesis, patients were subjected to evaluations of health-related quality of life and dyspnea, spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, upper limbs incremental test, incremental shuttle walk test, and blood test for quantification of systemic inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6 and IL-8. At the end of the evaluations, patients received a booklet containing the physical exercises to be performed at home, three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Around 25 patients were enrolled, and 14 completed the pre- and post-HBPR ratings. There was a significant increase in the walked distance and the maximal

  12. Chronic inflammation aggravates metabolic disorders of hepatic fatty acids in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Zhong, Shan; Qu, Haiyang; Xie, Yunxia; Cao, Zhennan; Li, Qing; Yang, Ping; Varghese, Zac; Moorhead, John F; Chen, Yaxi; Ruan, Xiong Z

    2015-05-14

    The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) increases with increasing body mass index (BMI). However, approximately 40-50% of obese adults do not develop hepatic steatosis. The level of inflammatory biomarkers is higher in obese subjects with NAFLD compared to BMI-matched subjects without hepatic steatosis. We used a casein injection in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed C57BL/6J mice to induce inflammatory stress. Although mice on a HFD exhibited apparent phenotypes of obesity and hyperlipidemia regardless of exposure to casein injection, only the HFD+Casein mice showed increased hepatic vacuolar degeneration accompanied with elevated inflammatory cytokines in the liver and serum, compared to mice on a normal chow diet. The expression of genes related to hepatic fatty acid synthesis and oxidation were upregulated in the HFD-only mice. The casein injection further increased baseline levels of lipogenic genes and decreased the levels of oxidative genes in HFD-only mice. Inflammatory stress induced both oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress in HFD-fed mice livers. We conclude that chronic inflammation precedes hepatic steatosis by disrupting the balance between fatty acid synthesis and oxidation in the livers of HFD-fed obese mice. This mechanism may operate in obese individuals with chronic inflammation, thus making them more prone to NAFLD.

  13. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Emblica officinalis in Rodent Models of Acute and Chronic Inflammation: Involvement of Possible Mechanisms

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    Mahaveer Golechha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emblica officinalis, commonly known as amla in Ayurveda, is unarguably the most important medicinal plant for prevention and treatment of various ailments. The present study investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of hydroalcoholic extract of Emblica officinalis (HAEEO. Acute inflammation in rats was induced by the subplantar injection of carrageenan, histamine, serotonin, and prostaglandin E2 and chronic inflammation was induced by the cotton pellet granuloma. Intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of HAEEO at all the tested doses (300, 500, and 700 mg/kg significantly (P<0.001 inhibited rat paw edema against all phlogistic agents and also reduced granuloma formation. However, at the dose of 700 mg/kg, HAEEO exhibited maximum anti-inflammatory activity in all experimental models, and the effects were comparable to that of the standard anti-inflammatory drugs. Additionally, in paw tissue the antioxidant activity of HAEEO was also measured and it was found that HAEEO significantly (P<0.001 increased glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activity and subsequently reduced lipid peroxidation evidenced by reduced malondialdehyde. Taken all together, the results indicated that HAEEO possessed potent anti-inflammatory activity and it may hold therapeutic promise in the management of acute and chronic inflammatory conditions.

  14. The Evaluation of the Role of Beta-Hydroxy Fatty Acids on Chronic Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Soydan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available β-hydroxy fatty acids are a major component of lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccaride. We aimed to investigate the role of free β-hydroxy fatty acids on inflammation, as well as to evaluate their effects on cytokine release from human blood cells, and whether they exist in plasma of patients with chronic inflammatory diseases with/without insulin resistance. Peripheral venous blood was incubated with β-hydroxy lauric and β-hydroxy myristic acids (each 100 ng, 1 μg, 10 μg/mL up to 24 hours. Cytokines were measured from culture media and plasma. Free fatty acids and biochemical parameters were also measured from patients' plasma. Only β-hydroxy lauric acid significantly stimulated interleukin-6 production at 10 μg/mL compared to control (533.9±218.1 versus 438.3±219.6 pg/mL, P<.05. However, free β-hydroxy lauric and myristic acids were not found in patients' plasma. Therefore, free β-hydroxy lauric and myristic acids do not seem to have a role on sterile inflammation in chronic inflammatory diseases associated with insulin resistance.

  15. Persistent infection with Crohn's disease-associated adherent-invasive Escherichia coli leads to chronic inflammation and intestinal fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Cherrie-Lee N; Reid-Yu, Sarah A; McPhee, Joseph B; Coombes, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract in which alterations to the bacterial community contribute to disease. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli are associated with human Crohn's disease; however, their role in intestinal immunopathology is unclear because of the lack of an animal model compatible with chronic timescales. Here we establish chronic adherent-invasive Escherichia coli infection in streptomycin-treated conventional mice (CD1, DBA/2, C3H, 129e and C57BL/6), enabling the study of host response and immunopathology. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli induces an active T-helper 17 response, heightened levels of proinflammatory cytokines and fibrotic growth factors, with transmural inflammation and fibrosis. Depletion of CD8+ T cells increases caecal bacterial load, pathology and intestinal fibrosis in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting a protective role. Our findings provide evidence that chronic adherent-invasive Escherichia coli infections result in immunopathology similar to that seen in Crohn's disease. With this model, research into the host and bacterial genetics associated with adherent-invasive Escherichia coli-induced disease becomes more widely accessible.

  16. Chronic inflammation, apoptosis and (pre-)malignant lesions in the gastro-intestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, CJ; Kleibeuker, JH; Jansen, PLM; Moshage, H

    Inflammatory conditions are characterized by activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB), resulting in the expression of NF-kappaB-regulated, inflammation-related genes, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2). Expression of these

  17. High amylose resistant starch diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammation is a major mediator of CKD progression and is partly driven by altered gut microbiome and intestinal barrier disruption, events which are caused by: urea influx in the intestine resulting in dominance of urease-possessing bacteria; disruption of epithelial barrier by urea-derived ammoni...

  18. A resistant starch fiber diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammation is a constant feature and a major mediator of CKD progression. It is, in part, driven by altered gut microbiome and disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier, events which are primarily caused by: 1- urea influx in the intestine resulting in dominance of urease-possessing bacteria; 2-...

  19. Diabetes mellitus, exocrine pancreatic deficiency, hypertrichosis, hyperpigmentation, and chronic inflammation: confirmation of a syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussain, Khalid; Padidela, Raja; Kapoor, Ritika R.; James, Chela; Banerjee, Kausik; Harper, John; Wilson, Louise C.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2009-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is characterized by dysregulation of the immune system leading to inflammation and selective destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Mild to moderate pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is found in patients with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes mellitus may also be part of a syndrome

  20. YKL-40: a novel marker shared by chronic inflammation and oncogenic transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roslind, Anne; Johansen, Julia S

    2009-01-01

    YKL-40, a member of 'mammalian chitinase-like proteins', is secreted by macrophages, neutrophils, chondrocytes, endothelial-, vascular smooth muscle-, and cancer cells. High serum YKL-40 is a biomarker of poor prognosis in patients with cancer, inflammation and increased tissue remodelling. High ...

  1. A20 prevents chronic liver inflammation and cancer by protecting hepatocytes from death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catrysse, L; Farhang Ghahremani, M; Vereecke, L; Youssef, S A; Mc Guire, C; Sze, M; Weber, A; Heikenwalder, M; de Bruin, A; Beyaert, R; van Loo, G

    2016-01-01

    An important regulator of inflammatory signalling is the ubiquitin-editing protein A20 that acts as a break on nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, but also exerts important cytoprotective functions. A20 knockout mice are cachectic and die prematurely due to excessive multi-organ inflammation. To

  2. Effect of Obesity and Chronic Inflammation on TRAIL-Based Immunotherapy for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    resistance. J Clin Invest, 112: 1821, 2003 3. Lee, I. S., Shin, G., Choue, R.: Shifts in diet from high fat to high carbohydrate improved levels of...induced adiposity alters the serum profile of inflammation in C57BL/6N mice as measured by antibody array. Diabetes Obes Metab, 11: 343, 2009 5. Smith

  3. Effect of chronic continual- and intermittent hypoxia-induced systemic inflammation on the cardiovascular system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Mei; Yao, Dan; Cai, Xue-Ding; Ding, Cheng; Lin, Qian-Ding; Wang, Liang-Xing; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2015-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been recognized as an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Present study aimed to investigate the role of NF-κB-dependent inflammation pathways in pathophysiological responses of cardiovascular system in OSAS. Thirty male specific pathogen-free (SPF) Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to normoxia (N) group, continual hypoxia (CH) group, and intermittent hypoxia (IH) group (n = 10) and were exposed to N (21% O2), CH (8% O2), or IH (6-11% O2 for 10 s and 21% O2 for 80 s in every 90 s) for 8 h/day for 35 days. The hemodynamic and pathomorphologic effects of IH and CH exposure were investigated as well as the expression of NF-κB-dependent inflammation factors. Chronic IH or CH significantly increased mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) in rats, while no significant changes occurred in mean carotid arterial pressure (mCAP). The ratio of right ventricle (RV) to left ventricle (LV) + septum (S) was significantly increased by both IH and CH, suggesting RV hypertrophy was induced by IH or CH. Elastic fiber staining showed an irregular pattern of elastic fiber distribution after hypoxia, and aortic tunica media thickness was increased. Both chronic IH and CH upregulated the expressions of transcription factor NF-κB and related pro-inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules. The current study expands our understanding that both IH and CH could activate the expression of NF-κB and related inflammatory factors as well as cause pathophysiologic damage to the cardiovascular system in OSAS. All these results provide further support to an emerging hypothesis that activation of NF-κB-dependent inflammation may play a central role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular dysfunction in OSAS.

  4. Low-Grade Inflammation and Ambulatory Cortisol in Adolescents: Interaction Between Interviewer-Rated Versus Self-Rated Acute Stress and Chronic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Hannah M C; Chen, Edith

    To determine whether the association between self-rated or interviewer-rated recent acute stress exposures and low-grade inflammation and daily cortisol production in adolescents is moderated by chronic stress ratings. Acute and chronic stress exposures were assessed in 261 adolescents aged 13 to 16 years using a semistructured life stress interview. The negative impact of acute stressors was independently rated by both adolescents (self-rated) and interviewers (interviewer-rated). Markers of inflammation (interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1ra, C-reactive protein) were measured from peripheral blood samples obtained via antecubital venipuncture. Participants collected 4 saliva samples at home on each of 6 consecutive days for the analysis of diurnal salivary cortisol profiles. There were no main effects of acute stressors (self- and interviewer-rated) and chronic family or peer stress on adolescent inflammation markers and cortisol (p values > .10). However, the interaction between interviewer-rated acute stress and chronic family stress was significantly associated with adolescent inflammation markers (IL-6, IL-1ra). Specifically, as chronic family stress increased, the association between acute stressor impact (interviewer-rated) and inflammation markers became more positive (IL-6 (B = .054, SE = .023, p = .022); IL-1ra (B = .030, SE = .014, p = .034)). Interactions between self-rated acute stress and chronic family stress were not associated with any biological measures (p values > .10). Interactions between acute stressor impact (both self- and interviewer-rated) and chronic peer stress were also not significantly associated with any biological measures (p values > .05). Among adolescents, interviewer-based ratings of acute stressor impact may allow for better prediction of health-relevant inflammation markers than adolescents' own ratings.

  5. Functional up-regulation of Nav1.8 sodium channel in Aβ afferent fibers subjected to chronic peripheral inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional alterations in the properties of Aβ afferent fibers may account for the increased pain sensitivity observed under peripheral chronic inflammation. Among the voltage-gated sodium channels involved in the pathophysiology of pain, Nav1.8 has been shown to participate in the peripheral sensitization of nociceptors. However, to date, there is no evidence for a role of Nav1.8 in controlling Aβ-fiber excitability following persistent inflammation. Methods Distribution and expression of Nav1.8 in dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves were qualitatively or quantitatively assessed by immunohistochemical staining and by real time-polymerase chain reaction at different time points following complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) administration. Using a whole-cell patch-clamp configuration, we further determined both total INa and TTX-R Nav1.8 currents in large-soma dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons isolated from sham or CFA-treated rats. Finally, we analyzed the effects of ambroxol, a Nav1.8-preferring blocker on the electrophysiological properties of Nav1.8 currents and on the mechanical sensitivity and inflammation of the hind paw in CFA-treated rats. Results Our findings revealed that Nav1.8 is up-regulated in NF200-positive large sensory neurons and is subsequently anterogradely transported from the DRG cell bodies along the axons toward the periphery after CFA-induced inflammation. We also demonstrated that both total INa and Nav1.8 peak current densities are enhanced in inflamed large myelinated Aβ-fiber neurons. Persistent inflammation leading to nociception also induced time-dependent changes in Aβ-fiber neuron excitability by shifting the voltage-dependent activation of Nav1.8 in the hyperpolarizing direction, thus decreasing the current threshold for triggering action potentials. Finally, we found that ambroxol significantly reduces the potentiation of Nav1.8 currents in Aβ-fiber neurons observed following intraplantar CFA injection and

  6. The association between serological features of chronic Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and markers of systemic inflammation and nutrition in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paplińska-Goryca, Magdalena; Rubinsztajn, Renata; Nejman-Gryz, Patrycja; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz; Krenke, Rafał; Chazan, Ryszarda

    2017-12-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is an obligatory human pathogen involved in lower and upper airway infections, including pneumonia, bronchitis. Asymptomatic C. pneumoniae carriage is also relatively common. The association of C. pneumoniae infections with the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) course is unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between chronic C. pneumoniae infection and clinical features of COPD, markers of inflammation and metabolic dysfunction. The study included 59 patients with stable COPD who had no, or had ≥2 acute exacerbations during last year. The level of IgA and IgG antibody against C. pneumoniae, IL-6, IL-8, resistin, insulin, adiponectin and acyl ghrelin was measured in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). No differences in clinical and functional data were observed between COPD patients without serological features of C. pneumoniae infection and chronic C. pneumoniae infection. The level of anti C. pneumoniae IgA significantly correlated with IL-8, IL-6, resistin concentration in group of frequent exacerbators. IgG level correlated negatively with acetyl ghrelin and body mass index (BMI) in patients without frequent exacerbations, in contrast to frequent COPD exacerbation group where significant correlations between IgG level and BMI was demonstrated. Serum IL-6 correlated positively with resistin and insulin and negatively with adiponectin in group of patients with serological features of chronic C. pneumoniae infection only. Our study showed that chronic C. pneumoniae infection does not influence the clinical course of COPD in the both study groups. Chronic C. pneumoniae infections might be associated with a distinct COPD phenotype that affects metabolic dysfunction.

  7. Basal inflammation and innate immune response in chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Generaal, E.; Vogelzangs, N.; MacFarlane, G.J.; Geenen, R.; Smit, J.H.; Dekker, J.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in chronic pain, although study findings are inconsistent. This cross-sectional study examined whether basal inflammatory markers and the innate immune response are associated with the presence and severity of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain.

  8. Inflammation Markers and Major Depressive Disorder in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: Results From the Sertraline Against Depression and Heart Disease in Chronic Heart Failure Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Glen L; Prybol, Kevin; Boyle, Stephen H; Hall, Russell; Streilein, Robert D; Steffens, David C; Krishnan, Ranga; Rogers, Joseph G; O'Connor, Christopher M; Jiang, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and chronic heart failure (CHF) have in common heightening states of inflammation, manifested by elevated inflammation markers such as C-reactive protein. This study compared inflammatory biomarker profiles in patients with CHF and MDD to those without MDD. The study recruited patients admitted to inpatient care for acute heart failure exacerbations, after psychiatric diagnostic interview. Patients with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores lower than 10 and with no history of depression served as the nondepressed reference group (n = 25). MDD severity was defined as follows: mild (BDI 10-15; n = 48), moderate (BDI 16-23; n = 51), and severe (BDI ≥ 24; n = 33). A Bio-Plex assay measured 18 inflammation markers. Ordinal logistic models were used to examine the association of MDD severity and biomarker levels. Adjusting for age, sex, statin use, body mass index, left ventricular ejection fraction, tobacco use, and New York Heart Association class, the MDD overall group variable was significantly associated with elevated interleukin (IL)-2 (p = .019), IL-4 (p = .020), IL-6 (p = .026), interferon-γ (p = .010), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (p = .002), macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (p = .003), and tumor necrosis factor α (p = .004). MDD severity subgroups had a greater probability of elevated IL-6, IL-8, interferon-γ, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β, and tumor necrosis factor α compared with nondepressed group. The nondepressed group had greater probability of elevated IL-17 (p marker levels compared with patients with CHF who had no depression. Whether effective depression treatment will normalize the altered inflammation marker levels requires further study. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00078286.

  9. Metallothionein prevents neurodegeneration and central nervous system cell death after treatment with gliotoxin 6-aminonicotinamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Quintana, Albert; Carrasco, Javier

    2004-01-01

    Transgenic expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the CNS under the control of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene promoter (GFAP-IL6 mice) induces significant inflammation and neurodegeneration but also affords neuroprotection against acute traumatic brain injury. This neuroprotection...

  10. Identification of a cytochrome P4502E1/Bid/C1q-dependent axis mediating inflammation in adipose tissue after chronic ethanol feeding to mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Becky M; Roychowdhury, Sanjoy; Tang, Hui; Hillian, Antoinette D; Feldstein, Ariel E; Stahl, Gregory L; Takahashi, Kazue; Nagy, Laura E

    2011-10-14

    Chronic, heavy alcohol exposure results in inflammation in adipose tissue, insulin resistance, and liver injury. Here we have identified a CYP2E1/Bid/C1q-dependent pathway that is activated in response to chronic ethanol and is required for the development of inflammation in adipose tissue. Ethanol feeding for 25 days to wild-type (C57BL/6J) mice increased expression of multiple markers of adipose tissue inflammation relative to pair-fed controls independent of increased body weight or adipocyte size. Ethanol feeding increased the expression of CYP2E1 in adipocytes, but not stromal vascular cells, in adipose tissue and Cyp2e1(-/-) mice were protected from adipose tissue inflammation in response to ethanol. Ethanol feeding also increased the number of TUNEL-positive nuclei in adipose tissue of wild-type mice but not in Cyp2e1(-/-) or Bid (-/-) mice. Apoptosis contributed to adipose inflammation, as the expression of multiple inflammatory markers was decreased in mice lacking the Bid-dependent apoptotic pathway. The complement protein C1q binds to apoptotic cells, facilitating their clearance and activating complement. Making use of C1q-deficient mice, we found that activation of complement via C1q provided the critical link between CYP2E1/Bid-dependent apoptosis and onset of adipose tissue inflammation in response to chronic ethanol. In summary, chronic ethanol increases CYP2E1 activity in adipose, leading to Bid-mediated apoptosis and activation of complement via C1q, finally resulting in adipose tissue inflammation. Taken together, these data identify a novel mechanism for the development of adipose tissue inflammation that likely contributes to the pathophysiological effects of ethanol.

  11. Chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue is associated with high-grade prostate cancer in the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurel, Bora; Lucia, M. Scott; Thompson, Ian M.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Tangen, Catherine M.; Kristal, Alan R.; Parnes, Howard L.; Hoque, Ashraful; Lippman, Scott M.; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Drake, Charles G.; Nelson, William G.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is hypothesized to influence prostate cancer development, although a definitive link has not been established. Methods Prostate cancer cases (N=191) detected on a for-cause (clinically indicated) or end-of-study (protocol directed) biopsy, and frequency-matched controls (N=209), defined as negative for cancer on an end-of-study biopsy, were sampled from the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. Inflammation prevalence and extent in benign areas of biopsy cores were visually assessed using digital images of H&E stained sections. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations. Results 86.2% of cases and 78.2% of controls had at least one biopsy core (of 3 assessed) with inflammation in benign areas, most of which was chronic. Men who had at least one biopsy core with inflammation had 1.78 (95% CI 1.04–3.06) times the odds of prostate cancer compared with men who had zero cores with inflammation. The association was stronger for high-grade disease (Gleason sum 7–10, N=94; odds ratio [OR]=2.24, 95% CI 1.06–4.71). These patterns were present when restricting to cases and controls in whom intraprostatic inflammation was the least likely to have influenced biopsy recommendation because their PSA was low (Inflammation, most of which was chronic, was common in benign prostate tissue, and was positively associated with prostate cancer, especially high-grade. The association did not appear to be due to detection bias. Impact This study supports an etiologic link between inflammation and prostate carcinogenesis, and suggests an avenue for prevention by mitigating intraprostatic inflammation. PMID:24748218

  12. Low-grade chronic inflammation and superoxide anion production by NADPH oxidase are the main determinants of physical frailty in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Gregory; Dupuy, Anne-Marie; Jaussent, Audrey; Durant, Richard; Ventura, Emilie; Sauguet, Pauline; Picot, Marie-Christine; Jeandel, Claude; Cristol, Jean Paul

    2012-09-01

    Physical performance measured by gait speed is being recognized as a major instrument for clinical evaluation in older adults, because it predicts physical frailty, loss of autonomy, hospitalization and decreased survival. Low-grade chronic inflammation and oxidative stress, mediated partly by the superoxide anion produced by NADPH oxidase, are closely linked and could be involved in age-related physical decline. To determine whether slow gait speed is associated with superoxide anion overproduction by NADPH oxidase and low-grade chronic inflammation. Observational study among the 280 elderly of an ambulatory geriatric care unit (191 women, 89 men, 79.9 ± 6.1 years old). Gait speed was evaluated by walking at self-chosen usual pace. Usual gait speed older people is associated with superoxide anion overproduction by NADPH oxidase and low-grade chronic inflammation.

  13. Interleukin-10 is differentially expressed in the small intestine and the colon experiencing chronic inflammation and ulcerative colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate in young pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackeyram, D; Young, D; Kim, C J; Yang, C; Archbold, T L; Mine, Y; Fan, M Z

    2017-03-31

    Intestinal inflammation induced with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) is used to study acute or chronic ulcerative colitis in animal models. Decreased gut tissue anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 concentration and mRNA abundance are associated with the development of chronic bowel inflammation. Twelve piglets of 3 days old were fitted with an intragastric catheter and randomly allocated into control and DSS groups by administrating either sterile saline or 1.25 g of DSS/kg body weight (BW) in saline per day, respectively, for 10 days. Growth rate and food conversion efficiency were reduced (pIL-10 were reduced (pIL-10 mRNA abundance was increased (pIL-10 in the young pigs, mimicking the IL-10 expression pattern in humans Associated with chronic bowel inflammation.

  14. Long-term azithromycin ameliorates not only airway inflammation but also remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji Young; Jo, Mi Ran; Kang, Hyeon Hui; Kim, Sung Kyoung; Kim, Myoung Sook; Kim, Yong Hyun; Kim, Seok Chan; Kwon, Soon Seog; Lee, Sook Young; Kim, Jin Woo

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the effect of long-term treatment with azithromycin on the pathogenesis of chronic asthma with airway remodeling. Six-week-old-BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) combined with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 1 month, then challenged with OVA for 3 months. Azithromycin at 75 mg/kg was administered via oral gavage five times a week during the challenge period. Inflammatory cells, T helper 2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) fluid, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) were measured. Parameters related to airway remodeling were evaluated. The levels of neutrophil elastase, Interleukin (IL)-8, and BRP-39 (human homologue YKL-40) were assessed. The expression of MAPK and NF-κB signaling were investigated. Long-term treatment with azithromycin improved AHR and airway inflammation compared with the OVA and the OVA/LPS groups. The concentrations of IL-5 and IL-13 in the OVA/LPS group decreased significantly after azithromycin administration. The levels of neutrophil elastase and IL-8, as surrogate markers of neutrophil activation, were reduced in the azithromycin group compared with the OVA/LPS group. Goblet cell hyperplasia and the smooth muscle thickening of airway remodeling were attenuated after azithromycin treatment. The expression of MAPK/NF-kappaB signal and the level of BRP-39 in the lung decreased remarkably in the OVA/LPS with azithromycin-treated group. This study suggests that in a murine model of chronic asthma, long-term azithromycin treatment ameliorates not only airway inflammation but also airway remodeling by influencing on neutrophilc-related mediators, BRP-39 and MAPK/NF-κB signal pathways. Macrolide therapy might be an effective adjuvant therapy in a chronic, severe asthma with remodeling airway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neurodegeneration-associated instability of ribosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Justin; Pietrzak, Maciej; Rempala, Grzegorz; Nelson, Peter T; Hetman, Michal

    2014-06-01

    Homologous recombination (HR)-mediated instability of the repetitively organized ribosomal DNA (rDNA) has been proposed as a mediator of cell senescence in yeast triggering the DNA damage response. High individual variability in the content of human rDNA suggests that this genomic region remained relatively unstable throughout evolution. Therefore, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the genomic content of rDNA in post mortem samples of parietal cortex from 14 young and 9 elderly individuals with no diagnosis of a chronic neurodegenerative/neurological disease. In addition, rDNA content in that brain region was compared between 10 age-matched control individuals and 10 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) which involves neurodegeneration of the cerebral cortex. Probing rRNA-coding regions of rDNA revealed no effects of aging on the rDNA content. Elevated rDNA content was observed in DLB. Conversely, in the DLB pathology-free cerebellum, lower genomic content of rDNA was present in the DLB group. In the parietal cortex, such a DLB-associated instability of rDNA was not accompanied by any major changes of cytosine-phosphate-guanine methylation of the rDNA promoter. As increased cerebro-cortical rDNA content was previously reported in Alzheimer's disease, neurodegeneration appears to be associated with instability of rDNA. The hypothetical origins and consequences of this phenomenon are discussed including possibilities that the DNA damage-induced recombination destabilizes rDNA and that differential content of rDNA affects heterochromatin formation, gene expression and/or DNA damage response. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Whether, when and how chronic inflammation increases the risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikelenboom, Piet; Hoozemans, Jeroen Jm; Veerhuis, Rob; van Exel, Eric; Rozemuller, Annemieke Jm; van Gool, Willem A

    2012-06-04

    Neuropathological studies have revealed the presence of a broad variety of inflammation-related proteins (complement factors, acute-phase proteins, pro-inflammatory cytokines) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. These constituents of innate immunity are involved in several crucial pathogenic events of the underlying pathological cascade in AD, and recent studies have shown that innate immunity is involved in the etiology of late-onset AD. Genome-wide association studies have demonstrated gene loci that are linked to the complement system. Neuropathological and experimental studies indicate that fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) can activate the innate immunity-related CD14 and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways of glial cells for pro-inflammatory cytokine production. The production capacity of this pathway is under genetic control and offspring with a parental history of late-onset AD have a higher production capacity for pro-inflammatory cytokines. The activation of microglia by fibrillar Aβ deposits in the early preclinical stages of AD can make the brain susceptible later on for a second immune challenge leading to enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. An example of a second immune challenge could be systemic inflammation in patients with preclinical AD. Prospective epidemiological studies show that elevated serum levels of acute phase reactants can be considered as a risk factor for AD. Clinical studies suggest that peripheral inflammation increases the risk of dementia, especially in patients with preexistent cognitive impairment, and accelerates further deterioration in demented patients. The view that peripheral inflammation can increase the risk of dementia in older people provides scope for prevention.

  17. High amylose resistant starch diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosratola D Vaziri

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a major mediator of CKD progression and is partly driven by altered gut microbiome and intestinal barrier disruption, events which are caused by: urea influx in the intestine resulting in dominance of urease-possessing bacteria; disruption of epithelial barrier by urea-derived ammonia leading to endotoxemia and bacterial translocation; and restriction of potassium-rich fruits and vegetables which are common sources of fermentable fiber. Restriction of these foods leads to depletion of bacteria that convert indigestible carbohydrates to short chain fatty acids which are important nutrients for colonocytes and regulatory T lymphocytes. We hypothesized that a high resistant starch diet attenuates CKD progression. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed a chow containing 0.7% adenine for 2 weeks to induce CKD. Rats were then fed diets supplemented with amylopectin (low-fiber control or high fermentable fiber (amylose maize resistant starch, HAM-RS2 for 3 weeks. CKD rats consuming low fiber diet exhibited reduced creatinine clearance, interstitial fibrosis, inflammation, tubular damage, activation of NFkB, upregulation of pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-fibrotic molecules; impaired Nrf2 activity, down-regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and disruption of colonic epithelial tight junction. The high resistant starch diet significantly attenuated these abnormalities. Thus high resistant starch diet retards CKD progression and attenuates oxidative stress and inflammation in rats. Future studies are needed to explore the impact of HAM-RS2 in CKD patients.

  18. Aging linked to type 2 diabetes increases oxidative stress and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel; Rosado-Pérez, Juana; Santiago-Osorio, Edelmiro; Ortiz, Rocío; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Martha A; Galván-Duarte, Rosa Elba

    2011-02-01

    Oxidative stress (OxS) and inflammation are physiopathological mechanisms related to diabetes and aging. We evaluated the additive effect of diabetes and aging on OxS and inflammation in a cross-sectional comparative study of 228 subjects: (1) 56 healthy adults (mean age, 47 ± 7 years); (2) 60 diabetic adults (mean age, 52 ± 6 years); (3) 40 healthy elderly adults (mean age, 67 ± 7 years); and (4) 72 diabetic elderly adults (mean age, 68 ± 7 years). We measured levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), plasma lipid peroxides, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, total antioxidants, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). The results indicate that diabetes is a risk factor for subjects with high serum levels of TNF-α (odds ratio [OR] = 12.1; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 5.0-28; p aging (OR = 14; 95% CI, 3.7-53.7; p diabetes is an independent risk factor for OxS (OR = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.2-3.8; p aging, in concert with diabetes, exerts an additive effect on OxS and inflammation.

  19. High amylose resistant starch diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Liu, Shu-Man; Lau, Wei Ling; Khazaeli, Mahyar; Nazertehrani, Sohrab; Farzaneh, Seyed H; Kieffer, Dorothy A; Adams, Sean H; Martin, Roy J

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a major mediator of CKD progression and is partly driven by altered gut microbiome and intestinal barrier disruption, events which are caused by: urea influx in the intestine resulting in dominance of urease-possessing bacteria; disruption of epithelial barrier by urea-derived ammonia leading to endotoxemia and bacterial translocation; and restriction of potassium-rich fruits and vegetables which are common sources of fermentable fiber. Restriction of these foods leads to depletion of bacteria that convert indigestible carbohydrates to short chain fatty acids which are important nutrients for colonocytes and regulatory T lymphocytes. We hypothesized that a high resistant starch diet attenuates CKD progression. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed a chow containing 0.7% adenine for 2 weeks to induce CKD. Rats were then fed diets supplemented with amylopectin (low-fiber control) or high fermentable fiber (amylose maize resistant starch, HAM-RS2) for 3 weeks. CKD rats consuming low fiber diet exhibited reduced creatinine clearance, interstitial fibrosis, inflammation, tubular damage, activation of NFkB, upregulation of pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-fibrotic molecules; impaired Nrf2 activity, down-regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and disruption of colonic epithelial tight junction. The high resistant starch diet significantly attenuated these abnormalities. Thus high resistant starch diet retards CKD progression and attenuates oxidative stress and inflammation in rats. Future studies are needed to explore the impact of HAM-RS2 in CKD patients.

  20. INFLAMMATION IS ASSOCIATED WITH EXCESSIVE BODY ADIPOSITY IN NONDIALYSED CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE (CKD PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês Barreto-Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate inflammation in non-dialysed CKD patients with normal and high body adiposity level. One hundred and thirty four CKD patients (male: 56%; age=65±12 years under treatment for 3.0±2.0 years were evaluated in a cross-sectional study. Glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was estimated by MDRD equation. Body adiposity was assessed by BMI and total body fat (BF; dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Laboratorial measurements were: albumin, pro-inflammatory cytokines by Multiplexed analysis: tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, high sensitive C reactive protein, monocyte chemotactic protein, inteleukine 6 and 8, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular adhesion molecule-1. The inflammation status was defined according to the median values for each studied pro-inflammatory cytokines: negative for inflammation (Infl- (< median, positive for inflammation (Infl+ (≥ median. The cytokines were compared between patients with normal BMI (<25kg/m2 (46%; BMI=22.2±1.9 and high BMI (≥25kg/m2 (BMI=28.8±2.8. Both groups showed similar eGFR and CKD stages distribution (stage 3:42%, 4: 37%, 5: 21%. BF and all cytokines were higher in high BMI group than in normal BMI (P<0.0001. BMI and BF were correlated (r= 0.74; P<0.0001. The Infl+ condition was more prevalent, for all cytokines, in the high BMI group (range:61–76% than in normal (24–38%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis, for all cytokines, showed that Infl+ condition was associated with high BMI (Odds Ratio range: 2.5–4.2; 95%CI: 1.1 - 9.6; P<0.01, even after adjusted for age, gender, diabetes and eGFR. In conclusion, CKD patients with high BMI and body adiposity are at higher risk for inflammation. Therefore, the excess of adiposity should be carefully treated in these patients.

  1. Keloid and Hypertrophic Scar/span>s Are the Result of Chronic Inflammation in the Reticular Dermis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Rei

    2017-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scar/span>s are caused by cutaneous injury and irritation, including trauma, insect bite, burn, surgery, vaccination, skin piercing, acne, folliculitis, chicken pox, and herpes zoster infection. Notably, superficial injuries that do not reach the reticular dermis never cause keloidal and hypertrophic scarring. This suggests that these pathological scar/span>s are due to injury to this skin layer and the subsequent aberrant wound healing therein. The latter is characterized by continuous and histologically localized inflammation. As a result, the reticular layer of keloids and hypertrophic scar/span>s contains inflammatory cells, increased numbers of fibroblasts, newly formed blood vessels, and collagen deposits. Moreover, proinflammatory factors, such as interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α are upregulated in keloid tissues, which suggests that, in patients with keloids, proinflammatory genes in the skin are sensitive to trauma. This may promote chronic inflammation, which in turn may cause the invasive growth of keloids. In addition, the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in pathological scar/span>s suggests that, rather than being skin tumors, keloids and hypertrophic scar/span>s are inflammatory disorders of skin, specifically inflammatory disorders of the reticular dermis. Various external and internal post-wounding stimuli may promote reticular inflammation. The nature of these stimuli most likely shapes the characteristics, quantity, and course of keloids and hypertrophic scar/span>s. Specifically, it is likely that the intensity, frequency, and duration of these stimuli determine how quickly the scars appear, the direction and speed of growth, and the intensity of symptoms. These proinflammatory stimuli include a variety of local, systemic, and genetic factors. These observations together suggest that the clinical differences between keloids and hypertrophic scar/span>s merely reflect differences in

  2. Effects of inhaled corticosteroids on airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Rachel Jen,1 Stephen,1 Rennard,2 Don D Sin1,31Department of Medicine, Respiratory Division, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2Internal Medicine Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA; 3Institute of Heart and Lung Health and the UBC James Hogg Research Center, St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, CanadaBackground: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by chronic inflammation in the small airways. The effect of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS on lung inflammation in COPD remains uncertain. We sought to determine the effects of ICS on inflammatory indices in bronchial biopsies and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with COPD.Methods: We searched Medline, Embase, Cinahl, and the Cochrane database for randomized, controlled clinical trials that used bronchial biopsies and bronchoalveolar lavage to evaluate the effects of ICS in stable COPD. For each chosen study, we calculated the mean differences in the concentrations of inflammatory cells before and after treatment in both intervention and control groups. These values were then converted into standardized mean differences (SMD to accommodate the differences in patient selection, clinical treatment, and biochemical procedures that were employed across the original studies. If significant heterogeneity was present (P < 0.1, then a random effects model was used to pool the original data; otherwise, a fixed effects model was used.Results: We identified eight original studies that met the inclusion criteria. Four studies used bronchial biopsies (n = 102 participants and showed that ICS were effective in reducing CD4 and CD8 cell counts (SMD, −0.52 units and −0.66 units, 95% confidence interval. The five studies used bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (n = 309, which together showed that ICS reduced neutrophil and lymphocyte counts (SMD, −0.64 units and −0.64 units, 95% confidence interval. ICS on the other hand

  3. Are PTH levels related to oxidative stress and inflammation in chronic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaqueto, Marcel; Delfino, Vinicius Daher Alvares; Bortolasci, Chiara Cristina; Barbosa, Decio Sabbatini; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Frange, Raquel Ferreira Nassar; Ferreira, Larissa França Fontoura; Guimarães, Fernanda Burle Dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Patients at end stage renal disease have higher levels of inflammation and oxidative stress than the general population. Many factors contribute to these issues, and the parathyroid hormone (PTH) is also implicated. The study was conducted in order to assess the relationship between PTH levels and inflammation and oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients. Cross-sectional study with patients of two hemodialysis facilities in Londrina, Brazil. Patients with other conditions known to generate oxidative stress and inflammation were excluded. Blood levels of PTH and biochemical parameters of inflammation (interleukins 1 and 6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha) and oxidative stress (total plasma antioxidant capacity, malonic dialdehyde, lipid hydroperoxidation, advanced oxidation protein products, quantification of nitric oxide metabolites, and 8-isoprostane) were measured before a dialysis session. Then, we made correlation analyses between PTH levels - either as the continuous variable or categorized into tertiles-, and inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers. PTH did not show any correlation with the tested inflammation and oxidative stress parameters, nor as continuous variable neither as categorical variable. In this descriptive study, the results suggest that the inflammation and oxidative stress of hemodialysis patients probably arise from mechanisms other than secondary hyperparathyroidism. Pacientes com doença renal em estágio terminal têm níveis de inflamação e estresse oxidativo maiores do que a população geral. Muitos fatores contribuem para isso, e o hormônio paratireoidiano (PTH) é um deles. Estudo foi realizado para avaliar a relação entre os níveis de PTH e níveis de inflamação e estresse oxidativo em pacientes em hemodiálise. estudo transversal com pacientes de duas unidades de hemodiálise de Londrina, Brasil. Pacientes com condições causadoras de inflamação e estresse oxidativo foram exclusos. Níveis plasmáticos de PTH e par

  4. Sub-chronic lung inflammation after airway exposures to Bacillus thuringiensis biopesticides in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kenneth K; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Hammer, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess possible health effects of airway exposures to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) based biopesticides in mice. Endpoints were lung inflammation evaluated by presence of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), clearance of bacteria from the lung...... lumen and histological alterations of the lungs. Hazard identifications of the biopesticides were carried out using intratracheal (i.t.) instillation, followed by an inhalation study. The two commercial biopesticides used were based on the Bt. subspecies kurstaki and israelensis, respectively. Groups...

  5. Dyslipidemia and chronic inflammation markers are correlated with telomere length shortening in Cushing's syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Aulinas

    Full Text Available Cushing's syndrome (CS increases cardiovascular risk (CVR and adipocytokine imbalance, associated with an increased inflammatory state. Telomere length (TL shortening is a novel CVR marker, associated with inflammation biomarkers. We hypothesized that inflammatory state and higher CVR in CS might be related to TL shortening, as observed in premature aging.To evaluate relationships between TL, CVR and inflammation markers in CS.In a cross-sectional study, 77 patients with CS (14 males, 59 pituitary-, 17 adrenal- and 1 ectopic-origin; 21 active disease and 77 age-, gender-, smoking-matched controls were included. Total white blood cell TL was measured by TRF-Southern technique. Clinical data and blood samples were collected (lipids, adrenal function, glucose. Adiponectin, interleukin-6 (IL6 and C-reactive protein (CRP were available in a subgroup of patients (n=32. Correlations between TL and clinical features were examined and multiple linear regression analysis was performed to investigate potential predictors of TL.Dyslipidemic CS had shorter TL than non-dyslipidemic subjects (7328±1274 vs 7957±1137 bp, p<0.05. After adjustment for age and body mass index, cured and active CS dyslipidemic patients had shorter TL than non-dyslipidemic CS (cured: 7187±1309 vs 7868±1104; active: 7203±1262 vs 8615±1056, respectively, p<0.05. Total cholesterol and triglycerides negatively correlated with TL (r-0.279 and -0.259, respectively, p<0.05, as well as CRP and IL6 (r-0.412 and -0.441, respectively, p<0.05. No difference in TL according the presence of other individual CVR factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity were observed in CS or in the control group. Additional TL shortening was observed in dyslipidemic obese patients who were also hypertensive, compared to those with two or less CVR factors (6956±1280 vs 7860±1180, respectively, p<0.001. Age and dyslipidemia were independent negative predictors of TL.TL is shortened in dyslipidemic CS

  6. The differences of eosinophil- and neutrophil-related inflammation in elderly allergic and non-allergic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jaw-Ji; Liao, En-Chih; Hsu, Jeng-Yuan; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lai, Yiu-Kay

    2010-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease in the elderly population and is characterized by airway inflammation. Whether it is a progressive condition resulting from allergic inflammation or a distinct condition involving a pathogen-induced reaction remains unclear. To determine the role of allergic inflammation in the pathogenesis of elderly COPD. A total of 63 elderly adults (21 mite-allergic COPD patients, 29 non-allergic COPD patients, and 13 normal controls) were recruited in this study. The serum-specific IgE for mites, level of interleukin-5 (IL-5), IL-8, leptin, adiponectin, regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), growth-related oncogene-α (GRO-α), vitamin E, and glutathione (GSH) were determined. The serum levels of GRO-α in patients with COPD were higher in comparison to normal controls (105.8 ± 32.7 vs. 7.5 ± 7.5 pg/mL, p= .021). Compared to patients with non-allergic COPD, patients with mite allergies had a higher serum level of IL-8 (63.2 ± 12.6 vs. 35.0 ± 8.2 pg/mL, p= .022). Although both IL-5 and RANTES levels were increased in COPD patients, there were no significant differences between allergic and non-allergic COPD. There were also no differences in serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, vitamin E, and GSH between COPD patients and normal controls. The increased serum levels of GRO-α indicate that it may have potential as a candidate biomarker for elderly COPD patients. There was no difference of eosinophils-related chemokines in allergic and non-allergic COPD. These results indicated that both adipokines and eosinophil-related chemokines only play trivial roles in the pathogenesis of COPD.

  7. Effects of active smoking on airway and systemic inflammation profiles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrino, Nilva R G; Tanni, Suzana E; Amaral, Renata A F; Angeleli, Aparecida Y O; Correa, Camila; Godoy, Irma

    2013-06-01

    The markers that characterize local and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remain unclear, as do their correlations with smoking status and presence of disease. The aim of this study was to assess markers of inflammation in the peripheral blood and airways of current smokers without COPD, of current smokers with COPD and of ex-smokers with COPD. In this study, 17 current smokers with COPD (mean age: 58.2 ± 9.6 years; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]: 56.1 ± 15.9%), 35 ex-smokers with COPD (mean age: 66.3 ± 7.3 years; mean FEV1: 47.9 ± 17.2%) and 20 current smokers without COPD (mean age: 49.1 ± 6.2 years; mean FEV1: 106.5 ± 15.8%) were evaluated. Spirometry findings, body composition and serum/induced sputum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and IL-10, together with serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, were assessed. Serum TNF-α concentration was higher in all current smokers than in ex-smokers with COPD. In current smokers without COPD, serum CRP level was lower than in ex-smokers with COPD and significantly lower than in current smokers with COPD. Sputum TNF-α concentration was higher in current and ex-smokers with COPD than in current smokers without COPD. Multiple regression analyses showed that serum TNF-α was associated with active smoking, and serum CRP and sputum TNF-α were associated with COPD diagnosis. Smoking is associated with higher systemic inflammation in patients with COPD. Current findings also support the hypothesis that smoking and COPD have different effects on the regulation of airway and systemic inflammatory processes.

  8. Fish Oil Supplementation Reduces Heart Levels of Interleukin-6 in Rats with Chronic Inflammation due to Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Bocca Nejm

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP is a major cause of premature death related to epilepsy. The causes of SUDEP remain unknown, but cardiac arrhythmias and asphyxia have been suggested as a major mechanism of this event. Inflammation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of both epilepsy and ventricular arrhythmia, with interleukin-6 (IL-6 being recognized as a crucial orchestrator of inflammatory states. Our group previously reported that levels of IL-6 were increased in the hearts of epileptic rats. In this scenario, anti-inflammatory actions are among the beneficial effects of fish oil dietary supplementation. This investigation revealed that elevated levels of IL-6 in the heart were markedly reduced in epileptic rats that were treated in the long-term with fish oil, suggesting protective anti-inflammatory actions against dangerously high levels of IL-6. Based on these findings, our results suggest beneficial effects of long-term intake of fish oil in reducing the inflammation associated with chronic epilepsy.

  9. The Effect of Serine Protease Inhibitors on Airway Inflammation in a Chronic Allergen-Induced Asthma Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Che Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine protease inhibitors reportedly attenuated airway inflammation and had antioxidant in multiorgan. However, the effects of the serine protease inhibitors nafamostat mesilate (FUT, gabexate mesilate (FOY, and ulinastatin (UTI on a long-term challenged mouse model of chronic asthma are unclear. BALB/c mice (6 mice/group were intratracheally inoculated with five doses of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p; 50 μL, 1 mg/mL at one-week intervals. Therapeutic doses of FUT (0.0625 mg/kg, FOY (20 mg/kg, or UTI (10,000 U/kg were, respectively, injected intraperitoneally into these mice. Control mice received sterile PBS. At 3 days after the last challenge, mice were sacrificed to assess airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR, remodeling, and inflammation; lung histological features; and cytokine expression profiles. Compared with untreated controls, mice treated with FUT, FOY, and UTI had decreased AHR and goblet cell hyperplasia, decreased eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration, decreased Der p-induced IL-4 levels in serum and IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, and IL-17 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and inhibited nuclear factor (NF-κB activity in lung tissues. The serine protease inhibitors FUT, FOY, and UTI have potential therapeutic benefits for treating asthma by downregulating Th2 cytokines and Th17 cell function and inhibiting NF-κB activation in lung tissue.

  10. Olive oil bioactives protect pigs against experimentally-induced chronic inflammation independently of alterations in gut microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liehr, Martin; Mereu, Alessandro; Pastor, Jose Javier; Quintela, Jose Carlos; Staats, Stefanie; Rimbach, Gerald; Ipharraguerre, Ignacio Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    Subclinical chronic inflammation (SCI) is associated with impaired animal growth. Previous work has demonstrated that olive-derived plant bioactives exhibit anti-inflammatory properties that could possibly counteract the growth-depressing effects of SCI. To test this hypothesis and define the underlying mechanism, we conducted a 30-day study in which piglets fed an olive-oil bioactive extract (OBE) and their control counterparts (C+) were injected repeatedly during the last 10 days of the study with increasing doses of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides (LPS) to induce SCI. A third group of piglets remained untreated throughout the study and served as a negative control (C-). In C+ pigs, SCI increased the circulating concentration of interleukin 1 beta (p OBE animals. Although intestinal inflammation and colonic microbial ecology was not altered by treatments, OBE enhanced ileal mRNA abundance of tight and adherens junctional proteins (p OBE improved transepithelial electrical resistance (p OBE attenuates the suppressing effect of SCI on animal growth through a mechanism that appears to involve improvements in intestinal integrity unrelated to alterations in gut microbial ecology and function. PMID:28346507

  11. Systemic inflammation in peripheral arterial disease with or without coexistent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: analysis of selected markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Krzysztof; Sleszycka, Justyna; Safianowska, Aleksandra; Wiechno, Wieslaw; Domagala-Kulawik, Joanna

    2012-07-04

    Low-grade systemic inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis and natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The aim of the study was to analyze plasma concentrations of selected markers of inflammation in patients suffering from PAD with or without coexistent COPD. Thirty patients (6 women) with advanced PAD (at least IIb stage according to Fontaine scale) hospitalized due to critical limb ischemia were examined. In all patients spirometry was performed to confirm or exclude COPD. Plasma concentration of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α was measured using ELISA method. Statistical analysis was performed according to COPD status and according to smoking status independently. In the whole group of patients with PAD, COPD was recognized in 14 cases (for the first time in 10 cases). All patients were smokers (46.7% current, 53.3% ex-smokers). We found a significant correlation between FEV1%N (percent of norm of first second expiratory volume) and the number of years of smoking (r = -0.39; p diseases.

  12. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of Jeevaneeya Rasayana: an ayurvedic polyherbal formulation on acute and chronic models of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyni, G L; Ratheesh, M; Sindhu, G; Helen, A

    2010-12-01

    The present study was aimed to establish the efficacy of Jeevaneeya Rasayana (JR), an ayurvedic polyherbal formulation, in adjuvant-induced arthritic (AIA) rat model with reference to mediators of inflammation. The methanolic (MJR), ethanolic (EJR), and water extracts (WJR) of JR were prepared and their anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan-induced acute model was evaluated. MJR at a dose of 25 mg/kg showed significantly higher anti-inflammatory effect than EJR, WJR, and standard drug diclofenac. MJR also significantly decreased the paw edema in AIA rats. Activities of cyclooxygenase, 5-lipoxygenase, and myeloperoxidase were decreased significantly on treatment with MJR. Supplementation with MJR increases the activities of antioxidant enzymes and the level of glutathione content. The increment in the concentration of C-reactive protein, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance, and ceruloplasmin observed in arthritic rats were found to be significantly restored in MJR treated rats. Thus, the results demonstrated the potential beneficiary effect of methanolic extract of Jeevaneeya Rasayana on acute and chronic models of inflammation.

  13. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases: chronic inflammation or disease specific patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant...... differences in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (MNC) gene expression patterns between 15 newly diagnosed HT patients and 15 matched healthy controls. However, the MNC expression levels of five genes were significantly upregulated in 25 IBD patients, compared to 18 matched healthy controls (CD14, FACL2, FCN1...

  14. The NLRP3 inflammasome is a potential target of ozone therapy aiming to ease chronic renal inflammation in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gang; Bai, Zhiming; Chen, Zhiyuan; Chen, Hui; Wang, Guoren; Wang, Gang; Liu, Zhenxiang

    2017-02-01

    Ozone therapy is an effective medical treatment for various diseases. A previous study has demonstrated its reno-protective effect in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the mechanism involved is not completely known. This study produced the 5/6 nephrectomized CKD rat model and investigated whether the reno-protective effect of ozone therapy was achieved by its anti-inflammatory property through the modulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. The results showed that ozone therapy at a low concentration improved renal function and ameliorated renal morphological injury in 5/6 nephrectomized rats. The expression of NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1-p10 in the kidney of these rats was simultaneously lowered by ozone therapy. Moreover, renal inflammation caused by IL-1β was significantly alleviated by ozone therapy. The Pearson correlation analysis indicated that the protein level of IL-1β was positively correlated with renal injury scores. Taken together, these results indicated that ozone therapy might reduce sterile renal inflammation and slow down CKD progression through the modulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in 5/6 nephrectomized rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. CS2164, a novel multi-target inhibitor against tumor angiogenesis, mitosis and chronic inflammation with anti-tumor potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Shan, Song; Li, Zhi-Bin; Xin, Li-Jun; Pan, De-Si; Yang, Qian-Jiao; Liu, Ying-Ping; Yue, Xu-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Rong; Gao, Ji-Zhou; Zhang, Jin-Wen; Ning, Zhi-Qiang; Lu, Xian-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Although inhibitors targeting tumor angiogenic pathway have provided improvement for clinical treatment in patients with various solid tumors, the still very limited anti-cancer efficacy and acquired drug resistance demand new agents that may offer better clinical benefits. In the effort to find a small molecule potentially targeting several key pathways for tumor development, we designed, discovered and evaluated a novel multi-kinase inhibitor, CS2164. CS2164 inhibited the angiogenesis-related kinases (VEGFR2, VEGFR1, VEGFR3, PDGFRα and c-Kit), mitosis-related kinase Aurora B and chronic inflammation-related kinase CSF-1R in a high potency manner with the IC50 at a single-digit nanomolar range. Consequently, CS2164 displayed anti-angiogenic activities through suppression of VEGFR/PDGFR phosphorylation, inhibition of ligand-dependent cell proliferation and capillary tube formation, and prevention of vasculature formation in tumor tissues. CS2164 also showed induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and suppression of cell proliferation in tumor tissues through the inhibition of Aurora B-mediated H3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, CS2164 demonstrated the inhibitory effect on CSF-1R phosphorylation that led to the suppression of ligand-stimulated monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation and reduced CSF-1R(+) cells in tumor tissues. The in vivo animal efficacy studies revealed that CS2164 induced remarkable regression or complete inhibition of tumor growth at well-tolerated oral doses in several human tumor xenograft models. Collectively, these results indicate that CS2164 is a highly selective multi-kinase inhibitor with potent anti-tumor activities against tumor angiogenesis, mitosis and chronic inflammation, which may provide the rationale for further clinical assessment of CS2164 as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of cancer. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  16. Harnessing Neutrophil Survival Mechanisms during Chronic Infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Novel Therapeutic Targets to Dampen Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît S. Marteyn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available More than two decades after cloning the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene, the defective gene in cystic fibrosis (CF, we still do not understand how dysfunction of this ion channel causes lung disease and the tremendous neutrophil burden which persists within the airways; nor why chronic colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa develops in CF patients who are thought to be immunocompetent. It appears that the microenvironment within the lung of CF patients provides favorable conditions for both P. aeruginosa colonization and neutrophil survival. In this context, the ability of bacteria to induce hypoxia, which in turn affects neutrophil survival is an additional level of complexity that needs to be accounted for when controlling neutrophil fate in CF. Recent studies have underscored the importance of neutrophils in innate immunity and their functions appear to extend far beyond their well-described role in antibacterial defense. Perhaps a disturbance in neutrophil reprogramming during the course of an infection severely modulates the inflammatory response in CF. Furthermore there is an emerging concept that the CFTR itself may be an immune modulator and stimulating CFTR function in CF patients could promote neutrophil and macrophages antimicrobial function. Fostering the resolution of inflammation by favoring neutrophil apoptosis could preserve their microbicidal activities but decrease their proinflammatory potential. In this context, triggering neutrophil apoptosis with roscovitine may be a potential therapeutic option and this is currently being evaluated in CF patients. In the present review we discuss how neutrophils functions are disturbed in CF and how this may relate to chronic infection with P. aeuginosa and we propose novel research directions aimed at modulating neutrophil survival, dampening lung inflammation and ultimately leading to an amelioration of the lung disease.

  17. Serum hyaluronate as a non-invasive marker of hepatic fibrosis and inflammation in HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Ghodrat; Estakhri, Arezoo; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Nouri, Negin; Montazeri, Farhad; Mohammadkani, Ashraf; Derakhshan, Mohammad Hossain; Zamani, Farhad; Samiee, Shahram; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2005-01-01

    Background HBV infection is a serious global heath problem. It is crucial to monitor this disease more closely with a non-invasive marker in clinical trials. We aimed to evaluate the predictive value of serum hyaluronate for the presence of extensive liver fibrosis and inflammation. Methods 28 healthy volunteers and 65 patients with HBeAg negative chronic hepatitis B were enrolled. Liver biopsies scored according to Ishak system. Association of serum hyaloronate with liver fibrosis and inflammation were assessed, and cut off points for serum hyaluronate levels were identified by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves and their values for prediction of fibrosis and inflammation were assessed. Results In patients with CHB serum hyaluronate had the most significant correlation and predictive values for the liver fibrosis and inflammation comparing to the other variables. At the cut off point of 126.4 ngm/ml it could discriminate extensive fibrosis from milder ones with sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 98.1%. With the same value it could discriminate extensive inflammation from their milder counterparts with sensitivity of 63.6% and specificity of 92.6%. Conclusion Serum hyaluronate was the best predictor of extensive liver fibrosis and inflammation and it could discriminate subgroups of patients with chronic hepatitis B. It could be used as a non-invasive test to monitor these patients more closely with developing anti viral agents in clinical trials. PMID:16221307

  18. Serum hyaluronate as a non-invasive marker of hepatic fibrosis and inflammation in HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derakhshan Mohammad

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HBV infection is a serious global heath problem. It is crucial to monitor this disease more closely with a non-invasive marker in clinical trials. We aimed to evaluate the predictive value of serum hyaluronate for the presence of extensive liver fibrosis and inflammation. Methods 28 healthy volunteers and 65 patients with HBeAg negative chronic hepatitis B were enrolled. Liver biopsies scored according to Ishak system. Association of serum hyaloronate with liver fibrosis and inflammation were assessed, and cut off points for serum hyaluronate levels were identified by receiver operating characteristics (ROC curves and their values for prediction of fibrosis and inflammation were assessed. Results In patients with CHB serum hyaluronate had the most significant correlation and predictive values for the liver fibrosis and inflammation comparing to the other variables. At the cut off point of 126.4 ngm/ml it could discriminate extensive fibrosis from milder ones with sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 98.1%. With the same value it could discriminate extensive inflammation from their milder counterparts with sensitivity of 63.6% and specificity of 92.6%. Conclusion Serum hyaluronate was the best predictor of extensive liver fibrosis and inflammation and it could discriminate subgroups of patients with chronic hepatitis B. It could be used as a non-invasive test to monitor these patients more closely with developing anti viral agents in clinical trials.

  19. Synergistic Effects of Celecoxib and Bupropion in a Model of Chronic Inflammation-Related Depression in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Izaque S.; Silva, Rodrigo B. M.; Morrone, Fernanda B.; Calixto, João B.; Campos, Maria M.

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed to characterize the depression-like behaviour in the classical model of chronic inflammation induced by Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA). Male Swiss mice received an intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of CFA (50 µl/paw) or vehicle. Behavioural and inflammatory responses were measured at different time-points (1 to 4 weeks), and different pharmacological tools were tested. The brain levels of IL-1β and BDNF, or COX-2 expression were also determined. CFA elicited a time-dependent edema formation and mechanical allodynia, which was accompanied by a significant increase in the immobility time in the tail suspension (TST) or forced-swimming (FST) depression tests. Repeated administration of the antidepressants imipramine (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) and bupropion (30 mg/kg) significantly reversed depression-like behaviour induced by CFA. Predictably, the anti-inflammatory drugs dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg), indomethacin (10 mg/kg) and celecoxib (30 mg/kg) markedly reduced CFA-induced edema. The oral treatment with the analgesic drugs dipyrone (30 and 300 mg/kg) or pregabalin (30 mg/kg) significantly reversed the mechanical allodyinia induced by CFA. Otherwise, either dipyrone or pregabalin (both 30 mg/kg) did not significantly affect the paw edema or the depressive-like behaviour induced by CFA, whereas the oral treatment with dipyrone (300 mg/kg) was able to reduce the immobility time in TST. Noteworthy, CFA-induced edema was reduced by bupropion (30 mg/kg), and depression behaviour was prevented by celecoxib (30 mg/kg). The co-treatment with bupropion and celecoxib (3 mg/kg each) significantly inhibited both inflammation and depression elicited by CFA. The same combined treatment reduced the brain levels of IL-1β, as well as COX-2 immunopositivity, whilst it failed to affect the reduction of BDNF levels. We provide novel evidence on the relationship between chronic inflammation and depression, suggesting that combination of antidepressant and

  20. Synergistic effects of celecoxib and bupropion in a model of chronic inflammation-related depression in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaque S Maciel

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to characterize the depression-like behaviour in the classical model of chronic inflammation induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA. Male Swiss mice received an intraplantar (i.pl. injection of CFA (50 µl/paw or vehicle. Behavioural and inflammatory responses were measured at different time-points (1 to 4 weeks, and different pharmacological tools were tested. The brain levels of IL-1β and BDNF, or COX-2 expression were also determined. CFA elicited a time-dependent edema formation and mechanical allodynia, which was accompanied by a significant increase in the immobility time in the tail suspension (TST or forced-swimming (FST depression tests. Repeated administration of the antidepressants imipramine (10 mg/kg, fluoxetine (20 mg/kg and bupropion (30 mg/kg significantly reversed depression-like behaviour induced by CFA. Predictably, the anti-inflammatory drugs dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg, indomethacin (10 mg/kg and celecoxib (30 mg/kg markedly reduced CFA-induced edema. The oral treatment with the analgesic drugs dipyrone (30 and 300 mg/kg or pregabalin (30 mg/kg significantly reversed the mechanical allodyinia induced by CFA. Otherwise, either dipyrone or pregabalin (both 30 mg/kg did not significantly affect the paw edema or the depressive-like behaviour induced by CFA, whereas the oral treatment with dipyrone (300 mg/kg was able to reduce the immobility time in TST. Noteworthy, CFA-induced edema was reduced by bupropion (30 mg/kg, and depression behaviour was prevented by celecoxib (30 mg/kg. The co-treatment with bupropion and celecoxib (3 mg/kg each significantly inhibited both inflammation and depression elicited by CFA. The same combined treatment reduced the brain levels of IL-1β, as well as COX-2 immunopositivity, whilst it failed to affect the reduction of BDNF levels. We provide novel evidence on the relationship between chronic inflammation and depression, suggesting that combination of antidepressant and

  1. Lifestyle and nutritional imbalances associated with Western diseases : causes and consequences of chronic systemic low-grade inflammation in an evolutionary context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Nunez, Begona; Pruimboom, Leo; Dijck-Brouwer, D.A. Janneke; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    In this review, we focus on lifestyle changes, especially dietary habits, that are at the basis of chronic systemic low grade inflammation, insulin resistance and Western diseases. Our sensitivity to develop insulin resistance traces back to our rapid brain growth in the past 2.5 million years. An

  2. Association of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio With Inflammation and Erythropoietin Resistance in Chronic Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Pineault

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR was widely studied as a prognostic marker in various medical and surgical specialties, but its significance in nephrology is not yet established. Objective: We evaluated its accuracy as an inflammation biomarker in a dialysis population. Design setting: Single-center retrospective study. Patients: The records of all 550 patients who were treated with hemodialysis (HD or peritoneal dialysis (PD from September 2008 to March 2011 were included. Measurements: NLR was calculated from the monthly complete blood count. Methods: Association between NLR and markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein [CRP], serum albumin, and erythropoietin resistance index [ERI] was measured using Spearman coefficient. Results: In total, 120 patients were eligible for the correlation analyses. We found a positive correlation between NLR and CRP (all patients: r = 0.45, P < .001; HD: r = 0.47, P < .001; PD: r = 0.48, P = .13. NLR and albumin were inversely correlated ( r = −0.51, P < .001. Finally, high NLR was associated with a nonsignificant increased ERI, but we have not demonstrated a direct correlation. Limitations: CRP and albumin are not measured routinely and were ordered for a specific clinical reason leading to an indication bias. Also, no relationship with clinical outcome was established. Conclusions: NLR seems to be a good inflammatory biomarker in dialysis in addition to being easily available. However, controlled studies should be conducted to properly assess and validate NLR levels that would be clinically significant and relevant, as well as its prognostic significance and utility in a clinical setting.

  3. Chronic inflammation drives glioma growth: cellular and molecular factors responsible for an immunosuppressive microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P Antonios

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review examines glioma disease initiation, promotion, and progression with a focus on the cell types present within the tumor mass and the molecules responsible for the immunosuppressive microenvironment that are present at each step of the disease. The cell types and molecules present also correlate with the grade of malignancy. An overall "type 2" chronic inflammatory microenvironment develops that facilitates glioma promotion and contributes to the neo-vascularization characteristic of gliomas. An immunosuppressive microenvironment shields the tumor mass from clearance by the patient's own immune system. Here, we provide suggestions to deal with a chronically-inflamed tumor microenvironment and provide recommendations to help optimize adjuvant immune- and gene therapies currently offered to glioma patients.

  4. [Blood cholesterol spectre in patients with acute and chronic inflammation of infectious origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchyshyn, Iu M; Srokopud, O O; Zhakun, I B; Komarytsia, O I; Huk-Leshnevs'ka, S O; Panchyshyn, M V

    2006-12-01

    Low level of blood cholesterol is often found in patients with diseases which pathogenesis is mainly associated with inflamation. To detect blood cholesterol spectre, 383 patients with acute and chronic infections have been observed, level of blood cholesterol of 1259 patients with different pathology was retrospectively analyzed. It was found that an increase in frequency of low cholesterol and decrease in frequency of high cholesterol in patients with diseases not associated with infections do not depend on the age of patients. Extremely low level of cholesterol (Cholesterol inflamation of infectious origion, oftener in patients with community-acquired pneumonia and chronic virus hepatitis. Patients with intestinal infections have extremely low level of cholesterol; two-fold oftener than healthy persons have.

  5. [Observation on therapeutic effect of warming needle moxibustion on chronic pelvic inflammation of cold-damp stagnation type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Hong-Liang; Wang, Ying; Liu, Xian-Ju

    2008-10-01

    To observe clinical therapeutic effect of warming needle moxibustion on chronic pelvic in flammation of cold-damp stagnation type. Eighty-five cases with chronic pelvic inflammation were randomly divided into a warming needle moxibustion group of 45 cases and a Chinese drug group of 40 cases. The war ming needle moxibustion group were treated with warming needle moxibustion at Guanyuan (CV 4), Qihai (CV 6), Zusanli (ST 36) and Shenshu (BL 23) etc. and the Chinese drug group were treated with oral administration of TCM decoction, one dose each day. One course was constituted by 10 days. After treatment of 3 courses, the therapeutic effects, changes of C-reactive protein (CRP) level and the recurrence rate of the cured cases a half year later were observed. The total effective rate was 95.6% in the warming needle moxibustion group and 77.5% in the Chinese drug group with a significant difference between the two groups (P after treatment CRP levels were (16.47 +/- 7.11) mg/L and (5.98 +/- 2.29) mg/L in the warming needle moxibustion group, and (16.32 +/- 8.19) mg/L and (8.63 +/- 2.41) mg/L in the Chinese drug group, with significantly decreased in the two groups (P after treatment (P cold-damp stagnation type and better improves CRP level of the patient.

  6. Ethanol-Induced Neurodegeneration and Glial Activation in the Developing Brain

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    Mariko Saito

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol induces neurodegeneration in the developing brain, which may partially explain the long-lasting adverse effects of prenatal ethanol exposure in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD. While animal models of FASD show that ethanol-induced neurodegeneration is associated with glial activation, the relationship between glial activation and neurodegeneration has not been clarified. This review focuses on the roles of activated microglia and astrocytes in neurodegeneration triggered by ethanol in rodents during the early postnatal period (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy. Previous literature indicates that acute binge-like ethanol exposure in postnatal day 7 (P7 mice induces apoptotic neurodegeneration, transient activation of microglia resulting in phagocytosis of degenerating neurons, and a prolonged increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes. In our present study, systemic administration of a moderate dose of lipopolysaccharides, which causes glial activation, attenuates ethanol-induced neurodegeneration. These studies suggest that activation of microglia and astrocytes by acute ethanol in the neonatal brain may provide neuroprotection. However, repeated or chronic ethanol can induce significant proinflammatory glial reaction and neurotoxicity. Further studies are necessary to elucidate whether acute or sustained glial activation caused by ethanol exposure in the developing brain can affect long-lasting cellular and behavioral abnormalities observed in the adult brain.

  7. Increased White Matter Inflammation in Aging- and Alzheimer's Disease Brain.

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    Raj, Divya; Yin, Zhuoran; Breur, Marjolein; Doorduin, Janine; Holtman, Inge R; Olah, Marta; Mantingh-Otter, Ietje J; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter P; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Eggen, Bart J L; Amor, Sandra; Boddeke, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Chronic neuroinflammation, which is primarily mediated by microglia, plays an essential role in aging and neurodegeneration. It is still unclear whether this microglia-induced neuroinflammation occurs globally or is confined to distinct brain regions. In this study, we investigated microglia activity in various brain regions upon healthy aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathology in both human and mouse samples. In purified microglia isolated from aging mouse brains, we found a profound gene expression pattern related to pro-inflammatory processes, phagocytosis, and lipid homeostasis. Particularly in white matter microglia of 24-month-old mice, abundant expression of phagocytic markers including Mac-2, Axl, CD16/32, Dectin1, CD11c, and CD36 was detected. Interestingly, in white matter of human brain tissue the first signs of inflammatory activity were already detected during middle age. Thus quantification of microglial proteins, such as CD68 (commonly associated with phagocytosis) and HLA-DR (associated with antigen presentation), in postmortem human white matter brain tissue showed an age-dependent increase in immunoreactivity already in middle-aged people (53.2 ± 2.0 years). This early inflammation was also detectable by non-invasive positron emission tomography imaging using [11C]-(R)-PK11195, a ligand that binds to activated microglia. Increased microglia activity was also prominently present in the white matter of human postmortem early-onset AD (EOAD) brain tissue. Interestingly, microglia activity in the white matter of late-onset AD (LOAD) CNS was similar to that of the aged clinically silent AD cases. These data indicate that microglia-induced neuroinflammation is predominant in the white matter of aging mice and humans as well as in EOAD brains. This white matter inflammation may contribute to the progression of neurodegeneration, and have prognostic value for detecting the onset and progression of aging and neurodegeneration.

  8. Effects of four antitussives on airway neurogenic inflammation in a guinea pig model of chronic cough induced by cigarette smoke exposure.

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    Luo, Yu-long; Li, Pei-bo; Zhang, Chen-chen; Zheng, Yan-fang; Wang, Sheng; Nie, Yi-chu; Zhang, Ke-jian; Su, Wei-wei

    2013-12-01

    The effects of four antitussives, including codeine phosphate (CP), moguisteine, levodropropizine (LVDP) and naringin, on airway neurogenic inflammation and enhanced cough were investigated in guinea pig model of chronic cough. Guinea pigs were exposed to CS for 8 weeks. At the 7th and 8th week, the animals were treated with vehicle, CP (4.8 mg/kg), moguisteine (24 mg/kg), LVDP (14 mg/kg) and naringin (18.4 mg/kg) respectively. Then the cough and the time-enhanced pause area under the curve (Penh-AUC) during capsaicin challenge were recorded. The substance P (SP) content, NK-1 receptor expression and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) activity in lung were determined. Chronic CS exposure induced a bi-phase time course of cough responsiveness to capsaicin. Eight weeks of CS exposure significantly enhanced the airway neurogenic inflammation and cough response in guinea pigs. Two weeks of treatment with CP, moguisteine, LVDP or naringin effectively attenuated the chronic CS-exposure enhanced cough. Only naringin exerted significant effect on inhibiting Penh-AUC, SP content and NK-1 receptor expression, as well as preventing the declining of NEP activity in lung. Chronic CS-exposed guinea pig is suitable for studying chronic pathological cough, in which naringin is effective on inhibiting both airway neurogenic inflammation and enhanced cough.

  9. Commensal bacteria at the crossroad between cholesterol homeostasis and chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis.

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    Kasahara, Kazuyuki; Tanoue, Takeshi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yodoi, Keiko; Matsumoto, Takuya; Emoto, Takuo; Mizoguchi, Taiji; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Kitano, Naoki; Sasaki, Naoto; Atarashi, Koji; Honda, Kenya; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2017-03-01

    The gut microbiota were shown to play critical roles in the development of atherosclerosis, but the detailed mechanism is limited. The purpose of this study is to clarify the influence of gut microbiota on atherogenesis via lipid metabolism and systemic inflammation. Germ-free or conventionally raised (Conv) ApoE-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice were fed chow diet and euthanized at 20 weeks of age. We found that the lack of gut microbiota in ApoE-/- mice caused a significant increase in the plasma and hepatic cholesterol levels compared with Conv ApoE-/- mice. The absence of gut microbiota changed the bile acid composition in the ileum, which was associated with activation of the enterohepatic fibroblast growth factor 15, fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 axis, and reduction of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase and hepatic bile acid synthesis, resulting in the accumulation of liver cholesterol content. However, we found that the lack of microbiota caused a significant reduction in atherosclerotic lesion formation compared with Conv ApoE-/- mice, which might be associated with the attenuation of lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammatory responses. Our findings indicated that the gut microbiota affected both hypercholesterolemia and atherogenesis in mice. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Association between Inflammation and Cardiac Geometry in Chronic Kidney Disease: Findings from the CRIC Study.

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    Gupta, Jayanta; Dominic, Elizabeth A; Fink, Jeffrey C; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Barrows, Ian R; Reilly, Muredach P; Townsend, Raymond R; Joffe, Marshall M; Rosas, Sylvia E; Wolman, Melanie; Patel, Samir S; Keane, Martin G; Feldman, Harold I; Kusek, John W; Raj, Dominic S

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and myocardial contractile dysfunction are independent predictors of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The association between inflammatory biomarkers and cardiac geometry has not yet been studied in a large cohort of CKD patients with a wide range of kidney function. Plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, high-sensitivity C-Reactive protein (hs-CRP), fibrinogen and serum albumin were measured in 3,939 Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study participants. Echocardiography was performed according to the recommendations of the American Society of Echocardiography and interpreted at a centralized core laboratory. LVH, systolic dysfunction and diastolic dysfunction were present in 52.3%, 11.8% and 76.3% of the study subjects, respectively. In logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, diabetic status, current smoking status, systolic blood pressure, urinary albumin- creatinine ratio and estimated glomerular filtration rate, hs-CRP (OR 1.26 [95% CI 1.16, 1.37], psystolic dysfunction were greater for subjects with elevated levels of hs-CRP (1.32 [1.18, 1.48], pdiastolic dysfunction (1.14 [1.04, 1.26], p = 0.005). In patients with CKD, elevated plasma levels of hs-CRP and IL-6 are associated with LVH and systolic dysfunction.

  11. Evidence for chronic low-grade systemic inflammation in individuals with agoraphobia from a population-based prospective study.

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    Wagner, En-Young N; Wagner, Jan T; Glaus, Jennifer; Vandeleur, Caroline L; Castelao, Enrique; Strippoli, Marie-Pierre F; Vollenweider, Peter; Preisig, Martin; von Känel, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders have been linked to an increased risk of incident coronary heart disease in which inflammation plays a key pathogenic role. To date, no studies have looked at the association between proinflammatory markers and agoraphobia. In a random Swiss population sample of 2890 persons (35-67 years, 53% women), we diagnosed a total of 124 individuals (4.3%) with agoraphobia using a validated semi-structured psychiatric interview. We also assessed socioeconomic status, traditional cardiovascular risk factors (i.e., body mass index, hypertension, blood glucose levels, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio), and health behaviors (i.e., smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activity), and other major psychiatric diseases (other anxiety disorders, major depressive disorder, drug dependence) which were treated as covariates in linear regression models. Circulating levels of inflammatory markers, statistically controlled for the baseline demographic and health-related measures, were determined at a mean follow-up of 5.5 ± 0.4 years (range 4.7 - 8.5). Individuals with agoraphobia had significantly higher follow-up levels of C-reactive protein (p = 0.007) and tumor-necrosis-factor-α (p = 0.042) as well as lower levels of the cardioprotective marker adiponectin (p = 0.032) than their non-agoraphobic counterparts. Follow-up levels of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 did not significantly differ between the two groups. Our results suggest an increase in chronic low-grade inflammation in agoraphobia over time. Such a mechanism might link agoraphobia with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease, and needs to be tested in longitudinal studies.

  12. Evidence for chronic low-grade systemic inflammation in individuals with agoraphobia from a population-based prospective study.

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    En-Young N Wagner

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders have been linked to an increased risk of incident coronary heart disease in which inflammation plays a key pathogenic role. To date, no studies have looked at the association between proinflammatory markers and agoraphobia.In a random Swiss population sample of 2890 persons (35-67 years, 53% women, we diagnosed a total of 124 individuals (4.3% with agoraphobia using a validated semi-structured psychiatric interview. We also assessed socioeconomic status, traditional cardiovascular risk factors (i.e., body mass index, hypertension, blood glucose levels, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio, and health behaviors (i.e., smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activity, and other major psychiatric diseases (other anxiety disorders, major depressive disorder, drug dependence which were treated as covariates in linear regression models. Circulating levels of inflammatory markers, statistically controlled for the baseline demographic and health-related measures, were determined at a mean follow-up of 5.5 ± 0.4 years (range 4.7 - 8.5.Individuals with agoraphobia had significantly higher follow-up levels of C-reactive protein (p = 0.007 and tumor-necrosis-factor-α (p = 0.042 as well as lower levels of the cardioprotective marker adiponectin (p = 0.032 than their non-agoraphobic counterparts. Follow-up levels of interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6 did not significantly differ between the two groups.Our results suggest an increase in chronic low-grade inflammation in agoraphobia over time. Such a mechanism might link agoraphobia with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease, and needs to be tested in longitudinal studies.

  13. Different Patterns of Acetylation and Dimethylation of Histone H3 between Young and Aged Cases with Chronic Tonsillitis: Influences of Inflammation and Aging.

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    Saito, Akihiko; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Egawa, Seiko; Okubo, Kimihiro

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics is now considered to be crucially involved in normal genetics and differentiation and in pathological conditions, such as cancer, aging, and inflammation. Epigenetic mechanisms involve DNA methylation and histone modifications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of inflammation on epigenetics in young subjects and the effect of aging. The palatine tonsils were extracted from child and adult patients with chronic tonsillitis. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to examine the morphology of the palatine tonsils. A fluorescence immunological examination was also performed to detect acetyl-histone H3 or dimethyl-histone H3. Confocal scanning microscopy was used for observations. Acetylated histone H3 was detected in tonsils from child patients but not from adult patients. Dimethylated histone H3 was not detected in tonsils from either group of patients. Degeneration of the tonsillar structures was apparent in tonsils from adult patients. The differential expression of acetylated histone H3 Lys9 may reflect immunological differences between young and aged tonsils. The decrease observed in the activity of histone methyltransferase induced the down-regulated expression of methylated histone H3. Our results suggest that epigenetic changes participate in chronic inflammation and aging in the palatine tonsils. Although the results do not lead to a direct treatment, the epigenetic pathogenesis of chronic inflammation, such as immunoglobulin A nephropathy, by focal infections will be described in greater detail in future studies, which will lead to new treatments being developed.

  14. Thrombin generation assay: interactions between chronic inflammation and haemostasis in patients with autoimmune diseases.

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    Solfietti, Laura; Binello, Giovanni B; Stella, Stefania; Bazzan, Mario; Salierno, Milena; Roccatello, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidences show a direct link between inflammation and activation of haemostasis. That could increase thrombotic and cardiovascular risk in patients with active autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic sclerosis (SSc). The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible hypercoagulable condition in RA and SSc patients, using the thrombin generation assay (TGA). TGA was assessed in 44 RA [33 with active disease (actRA) and 11 inactive (non-actRA)], 25 SSc patients and 41 healthy controls using a fluorimetric technique and the TGA RB Low reagent. The Lag time (tLag), the time to thrombin peak (tPeak), the maximal concentration of formed thrombin (Peak), the velocity of thrombin generation (velocity) and the total amount of thrombin generated (AUC) were determined. As compared to the control group, tLag was found to be significantly reduced both in patients with actRA (p=0.0001) and non-actRA (p=0.01); tPeak was found to be reduced in actRA patients (p=0.0002). Similarly, as compared to healthy subjects, Peak and AUC were found to be increased in actRA patients (p=0.01; p=0.002), as well as D-dimer (p=0.01). Analysing SSc vs RA, a higher Peak and AUC were detected in RA patients. The TGA profile identified in actRA patients (decreased tLag and tPeak combined with higher thrombin peak and greater AUC) reflects a hypercoagulable state that could make patients more susceptible to develop a cardiovascular disease.

  15. Systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a population-based study

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    Sánchez Guadalupe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated circulating levels of several inflammatory biomarkers have been described in selected patient populations with COPD, although less is known about their population-based distribution. The aims of this study were to compare the levels of several systemic biomarkers between stable COPD patients and healthy subjects from a population-based sample, and to assess their distribution according to clinical variables. Methods This is a cross-sectional study design of participants in the EPI-SCAN study (40-80 years of age. Subjects with any other condition associated with an inflammatory process were excluded. COPD was defined as a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC Results We compared 324 COPD patients and 110 reference subjects. After adjusting for gender, age, BMI and tobacco consumption, COPD patients showed higher levels of CRP (0.477 ± 0.023 vs. 0.376 ± 0.041 log mg/L, p = 0.049, TNF-α (13.12 ± 0.59 vs. 10.47 ± 1.06 pg/mL, p = 0.033, IL-8 (7.56 ± 0.63 vs. 3.57 ± 1.13 pg/ml; p = 0.033 and NOx (1.42 ± 0.01 vs. 1.36 ± 0.02 log nmol/l; p = 0.048 than controls. In COPD patients, serum concentrations of some biomarkers were related to severity and their exercise tolerance was related to serum concentrations of CRP, IL-6, IL-8, fibrinogen and albumin. Conclusions Our results provide population-based evidence that COPD is independently associated with low-grade systemic inflammation, with a different inflammatory pattern than that observed in healthy subjects.

  16. Systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a population-based study.

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    Garcia-Rio, Francisco; Miravitlles, Marc; Soriano, Joan B; Muñoz, Luis; Duran-Tauleria, Enric; Sánchez, Guadalupe; Sobradillo, Víctor; Ancochea, Julio

    2010-05-25

    Elevated circulating levels of several inflammatory biomarkers have been described in selected patient populations with COPD, although less is known about their population-based distribution. The aims of this study were to compare the levels of several systemic biomarkers between stable COPD patients and healthy subjects from a population-based sample, and to assess their distribution according to clinical variables. This is a cross-sectional study design of participants in the EPI-SCAN study (40-80 years of age). Subjects with any other condition associated with an inflammatory process were excluded. COPD was defined as a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC prescription of medication. Subjects were evaluated with quality-of-life questionnaires, spirometry and 6-minute walk tests. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukins (IL-6 and IL-8), alpha1-antitrypsin, fibrinogen, albumin and nitrites/nitrates (NOx) were measured. We compared 324 COPD patients and 110 reference subjects. After adjusting for gender, age, BMI and tobacco consumption, COPD patients showed higher levels of CRP (0.477 +/- 0.023 vs. 0.376 +/- 0.041 log mg/L, p = 0.049), TNF-alpha (13.12 +/- 0.59 vs. 10.47 +/- 1.06 pg/mL, p = 0.033), IL-8 (7.56 +/- 0.63 vs. 3.57 +/- 1.13 pg/ml; p = 0.033) and NOx (1.42 +/- 0.01 vs. 1.36 +/- 0.02 log nmol/l; p = 0.048) than controls. In COPD patients, serum concentrations of some biomarkers were related to severity and their exercise tolerance was related to serum concentrations of CRP, IL-6, IL-8, fibrinogen and albumin. Our results provide population-based evidence that COPD is independently associated with low-grade systemic inflammation, with a different inflammatory pattern than that observed in healthy subjects.

  17. Interaction of Synuclein and Inflammation in Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    neurodegenerative disorder behind Alzheimer Disease. It is characterized clinically by resting tremor, slowness of movement, muscle rigidity and postural...other transmitter systems such as the noradrenergic and the serotonergic systems are also affected (Dauer and Przedborski, 2003). Also found within the...over-expression of wild-type -synuclein have been linked to the familial form of PD (Polymerpoulos et al, 1997; Kruger et al, 1998; Masliah et al, 2000

  18. GDF-15, iron, and inflammation in early chronic kidney disease among elderly patients.

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    Lukaszyk, Ewelina; Lukaszyk, Mateusz; Koc-Zorawska, Ewa; Bodzenta-Lukaszyk, Anna; Malyszko, Jolanta

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess GDF-15 and iron status in patients in early stages of chronic kidney disease with a particular emphasis on elderly population in association of classic iron status parameters with novel iron homeostasis biomarkers and inflammatory parameters. Serum concentrations of GDF-15, iron (Fe), transferrin saturation, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), hepcidin, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and hemoglobin were measured in 56 patients ≥65 years of age and in 31 disease, and other comorbidities. Further understanding regarding the signaling pathways of GDF-15 may help to discover next pieces in the exciting puzzle of GDF-15. Finally, as studies dealing with normal level of GDF-15 in the healthy aged are lacking, it is possible that the higher values of GDF-15 values found in the present study represent values of GDF-15 according to age more than CKD levels.

  19. IMMUNE COMPLEXES AS INDICES OF CHRONIC INFLAMMATION ACCOMPANYING POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER

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    L. P. Hovhannisyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available C1q- and C3d-IC, were determined in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, as compared to healthy subjects, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. According to the data obtained, the levels of both C1q- и C3d-IC were significantly increased in PTSD-patients versus healthy subjects, thus reflecting hyperactivation of classical complement pathway detected in this pathology. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between C1q- and C3d-IC levels in PTSD group. It was concluded that PTSD is characterized by altered mechanisms of IC recognition and elimination that may underly chronic activation of immune system and systemic inflammatory response associated with this disorder.

  20. Interactions between Myc and Mediators of Inflammation in Chronic Liver Diseases

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    Ting Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most chronic liver diseases (CLDs are characterized by inflammatory processes with aberrant expressions of various pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators in the liver. These mediators are the driving force of many inflammatory liver disorders, which often result in fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver tumorigenesis. c-Myc is involved in many cellular events such as cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. c-Myc upregulates IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, and TGF-β, while IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, TNF-α, and TGF-β promote c-Myc expression. Their interactions play a central role in fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. Molecular interference of their interactions offers possible therapeutic potential for CLDs. In this review, current knowledge of the molecular interactions between c-Myc and various well known inflammatory mediators is discussed.

  1. From inflammation to cancer.

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    Korniluk, A; Koper, O; Kemona, H; Dymicka-Piekarska, V

    2017-02-01

    The participation of inflammation in the progression of cancer for many years have been the subject of research. In the 19th century, there was evidence that an acute inflammation may inhibit the development of cancer. However, chronic inflammation affects the progression of the disease. Today, it is known that inflammation and cancer use similar mechanisms of development such as severe cell proliferation or angiogenesis. It has been shown that prolonged presence of inflammatory cells and factors in the tumor microenvironment can accelerate its growth and inhibit apoptosis of transformed cells. In this article we present a brief history of the discovery mechanisms and potential links between acute and chronic inflammation and cancer.

  2. Abnormal epithelial structure and chronic lung inflammation after repair of chlorine-induced airway injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yiqun; Chen, Jing; Humphrey, David M.; Fodah, Ramy A.; Warawa, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Chlorine is a toxic gas used in a variety of industrial processes and is considered a chemical threat agent. High-level chlorine exposure causes acute lung injury, but the long-term effects of acute chlorine exposure are unclear. Here we characterized chronic pulmonary changes following acute chlorine exposure in mice. A/J mice were exposed to 240 parts per million-hour chlorine or sham-exposed to air. Chlorine inhalation caused sloughing of bronchial epithelium 1 day after chlorine exposure, which was repaired with restoration of a pseudostratified epithelium by day 7. The repaired epithelium contained an abnormal distribution of epithelial cells containing clusters of club or ciliated cells rather than the uniformly interspersed pattern of these cells in unexposed mice. Although the damaged epithelium in A/J mice was repaired rapidly, and minimal airway fibrosis was observed, chlorine-exposed mice developed pneumonitis characterized by infiltration of alveoli with neutrophils and prominent, large, foamy macrophages. Levels of CXCL1/KC, CXCL5/LPS-induced CXC chemokine, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and VEGF in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid from chlorine-exposed mice showed steadily increasing trends over time. BAL protein levels were increased on day 4 and remained elevated out to day 28. The number of bacteria cultured from lungs of chlorine-exposed mice 4 wk after exposure was not increased compared with sham-exposed mice, indicating that the observed pneumonitis was not driven by bacterial infection of the lung. The results indicate that acute chlorine exposure may cause chronic abnormalities in the lungs despite rapid repair of injured epithelium. PMID:25398987

  3. Abnormal epithelial structure and chronic lung inflammation after repair of chlorine-induced airway injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yiqun; Chen, Jing; Humphrey, David M; Fodah, Ramy A; Warawa, Jonathan M; Hoyle, Gary W

    2015-01-15

    Chlorine is a toxic gas used in a variety of industrial processes and is considered a chemical threat agent. High-level chlorine exposure causes acute lung injury, but the long-term effects of acute chlorine exposure are unclear. Here we characterized chronic pulmonary changes following acute chlorine exposure in mice. A/J mice were exposed to 240 parts per million-hour chlorine or sham-exposed to air. Chlorine inhalation caused sloughing of bronchial epithelium 1 day after chlorine exposure, which was repaired with restoration of a pseudostratified epithelium by day 7. The repaired epithelium contained an abnormal distribution of epithelial cells containing clusters of club or ciliated cells rather than the uniformly interspersed pattern of these cells in unexposed mice. Although the damaged epithelium in A/J mice was repaired rapidly, and minimal airway fibrosis was observed, chlorine-exposed mice developed pneumonitis characterized by infiltration of alveoli with neutrophils and prominent, large, foamy macrophages. Levels of CXCL1/KC, CXCL5/LPS-induced CXC chemokine, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and VEGF in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid from chlorine-exposed mice showed steadily increasing trends over time. BAL protein levels were increased on day 4 and remained elevated out to day 28. The number of bacteria cultured from lungs of chlorine-exposed mice 4 wk after exposure was not increased compared with sham-exposed mice, indicating that the observed pneumonitis was not driven by bacterial infection of the lung. The results indicate that acute chlorine exposure may cause chronic abnormalities in the lungs despite rapid repair of injured epithelium. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Landolphia owariensis Attenuates Alcohol-induced Cerebellar Neurodegeneration: Significance of Neurofilament Protein Alteration in the Purkinje Cells

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    Oyinbo Charles A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alcohol-induced cerebellar neurodegeneration is a neuroadaptation that is associated with chronic alcohol abuse. Conventional drugs have been largely unsatisfactory in preventing neurodegeneration. Yet, multimodal neuro-protective therapeutic agents have been hypothesised to have high therapeutic potential for the treatment of CNS conditions; there is yet a dilemma of how this would be achieved. Contrarily, medicinal botanicals are naturally multimodal in their mechanism of action.

  5. Association between Inflammation and Cardiac Geometry in Chronic Kidney Disease: Findings from the CRIC Study.

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    Jayanta Gupta

    Full Text Available Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH and myocardial contractile dysfunction are independent predictors of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. The association between inflammatory biomarkers and cardiac geometry has not yet been studied in a large cohort of CKD patients with a wide range of kidney function.Plasma levels of interleukin (IL-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, transforming growth factor (TGF-β, high-sensitivity C-Reactive protein (hs-CRP, fibrinogen and serum albumin were measured in 3,939 Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study participants. Echocardiography was performed according to the recommendations of the American Society of Echocardiography and interpreted at a centralized core laboratory.LVH, systolic dysfunction and diastolic dysfunction were present in 52.3%, 11.8% and 76.3% of the study subjects, respectively. In logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, diabetic status, current smoking status, systolic blood pressure, urinary albumin- creatinine ratio and estimated glomerular filtration rate, hs-CRP (OR 1.26 [95% CI 1.16, 1.37], p<0.001, IL-1RA (1.23 [1.13, 1.34], p<0.0001, IL-6 (1.25 [1.14, 1.36], p<0.001 and TNF-α (1.14 [1.04, 1.25], p = 0.004 were associated with LVH. The odds for systolic dysfunction were greater for subjects with elevated levels of hs-CRP (1.32 [1.18, 1.48], p<0.001 and IL-6 (1.34 [1.21, 1.49], p<0.001. Only hs-CRP was associated with diastolic dysfunction (1.14 [1.04, 1.26], p = 0.005.In patients with CKD, elevated plasma levels of hs-CRP and IL-6 are associated with LVH and systolic dysfunction.

  6. Chronic Infection of the Prostate by Chlamydia muridarum Is Accompanied by Local Inflammation and Pelvic Pain Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Leonardo R; Breser, Maria L; Godoy, Gloria J; Salazar, Florencia C; Mackern-Oberti, Juan P; Cuffini, Cecilia; Motrich, Ruben D; Rivero, Virginia E

    2017-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis urogenital infections are the leading cause of sexually transmitted bacterial infections. Although the prevalence of chlamydial infection is similar in men and women, current research is mainly focused on women, neglecting the study of male genital tract infections. We, therefore, investigated Chlamydia infection in the rodent male genital tract. Male NOD and C57BL/6 mice were inoculated in the meatus urethra with C. muridarum. Bacterial DNA, leukocyte infiltration of male genital tract tissues, pelvic pain, and Chlamydia-specific immune responses were analyzed at different time points. The inoculation of C. muridarum in the meatus urethra of male mice resulted in an ascending and widely disseminated infection of the male genital tract. C. muridarum remained longer and with the highest bacterial burdens in the prostate, thus showing a special tropism for this organ. Infection caused leukocyte infiltration, mainly composed by neutrophils, and also induced early pelvic pain development that rapidly dropped and resolved as the infection became chronic. Bacterial load and leukocyte infiltration was observed in all prostate lobes, although dorsolateral prostate was the most affected lobe. Interestingly, immune responses induced by both mice strains were characterized by the production of high levels of IL-10 during early stages of the infection, with highest and sustained levels observed in NOD mice, which showed to be less efficient in clearing the infection. Chronic infection of the prostate accompanied by local inflammation and pelvic pain development described herein have important implications for the improvement of the diagnosis and for the design of new efficient therapies. Prostate 77:517-529, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nanoparticle Enhanced MRI Scanning to Detect Cellular Inflammation in Experimental Chronic Renal Allograft Rejection

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    S. R. Alam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We investigated whether ultrasmall paramagnetic particles of iron oxide- (USPIO- enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can detect experimental chronic allograft damage in a murine renal allograft model. Materials and Methods. Two cohorts of mice underwent renal transplantation with either a syngeneic isograft or allograft kidney. MRI scanning was performed prior to and 48 hours after USPIO infusion using T2∗-weighted protocols. R2∗ values were calculated to indicate the degree of USPIO uptake. Native kidneys and skeletal muscle were imaged as reference tissues and renal explants analysed by histology and electron microscopy. Results. R2∗ values in the allograft group were higher compared to the isograft group when indexed to native kidney (median 1.24 (interquartile range: 1.12 to 1.36 versus 0.96 (0.92 to 1.04, P<0.01. R2∗ values were also higher in the allograft transplant when indexed to skeletal muscle (6.24 (5.63 to 13.51 compared to native kidney (2.91 (1.11 to 6.46 P<0.05. Increased R2∗ signal in kidney allograft was associated with macrophage and iron staining on histology. USPIO were identified within tissue resident macrophages on electron microscopy. Conclusion. USPIO-enhanced MRI identifies macrophage.

  8. Smoking and inflammation: evidence for a synergistic role in chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Annsofi; Susin, Cristiano; Gustafsson, Anders

    2014-02-01

    Tobacco smoking is the most important preventable risk factor for periodontitis; however, the underlying biological mechanisms responsible for the detrimental effects of smoking on periodontal health remain largely unclear. It is also well established that smoking has a negative impact on several inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this paper was to review smoking-related changes in local and systemic host responses with a focus on cellular and molecular effects that could explain a hyperinflammatory response leading to periodontal destruction. Biological mechanisms that may be common to periodontal disease and other chronic inflammatory diseases were also explored, together with gene-smoking interactions. An epidemiologic perspective on the burden of smoking on periodontal health and the potential for smoking cessation is also presented. Tobacco smoking seems to induce changes ranging from decreased leukocyte chemotaxis to decreased production of immunoglobulins. Smoking also seems to cause a stronger inflammatory reaction with an increased release of potentially tissue-destructive substances (e.g. reactive oxygen species, collagenase, serine proteases and proinflammatory cytokines). These findings support a hypothesis that periodontitis is a hyperinflammatory condition rather than a hypo-inflammatory condition. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Suppression of NFAT5-mediated Inflammation and Chronic Arthritis by Novel κB-binding Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jin Han

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and arthritis. However, therapeutic agents inhibiting NFAT5 activity are currently unavailable. To discover NFAT5 inhibitors, a library of >40,000 chemicals was screened for the suppression of nitric oxide, a direct target regulated by NFAT5 activity, through high-throughput screening. We validated the anti-NFAT5 activity of 198 primary hit compounds using an NFAT5-dependent reporter assay and identified the novel NFAT5 suppressor KRN2, 13-(2-fluoro-benzylberberine, and its derivative KRN5. KRN2 inhibited NFAT5 upregulation in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and repressed the formation of NF-κB p65-DNA complexes in the NFAT5 promoter region. Interestingly, KRN2 selectively suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory genes, including Nos2 and Il6, without hampering high-salt-induced NFAT5 and its target gene expressions. Moreover, KRN2 and KRN5, the latter of which exhibits high oral bioavailability and metabolic stability, ameliorated experimentally induced arthritis in mice without serious adverse effects, decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Particularly, orally administered KRN5 was stronger in suppressing arthritis than methotrexate, a commonly used anti-rheumatic drug, displaying better potency and safety than its original compound, berberine. Therefore, KRN2 and KRN5 can be potential therapeutic agents in the treatment of chronic arthritis.

  10. Irsogladine maleate ameliorates inflammation and fibrosis in mice with chronic colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hana; Suzuki, Kenji; Nagata, Masaki; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Sukumaran, Vijayakumar; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Kawauchi, Yusuke; Yokoyama, Junji; Tomita, Masayuki; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kenichi; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Asakura, Hitoshi; Takagi, Ritsuo

    2012-06-01

    Intestinal fibrosis is a common and severe complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially Crohn's disease (CD). To investigate the therapeutic approach to intestinal fibrosis, we have developed a mouse model of intestinal fibrosis by administering dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and examining the effects of irsogladine maleate (IM) [2,4-diamino-6-(2,5-dichlorophenyl)-s-triazine maleate], which has been widely used as an antiulcer drug for gastric mucosa in Japan, on DDS-induced chronic colitis. In this experimental colitis lesion, several pathognomonic changes were found: increased deposition of collagen, increased number of profibrogenic mesenchymal cells such as fibroblasts (vimentin(+), α-SMA(-)) and myofibroblasts (vimentin(+), α-SMA(+)) in both mucosa and submucosa of the colon with infiltrating inflammatory cells, and increased mRNA expressions of collagen type I, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1. When IM was administered intrarectally to this colitis, all these pathological changes were significantly decreased or suppressed, suggesting a potential adjunctive therapy for intestinal fibrosis. IM could consequently reduce fibrosis in DSS colitis by direct or indirect effect on profibrogenic factors or fibroblasts. Therefore, the precise effect of IM on intestinal fibrosis should be investigated further.

  11. Oral inflammation and infection, and chronic medical diseases: implications for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannapieco, Frank A; Cantos, Albert

    2016-10-01

    Oral diseases, such as caries and periodontitis, not only have local effects on the dentition and on tooth-supporting tissues but also may impact a number of systemic conditions. Emerging evidence suggests that poor oral health influences the initiation and/or progression of diseases such as atherosclerosis (with sequelae including myocardial infarction and stoke), diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative diseases (such as Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis and others). Aspiration of oropharyngeal (including periodontal) bacteria causes pneumonia, especially in hospitalized patients and the elderly, and may influence the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article addresses several pertinent aspects related to the medical implications of periodontal disease in the elderly. There is moderate evidence that improved oral hygiene may help prevent aspiration pneumonia in high-risk patients. For other medical conditions, because of the absence of well-designed randomized clinical trials in elderly patients, no specific guidance can be provided regarding oral hygiene or periodontal interventions that enhance the medical management of older adults. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Association between chronic periodontal and apical inflammation and acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willershausen, Ines; Weyer, Veronika; Peter, Maximilian; Weichert, Christian; Kasaj, Adrian; Münzel, Thomas; Willershausen, Brita

    2014-07-01

    Evidence from epidemiologic studies suggests that periodontal diseases may exert a weak to moderate influence on the severity and course of coronary heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an association between chronic oral infections and the presence of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) exists. A total of 248 patients after AMI and 249 healthy controls were recruited for this study. The oral assessment included caries frequency (DMFT indices), number of teeth, probing pocket depths, bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level, as well as radiographs to diagnose apical lesions. The medical examination included a blood analysis, e.g. the determination of the serum concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP). The data analysis showed statistically significant differences between AMI patients and the controls with regard to number of missing teeth (p = 0.001), DMFT index (p = 0.001) and presence of apical lesions of endodontic origin (p = 0.001). Logistic regression showed that the probability of having lesions of endodontic origin was with an odds ratio of 1.54 (95% CI 1.10-2.16; p = 0.012) considerably higher in the AMI patient group. Likewise, the AMI patients had with an odds ratio of 1.21 (95% CI 1.14-1.28; p lesions. The results of the present study underline that patients, who have experienced a myocardial infarction, had more missing teeth and a higher number of inflammatory processes, especially of endodontic origin, than healthy patients.

  13. Kinetics of chronic inflammation in Nile tilapia fed n‑3 and n‑6 essential fatty acids

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    Róberson Sakabe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation with essential fatty acids on the kinetics of macrophage accumulation and giant cell formation in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus. The supplementation sources were soybean oil (SO, source of omega 6, n‑6 and linseed oil (LO, source of omega 3, n‑3, in the following proportions: 100% SO; 75% SO + 25% LO; 50% SO + 50% LO; 25% SO + 75% LO; and 100% LO (four replicates per treatment. After a feeding period of three months, growth performance was evaluated, and glass coverslips were implanted into the subcutaneous connective tissue of fish, being removed for examination at 2, 4, 6, and 8 days after implantation. Growth performance did not differ between treatments. Fish fed 100% linseed oil diet had the greatest macrophage accumulation and the fastest Langhans cell formation on the sixth day. On the eighth day, Langhans cells were predominant on the coverslips implanted in the fish feed 75 and 100% linseed oil. n‑3 fatty acids may contribute to macrophage recruitment and giant cell formation in fish chronic inflammatory response to foreign body.

  14. Mechanism of Neurodegeneration Following Viral Infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maheshwari, Radha

    2001-01-01

    The long term goal of this proposal is to delineate the mechanism(s) for neurodegeneration and neuropathogenesis following infection with a neurovirulent virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE...

  15. Dendritic cells from aged subjects contribute to chronic airway inflammation by activating bronchial epithelial cells under steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, S; Agrawal, S; Vahed, H; Ngyuen, M; BenMohamed, L; Gupta, S; Agrawal, A

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the increased susceptibility of the elderly to respiratory infections are not well understood. The crosstalk between the dendritic cells (DCs) and epithelial cells is essential in maintaining tolerance as well as in generating immunity in the respiratory mucosa. DCs from aged subjects display an enhanced basal level of activation, which can affect the function of epithelial cells. Our results suggest that this is indeed the scenario as exposure of primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) to supernatants from unstimulated DCs of aged subjects resulted in activation of PBECs. The expression of CCL20, CCL26, CXCL10, mucin, and CD54 was significantly increased in the PBECs exposed to aged DC supernatants, but not to young DC supernatants. Furthermore, aged DC supernatants also enhanced the permeability of the PBEC barrier. We also found that DCs from aged subjects spontaneously secreted increased levels of pro-inflammatory mediators, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and metalloproteinase A disintegrin family of metalloproteinase 10, which can affect the functions of PBECs. Finally, we demonstrated that TNF-α, present in the supernatant of DCs from aged subjects, was the primary pro-inflammatory mediator that affected PBEC functions. Thus, age-associated alterations in DC–epithelial interactions contribute to chronic airway inflammation in the elderly, increasing their susceptibility to respiratory diseases. PMID:24759206

  16. Long sleep duration, independent of frailty and chronic Inflammation, was associated with higher mortality: A national population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Ju; Peng, Li-Ning; Liang, Chih-Kuang; Chiou, Shu-Ti; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2017-10-01

    There is a complex interrelationship between long sleep duration, frailty, chronic inflammation and mortality among the community-dwelling middle-aged and elderly population, which remains unclear and deserves to be investigated. The current study intended to explore these associations by using a prospective population-based cohort study. A total of 937 community-dwelling middle-aged and elderly people were enrolled. Sleep patterns of the study participants were categorized as short (Frailty was defined as three or more phenotypes of Fried's Frailty. During an average of 4.7 years follow up, 72 (7.7%) study participants died. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for death of long sleepers was 2.42 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.38-4.27), HR of long sleepers plus frailty was 2.37 (95% CI 1.35-4.19) and HR of long sleepers plus log interleukin-6 was 2.11 (95% CI 1.19-3.76). Adjusted HR of daytime dysfunction was 1.79 (95% CI 1.09-2.94). The association between daytime dysfunction and mortality became statistical insignificant after further adjustment for frailty. Long sleep duration, independent of frailty and interleukin-6, was associated with 5-year mortality in older adults. The relationship between daytime dysfunction and death diminished after adjusting for frailty. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1481-1487. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  17. CLINICAL AND LABORATORY ASPECTS OF CHRONIC HEPATITIS B ON THE BACKGROUND OF REFRACTORY ANEMIA OF INFLAMMATION IN CHILDREN OF UZBEKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. I. Inoyatova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 75 children with chronic hepatitis B (ChHB with a refractory variant of anemia of inflammation (AV course were examined, the pathogenetic manifestation of which was the development of iron overload syndrome (IOS. It was revealed that against the background of an increase in the severity of the IOS, the incidence of progressive forms of the disease with persistent prevalence of asthenovegetative, hemorrhagic syndromes and severe hepatosplenomegaly increased. At the same time, the leading biochemical syndromes were the presence of cytolysis with prolonged hyperfermentemia, endotoxemia and mesenchymal inflammatory syndrome. A directly proportional dependence of the hepcidin-25 peptide level on the degree of expression of the IOS, the higher the presentation of the IOS, the higher the level of suppression of peptide expression in hepatocytes. Diagnostically significant tests of severe forms of IOS in ChHB in children are the presence of hemosiderin in the urine and an increase in the level of sIL-6R in the serum.  

  18. CYTOTOXIC LYMPHOCYTES: THE ROLE IN INFLAMMATION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE EXACERBATION AND REMISSION

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    N. A. Raspopina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the number of publications related to the expression of surface antigens of periphery blood lymphocytes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, algorithm for interpreting of the results and implicating pathogene-tic treatments still needs to be developed. Aim: To assess the role of cytotoxic lymphocytes in the maintaining of inflammation in COPD. Materials and methods: To examine immune status in 37 patients with COPD exacerbation or remission and 24 healthy donors (control group, blood cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and NK-cells contents were measured using indirect immunofluorescence method. Absolute and relative numbers of lymphocytes expressing CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD20, CD23, CD25, CD54, CD71, CD72, HLA-DR, CD95 antigens, membrane immunoglobulins  M (mIgM and G (mIgG were estimated. Results: In COPD, significantly increased numbers of blood cytotoxic lymphocytes were demonstrated independently from the disease stage (p < 0.001. During COPD exacerbation, significant elevations of CD4, CD8, CD20, CD72, NК-cells numbers, serum mIgM and mIgG were demonstrated. During remission, CD20 and CD72 content returned to normal, though, increased numbers of other cytotoxic cells persisted promoting inflammation and progressive damage of pulmonary and bronchial tissues. Conclusion: Observed changes may be due to excessive stimulation of T-cell component of immune system in COPD patients both in exacerbation and remission. Relative reduction of total T-lymphocyte numbers indicates non-specific (non-infectious inflammation type. High cytotoxic potential of immune system results in pulmonary damage and promotes development of pneumosclerosis and emphysema.

  19. Abnormal blood rheology and chronic low grade inflammation: possible risk factors for accelerated atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease in Lewis negative subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexy, Tamas; Pais, Eszter; Wenby, Rosalinda B; Mack, Wendy J; Hodis, Howard N; Kono, Naoko; Wang, Jun; Baskurt, Oguz K; Fisher, Timothy C; Meiselman, Herbert J

    2015-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that abnormal hemorheology and chronic low-grade inflammation are more prevalent in Lewis negative individuals, possibly contributing to premature atherosclerosis. We enrolled 223 healthy subjects (154 females, mean age: 64yrs). Conventional risk factors, markers of inflammation and hemorheological profiles were measured; Lewis blood group was determined by serology. Conventional risk factors (age, gender, BMI, blood pressure, lipid profile, smoking habit) did not differ among Lewis phenotypes. However, markers of inflammation (WBC, hs-CRP, ESR) were significantly elevated and rheological parameters (RBC aggregation, plasma viscosity) were abnormal in Lewis negative subjects, especially when compared to the Le(a-b+) group. With a prevalence of 33% in select populations, our data support the hypothesis that Le(a-b-) represents a pro-inflammatory phenotype that may contribute to the elevated cardiovascular risk in this group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of the BDCA2-DTR Transgenic Mouse Model in Chronic and Acute Inflammation.

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    Manuela Mandl

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs are a small subset of dendritic cells and the main producers of type I interferons. Besides their contribution to tolerance, they are known to be involved in autoimmune diseases and have recently been implicated in atherosclerosis. However, their precise involvement, particularly in advanced lesion development, remains elusive. Hence, we investigated the role of pDCs in atherogenesis vs atheroprogression by specifically depleting this cell population using the BDCA2-DTR mouse model bred to Apolipoprotein E (Apoe-/- deficient mice.Our results revealed that continuous diphtheria toxin-induced pDC depletion in Apoe-/- BDCA2-DTR mice receiving a high-fat diet (HFD for 4 weeks did not alter lesion size or composition. Instead, these mice displayed increased B cell numbers and altered levels of inflammatory cytokines. Analysis of depletion efficiency showed that complete pDC depletion could only be sustained for one week and reoccurring pDCs sorted after 4 weeks did not express DTR anymore. Consequently, we analyzed lesion development in a model of partial carotid ligation, inducing established lesions after 5 weeks of HFD feeding, and only depleted pDCs during the last week of 5 weeks HFD feeding. Despite short-term, but efficient pDC depletion, we observed no differences in atherosclerotic lesion development, but changes in inflammatory cytokine titers. To assure the functionality of the BDCA2-DTR model in acute settings, we additionally examined the effect of pDC depletion in an indirect acute lung injury (iALI model. This time, efficient pDC depletion resulted in a significantly reduced macrophage and neutrophil accumulation in the lung 12 hours after LPS challenge, underlining a pro-inflammatory role of pDCs in the innate immune response in iALI.Taken together, the BDCA2-DTR mouse model only allows efficient pDC depletion for one week, which subsequently restricts its usability to more acute but not chronic

  1. Evaluation of the BDCA2-DTR Transgenic Mouse Model in Chronic and Acute Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Manuela; Drechsler, Maik; Jansen, Yvonne; Neideck, Carlos; Noels, Heidi; Faussner, Alexander; Soehnlein, Oliver; Weber, Christian; Döring, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a small subset of dendritic cells and the main producers of type I interferons. Besides their contribution to tolerance, they are known to be involved in autoimmune diseases and have recently been implicated in atherosclerosis. However, their precise involvement, particularly in advanced lesion development, remains elusive. Hence, we investigated the role of pDCs in atherogenesis vs atheroprogression by specifically depleting this cell population using the BDCA2-DTR mouse model bred to Apolipoprotein E (Apoe-/-) deficient mice. Our results revealed that continuous diphtheria toxin-induced pDC depletion in Apoe-/- BDCA2-DTR mice receiving a high-fat diet (HFD) for 4 weeks did not alter lesion size or composition. Instead, these mice displayed increased B cell numbers and altered levels of inflammatory cytokines. Analysis of depletion efficiency showed that complete pDC depletion could only be sustained for one week and reoccurring pDCs sorted after 4 weeks did not express DTR anymore. Consequently, we analyzed lesion development in a model of partial carotid ligation, inducing established lesions after 5 weeks of HFD feeding, and only depleted pDCs during the last week of 5 weeks HFD feeding. Despite short-term, but efficient pDC depletion, we observed no differences in atherosclerotic lesion development, but changes in inflammatory cytokine titers. To assure the functionality of the BDCA2-DTR model in acute settings, we additionally examined the effect of pDC depletion in an indirect acute lung injury (iALI) model. This time, efficient pDC depletion resulted in a significantly reduced macrophage and neutrophil accumulation in the lung 12 hours after LPS challenge, underlining a pro-inflammatory role of pDCs in the innate immune response in iALI. Taken together, the BDCA2-DTR mouse model only allows efficient pDC depletion for one week, which subsequently restricts its usability to more acute but not chronic inflammatory

  2. Impaired Glutathione Synthesis in Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Koji; Nakaki, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) was discovered in yeast cells in 1888. Studies of GSH in mammalian cells before the 1980s focused exclusively on its function for the detoxication of xenobiotics or for drug metabolism in the liver, in which GSH is present at its highest concentration in the body. Increasing evidence has demonstrated other important roles of GSH in the brain, not only for the detoxication of xenobiotics but also for antioxidant defense and the regulation of intracellular redox homeostasis. GSH also regulates cell signaling, protein function, gene expression, and cell differentiation/proliferation in the brain. Clinically, inborn errors in GSH-related enzymes are very rare, but disorders of GSH metabolism are common in major neurodegenerative diseases showing GSH depletion and increased levels of oxidative stress in the brain. GSH depletion would precipitate oxidative damage in the brain, leading to neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the significance of GSH function, the synthesis of GSH and its metabolism, and clinical disorders of GSH metabolism. A potential approach to increase brain GSH levels against neurodegeneration is also discussed. PMID:24145751

  3. Myeloperoxidase Content is a Marker of Systemic Inflammation in a Chronic Condition: The Example Given by the Periodontal Disease in Rats

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    Celso Martins Queiroz-Junior

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the suitability of myeloperoxidase (MPO content as a local indicator of chronic inflammation, using the periodontal disease model. Anesthetized adult male Holtzman rats had their second left maxilar molar tied by a thread for 11 days and were then killed. Blood samples and photographic images from histopathological inflamed and noninflamed (contralateral neighboring gingivomucosal specimens were collected for cell counts and MPO level analysis. Diseased animals were also treated with pharmacological tools such as the anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib or the opioid morphine. Increased blood neutrophils and local cell numbers characterized diseased animals. However, local MPO content was increased in inflamed and noninflamed tissues from diseased animals. Celecoxib and morphine reduced blood neutrophils and bilateral MPO content, but only celecoxib reduced local cell numbers in diseased animals. It is concluded that MPO content is a good indicator of a systemic rather than a local inflammation in a chronic inflammatory condition.

  4. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: When Natural Friends Turn into Enemies—The Importance of CpG Motifs of Bacterial DNA in Intestinal Homeostasis and Chronic Intestinal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Obermeier

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available From numerous studies during the last years it became evident that bacteria and bacterial constituents play a decisive role both in the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis as well as in the development and perpetuation of chronic intestinal inflammation. In this review we focus on the role of bacterial DNA which is a potent immunomodulatory component of the bacterial flora. Bacterial DNA has been shown to be protective against experimental colitis. In contrast bacterial DNA essentially contributes to the perpetuation of an already established chronic intestinal inflammation in a Toll-like receptor (TLR9-dependent manner. This dichotomic action may be explained by a different activation status of essential regulators of TLR signaling like Glycogen synthase kinase 3- (GSK3- depending on the pre-activation status of the intestinal immune system. In this review we suggest that regulators of TLR signaling may be interesting therapeutic targets in IBD aiming at the restoration of intestinal immune homeostasis.

  5. Technetium-99m human polyclonal immunoglobulin g studies and conventional bone scans to detect active joint inflammation in chronic rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, Ll.; Torres, G.; Estorch, M.; Martinez-Duncker, D.; Carrio, I. (Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Diez, C. (Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Rheumatology)

    1992-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic polyarthritis in which active inflammed joints coexist with joints in remission. We performed bone scans ({sup 99m}Tc-DPD) and {sup 99m}Tc human polyclonal immunoglobulin G scans ({sup 99m}Tc-IgG) in 18 patients with rheumatoid arthritis to assess the uptake in actively inflammed joints and in joints in which remission after inflammation had occurred. A quantitative analysis of tracer uptake in each joint was performed on both scans. In 123 joints without current active inflammation, an increased {sup 99m}Tc-DPD uptake was observed (2.31{+-}1.27), whereas no {sup 99m}Tc-IgG uptake was noted (1.18{+-}0.32). Some 78 joints with mild pain or swelling exhibited increased {sup 99m}Tc-DPD uptake (2.48{+-}1.14) and increased {sup 99m}Tc-IgG uptake (1.76{+-}0.50; P<0.001), white 21 joints with moderate to severe pain or swelling exhibited increased {sup 99m}Tc-DPD uptake (2.39{+-}0.93) and increased {sup 99m}Tc-IgG uptake (1.79{+-}0.51; P<0.001). In conclusion, {sup 99m}Tc-IgG scans distinguish between joints with and without active inflammation in chronic rheumatoid arthritis, whereas bone scans do not. Thus, {sup 99m}Tc-IgG scans may be useful in identifying joints with current active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.).

  6. Microscopic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) occurring in pseudocysts: do these tumors belong to the category of DLBCL associated with chronic inflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroumand, Nahal; Ly, T Linda; Sonstein, Joseph; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2012-07-01

    We report 2 cases of localized, microscopic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) that were detected incidentally within pseudocysts. In case 1, the neoplasm was identified within a 26-cm, 860-g adrenal gland pseudocyst. In case 2, the neoplasm was detected within a 9-cm, 90-g paratesticular pseudocyst. In both cases, the neoplastic cells were large, had a nongerminal center B-cell immunophenotype, and were positive for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded RNA detected by in situ hybridization. The most appropriate classification of these tumors using current World Health Organization classification is uncertain. The best fit seems to be DLBCL associated with chronic inflammation (DLBCL-CI), defined as DLBCL arising in the context of long-standing chronic inflammation and associated with EBV infection, with the prototype for this category being pyothorax-associated lymphoma. This term has been used by others in the literature for tumors similar to the cases reported here. However, in the 2 cases we report chronic inflammation was not a prominent feature, and the inflammatory cells that were present showed little relationship to the lymphoma cells. The findings in these cases have led us to question the role of chronic inflammation in pathogenesis. Perhaps the closed space of the pseudocyst, by preventing a cytolytic response to EBV-infected cells, results in local immunodeficiency that may be most important for pathogenesis. We also have concerns about using the term DLBCL-CI for these tumors. Perhaps the cases we report and the few other similar cases reported previously deserve their own category in a future version of the World Health Organization classification.

  7. RORgamma-expressing Th17 cells induce murine chronic intestinal inflammation via redundant effects of IL-17A and IL-17F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppkes, Moritz; Becker, Christoph; Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Hirth, Sebastian; Wirtz, Stefan; Neufert, Clemens; Pouly, Sandrine; Murphy, Andrew J; Valenzuela, David M; Yancopoulos, George D; Becher, Burkhard; Littman, Dan R; Neurath, Markus F

    2009-01-01

    IL-17-producing CD4(+) T-helper cells (Th17) contribute to chronic autoimmune inflammation in the brain, and levels of Th17-derived cytokines increase in patients with colitis, suggesting a role in pathogenesis. We analyzed the roles of Th17 cells and the transcription factor retinoic acid receptor-related organ receptor (ROR)gamma, which regulates Th17 differentiation, in chronic intestinal inflammation. Using an adoptive transfer model of colitis, we compared the colitogenic potential of wild-type, interleukin-17A (IL-17A)-, IL-17F-, IL-22-, and RORgamma-deficient CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells in RAG1-null mice. Adoptive transfer of IL-17A-, IL-17F-, or IL-22-deficient T lymphocytes into RAG1-null mice caused severe colitis that was indistinguishable from that caused by wild-type cells. In contrast, transfer of RORgamma-null T cells failed to increase mucosal IL-17 cytokine levels and did not induce colitis. Treatment with IL-17A was able to restore colitis after transfer of RORgamma-null T cells, indicating a crucial role for Th17 cells in pathogenesis. Treatment of RAG1 mice that received IL-17F-null (but not wild-type) T cells with a neutralizing anti-IL-17A antibody significantly suppressed disease, indicating redundant biological effects of IL-17A and IL-17F. We have identified a crucial role of RORgamma-expressing Th17 cells in chronic intestinal inflammation. RORgamma controls IL-17A and IL-17F production, and these cytokines have a redundant but highly pathogenic role in gut inflammation. Reagents that target RORgamma or a combination of anti-IL-17A and anti-IL-17F might be developed as therapeutics for chronic colitis.

  8. The effect of cardioprotective diet rich with natural antioxidants on chronic inflammation and oxidized LDL during cardiac rehabilitation in patients after acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlakar, Polona; Salobir, Barbara; Čobo, Nusret; Strašek, Janja; Prezelj, Marija; Debevc, Ana; Jug, Borut; Terčelj, Marjeta; Šabovič, Mišo

    2015-06-01

    Chronic inflammation, the fundamental pathogenetic process of atherosclerosis, can be modified by pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures as a part of secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of our study was to determine the effect of diet, rich with natural antioxidants, added to physical activity (as a part of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program) on inflammatory markers and ox-LDL, a marker of oxidative stress, closely involved in the process of chronic inflammation. 41 male patients after AMI undergoing CR were divided into a diet group (supervised cardioprotective diet throughout the CR), and control group (CR without diet). We measured hsCRP, leucocytes, neutrophils, IL-6, oxLDL, exercise capacity and classic risk factors before and after CR program. Patients from the diet group presented with a significant decline in classic risk factors (BMI, waist circumference, waist to hip ratio, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL, TAG) and inflammatory markers (hsCRP, leucocytes, neutrophils) compared to control group. Furthermore, when studying nonsmokers, we observed significant decline of oxLDL in the diet group. The addition of cardioprotective diet, rich with natural antioxidants, to physical activity as a part of a CR program, positively modifies not just classic risk factors and exercise capacity, but also diminishes chronic inflammation markers. These effects, and oxLDL decline were most prominent in nonsmoking patients.

  9. Analysis of local chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate combined with systemic inflammation improves prognostication in stage II colon cancer independent of standard clinicopathologic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Natalie; Wong, Hui-Li; Templeton, Arnoud; Tripathy, Sagarika; Whiti Rogers, Te; Croxford, Matthew; Jones, Ian; Sinnathamby, Mathuranthakan; Desai, Jayesh; Tie, Jeanne; Bae, Susie; Christie, Michael; Gibbs, Peter; Tran, Ben

    2016-02-01

    In Stage II colon cancer, multiple independent studies have shown that a dense intratumoural immune infiltrate (local inflammation) is associated with improved outcomes, while systemic inflammation, measured by various markers, has been associated with poorer outcomes. However, previous studies have not considered the interaction between local and systemic inflammation, nor have they assessed the type of inflammatory response compared with standard clinicopathologic criteria. In order to evaluate the potential clinical utility of inflammatory markers in Stage II colon cancer, we examined local and systemic inflammation in a consecutive series of patients with resected Stage II colon cancer between 2000 and 2010 who were identified from a prospective clinical database. Increased intratumoural chronic inflammatory cell (CIC) density, as assessed by pathologist review of hematoxylin and eosin stained slides, was used to represent local inflammation. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) >5, as calculated from pre-operative full blood counts, was used to represent systemic inflammation. In 396 eligible patients identified, there was a non-significant inverse relationship between local and systemic inflammation. Increased CIC density was significantly associated with improved overall (HR 0.45, p = 0.001) and recurrence-free survival (HR 0.37, p = 0.003). High NLR was significantly associated with poorer overall survival (HR 2.56, p < 0.001). The combination of these markers further stratified prognosis independent of standard high-risk criteria, with a dominant systemic inflammatory response (low CIC/high NLR) associated with the worst outcome (5-year overall survival 55.8%). With further validation this simple, inexpensive combined inflammatory biomarker might assist in patient selection for adjuvant chemotherapy in Stage II colon cancer. © 2015 UICC.

  10. A high-fat, high-protein diet attenuates the negative impact of casein-induced chronic inflammation on testicular steroidogenesis and sperm parameters in adult mice.

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    Zhao, Jing-Lu; Zhao, Yu-Yun; Zhu, Wei-Jie

    2017-10-01

    The interaction between obesity and chronic inflammation has been studied. Diet-induced obesity or chronic inflammation could reduce the testicular functions of males. However, the mechanism underlying the reproductive effects of fattening foods in males with or without chronic inflammation still needs further discussion. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of high-fat, high-protein diet on testicular steroidogenesis and sperm parameters in adult mice under physiological and chronic inflammatory conditions. Because casein can trigger a non-infectious systemic inflammatory response, we used casein injection to induce chronic inflammation in male adult Kunming mice. Twenty-four mice were randomly and equally divided into four groups: (i) normal diet+saline (Control); (ii) normal diet+casein (ND+CS); (iii) high-fat, high-protein diet+saline (HFPD+SI); (iv) high-fat, high-protein diet+casein (HFPD+CS). After 8weeks, there was a significant increase in body weight for groups HFPD+SI and HFPD+CS and a decrease in group ND+CS compared with the control. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and lipid profiles were increased markedly in groups ND+CS, HFPD+SI and HFPD+CS compared with the control. A remarkable reduction of serum adiponectin level occurred in group HFPD+CS compared with group ND+CS. Sperm parameters (sperm count, viability and abnormality) were also adversely affected in groups ND+CS and HFPD+SI. Groups ND+CS and HFPD+SI showed severe pathological changes in testicular tissues. Semiquantitative RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemical staining also showed significant reductions in both testicular mRNA and protein levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) and cytochrome P450scc (CYP11A1) in groups HFPD+SI and HFPD+CS compared with the control, whereas testicular mRNA and protein levels of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) in groups HFPD+SI and HFPD+CS significantly increased. The m

  11. Age-Related Neurodegeneration and Memory Loss in Down Syndrome

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    Jason P. Lockrow

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is a condition where a complete or segmental chromosome 21 trisomy causes variable intellectual disability, and progressive memory loss and neurodegeneration with age. Many research groups have examined development of the brain in DS individuals, but studies on age-related changes should also be considered, with the increased lifespan observed in DS. DS leads to pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD by 40 or 50 years of age. Progressive age-related memory deficits occurring in both AD and in DS have been connected to degeneration of several neuronal populations, but mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Inflammation and oxidative stress are early events in DS pathology, and focusing on these pathways may lead to development of successful intervention strategies for AD associated with DS. Here we discuss recent findings and potential treatment avenues regarding development of AD neuropathology and memory loss in DS.

  12. Tryptophan, Neurodegeneration and HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder

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    Nicholas W.S. Davies

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This review presents an up-to-date assessment of the role of the tryptophan metabolic and catabolic pathways in neurodegenerative disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. The kynurenine pathway and the effects of each of its enzymes and products are reviewed. The differential expression of the kynurenine pathway in cells within the brain, including inflammatory cells, is explored given the increasing recognition of the importance of inflammation in neurodegenerative disease. An overview of common mechanisms of neurodegeneration is presented before a review and discussion of the evidence for a pathogenetic role of the kynurenine pathway in Alzheimer’s disease, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, Huntington’s disease, motor neurone disease, and Parkinson’s disease.

  13. Tryptophan, Neurodegeneration and HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas W.S. Davies

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review presents an up-to-date assessment of the role of the tryptophan metabolic and catabolic pathways in neurodegenerative disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. The kynurenine pathway and the effects of each of its enzymes and products are reviewed. The differential expression of the kynurenine pathway in cells within the brain, including inflammatory cells, is explored given the increasing recognition of the importance of inflammation in neurodegenerative disease. An overview of common mechanisms of neurodegeneration is presented before a review and discussion of the evidence for a pathogenetic role of the kynurenine pathway in Alzheimer's disease, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, Huntington's disease, motor neurone disease, and Parkinson's disease.

  14. Dying for love: Perimenopausal degeneration of vaginal microbiome drives the chronic inflammation-malignant transformation of benign prostatic hyperplasia to prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2017-04-01

    Prostatic carcinoma is the second commonest cancer in males and is so common as to become almost holoendemic with advancing age. The recent demonstration that far from being benign, "benign" prostatic hypertrophy is a likely a reaction of the prostate to chronic untreated lower genital tract infection, and that this chronic inflammation is likely the usual precursor to the frequent occurrence of prostatic carcinoma has far reaching implications. The obvious source for the chronic inflammatory stimulus in the prostate is the documented dramatically altered lower female genital microbiota associated with the menopause. Hence the major hypothesis is that prostatic cancer may arise due to chronic infection and inflammation in the prostate gland consequent upon the altered microbiome of the menopausal female genital tract. This has implications for testing and diagnosis, treatment, population health and personal hygiene practices. It suggests that male dyspareunia, although almost never encountered in clinical practice may in fact be relatively common in older males, and in particular if diagnosed, represents a critical opportunity for therapeutic intervention to interrupt the chronic inflammation - cancer transformation and progression which has been well documented in other tissues. It implies that the coordinated application of next generation sequencing to the microbiome of the lower genital tracts of male and female couples, including seminal fluid, will have both research applications to further explore this sequence, as well as finding application as a potential population level screening procedure as is presently done for the "Thin Prep" cervical screening for human papillomavirus in females. Moreover this insight opens up new opportunities for chemointervention and chemoprevention for this important clinicopathological progression. These considerations give rise to the exciting possibility that prostatic malignancy may be preventable by various methods of local

  15. Hepatitis C Virus Nonstructural 3/4A Protein Dampens Inflammation and Contributes to Slow Fibrosis Progression during Chronic Fibrosis In Vivo.

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    Ruchi Bansal

    Full Text Available HCV infection typically induces liver injury and inflammation, which appears to be responsible for the associated fibrogenesis. To date, the mechanism underlying the different rates of disease progression remains unclear. The aim of the study is to understand the possible role of the HCV non-structural (NS 3/4A protein in the fibrosis progression. We used NS3/4A-expressing transgenic mice (NS3/4A-Tg to accomplish the goals of the study. Different stages of liver fibrosis were induced in wild-type and NS3/4A-Tg mice by single carbon tetrachloride (acute or multiple injections for 4 (intermediate or 8 (chronic weeks. Fibrotic parameters, inflammatory responses and hepatocyte turnover were extensively examined. Hepatic expression of HCV NS3/4A did not induce spontaneous liver damage. However, NS3/4A expression exerted contrasting effects during acute and chronic liver damage. During early fibrogenesis and intermediate fibrosis (4 weeks, NS3/4A-Tg mice exhibited enhanced liver damage whereas reduced fibrosis was observed in NS3/4A-Tg during chronic liver fibrosis (8 weeks. Furthermore, attenuated inflammation was observed in NS3/4A-Tg during chronic fibrosis with increase in M2 macrophages, hepatocyte proliferation, decreased hepatocyte apoptosis and decreased ductular reaction. In conclusion, during early fibrogenesis, HCV NS3/4A contributes to liver damage. While, during chronic liver fibrosis, NS3/4A dampens inflammation and induces hepatocyte regeneration thereby contributing to slow fibrosis progression to promote its survival or persistence.

  16. The topograpy of demyelination and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain

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    Haider, Lukas; Hametner, Simon; Höftberger, Romana; Bagnato, Francesca; Grabner, Günther; Trattnig, Siegfried; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Brück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. In our study we analysed demyelination and neurodegeneration in a large series of multiple sclerosis brains and provide a map that displays the frequency of different brain areas to be affected by these processes. Demyelination in the cerebral cortex was related to inflammatory infiltrates in the meninges, which was pronounced in invaginations of the brain surface (sulci) and possibly promoted by low flow of the cerebrospinal fluid in these areas. Focal demyelinated lesions in the white matter occurred at sites with high venous density and additionally accumulated in watershed areas of low arterial blood supply. Two different patterns of neurodegeneration in the cortex were identified: oxidative injury of cortical neurons and retrograde neurodegeneration due to axonal injury in the white matter. While oxidative injury was related to the inflammatory process in the meninges and pronounced in actively demyelinating cortical lesions, retrograde degeneration was mainly related to demyelinated lesions and axonal loss in the white matter. Our data show that accumulation of lesions and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain does not affect all brain regions equally and provides the pathological basis for the selection of brain areas for monitoring regional injury and atrophy development in future magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:26912645

  17. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Markers of Inflammation in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Controversial Issue.

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    Hu, Chun; Yang, Ming; Zhu, Xuejing; Gao, Peng; Yang, Shikun; Han, Yachun; Chen, Xianghui; Xiao, Li; Yuan, Shuguang; Liu, Fuyou; Kanwar, Yashpal S; Sun, Lin

    2017-12-22

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global problem which contributes to a significant morbidity and mortality in China. Concomitant inflammatory state further boosts the mortality due to cardiovascular events in patients with CKD undergoing dialysis. There is a general notion that Omega-3 fatty acids including docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic (EPA) have certain health benefits perhaps via the regulation of inflammation. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of omega-3 fatty acids in patients with CKD is controversial. We analyzed the data of oral supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids in CKD patients by searching literature on database from inception to August 2016. The analysis included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) derived from multiple databases, and the effect of omega-3 fatty acids supplementation versus the control cohorts were compared. All of the data analysis was calculated by RevMan 5.2. A total of 12 RCTs involving 487 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Among them 254 patients received omega-3 fatty acids and 233 patients served as controls who received placebo. The meta-analysis revealed no statistical significance in serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) (SMD, -0.20; 95% CI, -0.44 to 0.05; P = 0.11), IL-6 (SMD, 0.00; 95% CI, -0.33 to 0.33; P = 0.99) and TNF-α (SMD, 0.14; 95% CI, -0.17 to 0.44; P = 0.38) between the omega-3 fatty acids supplementation group and control. This suggested that there is insufficient evidence to conclude the benefit of omega-3 fatty acids oral supplementation in reducing serum levels of CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α in patients with CKD. © 2017 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  18. Disruption of Sirtuin 1–Mediated Control of Circadian Molecular Clock and Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

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    Yao, Hongwei; Sundar, Isaac K.; Huang, Yadi; Gerloff, Janice; Sellix, Michael T.; Sime, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth most common cause of death, and it is characterized by abnormal inflammation and lung function decline. Although the circadian molecular clock regulates inflammatory responses, there is no information available regarding the impact of COPD on lung molecular clock function and its regulation by sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). We hypothesize that the molecular clock in the lungs is disrupted, leading to increased inflammatory responses in smokers and patients with COPD and its regulation by SIRT1. Lung tissues, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and sputum cells were obtained from nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD for measurement of core molecular clock proteins (BMAL1, CLOCK, PER1, PER2, and CRY1), clock-associated nuclear receptors (REV-ERBα, REV-ERBβ, and RORα), and SIRT1 by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot. PBMCs were treated with the SIRT1 activator SRT1720 followed by LPS treatment, and supernatant was collected at 6-hour intervals. Levels of IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α released from PBMCs were determined by ELISA. Expression of BMAL1, PER2, CRY1, and REV-ERBα was reduced in PBMCs, sputum cells, and lung tissues from smokers and patients with COPD when compared with nonsmokers. SRT1720 treatment attenuated LPS-mediated reduction of BMAL1 and REV-ERBα in PBMCs from nonsmokers. Additionally, LPS differentially affected the timing and amplitude of cytokine (IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α) release from PBMCs in nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD. Moreover, SRT1720 was able to inhibit LPS-induced cytokine release from cultured PBMCs. In conclusion, disruption of the molecular clock due to SIRT1 reduction contributes to abnormal inflammatory response in smokers and patients with COPD. PMID:25905433

  19. Asthma-COPD overlap. Clinical relevance of genomic signatures of type 2 inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Stephanie A; Steiling, Katrina; van den Berge, Maarten; Hijazi, Kahkeshan; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Postma, Dirkje S; Lenburg, Marc E; Spira, Avrum; Woodruff, Prescott G

    2015-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease and likely includes a subgroup that is biologically comparable to asthma. Studying asthma-associated gene expression changes in COPD could add insight into COPD pathogenesis and reveal biomarkers that predict a favorable response to corticosteroids. To determine whether asthma-associated gene signatures are increased in COPD and associated with asthma-related features. We compared disease-associated airway epithelial gene expression alterations in an asthma cohort (n = 105) and two COPD cohorts (n = 237, 171). The T helper type 2 (Th2) signature (T2S) score, a gene expression metric induced in Th2-high asthma, was evaluated in these COPD cohorts. The T2S score was correlated with asthma-related features and response to corticosteroids in COPD in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, the Groningen and Leiden Universities study of Corticosteroids in Obstructive Lung Disease (GLUCOLD; n = 89). The 200 genes most differentially expressed in asthma versus healthy control subjects were enriched among genes associated with more severe airflow obstruction in these COPD cohorts (P COPD cohorts. Higher T2S scores correlated with increased airway wall eosinophil counts (P = 0.003), blood eosinophil percentage (P = 0.03), bronchodilator reversibility (P = 0.01), and improvement in hyperinflation after corticosteroid treatment (P = 0.019) in GLUCOLD. These data identify airway gene expression alterations that can co-occur in asthma and COPD. The association of the T2S score with increased severity and "asthma-like" features (including a favorable corticosteroid response) in COPD suggests that Th2 inflammation is important in a COPD subset that cannot be identified by clinical history of asthma.

  20. Asthma–COPD Overlap. Clinical Relevance of Genomic Signatures of Type 2 Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiling, Katrina; van den Berge, Maarten; Hijazi, Kahkeshan; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Lenburg, Marc E.; Spira, Avrum; Woodruff, Prescott G.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease and likely includes a subgroup that is biologically comparable to asthma. Studying asthma-associated gene expression changes in COPD could add insight into COPD pathogenesis and reveal biomarkers that predict a favorable response to corticosteroids. Objectives: To determine whether asthma-associated gene signatures are increased in COPD and associated with asthma-related features. Methods: We compared disease-associated airway epithelial gene expression alterations in an asthma cohort (n = 105) and two COPD cohorts (n = 237, 171). The T helper type 2 (Th2) signature (T2S) score, a gene expression metric induced in Th2-high asthma, was evaluated in these COPD cohorts. The T2S score was correlated with asthma-related features and response to corticosteroids in COPD in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, the Groningen and Leiden Universities study of Corticosteroids in Obstructive Lung Disease (GLUCOLD; n = 89). Measurements and Main Results: The 200 genes most differentially expressed in asthma versus healthy control subjects were enriched among genes associated with more severe airflow obstruction in these COPD cohorts (P COPD cohorts. Higher T2S scores correlated with increased airway wall eosinophil counts (P = 0.003), blood eosinophil percentage (P = 0.03), bronchodilator reversibility (P = 0.01), and improvement in hyperinflation after corticosteroid treatment (P = 0.019) in GLUCOLD. Conclusions: These data identify airway gene expression alterations that can co-occur in asthma and COPD. The association of the T2S score with increased severity and “asthma-like” features (including a favorable corticosteroid response) in COPD suggests that Th2 inflammation is important in a COPD subset that cannot be identified by clinical history of asthma. PMID:25611785

  1. Differential dose effect of fish oil on inflammation and adipose tissue gene expression in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Debard, Cyril; Drai, Jocelyne; Denis, Laure; Pesenti, Sandra; Bienvenu, Jacques; Vidal, Hubert; Laville, Martine; Fouque, Denis

    2013-05-01

    The beneficial effects of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in cardiovascular disease are partly attributed to their anti-inflammatory properties. Their potential effect on the adipose tissue of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has never been explored. To determine the metabolic effect of supplementation with two different doses of fish oil (FO), 12 non-dialyzed patients with stage IV/V CKD were randomly allocated to receive 1.8 g or 3.6 g/d of ω-3 PUFA for 10 wk. Metabolic parameters, adipose tissue function, and gene expression were evaluated at baseline and 10 wk. Body weight, fat mass, energy intake, fasting glucose, and insulin were unchanged. The daily intake of 3.6 g of ω-3 PUFA resulted in decreased serum triacylglycerol and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, whereas low-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased with 1.8 g of ω-3 PUFA. Serum adiponectin, leptin, C-reactive protein, and tumor necrosis factor-α were not modified in either group. Interleukin-6 levels tended to decrease with 1.8 g of ω-3 PUFA. Additionally, a subset of inflammation-related genes (CD68 and MMP9) was reduced in subcutaneous adipose tissue in this group. Adiponectin, leptin, and adipoR2 gene expression were upregulated with 3.6 g of ω-3 PUFA. A moderate dose of FO alters the gene expression profile of adipose tissue to a more antiinflammatory status. Higher doses of FO have a favorable effect on lipid profile and lead to the upregulation of adipokines gene expression suggesting a different dose response to ω-3 PUFA administration in patients with CKD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genotyping of Endocervical Chlamydia trachomatis Strains and Detection of Serological Markers of Acute and Chronic Inflammation in Their Host

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    Behrouz Taheri Beni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis is the most prevalent cause ofbacterial sexually transmitted infections (STI recognized throughout the world. Theaim of this study is to determine different genotypes of genital C. trachomatis andthe association between the serological markers of inflammation and genotypes ofC. trachomatis in sexually active women (n=80 attending Shahid Beheshti Hospitalin Isfahan, Iran.Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, endocervical swabs were collectedfrom 80 women. There were 17 endocervical samples that showed positivity for C. trachomatisby plasmid polymerase chain reaction (PCR using KL1 and KL2 primers. Theomp1 gene was directly amplified in 17 plasmid PCR positive samples and was usedto differentiate the clinical genotypes by omp1 gene PCR-restriction fragment lengthpolymorphism (PCR-RFLP. The levels of IgG and IgA specific to C. trachmatis andC-reactive protein (CRP were evaluated.Results: Based on restriction-digestion patterns, four genotypes were identified. GenotypesE (35.3% and F (35.3% were the most prevalent, followed by D/Da (23.5% and K(5.9%. There was no significant association between genotypes and the presence ofIgG and CRP. Patients infected with genotype E showed a serological marker of chronicinflammation, i.e. IgA seropositivity, significantly more than patients infected with othergenotypes (p=0.042.Conclusion: Nested PCR could increase the sensitivity of omp1 amplification. Based onthe presence of IgA, chronic C. trachomatis infections were observed more frequentlyamong genotype E-infected patients in our population.

  3. Intestinal congestion and right ventricular dysfunction: a link with appetite loss, inflammation, and cachexia in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentova, Miroslava; von Haehling, Stephan; Bauditz, Juergen; Doehner, Wolfram; Ebner, Nicole; Bekfani, Tarek; Elsner, Sebastian; Sliziuk, Veronika; Scherbakov, Nadja; Murín, Ján; Anker, Stefan D; Sandek, Anja

    2016-06-01

    Mechanisms leading to cachexia in heart failure (HF) are not fully understood. We evaluated signs of intestinal congestion in patients with chronic HF and their relationship with cachexia. Of the 165 prospectively enrolled outpatients with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤40%, 29 (18%) were cachectic. Among echocardiographic parameters, the combination of right ventricular dysfunction and elevated right atrial pressure (RAP) provided the best discrimination between cachectic and non-cachectic patients [area under the curve 0.892, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.832-0.936]. Cachectic patients, compared with non-cachectic, had higher prevalence of postprandial fullness, appetite loss, and abdominal discomfort. Abdominal ultrasound showed a larger bowel wall thickness (BWT) in the entire colon and terminal ileum in cachectic than in non-cachectic patients. Bowel wall thickness correlated positively with gastrointestinal symptoms, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, RAP, and truncal fat-free mass, the latter serving as a marker of the fluid content. Logistic regression analysis showed that BWT was associated with cachexia, even after adjusting for cardiac function, inflammation, and stages of HF (odds ratio 1.4, 95% CI: 1.0-1.8; P-value = 0.03). Among the cardiac parameters, only RAP remained significantly associated with cachexia after multivariable adjustment. Cardiac cachexia was associated with intestinal congestion irrespective of HF stage and cardiac function. Gastrointestinal discomfort, appetite loss, and pro-inflammatory activation provide probable mechanisms, by which intestinal congestion may trigger cardiac cachexia. However, our results are preliminary and larger studies are needed to clarify the intrinsic nature of this relationship. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Protection of MPTP-induced neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration by Pycnogenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Moshahid; Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Thangavel, Ramasamy; Zaheer, Asgar

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play a crucial role in Parkinson’s disease (PD) pathogenesis and may represent a target for treatment. Current PD drugs provide only symptomatic relief and have limitations in terms of adverse effects and inability to prevent neurodegeneration. Flavonoids have been suggested to exert human health benefits by its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, in the present study, using 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydro pyridine (MPTP)-induced mouse model of Parkinsonism, we investigated the neuroprotective potential of bioflavonoid compound Pycnogenol® (PYC), an extract of Pinus maritime bark. MPTP injected mice developed significantly severe oxidative stress and impaired motor coordination at day 1 and day 7 postinjection. This was associated with significantly increased inflammatory responses of astrocyte and microglia as assessed by ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba 1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunohistochemistry, and nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-kB), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the striata by Western blot. Additionally, there was significant upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) expression in the striata of MPTP injected mice compared to saline controls. The MPTP-induced neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and behavioral impairments were markedly repudiated by treatment with PYC. These results suggest that PYC protects dopaminergic neurons from MPTP toxicity in the mouse model of PD. Thus, the present finding of PYC-induced adaptation to oxidative stress and inflammation could suggest a novel avenue for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases including PD. PMID:23391521

  5. Inflammation, depression and dementia: are they connected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Brian E

    2007-10-01

    Chronic inflammation is now considered to be central to the pathogenesis not only of such medical disorders as cardiovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, diabetes and cancer but also of major depression. If chronic inflammatory changes are a common feature of depression, this could predispose depressed patients to neurodegenerative changes in later life. Indeed there is now clinical evidence that depression is a common antecedent of Alzheimer's disease and may be an early manifestation of dementia before the cognitive declines becomes apparent. This review summarises the evidence that links chronic low grade inflammation with changes in brain structure that could precipitate neurodegenerative changes associated with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. For example, neuronal loss is a common feature of major depression and dementia. It is hypothesised that the progress from depression to dementia could result from the activation of macrophages in the blood, and microglia in the brain, that release pro-inflammatory cytokines. Such cytokines stimulate a cascade of inflammatory changes (such as an increase in prostaglandin E2, nitric oxide in addition to more pro-inflammatory cytokines) and a hypersecretion of cortisol. The latter steroid inhibits protein synthesis thereby reducing the synthesis of neurotrophic factors and preventing reairto damages neuronal networks. In addition, neurotoxic end products of the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway, such as quinolinic acid, accumulate in astrocytes and neurons in both depression and dementia. Thus increased neurodegeneration, reduced neuroprotection and neuronal repair are common pathological features of major depression and dementia. Such changes may help to explain why major depression is a frequent prelude to dementia in later life.

  6. Signs of ongoing inflammation in female patients with chronic widespread pain: A multivariate, explorative, cross-sectional study of blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdle, Björn; Ghafouri, Bijar; Ghafouri, Nazdar; Bäckryd, Emmanuel; Gordh, Torsten

    2017-03-01

    This cross-sectional study investigates the plasma inflammatory profile of chronic widespread pain (CWP) patients compared to healthy controls (CON). Rather than analyzing a relatively few substances at a time, we used a new multiplex proximity extension assay (PEA) panel that enabled the simultaneous analysis of 92 inflammation-related proteins, mainly cytokines and chemokines.Seventeen women with CWP and 21 female CON participated and a venous blood sample was drawn from all subjects. Pain intensity and pain thresholds for pressure, heat, and cold were registered. A PEA panel (92 proteins) was used to analyze the blood samples. Multivariate data analysis by projection was used in the statistical analyses.Eleven proteins significantly differentiated the CON and CWP subjects (R = 0.58, Q = 0.37, analysis of variance of cross-validated predictive residuals P = 0.006). It was not possible to significantly regress pain thresholds within each group (CON or CWP). Positive significant correlations existed between several proteins and pain intensities in CWP, but the model reliability of the regression was poor.CWP was associated with systemic low-grade inflammation. Larger studies are needed to confirm the results and to investigate which alterations are condition-specific and which are common across chronic pain conditions. The presence of inflammation could promote the spreading of pain, a hallmark sign of CWP. As it has been suggested that prevalent comorbidities to pain (e.g., depression and anxiety, poor sleep, and tiredness) also are associated with inflammation, it will be important to determine whether inflammation may be a common mediator.

  7. The effects of grounding (earthing on inflammation, the immune response, wound healing, and prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oschman JL

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available James L Oschman,1 Gaétan Chevalier,2 Richard Brown3 1Nature’s Own Research Association, Dover, NH, USA; 2Developmental and Cell Biology Department, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA; 3Human Physiology Department, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, USA Abstract: Multi-disciplinary research has revealed that electrically conductive contact of the human body with the surface of the Earth (grounding or earthing produces intriguing effects on physiology and health. Such effects relate to inflammation, immune responses, wound healing, and prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this report is two-fold: to 1 inform researchers about what appears to be a new perspective to the study of inflammation, and 2 alert researchers that the length of time and degree (resistance to ground of grounding of experimental animals is an important but usually overlooked factor that can influence outcomes of studies of inflammation, wound healing, and tumorigenesis. Specifically, grounding an organism produces measurable differences in the concentrations of white blood cells, cytokines, and other molecules involved in the inflammatory response. We present several hypotheses to explain observed effects, based on current research results and our understanding of the electronic aspects of cell and tissue physiology, cell biology, biophysics, and biochemistry. An experimental injury to muscles, known as delayed onset muscle soreness, has been used to monitor the immune response under grounded versus ungrounded conditions. Grounding reduces pain and alters the numbers of circulating neutrophils and lymphocytes, and also affects various circulating chemical factors related to inflammation. Keywords: chronic inflammation, immune system, wound repair, white blood cells, macrophages, autoimmune disorders

  8. Restoring Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Function Reduces Airway Bacteria and Inflammation in People with Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Lung Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisert, Katherine B; Heltshe, Sonya L; Pope, Christopher; Jorth, Peter; Wu, Xia; Edwards, Rachael M; Radey, Matthew; Accurso, Frank J; Wolter, Daniel J; Cooke, Gordon; Adam, Ryan J; Carter, Suzanne; Grogan, Brenda; Launspach, Janice L; Donnelly, Seamas C; Gallagher, Charles G; Bruce, James E; Stoltz, David A; Welsh, Michael J; Hoffman, Lucas R; McKone, Edward F; Singh, Pradeep K

    2017-06-15

    Previous work indicates that ivacaftor improves cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) activity and lung function in people with cystic fibrosis and G551D-CFTR mutations but does not reduce density of bacteria or markers of inflammation in the airway. These findings raise the possibility that infection and inflammation may progress independently of CFTR activity once cystic fibrosis lung disease is established. To better understand the relationship between CFTR activity, airway microbiology and inflammation, and lung function in subjects with cystic fibrosis and chronic airway infections. We studied 12 subjects with G551D-CFTR mutations and chronic airway infections before and after ivacaftor. We measured lung function, sputum bacterial content, and inflammation, and obtained chest computed tomography scans. Ivacaftor produced rapid decreases in sputum Pseudomonas aeruginosa density that began within 48 hours and continued in the first year of treatment. However, no subject eradicated their infecting P. aeruginosa strain, and after the first year P. aeruginosa densities rebounded. Sputum total bacterial concentrations also decreased, but less than P. aeruginosa. Sputum inflammatory measures decreased significantly in the first week of treatment and continued to decline over 2 years. Computed tomography scans obtained before and 1 year after ivacaftor treatment revealed that ivacaftor decreased airway mucous plugging. Ivacaftor caused marked reductions in sputum P. aeruginosa density and airway inflammation and produced modest improvements in radiographic lung disease in subjects with G551D-CFTR mutations. However, P. aeruginosa airway infection persisted. Thus, measures that control infection may be required to realize the full benefits of CFTR-targeting treatments.

  9. Rat strain differences in levels and effects of chronic inflammation due to intratracheal instillation of quartz on lung tumorigenesis induced by DHPN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yuko; Yokohira, Masanao; Hashimoto, Nozomi; Yamakawa, Keiko; Kishi, Sosuke; Ninomiya, Fumiko; Kanie, Shohei; Saoo, Kousuke; Imaida, Katsumi

    2014-10-01

    Chronic inflammatory effects of single intratracheal instillation (i.t.) of quartz on rat lung tumorigenesis were examined using 4 different animal models. At first, in order to determine an appropriate dose of quartz i.t. to promote lung tumorigenesis, F344 male rats were administrated single 0, 0.5, 1, 2 or 4 mg quartz/rat after initiation by N-bis(2-hydroxypropyl) nitrosamine (DHPN). Further studies were performed to examine strain differences of the effects of chronic inflammation caused by quartz i.t. in 3 strains of rat, i.e. F344, Wistar-Hannover and SD. Each was instilled with 2mg quartz/rat after DHPN administration and sacrificed in week 24. In addition, strain differences in generation of inflammation were determined at days 1 and 28. Finally, for determination of long-term effects period, F344 and Wistar-Hannover rats were similarly treated, but the experiment was terminated at week 52. In F344 rats, the tumor areas in DHPN treated groups showed a tendency to increase along with the dose of quartz. F344 rats demonstrated the highest and Wistar-Hannover rats the lowest sensitivity to quartz in acute and chronic phases in the 3 strains. In 52 week, in F344 rats, the multiplicity of tumors and the serum concentration of IL-6 in the group treated with DHPN and quartz were significantly increased. The present experiments indicated that chronic inflammation due to quartz instillation exerted promoting effects on lung carcinogenesis in F344, SD and Wistar-Hannover rats. The strain differences in tumor promotion appeared to correlate with inflammatory reactions to quartz and increase of IL-6. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. The Role of TNF Family Molecules Light in Cellular Interaction Between Airway Smooth Muscle Cells and T Cells During Chronic Allergic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fei; Xiong, Yi; Zhang, Yarui; Qiu, Chen; Li, Manhui; Shan, Aijun; Yang, Ying; Li, Binbin

    2018-02-19

    Interaction between T cells and airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells has been identified as an important factor in the development of asthma. LIGHT (known as TNFSF14) -mediated signaling likely contributes to various inflammatory disorders and airway remodeling. The objective of this study was to investigate the roles of LIGHT-mediated pathways in the interaction between ASM cells and T cells during chronic allergic inflammation. Mice were sensitized and challenged by ovalbumin (OVA) to induce chronic airway allergic inflammation. The control group received PBS only. The histological features and LIGHT expressions in lungs were assessed in vivo. Furthermore, T cells and ASM cells derived from the model mice were co-cultured both in the presence and absence of anti-LIGHT Ab for 72 h. The effects of LIGHT blockade on expressions of downstream signaling molecules, proliferation, and apoptosis of ASM cells, differentiation of T cells, and inflammatory cytokines release were evaluated. We demonstrated that LIGHT blockade strikingly inhibited the mRNA and protein expressions of HVEM, c-JUN, and NFκB. Additionally, LIGHT blockade resulted in decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of ASM cells. Moreover, depletion of LIGHT dramatically reduced the differentiation of CD4 + T cells into Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells, as well as inhibited inflammatory cytokines release including IL-13, TGF-β, and IFN-γ, which are associated with CD4 + T cell differentiation and ASM cell proliferation. LIGHT plays an important role in the interaction between T cells and ASM cells in chronic allergic asthma. Blockade of LIGHT markedly suppressed ASM hyperplasia and inflammatory responses, which might be modulated through HVEM-NFκB or c-JUN pathways. Therefore, targeting LIGHT is a promising therapeutic strategy for airway inflammation and remodeling in chronic allergic asthma.

  11. Indicators of inflammation and cellular damage in chronic asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic alcoholics: correlation with alteration of bilirubin and hepatic and pancreatic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borini Paulo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and hematimetric indicators of inflammation and cell damage were correlated with bilirubin and hepatic and pancreatic enzymes in 30 chronic male alcoholics admitted into psychiatric hospital for detoxification and treatment of alcoholism. Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and total bilirubin were altered, respectively, in 90%, 63%, 87%, 23% and 23% of the cases. None of the indicators of inflammation (lactic dehydrogenase, altered in 16% of the cases; alpha-1 globulin, 24%; alpha-2 globulin, 88%; leucocyte counts, 28% was correlated with alterations of bilirubin or liver enzymes. Lactic dehydrogenase was poorly sensitive for detection of hepatocytic or muscular damage. Alterations of alpha-globulins seemed to have been due more to alcohol metabolism-induced increase of lipoproteins than to inflammation. Among indicators of cell damage, serum iron, increased in 40% of the cases, seemed to be related to liver damage while creatine phosphokinase, increased in 84% of the cases, related to muscle damage. Hyperamylasemia was found in 20% of the cases and significantly correlated with levels of bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltransferase. It was indicated that injuries of liver, pancreas, salivary glands, and muscle occurred in asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic chronic alcoholics.

  12. Effects of central administration of oxytocin-saporin cytotoxin on chronic inflammation and feeding/drinking behaviors in adjuvant arthritic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Takanori; Kawasaki, Makoto; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Motojima, Yasuhito; Saito, Reiko; Ueno, Hiromichi; Maruyama, Takashi; Sabanai, Ken; Mori, Toshiharu; Ohnishi, Hideo; Sakai, Akinori; Ueta, Yoichi

    2016-05-16

    An increase in the arthritis index as a marker of chronic inflammation and suppression of food intake are observed in adjuvant arthritic (AA) rats. Our previous study demonstrated that central oxytocin (OXT)-ergic pathways were activated potently in AA rats. In the present study, OXT-saporin (SAP) cytotoxin, which chemically disrupts OXT signaling was administered centrally to determine whether central OXT may be involved in the developments of chronic inflammation and alteration of feeding/drinking behavior in AA rats. The arthritis index was significantly enhanced in AA rats pretreated with OXT-SAP administered intrathecally (i.t.) but not intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). Suppression of food intake was significantly attenuated transiently in AA rats pretreated with OXT-SAP administered i.c.v. but not i.t. Suppression of drinking behavior was not affected by i.t. or i.c.v. administration of OXT-SAP in AA rats. In addition, intraperitoneal administration of an OXT receptor antagonist did not change the arthritis index or feeding/drinking behavior in AA rats. These results suggest that central OXT-ergic pathways may be involved in anti-inflammation at the spinal level and suppression of feeding behavior at the forebrain-brainstem level in AA rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hydrogen-rich saline inhibits tobacco smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by alleviating airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zibing; Geng, Wenye; Jiang, Chuanwei; Zhao, Shujun; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Ying; Qin, Shucun; Li, Chenxu; Zhang, Xinfang; Si, Yanhong

    2017-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease induced by tobacco smoke has been regarded as a great health problem worldwide. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline, a novel antioxidant, on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and explore the underlying mechanism. Sprague-Dawley rats were made chronic obstructive pulmonary disease models via tobacco smoke exposure for 12 weeks and the rats were treated with 10 ml/kg hydrogen-rich saline intraperitoneally during the last 4 weeks. Lung function testing indicated hydrogen-rich saline decreased lung airway resistance and increased lung compliance and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 0.1 s/forced vital capacity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. Histological analysis revealed that hydrogen-rich saline alleviated morphological impairments of lung in tobacco smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. ELISA assay showed hydrogen-rich saline lowered the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-8 and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. The content of malondialdehyde in lung tissue and serum was also determined and the data indicated hydrogen-rich saline suppressed oxidative stress reaction. The protein expressions of mucin MUC5C and aquaporin 5 involved in mucus hypersecretion were analyzed by Western blot and ELISA and the data revealed that hydrogen-rich saline down-regulated MUC5AC level in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue and up-regulated aquaporin 5 level in lung tissue of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that administration of hydrogen-rich saline exhibits significant protective effect on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease through alleviating inflammation, reducing oxidative stress and lessening mucus hypersecretion in tobacco smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats

  14. The effects of grounding (earthing) on inflammation, the immune response, wound healing, and prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oschman, James L; Chevalier, Gaétan; Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Multi-disciplinary research has revealed that electrically conductive contact of the human body with the surface of the Earth (grounding or earthing) produces intriguing effects on physiology and health. Such effects relate to inflammation, immune responses, wound healing, and prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this report is two-fold: to 1) inform researchers about what appears to be a new perspective to the study of inflammation, and 2) alert researchers that the length of time and degree (resistance to ground) of grounding of experimental animals is an important but usually overlooked factor that can influence outcomes of studies of inflammation, wound healing, and tumorigenesis. Specifically, grounding an organism produces measurable differences in the concentrations of white blood cells, cytokines, and other molecules involved in the inflammatory response. We present several hypotheses to explain observed effects, based on current research results and our understanding of the electronic aspects of cell and tissue physiology, cell biology, biophysics, and biochemistry. An experimental injury to muscles, known as delayed onset muscle soreness, has been used to monitor the immune response under grounded versus ungrounded conditions. Grounding reduces pain and alters the numbers of circulating neutrophils and lymphocytes, and also affects various circulating chemical factors related to inflammation.

  15. Hypogonadism in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: relationship with airflow limitation, muscle weakness and systemic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Galal Daabis

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Hypogonadism is highly prevalent in clinically stable COPD patients and is particularly related to the severity of the airway obstruction. Systemic inflammation is present in stable COPD patients and its intensity is related to the severity of the underlying disease and it predisposes to skeletal muscle weakness and exercise intolerance. However, we failed to find a significant association between hypogonadism and muscle weakness or systemic inflammation.

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited CD8+ T cell-mediated myocarditis: chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules as potential therapeutic targets to control chronic inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseli Lannes-Vieira

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available In Chagas disease, during the acute phase, the establishment of inflammatory processes is crucial for Trypanosoma cruzi control in target tissues and for the establishment of host/parasite equilibrium. However, in about 30% of the patients, inflammation becomes progressive, resulting in chronic disease, mainly characterized by myocarditis. Although several hypothesis have been raised to explain the pathogenesis of chagasic myocardiopathy, including the persistence of the parasite and/or participation of autoimmune processes, the molecular mechanisms underlying the establishment of the inflammatory process leading to parasitism control but also contributing to the maintenance of T. cruzi-elicited chronic myocarditis remain unsolved. Trying to shed light on these questions, we have for several years been working with murine models for Chagas disease that reproduce the acute self-resolving meningoencephalitis, the encephalitis resulting of reactivation described in immunodeficient individuals, and several aspects of the acute and chronic myocarditis. In the present review, our results are summarized and discussed under the light of the current literature. Furthermore, rational therapeutic intervention strategies based on integrin-mediated adhesion and chemokine receptor-driven recruitment of leukocytes are proposed to control T. cruzi-elicited unbalanced inflammation.

  17. Novel detection of post-translational modifications in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells after chronic alcohol exposure: Role of inflammation regulator H4K12ac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parira, Tiyash; Figueroa, Gloria; Laverde, Alejandra; Casteleiro, Gianna; Gomez Hernandez, Mario E; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco; Agudelo, Marisela

    2017-09-11

    Previous reports on epigenetic mechanisms involved in alcohol abuse have focus on hepatic and neuronal regions, leaving the immune system and specifically monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) understudied. Our lab has previously shown histone deacetylases are modulated in cells derived from alcohol users and after in vitro acute alcohol treatment of human MDDCs. In the current study, we developed a novel screening tool using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FT-ICR MS) and single cell imaging flow cytometry to detect post-translational modifications (PTMs) in human MDDCs due to chronic alcohol exposure. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, in vitro chronic alcohol exposure of MDDCs modulates H3 and H4 and induces a significant increase in acetylation at H4K12 (H4K12ac). Moreover, the Tip60/HAT inhibitor, NU9056, was able to block EtOH-induced H4K12ac, enhancing the effect of EtOH on IL-15, RANTES, TGF-β1, and TNF-α cytokines while restoring MCP-2 levels, suggesting that H4K12ac may be playing a major role during inflammation and may serve as an inflammation regulator or a cellular stress response mechanism under chronic alcohol conditions.

  18. The malnutrition-inflammation-depression-arteriosclerosis complex is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause death in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myung-Jin; Seo, Jang-Won; Yoon, Jong-Woo; Lee, Sang-Kyu; Kim, Soo-Jin; Lee, Young-Ki; Noh, Jung-Woo; Koo, Ja-Ryong

    2012-01-01

    In chronic hemodialysis patients, malnutrition, inflammation, depression and arteriosclerosis are pathogenetically associated suggesting the presence of malnutrition-inflammation-depression-arteriosclerosis (MIDA) complex acting as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Nutritional status was assessed by serum albumin, subjective global assessment and normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR). Inflammation was assessed by serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Depression was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory and DSM-IV criteria. The severity of arteriosclerosis was measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV). Among 81 hemodialysis patients, 44 (54.3%) had malnutrition (albumin 1 mg/l). The prevalence of depression was 50.6% (n = 41). Fifty-nine (73.8%) had arteriosclerosis (measured PWV > expected PWV based on age/blood pressure/gender adjustment). The severity of the all four individual MIDA components correlated well with each other. The average number of the MIDA complication (MIDA score) was 2.27 ± 1.33. -During the 5-year follow-up, 40 cases of CVD and 26 cases of all-cause death occurred. In Cox analysis adjusted for -previous CVD, age, diabetes, blood pressure, pulse pressure, intradialytic hypotension, B-type natriuretic peptide, -hemoglobin and hemodialysis incompliance, the MIDA score was an independent predictor of CVD and all-cause death: hazard ratio (95% confidence interval); 1.89 (1.13-3.17) and 3.48 (1.32-9.21) for an increase of 1 MIDA score. This study suggests the presence of MIDA complex, which is composed of malnutrition, inflammation, depression and arteriosclerosis. The MIDA complex syndrome was an independent risk factor for CVD and all-cause death in chronic hemodialysis patients. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Effects of Salbutamol on Acute and Chronic Models of Inflammation in Rats: Involvement of an Antioxidant Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Uzkeser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible role of β-2 adrenergic receptors in modulation of inflammatory and nociceptive conditions suggests that the β-2 adrenergic receptor agonist, salbutamol, may have beneficial anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. Therefore, in this study, we induced inflammatory and nociceptive responses with carrageenan-induced paw edema or cotton-pellet-induced granuloma models, both of which result in oxidative stress. We hypothesized that salbutamol would prevent inflammatory and nociceptive responses by stimulating β-2 adrenergic receptors and the prevention of generation of ROS during the acute inflammation process in rats. Both doses of salbutamol used in the study (1 and 2 mg/kg effectively blocked the acute inflammation and inflammatory nociception induced by carrageenan. In the cotton-pellet-induced granuloma test, both doses of salbutamol also significantly decreased the weight of granuloma tissue on the cotton pellets when compared to the control. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of salbutamol were found to be comparable with those of indomethacin. Salbutamol decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and lipid peroxidation (LPO level and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and level of glutathione (GSH during the acute phase of inflammation. In conclusion, salbutamol can decrease acute and chronic inflammation, possibly through the stimulation of β-2 adrenergic receptors. This anti-inflammatory effect may be of significance in asthma treatment, where inflammation also takes part in the etiopathology. This study reveals that salbutamol has significant antioxidative effects, which at least partially explain its anti-inflammatory capabilities. These findings presented here may also shed light on the roles of β-2 adrenergic receptors in inflammatory and hyperalgesic conditions.

  20. Elevation of serum c-reactive protein in patients with OAB and IC/BPS implies chronic inflammation in the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Liu, Hsin-Tzu; Lin, Heng; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2011-03-01

    Chronic inflammation has been implicated in the development of overactive bladder (OAB) and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS). An elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP) has been associated with chronic inflammation and lower urinary tract symptoms. This study aims to elucidate the association between CRP and OAB or IC/BPS. Serum CRP and urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) levels were examined in 70 patients with OAB (n=22) or IC/BPS (n=48) and compared with 33 normal controls. Data of serum CRP and urinary NGF levels were compared among the controls, IC/PBS, and OAB. The Spearmen correlation analysis test and ANOVA (Kruskal-Wallis) test were used for statistical analysis with PBPS (1.76 ± 3.56 mg/L vs. 0.59 ± 0.40 mg/L, P=0.049) than in controls. No significant difference in CRP level was noted between patients with OAB and IC/BPS (P=0.43). In a subgroup analysis, patients of OAB wet had higher serum CRP level than that of OAB dry (2.95 ± 3.08 mg/L vs. 0.90 ± 0.52 mg/L); however, the difference did not reach statistical significance (P=0.34). The CRP between OAB wet and OAB patients with medical disease was not significantly different. There was no significant correlation between serum CRP and urinary NGF levels in the controls or patients with OAB or IC/BPS, except in the OAB patients with a CRP level >3 mg/L. Our data support the association between chronic inflammation of the urinary bladder in patients with OAB or IC/BPS. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Effects of a treatment with Se-rich rice flour high in resistant starch on enteric dysbiosis and chronic inflammation in diabetic ICR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huaibo; Wang, Wenjuan; Chen, Deyi; Zhu, Xiping; Meng, Lina

    2017-05-01

    Enteric dysbiosis is associated with chronic inflammation and interacts with obesity and insulin resistance. Obesity and diabetes are induced in ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) mice fed a high-fat diet and administered a streptozocin injection. These mice were treated with normal rice (NR), normal rice with a high resistant starch content (NRRS) or Se-rich rice (selenium-enriched rice) with a high resistant starch content (SRRS). Faecal cell counts of Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus and Enterococcus were significantly higher in SRRS-treated mice than in diabetic controls, while Enterobacter cloacae were lower. Similar results were also found in NRRS-treated mice. In contrast, no significant difference was found between NR-treated and diabetic control groups. The treatments with SRRS and NRRS reduced the faecal pH values of the diabetic mice. Regarding the inflammatory factor levels, lower levels of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), nuclear factor-k-gene binding (NF-κB) and leptin (LEP) and higher adiponutrin (ADPN) levels were found in the SRRS and NRRS-treated mice compared with the diabetic and NR-treated mice. In addition, the CRP, IL-6 and NF-κB levels in the SRRS-treated mice were significantly reduced compared with those observed in the NRRS-treated mice. The reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) results showed that the SRRS and NRRS-treated mice presented higher expression levels of orphan G protein-coupled receptor 41 (GPR41) and orphan G protein-coupled receptor 43 (GPR43) proteins compared with diabetic mice and NR-treated mice. These results indicate that treatments with rice high in RS exert beneficial effects by improving enteric dysbiosis and chronic inflammation. In addition, selenium and RS may exert synergistic effects on chronic inflammation. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Increased IgA responses to the LPS of commensal bacteria is associated with inflammation and activation of cell-mediated immunity in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michael; Twisk, Frank N M; Kubera, Marta; Ringel, Karl; Leunis, Jean-Claude; Geffard, Michel

    2012-02-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is accompanied by a) systemic IgA/IgM responses against the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of commensal bacteria; b) inflammation, e.g. increased plasma interleukin-(IL)1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α; and c) activation of cell-mediated immunity (CMI), as demonstrated by increased neopterin. To study the relationships between the IgA/IgM responses to the LPS of microbiota, inflammation, CMI and the symptoms of ME/CFS we measured the IgA/IgM responses to the LPS of 6 different enterobacteria, serum IL-1, TNFα, neopterin, and elastase in 128 patients with ME/CFS and chronic fatigue (CF). Severity of symptoms was assessed by the Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (FF) Rating Scale. Serum IL-1, TNFα, neopterin and elastase are significantly higher in patients with ME/CFS than in CF patients. There are significant and positive associations between the IgA responses to LPS and serum IL-1, TNFα, neopterin and elastase. Patients with an abnormally high IgA response show increased serum IL-1, TNFα and neopterin levels, and higher ratings on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) than subjects with a normal IgA response. Serum IL-1, TNFα and neopterin are significantly related to fatigue, a flu-like malaise, autonomic symptoms, neurocognitive disorders, sadness and irritability. The findings show that increased IgA responses to commensal bacteria in ME/CFS are associated with inflammation and CMI activation, which are associated with symptom severity. It is concluded that increased translocation of commensal bacteria may be responsible for the disease activity in some ME/CFS patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Military-related traumatic brain injury and neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C.; Robinson, Meghan E.

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) includes concussion, subconcussion, and most exposures to explosive blast from improvised explosive devices. mTBI is the most common traumatic brain injury affecting military personnel; however, it is the most difficult to diagnose and the least well understood. It is also recognized that some mTBIs have persistent, and sometimes progressive, long-term debilitating effects. Increasing evidence suggests that a single traumatic brain injury can produce long-term gray and white matter atrophy, precipitate or accelerate age-related neurodegeneration, and increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and motor neuron disease. In addition, repetitive mTBIs can provoke the development of a tauopathy, chronic traumatic encephalopathy. We found early changes of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in four young veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflict who were exposed to explosive blast and in another young veteran who was repetitively concussed. Four of the five veterans with early-stage chronic traumatic encephalopathy were also diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder. Advanced chronic traumatic encephalopathy has been found in veterans who experienced repetitive neurotrauma while in service and in others who were accomplished athletes. Clinically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory loss, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and progress slowly over decades. Pathologically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy produces atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, thalamus, and hypothalamus; septal abnormalities; and abnormal deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau as neurofibrillary tangles and disordered neurites throughout the brain. The incidence and prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the genetic risk factors critical to its development are currently unknown. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy has clinical and

  4. Chronic tooth pulp inflammation induces persistent expression of phosphorylated ERK (pERK) and phosphorylated p38 (pp38) in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, M.A.; Allen, C.E.; Billinton, A.; King, A.E.; Boissonade, F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase are transiently phosphorylated (activated) in the spinal cord and trigeminal nucleus by acute noxious stimuli. Acute stimulation of dental pulp induces short-lived ERK activation in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc), and p38 inhibition attenuates short-term sensitization in Vc induced by acute pulpal stimulation. We have developed a model to study central changes following chronic inflammation of dental pulp that induces long-term sensitization. Here, we examine the effects of chronic inflammation and acute stimulation on the expression of phosphorylated ERK (pERK), phosphorylated p38 (pp38) and Fos in Vc. Results Chronic inflammation alone induced bilateral expression of pERK and pp38 in Vc, but did not induce Fos expression. Stimulation of both non-inflamed and inflamed pulps significantly increased pERK and pp38 bilaterally; expression was greatest in inflamed, stimulated animals, and was similar following 10-min and 60-min stimulation. Stimulation for 60 min, but not 10 min, induced Fos in ipsilateral Vc; Fos expression was significantly greater in inflamed, stimulated animals. pERK was present in both neurons and astrocytes; pp38 was present in neurons and other non-neuronal, non-astrocytic cell types. Conclusions This study provides the first demonstration that chronic inflammation of tooth pulp induces persistent bilateral activation of ERK and p38 within Vc, and that this activation is further increased by acute stimulation. This altered activity in intracellular signaling is likely to be linked to the sensitization that is seen in our animal model and in patients with pulpitis. Our data indicate that pERK and pp38 are more accurate markers of central change than Fos expression. In our model, localization of pERK and pp38 within specific cell types differs from that seen following acute stimulation. This may indicate specific roles for different cell types in

  5. Redox homeostasis and cellular stress response in aging and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Vittorio; Cornelius, Carolin; Mancuso, Cesare; Lentile, Riccardo; Stella, A M Giuffrida; Butterfield, D Allan

    2010-01-01

    Decreased expression and/or activity of antioxidant proteins leads to oxidative stress, accelerated aging, and neurodegeneration. While overwhelming levels and uncontrolled/dysregulated actions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) lead to deleterious effects, tighter regulation of those plays an important role in cell signaling. Mutations causing protein misfolding and the overload of toxic products derived from the free radical oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and glucose contribute to the disruption of the cellular redox homeostasis. Collectively or individually, these effects create pro-oxidant conditions in cells. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damage, modulate intracellular signaling, and can ultimately lead to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. Emerging evidence indicates that homocysteine (Hcy), a non-protein amino acid naturally present in the plasma, is implicated as a risk factor for numerous diseases. In particular, increased levels of circulating Hcy have been recognized as an independent risk factor for the development of vascular disease(s). Recent findings emphasize a relationship between elevated Hcy levels and neurodegeneration, which can be observed in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. An integrated response exists in the brain to detect and control diverse forms of stress. This is accomplished by a complex network of the so-called longevity assurance processes, which are controlled by several genes termed "vitagenes." Among these, the heat-shock proteins (HSPs) form a highly conserved system that is responsible for the preservation and repair of the correct protein conformation. Recent studies have shown that the heat-shock response (HSR) contributes to cytoprotection in a number of human diseases including inflammation, cancer, aging, and neurodegenerative disorders. Given the broad cytoprotective properties of the HSR, interest mounts currently among investigators toward discovering and developing

  6. The multiple sclerosis visual pathway cohort: understanding neurodegeneration in MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Fraga-Pumar, Elena; Gabilondo, Iñigo; Martínez-Heras, Eloy; Torres-Torres, Ruben; Ortiz-Pérez, Santiago; Llufriu, Sara; Tercero, Ana; Andorra, Magi; Roca, Marc Figueras; Lampert, Erika; Zubizarreta, Irati; Saiz, Albert; Sanchez-Dalmau, Bernardo; Villoslada, Pablo

    2014-12-15

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of the Central Nervous System with two major underlying etiopathogenic processes: inflammation and neurodegeneration. The latter determines the prognosis of this disease. MS is the main cause of non-traumatic disability in middle-aged populations. The MS-VisualPath Cohort was set up to study the neurodegenerative component of MS using advanced imaging techniques by focusing on analysis of the visual pathway in a middle-aged MS population in Barcelona, Spain. We started the recruitment of patients in the early phase of MS in 2010 and it remains permanently open. All patients undergo a complete neurological and ophthalmological examination including measurements of physical and disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale; Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite and neuropsychological tests), disease activity (relapses) and visual function testing (visual acuity, color vision and visual field). The MS-VisualPath protocol also assesses the presence of anxiety and depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), general quality of life (SF-36) and visual quality of life (25-Item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire with the 10-Item Neuro-Ophthalmic Supplement). In addition, the imaging protocol includes both retinal (Optical Coherence Tomography and Wide-Field Fundus Imaging) and brain imaging (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). Finally, multifocal Visual Evoked Potentials are used to perform neurophysiological assessment of the visual pathway. The analysis of the visual pathway with advance imaging and electrophysilogical tools in parallel with clinical information will provide significant and new knowledge regarding neurodegeneration in MS and provide new clinical and imaging biomarkers to help monitor disease progression in these patients.

  7. Increased White Matter Inflammation in Aging- and Alzheimer’s Disease Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Raj

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic neuroinflammation, which is primarily mediated by microglia, plays an essential role in aging and neurodegeneration. It is still unclear whether this microglia-induced neuroinflammation occurs globally or is confined to distinct brain regions. In this study, we investigated microglia activity in various brain regions upon healthy aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD-related pathology in both human and mouse samples. In purified microglia isolated from aging mouse brains, we found a profound gene expression pattern related to pro-inflammatory processes, phagocytosis, and lipid homeostasis. Particularly in white matter microglia of 24-month-old mice, abundant expression of phagocytic markers including Mac-2, Axl, CD16/32, Dectin1, CD11c, and CD36 was detected. Interestingly, in white matte