WorldWideScience

Sample records for neurocysticercosis case caused

  1. Acute hydrocephalus caused by intraspinal neurocysticercosis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seok-Won; Wang, Hui Sun; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Dong-Min

    2014-01-02

    Intraspinal neurocysticercosis is an uncommon manifestation that may present as an isolated lesion. Furthermore, acute hydrocephalus caused by isolated intraspinal neurocysticercosis without concomitant cerebral involvement is extremely rare. A 64-year-old man presented with a history of severe headache, an unsteady gait, and occasional urinary incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoraco-lumbar spine revealed multiple, cystic, contrast-enhancing intraspinal lesions. A computed tomographic scan of the brain showed marked ventricular dilatation but no intraparenchymal lesions or intraventricular cysticercal lesions. This case of acute hydrocephalus was found to be caused by isolated intraspinal neurocysticercosis and was treated by ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement and surgical removal of the intraspinal lesions (which were histologically confirmed as neurocysticercosis), followed by administration of dexamethasone and albendazole. Isolated spinal neurocysticercosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute hydrocephalus when no explanation is found in the brain, particularly in geographical regions endemic for cysticercosis.

  2. An uncommon cause of seizures in children living in developed countries: neurocysticercosis -a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denegri Federica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neurocysticercosis represents an important cause of seizures in children in endemic countries, such as Latin America, Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, while in Europe, especially in Italy, the cases of neurocysticercosis are anectodal. We report the case of a 6 year old boy, born and lived for four years in Cameroon, who presented a right emiconvulsion. The diagnosis was neurocysticercosis. This case accentuates the need to consider neurocysticercosis in a child presenting with non febrile seizures, mainly if he emigrated from an area of high prevalence or if he had long-term stay in endemic regions.

  3. [Neurocysticercosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscherpel, C; Gottschalk, A; Meyding-Lamadé, U; Fink, G R; Burghaus, L

    2015-08-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a leading cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide and endemic in underdeveloped and developing regions. As a result of increased migration and traveling, cases of neurocysticercosis reach Europe more frequently. Neurological symptoms are multifarious and often nonspecific, so that neurocysticercosis poses a diagnostic challenge. We report a case of a patient in whom the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis was achieved quickly via the patient's history, neuroimaging and serology. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. [Paediatric neurocysticercosis: two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieiro-Dantas, Carla; Serramito-García, Ramón; Reyes-Santías, Rosa M; Rico-Cotelo, María; Allut, Alfredo G; Gelabert-González, Miguel

    2013-01-16

    Neurocysticercosis, caused by the larvae of Taenia solium, is the most common parasitic infection of the central nervous system in humans. Considered an endemic parasitosis in developing countries including Latin America, Asia and Africa while in Europa, the cases of neurocysticercosis are anecdotal. We report two cases of neurocysticercosis in children of non-Spanish origin who presented with seizures, with the initial diagnosis of brain tumors both were treated with surgery; later, to be the diagnosis of neurocisticercosis antiparasitic therapy was administered. Neurocysticercosis can be a potential cause of epilepsy even in non-endemic countries. Some cases may be difficult to diagnose and they can be confused with other intracranial lesions. Clinicians should be aware of this condition given increasing incidence in Spain and neurocysticercosis should be always be considered in the differential diagnosis particularly in patients from Latin America and Africa.

  5. Intradural spinal neurocysticercosis: case illustration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balderrama Jorge

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neurocysticercosis (NCC is a common parasitic infection of the central nervous system caused by the larvae of the Taenia solium. Spinal cord involvement is very uncommon. Clinical case: A female patient with a history of NCC presented with chronic and recurrent headache associated with motor and sensory deficit, which develops tonic-clonic convulsion, with spatial disorientation. She also had intracranial hypertension syndrome, meningitis syndrome, and pyramidal sygns suggestive of spinal NCC. Conclusions: Neurocysticercosis usually occurs in developing countries and should be considered as a differential diagnosis of neurological diseases. Early diagnosis and treatment are mandatory, as well as education to the community to primary prevention.

  6. Cervicomedullary neurocysticercosis causing obstructive hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Doris D; Huang, Michael C

    2015-09-01

    We present a 45-year-old man with tussive headache and blurred vision found to have obstructive hydrocephalus from a neurocysticercal cyst at the cervicomedullary junction who underwent surgical removal of the cyst. We performed a suboccipital craniectomy to remove the cervicomedullary cyst en bloc. Cyst removal successfully treated the patient's headaches without necessitating permanent cerebrospinal fluid diversion. Neurocysticercosis is the most common parasite infection of the central nervous system causing seizures and, less commonly, hydrocephalus. Intraventricular cysts or arachnoiditis usually cause hydrocephalus in neurocysticercosis but craniocervical junction cysts causing obstructive hydrocephalus are rare. Neurocysticercosis at the craniocervical junction may cause Chiari-like symptoms. In the absence of arachnoiditis and leptomeningeal enhancement, surgical removal of the intact cyst can lead to favorable outcomes. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Second Reactivation of Neurocysticercosis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Young Sup; Hwang, Hee Young; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Jee Eun; Kim, Hyung Sik [Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    This report describes the first case involving a second reactivation of neurocysticercosis. There was peripheral enhancement and surrounding edema at multiple calcified lesions in both cerebral hemispheres on the brain MRI. One must be aware of the possibility of reactivation of neurocysticercosis to make the correct diagnosis

  8. Neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2014-01-01

    Known as a disease of swine in ancient civilizations, cysticercosis is currently considered the most common helminthic infection of the nervous system, and a leading cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. The disease occurs when humans become intermediate hosts of the tapeworm Taenia solium by ingesting its eggs from contaminated food or, most often, directly from a Taenia carrier by the fecal-oral route. Once in the human intestine, Taenia eggs evolve to oncospheres that, in turn, cross the intestinal wall and lodge in human tissues - especially the nervous system - where cysticerci develop. The brain is a hostile environment in which parasites attempt to escape the immune surveillance while the host is trying to drive out the infection. In some cases, cysticerci are destroyed by this immunological attack, while in others, parasites may live unchanged for years. Cysticerci may be located in brain parenchyma, subarachnoid space, ventricular system, or spinal cord, causing a myriad of pathologic changes that are the main changes responsible for the clinical pleomorphism of neurocysticercosis. Seizures are the most common clinical manifestation of the disease, but some patients present with focal deficits, intracranial hypertension, or cognitive decline. With the exception of cystic lesions showing the scolex as an eccentric nodule, neuroimaging findings of neurocysticercosis are nonspecific and may be seen in other diseases of the nervous system. Likewise, immune diagnostic tests have been faced with problems related to poor sensitivity or specificity. Accurate diagnosis is possible after interpretation of clinical data together with findings of neuroimaging studies and results of immunologic tests, in a proper epidemiologic scenario. The introduction of cysticidal drugs has changed the prognosis of neurocysticercosis. Praziquantel and albendazole have been shown to reduce the burden of infection in the brain (as seen on neuroimaging studies) and to improve the

  9. Neurocysticercosis presenting as acute psychosis: a rare case report from rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Archana; Kumar, Alok

    2013-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis, caused by the larval stage of the tapeworm Taenia solium, is the most common parasitic infection of the central nervous system. Its clinical manifestations are varied, non specific and pleomorphic, depending on multiple factors. Seizures are the commonest presentation of neurocysticercosis. In this communication we describe an interesting case of multiple neurocysticercosis in a young presenting with psychiatric manifestations. He responded well to steroid and antipsychotic treatment. This case highlights an uncommon presentation of neurocysticercosis and significance of early recognizing this reversible cause will avoid delay in treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Neurocysticercosis masquerading psychotic disorder: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachita Sarangi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychotic manifestations are uncommon in neurocysticercosis. This article describes a ten year girl presented with manic–psychotic manifestation for which she was under treatment with antipsychotics for eight months. Eventually she developed generalized tonic clonic seizure and CT scan of brain revealed small isodense right posterior parietal lesion of 5 mm size with perifocal edema. CECT revealed intense nodular post contrast enhancement. This highlights the possible misdiagnosis of a case of neurocysticercosis as an organic psychotic disorder so it should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with neurological as well as psychiatric manifestations in endemic area like India.

  11. Pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinoma mimicking neurocysticercosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, John C; Robinson, Stephen R; Schell, Andrew; Vaughan, Stephen

    2016-06-02

    Neurocysticercosis occurs when the eggs of the pork tapeworm (Taenia solium) migrate and hatch into larvae within the central nervous system. Neurocysticercosis is the most common cause of seizures in the developing world and is characterized on brain imaging by cysts in different stages of evolution. In Canada, cases of neurocysticercosis are rare and most of these patients acquire the disease outside of Canada. We report the case of a patient with multiple intracranial lesions whose history and diagnostic imaging were consistent with neurocysticercosis. Pathological investigations ultimately demonstrated that her brain lesions were secondary to malignancy. Brain metastases are considered to be the most common cause of intracranial cystic lesions. We present the case of a 60-year-old Canadian-born Caucasian woman with a subacute history of ataxia, lower extremity hyper-reflexia, and otalgia who resided near a pig farm for most of her childhood. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed that she had multiple heterogeneous intracranial cysts, suggestive of neurocysticercosis. Despite a heavy burden of disease, serological tests for cysticercosis were negative. This result and a lack of the central scolices on neuroimaging that are pathognomonic of neurocysticercosis prompted whole-body computed tomography imaging to identify another etiology. The whole-body computed tomography revealed right hilar lymphadenopathy associated with soft tissue nodules in her chest wall and abdomen. A biopsy of an anterior chest wall nodule demonstrated high-grade poorly differentiated carcinoma with necrosis, which stained strongly positive for thyroid transcription factor-1 and synaptophysin on immunohistochemistry. A diagnosis of stage 4 metastatic small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma was made and our patient was referred for oncological palliative treatment. This case illustrates the importance of the diagnostic approach to intracranial lesions. Our patient

  12. [Giant racemose subarachnoid and intraventricular neurocysticercosis: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Larsen, Alvaro; Monteagudo, Maria; Lozano-Setien, Elena; Garcia-Garcia, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is the most frequent parasitic disease of the central nervous system. It is caused by the larvae of Taenia solium, which can affect different anatomical sites. In Spain there is an increasing prevalence mainly due to immigration from endemic areas. The extraparenchymal forms are less common, but more serious because they usually develop complications. Neuroimaging plays a major role in the diagnosis and follow-up of this disease, supported by serology and a compatible clinical and epidemiological context. First-line treatments are cysticidal drugs such as albendazole and praziquantel, usually coadministered with corticosteroids, and in some cases surgery is indicated. We here report a case of neurocysticercosis with simultaneous intraventricular and giant racemose subarachnoid involvement. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Neurocysticercosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Neurocysticercosis. Causative agent: Taenia solium (pork tapeworm). Larval form: cysticercus cellulosae. Commonest parasitic infection of the brain. Prevalent in under-developed regions of the world with poor santitation. Seizures or epilepsy is the commonest (>70% of ...

  14. A Classic Neurocysticercosis Case with an Unusual Complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Rodrigues

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cysticercosis is triggered by infection with the larval form of the tapeworm Taenia solium. The usual sites for the development of cyscticerci are the central nervous system (neurocysticercosis – NCC, subcutaneous tissue, skeletal muscle, heart muscle, and the eye. Ocular cysticercosis is caused by the growth of the larvae within ocular tissues. The extraocular muscles form is the most common type of orbital cysticercosis. We report a case of a patient admitted with seizures secondary to NCC, who developed ocular symptoms after starting combined treatment with albendazole, praziquantel and dexamethasone. The investigation revealed a cystic lesion in the lateral rectus muscle.

  15. A case report on subarachnoid and intraventricular neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is the most common central nervous system helminthic infection in humans. We hereby present a case combining two rare manifestations of neurocysticercosis: the subarachnoid and intraventricular forms. The patient presented with hydrocephalus and neurologic deficits and although endoscopic removal of the cysts and two cycles of postoperative cysticidal drugs resulted in resolution of symptoms, they later recurred. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement and a further cycle of albendazole plus dexamethasone led to substantial clinical improvement. Extraparenchymal neurocysticercosis may be challenging to diagnose and treat and is usually associated with a poorer prognosis. Clinicians should be aware of this condition.

  16. Report of three imported cases of neurocysticercosis in Guadeloupe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaizot, R; Melot, B; Schepers, K; Nicolas, M; Gaumond, S; Poullain, P; Belaye, L; Lannuzel, A; Hoen, B

    2017-01-31

    Neurocysticercosis is endemic in most countries of Central and South America but has rarely been described in the French West Indies. We aimed to better understand the clinical and radiological presentation of our cases. We report three cases of neurocysticercosis in patients living in Guadeloupe, with different clinical and radiological presentations. Given the eventuality of autochtonous transmission, the diagnosis should be considered in all patients living in Guadeloupe presenting with seizures.

  17. Neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo M. Takayanagui

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cysticercosis is one of the most common parasitic diseases of the nervous system in humans, and constitutes a major public health problem for most of the developing world. The clinical manifestations of neurocysticercosis (NCC largely depend on the the host immune response against the parasite. NCC diagnosis is based upon neuroimaging studies (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and antibody/antigen detection in the serum and the cerebrospinal fluid. Anticysticercal therapy has been marked by an intense controversy. Randomized controlled trials evaluating the clinical benefit of treatment have yield conflicting data with some studies indicating a benefit and others failing to show a difference. Prevention strategies must rely on multiple approaches, tailoring each to the special features of the particular endemic area.

  18. [Temporal lobe epilepsy and active neurocysticercosis: two representative case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Zúñiga, Rodrigo; Pérez-Gómez, Héctor R; Gaytán-Martínez, Luis A; Vega-Ruiz, Brenda; Soto-Rodríguez, Sofía; Rochín-Mozqueda, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    There are limited evidences reported of temporal lobe epilepsy associated with active cysticercosis in cystic stage. The objective is to present the correlation between active cysticercosis in topographical zones associated with temporal lobe epilepsy, with neuropsychiatric manifestations and pattern of secondarily generalized partial seizures. Two cases of adult patients with neuropsychiatric manifestations of one year evolution, refractory to antipsychotic drug treatment, and who subsequently appear late onset partial-secondarily generalized seizures. Cysticercosis active presence in the temporal lobe in one patient, and the insula in the other, is identified. A better clinical control after albendazol treatment and subsequently anticonvulsant therapy only remained to evaluate pertinence of pharmacological withdrawal criteria. Active neurocysticercosis, may be the cause of acquired neuropsychiatric disorders and temporal lobe epilepsy of late onset when the topography is in the mesolimbic circuit. Early etiologic diagnosis and appropriate treatment allows adequate control of their symptoms and potentially final cure.

  19. Reduced percentage of neurocysticercosis cases among patients with late-onset epilepsy in the new millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Del Brutto, Victor J

    2012-11-01

    To determine if the number of neurocysticercosis cases among patients with late-onset epilepsy has decreased over the past two decades. Retrospective cohort study of 431 consecutive patients with recurrent seizures starting after the age of 20 years evaluated at our Institution from 1990 to 2009. Patients were classified according to the year in which they were first seen. Group I included 129 patients evaluated between 1990 and 1994, Group II included 108 patients evaluated between 1995 and 1999, Group III included 106 patients evaluated between 2000 and 2004, and Group IV included 88 patients evaluated between 2005 and 2009. We correlated the percentage of persons with cryptogenic and symptomatic epilepsy between the groups to determine if there was any change in the causes of late-onset epilepsy. One hundred seventy-one patients had cryptogenic and 260 had symptomatic epilepsy. Common causes of symptomatic epilepsy were neurocysticercosis in 120 cases, cerebrovascular disease in 68, and brain tumors in 40. We found a reduction in the number of patients with symptomatic epilepsy (p=0.0007) as well as a reduction in the number of neurocysticercosis cases (p=0.0004) over the study years. There was a reduction in the weight of neurocysticercosis as an etiological factor for symptomatic late-onset epilepsy related to a drop in the number of patients with this condition evaluated between 2005 and 2009 (p=0.0045). The number of neurocysticercosis cases among patients with late-onset epilepsy has changed over the years. This parasitic disease is no longer the most common cause of symptomatic late-onset epilepsy in our population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary Spinal Intramedullary Neurocysticercosis: A Report of 3 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subramanya G S; Mehta, Ritu; Macha, Shrikant; Tripathi, Sanjog

    2017-09-01

    We describe a series of 3 cases of the rare intramedullary form of primary spinal neurocysticercosis. The cases were seen in varied age groups and showed different profiles at presentation. All the cases were thoroughly evaluated clinically and radiologically. Serologic tests were not conducted. In all cases, magnetic resonance imaging showed a large intramedullary lesion in the thoracic spinal cord consisting of a cystic lesion with a well-defined intramural nodule. One case was managed with steroids and cysticidal therapy, a second case was managed with steroids and surgery (2 emergency procedures), while the third case was managed without any medical or surgical intervention, as the patient was unwilling for either. All cases showed good neurologic recovery. In the second case where surgery was done, histologic examination of the resected specimen demonstrated the cysticercal parasite surrounded by mixed inflammatory infiltrate. As there were no intracranial lesions in all 3 cases, the final diagnosis was primary isolated intramedullary neurocysticercosis. Primary isolated intramedullary-neurocysticercosis remains a rare condition afflicting the spinal cord. It forms a small subset of cysticercal infestation of the neuraxis. Such evidence is rare, and only anecdotal reports are available. Our case series captures the wide spectrum of presentations, as well as the management options, and highlights the varied ways in which these cases were managed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Neurocysticercosis as an important differential of seizures in pregnancy: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhal Suresh K

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Seizures in pregnancy usually result from eclampsia, epilepsy or central nervous system disorders. Neurocysticercosis is a rare, but an important, cause of first-time convulsions in pregnancy. Case presentations We report the cases of two Indian women, aged 20 and 24 years old respectively, with neurocysticercosis presenting in the second trimester of pregnancy with convulsions. Both had marginally raised blood pressure with 1+ urine albumin and neither had a past history of convulsions. The neurocysticercosis was diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging of the head, which showed spherical ring-enhancing lesions in the brain. In one woman, pregnancy was terminated due to spina bifida in the fetus and she was discharged on albendazole and phenytoin. The second woman was put on carbamazepine: she had an emergency Cesarean section at term for fetal distress and delivered a healthy baby. Her postnatal period was uneventful. Conclusion Neurocysticercosis should be considered in pregnant women presenting with seizures which cannot be explained by eclampsia, especially in early pregnancy.

  2. A rare case of racemose neurocysticercosis and its complications. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Jaime; Braz, Ana; Conceição, Carla; Rios, Cristina; Reis, João

    2015-08-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a central nervous system infection caused by the pork tapeworm Taenia solium. The disease is endemic in Central and South America, Asia and Africa. Racemose neurocysticercosis refers to cysts in the subarachnoid space and is characterized by proliferative lobulated cysts without a scolex. We report a case of a 43-year-old woman with an eight-month history of headaches, ataxia and loss of vision. CT and MRI showed an intraventricular cyst, causing entrapment of Monro foramina and hydrocephalus, smaller cysts at subarachnoid space in temporal lobes, Sylvian fissures, supra-selar and perimesencephalic cisterns, and an intra-orbital cyst. Additionally, there were acute ischemic vascular lesions on the left thalamus and corpus callosum splenium and subacute ischemic lesions of both occipital lobes. The diagnosis of racemose cysticercosis was made after biopsy and drainage of the intraventricular cyst. It is important to recognize neurocysticercosis as a differential diagnosis in intra-cranial cysts, not only intraparenchymal cysts. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Intraventricular Taenia solium Neurocysticercosis: A Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Pant

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NCC, caused by the pork tapeworm Taenia solium, is reported to be a common condition in Nepal. So far imaging diagnosis was mainstay of the diagnosis. In this paper, we report three patients presenting with neurological symptoms due to intraventricular NCC. We have diagnosed the causative agent as T. solium on molecular basis. Further research is warranted to assess the actual health impact of T. solium in Nepal. Keywords: Intraventricular neurocysticerosis, PCR-RELP, Taenia solium.

  4. Clinical management of neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2014-04-01

    Neurocysticercosis is the most common helminthic disease of the nervous system and a leading cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. Differences in the number and location of lesions as well as in the severity of the immune response against the parasites, makes neurocysticercosis a complex disease. Therefore, a single therapeutic approach is not expected to be useful in every patient. Introduction of cysticidal drugs - praziquantel and albendazole - have changed the prognosis of thousands of patients with neurocysticercosis. While pioneer trials of therapy were flawed by a poor design, recent studies have shown that cysticidal drugs results in disappearance of lesions and clinical improvement in most cases. Nevertheless, some patients with parenchymal neurocysticercosis may be left with remaining cysts and may develop recurrent seizures after therapy, and many patients with subarachnoid cysts may need repeated courses of therapy. In addition, not all forms of the disease benefit from cysticidal drugs.

  5. Three cases of imported neurocysticercosis in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, Maria Teresa; Tamarozzi, Francesca; Cattaneo, Federico; Brunetti, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is an important cause of adult-onset seizures in endemic areas, whereas it is emerging in some nonendemic areas as well because of extensive immigration. We describe three cases of imported NCC recently admitted to San Bortolo Hospital in Vicenza, located in Northern Italy. All patients were immigrants. One patient was human immunodeficiency virus positive with severe immunosuppression. The diagnosis of NCC was made on the basis of magnetic resonance results; failure of anti-Toxoplasma, antitubercular, and antifungal therapy; and regression of the cystic lesions after empiric therapy with albendazole. Serology was positive in only one case. In one patient, NCC was diagnosed by biopsy of the brain lesion. In nonendemic countries, NCC should be included in the differential diagnosis of all patients coming from endemic areas with seizures, hydrocephalus, and compatible lesions on brain imaging. Long-term follow-up is required but may be difficult to implement because these patients tend to move in search of employment. Screening of patient's household contacts for Taenia solium infection should always be carried out. © 2013 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  6. Bruns' syndrome and racemose neurocysticercosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Diehl Rodriquez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cysticercosis is an infection caused by the larval stage of the tapeworm Taenia solium. The parasite may infect the central nervous system, causing neurocysticercosis (NCC. The clinical manifestations depend on load, type, size, location, stage of development of the cysticerci, and the host's immune response against the parasite. The racemose variety occurs in the ventricles or basal cisterns and is a malignant form. Mobile ventricular mass can produce episodic hydrocephalus on changing head posture with attacks of headache, vomiting, and vertigo, triggered by abrupt movement of the head, a phenomenon called Bruns' syndrome (BS. We report a patient with racemose NCC and BS.

  7. An incidental diagnosis of neurocysticercosis in a dental patient.

    OpenAIRE

    PUTTARAJU, Mahesh K; Srikanth Hanasoge Srivathsa

    2013-01-01

    Tenia solium, a parasite causes cysticercous cellulose when affecting the central nervous system, the manifestation is called neurocysticercosis. The most common symptom in neurocysticercosis is seizure. Generally, oral diagnosticians come across cases of oral cysticercosis and it is rare to find a case of neurocysticercosis in the dental office, as it goes undetected. Sometimes, when patients experience seizure in the dental office and subsequent evaluation is performed, rarity such as this ...

  8. An incidental diagnosis of neurocysticercosis in a dental patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh K Puttaraju

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tenia solium, a parasite causes cysticercous cellulose when affecting the central nervous system, the manifestation is called neurocysticercosis. The most common symptom in neurocysticercosis is seizure. Generally, oral diagnosticians come across cases of oral cysticercosis and it is rare to find a case of neurocysticercosis in the dental office, as it goes undetected. Sometimes, when patients experience seizure in the dental office and subsequent evaluation is performed, rarity such as this can be detected. One case of neurocysticercosis in a 27 year old unmarried female patient detected due to its presentation in the dental office is being reported here.

  9. The Impact of Neurocysticercosis in California: A Review of Hospitalized Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croker, Curtis; Redelings, Matthew; Reporter, Roshan; Sorvillo, Frank; Mascola, Laurene; Wilkins, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    To assess the burden of neurocysticercosis (NCC) in California we examined statewide hospital discharge data for 2009. There were 304 cases hospitalized with NCC identified (incidence = 0.8 per 100,000). Cases were mostly Latino (84.9%), slightly more likely to be male than female (men 57.6%, women 42.4%) with an average age of 43.5 years. A majority of cases were hospitalized in Southern California (72.1%) and many were hospitalized in Los Angeles County (44.7%). Men were more likely than women to have severe disease including hydrocephalus (29.7% vs. 18.6%, p = 0.027), resulting in longer hospitalizations (>4 days, 48.0% vs. 32.6%, p = 0.007) that were more costly (charge>$40 thousand men = 46.9% vs. woman = 4.1%, p = 0.026). Six deaths were recorded (2.0%). The total of NCC-related hospital charges exceeded $17 million; estimated hospital costs exceeded $5 million. Neurocysticercosis causes appreciable disease and exacts a considerable economic burden in California. PMID:22292097

  10. Surgical treatment of neurocysticercosis. Retrospective cohort study and an illustrative case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Aline Lariessy Campos; Araujo, João Luiz Vitorino; Ferraz, Vinicius Ricieri; Lovato, Renan Maximilian; Pedrozo, Charles Alfred Grander; Aguiar, Guilherme Brasileiro de; Veiga, José Carlos Esteves

    2017-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is prevalent in developing countries and manifests with several neurological signs and symptoms that may be fatal. The cysts may be parenchymal or extraparenchymal and therefore several signs and symptoms may occur. Depending on their location, neurosurgical procedures may be required, sometimes as emergencies. The aim here was to review 10-year statistics on all surgical neurocysticercosis cases at a large public tertiary-level hospital. Retrospective cohort at a large public tertiary-level hospital. All surgical neurocysticercosis cases seen between July 2006 and July 2016 were reviewed. Parenchymal and extraparenchymal forms were considered, along with every type of surgical procedure (shunt, endoscopic third ventriculostomy and craniotomy). The literature was reviewed through PubMed, using the terms "neurocysticercosis", "surgery", "shunt" and "hydrocephalus". 37 patients underwent neurosurgical procedures during the study period. Most were male (62.16%) and extraparenchymal cases predominated (81%). Patients aged 41 to 50 years were most affected (35.13%) and those 20 years or under were unaffected. Ventricular forms were most frequently associated with hydrocephalus and required permanent shunts in most cases (56.57%). The treatment of neurocysticercosis depends on the impairment: the parenchymal type usually does not require surgery, which is more common in the extraparenchymal form. Hydrocephalus is a frequent complication because the cysts often obstruct the cerebrospinal flow. The cysts should be removed whenever possible, to avoid the need for permanent shunts.

  11. Imaging spectrum of neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Long Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is the most common parasitic disease of the central nervous system, and also one of the most common causes of seizures in endemic areas. Globalization has caused the disease to spread around the world beyond the endemic regions. With no specific clinical symptoms of the disease, medical imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis. Familiarity with these imaging findings may help greatly in early diagnosis, appropriate treatment decision, and follow-up of patients with neurocysticercosis.

  12. Nodular calcified neurocysticercosis with signs of reactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coeli, Gustavo Nunes Medina; Tiengo, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Silva, Guilherme Carlos da; Silva, Leandro Urquiza Marques Alves da, E-mail: gustavonmc@yahoo.com.br [Department of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis, Hospital Escola de Itajuba, MG (Brazil); Silva, Afonso Carlos da [Medical Practice, Hospital Escola de Itajuba, MG (Brazil); Fernandes, Jose Otavio Meyer [Clinica Sul Mineira Tomosul and Clinica Magsul, Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Neurocysticercosis is a disease characterized by the involvement of the central nervous system by the intermediate larval stage of the parasite Taenia solium. The larva degeneration process and the inflammatory reaction of the body cause clinical symptoms. The authors report a case of clinical and radiological reactivation of nodular calcified neurocysticercosis in a patient who was asymptomatic for more than 20 years. Antiparasitic treatment showed a good response (author)

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Theodore E; Garcia, Hector H

    2011-09-13

    Neurocysticercosis is a parasitic disease caused by the larval (cystic) form of the pork cestode tapeworm, Taenia solium, and is a major cause of acquired seizures and epilepsy worldwide. Development of sensitive and specific diagnostic methods, particularly CT and MRI, has revolutionized our knowledge of the burden of cysticercosis infection and disease, and has led to the development of effective antihelminthic treatments for neurocysticercosis. The importance of calcified granulomas with perilesional edema as foci of seizures and epilepsy in populations where neurocysticercosis is endemic is newly recognized, and indicates that treatment with anti-inflammatory agents could have a role in controlling or preventing epilepsy in these patients. Importantly, neurocysticercosis is one of the few diseases that could potentially be controlled or eliminated-an accomplishment that would prevent millions of cases of epilepsy. This Review examines the rationale for treatment of neurocysticercosis and highlights the essential role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of disease, the exacerbation of symptoms that occurs as a result of antihelminthic treatment, and the limitations of current antihelminthic and anti-inflammatory treatments.

  14. Human neurocysticercosis case and an endemic focus of Taenia solium in Lao PDR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu; Yong, Tai-Soon; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Chai, Jong-Yil; Min, Duk-Young; Rim, Han-Jong; Insisiengmay, Bounnaloth; Eom, Keeseon S

    2013-10-01

    A male patient with neurocysticercosis was identified in Montai Village, Xay District, Oudomxay Province, Lao PDR in February 2004. He had a history of diagnosis for neurocysticercosis by a CT scan in Thailand after an onset of epileptic seizure in 1993. A pig in the same district was found to contain Taenia solium metacestodes (=cysticerci); the slaughtered pig body contained more than 2,000 cysticerci. In addition to morphological identification, molecular identification was also performed on the cysticerci by DNA sequencing analysis of the mitochondrial cox1 gene; they were confirmed as T. solium metacestodes. The patient is regarded as an indigenous case of neurocysticercosis infected in an endemic focus of T. solium taeniasis/cysticercosis in Oudomxay Province, Lao PDR.

  15. Pediatric Neurocysticercosis: Three Cases Presented in the Netherlands with Divergent Clinical Presentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, L.A.; van Doeveren, T.E.M.; van der Kuip, M.; Wolf, N.I.; Vermeulen, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neurocysticercosis is a helminthic disease that affects the central nervous system by the larvae of the Taenia solium, the pork tapeworm. Because of the growing number of immigrants from endemic areas, its incidence is increasing in Western Europe. Cases We describe three children, aged

  16. Neurocysticercosis in infants and toddlers: report of seven cases and review of published patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2013-06-01

    Neurocysticercosis in infants and toddlers has received little attention in the literature, and little is known about the mechanisms of disease acquisition and clinical forms of presentation of the disease in this age group. All patients aged ≤3 years with neurocysticercosis evaluated at Hospital-Clínica Kennedy, Guayaquil, over a 22-year period were included in this study. Their household contacts were screened to detect Taenia solium carriers, which may represent the source of infection. A literature search on neurocysticercosis in infants and toddlers was also performed to compare personal cases with those described elsewhere. A total of 25 infants and toddlers with neurocysticercosis were included (seven from our institution and 18 from the literature). All patients had seizures as the primary manifestation of the disease, and neuroimaging studies showed one or two parenchymal brain cysticerci in the colloidal stage in 88% of patients. The source of infection was investigated in 11 houses, including the seven households of the present series, and only four of the 18 reported in the literature. A Taenia carrier was found in five (45%) of these households, including three from the present series and two from the literature. A sizable proportion of infants and toddlers with neurocysticercosis have been infected at home. Compulsory search of Taenia carriers among household contacts will allow the detection of the potential source of infection and will reduce further spread of the disease. The search must not be limited to family members, but also extended to domestic employees who are in daily contact with the children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Frequency of suspected cases of neurocysticercosis detected by computed skull tomography in Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jose Edson Paz da [Santa Maria Univ., RS (Brazil). Dept. de Analises Clinicas e Toxicologicas; Diefenthaeler, Ana Paula [Santa Maria Univ., RS (Brazil). Curso de Farmacia e Bioquimica; Palma, Jose Knoll [Hospital de Caridade Astrogildo de Azevedo, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2000-02-01

    Due to the lack of studies about neurocysticercosis in the South of Brazil, an investigation was conducted to determine the percentage cases of neurocysticercosis in computed tomography diagnoses in Santa Maria, RS, from January 1997 to December 1998. Of 6300 computed tomographs (CT) of the skull performed at the private Hospital de Caridade Astrogildo de Azevedo, 80, i.e. 1.27% were suspected of neurocysticercosis. Fifty were women (62.5%) and 30 were men (37.5). The most frequent radiological manifestation indicating neurocysticercosis was the presence of calcifications (isolated or associated), with a 95% rate (76 cases), while the presence of hypodense lesions reached a 5% rate (4 cases). After routine analysis, each CT was evaluated again and the suspected cases were confirmed. The percentage of suspected cases of neurocysticercosis detected by CT in the present study carried out in santa Maria was considered low (1.27%). This can be explained by the fact that tomography is not accessible to the economically underprivileged population of Santa Maria. We hope that the present study can alert the population and the professionals to the fact neurocysticercosis is a more frequent disease than indicated by the few diagnoses made. (author)

  18. Oxidative stress in children with neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajniti; Anil; Mishra, Om P; Mishra, Surendra P; Upadhyay, Ram S; Singh, Tej B

    2012-10-01

    Free radicals can cause neuronal injury and play an important role in pathogenesis of neurocysticercosis. This study was done to evaluate oxidative stress (antioxidants and oxidants) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of children with neurocysticercosis and to observe their correlation with the type of seizure and outcome. Forty consecutive confirmed cases of neurocysticercosis were evaluated for their markers of reactive oxygen species, that is, oxidants (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl and nitrite) and antioxidant (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, ceruloplasmin, ascorbic acid, copper and zinc) concentrations in CSF. An equal number of children, age and sex matched with an idiopathic generalized tonic-clonic seizure, were studied as controls. Generalized tonic-clonic seizure (65%) was the most common presentation, and a single ring-enhancing lesion in the parietal lobe was the most common finding in cranial imaging. Oxidants such as malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl and nitrite in CSF were significantly elevated (P neurocysticercosis than in controls. There were insignificant differences in oxidant and antioxidant value in CSF in relation to the type of seizure, number and location of lesion in cerebral cortex and antiepileptic therapy. The significantly elevated malondialdehyde, nitrite and protein carbonyl values reflect increased oxidative stress, whereas decreased concentrations of glutathione peroxidase, ascorbic acid, zinc, copper, ceruloplasmin and superoxide dismutase point toward utilization of the antioxidants in neurocysticercosis. The observed changes in oxidants and antioxidants suggest the production of reactive oxygen species such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxides and hydroxyl radicals and their possible role in pathogenesis of neurocysticercosis.

  19. Conservative management of neurocysticercosis in a patient with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvey, S; Lu, K; Mukkamalla, S K; Anandi, P; Dumitriu, B; Kranick, S; Hammoud, D A; O'Connell, E; Oh, A L; Barrett, J; Mahanty, S; Battiwalla, M

    2015-06-01

    Neurocysticercosis, an infection of the central nervous system with the larval stage of the cestode Taenia solium, is common in developing countries but its occurrence and management in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has not been reported previously, to our knowledge. We report the case of an immigrant female patient who underwent a matched-related allogeneic HSCT for acute lymphoblastic leukemia and was incidentally found to have a solitary viable neurocysticercosis lesion. However, despite severe immunosuppression, the size of the cyst did not increase. More importantly, restoration of the immune system did not induce significant inflammation or seizures. Subsequent follow-up demonstrated complete resolution of the neurocysticercosis lesion. Thus, in the setting of HSCT, an asymptomatic patient with a single neurocysticercosis lesion was successfully managed without the use of anthelmintics, steroids, or anti-epileptics. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Intraventricular racemose type neurocysticercosis with anterior interhemispheric fissure cyst: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Racemose type of neurocysticercosis (NCC is a rare form of parasitic infestation of central nervous system. Most commonly it is found in fourth ventricle and cisterns. On reviewing the PubMed and Google databases, we found that this would be the first reported case of racemose type NCC in occipital horn of lateral ventricle with obstructive hydrocephalus, along with an incidental interhemispheric fissure arachnoid cyst.

  1. Late onset temporal lobe epilepsy with MRI evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis following acute neurocysticercosis. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Eliane; Guerreiro, Carlos A.M.; Cendes, Fernando [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Neurologia]. E-mail: fcendes@unicamp.br

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this case report is to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) in a patient with new onset temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and acute neurocysticercosis with multiple cysts. A 56 years old man with new onset headache, Simple Partial Seizures and Complex Partial Seizures underwent CT scan and lumbar puncture as diagnose proceeding. Multiple cysts and meningitis were identified, with a positive immunology for cysticercosis. Seizures were recorded over the left temporal region in a routine EEG. Treatment with al bendazole was performed for 21 days, with clinical improvement and seizure remission after 4 months. An MRI scan 11 months after treatment, showed complete resolution of those cystic lesions and a left hippocampal atrophy (HA) with hyperintense T2 signal. The presence of HA and hyperintense T 2 signal in this patient has not, to date, been associated with a poor seizure control. Conclusions: This patient presented with MRI evidence of left MTS after new onset partial seizures of left temporal lobe origin. Although we did not have a previous MRI scan, it is likely that this hippocampal abnormality was due to the acute inflammatory response to cysticercosis associated to repeated partial seizures. This suggests that acute neurocysticercosis associated with repeated seizures may cause MTS and late onset TLE. (author)

  2. Neurocysticercosis: An uncommon cause of drug-refractory epilepsy in North Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Manoj; Chand, Partap; Modi, Manish; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Kharbanda, Parampreet Singh; Lal, Vivek; Singla, Veenu; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2015-11-01

    Being a common cause of epilepsy in endemic areas, neurocysticercosis (NCC) is expected to account for a sizable proportion of patients with drug-refractory epilepsy (DRE) as well. However, data regarding prevalence of DRE in NCC are sparse. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of DRE as well as identification of clinical and radiologic factors that lead to DRE in patients with NCC. This study was conducted in a tertiary-care postgraduate teaching institute in Northern India from July 2011 to July 2013. Two hundred patients with epilepsy due to NCC (definite [n = 59, 29.5%] or probable [n = 141, 70.5%]) based on diagnostic criteria by Del Brutto et al. were enrolled in the study in both a prospective (n = 51 [25.5%]) and a retrospective manner (n = 149 [74.5%]), and were followed for a minimum period of 1 year. Thirteen patients with NCC were found to be refractory to drug therapy. Prevalence of DRE was found to be 65 of 1,000 NCC patients with epilepsy in the present study. The risk factors associated with high risk of DRE were male sex (p = 0.035), older age (p = 0.016), pig-raising practices (p = 0.003), pork eating (p = 0.04), and presence of multiple (>2) (p = 0.0001) or mixed stage lesions (p = 0.007) on neuroimaging. On multivariate analysis, it was found that residing in an area where pig raising is prevalent (p = 0.01) and presence of multiple (>2) (p = 0.004) lesions on neuroimaging are associated with increased risk of DRE. NCC is only rarely associated with the development of DRE. The common risk factors associated with increased chance of DRE include pig-rearing practices and presence of multiple (>2) lesions on neuroimaging. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Neurocysticercosis in Wisconsin: 3 cases and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, Elie; Seeger, Susanne K; Stafstrom, Carl E

    2014-04-01

    Neurocysticercosis is the most common parasitic infection of the brain. Endemic in many regions of the world, neurocysticercosis is now showing up in nonendemic areas such as Wisconsin. We present 3 patients that illustrate features typical for neurocysticercosis in anon-endemic area, including immigrant/travel status, presentation with focal seizures, classic magnetic resonance imaging features of single enhancing lesions, and good response to treatment with anticonvulsants, anti-inflammatory agents, and cysticidal drugs. It behooves physicians involved in the care of at-risk populations to be aware of the clinical features, radiographic signs, diagnostic tests, and general principles for treating neurocysticercosis.

  4. Imaging in neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhesi, Balraj; Karia, Sumit J; Adab, Naghme; Nair, Sujit

    2015-04-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a parasitic neurological infection caused by the ingestion of larvae from the adult tapeworm Taenia solium. We describe a man who presented with generalised tonic-clonic seizures. He had been previously diagnosed with epilepsy in Malawi, where he had emigrated from 2 years before this episode. An MRI was performed to further investigate the cause of his seizures, as no previous imaging had been performed. His initial MRI showed multiple characteristic cystic lesions in keeping with neurocysticercosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Corticosteroid use in neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Theodore E; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Garcia, Hector H

    2013-01-01

    The cystic larvae of Taenia solium commonly infect the human nervous system, resulting in neurocysticercosis, a major contributor to seizure disorders in most of the world. Inflammation around the parasites is a hallmark of neurocysticercosis pathophysiology. Although mechanisms regulating this inflammation are poorly understood, anti-inflammatory drugs, particularly corticosteroids, have been long used alone or with anthelmintics to manage disease and limit neurological complications and perhaps damage to neural tissues. Only scarce controlled data exist to determine when and what type of corticosteroids and the treatment regime to use. This article revisits the mechanisms of action, rationale, evidence of benefit, safety and problems of corticosteroids in the context of neurocysticercosis, as well as alternative anti-inflammatory strategies to limit the damage caused by inflammation in the CNS. PMID:21797658

  6. Diagnosis and Treatment of Neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M. Coyle

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis, the infection caused by the larval form of the tapeworm Taenia solium, is the most common parasitic disease of the central nervous system and the most common cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. This has primarily been a disease that remains endemic in low-socioeconomic countries, but because of increased migration neurocysticercosis is being diagnosed more frequently in high-income countries. During the past three decades improved diagnostics, imaging, and treatment have led to more accurate diagnosis and improved prognosis for patients. This article reviews the current literature on neurocysticercosis, including newer diagnostics and treatment developments.

  7. Pourradiculoneurite e neurocisticercose: relato de caso Polyradiculoneuropathy and neurocysticercosis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Agapejev

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se o caso de doente com forma hidrocefálica e meningoencefalítica de neurocisticercose que, na primeira semana de tratamento com albendazol, desenvolveu simultaneamente polirradiculoneurite e síndrome de hipertensão intracraniana. São relacionados vários agentes etiológicos encontrados na literatura associados à polirradiculoneurite. Comenta-se sobre a possível fisiopatogenia desta entidade na vigência de cisticercose. Faz-se menção a outro caso que apresentou polirradiculoneurite, do tipo síndrome de Guillain-Barré, como única manifestação de provável cisticercose de sistema nervoso. No caso apresentado, além da própria neurocisticercose, o stress cirúrgico e aquele relativo à gravidade do quadro clínico, um possível efeito colateral do albendazol - ou, até mesmo, uma simples coincidência - podem ser considerados como fatores relacionados à presença de polirradiculoneurite nesse doente.Report of a patient with the hydrocephalic and meningoencephalitic form of neurocysticercosis who simultaneously developed polyradiculoneuropathy and intracranial hypertension syndrome during the first week of treatment with albendazole. Etiologic agents associated with polyradiculoneuropathy related in the literature are cited. Some comments about the possible physiopathogeny of this entity in the presence of cysticercosis are also done. It is mentioned another case who presented polyradiculoneuropathy as the only manifestation of a probable cysticercosis of the nervous system. In this presented case, including the neurocysticercosis and even a mere coincidence of facts, some factors can have a relationship with the appearance of polyradiculoneuropathy as the surgical stress, the stress due to the severity of the clinical picture and the possible side effect of albendazole.

  8. Unusual manifestations of neurocysticercosis in MR imaging: analysis of 172 cases; Manifestacoes incomuns na ressonancia magnetica da neurocisticercose: analise de 172 casos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Lazaro; Ferreira, Nelson Fortes; Mendonca, Renato [Hospital Beneficencia Portuguesa, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Med Imagem]. E-mail: lazden.terra.com.br; Maschietto, Murilo; Maschietto, Roberta; Cury, Ricardo [Hospital Beneficencia Portuguesa, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Med Imagem. Setor de Ressonancia Magnetica; Lima, Sergio Santos [Hospital Beneficencia Portuguesa, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Med Imagem. Dept. de Imagens

    2003-09-01

    The typical manifestations of neurocysticercosis are described widely in the literature. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the uncommon presentations of different forms of neurocysticercosis in MR imaging. A retrospective analysis of 172 cases of neurocysticercosis in MR studies was carried out over a period of 13 years. One hundred and four males and 68 females with a mean age of 32 {+-} 3.7 years were studied. The studies were performed on 1.5 T G E MR units and T1 was used before and after gadolinium injection, T2 and gradient-echo (T2*) sequences. The authors divided the unusual manifestations of neurocysticercosis into: intraventricular, subarachnoid, spinal, orbital, intra parenchymatous, and reactivation of previously calcified lesions. The results obtained were: intra parenchymatous 95 cases (55.23%); intraventricular 27 cases (15.69%); subarachnoid 20 cases (11.63%); spinal 6 cases (3.49%); orbital 1 case (0.58%); reactivated lesion 1 case (0.58%); association of intraventricular and intra parenchymatous 12 cases (6.98%); association of subarachnoid and intra parenchymatous 6 cases (3.49%); association of subarachnoid and intraventricular, 4 cases (2.32%). MR imaging is a sensitive and specific method in the analysis of different forms of unusual manifestations of neurocysticercosis, which should appear in the differential diagnosis of parenchymal, ventricular, spinal, cysternal, and orbital lesions. (author)

  9. MRI and CT patterns of neurocysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodiek, S.O.; Rupp, N.; Einsiedel, H. von

    1987-05-01

    MRI and CT manifestations were studied in five cases of neurocysticercosis. As demonstrated by long-term follow-ups the disease usually causes multiple lesions the morphology of which depends on the life cycle of the parasite. Tissue lesions consist of three main types: 1) vital cysticerci, 2) inflammatory parenchymatous reactions following degenerating cysts and 3) calcified granulomas. MRI provides all information that is given by CT except for small calcifications which are usually missed. Morphological details of vital cysticerci like cysts wall and scolex are better outlined by MRI. When i.v. contrast medium is applied, it leads to nodular or annular enhancement of inflamed tissue. The sensitivity of MRI towards edema caused by parasite exceeds that of CT by several weeks. CT and MRI are complementary methods providing at the present time the highest degree of specificity in diagnosing neurocysticercosis.

  10. Neurocysticercosis in Oregon, 1995–2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christopher J.; Kohn, Melvin A.

    2004-01-01

    The unexpected death of a teenager from neurocysticercosis prompted an investigation of this disease in Oregon. We found 89 hospitalizations, 43 newly diagnosed cases, and 6 deaths from 1995 to 2000. At least five cases occurred in persons who had not traveled or lived outside the United States. Enhanced surveillance for neurocysticercosis is warranted. PMID:15109424

  11. [Epidemiology of cysticercosis and neurocysticercosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouteille, B

    2014-01-01

    Within the genus Taenia, three species are human parasites: T. solium, T. saginata and a new uncommon species, T. asiatica, described recently in Asia. T. saginata and T. solium live as adult tapeworms in human intestines, where they cause taeniasis. T. saginata is widely present worldwide, in all regions where cattle are bred. T. solium is endemic in many countries where livestock and consumption of pigs are common. Cattle and pigs become infected by ingesting eggs emitted by humans into the environment and serve as the respective intermediate hosts of these helminths and host larval forms, or metacestodes or cysticerci. Cysticerci develop into adult worms in the human intestines after a person has eaten contaminated raw or undercooked meat. In the T. solium, eggs are also human contaminants. Humans, like swine, can develop cysticercosis after ingesting eggs with water or contaminated food, or via dirty hands. The clinical manifestations of cysticercosis are highly variable both in kind and in severity. The period between initial infection and the onset of symptoms can also vary. The clinical expression of cysticercosis is generally dependent on the number, size and location of the cysts, as well as the host immune response to the parasite. The preferred locations are the muscles, subcutaneous tissues, central nervous system (CNS), and eyes. Subcutaneous and muscular forms are often asymptomatic. Severe cysticercosis is due to larvae located in human CNS - neurocysticercosis. The World Health Organization (WHO) lists neurocysticercosis as a neglected tropical disease. It estimates that about 50 million people worldwide have neurocysticercosis in the world and that it causes about 50,000 deaths each year. Its most frequent clinical manifestations are seizures, intracranial hypertension, neurological deficits, and sometimes psychiatric manifestations. It is also responsible for more than 50% of the cases of late-onset epilepsy in developing countries. The T

  12. HIV-Associated Neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Kuljeet Singh; Wadhwa, Ankur; Garg, Jyoti; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Few cases of HIV and neurocysticercosis co-infection have been reported till date. The symptomatic manifestation of cysticercosis may be further reduced by interactions between the 2 disease processes. In patients with HIV, the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis is challenging and management must be individualized depending on the stage and the coexistent opportunistic conditions. We present 2 such cases. First was a 35-year-old driver seropositive for HIV-1 presented with complex partial seizures and a CD4 count of 530 cells/mm(3). The second case was a 40-year-old businessman with a CD4 count of 350 cells/mm(3). Both of them had multiple parenchymal lesions, with 1 being a large cystic lesion. Relatively high CD4 count and a positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay increased the likelihood for diagnosis and treatment. Both of our patients received cysticidal therapy, and none of them deteriorated with treatment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Profile of adult and pediatric neurocysticercosis cases observed in five Southern European centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Angheben, Andrea; Gobbi, Federico; Zavarise, Giorgio; Requena-Mendez, Ana; Marchese, Valentina; Montagnani, Carlotta; Galli, Luisa; Bisoffi, Zeno; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Muñoz, Jose

    2016-08-01

    In Europe the management of neurocysticercosis (NCC) is challenging because health care providers are unaware of this condition, thus leading to diagnostic delay and mismanagement. The aim of this study is to retrospectively review the cases of NCC observed in five centers located in Florence, Negrar (Italy) and Barcelona (Spain). A total of 81 subjects with NCC were evaluated in the period 1980-2013. By applying the Del Brutto's criteria 39 cases (48.1 %) were classified as definitive cases, 31 (38.8 %) as probable cases and 11 (13.6 %) did not satisfy the diagnostic criteria. Continent of origin was known for 80 subjects. Latin America and Asia were the most frequent continents of origin (n = 37; 46.3 % and n = 22; 27.5 %) followed by Europe (n = 14; 17.5 %) and Africa (n = 7; 8.8 %). Compared with adults, paediatric patients were more likely to have eosinophilia, to have other parasitic infections, to be asymptomatic, to not be treated with antiepileptic drugs or analgesic and to heal. The study shows that there are some hurdles in the management of NCC in Europe. A not negligible portion of patients diagnosed at reference centers do not fully satisfy Del Brutto's diagnostic criteria. The higher portion of asymptomatic subjects found among the paediatric group is probably related to an ongoing serological screening among adopted children coming from endemic regions. The value of such a serological screening should be better assessed by a further cost-effective analysis.

  14. Cerebral neurocysticercosis mimicking or comorbid with episodic migraine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogang, Yannick Fogoum; Camara, Massaman; Diop, Amadou Gallo; Ndiaye, Mansour Mouhamadou

    2014-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a major cause of neurological symptoms in developing countries. We report a case of cerebral neurocysticercosis presenting as episodic migraine without aura, with clinico-radiological correlations and discuss the possible causal influence of neurocysticercosis on the pathomechanisms of migraine. We report a 24 year-old male consulting for a one year history of recurrent headaches. He described bilateral frontal and/or temporal attacks of throbbing headache, moderate to severe in intensity, worsened by head movements and accompanied by nausea, photophobia and phonophobia. Attacks lasted between 12 and 60 hours if untreated. He never had symptoms suggestive of a migraine aura or an epileptic seizure. Headache attacks progressively increased in frequency to up to 5 to 7 severe attacks per month. On taking history, the patient reported having consumed undercooked porcine meat. Physical examination was unremarkable. A brain CT scan showed two contiguous occipital cystic lesions with ring enhancement and surrounding edema suggestive of cerebral neurocysticercosis. On laboratory work-up, blood serology for cysticercal antibodies was positive. Full blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, c - reactive protein level, human immunodeficiency virus serology, liver and hepatic function were all normal. Albendazole (1000 mg/day) and prednisolone (60 mg/day) were prescribed for seven days. The patient was examined again two and six months after the end of his treatment and there was a significant reduction in headache severity and frequency. We propose that in our patient the occipital neurocysticercosis lesions cause migraine without aura-like attacks via inflammation in the surrounding brain parenchyma leading to sensitization of the trigemino-vascular system. We cannot rule out, however, the possibility that our patient has a genetic predisposition for migraine without aura and that the fortuitous association of neurocysticercosis is simply an

  15. Reprint of "Neurocysticercosis-related mortality in Brazil, 2000-2011: Epidemiology of a neglected neurologic cause of death".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Melo, Francisco Rogerlândio; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Cavalcanti, Marta Guimarães; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2017-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is an important cause of severe neurological disease mainly in low- and middle-income countries, but data on NCC mortality from endemic areas are scarce. Here we analysed the epidemiological patterns of NCC-related mortality in Brazil. We included all deaths recorded in Brazil between 2000 and 2011, in which NCC was mentioned on death certificates, either as underlying or as associated cause of death. NCC was identified in 1829/12,491,280 deaths (0.015%), 1130 (61.8%) as underlying cause, and 699 (38.2%) as associated cause. Overall age-adjusted mortality rate for the period was 0.97 deaths/1,000,000 inhabitants (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.83-1.12). The highest NCC-related mortality rates were found in males, elderly, white race/colour and residents in endemic states/regions. Age-adjusted mortality rates at national level decreased significantly over time (annual percent change [APC]: -4.7; 95% CI: -6.0 to -3.3), with a decrease in the Southeast, South and Central-West regions, and a non-significant increasing trend in the North and Northeast regions. We identified spatial and spatiotemporal high-risk mortality clusters located mainly in NCC-endemic areas. Conditions related to the nervous system were the most commonly associated causes of death when NCC was mentioned as an underlying cause, and HIV/AIDS was the main underlying cause when NCC was an associated cause. NCC is a neglected and preventable cause of severe neurologic disease and death with high public health impact in Brazil. There is a clear need to strengthen nationwide epidemiological surveillance and control for the taeniasis/cysticercosis complex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurocysticercosis-related mortality in Brazil, 2000-2011: Epidemiology of a neglected neurologic cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Melo, Francisco Rogerlândio; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Cavalcanti, Marta Guimarães; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is an important cause of severe neurological disease mainly in low- and middle-income countries, but data on NCC mortality from endemic areas are scarce. Here we analysed the epidemiological patterns of NCC-related mortality in Brazil. We included all deaths recorded in Brazil between 2000 and 2011, in which NCC was mentioned on death certificates, either as underlying or as associated cause of death. NCC was identified in 1829/12,491,280 deaths (0.015%), 1130 (61.8%) as underlying cause, and 699 (38.2%) as associated cause. Overall age-adjusted mortality rate for the period was 0.97 deaths/1,000,000 inhabitants (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.83-1.12). The highest NCC-related mortality rates were found in males, elderly, white race/colour and residents in endemic states/regions. Age-adjusted mortality rates at national level decreased significantly over time (annual percent change [APC]: -4.7; 95% CI: -6.0 to -3.3), with a decrease in the Southeast, South and Central-West regions, and a non-significant increasing trend in the North and Northeast regions. We identified spatial and spatiotemporal high-risk mortality clusters located mainly in NCC-endemic areas. Conditions related to the nervous system were the most commonly associated causes of death when NCC was mentioned as an underlying cause, and HIV/AIDS was the main underlying cause when NCC was an associated cause. NCC is a neglected and preventable cause of severe neurologic disease and death with high public health impact in Brazil. There is a clear need to strengthen nationwide epidemiological surveillance and control for the taeniasis/cysticercosis complex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Neurocysticercosis: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroysticercosis is the most common helminthic infection of the nervous system, and a leading cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. The disease occurs when humans become intermediate hosts of Taenia solium by ingesting its eggs from contaminated food or, most often, directly from a taenia carrier by the fecal-to-oral route. Cysticerci may be located in brain parenchyma, subarachnoid space, ventricular system, or spinal cord, causing pathological changes that are responsible for the pleomorphism of neurocysticercosis. Seizures are the most common clinical manifestation, but many patients present with focal deficits, intracranial hypertension, or cognitive decline. Accurate diagnosis of neurocysticercosis is possible after interpretation of clinical data together with findings of neuroimaging studies and results of immunological tests. The introduction of cysticidal drugs have changed the prognosis of most patients with neurocysticercosis. These drugs have shown to reduce the burden of infection in the brain and to improve the clinical course of the disease in most patients. Further efforts should be directed to eradicate the disease through the implementation of control programs against all the interrelated steps in the life cycle of T. solium, including human carriers of the adult tapeworm, infected pigs, and eggs in the environment. PMID:22312322

  18. Psychiatric manifestations of neurocysticercosis in paediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejado, Laura de Anta; Pozo, Kazuhiro Tajima; Palomino, Camila Bayón; de Dios de Vega, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is the most frequent parasitic disease of the central nervous system and is caused by the larval stage of the tapeworm Taenia solium, in which the human being becomes the parasite’s intermediary host. The disease has a worldwide distribution, with a marked prevalence in underdeveloped or developing. However, this disease is rare in children, which is attributed to the long incubation period of the disease, ranging from several months up to 30 years. For this reason, very few cases are found in infants at the age of preschoolers, while most frequently cases are found in children between the ages of 6 and 16. PMID:22892232

  19. Inflammation Caused by Praziquantel Treatment Depends on the Location of the Taenia solium Cysticercus in Porcine Neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangalaya, Carla; Zimic, Mirko; Marzal, Miguel; González, Armando E; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Nash, Theodore E; García, Hector H

    2015-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC), infection of the central nervous system by Taenia solium cysticerci, is a pleomorphic disease. Inflammation around cysticerci is the major cause of disease but is variably present. One factor modulating the inflammatory responses may be the location and characteristics of the brain tissue adjacent to cysticerci. We analyzed and compared the inflammatory responses to cysticerci located in the parenchyma to those in the meninges or cysticerci partially in contact with both the parenchyma and the meninges (corticomeningeal). Histological specimens of brain cysticerci (n = 196) from 11 pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium cysticerci were used. Four pigs were sacrificed after 2 days and four after 5 days of a single dose of praziquantel; 3 pigs did not receive treatment. All pigs were intravenously injected with Evans Blue to assess disruption of the blood-brain barrier. The degree of inflammation was estimated by use of a histological score (ISC) based on the extent of the inflammation in the pericystic areas as assessed in an image composed of several photomicrographs taken at 40X amplification. Parenchymal cysticerci provoked a significantly greater level of pericystic inflammation (higher ISC) after antiparasitic treatment compared to meningeal and corticomeningeal cysticerci. ISC of meningeal cysticerci was not significantly affected by treatment. In corticomeningeal cysticerci, the increase in ISC score was correlated to the extent of the cysticercus adjacent to the brain parenchyma. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier was associated with treatment only in parenchymal tissue. Inflammatory response to cysticerci located in the meninges was significantly decreased compared to parenchymal cysticerci. The suboptimal inflammatory response to cysticidal drugs may be the reason subarachnoid NCC is generally refractory to treatment compared to parenchymal NCC.

  20. Distribution and Potential Indicators of Hospitalized Cases of Neurocysticercosis and Epilepsy in Ecuador from 1996 to 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriël, Sarah; Benitez-Ortiz, Washington; Saegerman, Claude; Dorny, Pierre; Berkvens, Dirk; Abatih, Emmanuel Nji

    2015-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is one of the most common signs of Neurocysticercosis (NCC). In this study, spatial and temporal variations in the incidence of hospitalized cases (IHC) of epilepsy and NCC in Ecuadorian municipalities were analyzed. Additionally, potential socio-economic and landscape indicators were evaluated in order to understand in part the macro-epidemiology of the Taenia solium taeniasis/cysticercosis complex. Methodology Data on the number of hospitalized epilepsy and NCC cases by municipality of residence were obtained from morbidity-hospital systems in Ecuador. SatScan software was used to determine whether variations in the IHC of epilepsy and NCC in space and time. In addition, several socio-economic and landscape variables at municipality level were used to study factors intervening in the macro-epidemiology of these diseases. Negative Binomial regression models through stepwise selection and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) were used to explain the variations in the IHC of epilepsy and NCC. Principal findings Different clusters were identified through space and time. Traditional endemic zones for NCC and epilepsy, recognized in other studies were confirmed in our study. However, for both disorders more recent clusters were identified. Among municipalities, an increasing tendency for IHC of epilepsy, and a decreasing tendency for the IHC of NCC were observed over time. In contrast, within municipalities a positive linear relationship between both disorders was found. An increase in the implementation of systems for eliminating excrements would help to reduce the IHC of epilepsy by 1.00% (IC95%; 0.2%–1.8%) and by 5.12% (IC95%; 3.63%-6.59%) for the IHC of NCC. The presence of pig production was related to IHC of NCC. Conclusion/Significance Both disorders were related to the lack of an efficient system for eliminating excrements. Given the appearance of recent epilepsy clusters, these locations should be studied in depth to discriminate epilepsies due

  1. Distribution and Potential Indicators of Hospitalized Cases of Neurocysticercosis and Epilepsy in Ecuador from 1996 to 2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenin Ron-Garrido

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common signs of Neurocysticercosis (NCC. In this study, spatial and temporal variations in the incidence of hospitalized cases (IHC of epilepsy and NCC in Ecuadorian municipalities were analyzed. Additionally, potential socio-economic and landscape indicators were evaluated in order to understand in part the macro-epidemiology of the Taenia solium taeniasis/cysticercosis complex.Data on the number of hospitalized epilepsy and NCC cases by municipality of residence were obtained from morbidity-hospital systems in Ecuador. SatScan software was used to determine whether variations in the IHC of epilepsy and NCC in space and time. In addition, several socio-economic and landscape variables at municipality level were used to study factors intervening in the macro-epidemiology of these diseases. Negative Binomial regression models through stepwise selection and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA were used to explain the variations in the IHC of epilepsy and NCC.Different clusters were identified through space and time. Traditional endemic zones for NCC and epilepsy, recognized in other studies were confirmed in our study. However, for both disorders more recent clusters were identified. Among municipalities, an increasing tendency for IHC of epilepsy, and a decreasing tendency for the IHC of NCC were observed over time. In contrast, within municipalities a positive linear relationship between both disorders was found. An increase in the implementation of systems for eliminating excrements would help to reduce the IHC of epilepsy by 1.00% (IC95%; 0.2%-1.8% and by 5.12% (IC95%; 3.63%-6.59% for the IHC of NCC. The presence of pig production was related to IHC of NCC.Both disorders were related to the lack of an efficient system for eliminating excrements. Given the appearance of recent epilepsy clusters, these locations should be studied in depth to discriminate epilepsies due to NCC from epilepsies due to other causes. Field

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in parenchymal neurocysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Just, M.; Higer, H.P.; Pfannenstiel, P.; Mergner, T.; Henne, W.

    1987-03-01

    MRI-findings in a case of parenchymal neurocysticercosis are presented. The changes of the lesions as a response to chemotherapy were monitored by MRI and CT. Problems of sensitivity (MRI vs. CT) and MRI differential diagnoses are discussed.

  3. Calcified neurocysticercosis among patients with primary headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Del Brutto, Victor J

    2012-02-01

    Anecdotal reports and a single case-control epidemiological survey have suggested an association between the helminthic disease neurocysticercosis and primary headache. The present study was undertaken to determine whether neurocysticercosis is more common among patients with primary headaches than in other neurological disorders. We determined the prevalence of neurocysticercosis in a cohort of patients with primary headache who were seen at our institution over a 20-year period. We used as controls all people from the same cohort with four major different categories of neurological disorders, including cerebrovascular disease, degenerative disorders of the CNS, head trauma, and primary brain tumors. We evaluated differences in the prevalence of neurocysticercosis between patients and controls. Forty-eight of 1017 patients with primary headache and 31 of 1687 controls had neurocysticercosis (4.7% vs 1.8%, p neurocysticercosis. There is a relationship between calcified neurocysticercosis and primary headache disorders. It is possible that periodic remodeling of cysticercotic calcifications, with liberation of antigens to the brain parenchyma, contributes to the occurrence of headache in these patients.

  4. Neurocysticercosis in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpa, Jose A; White, A Clinton

    2012-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is typically considered a disease of the developing world. Nonetheless, NCC is also diagnosed in the developed world. The rise in the number of cases of NCC in developed countries, especially in the United States of America, has largely been driven by the influx of immigrants from endemic to non-endemic regions and the widespread access to neuroimaging. Cases of local transmission have also been documented particularly in the setting of a tapeworm carrier present in the household, which highlights the relevance of NCC as a public health problem in the USA. Although accurate incidence data in the USA are not available, estimates range from 0.2 to 0.6 cases per 100 000 general population and 1.5–5.8 cases per 100 000 Hispanics. We estimate that between 1320 and 5050 new cases of NCC occur every year in the USA. The number of NCC cases reported in the literature in the USA increased from 1494 prior to 2004 to 4632 after that date. Parenchymal cases remain the most commonly reported form of the disease; however, a slight increase in the percentage of extraparenchymal cases has been described in the most recent series. NCC is associated with significant morbidity resulting from hydrocephalus, cerebral edema, and seizures. Although uncommon, NCC is also a cause of premature death in the USA with a calculated annual age-adjusted mortality rate of at least 0.06 per million population. PMID:23265549

  5. Neurocysticercosis: A natural human model of epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Theodore E; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Loeb, Jeffrey A; Theodore, William H; Friedman, Alon; Sander, Josemir W; Singh, Gagandeep; Cavalheiro, Esper; Del Brutto, Oscar H; Takayanagui, Osvaldo M; Fleury, Agnes; Verastegui, Manuela; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Montano, Silvia; Pretell, E Javier; White, A Clinton; Gonzales, Armando E; Gilman, Robert H; Garcia, Hector H

    2015-02-01

    To develop a better understanding of mechanisms of seizures and long-term epileptogenesis using neurocysticercosis. A workshop was held bringing together experts in epilepsy and epileptogenesis and neurocysticercosis. Human neurocysticercosis and parallel animal models offer a unique opportunity to understand basic mechanisms of seizures. Inflammatory responses to degenerating forms and later-stage calcified parasite granulomas are associated with seizures and epilepsy. Other mechanisms may also be involved in epileptogenesis. Naturally occurring brain infections with neurocysticercosis offer a unique opportunity to develop treatments for one of the world's most common causes of epilepsy and for the development of more general antiepileptogenic treatments. Key advantages stem from the time course in which an acute seizure heralds a start of the epileptogenic process, and radiographic changes of calcification and perilesional edema provide biomarkers of a chronic epileptic state. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Neurocysticercosis presenting as pseudobulbar palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arinaganahalli Subbanna Praveen Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NCC is the most common helminthic infestation of the central nervous system (CNS and a leading cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. The common manifestations of NCC are seizures and headache. The NCC as a cause of pseudobulbar palsy is very unusual and not reported yet in the literature. A pseudobulbar palsy can occur in any disorder that causes bilateral corticobulbar disease. The common etiologies of pseudobulbar palsy are vascular, demyelinative, or motor neuron disease. We report a 38-year-old female patient who presented with partial seizures and pseudobulbar palsy. The MRI brain showed multiple small cysts with scolex in both the cerebral hemispheres and a giant intraparenchymal cyst. Our patient responded well to standard treatment of neurocysticercosis and antiepileptics.

  7. Treatment of neurocysticercosis with flubendazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez-Girón, E; Ramos, M C; Dufour, L; Montante, M; Tellez, E; Rodríguez, J; Gómez Méndez, F; Mireles, E

    1984-07-01

    Thirteen patients with neurocysticercosis were studied and treated with flubendazole. Diagnostic procedures included computerized tomography (CT) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In 12 cases treatment with the drug led to clinical improvement. CT showed that some cysts regressed in size, and in two patients they disappeared. The treatment also lowered the antibody levels. The drug was well tolerated and no allergic reaction or other side effects were observed.

  8. Dementia and neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2014-03-01

    Cysticercosis is a parasitic infestation that can be seen in developing countries with poor sanitation. The infection at brain, called neurocysticercosis, is a serious form. The neurocysticercosis can manifest neuropsychiatric presentations including dementia. In this short review, the author briefly summarizes on neurocysticercosis and dementia. In clinical practice, neurocysticercosis can manifest several neuropsychiatric symptoms. Dementia is an important neuropsychiatric manifestation to be mentioned. Many dementia patients have neurocysticercosis as underlying etiology. The problem might be unrecognized by practitioner and this can result in a delayed diagnosed, hence, the concern of the practitioner is required. Since the recovery after treatment of parasitic infection is very good, early diagnosis is a critical step determining success of patient management.

  9. Unusual MR manifestations of neurocysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, D.C. (Seoul National Univ. (Republic of Korea). Dept. of Radiology; Woolsan Medical Coll., Seoul (Republic of Korea). Dept. of Radiology); Chang, K.H.; Han, M.H.; Han, M.C.; Kim, C.W. (Seoul National Univ. (Republic of Korea). Dept. of Radiology); Lee, S.R. (Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Republic of Korea). Dept. of Radiology)

    1989-11-01

    MR and CT features of neurocysticercosis are variable and depend fundamentally on the stage in evolution of the infection, location, number and size of the worm. The authors retrospectively evaluated MR images obtained on a 2.0T superconducting unit in 22 neurocysticercosis patients and observed various MR features including some new findings. A variety of MR findings are presented with special reference to six case reports. The features include: (1) A large simple cyst containing both internal septations and a scolex; (2) suprasellar racemose cysts mimicking other cysts, (3) a fourth ventricular cyst readily depicted by aid of CSF flow-void in the sagittal plane; (4) degenerating cysts showing 'white target' appearance; (5) granulomatous lesions having a 'black target' appearance; and (6) a meningitic form showing Gd-DTPA enhancement of basal cisterns and of a subacute infarct. (orig.).

  10. Neurocisticercosis con lesiones cerebrales únicas: Presentación de dos casos documentados por Resonancia Magnética y revisión de la literatura Neurocysticercosis with single brain lesions: Report of two cases documented by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Corti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available La neurocisticercosis (NCC es una infección del sistema nervioso central (SNC originada por el estadio larvario de Taenia solium. Esta importante parasitosis es la causa más frecuente de epilepsia adquirida del adulto. Las manifestaciones clínicas más comunes de las formas parenquimatosas son la cefalea y las convulsiones, mientras que las formas extraparenquimatosas suelen presentarse con hidrocefalia. En este aspecto, es importante destacar que las manifestaciones clínicas de la enfermedad son el resultado de la muerte de la larva del cestodo y de la reacción inflamatoria perilesional que se produce en el SNC. El diagnóstico de NCC se basa en la epidemiología, las manifestaciones clínicas, los hallazgos de las neuroimágenes y la serología, y su tratamiento incluye el uso de fármacos antiepilépticos, corticoesteroides y drogas antiparasitarias, como el albendazol o el praziquantel. En este trabajo se describen dos casos de neurocisticercosis parenquimatosa con lesiones únicas que se manifestaron con cefalea y convulsiones.Neurocysticercosis is a central nervous system (CNS infection caused by the larval stage of Taenia solium. This major parasitic infection is the most common cause of adult-onset epilepsy. The most common clinical manifestations of the parenchymal form of this disease are headache and seizures, whereas extraparenchymal forms typically present with hydrocephalus. In this context, it is important to emphasize that the clinical manifestations of this disease are the result of the death of the tapeworm larvae and of the perilesional inflammatory reaction that occurs in the CNS. The diagnosis of neurocysticercosis is based on epidemiology, clinical manifestations, neuroimaging findings and serology. Treatment of neurocysticercosis includes the use of antiepileptic drugs, corticosteroids and antiparasitic therapy with albendazole or praziquantel. We report two cases of parenchymal neurocysticercosis with single lesions

  11. Intraventricular neurocysticercosis. Presentation of a case located in the third ventricle; Neurocisticercosis intraventricular. Presentacion de un caso localizado en el tercer ventriculo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, L.; Abad, L.; Lozano, E.; Maldonado, G. [Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Albacete (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis is the most common cerebral parasitosis. Of the three forms in which it can present itself, intraventricular cysticercosis is the least common and has the poorest prognosis. Diagnosis is principally made through the use of neuroimaging methods, especially MR, which is also indispensable both as a preoperative control and in the choice and response evaluation of postoperative treatment. We present the case of a 24-year-old Ecuadoran woman with clinical intracraneal hypertension due to a cysticercus cyst in the third ventricle. We analyze the imaging findings and their usefulness in assessing possible treatments. (Author) 13 refs.

  12. Clinical symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Hector H; Nash, Theodore E; Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2014-12-01

    The infection of the nervous system by the cystic larvae of Taenia solium (neurocysticercosis) is a frequent cause of seizure disorders. Neurocysticercosis is endemic or presumed to be endemic in many low-income countries. The lifecycle of the worm and the clinical manifestations of neurocysticercosis are well established, and CT and MRI have substantially improved knowledge of the disease course. Improvements in immunodiagnosis have further advanced comprehension of the pathophysiology of this disease. This knowledge has led to individualised treatment approaches that account for the involvement of parenchymal or extraparenchymal spaces, the number and form of parasites, and the extent of degeneration and associated inflammation. Clinical investigations are focused on development of effective treatments and reduction of side-effects induced by treatment, such as seizures, hydrocephalus, infarcts, and neuroinjury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Hydrocepahlia and subarachnoid cyst due to neurocysticercosis. A new case from rural Extremadura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, G; Castellanos-Pinedo, F; Giménez-Pando, J; Adeva-Bartolomé, M T; Zancada-Díaz, F

    Neurocystercicosis (NCC) is a disorder caused by the Taenia solium larva. It is the commonest parasitosis of the CNS. In Spain most patients are from countries where the condition is endemic. However, sporadic cases still occur amongst the non immigrant population of rural regions. We report a new case of NCC from the Valle del Jerte in rural Extremadura. A 51 year old man presented with intellectual impairment, motor aphasia, apraxia, right hemiparesia and sphincter incontinence for the past six months. On cranial CAT and MR hydorcephalia was seen together with a subarachnoid cyst in the left Sylvan fissure. Serology was positive for cysticercosis in both plasma and CSF. The patient was treated with albendazol after insertion of a ventriculo peritoneal shunt. Three months later there was both clinical and radiological improvement. NCC is still a condition which must be included in the differential diagnosis of patients in Spain who present with CNS involvement and cystic lesions on neuro imaging investigations, even when they are not from countries where the disease is endemic. Treatment with albendazol and steroids given after insertion of a ventriculo peritoneal shunt was effective in our patient.

  14. [Cerebrovascular disease and neurocysticercosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, M S; Brucki, S M; Ferraz, A C; Piccolo, A C

    2001-09-01

    We report three cases of stroke secondary to neurocysticercosis. The first one is a 36 years old man with bilateral middle cerebral artery occlusions who had presented acute right hemiparesia and aphasia. MRI demonstrated several enhancing subarachnoid cysts surrounding the occluded vessels, a right parietal racemose cyst and a left temporal large infarction area. Angiographic study showed total occlusion of left middle cerebral artery and a subtotal occlusion of right middle cerebral artery. The second one is a 42 years old man with vasculitis of small cortical vessels who presented with headache, seizures and focal neurological deficit. CT scan demonstrated several calcifications and a left temporal infarction area. Cerebral angiographic study was normal. The third case was a woman, 53 years old, with a past history of six stroke events and an actual behavior disturbance and seizures. MRI demonstrated several cortical and subcortical infarction areas and cisternal cysts. Angiographic study showed diffuse arteritis of basilar and carotid arterial system. In all three cases CSF study showed linfomonocitic pleocytosis and positive ELISA for cysticercosis.

  15. [Pediatric neurocysticercosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagón Valdez, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Cysticercosis: parasitic disease which affects 3% of the population in Mexico. It is considered that there are more than 50 million infected people in the world, endemic in Mexico, Central and South America, Africa, Asia and India. It is considered the most important neurological infectious disease world-wide for its clinical manifestations. The causal agent in pigs and humans is the cysticercus of the Taenia solium, that can lodge in muscle, brain and ventricles. If pork meat contaminated with cysticercus is eaten, the tapeworm will live in the human intestine and create thousands of eggs that are excreted by the feces. When food contaminated with fecal matter is consumed by man or pig, the cisticercosis is disseminated in several parts of the organism, specially CNS. Man is the only host of the tapeworm and the pig is the only intermediary, reason why the prevalence of the teniasis-cisticercosis depends on this bond. It is diagnosed in endemic zones by the presence of convulsion crises, focal migraine, neurological symptoms, disorders of vision, endocraneal hypertension and CT scan with hypodense zones or cysts with a hyperdense ring. The antiparasitic treatment in children is controversial among pediatricians; it is suggested to use it only in the non calcified cystic phase and in cases associated with epilepsy. Few are the cases of hydrocephalic or intraventricular cysticercus that need surgical treatment.

  16. Current Consensus Guidelines for Treatment of Neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Hector H.; Evans, Carlton A. W.; Nash, Theodore E.; Takayanagui, Osvaldo M.; White, A. Clinton; Botero, David; Rajshekhar, Vedantam; Tsang, Victor C. W.; Schantz, Peter M.; Allan, James C.; Flisser, Ana; Correa, Dolores; Sarti, Elsa; Friedland, Jon S.; Martinez, S. Manuel; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Gilman, Robert H.; Del Brutto, Oscar H.

    2002-01-01

    Taenia solium neurocysticercosis is a common cause of epileptic seizures and other neurological morbidity in most developing countries. It is also an increasingly common diagnosis in industrialized countries because of immigration from areas where it is endemic. Its clinical manifestations are highly variable and depend on the number, stage, and size of the lesions and the host's immune response. In part due to this variability, major discrepancies exist in the treatment of neurocysticercosis. A panel of experts in taeniasis/cysticercosis discussed the evidence on treatment of neurocysticercosis for each clinical presentation, and we present the panel's consensus and areas of disagreement. Overall, four general recommendations were made: (i) individualize therapeutic decisions, including whether to use antiparasitic drugs, based on the number, location, and viability of the parasites within the nervous system; (ii) actively manage growing cysticerci either with antiparasitic drugs or surgical excision; (iii) prioritize the management of intracranial hypertension secondary to neurocysticercosis before considering any other form of therapy; and (iv) manage seizures as done for seizures due to other causes of secondary seizures (remote symptomatic seizures) because they are due to an organic focus that has been present for a long time. PMID:12364377

  17. Transventricular Migration of Neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Abhidha; Vutha, Ravikiran; Sankhe, Shilpa; Goel, Atul

    2017-09-01

    The movements of a neurocysticercosis cyst within the ventricular cavity have been identified rarely. A 22-year old male patient presented with the main symptom of diplopia for about a week. Findings of the neurologic examination revealed bilateral sixth cranial nerve weakness. Investigations during the period showed an intraventricular tumor that migrated from lateral ventricle to the third ventricle and subsequently to the fourth ventricle. The lesion was resected from the fourth ventricle and was identified to be a neurocysticercosis cyst. Such an intraventricular migration of any kind of tumor has not been recorded in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment of neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, T.E.; Singh, G.; White, A.C.; Rajshekhar, V.; Loeb, J.A.; Proaño, J.V.; Takayanagui, O.M.; Gonzalez, A.E.; Butman, J.A.; DeGiorgio, C.; Del Brutto, O.H.; Delgado-Escueta, A.; Evans, C.A.W.; Gilman, R.H.; Martinez, S.M.; Medina, M.T.; Pretell, E.J.; Teale, J.; Garcia, H.H.

    2010-01-01

    Here we put forward a roadmap that summarizes important questions that need to be answered to determine more effective and safer treatments. A key concept in management of neurocysticercosis is the understanding that infection and disease due to neurocysticercosis are variable and thus different clinical approaches and treatments are required. Despite recent advances, treatments remain either suboptimal or based on poorly controlled or anecdotal experience. A better understanding of basic pathophysiologic mechanisms including parasite survival and evolution, nature of the inflammatory response, and the genesis of seizures, epilepsy, and mechanisms of anthelmintic action should lead to improved therapies. PMID:17030744

  19. Neurocysticercosis as an important differential of paradoxical response during antituberculosis therapy in HIV-negative patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivonirina Andry Rakotoarivelo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis can simulate a paradoxical response during antituberculosis therapy with neurological ailments. We report the case of a 31 year-old-man, treated for tuberculous meningitis who developed neurological deficit after nine weeks of early antituberculous therapy. The diagnosis of neurocysticercosis was confirmed by CT scan and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Neurocysticercosis should be sought as an important differential of paradoxical response during antituberculosis therapy.

  20. Neurocysticercosis in Western Europe: a re-emerging disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the study was to estimate the magnitude of neurocysticercosis in Western Europe and to determine the pattern of disease expression in the region. Review of patients with neurocysticercosis diagnosed in Western Europe from 1970 to 2011. Abstracted data included: demographic profile, clinical manifestations, form of neurocysticercosis, and whether the disease occurred in immigrants, European international travelers, or Europeans who had never been abroad. A total of 779 patients were found. Of these, only 28 were diagnosed before 1985. Countries with more reported patients were Portugal (n = 384), Spain (n = 228), France (n = 80), The United Kingdom (n = 26), and Italy (n = 21). Information on citizenship status, clinical manifestations, and forms of the disease was available in only 30-40% of patients. Immigrants accounted for 53% of cases, European travelers for 8%, and non-traveler Europeans for 39%. Immigrants/European travelers were most often diagnosed during the new Millennium, presented most often with seizures, and had less frequently inactive (calcified) neurocysticercosis than non-traveler Europeans. The prevalence of neurocysticercosis in Western Europe may be on the rise. The pattern of disease expression is different among immigrants/European travelers than among non-traveler Europeans. It is possible that some patients had acquired the disease as the result of contact with Taenia solium carriers coming from endemic countries. Much remains to be learned on the prevalence of neurocysticercosis in this region.

  1. Reversible dementia due to Neurocysticercosis: improvement of the racemose type with antihistamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislaine Cristina Lopes Machado-Porto

    Full Text Available Infection of the human central nervous system (CNS by the larvae of Taenia solium, termed neurocysticercosis (NCC, is endemic in most developing countries, where it is a major cause of acquired seizures and other neurological morbidity, including neuropsychiatric symptoms. However, despite its frequent manifestation, some findings, such as cognitive impairment and dementia, remain poorly understood. Less commonly, NCC may affect the ventricular system and subarachnoid spaces and this form is known as extraparenchymal neurocysticercosis. A particular presentation of the subarachnoid form is called racemose cysticercosis, which has a progressive pattern, frequently leads to hydrocephalus and can be life-threatening. Here we review a case of the racemose variety of cysticercosis, complicated by hydrocephalus and reversible dementia, with remission of symptoms after derivation and that remained stable with use of dexchlorpheniramine. We discuss the challenges in diagnosis, imaging findings, treatment and follow-up of this disease.

  2. Neurocisticercose: estudo clínico e patológico de 27 casos de necrópsia Neurocysticercosis: a clinical and pathological study of 27 necropsied cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÁRIO RODRIGUES MONTEMÓR NETTO

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurocisticercose é a mais frequente e disseminada neuroparasitose humana. O desenvolvimento de lesões no cérebro e leptomeninges, com consequente aparecimento de sintomas, está relacionado com a resposta imune do hospedeiro, ao número e à fase de involução dos parasitas . Relatamos os achados anatomopatológicos durante a necrópsia em 27 casos de neurocisticercose, que corresponderam a 3,1% dos casos necropsiados no serviço. 77% dos pacientes eram masculinos, com idade variando entre 18 e 85 anos. Em 26% dos casos havia história de alcoolismo. A análise clinico-patológica mostrou que 50% dos casos eram da forma assintomática, 11% da forma epiléptica, 11% da forma intraventricular e 11% da forma combinada. 33% dos pacientes apresentaram crise epiléptica como fator agravante do quadro clínico. O cisticerco era único em 60% dos casos, a forma cellulosae estava presente em 82% e a racemosa em 7% dos casos, sendo os 11% restantes portadores da forma combinada. Em 30% dos pacientes a causa mortis estava relacionada com a presença do cisticerco no sistema nervoso central. Nossos achados confirmam a alta morbidade desta parasitose.Neurocysticercosis is the most frequent and widespread neuroparasitosis of the human being. The development of brain and leptomeningeal lesions, with subsequent symptoms, are mainly related with the immune status of the host, and to the number and evolutional phase of the parasites. We present the pathological findings in 27 necropsies of patients with neurocysticercosis, which accounted for 3.1% of the necropsies. 77% of the patients were male and the age ranged from 18 to 85 years. In 26% there was previous history of alcoholism. Clinicopathological study showed that 50% of the cases were classified as asymptomatic form, 11% epileptic form, 11% intraventricular form and 11% combined form. 33% of the patients presented seizures as a factor of aggravation of the clinical picture. There was a single

  3. Ununsual manifestations of neurocysticercosis in MR imaging: analysis of 172 cases Manifestações incomuns na ressonância magnética da neurocisticercose: análise de 172 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro Amaral

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The typical manifestations of neurocysticercosis are described widely in the literature. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the uncommon presentations of different forms of neurocysticercosis in MR imaging. METHOD: A retrospective analysis of 172 cases of neurocysticercosis in MR studies was carried out over a period of 13 years. One hundred and four males and 68 females with a mean age of 32 ± 3.7 years were studied. The studies were performed on 1.5 T GE MR units and T1 was used before and after gadolinium injection, T2 and gradient-echo (T2* sequences. RESULTS: The authors divided the unusual manifestations of neurocysticercosis into: intraventricular, subarachnoid, spinal, orbital, intraparenchymatous, and reactivation of previously calcified lesions. The results obtained were: intraparenchymatous 95 cases (55.23%; intraventricular 27 cases (15.69%; subarachnoid 20 cases (11.63%; spinal 6 cases (3.49%; orbital 1 case (0.58%; reactivated lesion 1 case (0.58%; association of intraventricular and intraparenchymatous 12 cases (6.98%; association of subarachnoid and intraparenchymatous 6 cases (3.49%; association of subarachnoid and intraventricular, 4 cases (2.32%. CONCLUSION: MR imaging is a sensitive and specific method in the analysis of different forms of unusual manifestations of neurocysticercosis, which should appear in the differential diagnosis of parenchymal, ventricular, spinal, cisternal, and orbital lesions.OBJETIVO: as manifestações típicas da neurocisticercose já são bem conhecidas. O papel deste estudo foi demonstrar os aspectos incomuns da neurocisticercose na ressonância magnética. MÉTODO: foram analisados 172 casos de ressonância magnética de neurocisticercose na Med Imagem num período de 13 (treze anos em aparelhos GE de 1.5T Signa (Horizon, LX e CVI. Dos casos analisados, foram diversas as formas de apresentação, incluindo intraventricular, intraespinhal, cisternal, orbital, formas at

  4. CT-follow-up-studies in neurocysticercosis during praziquantel-therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, A.; Aulich, A.; Hammer, B.

    1987-05-01

    Praziquanteltherapy has produced a much better prognosis in neurocysticercosis since 1980. The computertomographic findings and follow-up study in 4 patients with neurocysticercosis before and after praziquanteltherapy are described. The special difficulties of differential diagnosis and further diagnostic procedures are discussed in cases in which calcifications are absent and only solitary foci can be found.

  5. Neurocysticercosis diagnosis and management in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Saavedra, Herbert; Servicio de Enfermedades Transmisibles, Departamento de Neuropediatria y Enfermedades Transmisibles, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas, Ministerio de Salud. Lima, Perú. Médico neurólogo.; Gonzalez, Isidro; Departamento de Neuropediatria y Enfermedades Transmisibles, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas, Ministerio de Salud. Lima, Perú. Médico neurólogo.; Alvarado, Manuel A.; Departamento de Neuropediatria y Enfermedades Transmisibles, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas, Ministerio de Salud. Lima, Perú. Médico neurólogo.; Porras, Miguel A.; Departamento de Neuropediatria y Enfermedades Transmisibles, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas, Ministerio de Salud. Lima, Perú. Médico neurólogo.; Vargas, Victor; Departamento de Neuropediatria y Enfermedades Transmisibles, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas, Ministerio de Salud. Lima, Perú. Médico neurólogo.; Cjuno, Román A.; Departamento de Neuropediatria y Enfermedades Transmisibles, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas, Ministerio de Salud. Lima, Perú. Médico neurólogo.; Garcia, Hector H.; Servicio de Enfermedades Transmisibles, Departamento de Neuropediatria y Enfermedades Transmisibles, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas, Ministerio de Salud. Lima, Perú. Médico, Doctor en salud internacional.; Martinez, S. Manuel; Servicio de Enfermedades Transmisibles, Departamento de Neuropediatria y Enfermedades Transmisibles, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Neurológicas, Ministerio de Salud. Lima, Perú. Médico, Doctor en salud internacional.

    2010-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common parasitic disease of the central nervous system and is caused by larvae of the tapeworn Taenia solium. NCC is endemic in almost all developing countries. It presents as intraparenchymal forms associated with seizures or as extraparenchymal forms associated with intracranial hypertension. The clinical and epidemiological suspicion are important but the diagnosis is made primarily by images and confirmed by serology. Computed tomography (CT) and m...

  6. Managing neurocysticercosis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogang YF

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yannick Fogoum Fogang, Abdoul Aziz Savadogo, Massaman Camara, Dènahin Hinnoutondji Toffa, Anna Basse, Adjaratou Djeynabou Sow, Mouhamadou Mansour Ndiaye Neurology Department, Fann Teaching Hospital, Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar, Senegal Abstract: Taenia solium neurocysticercosis (NCC is a major cause of neurological morbidity in the world. Variability in the neuropathology and clinical presentation of NCC often make it difficult to diagnose and manage. Diagnosis of NCC can be challenging especially in endemic and resource-limited countries where laboratory and imaging techniques are often lacking. NCC management can also be challenging as current treatment options are limited and involve symptomatic agents, antiparasitic agents, or surgery. Although antiparasitic treatment probably reduces the number of active lesions and long-term seizure frequency, its efficacy is limited and strategies to improve treatment regimens are warranted. Treatment decisions should be individualized in relation to the type of NCC. Initial measures should focus on symptomatic management, with antiparasitic therapy only to be considered later on, when appropriate. Symptomatic treatment remains the cornerstone in NCC management which should not only focuses on epilepsy, but also on other manifestations that cause considerable burden (recurrent headaches, cognitive decline. Accurate patients' categorization, better antiparasitic regimens, and definition of new clinical outcomes for trials on NCC could improve management quality and prognosis of NCC. Prevention strategies targeting tapeworm carriers and infected pigs are yielding good results in local models. If local elimination of transmission is confirmed and replicated, this will open the door to cysticercosis eradication efforts worldwide. Keywords: neurocysticercosis, Taenia solium, epilepsy, headache, albendazole, praziquantel

  7. Clinico-radiological aspects of neurocysticercosis in pediatric population in a tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bandana; Mainali, Prabha; Sayami, Sujan; Shrestha, Om Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Neurocysticercosisis common in developing countries including Nepal. Clinicalpresentations vary depending on the CT scan findings of head. Adequate information of neurocysticercosis in children from Western Nepal is lacking. This study was conducted with an objective of evaluating the most common clinical and radiological picture in children suffering from NCC at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Western Nepal. Hospital records of all pediatric inpatients, admitted from 16th June 2010 to 15th December 2012, consistent with the diagnosis of Neurocysticercosis were reviewed. Forty nine cases of neurocysticercosis were enrolled. Their age varied 2.6 years to 14 years with the mean age of 10.6 years and the peak age was at 12 years with slight male predominance, ratio being male:female 1.2:1. The commonest presentation was seizures (n=38; 77.5 %); partial seizures being most common. Most of the lesions were single (n=44; 89.8%), predominantly in the parietal region (n=20; 40.8%) and most were in transitional stage (61.22%) in Computed tomography (CT).However, number of lesions from CT scan of head showed no significance in association with seizure types (p=0.84). In addition, perilesional edema and scolex within the lesion were noted in 67.34% and 18.36% of the cases respectively. Any child presenting with acute onset of afebrile seizure should be screened for neurocysticercosis provided other common infective and metabolic causes are ruled out. CT scan is the valuable diagnostic tool to support our diagnosis.

  8. Hospitalization frequency and charges for neurocysticercosis, United States, 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Seth E; Flecker, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Neurocysticercosis, brain infection with Taenia solium larval cysts, causes substantial neurologic illness around the world. To assess the effect of neurocysticercosis in the United States, we reviewed hospitalization discharge data in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2003-2012 and found an estimated 18,584 hospitalizations for neurocysticercosis and associated hospital charges totaling >US $908 million. The risk for hospitalization was highest among Hispanics (2.5/100,000 population), a rate 35 times higher than that for the non-Hispanic white population. Nearly three-quarters of all hospitalized patients with neurocysticercosis were Hispanic. Male sex and age 20-44 years also incurred increased risk. In addition, hospitalizations and associated charges related to cysticercosis far exceeded those for malaria and were greater than for those for all other neglected tropical diseases combined. Neurocysticercosis is an increasing public health concern in the United States, especially among Hispanics, and costs the US health care system a substantial amount of money.

  9. Neurocysticercosis among patients with first time seizure in Northern Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segamwenge, Innocent Lule; Kioko, Ngalyuka Paul; Mukulu, Celia; Jacob, Ogunsina; Humphrey, Wanzira; Augustinus, Josephine

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a common cause of seizures in low resource countries. There is a paucity of data regarding the extent of this infection in Namibia. There are multiple causes of First-time seizure including electrolyte abnormalities, infections, trauma, drugs, alcohol and many times no apparent cause can be found. We sought to describe the burden of Neurocysticercosis among individuals with a first-time seizure in Namibia. We recruited 221 patients with a First-time seizure who presented to the Intermediate Hospital Oshakati between August 2012 and March 2014. Patients with seizures due to identifiable causes like trauma, electrolytes, intoxications and meningitis were excluded. Brain CT scans were done, blood serological testing of Neurocysticercosis antibodies, Physical examination and demographic variables were collected. Data was entered into Epidata version 3.1 and transferred to stata version for analysis. Ninety-six (96) of the participants had evidence of Neurocysticercosis on Brain CT scan representing a prevalence of 51.41%. Consumption of pork and rearing of pigs in the homestead were significant factors associated with Neurocysticercosis in our study population with odds of 3.48(1.45-8.33) and 2.07(1.11-3.86) respectively. Serological testing for Cyticercosis IgG had a sensitivity of 65.93% and Specificity of 96.51%. The positive and negative predictive values were 95.2% and 72.81% respectively. Neurocysticercosis is a common cause of Index seizures in Northern Namibia, living in a rural area, rearing pigs in homesteads, eating pork and poor sanitary practices are the major risk factors for this illness.

  10. Immunopathology in Taenia solium neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, A; Cardenas, G; Adalid-Peralta, L; Fragoso, G; Sciutto, E

    2016-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a clinically and radiologically heterogeneous disease, ranging from asymptomatic infection to a severe, potentially fatal clinical picture. The intensity and extension of the parasite-elicited inflammatory reaction is a key factor for such variability. The main features of the inflammatory process found in the brain and in the peripheral blood of neurocysticercosis patients will be discussed in this review, and the factors involved in its modulation will be herein presented. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Extraparenchymal (Racemose) Neurocysticercosis and Its Multitude Manifestations: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Anish; Rangasetty, Srinivasa

    2015-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is an infection of the central nervous system caused by the larval form of the pork tapeworm Taenia solium. In the brain it occurs in two forms: parenchymal and extraparenchymal or racemose cysts. The clinical presentation of racemose cysts is pleomorphic, and is quite different from parenchymal cysticercosis. The clinical diagnosis of racemose cysts is quite challenging, with neuroimaging being the mainstay. However, the advent of newer brain imaging modalities has made a more accurate diagnosis possible. The primary focus of this article is racemose neurocysticercosis and its multitude manifestations, and includes a discussion of the newer diagnostic modalities and treatment options. PMID:26022457

  12. Neurocysticercosis presenting as Millard Gubler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajniti Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is a common childhood neurological illness in India. A variety of presentations have been reported in the literature, including weber syndrome. Neurocysticercosis, manifesting as Millard Gubler syndrome, have not been reported in literature. Therefore, we report a child presented to us with Millard Gubler syndrome due to pontomedullary neurocysticercosis and was treated successfully.

  13. Managing neurocysticercosis: challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogang, Yannick Fogoum; Savadogo, Abdoul Aziz; Camara, Massaman; Toffa, Dènahin Hinnoutondji; Basse, Anna; Sow, Adjaratou Djeynabou; Ndiaye, Mouhamadou Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Taenia solium neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a major cause of neurological morbidity in the world. Variability in the neuropathology and clinical presentation of NCC often make it difficult to diagnose and manage. Diagnosis of NCC can be challenging especially in endemic and resource-limited countries where laboratory and imaging techniques are often lacking. NCC management can also be challenging as current treatment options are limited and involve symptomatic agents, antiparasitic agents, or surgery. Although antiparasitic treatment probably reduces the number of active lesions and long-term seizure frequency, its efficacy is limited and strategies to improve treatment regimens are warranted. Treatment decisions should be individualized in relation to the type of NCC. Initial measures should focus on symptomatic management, with antiparasitic therapy only to be considered later on, when appropriate. Symptomatic treatment remains the cornerstone in NCC management which should not only focuses on epilepsy, but also on other manifestations that cause considerable burden (recurrent headaches, cognitive decline). Accurate patients’ categorization, better antiparasitic regimens, and definition of new clinical outcomes for trials on NCC could improve management quality and prognosis of NCC. Prevention strategies targeting tapeworm carriers and infected pigs are yielding good results in local models. If local elimination of transmission is confirmed and replicated, this will open the door to cysticercosis eradication efforts worldwide. PMID:26527895

  14. Neurocysticercosis—a Parasitic Brain Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-20

    Dr. Seth O’Neal discusses his article on the economic burden of neurocysticercosis, which is a brain infection caused by Taenia solium larval cysts.  Created: 8/20/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/20/2015.

  15. Neurocysticercosis in sub-Saharan Africa: a review of prevalence, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Andrea Sylvia

    2012-09-01

    Neurocysticercosis has been recognized as a major cause of secondary epilepsy worldwide. So far, most of the knowledge about the disease comes from Latin America and the Indian subcontinent. Unfortunately, in sub-Saharan Africa the condition was neglected for a long time, mainly owing to the lack of appropriate diagnostic tools. This review therefore focuses on the prevalence of neurocysticercosis in sub-Saharan Africa, the clinical picture with emphasis on epilepsy, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of neurocysticercosis and its related epilepsy/epileptic seizures in African resource-poor settings.

  16. Extraparenchymal neurocysticercosis: Demographic, clinicoradiological, and inflammatory features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcin Sierra, Mariana; Arroyo, Mariana; Cadena Torres, May; Ramírez Cruz, Nancy; García Hernández, Fernando; Taboada, Diana; Galicia Martínez, Ángeles; Govezensky, Tzipe; Sciutto, Edda; Toledo, Andrea; Fleury, Agnès

    2017-06-01

    Extraparenchymal neurocysticercosis (ExPNCC), an infection caused by Taenia solium cysticerci that mainly occurs in the ventricular compartment (Ve) or the basal subarachnoid space (SAb), is more severe but less frequent and much less studied than parenchymal neurocysticercosis (ParNCC). Demographic, clinical, radiological, and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid features of patients affected by ExPNCC are herein described and compared with those of ParNCC patients. 429 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of neurocysticercosis, attending the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, a tertiary reference center in Mexico City, from 2000 through 2014, were included. Demographic information, signs and symptoms, radiological patterns, and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) laboratory values were retrieved from medical records for all patients. Data were statistically analyzed to assess potential differences depending on cyst location and to determine the effects of age and sex on the disease presentation. In total, 238 ExPNCC and 191 ParNCC patients were included. With respect to parenchymal cysts, extraparenchymal parasites were diagnosed at an older age (P = 0.002), chiefly caused intracranial hypertension (P < 0.0001), were more frequently multiple and vesicular (P < 0.0001), and CSF from these patients showed higher protein concentration and cell count (P < 0.0001). SAb patients were diagnosed at an older age than Ve patients, and showed more frequently seizures, vesicular cysticerci, and higher CSF cellularity. Gender and age modulated some traits of the disease. This study evidenced clear clinical, radiological, and inflammatory differences between ExPNCC and ParNCC, and between SAb and Ve patients, and demonstrated that parasite location determines different pathological entities.

  17. Extraparenchymal neurocysticercosis: Demographic, clinicoradiological, and inflammatory features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Marcin Sierra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Extraparenchymal neurocysticercosis (ExPNCC, an infection caused by Taenia solium cysticerci that mainly occurs in the ventricular compartment (Ve or the basal subarachnoid space (SAb, is more severe but less frequent and much less studied than parenchymal neurocysticercosis (ParNCC. Demographic, clinical, radiological, and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid features of patients affected by ExPNCC are herein described and compared with those of ParNCC patients.429 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of neurocysticercosis, attending the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, a tertiary reference center in Mexico City, from 2000 through 2014, were included. Demographic information, signs and symptoms, radiological patterns, and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF laboratory values were retrieved from medical records for all patients. Data were statistically analyzed to assess potential differences depending on cyst location and to determine the effects of age and sex on the disease presentation. In total, 238 ExPNCC and 191 ParNCC patients were included. With respect to parenchymal cysts, extraparenchymal parasites were diagnosed at an older age (P = 0.002, chiefly caused intracranial hypertension (P < 0.0001, were more frequently multiple and vesicular (P < 0.0001, and CSF from these patients showed higher protein concentration and cell count (P < 0.0001. SAb patients were diagnosed at an older age than Ve patients, and showed more frequently seizures, vesicular cysticerci, and higher CSF cellularity. Gender and age modulated some traits of the disease.This study evidenced clear clinical, radiological, and inflammatory differences between ExPNCC and ParNCC, and between SAb and Ve patients, and demonstrated that parasite location determines different pathological entities.

  18. Novel rat model for neurocysticercosis using Taenia solium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verastegui, Manuela R; Mejia, Alan; Clark, Taryn; Gavidia, Cesar M; Mamani, Javier; Ccopa, Fredy; Angulo, Noelia; Chile, Nancy; Carmen, Rogger; Medina, Roxana; García, Hector H; Rodriguez, Silvia; Ortega, Ynes; Gilman, Robert H

    2015-08-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by Taenia solium infecting the central nervous system and is the leading cause of acquired epilepsy and convulsive conditions worldwide. Research into the pathophysiology of the disease and appropriate treatment is hindered by lack of cost-effective and physiologically similar animal models. We generated a novel rat neurocysticercosis model using intracranial infection with activated T. solium oncospheres. Holtzman rats were infected in two separate groups: the first group was inoculated extraparenchymally and the second intraparenchymally, with different doses of activated oncospheres. The groups were evaluated at three different ages. Histologic examination of the tissue surrounding T. solium cysticerci was performed. Results indicate that generally infected rats developed cysticerci in the brain tissue after 4 months, and the cysticerci were observed in the parenchymal, ventricle, or submeningeal brain tissue. The route of infection did not have a statistically significant effect on the proportion of rats that developed cysticerci, and there was no dependence on infection dose. However, rat age was crucial to the success of the infection. Epilepsy was observed in 9% of rats with neurocysticercosis. In histologic examination, a layer of collagen tissue, inflammatory infiltrate cells, perivascular infiltrate, angiogenesis, spongy change, and mass effect were observed in the tissue surrounding the cysts. This study presents a suitable animal model for the study of human neurocysticercosis. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pediatric neurocysticercosis: current challenges and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhi P

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pratibha Singhi, Arushi Gahlot SainiDepartment of Pediatrics, Pediatric Neurology and Neurodevelopment Unit, Advanced Pediatrics Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, IndiaAbstract: Neurocysticercosis (NCC is an acquired infection of the nervous system caused by encysted larvae of Taenia solium. It is a major cause of epilepsy in the tropics and the commonest cause of focal seizures in North Indian children. T. solium teniasis-cysticercosis is considered a parasitic “Neglected Tropical Diseases” endemic throughout Southeast Asia. NCC in children has pleomorphic manifestations depending on the location, number and viability of the cysts, and host response. Even with advancing knowledge of the disease manifestations, many aspects related to diagnosis and treatment, particularly in children, still remain controversial and pose challenges to clinical practice. There is no gold standard test to diagnose NCC and the management recommendations are still emerging. This review provides an overview of diagnosis of NCC in children and its management with special focus on current challenges and future prospects.Keywords: neurocysticercosis, children, epilepsy, ring enhancing lesions, pigs

  20. [Risk factors associated with neurocysticercosis in a public hospital in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Trejo, Juan Manuel; Correa-Chacón, Arnulfo Joel; Sctelo-Ham, Elma Ivonne; Torres-Valenzuela, Alejandro; Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme

    2006-01-01

    A case-control study was carried out to determine risk factors associated with neurocysticercosis in a public hospital in Mexico. The following factors were analyzed: Socioeconomic, sociodemographic, hygiene, eating habits, and family history of neurocysticercosis in 85 cases and 170 controls. Cases were patients with cranial computed tomography images compatible with neurocysticercosis. The densitometric analysis (Hounsfield units) allowed us to distinguish normal tissue from physiological and pathological calcifications, and other types of lesions. Controls were admitted for neurocysticercosis but findings were not compatible with initial diagnosis. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS and Epi-info 2002. The most common clinical manifestation in patients was epileptic seizures OR=4.2 (IC 95% 2.40-9.67). With regards to risk factors, consumption of street food OR=2.33 (IC 95% 1.25-4.38), and family history of neurocysticercosis OR= 2.37 (IC 95% 1.11-5.04) were found to be associated with neurocysticercosis. In the north central region of Mexico where this study was performed, the disease was more frequent among urban populations.

  1. Neurocysticercosis in Radiographically Imaged Seizure Patients in U.S. Emergency Departments1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talan, David A.; Moran, Gregory J.; Mower, William; Newdow, Michael; Tsang, Victor C.W.; Pinner, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis appears to be on the rise in the United States, based on immigration patterns and published cases series, including reports of domestic acquisition. We used a collaborative network of U.S. emergency departments to characterize the epidemiology of neurocysticercosis in seizure patients. Data were collected prospectively at 11 university-affiliated, geographically diverse, urban U.S. emergency departments from July 1996 to September 1998. Patients with a seizure who underwent neuroimaging were included. Of the 1,801 patients enrolled in the study, 38 (2.1%) had seizures attributable to neurocysticercosis. The disease was detected in 9 of the 11 sites and was associated with Hispanic ethnicity, immigrant status, and exposure to areas where neurocysticercosis is endemic. This disease appears to be widely distributed and highly prevalent in certain populations (e.g., Hispanic patients) and areas (e.g., Southwest). PMID:12023918

  2. Cognitive and behaviour dysfunction of children with neurocysticercosis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajniti; Shambhavi; Mishra, Om P; Upadhyay, Shashi K; Singh, Tej B; Singh, Utpal Kant

    2014-10-01

    Eighty-three confirmed cases of neurocysticercosis diagnosed as per modified delBrutto criteria were enrolled in the study (Group-I) to observe cognitive and behavioural changes. Controls consisted of two groups: children with idiopathic generalized tonic-clonic seizure (Group-II) and normal children with non-specific cough (Group-III). Cases and controls were subjected to cognitive and behaviour assessment. There was significant difference in the intelligence quotient (IQ) of cases in domains of visual perception, immediate recall, analysis synthesis and reasoning, verbal ability, memory and spatial ability. In the age group of 6-18 years, cases had significantly more behaviour problems than control without seizure, in domains of anxious depressed, withdrawn depressed, somatic problems, social problems and rule-breaking behaviour. Neurocysticercosis causes decline in cognitive function and behaviours in older children, which should be recognized early for appropriate management and to avoid undue parental anxiety. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Proposed diagnostic criteria for neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, O.R.; Rajshekhar, V.; White, A.C.; Tsang, V.C.W.; Nash, T.E.; Takayanagui, O.M.; Schantz, P.M.; Evans, C.A.W.; Flisser, A.; Correa, D.; Botero, D.; Allan, J.C.; Sart̀i, E.; Gonzalez, A.E.; Gilman, R.H.; García, H.H.

    2010-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is the most common helminthic infection of the CNS but its diagnosis remains difficult. Clinical manifestations are nonspecific, most neuroimaging findings are not pathognomonic, and some serologic tests have low sensitivity and specificity. The authors provide diagnostic criteria for neurocysticercosis based on objective clinical, imaging, immunologic, and epidemiologic data. These include four categories of criteria stratified on the basis of their diagnostic strength, including the following: 1) absolute—histologic demonstration of the parasite from biopsy of a brain or spinal cord lesion, cystic lesions showing the scolex on CT or MRI, and direct visualization of subretinal parasites by funduscopic examination; 2) major—lesions highly suggestive of neurocysticercosis on neuroimaging studies, positive serum enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot for the detection of anticysticercal antibodies, resolution of intracranial cystic lesions after therapy with albendazole or praziquantel, and spontaneous resolution of small single enhancing lesions; 3) minor—lesions compatible with neurocysticercosis on neuroimaging studies, clinical manifestations suggestive of neurocysticercosis, positive CSF enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of anticysticercal antibodies or cysticercal antigens, and cysticercosis outside the CNS; and 4) epidemiologic—evidence of a household contact with Taenia solium infection, individuals coming from or living in an area where cysticercosis is endemic, and history of frequent travel to disease-endemic areas. Interpretation of these criteria permits two degrees of diagnostic certainty: 1) definitive diagnosis, in patients who have one absolute criterion or in those who have two major plus one minor and one epidemiologic criterion; and 2) probable diagnosis, in patients who have one major plus two minor criteria, in those who have one major plus one minor and one epidemiologic criterion, and in those who

  4. Headaches More Common among Epilepsy Sufferers with Neurocysticercosis than Other Structural Brain Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Erin K; Mehta, Bijal; Wang, Frances; Nakamoto, Beau

    2017-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in the developing world. Cysticercosis is endemic in many regions of Central and South America, sub-Saharan Africa, India, and Asia. Neurocysticercosis is of emerging importance because globalization has increased travel between Hawai‘i and disease-endemic areas. Headache and epilepsy are two of the most common complications of neurocysticercosis infection. Currently, it is not known if epilepsy patients with neurocysticercosis are more likely to have headaches than those with other structural brain lesions or those with no structural brain abnormalities. This study was designed to investigate whether epilepsy patients with neurocysticercosis report co-morbid headaches more frequently than those with other or with no structural brain lesions. A retrospective cross-sectional study of all patients treated at a community based neurology clinic for epilepsy during a three-month period was performed. One-hundred sixty patients were included in the analytical study. Co-morbid headaches were more commonly present among those with neurocysticercosis (40%) than those with other structural lesions and those with no structural brain abnormalities (19% and 22%, respectively; P = .031). Headache frequency among those reporting co-morbid headaches did not differ significantly between the groups. Prevalence of co-morbid headaches is greater among epilepsy patients with neurocysticercosis than those with other structural brain lesions or no structural brain abnormality. Epilepsy patients with neurocysticercosis may be especially vulnerable to development of headaches and a thorough headache history should be obtained to help screen for affected individuals. PMID:28607832

  5. Neurocysticercosis: Diagnostic problems & current therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajshekhar, Vedantam

    2016-09-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common single cause of seizures/epilepsy in India and several other endemic countries throughout the world. It is also the most common parasitic disease of the brain caused by the cestode Taenia solium or pork tapeworm. The diagnosis of NCC and the tapeworm carrier (taeniasis) can be relatively inaccessible and expensive for most of the patients. In spite of the introduction of several new immunological tests, neuroimaging remains the main diagnostic test for NCC. The treatment of NCC is also mired in controversy although, there is emerging evidence that albendazole (a cysticidal drug) may be beneficial for patients by reducing the number of seizures and hastening the resolution of live cysts. Currently, there are several diagnostic and management issues which remain unresolved. This review will highlight some of these issues.

  6. Calcified neurocysticercosis associates with hippocampal atrophy: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Salgado, Perla; Lama, Julio; Del Brutto, Victor J; Campos, Xavier; Zambrano, Mauricio; García, Héctor H

    2015-01-01

    Calcified neurocysticercosis has been associated with hippocampal atrophy in patients with refractory epilepsy, but the relevance of this association in the population at large is unknown. We assessed calcified cysticerci and its association with hippocampal atrophy in elderly persons living in Atahualpa, an Ecuadorian village endemic for neurocysticercosis. All Atahualpa residents ≥ 60 years of age were invited to undergo computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging for neurocysticercosis detection. Twenty-eight (11%) out of 248 enrolled persons had calcified cysticerci (case-patients) and were matched 1:1 by age, sex, and years of education to individuals without neurocysticercosis on computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (controls). Four case-patients and none of the controls had epilepsy (P = 0.134). Cognitive performance was similar across both groups. The Scheltens' medial temporal atrophy scale was used for hippocampal rating in case-patients and matched controls without neurocysticercosis. Mean score in the Scheltens' scale was higher in case-patients than in controls (P < 0.001). Atrophic hippocampi were noticed in 19 case-patients and five controls (P = 0.003). Atrophy was bilateral in 11 case-patients and unilateral in eight. All case-patients with unilateral hippocampal atrophy had at least one ipsilateral calcification. This study shows an association between calcified cysticerci and hippocampal atrophy and raises the possibility of an inflammation-mediated hippocampal damage as the responsible mechanism for these findings. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  7. Neurocysticercosis - experience at the teaching hospitals ofthe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neurocysticercosis - experience at the teaching hospitals ofthe University ofCape Town . A. J. G~ THOMSON. Abstract In the 15 years 1975-1989, 239 patients attending the associated teaching hospitals ofthe University of Cape Town have been identified retrospectively as having neurocysticercosis. One hundred and.

  8. [Neurocysticercosis with hydrocephalus and secondary bilateral hemianopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo-Villanueva, G; Rueda-Villa, A; Hernández-Ábrego, M P

    2014-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman with a history of seizures, headaches, nausea, vomiting, and decreased visual acuity of 5 years. Visual field detected a bitemporal heteronymous hemianopia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed basal cistern arachnoiditis and supratentorial hydrocephalus. Cranial computed tomography revealed supratentorial calcifications, scolex in the left occipital region, and hydrocephalus secondary to entrapment of the fourth ventricle. Neurocysticercosis can cause bitemporal hemianopsia due to chiasmatic compression secondary to obstructive hydrocephalus. The positivity of anti-cysticercus antibodies determined by ELISA evidence active disease. However patients with hydrocephalus and negative antigen may have sequelae of infection with non-living parasites. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Julio

    2011-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most frequent parasitic disease of the human brain. Modern imaging studies, CT and MRI, have defined the diagnosis and characterization of the disease. Through these studies the therapeutic approach for each case may be individualized with the aid of antihelmintics, steroids, symptomatic medicines, or surgery. The use of one or various therapeutic measures largely depends on the peculiar combination of number, location, and biological stage of lesions as well as the degree of inflammatory response to the parasites. Although there is not a typical clinical picture of NCC, epilepsy is the most frequent manifestation of parenchymal NCC, whereas hydrocephalus is the most frequent manifestation of meningeal NCC. Eradication of cysticercosis is an attainable goal by public education and sanitary improvement in endemic areas.

  10. An Unusual Presentation of Neurocysticercosis: A Space-Occupying Lesion in the Fourth Ventricle Associated with Progressive Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Carolin; Schmidt, Veronika; Poppert, Holger; Wilkins, Patricia; Noh, John; Poppert, Sven; Schlegel, Jürgen; Delbridge, Claire; da Costa, Clarissa Prazeres; Winkler, Andrea S

    2016-01-01

    We communicate a case of a middle-aged Brazilian patient with an unusual presentation of fourth ventricular neurocysticercosis: occurrence of two intraventricular cysts at different locations in the brain within 2 years and cognitive decline as the only neurological symptom. Neurocysticercosis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging, serology, histology, and genetic analysis. Neurocysticercosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases with atypical neurologic or psychiatric symptoms, atypical neuroimaging and travel history. Especially, fourth ventricular cysts carry the risk of obstructive hydrocephalus and brainstem compression and therefore should be extirpated completely. If complete removal of the cystic structures cannot be proven in cases with surgically treated neurocysticercosis, anthelminthic therapy and thorough follow-up examinations should be conducted. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  11. Intrathecal gadodiamide for identifying subarachnoid and ventricular neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera-Calleja, Jesús; Góngora-Rivera, Fernando; Soto-Hernández, José Luis; Del-Brutto, Oscar H; Moreno-Andrade, Talía; Gutiérrez-Alvarado, Ramón; Rodríguez-Carbajal, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    Some neurocysticercosis cysts may remain hidden despite novel MRI sequences. This study evaluates the diagnostic value of gadodiamide (GDD)-contrasted MRI cisternography in selected cases of neurocysticercosis. We included patients aged 18-65 years with a probable diagnosis of subarachnoid cysticercosis in whom previous neuroimaging studies failed to demonstrate the presence of cysts. One millilitre of GDD was administered intrathecally as a contrast agent with subsequent performance of MRI. Fourteen patients were included. Optimal contrast diffusion was achieved in nine patients, and partial diffusion was achieved in 4. Intracranial vesicles were identified in 10 patients, with the presence of more than 60 basal subarachnoid vesicles being revealed in all, with five cysts in the fourth ventricle in four patients and a floating cyst in the lateral ventricle in one. In one case, intrathecal GDD demonstrated spinal cysticercosis. No adverse events were reported after intrathecal GDD administration. Intrathecal GDD administration is useful for the diagnosis of subarachnoid and intraventricular neurocysticercosis and can be used to improve diagnostic accuracy in selected cases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Awareness of neurocysticercosis: A study from Northwest India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girotra Mohit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurocysticercosis (NCC is a common cause of epilepsy in developing countries. In order to plan and implement prevention programs, it is essential to study the awareness of NCC. Objective: To study the awareness of NCC among patients with NCC and compare with age- and gender-matched controls without NCC. Setting and Design: Hospital based case-control study. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and fourteen subjects were studied (109 NCC patients, and 105 age- and gender-matched controls without NCC. The participants were selected from neurology and medical wards of a tertiary referral hospital in northwest India. They were interviewed by trained medical interns using a questionnaire. Results: 64.2% of the NCC patients and 19% of control group had heard about NCC (P < 0.001. Knowledge regarding organ affected by NCC in the NCC group was 61.4% and in the control group was 80% (P = 0.09. Only 12.9% of the NCC group and none in the control group identified tape worm as a causative agent for NCC (P = 0.092. Negative effects of NCC on marriage and social life were more often cited by the NCC group but in the control group it was towards education (P = 0.004. Conclusions: The awareness of NCC was poor in both the groups. Educational programs are needed to improve the awareness about NCC among the patients and the public.

  13. The association between seizures and deposition of collagen in the brain in porcine Taenia solium neurocysticercosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nina Møller; Trevisan, Chiara; Leifsson, Páll Skúli

    2016-01-01

    tissue sections from seven pigs were examined histopathologically i.e. two pigs with epileptic seizures and T. solium cysts, four pigs without seizures but with cysts, and one non-infected control pig. Pigs with epileptic seizures had a larger amount of collagen in their brain tissue, showing as large......Neurocysticercosis caused by infection with Taenia solium is a significant cause of epilepsy and seizures in humans. The aim of this study was to assess the association between seizures and the deposition of collagen in brain tissue in pigs with T. solium neurocysticercosis. In total 78 brain...... fibrotic scars and moderate amount of collagen deposited around cysts, compared to pigs without seizures and the negative control pig. Our results indicate that collagen is likely to play a considerable part in the pathogenesis of seizures in T. solium neurocysticercosis....

  14. The association between seizures and deposition of collagen in the brain in porcine Taenia solium neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Nina M; Trevisan, Chiara; Leifsson, Páll S; Johansen, Maria V

    2016-09-15

    Neurocysticercosis caused by infection with Taenia solium is a significant cause of epilepsy and seizures in humans. The aim of this study was to assess the association between seizures and the deposition of collagen in brain tissue in pigs with T. solium neurocysticercosis. In total 78 brain tissue sections from seven pigs were examined histopathologically i.e. two pigs with epileptic seizures and T. solium cysts, four pigs without seizures but with cysts, and one non-infected control pig. Pigs with epileptic seizures had a larger amount of collagen in their brain tissue, showing as large fibrotic scars and moderate amount of collagen deposited around cysts, compared to pigs without seizures and the negative control pig. Our results indicate that collagen is likely to play a considerable part in the pathogenesis of seizures in T. solium neurocysticercosis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Immunological methods for diagnosing neurocysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, R.E.; Estrada, J.J.; Grogl, M.

    1989-01-31

    A method is described for diagnosing active human neurocysticercosis by detecting the presence of at least one Taenia solium larval antigen in cerebrospinal fluid, which comprises: contacting cerebrospinal fluid from a human to be diagnosed with a solid support, wherein the support binds with a Taenia solium larval antigen if present, contacting the support with a first antibody, wherein the first antibody binds with a larval Taenia solium antigen if present in the cerebrospinal fluid, contacting the solid support with a detectable second antibody which will bind with the first antibody, and detecting the second antibody bound to the support.

  16. Hospitalization Frequency and Charges for Neurocysticercosis, United States, 2003–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flecker, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis, brain infection with Taenia solium larval cysts, causes substantial neurologic illness around the world. To assess the effect of neurocysticercosis in the United States, we reviewed hospitalization discharge data in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2003–2012 and found an estimated 18,584 hospitalizations for neurocysticercosis and associated hospital charges totaling >US $908 million. The risk for hospitalization was highest among Hispanics (2.5/100,000 population), a rate 35 times higher than that for the non-Hispanic white population. Nearly three-quarters of all hospitalized patients with neurocysticercosis were Hispanic. Male sex and age 20–44 years also incurred increased risk. In addition, hospitalizations and associated charges related to cysticercosis far exceeded those for malaria and were greater than for those for all other neglected tropical diseases combined. Neurocysticercosis is an increasing public health concern in the United States, especially among Hispanics, and costs the US health care system a substantial amount of money. PMID:25988221

  17. NEUROCYSTICERCOSIS IN CHILDREN PRESENTING WITH AFEBRILE SEIZURE: CLINICAL PROFILE, IMAGING AND SERODIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshi Soumyaranjan Sahu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NCC is one of the major causes of childhood seizures in developing countries including India and Latin America. In this study neurological pediatric cases presenting with afebrile seizures were screened for anti-Cysticercus antibodies (IgG in their sera in order to estimate the possible burden of cysticercal etiology. The study included a total of 61 pediatric afebrile seizure subjects (aged one to 15 years old; there was a male predominance. All the sera were tested using a pre-evaluated commercially procured IgG-ELISA kit (UB-Magiwell Cysticercosis Kit ™. Anti-Cysticercus antibody in serum was positive in 23 of 61 (37.7% cases. The majority of cases with a positive ELISA test presented with generalized seizure (52.17%, followed by complex partial seizure (26.08%, and simple partial seizure (21.73%. Headaches were the major complaint (73.91%. Other presentations were vomiting (47.82%, pallor (34.78%, altered sensorium (26.08%, and muscle weakness (13.04%. There was one hemiparesis case diagnosed to be NCC. In this study one child without any significant findings on imaging was also found to be positive by serology. There was a statistically significant association found between the cases with multiple lesions on the brain and the ELISA-positivity (p = 0.017. Overall positivity of the ELISA showed a potential cysticercal etiology. Hence, neurocysticercosis should be suspected in every child presenting with afebrile seizure especially with a radio-imaging supportive diagnosis in tropical developing countries or areas endemic for taeniasis/cysticercosis.

  18. Neurocysticercosis presenting as a 'Stroke Mimic'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Reza; Rowe, Aimee; Shah, Rajiv; Venkatesan, Pradhib; England, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    A 62 year old Nepalese gentleman presented with left sided weakness and sensory loss. Initial brain CT scanning was suggestive of acute infarction but a subsequent MRI scan showed cysts with oedema. Cysticercosis serology was positive and a diagnosis of neurocysticercosis was made. The patient made almost a complete recovery after treatment with albendazole, praziquantel and steroids. Neurocysticercosis should be considered in the diffierential diagnosis when patients originating from endemic areas present with focal neurological deficit.

  19. Neurocysticercosis: Correlative pathomorphology and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotz, J.; Hewlett, R.; Alheit, B.; Bowen, R.

    1988-02-01

    CT and MR images of 32 patients with neurocysticercosis were correlated with pathomorphology. Gross morphological features of cystic larvae, complex arachnoid cysts, granulomatous abscesses, basal meningitis and mineralised nodules correlated closely with the images obtained, especially on MR, where resolution permitted visualisation of larval protoscolices. Our material indicates three forms of the natural history of neurocysticercosis related chiefly to anatomic location, and provides details of the evolution of large, complex arachnoid cysts.

  20. Antiepileptic drugs for seizure control in people with neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monika; Singh, Tejinder; Mathew, Amrith

    2015-10-12

    neurocysticercosis (identified on CT scan) presenting with seizures. In total, 466 people were enrolled. These studies compared various AED treatment durations, six, 12 and 24 months. The risk of seizure recurrence with six months treatment compared with 12 to 24 months treatment was not statistically significant (odds ratio (OR) 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73 to 2.47) (three studies n = 360, P 0.35). The risk of seizure recurrence with six to 12 months compared with 24 months treatment was not statistically significant (OR 1.36, 95% CI 0.72 to 2.57) (three studies, n = 385, P 0.34).Two studies co-related seizure recurrence with CT findings and suggested that persistent and calcified lesions had a higher recurrence risk and suggest longer duration of treatment with AEDs. One study reported no side effects, while the rest did not comment on side effects of drugs. None of the studies addressed the quality of life of the participants.These studies had certain methodological deficiencies such as a small sample size and a possibility of bias due to lack of blinding, which affect the results of this review. Despite neurocysticercosis being the most common cause of epilepsy worldwide, there is currently no evidence available regarding the use of AEDs as prophylaxis for preventing seizures among people presenting with symptoms other than seizures. For those presenting with seizures, there is no reliable evidence regarding the duration of treatment required. There is therefore a need for large scale randomised controlled trials to address these questions.

  1. Time trend of neurocysticercosis in children with seizures in a tertiary hospital of western Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kalipatnam Seshagiri; Adhikari, Sudhir; Gauchan, Eva; Sathian, Brijesh; B K, Ganesh; Basnet, Sahisnuta; Tiwari, Prabhat Kumar; Bahadur, Namraj; Mishra, Rajnish

    2017-05-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a common cause of seizure disorders in children of Western Nepal. The clinical presentation is variable. The incidence varies depending on the food habits and ethnicity of the population. The present study was undertaken with the objective of studying the mode of presentation, radiological findings and to determine the recent trend of the disease in children of Western Nepal. Records from the Department of Pediatrics, Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal of children aged 0-17 years admitted from 2003 to 2015 and with the discharge diagnosis of seizure and neurocysticercosis (NCC) were reviewed. The diagnosis was primarily based on clinical features, neurological involvement and CT and MRI studies. Seizures due to other CNS pathologies were excluded. Patients with NCC were treated with Albendazole15mg/kg/day for 28 days with supportive treatments for seizures and raised intracranial pressure. Patients were followed up for one year after the completion of the treatment. There were 1355 cases of seizure disorders, out of which 229 (16.90%) were NCC. There were 99 (43.23%) in the age group 6-10 years followed by 91 (41.09%) in the age group of 11-15 years. Seizures were the most common presenting symptom in 88.65%, followed by raised ICP in 9.61%. Neuropsychiatric changes were noted in 38 cases (16.59%). CT scan findings revealed single lesion in 78.16% and multiple lesions in 21.83%. Poisson regression analysis showed statistically significant decline of year-wise incidence of NCC cases (p<0.05) from 2003 to 2015. The decline in the incidence of NCC in recent years is most probably attributed to improved hygiene with the construction of household toilets to avoid open defecation and biannual deworming with Albendazole as a part of School Health and Nutrition Project.

  2. Time trend of neurocysticercosis in children with seizures in a tertiary hospital of western Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalipatnam Seshagiri Rao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is a common cause of seizure disorders in children of Western Nepal. The clinical presentation is variable. The incidence varies depending on the food habits and ethnicity of the population. The present study was undertaken with the objective of studying the mode of presentation, radiological findings and to determine the recent trend of the disease in children of Western Nepal.Records from the Department of Pediatrics, Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal of children aged 0-17 years admitted from 2003 to 2015 and with the discharge diagnosis of seizure and neurocysticercosis (NCC were reviewed. The diagnosis was primarily based on clinical features, neurological involvement and CT and MRI studies. Seizures due to other CNS pathologies were excluded. Patients with NCC were treated with Albendazole15mg/kg/day for 28 days with supportive treatments for seizures and raised intracranial pressure. Patients were followed up for one year after the completion of the treatment.There were 1355 cases of seizure disorders, out of which 229 (16.90% were NCC. There were 99 (43.23% in the age group 6-10 years followed by 91 (41.09% in the age group of 11-15 years. Seizures were the most common presenting symptom in 88.65%, followed by raised ICP in 9.61%. Neuropsychiatric changes were noted in 38 cases (16.59%. CT scan findings revealed single lesion in 78.16% and multiple lesions in 21.83%. Poisson regression analysis showed statistically significant decline of year-wise incidence of NCC cases (p<0.05 from 2003 to 2015.The decline in the incidence of NCC in recent years is most probably attributed to improved hygiene with the construction of household toilets to avoid open defecation and biannual deworming with Albendazole as a part of School Health and Nutrition Project.

  3. Neurocysticercosis, a Persisting Health Problem in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Agnès; Moreno García, Jael; Valdez Aguerrebere, Paulina; de Sayve Durán, María; Becerril Rodríguez, Paola; Larralde, Carlos; Sciutto, Edda

    2010-01-01

    Background The ongoing epidemiological transition in Mexico minimizes the relative impact of neurocysticercosis (NC) on public health. However, hard data on the disease frequency are not available. Methodology All clinical records from patients admitted in the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN) at Mexico City in 1994 and 2004 were revised. The frequencies of hospitalized NC patients in neurology, neurosurgery and psychiatry services, as well as NC mortality from 1995 through 2009, were retrieved. Statistical analyses were made to evaluate possible significant differences in frequencies of NC patients' admission between 1994 and 2004, and in yearly frequencies of NC patients' hospitalization and death between 1995 and 2009. Principal Findings NC frequency in INNN is not significantly different in 1994 and 2004. Between these two years, clinical severity of the cases diminished and the proportion of patients living in Mexico City increased. Yearly frequencies of hospitalization in neurology and psychiatry services were stable, while frequencies of hospitalization in neurosurgery service and mortality significantly decreased between 1995 and 2009. Conclusions Our findings show a stable tendency of hospital cases during the last decade that should encourage to redouble efforts to control this ancient disease. PMID:20808759

  4. Neurocysticercosis infection and disease-A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripper, Lucy B; Welburn, Susan C

    2017-02-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common parasitic disease of the human central nervous system (CNS), a pleomorphic disease with a diverse array of clinical manifestations. The infection is pleomorphic and dependent on a complex range of interconnecting factors, including number and size of the cysticerci, their stage of development and localisation within the brain with resulting difficulties in accurate diagnosis and staging of the disease. This review examines the factors that contribute to the accurate assessment of NCC distribution and transmission that are critical to achieving robust disease burden calculations. Control and prevention of T. solium transmission should be a key priority in global health as intervention can reduce the substantial healthcare and economic burdens inflicted by both NCC and taeniasis. Surveillance systems need to be better established, including implementing obligatory notification of cases. In the absence of reliable estimates of its global burden, NCC will remain-along with other endemic zoonoses, of low priority in the eyes of funding agencies-a truly neglected disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Magnitude of the Disease Burden from Neurocysticercosis in a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Caryn; Garcia, Hector H.; Evans, Carlton; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Verastegui, Manuela; Tsang, Victor C. W.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Cysticercosis contributes to higher epilepsy rates in developing countries than in industrialized ones, yet no estimate exists for the associated burden of disease. We used epidemiological data on neurocysticercosis in Peru to calculate the burden of disease and applied our model to the other countries of Latin America where neurocysticercosis is endemic to determine a regional estimate. Analysis of 12 population-based community studies demonstrated that neurocysticercosis was endemic in highland areas and high jungles, with seroprevalences from 6% to 24%. In one community, the adult seizure disorder rate was 9.1% among seropositive persons versus 4.6% among seronegative persons; we used this difference for estimates. On the basis of average prevalence rates in areas of endemicity of 6%–10%, we estimated that there are 23,512–39,186 symptomatic neurocysticercosis cases in Peru. In Latin America, an estimated 75 million persons live in areas where cysticercosis is endemic, and ~400,000 have symptomatic disease. Cysticercosis contributes substantially to neurological disease in Peru and in all of Latin America. PMID:10524964

  6. MR findings of degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yul; Chung, Eun A; Yang, Ik; Park, Hae Jung; Chung, Soo Young [Hallym Univ. Kangnam Sungshim Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    To evaluate MR imaging findings of degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis and to determine the characteristics which distinguish it from other brain diseases. MR imagings of 19 patients (56 lesions) of degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis were retrospectively evaluated, focusing on the size and location of lesions signal intensity patterns of cyst fluid and wall, the extent of the surrounding edema and features of contrast enhancement. Degenerating parenchymal neurocysticercosis was located in gray or subcortical while matter in 89.3% of 56 lesions (50/56) ; most of these (98.2%) were smaller than 2 cm in diameter. Cyst fluid signal was hyperintense relative to CSF on T1 and proton density weighted images (92.9%). A hypointense signal rim of the cyst wall was noted in the lesions on proton density (92.9%) and T2 weighted (98.2%) images, Surrounding edema was mostly mild. Peripheral rim enhancement was noted in all lesions, and this was frequently irregular and lobulated (67.9%) with a focal defect in the enhancing rim(41.1%). Findings which could be helpful in distinguishing degenerating parencymal neurocysticercosis from other brain diseases are as follows : small, superficial lesions ; hyperintense signal of the cyst fluid on T1 and proton density weighted images ; hypointense signal of the cyst wall on proton density and T2 weighted images ; relatively mild extent of surrounding edema, and peripheral rim enhancement which is frequently irregular and lobulated with a focal defect in the enhancing rim.

  7. Calcification of intracranial vessels in neurocysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Bouzas, A. [ENEP Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico (Mexico); Ballesteros-Maresma, A. [Radiologia Clinica de Cuernavaca (Mexico); Casian, G.; Hernandez-Martinez, P. [Hospital Juarez de Mexico S. S. (Mexico); Martinez-Lopez, M. [Fundacion Clinica Medica Sur (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    We report calcification of intracranial vessels in neurocysticercosis. Calcification was observed in the middle cerebral arteries in two patients, and the circle of Willis in two others. The patients with middle cerebral artery calcification underwent CT with inhaled stable xenon and an area of mild hypoperfusion was observed in the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere. (orig.)

  8. Case to Cause: Back to the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovitz, Mimi; Sherraden, Margaret S.

    2016-01-01

    This article reopens the historic debate about the roles of micro and macro practice in social work and encourages the profession to find ways to achieve a better balance between case and cause in education, practice, and research. To this end, it traces the history of the case versus cause debate including conceptual frameworks for rebalancing…

  9. [Sturge-Weber syndrome: differential diagnosis of neurocysticercosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, A C; Hernández-Cossio, O; Hernández-Fustes, O J; Munhoz, R P; Hernández-Fustes, O J; Francisco, A N

    The Sturge-Weber syndrome is characterized by facial cutaneous angioma associated with leptomeningeal and cerebral angioma, typically ipsilateral to the facial lesion, which is accompanied by convulsions, mental retardation, contralateral hemiparesia, hemiatrophy, homonymous hemianopsia and glaucoma. Most of the patients with radiographic evidence of intracranial angioma develop convulsive crises, but only half have severe mental retardation. The image of calcification on cranial tomography often leads to confusion in diagnosis, especially with neurocysticercosis, particularly in places where this is endemic and the patients present with minimal skin lesions or these are at atypical sites. We present the case of a 13 year-old boy hospitalized with status epilepticus who, since the age of 1 year and 3 months, had had convulsive seizures which were of generalized tonic-clonic type and partially complex with secondary generalization, treated with carbamazepine at a dose of 400 mg per day. Neurocysticercosis was diagnosed on a tomogram showing calcification of the left parieto-occipital gyrus. Following physical examination and complementary tests the diagnosis of Sturge-Weber syndrome was made. We emphasize the importance of the diagnosis of Sturge-Weber syndrome, its clinical picture and treatment.

  10. Neurocysticercosis in Nepal: a retrospective clinical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Ojha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The prevalence of epilepsy is higher in Nepal. This study was conducted to analyze the clinical manifestations of neurocysticercosis (NCC among seizure patients admitted to our center. Methods: We retrospectively studied all the NCC patients admitted to Neurology Department, Bir Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal from April 2012 to February 2014. Computer tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI head, clinical profile, lab investigations and exclusion of other causes were the basis of the NCC diagnosis. Chi-square and Student′s t-test were used for comparison of variables. Results: Out of 131 seizure patients admitted, 21 patients were diagnosed with NCC (mean age: 33.95 ± 16.41; male: 15 (71.4%, female: 6 (28.6%. Generalized tonic clonic seizure was the most common seizure type in NCC patients (18 patients; 85.7%, two of them had status epilepticus during presentation in Emergency Department. Three patients had focal seizure, one with epilepsia partialis continua. Neuroimaging showed multiple NCC lesions in 8 (38.1% and a single NCC lesion in 13 (61.9% patients. Seven of them (33.3% sought traditional healers before being presented to our center. Eight patients (38.1% were treated with antiepileptics in local health-post without neuroimaging studies done. Calcified stage of NCC was the most frequent CT/MRI findings (12 patients; 57.1%. Phenytoin was preferred both by physicians and patients due to its low cost. Conclusion: NCC is a common finding among seizure patients in Nepal. Poor economic status, illiteracy and underdeveloped rural society are the major challenges in prevention and treatment of NCC.

  11. Revised diagnostic criteria for neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, O H; Nash, T E; White, A C; Rajshekhar, V; Wilkins, P P; Singh, G; Vasquez, C M; Salgado, P; Gilman, R H; Garcia, H H

    2017-01-15

    A unified set of criteria for neurocysticercosis (NCC) has helped to standardize its diagnosis in different settings. Cysticercosis experts were convened to update current diagnostic criteria for NCC according to two principles: neuroimaging studies are essential for diagnosis, and all other information provides indirect evidence favoring the diagnosis. Recent diagnostic advances were incorporated to this revised set. This revised set is structured in absolute, neuroimaging and clinical/exposure criteria. Absolute criteria include: histological confirmation of parasites, evidence of subretinal cysts, and demonstration of the scolex within a cyst. Neuroimaging criteria are categorized as major (cystic lesions without scolex, enhancing lesions, multilobulated cysts, and calcifications), confirmative (resolution of cysts after cysticidal drug therapy, spontaneous resolution of single enhancing lesions, and migrating ventricular cysts on sequential neuroimaging studies) and minor (hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal enhancement). Clinical/exposure criteria include: detection of anticysticercal antibodies or cysticercal antigens by well-standardized tests, systemic cysticercosis, evidence of a household Taenia carrier, suggestive clinical manifestations, and residency in endemic areas. Besides patients having absolute criteria, definitive diagnosis can be made in those having two major neuroimaging criteria (or one major plus one confirmative criteria) plus exposure. For patients presenting with one major and one minor neuroimaging criteria plus exposure, definitive diagnosis of NCC requires the exclusion of confounding pathologies. Probable diagnosis is reserved for individuals presenting with one neuroimaging criteria plus strong evidence of exposure. This revised set of diagnostic criteria provides simpler definitions and may facilitate its more uniform and widespread applicability in different scenarios. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  12. Diagnostic criteria for neurocysticercosis, revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of neurocysticercosis (NCC) can be a challenge. Clinical manifestations are non-specific, most neuroimaging findings are non-pathognomonic, and some serologic tests have low sensitivity or specificity. A set of diagnostic criteria was proposed in 2001 to avoid the over diagnosis of NCC that occurs in epidemiologic surveys, and to help clinicians evaluating patients with suspected NCC. The set included four stratified categories of criteria, including: (1) absolute: histological demonstration of cysticerci, cystic lesions showing the scolex on neuroimaging studies, and direct visualization of subretinal parasites by fundoscopic examination; (2) major: lesions highly suggestive of NCC on neuroimaging studies, positive serum enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) for the detection of anticysticercal antibodies, resolution of intracranial cystic lesions after cysticidal drug therapy, and spontaneous resolution of single enhancing lesions; (3) minor: lesions compatible with NCC on neuroimaging studies, suggestive clinical manifestations, positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ELISA for detection of anticysticercal antibodies or cysticercal antigens, and cysticercosis outside the nervous system; and (4) epidemiological: evidence of a household contact with Taenia solium infection, individuals coming from or living in cysticercosis endemic areas, and history of travel to disease-endemic areas. Interpretation of these criteria permits two degrees of diagnostic certainty: (1) definitive diagnosis, in patients who have one absolute criterion or in those who have two major plus one minor and one epidemiological criteria; and (2) probable diagnosis, in patients who have one major plus two minor criteria, in those who have one major plus one minor and one epidemiological criteria, and in those who have three minor plus one epidemiological criteria. After 10 years of usage, this set has been proved useful in both, field studies, and hospital settings. Recent

  13. PSEUDOSEIZURES AND EPILEPSY IN NEUROCYSTICERCOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibañez-Valdés L de F.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied 32 rural patients from the poorest regions in South Africa, diagnosed as epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis presenting pseudoseizures. We found that the common clinical characteristics of this series and its psychological profile such as: duration of events, history of sexual abuse in females, absent of focal neurological signs, vocalization in the middle of the seizures, and lack of post-ictal symptoms were very useful for its differential diagnosis, and the possible difference between the clinical features and psychological profile of those patients and others without PS. Finally, some advices for the management of this condition by family doctors are suggested. ______________ RESUMEN: Estudiamos 32 pacientes provenientes de las áreas rurales mas pobres de Sudáfrica en los cuales se diagnosticó una epilepsia secundaria a neurocisticercosis cerebral y que además presentaban seudo crisis epilépticas. Encontramos un número de características clínicas y psicológicas comunes en este grupo tales como la duracion de las crisis, historia de abuso sexual en las hembras, ausencia de signos neurológicos focales, vocalización en el intervalo entre las crisis y la falta de signos postictales que resultó ser muy útil en el diagnóstico diferencial. Se encontraron además diferencias en las características clínicas y psicológicas estos pacientes con relación a otros que no presentaban pseudocrisis.

  14. Reversible dementia as a presenting manifestation of racemose neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Racemose cysticercosis is a less frequent presentation of neurocysticercosis (NCC. It′s presentation and management is quite different from cerebral parenchymal NCC. Diagnosis of racemose cysticercosis is based on the combination of clinical, epidemiologic, radiographic, and immunologic information. Compared with cysticercus cellulose, which most commonly presents as seizures, racemose NCC due to its extraaxial location presents with raised intracranial pressure and meningitis, and frequently requires neurosurgical intervention. Dementia as a sole presenting feature of NCC is rare. We report a case of racemose NCC with dementia as the presenting manifestation. The outcome of dementia patients with NCC seems favorable in most cases therefore a high index of suspicion for NCC should be kept especially in endemic areas.

  15. Interleukin 10 and dendritic cells are the main suppression mediators of regulatory T cells in human neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Sillas, A; Álvarez-Luquín, D D; Cárdenas, G; Casanova-Hernández, D; Fragoso, G; Hernández, M; Proaño Narváez, J V; García-Vázquez, F; Fleury, A; Sciutto, E; Adalid-Peralta, L

    2016-02-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium cysticerci in the central nervous system. It is considered that, during co-evolution, the parasite developed strategies to modulate the host's immune response. The action mechanisms of regulatory T cells in controlling the immune response in neurocysticercosis are studied in this work. Higher blood levels of regulatory T cells with CD4(+) CD45RO(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(high) and CD4(+) CD25(high) FoxP3(+) CD95(high) phenotype and of non-regulatory CD4(+) CD45RO(+) FoxP3(med) T cells were found in neurocysticercosis patients with respect to controls. Interestingly, regulatory T cells express higher levels of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG-3), programmed death 1 (PD-1) and glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR), suggesting a cell-to-cell contact mechanism with dendritic cells. Furthermore, higher IL-10 and regulatory T cell type 1 (Tr1) levels were found in neurocysticercosis patients' peripheral blood, suggesting that the action mechanism of regulatory T cells involves the release of immunomodulatory cytokines. No evidence was found of the regulatory T cell role in inhibiting the proliferative response. Suppressive regulatory T cells from neurocysticercosis patients correlated negatively with late activated lymphocytes (CD4(+) CD38(+) ). Our results suggest that, during neurocysticercosis, regulatory T cells could control the immune response, probably by a cell-to-cell contact with dendritic cells and interleukin (IL)-10 release by Tr1, to create an immunomodulatory environment that may favour the development of T. solium cysticerci and their permanence in the central nervous system. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  16. Neurocysticercosis Presenting with Epilepsia Partialis Continua: A Clinicopathologic Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Joe Yeh

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis, a disease caused by a tapeworm larva in the central nervous system, is the leading cause of acquired epilepsy in undeveloped regions of the world. In Taiwan, after improvements in sanitation, tapeworm infection became very rare except in mountain areas inhibited by aborigines. However, in recent years, immigration from other Asian countries has increased rapidly, and parasite infection of the central nervous system may again become an important cause of adult-onset epilepsy in clinical practice. Here, we describe a 27-year-old female Thai immigrant who presented with adult-onset epilepsia partialis continua of the right upper extremity. Electroencephalography showed epileptiform discharge in the left central region, while brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a small enhanced lesion in the left premotor cortex. She underwent operation and pathology of the mass revealed a degenerated cysticercus. In this article, we provide detailed neuroimaging findings, pathologic report, and literature review of this parasitic infection of the central nervous system. This case calls for physicians to be aware of cysticercosis as an etiology of adult-onset epilepsy in immigrants from endemic countries.

  17. Time trend of neurocysticercosis in children with seizures in a tertiary hospital of western Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Kalipatnam Seshagiri; Adhikari, Sudhir; Gauchan, Eva; Sathian, Brijesh; B. K., Ganesh; Basnet, Sahisnuta; Tiwari, Prabhat Kumar; Bahadur, Namraj; Mishra, Rajnish

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Neurocysticercosis is a common cause of seizure disorders in children of Western Nepal. The clinical presentation is variable. The incidence varies depending on the food habits and ethnicity of the population. The present study was undertaken with the objective of studying the mode of presentation, radiological findings and to determine the recent trend of the disease in children of Western Nepal. Methods Records from the Department of Pediatrics, Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokha...

  18. Neurocysticercosis - experience at the teaching hospitals of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neurocysticercosis - experience at the teaching hospitals of the University of Cape Town. AJG Thomson. Abstract. In the 15 years 1975-1989, 239 patients attending the associated teaching hospitals of the University of Cape Town have been identified retrospectively as having neurocysticercosis. One hundred and ...

  19. Disseminated neurocysticercosis presenting as isolated acute monocular painless vision loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav M Kasundra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis, the most common parasitic infection of the nervous system, is known to affect the brain, eyes, muscular tissues and subcutaneous tissues. However, it is very rare for patients with ocular cysts to have concomitant cerebral cysts. Also, the dominant clinical manifestation of patients with cerebral cysts is either seizures or headache. We report a patient who presented with acute monocular painless vision loss due to intraocular submacular cysticercosis, who on investigation had multiple cerebral parenchymal cysticercal cysts, but never had any seizures. Although such a vision loss after initiation of antiparasitic treatment has been mentioned previously, acute monocular vision loss as the presenting feature of ocular cysticercosis is rare. We present a brief review of literature along with this case report.

  20. Disseminated neurocysticercosis presenting as isolated acute monocular painless vision loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasundra, Gaurav M; Bhargava, Amita Narendra; Bhushan, Bharat; Khichar, Subhakaran; Sood, Isha

    2014-11-01

    Neurocysticercosis, the most common parasitic infection of the nervous system, is known to affect the brain, eyes, muscular tissues and subcutaneous tissues. However, it is very rare for patients with ocular cysts to have concomitant cerebral cysts. Also, the dominant clinical manifestation of patients with cerebral cysts is either seizures or headache. We report a patient who presented with acute monocular painless vision loss due to intraocular submacular cysticercosis, who on investigation had multiple cerebral parenchymal cysticercal cysts, but never had any seizures. Although such a vision loss after initiation of antiparasitic treatment has been mentioned previously, acute monocular vision loss as the presenting feature of ocular cysticercosis is rare. We present a brief review of literature along with this case report.

  1. Isolated and silent spinal neurocysticercosis associated with pseudotumor cerebri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohapatra Rabindra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of spinal neurocysticercosis (NCC is rare. Isolated spinal NCC is still rarer. We present here a case report where a young lady presented with all the clinical features of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC, where medical treatment for PTC failed and the presence of cysticercous in spinal canal was detected only on the operation table, while doing a lumbo-peritoneal shunt (LP shunt to save her vision. Diagnosis could be confirmed only after the histopathology report was received. She did not have any direct evidence of spinal involvement, thereby eluding correct diagnosis. In English literature, we could not find any report of isolated and silent spinal NCC associated with PTC. In addition, we could not find any report of recovery of cysticercous larva through the Touhey′s needle injury, although this was an incidental finding. In endemic areas, isolated spinal NCC should be suspected in patients presenting with PTC.

  2. CASE REPORT Uncommon Pathogen Bacillus Cereus Causing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-01

    Jan 1, 2018 ... ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Subdural empyema (SDE) in children is a severe intracranial infection. Many pathogens can cause SDE. CASE DETAILS: In this articlewe present a 15-month old. Indonesian boy diagnosed as SDE based on the clinical symptoms and neuroimaging. A complete blood count ...

  3. Neurocysticercosis Diagnosed in a Patient with Taenia saginata Taeniasis after Administration of Praziquantel: A Case Study and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Toni, Wandra; Raka, Sudewi; Ni Made, Susilawati; Kadek, Swastika; I Made, Sudarmaja; Luh Putu Eka, Diarthini; Ivan Elisabeth, Purba; 岡本, 宗裕; Christine M, Budke; 伊藤, 亮

    2016-01-01

    Taeniasis, caused by infection with Taenia saginata or Taenia solium, occurs on Bali due to the consumption ofundercooked beef and pork, respectively. Fieldwork conducted on Bali from 2002-2007, identified 69 taeniasis casesdue to T. saginata. In August 2007, three T. saginata tapeworm carriers in the Gianyar district of Bali were treated witha single dose of praziquantel. Within a few hours of treatment, a 47 year old man had a seizure and was admittedto a hospital in the city of Denpasar. A...

  4. Muscular cysticercosis: Case report and imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmo, Neide Regina Simoes; Fiorio, Ulysses Ferreira; Clemente, Marcel Andreazza, E-mail: neideolmo@yahoo.com.br [Clinica Mult Imagem, Santos, SP (Brazil); Bastos, Eder Amaral [Universidade Metropolitana de Santos (UNIMES), Santos, SP (Brazil); Mendes, Gustavo Gomes [AC Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    Cysticercosis is a parasitic disease caused by a worm of the Cestoda class. The most prevalent form affects the nervous system. This case report is from a 78-year old female patient evaluated at Clinica Mult Imagem, in the city of Santos, Brazil, who presented a form of the disease that differed from the classic neurocysticercosis, in this case muscular cysticercosis. This and other forms of manifestation justify further studies to ensure adequate recognition, diagnosis and treatment of this parasitic disease. (author)

  5. Albendazole versus praziquantel in the treatment of neurocysticercosis: a meta-analysis of comparative trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios K Matthaiou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurocysticercosis, infection of the brain with larvae of Taenia solium (pork tapeworm, is one of several forms of human cysticercosis caused by this organism. We investigated the role of albendazole and praziquantel in the treatment of patients with parenchymal neurocysticercosis by performing a meta-analysis of comparative trials of their effectiveness and safety. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a search in the PubMed database, Cochrane Database of Controlled Trials, and in references of relevant articles. Six studies were included in the meta-analysis. Albendazole was associated with better control of seizures than praziquantel in the pooled data analysis, when the generic inverse variance method was used to combine the incidence of seizure control in the included trials (patients without seizures/[patients x years at risk] (156 patients in 4 studies, point effect estimate [incidence rate ratio] = 4.94, 95% confidence interval 2.45-9.98. In addition, albendazole was associated with better effectiveness than praziquantel in the total disappearance of cysts (335 patients in 6 studies, random effects model, OR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.06-5.00. There was no difference between albendazole and praziquantel in reduction of cysts, proportion of patients with adverse events, and development of intracranial hypertension due to the administered therapy. CONCLUSIONS: A critical review of the available data from comparative trials suggests that albendazole is more effective than praziquantel regarding clinically important outcomes in patients with neurocysticercosis. Nevertheless, given the relative scarcity of trials, more comparative interventional studies--especially randomized controlled trials--are required to draw a safe conclusion about the best regimen for the treatment of patients with parenchymal neurocysticercosis.

  6. Epilepsy and Neurocysticercosis: An Incidence Study in a Peruvian Rural Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarán, Manuel V.; Montano, Silvia M.; Gonzalvez, Guillermo; Moyano, Luz M.; Chero, Juan C.; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Pan, William; Tsang, Victor C.W.; Gilman, Robert H.; Garcia, Hector H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder and neurocysticercosis (NCC), the central nervous system infection by the larvae of Taenia solium, is the main cause of acquired epilepsy in developing countries. NCC is becoming more frequent in industrialized countries due to immigration from endemic areas. Previously reported epilepsy incidences range from 30 to 50/100,000 people in industrialized countries and 90 to 122/100,000 people in developing countries. Objectives To determine the incidence of epilepsy in a cysticercosis endemic area of Peru. Methods A screening survey for possible seizure cases was repeated biannually in this cohort for a period of 5 years (1999–2004) using a previously validated questionnaire. All positive respondents throughout the study were examined by a trained neurologist in the field to confirm the seizure. If confirmed, they were offered treatment, serological testing, neuroimaging (CT scans and MRI) and clinical follow-up. Results The cohort study comprised 817 individuals. The overall epilepsy incidence rate was 162.3/100,000 person-years, and for epileptic seizures, 216.6/100,000 person-years. Out of the 8 individuals who had epileptic seizures, 4 had markers for NCC (neuroimaging and/or serology). Conclusion The incidence of epilepsy in this area endemic for cysticercosis is one of the highest reported worldwide. PMID:19325247

  7. Lack of association between parenchymal neurocysticercosis and HLA Class I and Class II antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Picchioni Bompeixe

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis, caused by encysted larvae of the tapeworm Taenia solium, is the most common infection of the central nervous system and a major public health problem in many countries. Prevalence in the region of Curitiba, located in the southern Brazilian State of Paraná, is one of the highest in the world. The genetics of host susceptibility to neurocysticercosis (NCC is still obscure. To investigate if major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes influence individual susceptibility to NCC, we performed a case-control association analysis. Fifty-two Caucasoid patients and 149 matched controls were typed for antigens of the HLA-A, B, C, DR and DQ loci. All patients had computerized tomography and clinical features compatible with parenchymal NCC. Indirect immunofluorescence of cerebrospinal fluid showed that 19 (37% of the patients presented anti-cysticercus antibodies at titers ³ 1:10. Frequencies of HLA specificities in the whole group of patients and in the subgroup with antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid were compared to those of the control group. No significant difference was found. These results do not support the hypothesis of HLA gene participation in susceptibility to parenchymal neurocysticercosis.A neurocisticercose, causada pelo cisticerco, a larva do cestóide Taenia solium, é a infecção mais comum do sistema nervoso central e constitui importante problema de saúde pública em muitos países. A sua prevalência na região de Curitiba, localizada no Estado do Paraná, foi estimada em 9%, situando-se entre as mais elevadas do mundo. Os aspectos genéticos de suscetibilidade à neurocisticercose (NCC ainda são pouco conhecidos. Com o objetivo de investigar se genes do MHC influenciam a suscetibilidade individual à NCC, realizamos uma análise de associação caso-controle. Cinqüenta e dois pacientes caucasóides e 149 indivíduos-controle pareados foram tipados para antígenos dos locos HLA-A, B, C, DR e DQ. Todos os

  8. A epilepsia na neurocisticercose The epilepsy in neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Marques-Assis

    1972-12-01

    ógicos focais ou sinais de hipertensão intracraniana.One hundred and thirty one cases of epilepsy with neurocysticercosis were studied. The investigation was made in regard to the type of epilepsy, the disease duration, the frequency of seizures and the electroencephalographic pattern regarding the epilepsies in general. The study was also done concerning the headache, the neurological findings, the cerebrospinal fluid, plain and contrasted radiologic examination and histopathology. The author draw the following conclusions: 1 In the neurocysticercosis group the onset of disease predominate in the first decada and from the fourth decada. 2 Concerning the type of seizures, the convulsions predominate; the Jacksonian fits were the less frequent. 3 Concerning the duration of disease the epilepsy with short duration (one year or less predominate in the neurocysticercosis group. 4 The severity of epilepsy (frequency of seizures was smaller in the neurocysticercosis group. 5 Excluding the cases with continuous EEG abnormalities, there were more normal EEG in neurocysticercosis group than in epilepsies in general. 6 The headache was present in 68% of cases, with paroxysmal pattern in the greater number (78%; in 67% of cases with paroxysmal headache the intracranial hypertension signs were absent; in the cases with continuous headache these signs were not present in only two cases (13%. 7 In the greater number (62% th3 patients have presented only epileptic manifestations without focal neurological signs or intracranial hypertension.

  9. Age-Related Differences in Clinical Features of Neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical, radiologic, and inflammatory features of neurocysticercosis (NC in 92 pediatric (<15 years and 114 adult Mexican patients were compared in a study at three hospitals in Mexico City.

  10. A Pneumonia Case Caused By Cedecea Lapagei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Agca

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cedecea spp., which are the member of Enterobacteriaceae family, is frequently isolated from sputum, but their clinical importance is not clear. This report presents a pneumonia case caused by Cedecea lapagei. An 18 year old, cachectic, spastic and epileptic male patient with oral and nasal bleeding was admitted to the hospital and underwent artificial respiration after epileptic convulsions. On the third day of hospitalization Chest X-ray revealed opacities in the right lobe. Tracheal aspirate’s direct microscopic examination revealed leukocytes and gram-negative bacilli. Bacteria isolated from tracheal aspirate culture was identified as Cedecea lapagei by the BBL Crystal Enteric/ Nonfermenter ID kit (Becton Dickinson, USA which was confirmed by the Vitek identification system (Biomerieux, France. Upon the initiation of intravenous sulbactam/cefoperazone and amikacin combination therapy, the signs of infection decreased in intensity. In this case, tracheal intubation and aspiration of the secretions let the bacteria cause pneumonia. This report supports the fact that Cedecea lapagei is a causative agent of pneumonia as shown in rare cases in the literature.

  11. Reliability of Diagnostic Criteria for Neurocysticercosis for Patients with Ventricular Cystic Lesions or Granulomas: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Javier A; García, Hector H; Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2017-09-01

    Intraventricular neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a severe form of NCC requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment. We aimed to assess the reliability of the most recent version of diagnostic criteria for this form of NCC. Two systematic literature reviews were performed; one included case reports of patients with intraventricular cysticercosis and the other included case reports of patients with intraventricular cystic lesions or granulomas caused by infections other than NCC. All assessed cases were categorized according to the last revision of the long-standing Del Brutto's set of diagnostic criteria to determine its sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value for this form of NCC. The search disclosed 128 patients with intraventricular NCC and 41 with other infections. The set of diagnostic criteria classified as definitive NCC 93 cases with intraventricular NCC (sensitivity 72.7%, 95% CI, 63.9-79.9%), as well as four cases with other infections (specificity 90.2%, 95% CI, 75.9-96.8%). The positive and negative predictive values of the criteria were 0.96 (95% CI, 0.89-0.99) and 0.51 (95% CI, 0.39-0.63), respectively. The revised Del Brutto's set of diagnostic criteria for NCC is acceptably sensitive and highly specific for diagnosing patients with the ventricular form of the disease.

  12. Gigantic neurocysticercosis: diagnosis and therapy;Neurocisticercose gigante: diagnostico e tratamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Rafael Augusto Castro Santiago; Dellaretti Filho, Marcos Antonio, E-mail: rafabrand@hotmail.co [Hospital Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Tadeu Wilker; Totola, Paolo Victor Fernandes; Fonseca, Vinicius Silveira; Souza, Warley Cristiano de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2010-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common parasitic infection of the nervous system. Considered a global epidemic, the parasite presents, mainly, as asymptomatic. Usually treatment is clinical, but in some selected cases surgical intervention is a good treatment option. In our case, keeping in view the magnitude of intracranial injury, surgery was the therapy chosen. A female patient, aged 54, Mulatto, native of Novo Cruzeiro (MG) and raised in Belo Horizonte. Presented with intense frontal headache, which progressed to right hemiparesis and seizure. Ten days after onset of symptoms, sought the service of emergency care. Tomography (CT) revealed a hypodense area in left frontoparietal region with characteristics of cystic lesion.

  13. Clinical Manifestations Associated with Neurocysticercosis: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabin, Hélène; Ndimubanzi, Patrick Cyaga; Budke, Christine M.; Nguyen, Hai; Qian, Yingjun; Cowan, Linda Demetry; Stoner, Julie Ann; Rainwater, Elizabeth; Dickey, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Background The clinical manifestations of neurocysticercosis (NCC) are poorly understood. This systematic review aims to estimate the frequencies of different manifestations, complications and disabilities associated with NCC. Methods A systematic search of the literature published from January 1, 1990, to June 1, 2008, in 24 different electronic databases and 8 languages was conducted. Meta-analyses were conducted when appropriate. Results A total of 1569 documents were identified, and 21 included in the analysis. Among patients seen in neurology clinics, seizures/epilepsy were the most common manifestations (78.8%, 95%CI: 65.1%–89.7%) followed by headaches (37.9%, 95%CI: 23.3%–53.7%), focal deficits (16.0%, 95%CI: 9.7%–23.6%) and signs of increased intracranial pressure (11.7%, 95%CI: 6.0%–18.9%). All other manifestations occurred in less than 10% of symptomatic NCC patients. Only four studies reported on the mortality rate of NCC. Conclusions NCC is a pleomorphic disease linked to a range of manifestations. Although definitions of manifestations were very rarely provided, and varied from study to study, the proportion of NCC cases with seizures/epilepsy and the proportion of headaches were consistent across studies. These estimates are only applicable to patients who are ill enough to seek care in neurology clinics and likely over estimate the frequency of manifestations among all NCC cases. PMID:21629722

  14. Taenia solium: Development of an Experimental Model of Porcine Neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Agnès; Trejo, Armando; Cisneros, Humberto; García-Navarrete, Roberto; Villalobos, Nelly; Hernández, Marisela; Villeda Hernández, Juana; Hernández, Beatriz; Rosas, Gabriela; Bobes, Raul J; de Aluja, Aline S; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis

    2015-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. NC is a severe disease still affecting the population in developing countries of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. While great improvements have been made on NC diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, the management of patients affected by extraparenchymal parasites remains a challenge. The development of a T. solium NC experimental model in pigs that will allow the evaluation of new therapeutic alternatives is herein presented. Activated oncospheres (either 500 or 1000) were surgically implanted in the cerebral subarachnoid space of piglets. The clinical status and the level of serum antibodies in the animals were evaluated for a 4-month period after implantation. The animals were sacrificed, cysticerci were counted during necropsy, and both the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of cysts were described. Based on the number of established cysticerci, infection efficiency ranged from 3.6% (1000 oncospheres) to 5.4% (500 oncospheres). Most parasites were caseous or calcified (38/63, 60.3%) and were surrounded by an exacerbated inflammatory response with lymphocyte infiltration and increased inflammatory markers. The infection elicited specific antibodies but no neurological signs. This novel experimental model of NC provides a useful tool to evaluate new cysticidal and anti-inflammatory approaches and it should improve the management of severe NC patients, refractory to the current treatments.

  15. Evidence-based guideline: Treatment of parenchymal neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Ruth Ann; Wiebe, Sam; Zunt, Joseph R.; Halperin, John J.; Gronseth, Gary; Roos, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review the evidence base for different treatment strategies in intraparenchymal neurocysticercosis in adults and children. Method: A literature search of Medline, EMBASE, LILACS, and the Cochrane Database from 1980 to 2008, updated in 2012, resulted in the identification of 10 Class I or Class II trials of cysticidal drugs administered with or without corticosteroids in the treatment of neurocysticercosis. Results: The available data demonstrate that albendazole therapy, administered with or without corticosteroids, is probably effective in decreasing both long-term seizure frequency and the number of cysts demonstrable radiologically in adults and children with neurocysticercosis, and is well-tolerated. There is insufficient information to assess the efficacy of praziquantel. Recommendations: Albendazole plus either dexamethasone or prednisolone should be considered for adults and children with neurocysticercosis, both to decrease the number of active lesions on brain imaging studies (Level B) and to reduce long-term seizure frequency (Level B). The evidence is insufficient to support or refute the use of steroid treatment alone in patients with intraparenchymal neurocysticercosis (Level U). PMID:23568997

  16. Feasibility of a lateral flow test for neurocysticercosis using novel up-converting nanomaterials and a lightweight strip analyzer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul L A M Corstjens

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is a frequent parasitic infection of the human brain, occurring in most of the world, and requires imaging of the brain to diagnose. To determine the burden of disease and to simplify diagnosis, a field-friendly rapid lateral flow (LF based antibody screening test was developed. The assay utilizes novel nano-sized up-converting phosphor (UCP reporter particles in combination with a portable lightweight analyzer and detects antibodies in serum samples reactive with bacterial-expressed recombinant (r T24H, a marker for detecting neurocysticercosis cases. Three sequential flow steps allow enrichment of antibodies on the Test (T line and consecutive binding of protein-A coated UCP reporter particles. Antibody binding was determined by measuring 550 nm emission after excitation of the UCP label with a 980 nm infrared (IR diode. Clinical sensitivity and specificity of the assay to detect cases of human neurocysticercosis with 2 or more viable brain cysts were 96% and 98%, respectively, using a sample set comprised of sera from 63 confirmed cases and 170 healthy parasite-naïve non-endemic controls.Proof-of-principle, of a rapid UCP-LF screening assay for neurocysticercosis was demonstrated. The assay utilized bacterial-expressed rT24H as a potential alternative for baculovirus-expressed rT24H. Performance of the UCP-LF assay was excellent, although further studies need to confirm that bacterial expressed antigen can entirely replace previously used baculovirus antigen. In addition, the increasing availability of commercial sources for UCP reporter materials as well as the accessibility of affordable semi-handheld scanners may allow UCP-based bioanalytical systems for point-of-care to evolve at an even faster pace.

  17. Feasibility of a lateral flow test for neurocysticercosis using novel up-converting nanomaterials and a lightweight strip analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corstjens, Paul L A M; de Dood, Claudia J; Priest, Jeffrey W; Tanke, Hans J; Handali, Sukwan

    2014-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a frequent parasitic infection of the human brain, occurring in most of the world, and requires imaging of the brain to diagnose. To determine the burden of disease and to simplify diagnosis, a field-friendly rapid lateral flow (LF) based antibody screening test was developed. The assay utilizes novel nano-sized up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporter particles in combination with a portable lightweight analyzer and detects antibodies in serum samples reactive with bacterial-expressed recombinant (r) T24H, a marker for detecting neurocysticercosis cases. Three sequential flow steps allow enrichment of antibodies on the Test (T) line and consecutive binding of protein-A coated UCP reporter particles. Antibody binding was determined by measuring 550 nm emission after excitation of the UCP label with a 980 nm infrared (IR) diode. Clinical sensitivity and specificity of the assay to detect cases of human neurocysticercosis with 2 or more viable brain cysts were 96% and 98%, respectively, using a sample set comprised of sera from 63 confirmed cases and 170 healthy parasite-naïve non-endemic controls. Proof-of-principle, of a rapid UCP-LF screening assay for neurocysticercosis was demonstrated. The assay utilized bacterial-expressed rT24H as a potential alternative for baculovirus-expressed rT24H. Performance of the UCP-LF assay was excellent, although further studies need to confirm that bacterial expressed antigen can entirely replace previously used baculovirus antigen. In addition, the increasing availability of commercial sources for UCP reporter materials as well as the accessibility of affordable semi-handheld scanners may allow UCP-based bioanalytical systems for point-of-care to evolve at an even faster pace.

  18. Fourth ventricle neurocysticercosis: Rigid endoscopic management. Description of direct transcerebellar approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceja-Espinosa, A; Franco-Jiménez, J A; Sosa-Nájera, A; Gutiérrez-Aceves, G A; Ruiz-Flores, M I

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopy has gained a crucial role in high specialty neurosurgery during the last decades. At present, there are well-defined flexible neuroendoscopic procedures to treat ventricular and subarachnoid space pathologies. Neurocysticercosis is recognized as a common cause of neurologic disease in developing countries and the United States. Surgical intervention, especially cerebrospinal fluid diversion, is the key for management of hydrocephalus. In 2002, a consensus suggested that ventricular forms should be treated with endoscopy as the first option. Here, we present the case of a 51-year-old right-handed male, from Estado de México. Two days before admission he experienced holocraneal headache 7/10 on the visual analogue scale which was intermittent, with no response to any medication, sudden worsening of pain to 10/10, nausea, and vomit. On physical examination, he presented with 14 points in the Glasgow coma scale (M6, O4, V4), pupils were 3 mm, there was adequate light-reflex response, and bilateral papilledema. The cranial nerves did not have other pathological responses, extremities had adequate strength of 5/5, and normal reflexes (++/++) were noted. Neuroimaging studies showed dilatation of the four ventricles as well as a cystic lesion in the fourth ventricle. Surgical position was Concorde, and the approach through a suboccipital burr hole was planned preoperatively with craneometric points. A rigid Karl Storz Hopkins II® endoscope was inserted directly through the cerebellum and the cystic lesion was extracted entirely. This article presents a useful technique with low morbidity and mortality. Further investigation is needed, especially in our Mexico, where neuroendoscopical techniques are still in the development phase.

  19. Epilepsy and neurocysticercosis in Latin America: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Bruno

    Full Text Available The difference in epilepsy burden existing among populations in tropical regions has been attributed to many factors, including the distribution of infectious diseases with neurologic sequels. To define the burden of epilepsy in Latin American Countries (LAC and to investigate the strength of association with neurocysticercosis (NCC, considered one of the leading causes of epilepsy, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature.Studies published until 2012 were selected applying predefined inclusion criteria. Lifetime epilepsy (LTE prevalence, active epilepsy (AE prevalence, incidence, mortality, treatment gap (TG and NCC proportion among people with epilepsy (PWE were extracted. Median values were obtained for each estimate using random effects meta-analysis. The impact of NCC prevalence on epilepsy estimates was determined using meta-regression models. To assess the association between NCC and epilepsy, a further meta-analysis was performed on case-control studies.The median LTE prevalence was 15.8/1,000 (95% CI 13.5-18.3, the median AE prevalence was 10.7/1,000 (95% CI 8.4-13.2, the median incidence was 138.2/100,000 (95% CI 83.6-206.4, the overall standardized mortality ratio was 1.4 (95% CI 0.01-6.1 and the overall estimated TG was 60.6% (95% CI 45.3-74.9. The median NCC proportion among PWE was 32.3% (95% CI 26.0-39.0. Higher TG and NCC estimates were associated with higher epilepsy prevalence. The association between NCC and epilepsy was significant (p<0.001 with a common odds ratio of 2.8 (95% CI 1.9-4.0.A high burden of epilepsy and of NCC in LAC and a consistent association between these two diseases were pointed out. Furthermore, NCC prevalence and TG were identified as important factors influencing epilepsy prevalence to be considered in prevention and intervention strategies.

  20. CASE REPORT Extramedullary haematopoiesis causing spinal cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extramedullary haematopoiesis (EMH) is a rare cause of spinal cord compression. When a patient with a haematological disorder that causes chronic anaemia (particularly thalassaemia) presents with neurological deficits referable to the spine, EMH with paraspinal masses should be considered and imaging planned ...

  1. Cellular immune response in intraventricular experimental neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Vania B L; Lima, Sarah B; Matos-Silva, Hidelberto; Vinaud, Marina C; Loyola, Patricia R A N; Lino, Ruy S

    2016-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is considered a neglected parasitic infection of the human central nervous system. Its pathogenesis is due to the host immune response, stage of evolution and location of the parasite. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ and systemic immune response through cytokines dosage (IL-4, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ) as well as the local inflammatory response of the experimental NCC with Taenia crassiceps. The in situ and systemic cellular and inflammatory immune response were evaluated through the cytokines quantification at 7, 30, 60 and 90 days after inoculation and histopathological analysis. All cysticerci were found within the cerebral ventricles. There was a discrete intensity of inflammatory cells of mixed immune profile, polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells, at the beginning of the infection and predominance of mononuclear cells at the end. The systemic immune response showed a significant increase in all the analysed cytokines and predominance of the Th2 immune profile cytokines at the end of the infection. These results indicate that the location of the cysticerci may lead to ventriculomegaly. The acute phase of the infection showed a mixed Th1/Th17 profile accompanied by high levels of IL-10 while the late phase showed a Th2 immune profile.

  2. Host Th1/Th2 immune response to Taenia solium cyst antigens in relation to cyst burden of neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharmalingam, J; Prabhakar, A T; Gangadaran, P; Dorny, P; Vercruysse, J; Geldhof, P; Rajshekhar, V; Alexander, M; Oommen, A

    2016-10-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC), Taenia solium larval infection of the brain, is an important cause of acquired seizures in endemic countries, which relate to number, location and degenerating cysts in the brain. Multicyst infections are common in endemic countries although single-cyst infection prevails in India. Single-cyst infections in an endemic country suggest a role for host immunity limiting the infection. This study examined ex vivo CD4(+) T cells and in vitro Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses to T. solium cyst antigens of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy subjects from endemic and nonendemic regions and of single- and multicyst-infected patients for association with cyst burden of NCC. T. solium cyst antigens elicited a Th1 cytokine response in healthy subjects of T. solium-endemic and T. solium-non-endemic regions and those with single-cyst infections and a Th2 cytokine response from subjects with multicyst neurocysticercosis. Multicyst neurocysticercosis subjects also exhibited low levels of effector memory CD4(+) T cells. Th1 cytokine response of T. solium exposure and low infectious loads may aid in limiting cyst number. Th2 cytokines and low effector T cells may enable multiple-cyst infections to establish and persist. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. MRI demonstration of subarachnoid neurocysticercosis simulating metastatic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, K.Y.; Roebuck, D.J.; Metreweli, C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin NT (Hong Kong); Mok, V.; Kay, R. [Dept. of Neurology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong); Ng, H.K.; Teo, J.G.C. [Dept. of Anatomical and Cellular Pathology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong); Lam, J.; Poon, W. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong)

    1998-11-01

    We present a patient with neurocysticercosis with spinal subarachnoid spread who presented with lower back pain and progressive numbness and weakness of the left leg. MRI of the spine simulated metastasis. MRI of the brain demonstrated a ``bunch of grapes`` appearance in the basal cisterns, characteristic of cysticercosis. (orig.) With 2 figs., 17 refs.

  4. Neurocysticercosis in patients presenting with epilepsy at St ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To survey the prevalence of neurocysticercosis in patients treated for epilepsy in Lusikisiki, E Cape. Design. This was a descriptive study. Variables considered were age, gender, symptoms and type of seizure, serological data, electroencephalogram and computed tomography (CT) findings, treatment, and ...

  5. Splenosis Causing ITP Relapse: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Koca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available ITP (idiopathic trombocitopenic purpura is defined as isolated thrombocytopenia which occurs even in normal bone marrow structure without any reason. Splenectomy is an efficient and permanent treatment in treatment-resistant ITP cases. Accesory spleen and splenosis, also known as auto-implantation of spleen, are rare clinical cases that need to be considered in ITP relapses. In this study, a 49 year old woman patient who had splenectomy because of ITP and had ITP relapse stemming from splenosis in postoperative 5th year is presented with literature.

  6. Estimating the non-monetary burden of neurocysticercosis in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Bhattarai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurocysticercosis (NCC is a major public health problem in many developing countries where health education, sanitation, and meat inspection infrastructure are insufficient. The condition occurs when humans ingest eggs of the pork tapeworm Taenia solium, which then develop into larvae in the central nervous system. Although NCC is endemic in many areas of the world and is associated with considerable socio-economic losses, the burden of NCC remains largely unknown. This study provides the first estimate of disability adjusted life years (DALYs associated with NCC in Mexico. METHODS: DALYs lost for symptomatic cases of NCC in Mexico were estimated by incorporating morbidity and mortality due to NCC-associated epilepsy, and morbidity due to NCC-associated severe chronic headaches. Latin hypercube sampling methods were employed to sample the distributions of uncertain parameters and to estimate 95% credible regions (95% CRs. FINDINGS: In Mexico, 144,433 and 98,520 individuals are estimated to suffer from NCC-associated epilepsy and NCC-associated severe chronic headaches, respectively. A total of 25,341 (95% CR: 12,569-46,640 DALYs were estimated to be lost due to these clinical manifestations, with 0.25 (95% CR: 0.12-0.46 DALY lost per 1,000 person-years of which 90% was due to NCC-associated epilepsy. CONCLUSION: This is the first estimate of DALYs associated with NCC in Mexico. However, this value is likely to be underestimated since only the clinical manifestations of epilepsy and severe chronic headaches were included. In addition, due to limited country specific data, some parameters used in the analysis were based on systematic reviews of the literature or primary research from other geographic locations. Even with these limitations, our estimates suggest that healthy years of life are being lost due to NCC in Mexico.

  7. Maculopathy caused by welding arcs; A report of 3 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fich, M. (Department of Ophthalmology, Esbjerg Central Hospital, Esbjerg (Denmark)); Dahl, H. (Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre (Denmark)); Fledelius, H. (Hilleroed Central Hospital, Hilleroed (Denmark)); Tinning, S. (Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that radiation from welding arcs can cause keratoconjunctivitis and 'glassblower's cataract'. In literature only few cases of welding arc maculopathy have been reported. Three cases are presented. (au) (8 refs.)

  8. Worst case beam incident causes and protection

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, B

    2009-01-01

    The failure events which can occur with the fastest timescales in the LHC are mainly associated with the injection and extraction processes. The possible worst-case failure events are catalogued and the protection layers in place to prevent the failure or mitigate the consequences are described. Particular attention is paid to the beam dump system kickers, the energy tracking system, the injection kickers and the aperture/tune kickers. The requirements for the positioning of the dedicated absorbers with respect to the aperture will be recalled, and the implications for the setting-up and operational stability critically examined.

  9. A Solitary Plasmocytoma Case Causing Horner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Vayvada

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Solitary plasmacytoma is a rare plasma cell tumour, when seen in the chest wall, it is important to diagnose since the treatment scheme and prognosis will vary, compared to primary malignant tumours of the chest wall. A 60-year-old male presented to our clinic with left shoulder pain radiating to the left axilla. Horner%u2019s syndrome symptoms were present, in further examination a chest wall mass located in the left upper lung lobe region was detected. Histopathologic diagnosis was solitary plasmocytoma via video-assisted thoracoscopy. The primary tumor of the rib malignancy causing Horner%u2019s syndrome is discussed with reference to the relevant literature.

  10. Editorial Misconduct—Definition, Cases, and Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matan Shelomi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Though scientific misconduct perpetrated by authors has received much press, little attention has been given to the role of journal editors. This article discusses cases and types of “editorial misconduct”, in which the action or inaction of editorial agents ended in publication of fraudulent work and/or poor or failed retractions of such works, all of which ultimately harm scientific integrity and the integrity of the journals involved. Rare but existent, editorial misconduct ranges in severity and includes deliberate omission or ignorance of peer review, insufficient guidelines for authors, weak or disingenuous retraction notices, and refusal to retract. The factors responsible for editorial misconduct and the options to address these are discussed.

  11. Under seize: neurocysticercosis in an immigrant woman and review of a growing neglected disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Meredith; Garcia, Hector H; Chin-Hong, Peter; Baxi, Sanjiv M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a significantly neglected tropical disease and, with increasing globalisation, a notable emerging infection in the developed world. We describe a case of ventricular NCC in a 22-year-old Mexican-American woman with a history of seizures, who presented with 2 weeks of headaches and intermittent fevers progressing to altered mental status and vomiting. Initial imaging revealed a cystic mass at the posteroinferior aspect of the third ventricle superior to the aqueduct of Sylvius, calcifications scattered throughout the parenchyma, and enlargement of the lateral and third ventricles. Initial laboratories were unrevealing and serum investigations for Taenia solium antibody were negative, but T. solium antibody was subsequently returned positive from cerebrospinal fluid. This case highlights important issues regarding the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation and treatment of NCC relevant to providers not only in areas with endemic disease but, importantly, in locales with diverse immigrant populations. PMID:26682841

  12. Post-treatment vascular leakage and inflammatory responses around brain cysts in porcine neurocysticercosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Mahanty

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cysticidal treatment of neurocysticercosis, an infection of humans and pig brains with Taenia solium, results in an early inflammatory response directed to cysts causing seizures and focal neurological manifestations. Treatment-induced pericystic inflammation and its association with blood brain barrier (BBB dysfunction, as determined by Evans blue (EB extravasation, was studied in infected untreated and anthelmintic-treated pigs. We compared the magnitude and extent of the pericystic inflammation, presence of EB-stained capsules, the level of damage to the parasite, expression of genes for proinflammatory and regulatory cytokines, chemokines, and tissue remodeling by quantitative PCR assays between treated and untreated infected pigs and between EB-stained (blue and non stained (clear cysts. Inflammatory scores were higher in pericystic tissues from EB-stained cysts compared to clear cysts from untreated pigs and also from anthelmintic-treated pigs 48 hr and 120 hr after treatment. The degree of inflammation correlated with the severity of cyst wall damage and both increased significantly at 120 hours. Expression levels of the proinflammatory genes for IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α were higher in EB-stained cysts compared to clear cysts and unaffected brain tissues, and were generally highest at 120 hr. Additionally, expression of some markers of immunoregulatory activity (IL-10, IL-2Rα were decreased in EB-stained capsules. An increase in other markers for regulatory T cells (CTLA4, FoxP3 was found, as well as significant increases in expression of two metalloproteases, MMP1 and MMP2 at 48 hr and 120 hr post-treatment. We conclude that the increase in severity of the inflammation caused by treatment is accompanied by both a proinflammatory and a complex regulatory response, largely limited to pericystic tissues with compromised vascular integrity. Because treatment induced inflammation occurs in porcine NCC similar to that in human cases, this model

  13. Post-treatment vascular leakage and inflammatory responses around brain cysts in porcine neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanty, Siddhartha; Orrego, Miguel Angel; Mayta, Holger; Marzal, Miguel; Cangalaya, Carla; Paredes, Adriana; Gonzales-Gustavson, Eloy; Arroyo, Gianfranco; Gonzalez, Armando E; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; García, Hector H; Nash, Theodore E

    2015-03-01

    Cysticidal treatment of neurocysticercosis, an infection of humans and pig brains with Taenia solium, results in an early inflammatory response directed to cysts causing seizures and focal neurological manifestations. Treatment-induced pericystic inflammation and its association with blood brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction, as determined by Evans blue (EB) extravasation, was studied in infected untreated and anthelmintic-treated pigs. We compared the magnitude and extent of the pericystic inflammation, presence of EB-stained capsules, the level of damage to the parasite, expression of genes for proinflammatory and regulatory cytokines, chemokines, and tissue remodeling by quantitative PCR assays between treated and untreated infected pigs and between EB-stained (blue) and non stained (clear) cysts. Inflammatory scores were higher in pericystic tissues from EB-stained cysts compared to clear cysts from untreated pigs and also from anthelmintic-treated pigs 48 hr and 120 hr after treatment. The degree of inflammation correlated with the severity of cyst wall damage and both increased significantly at 120 hours. Expression levels of the proinflammatory genes for IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α were higher in EB-stained cysts compared to clear cysts and unaffected brain tissues, and were generally highest at 120 hr. Additionally, expression of some markers of immunoregulatory activity (IL-10, IL-2Rα) were decreased in EB-stained capsules. An increase in other markers for regulatory T cells (CTLA4, FoxP3) was found, as well as significant increases in expression of two metalloproteases, MMP1 and MMP2 at 48 hr and 120 hr post-treatment. We conclude that the increase in severity of the inflammation caused by treatment is accompanied by both a proinflammatory and a complex regulatory response, largely limited to pericystic tissues with compromised vascular integrity. Because treatment induced inflammation occurs in porcine NCC similar to that in human cases, this model can be used to

  14. Onycholysis and Chromonychia: A Case Caused by Trichosporon inkin

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega-Springall, María Fernanda; Arroyo-Escalante, Sara; Arenas,Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Yeasts cause only 5-10% of onychomycosis; the most common yeast is Candida albicans, and rarely Trichosporon spp. is found. Recently, it has become an important cause of fungemia with a high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. Superficial infections caused by Trichosporon spp., including piedra and onychomycosis, occur in immunocompetent patients. Herein, we report a case of a fungal nail infection characterized by onycholysis and chromonychia caused by Trichosporon inkin.

  15. Case Report Blindness Caused by Pterygium – A Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    technique with Mitomycin C (MMC) dab. There was restoration of the lost vision. Pterygium is a cause of avoidable blindness with consequential impact on quality of life. Eye care providers should identify individual patient challenges to reduce avoidable blindness. Keywords: Avoidable blindness, Patient challenges, ...

  16. A study of neuropsychiatric manifestations in patients of neurocysticercosis

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, Smita; Chadda, Rakesh Kumar; Bala, Kiran; Majumdar, Pradipta

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is an endemic parasitic infection of Asia, Africa, Latin America, and central Europe. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of the illness include epilepsy and behavioral disturbances. There is a dearth of systematic studies on psychiatric manifestations of NCC from various Asian counties. The present study assessed the prevalence of various psychiatric disorders in a cohort of patients with NCC attending a neurological service. Materials and Methods: Detailed p...

  17. Neurocysticercosis among international travelers to disease-endemic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2012-01-01

    Review of neurocysticercosis in citizens from non-endemic countries who developed the disease after a travel to endemic regions, to estimate the magnitude of the disease and to determine the pattern of disease expression in travelers to disease-endemic areas. MEDLINE and manual search of international travelers with neurocysticercosis diagnosed in countries where the disease is not endemic, from 1981 to October 2011. Abstracted data included: demographic profile of patients, clinical manifestations, form of neurocysticercosis, and therapy. A total of 35 articles reporting 52 patients were found. Most patients were originally from Western Europe, Australia, Israel, and Japan. Mean age was 36.5 ± 15.1 years, and 46% were women. Common places for travelling were the Indian Subcontinent, Latin America, and Southeast Asia. Mean time spent aboard was 56.6 ± 56.1 months. Most patients developed symptoms 2 years or more after returning home. Seizures were the most common clinical manifestation of the disease (73%), and all but six patients had parenchymal brain cysticercosis (a single cysticercus granuloma was the most common neuroimaging finding, in 21 patients). Twenty patients underwent surgical resection of the brain lesion for diagnostic purposes, and 22 received cysticidal drugs. Neurocysticercosis is rare in international travelers to endemic countries, and most often occurs in long-term travelers. It is possible that most of these patients get infected by contact with a taenia carrier. The time elapsed between disease acquisition and symptoms occurrence suggests that, at least in some patients, clinical manifestations are related to reactivation of an infection that has previously been controlled by the host immune system. © 2012 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  18. Cisticercose suína, teníase e neurocisticercose humana no município de Barbalha, Ceará Porcine cysticercosis, taeniasis and human neurocysticercosis in municipal district of Barbalha, Ceará

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Silva

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Em Barbalha, Ceará, foram realizados levantamentos de casos de cisticercose suína, teníase e neurocisticercose humana causadas por Taenia solium, e realizou-se uma pesquisa quanto aos sistemas de criação de suínos na região. De 85 suínos abatidos em abatedouro local 4,7% apresentavam cisticercose, a maioria dos cisticercos localizava-se na língua e coração. Entre 2001 e 2004, das 302 criações de suínos denunciadas à vigilância sanitária, 96,6% eram chiqueiros. A teníase, entre 1998 e 2003, correspondeu a 1,1% das verminoses diagnosticadas pela Secretária de Saúde Municipal. Entre 2001 e 2003, os casos de neurocisticercose humana corresponderam a 5% das tomografias de crânio requisitadas nos hospitais da região.In Barbalha, municipal district of Ceará state, an assessment of cases of porcine cysticercosis, taeniasis and human neurocysticercosis caused by the Taenia solium was performed in order to evaluate the situation of these diseases. It was also carried out a research about the types of swine farms registered in the area. Considering the 85 swine slaughtered at the slaughterhouse of Barbalha, 4.7% presented cysticercosis. Most cysticerci were located in the tongue and in the heart. Between 2001 and 2004, from 302 swine farms denounced to the Sanitary Surveillance, 9.6% were pigsties. Taeniasis, between 1998 and 2003, corresponded to 1.1% of the helminthes diagnosed by the Municipal Health Office. From 2001 to 2003, the cases of human neurocysticercosis corresponded to 5% of the skull tomographies requested in the hospitals of the area.

  19. Antiepileptic drug therapy and recommendations for withdrawal in patients with seizures and epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Javier A; García, Héctor H; Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2016-09-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a leading causes of secondary epilepsy worldwide. There is increasing evidence on the epileptogenic role of NCC, and the presence of edema, calcified scars, gliosis and hippocampal sclerosis support this phenomenon. We summarized principles of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy as well as risk factors associated with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal in patients with NCC. Expert commentary: First-line AED monotherapy is effective as a standard approach to control seizures in most NCC patients. Risks and benefits of AED withdrawal have not been systematically studied, and this decision must be individualized. However, a seizure-free period of at least two years seem prudent before attempting withdrawal. Risk factors for seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal include a history of status epilepticus, poor seizure control during treatment, neuroimaging evidence of perilesional gliosis, hippocampal sclerosis and calcified lesions, as well as persistence of paroxysmal activity in the EEG.

  20. Muscular cysticercosis: Case report and imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neide Regina Simões Olmo

    Full Text Available Summary Cysticercosis is a parasitic disease caused by a worm of the Cestoda class. The most prevalent form affects the nervous system. This case report is from a 78-year-old female patient evaluated at Clínica Mult Imagem, in the city of Santos, Brazil, who presented a form of the disease that differed from the classic neurocysticercosis, in this case muscular cysticercosis. This and other forms of manifestation justify further studies to ensure adequate recognition, diagnosis and treatment of this parasitic disease.

  1. Small calcified lesions suggestive of neurocysticercosis are associated with mesial temporal sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos C. B. Oliveira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested a possible relationship between temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS and neurocysticercosis (NC. We performed a case-control study to evaluate the association of NC and MTS. Method: We randomly selected patients with different epilepsy types, including: MTS, primary generalized epilepsy (PGE and focal symptomatic epilepsy (FSE. Patients underwent a structured interview, followed by head computed tomography (CT. A neuroradiologist evaluated the scan for presence of calcified lesions suggestive of NC. CT results were matched with patients’ data. Results: More patients in the MTS group displayed calcified lesions suggestive of NC than patients in the other groups (p=0.002. On multivariate analysis, MTS was found to be an independent predictor of one or more calcified NC lesions (p=0.033. Conclusion: After controlling for confounding factors, we found an independent association between NC calcified lesions and MTS.

  2. Prevalence of Neurocysticercosis in People with Epilepsy in the Eastern Province of Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwape, Kabemba E; Blocher, Joachim; Wiefek, Jasmin; Schmidt, Kathie; Dorny, Pierre; Praet, Nicolas; Chiluba, Clarance; Schmidt, Holger; Phiri, Isaac K; Winkler, Andrea S; Gabriël, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Zambia is endemic for Taenia solium taeniosis and cysticercosis. In this single-centered, cross-sectional, community-based study, the role of neurocysticercosis (NCC) as a cause of epilepsy was examined. People with epilepsy (PWE, n = 56) were identified in an endemic area using a screening questionnaire followed by in-depth interviews and neurological examination. Computed tomography (CT) was performed on 49 people with active epilepsy (PWAE) and their sera (specific antibody and antigen detection, n = 56) and stools (copro-antigen detection, n = 54) were analyzed. The CT scan findings were compared to a group of 40 CT scan controls. Of the PWE, 39.3% and 23.2% were positive for cysticercal antibodies and antigens, respectively, and 14.8% for coproantigens (taeniosis). Lesions highly suggestive of NCC were detected in 24.5% and definite NCC lesions in 4.1% of CT scans of PWAE. This compares to 2.5% and 0%, respectively, in the control CT scans. Using the Del Brutto diagnostic criteria, 51.8% of the PWAE were diagnosed with probable or definitive NCC and this rose to 57.1% when the adapted criteria, as proposed by Gabriël et al. (adding the sero-antigen ELISA test as a major criterion), were used. There was no statistically significant relationship between NCC, current age, age at first seizure and gender. This study suggests that NCC is the single most important cause of epilepsy in the study area. Additional large-scale studies, combining a community based prevalence study for epilepsy with neuroimaging and serological analysis in different areas are needed to estimate the true impact of neurocysticercosis in endemic regions and efforts should be instituted to the control of T. solium.

  3. Epilepsy and Neurocysticercosis in Latin America: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Elisa; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Strohmeyer, Marianne; Bartalesi, Filippo; Bustos, Javier A.; Santivañez, Saul; García, Héctor H.; Nicoletti, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Background The difference in epilepsy burden existing among populations in tropical regions has been attributed to many factors, including the distribution of infectious diseases with neurologic sequels. To define the burden of epilepsy in Latin American Countries (LAC) and to investigate the strength of association with neurocysticercosis (NCC), considered one of the leading causes of epilepsy, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature. Methodology Studies published until 2012 were selected applying predefined inclusion criteria. Lifetime epilepsy (LTE) prevalence, active epilepsy (AE) prevalence, incidence, mortality, treatment gap (TG) and NCC proportion among people with epilepsy (PWE) were extracted. Median values were obtained for each estimate using random effects meta-analysis. The impact of NCC prevalence on epilepsy estimates was determined using meta-regression models. To assess the association between NCC and epilepsy, a further meta-analysis was performed on case-control studies. Principal findings The median LTE prevalence was 15.8/1,000 (95% CI 13.5–18.3), the median AE prevalence was 10.7/1,000 (95% CI 8.4–13.2), the median incidence was 138.2/100,000 (95% CI 83.6–206.4), the overall standardized mortality ratio was 1.4 (95% CI 0.01–6.1) and the overall estimated TG was 60.6% (95% CI 45.3–74.9). The median NCC proportion among PWE was 32.3% (95% CI 26.0–39.0). Higher TG and NCC estimates were associated with higher epilepsy prevalence. The association between NCC and epilepsy was significant (p<0.001) with a common odds ratio of 2.8 (95% CI 1.9–4.0). Significance A high burden of epilepsy and of NCC in LAC and a consistent association between these two diseases were pointed out. Furthermore, NCC prevalence and TG were identified as important factors influencing epilepsy prevalence to be considered in prevention and intervention strategies. PMID:24205415

  4. Listeria Monocytogenes: a rare cause of endophthalmitis, a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Gaskell, Katherine M.; Williams, Gwyn; Grant, Kathie; Lightman, Susan; Godbole, Gauri

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a known cause of gastroenteritis. Invasive disease can follow bacteremia causing meningoencephalitis, endocarditis and spontaneous miscarriages in immunocompromised patients and pregnant women respectively. We present the first case in England of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by L. monocytogenes following acute gastroenteritis in an immunocompetent host. A 50-year-old South Asian female presented with acute painful unilateral visual loss occurring shortly after a...

  5. Skin infection caused by Burkholderia thailandensis: Case report with review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdelRahman Mohammad Zueter, Mahmoud Abumarzouq, Chan Yean Yean, Azian Harun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia thailandensis is genetically closed to Burkholderia pseudomallei, which causes melioidosis. The bacterium inhabits the environments of tropical regions including those in Southeast Asia and the Northern part of Australia. B. thailandensis is considered avirulent and extremely uncommon to cause disease. We report the first case of foot abscess with skin cellulitis and ankle swelling caused by B. thailandensis in Malaysia. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(2: 92-95

  6. Lumbar discal cyst as a cause of radiculopathy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Newton; Keith, Julia; Pirouzmand, Fahard

    2016-12-01

    Lumbar discal cysts are rare entities causing radicular pain with unknown etiologies. We report a case of a 42-year-old man who developed radiculopathy secondary to a lumbar discal cyst. Our case sheds some light on anatomy, possible etiological association and clinical course which can help management.

  7. A false case of infection caused by Dicrocoelium dendriticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Rossi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a false case of infection caused by Dicrocoelium dendriticum, a cosmopolite trematode that can infect human bile ducts but tends to live in cattle or other grazing mammals. Our aim is to stress the relevance of adequate diagnostic methods and of exact medical history in order to detect any possible clinical case.

  8. Wooden beverage cases cause little damage to bottle caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Bruce Anderson; William C. Miller

    1973-01-01

    Wooden beverage cases cause little damage to aluminum resealable caps during distribution. A study at bottling plants and distribution warehouses showed that an average of 1 bottle out of 4,000 has cap damage. Most of the damage was attributed to handling at the warehouse and in transit. Some recommendations are given for improvement of wooden beverage cases to prevent...

  9. What is the cause of palate lesions? A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveira, S.C.; Slot, D.E.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Trauma to the oral tissues can be caused by fellatio. Few cases are reported in the literature. Methods A case of oral palate lesions is presented and discussed. Results The patient developed a large band of petechial haemorrhage extending across the soft palate following the practice of

  10. Candidiasis, A Rare Cause of Gastric Perforation: A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungi are unusually rare causes of gastric perforation, with most cases of gastric perforation occurring as complications of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), nonsteroidal anti‑inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and gastric neoplasms. Here, we report the case of a 70‑year‑old Nigerian male who presented with severe epigastric pain, ...

  11. Suicidal death caused by electrocution: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Slobodan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicides by electrocution are extremly rare in our country. In these cases, specific or characteristic external lesions caused through contact with conductors at the sites of entry and exit of the current, as well as general autopsy findings, and excluding the other possible causes of death, are important to elucidate them. Dilema if death was sucidal, homicidal or accidental in manner, could be solved through good police investigation, and properly explained circumstantial events. Herein, we reported two cases of suicidal deaths, caused by electrocution. In the first case, it was a male, age of 32, who wraped the electrical cord around his rists, and kiled himself by plugging it in. In second case, it was a female, age of 46, abused by her husband, who commited suicide by putting the switched hear-dryer into the water in bathtube.

  12. Peritonitis caused by Bifidobacterium longum: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena, Daniel; Losa, Cristina; Medina, María José; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Bifidobacterium spp. rarely causes human infections. We report a case of a 42-year-old man with a history of pancolonic diverticulosis, who suffered a purulent peritonitis caused by Bifidobacterium longum secondary to intestinal perforation. Clinical outcome was good after urgent surgery and antibiotic treatment with imipenem and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Our case shows that Bifidobacterium spp. should be considered as a cause of peritonitis, especially in patients with risk of intestinal perforation. The review of the literature shows that these organisms can cause a wide spectrum of severe infections, especially in patients with underlying diseases. Infections caused by Bifidobacterium spp. may be overlooked or underreported since it may be considered normal microbiota. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Causes of death in forensic autopsy cases of malnourished persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hideto; Tanifuji, Takanobu; Abe, Nobuyuki; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

    2013-01-01

    Medical examiners and forensic pathologists often encounter emaciated bodies in postmortem examinations. However, the main disease that caused death is often not clear and measures to prevent the unexpected death of malnourished persons have not been established. In this study, we examined the underlying causes of death among a large number of forensic autopsy cases that showed emaciation to clarify the features of sudden, unexpected death in malnourished persons. Documents of autopsy cases without putrefaction handled during 2007-2010 by the Tokyo Medical Examiner's Office were reviewed (n=7227). The body mass index (BMI) was calculated for each case. The causes of death for cases with severe malnutrition (BMIautopsy cases of malnourished persons show various causes of death, physicians have to pay more attention in making death diagnosis in such cases. From a preventative point of view, early detection of organic diseases, a better approach toward managing psychiatric diseases, and implementation of vaccination for pneumonia will contribute to reduction of future unexpected deaths among malnourished persons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. TsAg5, a Taenia solium cysticercus protein with a marginal trypsin-like activity in the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Analiz; Sifuentes, Cecilia; Gilman, Robert H.; Gutiérrez, Andrés H.; Piña, Ruby; Chile, Nancy; Carrasco, Sebastián; Larson, Sandra; Mayta, Holger; Verástegui, Manuela; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gutiérrez-Correa, Marcel; García, Héctor H.; Sheen, Patricia; Zimic, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is an endemic parasitic disease caused by Taenia solium larva. Although the mechanism of infection is not completely understood, it is likely driven by proteolytic activity that degrades the intestinal wall to facilitate oncosphere penetration and further infection. We analyzed the publicly available Taenia solium EST/DNA library and identified two contigs comprising a full-length cDNA fragment very similar to E. granulosus Ag5 protein. The Taenia solium cDNA sequence included a proteolytic trypsin-like-domain in the C-terminal region, and a thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain in the N-terminal region. Both the trypsin-like and adherence domains were expressed independently as recombinant proteins in bacterial systems. TsAg5 showed marginal trypsin-like activity and high sequence similarity to Ag5. The purified antigens were tested in a Western immunoblot assay to diagnose human neurocysticercosis. The sensitivity of the trypsin-like-domain was 96.36% in patients infected with extraparenchymal cysts, 75.44% in patients infected with multiple cysts, and 39.62% in patients with a single cyst. Specificity was 76.70%. The thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain was not specific for neurocysticercosis. PMID:21893105

  15. Spontaneous Uterine Perforation Caused by Pyometra: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefi, Zohreh; sharifi, Noorieh; Morshedy, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pyometra is an accumulation of purulent material or pus in the uterine cavity. Spontaneous perforation of uterus by pyometra is rare. This is a clinical presentation and management of a spontaneous perforation of uterine caused by pyometra. Case Presentation: This is a case report on spontaneously perforated associated with pyometra secondary to cervical malignancy. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy with total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Conclusi...

  16. Hemobilia caused by a ruptured hepatic cyst: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutta Sudhir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemobilia is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. More than 50% of hemobilia cases are related to iatrogenic trauma from hepatobiliary procedures, and needle biopsy of the liver represents the most common cause. A minority of hemobilia cases are due to hepatobiliary disorders such as cholangitis, hepatobiliary cancers, choledocholithiasis, and vascular abnormalities in the liver. The classic presentation of hemobilia is the triad of right upper quadrant (biliary pain, obstructive jaundice, and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a rare case of hemobilia caused by a spontaneous hepatic cyst rupture, where our patient presented without the classical symptoms, in the absence of therapeutic or pathological coagulopathy, and in the absence of spontaneous or iatrogenic trauma. Case presentation A 91-year-old African-American woman was referred to our out-patient gastroenterology clinic for evaluation of mild epigastric pain and intermittent melena. An abdominal computed tomography scan was remarkable for multiple hepatic cysts. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed multiple blood clots at the ampulla of Vater. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed a single 18 mm-sized filling defect in the common hepatic duct wall at the junction of the right and left hepatic duct, adjacent to one of the hepatic cysts. The ruptured hepatic cyst communicated to the bile ducts and was the cause of hemobilia with an atypical clinical presentation. Conclusion Hemobilia is an infrequent cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and rarely occurs due to hepatic cyst rupture. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second case report in the literature that describes hemobilia due to hepatic cyst rupture. However, it is the first case in the literature of hemobilia due to hepatic cyst rupture in the absence of iatrogenic or spontaneous trauma, and in the absence of a spontaneous or pathological coagulopathy.

  17. Transitory alexia without agraphia: a disconnection syndrome due to neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Archana; Singh, N N; Misra, Surendra

    2004-09-01

    We describe a 65-year-old male who presented with acute onset inability to read, without any difficulty in writing. A clinical diagnosis of alexia without agraphia was made and the patient was subjected to routine investigations including contrast MRI. MRI showed a ring-enhancing lesion in left occipital area, suggestive of neurocysticercosis supported by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay from purified cell fraction of taenia solium cysticerci (PCF-ELISA). Patient was treated with albendazole and prednisolone for one week. The clinical manifestation as well as the radiological finding resolved after treatment.

  18. CASE REPORT Unusual cause of breast lump: a CSF pseudocyst

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • June 2012 69. CASE REPORT. Unusual cause of breast lump: a CSF pseudocyst. Sandeep Gopal Jakhere, MD, DNB. Raju Kumbhar, MD. Harshal Dhongade, MD. Department of Radiology, B Y L Nair Charitable Hospital and Topiwala National Medical College, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

  19. An atypical cause of alkali chemical burn: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutefnouchet, T; Moiemen, N; Papini, R

    2010-12-31

    It has already been reported that wet ash turns into a strong alkali agent, which can cause full-thickness skin burns. A case is presented which has the particularity of sustained, self-inflicted contact with wet ash. The coal used was the self-igniting type normally used for burning scented weed or for smoking the hubbly bubbly or shisha pipe.

  20. An Atypical Cause of Alkali Chemical Burn: a Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Boutefnouchet, T; Moiemen, N.; Papini, R.

    2010-01-01

    It has already been reported that wet ash turns into a strong alkali agent, which can cause full-thickness skin burns. A case is presented which has the particularity of sustained, self-inflicted contact with wet ash. The coal used was the self-igniting type normally used for burning scented weed or for smoking the hubbly bubbly or shisha pipe.

  1. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by lipoma: a case report | Sbai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . A lipoma of the hand causing a carpal tunnel syndrome by compression of the median nerve is exceptional. We report the case of a 70-year-old female presenting with a carpal tunnel syndrome. A compression of the median nerve by a ...

  2. Candidiasis, A Rare Cause of Gastric Perforation: A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Candidiasis, A Rare Cause of Gastric Perforation: A Case Report and Review of Literature. Ukekwe FI, Nwajiobi C1, Agbo MO2, Ebede SO3, Eni AO. Department of Morbid Anatomy, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu/University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital. Ituku‑Ozalla, 1Division of General Surgery, Department ...

  3. A Rare Case of Labial Myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurer, Maria I; Grando, Liliane J; Rivero, Elena Rc; Souza, Carlos Ecp; Marcondes, Carlos B

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this article is to present a rare case of myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis. Myiasis is a disease caused by invasion of tissues of animals and humans by larval stages of dipterous (2-winged) flies. There are few reports of oral myiasis in the literature, mostly related to Cochliomyia hominivorax larvae. We present a case of a 53-year-old man with painful swelling of the left lower lip that was confirmed to be myiasis caused by D. hominis. Though more common in tropical and subtropical regions of North and South America, myiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous masses among residents or travelers in endemic areas.

  4. What is the cause of palate lesions? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, S C; Slot, D E; Van der Weijden, G A

    2013-11-01

    Trauma to the oral tissues can be caused by fellatio. Few cases are reported in the literature. A case of oral palate lesions is presented and discussed. The patient developed a large band of petechial haemorrhage extending across the soft palate following the practice of fellatio. The diagnosis was made through an interview with the patient, which disclosed a probable case for fellatio as the cause of the palatal spots. At the follow-up visit 14 days later, the lesions disappeared. Oral sex activity has increased over the last decades. The dental care professional should be aware that lesions of the palate may result from sexual behaviour. With this possibility in mind, those working in the area of head and neck medicine should consider fellatio as an addition to the differential aetiology of intraoral petechiae. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Epidemiology of neurocysticercosis in Brazil Epidemiologia da neurocisticercose no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Agapejev

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A revision of literature was done with the objective of tracing an epidemiologic profile of neurocysticercosis (NCC in Brazil. The prevalence was 0.12-9% in autopsies. The frequency was 0.03-7.5% in clinical series and 0.68-5.2% in seroepidemiological studies. The disease corresponds to 0.08-2.5% of admissions to general hospitals. Patient origin was rural in 30-63% of cases. The most involved age range (64-100% was 11 to 60 years, with a predominance (22-67% between 21 and 40 years. The male sex was the most affected (51-80%. In the severe forms there was a predominance of urban origin (53-62% and of the female sex (53-75%. The period of hospitalization ranges from 1 to 254 days and 33 to 50% of patients suffer 1.7 ± 1.4 admissions. The clinical picture was variable, with a predominance of epileptic syndrome (22-92% and intracranial hypertension (19-89%. Psychiatric manifestations were associated in 9-23% of patients. Lethality was 0.29% in terms of all diseases in general and 4.8-25.9% in terms of neurologic diseases. The asymptomatic form was detected in 6% of patients in clinical serie and in 48.5% of case from autopsies. The racemose form and ventricular localization also was observed as asymptomatic form. Among the patients with cutaneous cysticercosis 65% of them showed neurologic manifestations.Realizou-se revisão da literatura com o objetivo de tentar delinear um perfil epidemiológico da neurocisticercose no Brasil. A prevalência em necrópsias variou de 0,12-9%. A freqüência, nas casuísticas clínicas foi de 0,03-7,5% e, nos estudos soroepidemiológicos, de 0,68-5,2%. Compreendeu 0,08-2,5% das internações em hospitais gerais. A procedência foi rural em 30-63% dos doentes. Comprometeu mais (64-100% na faixa etária dos 11 aos 60 anos, predominantemente (22-67% entre 21 e 40 anos. O sexo masculino foi mais atingido (51-80%. Nas formas graves, houve predomínio da origem urbana (53-62% e do sexo feminino (53-75%. O período de

  6. Herbal hepatotoxicity: suspected cases assessed for alternative causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Rolf; Schulze, Johannes; Schwarzenboeck, Alexander; Eickhoff, Axel; Frenzel, Christian

    2013-09-01

    Alternative explanations are common in suspected drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and account for up to 47.1% of analyzed cases. This raised the question of whether a similar frequency may prevail in cases of assumed herb-induced liver injury (HILI). We searched the Medline database for the following terms: herbs, herbal drugs, herbal dietary supplements, hepatotoxic herbs, herbal hepatotoxicity, and herb-induced liver injury. Additional terms specifically addressed single herbs and herbal products: black cohosh, Greater Celandine, green tea, Herbalife products, Hydroxycut, kava, and Pelargonium sidoides. We retrieved 23 published case series and regulatory assessments related to hepatotoxicity by herbs and herbal dietary supplements with alternative causes. The 23 publications comprised 573 cases of initially suspected HILI; alternative causes were evident in 278/573 cases (48.5%). Among them were hepatitis by various viruses (9.7%), autoimmune diseases (10.4%), nonalcoholic and alcoholic liver diseases (5.4%), liver injury by comedication (DILI and other HILI) (43.9%), and liver involvement in infectious diseases (4.7%). Biliary and pancreatic diseases were frequent alternative diagnoses (11.5%), raising therapeutic problems if specific treatment is withheld; pre-existing liver diseases including cirrhosis (9.7%) were additional confounding variables. Other diagnoses were rare, but possibly relevant for the individual patient. In 573 cases of initially assumed HILI, 48.5% showed alternative causes unrelated to the initially incriminated herb, herbal drug, or herbal dietary supplement, calling for thorough clinical evaluations and appropriate causality assessments in future cases of suspected HILI.

  7. Induced Neurocysticercosis in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta Produces Clinical Signs and Lesions Similar to Natural Disease in Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is a serious endemic zoonosis resulting in increased cases of seizure and epilepsy in humans. The genesis of clinical manifestations of the disease through experimental animal models is poorly exploited. The monkeys may prove useful for the purpose due to their behavior and cognitive responses mimicking man. In this study, neurocysticercosis was induced in two rhesus monkeys each with 12,000 and 6,000 eggs, whereas three monkeys were given placebo. The monkeys given higher dose developed hyperexcitability, epileptic seizures, muscular tremors, digital cramps at 10 DPI, and finally paralysis of limbs, followed by death on 67 DPI, whereas the monkeys given lower dose showed delayed and milder clinical signs. On necropsy, all the infected monkeys showed numerous cysticerci in the brain. Histopathologically, heavily infected monkeys revealed liquefactive necrosis and formation of irregular cystic cavities lined by atrophied parenchymal septa with remnants of neuropil of the cerebrum. In contrast, the monkeys infected with lower dose showed formation of typical foreign body granulomas characterized by central liquefaction surrounded by chronic inflammatory response. It was concluded that the inflammatory and immune response exerted by the host against cysticerci, in turn, led to histopathological lesions and the resultant clinical signs thereof.

  8. Case report: Infective endocarditis caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tun-Chieh

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few reports in the literature of invasive infection caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis in patients without immunosuppression or other predisposing factors. The choice of antimicrobial therapy for bacteremia caused by the pathogen requires more case experience to be determined. Case presentation The case of a 40-year-old previously healthy man with subacute endocarditis proposed to be contributed from an occult dental abscess is described. The infection was found to be caused by B. vesicularis on blood culture results. The patient recovered without sequelae after treatment with ceftriaxone followed by subsequent ciprofloxacin therapy owing to an allergic reaction to ceftriaxone and treatment failure with ampicillin/sulbactam. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of B. vesicularis as a cause of infective endocarditis. According to an overview of the literature and our experience, we suggest that third-generation cephalosporins, piperacillin/tazobactam, and ciprofloxacin are effective in treating invasive B. vesicularis infections, while the efficacy of ampicillin-sulbactam needs further evaluation.

  9. A Case of Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Causing Hydroureter and Hydronephrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Farpour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (GPA, formerly known as Wegener is a systemic vasculitis characterized by granulomatous involving upper and lower respiratory tract and can also cause necrotizing glomerulonephritis (Umemoto et al. 2012 and Takala et al. 2011. GPA is associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA against serine proteinase 3 (PR3 (Takala et al. 2011, Dufour et al. 2012, and Berthoux et al. 2011. This disease usually starts with involvement of the upper and lower respiratory tracts and also can involve kidney, eyes, skin, central and peripheral nervous systems, and gastrointestinal tract (Umemoto et al. 2012, Takala et al. 2011, and Berthoux et al. 2011. We describe a case of GPA that presented with abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT scan with contrast showed right sided moderate hydronephrosis and hydroureter, to the level of the right common iliac artery. There was also mural segmental thickening in common iliac artery which was thought to be the cause of the ureteral obstruction and hydronephrosis. Our case shows that mural segmental thickening in common iliac artery happened due to GPA and caused hydronephrosis. In addition, most of the cases with hydronephrosis due to GPA went through urology intervention such as stent placement but in our case hydronephrosis resolved with medical management.

  10. A Case of Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Causing Hydroureter and Hydronephrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farpour, Farzin; Abrudescu, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (GPA, formerly known as Wegener) is a systemic vasculitis characterized by granulomatous involving upper and lower respiratory tract and can also cause necrotizing glomerulonephritis (Umemoto et al. 2012 and Takala et al. 2011). GPA is associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) against serine proteinase 3 (PR3) (Takala et al. 2011, Dufour et al. 2012, and Berthoux et al. 2011). This disease usually starts with involvement of the upper and lower respiratory tracts and also can involve kidney, eyes, skin, central and peripheral nervous systems, and gastrointestinal tract (Umemoto et al. 2012, Takala et al. 2011, and Berthoux et al. 2011). We describe a case of GPA that presented with abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) scan with contrast showed right sided moderate hydronephrosis and hydroureter, to the level of the right common iliac artery. There was also mural segmental thickening in common iliac artery which was thought to be the cause of the ureteral obstruction and hydronephrosis. Our case shows that mural segmental thickening in common iliac artery happened due to GPA and caused hydronephrosis. In addition, most of the cases with hydronephrosis due to GPA went through urology intervention such as stent placement but in our case hydronephrosis resolved with medical management. PMID:24551472

  11. The role of 3D volumetric MR sequences in diagnosing intraventricular neurocysticercosis: preliminar results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Edward Frota Mont'Alverne Filho

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this paper was to investigate the role of two three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MRI sequences: enhanced spoiled gradient recalled echo (SPGR, and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA in the evaluation of intraventricular neurocysticercosis cysts and scolices. METHOD: Seven neurocysticercosis patients suspected of presenting intraventricular lesions were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging using enhanced SPGR, and FIESTA. RESULTS: Enhanced SPGR detected eight cystic lesions, with scolices in four. Contrast enhancement was observed in three cysts. FIESTA also detected eight cystic lesions with the presence of scolices in seven of those cystic lesions. Four patients presented parenchymal involvement, while the remaining three presented the racemose form. CONCLUSION: FIESTA and SPGR are sequences that can detect intraventricular cysts of neurocysticercosis, and FIESTA also is good for the detection of the scolex. Considering this information we suggest that FIESTA and SPGR should be included in the MRI protocol for the investigation of intraventricular neurocysticercosis.

  12. Scrub typhus causing myocarditis and ARDS: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Lakshmikanth Bharathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus, caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, is endemic in the so-called "tsutsugamushi triangle". There is a wide spectrum of presentation of the disease ranging from uncomplicated febrile illness to life-threatening sepsis with multiorgan dysfunction. We are presenting a case of scrub typhus causing myocarditis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in an adult female with no previous comorbid illness who recovered fully with prompt treatment in spite of prolonged ventilator support, emphasizng the need for early diagnosis and prompt treatment with antirickettsial antibiotics in a patient presenting with features of scrub typhus.

  13. A rare case of kissing gastric ulcers caused by trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yafei; Ma, Shiyang; Shi, Haitao; Lu, Xiaolan

    2016-11-01

    We present a rare case of a 32-year-old female with gastric ulcers caused by pressure from trauma. The patient was diagnosed with stress-related acute gastritis by a local hospital and she was discharged 1 week later after her symptoms improved. She was given oral proton pump inhibitors (PPI). However, epigastric pain intensified, so the woman was seen at this Hospital 3 days later. Gastric endoscopy revealed kissing ulcers in the lower body of the stomach. A point worth mentioning is that the kissing gastric ulcers were caused by trauma due to impact with the steering wheel.

  14. Cysticidal therapy - Impact on seizure control in epilepsy associated with neurocysticercosis

    OpenAIRE

    ISABEL CRISTINA DOS SANTOS; ELIANE KOBAYASHI; TÂNIA MARCHIORI CARDOSO; CARLOS ALBERTO MANTOVANI GUERREIRO; FERNANDO CENDES

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical features and seizure control of epilepsy related to neurocysticercosis. METHOD: 18 patients with partial epilepsy and neurocysticercosis were treated with albendazol or praziquantel and followed from 3 months to 12 years. We analyzed results from the CSF exam, interictal electroencephalogram (EEG), head computerized tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: The patients' mean age was 36.4 years. The mean duration of epilepsy was 16 years. 83% p...

  15. Silicosis Caused by Denim Sandblasting: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilaver Tas

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary Silicosis which develops as a results of environmental and occupational silica inhalation is well-known. Although the disease is preventable, it continues to be a problem in our country and other developing countries. Causing silicosis, sandblasting has been a striking occupation last years. We presents two cases who develop silicosis because they worked as sandblasters. Case 1 and 2: Both cases had worked at a denim factory in Istanbul. Case one had worked for 8 months and case two had worked for 2 years and ten months. Chest X ray and thorax high resolution computerized tomography (HRCT revealed that there are bilateral reticulonodular and nodular opacities at the pulmonary paranchima. Silicosis was diagnosed by examining of open lung biopsy (case one and transbronchial biopsy (case two. Because of changes in fashion, denim sandblasting has been occured as an occupation recently years. Workplaces sandblasting denim should be controlled. Even public should be informed of silicosis via media. Thus the disease’s incidence would decrease. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(5.000: 395-399

  16. Silicosis Caused by Denim Sandblasting: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilaver Tas

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary Silicosis which develops as a results of environmental and occupational silica inhalation is well-known. Although the disease is preventable, it continues to be a problem in our country and other developing countries. Causing silicosis, sandblasting has been a striking occupation last years. We presents two cases who develop silicosis because they worked as sandblasters. Case 1 and 2: Both cases had worked at a denim factory in Istanbul. Case one had worked for 8 months and case two had worked for 2 years and ten months. Chest X ray and thorax high resolution computerized tomography (HRCT revealed that there are bilateral reticulonodular and nodular opacities at the pulmonary paranchima. Silicosis was diagnosed by examining of open lung biopsy (case one and transbronchial biopsy (case two. Because of changes in fashion, denim sandblasting has been occured as an occupation recently years. Workplaces sandblasting denim should be controlled. Even public should be informed of silicosis via media. Thus the disease’s incidence would decrease. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(5: 395-399

  17. Liver abscess caused by Ascaris lumbricoides: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PINILLA Análida Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A case is reported of a woman who lived in a rural area with a chronic illness that consisted of weight loss and abdominal pain in the epigastrium and upper right quadrant. The initial diagnosis was a mass in the liver, which was later, demonstrated, both by direct and histological examination, to be an abscess caused by Ascaris lumbricoides. Eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides and abundant Charcot-Leyden Crystals were found.

  18. A case of retropharyngeal abscess with spondylitis causing tetraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kusunoki

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of retropharyngeal abscess with spondylitis causing tetraplegia. At a previous hospital, administration of antibiotics improved the inflammation findings. However, magnetic resonace imaging showed a remaining retropharyngeal abscess. This patient showed a disturbance of consciousness under this therapy. Therefore, he was admitted to our hospital and underwent a drainage operation. At 1 day after this operation, he recovered from the disturbance of consciousness.

  19. Perforated duodenal diverticulum caused by Bezoar: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Jung; Moon, Sung Kyoung; Park, Seong Jin; Lim, Joo Won; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Duodenal diverticulum is common, but its perforation is a rare complication. Duodenal diverticulum perforation requires prompt treatments because of its high mortality rate. However, an accurate diagnosis is difficult to make due to nonspecific symptoms and signs. It can be misdiagnosed as pancreatitis, cholecystitis, or peptic ulcer. Herein, we report a case of perforated duodenal diverticulum caused by bezoar in a 33-year-old woman whom was diagnosed by abdomen computed tomography and ultrasonography.

  20. Balanitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, S; Komiya, H

    2005-09-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (the Lancefield group A streptococcus) is a cause of pharyngitis and impetigo. However, it has rarely been implicated as a sexually transmitted pathogen. We herein report two cases of severe balanitis due to S. pyogenes in sexually active men. It is postulated that penile cellulitis developed following the invasion of S. pyogenes through a traumatic abrasion acquired during fellatio performed by commercial sex workers. Both patients were treated successfully with oral administration of penicillin.

  1. Accidental miasis caused by Piophila casei: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Espedito Nocera; Daniele Crotti

    2009-01-01

    Miasis are infestations caused by larvae ingested with damaged food or food washed with contaminated water. Musca domestica (muscidi), Sarcophaga carnaria (sarcofagidi) and Piophila casei (piofilidi) are usually involved. The above miasis are known as involuntary, while the voluntary ingestion of larvae regards, in fact, only P. casei. In this paper we describe the case of a patient who ingested some larvae of P. casei, taking back a remarkable clinical picture.

  2. Accidental miasis caused by Piophila casei: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espedito Nocera

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Miasis are infestations caused by larvae ingested with damaged food or food washed with contaminated water. Musca domestica (muscidi, Sarcophaga carnaria (sarcofagidi and Piophila casei (piofilidi are usually involved. The above miasis are known as involuntary, while the voluntary ingestion of larvae regards, in fact, only P. casei. In this paper we describe the case of a patient who ingested some larvae of P. casei, taking back a remarkable clinical picture.

  3. Puerperal sepsis caused by liver abscess: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Xavier Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: sepsis is a serious public health problem, affecting millions of people in the world each year, with a high mortality rate (one out of four patients and an increasing incidence. Sepsis is one of the main causes of maternal mortality and an important cause of admission to obstetric intensive care units. Case description: In this study, the authors report the case of a woman having been submitted to cesarean section three days before presenting clinical signs of sepsis and septic shock caused by a liver abscess. The patient had a set of complications secondary to shock, such as thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, toe ischemia and acute kidney failure. The patient had cholelithiasis and recurrent pain in the right hypochondrium during pregnancy. During hospitalization, the mechanism involved in the development of hepatic abscess was infection of the biliary tract. The patient was treated in an obstetric intensive care unit with antibiotics and drainage of the liver abscess. Progress was favorable and the patient was discharged in good health. Discussion: pyogenic liver abscess during pregnancy and puerperium is a serious condition which represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, with few cases reported. The normally nonspecific clinical and laboratory findings can lead to a late diagnosis, which increases the risk of maternal morbidity and mortality.

  4. Listeria Monocytogenes: a rare cause of endophthalmitis, a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskell, Katherine M; Williams, Gwyn; Grant, Kathie; Lightman, Susan; Godbole, Gauri

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a known cause of gastroenteritis. Invasive disease can follow bacteremia causing meningoencephalitis, endocarditis and spontaneous miscarriages in immunocompromised patients and pregnant women respectively. We present the first case in England of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by L. monocytogenes following acute gastroenteritis in an immunocompetent host. A 50-year-old South Asian female presented with acute painful unilateral visual loss occurring shortly after an episode of self-limiting gastroenteritis. On examination, the eye was very inflamed with a hypopyon uveitis. A vitreous biopsy confirmed growth of L.monocytogenes serotype 1/2a. Diagnostic delay commonly occurs in endogenous endophthalmitis and exacerbates an already poor visual prognosis. Listeria spp. must be considered in ocular inflammation following gastroenteritis. The intraocular inflammation subsided but surgical intervention was required to remove vitreous debris and improve visual acuity.

  5. Unusual cause of generalized osteolytic vertebral lesions: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Sudip

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebral sarcoidosis is an extremely rare form of osseous sarcoidosis. Although osseous sarcoidosis is almost always an incidental finding of sarcoidosis elsewhere in the body, vertebrae may be the primary disease site. Involvement of vertebrae is usually localized and sclerotic or lytic. Case presentation We describe a case of extensive asymptomatic vertebral involvement by sarcoid with osteolytic lesions. Making the diagnosis requires biopsy and ruling out other commoner causes of osteolytic vertebral lesions. Conclusion We report this case in the hope of expanding the knowledge of osseous sarcoidosis. Our patient was unique in that all involvement was axial with sparing of the peripheral skeleton, near absence of any other organ involvement, diffuse involvement of the whole spine and osteolytic bone lesions.

  6. Neurocysticercosis: a review on status in India, management, and current therapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rumana; Khan, Tahmeena; Ahmad, Bilal; Misra, Aparna; Balapure, Anil K

    2017-01-01

    Tapeworms (cestodes) are segmented flatworms responsible for causing diseases that may prove fatal and difficult to treat in the absence of proper treatment and efficient drugs. Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a common parasitic infection of the central nervous system and a major contributor to epilepsy caused by the metacestode (larva) of the human tapeworm Taenia solium, characterized by a range of pathological symptoms including epileptic seizures, headaches, and hydrocephalus. Cysticercosis is considered as a "biological imprint" of the socioeconomic development of a community in general and a country in particular. It is the single most common cause of epilepsy in the resource-poor endemic regions of the world, including most of South and Central America, India, Southeast Asia, China, and sub-Saharan Africa. A vast degree of variation in the neuropathology and clinical symptoms of NCC often makes it difficult to diagnose and manage. To add to it, emerging drug resistance to known anti-parasitic agents, together with the inability of these agents to prevent re-infection and relapse, further complicates the disease scenario. The aim of the current review was to provide the latest update on NCC with special emphasis on the Indian scenario, along with current and novel methods of diagnosis as well as scope of development for novel detection techniques, novel targets for drug development, and therapeutic interventions, as well as future challenges.

  7. Epidemiologic pattern of patients with neurocysticercosis diagnosed by computed tomography in Curitiba, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazziotin, Ana Laura; Monego, Fernanda [Federal University of Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Coll. of Cellular and Molecular Biology; Fontalvo, Mariana Campos; Santos, Marilis Beckert Feijo; Grazziotin, Ana Line; Kolinski, Victor Hugo Zanini; Bordignon, Rodrigo Henrique; Biondo, Alexander Welker, E-mail: abiondo@illinois.ed [Federal University of Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). College of Veterinary Medicine; Antoniuk, Affonso [Federal University of Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2010-04-15

    The aim of this study was to drawn an epidemiological pattern of neurocystisticercosis (NCC) patients diagnosed by computed tomography at the major private diagnostic center in Curitiba, Brazil. A total of 1,009 medical files of consecutive patients presenting neurological indications were diagnosed by computed tomography from July 2007 to April 2008. Patient data included sex, age, municipality and tomography findings were analysed by Epi-info version 6.0.1. software. Most patients (81.10%) were living in Curitiba. A total of 91/1,009 cases (9.02%) were considered positive to NCC; 88 (96.7%) patients had inactive form of NCC and only 3 (3.2%) patients had cysts in granulomatous process. No patients had both forms. The prevalence of NCC cases in studied group was greater in patients between 51 to 60 years old, however, difference between sex was not significant. This epidemiological pattern of NCC was similar to the first NCC study in Curitiba, performed in 1995-1996 with 9.24% of positive cases. Key words: neurocysticercosis, cysticercus cellulosae, epidemiology. (author)

  8. [Liver abscess and infective endocarditis cases caused by Ruminococcus productus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucu, Nurgün; Köksal, Iftihar; Yilmaz, Gürdal; Aydin, Kemalettin; Caylan, Rahmet; Aktoz Boz, Gönülden

    2006-10-01

    The genus Ruminococcus which are anaerobe Gram positive cocci, previously classified as Peptostreptococcus, may colonize the upper respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, vagina and skin of humans and animals. In this report a case of liver abscess and a case of infective endocarditis caused by Ruminoccocus productus, which is very rarely encountered in the clinical practice were presented. The first case was a 32 years old male who was admitted to the hospital in 2002, with the complaints of fever lasting for 20 days and pain while breathing. The abdominal ultrasonography revealed the presence of a liver abscess, and the drainage material from the abscess yielded Ruminococcus productus, identified in BACTEC 9200 (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, Md) anaerobe system. As the isolate was found to be sensitive to penicilin, the empirical gentamicin and ampicillin/sulbactam therapy was continued. The second case was a 25 years old male who was admitted to the hospital in 2005, with the signs of fever lasting for 3-4 months, chills, bone and joint pains. As multiple vegetations were detected in echocardiography, blood cultures were collected and empirical therapy with ceftriaxone and gentamicin was initiated with the preliminary diagnosis of infective endocarditis. Bacteria which were isolated from blood cultures by BACTEC 9200 system have been identified as R. productus. As this strain was also sensitive to penicillin, the empirical therapy was changed to penicilin and gentamicin. These two cases indicated that R. productus should be considered in complicated infections even if it is a rarely isolated species from the clinical samples.

  9. What Causes Care Coordination Problems? A Case for Microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary, Wayne; Maulitz, Russell Charles; Zachary, Drew A

    2016-01-01

    Care coordination (CC) is an important fulcrum for pursuing a range of health care goals. Current research and policy analyses have focused on aggregated data rather than on understanding what happens within individual cases. At the case level, CC emerges as a complex network of communications among providers over time, crossing and recrossing many organizational boundaries. Micro-level analysis is needed to understand where and how CC fails, as well as to identify best practices and root causes of problems. Coordination Process Diagramming (CPD) is a new framework for representing and analyzing CC arcs at the micro level, separating an arc into its participants and roles, communication structure, organizational structures, and transitions of care, all on a common time line. Comparative CPD analysis across a sample of CC arcs identifies common CC problems and potential root causes, showing the potential value of the framework. The analyses also suggest intervention strategies that could be applied to attack the root causes of CC problems, including organizational changes, education and training, and additional health information technology development.

  10. Hypertriglyceridemia as a possible cause of coma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inokuchi Ryota

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Many studies suggest that elevated triglyceride levels are associated with increased long-term risk of stroke, including transient ischemic attacks. In addition, elevated triglyceride levels independently contribute to plasma viscosity and decreased blood flow. However, no consensus has been reached regarding the significance of hypertriglyceridemia as an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Case presentation We report the case of a patient admitted to our hospital for sudden onset of coma. Laboratory test results revealed he had high blood glucose (28.2mmol/L, high glycated hemoglobin (11.4 percent, considerably high serum triglyceride levels (171.5mmol/L; type V hyperlipoproteinemia, and high plasma viscosity (1.90mPa/s with normal β-hydroxybutyric acid levels. His triglyceride levels decreased after administering intravenous fluids. Our patient’s consciousness level improved gradually over three days. All serum lipid levels decreased seven days after admission. Conclusions The findings in our patient’s case are likely explained by triglyceride-mediated hyperviscosity causing a transient ischemic attack. In the present report we suggest that when several tests do not reveal the cause of stroke-like symptoms, measurement of plasma viscosity may be informative.

  11. Accidental hypoglycaemia caused by an arterial flush drug error: a case report and contributory causes analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K J; Cook, T M

    2013-11-01

    In 2008, the National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) issued a Rapid Response Report concerning problems with infusions and sampling from arterial lines. The risk of blood sample contamination from glucose-containing arterial line infusions was highlighted and changes in arterial line management were recommended. Despite this guidance, errors with arterial line infusions remain common. We report a case of severe hypoglycaemia and neuroglycopenia caused by glucose contamination of arterial line blood samples. This case occurred despite the implementation of the practice changes recommended in the 2008 NPSA alert. We report an analysis of the factors contributing to this incident using the Yorkshire Contributory Factors Framework. We discuss the nature of the errors that occurred and list the consequent changes in practice implemented on our unit to prevent recurrence of this incident, which go well beyond those recommended by the NPSA in 2008. © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Two cases of methemoglobinaemia caused by suspected sodium nitrite poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Matteucci

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the causes of acute methemo-globinaemia are the ingestion and inhalation of over 40 oxidising substances, including nitrite, nitrate, carbon monoxide, some medicines, chlorine. The authors describe a case of acute methemoglobinaemia in two people that most probably suffered from food poisoning resulting from the consumption of a preparation of a dish called turkey alla canzanese that contained significant amounts of sodium nitrite. Both subjects who were treated promptly with methylene blue and hyperbaric oxygen therapy room recovered fully. Epidemiological investigations performed to clarify the dynamics of the episode suggested that among the causes of contamination were the swapping of products at the time of sale and the non-compliance to rules for the preparation of foods for human consumption.

  13. A Case of Onychomycosis Caused by Rhodotorula glutinis

    OpenAIRE

    Hatice Uludag Altun; Tuba Meral; Emel Turk Aribas; Canan Gorpelioglu; Nilgun Karabicak

    2014-01-01

    Rhodotorula spp. have emerged as opportunistic pathogens, particularly in immunocompromised patients. The current study reports a case of onychomycosis caused by Rhodotorula glutinis in a 74-year-old immunocompetent female. The causative agent was identified as R. glutinis based on the pinkish-orange color; mucoid-appearing yeast colonies on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar at 25°C; morphological evaluation in the Corn Meal-Tween 80 agar; observed oval/round budding yeast at 25°C for 72 hours; no obse...

  14. [Allergy caused by sodium fluoride glycerin: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jihong

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, though more and more ulcerations of oral mucosa caused by allergy to drug occurred clinically, allergy to sodium fluoride glycerin is extremely rare. A case of allergy to sodium fluoride glycerin occurred in Qianfoshan Campus Hospital of Shandong University. After treatment by sodium fluoride glycerin, there was mucosal edema, a large number of red miliary granules in buccal and palatal mucosa. After 3 hours, there were swallowing difficulties, but no breathing difficulties. Next day large ulcers of oral mucosa developed. The patient was cured 7 days after treatment. Fluoride-sensitive test result was positive.

  15. Aseptic Meningitis Caused by Lassa Virus: Case Series Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okokhere, Peter O; Bankole, Idowu A; Iruolagbe, Christopher O; Muoebonam, Benard E; Okonofua, Martha O; Dawodu, Simeon O; Akpede, George O

    2016-01-01

    The Lassa virus is known to cause disease in different organ systems of the human body, with varying clinical manifestations. The features of severe clinical disease may include bleeding and/or central nervous system manifestations. Whereas Lassa fever encephalopathy and encephalitis are well described in the literature, there is paucity of data on Lassa virus meningitis. We present the clinical description, laboratory diagnosis, and management of 4 consecutive cases of aseptic meningitis associated with Lassa virus infection without bleeding seen in a region of Nigeria known to be endemic for both the reservoir rodent and Lassa fever. The 4 patients recovered fully following intravenous ribavirin treatment and suffered no neurologic complications.

  16. A rare case of kissing gastric ulcers caused by trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yafei; Ma, Shiyang; Shi, Haitao; Lu, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of a 32-year-old female with gastric ulcers caused by pressure from trauma. The patient was diagnosed with stress-related acute gastritis by a local hospital and she was discharged 1 week later after her symptoms improved. She was given oral proton pump inhibitors (PPI). However, epigastric pain intensified, so the woman was seen at this Hospital 3 days later. Gastric endoscopy revealed kissing ulcers in the lower body of the stomach. A point worth mentioning is that th...

  17. A case of metastatic brain tumor causing multifocal cerebral embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Takuya; Yamanouchi, Yasuo; Numa, Yoshihiro; Sakurai, Yasuo; Yamahara, Takahiro; Seno, Toshitaka; Shikata, Nobuaki; Asai, Akio; Kawamoto, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    The patient was a 72-year-old woman who had previously undergone treatment for femoral chondrosarcoma (histologically rated as myxofibrosarcoma). She suddenly developed left homonymous hemianopsia and was diagnosed with cerebral embolism. Because she had atrial fibrillation, we treated her for cardiogenic cerebral embolism. About 3 months later, however, she developed left hemiplegia, and head magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple tumorous lesions affecting the previously detected infracted area and several new areas. We assumed that a tumor embolus had caused cerebral embolism, which resulted in growth of the tumor from the embolus and formation of a metastatic brain tumor. The metastatic foci formed from the tumor embolus were visualized by diagnostic imaging, and histological examination of the resected tumor confirmed that the brain tumor had occluded the brain vessel (tumorigenic cerebral embolism). No such case has been reported to date, and this case seems to be important.

  18. Rehabilitation for paraplegia caused by neuromyelitis optica: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M; Sugiyama, K; Kondo, T; Izumi, S-I

    2014-11-01

    Single case report. We present a case of paraplegia due to neuromyelitis optica (NMO) with poor rehabilitation outcome. University hospital, Japan. A 27-year-old woman with NMO presented with T5 paraplegia of ASIA impairment scale grade A. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion spanning C3 to L1 level. After acute phase treatment, flaccid paraplegia below T5 and a T2-weighted hyperintense lesion from T6 to T10 level remained. Rehabilitation aimed at independence of activities of daily living with wheelchair assistance, including transfer activity, was provided for 19 months. However, flaccid paralysis of the trunk and limbs persisted, and safe independent transfer was not achieved. Spinal lesions spanning many vertebral segments, a characteristic of NMO, can cause extensive flaccid paralysis of the trunk and limbs. Rehabilitation may achieve poorer functional recovery than that for spinal cord injury.

  19. The relationship between neurocysticercosis and epilepsy: an endless debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Carpio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NC, or cerebral infection with Taenia solium, is an important public health problem worldwide. Among the neurological sequelae of NC, seizures have been described as the most common symptom. Acute symptomatic seizures often result from degeneration of a viable cyst; however, not all of these patients with acute or provoked seizures will develop epilepsy (i.e., recurrent unprovoked seizures. Because of the high prevalence of epilepsy and NC, a causal, as well as incidental relationship between the two may exist. The epileptogenicity of calcified cysts as well as the potential association between NC and hippocampal sclerosis necessitates future research. Antihelminthic treatment of NC results in disappearance of viable cysts in about one-third of patients with parenchymal disease, but a reduction in seizure recurrence has not been demonstrated in randomized controlled trials. Prevention is critical to reduce the burden of seizure and epilepsy related to NC.

  20. Two Cases of Vulvovaginitis Caused by Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei: a Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Aydın, Faruk; Karagüzel, Gülay; İmamoğlu, Mustafa; ÖKTEN, Ayşenur

    2012-01-01

    Vulvovaginitis caused by Shigella species (Shigella spp.) has rarely been reported. This paper describes two cases of prepubertal vulvovaginitis, presenting with a bloody and purulent vaginal discharge, separately caused by ampicillin-resistant Shigella flexneri and trimethoprim-sulfomethoxazoleresistant Shigella sonnei. Our conclusions are that Shigella spp. is the potential cause of vulvovaginitis in prepubertal girls in developing countries where these pathogens are endemic, and identifica...

  1. Calcified neurocysticercosis lesions and antiepileptic drug-resistant epilepsy: a surgically remediable syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Chaturbhuj; Thomas, Bejoy; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Abraham, Mathew; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath

    2013-10-01

    In contrast to the well-recognized association between acute symptomatic seizures and neurocysticercosis, the association between antiepileptic drug (AED)-resistant epilepsy and calcified neurocysticercosis lesions (CNLs) is poorly understood. We studied the association between AED-resistant epilepsy and CNLs, including the feasibility and outcome of resective surgery. From the prospective database maintained at our epilepsy center, we reviewed the data of all patients with AED-resistant epilepsy who underwent presurgical evaluation from January 2001 to July 2010 and had CNL on imaging. We used clinical, neuroimaging, and interictal, ictal, and intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) findings to determine the association between CNL and epilepsy. Suitable candidates underwent resective surgery. Forty-five patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. In 17 patients, CNL was proven to be the causative lesion for AED-resistant epilepsy (group 1); in 18 patients, CNL was associated with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS; group 2); and in 10 patients, CNLs were considered as incidental lesions (group 3). In group 1 patients, CNLs were more common in frontal lobes (12/17), whereas in group 2 patients, CNLs were more commonly located in temporal lobes (11/18; p = 0.002). Group 2 patients were of a younger age at epilepsy onset than those in group 1 (8.9 ± 7.3 vs. 12.6 ± 6.8 years, p = 0.003). Perilesional gliosis was more common among patients in group 1 when compared to group 3 patients (12/17 vs. 1/10; p = 0.006). Fifteen patients underwent resective surgery. Among group 1 patients, four of five became seizure-free following lesionectomy alone. In group 2, four patients underwent anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) alone, of whom one became seizure-free; five underwent ATL combined with removal of CNL (two of them after intracranial EEG and all of them became seizure-free, whereas one patient underwent lesionectomy alone and did not become seizure-free. In endemic

  2. A Case of Apparent Contact Dermatitis Caused by Toxocara Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Qualizza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection from Toxocara species may give rise to a large array of clinical symptoms, including apparent manifestations of allergy such as asthma, urticaria/angioedema, and dermatitis. We report a case, thus far not described, of contact dermatitis attributed to nickel allergy but caused by Toxocara infection. The patient was a 53-year-old woman presenting from 10 years a dermatitis affecting head, neck, and thorax. Patch tests initially performed gave a positive result to nickel, but avoidance of contact with nickel did not result in recovery. The patient referred to our Allergy Service in 2010 because of dermatitis to feet. Patch testing confirmed the positive result for nickel, but expanding the investigation a positive result for IgG antibodies to Toxocara was detected by Western blotting and ELISA. Treatment with mebendazole achieved immediate efficacy on feet dermatitis. Then, two courses of treatment with albendazole resulted in complete regression of dermatitis accompanied by development of negative ELISA and Western blotting for Toxocara antibodies. This report adds another misleading presentation of Toxocara infection as apparent contact dermatitis caused by nickel and suggests bearing in mind, in cases of contact dermatitis not responding to avoidance of the responsible hapten and to medical treatment, the possible causative role of Toxocara.

  3. A case of anti-Rd causing fetal anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Stefan; Ritgen, Jochen; Wißkirchen, Matthias; Bauerfeind, Ursula; Kohne, Elisabeth; Weinstock, Christof

    2017-06-01

    Rd (SC4) is a low-frequency antigen of the Scianna blood group system. Only very few reports on anti-Rd in pregnancy exist. Mild to moderate hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by anti-Rd has been reported. This report may add further information on the clinical significance of anti-Rd for the fetus. In a case of severe fetal anemia (hemoglobin concentration, 3.0 g/dL) repeated intrauterine transfusions were required. The strongly positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT) of the fetal red blood cells led to the diagnosis of hemolytic disease. The routine antibody screen was negative, extended testing revealed a maternal anti-Rd with a titer of 256. Both the newborn and her father were confirmed to carry the SC*01.04 allele. Anti-Rd can cause fetal anemia. Low-frequency antigens including Rd are normally not present on screening cells. Antibodies directed against low-frequency antigens will usually not be detected by routine antibody screening in pregnancy. Thus, in cases of fetal anemia the DAT should always be included in the diagnostic workup. © 2017 AABB.

  4. A Rare Case of Cranial Osteomyelitis Caused by Proteus Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Uslu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis of the calvarial bones can cause serious complications such as brain abscess, due to the close proximity to adjacent brain structures. Development of the purulent secretion in surgery and traumatic scalp injuries must be considered as a possibility of osteomyelitis possibility. Generally gram positive, rarely gram negative bacteria and mix agents, can be isolated in infection. Especially chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis agents can be isolated from chronic infections such as tuberculosis. In cranial osteomyelitis diagnosis, radiological diagnosis has a very important place together with the clinical diagnosis. However, infection can usually show late findings radiologically. In treatment, antibiotic treatment is absolutely essential as well as removal of the infected part of the bone. Due to antibiotic treatment lasting between 6-12 weeks, organizing the antibiotic protocols according to the results of culture-antibiograms, which were provided from purulent secretions, has the most important role in the success of surgical treatment. In Proteus sp. infections, for choice of suitable treatment, determination of the type of bacteria is important. For exact diagnosis, histopathological examination of the bone tissue must be carried out. In this report, a case with cranial osteomyelitis caused by Proteus vulgaris which is a gram negative bacteria causing anaerobic infections and classified in the Enterobacteriaceae family is presented. The patient was treated with surgery and appropriate antibiotics. Early recognition of this condition, planning the best treatment strategy and taking precautions to prevent complications, is mandatory for a better outcome.

  5. Causes of uveitis in dogs: 102 cases (1989-2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Kathleen L; Gilger, Brian C; Miller, Tammy L; Davidson, Michael G

    2002-06-01

    Uveitis is one of the most common ocular diseases and one of the most common causes of blindness in dogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to correlate the signalment, history, clinical signs and ophthalmic findings of dogs with uveitis with the underlying etiology. We conducted a retrospective study of 102 dogs presented to the NCSU-VTH from 1989 to 2000 with clinical signs of uveitis. Medical records of dogs presented for uveitis were reviewed. Dogs were included in the study only if a complete diagnostic work-up database was collected, if sufficient follow-up was documented, and if the uveitis was not secondary to trauma or a hypermature cataract. The mean age +/- SD of all dogs in this study was 6.2 +/- 3.6 years. There were 33 intact and 16 castrated males, and 14 intact and 27 neutered females. Fourteen breeds were represented, with the Golden Retriever (n = 14) most common. Fifty-nine dogs (58%) were diagnosed with idiopathic/immune-mediated uveitis, neoplasia was diagnosed in 25 dogs (24.5%) and 18 dogs (17.6%) were diagnosed with infectious causes of uveitis. Aqueous flare was the most common clinical sign, occurring in 88 dogs (86%). The most common infectious organisms associated with uveitis in the dogs of this study were Ehrlichia canis (n = 7). Lymphosarcoma (n = 17) was the most common neoplasm. In approximately 60% of dogs presenting for uveitis an underlying cause was not found, and a diagnosis of immune-mediated or idiopathic uveitis was made. However, approximately 25% of dogs had ocular and/or systemic neoplasia (with 17% of cases having lymphosarcoma) and 18% with an underlying infectious cause for uveitis. Because of the high percentage of systemic disease associated with uveitis in dogs, extensive diagnostic testing is recommended before instituting symptomatic anti-inflammatory therapy.

  6. Use of Statewide Hospital Discharge Data to Evaluate the Economic Burden of Neurocysticercosis in Los Angeles County (1991–2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croker, Curtis; Reporter, Roshan; Mascola, Laurene

    2010-01-01

    Statewide hospital discharge data were used to assess the economic burden of neurocysticercosis in Los Angeles County (LAC) from 1991 through 2008. A neurocysticercosis hospitalization was defined as having a discharge diagnosis of cysticercosis in addition to convulsions, seizures, hydrocephalus, cerebral edema or cerebral cysts. This study identified 3,937 neurocysticercosis hospitalizations, with the number of annual hospitalizations remaining relatively unchanged over the study period (R2 = 0.01), averaging 219 per year (range 180–264). The total of all neurocysticercosis hospitalization charges over the study period was $136.2 million, averaging $7.9 million per year. The average charge per patient was $37.6 thousand and the most common payment method was Medicaid (43.9%), followed by private insurance (24.5%). The average length of stay was 7.2 days. The substantial number of hospitalizations and significant economic cost underscore the importance of neurocysticercosis in LAC. PMID:20595487

  7. High Prevalence of Asymptomatic Neurocysticercosis in an Endemic Rural Community in Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz M Moyano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is a common helminthic infection of the central nervous system and an important cause of adult-onset epilepsy in endemic countries. However, few studies have examined associations between neurologic symptoms, serology and radiographic findings on a community-level.We conducted a population-based study of resident's ≥2 years old in a highly endemic village in Peru (pop. 454. We applied a 14 -question neurologic screening tool and evaluated serum for antibodies against Taenia solium cysticercosis using enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (LLGP-EITB. We invited all residents ≥18 years old to have non-contrast computerized tomography (CT of the head.Of the 385 residents who provided serum samples, 142 (36.9% were seropositive. Of the 256 residents who underwent CT scan, 48 (18.8% had brain calcifications consistent with NCC; 8/48 (17.0% reported a history of headache and/or seizures. Exposure to T. solium is very common in this endemic community where 1 out of 5 residents had brain calcifications. However, the vast majority of people with calcifications were asymptomatic.This study reports a high prevalence of NCC infection in an endemic community in Peru and confirms that a large proportion of apparently asymptomatic residents have brain calcifications that could provoke seizures in the future.

  8. Application of Taenia saginata metacestodes as an alternative antigen for the serological diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Heliana B; Machado, Gleyce A; Cabral, Dagmar D; Costa-Cruz, Julia M

    2007-09-01

    Serological tests are an important tool for the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis (NCC), the disease caused by Taenia solium metacestodes. The aim of the present research was to test the application of Taenia saginata metacestodes as an alternative antigen for use in the immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and Western blotting (WB) tests compared with the metacestodes antigen of T. solium in serum samples. The samples were obtained from 130 individuals: 20 from patients with definitive NCC, Group 1; 18 from individuals infected by Taenia sp., Group 2; 40 from individuals infected by various parasites, Group 3; and 40 from healthy individuals, Group 4. The sensitivity of IFAT, ELISA, and WB using antigen obtained from T. solium applied to the patients of Group 1 yielded results of 85, 95, and 95%, respectively, for the three tests. When the tests were conducted using T. saginata metacestodes, results were 75, 80, and 85%, respectively. The specificity of IFAT, ELISA, and WB using antigen obtained from T. solium yielded results of 94.9, 88.8, and 93.9%. When the tests were conducted using T. saginata metacestodes, results were 95.9, 88.8, and 93.6%, respectively. No statistical differences for sensitivity or specificity among the antigens were found. In conclusion, the results indicated that T. saginata metacestodes can be used as an alternative antigen for NCC diagnosis.

  9. High Prevalence of Asymptomatic Neurocysticercosis in an Endemic Rural Community in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, Luz M; O'Neal, Seth E; Ayvar, Viterbo; Gonzalvez, Guillermo; Gamboa, Ricardo; Vilchez, Percy; Rodriguez, Silvia; Reistetter, Joe; Tsang, Victor C W; Gilman, Robert H; Gonzalez, Armando E; Garcia, Hector H

    2016-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a common helminthic infection of the central nervous system and an important cause of adult-onset epilepsy in endemic countries. However, few studies have examined associations between neurologic symptoms, serology and radiographic findings on a community-level. We conducted a population-based study of resident's ≥2 years old in a highly endemic village in Peru (pop. 454). We applied a 14 -question neurologic screening tool and evaluated serum for antibodies against Taenia solium cysticercosis using enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (LLGP-EITB). We invited all residents ≥18 years old to have non-contrast computerized tomography (CT) of the head. Of the 385 residents who provided serum samples, 142 (36.9%) were seropositive. Of the 256 residents who underwent CT scan, 48 (18.8%) had brain calcifications consistent with NCC; 8/48 (17.0%) reported a history of headache and/or seizures. Exposure to T. solium is very common in this endemic community where 1 out of 5 residents had brain calcifications. However, the vast majority of people with calcifications were asymptomatic. This study reports a high prevalence of NCC infection in an endemic community in Peru and confirms that a large proportion of apparently asymptomatic residents have brain calcifications that could provoke seizures in the future.

  10. Paradoxical migrating cyst: an unusual presentation of intraventricular neurocysticercosis with a coincidental pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shanchita; Al-Khalili, Rend; Liu, James K; Slasky, Shira E

    2014-06-01

    Intraventricular neurocysticercosis is an uncommon entity which may become symptomatic due to cerebrospinal fluid flow obstruction. Migration of intraventricular cysts through the ventricular spaces is a rare occurrence. This phenomenon is poorly understood but may be due to pressure changes within the ventricular cavities. We present a patient with intraventricular neurocysticercosis with paradoxical transaqueductal migration of the cyst from the cerebral aqueduct to the fourth ventricle shortly after ventricular drain placement for acute hydrocephalus. The patient also presented with a coincidental sellar and suprasellar mass, later pathologically proven to be a pituitary adenoma. The migration of this cyst resulted in spontaneous relief of obstruction at the cerebral aqueduct, thus restoring normal cerebrospinal fluid pathways and avoiding permanent shunting. We discuss the possible mechanisms and implications of cyst migration, and the diagnostic challenges of concomitant findings of a pituitary mass and neurocysticercosis. Although the presence of a sellar and suprasellar mass in a patient with known neurocysticercosis should raise clinical suspicion for the possibility of sellar neurocysticercosis, pituitary macroadenoma is a more common entity and a more likely etiology for a sellar lesion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy of combined antiparasitic therapy with praziquantel and albendazole for neurocysticercosis: a double-blind, randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Hector H; Gonzales, Isidro; Lescano, Andres G; Bustos, Javier A; Zimic, Mirko; Escalante, Diego; Saavedra, Herbert; Gavidia, Martin; Rodriguez, Lourdes; Najar, Enrique; Umeres, Hugo; Pretell, E Javier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Neurocysticercosis causes a substantial burden of seizure disorders worldwide. Treatment with either praziquantel or albendazole has suboptimum efficacy. We aimed to establish whether combination of these drugs would increase cysticidal efficacy and whether complete cyst resolution results in fewer seizures. We added an increased dose albendazole group to establish a potential effect of increased albendazole concentrations. Methods In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, patients with viable intraparenchymal neurocysticercosis were randomly assigned to receive 10 days of combined albendazole (15 mg/kg per day) plus praziquantel (50 mg/kg per day), standard albendazole (15 mg/kg per day), or increased dose albendazole (22·5 mg/kg per day). Randomisation was done with a computer generated schedule balanced within four strata based on number of cysts and concomitant antiepileptic drug. Patients and investigators were masked to group assignment. The primary outcome was complete cyst resolution on 6-month MRI. Enrolment was stopped after interim analysis because of parasiticidal superiority of one treatment group. Analysis excluded patients lost to follow-up before the 6-month MRI. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00441285. Findings Between March 3, 2010 and Nov 14, 2011, 124 patients were randomly assigned to study groups (41 to receive combined albendazole plus praziquantel [39 analysed], 43 standard albendazole [41 analysed], and 40 increased albendazole [38 analysed]). 25 (64%) of 39 patients in the combined treatment group had complete resolution of brain cysts compared with 15 (37%) of 41 patients in the standard albendazole group (rate ratio [RR] 1·75, 95% CI 1·10–2·79, p=0·014). 20 (53%) of 38 patients in the increased albendazole group had complete cyst resolution at 6-month MRI compared with 15 (37%) of 41 patients in the standard albendazole group (RR 1·44, 95% CI 0·87–2·38, p=0·151

  12. [Case report: severe neck injury caused by an angle grinder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corzillius, Michael; Storz, Christian; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten

    2007-02-01

    EMS is called to a construction worker with serious cutting injuries of the neck from an angle grinder. The patient was found on the upper floor of a construction building accessible only through a scaffolding with narrow ladders. Primary examination reveals severe hemorrhagic shock. The Fire Department is called for evacuation of the patient with a turntable ladder. Further examination in the hospital shows complete dissection of the left carotid artery and the left internal jugular vein. The history reveals alcohol abuse and depression. Attempted suicide appears to be the most likely cause of the injury. The case report further discusses proper coordination of medical and technical measures in rescue operations, recommended treatment of hemorrhagic shock, and the unusual finding of paradoxical bradycardia despite volume depletion.

  13. Localization fibrosing mediastinitis causing pulmonary infraction: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sur, Young Keun; Kim, Eun Young; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Park, Kyung Joo; Koh, Young Wha; Sun, Joo Sung [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    A 44-year-old female patient visited our emergency room for hemoptysis and refractory chest wall pain of 2 months duration. She had no history of smoking or other medical conditions. Chest CT scan showed homogenously enhancing soft tissue mass without calcification at the left pulmonary hilum. Encasing and compression of the left lower pulmonary artery by the mass had resulted in pulmonary infarction in the left lower lobe. Laboratory tests for tuberculosis, fungus, and vasculitis were all negative. The patient underwent surgical biopsy and resection of infarcted left lower lobe that was histopathologically confirmed as fibrosing mediastinitis. Herein, we reported a rare case of surgically confirmed and treated localized fibrosing mediastinitis causing pulmonary infarction.

  14. Aseptic Meningitis Caused by Lassa Virus: Case Series Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter O. Okokhere

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lassa virus is known to cause disease in different organ systems of the human body, with varying clinical manifestations. The features of severe clinical disease may include bleeding and/or central nervous system manifestations. Whereas Lassa fever encephalopathy and encephalitis are well described in the literature, there is paucity of data on Lassa virus meningitis. We present the clinical description, laboratory diagnosis, and management of 4 consecutive cases of aseptic meningitis associated with Lassa virus infection without bleeding seen in a region of Nigeria known to be endemic for both the reservoir rodent and Lassa fever. The 4 patients recovered fully following intravenous ribavirin treatment and suffered no neurologic complications.

  15. A fatal case caused by massive honey bee stings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyıldız, Başak; Özsoylu, Serkan; Öztürk, Mehmet Adnan; İnci, Abdullah; Düzlü, Önder; Yıldırım, Alparslan

    2015-01-01

    Bee venom is a complex substance which acts in different ways; local or systemic anaphylaxis associated with IgE and direct toxic effects of the large volume of injected venom. We report a 10- year-old boy who was the vulnerable of 5989 honey bee attacks. To the best of our knowledge, this case had the ultimate number of honey bee stings in the literature, until now. He was admitted to pediatric intensive care unit after 3 hours of incident. Plasmapheresis was started to remove circulating venom that can cause many systemic side effects. Unfortunately, multiorgan failure developed on the 2nd day of admission due to severe hemolysis and rabdomyolysis. Additional therapies modalities, mechanical ventilation, hemodialysis, and antihypertensive drugs were added to the treatment during the disease process. Despite all of the treatments, the patient was failed on 12th day of hospitalization.

  16. Antral hyperplastic polyp causing intermittent gastric outlet obstruction: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtkaya-Yapicier Ozlem

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperplastic polyps are the most common polypoid lesions of the stomach. Rarely, they cause gastric outlet obstruction by prolapsing through the pyloric channel, when they arise in the prepyloric antrum. Case presentation A 62-year-old woman presented with intermittent nausea and vomiting of 4 months duration. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a 30 mm prepyloric sessile polyp causing intermittent gastric outlet obstruction. Following submucosal injection of diluted adrenaline solution, the polyp was removed with a snare. Multiple biopsies were taken from the greater curvature of the antrum and the corpus. Rapid urease test for Helicobacter pylori yielded a negative result. Histopathologic examination showed a hyperplastic polyp without any evidence of malignancy. Biopsies of the antrum and the corpus revealed gastritis with neither atrophic changes nor Helicobacter pylori infection. Follow-up endoscopy after a 12-week course of proton pomp inhibitor therapy showed a complete healing without any remnant tissue at the polypectomy site. The patient has been symptom-free during 8 months of follow-up. Conclusions Symptomatic gastric polyps should be removed preferentially when they are detected at the initial diagnostic endoscopy. Polypectomy not only provides tissue to determine the exact histopathologic type of the polyp, but also achieves radical treatment.

  17. Rare case of fungal keratitis caused by Plectosporium tabacinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamada R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rika Kamada,1 Yu Monden,1 Koji Uehara,1 Ryoji Yamakawa,1 Kazuko Nishimura21Department of Ophthalmology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka, 2Medical Mycology Research Center, Chiba University and First Laboratories Co, Ltd, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, JapanAbstract: A rare case of fungal keratitis caused by Plectosporium tabacinum is reported. A 78-year-old female gardener presented with conjunctivitis and an oval infiltrate with irregular margins in the nasal half of the cornea in the right eye. Light microscopy of corneal scrapings revealed a filamentous fungus, and a diagnosis of fungal keratitis was made. The patient was admitted into our hospital on February 19, 2008. Treatment with topical miconazole, topical fluconazole, pimaricin ointment, intravenous miconazole, and corneal debridement was commenced. One week later, the infiltrate improved, but the central part of the infiltrate was still deep. Topical fluconazole was switched to topical voriconazole, and intravenous miconazole was switched to intravenous voriconazole. One month after admission, the causative organism was identified by morphology and molecular biological analysis as Plectosporium tabacinum. The corneal infiltrate resolved 3 months after admission. A stromal scar persisted for 3 months after the patient was discharged. This is the first detailed report of fungal keratitis caused by P. tabacinum. Voriconazole was effective in treating this refractory keratitis.Keywords: fungal keratitis, Plectosporium tabacinum, voriconazole, filamentous fungi

  18. Sternoclavicular joint infection caused by Coxiella burnetii: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelakis, Emmanouil; Thiberville, Simon-Djamel; Million, Matthieu; Raoult, Didier

    2016-05-31

    Few cases of Q fever osteoarticular infection have been reported, with chronic osteomyelitis as the most common manifestation of Q fever osteoarticular infection. Here we present the case of a sternoclavicular joint infection caused by Coxiella burnetii and localized by positron emission tomography scanning. A 67-year-old French man from south France was hospitalized for fever and confusion. An examination revealed subclavicular and axillary lymph node enlargement. Computed tomography scanning and transesophageal echocardiogram were normal, and magnetic resonance imaging scanning did not reveal signs of infection. An immunofluorescence assay of an acute serum sample was positive for C. burnetii and he was treated with 200 mg doxycycline for 21 days. An immunofluorescence assay of convalescent serum sampled after 2 months revealed very high C. burnetii antibody titers. To localize the site of the infection, we performed positron emission tomography scanning, which revealed intense fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in his right sternoclavicular joint; treatment with 200 mg oral doxycycline daily and 200 mg oral hydroxychloroquine three times daily for 18 months was initiated. Q fever articular infections may be undiagnosed, and we strongly urge the use of positron emission tomography scanning in patients with high C. burnetii antibody titers to localize the site of C. burnetii infection.

  19. [Case of androgenic anabolic steroid abuse caused hypogonadotropic hypogonadism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Akio; Kobayashi, Ko; Hashimoto, Kohei; Kato, Ryuichi; Masumori, Naoya; Itoh, Naoki; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2008-11-01

    A 32-year-old man complained about a reduction of testicular volume and loss of libido. He had been abusing androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) for 7 years. Genital examination revealed that both testicular volumes were reduced to 13 ml. Endocrinological investigations showed luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and total testosterone (Total T) levels to be low. The level of free testosterone (Free T) was documented to be high. Later, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and calculated bioavailable testosterone (cBAT) levels were found to be low. Based on these features, we diagnosed his condition as hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism caused by AAS abuse. We first forbade him to use AAS, but the symptoms and endocrinological features were not improved. Then treatment with injections of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was started. About one month after treatment with hCG started, his symptoms and endocrinological features were not improved. It is well known that AAS abuse induces hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. It is also reported that normal hormonal function usually recovers after AAS are discontinued, but sometimes the condition is not reversible. In such cases, we should carefully observe the endocrinological features of the patient, and whether the early treatment with hCG injection leads to early recovery of testicular function. It was useful to examine cBAT in this case to understand his endocrinological condition. There are many severe side effects of abusing AAS and thus education about the severe side effects of AAS abuse is necessary.

  20. A rare case of ileus caused by ileum endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratu, Dan; Chicea, Radu; Ciprian, Tanasescu; Beli, Laurentiu; Dan, Sabau; Mihetiu, Alin; Adrian, Boicean

    2016-01-01

    We report our experience involving a rare case of ileum endometriosis complicated with small bowel obstruction. 33 years old female patient, admitted to emergency service with abdominal pain, abdominal distension, and vomiting. Abdominal X-ray showed dilated small bowel loops. Computerized tomography scan showed dilated small intestine segments excepting last ileum loop, gastric distension, enlarged ovaries. Emergency laparotomy was performed, showing acute bowel obstruction due to a stenotic tumor placed on the terminal ileum, cecum tumors, multiple tumors in Douglas pouch, multiple mesenteric enlarged lymph nodes. Right colectomy is performed with an ileo-transverso stomy placed in right hypochondrium. Postoperative evolution without complication, patient discharged after 13-days hospitalization. After hormonal treatment, she returned for a second look and ileotransverso anastomosis. Gastrointestinal involvement of endometriosis has been found in 3%-37% of menstruating women. Ileum localization is very rare (1%-7%), causing intestinal obstruction 7%-23% of cases. Intraoperative differential diagnosis is difficult, predisposing at confusion with other types of tumors. In the absence of fast microscopic exam, the tumor was considered malignant and imposed a right hemicolectomy. Intestinal obstruction due to ileum endometriosis is a rare condition, however, it should always be considered in the differential diagnosis in women of reproductive age. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Late Ebola virus relapse causing meningoencephalitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Michael; Rodger, Alison; Bell, David J; Bhagani, Sanjay; Cropley, Ian; Filipe, Ana; Gifford, Robert J; Hopkins, Susan; Hughes, Joseph; Jabeen, Farrah; Johannessen, Ingolfur; Karageorgopoulos, Drosos; Lackenby, Angie; Lester, Rebecca; Liu, Rebecca S N; MacConnachie, Alisdair; Mahungu, Tabitha; Martin, Daniel; Marshall, Neal; Mepham, Stephen; Orton, Richard; Palmarini, Massimo; Patel, Monika; Perry, Colin; Peters, S Erica; Porter, Duncan; Ritchie, David; Ritchie, Neil D; Seaton, R Andrew; Sreenu, Vattipally B; Templeton, Kate; Warren, Simon; Wilkie, Gavin S; Zambon, Maria; Gopal, Robin; Thomson, Emma C

    2016-07-30

    There are thousands of survivors of the 2014 Ebola outbreak in west Africa. Ebola virus can persist in survivors for months in immune-privileged sites; however, viral relapse causing life-threatening and potentially transmissible disease has not been described. We report a case of late relapse in a patient who had been treated for severe Ebola virus disease with high viral load (peak cycle threshold value 13.2). A 39-year-old female nurse from Scotland, who had assisted the humanitarian effort in Sierra Leone, had received intensive supportive treatment and experimental antiviral therapies, and had been discharged with undetectable Ebola virus RNA in peripheral blood. The patient was readmitted to hospital 9 months after discharge with symptoms of acute meningitis, and was found to have Ebola virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). She was treated with supportive therapy and experimental antiviral drug GS-5734 (Gilead Sciences, San Francisco, Foster City, CA, USA). We monitored Ebola virus RNA in CSF and plasma, and sequenced the viral genome using an unbiased metagenomic approach. On admission, reverse transcriptase PCR identified Ebola virus RNA at a higher level in CSF (cycle threshold value 23.7) than plasma (31.3); infectious virus was only recovered from CSF. The patient developed progressive meningoencephalitis with cranial neuropathies and radiculopathy. Clinical recovery was associated with addition of high-dose corticosteroids during GS-5734 treatment. CSF Ebola virus RNA slowly declined and was undetectable following 14 days of treatment with GS-5734. Sequencing of plasma and CSF viral genome revealed only two non-coding changes compared with the original infecting virus. Our report shows that previously unanticipated, late, severe relapses of Ebola virus can occur, in this case in the CNS. This finding fundamentally redefines what is known about the natural history of Ebola virus infection. Vigilance should be maintained in the thousands of Ebola survivors

  2. Listeria Monocytogenes: a rare cause of endophthalmitis, a case report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katherine M. Gaskell; Gwyn Williams; Kathie Grant; Susan Lightman; Gauri Godbole

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a known cause of gastroenteritis. Invasive disease can follow bacteremia causing meningoencephalitis, endocarditis and spontaneous miscarriages in immunocompromised patients and pregnant women respectively...

  3. Neuroimaging observations linking neurocysticercosis and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchin, Marino M; Velasco, Tonicarlo R; Wichert-Ana, Lauro; Araújo, David; Alexandre, Veriano; Scornavacca, Francisco; Escorsi-Rosset, Sara R; dos Santos, Antonio Carlos; Carlotti, Carlos G; Takayanagui, Osvaldo M; Sakamoto, Américo C

    2015-10-01

    To test if chronic calcificed neurocysticercosis (cNCC) and hippocampal sclerosis occur more often than by chance ipsilateral to the same brain hemisphere or brain region in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) plus neurocysticercosis. This proof-of-concept would provide important evidence of a direct pathogenic relationship between neurocysticercosis and MTLE-HS. A cohort of 290 consecutive MTLE-HS surgical patients was studied. A test of proportions was used to analyze if the proportion of patients with a single cNCC lesion matching the same brain hemisphere or region of hippocampal sclerosis was significantly greater than 50%, as expected by the chance. Neuroimaging findings of cNCC were observed in 112 (38.6%) of 290 MTLE-HS patients and a single cNCC lesion occurred in 58 (51.8%) of them. There were no differences in main basal clinical characteristics of MTLE-HS patients with single or multiple cNCC lesions. In patients with single cNCC lesions, the lesion matched the side in which hippocampal sclerosis was observed in 43 (74.1%) patients, a proportion significantly greater than that expected to occur by chance (p=0.008). Neurocysticercosis in temporal lobe was ipsilateral to hippocampal sclerosis in 85.0% of patients and accounted mostly for this result. This work is a proof-of-concept that the association of neurocysticercosis and MTLE-HS cannot be explained exclusively by patients sharing common biological or socio-economic predisposing variables. Instead, our results suggest the involvement of more direct pathogenic mechanisms like regional inflammation, repetitive seizures or both. Neurocysticercosis within temporal lobes was particularly related with ipsilateral hippocampal sclerosis in MTLE-HS, a finding adding new contributions for understanding MTLE-HS plus cNCC or perhaps to other forms of dual pathology in MTLE-HS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Meningitis caused by Streptococcus suis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Parisi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcus suis, a diplococcus Gram +, alfa haemolytic, commensal in pigs. Infection in humans is due to a different location and is one of the most common cause of meningitis in adults. Risks: consumption of undercooked pork, rearing and slaughter of pigs. Clinical case.Woman, 46aa., caregiver, Romanian, presents to the emergency of our hospital with fever (39.5C, drowsiness, no neurological deficits. Neutrophilia 93%, ESR 140 mm/h, CRP 26.40 mg/dl; LCR turbid, cell count 950/mm3, glicorrachia undetectable and, proteinorrachia 5.3g/l, PMN prevailing, presence diplococci Gram +, pneumococcal antigen negative. Tac cerebral negative for focal parenchymal lesions, alterations densitometric signs of bleeding. Improving after empiric therapy (ceftriaxone, ampicillin and levofloxacin iv but emergence of the sense of “muffled ear dx”. Tac fortresses petros and paranasal sinuses: ”breasts not procidenti side of dura mater. Presence of tissue density of the soft parts at the right external ear canal.” Methods. Blood cultures (Bactec 9240 BD negative. LCR culture (12 h in CO2: development of alfa haemolytic colonies, Gram + diplococci, catalase -, bile esculin -, PYR -, lysis of bile salts -, optochin R. Identified with API 20 strep (bioMérieux as Streptococcus suis and confirmed by molecular studies. Susceptible to penicillin, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, resistant to tetracycline and clindamycin. Improvement after this therapy, administered for 14 days with disappearance of “the sense of muffled“ and normalization of blood chemical parameters. Conclusions. According to literature, S. suis meningitis is often not recognized.Awareness of the clinicians of this possible etiology and an accurate history of the patient intended to reveal dietary habits (consumption of undercooked pork and profession (butchers, etc... are important factors for a prompt diagnosis, since there are negligible sequelae as hearing loss (50% of cases and

  5. A Case of Onychomycosis Caused by Rhodotorula glutinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludag Altun, Hatice; Meral, Tuba; Turk Aribas, Emel; Gorpelioglu, Canan; Karabicak, Nilgun

    2014-01-01

    Rhodotorula spp. have emerged as opportunistic pathogens, particularly in immunocompromised patients. The current study reports a case of onychomycosis caused by Rhodotorula glutinis in a 74-year-old immunocompetent female. The causative agent was identified as R. glutinis based on the pinkish-orange color; mucoid-appearing yeast colonies on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar at 25°C; morphological evaluation in the Corn Meal-Tween 80 agar; observed oval/round budding yeast at 25°C for 72 hours; no observed pseudohyphae; positive urease activity at 25°C for 4 days; and assimilation features detected by API ID 32C kit and automated Vitek Yeast Biochemical Card 2 system. Antifungal susceptibility test results were as follows: amphotericin B (MIC = 0.5 µg/mL), fluconazole (MIC = 128 µg/mL), itraconazole (MIC = 0.125 µg/mL), voriconazole (MIC = 1 µg/mL), posaconazole (MIC = 0.5 µg/mL), anidulafungin (MIC = 0.5 µg/mL), and caspofungin (MIC = 16 µg/mL). Antifungal therapy was initiated with oral itraconazole at a dose of 400 mg/day; seven-day pulse therapy was planned at intervals of three weeks. Clinical recovery was observed in the clinical evaluation of the patient before the start of the third cure. Although R. glutinis has rarely been reported as the causative agent of onychomycosis, it should be considered.

  6. Another cause of vaccine encephalopathy: a case of Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novy, Jan; Catarino, Claudia B; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Smith, Shelagh M; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Hammond, Peter; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2012-05-01

    Dravet syndrome has been found recently as an important underlying condition in cases of alleged vaccine encephalopathy after pertussis vaccination, where vaccination seemed to have precipitated the occurrence of the disease without modifying the long-term course. We report on a patient diagnosed with Angelman syndrome in her fifth decade, in whom the intellectual disability and epilepsy had been assumed to be caused by a vaccine encephalopathy following smallpox vaccination. Clinical features of Angelman syndrome had faded away. The history of the present patient suggests that genetic conditions other than Dravet syndrome can be associated with an alleged vaccine encephalopathy. A history of vaccine encephalopathy is rare among patients with learning disability and refractory epilepsy (1.4% in our cohort), but it should lead to consideration of a comprehensive genetic work-up if Dravet syndrome is excluded. The early history of the patient, when available, should guide the investigations. Medico-legal aspects are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. A Case of Adrenal Mass Causing Adrenal Insufficiency: Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Şişman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis, the prevalence of which has continued to decline in developed countries, is still one of the reasons of adrenal insufficiency. In this report, we aimed to present a case of adrenal and miliary tuberculosis presenting with adrenal insufficiency. A 71-year-old woman with a history of unilateral adrenalectomy was admitted with the symptoms of adrenal insufficiency. In her further medical investigations, the diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency was established and a mass presenting as involvement of tuberculosis was detected in the adrenal gland. Bilateral pulmonary nodules compatible with miliary tuberculosis were observed. After anti-tuberculosis treatment, pulmonary nodules disappeared, but there was no significant decrease in the size of the adrenal mass. The patient, who underwent adrenalectomy, was followed with glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid treatment. Tuberculosis of the adrenal glands is a common cause of adrenal insufficiency in developing countries. Tuberculosis can destroy the adrenal glands and the diagnosis of adrenal tuberculosis, especially presenting with enlargement of the adrenal glands, can be difficult.

  8. A Case of Onychomycosis Caused by Rhodotorula glutinis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Uludag Altun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodotorula spp. have emerged as opportunistic pathogens, particularly in immunocompromised patients. The current study reports a case of onychomycosis caused by Rhodotorula glutinis in a 74-year-old immunocompetent female. The causative agent was identified as R. glutinis based on the pinkish-orange color; mucoid-appearing yeast colonies on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar at 25°C; morphological evaluation in the Corn Meal-Tween 80 agar; observed oval/round budding yeast at 25°C for 72 hours; no observed pseudohyphae; positive urease activity at 25°C for 4 days; and assimilation features detected by API ID 32C kit and automated Vitek Yeast Biochemical Card 2 system. Antifungal susceptibility test results were as follows: amphotericin B (MIC = 0.5 µg/mL, fluconazole (MIC = 128 µg/mL, itraconazole (MIC = 0.125 µg/mL, voriconazole (MIC = 1 µg/mL, posaconazole (MIC = 0.5 µg/mL, anidulafungin (MIC = 0.5 µg/mL, and caspofungin (MIC = 16 µg/mL. Antifungal therapy was initiated with oral itraconazole at a dose of 400 mg/day; seven-day pulse therapy was planned at intervals of three weeks. Clinical recovery was observed in the clinical evaluation of the patient before the start of the third cure. Although R. glutinis has rarely been reported as the causative agent of onychomycosis, it should be considered.

  9. Blast Injuries Caused by Vape Devices: 2 Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kite, Amy C; Le, Brian Q; Cumpston, Kirk L; Hieger, Michelle A; Feldman, Michael J; Pozez, Andrea L

    2016-12-01

    Vaporizing devices have become a popular alternative to conventional nicotine products. They are thought to be safer as they produce aerosolized nicotine powered by a lithium ion battery. Many people have used these electronic devices as a tool to quit smoking; however, the batteries can be unstable and explode.We present 2 case reports where explosions of electronic vapor devices caused significant injuries. The first patient sustained a combustion injury to the maxilla resulting in bone and anterior maxillary tooth loss requiring reconstruction. The second patient had a severe blast injury to the hand which ultimately resulted in loss of a digit. Toxicology was consulted due to concerns for systemic absorption of metals in the soft tissue of the hand. Cobalt and manganese were initially elevated but decreased after surgical debridement. The patient did not have any systemic symptoms.Currently, there is no federal regulation of electronic cigarettes or vape devices in the United States. With the increasing use of these devices and no standard regulations, we anticipate more blast injuries occurring in the future. Medical providers will need to be able to be prepared to manage the devastating clinical injuries that ensue.

  10. Tophaceous gout causing lumbar stenosis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huigen; Sheng, Jianming; Dai, Jiaping; Hu, Xuqi

    2017-08-01

    Gout in the spine is very rare. The clinical symptoms of the spinal gout are various and lack of specificity. The authors report a case of spinal gout causing lumbar stenosis. We never find such wide-invasive spinal gouty lesion in the published studies. A 68-year-old male had low back pain radiating to bilateral lower limbs, accompanying with intermittent claudication that lasted for 3 months and aggravated 5 days ago. Spinal gout, lumbar stenosis. The patient underwent L2-L4 laminectomy, L2/3 L3/4 an d L4/5 discectomy and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation. Dual-energy computed tomography detected extensive tophaceous deposits in L1/2 L2/3 L3/4 and L4/5 lumbar discs as well as the posterior column, especially L2-L3 and L4-L5 facet joints. During the surgery, we found a mass of chalky white material at the posterior column of L3 to L5 vertebral bodies, which also involved the intervertebral discs. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of spinal gout. Although spinal gout is thought to be rare, the diagnosis should be considered if the patient had severe back pain and a history of gout. Dual-energy computed tomography is highly recommended for these patients.

  11. Toll-like Receptor-4 Polymorphisms and Serum Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 in Newly Diagnosed Patients With Calcified Neurocysticercosis and Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachuriya, Gaurav; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Jain, Bhawna; Kumar, Neeraj; Verma, Rajesh; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated seizure profile, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 polymorphisms, and serum matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in patients with calcified neurocysticercosis.One-hundred nine patients with calcified neurocysticercosis with newly diagnosed seizures and 109 control subjects were enrolled. TLR-4 Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile polymorphisms and serum MMP-9 levels were evaluated. The patients were followed for 1 year.Asp/Gly (P = 0.012) and Thr/Ile (P = 0.002), Gly (Asp/Gly plus Gly/Gly) (P = 0.008) and Ile (Thr/Ile plus Ile/Ile) (P = 0.003) genotypes were significantly associated with calcified neurocysticercosis compared with controls. Gly/Gly and Ile/Ile genotypes were not significantly associated (P = 0.529 for Gly/Gly, P = 0.798 for Ile/Ile) with either group. The levels of MMP-9 were higher in calcified neurocysticercosis (P =  neurocysticercosis compared with single calcified neurocysticercosis (P =  10 mm (P = 0.001), and perilesional edema (P =  neurocysticercosis leading to an increase in perilesional edema and provocation of seizures.

  12. A study of neuropsychiatric manifestations in patients of neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Smita; Chadda, Rakesh Kumar; Bala, Kiran; Majumdar, Pradipta

    2013-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is an endemic parasitic infection of Asia, Africa, Latin America, and central Europe. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of the illness include epilepsy and behavioral disturbances. There is a dearth of systematic studies on psychiatric manifestations of NCC from various Asian counties. The present study assessed the prevalence of various psychiatric disorders in a cohort of patients with NCC attending a neurological service. Detailed psychiatric assessment was carried out on 50 patients of NCC with epilepsy and 50 patients of epilepsy without any evidence of NCC. Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale was used to elicit the symptoms. Cognitive functions were assessed using Mini Mental Status Examination. Psychiatric diagnoses were made as per International Classification of Diseases, 10(th) edition (ICD-10). Sixty eight percent of the patients with NCC suffered from a psychiatric disorder, as compared to 44% of those without NCC (P=0.02). Major depression and mixed anxiety depression were the two most common diagnoses. None of the patients was to found to suffer from a psychotic disorder. The most frequent site of brain lesion of NCC was the parietal lobe, followed by frontal lobes and disseminated lesions. Left sided lesions were associated with greater psychiatric morbidity. Focal seizures with or without secondary generalizations were present more frequently in patients with NCC whereas primary generalized seizures were more common in patients with idiopathic epilepsy (P=0.05). Psychiatric manifestations are more common in patients of epilepsy with NCC than those without NCC. The treating clinician need to be vigilant about the phenomenon.

  13. Seizure in People with Newly Diagnosed Active or Transitional Neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelvin, Elizabeth A.; Carpio, Arturo; Bagiella, Emilia; Leslie, Denise; Leon, Pietro; Andrews, Howard; Hauser, W. Allen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to describe seizure as a presenting symptom in individuals with recently diagnosed neurocysticercosis (NCC). Methods Using logistic regression, we examined the probability of having seizures as a presenting symptom among those with active or transitional NCC by host age and gender, and by number of cysts, location of the cysts in the brain, and phase of evolution of the encysted parasite. Results We found that the odds of having seizures as presenting symptom for those in the youngest age group (3–24 years old) were 12.9 times that of the oldest participants (age 55–82 years) (p=0.006). People with cysts in parenchymal locations had a significantly higher odds of seizures compared to those with all their cysts elsewhere (ventricles or subarachnoid) (OR=6.2, p=0.028); and the number of cysts was significantly associated with having seizures (OR=1.1, p=0.026). Host gender and cyst phase were not significantly associated with having seizures after adjusting for confounders and covariates. Conclusion Children, those with cysts in parenchymal locations, and those with a higher number of cysts appear to be more likely to experience seizure when they have NCC cysts in the active or transitional stage. PMID:21145263

  14. Experimental neurocysticercosis: absence of IL-4 induces lower encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidelberto Matos Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Neurocysticercosis (NCC is the most severe clinical manifestation of cysticercosis. One of the factors responsible for its symptomatology is the host inflammatory response. Therefore the influence of interleukin 4 (IL-4 on the induction of encephalitis in experimental NCC was evaluated. Methods BALB/c (WT and BALB/c (IL-4-KO mice were inoculated intracranially with Taenia crassiceps cysticerci and euthanized at 7, 30, 60 and 90 days later, the encephala removed and histopathologically analyzed. Results The absence of IL-4 induced greater parasitism. In the initial phase of the infection, IL-4-KO showed a lower intensity in the inflammatory infiltration of polimorphonuclear cells in the host-parasite interface and intra-parenquimatous edema. The IL-4-KO animals, in the late phase of the infection, showed lower intensity of ventriculomegaly, encephalitis, and meningitis, and greater survival of the parasites in comparison with the WT animals. Conclusion The absence of IL-4 induced lower inflammatory infiltration, ventriculomegaly and perivasculitis in experimental NCC.

  15. Neurocysticercosis: relationship between Taenia antigen levels in CSF and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, Ronaldo, E-mail: rnabraham@uol.com.b [University of Taubate (UNITAU), Taubate, SP (Brazil). Medicine Dept.; Livramento, Jose Antonio; Machado, Luis dos Ramos [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Medical School. Neurology Dept.; Leite, Claudia da Costa [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Medical School. Radiology Dept.; Pardini, Alessandra Xavier; Vaz, Adelaide Jose [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Biomedical Science Institute. Immunology Dept.

    2010-02-15

    Objective: to determine the relationship between Taenia antigen (TA) detection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with definite diagnosis of neurocysticercosis (NC). Method: sixty-three patients with definite diagnosis of NC were submitted to a MRI of the brain, and to a CSF examination, with a meticulous search for TA by ELISA. Results: TA detection was positive in 36 patients (57.1%). A total of 836 lesions were analyzed, greatly within the cerebral parenchyma (98.7 of the lesions). Intact or non-degenerating cysts were the most common evolutive phase observed (50.4% of all lesions), 22.1% were degenerating cysts and 19.5% calcified cysts. We observed a significant relationship between TA levels detected and the total number of lesions and the number of non-degenerating cysts, but not with calcified lesions. Conclusion: according to our results, we propose at least four important types of contribution: TA detection may allow etiologic diagnosis in transitional phases of NC, with non-characteristic images; in final stages of evolution of cysticercoids in the CNS, lesions may not appear on CT or MRI, and TA detection may contribute to a definite etiologic diagnosis; TA detection may permit diagnosis of NC in some patients with previous negative tests for antibody detection in CSF; TA detection may represent an accurate marker of disease activity in the epileptic form of NC. (author)

  16. The causal relationship between neurocysticercosis infection and the development of epilepsy - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripper, Lucy B; Welburn, Susan C

    2017-04-05

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic infection of the human central nervous system, the most common form of which involves infection of the brain parenchyma with the larval form of the Taenia solium tapeworm. A causal relationship between such an NCC infection and the development of epilepsy in infected individuals is acknowledged, in part supported by high levels of comorbidity in endemic countries worldwide. This study undertook a systematic review and critical analysis of the NCC-epilepsy relationship with the primary objective of quantifying the risk of developing epilepsy following NCC infection. A secondary aim was to analyse the proportions of NCC-associated epilepsy within different populations. Significant emphasis was placed on the importance of neuroimaging (CT or MRI) availability and use of clear guidelines for epilepsy diagnosis, in order to avoid overestimations of prevalence rates of either condition; a limitation identified in several previous studies. A common odds ratio of 2.76 was identified from meta-analysis of case-control studies, indicating that an individual infected with NCC has almost a three times higher risk of developing epilepsy than an uninfected individual. Furthermore, meta-analysis of studies identified a common proportion of 31.54% of epilepsy cases associated with NCC infection which suggests that amongst epileptic populations in at risk countries, approximately one-third may be associated with NCC infection. A significant finding was the lack of good clinical data to enable accurate determination of a causal relationship. Even studies that were included had noticeable limitations, including a general lack of consistency in diagnostics, and lack of accurate epidemiological data. This review highlights a need for consistency in research in this field. In the absence of reliable estimates of its global burden, NCC will remain of low priority in the eyes of funding agencies - a truly neglected disease.

  17. Taenia solium metacestode fasciclin-like protein is reactive with sera of chronic neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-An; Yeom, Joon-Sup; Wang, Hu; Kim, Seon-Hee; Ahn, Chun-Seob; Kim, Jin-Taek; Yang, Hyun-Jong; Kong, Yoon

    2014-06-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NC), an infection of the central nervous system with Taenia solium metacestodes (TsM), invokes a formidable neurological disease. A bundle of antigens is applicable for serodiagnosis of active cases, while they demonstrate fairly low reactivity against sera of chronic NC. Identification of sensitive biomarkers for chronic NC is critical for appropriate management of patients. Proteome analysis revealed several isoforms of 65- and 83-kDa TsM fasciclin-like proteins (TsMFas) to be highly reactive with sera of chronic NC. A cDNA encoding one of the 83-kDa TsMFas (TsMFas1) was isolated from a cDNA library. We expressed a recombinant protein (rTsMFas1) and evaluated its diagnostic potential employing sera from chronic NC (n = 80), tissue-invasive cestodiases (n = 169) and trematodiases (n = 80) and those of normal controls (n = 50). Secretory TsMFas1 was composed of 766 amino acid polypeptide and harboured fasciclin and fasciclin-superfamily domains. The protein was constitutively expressed in metacestode and adult stages, with preferential locality in the scolex. Bacterially expressed rTsMFas1 exhibited 78.8% sensitivity (63/80 cases) and 93% specificity (278/299 samples) in diagnosing chronic NC. Some cross-reactivity was observed with sera of cystic echinococcosis (10/56, 17.8%) and sparganosis (4/50, 8%). Positive and negative predictive values were 75% and 95.5%, respectively. TsM fasciclin-like protein may be useful for differential diagnosis of chronic NC in clinical settings, especially where both NC and other infectious cerebral granulomatoses are prevalent. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A Rare Case of Jejunal Diverticulosis Causing Mesenteric Volvulus

    OpenAIRE

    Reddi, Bhavani Rao; Konkena, Janardhan Rao; Bogarapu, Chaitanya Babu; Kollu, Srinu Babu; Neelam, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Jejunal diverticulosis is a rare asymptomatic entity [1]. In literature, there are only few cases of jejunal diverticulosis where small gut volvulus is reported. The disease entity is important as it may masquerade as hemorrhage, obstruction, or perforation which are life threatening. We report a rare case of small bowel volvulus secondary to jejunal diverticulosis.

  19. Candidiasis, A Rare Cause of Gastric Perforation: A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    search of literature show that this condition has not been previously reported in Nigeria. Here we report the first. Nigerian case of gastric perforation from invasive gastric candidiasis in a 70-year-old Nigerian male and review the relevant literature. Case Report. A 70-year-old Nigerian man presented at the emergency unit.

  20. Added Value of Antigen ELISA in the Diagnosis of Neurocysticercosis in Resource Poor Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorny, Pierre; Abatih, Emmanuel Nji; Schmutzhard, Erich; Ombay, Michaeli; Mathias, Bartholomayo; Winkler, Andrea Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Background Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common cause of acquired epilepsy in Taenia solium endemic areas, primarily situated in low-income countries. Diagnosis is largely based upon the “Del Brutto diagnostic criteria” using the definitive/probable/no NCC diagnosis approach. Neuroimaging and specific T. solium cysticercosis antibody detection results are at the mainstay of this diagnosis, while antigen detection in serum has never been included. This study aimed at evaluating the addition of antigen detection as a major diagnostic criterion, especially in areas where neuroimaging is absent. Methods The B158/B60 monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of circulating cysticercus antigen was carried out retrospectively on serum samples collected during a hospital-based study from 83 people with epilepsy (PWE) in an endemic area. Results The addition of antigen results as a major criterion allowed the correct diagnosis of definitive NCC in 10 out of 17 patients as opposed to 0/17 without antigen results in the absence of neuroimaging. A sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 84% were determined for the diagnosis of active NCC using antigen ELISA. While the use of a higher cutoff improves the specificity of the test to 96%, it decreases its sensitivity to 83%. Conclusions In areas where neuroimaging is absent, NCC diagnosis according to the existing criteria is problematic. Taking into account its limitations for diagnosis of inactive NCC, antigen detection can be of added value for diagnosing NCC in PWE by supporting diagnostic and treatment decisions. Therefore, we recommend a revision of the “Del Brutto diagnostic criteria” for use in resource poor areas and suggest the inclusion of serum antigen detection as a major criterion. PMID:23094118

  1. Added value of antigen ELISA in the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis in resource poor settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Gabriël

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurocysticercosis (NCC is the most common cause of acquired epilepsy in Taenia solium endemic areas, primarily situated in low-income countries. Diagnosis is largely based upon the "Del Brutto diagnostic criteria" using the definitive/probable/no NCC diagnosis approach. Neuroimaging and specific T. solium cysticercosis antibody detection results are at the mainstay of this diagnosis, while antigen detection in serum has never been included. This study aimed at evaluating the addition of antigen detection as a major diagnostic criterion, especially in areas where neuroimaging is absent. METHODS: The B158/B60 monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the detection of circulating cysticercus antigen was carried out retrospectively on serum samples collected during a hospital-based study from 83 people with epilepsy (PWE in an endemic area. RESULTS: The addition of antigen results as a major criterion allowed the correct diagnosis of definitive NCC in 10 out of 17 patients as opposed to 0/17 without antigen results in the absence of neuroimaging. A sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 84% were determined for the diagnosis of active NCC using antigen ELISA. While the use of a higher cutoff improves the specificity of the test to 96%, it decreases its sensitivity to 83%. CONCLUSIONS: In areas where neuroimaging is absent, NCC diagnosis according to the existing criteria is problematic. Taking into account its limitations for diagnosis of inactive NCC, antigen detection can be of added value for diagnosing NCC in PWE by supporting diagnostic and treatment decisions. Therefore, we recommend a revision of the "Del Brutto diagnostic criteria" for use in resource poor areas and suggest the inclusion of serum antigen detection as a major criterion.

  2. Immunodiagnosis of Neurocysticercosis: Ways to Focus on the Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Velázquez, M.; Ostoa-Saloma, P.; Morales-Montor, J.; Hernández-Bello, R.; Larralde, C.

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a disease of the central nervous system that is considered a public health problem in endemic areas. The definitive diagnosis of this disease is made using a combination of tools that include imaging of the brain and immunodiagnostic tests, but the facilities for performing them are usually not available in endemic areas. The immunodiagnosis of NCC is a useful tool that can provide important information on whether a patient is infected or not, but it presents many drawbacks as not all infected patients can be detected. These tests rely on purified or semipurified antigens that are sometimes difficult to prepare. Recent efforts have focused on the production of recombinant or synthetic antigens for the immunodiagnosis of NCC and interesting studies propose the use of new elements as nanobodies for diagnostic purposes. However, an immunodiagnostic test that can be considered as “gold standard” has not been developed so far. The complex nature of cysticercotic disease and the simplicity of common immunological assumptions involved explain the low scores and reproducibility of immunotests in the diagnosis of NCC. Here, the most important efforts for developing an immunodiagnostic test of NCC are listed and discussed. A more punctilious strategy based on the design of panels of confirmed positive and negative samples, the use of blind tests, and a worldwide effort is proposed in order to develop an immunodiagnostic test that can provide comparable results. The identification of a set of specific and representative antigens of T. solium and a thorough compilation of the many forms of antibody response of humans to the many forms of T. solium disease are also stressed as necessary. PMID:22131808

  3. Immunodiagnosis of Neurocysticercosis: Ways to Focus on the Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Esquivel-Velázquez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NCC is a disease of the central nervous system that is considered a public health problem in endemic areas. The definitive diagnosis of this disease is made using a combination of tools that include imaging of the brain and immunodiagnostic tests, but the facilities for performing them are usually not available in endemic areas. The immunodiagnosis of NCC is a useful tool that can provide important information on whether a patient is infected or not, but it presents many drawbacks as not all infected patients can be detected. These tests rely on purified or semipurified antigens that are sometimes difficult to prepare. Recent efforts have focused on the production of recombinant or synthetic antigens for the immunodiagnosis of NCC and interesting studies propose the use of new elements as nanobodies for diagnostic purposes. However, an immunodiagnostic test that can be considered as “gold standard” has not been developed so far. The complex nature of cysticercotic disease and the simplicity of common immunological assumptions involved explain the low scores and reproducibility of immunotests in the diagnosis of NCC. Here, the most important efforts for developing an immunodiagnostic test of NCC are listed and discussed. A more punctilious strategy based on the design of panels of confirmed positive and negative samples, the use of blind tests, and a worldwide effort is proposed in order to develop an immunodiagnostic test that can provide comparable results. The identification of a set of specific and representative antigens of T. solium and a thorough compilation of the many forms of antibody response of humans to the many forms of T. solium disease are also stressed as necessary.

  4. Radiological evolution of porcine neurocysticercosis after combined antiparasitic treatment with praziquantel and albendazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangalaya, Carla; Bustos, Javier A; Calcina, Juan; Vargas-Calla, Ana; Mamani, Javier; Suarez, Diego; Arroyo, Gianfranco; Gonzalez, Armando E; Chacaltana, Juan; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Nash, Theodore E; García, Héctor H

    2017-06-01

    The onset of anthelmintic treatment of neurocysticercosis (NCC) provokes an acute immune response of the host, which in human cases is associated with exacerbation of neurological symptoms. This inflammation can occur at the first days of therapy. So, changes in the brain cysts appearance may be detected by medical imaging. We evaluated radiological changes in the appearance of brain cysts (enhancement and size) on days two and five after the onset of antiparasitic treatment using naturally infected pigs as a model for human NCC. Contrast T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium was performed before and after antiparasitic treatment. Eight NCC-infected pigs were treated with praziquantel plus albendazole and euthanized two (n = 4) and five (n = 4) days after treatment; another group of four infected pigs served as untreated controls. For each lesion, gadolinium enhancement intensity (GEI) and cyst volume were measured at baseline and after antiparasitic treatment. Volume and GEI quantification ratios (post/pre-treatment measures) were used to appraise the effect of treatment. Cysts from untreated pigs showed little variations between their basal and post treatment measures. At days 2 and 5 there were significant increases in GEI ratio compared with the untreated group (1.32 and 1.47 vs 1.01, p = 0.021 and p = 0.021). Cyst volume ratios were significantly lower at days 2 and 5 compared with the untreated group (0.60 and 0.22 vs 0.95, p = 0.04 and p = 0.02). Cysts with lower cyst volume ratios showed more marked post-treatment inflammation, loss of vesicular fluid and cyst wall wrinkling. A significant and drastic reduction of cyst size and increased pericystic enhancement occur in the initial days after antiparasitic treatment as an effect of acute perilesional immune response. These significant changes showed that early anthelmintic efficacy (day two) can be detected using magnetic resonance imaging.

  5. High frequency of spinal involvement in patients with basal subarachnoid neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callacondo, D.; Garcia, H.H.; Gonzales, I.; Escalante, D.; Gilman, Robert H.; Tsang, Victor C.W.; Gonzalez, Armando; Lopez, Maria T.; Gavidia, Cesar M.; Martinez, Manuel; Alvarado, Manuel; Porras, Miguel; Saavedra, Herbert; Rodriguez, Silvia; Verastegui, Manuela; Mayta, Holger; Herrera, Genaro; Lescano, Andres G.; Zimic, Mirko; Gonzalvez, Guillermo; Moyano, Luz M.; Ayvar, Viterbo; Diaz, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of spinal neurocysticercosis (NCC) in patients with basal subarachnoid NCC compared with that in individuals with viable limited intraparenchymal NCC (≤20 live cysts in the brain). Methods: We performed a prospective observational case-control study of patients with NCC involving the basal cisterns or patients with only limited intraparenchymal NCC. All patients underwent MRI examinations of the brain and the entire spinal cord to assess spinal involvement. Results: Twenty-seven patients with limited intraparenchymal NCC, and 28 patients with basal subarachnoid NCC were included in the study. Spinal involvement was found in 17 patients with basal subarachnoid NCC and in only one patient with limited intraparenchymal NCC (odds ratio 40.18, 95% confidence interval 4.74–340.31; p < 0.0001). All patients had extramedullary (intradural) spinal NCC, and the lumbosacral region was the most frequently involved (89%). Patients with extensive spinal NCC more frequently had ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement (7 of 7 vs 3 of 11; p = 0.004) and tended to have a longer duration of neurologic symptoms than those with regional involvement (72 months vs 24 months; p = 0.062). Conclusions: The spinal subarachnoid space is commonly involved in patients with basal subarachnoid NCC, compared with those with only intraparenchymal brain cysts. Spinal cord involvement probably explains serious late complications including chronic meningitis and gait disorders that were described before the introduction of antiparasitic therapy. MRI of the spine should be performed in basal subarachnoid disease to document spinal involvement, prevent complications, and monitor for recurrent disease. PMID:22517102

  6. A longitudinal study of neurocysticercosis through CT scan of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhiram Chakraborty

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find out the role of CT scan in the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis (NC and also to get an idea of the nature and extent of this disease in a definite geographical ethnic location. Methods: CT scan of the brain of altogether 4 762 persons residing in a congested area of central Kolkata, was performed between 2004 and 2010, in an imaging centre in central Kolkata (Calcutta, of whom 1 114 (23.39% suspected patients were investigated for NC, having complaints of convulsion (472, headache (272, right sided weakness (98, loss of consciousness (84, left sided weakness (61, abnormal behavior (48, slurring of speech (34, difficulty with keeping balance (33 and dementia (12. Results: NC was detected in 45, 1, 0, 2, 1, 0, 0, 1 and 0, respectively consisting 4.48% (50/1 114 of the suspected cases varying from as low as 2 (in 2006 to as high as 23 (in 2005 in different years indicating this parasitic infection is perennial. The age of patients varied from 6 to 59 years of whom 28 (56% were vegan. We were also able to detect 4 types of lesions viz. calcified lesions (14, small hypodense i.e. vesicle (12, bright central spot i.e. vesicular lesion with central spot (2 and ring enhancement (22. For 3 patients, further imaging investigation (MRI was needed to confirm the diagnosis. We calculated the specificity and sensitivity of CT scan of brain diagnosing NC which was found to be 64% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: Although, the sample may not be the representatives of the whole community, the findings suggest that cysticercosis is a significant but under-recognized public health concern in Kolkata.

  7. An unusual cause for trismus caused by mandibular coronoid osteoma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vashishth, Shirin; Garg, Kanika; Patil, Prashant; Sreenivasan, Venkatraman [Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Subharati Dental College, Meerut (India)

    2013-03-15

    Osteoma is a dense bony proliferation of otherwise normal membranous bone. This tumor is essentially restricted to the craniofacial skeleton and is rarely diagnosed in other bones. The mandible and the paranasal sinuses are the most common sites, while the involvement of the coronoid process has been reported in only 6 cases so far. This report demonstrated a case of osteoma occurring at the mandibular coronoid process in a 26-year-old female patient. The patient was managed with surgical resection of the osteoma followed by physiotherapy.

  8. Taenia crassiceps injection into the subarachnoid space of rats simulates radiological and morphological features of racemose neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto Filho, Pedro Tadao; Fabro, Alexandre Todorovic; Rodrigues, Marianna Vaz; Bazan, Rodrigo; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Biondi, Germano Francisco; Zanini, Marco Antônio

    2017-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a major public health concern. Although its eradication appears feasible, the disease remains endemic in developing countries and has emerged again in Europe and in the USA. Basic studies on neurocysticercosis are needed to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms and, consequently, to improve treatment perspectives. Much has been published on experimental parenchymal neurocysticercosis, but there are no experimental models of racemose neurocysticercosis. Cysts of Taenia crassiceps were injected into the subarachnoid space of 11 rats. After 4 months, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to verify the occurrence of ventricular dilatation and the distribution of cysts in the cerebrospinal fluid compartments. The histologic assessment was done focusing on changes in the ependyma, choroid plexus, and brain parenchyma. MRI and histologic assessment confirmed the findings similar to those seen in human racemose neurocysticercosis including enlargement of the basal cisterns, hydrocephalus, and inflammatory infiltration through the ependyma and choroid plexus into cerebrospinal fluid spaces. We developed a simple model of racemose neurocysticercosis by injecting cysts of T. crassiceps into the subarachnoid space of rats. This model can help understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms of the disease.

  9. [Biliary endoprosthesis causing ileal perforation--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiński, Robert; Olędzki, Szymon; Modrzejewski, Andrzej

    2015-10-01

    We experienced ileal perforation caused by dislocated biliary endoprosthesis in 59 years old female patient. The endoprosthesis was implanted due to biliary fistula after laparoscopic cholecystectomy 2 years before the perforation. It seems that endoprosthesis dislocation and the perforation were the result of too long stay of endoprosthesis. After the surgical management and the removal of the prosthesis patient was cured. Although ileal perforation caused by dislocated biliary endoprosthesis is rare, clinicians should be aware of the possibility of its occurrence. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  10. Prevalence of neurocysticercosis among people with epilepsy in rural areas of Burkina Faso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millogo, Athanase; Nitiéma, Pascal; Carabin, Hélène; Boncoeur-Martel, Marie Paule; Rajshekhar, Vedantam; Tarnagda, Zékiba; Praet, Nicolas; Dorny, Pierre; Cowan, Linda; Ganaba, Rasmané; Hounton, Sennen; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Cissé, Rabiou

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the lifetime prevalence of neurocysticercosis (NCC) associated epilepsy and the proportion of NCC among people with epilepsy in three Burkina Faso villages. Methods Three villages were selected to represent three types of pig-rearing methods: 1) Batondo where pigs are left to roam; 2) Pabré where pigs are mostly tethered or penned, and 3) Nyonyogo where the majority of residents are Muslim and few pigs are raised. In Batondo and Nyonyogo, all concessions (a group of several households) were included. Half of the concessions in Pabré were randomly chosen. All households of selected concessions were included, and one person per household was randomly selected for epilepsy screening and serological testing for cysticercosis. Self-reported cases of epilepsy were also examined and confirmed cases included in analyses other than the estimate of NCC-associated epilepsy prevalence. Epilepsy was defined as ever having had more than one episode of unprovoked seizures. Medically confirmed cases of epilepsy had a computerized tomography (CT) scan of the brain before and after contrast medium injection. The diagnosis of NCC was made using a modification of the criteria of Del Brutto et al. (2001). Key Findings Thirty-nine (4.4%) of 888 randomly selected villagers and 33 of 35 (94.3%) self-reported seizures cases were confirmed to have epilepsy by medical examination. Among the 68 participants with epilepsy who had a CT scan, 20 patients were diagnosed with definitive or probable NCC for a proportion of 46.9% (95% CI=30.2; 64.1) in Batondo and 45.5% (95%CI=19.0; 74.1) in Pabré. No cases of NCC were identified in Nyonyogo. Significance All the definitive and probable cases of NCC were from the two villages where pig breeding is common. Prevention policies intended to reduce the burden of epilepsy in this country should include measures designed to interrupt the life cycle of Taenia solium. PMID:23148555

  11. Blindness Caused by Pterygium – A Case Report | Ayanniyi | Sierra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Having defaulted from clinic over 4 months for lack of fund, the patient, after concession, had successful bilateral pterygia excision using bare sclera technique with Mitomycin C (MMC) dab. There was restoration of the lost vision. Pterygium is a cause of avoidable blindness with consequential impact on quality of life.

  12. Case Report: Early Neonatal Death Due To Liver Rupture Caused ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An early neonatal death due to liver to liver rupture caused by maternal abdominal manipulation and massage is presented. An apparently health baby girl was born to 26 years old primigravida who came in the second state of labour and deliver of her baby within eight minutes of arrival to the labour ward. Her labour lasted ...

  13. Abdominal epilepsy as an unusual cause ofabdominal pain: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Abdominal pain, in etiology sometimes difficult to be defined, is a frequent complaint in childhood. Abdominal epilepsy is a rare cause of abdominal pain. Objectives: In this article, we report on 5 year old girl patient with abdominal epilepsy. Methods: Some investigations (stool investigation, routine blood tests, ...

  14. A Case Study into the Causes of School Dropout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirtes, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    School dropout leads to failure in social integration, and as a result greatly diminishes a person's chances to achieve personal success in legally accepted fields of activity. The prevention and reduction of this phenomenon are extremely difficult to achieve due to the high complexity of its causes. Research that has been carried out into this…

  15. Factors Causing Demotivation in EFL Teaching Process: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Selami

    2012-01-01

    Studies have mainly focused on strategies to motivate teachers or the student-teacher motivation relationships rather than teacher demotivation in the English as a foreign language (EFL) teaching process, whereas no data have been found on the factors that cause teacher demotivation in the Turkish EFL teaching contexts at the elementary education…

  16. Intussusception caused by dried apricot: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Puckett

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Bezoars are an extremely rare cause of intussusception in adults. A high level of suspicion needs to exist in the presence of a history of eating dried fruit, history of gastric surgery, diabetes mellitus, and problems with mastication. Various treatment modalities exist to treat obstructions secondary to bezoars, including open reduction and removal of bezoar via enterotomy.

  17. Acquired Lymphangioma Circumscriptum Caused Macroglossia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Sami Metin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangioma circumscriptum (LC is a hamartomatous vascular malformation of lymphatic channels. The etiology is not fully understood. It is usually congenital. Lesions are characterized as thin-walled and grouped vesicles. Lesions are usually seen on proximal extremities, shoulder, axilla, abdomen and neck. They are rarely seen on genital and oral mucosa. Our case was 20 years old male suffering from growing, pain and burning of tongue for 2 months durations. There was a plaque consisted of grouped vesicles on tongue in dermatological examination. Biopsy was obtained. LC was diagnosed. We decided to report this case since acquired LC on tongue and macroglossi is very rare in literature.

  18. Cognitive and Surgical Outcome in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Associated with Hippocampal Sclerosis Plus Neurocysticercosis: A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchin, Marino M.; Velasco, Tonicarlo R.; Coimbra, Erica R.; Gargaro, Ana C.; Escorsi-Rosset, Sara R.; Wichert-Ana, Lauro; Terra, Vera C.; Alexandre, Veriano; Araujo, David; dos Santos, Antonio Carlos; Fernandes, Regina M. F.; Assirati, João A.; Carlotti, Carlos G.; Leite, João P.; Takayanagui, Osvaldo M.; Markowitsch, Hans J.; Sakamoto, Américo C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Where neurocysticercosis (NCC) is endemic, chronic calcified neurocysticercosis (cNCC) can be observed in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS). Considering that both disorders cause recurrent seizures or cognitive impairment, we evaluated if temporal lobectomy is cognitively safe and effective for seizure control in MTLE-HS plus cNCC. Methods Retrospective cohort study of neuropsychological profile and surgical outcome of 324 MTLE-HS patients submitted to temporal lobectomy, comparing the results according to the presence or absence of cNCC. Findings cNCC occurred in 126 (38.9%) of our MTLE-HS patients, a frequency higher than expected, more frequently in women than in men (O.R. = 1.66; 95% C.I. = 1.05–2.61; p = 0.03). Left-side (but not right side) surgery caused impairment in selected neuropsychological tests, but this impairment was not accentuated by the presence of cNCC. Ninety-four (74.6%) patients with MTLE-HS plus cNCC and 153 patients (77.3%) with MTLE-HS alone were Engel class I after surgery (O.R. = 1.16; 95% C.I. = 0.69–1.95; p = 0.58). However, the chances of Engel class IA were significantly lower in MTLE-HS plus cNCC than in patients with MTLE-HS alone (31.7% versus 48.5%; O.R. = 2.02; 95% C.I. = 1.27–3.23; p = 0.003). Patients with MTLE-HS plus cNCC showed higher rates of Engel class ID (15.1% versus 6.6%; O.R. = 2.50; 95% C.I. = 1.20–5.32; p = 0.012). Interpretation cNCC can be highly prevalent among MTLE-HS patients living in areas where neurocysticercosis is endemic, suggesting a cause-effect relationship between the two diseases. cNCC does not add further risk for cognitive decline after surgery in MTLE-HS patients. The rates of Engel class I outcome were very similar for the two groups; however, MTLE-HS plus cNCC patients achieved Engel IA status less frequently, and Engel ID status more frequently. Temporal lobectomy can be

  19. An unusual case of common carotid artery pseudoaneurysm caused ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common carotid artery (CCA) pseuoaneurysms are most commonly a result of traumatic injuries. CCA pseudoaneurysm due to migration of ingested foreign body is an unusual occurrence. Here we report a case of a 50-year-old female who presented with a pulsatile swelling in the right lower neck for 2 months.

  20. CASE REPORT Choledochal cysts – an unusual cause of jaundice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Choledochal cysts occur in approximately 1:10 000 to 1:150 000.1 Of these only 20-30% are diagnosed in adults,2 with 80% of cases diagnosed reported as being of the type I variety. Complete surgical excision with biliary reconstruction is considered the treatment of choice rather than biliary enteric bypass procedures.

  1. Odontogenic orbital cellulitis causing blindness: A case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blindness secondary to odontogenic orbital cellulitis is a rarity. We report a case of a 38-year-old man who presented with facial swelling and orbital pain. Examination revealed right orbital purulent discharge, nil light perception in the right eye and the presence of a grossly carious ipsilateral maxillary molar. Investigations ...

  2. [ACUTE ABDOMEN CAUSED BY COMPLICATED FIBROID IN PREGNANCY. CASE REPORT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasova, V; Petrakieva, N; Markov, P; Raycheva, I; Nikolov, A

    2015-01-01

    With the advancing maternal age the rate of fibroids in pregnancy is also growing. A small part of fibroids in pregnancy are complicated and in about 2.6% necessitate urgent surgical treatment. We present a clinical case of subserose fibroid at 20 gestational weeks complicated with acute abdomen treated urgently with normal continuation of pregnancy.

  3. Case Report: Calciphylaxis Causing Digital, Gangrene in End Stage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is more frequently reported in whites than in blacks and commonly accompanies hyperphosphataemia, elevated calcium-phosphate product and marked secondary hyperparathyroidism. We report a rare case of CUA that complicated end stage renal disease secondary to obstructive uropathy in a 68 year old Nigerian.

  4. Another cause of vaccine encephalopathy: A case of Angelman syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novy, Jan; Catarino, Claudia B.; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Smith, Shelagh M.; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Hammond, Peter; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2012-01-01

    Dravet syndrome has been found recently as an important underlying condition in cases of alleged vaccine encephalopathy after pertussis vaccination, where vaccination seemed to have precipitated the occurrence of the disease without modifying the long-term course. We report on a patient diagnosed

  5. Odontogenic Orbital Cellulitis Causing Blindness: A Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blindness secondary to odontogenic orbital cellulitis is a rarity. We report a case of a 38-year-old man who presented with facial swelling and orbital pain. Examination revealed right orbital purulent discharge, nil light perception in the right eye and the presence of a grossly carious ipsilateral maxillary molar. Investigations ...

  6. Second Fatal Case of Infective Endocarditis caused by Gemella bergeriae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijan Ukudeeva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Our case illustrates a fatal course of infection with Gemella bergeriae endocarditis that was complicated by cardiogenic shock due to perforation of the mitral valve with severe mitral regurgitation, extension of infection into the myocardium adjacent to the mitral valve, and coronary sinus thrombosis.

  7. A case of endometriosis causing acute large bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Zexi

    2018-01-01

    Endometriosis is a gynaecological condition which produce symptoms such as pelvic pain, abnormal menstruation and infertility. Intestinal endometriosis can occur however endometriosis causing acute large bowel obstruction is extremely rare. We present a 37-year-old lady with acute large bowel obstruction caused by endometriosis. Despite initial endoscopic decompression being unsuccessful due to severe mucosal stenosis, she underwent emergency laparoscopic wedge resection and decompression successfully. Diagnosing intestinal endometriosis is difficult. While different modalities of investigation help, definitive diagnosis is achieved via laparoscopy. Treatment of obstruction is decompression followed by surgical resection. Diagnosing intestinal endometriosis with or without obstruction is challenging. Correct diagnosis is needed for definitive management. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Sacral Fracture Causing Neurogenic Bladder: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaji, Tatsuro; Yamada, Noboru; Iwai, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    A 76-year-old man presented with a Denis Zone III sacral fracture after a traffic accident. He also developed urinary retention and perineal numbness. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by the sacral fracture. A computed tomogram (CT) revealed that third sacral lamina was fractured and displaced into the spinal canal, but vertebral body did not displace. The fracture lines began at the center of lamina and extended bilateraly. The fracture pattern was unique....

  9. Cardiac injuries caused by trauma: Review and case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Luís; Gonçalves, Lino; Nuno Vieira, Duarte

    2017-11-01

    Assessment of suspected cardiac injuries in a trauma setting is a challenging and time-critical matter, with clinical and imaging findings having complementary roles in the formation of an accurate diagnosis. In this article, we review the supporting literature for the pathophysiology, classification and evaluation of cardiac injuries caused by trauma. We also describe 4 cardiac trauma patients seen at a tertiary referral hospital. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  10. Root Cause Assessment for a Manufacturing Industry: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kalantri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Root-cause identification for quality related problems are key issues for manufacturing processes. It has been a very challenging engineering problem particularly in a multistage manufacturing, where maximum number of processes and activities are performed. However, it may also be implemented with ease in each and every individual set up and activities in any manufacturing process. Kaizen is aimed towards reduction in different types of losses i.e. Failure Loss/ Breakdown Loss, Minor stoppage, idling loss, Setup and adjustment loss etc. So as to improve quality and productivity.In this report, root-cause identification methodology has been adopted to eliminate the rejection of product manufactured by the enterprise and improving the life of product. Brainstorming and other Root Cause Assesmenttools have been used to find out the reasons of tube failure and vibration in tubular strander. Solutions of these problems have also given in this report. Kaizen activities have reduced the time consumed in daily activities of cleaning, lubricating, inspection etc. A detailed study has illustrated the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  11. Chronic sialoadenitis caused by Enterobius vermicularis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, R; Di Legami, R; Maresi, E; Restivo, S

    2003-08-01

    Enterobius vermicularis infection, an oro-faecal transmitted parasitosis, is a frequent finding in infant communities. Enterobius vermicularis is located predominantly in the caecum, appendix, and proximal areas of the ileum and colon, even if reports of some rare extra-intestinal cases have appeared in the literature. The case is reported here of a 62-year-old male presenting a mass in the right submandibular triangle. Histological examination, following removal of submandibular gland, revealed a granulomatous sialoadenitis due to Enterobius vermicularis. A review of the international literature confirms that this is a very rare site and it would appear to be the first report concerning enterobiasis in the salivary glands. Authors advance a hypothesis concerning a possible pathogenic mechanism.

  12. Bullous impetigo caused by Streptococcus salivarius: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, I

    1980-01-01

    A 19-month-old child presented with bullous impetigo around the perineal region, penis, and left foot. Streptococcus salivarius was the only isolate recovered from the lesions. The child was treated with parenteral penicillin, debridement of the bulli, and local application of silver sulphadiazine cream. This case of bullous impetigo illustrates another aspect of the pathogenicity of Strep. salivarius. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7002959

  13. Acute chemical pneumonitis caused by nitric acid inhalation: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Hyung Shim; Lee, In Jae; Ko, Eun Young; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Beom; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation is a rare clinical condition. The previously reported radiologic findings of this disease include acute permeability pulmonary edema, delayed bronchiolitis obliterans, and bronchiectasis. In very few published rare radiologic reports has this disease manifested as acute alveolar injury; we report a case of acute chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation which at radiography manifested as bilateral perihilar consolidation and ground-glass attenuation, suggesting acute alveolar injury.

  14. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction Caused by Chronic Lyme Neuroborreliosis. A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Schefte, David F; Nordentoft, Tyge

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction is often classified as idiopathic. The condition is associated with poor quality of life and high morbidity, and treatment options are often unsatisfactory. A case of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction in a 66-year-old woman, presenting with back and abdominal pain, urinary retention and severe constipation is described. The patient lived in an area in which Lyme disease is endemic and had been bitten by ixodes ticks. Intrathecal synthesis of anti-borrel...

  15. Chronic mastitis in cows caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cojkić Aleksandar; Čobanović Nikola; Suvajdžić Branko; Savić Mila; Petrujkić Branko; Dimitrijević Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Mastitis in dairy cows is an economically important disease because it makes up 38% of all diseases that occur in intensive cattle breeding. Mastitis affects milk production, either temporarily or permanently, depending on the course of infection and type of pathogen agent. Regular and timely therapy of mastitis based on the application antimicrobials, apart from prophylaxis, is very important for good health of breeding stock. This paper presents the case ...

  16. A Finger Amputation Case Caused by Human Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Hakan Doğan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bite is a type of wound created with animal or human teeth. Bite wounds created by humans are encountered in situations as fighting, rape, murder and child abuse. Bite marks are usually observed on arms, neck, breasts, body, cheeks and legs. The teeth may penetrate to skin on the areas where bone or cartilage tissue lies underneath skin, and tissue loss may occur. Auricles are most frequent regions that occur tissue loss with bites. Finger amputation occurring with human bite is extremely rare. The case presented in this paper is a 28 years old man. In his medical history, the 3rd finger of his left hand was bitten during a fight two months ago. One centimeter shortness at the end point of the distal phalanx of the left 3rd finger because of tissue loss was found in the examination. In his left hand radiograph, bone defect at the middle part of the distal phalanx of 3rd finger was determined. The case has been discussed by comparing similar cases rarely reported in the literature. Keywords: Forensic medicine, human bite, amputation

  17. Distúrbios psíquicos na neurocisticercose em crianças Psychic disturbances in children with neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio B. Lefèvre

    1969-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam as observações clínicas de 6 casos de neurocisticercose em crianças, todas do sexo feminino. De um total de 54 casos de neurocisticercose em crianças, destacaram estes 6 nos quais havia, de comum, o fato das pacientes apresentarem intensa agitação psicomotora, com alucinações visuais terroríficas (zoopsias, sendo que 5 destas crianças haviam perdido totalmente a visão, o que tornava o quadro ainda mais dramático. As características clínicas destes casos são relatadas sendo destacada a evolução relativamente satisfatória, tendo em vista o mau prognóstico da neurocisticercose.Six cases of neurocysticercosis in children are reported. These 6 patients were selected from a total number of 54 cases, in view of their particular symptomatology, represented by terrifying visual hallucinations (zoopsias and psichic disturbances. Five of the patients also had a total loss of sight. The clinical characteristics of the patients are reported. The relatively satisfactory response to treatment in 5 cases is commented.

  18. Case-based ethics education: the impact of cause complexity and outcome favorability on ethicality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James F; Bagdasarov, Zhanna; Connelly, Shane; Harkrider, Lauren; Devenport, Lynn D; Mumford, Michael D; Thiel, Chase E

    2012-07-01

    Case-based learning has been used across multiple disciplines, including ethics education, as an effective instructional tool. However, the value of case-based learning in ethics education has varied widely regarding case quality. Case content may significantly impact the ability of case-based ethics education to promote knowledge acquisition and knowledge transfer to future situations requiring ethical decision-making. This study examined two critical areas of ethical case content--causes and outcomes. Complexity of described causes and outcome favorability were manipulated in two ethical cases used during an ethics education course. Results suggest that including information in case studies reflecting clear, simple key causes and negative outcomes results in better ethical sensemaking and ethical decision-making. Implications regarding case content and case-based ethics education are explored.

  19. [Case report: anaphylaxis caused by linseed included in baked bread].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Yuta; Arai, Hidenori; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Kano, Seiya; Tachizawa, Naoko; Sagawa, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Masao; Ohta, Ken

    2014-07-01

    We recently experienced a 29-year-old female with anaphylaxis caused by linseed included in homemade bread. This is the first report of linseed-induced allergy in Japan. She obtained the linseed-containing ingredients of bread by mail order. We performed skin-prick tests and basophil degranulation tests using extracts of the ingredients and commercially available linseeds; both tests showed positive results for linseed. The patient's serum was also positive for linseed-specific IgE. Since linseeds are included in various kinds of foods and exposure to them is increasing, linseeds may need to be recognized as a potential trigger of immediate-type allergy in Japan.

  20. [Dementia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency. Clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, María Isabel; Díaz, Violeta; Vásquez, Carolina; Donoso, Archibaldo

    2003-08-01

    Cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency can cause polyneuropathy, myelopathy, blindness, confusion, psychosis and dementia. Nonetheless, its deficiency as the sole cause of dementia is infrequent. We report a 59 years old man with a 6 months history of progressive loss of memory, disorientation, apathy, paranoid delusions, gait difficulties with falls, and urinary incontinence. He had suffered a similar episode 3 years before, with a complete remission. On examination there was frontal type dementia with Korsakoff syndrome, a decrease in propioception and ataxic gait. Cerebrospinal fluid examination showed a protein of 0.42 g/L. Brain computed tomography showed sequelae of a frontal left trauma. Brain single photon computed tomography (SPECT) was normal. Complete blood count showed a macrocytic anemia with a hematocrit 29% and a mean corpuscular volume of 117 micron3. Plasma vitamin B12 levels were undetectable, erythrocyte folate levels were 3.9 ng/ml and plasma folate was normal. The myelogram showed megaloblastosis and the gastric biopsy showed atrophic gastritis. Treatment with parenteral B12 vitamin and folic acid reverted the symptoms, with normalization of the neuropsychological tests and reintegration to work.

  1. Uncommon Cause of Acute Adrenal Failure - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Adrenomyeloneuropathy is a rare X-linked inherited disorder of peroxisomes characterized by accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA in the central and peripheral nervous system, adrenal glands and testes, leading to dysfunction of these organs and systems (1. Here, we report a case of adrenomyeloneuropathy presenting initially as acute adrenal crisis, which progressed rapidly within one year to variant neurological manifestations, dementia, sensory, motor and psycho-intellectual dysfunction, and generalized spasticity. Turk Jem 2010; 14: 103-5

  2. Unusual cranial trauma caused by pencil in teenager: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Amer Saeed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Penetrating lesions by pencil in the temporal lobe in children and adolescents are uncommon. We present the case of a teenager with penetrating injury by strange object in the temporal lobe. Case: Twelve years old male patient, with history of trauma while he was playing with his friends, presents alteration of the consciousness state, weakness in right hemibody and dysphasia. Urgent surgery is practiced employing an incision in “C” form with improvement of the consciousness state during post-operative. Discussion: Penetrating lesions in the skull and brain are classified as missiles and non-missiles depending of their impact velocity. The wood is a porous organic material that provide a natural deposit of microbian agents, making it potentially lethal. Pre-operative radiological evaluation allows check the trajectory of the penetrating object and secondary lesions present guiding de neurosurgical approach. The prognostic depends on penetration site, timely handling and complications associated. Conclusion: Penetrating lesions by pencil are uncommon, an appropriate imaging evaluation is fundamental to determine the neurosurgical approach that allows prevent and/or decrease secondary damage.

  3. Analysis of cases caused by acute spider bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihni Sulaj

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed a retrospective study of 176 patients in the University Hospital Center of Tirana (Albania, during the period 2001–2011, admitted with the diagnosis of a suspected spider bite. Three fatalities were registered during this decade covered from our study, with a clinical picture of marked hypertension, tachycardia and acute cardiac failure leading to death within a minimum of 25 h and a maximum of 42 h from the occurrence. Out of the total of 176 patients, we had 59% (104 cases females, and 41% males. The overwhelming majority of the patients lived in rural areas (155 of the cases; extremities were mostly affected from the bites. A summary of clinical signs and a brief review of the available literature are made in the results and discussion section of this paper. Authors advocate that special precautions should be taken especially in severe forms of interesting autonomous nerve system, with aggressive fluid resuscitation, supportive therapy and close monitoring of vital signs.

  4. Isolated Mammillary Body Infarct Causing Global Amnesia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male, Shailesh; Zand, Ramin

    2017-03-01

    Mamillary bodies play an important role in human memory and emotions. Vascular lesions causing an isolated mammillary body lesion without affecting the surrounding structures are very rare. A 53-year-old male was brought to the emergency department with acute-onset memory problems suggestive of partial anterograde and retrograde amnesia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an isolated left mammillary body infarct sparing adjacent structures. Mamillary bodies play an intrinsic role in memory formation and retrieval rather than acting as relay-only station for hippocampal projections. Non-hippocampal input from the limbic midbrain via the ventral tegmental nucleus of Gudden could be contributing to its function. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. First case of infectious endocarditis caused by Parvimonas micra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Carlos A; Gerber, Daniel A; Zambrano, Eduardo; Banaei, Niaz; Deresinski, Stan; Blackburn, Brian G

    2015-12-01

    P. micra is an anaerobic Gram-positive cocci, and a known commensal organism of the human oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. Although it has been classically described in association with endodontic disease and peritonsillar infection, recent reports have highlighted the role of P. micra as the primary pathogen in the setting of invasive infections. In its most recent taxonomic classification, P. micra has never been reported causing infectious endocarditis in humans. Here, we describe a 71 year-old man who developed severe native valve endocarditis complicated by aortic valvular destruction and perivalvular abscess, requiring emergent surgical intervention. Molecular sequencing enabled identification of P. micra. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hemoptysis Caused by Leech Infestation: A Unique Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Moini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemoptysis in the patients suffered from pulmonary tuberculosis (TB may be resulted by active TB or the complications of such disease which appears as bronchiectasis, fungal lesions deployed in tuberculosis cavities or Rasmussen aneurysm, Bronchiolitis or relapse and sometimes, it may be considered as caused by reasons irrelevant to TB. In this report, the patient is a 69-year-old man as complained of hemoptysis with a treated TB experience that was found as normal in the preliminary review of X-ray and CT. During bronchoscopy, a live leech (bloodsucker was found in hypopharynx area that was swallowed after repeated attempts to remove it through the gastrointestinal tract and its suction signs were appeared as a mucosal mass in the hypopharynx area. The patient had no symptoms during his stay in the hospital.

  7. Drug abuse, a rare cause of stroke: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Özözen Ayas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available At the present time the incidence of illicit drug use increases worldwide among young adults. Abuse of these substances is a rare cause of stroke in young adults. Cocaine, heroin, cannabis, and amphetamines use increase the risk of stroke. Cannabis sativa induce main effects by delta-9-hydrocannabinol. The main mechanism of marijuana-related stroke in young patients is vasospazm. The other possible mechanisms are systemic hypotension, impaired cerebral autoregulation, alteration of cerebral blood flow, cardioembolism due to atrial fibrillation. In this article a 25-year-old young male patient with paresia and paresthesia of right side who had chronic abuse of marijuana is reported. Clinicians must be alert about marijuana can be seriously harmful to cerebrovascular system in chronic use.

  8. Sacral Fracture Causing Neurogenic Bladder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Sasaji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old man presented with a Denis Zone III sacral fracture after a traffic accident. He also developed urinary retention and perineal numbness. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by the sacral fracture. A computed tomogram (CT revealed that third sacral lamina was fractured and displaced into the spinal canal, but vertebral body did not displace. The fracture lines began at the center of lamina and extended bilateraly. The fracture pattern was unique. The sacrum was osteoporosis, and this fracture may be based on osteoporosis. We performed laminectomy to decompress sacral nerve roots. One month after surgery, the patient was able to urinate. Three months after surgery, his bladder function recovered normally. One year after surgery, he returned to a normal daily life and had no complaints regarding urination. One-year postoperative CT showed the decompressed third sacrum without displacement.

  9. Is aspirin a cause of Reye's syndrome? A case against.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowski, James P; Hanhan, Usama A; Fiallos, Mariano R

    2002-01-01

    Reye's syndrome was a rare disease which appeared suddenly in the early 1950s and disappeared just as suddenly in the late 1980s. An association between Reye's syndrome and the ingestion of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) was claimed, although no proof of causation was ever established. The presence of salicylates in the blood or urine of Reye's syndrome patients has not been demonstrated, and no animal model of Reye's syndrome has been developed where aspirin causes the disease. It is clear from epidemiological data that the incidence of Reye's syndrome was decreasing well before warning labels were placed on aspirin products. Reye's syndrome disappeared from countries where aspirin was not used in children as well as from countries which continued to use aspirin in children. Reye's syndrome was probably either a viral mutation which spontaneously disappeared, or a conglomeration of metabolic disorders that had not been recognized or described at that time.

  10. Pseudocyst in Omentum caused by Abdominal Tuberculosis : Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Hyun Jin; Park, Soo Youn; Choi, Hyun Joo; Hwang, Seong Su; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Young Ha [Catholic University of Korea, St.Vincent' s Hospital, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    A 25-year-old woman presented with abdominal discomfort and weight loss. Sonography demonstrated a well defined, anechoic, cystic mass with posterior acoustic enhancement, internal thin septations, and a peripheral hypoechoic solid portion that had no increased blood flow on Doppler ultrasound. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed a cystic omental mass with internal thin septations and an enhancing solid portion which appeared as the hypoechoic solid portion on ultrasonography. A pathologic specimen demonstrated a pseudocyst containing serous fluid with gelatinous material. The solid component at the peripheral portion of the pseudocyst indicated caseous necrosis with multinucleated giant cells. This histologic finding was consistent with tuberculosis and supported the final diagnosis of omental pseudocyst caused by tuberculous peritonitis. Therefore, intraperitoneal pseudocyst with tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an intraperitoneal cystic mass in a young adult

  11. AN ADULT CASE OF ANAPHYLAXIS CAUSED BY ALLERGY TO JELLYFISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shintaro; Miyata, Yoshito; Jinno, Megumi; Kishino, Yasunari; Homma, Tetsuya; Ota, Shin; Tanaka, Akihiko; Yokoe, Takuya; Ohnishi, Tsukasa; Sagara, Hironori; Kurata, Naomi; Shimakura, Kuniyoshi; Kurose, Kouichi

    2017-01-01

    A 35-year-old female, professional diver, reported nausea, vomiting, and systemic hives 20 to 30 minutes after ingestion of antipasto made with jellyfish. Patient reported prior episodes of swelling after stings from several different creatures, including jelly fish. She also developed a systemic allergic reaction after sting from an unknown creature while diving. On the initial visit to our hospital, serum total IgE level was 545IU/ml. We extracted crude allergen from jellyfish and evaluated allergen specific IgE antibody levels using ELISA. Patient samples showed higher levels of jellyfish-derived allergen specific IgE than healthy control samples. Basophils were isolated from the peripheral blood of patient. Stimulation with jellyfish-derived allergen showed expression of surface antigens on basophils increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Methods using sodium dodecyl sulfate poly acrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting showed acid-soluble collagen fraction from jellyfish contained above 250kDa weighed protein that may have caused this current event. A provocation test using jellyfish samples was not performed due to risk of anaphylactic shock. The patient was diagnosed with a jellyfish allergy due to IgE mediated anaphylaxis after ingestion. She was asked to refrain from consuming any food containing jellyfish. IgE-mediated food allergy caused by jellyfish is rare worldwide. Collagen was speculated to be an allergen in this study. Additional study to detect specific allergens related to jellyfish allergy would be particularly useful to specify disease phenotypes and individual care in future.

  12. [Neonatal septicemia caused by Listeria monocytogenes: report of 6 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Zhang, Xian-hua; Chen, Hao; Yin, Xue-lei

    2008-01-01

    Neonatal listeriosis is a relatively rare but serious disease with a high mortality rate. This study was conducted to analyze the clinical features, treatment, and outcome of 6 cases with Listeria monocytogenes septicemia confirmed by positive blood cultures. Totally 12,538 live births delivered in the hospital from January 1, 2004 to June 30, 2006 were investigated. Differences in the time of onset of the disease, clinical presentation, illness severity, laboratory data, management, and prognosis were compared between preterm and full-term infants. The incidence of neonatal listeriosis was 4.8% in this study. All the cases with listeriosis were found to have early onset and the disease was transmitted from the mother to the fetus, 4 of the cases were delivered via cesarean section, 2 were born via normal spontaneous vaginal delivery. Maternal infection before parturition presented with fever in 4, diarrhea in 1; 5 had abnormal white blood cell counts and total neutrophil counts; 1 had positive result of Listeria monocytogenes in intrauterine contents culture. Three premature infants showed signs and symptoms of severe bacterial septicemia at birth, such as reduced activity, respiratory distress, poor skin color and poor peripheral perfusion; the enlarged liver was palpable 2 - 3 cm below the right costal margin and 5 cm below the xiphoid in one; congestive rashes over the body and muscular hypotonia. Abnormal results of laboratory tests included peripheral blood white cell count (21.6 - 33.8 x 10(9))/L, total neutrophil count 0.77 - 0.83; platelet count (102 - 59 x 10(9))/L; C-reactive protein (CRP) > (160 - 118) mg/L(24 - 72 h after birth). Three preterm infants who received intensive care, accompanied by pathological changes of lungs indicated by chest X ray required assisted mechanical ventilation and 2 of them survived without sequelae but the other one died at 51 h of life. The initial clinical signs of septicemia in 3 full-term infants appeared later than

  13. Miserable case of total hip replacement caused by postirradiation necrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihara, Fumitoshi; Okue, Akira; Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Ohzuma, Masakazu; Wada, Fumio (Saga Prefectural Hospital (Japan))

    1983-06-01

    We experienced a miserable case of postirradiation femoral head necrosis. Osteomyelitis due to a screw penetration into the cecum was followed by total hip replacement. The patient is a sixty seven years old woman. As she was injured by inoperable uterus cancer at fifty one years old, /sup 60/Co irradiation therapy was done. As postirradiation necrosis occurred 5 years after irradiation, total hip replacement (Mckee-Farrar type) was done. However, bone necrosis area in iliac bone due to irradiation progressed gradually, and anchoring screw migrated proximally into the cecum. Then the fistula formed at the region of right major trochanter. In fistulography, contrast medium leaked out into the cecum. So after iliocecectomy and anastomosis of colon, removal of prosthesis and local continuous suction irrigation was done twice. Since then, there has been no recurrence.

  14. A case of emphysematous cystitis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolazco, José Ignacio; González, Matías Ignacio; Favre, Gabriel; Gueglio, Guillermo; Tejerizo, Juan Carlos

    2017-08-01

    Emphysematous cystitis is a rare type of urinary tract infection that is characterized by air pockets within the bladder wall and lumen, which come from gas that is mainly produced by gram-negative bacteria, notably Escherichia coli. This infection is more common in older women with poorly controlled diabetes. An abdominal computerized tomography (CT) scan is the gold standard method to make the diagnosis. The infection can be life-threatening, so prompt treatment is essential. We present a case of a 39-year-old woman with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes who developed emphysematous cystitis after a bilateral adrenalectomy. The infection was diagnosed by a CT scan that revealed gas in the bladder wall. A urine culture revealed 106 colonies/mL of Klebsiella pneumoniae. After a month of treatment with intravenous antibiotics (vancomycin plus meropenem plus colistin), bladder drainage, and strict glycemic control, the patient had a good outcome.

  15. GITELMAN SYNDROME AS A RARE CAUSE OF HYPOKALEMIA - CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Dimitrijević

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gitelman syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive tubulopathy leading to hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia, hypocalciuria and low-to-normal blood pressure. Clinical signs are mostly secondary to chronic hypokalemia and include dizziness, fatigue, constipation and weakness. Patients can also present with muscle cramps, tetany and convulsions due to severe metabolic alkalosis or hypomagnesemia. Therefore, early recognition and treatment are important. Diagnosis of Gitelman syndrome is usually made incidentally during adolescence or early adulthood based on clinical and biochemical findings. In this paper we report a case of a young women with classic Gitelman syndrome. Treatment included magnesium and potassium salts and potassium saving diuretics. In general, the long-term prognosis of Gitelman syndrome is excellent. However, the severity of fatigue may seriously hamper some patients in their daily activities.

  16. Nosocomial invasive infection caused by Cunninghamella bertholletiae: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Xisto Sena; Sales, Werther Souza; Maciel, Patrícia Jackeline; Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; Ferreira, Denise Milioli; do Silva, Maria Rosário Rodrigues

    2006-01-01

    Human infection by Cunninghamella bertholletiae occurs almost exclusively in immunocompromised patients. Infections due to this microorganism have been most frequently diagnosed in patients with hematological malignancies, with neutropenia and in diabetes mellitus patients. This work reports a case of fungal infection by Cunninghamella bertholletiae isolated from blood in a man with a complex clinical picture, involving diabetes and pharmacological immunosupression. Blood culture at room temperature and at 37 degrees C on Sabouraud agar grew a single mold with characteristic properties of Cunninghamella. In the microscopic morphology, were found wide, non-septate, branching hyphae with erect sporangiophores terminated in swollen vesicles and sporangioles borne off the vesicles. C. bertholetiae was identified after subculture on Sabouraud dextrose agar at 45 degrees C. The patient died 15 days after the beginning of amphotericin B therapy.

  17. A case study into the causes of school dropout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Chirteş

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available School dropout leads to failure in social integration, and as a result greatly diminishes aperson’s chances to achieve personal success in legally accepted fields of activity. The preventionand reduction of this phenomenon are extremely difficult to achieve due to the high complexity ofits causes. Research that has been carried out into this problem leads to the conclusion that therehas been an increase in the number of students facing school adjustment problems and it alsoattempts to answer the question whether there has been a real increase in the number of dropouts orif the situation should be put down to a series of very different and complex factors.A just identification and analysis of these factors would help reveal the action to be taken andeventually lead to a decrease and prevention of school dropout.Apart from the ineffectiveness of social policies in our country, a successful result of such anintervention would be the result of the joint efforts of a multi-curricular approach, involvement ofsocial institutions and team work.

  18. Posterior capsular rupture causing posterior shoulder instability: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anup A; Butler, R Bryan; Fowler, Rachel; Higgins, Laurence D

    2011-09-01

    We report the case of a 20-year-old male competitive football player who was treated for a midsubstance posterior capsule rupture after a posterior dislocation from falling onto his shoulder. Conservative management for 5 months after the injury failed to improve his subjective symptoms, with the primary symptom being activity-related posterior shoulder pain. Advanced imaging findings and physical examination were consistent with posterior instability, thought to be due to a posterior labral tear. At the time of a diagnostic arthroscopy, the patient was found to have an oval-shaped rupture of the capsule that was neither a reverse humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament lesion nor a posterior labral tear. The capsular tear was repaired through an all-arthroscopic technique with nonabsorbable sutures. The patient returned to his previous competitive function, had no pain, and had full motion at final follow-up without recurrence of instability or pain symptoms. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic mastitis in cows caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cojkić Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mastitis in dairy cows is an economically important disease because it makes up 38% of all diseases that occur in intensive cattle breeding. Mastitis affects milk production, either temporarily or permanently, depending on the course of infection and type of pathogen agent. Regular and timely therapy of mastitis based on the application antimicrobials, apart from prophylaxis, is very important for good health of breeding stock. This paper presents the case of repeated mastitis in a cow, Holstein-Friesian breed, 5 years old, which did not respond to antibiotic therapy. Milk samples from each separate quarter of the udder were collected under aseptic conditions and sent to the laboratory for further bacteriological tests, for isolation and identification of pathogens, as well as to test pathogen resistance to some antibiotics. On the basis of bacteriological examinations, there was confirmed the presence of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, which showed sensitivity to ampicillin, cloxacillin and augmentin, intermediate resistance to tetracycline and resistance to kotrimeksazol.(cotrimoxazole-proveriti [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31085

  20. [Acetaminophen (paracetamol) causing renal failure: report on 3 pediatric cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vaillant, J; Pellerin, L; Brouard, J; Eckart, P

    2013-06-01

    Renal failure secondary to acetaminophen poisoning is rare and occurs in approximately 1-2 % of patients with acetaminophen overdose. The pathophysiology is still being debated, and renal acetaminophen toxicity consists of acute tubular necrosis, without complication if treated promptly. Renal involvement can sometimes occur without prior liver disease, and early renal manifestations usually occur between the 2nd and 7th day after the acute acetaminophen poisoning. While therapy is exclusively symptomatic, sometimes serious metabolic complications can be observed. The monitoring of renal function should therefore be considered as an integral part of the management of children with acute, severe acetaminophen intoxication. We report 3 cases of adolescents who presented with acute renal failure as a result of voluntary drug intoxication with acetaminophen. One of these 3 girls developed severe renal injury without elevated hepatic transaminases. None of the 3 girls' renal function required hemodialysis, but one of the 3 patients had metabolic complications after her acetaminophen poisoning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Case report: a nosocomial infection caused by vancomycin resistant enterococcus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşdelen Fişgin, Nuriye; Darka, Ozge; Sünbül, Mustafa; Coban, Ahmet Yilmaz; Sarikaya, Hanife; Altun, Belgin; Durupinar, Belma; Leblebicioğlu, Hakan

    2005-07-01

    Vancomycin resistant enterococcus (VRE) was recovered from the urine culture of a 61 years old female patient, who was being treated for sepsis, on the 15th day of hospitalization in Ondokuz Mayis University Hospital Infectious Disease Unit. The underlying diseases of this patient were chronic renal failure and diabetes mellitus. The patient died due to septic shock on the day of VRE isolation. Since this case was the first VRE infection in our hospital, a point prevalence study was planned. For this purpose, rectal swab samples collected from 10 patients from the same unit and 27 personnel who worked in the same unit, were screened for the presence of VRE. Nasal swabs and finger tip samples were also taken from the staff to determine if the transmission has occured in this way. As a result, a second VRE strain was isolated from another patient with chronic renal failure who was under treatment due to multiple pulmonary abscesses. Immediate isolation of this patient prevented a possible epidemic in this specific unit. In this report, the importance of VRE screening and isolation of the patients after the recovery of VRE has been emphasized.

  2. Estimation of the health and economic burden of neurocysticercosis in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B B; Khatkar, M S; Gill, J P S; Dhand, N K

    2017-01-01

    Taenia solium is an endemic parasite in India which occurs in two forms in humans: cysticercosis (infection of soft tissues) and taeniosis (intestinal infection). Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most severe form of cysticercosis in which cysts develop in the central nervous system. This study was conducted to estimate health and economic impact due to human NCC-associated active epilepsy in India. Input data were sourced from published research literature, census data and other official records. Economic losses due to NCC-associated active epilepsy were estimated based on cost of treatment, hospitalisation and severe injury as well as loss of income. The disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) due to NCC were estimated by combining years of life lost due to early death and the number of years compromised due to disability taking the disease incidence into account. DALYs were estimated for five age groups, two genders and four regions, and then combined. To account for uncertainty, probability distributions were used for disease incidence data and other input parameters. In addition, sensitivity analyses were conducted to determine the impact of certain input parameters on health and economic estimates. It was estimated that in 2011, human NCC-associated active epilepsy caused an annual median loss of Rupees 12.03 billion (uncertainty interval [95% UI] Rs. 9.16-15.57 billion; US $ 185.14 million) with losses of Rs. 9.78 billion (95% UI Rs. 7.24-13.0 billion; US $ 150.56 million) from the North and Rs. 2.22 billion (95% UI Rs. 1.58-3.06 billion; US $ 34.14 million) from the South. The disease resulted in a total of 2.10 million (95% UI 0.99-4.10 million) DALYs per annum without age weighting and time discounting with 1.81 million (95% UI 0.84-3.57 million) DALYs from the North and 0.28 million (95% UI 0.13-0.55 million) from the South. The health burden per thousand persons per year was 1.73 DALYs (95% UI 0.82-3.39). The results indicate that human NCC causes

  3. Intracerebral neurocysticercosis mimicking glioblastoma multiforme: a rare differential diagnosis in Central Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabel, M.; Weber, F. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Heinrich-Heine Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany); Neuen-Jacob, E. [Dept. of Neuropathology, Heinrich-Heine Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany); Vogt, C. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Heinrich-Heine Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2001-03-01

    A 47-year-old Greek man presented with a 4-week history of speech difficulties. CT and MRI revealed a low-density multilobulated cystic frontal mass with peripheral ring contrast enhancement adjacent to the sylvian fissure. Examination was normal. Blood tests revealed leucocytosis (16,000 cells/{mu}l) and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (30/52). A malignant brain tumour was suspected and surgically removed. Histological examination disclosed intracerebral neurocysticercosis. (orig.)

  4. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of cystic lesions of neurocysticercosis: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffin, Luciana S.; Bacheschi, Luiz A.; Machado, Luis R.; Nobrega, Jose P.S.; Coelho, Christina; Leite, Claudia C. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurologia]. E-mail: bacheschi@henet.usp.br

    2001-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis is an endemic disease in some developing countries. It has pleomorfic clinical and imaging findings, which are variable from patient to patient. In this preliminary note, we studied the magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted images of sixteen patients presenting with cystic lesions of this disease diagnosed by clinical and laboratorial findings. All the lesions had hypointense signal and the similar apparent diffusion coefficient values as the cerebrospinal fluid. (author)

  5. Clinical and epidemiological profile of patients diagnosed with neurocysticercosis at two hospitals in Chiclayo, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Rojas-Panta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the clinical and epidemiological profile of patients diagnosed with neurocysticercosis at two hospitals in Chiclayo, Peru. Materials and methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional and retrospective study was performed at the Almanzor Aguinaga Asenjo Hospital and Lambayeque Regional Hospital. Ninety-six (96 medical records of patients attended in 2014 with a diagnosis of neurocysticercosis were reviewed. Results: The mean age of the patients was 42.8 ± 18.8 years old, 52.1% were female, 26% came from Chiclayo and 54.2% received care for the first time. The most common symptom leading to medical consultation was headache. All patients underwent a diagnostic imaging method. The location of the parasite was mostly in the brain and the calcified stage was the most common one. The most widely used treatments were anticonvulsants and pain relievers. Conclusions: Neurocysticercosis mainly affects the economically active population, is more common in women and the most common clinical manifestation is headache

  6. On the relationship between neurocysticercosis and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis: coincidence or a pathogenic relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchin, Marino Muxfeldt; Velasco, Tonicarlo Rodrigues; dos Santos, Antonio Carlos; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki

    2012-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) are two common worldwide forms of focal epilepsy. In regions where NCC is endemic, both diseases can be observed in the same patient. There is recent and growing evidence suggesting that NCC might contribute to or even cause MTLE-HS. In this article, we review the literature regarding NCC and temporal lobe epilepsy, specifically addressing the relationship between NCC and MTLE-HS. In addition, we review some scenarios where NCC seems to emerge as a causative agent or contributor to the development of MTLE-HS in some patients. This association is important because it may have an impact on the evaluation and treatment of a sizable proportion of patients with epilepsy. Insights from these clinical observations might also contribute to the understanding of the neurobiology of both NCC and MTLE-HS. We hope that our review might shed some light on this interesting interplay between two of the most common worldwide conditions associated with human focal epilepsy. PMID:23265552

  7. Evidence-based guideline: treatment of parenchymal neurocysticercosis: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Ruth Ann; Wiebe, Sam; Zunt, Joseph R; Halperin, John J; Gronseth, Gary; Roos, Karen L

    2013-04-09

    To review the evidence base for different treatment strategies in intraparenchymal neurocysticercosis in adults and children. A literature search of Medline, EMBASE, LILACS, and the Cochrane Database from 1980 to 2008, updated in 2012, resulted in the identification of 10 Class I or Class II trials of cysticidal drugs administered with or without corticosteroids in the treatment of neurocysticercosis. The available data demonstrate that albendazole therapy, administered with or without corticosteroids, is probably effective in decreasing both long-term seizure frequency and the number of cysts demonstrable radiologically in adults and children with neurocysticercosis, and is well-tolerated. There is insufficient information to assess the efficacy of praziquantel. Albendazole plus either dexamethasone or prednisolone should be considered for adults and children with neurocysticercosis, both to decrease the number of active lesions on brain imaging studies (Level B) and to reduce long-term seizure frequency (Level B). The evidence is insufficient to support or refute the use of steroid treatment alone in patients with intraparenchymal neurocysticercosis (Level U).

  8. Oral cysticercosis: A rare case presentation with ultrasound and MRI findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revath Vyas Devulapalli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taenia solium , the larvae of pork tapeworm, can cause the parasitic infection known as cysticercosis. It is commonly seen in developing countries. The World Health Organization estimates that over 50,000 deaths per year are caused by neurocysticercosis worldwide. It can occur anywhere in the body. Cysticerci in the muscles generally do not cause symptoms; they present as nodules and can be felt as lumps under the skin or they can present as muscular pseudohypertrophy. The condition rarely involves musculature of the orofacial region and presents a difficulty in clinical diagnosis. Here, we present a case report of a healthy middle-aged female patient who had a painless swelling below the lower lip. The ultrasound examination revealed an intramuscular cysticercosal cyst. The diagnosis was confirmed using magnetic resonance imaging and by histopathology. The case was managed by conservative enucleation of the cyst.

  9. Actinomycotic Mycetoma Of Scalp Caused By Actinomadura Pelletierii-A Report Of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvam A

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of actinomycotic mycetoma of the scalp caused by Actinomadura pelletierii are described with their classical clinical, mycological, histopathological and radiological features. The first case was treated with contrimoxazole as monotherapy. She developed recurrence later, even while on therapy. The second case was treated with combined oral cotrimoxazole and parenteral streptomycin with a good response.

  10. Human Glutathione S-Transferase Enzyme Gene Polymorphisms and Their Association With Neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amrita; Prasad, Kashi N; Singh, Aloukick K; Singh, Satyendra K; Gupta, Kamlesh K; Paliwal, Vimal K; Pandey, Chandra M; Gupta, Rakesh K

    2017-05-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC), caused by cysticerci of Taenia solium is the most common helminthic infection of the central nervous system. Some individuals harboring different stages of cysticerci in the brain remain asymptomatic, while others with similar cysticerci lesions develop symptoms and the reasons remain largely unknown. Inflammatory response to antigens of dying parasite is said to be responsible for symptomatic disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are generated in inflammatory conditions can damage cellular macromolecules such as lipids, DNA, and proteins. The glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are critical for the protection of cells from ROS. A total of 250 individuals were included in the study: symptomatic NCC = 75, asymptomatic NCC = 75, and healthy controls = 100. The individuals carrying the deletions of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were at risk for NCC (OR = 2.99, 95 %CI = 1.31-6.82, p = 0.0073 and OR = 1.94, 95 %CI = 0.98-3.82, p = 0.0550 respectively). Further, the individuals with these deletions were more likely to develop symptomatic disease (OR = 5.08, 95 % CI = 2.12-12.18, p = 0.0001 for GSTM1 and OR = 3.25, 95 %CI = 1.55-6.82, p = 0.0018 for GSTT1). Genetic variants of GSTM3 and GSTP1 were not associated with NCC. The total GST activity and levels of GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTM3 were significantly higher in asymptomatic subjects than in symptomatic and healthy controls. Lower GST activity was observed in individuals with GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions. The present study suggests that the individuals with GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions are at higher risk to develop symptomatic disease. The higher GST activity and levels of GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTM3 are likely to play role in maintaining asymptomatic condition.

  11. Frequency of depression among patients with neurocysticercosis Depressão em pacientes portadores de neurocisticercose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Monteiro de Almeida

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NCC is a common central nervous system infection caused by Taenia solium metacestodes. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the occurrence of depression in patients with calcified NCC form. The study group consisted of 114 patients subdivided in four groups: NCC with epilepsy, NCC without epilepsy, epilepsy without NCC and chronic headache. METHOD: Depression was evaluated and quantified by the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD-21. RESULTS: Percentage of patients with depression was as follows: group 1 (83%; group 2 (88%; group 3 (92%; group 4 (100%. The majority of patients had moderate depression. CONCLUSION: Incidence of depression in all groups was higher than in the general population. It is possible that, in a general way, patients with chronic diseases would have depression with similar intensity. NCC is associated with the presence of depression.Neurocysticercose (NCC é uma infecção do sistema nervoso central comum causada por metacestodes da Taenia solium. OBJETIVO: investigar a ocorrência de depressão nos pacientes com NCC forma calcificada. O grupo de estudo é formado por 114 pacientes subdivididos em quatro grupos: NCC com epilepsia, NCC sem epilepsia, epilepsia sem NCC e cefaléia crônica. MÉTODO: A presença de depressão foi determinada e quantificada pela Escala de Depressão de Hamilton (HRSD-21. RESULTADOS: A porcentagem de pacientes com depressão foi: grupo 1 (83%; grupo 2 (88%; grupo 3 (92%; grupo 4 (100%. A maioria dos pacientes apresentou depressão moderada. CONCLUSÃO: A incidência da depressão em todos os grupos foi mais elevada do que na população geral, contudo não houve diferença entre os grupos estudados. É possível que, de uma maneira geral, os pacientes portadores de doença crônica apresentarem a depressão em intensidade similar. NCC está associada com a presença de depressão.

  12. Taenia saginata a rare cause of acute cholangitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygur-Bayramiçli, O; Ak, O; Dabak, R; Demirhan, G; Ozer, S

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic infestations of the galdbladder and biliary tract are quite rare. Taenia saginata is an intestinal helmint and patients harbouring adult T.saginata tapeworms are mostly asymptomatic and discharge only fecal proglottids. In some cases there might be nonspecific symptoms like vomiting, nausea, epigastric pain, diarrhea and weight loss. Tenia saginata is a also rare cause of ileus, pancreatitis, cholecystitis and cholangitis. We report a case of acute cholangitis caused by T. saginata presenting with fever, nausea, vomiting, jaundice and right upper quadrant pain. Although parasites are not an uncommon cause of cholangitis especially in diseaseendemic areas like the Far East, this is not true for T. saginata causing acute cholangitis.

  13. Tricuspid valve endocarditis caused by Haemophilus parainfluenzae: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaohiri, Nnamdi; Urban, Carl; Gluck, Jason; Ahluwalia, Maneesha; Wehbeh, Wehbeh

    2009-06-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a Gram-negative bacterium that is often difficult to isolate and identify. We report a rare case of tricuspid valve and pacemaker endocarditis caused by this organism and explore factors related to etiopathogenesis, prevention, and treatment.

  14. Hemothorax caused by spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma in the pleural cavity: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hin Hee; Ohm, Joon Young [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Song Soo; Kim, Jin Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Hemothorax resulting from ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is extremely rare and is generally caused by ruptured intrathoracic metastatic lesions. However, we report a rare case of hemothorax resulting from intrathoracic rupture of primary HCC.

  15. First Cases of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi Infection in Surinam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thiel, Pieter-Paul A. M.; van Gool, Tom; Kager, Piet A.; Bart, Aldert

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Surinam is generally caused by infection by Leishmania guyanensis. We report three cases of infection with Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi, a Leishmania species not described from Surinam before. Treatment with pentamidine proved to be effective

  16. First Cases of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi Infection in Surinam

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Thiel, Pieter-Paul A. M.; van Gool, Tom; Kager, Piet A.; Bart, Aldert

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Surinam is generally caused by infection by Leishmania guyanensis. We report three cases of infection with Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi, a Leishmania species not described from Surinam before. Treatment with pentamidine proved to be effective. PMID:20348504

  17. Diffuse Ependymal Dysembryoplastic Neuroepithelial Tumor Causing Spinal Drop Metastases: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seul Kee; Jeong, Min Young; Kang, Heoung Keun; Yoon, Woong [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Tae Young [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNETs) arise mostly in the supratentorial cerebral cortex. A very rare case of intraventricular DNET with diffuse ependymal involvement, which causes spinal drop metastasis, is presented.

  18. A fatal case of Ludwig's angina and mediastinitis caused by an unusual microorganism, Gemella morbillorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofianou, Danai; Peftoulidou, Maria; Manolis, Evangelos N; Sofianos, Efthimios; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2005-01-01

    We present a case of Ludwig's angina in a 48-y-old immunocompetent male caused by an unusual pathogen, Gemella morbillorum. The infection was complicated with mediastinitis and despite aggressive management of the disease the patient died after 12 d of hospitalization. This is the first reported case of Ludwig's angina caused by G. morbillorum and emphasizes that the disease remains a potentially lethal infection.

  19. The Causes of Churn in the Telecommunication Industry: A Single, Exploratory Case Study on Kenyan Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    This single explorative case study investigated the causes of churn in the telecommunication industry in Kenya, narrowed down to include only the capital city of Nairobi. The question of this dissertation was split into three sub-questions. The first sub-question investigated the behavioral patterns of customers causing churn. The second…

  20. Analysis on 113 cases of adverse reactions caused by β-lactam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis on 113 cases of adverse reactions caused by β-lactam antibiotics. ... African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines ... The objectives of this study were to learn about the characteristics and rules of the occurrence of adverse reactions caused by lactam antibiotics and provide a reference ...

  1. Cutaneous infection and bactaeremia caused by Erwinia billingiae: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Prod'homme

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cellulitis and erysipelas are common skin infections usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci. Gram-negative rods are rarely implicated. We report here a case of dermohypodermitis and bactaeremia caused by Erwinia billingiae, a Gram-negative bacteria usually pathogenic and epiphytic to pome fruit tree.

  2. Cutaneous infection and bactaeremia caused byErwinia billingiae: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prod'homme, M; Micol, L A; Weitsch, S; Gassend, J-L; Martinet, O; Bellini, C

    2017-09-01

    Cellulitis and erysipelas are common skin infections usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci. Gram-negative rods are rarely implicated. We report here a case of dermohypodermitis and bactaeremia caused by Erwinia billingiae , a Gram-negative bacteria usually pathogenic and epiphytic to pome fruit tree.

  3. Cutaneous infection and bactaeremia caused by Erwinia billingiae: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Prod'homme, M.; Micol, L.A.; Weitsch, S.; Gassend, J.-L.; Martinet, O.; Bellini, C.

    2017-01-01

    Cellulitis and erysipelas are common skin infections usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci. Gram-negative rods are rarely implicated. We report here a case of dermohypodermitis and bactaeremia caused by Erwinia billingiae, a Gram-negative bacteria usually pathogenic and epiphytic to pome fruit tree.

  4. Primary Mesenteric Lipoma Causing Closed Loop Bowel Obstruction: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heong-Ieng Wong

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary mesenteric lipoma is rare, with fewer than 50 cases described in English-language literature, and those causing bowel obstructions are even more uncommon. The long stalk of the lipoma that caused secondary volvulus and rapid ischemic change in our patient is worth reporting because of its rarity and distinctive picture in emergency abdominal computed tomography.

  5. Prosthetic joint infection caused by Pasteurella multocida: a case series and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnorat, Estelle; Seng, Piseth; Savini, Hélène; Pinelli, Pierre-Olivier; Simon, Fabrice; Stein, Andreas

    2016-08-20

    Pasteurella multocida is a well-recognized zoonotic agent following dog or cat bites or scratches. Nevertheless, prosthetic joint infection caused by P. multocida are rarely reported. We report here a series of six cases of prosthetic joint infection caused by P. multocida managed at a referral centre for the treatment of bone and joint infection in southern France. We also reviewed the 26 cases reported in literature. The mean age of our cases was 74 years [±8.2, range 63-85]. In majority of our cases (5 cases) were associated with knee prostheses and one case with a hip prosthesis. Most of cases occurred after cat or dog scratches or licks or contact. Diagnoses of prosthetic joint infection caused by P. multocida were made by positive cultures of surgical biopsies or needle aspiration. Mean time delay between prosthetic joint implantation and infection onset was 7.6 years (±5.12 years, range 2-17). Local inflammation, which occurred in all six cases, was the most frequent clinical symptom, followed by pain in five cases, fever and swollen joints in four cases, and a fistula with purulent discharge inside the wound in two cases. The mean time of antibiotic therapy was 8 months. Surgical treatment with prosthesis removal was performed in three cases. Six of our cases were in remission without apparent relapse at 3 years after end of treatment. Prosthetic joint infections caused by P. multocida usually occur after animal scratches or bites, but can occasionally occur after a short animal lick. These infections are usually resulting from a contiguous infection and localized in the knee. An early antibiotic therapy after surgical debridement could avoid prosthetic withdrawal, notably in elderly patients. Patients with prosthetic joints should be warned that animals are potential sources of serious infection and urgent medical advice should be sought if they are bitten or scratched.

  6. Dientamoeba fragilis as a cause of travelers' diarrhea: report of seven cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Damien; Beebe, Nigel; Marriott, Deborah; Ellis, John; Harkness, John

    2007-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a pathogenic trichomonad parasite that causes gastrointestinal disease in humans. We report seven cases of travelers' diarrhea caused by D fragilis in patients who had traveled to overseas destinations within Asia or the Pacific which occurred over an 8-month period. Patients presented with diarrhea lasting from 5 days to over 4 weeks. Dientamoeba fragilis should be considered as a cause of diarrhea in returning travelers.

  7. Urogenital myiasis caused by Megaselia scalaris (Diptera: Phoridae): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, T S; Rana, D

    1989-05-01

    A case of urogenital myiasis in a patient with transverse myelitis is reported from Imphal, Manipur, India. The larvae of Megaselia scalaris Lowe were recovered repeatedly from the urine of the patient and were reared to adult to facilitate identification. This is the first known case of urinary myiasis caused by M. scalaris in India.

  8. Liver transplantation for neotropical polycystic echinococcosis caused by Echinococcus vogeli: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tércio Genzini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neotropical polycystic echinococcosis (NPE is a parasitic disease caused by cestodes of Echinococcus vogeli. This parasite grows most commonly in the liver, where it produces multiples cysts that cause hepatic and vessel necrosis, infects the biliary ducts, and disseminates into the peritoneal cavity, spreading to other abdominal and thoracic organs. In cases of disseminated disease in the liver and involvement of biliary ducts or portal system, liver transplantation may be a favorable option. We present a report of the first case of liver transplantation for the treatment of advanced liver NPE caused by E. vogeli.

  9. Case of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis caused by ampicillin/cloxacillin sodium in a pregnant woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yuka; Okubo, Yukari; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Tomonobu; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2008-06-01

    We report a case of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) induced by ampicillin/cloxacillin sodium (ABPC/MCIPC) in a pregnant woman. AGEP is caused mostly by drugs. Among them, beta-lactam antibiotics account for a high proportion of the cases, predominantly by amoxicillin. To our knowledge, this is only the second case ever reported in the Japanese language published work of AGEP induced by ABPC/MCIPC.

  10. Biliary stricture caused by portal biliopathy: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero Hernández, Ignacio; Weimersheimer Sandoval, Mariana; López Méndez, Eric; Hernández Calleros, Jorge; Tapia, Alberto Rubio; Uribe, Misael

    2005-01-01

    Portal biliopathy is a rare condition that is usually not diagnosed and only in few cases causes symptoms. Those symptoms are caused by vascular obstruction of the biliary tree in patients with portal hypertension. We report a case of a 29 years man who presented with history of intermittent jaundice, persistent elevation of hepatic function test and hematemesis as a manifestation of portal hypertension without liver damage. We present the clinical, radiological and pathological characteristics and literature review of the cases that had been reported, their diagnoses, treatment and clinical implication.

  11. Tracheopulmonary Myiasis Caused by a Mature Third-Instar Cuterebra Larva: Case Report and Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Muriel; Florent, Martine; Lefebvre, Aurélie; Wertheimer, Christophe; Perez-Eid, Claudine; Bangs, Michael J.; Bouvet, Anne

    2003-01-01

    Myiasis is the infestation of vertebrate tissues with fly larvae (Diptera). Most human cases in North America are subcutaneous forms due to Dermatobia hominis imported from Central and South America. Human cases of myiasis acquired in North America are rare and are primarily subdermal or ophthalmologic forms of infestation caused by early stages of Cuterebra larvae. We report an unusual case of tracheopulmonary myiasis, resulting from the in situ development of a mature cuterebrine larva associated with high eosinophilia. Only two other cases of tracheopulmonary cuterebrid myiasis have been reported in humans, and they are reviewed herein. Cuterebra myiasis (cuterebrosis) remains a rare and aberrant cause of tracheopulmonary disease and is a newly described cause of eosinophilia in humans. PMID:14662989

  12. The effect of albendazole treatment on seizure outcomes in patients with symptomatic neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, Matthew L; Wyka, Katarzyna; Carpio, Arturo; Leslie, Denise; Andrews, Howard; Bagiella, Emilia; Hauser, W Allen; Kelvin, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-01

    Randomized controlled trials have found an inconsistent effect of anthelmintic treatment on long-term seizure outcomes in neurocysticercosis. The objective of this study was to further explore the effect of albendazole treatment on long-term seizure outcomes and to determine if there is evidence for a differential effect by seizure type. In this trial, 178 patients with active or transitional neurocysticercosis cysts and new-onset symptoms were randomized to 8 days of treatment with albendazole (n=88) or placebo (n=90), both with prednisone, and followed for 24 months. We used negative binomial regression and logistic regression models to determine the effect of albendazole on the number of seizures and probability of recurrent or new-onset seizures, respectively, over follow-up. Treatment with albendazole was associated with a reduction in the number of seizures during 24 months of follow-up, but this was only significant for generalized seizures during months 1-12 (unadjusted rate ratio [RR] 0.19; 95% CI: 0.04-0.91) and months 1-24 (unadjusted RR 0.06; 95% CI: 0.01-0.57). We did not detect a significant effect of albendazole on reducing the number of focal seizures or on the probability of having a seizure, regardless of seizure type or time period. Albendazole treatment may be associated with some symptomatic improvement; however, this association seems to be specific to generalized seizures. Future research is needed to identify strategies to better reduce long-term seizure burden in patients with neurocysticercosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Intervertebral discitis caused by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in an adult: Case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, R.; Swayamprakasam, A.; Raza, M.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Haemophilus influenzae is a common cause of bacterial meningitis in children and can cause upper respiratory tract infections in adults, but has yet to be reported solely involving intervertebral discitis. PRESENTATION OF CASE: A 67-year-old builder presenting with fever, myalgia and back pain is found to have intervertebral discitis (confirmed on MRI) caused by H. influenzae (identified on blood cultures). DISCUSSION: A nontypeable form of H. influenzae has not been reported causing discitis. We describe a case in a relatively fit individual who was treated successfully with antimicrobial treatment. A preceding upper respiratory tract infection is the presumed source of infection, predisposed by long-term low-dose steroid therapy. CONCLUSION: H. influenzae is a rare, but treatable cause of discitis. PMID:22466113

  14. Endometrioid Endometrial Carcinoma Indirectly Caused by Pituitary Prolactinoma:A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihiro Nishino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 44-year-old nulliparous woman who experienced irregular menstrual cycles for about 10 years and developed both pituitary prolactinoma and endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. In premenopausal women, hyperprolactinemia causes hypogonadism by inhibiting secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone and thus suppressing luteinizing hormone levels, which can cause menstrual disorders ranging from amenorrhea, oligomenorrhea and chronic anovulatory cycle to short luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. A chronic anovulatory menstrual cycle is the most common cause of long-term exposure of the endometrium to endogenous estrogen without adequate opposition from progestins, which can lead to endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. In this case, pituitary prolactinoma may have caused the chronic anovulatory cycle and indirectly led to the endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. In patients for whom the cause of irregular menstruation and chronic anovulatory cycle is suspected to be hyperprolactinemia, explorations of both the hypophysis and endometrium are essential.

  15. A Cross-Sectional Study of People with Epilepsy and Neurocysticercosis in Tanzania: Clinical Characteristics and Diagnostic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocher, Joachim; Schmutzhard, Erich; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Gupton, Paige N.; Schaffert, Matthias; Auer, Herbert; Gotwald, Thaddaeus; Matuja, William; Winkler, Andrea S.

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a major cause of epilepsy in regions where pigs are free-ranging and hygiene is poor. Pork production is expected to increase in the next decade in sub-Saharan Africa, hence NCC will likely become more prevalent. In this study, people with epilepsy (PWE, n = 212) were followed up 28.6 months after diagnosis of epilepsy. CT scans were performed, and serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of selected PWE were analysed. We compared the demographic data, clinical characteristics, and associated risk factors of PWE with and without NCC. PWE with NCC (n = 35) were more likely to be older at first seizure (24.3 vs. 16.3 years, p = 0.097), consumed more pork (97.1% vs. 73.6%, p = 0.001), and were more often a member of the Iraqw tribe (94.3% vs. 67.8%, p = 0.005) than PWE without NCC (n = 177). PWE and NCC who were compliant with anti-epileptic medications had a significantly higher reduction of seizures (98.6% vs. 89.2%, p = 0.046). Other characteristics such as gender, seizure frequency, compliance, past medical history, close contact with pigs, use of latrines and family history of seizures did not differ significantly between the two groups. The number of NCC lesions and active NCC lesions were significantly associated with a positive antibody result. The electroimmunotransfer blot, developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was more sensitive than a commercial western blot, especially in PWE and cerebral calcifications. This is the first study to systematically compare the clinical characteristics of PWE due to NCC or other causes and to explore the utility of two different antibody tests for diagnosis of NCC in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:21666796

  16. A cross-sectional study of people with epilepsy and neurocysticercosis in Tanzania: clinical characteristics and diagnostic approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Blocher

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NCC is a major cause of epilepsy in regions where pigs are free-ranging and hygiene is poor. Pork production is expected to increase in the next decade in sub-Saharan Africa, hence NCC will likely become more prevalent. In this study, people with epilepsy (PWE, n=212 were followed up 28.6 months after diagnosis of epilepsy. CT scans were performed, and serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of selected PWE were analysed. We compared the demographic data, clinical characteristics, and associated risk factors of PWE with and without NCC. PWE with NCC (n=35 were more likely to be older at first seizure (24.3 vs. 16.3 years, p=0.097, consumed more pork (97.1% vs. 73.6%, p=0.001, and were more often a member of the Iraqw tribe (94.3% vs. 67.8%, p=0.005 than PWE without NCC (n=177. PWE and NCC who were compliant with anti-epileptic medications had a significantly higher reduction of seizures (98.6% vs. 89.2%, p=0.046. Other characteristics such as gender, seizure frequency, compliance, past medical history, close contact with pigs, use of latrines and family history of seizures did not differ significantly between the two groups. The number of NCC lesions and active NCC lesions were significantly associated with a positive antibody result. The electroimmunotransfer blot, developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was more sensitive than a commercial western blot, especially in PWE and cerebral calcifications. This is the first study to systematically compare the clinical characteristics of PWE due to NCC or other causes and to explore the utility of two different antibody tests for diagnosis of NCC in sub-Saharan Africa.

  17. Current status and future perspectives on the medical treatment of neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Isidro; Garcia, Hector H

    2012-01-01

    Neurological disease resulting from neurocysticercosis (NCC) is common in most of the world. The variability in the biology of the infection and in its clinical manifestations has led to much confusion regarding appropriate management. Therapeutic options have evolved from surgery, symptomatic measures, and steroids, to include the use of anti-parasitic drugs and minimally invasive neurosurgery. This manuscript reviews the principles of medical therapy for NCC, from discussion of the need for individualized management approaches for each type of NCC to exploration of the most likely potential additions or modifications currently under study. PMID:23265555

  18. Case Report: First Case of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis in Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Ricardo V. P. F.; Kent, Alida D.; Adams, Emily R.; van der Veer, Charlotte; Sabajo, Leslie O. A.; Mans, Dennis R. A.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Schallig, Henk D. F. H.; Fat, Rudy F. M. Lai A.

    2012-01-01

    The main causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Suriname is Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis. This case report presents a patient infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, a species never reported before in Suriname. This finding has clinical implications, because L. braziliensis

  19. [Cardiac arrest and hypothermia caused by suicidal intoxication with butane: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Gerrit; Mertzlufft, Fritz; Kirchhoff, Carsten; Bach, Friedhelm

    2012-02-01

    In the emergency medicine field cases of intoxication by sniffing agents do not occur very often. Nevertheless, considering the easy availability of butane the option of abuse especially by adolescent persons cannot be ignored. Although many cases of accidental death caused by malignant arrhythmia are described ("Sudden sniffing death syndrome"), suicide attempts using butane are a rarity. In this case the emergency treatment has to allow for special pathophysiological changes explained by physicochemical characteristics of butane. The following case report describes the symptomatology and pre-hospital treatment of an intoxication by butane with a suicidal intention. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  20. A Chinese patient with peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis caused by Gordonia terrae: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chenrui; Yang, Yun; Li, Ziyang

    2017-02-28

    Gordonia terrae is a rare cause of clinical infections, with only 23 reported cases. We report the first case of peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis caused by Gordonia terrae in mainland China. A 52-year-old man developed peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis and received preliminary antibiotic treatment. After claiming that his symptoms had been resolved, the patient insisted on being discharged (despite our recommendations) and did not receive continued treatment after leaving the hospital. A telephone follow-up with the patient's relatives revealed that the patient died 3 months later. Routine testing did not identify the bacterial strain responsible for the infection, although matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry identified the strain as Gordonia rubropertincta. However, a 16S rRNA sequence analysis using an isolate from the peritoneal fluid culture revealed that the responsible strain was actually Gordonia terrae. Similar to this case, all previously reported cases have involved a delayed diagnosis and initial treatment failure, and the definitive diagnosis required a 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Changes from an inappropriate antibiotic therapy to an appropriate one have relied on microbiological testing and were performed 7-32 days after the initial treatment. The findings from our case and the previously reported cases indicate that peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis caused by Gordonia terrae can be difficult to identify and treat. It may be especially challenging to diagnose these cases in countries with limited diagnostic resources.

  1. Hemifacial spasm caused by a cerebellopontine angle arachnoid cyst. Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Juretschke, Fernando; Vargas, Antonio; González-Rodrigalvarez, Rosario; Garcia-Leal, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts involving the cerebellopontine angle are an unusual cause of hemifacial spasm. The case is reported of a 71-year old woman presenting with a right hemifacial spasm and an ipsilateral arachnoid cyst. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging findings suggested a neurovascular compression caused by displacement of the facial-acoustic complex and the anterior inferior cerebellar artery by the cyst. Cyst excision and microvascular decompression of the facial nerve achieved permanent relief. The existing cases of arachnoid cysts causing hemifacial spasm are reviewed and the importance of a secondary neurovascular conflict identification and decompression in these cases is highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Inflammatory pseudotumor in the liver and right omentum caused by pelvic inflammatory disease: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Hyuk Jun; Kim, Seong Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Inflammatory pseudotumor can develop in any part of the human body. It is one of the most important tumor-mimicking lesions that require differential diagnosis. There are various causes of inflammatory pseudotumor, one of which is infection and its resultant inflammation. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) often causes perihepatitis, which is called Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome. In Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome, bacteria spread along the right paracolic gutter, causing inflammation of the right upper quadrant peritoneal surfaces and the right lobe of the liver. We experienced a case of PID with accompanying inflammatory pseudotumor in the liver and the right omentum. This case identically correlates with the known intraperitoneal spreading pathway involved in Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome, and hence, we present this case report.

  3. Skin ulcers caused by Serratia marcescens: three cases and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraldi, Stefano; Nazzaro, Gianluca

    2016-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is a Gram-negative, encapsulated, motile, anaerobic, non-sporulating bacillus that belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family. It is found in water, soil, plants, food, and garbage. S. marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen. It usually causes nosocomial infections, such as lung and genitourinary infections, sinusitis, otitis, endocarditis, and sepsis. Skin infections caused by S. marcescens are rare. To describe three new cases of skin ulcers of the leg caused by S. marcescens and review the relevant literature. We investigated three patients admitted for ulcers on the leg. In two patients, post-traumatic aetiology was concluded. The modality of infection was not identified for the other patient. One patient was diabetic. All patients recovered with specific antibiotic therapy (ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone and levofloxacin, respectively). Skin ulcers due to S. marcescens are very rare. The three cases presented here add to the limited literature of skin infections caused by S. marcescens.

  4. Case Report: Sciatic nerve schwannoma - a rare cause of sciatica [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Munakomi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein we report a rare case of a sciatic nerve schwannoma causing sciatica in a 69-year-old female. Sciatic nerve schwannoma is a rare entity. It should always be considered as a possible cause of sciatica in patients that present with symptoms of sciatica with no prolapsed disc in the lumbar spine and a negative crossed straight leg raise test. Timely diagnosis and complete excision of the lesion leads to complete resolution of the symptoms of such patients.

  5. Sclerotherapy for a simple renal cyst causing hydronephrosis: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji Hun; Park, Sang Woo; Chang, Il Soo; Hwang, Jin Ho; Jung, Sung Il [Dept. Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    A simple renal cyst usually remains asymptomatic and requires no invasive treatment. Occasionally, however, some cysts may cause pain, hematuria, hypertension, or obstruction of the collecting system. We describe a case of a 50-year-old man who presented with hydronephrosis caused by an ipsilateral simple renal cyst without any stone or significant mass in the urinary system. The patient was eventually treated successfully with sclerotherapy.

  6. Case Reports: Unusual Cause of Shoulder Pain in a Collegiate Baseball Player

    OpenAIRE

    Ligh, Cassandra A.; Schulman, Brian L.; Safran, Marc R.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of reporting this case was to introduce a unique cause of shoulder pain in a high-level Division I NCAA collegiate baseball player. Various neurovascular causes of shoulder pain have been described in the overhead athlete, including quadrilateral space syndrome, thoracic outlet syndrome, effort thrombosis, and suprascapular nerve entrapment. All of these syndromes are uncommon and frequently are missed as a result of their rarity and the need for specialized tests to confirm the...

  7. THE HUMAN RISKS CAUSED BY DEINDUSTRIALI-SATION. CASE STUDY: CERNA RIVER BASIN (HUNEDOARA COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. SOFIA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Human Risks caused by deindustrialization. Case Study: Cerna River Basin (Hunedoara County. Industrial restructuring during economic transition has affected the population, causing loss of jobs, reduced income, increased poverty and emphasizing social inequalities and marginalization phenomenon. These have led to population decline, massive emigration, difficulties in finding a job as well as an increased incidence of certain diseases, negatively influencing socio-economic development of the area.

  8. Bleeding diathesis as a cause of menorrhagia: a report of 3 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Jyotsna; Minocha, Bharti; Dabral, Anjali

    2012-11-01

    Bleeding diathesis as a cause of menorrhagia should not be overlooked at any age even in the perimenopausal woman. Three cases have been presented, wherein bleeding diathesis was the cause of menorrhagia. Two of these patients had acute myeloid leukaemia and the third had immunothrombocytopaenic purpura. A noteworthy point of this series is that one patient was in her teens, the second in the peak reproductive age group and the third in the perimenopausal age.

  9. Sonographic Finding of Scrotal Cystic Lymphangioma with Hemorrhage Caused by Percutaneous Needle Aspiration: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Woon; Cho, Jae Ho [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Lymphangioma is a hamartoma, which is a benign tumor caused by congenital malformation of the lymphatic system. These tumors usually occur in the neck and axilla, and occasionally in the mediastinum, mesenterium, retroperitoneum and thigh, The scrotum and perineum are the least frequent sites. We report here on an uncommon case of cystic lymphangioma that presented as focal hemorrhage caused by percutaneous needle aspiration, and we briefly review the radiologic finding and the relevant literature

  10. Nosocomial pneumonia caused by carbapenem-resistant Raoultella planticola: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M; Xie, W; Fu, Y; Zhou, H; Zhou, J

    2015-04-01

    Raoultella planticola is a rare opportunistic pathogen usually invaded immunocompromised patients and sometimes even causes fatal infections. Recently, there is growing concern about the emergence of carbapenem resistance in this species. Here, we describe one case of hospital-acquired pneumonia due to a carbapenem-resistant R. planticola (CRRP) co-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase and extended-spectrum β-lactamase. A literature review was performed to indicate the microbiological and clinical features of infections caused by CRRP.

  11. First Human Case of Fungal Keratitis Caused by a Putatively Novel Species of Lophotrichus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghrari, Allen O; Gibas, Connie; Watkins, Tonya; Vahedi, Sina; Lee, Rick; Houle, Elizabeth; Suarez, Maria Jose; Eberhart, Charles; Sutton, Deanna A; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Sikder, Shameema; Zhang, Sean X

    2015-09-01

    We report an aggressive fungal keratitis caused by a putatively novel species of Lophotrichus in a patient with traumatic injury to the cornea from a dog paw. The organism was isolated from the patient's necrotic cornea, which perforated despite coverage with hourly fortified broad-spectrum topical antibiotic therapy. This report represents the first case of human infection caused by this species. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Intracranial hypotension caused by cisternal irrigation for vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Atsushi; Matsuo, Seigo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vasospasm is the most common cause of complication after a subarachnoid hemorrhage and tremendous efforts have been made to prevent it. A subarachnoid clot is the cause of the vasospasm and dissolving and washing it out is considered to be the best practice. Cisternal irrigation with urokinase and ascorbic acid has been widely used due to its proven effect. Case presentation A 60-year-old Japanese male presented with a severe headache was diagnosed with a subarachnoid hemorrhage ...

  13. Infective endocarditis causing mitral valve stenosis - a rare but deadly complication: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael A; Shroff, Gautam R

    2017-02-17

    Infective endocarditis rarely causes mitral valve stenosis. When present, it has the potential to cause severe hemodynamic decompensation and death. There are only 15 reported cases in the literature of mitral prosthetic valve bacterial endocarditis causing stenosis by obstruction. This case is even more unusual due to the mechanism by which functional mitral stenosis occurred. We report a case of a 23-year-old white woman with a history of intravenous drug abuse who presented with acute heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography failed to show valvular vegetation, but high clinical suspicion led to transesophageal imaging that demonstrated infiltrative prosthetic valve endocarditis causing severe mitral stenosis. Despite extensive efforts from a multidisciplinary team, she died as a result of her critical illness. The discussion of this case highlights endocarditis physiology, the notable absence of stenosis in modified Duke criteria, and the utility of transesophageal echocardiography in clinching a diagnosis. It advances our knowledge of how endocarditis manifests, and serves as a valuable lesson for clinicians treating similar patients who present with stenosis but no regurgitation on transthoracic imaging, as a decision to forego a transesophageal echocardiography could cause this serious complication of endocarditis to be missed.

  14. Remote transient Lactobacillus animalis bacteremia causing prosthetic hip joint infection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Somayaji

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactobacillus spp. are uncommon pathogens in immunocompetent hosts, and even rarer causes of prosthetic device infections. Case presentation A case of chronic hip prosthetic joint infection (PJI caused by L. animalis is described. This occurred 5 years after a transient bacteremia with the same organism. Whole genome sequencing of both isolates proved this PJI infection resulted from this remote bacteremia. Conclusions We document that prosthetic joint infections may be a consequence of bacteremia as much as 3 years before the onset of symptoms.

  15. Cubital tunnel syndrome due to heterotrophic ossification caused by radial head fracture: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyitali Gumustas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Compression of the ulnar nerve in the cubital tunnel is the second most common nerve entrapment syndrome in the upper extremity after carpal tunnel syndrome. Although various etiologies have been described, heterotrophic ossification is rarely seen. Heterotrophic ossification should be kept in mind as a cause of ulnar nerve entrapment after elbow trauma. Early diagnosis and surgical intervention are important in such cases before completion of the maturation phase. We report a case of heterotrophic ossification due to elbow trauma that caused cubital tunnel syndrome. [Hand Microsurg 2014; 3(1.000: 24-28

  16. Purulent Pericarditis Caused by Streptococcus Milleri Strains; the Gained Experience from Nine Reported Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias A. Kouerinis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pericarditis caused by Streptococcus Milleri Group (SMG strains is a particularly exceptional pathology. All the eight previous reported cases were under the care of medical teams and the seven existed reports in medical journals were more or less from this perspective. Herein, we reported a unique case of a pericardial-cutaneous fistula resulting from a recurrent purulent pericardial effusion caused by SMG strains, which had been treated with open surgical drainage two months before. A thorough review of the surgical treatment options and the results has also been presented.

  17. The Case for Pyriproxyfen as a Potential Cause for Microcephaly; From Biology to Epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Bar-Yam, Yaneer; Nijhout, H. Frederik; Parens, Raphael; Costa, Felipe; Morales, Alfredo J.

    2017-01-01

    The Zika virus has been found in individual cases but has not been confirmed as the cause of in the large number of cases of microcephaly in Brazil in 2015-6. Indeed, disparities between the incidence of Zika and microcephaly across geographic locations has led to questions about the virus's role. Here we consider whether the insecticide pyriproxyfen used in Brazilian drinking water might be the primary cause or a cofactor. Pyriproxifen is a juvenile hormone analog which has been shown to cor...

  18. Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Endometrium Causing Paraneoplastic Retinopathy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Cybulska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed the literature for cases in which gynecologic malignancies caused paraneoplastic retinopathy and ultimately led to blindness. Twenty-eight cases were derived from the literature, and one unique case is described from our institution. Of these 28 cases, 14 patients were diagnosed with endometrial cancer, 7 with ovarian cancer, 5 with cervical cancer, 1 fallopian tube cancer and 1 with concomitant endometrial and ovarian cancers. The average age of patients at the time of diagnosis was 64 years (range, 35–89 years. Typically, ocular manifestations antedate symptoms of the underlying carcinoma by 3–12 months. Information regarding the interval from visual symptoms to time of death is limited, but ranges from several months to several years. Our report is the first to document a clear cell carcinoma of the endometrium causing paraneoplastic retinopathy and is the first to review all gynecologic malignancies associated with visual paraneoplastic syndromes.

  19. Clear cell carcinoma of the endometrium causing paraneoplastic retinopathy: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulska, Paulina; Navajas, Eduardo V; Altomare, Filiberto; Bernardini, Marcus Q

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the literature for cases in which gynecologic malignancies caused paraneoplastic retinopathy and ultimately led to blindness. Twenty-eight cases were derived from the literature, and one unique case is described from our institution. Of these 28 cases, 14 patients were diagnosed with endometrial cancer, 7 with ovarian cancer, 5 with cervical cancer, 1 fallopian tube cancer and 1 with concomitant endometrial and ovarian cancers. The average age of patients at the time of diagnosis was 64 years (range, 35-89 years). Typically, ocular manifestations antedate symptoms of the underlying carcinoma by 3-12 months. Information regarding the interval from visual symptoms to time of death is limited, but ranges from several months to several years. Our report is the first to document a clear cell carcinoma of the endometrium causing paraneoplastic retinopathy and is the first to review all gynecologic malignancies associated with visual paraneoplastic syndromes.

  20. Anti-Taenia solium monoclonal antibodies for the detection of parasite antigens in body fluids from patients with neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Adriana; Sáenz, Patricia; Marzal, Miguel W; Orrego, Miguel A; Castillo, Yesenia; Rivera, Andrea; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; García, Hector H; Nash, Theodore E

    2016-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC), an infection of the brain by Taenia solium (Ts) cysts, is the most common cause of adult-onset epilepsy in developing countries. Serological testing consists primarily of varying methods to detect antibodies in body fluids and more recently antigen (Ag) detection assays to identify individuals or animals with viable parasites. Antigen assays currently in use employ monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against T. saginata, which have known cross reactivity to animal cestodes but are highly specific in human samples. We produced, characterized and tested 21 mAbs raised against T. solium whole cyst antigens, vesicular fluid or excretory secretory products. Reactivity of the TsmAbs against specific cyst structures was determined using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry on histological sections of Ts muscle cysts. Four TsmAbs reacted to vesicular space alone, 9 to the neck and cyst wall, one to the neck and vesicular space and 7 to the neck, cyst wall and vesicular space. An in-house ELISA assay to detect circulating Ts antigen, using the TsmAbs as capture antibodies and a rabbit polyclonal anti-Ts whole cyst antibody as a detector antibody demonstrated that eight of the 21 TsmAbs detected antigens in known NCC-positive human sera and three of these also in urine samples. Reactivity was expressed as normalized ratios of optical densities (OD positive control/OD negative control). Three TsmAbs had ratios >10 and five between 2 and 10. The TsmAbs have potential utility for the diagnosis and post-treatment monitoring of patients with viable NCC infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Adhesion molecules, chemokines and matrix metallo-proteinases response after albendazole and albendazole plus steroid therapy in swine neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satyendra K; Prasad, Kashi N; Singh, Aloukick K; Gupta, Kamlesh K; Singh, Amrita; Tripathi, Mukesh; Gupta, Rakesh K

    2017-11-01

    The treatment of neurocysticercosis (NCC) varies with location, number and stage of the Taenia solium cysticerci (cysts). Albendazole (ABZ) effectively kills cysticerci, and subsequently induces neuro-inflammation facilitated by leukocyte infiltration. We hypothesize that immune response varies around drug responder (degenerating/dying) and non-responder (viable) cysts after ABZ and ABZ plus steroid (ABZS) therapy, which may determine the disease pathogenesis. Twenty cysticercotic swine were treated with ABZ (n = 10; group1) and ABZS (n = 10; group2). Expression of adhesion molecules, chemokines and matrix metallo-proteinases (MMPs) was measured by qRT-PCR (quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) and ELISA. Gelatin gel zymography was performed to detect the activity of MMP-2 and -9. In group1, ABZ therapy induced higher expressions of ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1), E-selectin, MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1), Eotaxin-1, MIP-1α (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α), RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted), MMP-2 and MMP-9 around ABZ responder (AR) cysts. Three pigs with cyst burdens ≥10 died following ABZ therapy. However, in group2, moderate expressions of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, RANTES and MMP-9 were associated with ABZS responder (ASR), whereas low expressions of these molecules were associated with ABZS non-responder (ASNR) cysts. In conclusion, ABZ alone therapy is not safe since it causes death of pigs due to higher inflammatory immune response around dying cysts. However, combination therapy is an effective treatment regimen even with the high cyst burden. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ulceration Caused by a Small Alkaline Battery: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Tekin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Small alkaline or lithium-ion batteries, which are commonly referred to as watch batteries or button cells, may cause potentially dangerous organ injuries and tissue damage if swallowed. This condition, which is commonly seen in children, may cause damage, particularly in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, as well as in the nose, external ear canal, and middle and inner ears. Ulceration due toxin contact is a very rare condition. In this study, we present the case of an 18-month-old male who swallowed a cell which caused damage in the medial femoral area after harmlessly passing through the entire gastrointestinal tract. The battery caused skin necrosis with the contribution of the electrolytic effect of stool in a diaper is an infrequent case and avoidable with only the parents' attention. Usually, swallowing watch batteries does not cause any symptoms or findings, and it easily excreted in stool. However, serious injuries and even deaths in cases involving the nasal cavities, outer and inner ear, esophagus, stomach, intestines, and neighboring organs have been reported in the literature. It is important to acknowledge the negative consequences and signs and symptoms of such conditions, and note that the battery may stick to body parts such as genital, medial femoral, anal, and intergluteal regions that remain in the diaper-covered area and may cause skin ulcerations due to the electrolytic characteristics of the stool.

  3. Hydrophobic fraction of Taenia saginata metacestodes, rather than hydrophilic fraction, contains immunodominant markers for diagnosing human neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Flávia de Assunção; Machado, Gleyce Alves; Oliveira, Heliana Batista; Rezende, Maria Teresa Nunes Pacheco; Mineo, José Roberto; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2010-01-01

    Considering that alternative antigens for diagnosing neurocysticercosis continue to be a challenge because of the increasing difficulty in obtaining parasites from naturally infected pigs for preparation of Taenia solium homologous antigen, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the detergent (D) and aqueous (A) fractions from saline extract of Taenia saginata metacestodes for diagnosing neurocysticercosis. Taenia saginata was obtained from naturally infected bovines in the Triângulo Mineiro region, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The carcasses came from cold storage units and had been slaughtered in accordance with the inspection technique recommended by the Federal Inspection Service. The D and A fractions were obtained by using Triton X-114 (TX-114). Serum samples were obtained from 40 patients with a diagnosis of neurocysticercosis, 45 with other parasitic diseases and 30 from apparently normal individuals. IgG antibody levels were evaluated using the ELISA and immunoblotting assays. The ELISA sensitivity and specificity were 95% and 73.3%, when using saline extract; 95% and 82.6% for the D fraction; and 65% and 61.3% for the A fraction, respectively. The immunoblotting assay confirmed the ELISA results, such that the D fraction was more efficient than the other extracts, and the 70-68 kDa component was immunodominant among neurocysticercosis patients. These results demonstrated that the D fraction from Taenia saginata metacestodes obtained using TX-114 can be used as a heterologous antigenic fraction in the immunoblotting assay for serologically diagnosing human neurocysticercosis, given its ability to select immunodominant antigens.

  4. Development of an experimental model of neurocysticercosis-induced hydrocephalus. Pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto Filho, Pedro Tadao; Zanini, Marco Antônio; Botta, Fabio Pires; Rodrigues, Marianna Vaz; Bazan, Rodrigo; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Biondi, Germano Francisco

    2015-12-01

    To develop an experimental model of neurocysticercosis-induced hydrocephalus There were used 17 rats. Ten animals were inoculated with Taenia crassiceps cysts into the subarachnoid. Five animals were injected with 0. ml of 25% kaolin (a standard solution for the development of experimental hydrocephalus) and two animals were injected with saline. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate enlargement of the ventricles after one or three months of inoculation. Volumetric study was used to quantify the ventricle enlargement. Seven of the 10 animals in the cyst group developed hydrocephalus, two of them within one month and five within three months after inoculation. Three of the five animals in the kaolin group had hydrocephalus and none in the saline group. Ventricle volumes were significantly higher in the 3-months MRI cyst subgroup than in the 1-month cyst subgroup. Differences between cyst subgroups and kaolin group did not reach statistical significance. The developed model may reproduce the human condition of neurocysticercosis-related hydrocephalus, which exhibits a slowly progressive chronic course.

  5. Cysticidal therapy: impact on seizure control in epilepsy associated with neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, I C; Kobayashi, E; Cardoso, T M; Guerreiro, C A; Cendes, F

    2000-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical features and seizure control of epilepsy related to neurocysticercosis. 18 patients with partial epilepsy and neurocysticercosis were treated with albendazol or praziquantel and followed from 3 months to 12 years. We analyzed results from the CSF exam, interictal electroencephalogram (EEG), head computerized tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging. The patients' mean age was 36.4 years. The mean duration of epilepsy was 16 years. 83% patients had simple partial seizures; 17% had complex partial seizures. All patients underwent routine EEGs: 62% had abnormalities and 38% were normal. A relationship was observed between focal EEG abnormality and the location of cyst in 28% of the patients. The CSF exams showed pleocytosis in 33% of the patients, and 28% had elevated protein levels. Only 22% of patients had positive titer for cysticercosis in the CSF. In all patients who had somatosensory and special sensory seizures there was a relationship between location of the cysts and seizure semiology (n=11). After cysticidal therapy, 83% patients had a significant improvement in controlling seizures. In this group, we found a predominance of simple partial seizures and a relationship between somatosensory and special sensory seizures and the location of the cysts. Cysticidal therapy was effective in controlling seizures in these patients and should be considered for patients with partial seizures and semiology related to cyst location.

  6. First case report of Nocardia veterana causing nodular lymphangitis in an immunocompromised host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Janet; Clayton, Rima

    2014-08-01

    We report a unique case of ascending cutaneous lymphangitis in a 72-year-old immunocompromised man from which a newly described Nocardia species was isolated by 16S ribosomal gene sequencing. Treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resulted in successful resolution of symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of N. veterana implicated in causing ascending cutaneous lymphangitis. © 2013 The Authors Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2013 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  7. A Case of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Caused by Ewingella americana : First Report from Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Ecemiş

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ewingella americana is a very rare cause of serious infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP in an intensive care unit patient, who was treated successfully with ceftriaxone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of VAP due to Ewingella americana in the English literature.J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014; 4(3: 118-120

  8. Unusual pharyngeal pain caused by acute coronary syndrome: a report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Anzai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most patients complaining of pharyngeal pain have an upper respiratory tract infection or other local explanation for their pain. Here we show 3 rare cases of patients visiting our Otorhinolaryngology Department who had an initial symptom of pharyngeal pain caused by acute coronary syndrome (ACS. An electrocardiogram and a cardiac biomarker test are recommended to exclude ACS with atypical presentation in cases without pharyngolaryngeal findings comparable to pharyngeal pain.

  9. A Rare Case of Osteonecrosis Caused by Arthroscopy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Bağcıer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Avascular necrosis, which is caused by non-traumatic factors, is not a specific disease entity but the final common result of many conditions leading to death of bone cells by the impairment of blood supply. Although associated diseases and conditions (steroid administration, alcoholism, systemic lupus erythematosus, etc. are well known, avascular necrosis is thought to arise from a multifactorial etiology of mechanical, hormonal and hematologic factors. The goals of treatment are to maintain range of motion, to stop the progression of disease, and to reduce symptoms. If conservative treatment fails, arthroscopic debridement, core decompression, grafting, and arthroplasty are surgical alternatives according to the stage of disease.

  10. Case of dermatophyte abscess caused by Trichophyton rubrum: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoki, Makoto; Nishijima, Chihiro; Miyake, Miho; Asaka, Toshiyuki; Hasegawa, Youichi; Anzawa, Kazushi; Mochizuki, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    A 54-year-old Japanese man without apparent immunosuppression presented with nodules with purulent drainage on the right lower leg. He had ringworm of the right leg and tinea unguium. A biopsy specimen of the nodule showed intradermal abscesses with fungal elements, and Trichophyton rubrum was cultured from both the pus and the biopsy specimen. Treatment with oral terbinafine resolved the nodules. Dermatophyte abscess is a rare, deep and invasive dermatophytosis, which is often associated with immunocompromised conditions. We provide a review of the literature including Japanese cases. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Causes and consequences of personal financial management in the case of larger and structural charitable donations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiepking, P.; Bekkers, R.H.F.P.

    2010-01-01

    We study causes and consequences of financial management in households in the specific case of charitable giving. We test hypotheses using couples in the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Study (n = 1,101). We find that more relationship specific investments lead to deciding on charitable giving as

  12. De Quervain disease caused by abductor pollicis longus tenosynovitis: a report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Takahara, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Noriaki; Ito, Kazuo; Watanabe, Tadayoshi; Ogino, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    De Quervain disease is caused by a stenosing tenosynovitis in the first dorsal compartment, and the main aetiology is extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) tenosynovitis. We encountered three cases in which EPB tenosynovitis was absent and abductor pollicis longus (APL) tenosynovitis was confirmed during operation. In the treatment of de Quervain disease, APL tenosynovitis should be paid as much attention as EPB tenosynovitis.

  13. Case Report: Salivary gland anlage tumour – a rare cause of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salivary gland anlage tumour, also known as congenital pleomorphic adenoma, is a rare salivary hamartoma that presents in the nasopharynx of neonates. It is important to distinguish this lesion from other causes of neonatal respiratory distress. Treatment usually involves simple excision, and recurrence is rare. No cases ...

  14. A Rare Case of Inherited Factor‑II Deficiency Causing Life ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    her pregnancies and prolonged prothrombin time and activated. A Rare Case of Inherited Factor‑II Deficiency Causing. Life‑Threatening Menorrhagia. Sunita TH, Desai RM, Premaleela KGM. Department of OBG, SDM College of Medical Sciences and Hospital, Sattur, Dharwad, Karnataka, India. Abstract. Menorrhagia is a ...

  15. A case of squamous cell carcinoma caused by previous irradiation to the giant pigmented nevus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoashi, Toshihiko; Kakinuma, Takashi; Idetsuki, Takeo; Kawabata, Yasuhiro; Imakado, Sumihisa; Tamaki, Kunihiko [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1999-02-01

    We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the left leg caused by previous irradiation to the giant pigmented nevus. In treating skin cancers originated from radiation dermatitis, we think it is important to resect surrounding radiation dermatitis lesions as well as tumor itself. (author)

  16. Multiple Pyogenic Liver Abscesses Caused by Eggerthella lenta Treated with Ertapenem: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Elias

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic gram-positive bacilli can occasionally be implicated in infections but are difficult to identify in culture by conventional biochemical methods. We report a case of liver abscesses caused by Eggerthella lenta, identified via 16S rRNA sequencing in a previously healthy patient, successfully treated with percutaneous drainage and ertapenem.

  17. Autochthonous Case of Eosinophilic Meningitis Caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis, France, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Yann; Rossi, Benjamin; Argy, Nicolas; Baker, Catherine; Nickel, Beatrice; Marti, Hanspeter; Zarrouk, Virginie; Houzé, Sandrine; Fantin, Bruno; Lefort, Agnès

    2017-06-01

    We report a case of a 54-year-old Moroccan woman living in France diagnosed with eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Diagnosis was based on clinical symptoms and confirmed by testing of serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples. Physicians should consider the risk for A. cantonensis infection outside of endemic areas.

  18. Two cases of severe sepsis caused by Bacillus pumilus in neonatal infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimouli, Maria; Vrioni, Georgia; Papadopoulou, Magdalini; Koumaki, Vasiliki; Petropoulou, Dimitra; Gounaris, Antonios; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Tsakris, Athanassios

    Bacillus pumilus is an environmental contaminant that has been rarely associated with clinical infections. Here, two cases of severe sepsis caused by B. pumilus are described in two full-term neonates; one in a female infant with no factors predisposing her to infection and the other in a male

  19. Keratitis caused by the recently described new species Aspergillus brasiliensis: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vágvölgyi Csaba

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Human infections caused by Aspergillus brasiliensis have not yet been reported. We describe the first two known cases of fungal keratitis caused by Aspergillus brasiliensis. Case presentations A 49-year-old Indian Tamil woman agricultural worker came with pain and defective vision in the right eye for one month. Meanwhile, a 35-year-old Indian Tamil woman presented with a history of a corneal ulcer involving the left eye for 15 days. The fungal strains isolated from these two cases were originally suspected to belong to Aspergillus section Nigri based on macro- and micromorphological characteristics. Molecular identification revealed that both isolates represent A. brasiliensis. Conclusion The two A. brasiliensis strains examined in this study were part of six keratitis isolates from Aspergillus section Nigri, suggesting that this recently described species may be responsible for a significant proportion of corneal infections caused by black Aspergilli. The presented cases also indicate that significant differences may occur between the severities of keratitis caused by individual isolates of A. brasiliensis.

  20. An unusual ulcer: A case of cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Gardiner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycoses are high-mortality infections feared by clinicians worldwide. They predominantly affect immunocompromised hosts and are associated with a spectrum of disease. We describe a case of cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus oryzae in a patient with multiple risk factors cured with complete surgical excision and a short course of antifungal therapy.

  1. Case Report - Analgesic nephropathy as a cause of end‑stage renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analgesic nephropathy is a subtle but significant cause of chronic renal failure. There is paucity of data on analgesic nephropathy in Nigeria. This case presentation is to highlight the need to have high index of suspicion in patients at risk of developing analgesic nephropathy. In March 2009 a 55‑year‑old businessman was ...

  2. Two Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp. canetti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillon, Marc; Koeck, Jean-Louis; Varnerot, Anne; Briant, Jean-François; Nguyen, Gilbert; Verrot, Denis; Bonnet, Daniel; Vincent, Véronique

    2002-01-01

    We identified an unusual strain of mycobacteria from two patients with pulmonary tuberculosis by its smooth, glossy morphotype and, primarily, its genotypic characteristics. Spoligotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism typing were carried out with the insertion sequence IS6110 patterns. All known cases of tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium canetti have been contracted in the Horn of Africa. PMID:12453369

  3. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis on the scrotum caused by Exophiala jeanselmei: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, André Luiz; Dellatorre, Gerson; Pérsio, Renan André; Romeiro, José Ceciliano de Menezes; Cruz, Rosana Cé Bella

    2010-01-01

    Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is a disease caused by dematiaceous fungi that develops mainly in immunocompromised patients. Lesions are generally located on the lower limbs. The present report describes a case of phaeohyphomycosis in an immunocompetent patient in whom a subcutaneous abscess was located in an unusual site, on the left hemiscrotum. The abscess was treated successfully with oral fluconazole associated with surgical excision.

  4. Cerebellopontine angle arachnoid cyst: a case of hemifacial spasm caused by an organic lesion other than neurovascular compression: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastronardi, Luciano; Taniguchi, Raymond; Caroli, Manuela; Crispo, Francesco; Ferrante, Luigi; Fukushima, Takanori

    2009-12-01

    A rare case of cerebellopontine angle arachnoid cyst manifesting as hemifacial spasm (HFS) is reported. The patient is a 42-year-old woman with 10-month history of left HFS. A preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a well-demarcated area, hypointense on T1-weighted imaging and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging, in the left cerebellopontine angle, without contrast enhancement, resembling an arachnoid cyst. The cyst was excised with microneurosurgical technique and the facial, vestibular, and acoustic nerves were completely decompressed from the arachnoid wall. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the left HFS disappeared immediately. Histologically, the cyst wall was a typical arachnoidal membrane. Ten months after surgery, the patient is symptom free. It is well-known that in approximately 10% of cases, trigeminal neuralgia can be caused by a space-occupying mass. However, the fact that HFS can also be caused by organic lesions as well as neurovascular compression is less well-known. Although the occurrence of tumor compression causing HFS has been previously recognized, cerebellopontine angle cysts have very rarely been described. The observation of a patient with a cerebellopontine angle arachnoid cyst causing HFS prompted us to review the literature relative to HFS caused by an organic lesion rather than neurovascular compression.

  5. Budd-chiari syndrome caused by diaphragmatic hernia of the liver: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jae Min; Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Jae Wook; Chung, Woo Kyoung; Chung, Hee Sun; Kim, Joo Hyung; Choi, Jun Ho; Kim, Seung Ho [Armed Forces Capital Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Budd-Chiari syndrome is an uncommon disorder, and it is caused by obstruction of the hepatic venous out-flow or inferior vena cava above the hepatic vein. It may result from a large number of conditions, including primary congenital obstructions of the hepatic veins or inferior vena cava by webs or bands. Secondary causes include trauma, polycythemia vera, chronic leukemia, pregnancy, tumors and use of oral contraceptives. No definitive etiologic factors have been identified in two thirds of all cases. We recently experienced a case of Budd-Chiari syndrome caused by diaphragmatic hernia in 21-year-old man. Postoperative follow up CT showed normal venous flow after reintroduction of the liver into the abdominal cavity and closure of the diaphragm defect.

  6. Acute abdomen probably caused by acute tuberculous appendicitis. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montiel-Jarquín, Álvaro José

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute tuberculous appendicitis is a rare disease. It constitutes from 0.001 % to 0.01 % of the clinical forms of tuberculosis. We present cases of such disease as probably cause for surgical acute abdomen. Case report: Male aged 29 with mild to moderate diffuse abdominal pain, which intensified and localized in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen, fever, vomiting, malaise, leukocytosis (11,300/µL and 91 % neutrophils. Appendectomy was performed, the histopathological report was acute appendicitis, Ziehl-Neelsen stain was positive. Three days later he returned home and had no short- or long term complications. Conclusion: Acute tuberculous appendicitis is a rare disease that may cause acute abdomen, patients should receive drug treatment to eradicate the cause and have proper epidemiological monitoring.

  7. Case of a cerebral abscess caused by Porphyromonas gingivalis in a subject with periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisar, Koenraad; Maes, Honorine; Politis, Constantinus

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 65-year-old man presenting with generalised seizures after developing a right frontal brain abscess. Stereotactic aspiration and subsequent matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight analyzer (MALDI-TOF) spectrometry revealed Porphyromonas gingivalis as the only causative anaerobe microorganism. Secondary incision and drainage was required due to neurological deterioration with increased dimensions of the abscess, intracranial pressure and formation of a subdural occipitoparietal empyema. Oral imaging was positive for apical periodontitis of multiple elements; therefore, the remaining dentition was removed. Targeted antibiotic treatment included intravenous ceftriaxone and ornidazole. The patient was discharged to our revalidation unit 59 days after admission to make a full recovery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the sixth reported case of P. gingivalis causing an intracranial abscess and the third case of a true intracerebral parenchymal abscess caused by this bacterium. PMID:28228396

  8. A case of urinary tract infection caused by Kluyvera ascorbata in an infant: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isozaki, Atsushi; Shirai, Kentaro; Mimura, Sho; Takahashi, Masaki; Furushima, Wakana; Kawano, Yutaka

    2010-12-01

    We experienced a case of urinary tract infection in a 3-month-old child caused by Kluyvera ascorbata. The authors report the case and review the literature regarding Kluyvera urinary tract infection exclusively in children. Kluyvera infection, which had been extremely rare, has increasingly been reported, including urinary tract infection. A prompt identification of Kluyvera species in clinical infections is important. Recognition of its disease-producing potential and the subsequent initiation of effective antimicrobial coverage are essential for appropriate management in the pediatric population.

  9. Recurrent locked knee caused by an impaction fracture following inferior patellar dislocation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutcliffe William

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Locked knee caused by inferior patellar dislocation is considered rare in elderly patients. It was originally thought that, in the osteoarthritic knee, osteophytes on the pole of the patella become entrapped in the inter-condylar notch, which is managed by performing closed reduction and immobilization in a knee splint for three to four weeks. We present an unusual case of a locked knee with an impaction fracture. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of such impaction fractures managed with arthroscopy. Case presentation We present an unusual case of an 88-year-old Caucasian woman with moderate arthritis who had a locked knee caused by an impaction fracture of the patella into the lateral femoral condyle. In this case report, we describe the need for arthroscopic surgery to prevent relocking of the knee in these patients. Conclusions This case report emphasizes the need for careful assessment of locked knees in elderly patients. Impaction fractures should be considered in all rare cases of patellar dislocation, and we advocate arthroscopic assessment of the articular cartilage in these patients. This is an important consideration, as the population demographics change and such impaction fractures may become more common in patients with degeneration in the knees.

  10. [Analysis of death causes of 345 cases with HIV/AIDS in Guangdong area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-fen; Tang, Xiao-ping; Cai, Wei-ping; Lei, Chun-liang; Zheng, Fu-chun; Chen, Wei-lie; Ye, Xiao-xin

    2013-02-01

    To analyze the death causes of 345 cases with HIV/AIDS in Guangdong area. The situations of 345 hospitalized death cases with HIV/AIDS were conducted by retrospective analysis. (1)There were total 3406 hospitalized cases with HIV/AIDS in a hospital from January 2001 to December 2011 and 345 cases died, the fatality rate was 10. 13%. Since 2005 the introduction of free anti-viral treatment, the fatality rate of HIV/AIDS declined. The fatality rate of the patients whose CD4+ T lymphocyte counts or=200 cells/microl (P death cases had more than one kind of opportunistic infections (OI) and there were 924 cases of OI totally. 84. 64% of OI related to the death directly. Fungal infection was the most common in OI, followed by bacterial infection. Most OI occurred in the lungs, mouth, other systemic disseminated diseases, gastrointestine, central nerver system, septicemia, skin. The AIDS defining opportunistic infections such as several pneumonia, disseminated penicilliosis marneffei and CNS infections accounted for 29.65%. Other factors that caused HIV/AIDS death included opportunistic tumors, HIV related disease and non AIDS-related disease accounted for 15.36%. No accepted effective highly active antiretroviral therapy (HARRT) also constituted factors of death. Among cases which accepted HARRT treatment, only 6.96% had the period of treatment over three months. The fatality rate of end-stage AIDS patients was high and the opportunistic infections was the most important cause of death. Early diagnosis and treatment for opportunistic infections, timely effective HARRT were the key to improve the quality of life of AIDS patients.

  11. A Case Report of Penile Infection Caused by Fluconazole- and Terbinafine-Resistant Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongxuan; Hu, Yanqing; Lu, Yan; Huang, Shiyun; Liu, Kangxing; Han, Xue; Mao, Zuhao; Wu, Zhong; Zhou, Xianyi

    2017-04-01

    Candida albicans is the most common pathogen that causes balanoposthitis. It often causes recurrence of symptoms probably due to its antifungal resistance. A significant number of balanitis Candida albicans isolates are resistant to azole and terbinafine antifungal agents in vitro. However, balanoposthitis caused by fluconazole- and terbinafine-resistant Candida albicans has rarely been reported. Here, we describe a case of a recurrent penile infection caused by fluconazole- and terbinafine-resistant Candida albicans, as well as the treatments administered to this patient. The isolate from the patient was tested for drug susceptibility in vitro. It was sensitive to itraconazole, voriconazole, clotrimazole and amphotericin B, but not to terbinafine and fluconazole. Thus, oral itraconazole was administrated to this patient with resistant Candida albicans penile infection. The symptoms were improved, and mycological examination result was negative. Follow-up treatment of this patient for 3 months showed no recurrence.

  12. Homicidal commotio cordis caused by domestic violence: A report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Jiao; Zhang, Ji; Liu, Liang; Dong, Hongmei

    2016-04-01

    Commotio cordis is a rare and fatal mechano-electric arrhythmogenic syndrome, occurring mainly during sports activities. The present study describes two cases of sudden death due to homicidal commotio cordis caused violence from an intimate partner. The two decedents were both young women. They suffered from physical abuse by their intimate partner and collapsed immediately after being punched in the precordium. Electrocardiograms were recorded at the hospital and showed ventricular fibrillation in one case. An autopsy was performed in each case, and no structural cardiac damage, evident lesions of other internal organs or underlying diseases were found. Combined with the negative toxicological analysis, it was concluded that the cause of death was commotio cordis due to a blunt force to the anterior chest. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there is no published report on commotio cordis caused by physical abuse from an intimate partner. The accurate diagnosis of the cause of death is emphasised, as it is important for judicial fairness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Death caused by a signal rocket--not an isolated case*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alempijević, Djordje; Jecmenica, Dragan; Pavlekić, Snezana; Savić, Slobodan; Kovacević, Slobodan

    2008-09-01

    Fatalities related to sporting events are predominantly caused by blunt force injuries especially due to the emotional involvement of crowd, but occasionally other types of trauma are reported as well. A case of very rare trauma caused by shooting with a hand-held parachute signal rocket during a football match is presented. A 17-year-old football fan sustained fatal injuries, a combination of mechanical trauma caused by rocket penetration, as well as extensive thermal burning of the thoracic viscera. Analysis of the event was based on autopsy findings and evidence produced by medicolegal and ballistic experts. Improper use of a hand-held signal rocket, designed for marine distress signals, may cause serious injuries either mechanically, due to explosion, or as a result of thermal discharge. In the reported case, pattern of injuries is discussed, and medical finding corroborated to other available evidence. The presented case is a reminder that the forensic pathologist should be informed accordingly on the type and features of weapon suspected to produce injury, to be able to understand traumatic changes, and look for potential presence of foreign bodies at postmortem examination.

  14. An unusual foreign body as cause of chronic sinusitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinerman Harry

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The presence of a foreign body in the nose is a relatively uncommon occurrence. Many unusual foreign bodies in the nose have been reported in the literature, but no case of a nasal packing occurring as a foreign body in the nasal cavity for a prolonged time has been found. Case presentation We describe a unique case of the largest foreign body left in situ in the nasal cavity for over 10 years. Our patient was a 71-year-old Caucasian man with diabetes. Because of this, he was at high risk of developing complications from the foreign body and the chronic sinusitis. Amazingly, though, the foreign body had not caused any symptoms on our patient for many years, except for nasal discharge during the last few years. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature of such a large intra-nasal foreign body described in an adult without mental illness and without trauma that remained in situ for such a long time. Conclusion Undoubtedly, even illnesses with no complications could prove difficult for clinicians to diagnose. Clinicians should recognize the underlying causes that are responsible for the symptoms of chronic sinusitis and a unilateral nasal discharge should be assumed to be caused by an intra-nasal foreign body until proven otherwise.

  15. A case of lobar pneumonia and sepsis with death caused by invasive Klebsiella rhinoscleromatis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumade, Eri; Furusyo, Norihiro; Takeshima, Norito; Kishihara, Yasuhiro; Mitsumoto-Kaseida, Fujiko; Etoh, Yoshitaka; Murata, Masayuki; Hayashi, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae often causes pneumonia and other infections in heavy drinkers and patients with diabetes. Pneumonia caused by Klebsiella rhinoscleromatis, a subspecies of K. pneumoniae, has not been previously reported. We report a case of pneumonia caused by K. rhinoscleromatis. A 68-year-old man with type 2 diabetes visited our department complaining fever and fatigue for 10 days and cough and bloody sputum for two days. His Japan Coma Scale score was I-1, body temperature 38.3 °C, blood pressure 85/51 mmHg, pulse 135 bpm, and peripheral capillary oxygen saturation level 92% (room air). He had no abnormal breathing sounds. His white blood cell count had decreased to 2600/μL, and his C-reactive protein level was high, at 35.9 mg/dL. Chest computed tomography revealed lobar pneumonia in the right upper lobe and pneumonia in the left upper division. Klebsiella was suspected based on the result of a sputum smear examination. He was diagnosed with septic shock due to pneumonia and was immediately admitted. Intravenous antibacterial (levofloxacin) treatment was initiated, however, he died 13 h after presenting at the hospital. Subsequently, K. rhinoscleromatis was detected in sputum and blood culture. Additional testing determined the bacteria to be a highly pathogenic hypermucoviscosity phenotype and the cause of the fatal lobar pneumonia. Although cases of rhinoscleroma and bacteremia caused by K. rhinoscleromatis infection have been reported, this is the first report of a case with sepsis caused by fulminant pneumonia. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A case of meningoencephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a healthy child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Lee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative anaerobic, gram-positive bacillus that is isolated from the soil, vegetables, and wild or domestic animals. Listeria occurs predominantly in the elderly, immunocompromised patients, pregnant women and newborns. Infections by this microorganism are rare in healthy infants and children. L. monocytogenes may cause meningitis, meningoencephalitis, brain abscess, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and liver abscesses in children. The course of meningoencephalitis by listeria is often severe and even fatal. Acute hydrocephalus can develop as a complication and the mortality associated with listeriosis is significantly high. We present a case of meningoencephalitis caused by L. monocytogenes in a previously healthy 7-year-old girl.

  17. A case of meningoencephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a healthy child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Eun; Cho, Won Kyoung; Nam, Chan Hee; Jung, Min Ho; Kang, Jin Han; Suh, Byung Kyu

    2010-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative anaerobic, gram-positive bacillus that is isolated from the soil, vegetables, and wild or domestic animals. Listeria occurs predominantly in the elderly, immunocompromised patients, pregnant women and newborns. Infections by this microorganism are rare in healthy infants and children. L. monocytogenes may cause meningitis, meningoencephalitis, brain abscess, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and liver abscesses in children. The course of meningoencephalitis by listeria is often severe and even fatal. Acute hydrocephalus can develop as a complication and the mortality associated with listeriosis is significantly high. We present a case of meningoencephalitis caused by L. monocytogenes in a previously healthy 7-year-old girl.

  18. Pedunculated Cecal Lipoma Causing Colo-Colonic Intussusception: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanos Atmatzidis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonic lipomas are uncommon nonepithelial neoplasms that are typically sessile, asymptomatic and incidentally found during endoscopy, surgery, or autopsy. We present a very rare case of a 34-year-old female patient with symptomatic pedunculated cecal lipoma causing intermittent colo-colonic intussusception. Despite adequate imaging studies, definite preoperative diagnosis was not established and the patient underwent exploratory laparotomy. Intraoperatively, intussusception of the cecum into the ascending colon was found and right hemicolectomy was performed. Macroscopic assessment of the resected specimen showed the presence of a giant cecal pedunculated polypoid tumor with features of lipoma, causing intussusception. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of pedunculated cecal lipoma.

  19. Can lumbar hemorrhagic synovial cyst cause acute radicular compression? Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbó, Luciana Sátiro; Rosemberg, Laercio Alberto; Brandt, Reynaldo André; Peres, Ricardo Botticini; Nakamura, Olavo Kyosen; Guimarães, Juliana Frota

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts are an uncommon cause of back pain and radiculopathy, usually manifesting with gradual onset of symptoms, secondary to involvement of the spinal canal. Rarely, intracyst hemorrhage occurs, and may acutely present as radicular - or even spinal cord - compression syndrome. Synovial cysts are generally associated with degenerative facets, although the pathogenesis has not been entirely established. We report a case of bleeding complication in a synovial cyst at L2-L3, adjacent to the right interfacet joint, causing acute pain and radiculopathy in a patient on anticoagulation therapy who required surgical resection.

  20. Disseminated Infection Caused by Eggerthella lenta in a Previously Healthy Young Man: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Salameh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic bacteria are the predominant normal flora of the mucous membranes which may cause life-threatening disseminated infections and are often difficult to culture from infected sites. Eggerthella (previously known as Eubacteria species is an anaerobic, nonsporulating, nonmotile, Gram-positive rod that is found in the human colon and feces and has been isolated from various other clinical specimens. We report a case of complicated disseminated anaerobic bacterial infection with Eggerthella lenta in a healthy immunocompetent man causing multiple brain abscesses, liver abscesses, necrotizing pneumonia, and osteomyelitis of the left radial bone. He was successfully treated with empiric penicillin G and metronidazole.

  1. Compressive Ulnar Neuropathy Caused by Olecranon Bursitis and Concomitant Epidermal Cyst: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Shinone, Michitaka; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2017-12-01

    Epidermal cyst is a dermal or subcutaneous epithelial cyst that contains keratin and is lined by true epidermis. Although extremely rare, it can cause pathology including nerve compression syndrome. We report a rare case of ulnar nerve compression in the elbow that was caused by olecranon bursitis and concomitant epidermal cyst in a 67-year-old man. The ulnar nerve was immediately adjacent to the olecranon bursa and was significantly compressed. There was no connection between the tumor and the ulnar nerve. Pain, numbness, and weakness in his ring and little fingers disappeared after resection of the cyst and bursa.

  2. Infective endocarditis caused by Cellulomonas spp. in an intravenous drug user: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logar, Mateja; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana

    2013-06-01

    Cellulomonas spp. are often believed to be of low virulence. There are only a few reports of human infections. We report the first case of endocarditis caused by Cellulomonas in an intravenous drug abuser. The diagnosis of infective endocarditis (IE) in this case was definite using the Duke criteria. The course of the disease was complicated with a heart failure and possible mycotic aneurysm in the left leg. After the end of antimicrobial therapy aortic valve replacement was done because of severe heart failure.

  3. A Case of Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Caused by Opioid Treatment for Nonmalignant Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Tabuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of 42-year-old male patient with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. He suffered from general fatigue and erectile dysfunction after the treatment with transdermal fentanyl for chronic pain by traffic injury. Endocrine examinations and hormone stimulating tests showed that he had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed no abnormal findings, and he had no past history of accounting for acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Therefore, his hypogonadism was diagnosed to be caused by opioid treatment. Although opioid-induced endocrine dysfunctions are not widely recognized, this case suggests that we should consider the possibility of endocrine dysfunctions in patients with opioid treatment.

  4. Severe Postpartum Headache and Hypertension Caused by Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Ed; Sethuraman, Rajamani; Woograsingh, Reshma; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Gilbert-Kawai, Edward

    2017-07-10

    Reversible cerebrovascular vasoconstriction syndrome is an uncommon condition that presents as severe headache and hypertension. Recent literature suggests a 1% incidence in postpartum headache cases. It can cause subarachnoid hemorrhages, cerebral ischemia, and seizures. It is often misdiagnosed as postdural puncture headache or preeclampsia. In this case, a postpartum woman, who had received epidural anesthesia for labor, presented 5 days postpartum with severe headache that did not resolve with an epidural blood patch. She then became more hypertensive and suffered a grand mal seizure. When treatment for eclampsia failed to resolve her symptoms, magnetic resonance angiography was performed. It demonstrated the pathognomic signs of reversible cerebrovascular vasoconstriction syndrome. Her symptoms resolved with nimodipine.

  5. Nocardia nova causing empyema necessitatis afterlung re-transplantation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Bittencourt Severo

    Full Text Available Abstract: We report herein a case of thoracic infection due to Nocardia nova following lung re-transplantation performed for emphysema related to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. The infection extended from the lung into the pleural space, thoracic wall, and mediastinum, presenting as pericarditis and empyema necessitatis. Nocardia nova was identified by 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. According to a literature search of PubMed, LILACS and MEDLINE databases, we describe herein the first case of empyema necessitatis caused by N. nova species in a transplanted patient.

  6. Rare yeasts causing fungemia in immunocompromised and haematology patients: Case series from Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Capoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic fungal infection related to fluconazole-resistant yeasts are emerging in immunocompromised patients. In this case-series, we report eight cases of fungemia caused by Trichosporon spp. (2, Stephanoascus ceferrii (1, Kodamaea ohmeri (1, Pichia kutrawersi (2, Candida rugosa (1 and Candida lusitianae (1 in immunocompromised patients. All the yeasts except (Trichosporon asahii were sequenced. As these rare species are inherently resistant to antifungal agents and they may lead to the development of nosocomial outbreaks, therefore, accurate identification followed by antifungal susceptibility testing is crucial for proper treatment and management.

  7. A pediatric case of life-threatening airway obstruction caused by a cervicomediastinal thymic cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komura, Makoto; Kanamori, Yutaka; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Iwanaka, Tadashi [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Tokyo (Japan); Fukushima, Noriyoshi [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Pathology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    Most patients with thymic cysts complain of a slowly enlarging, asymptomatic cervical mass. Only 6-10% suffer dysphagia, dyspnoea, stridor, cervical pain or vocal paralysis. In some rare cases sudden onset of severe dyspnoea or asphyxia is the first symptom, especially in neonates and small infants. We report a unique case of a 20-month-old child, who required emergency tracheal intubation due to asphyxia. Cervicomediastinal thymic cyst might need to be included in causes of life-threatening airway obstruction in young children. (orig.)

  8. [Early diagnosis and treatment of compartment syndrome caused by landslides:a report of 20 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong-Bo; Peng, Zi-Lai; Liu, Xu-Bang; Chen, Lian

    2012-01-01

    To summarize early diagnosis and treatment methods of 20 patients with compartment syndrome caused by landslides during coal mine accidents in order to improve the level of diagnosis and treatment of compartment syndrome and reduce disability. From September 2006 to April 2010,20 patients with compartment syndrome were treated with the methods of early decompression, systemic support. All the patients were male with an average age of 42 years (ranged, 23 to 54). All the patients with high tension limb swelling, pain, referred pain passive positive; 5 extremities feeling diminish or disappear and the distal blood vessel beat were normal or weakened or disappeared; myoglobinuria, hyperkalemia, serum urea nitrogen and creatinine increased in 5 cases and oliguria in occurred 1 case. The function of affected limbs was observed according to disability ratings. Three cases complicated with infection of affected limb and 6 cases occurred with renal function insufficiency. Total recovery was in 16 cases, basically recovery in 3, amputation in 1 case. All patients were followed up for 6-15 months with an average of 12 months. The ability to work according to national standard identification--Employee work-related injuries and occupational disability rating classification (GB/T16180-2006) to assess, grade 5 was in 1 case, grade 8 in 2 cases, grade 10 in 1 case, no grade in 16 cases. Arteriopalmus of dorsalis pedis weaken and vanished can not be regard as an evidence in early diagnosis of compartment syndrome. Early diagnosis and decompression, systemic support and treatment is the key in reducing disability.

  9. Analysis on 113 cases of adverse reactions caused by β-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianquan; Cai, Chunyue; Gu, Yufeng; Tang, Yanhui; Xue, Jinbiao; Huang, Kaijian

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to learn about the characteristics and rules of the occurrence of adverse reactions caused by lactam antibiotics and provide a reference for clinical drug use. A retrospective study was made to analyse the 113 case reports of adverse reactions caused by β-lactam antibiotics collected in our hospital between 2007 and 2009. 113 cases of ADR involved 17 kinds of β-lactam antibiotics, headed by ceftriaxone sodium. The most common manifestation was skin and accessory damage; nervous system and gastrointestinal system damage were also easier to find, and the administration route was mainly intravenous infusion. The clinical application of β-lactam antibiotics should pay attention to adverse reaction monitoring and rational drug use to reduce the incidence of adverse reactions.

  10. Purulent pericarditis caused by the Streptococcus milleri group: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuyasu, Hirokazu; Saitoh, Yuhei; Harada, Tomoya; Touge, Hirokazu; Kawasaki, Yuji; Maeda, Ryo; Isowa, Noritaka; Shimizu, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    A 69-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus presented at our emergency room with chest pain and dyspnea. A chest computed tomography revealed a pericardial effusion. Pericardiocentesis was performed; strains of the Streptococcus milleri group were detected on culture of the fluid thus obtained. Therefore, purulent pericarditis was diagnosed. Despite treatment with panipenem/betamipron, the pericarditis worsened leading to the development of cardiac tamponade. Emergency pericardial drainage was performed, after which the condition resolved without any complications. We report an extremely rare case of purulent pericarditis caused by a strain of the Streptococcus milleri group. In addition, we review 5 previously reported cases of purulent pericarditis caused by strains.

  11. Case report of a giant colonic sigmoid diverticulum causing sigmoid volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, John Alfred

    2017-01-01

    Giant colonic diverticulum is a rare complication of colonic diverticulosis that occurs when a single diverticulum enlarges to over 4cm in diameter. There have been fewer than 200 cases reported worldwide since it was first described in 1946. The author presents a rare case of a giant colonic diverticulum that presented as a sigmoid volvulus. The patient underwent emergency surgery with resection of the diverticulum and reduction of the volvulus. Due to their propensity to cause complications and mechanical blockage from their large size, all authors recommend surgical resection of giant colonic diverticula. This has been documented to be safely done by diverticulectomy as was performed in this patient, but also by segmental colectomy, laparoscopic diverticulectomy, or laparoscopic colectomy. Giant colonic diverticulum is a rare entity that tends to cause many intra-abdominal complications, including volvulus. Surgical resection is recommended once identified. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Hemifacial spasm caused by pontine glioma: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgamal, Essam A; Coakham, Hugh B

    2005-10-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is an involuntary paroxysmal contractions of the facial musculature, caused generally by vascular compression of the seventh cranial nerve at its root exit zone from the brain stem. The case of an adult man harbouring brain stem glioma (BSG) whose only neurological signs were left HFS and mild facial weakness is reported. Radiological and neurophysiological findings are described. No responsible vessel could be identified during surgery, but the causative lesion was found to be an astrocytic tumour encasing the facial nerve at its root exit zone from the brain stem. The rarity of such a condition prompted us to review the literature. Nine cases, including our patient presenting with HFS caused by BSG, are reviewed.

  13. Snapping hip caused by a venous hemangioma of the gluteus maximus muscle: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Cheng-Li

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Snapping hip, or coxa saltans, is defined as a clinical condition where a usually painful, audible snap occurs during hip flexion and extension. Its causes can be divided into external, internal or intra-articular origin. Accurate diagnosis is a prerequisite to successful treatment. We report a rare cause of snapping hip which is different from any previously reported cases. Case presentation A 23-year-old man presented to us with right hip pain of more than 10 years duration. Atrophy of the right gluteus maximus with snapping and tenderness were also noted. The imaging study revealed a focal intramuscular lesion in the lateral portion of the right gluteus maximus muscle. Surgery was performed and pathological examination concluded this mass to be a venous hemangioma. Conclusion Intramuscular hemangioma, though rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a snapping hip even though muscle fibrosis is most frequently encountered.

  14. Infective endocarditis and osteomyelitis caused by Cellulomonas: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ping-Chang; Chen, Yao-Shen; Lee, Susan Shin-Jung

    2009-10-01

    Cellulomonas spp. are often believed to be of low virulence and have never been reported as a pathogen causing human disease before. We report the first case of endocarditis caused by Cellulomonas and complicated with osteomyelitis of the lumbar spine in a 78-year-old woman. General weakness and aggravated lower back pain followed by sudden-onset of fever and chills were the major presentation. The diagnosis of infective endocarditis in this case was definitely using the Duke criteria. The magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine revealed infective spondylodisciitis at an early stage. After a full course of antibiotics treatment, the patient's fever subsided but her lower back pain persisted. A slow clinical response to appropriate antimicrobial agents was characteristic of Gram-positive bacillary endocarditis.

  15. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by cobalt in leather – clinical cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Opstrup, Morten S.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, we raised suspicion that cobalt in leather could be responsible for hitherto unrecognized cases of allergic contact dermatitis. We saw a patient sensitized only to cobalt with clear long-term exposure to cobalt from a leather sofa, and observed resolution of dermatitis following avoidance...... [1]. In 2014, we performed a questionnaire study, which showed a positive and significant association between cobalt allergy and a history of dermatitis caused by non-occupational exposure to leather articles [2]. Recently, we published an article showing high amounts of cobalt in selected leather...... swatches from furniture [3]. Here, we report 2 additional cases of allergic cobalt dermatitis caused by consumer leather exposure, to increase awareness about this topic....

  16. Acute small bowel obstruction caused by endometriosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ceglie, Antonella; Bilardi, Claudio; Blanchi, Sabrina; Picasso, Massimo; Di Muzio, Marcello; Trimarchi, Alberto; Conio, Massimo

    2008-06-07

    Gastrointestinal involvement of endometriosis has been found in 3%-37% of menstruating women and exclusive localization on the ileum is very rare (1%-7%). Endometriosis of the distal ileum is an infrequent cause of intestinal obstruction, ranging from 7% to 23% of all cases with intestinal involvement. We report a case in which endometrial infiltration of the small bowel caused acute obstruction requiring emergency surgery, in a woman whose symptoms were not related to menses. Histology of the resected specimen showed that endometriosis was mainly prevalent in the muscularis propria and submucosa and that the mucosa was not ulcerated but had inflammation and glandular alteration. Endometrial lymph node involvement, with a cystic glandular pattern was also detected.

  17. Premature delivery due to intrauterine Candida infection that caused neonatal congenital cutaneous candidiasis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Fumitake; Okubo, Tomoharu; Yasuo, Tadahiro; Mori, Taisuke; Iwasa, Koichi; Iwasaku, Kazuhiro; Kitawaki, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Congenital cutaneous candidiasis is a very rare disease with less than 100 cases published in the medical literature. Neonates having this disease present with systemic skin lesions caused by intrauterine Candida infections. We present a case of threatened premature delivery due to Candida chorioamnionitis, which caused both maternal postpartum endometritis and neonatal congenital cutaneous candidiasis. A 34-year-old woman who was admitted for fetal membrane bulging at 20 weeks of gestation underwent McDonald cervical cerclage. We diagnosed threatened premature delivery due to intrauterine infection; therefore, we terminated the gestation by cesarean section at 24 weeks of gestation. Fungi-like yeast was detected in infantile gastric juice. Histopathological findings of the placenta revealed that Candida albicans mycelium invaded the placenta, chorioamniotic membrane and umbilical cord. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. Primary sternal osteomyelitis caused by Nocardia nova: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis G. Baraboutis

    Full Text Available A 51 year old woman without significant past medical history or risk factors for Nocardia infection developed primary Nocardia nova sternal osteomyelitis with mediastinal abscess, diagnosed with open biopsy. She required prolonged antibiotic therapy and had a favorable outcome. Primary sternal osteomyelitis develops in the absence of a contiguous focus of infection, as opposed to secondary sternal osteomyelitis, which is usually a complication of sternotomy. Staphylococcus aureus probably still is the most common cause of both forms of sternal osteomyelitis. Nocardia species invade humans usually through the respiratory tract and can cause a variety of localized infections through the hematogenous route. Pulmonary involvement may or may not coexist. Immunosuppressed patients are more prone to infection by Nocardia species, although cases involving seemingly immunocompetent patients are not rare. This is the first reported case in the English literature of primary sternal osteomyelitis due to Nocardia nova or any other Nocardia species.

  19. Giant Fecaloma Causing Small Bowel Obstruction: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Mosin; Shah, Mubashir A; Malik, Aijaz A; Wani, Khurshid A; Thakur, Natasha; Q Parray, Fazl

    2015-01-01

    Fecaloma is a mass of hardened feces being impacted mostly in rectum and sigmoid. The most common sites of the fecaloma is the sigmoid colon and the rectum. There are several causes of fecaloma and have been described in association with Hirschsprung’s disease, psychiatric patients, Chagas disease, both inflammatory and neoplastic, and in patients suffering with chronic constipation. Up to now several cases of giant fecaloma has been reported in the literature most of them presenting with megacolon or urinary retention. We herein report a case of giant fecaloma leading to bowel obstruction who was successfully treated by surgery. A 30-yrar-old man presented with sign and symptoms of acute bowel obstruction. He underwent exploratory laparotomy and enterotomy. He was found to have a giant fecaloma causing bowel obstruction in the jejunum. He was discharged after the operation with good condition. Jejunal fecaloma is extremely rare condition. PMID:27162906

  20. Phaeohyphomycosis Caused by Phaeoacremoniumrubrigenum in an Immunosuppressive Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadanori Furudate

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Phaeohyphomycosis (PHM is a rare, deep fungal infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissues caused by dematiaceous fungi. In this report, we describe a case of PHM caused by Phaeoacremoniumrubrigenum, which is generally known to infect woody plants. We detected the gray-blackish villi by biopsy culture material, and slide culture revealed the conidia arising from slightly tapering phialides. Furthermore, we differentiated these fungi as P.rubrigenum by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST algorithm. We performed surgical debridement of disseminated nodules and administered oral itraconazole for a duration of 4 weeks. One year after stopping itraconazole, there was no sign of relapsing subcutaneous nodules. To our knowledge, this is the third case report of PHM developing from skin infection by P. rubrigenum in human.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of endometriosis of the piriform muscle causing sciatica: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, N.A.J.; Murphy, J.P.; Bloom, C.; Hamilton, P. [Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Centre, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-02-01

    Endometriosis is the presence of functioning endometrial tissue in a location outside the uterus and is a rare cause of sciatica. The superior soft-tissue contrast and sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting blood products make it a valuable imaging modality in patients with pelvic endometriosis. In the case described below, it allowed a presumptive diagnosis to be made and the response to medical therapy to be monitored. (author)

  2. [A case of cutaneous actinomycosis (streptothricosis) in cattle, caused by dermatophilus congolensis (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, R G; Zandstra, F K

    1975-03-01

    A skin condition in cattle, associated with crusted lesions on the back, flanks, neck, head and skin of the udder was found to be cutaneous actinomycosis (streptothricosis) caused by D. congolensis, which is common in tropical regions during the rainy season. This actinomycete was isolated for the first time from cattle in the Netherlands in the case reported. Data culled from the literature as well as the diagnosis and treatment of the patient are discussed.

  3. A case report of tinea pedis caused by Trichosporon faecale in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Fallahi, Ali akbar; Moazeni, Maryam; Noorbakhsh, Fatemeh; Kordbacheh, Parivash; Farideh ZAINI; MIRHENDI, Hossein; Zeraati, Hojjat; Sassan REZAIE

    2012-01-01

    Trichosporon species are known as the causative agents of cutaneous infections and are involved in systemic, localized, as well as disseminated mycoses particularly in immunocompromised patients. Here we report a case of tinea pedis infection caused by Trichosporon faecale in a healthy 29-year-old woman in the north of Iran. Macroscopic and microscopic characteristics using direct examination as well as culture method revealed the causative agent as Trichosporon species.

  4. Case report: cutaneous myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis, the human botfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Kanishka W; Singh, Virtaj

    2007-05-01

    Cutaneous myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis, the human botfly, involves the infestation of human tissue with fly larvae, and is common in Central and South America. We report a case of a 57-year-old man with cutaneous myiasis imported into the US from Belize. The epidemiology, biological life cycle, clinical presentation, and various methods of larval extraction, including incision and drainage, are discussed.

  5. Spontaneous Obturator Internus Hematoma?a Rare Cause of Hip Pain: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Chouhan, Varun; Mandliya, Alok; Chouhan, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Obturator internus hematoma(OIH) is a very rare entity. In past it has been reported in hemophilics, we firstly report obturator internus hematoma in a patient of stroke on antiplatelet drugs. Obturator internus hematoma can cause severe hip pain with normal X-rays, so it should kept in differential diagnosis of hip pain with normal radiographs. Case report: 74 year old male with history of recent onset stroke presented to us with left side weakness and left hip pain. Radiograph...

  6. Brown tumor of the patella caused by primary hyperparathyroidism: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irie, Tomoko; Mawatari, Taro; Ikemura, Satoshi; Matsui, Gen; Iguchi, Takahiro; Mitsuyasu, Hiroaki [Orthopaedic Surgery, Hamanomachi Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    It has been reported that the common sites of brown tumors are the jaw, pelvis, ribs, femurs and clavicles. We report our experience in a case of brown tumor of the patella caused by primary hyperparathyroidism. An initial radiograph and CT showed an osteolytic lesion and MR images showed a mixed solid and multiloculated cystic tumor in the right patella. One month after the parathyroidectomy, rapid bone formation was observed on both radiographs and CT images.1.

  7. Brown tumor of the patella caused by primary hyperparathyroidism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Tomoko; Mawatari, Taro; Ikemura, Satoshi; Matsui, Gen; Iguchi, Takahiro; Mitsuyasu, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that the common sites of brown tumors are the jaw, pelvis, ribs, femurs and clavicles. We report our experience in a case of brown tumor of the patella caused by primary hyperparathyroidism. An initial radiograph and CT showed an osteolytic lesion and MR images showed a mixed solid and multiloculated cystic tumor in the right patella. One month after the parathyroidectomy, rapid bone formation was observed on both radiographs and CT images.

  8. Sinusitis caused by Scopulariopsis brevicaulis: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Sattler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of non-invasive sinusitis caused by Scopulariopsis brevicaulis in a 70-year-old immunocompetent patient who had an antibiotic-resistant suppurative tooth infection evolving for seven months. The sinus endoscopy highlighted a foreign body at the bottom of the sinus, which led to the hypothesis of fungal ball sinusitis. Culture of excised tissue was positive for S. brevicaulis.

  9. Septicemia of unknown origin causing by Streptococcus agalactiae primary psoas abscess: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesiri, Somchai

    2010-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the commonest organism resulting in primary psoas abscesses. However non-staphylococcal primary psoas abscesses have increasingly been published in the literature. Here, the author reports a case of primary psoas abscess in a type II diabetic woman previously diagnosed Streptococcus agalactiae septicemia of unknown origin, which rapidly responded to penicillin plus clindamycin and prompt surgical drainage. Diabetic patients are not only susceptible to soft tissue infection but also primary psoas abscess caused by Streptococcus agalactiae.

  10. Fasciola hepatica as a cause of jaundice after chewing khat: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bree, L C J; Bodelier, A G L; Verburg, G P

    2013-11-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a worldwide distributed zoonotic trematode incidentally infecting humans. Although often symptomatic, fascioliasis can cause a wide spectrum of disease. The diagnosis can be established by stool examination detecting ova of the parasite, although serological testing has a higher sensitivity and specificity in the acute phase of disease. This case presents a 24-year-old Somalian man admitted with jaundice and abdominal discomfort due to fascioliasis after chewing khat. The patient was treated successfully with a single dose of triclabendazole.

  11. Staphylococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome Caused By An Intravaginal Product. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marton Monica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS represents a potentially lethal disease, and survival depends primarily on the early initiation of appropriate treatment. As the clinical picture at presentation is usually common, frequently this could lead to misdiagnosis and delays in the initiation of the proper therapy. The case of a 43-years old female who developed a staphylococcal septic shock syndrome caused by a forgotten intravaginal tampon is reported.

  12. Emergency radiation treatment for paraplegia caused by extradural leukemic invasion; Report of 2 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Masao; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Sano, Akira (Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)) (and others)

    1993-02-01

    We present 2 cases of emergency radiation therapy for paraplegia caused by extradural leukemic invasion. Tumor regression was noted at 12 Gy, and complete disappearance at 20 Gy. MRI proved useful in early detection and in the follow-up. They were doing well for 14 months after irradiation. Irradiation should be the treatment of first choice for these tumors, and the detail such as radiation field, total dosage should be determined in consideration of other therapeutic measures. (author).

  13. Jacalin-unbound fraction of Taenia saginata in immunodiagnosis of neurocysticercosis in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Nunes, Daniela; da Silva Ribeiro, Vanessa; Manhani, Marianna Nascimento; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate jacalin-bound fraction (JBF) and jacalin-unbound fraction (JUF) of the total saline extract from Taenia saginata metacestodes for human neurocysticercosis (NC) immunodiagnosis in cerebrospinal fluid. Total extract, JBF, and JUF were separated by affinity chromatography using Sepharose(®)-jacalin and were tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting (WB) to detect immunoglobulin G. In ELISA test, JUF showed the higher diagnostic efficiency and specificity indexes, 92% and 100%, respectively. In WB, 5 immunodominant proteins (39-42, 47-52, 64-68, 70, and 75 kDa) were detected when using JUF. In conclusion, the results achieved demonstrate that JUF, obtained from T. saginata metacestodes, are an important source of specific peptides and are efficient in the diagnosis of NC. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Follow-up of neurocysticercosis patients after treatment using an antigen detection ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguekam

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Seven patients with active neurocysticercosis (NCC received an eight days treatment with albendazole and were followed up using computed tomography (CT-scan and a monoclonal antibody based ELISA for the detection of circulating antigen (Ag-ELISA. Only three patients were cured as was shown by CT-scan and by the disappearance of circulating antigens one month after treatment. After a second course of albendazole therapy, two other patients became seronegative. CT-scan showed the disappearance of viable cysts in all persons who became seronegative whereas patients who were not cured remained seropositive. These preliminary results show that this Ag-ELISA is a promising technique for monitoring the success of treatment of NCC patients because of the excellent correlation between the presence of circulating antigens and of viable brain cysts.

  15. Bacteremia caused by a rare pathogen – Chromobacterium violaceum: a case report from Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parajuli NP

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Narayan Prasad Parajuli,1,2 Anjeela Bhetwal,2 Sumitra Ghimire,2 Anjila Maharjan,2 Shreena Shakya,2 Deepa Satyal,2 Roshan Pandit,2 Puspa Raj Khanal2 1Department of Clinical Laboratory Services, Manmohan Memorial Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Manmohan Memorial Institute of Health Sciences, Kathmandu, Nepal Abstract: Chromobacterium violaceum is a gram negative saprophytic bacterium, prevalent in tropical and subtropical climates. Infections caused by C. violaceum are very uncommon, yet it can cause severe systemic infections with higher mortality when entered into the bloodstream through open wound. A case of symptomatic bacteremia in a woman caused by C. violaceum was identified recently at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Nepal. Timely diagnosis by microbiological methods and rapid administration of antimicrobials led to a successful treatment of this life-threatening infection in this case. From this experience, we suggest to include this bacterium in the differential diagnosis of sepsis, especially when abraded skin is exposed to soil or stagnant water in tropical areas. The precise antimicrobial selection and timely administration should be considered when this infection is suspected. Keywords: Chromobacterium violaceum, case report, bacteremia, Nepal

  16. Head and neck infections caused by Streptococcus milleri group: an analysis of 17 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Tomohisa; Kimura, Shinji; Mori, Naoki

    2005-03-01

    Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) is a common inhabitant of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract, and can be an aggressive pathogen causing abscess formation at various sites in the body. However, it has rarely been listed as a cause of head and neck infections. The present study was performed to evaluate the clinical significance of SMG by reviewing the microbiology and clinical records of patients with SMG in head and neck infections retrospectively. A retrospective review of all patients diagnosed as having SMG bacterial infections at Onomichi General Hospital, Hiroshima, between the years 2001 and 2002 was performed; 17 patients developed head and neck infections with SMG. Here, we describe the clinical features and management of SMG in head and neck infection. The patient population consisted of 12 males and 5 females with a median age of 62 years (age range, 8-78 years). The sites of infection were as follows: maxillary sinus (n=6), peritonsillar region (n=4), subcutaneous (n=3), submandibular space-retropharyngeal space (n=1), deep neck-mediastinum (n=1), parapharyngeal space (n=1), submandibular space (n=1), tonsil (n=1), parotid gland (n=1), and masseter muscle (n=1). Ten cases (59%) were of suppurative diseases. Six cases (35%) had mixed SMG with anaerobe infection. Three cases showed deteriorating clinical courses, and all three of these cases were culture-positive for SMG with anaerobes. In addition, one deteriorating case showed gas gangrene regardless of repeated surgical debridement and intravenous antibiotic therapy; hyperbaric oxygen therapy improved this patient's condition. It is important to recognize SMG as a pathogen in head and neck infection. In addition, the care should be taken with infectious diseases caused by SMG with anaerobes as the patient's clinical course can deteriorate rapidly.

  17. Quadrilateral space syndrome caused by a humeral osteochondroma: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirpar, Meric; Gudemez, Eftal; Cetik, Ozgur; Uslu, Murad; Eksioglu, Fatih

    2006-09-01

    Quadrilateral space syndrome (QSS) is a rare condition in which the posterior humeral circumflex artery and the axillary nerve are entrapped within the quadrilateral space. The main causes of the entrapment are abnormal fibrous bands and hypertrophy of the muscular boundaries. Many other space-occupying causes such as a glenoidal labral cyst or fracture hematoma have been reported in the literature. However, we could not find a report on classical QSS caused by an osteochondroma. The aim of this case report is to attract attention to an unusual etiology of shoulder pain, and to emphasize the importance of physical examination and x-ray imaging before performing more complex attempts for differential diagnosing.

  18. Tinea Corporis, Caused by Microsporum Canis - a Case Report From Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokollari, Fatime; Daka, Aferdita; Blyta, Ymrane; Ismajli, Fellanza; Haxhijaha-Lulaj, Kujtesa

    2015-10-01

    Tinea corporis (B35.6) caused by Microsporum canis which is fungal species that causes numerous forms of disease. It is part of a group of fungi known as Dermatophytes. Though mostly well known for ringworm in pets, it is also known to infect humans. This fact makes this pathogen both anthrophilic and zoophilic in nature. Microsporum canis is a communicable pathogen. We will report about a case, 22-year-old female, residing in a village, with typical changes of a mycotic infection caused by M. Canis. Dermatological description can be summarized with polymorphic erythematous, papulosquamous changes, erosions mainly on genital organ and spread to the thighs and lower abdomen which are accompanied with itching and burning. Diagnosis B35.6 was determined on the basis of clinical appearance complemented with anamnesis, microscopic examination and culture. The patient was treated successfully with general and local antimycotics and antibiotics.

  19. Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by Aloe vera Bezoars: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, In Taik; Cha, Jae Myung; Ki, Hye Jin; Kwak, Min Seob; Yoon, Jin Young; Shin, Hyun Phil; Jeoun, Jung Won; Choi, Sung Il

    2017-05-25

    Small bowel obstruction is a clinical condition commonly caused by postoperative adhesion, volvulus, intussusceptions, and hernia. Small bowel obstruction due to bezoars is clinically uncommon, accounting for approximately 2-4% of all obstructions. Computed tomography (CT) is a useful method in diagnosing the cause of small bowel obstruction. However, small bowel obstruction caused by bezoars may not be detected by an abdominal CT examination. Herein, we report a rare case of small bowel obstruction by Aloe vera bezoars, which were undetected by an abdominal CT. Phytobezoars should be included in the differential diagnosis of small bowel obstruction in patients with predisposing factors, such as excessive consumption of high-fiber food and diabetes.

  20. Syringomyelia Caused by Traumatic Intracranial Hypotension: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Sébastien; Humbertjean, Lisa; Mione, Gioia; Braun, Marc; Schmitt, Emmanuelle; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    Syringomyelia due to intracranial hypotension is rarely described. As a consequence, intracranial hypotension is less recognized as a potential cause of syringomyelia or mistaken with Chiari type 1 malformation. The pathogeny is poorly understood, and we lack diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for this particular setting. We describe a 45-year-old patient who developed syringomyelia after about 10 years of undiagnosed intracranial hypotension caused by traumatic C6 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Surgical closing of the leak was required to treat intracranial hypotension after failure of conservative measures and blind epidural patches. It led to a marked improvement of cerebral and spinal signs. We discuss the pathogeny of syringomyelia caused by intracranial hypotension and highlight a mechanical theory of hyperpressure against the cervical spine due to blockage of CSF flow by descent of cerebellar tonsils at the foramen magnum level. We describe discriminating clinical and radiologic signs to differentiate intracranial hypotension from Chiari type 1 malformation and discuss mechanisms and causality relating trauma and intracranial hypotension. Syringomyelia can be a consequence of long-term progression of intracranial hypotension, which must be differentiated from Chiari type 1 malformation. In our case, resolution was achieved by detecting and closing the CSF leak causing the intracranial hypotension. Reports of similar cases are necessary to understand the origin of CSF leak in traumatic intracranial hypotension and assess the best therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Albendazole metabolism in patients with neurocysticercosis: antipyrine as a multifunctional marker drug of cytochrome P450

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Marques

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the isoform(s of cytochrome P450 (CYP involved in the metabolism of albendazole sulfoxide (ASOX to albendazole sulfone (ASON in patients with neurocysticercosis using antipyrine as a multifunctional marker drug. The study was conducted on 11 patients with neurocysticercosis treated with a multiple dose regimen of albendazole for 8 days (5 mg/kg every 8 h. On the 5th day of albendazole treatment, 500 mg antipyrine was administered po. Blood and urine samples were collected up to 72 h after antipyrine administration. Plasma concentrations of (+-ASOX, (--ASOX and ASON were determined by HPLC using a chiral phase column and detection by fluorescence. The apparent clearance (CL/f of ASON and of the (+ and (--ASOX enantiomers were calculated and compared to total antipyrine clearance (CL T and the clearance for the production of the three major antipyrine metabolites (CLm. A correlation (P<=0.05 was obtained only between the CL T of antipyrine and the CL/f of ASON (r = 0.67. The existence of a correlation suggests the involvement of CYP isoforms common to the metabolism of antipyrine and of ASOX to ASON. Since the CL T of antipyrine is a general measure of CYP enzymes but with a slight to moderate weight toward CYP1A2, we suggest the involvement of this enzyme in ASOX to ASON metabolism in man. The study supports the establishment of a specific marker drug of CYP1A2 in the study of the in vivo metabolism of ASOX to ASON.

  2. Transtornos depressivos associados à neurocisticercose: prevalência e correlações clínicas Depressive disorders associated with neurocysticercosis: prevalence and clinical correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ORESTES VICENTE FORLENZA

    1998-03-01

    strongly related to current depression. CONCLUSIONS: Depression syndromes are frequent in patients with neurocysticercosis. The extent to which organic mechanisms related to brain lesions may underlie the observed mental changes is yet unclear, though the similar sex distribution of patients with and without depression, as well as the above mentioned correlations, provide further evidence of the role played by organic factors in the cause of these syndromes. The results of this study are discussed in the light of the data available for other organic psychiatric disorders.

  3. Myocardial bridging as a cause of acute myocardial infarction: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiroglu Yunus

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systolic compression of a coronary artery by overlying myocardial tissue is termed myocardial bridging. Myocardial bridging usually has a benign prognosis, but some cases resulting in myocardial ischemia, infarction and sudden cardiac death have been reported. We are reporting a case of myocardial bridging which was complicated with acute myocardial infarction associated with inappropriate blood donation. Case presentation A 33 year-old-man was admitted to our emergency with acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction after a blood donation. The electrocardiography showed sinus rhythm and was consistent with an acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction. We decided to perform primary percutanous intervention (PCI. Myocardial bridging was observed in the mid segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery on coronary angiogram. PCI was canceled and medical follow up was decided. Blood transfusion was made because he had a deep anemia. A normal hemaglobin level and clinical reperfusion was achieved after ten hours by blood transfusion. At the one year follow up visit, our patient was healthy and had no cardiac complaints. Conclusions Myocardial bridging may cause acute myocardial infarction in various clinical conditions. Although the condition in this case caused profound anemia related acute myocardial infarction, its treatment and management was unusual.

  4. Forensic aspect of cause of subendocardial hemorrhage in cardiopulmonary resuscitation cases: chest compression or adrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charaschaisri, Werasak; Jongprasartsuk, Kesanee; Rungruanghiranya, Suthat; Kaufman, Larry

    2011-03-01

    Subendocardial hemorrhage (SEH) is a striking feature seen in many forensic autopsy cases. It was believed earlier to represent an agonal phenomenon without any particular reference to the cause of death. However, the latest study showed that even minor SEH might have an influence on cardiac function and might be involved in the mechanism of death. To rule out the possible cause of SEH from defibrillation, autopsies were performed in 240 adults admitted to Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Srinakarinwirot University and Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University between July 2006 and June 2008. All the subjects were subdivided into 2 groups: one group receiving resuscitation and the other group receiving no resuscitation. In the former group, 76 patients had attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation with adrenaline and 44 patients without adrenaline. While in the latter group, 120 patients received no resuscitation attempt. Approximately, 43.4% of resuscitation with adrenaline cases (33/76) demonstrated SEH in contrast to 4 cases of resuscitation without adrenaline (9.1%, P < 0.05). This demonstrates an increasing trend of SEH in cases with prolonged resuscitation and higher level of adrenaline utilizations.

  5. A case of necrotising fasciitis caused by Serratia marsescens: extreme age as functional immunosuppression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Thomas Edmund; Cope, Wei; Beaumont, David Martin

    2013-03-01

    We report the case of a 97-year-old woman who had a prolonged hospital admission for the treatment of right-sided heart failure. During her stay she experienced a rapid deterioration, characterised by shortness of breath, cardiovascular compromise and a hot, red, swollen calf. Post-mortem examination demonstrated that this was caused by necrotising fasciitis due to Serratia marcescens as a single pathogen. This is only the second reported case of this condition in the absence of diabetes or immunosuppression, and clinical deterioration was much more rapid. The case underlines the importance of circumspection and regular review in the diagnosis of the elderly patient. It reminds us that these patients should be viewed as functionally immunosuppressed, and that some or all of the haematological markers of infection can be absent even in severe disease.

  6. A Case of Delayed Myelopathy Caused by Atlantoaxial Subluxation without Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Takamatsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of delayed myelopathy caused by atlantoaxial subluxation without fracture. The patient was a 38-year-old male who became aware of weakness in extremities. The patient had a history of hitting his head severely while diving into a swimming pool at the age of 14 years old. At that time, cervical spine plain X-ray images showed no fracture, and the cervical pain disappeared after use of a collar for several weeks. At his first visit to our department, X-ray images showed an unstable atlantoaxial joint. After surgery, weakness of the extremities gradually improved. At 6 months after surgery, bone union was completed and the symptoms disappeared. This case shows that atlantoaxial ligament injuries are difficult to diagnose and may easily be missed. A high level of suspicion is important in such cases, since neurological compromise or deterioration may occur many years after the injury.

  7. Contact dermatitis caused by airborne agents. A review and case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooms-Goossens, A.E.; Debusschere, K.M.; Gevers, D.M.; Dupre, K.M.; Degreef, H.J.; Loncke, J.P.; Snauwaert, J.E.

    1986-07-01

    A general review is given of airborne-induced contact dermatoses, particularly of the irritant and allergenic types. Because the reports in the literature often omit the term airborne, 12 volumes of Contact Dermatitis (January 1975-July 1985) were screened, and the cases cited were classified in function of the anamnesis, lesion locations, causative irritants and allergens, and other factors. The present article also discusses differential diagnoses, in particular with regard to contact dermatitis of the face, ears, and neck. Finally, seven case reports of occupational and nonoccupational contact dermatitis problems caused by airborne agents are presented. In some of the cases the allergens have not been mentioned in published literature previously. 84 references.

  8. Gastroduodenal Intussusception Caused by a Peutz- Jeghers Polyp in a Young Child: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Jae Eun; Cho, Bum Sang; Lee, Seung Young; Jeon, Min Hee; Lee, Ji Hyuk; Lee, Ho Chang; Koo, Ji Hae [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    Gastroduodenal intussusception is a rare condition caused by the prolapse of a gastric tumor with subsequent invagination of a portion of the gastric wall into the duodenum. Various gastric lesions including adenoma, lipoma, leiomyoma, hamartoma, adenocarcinoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), and as in our case a Peutz- Jeghers polyp, can serve as a lead point of intussusception. Only three cases of gastroduodenal intussusception secondary to a Peutz-Jeghers polyp have been reported. We experienced a case of gastroduodenal intussusception in a 36-month-old boy who presented with intermittent nonbilious vomiting, abdominal pain, and anemia. An abdominal ultrasound and contrast enhanced CT scan showed gastrointestinal intussusception and a mass-like lesion in the second portion of duodenum. A laparotomy revealed a 7x8 cm sized mass at the gastric body, which was pathologically confirmed as a Peutz-Jeghers polyp

  9. Cracked mercury dental amalgam as a possible cause of fever of unknown origin: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamonti Fabrizia

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Sudden fever of unknown origin is quite a common emergency and may lead to hospitalization. A rise in body temperature can be caused by infectious diseases and by other types of medical condition. This case report is of a woman who had fever at night for several days and other clinical signs which were likely related to cracked dental mercury amalgam. Case presentation A healthy women developed fever many days after had cracked a mercury dental amalgam filling. Blood tests evidenced increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, anemia and elevated white cell count; symptoms were headache and palpitations. Blood tests and symptoms normalized within three weeks of removal of the dental amalgam. Conclusion This case highlights the possible link between mercury vapor exposure from cracked dental amalgam and early activation of the immune system leading to fever of unknown origin.

  10. Static winging of the scapula caused by osteochondroma in adults: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orth Patrick

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Although palsy of the long thoracic nerve is the classical pathogenesis of winging scapula, it may also be caused by osteochondroma. This rare etiopathology has previously been described in pediatric patients, but it is seldom observed in adults. Case presentation We describe three cases of static scapular winging with pain on movement. Case 1 is a Caucasian woman aged 35 years with a wing-like prominence of the medial margin of her right scapula due to an osteochondroma originating from the ventral omoplate. Histopathological evaluation after surgical resection confirmed the diagnosis. The postoperative course was unremarkable without signs of recurrence on examination at 2 years. Case 2 is a Caucasian woman aged 39 years with painful scapula alata and neuralgic pain projected along the left ribcage caused by an osteochondroma of the left scapula with contact to the 2nd and 3rd rib. Following surgical resection, the neuropathic pain continued, demanding neurolysis of the 3rd and 4th intercostal nerve after 8 months. The patient was free of symptoms 2 years after neurolysis. Case 3 is a Caucasian woman aged 48 years with scapular winging due to a large exostosis of the left ventral scapular surface with a broad cartilaginous cap and a large pseudobursa. Following exclusion of malignancy by an incisional biopsy, exostosis and pseudobursa were resected. The patient had an unremarkable postoperative course without signs of recurrence 1 year postoperatively. Based on these cases, we developed an algorithm for the diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic management of scapula alata due to osteochondroma. Conclusions Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of this uncommon condition in the differential diagnosis of winged scapula not only in children, but also in adult patients.

  11. Tuberculosis as primary cause of death among AIDS cases in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraceni, V; King, B S; Cavalcante, S C; Golub, J E; Lauria, L M; Moulton, L H; Chaisson, R E; Durovni, B

    2008-07-01

    Data from the mortality database, Rio de Janeiro City (RJC) Health Department, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. To determine the role played by tuberculosis (TB) in Brazil's human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive population, we investigated the frequency of TB as the primary cause of death among HIV-positive subjects in RJC. Information about acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) deaths from 1996 to 2005 in individuals aged >12 years was obtained from the Mortality Information System (SIM), and the cause of death was classified according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), through primary causes coded in Chapter I--B20 to B24 (HIV disease). There were 8601 AIDS-related deaths in RJC between 1996 and 2005. TB was the primary cause of death in 9.0% of all AIDS-related deaths, while Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) accounted for 4.7%. TB cases erroneously classified under other infectious diseases may have contributed to an underestimation of the number of TB deaths among HIV-positive patients. Our study showed that TB is the leading cause of AIDS-related deaths and is responsible for twice as many deaths as PCP, in a scenario of free access to antiretrovirals. The potential benefits of TB preventive treatment and of the availability of highly active antiretroviral treatment could not be established by this analysis.

  12. Tuberculosis as primary cause of death among AIDS cases in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraceni, V.; King, B. S.; Cavalcante, S. C.; Golub, J. E.; Lauria, L. M.; Moulton, L. H.; Chaisson, R. E.; Durovni, B.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING Data from the mortality database, Rio de Janeiro City (RJC) Health Department, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. OBJECTIVES To determine the role played by tuberculosis (TB) in Brazil’s human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive population, we investigated the frequency of TB as the primary cause of death among HIV-positive subjects in RJC. DESIGN Information about acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) deaths from 1996 to 2005 in individuals aged >12 years was obtained from the Mortality Information System (SIM), and the cause of death was classified according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), through primary causes coded in Chapter I—B20 to B24 (HIV disease). RESULTS There were 8601 AIDS-related deaths in RJC between 1996 and 2005. TB was the primary cause of death in 9.0% of all AIDS-related deaths, while Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) accounted for 4.7%. TB cases erroneously classified under other infectious diseases may have contributed to an underestimation of the number of TB deaths among HIV-positive patients. CONCLUSION Our study showed that TB is the leading cause of AIDS-related deaths and is responsible for twice as many deaths as PCP, in a scenario of free access to antiretrovirals. The potential benefits of TB preventive treatment and of the availability of highly active antiretroviral treatment could not be established by this analysis. PMID:18544202

  13. Clinical Symptoms, Imaging Features and Cyst Distribution in the Cerebrospinal Fluid Compartments in Patients with Extraparenchymal Neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, Rodrigo; Hamamoto Filho, Pedro Tadao; Luvizutto, Gustavo José; Nunes, Hélio Rubens de Carvalho; Odashima, Newton Satoru; Dos Santos, Antônio Carlos; Elias Júnior, Jorge; Zanini, Marco Antônio; Fleury, Agnès; Takayanagui, Osvaldo Massaiti

    2016-11-01

    Extraparenchymal neurocysticercosis has an aggressive course because cysts in the cerebrospinal fluid compartments induce acute inflammatory reactions. The relationships between symptoms, imaging findings, lesion type and location remain poorly understood. In this retrospective clinical records-based study, we describe the clinical symptoms, magnetic resonance imaging features, and cyst distribution in the CSF compartments of 36 patients with extraparenchymal neurocysticercosis. Patients were recruited between 1995 and 2010 and median follow up was 38 months. During all the follow up time we found that 75% (27/36) of the patients had symptoms related to raised intracranial pressure sometime, 72.2% (26/36) cysticercotic meningitis, 61.1% (22/36) seizures, and 50.0% (18/36) headaches unrelated to intracranial pressure. Regarding lesion types, 77.8% (28/36) of patients presented with grape-like cysts, 22.2% (8/36) giant cysts, and 61.1% (22/36) contrast-enhancing lesions. Hydrocephalus occurred in 72.2% (26/36) of patients during the follow-up period. All patients had cysts in the subarachnoid space and 41.7% (15/36) had at least one cyst in some ventricle. Cysts were predominantly located in the posterior fossa (31 patients) and supratentorial basal cisterns (19 patients). The fourth ventricle was the main compromised ventricle (10 patients). Spinal cysts were more frequent than previously reported (11.1%, 4/36). Our findings are useful for both diagnosis and treatment selection in patients with neurocysticercosis.

  14. [A rare cause of spinal cord compression: spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (about 3 cases)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Saqui, Abderrazzak; Aggouri, Mohamed; Benzagmout, Mohamed; Chakour, Khalid; Chaoui, Mohamed El Faiz

    2017-01-01

    Spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) is a benign condition whose pathophysiology is still uncertain. It is most commonly asymptomatic but it can cause severe neurological sequelae especially when treatment is not received in time. We conducted a retrospective study of three patients treated for SEAC conducted in the Neurosurgery Department, Hassan II University Hospital, Fez. We report the case of two male patients and a woman, with an average age of 35 years (range: 16-56 years), admitted with slow progressive spinal cord compression. All patients underwent spinal cord MRI showing epidural fluid collection, having the same signal as that of cerebrospinal fluid, compressing the opposite marrow. The collection was located in the chest in all cases. All patients underwent surgery via posterior approach for cyst resection and cyst neck ligation in two cases and dural plasty in a single case. Anatomo-pathologic examination showed arachnoid cysts. Postoperative outcome was simple in all cases. This study aims to update the current understanding of this pathology while insisting on the need for early management given its tendency toward gradual worsening in the absence of adapt therapy. It also aims to review the clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic features of this condition.

  15. A Case Report: Subcutaneous Myiasis Caused by Dermatobia Hominis After a Trip to Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Kamer Varıcı Balcı

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is an invasive diseases caused by larvae of various Dipterian flies. Subcutaneus myiasis cases are commonly observed by Dermatobia hominis larvea. A 26-year-old female patient with a history of travel abroad. Brasil diagnosed with subcutaneous myiasis originating from D. hominis. After spending six months in Amazon forests, Brasil, patient observed two small erythematous papules on right lower quadrant abdomen and delicate and itchy in the sacral region. Two larvae removed from the papules were sent to Ege University Medical Faculty Polyclinic of Infectious Diseases and sent to the parasitology polyclinic for the identification of larval species. After the necessary macroscopic and microscopic examinations, D. hominis was obtained as aresult of myiasis effect. Geographically, natural distribution of D. hominis is South American countries. In this case report we want to introduce the mechanism of egg distribution and take attention to the importance of medical history on myiasis cases. Since it is the first case seen in Turkish patients, it is thought to be presented in terms of revealing the importance of anamnesis in myiasis cases.

  16. Ileocecal-colonic intussusception caused by cecal adenocarcinoma A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verre, Luigi; Rossi, Rachele; Gaggelli, Ilaria; Piccolomini, Alessandro; Podzemny, Vlasta; Tirone, Andrea

    2012-09-12

    INTRODUCTION: Intussusception in adults is an infrequent cause of intestinal occlusion that is usually due to neoplasm lesions. The unspecific nature of the clinical presentation often delays diagnosis. It is most commonly emergency explorative laparotomy which clarifies the etiology of the occlusion. The authors report a case of intestinal occlusion caused by ileocecal-colonic invagination with a small cecal adenocarcinoma as lead point, in a 74-year-old woman. CASE REPORT: A 74-year-old woman came to the Emergency Department, complaining of crampy pain in the mid- and lower abdomen. An abdominal ultrasound revealed a "pseudokidney sign" apparently involving the cecum. Because there were no clear signs of occlusion, the patient was dicharged on the same day. Three days later, upon admission, the patient complained of episodes of abdominal pain with intervals of moderate well-being, associated with nausea, vomiting and an inability to pass stool (but not gas) for 36 hours. On clinical examination her abdomen was distended and tender on palpation in all quadrants, especially in the right iliac fossa where a large mass could be felt. Standard abdominal x-Ray documented gaseous distension of some loops of the jejunum-ileum with some air-fluid level. The patient underwent an abdominal CT scan which showed advanced intussusception that appeared to be ileocolic and multiple enlarged lymphnodes were found in the invaginated mesentery at the base of which there appears to be a thickening of the intestinal wall that is probably neoplastic in nature. The patient underwent explorative laparotomy. Ileocecal-colonic intussusception caused by a cecal growth 5 cm in diameter was found on examination of the surgical specimen. Histology showed that the cause of the large swelling of the ascending colon was a vegetating ulcerated adenocarcinoma (medium grade differentiation: G2), measuring 6.5x 4.0 cm, arising from a tubulovillous adenoma infiltrating the submucosa. CONCLUSIONS

  17. A rare cause of chronic mesenteric ischemia from fibromuscular dysplasia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senadhi Viplove

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chronic mesenteric ischemia is a condition that is classically associated with significant atherosclerosis of the abdominal arteries, causing postprandial abdominal pain out of proportion to physical examination. The abdominal pain is exacerbated after meals due to the shunting of blood away from the intestines to the stomach, causing relative ischemia. More than 95% of chronic mesenteric ischemia cases are due to atherosclerosis. We report the first known case of chronic mesenteric ischemia from fibromuscular dysplasia. To the best of our knowledge, this is also the first known case in the literature where postprandial abdominal pain was the presenting symptom of fibromuscular dysplasia. Case presentation A 44-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of hypertension and preeclampsia, who had taken oral contraceptive pills for 15 years, presented with an intractable, colicky abdominal pain of two weeks duration. This abdominal pain worsened with oral intake. It was also associated with diarrhea and vomiting. Physical examination revealed stage III hypertension out of proportion to her risk factors and diffuse abdominal pain without peritoneal signs. An abdominal computed tomography scan, completed in the emergency room, revealed nonspecific colitis. Laboratory work revealed leukocytosis with a left shift, an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 79 and a C-reactive protein level of 100. She was started on intravenous flagyl and intravenous ciprofloxacin. However, all microbial cultures were negative including three cultures for clostridium difficile. Urine analysis revealed nephritic range proteinuria. The laboratory profile was within normal limits for perinuclear-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, cytoplasmic-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, anti-saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody, antinuclear antibody test, celiac profile, lactate, carbohydrate antigen-125 and thyroid stimulating hormone. A colonoscopy was completed

  18. Synthetic fiber from a teddy bear causing keratitis and conjunctival granuloma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prause Jan U

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report a case of keratitis and a case of conjunctivitis caused by synthetic fibers from toy teddy bears. Case presentation Case stories with histopathological analysis. 1 A two-year-old girl developed a severe case of keratitis and corneal ulceration. The initial treatment with various antibiotics gave no improvement and eventually the patient developed spontaneous perforation of the cornea. The corneal swabs contained no bacteria or fungi. Corneal grafting was performed and the corneal button was sent for histopathological examination. 2 A five-year-old girl presented with ocular irritation in her left eye. Examination revealed a conjunctival granuloma in the inferior fornix. The lesion was excised and histopathologically examined. Results Microscopy revealed synthetic fibers embedded in the cornea and in the conjunctival granuloma. The diagnosis was confirmed by demonstration of marked birefringence of the synthetic fibers. Microscopical examination of synthetic fibers from two different types of fur (whiskers and face hairs from the two-year-old girl's teddy bear was performed. Hairs from the face of the teddy bear were morphologically and microscopically identical with the fibers causing the severe corneal ulceration in the two-year-old girl. Conclusions Doctors should especially in small children be aware of the risk of ocular consequences of close exposure of synthetic fibers from stuffed toy animals. Corneal ulceration, clinically presenting as corneal infection with negative culturing and staining, should lead to a different clinical strategy and treatment. The treatment of conjunctival synthetic fiber granuloma is excision and antibiotic eye drops.

  19. [Radicular pain caused by Schmörl's node: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Saeyoung; Jang, Seungwon

    2017-10-04

    Schmörl's node is focal herniation of intervertebral disc through the end plate into the vertebral body. Most of the established Schmörl's nodes are quiescent. However, disc herniation into the vertebral marrow can cause low back pain by irritating a nociceptive system. Schmörl's node induced radicular pain is very rare condition. Some cases of Schmörl's node which generated low back pain or radicular pain were treated by surgical methods. In this article, authors reported a rare case of a patient with radicular pain cause by Schmörl's node located inferior surface of the 5th lumbar spine. The radicular pain was alleviated by serial 5th lumbar transforamnial epidural blocks. Transforamnial epidural block is suggested as first conservative option to treat radicular pain due to herniation of intervertebral disc. Therefore, non-surgical treatment such as transforamnial epidural block can be considered first treatment option of radicular pain caused by Schmörl's node. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Oral rehabilitation of a patient with temporomandibular joint ankylosis caused by ankylosing spondylitis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brkić Zlata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS/Morbus Bechterew is a chronic inflammatory rheumatoid disease. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ dysfunction is involved in 4–35% of AS cases, and is correlated to the severity and extension of AS. Even though AS-caused TMJ ankylosis is exceptional, one should have high index of suspicion of TMJ ankylosis in AS for an early detection, because it is an extremely serious and disabling condition that causes problems with mastication, swallowing, digestion, speech, appearance and poor oral hygiene with heavy caries. Case report. A 54-year-old male patient sought medical attention at the Department of Periodontology and Oral Medicine, Clinic for Dentistry at the Military Medical Academy, Belgrade, Serbia, with the chief complaint of pain in the area of the upper left canine in the presence of limited mouth opening. The treatment plan consisted of upper left canine management and rehabilitation of the remaining teeth in the frontal and the premolar region in both, the upper and lower jaw. Even though molar region needed to be treated, unfortunately it was not in the treatment plan because ankylosis of TMJ made the treatment impossible. Conclusions. The patients with AS-caused TMJ ankylosis are considered a diagnostic challenge to routine dentistry. Accent should be given to early diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach in the treatment of the AS patients towards the favorable disease course and outcome.