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  1. Neurochemical alterations associated with borderline personality disorder.

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    Atmaca, Murad; Karakoc, Tevfik; Mermi, Osman; Gurkan Gurok, M; Yildirim, Hanefi

    2015-01-01

    In neuroimaging on borderline personality disorder, prior studies focused on the hippocampus and amygdala, as mentioned above. However, no study investigated whether there were neurochemical changes in the patients with borderline personality disorder. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to investigate neurochemical change of patients diagnosed with borderline disorder and hypothesized that neurochemicals would change in the hippocampus region of these patients. Seventeen patients and the same number of healthy control subjects were analyzed by using a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa Imaging System. N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline compounds (CHO), and creatine (CRE) values of hippocampal region were measured. The mean NAA/CRE ratio in the hippocampus region was significantly reduced in the patients with borderline personality disorder compared to that of healthy control subjects, In addition, NAA/CHO ratio of the patients with borderline personality disorder was also significantly reduced when compared to that of healthy subjects. There was no difference in the ratio of CHO/CRE. In summary, we present evidence for reduced NAA in the patients with borderline personality disorder. © 2015, The Author(s).

  2. Dyslipidemia links obesity to early cerebral neurochemical alterations.

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    Haley, Andreana P; Gonzales, Mitzi M; Tarumi, Takashi; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2013-10-01

    To examine the role of hypertension, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia in potentially accounting for obesity-related brain vulnerability in the form of altered cerebral neurochemistry. Sixty-four adults, ages 40-60 years, underwent a health screen and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H MRS) of occipitoparietal gray matter to measure N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), myo-inositol (mI), and glutamate (Glu) relative to creatine (Cr). The causal steps approach and nonparametric bootstrapping were utilized to assess if fasting glucose, mean arterial pressure or peripheral lipid/lipoprotein levels mediate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and cerebral neurochemistry. Higher BMI was significantly related to higher mI/Cr, independent of age and sex. BMI was also significantly related to two of the proposed mediators, triglyceride, and HDL-cholesterol, which were also independently related to increased mI/Cr. Finally, the relationship between BMI and mI/Cr was significantly attenuated after inclusion of triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol into the model, one at a time, indicating statistical mediation. Higher triglyceride and lower HDL levels statistically account for the association between BMI and myo-inositol, pointing toward a potentially critical role for dyslipidemia in the development of cerebral neurochemical alterations in obesity. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  3. Neurochemical Alterations in Sudden Unexplained Perinatal Deaths—A Review

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    Nazeer Muhammad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden unexpected perinatal collapse is a major trauma for the parents of victims. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS is unexpected and mysterious death of an apparently healthy neonate from birth till 1 year of age without any known causes, even after thorough postmortem investigations. However, the incidence of sudden intrauterine unexplained death syndrome (SIUDS is seven times higher as compared with SIDS. This observation is approximated 40–80%. Stillbirth is defined as death of a fetus after 20th week of gestation or just before delivery at full term without a known reason. Pakistan has the highest burden of stillbirth in the world. This basis of SIDS, SIUDS, and stillbirths eludes specialists. The purpose of this study is to investigate factors behind failure in control of these unexplained deaths and how research may go ahead with improved prospects. Animal models and physiological data demonstrate that sleep, arousal, and cardiorespiratory malfunctioning are abnormal mechanisms in SIUDS risk factors or in newborn children who subsequently die from SIDS. This review focuses on insights in neuropathology and mechanisms of SIDS and SIUDS in terms of different receptors involved in this major perinatal demise. Several studies conducted in the past decade have confirmed neuropathological and neurochemical anomalies related to serotonin transporter, substance P, acetylcholine α7 nicotine receptors, etc., in sudden unexplained fetal and infant deaths. There is need to focus more on research in this area to unveil the major curtain to neuroprotection by underlying mechanisms leading to such deaths.

  4. Caffeine triggers behavioral and neurochemical alterations in adolescent rats.

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    Ardais, A P; Borges, M F; Rocha, A S; Sallaberry, C; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2014-06-13

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide but concerns arise about the growing intake of caffeine-containing drinks by adolescents since the effects of caffeine on cognitive functions and neurochemical aspects of late brain maturation during adolescence are poorly known. We now studied the behavioral impact in adolescent male rats of regular caffeine intake at low (0.1mg/mL), moderate (0.3mg/mL) and moderate/high (1.0mg/mL) doses only during their active period (from 7:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M.). All tested doses of caffeine were devoid of effects on locomotor activity, but triggered anxiogenic effects. Caffeine (0.3 and 1mg/mL) improved the performance in the object recognition task, but the higher dose of caffeine (1.0mg/mL) decreased the habituation to an open-field arena, suggesting impaired non-associative memory. All tested doses of caffeine decreased the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein and synaptosomal-associated protein-25, but failed to modify neuron-specific nuclear protein immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Caffeine (0.3-1mg/mL) increased the density of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and proBDNF density as well as adenosine A1 receptor density in the hippocampus, whereas the higher dose of caffeine (1mg/mL) increased the density of proBDNF and BDNF and decreased A1 receptor density in the cerebral cortex. These findings document an impact of caffeine consumption in adolescent rats with a dual impact on anxiety and recognition memory, associated with changes in BDNF levels and decreases of astrocytic and nerve terminal markers without overt neuronal damage in hippocampal and cortical regions. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. REM sleep deprivation reverses neurochemical and other depressive-like alterations induced by olfactory bulbectomy.

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    Maturana, Maira J; Pudell, Cláudia; Targa, Adriano D S; Rodrigues, Laís S; Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Fortes, Mariana H; Dos Santos, Patrícia; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Zanata, Sílvio M; Ferraz, Anete C; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2015-02-01

    There is compelling evidence that sleep deprivation (SD) is an effective strategy in promoting antidepressant effects in humans, whereas few studies were performed in relevant animal models of depression. Acute administration of antidepressants in humans and rats generates a quite similar effect, i.e., suppression of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Then, we decided to investigate the neurochemical alterations generated by a protocol of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REMSD) in the notably known animal model of depression induced by the bilateral olfactory bulbectomy (OBX). REMSD triggered antidepressant mechanisms such as the increment of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), which were strongly correlated to the swimming time (r = 0.83; P < 0.0001) and hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) content (r = 0.66; P = 0.004). Moreover, there was a strong correlation between swimming time and hippocampal 5-HT levels (r = 0.70; P = 0.003), strengthen the notion of an antidepressant effect associated to REMSD in the OBX rats. In addition, REMSD robustly attenuated the hippocampal 5-HT deficiency produced by the OBX procedure. Regarding the rebound (REB) period, we observed the occurrence of a sustained antidepressant effect, indicated mainly by the swimming and climbing times which could be explained by the maintenance of the increased nigral BDNF expression. Hence, hippocampal 5-HT levels remained enhanced in the OBX group after this period. We suggested that the neurochemical complexity inflicted by the OBX model, counteracted by REMSD, is directly correlated to the nigral BDNF expression and hippocampal 5-HT levels. The present findings provide new information regarding the antidepressant mechanisms triggered by REMSD.

  6. NMR-Based Metabolic Profiling Reveals Neurochemical Alterations in the Brain of Rats Treated with Sorafenib.

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    Du, Changman; Shao, Xue; Zhu, Ruiming; Li, Yan; Zhao, Qian; Fu, Dengqi; Gu, Hui; Kong, Jueying; Luo, Li; Long, Hailei; Deng, Pengchi; Wang, Huijuan; Hu, Chunyan; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2015-11-01

    Sorafenib, an active multi-kinase inhibitor, has been widely used as a chemotherapy drug to treat advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma patients. In spite of the relative safety, sorafenib has been shown to exert a negative impact on cognitive functioning in cancer patients, specifically on learning and memory; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, an NMR-based metabolomics approach was applied to investigate the neurochemical effects of sorafenib in rats. Male rats were once daily administrated with 120 mg/kg sorafenib by gavage for 3, 7, and 28 days, respectively. NMR-based metabolomics coupled with histopathology examinations for hippocampus, prefrontal cortex (PFC), and striatum were performed. The (1)H NMR spectra data were analyzed by using multivariate pattern recognition techniques to show the time-dependent biochemical variations induced by sorafenib. Excellent separation was obtained and distinguishing metabolites were observed between sorafenib-treated and control rats. A total of 36 differential metabolites in hippocampus of rats treated with sorafenib were identified, some of which were significantly changed. Furthermore, these modified metabolites mainly reflected the disturbances in neurotransmitters, energy metabolism, membrane, and amino acids. However, only a few metabolites in PFC and striatum were altered by sorafenib. Additionally, no apparent histological changes in these three brain regions were observed in sorafenib-treated rats. Together, our findings demonstrate the disturbed metabonomics pathways, especially, in hippocampus, which may underlie the sorafenib-induced cognitive deficits in patients. This work also shows the advantage of NMR-based metabolomics over traditional approach on the study of biochemical effects of drugs.

  7. Elevated mercury exposure and neurochemical alterations in little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) from a site with historical mercury contamination.

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    Nam, Dong-Ha; Yates, David; Ardapple, Pedro; Evers, David C; Schmerfeld, John; Basu, Niladri

    2012-05-01

    Despite evidence of persistent methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in the South River (Virginia, USA) ecosystem, there is little information concerning MeHg-associated neurological impacts in resident wildlife. Here we determined mercury (Hg) concentrations in tissues of insectivorous little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) collected from a reference site and a MeHg-contaminated site in the South River ecosystem. We also explored whether neurochemical biomarkers (monoamine oxidase, MAO; acetylcholinesterase, ChE; muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, mAChR; N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, NMDAR) previously shown to be altered by MeHg in other wildlife were associated with brain Hg levels in these bats. Concentrations of Hg (total and MeHg) in tissues were significantly higher (10-40 fold difference) in South River bats when compared to reference sites. Mean tissue mercury levels (71.9 ppm dw in liver, 7.14 ppm dw in brain, 132 ppm fw in fur) in the South River bats exceed (sub)-clinical thresholds in mammals. When compared to the South River bats, animals from the reference site showed a greater ability to demethylate MeHg in brain (33.1% of total Hg was MeHg vs. 65.5%) and liver (8.9% of total Hg was MeHg vs. 50.8%) thus suggesting differences in their ability to detoxify and eliminate Hg. In terms of Hg-associated neurochemical biomarker responses, interesting biphasic responses were observed with an inflection point between 1 and 5 ppm dw in the brain. In the reference bats Hg-associated decreases in MAO (r = -0.61; p exposures, differences in Hg metabolism, and the importance of the aforementioned neurochemicals in multiple facets of animal health, altered or perhaps even a lack of expected neurochemical responses in Hg-contaminated bats raise questions about the ecological and physiological impacts of Hg on the bat population as well as the broader ecosystem in the South River.

  8. Rapid recovery and altered neurochemical dependence of locomotor central pattern generation following lumbar neonatal spinal cord injury.

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    Züchner, Mark; Kondratskaya, Elena; Sylte, Camilla B; Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2018-01-15

    were two main locomotor frequencies, but injured spinal cords exhibited a shift towards the higher frequency. Injury also altered the neurochemical dependence of locomotor CPG output, such that injured spinal cords, unlike control spinal cords, were incapable of generating low frequency rhythmic coordinated activity in the presence of NMDA and dopamine alone. Thus, the neonatal spinal cord also exhibits remarkable functional recovery after lumbar injuries, but the neurochemical sensitivity of locomotor circuitry is modified in the process. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  9. Cerebellar neurochemical alterations in spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 appear to include glutathione deficiency.

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    Doss, Sarah; Rinnenthal, Jan Leo; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Brandt, Alexander U; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Lux, Silke; Maul, Stephan; Würfel, Jens; Endres, Matthias; Klockgether, Thomas; Minnerop, Martina; Paul, Friedemann

    2015-08-01

    Autosomal dominant ataxia type 14 (SCA14) is a rare usually adult-onset progressive disorder with cerebellar neurodegeneration caused by mutations in protein kinase C gamma. We set out to examine cerebellar and extracerebellar neurochemical changes in SCA14 by MR spectroscopy. In 13 SCA14 patients and 13 healthy sex- and age-matched controls, 3-T single-voxel brain proton MR spectroscopy was performed in a cerebellar voxel of interest (VOI) at TE = 30 ms to obtain a neurochemical profile of metabolites with short relaxation times. In the cerebellum and in additional VOIs in the prefrontal cortex, motor cortex, and somatosensory cortex, a second measurement was performed at TE = 144 ms to mainly extract the total N-acetyl-aspartate (tNAA) signal besides the signals for total creatine (tCr) and total choline (tCho). The cerebellar neurochemical profile revealed a decrease in glutathione (6.12E-06 ± 2.50E-06 versus 8.91E-06 ± 3.03E-06; p = 0028) and tNAA (3.78E-05 ± 5.67E-06 versus 4.25E-05 ± 5.15E-06; p = 0023) and a trend for reduced glutamate (2.63E-05 ± 6.48E-06 versus 3.15E-05 ± 7.61E-06; p = 0062) in SCA14 compared to controls. In the tNAA-focused measurement, cerebellar tNAA (296.6 ± 42.6 versus 351.7 ± 16.5; p = 0004) and tCr (272.1 ± 25.2 versus 303.2 ± 31.4; p = 0004) were reduced, while the prefrontal, somatosensory and motor cortex remained unaffected compared to controls. Neuronal pathology in SCA14 detected by MR spectroscopy was restricted to the cerebellum and did not comprise cortical regions. In the cerebellum, we found in addition to signs of neurodegeneration a glutathione reduction, which has been associated with cellular damage by oxidative stress in other neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Friedreich's ataxia.

  10. Carbamazepine normalizes the altered behavioral and neurochemical response to stress in benzodiazepine-withdrawn rats.

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    Martijena, I D; Lacerra, C; Molina, V A

    1997-07-09

    Rats chronically treated with diazepam (2 mg/kg per day, i.p.) for 21 days were tested 96 h after the last injection in both the forced swim test (inescapable stress) and in an active avoidance test (escapable stress). The influence of carbamazepine (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.) administered 25 min prior to each behavioral task was investigated. Withdrawn animals showed a reduced time spent in immobility in the forced swim test and an enhanced latency to escape in the active avoidance test. Both behavioral effects were normalized by a single carbamazepine administration. An additional experiment was performed to investigate the effect of a forced swim experience on cortical chloride uptake following GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) stimulation 96 h after diazepam withdrawal, and the influence of a single administration of carbamazepine on these effects. An increased chloride uptake was observed in vehicle-treated rats but not in diazepam-withdrawn animals following the swimming experience. Carbamazepine pretreatment enhanced chloride uptake after diazepam withdrawal but did not modify chloride flux in stressed or unstressed vehicle-treated rats. These results support the hypothesis that diazepam withdrawal affects the ability to develop adaptive responses to stress and that carbamazepine can normalize such an alteration.

  11. Paradoxical sleep deprivation: neurochemical, hormonal and behavioral alterations. Evidence from 30 years of research

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    Sergio Tufik

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep comprises approximately one-third of a person's lifetime, but its impact on health and medical conditions remains partially unrecognized. The prevalence of sleep disorders is increasing in modern societies, with significant repercussions on people's well-being. This article reviews past and current literature on the paradoxical sleep deprivation method as well as data on its consequences to animals, ranging from behavioral changes to alterations in the gene expression. More specifically, we highlight relevant experimental studies and our group's contribution over the last three decades.O sono ocupa cerca de um terço de nossas vidas, entretanto seu impacto na saúde e sua influência nas condições patológicas ainda não foi completamente elucidado. A prevalência dos distúrbios de sono é cada vez maior, sobretudo nas regiões mais industrializadas, repercutindo diretamente no bem-estar da população. Este artigo tem como objetivo sintetizar e atualizar a literatura a respeito do método de privação de sono paradoxal e seu panorama de conseqüências desde comportamentais até genéticas em animais. Ainda, destacamos a contribuição e relevância dos estudos experimentais realizados por nosso grupo nas ultimas três décadas.

  12. Mitochondrial oxidative stress alters a pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans strongly resembling that of bile acid biosynthesis and secretion in vertebrates.

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    Ju-Ling Liu

    Full Text Available Mammalian bile acids (BAs are oxidized metabolites of cholesterol whose amphiphilic properties serve in lipid and cholesterol uptake. BAs also act as hormone-like substances that regulate metabolism. The Caenorhabditis elegans clk-1 mutants sustain elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress and display a slow defecation phenotype that is sensitive to the level of dietary cholesterol. We found that: 1 The defecation phenotype of clk-1 mutants is suppressed by mutations in tat-2 identified in a previous unbiased screen for suppressors of clk-1. TAT-2 is homologous to ATP8B1, a flippase required for normal BA secretion in mammals. 2 The phenotype is suppressed by cholestyramine, a resin that binds BAs. 3 The phenotype is suppressed by the knock-down of C. elegans homologues of BA-biosynthetic enzymes. 4 The phenotype is enhanced by treatment with BAs. 5 Lipid extracts from C. elegans contain an activity that mimics the effect of BAs on clk-1, and the activity is more abundant in clk-1 extracts. 6 clk-1 and clk-1;tat-2 double mutants show altered cholesterol content. 7 The clk-1 phenotype is enhanced by high dietary cholesterol and this requires TAT-2. 8 Suppression of clk-1 by tat-2 is rescued by BAs, and this requires dietary cholesterol. 9 The clk-1 phenotype, including the level of activity in lipid extracts, is suppressed by antioxidants and enhanced by depletion of mitochondrial superoxide dismutases. These observations suggest that C. elegans synthesizes and secretes molecules with properties and functions resembling those of BAs. These molecules act in cholesterol uptake, and their level of synthesis is up-regulated by mitochondrial oxidative stress. Future investigations should reveal whether these molecules are in fact BAs, which would suggest the unexplored possibility that the elevated oxidative stress that characterizes the metabolic syndrome might participate in disease processes by affecting the regulation of metabolism by BAs.

  13. Suicide: Neurochemical Approaches

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    Ritabrata Banerjee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the devastating effect of suicide on numerous lives, there is still a dearthof knowledge concerning its neurochemical aspects. There is increasing evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and Nerve growth factor (NGF are involved in the pathophysiology and treatment of depression through binding and activating their cognate receptors trk B and trk A respectively. The present study was performed to examine whether the expression profiles of BDNF and/or trk B as well as NGF and/or trk A were altered in postmortem brain in subjects who commitsuicide and whether these alterations were associated with specific psychopathologic conditions. These studies were performed in hippocampus obtained 21 suicide subjects and 19 non-psychiatric control subjects. The protein and mRNA levels of BDNF, trk B and NGF, trk A were determined with Sandwich ELISA, Western Blot and RT PCR respectively. Given the importance of BDNFand NGF along with their cognate receptors in mediating physiological functions, including cell survival and synaptic plasticity, our findings of reduced expression of BDNF, Trk B and NGF, Trk A in both protein and mRNA levels of postmortem brain in suicide subjects suggest that these molecules may play an important role in the pathophysiological aspects of suicidal behavior.

  14. Repeated, Intermittent Social Defeat across the Entire Juvenile Period Resulted in Behavioral, Physiological, Hormonal, Immunological, and Neurochemical Alterations in Young Adult Male Golden Hamsters

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    Yu, Wei-Chun; Liu, Ching-Yi; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The developing brain is vulnerable to social defeat during the juvenile period. As complements of human studies, animal models of social defeat provide a straightforward approach to investigating the functional and neurobiological consequences of social defeats. Taking advantage of agonist behavior and social defeat in male golden hamster, a set of 6 experiments was conducted to investigate the consequences at multiple levels in young adulthood resulting from repeated, intermittent social defeats or “social threats” across the entire juvenile period. Male hamsters at postnatal day 28 (P28) were randomly assigned to either the social defeat, “social threat”, or arena control group, and they correspondingly received a series of nine social interaction trials (i.e., either social defeat, “social threat”, or arena control conditions) from P33 to P66. At the behavioral level (Experiment 1), we found that repeated social defeats (but not “social threats”) significantly impacted locomotor activity in the familiar context and social interaction in the familiar/unfamiliar social contexts. At the physiological and hormonal levels (Experiments 2 and 3), repeated social defeat significantly enhanced the cortisol and norepinephrine concentrations in blood. Enlargement of the spleen was also found in the social defeat and “social threat” groups. At the immunological level (Experiment 4), the social defeat group showed lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the hypothalamus and hippocampus but higher concentration of IL-6 in the striatum compared to the other two groups. At the neurochemical level (Experiment 5), the socially defeated hamsters mainly displayed reductions of dopamine, dopamine metabolites, and 5-HT levels in the striatum and decreased level of 5-HT in the hippocampus. In Experiment 6, an increase in the spine density of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was specifically observed in the “social threat” group. Collectively, our

  15. Modulatory effect of cilostazol on tramadol-induced behavioral and neurochemical alterations in rats challenged across the forced swim despair test

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    Noha M. Gamil

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain-associated depression is encountered clinically in some cases such as cancer, chronic neuropathy, and after operations. Tramadol is an opioid analgesic drug that may modulate monoaminergic neurotransmission by inhibition of noradrenaline and serotonin reuptake that may contribute to its antidepressant-like effects. Clinically, tramadol is used either alone or in combination with other NSAIDs in the treatment of cases associated with pain and depression, e.g. low back pain, spinal cord injury, and post-operative pain management. However, tramadol monotherapy as an antidepressant is impeded by severe adverse effects including seizures and serotonin syndrome. Interestingly, phosphodiesterase-III inhibitors demonstrated novel promising antidepressant effects. Among which, cilostazol was reported to attenuate depression in post-stroke cases, geriatrics and patients undergoing carotid artery stenting. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the possible antidepressant-like effects of tramadol and/or cilostazol on the behavioral level in experimental animals, and to examine the neurochemical and biochemical effects of tramadol, cilostazol and their combination in rats, in order to explore the probable mechanisms of action underlying their effects. To achieve our target, male albino mice and rats were randomly allocated into five groups and administered either vehicle for control, fluoxetine (20 mg/kg, p.o., tramadol HCl (20 mg/kg, p.o., cilostazol (100 mg/kg, p.o., or combination of both tramadol and cilostazol. At day 14, mice and rats were challenged in the tail suspension test and forced swim test, respectively. Rats were sacrificed and brains were isolated for determination of brain monoamines, MDA, NO, SOD, and TNF-α. The current results showed that concurrent administration of cilostazol to tramadol-treated animals modulated depression on the behavioral level, and showed ameliorative neurochemical and biochemical effects

  16. Neurochemical aspects of childhood autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B. Minderaa (Ruud)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe topic of this thesis is neurochemical aspects of infantile autism. The experimental work is centered around the most robust and consistant neurochemical finding in child psychiatry, namely that group mean whole blood serotonin (5-Hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) values are

  17. Differential susceptibility to extinction-induced despair and age-dependent alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and neurochemical parameters.

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    Topic, Bianca; Oitzl, Melly S; Meijer, Onno C; Huston, Joseph P; de Souza Silva, Maria A

    2008-01-01

    Clinical studies point to structural differences in the neurobiological mechanisms underlying early versus late onset of depression. However, studies examining the neuropathology of depressive-like behavior induced in the aged rodent are sparse. Extinction of learned behavior induces be- havioral 'despair', and is held to provide a conceptual and empirical model of human depression resulting from the withdrawal of reinforcement. We tested whether the neuroendocrinological and chemical concomitants of susceptibility to extinction-induced despair in aged animals differed from adult ones. Following the withholding of reinforcement (extinction of escape from a water maze), a number of aged and adult rats are prone to develop depressive-like behavior, i.e. immobility. Analysis of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis markers revealed an increase in the mineralocorticoid/glucocorticoid receptor (MR/GR) mRNA ratio in the CA1 region of the hippocampus in aged and adult despair animals; however, in dependence on age, divergent changes contributed to the enhanced ratio. While aged despair rats had less GR mRNA, adult despair rats had more MR mRNA. Furthermore, age- and despair-related interactions with hippocampal and cortical steroid receptor co-activators and neurotransmitter contents in diverse brain areas were found. For instance, adult despair rats had an increased, and aged despair rats a decreased, DOPAC/dopamine turnover compared to the respective non-despair group. These results show that neurobiological underpinnings of depression in the aged differ from those of adults, and underline the importance of investigating age-related alterations in HPA axis dynamics in conjunction with neurotransmitter systems to advance our knowledge about neuronal mechanisms of late-life and/or late-onset depression. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Does facial resemblance enhance cooperation?

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    Trang Giang

    Full Text Available Facial self-resemblance has been proposed to serve as a kinship cue that facilitates cooperation between kin. In the present study, facial resemblance was manipulated by morphing stimulus faces with the participants' own faces or control faces (resulting in self-resemblant or other-resemblant composite faces. A norming study showed that the perceived degree of kinship was higher for the participants and the self-resemblant composite faces than for actual first-degree relatives. Effects of facial self-resemblance on trust and cooperation were tested in a paradigm that has proven to be sensitive to facial trustworthiness, facial likability, and facial expression. First, participants played a cooperation game in which the composite faces were shown. Then, likability ratings were assessed. In a source memory test, participants were required to identify old and new faces, and were asked to remember whether the faces belonged to cooperators or cheaters in the cooperation game. Old-new recognition was enhanced for self-resemblant faces in comparison to other-resemblant faces. However, facial self-resemblance had no effects on the degree of cooperation in the cooperation game, on the emotional evaluation of the faces as reflected in the likability judgments, and on the expectation that a face belonged to a cooperator rather than to a cheater. Therefore, the present results are clearly inconsistent with the assumption of an evolved kin recognition module built into the human face recognition system.

  19. Longitudinal neurochemical modifications in the aging mouse brain measured in vivo by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

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    Duarte, João M N; Do, Kim Q; Gruetter, Rolf

    2014-07-01

    Alterations to brain homeostasis during development are reflected in the neurochemical profile determined noninvasively by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We determined longitudinal biochemical modifications in the cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of C57BL/6 mice aged between 3 and 24 months . The regional neurochemical profile evolution indicated that aging induces general modifications of neurotransmission processes (reduced GABA and glutamate), primary energy metabolism (altered glucose, alanine, and lactate) and turnover of lipid membranes (modification of choline-containing compounds and phosphorylethanolamine), which are all probably involved in the frequently observed age-related cognitive decline. Interestingly, the neurochemical profile was different in male and female mice, particularly in the levels of taurine that may be under the control of estrogen receptors. These neurochemical profiles constitute the basal concentrations in cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of healthy aging male and female mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute sleep deprivation enhances avoidance learning and spatial memory and induces delayed alterations in neurochemical expression of GR, TH, DRD1, pCREB and Ki67 in rats.

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    Azogu, Idu; de la Tremblaye, Patricia Barra; Dunbar, Megan; Lebreton, Marianne; LeMarec, Nathalie; Plamondon, Hélène

    2015-02-15

    The current study investigated the effects of acute versus repeated periods of sleep deprivation on avoidance learning and spatial memory and on the expression of discrete biochemical brain signals involved in stress regulation, motivation and brain plasticity. Male Long-Evans rats were sleep deprived using the platform-over-water method for a single 4 h period (ASD) or for daily 4h RSD period on five consecutive days (CSD). The Y maze passive avoidance task (YM-PAT) and the Morris water maze (MWM) were used to determine learning and memory 1h following the last SD period. Region-specific changes in glucocorticoid receptors (GR), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine 1 receptors (DRD1), phospho-CREB (pCREB) and Ki-67 expression were assessed in the hippocampal formation, hypothalamus and mesolimbic regions 72 h following RSD. Behaviorally, our findings revealed increased latency to re-enter the aversive arm in the YM-PAT and reduced distance traveled and latency to reach the platform in the MWM in ASD rats compared to all other groups, indicative of improved avoidance learning and spatial memory, respectively. Acute SD enhanced TH expression in the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens and A11 neurons of the hypothalamus and DRD1 expression in the lateral hypothalamus. Cell proliferation in the subventricular zone and pCREB expression in the dentate gyrus and CA3 regions was also enhanced following acute SD. In contrast, repeated SD significantly elevated GR-ir at the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and CA1 and CA3 layers of the hippocampus compared to all other groups. Our study supports that a brief 4h sleep deprivation period is sufficient to induce delayed neurochemical changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Resemblance and investment in children.

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    Dolinska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    According to evolutionary explanations men hardly ever are absolutely certain about their biological fatherhood therefore they must seek various sources of information to subjectively establish whether they are the genetic fathers of the children they raise. Apicella and Marlowe (2004) showed that fathers who perceived greater similarity between their children and themselves were willing to invest more resources (e.g., time, money, care) in their offspring presumably because the perceived resemblance indicated to the fathers their genetic relatedness with their children. The present study extended the design of Apicella and Marlowe's original study and included both fathers and mothers as participants. Parents were recruited by a female confederate at the airport and at the railway station in Wroclaw (Poland). Multiple regression analyses showed that perceived resemblance predicted parental investment in the child for both men and women. The fact that mothers' declarations of investment in their children also depended on the perceived resemblance factor is not consistent with evolutionary formulations delineated by Apicella and Marlowe (2004; 2007). Future studies must resolve the issue of whether the resemblance-investment relation in fathers results from men relaying on child's resemblance to themselves as an indicator of their own biological paternity, or whether it results from the more parsimonious phenomenon that people in general are attracted more to other people who are similar to them.

  2. SU-E-I-34: Intermittent Low- and High-Dose Ethanol Exposure Alters Neurochemical Responses in Adult Rat Brain: An Ex Vivo 1H NMR Spectroscopy at 11.7 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Do-Wan; Kim, Sang-Young; Song, Kyu-Ho; Choe, Bo-Young [Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The first goal of this study was to determine the influence of the dose-dependent effects of intermittent ethanol intoxication on cerebral neurochemical responses among sham controls and low- and high-dose-ethanol-exposed rats with ex vivo high-resolution spectra. The second goal of this study was to determine the correlations between the metabolite-metabolite levels (pairs-of-metabolite levels) from all of the individual data from the frontal cortex of the intermittent ethanol-intoxicated rats. Methods: Eight-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups. Twenty rats in the LDE (n = 10) and the HDE (n = 10) groups received ethanol doses of 1.5 g/kg and 2.5 g/kg, respectively, through oral gavage every 8-h for 4 days. At the end of the 4-day intermittent ethanol exposure, one-dimensional ex vivo 500-MHz proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were acquired from 30 samples of the frontal cortex region (from the 3 groups). Results: Normalized total-N-acetylaspartate (tNAA: NAA + NAAG [N-acetylaspartyl-glutamate]), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutathione (GSH) levels were significantly lower in the frontal cortex of the HDE-exposed rats than that of the LDE-exposed rats. Moreover, compared to the CNTL group, the LDE rats exhibited significantly higher normalized GABA levels. The 6 pairs of normalized metabolite levels were positively (+) or negatively (−) correlated in the rat frontal cortex as follows: tNAA and GABA (+), tNAA and Aspartate (Asp) (−), myo-Inositol (mIns) and Asp (−), mIns and Alanine (+), mIns and Taurine (+), and mIns and tNAA (−). Conclusion: Our results suggested that repeated intermittent ethanol intoxication might result in neuronal degeneration and dysfunction, changes in the rate of GABA synthesis, and oxidative stress in the rat frontal cortex. Our ex vivo 1H high-resolution-magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy results suggested some novel metabolic markers for the dose

  3. Neurochemical dementia diagnostics for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias: an ISO 15189 perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waedt, Johanna; Kleinow, Martina; Kornhuber, Johannes; Lewczuk, Piotr

    2012-10-01

    Dementia is one of the most common causes of health problems in the elderly populations of Western industrialized countries. A combined analysis of cerebrospinal fluid-based neurochemical dementia diagnostics biomarkers (amyloid-β peptides, total tau and phosphorylated forms of tau) provides sensitivity and specificity in the range of 85% for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia. The alterations occur very early in the course of neurodegeneration, enabling medical follow-up of persons with increased risk of developing dementia. With a growing number of laboratories performing neurochemical dementia diagnostics routinely, it is important to standardize protocols and laboratory performance to enable comparisons of results and their interpretations. Together with the recently published expert guidelines for sample handling and preparation, as well as the interpretation (post-analytical) algorithms developed by experienced centers, ISO 15189 norm provides an extremely useful tool for standardization of neurochemical dementia diagnostics.

  4. Simultaneous wireless electrophysiological and neurochemical monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, Kartikeya; Mollazadeh, Mohsen; Thakor, Nitish; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2008-08-01

    Information processing and propagation in the central nervous system is mostly electrical in nature. At synapses, electrical signals cause the release of neurotransmitters like dopamine, glutamate etc., that are sensed by post-synaptic neurons resulting in signal propagation or inhibition. It can be very informative to monitor electrical and neurochemical signals simultaneously to understand the mechanisms underlying normal or abnormal brain function. We present an integrated system for the simultaneous wireless acquisition of neurophysiological and neurochemical activity. Applications of the system to neuroscience include monitoring EEG and glutamate in rat somatosensory cortex following global ischemia.

  5. Neurochemical Profile of Dementia Pugilistica

    OpenAIRE

    Kokjohn, Tyler A.; Maarouf, Chera L.; Daugs, Ian D.; Hunter, Jesse M.; Charisse M Whiteside; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Rodriguez, Emma; Kalback, Walter; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sabbagh, Marwan N; Beach, Thomas G; Roher, Alex E.

    2013-01-01

    Dementia pugilistica (DP), a suite of neuropathological and cognitive function declines after chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI), is present in approximately 20% of retired boxers. Epidemiological studies indicate TBI is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD). Some biochemical alterations observed in AD and PD may be recapitulated in DP and other TBI persons. In this report, we investigate long-term biochemical changes in th...

  6. Neurochemical measurements in the zebrafish brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren eJones

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish is an ideal model organism for behavioural genetics and neuroscience. The high conservation of genes and neurotransmitter pathways between zebrafish and other vertebrates permits the translation of research between species. Zebrafish behaviour can be studied at both larval and adult stages and recent research has begun to establish zebrafish models for human disease. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV is an electrochemical technique that permits the detection of neurotransmitter release and reuptake. In this study we have used in vitro FSCV to measure the release of analytes in the adult zebrafish telencephalon. We compare different stimulation methods and present a characterisation of neurochemical changes in the wild-type zebrafish brain. This study represents the first FSCV recordings in zebrafish, thus paving the way for neurochemical analysis of the fish brain.

  7. Neurochemical measurements in the zebrafish brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lauren J.; McCutcheon, James E.; Young, Andrew M. J.; Norton, William H. J.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is an ideal model organism for behavioral genetics and neuroscience. The high conservation of genes and neurotransmitter pathways between zebrafish and other vertebrates permits the translation of research between species. Zebrafish behavior can be studied at both larval and adult stages and recent research has begun to establish zebrafish models for human disease. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique that permits the detection of neurotransmitter release and reuptake. In this study we have used in vitro FSCV to measure the release of analytes in the adult zebrafish telencephalon. We compare different stimulation methods and present a characterization of neurochemical changes in the wild-type zebrafish brain. This study represents the first FSCV recordings in zebrafish, thus paving the way for neurochemical analysis of the fish brain. PMID:26441575

  8. SOME NEUROCHEMICAL DISTURBANCES IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir V. Markelov; Maxim V. Trushin

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACTThe data presented in this manuscript suggest a pivotal role of the central nervous system (CNS) in the regulation of immune status. We describe here that some neurochemical disturbances may provoke development of various diseases including multiple sclerosis. Some theoretic and practical backgrounds, how to improve the multiple sclerosis sufferers and patients with other autoimmune disorders, are also given.RESUMENLos datos que presentamos en este manuscrito, sugieren un papel guia d...

  9. Distinct Neurochemical Profiles of Spinocerebellar Ataxias 1, 2, 6, and Cerebellar Multiple System Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, Gülin; Iltis, Isabelle; Hutter, Diane; Thomas, William; Bushara, Khalaf O.; Gomez, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary and sporadic neurodegenerative ataxias are movement disorders that affect the cerebellum. Robust and objective biomarkers are critical for treatment trials of ataxias. In addition, such biomarkers may help discriminate between ataxia subtypes because these diseases display substantial overlap in clinical presentation and conventional MRI. Profiles of 10–13 neurochemical concentrations obtained in vivo by high field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) can potentially provide ataxia-type specific biomarkers. We compared cerebellar and brainstem neurochemical profiles measured at 4 T from 26 patients with spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA1, N=9; SCA2, N=7; SCA6, N=5) or cerebellar multiple system atrophy (MSA-C, N=5) and 15 age-matched healthy controls. The Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) was used to assess disease severity. The patterns of neurochemical alterations relative to controls differed between ataxia types. Myo-inositol levels in the vermis, myo-inositol, total N-acetylaspartate, total creatine, glutamate, glutamine in the cerebellar hemispheres and myo-inositol, total N-acetylaspartate, glutamate in the pons were significantly different between patient groups (Bonferroni corrected pataxia types. Studies with higher numbers of patients and other ataxias are warranted to further investigate the clinical utility of neurochemical levels as measured by high-field MRS as ataxia biomarkers. PMID:20838948

  10. Behavioral metabolomics analysis identifies novel neurochemical signatures in methamphetamine sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Adkins, Daniel E.; McClay, Joseph L.; VUNCK, SARAH A.; Batman, Angela M.; Vann, Robert E.; Clark, Shaunna L.; SOUZA,RENAN P. DE; Crowley, James J.; Sullivan, Patrick F; van den Oord, Edwin J.C.G.; Beardsley, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization has been widely studied in animal models and is theorized to reflect neural modifications associated with human psychostimulant addiction. While the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is known to play a role, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying behavioral sensitization remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we conducted the first metabolomics analysis to globally characterize neurochemical differences associated with behavioral sensitization. Methamphe...

  11. Neurochemical dynamics of acute orofacial pain in the human trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Nuno M P; Hock, Andreas; Wyss, Michael; Ettlin, Dominik A; Brügger, Mike

    2017-09-04

    The trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex is the first central relay structure mediating orofacial somatosensory and nociceptive perception. Animal studies suggest a substantial involvement of neurochemical alterations at such basal CNS levels in acute and chronic pain processing. Translating this animal based knowledge to humans is challenging. Human related examining of brainstem functions are challenged by MR related peculiarities as well as applicability aspects of experimentally standardized paradigms. Based on our experience with an MR compatible human orofacial pain model, the aims of the present study were twofold: 1) from a technical perspective, the evaluation of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T regarding measurement accuracy of neurochemical profiles in this small brainstem nuclear complex and 2) the examination of possible neurochemical alterations induced by an experimental orofacial pain model. Data from 13 healthy volunteers aged 19-46 years were analyzed and revealed high quality spectra with significant reductions in total N-acetylaspartate (N-acetylaspartate + N-acetylaspartylglutamate) (-3.7%, p = 0.009) and GABA (-10.88%, p = 0.041) during the pain condition. These results might reflect contributions of N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate in neuronal activity-dependent physiologic processes and/or excitatory neurotransmission, whereas changes in GABA might indicate towards a reduction in tonic GABAergic functioning during nociceptive signaling. Summarized, the present study indicates the applicability of (1)H-MRS to obtain neurochemical dynamics within the human trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex. Further developments are needed to pave the way towards bridging important animal based knowledge with human research to understand the neurochemistry of orofacial nociception and pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. SOME NEUROCHEMICAL DISTURBANCES IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Markelov

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe data presented in this manuscript suggest a pivotal role of the central nervous system (CNS in the regulation of immune status. We describe here that some neurochemical disturbances may provoke development of various diseases including multiple sclerosis. Some theoretic and practical backgrounds, how to improve the multiple sclerosis sufferers and patients with other autoimmune disorders, are also given.RESUMENLos datos que presentamos en este manuscrito, sugieren un papel guia del sistema nervioso central (SNC en la regulación del estado inmune. Describimos aquí que varias alteraciones neuroquímicas pueden provocar el desarrollo de varias enfermedades, incluyendo esclerosis múltiple. También se comenta acerca del trasfondo teórico y práctico, y cómo mejorar a víctimas y pacientes con esclerosis múltiple y otras alteraciones autoinmunes.

  13. Induction of gram-negative bacterial growth by neurochemical containing banana (Musa x paradisiaca) extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyte, M

    1997-09-15

    Bananas contain large quantities of neurochemicals. Extracts from the peel and pulp of bananas in increasing stages of ripening were prepared and evaluated for their ability to modulate the growth of non-pathogenic and pathogenic bacteria. Extracts from the peel, and to a much lesser degree the pulp, increased the growth of Gram-negative bacterial strains Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shigella flexneri, Enterobacter cloacae and Salmonella typhimurium, as well as two non-pathogenic E. coli strains, in direct relation to the content of norepinephrine and dopamine, but not serotonin. The growth of Gram-positive bacteria was not altered by any of the extracts. Supplementation of vehicle and pulp cultures with norepinephrine or dopamine yielded growth equivalent to peel cultures. Total organic analysis of extracts further demonstrated that the differential effects of peel and pulp on bacterial growth was not nutritionally based, but due to norepinephrine and dopamine. These results suggest that neurochemicals contained within foodstuffs may influence the growth of pathogenic and indigenous bacteria through direct neurochemical-bacterial interactions.

  14. Neurochemical Effects of Chronic Administration of Calcitriol in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Jiang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite accumulating data showing the various neurological actions of vitamin D (VD, its effects on brain neurochemistry are still far from fully understood. To further investigate the neurochemical influence of VD, we assessed neurotransmitter systems in the brain of rats following 6-week calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D administration (50 ng/kg/day or 100 ng/kg/day. Both the two doses of calcitriol enhanced VDR protein level without affecting serum calcium and phosphate status. Rats treated with calcitriol, especially with the higher dose, exhibited elevated γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA status. Correspondingly, the mRNA expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD 67 was increased. 100 ng/kg of calcitriol administration also increased glutamate and glutamine levels in the prefrontal cortex, but did not alter glutamine synthetase (GS expression. Additionally, calcitriol treatment promoted tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2 expression without changing dopamine and serotonin status. However, the concentrations of the metabolites of dopamine and serotonin were increased and the drug use also resulted in a significant rise of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA expression, which might be responsible to maintain the homeostasis of dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmission. Collectively, the present study firstly showed the effects of calcitriol in the major neurotransmitter systems, providing new evidence for the role of VD in brain function.

  15. Social Stress and Psychosis Risk: Common Neurochemical Substrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Romina

    2016-02-01

    Environmental risk factors have been implicated in the etiology of psychotic disorders, with growing evidence showing the adverse effects of migration, social marginalization, urbanicity, childhood trauma, social defeat, and other adverse experiences on mental health in vulnerable populations. Collectively, social stress may be one mechanism that could link these environmental risk factors. The exact mechanism(s) by which social stress can affect brain function, and in particular the molecular targets involved in psychosis (such as the dopaminergic (DA) system), is (are) not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss the interplay between social environmental risk factors and molecular changes in the human brain; in particular, we will highlight the impact of social stress on three specific neurochemical systems: DA, neuroinflammation/immune, and endocannabinoid (eCB) signaling. We have chosen the latter two molecular pathways based on emerging evidence linking schizophrenia to altered neuroinflammatory processes and cannabis use. We further identify key developmental periods in which social stress interacts with these pathways, suggesting window(s) of opportunities for novel interventions. Taken together, we suggest that they may have a key role in the pathogenesis and disease progression, possibly provide novel treatment options for schizophrenia, and perhaps even prevent it.

  16. Autism and Fragile X: Is There a Neurochemical Link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagwa A. Meguid

    2014-12-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Autism and Fragile X syndrome share some neurochemical similarities with regards of high Glutamate and GABA levels while Serotonin was significantly different in the 2 disorders and may be used a unique biomarker for autism.

  17. Central Neurochemical Ultradian Variability in Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald M. Salomon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression is characterized by blunted behavior and neuroendocrine function that generally improve with antidepressant treatment. This study examined intrinsic variability in brain neurotransmitter function, since it may be a source of blunted behavior and neuroendocrine function in depression and a marker for the illness, and has not previously been analyzed using wavelet decomposition. To measure variability in monoamine metabolites, lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was collected in serial samples in depressed patients before and after treatment. We hypothesized that changes in variability would be observed after treatment. Mechanisms that control such variability may be critical to the pathophysiology of depression. Method: Time series data was obtained from serial ten-min sampling over a 24-hr period (N = 144 from thirteen depressed patients, with a repeat collection after 5 weeks of antidepressant (sertraline or bupropion treatment. Concentrations of tryptophan (TRP, the monoamine metabolites 5-HIAA (metabolite of serotonin and HVA (metabolite of dopamine, and the HVA:5HIAA ratio were transformed to examine power in slowly (160 min/cycle to rapidly (20 min/cycle occurring events. Power, the sum of the squares of the coefficients in each d (detail wavelet, reflects variability within a limited frequency bandwidth for that wavelet. Pre-treatment to post-treatment comparisons were conducted with repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Antidepressant treatment was associated with increased power in the d2 wavelet from the HVA (p = 0.03 and the HVA:5-HIAA ratio (p = 0.03 series. The d1 and d3 wavelets showed increased power following antidepressant treatment for the ratio series (d1, p = 0.01; d3, p = 0.05. Significant changes in power were not observed for the 5-HIAA data series. Power differences among analytes suggest that the findings are specific to each system. Conclusion: The wavelet transform analysis shows changes in neurochemical signal

  18. Neurochemical mechanisms underlying responses to psychostimulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Hitzemann, R.; Wang, G.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1994-11-01

    This study employed positron emission tomography (PET) to investigate biochemical and metabolic characteristics of the brain of individuals which could put them at risk for drug addiction. It takes advantage of the normal variability between individuals in response to psychoactive drugs to investigate relation between mental state, brain neurochemistry and metabolism and the behavioral response to drugs. We discuss its use to assess if there is an association between mental state and dompaminergic reactivity in response to the psychostimulant drug methylphenidate (MP). Changes in synaptic dopamine induced by MP were evaluated with PET and [11C]raclopride, a D{sub 2} receptor radioligand that is sensitive to endogenous dopamine. Methylpphenidate significantly decreased striatal [11C]raclopride binding. The study showed a correlation between the magnitude of the dopamine-induced changes by methylphenidate, and the mental state of the subjects. Subjects reporting high levels of anxiety and restlessness at baseline had larger changes in MP-induced dopamine changes than those that did not. Further investigations on the relation between an individual`s response to a drug and his/her mental state and personality as well as his neurochemical brain composition may enable to understand better differences in drug addiction vulnerability.

  19. Carbon Nanofiber Electrode Array for Neurochemical Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica E.

    2017-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. Here, we report using vertically aligned CNF as neurotransmitter recording electrodes for application in a smart deep brain stimulation (DBS) device. Our approach combines a multiplexed CNF electrode chip, developed at NASA Ames Research Center, with the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensor (WINCS) system, developed at the Mayo Clinic. Preliminary results indicate that the CNF nanoelectrode arrays are easily integrated with WINCS for neurotransmitter detection in a multiplexed array format. In the future, combining CNF based stimulating and recording electrodes with WINCS may lay the foundation for an implantable smart therapeutic system that utilizes neurochemical feedback control while likely resulting in increased DBS application in various neuropsychiatric disorders. In total, our goal is to take advantage of the nanostructure of CNF arrays for biosensing studies requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, and selective biofunctionalization.

  20. Neuroanatomical and Neurochemical Basis of Impulsivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Yazici

    2010-08-01

    tis paradigm, the tendency to prefer small immediate rewards over larger, more delayed reinforcers is measured. İmpulsive choice is defined by a greater tendency to value or choose smaller, more immediate reinforcers. Impulsivity is a multi-faceted behaviour. This behaviour may be studied by subdividing it into different processes neuroanatomically and neurochemically. Neuroanatomical data support the suggestion that behavioral disinhibition (impulsive action / motoric impulsivity and delay-discounting (impulsive choice / decision making differ in the degree to which various components of frontostriatal loops are implicated in their regulation. The dorsal prefrontal cortex does not appear to be involved in mediating impulsive choice, yet does have some role in regulating inhibitory processes. In contrast, there appears to be a pronounced role for the orbitofrontal cortex and basolateral amygdala in controlling impulsive choice. Other structures, however, such as the nucleus accumbens and subthalamic nucleus may be common to both circuits. From the neurochemical perspective, dopamine system and dopamine- 2 (D2 receptors in particular, seems to be closely involved in making impulsive choice. When the noradrenaline system does not function optimally, it might contribute to increased impulsivity. Serotonin might act upon prefrontal cortex to decrease impulsive choices. Interactions between the serotonin and the dopamine systems are important in the regulation of impulsive behaviour. It is possible that various receptor subtypes of the serotonin system may exert differing and even contrasting effects on impulsive behaviour. Although it is very informative to study neurotransmitter systems separately, it should be kept in mind that there are very intimate interactions between the neurotransmitter systems mentioned above. Based on the fact that impulsivity is regulated through multiple neurotransmitters and even more receptors, one may suggest that pharmacotherapy of

  1. Neurochemical consequence of steroid abuse: stanozolol-induced monoaminergic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Paolo; Morgese, Maria Grazia; Colaianna, Marilena; Zotti, Margherita; Schiavone, Stefania; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Trabace, Luigia

    2012-02-01

    An extensive literature has documented adverse effects on mental health in anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) abusers. Depression seems a common adverse reaction in AAS abusers. Recently it has been reported that in a rat model of AAS abuse stanozolol induces behavioural and biochemical changes related to the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. In the present study, we used the model of AAS abuse to examine possible changes in the monoaminergic system, a neurobiological substrate of depression, in different brain areas of stanozolol-treated animals. Wistar rats received repeated injections of stanozolol (5mg/kg, s.c.), or vehicle (propylene glycol, 1ml/kg) once daily for 4weeks. Twenty-four hours after last injection, changes of dopamine (DA) and relative metabolite levels, homovanilic acid (HVA) and 3,4-dihydroxy phenylacetic acid (DOPAC), serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite levels, 5-hydroxy indolacetic acid (5-HIAA), and noradrenaline (NA) amount were investigated in prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens (NAC), striatum (STR) and hippocampus (HIPP). The analysis of data showed that after chronic stanozolol, DA levels were increased in the HIPP and decreased in the PFC. No significant changes were observed in the STR or in the NAC. 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels were decreased in all brain areas investigated after stanozolol exposure; however, the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio was not altered. Taken together, our data indicate that chronic use of stanozolol significantly affects brain monoamines leading to neurochemical modifications possibly involved in depression and stress-related states. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurochemical Evidence of Potential Neurotoxicity After Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalm, Marie, E-mail: marie.kalm@neuro.gu.se [Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Insitute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Abel, Edvard [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wasling, Pontus [Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Nyman, Jan [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Hietala, Max Albert [Department of Neurology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Bremell, Daniel; Hagberg, Lars [Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Elam, Mikael [Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Insitute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Blennow, Kaj [Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal (Sweden); Björk-Eriksson, Thomas [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Zetterberg, Henrik [Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal (Sweden); UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To examine whether cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for neuroaxonal damage, neuroglial activation, and amyloid β–related processes could characterize the neurochemical response to cranial radiation. Methods and Materials: Before prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) of patients with small cell lung cancer, each patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, lumbar puncture, and Mini-Mental State Examination of cognitive function. These examinations were repeated at approximately 3 and 12 months after radiation. Results: The major findings were as follows. (1) Cerebrospinal fluid markers for neuronal and neuroglial injury were elevated during the subacute phase after PCI. Neurofilament and T-tau increased 120% and 50%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). The same was seen for the neuroglial markers YKL-40 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, which increased 144% and 106%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). (2) The levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein-α and -β were reduced 44% and 46%, respectively, 3 months after PCI, and the levels continued to decrease as long as 1 year after treatment (P<.05). (3) Mini-Mental State Examination did not reveal any cognitive decline, indicating that a more sensitive test should be used in future studies. Conclusion: In conclusion, we were able to detect radiation therapy–induced changes in several markers reflecting neuronal injury, inflammatory/astroglial activation, and altered amyloid precursor protein/amyloid β metabolism, despite the low number of patients and quite moderate radiation doses (20-30 Gy). These changes are hypothesis generating and could potentially be used to assess the individual risk of developing long-term symptoms of chronic encephalopathy after PCI. This has to be evaluated in large studies with extended clinical follow-up and more detailed neurocognitive assessments.

  3. Resemblances in the Wedding and Natal Customs

    OpenAIRE

    Reneta Zlateva; Zlatozhivka Zdravkova

    2011-01-01

    The present article describes the natal rites and customs of the Azerbaijan and Bulgarian nations. Special attention is paid to the resemblances in the practicing and understanding of the traditions. Despite the fact that the two nations live in regions remote from each other, they have common beliefs and strive to provide prosperity for the home, family and children.

  4. Neurochemical changes in the pericalcarine cortex in congenital blindness attributable to bilateral anophthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coullon, Gaelle S L; Emir, Uzay E; Fine, Ione; Watkins, Kate E; Bridge, Holly

    2015-09-01

    Congenital blindness leads to large-scale functional and structural reorganization in the occipital cortex, but relatively little is known about the neurochemical changes underlying this cross-modal plasticity. To investigate the effect of complete and early visual deafferentation on the concentration of metabolites in the pericalcarine cortex, (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed in 14 sighted subjects and 5 subjects with bilateral anophthalmia, a condition in which both eyes fail to develop. In the pericalcarine cortex, where primary visual cortex is normally located, the proportion of gray matter was significantly greater, and levels of choline, glutamate, glutamine, myo-inositol, and total creatine were elevated in anophthalmic relative to sighted subjects. Anophthalmia had no effect on the structure or neurochemistry of a sensorimotor cortex control region. More gray matter, combined with high levels of choline and myo-inositol, resembles the profile of the cortex at birth and suggests that the lack of visual input from the eyes might have delayed or arrested the maturation of this cortical region. High levels of choline and glutamate/glutamine are consistent with enhanced excitatory circuits in the anophthalmic occipital cortex, which could reflect a shift toward enhanced plasticity or sensitivity that could in turn mediate or unmask cross-modal responses. Finally, it is possible that the change in function of the occipital cortex results in biochemical profiles that resemble those of auditory, language, or somatosensory cortex. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Mercury Vapour Long-Lasting Exposure: Lymphocyte Muscarinic Receptors as Neurochemical Markers of Accidental Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Roda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic poisoning may result in home setting after mercury (Hg vapours inhalation from damaged devices. We report a chronic, nonoccupational Hg poisoning due to 10-year indoor exposure to mercury spillage. Case Report. A 72-year-old man with polyneuropathy of suspected toxic origin. At hospitalization, toxicological clinical evaluations confirmed the altered neurological picture documented across the last decade. Periodic blood and urine Hg levels (BHg, UHg monitoring were performed from admission (t0, until 1 year later (t2, paralleled by blood neurochemical markers assessment, that is, lymphocytes muscarinic receptors (l-MRs. At t0: BHg and UHg were 27 and 1.4 microg/L, respectively (normal values: BHg 1–4.5; UHg 0.1–4.5, associated with l-MRs increase, 185.82 femtomoL/million lymphocytes (normal range: 8.0–16.0. At t1 (two days after DMSA-mobilization test, BHg weak reduction, paralleled by UHg 3.7-fold increase, was measured together with further l-MRs enhancement (205.43 femtomoL/million lymphocytes. At t2 (eight months after two cycles of DMSA chelating therapy ending, gradual improving of clinical manifestations was accompanied by progressive decrease of BHg and UHg (4.0 and 2.8 microg/L, resp. and peripheral l-MRs neurochemical marker (24.89 femtomoL/million lymphocytes. Conclusion. l-MRs modulatory effect supports their use as peripheral neurochemical marker in Hg poisoning diagnosis and chelation therapy monitoring.

  6. Mercury Vapour Long-Lasting Exposure: Lymphocyte Muscarinic Receptors as Neurochemical Markers of Accidental Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, E; Giampreti, A; Vecchio, S; Apostoli, P; Coccini, T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic poisoning may result in home setting after mercury (Hg) vapours inhalation from damaged devices. We report a chronic, nonoccupational Hg poisoning due to 10-year indoor exposure to mercury spillage. Case Report. A 72-year-old man with polyneuropathy of suspected toxic origin. At hospitalization, toxicological clinical evaluations confirmed the altered neurological picture documented across the last decade. Periodic blood and urine Hg levels (BHg, UHg) monitoring were performed from admission (t0), until 1 year later (t2), paralleled by blood neurochemical markers assessment, that is, lymphocytes muscarinic receptors (l-MRs). At t0: BHg and UHg were 27 and 1.4 microg/L, respectively (normal values: BHg 1-4.5; UHg 0.1-4.5), associated with l-MRs increase, 185.82 femtomoL/million lymphocytes (normal range: 8.0-16.0). At t1 (two days after DMSA-mobilization test), BHg weak reduction, paralleled by UHg 3.7-fold increase, was measured together with further l-MRs enhancement (205.43 femtomoL/million lymphocytes). At t2 (eight months after two cycles of DMSA chelating therapy ending), gradual improving of clinical manifestations was accompanied by progressive decrease of BHg and UHg (4.0 and 2.8 microg/L, resp.) and peripheral l-MRs neurochemical marker (24.89 femtomoL/million lymphocytes). Conclusion. l-MRs modulatory effect supports their use as peripheral neurochemical marker in Hg poisoning diagnosis and chelation therapy monitoring.

  7. The trace amine-associated receptor 1 modulates methamphetamine's neurochemical and behavioral effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Rachel; Pei, Yue; Mus, Liudmila; Harmeier, Anja; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Hoener, Marius C; Canales, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    The newly discovered trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) has the ability to regulate both dopamine function and psychostimulant action. Here, we tested in rats the ability of RO5203648, a selective TAAR1 partial agonist, to modulate the physiological and behavioral effects of methamphetamine (METH). In experiment 1, RO5203468 dose- and time-dependently altered METH-induced locomotor activity, manifested as an early attenuation followed by a late potentiation of METH's stimulating effects. In experiment 2, rats received a 14-day treatment regimen during which RO5203648 was co-administered with METH. RO5203648 dose-dependently attenuated METH-stimulated hyperactivity, with the effects becoming more apparent as the treatments progressed. After chronic exposure and 3-day withdrawal, rats were tested for locomotor sensitization. RO5203648 administration during the sensitizing phase prevented the development of METH sensitization. However, RO5203648, at the high dose, cross-sensitized with METH. In experiment 3, RO5203648 dose-dependently blocked METH self-administration without affecting operant responding maintained by sucrose, and exhibited lack of reinforcing efficacy when tested as a METH's substitute. Neurochemical data showed that RO5203648 did not affect METH-mediated DA efflux and uptake inhibition in striatal synaptosomes. In vivo, however, RO5203648 was able to transiently inhibit METH-induced accumulation of extracellular DA levels in the nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these data highlight the significant potential of TAAR1 to modulate METH's neurochemical and behavioral effects.

  8. Multiple ureterolithiasis resembling steinstrasse: An unusual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kumar Pandey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Steinstrasse or “stone street” is an expected complication after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with high stone burden. However, there are published reports of multiple ureterolithiasis resembling steinstrasse in patients with distal renal tubular acidosis. Here we report an uncommon case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with right renal calculi. Her right ureter was studded with multiple calculi up to the vesicoureteric junction. The affected right kidney was nonfunctional and was managed by nephroureterectomy.

  9. A novel syndrome resembling Desbuquois dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Nessib, N; Ghachem, M B; Hammou, A; Guiddana, N; Kozlowski, K

    2005-01-01

    We report on three Tunisian siblings with a rare assortment of clinical and radiographic abnormalities closely resembling Desbuquois dysplasia. However, the siblings have had normal facies, normal hands, and were mentally normal. There were severe musculo-skeletal distinguishing features such as joint stiffness, severe kyphoscoliosis, and multiple large joint dislocations. Moreover, the patients had an additional remarkable radiographic feature not reported in Desbequois dysplasia-multiple carpal ossification centers. The diagnosis of Desbuquois dysplasia is more difficult in older children and adults as the characteristic facial features of early childhood may recede, and the metaphyseal growth plates obliterate. This condition of these patients represents a novel Desbuquois-like syndrome. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Neurochemical organization of the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis in the human

    OpenAIRE

    Baizer, Joan S.; Baker, James F.; Haas, Kristin; Lima, Raquel

    2007-01-01

    We have characterized the neurochemical organization of a small brainstem nucleus in the human brain, the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis (PMD). PMD is located adjacent and medial to the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (PH) in the dorsal medulla, and is distinguished by the pattern of immunoreactivity of cells and fibers to several markers including calcium-binding proteins, a synthetic enzyme for nitric oxide (neuronal nitric oxide synthase, nNOS) and a nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (a...

  11. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eSmith

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular (VOR and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa’s ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC, it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarises and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics.

  12. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa's ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarizes and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics.

  13. Behavioral metabolomics analysis identifies novel neurochemical signatures in methamphetamine sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, D E; McClay, J L; Vunck, S A; Batman, A M; Vann, R E; Clark, S L; Souza, R P; Crowley, J J; Sullivan, P F; van den Oord, E J C G; Beardsley, P M

    2013-11-01

    Behavioral sensitization has been widely studied in animal models and is theorized to reflect neural modifications associated with human psychostimulant addiction. While the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is known to play a role, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying behavioral sensitization remain incompletely understood. In this study, we conducted the first metabolomics analysis to globally characterize neurochemical differences associated with behavioral sensitization. Methamphetamine (MA)-induced sensitization measures were generated by statistically modeling longitudinal activity data for eight inbred strains of mice. Subsequent to behavioral testing, nontargeted liquid and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling was performed on 48 brain samples, yielding 301 metabolite levels per sample after quality control. Association testing between metabolite levels and three primary dimensions of behavioral sensitization (total distance, stereotypy and margin time) showed four robust, significant associations at a stringent metabolome-wide significance threshold (false discovery rate, FDR biomarkers, and developing more comprehensive neurochemical models, of psychostimulant sensitization. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  14. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Neurochemical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Lahoz, Juan; Gironell, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    The pathophysiology and the exact anatomy of essential tremor (ET) is not well known. One of the pillars that support the cerebellum as the main anatomical locus in ET is neurochemistry. This review examines the link between neurochemical abnormalities found in ET and cerebellum. The review is based on published data about neurochemical abnormalities described in ET both in human and in animal studies. We try to link those findings with cerebellum. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main neurotransmitter involved in the pathophysiology of ET. There are several studies about GABA that clearly points to a main role of the cerebellum. There are few data about other neurochemical abnormalities in ET. These include studies with noradrenaline, glutamate, adenosine, proteins, and T-type calcium channels. One single study reveals high levels of noradrenaline in the cerebellar cortex. Another study about serotonin neurotransmitter results negative for cerebellum involvement. Finally, studies on T-type calcium channels yield positive results linking the rhythmicity of ET and cerebellum. Neurochemistry supports the cerebellum as the main anatomical locus in ET. The main neurotransmitter involved is GABA, and the GABA hypothesis remains the most robust pathophysiological theory of ET to date. However, this hypothesis does not rule out other mechanisms and may be seen as the main scaffold to support findings in other systems. We clearly need to perform more studies about neurochemistry in ET to better understand the relations among the diverse systems implied in ET. This is mandatory to develop more effective pharmacological therapies.

  15. Atherosclerosis and Cancer; A Resemblance with Far-reaching Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Vieyra, Juana Virginia; Delgado-Coello, Blanca; Mas-Oliva, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and cancer are chronic diseases considered two of the main causes of death all over the world. Taking into account that both diseases are multifactorial, they share not only several important molecular pathways but also many ethiological and mechanistical processes from the very early stages of development up to the advanced forms in both pathologies. Factors involved in their progression comprise genetic alterations, inflammatory processes, uncontrolled cell proliferation and oxidative stress, as the most important ones. The fact that external effectors such as an infective process or a chemical insult have been proposed to initiate the transformation of cells in the artery wall and the process of atherogenesis, emphasizes many similarities with the progression of the neoplastic process in cancer. Deregulation of cell proliferation and therefore cell cycle progression, changes in the synthesis of important transcription factors as well as adhesion molecules, an alteration in the control of angiogenesis and the molecular similarities that follow chronic inflammation, are just a few of the processes that become part of the phenomena that closely correlates atherosclerosis and cancer. The aim of the present study is therefore, to provide new evidence as well as to discuss new approaches that might promote the identification of closer molecular ties between these two pathologies that would permit the recognition of atherosclerosis as a pathological process with a very close resemblance to the way a neoplastic process develops, that might eventually lead to novel ways of treatment. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurochemical changes in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex associated with electroacupuncture for learning and memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian; Zhao, Congkuai; Liu, Weilin; Huang, Jia; Liang, Shengxiang; Chen, Lidian; Tao, Jing

    2018-02-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been widely used to treat cognitive impairment following cerebral ischemia. However, the functional mechanisms of EA have not been fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether EA at the GV 20 and DU 24 acupoints can improve the learning and memory ability via alteration of the neurochemical metabolism in the hippocampus (HPC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of rats with ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. Sprague‑Dawley male rats were randomly divided into three groups, namely the sham group (n=12), the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) group (n=12) and the EA treatment (MCAO + EA) group (n=12). MCAO was performed to establish the left focal cerebral I/R injury model, and the GV 20 and DU 24 acupoints were then stimulated with EA for 30 min per time, once daily, for 7 consecutive days. The Morris water maze (MWM) test was used to assess learning and memory ability. T2‑weighted imaging was used to assess the cerebral infarct volume. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to assess neurochemical metabolism of HPC and PFC. The neurological scores of the MCAO + EA group were significantly reduced compared with those of the MCAO group 7 days after EA treatment (Pplatform area was significantly higher in the MCAO + EA group compared with that in the MCAO group (P0.05). The ratios of NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and Glu/Cr of left‑to‑right PFC were elevated (Plearning and memory ability, possibly through increasing the levels of NAA and Cho in the HPC and PFC of rats with I/R injury.

  17. Previous Ketamine Produces an Enduring Blockade of Neurochemical and Behavioral Effects of Uncontrollable Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolzani, Samuel D.; Tilden, Scott; Christianson, John P.; Kubala, Kenneth H.; Bartholomay, Kristi; Sperr, Katherine; Ciancio, Nicholas; Watkins, Linda R.; Maier, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent interest in the antidepressant and anti-stress effects of subanesthetic doses of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, has identified mechanisms whereby ketamine reverses the effect of stress, but little is known regarding the prophylactic effect ketamine might have on future stressors. Here we investigate the prophylactic effect of ketamine against neurochemical and behavioral changes that follow inescapable, uncontrollable tail shocks (ISs) in Sprague Dawley rats. IS induces increased anxiety, which is dependent on activation of serotonergic (5-HT) dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) neurons that project to the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Ketamine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administered 2 h, 1 week, or 2 weeks before IS prevented the increased extracellular levels of 5-HT in the BLA typically produced by IS. In addition, ketamine administered at these time points blocked the decreased juvenile social investigation produced by IS. Microinjection of ketamine into the prelimbic (PL) region of the medial prefrontal cortex duplicated the effects of systemic ketamine, and, conversely, systemic ketamine effects were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of the PL. Although IS does not activate DRN-projecting neurons from the PL, IS did so after ketamine, suggesting that the prophylactic effect of ketamine is a result of altered functioning of this projection. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The reported data show that systemic ketamine, given up to 2 weeks before a stressor, blunts behavioral and neurochemical effects of the stressor. The study also advances understanding of the mechanisms involved and suggests that ketamine acts at the prelimbic cortex to sensitize neurons that project to and inhibit the DRN. PMID:26740657

  18. The trace amine-associated receptor 1 modulates methamphetamine’s neurochemical and behavioural effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel eCotter

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The newly discovered trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1 has the ability to regulate both dopamine function and psychostimulant action. Here, we tested in rats the ability of RO5203648, a selective TAAR1 partial agonist, to modulate the physiological and behavioural effects of methamphetamine (METH. In experiment 1, RO5203468 dose- and time-dependently altered METH-induced locomotor activity, manifested as an early attenuation followed by a late potentiation of METH’s stimulating effects. In experiment 2, rats received a 14-day treatment regimen during which RO5203648 was co-administered with METH. RO5203648 dose-dependently attenuated METH-stimulated hyperactivity, with the effects becoming more apparent as the treatments progressed. After chronic exposure and 3-day withdrawal, rats were tested for locomotor sensitization. RO5203648 administration during the sensitizing phase prevented the development of METH sensitization. However, RO5203648, at the high dose, cross-sensitized with METH. In experiment 3, RO5203648 dose-dependently blocked METH self-administration without affecting operant responding maintained by sucrose, and exhibited lack of reinforcing efficacy when tested as a METH’s substitute. Neurochemical data showed that RO5203648 did not affect METH-mediated DA efflux and uptake inhibition in striatal synaptosomes. In vivo, however, RO5203648 was able to transiently inhibit METH-induced accumulation of extracellular DA levels in the nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these data highlight the significant potential of TAAR1 to modulate METH’s neurochemical and behavioural effects.

  19. Metabolomics reveals distinct neurochemical profiles associated with stress resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke N. Dulka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute social defeat represents a naturalistic form of conditioned fear and is an excellent model in which to investigate the biological basis of stress resilience. While there is growing interest in identifying biomarkers of stress resilience, until recently, it has not been feasible to associate levels of large numbers of neurochemicals and metabolites to stress-related phenotypes. The objective of the present study was to use an untargeted metabolomics approach to identify known and unknown neurochemicals in select brain regions that distinguish susceptible and resistant individuals in two rodent models of acute social defeat. In the first experiment, male mice were first phenotyped as resistant or susceptible. Then, mice were subjected to acute social defeat, and tissues were immediately collected from the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, basolateral/central amygdala (BLA/CeA, nucleus accumbens (NAc, and dorsal hippocampus (dHPC. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry (UPLC-HRMS was used for the detection of water-soluble neurochemicals. In the second experiment, male Syrian hamsters were paired in daily agonistic encounters for 2 weeks, during which they formed stable dominant-subordinate relationships. Then, 24 h after the last dominance encounter, animals were exposed to acute social defeat stress. Immediately after social defeat, tissue was collected from the vmPFC, BLA/CeA, NAc, and dHPC for analysis using UPLC-HRMS. Although no single biomarker characterized stress-related phenotypes in both species, commonalities were found. For instance, in both model systems, animals resistant to social defeat stress also show increased concentration of molecules to protect against oxidative stress in the NAc and vmPFC. Additionally, in both mice and hamsters, unidentified spectral features were preliminarily annotated as potential targets for future experiments. Overall, these findings

  20. Effects of serotonin 2C receptor agonists on the behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manvich, Daniel F; Kimmel, Heather L; Howell, Leonard L

    2012-05-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the serotonin system modulates the behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine, but the receptor subtypes mediating these effects remain unknown. Recent studies have demonstrated that pharmacological activation of the serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT(2C)R) attenuates the behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine in rodents, but such compounds have not been systematically evaluated in nonhuman primates. The present experiments sought to determine the impact of pretreatment with the preferential 5-HT(2C)R agonist m-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) and the selective 5-HT(2C)R agonist Ro 60-0175 [(α-S)-6-chloro-5-fluoro-α-methyl-1H-indole-1-ethanamine fumarate] on the behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys. In subjects trained to lever-press according to a 300-s fixed-interval schedule of stimulus termination, pretreatment with either 5-HT(2C)R agonist dose-dependently and insurmountably attenuated the behavioral stimulant effects of cocaine. In subjects trained to self-administer cocaine, both compounds dose-dependently and insurmountably attenuated cocaine-induced reinstatement of previously extinguished responding in an antagonist-reversible manner, and the selective agonist Ro 60-0175 also attenuated the reinforcing effects of cocaine during ongoing cocaine self-administration. It is noteworthy that the selective agonist Ro 60-0175 exhibited behavioral specificity because it did not significantly alter nondrug-maintained responding. Finally, in vivo microdialysis studies revealed that pretreatment with Ro 60-0175 caused a reduction of cocaine-induced dopamine increases within the nucleus accumbens, but not the caudate nucleus. These results suggest that 5-HT(2C)R agonists functionally antagonize the behavioral effects of cocaine in nonhuman primates, possibly via a selective modulation of cocaine-induced dopamine increases within the mesolimbic dopamine system and may therefore represent a novel

  1. Paternal Care May Influence Perceptions of Paternal Resemblance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A. Volk

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Father-child resemblance is increasingly attracting attention from researchers interested in studying paternal investment. The current study sought to determine whether a quasi-experimental infant massage intervention would increase father's perceptions of resemblance. The study included a dozen fathers in each of two groups: the first received an intensive series of lessons on infant-father massage along with their infants, while the second group served as a neutral control. We failed to find significant correlations between paternal investment and resemblance, but we found that fathers who participated in the infant massage intervention reported significantly larger post-study ratings of resemblance and lower ratings of paternal stress. This suggests that the relationship between father-child resemblance and paternal investment may be bidirectional.

  2. Attenuation of neurobehavioral and neurochemical abnormalities in animal model of cognitive deficits of Alzheimer's disease by fermented soybean nanonutraceutical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Prakash Chandra; Pathak, Shruti; Kumar, Vikas; Panda, Bibhu Prasad

    2018-02-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of nanonutraceuticals (NN) for attenuation of neurobehavioral and neurochemical abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease. Solid-state fermentation of soybean with Bacillus subtilis was performed to produce different metabolites (nattokinase, daidzin, genistin and glycitin and menaquinone-7). Intoxication of rats with colchicine caused impairment in learning and memory which was demonstrated in neurobehavioral paradigms (Morris water maze and passive avoidance) linked with decreased activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). NN treatment led to a significant increase in TLT in the retention trials as compared to acquisition trial TLT suggesting an improved learning and memory in rats. Further, treatment of NN caused an increase in the activity of AChE (42%), accompanied with a reduced activity of glutathione (42%), superoxide dismutase (43%) and catalase (41%). It also decreased the level of lipid peroxidation (28%) and protein carbonyl contents (30%) in hippocampus as compared to those treated with colchicine alone, suggesting a possible neuroprotective efficacy of NN. Interestingly, in silico studies also demonstrated an effective amyloid-β and BACE-1 inhibition activity. These findings clearly indicated that NN reversed colchicine-induced behavioral and neurochemical alterations through potent antioxidant activity and could possibly impart beneficial effects in cognitive defects associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Clozapine protection against gestational cocaine-induced neurochemical abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablonsky-Alter, Elena; Gashi, Eleonora; Lidsky, Theodore I; Wang, Hoau-Yan; Banerjee, Shailesh P

    2005-01-01

    Clozapine was found to be effective in attenuating cocaine-induced neurochemical effects. We investigate whether clozapine influences in utero cocaine exposure-induced changes in striatal dopamine levels and cortical N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor density in mouse and rat brains. Pregnant mice or rats were injected with cocaine (5 or 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or saline every 24 h throughout gestation and continued for 6 weeks following the delivery. Striatal dopamine levels measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography were found to decrease 24 to 33% in gestational cocaine exposed between the ages of 3 to 15 days, but not in 42-day-old pups. The cortical NMDA receptor densities assessed either in the presence of 100 microM glutamate or 30 microM glycine were significantly increased in 15-day-old gestational cocaine-exposed rats. Simultaneous daily administration of 3 mg/kg clozapine with 5 mg/kg cocaine to pregnant mice protected against the decrease in striatal dopamine levels or an increase in the concentration of NMDA receptor measured in the presence of 100 microM glutamate in 15-day-old pups. Clozapine did not affect striatal dopamine levels by itself or when coadministered with cocaine in 42-day-old pups. The results show gestational cocaine may induce neurochemical abnormalities in brain exhibited as an increased glutamate NMDA receptor density together with a decreased striatal dopamine level. These effects of gestational cocaine exposure may be prevented by simultaneous administration of clozapine. Thus clozapine, which is a partial agonist at the NMDA receptor, may be of value in protecting against gestational cocaine-induced adverse effects in the brain.

  4. Neurochemical phenotype of cytoglobin‑expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2014-01-01

    of Cygb neurons remain uncharacterized by the neurochemical content. The aim of the present study was to provide an additional and more detailed neurochemical phenotype of Cygb-expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus. The rat hippocampus was chosen due to the abundance of Cygb, as well as this limbic...... of Cygb neurons co-expressing nNOS. Furthermore, it was shown that the majority of neurons expressing somastostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide also co-express Cygb and nNOS. Detailed information regarding the neurochemical phenotype of Cygb neurons in the hippocampus can be a valuable tool...

  5. Social vs. environmental stress models of depression from a behavioural and neurochemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venzala, E; García-García, A L; Elizalde, N; Tordera, R M

    2013-07-01

    Major depression is a mental disorder often preceded by exposure to chronic stress or stressful life events. Recently, animal models based on social conflict such as chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) are proposed to be more relevant to stress-induced human psychopathology compared to environmental models like the chronic mild stress (CMS). However, while CMS reproduces specifically core depressive symptoms such as anhedonia and helplessness, CSDS studies rely on the analysis of stress-induced social avoidance, addressing different neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we study comparatively the two models from a behavioural and neurochemical approach and their possible relevance to human depression. Mice (C57BL/6) were exposed to CMS or CSDS for six weeks and ten days. Anhedonia was periodically evaluated. A battery of test applied during the fourth week after the stress procedure included motor activity, memory, anxiety, social interaction and helplessness. Subsequently, we examined glutamate, GABA, 5-HT and dopamine levels in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and brainstem. CMS induced a clear depressive-like profile including anhedonia, helplessness and memory impairment. CSDS induced anhedonia, hyperactivity, anxiety and social avoidance, signs also common to anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorders. While both models disrupted the excitatory inhibitory balance in the prefrontal cortex, CMS altered importantly this balance in the brainstem. Moreover, CSDS decreased dopamine in the prefrontal cortex and brainstem. We suggests that while depressive-like behaviours might be associated to altered aminoacid neurotransmission in cortical and brain stem areas, CSDS induced anxiety behaviours might be linked to specific alteration of dopaminergic pathways involved in rewarding processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of melatonin on aluminium-induced neurobehavioral and neurochemical changes in aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allagui, M S; Feriani, A; Saoudi, M; Badraoui, R; Bouoni, Z; Nciri, R; Murat, J C; Elfeki, A

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential protective effects of melatonin (Mel) against aluminium-induced neurodegenerative changes in aging Wistar rats (24-28months old). Herein, aluminium chloride (AlCl3) (50mg/kg BW/day) was administered by gavage, and melatonin (Mel) was co-administered to a group of Al-treated rats by an intra-peritoneal injection at a daily dose of 10mg/kg BW for four months. The findings revealed that aluminium administration induced a significant decrease in body weight associated with marked mortality for the old group of rats, which was more pronounced in old Al-treated rats. Behavioural alterations were assessed by 'open fields', 'elevated plus maze' and 'Radial 8-arms maze' tests. The results demonstrated that Mel co-administration alleviated neurobehavioral changes in both old and old Al-treated rats. Melatonin was noted to play a good neuroprotective role, reducing lipid peroxidation (TBARs), and enhancing enzymatic (SOD, CAT and GPx) activities in the brain organs of old control and old Al-treated rats. Mel treatment also reversed the decrease of AChE activity in the brain tissues, which was confirmed by histological sections. Overall, the results showed that Mel administration can induce beneficial effects for the treatment of Al-induced neurobehavioral and neurochemical changes in the central nervous system (CNS). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Curcumin ameliorates reserpine-induced pain-depression dyad: behavioural, biochemical, neurochemical and molecular evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, V; Kuhad, A; Tiwari, V; Chopra, K

    2011-11-01

    An apparent clinical relationship between pain and depression has long been recognized. Depression and pain are often diagnosed in the same patients. The emerging concept for pain-depression pathogenesis is the dysfunction of biogenic amine-mediated pain-depression control and the possible involvement of nitrodative stress-induced neurogenic inflammation. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of curcumin on reserpine-induced pain-depression dyad in rats. Administration of reserpine (1mg/kg subcutaneous daily for three consecutive days) led to a significant decrease in nociceptive threshold as evident from reduced paw withdrawal threshold in Randall Sellitto and von-Frey hair test as well as significant increase in immobility time in forced swim test. This behavioural deficit was integrated with decrease in the biogenic amine (dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin) levels along with increased substance P concentration, nitrodative stress, inflammatory cytokines, NF-κβ and caspase-3 levels in different brain regions (cortex and hippocampus) of the reserpinised rats. Curcumin (100, 200, 300mg/kg; ip) dose dependently ameliorated the behavioural deficits associated with pain and depression by restoring behavioural, biochemical, neurochemical and molecular alterations against reserpine-induced pain-depression dyad in rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Different Matrices as Potential Quality Control Samples for Neurochemical Dementia Diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelental, N.; Brandner, S.; Kofanova, O.; Blennow, K.; Zetterberg, H.; Andreasson, U.; Engelborghs, S.; Mroczko, B.; Gabryelewicz, T.; Teunissen, C.; Mollenhauer, B.; Parnetti, L.; Chiasserini, D.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Perret-Liaudet, A.; Verbeek, M.M.; Andreasen, N.; Brosseron, F.; Bahl, J.M.; Herukka, S.K.; Hausner, L.; Frolich, L.; Labonte, A.; Poirier, J.; Miller, A.M.; Zilka, N.; Kovacech, B.; Urbani, A.; Suardi, S.; Oliveira, C. de; Baldeiras, I.; Dubois, B.; Rot, U.; Lehmann, S.; Skinningsrud, A.; Betsou, F.; Wiltfang, J.; Gkatzima, O.; Winblad, B.; Buchfelder, M.; Kornhuber, J.; Lewczuk, P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assay-vendor independent quality control (QC) samples for neurochemical dementia diagnostics (NDD) biomarkers are so far commercially unavailable. This requires that NDD laboratories prepare their own QC samples, for example by pooling leftover cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples.

  9. Comparison of Different Matrices as Potential Quality Control Samples for Neurochemical Dementia Diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelental, Natalia; Brandner, Sebastian; Kofanova, Olga; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Andreasson, Ulf; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Mroczko, Barbara; Gabryelewicz, Tomasz; Teunissen, Charlotte; Mollenhauer, Brit; Parnetti, Lucilla; Chiasserini, Davide; Molinuevo, Jose Luis; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Andreasen, Niels; Brosseron, Frederic; Bahl, Justyna M. C.; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Hausner, Lucrezia; Froelich, Lutz; Labonte, Anne; Poirier, Judes; Miller, Anne-Marie; Zilka, Norbert; Kovacech, Branislav; Urbani, Andrea; Suardi, Silvia; Oliveira, Catarina; Baldeiras, Ines; Dubois, Bruno; Rot, Uros; Lehmann, Sylvain; Skinningsrud, Anders; Betsou, Fay; Wiltfang, Jens; Gkatzima, Olymbia; Winblad, Bengt; Buchfelder, Michael; Kornhuber, Johannes; Lewczuk, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background: Assay-vendor independent quality control (QC) samples for neurochemical dementia diagnostics (NDD) biomarkers are so far commercially unavailable. This requires that NDD laboratories prepare their own QC samples, for example by pooling leftover cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples.

  10. Behavioral and Neurochemical Studies in Stressed and Unstressed Rats Fed on Protein, Carbohydrate and Fat Rich Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Moin§, Saida Haider*, Saima Khaliq1, Saiqa Tabassum and Darakhshan J. Haleem

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Stress produces behavioral and neurochemical deficits. To study the relationship between adaptation to stress and macronutrient intake, the present study was designed to monitor the effects of different diets on feed intake, growth rate and serotonin (5-Hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT metabolism following exposure to restraint stress in rats. Rats were divided into four groups (n=12 as control, sugar, protein and fat rich diet fed rats. After 5 weeks of treatment animals of each group were divided into unrestrained and restrained animals (n=6. Rats of restrained group were given immobilization stress for 2 hours/day for 5 days. Food intake and growth rates of unrestrained and restrained rats were monitored daily. Rats were decapitated on 6th day to collect brain samples for neurochemical estimation. Results show that sugar diet fed rats produced adaptation to stress early as compared to normal diet fed rats. Food intake and growth rates of unrestrained and restrained rats were comparable on 3rd day in sugar diet fed rats and on 4th day in normal diet fed rats. Stress decreased food intake and growth rates of protein and fat treated rats. Repeated stress did not alter brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels of normal diet fed rats and sugar diet fed rats. Protein diet fed restrained rats showed elevated brain 5-HT levels. Fat diet fed restrained rats significantly decreased brain TRP and 5-HIAA levels. Finding suggested that carbohydrate diet might protect against stressful conditions. Study also showed that nutritional status could alter different behaviors in response to a stressful environment.

  11. A neurochemical approach to valuation sensitivity over gains and losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Songfa; Israel, Salomon; Xue, Hong; Sham, Pak C; Ebstein, Richard P; Chew, Soo Hong

    2009-12-07

    Prospect theory proposes the hypothesis that people have diminishing sensitivity in valuing increases in the size of monetary outcomes, for both gains and losses. For decision-making under risk, this implies a tendency to be risk-tolerant over losses while being generally risk averse over gains. We offer a neurochemistry-based model of the diminishing valuation sensitivity hypothesis. Specifically, we propose that dopamine tone modulates the sensitivity towards valuation of gains while serotonin tone modulates the sensitivity towards valuation of losses. Consequently, higher dopamine tone would yield a more concave valuation function over gains while higher serotonin tone would yield a more convex valuation function over losses. Using a neurogenetics strategy to test our neurochemical model, we find that subjects with the 9-repeat allele of DAT1 (lower DA tone) are more risk-tolerant over gains than subjects with the 10-repeat allele, and that subjects with the 10-repeat allele of STin2 (higher 5HT tone) are more risk-tolerant over losses than subjects with the 12-repeat allele. Overall, our results support the implications of our model and provide the first neurogenetics evidence that risk attitudes are partially hard-wired in differentiating between gain- and loss-oriented risks.

  12. Neurochemical background and approaches in the understanding of motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The problems and nature of space motion sickness were defined. The neurochemical and neurophysiological bases of vestibular system function and of the expression of motion sickness wre reviewed. Emphasis was given to the elucidation of the neuropharmacological mechanisms underlying the effects of scopolamine and amphetamine on motion sickness. Characterization of the ascending reticular activating system and the limbic system provided clues to the etiology of the side effects of scopolamine. The interrelationship between central cholinergic pathways and the peripheral (autonomic) expression of motion sickness was described. A correlation between the stress of excessive motion and a variety of hormonal responses to that stress was also detailed. The cholinergic system is involved in the efferent modulation of the vestibular hair cells, as an afferent modulator of the vestibular nuclei, in the activation of cortical and limbic structures, in the expression of motion sickness symptoms and most likely underscores a number of the hormonal changes that occur in stressful motion environments. The role of lecithin in the regulation of the levels of neurotransmitters was characterized as a possible means by which cholinergic neurochemistry can be modulated.

  13. Intentions vs. resemblance: understanding pictures in typical development and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Calum; Allen, Melissa L

    2014-04-01

    Research has debated whether children reflect on artists' intentions when comprehending pictures, or instead derive meaning entirely from resemblance. We explore these hypotheses by comparing how typically developing toddlers and low-functioning children with autism (a population impaired in intentional reasoning) interpret abstract pictures. In Experiment 1, both groups mapped familiar object names onto abstract pictures, however, they related the same representations to different 3-D referents. Toddlers linked abstract pictures with intended referents they did not resemble, while children with autism mapped picture-referent relations based on resemblance. Experiment 2 showed that toddlers do not rely upon linguistic cues to determine intended referential relations. Experiment 3 confirmed that the responding of children with autism was not due to perseveration or associative word learning, and also provided independent evidence of their intention-reading difficulties. We argue that typically developing children derive meaning from the social-communicative intentions underlying pictures when resemblance is an inadequate cue to meaning. By contrast, children with autism do not reflect on artists' intentions and simply relate pictures to whatever they happen to resemble. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Neurochemical differences in learning and memory paradigms among rats supplemented with anthocyanin-rich blueberry diets and exposed to acute doses of 56Fe particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulose, Shibu M.; Rabin, Bernard M.; Bielinski, Donna F.; Kelly, Megan E.; Miller, Marshall G.; Thanthaeng, Nopporn; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    The protective effects of anthocyanin-rich blueberries (BB) on brain health are well documented and are particularly important under conditions of high oxidative stress, which can lead to "accelerated aging." One such scenario is exposure to space radiation, consisting of high-energy and -charge particles (HZE), which are known to cause cognitive dysfunction and deleterious neurochemical alterations. We recently tested the behavioral and neurochemical effects of acute exposure to HZE particles such as 56Fe, within 24-48 h after exposure, and found that radiation primarily affects memory and not learning. Importantly, we observed that specific brain regions failed to upregulate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms in response to this insult. To further examine these endogenous response mechanisms, we have supplemented young rats with diets rich in BB, which are known to contain high amounts of antioxidant-phytochemicals, prior to irradiation. Exposure to 56Fe caused significant neurochemical changes in hippocampus and frontal cortex, the two critical regions of the brain involved in cognitive function. BB supplementation significantly attenuated protein carbonylation, which was significantly increased by exposure to 56Fe in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Moreover, BB supplementation significantly reduced radiation-induced elevations in NADPH-oxidoreductase-2 (NOX2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and upregulated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Overall results indicate that 56Fe particles may induce their toxic effects on hippocampus and frontal cortex by reactive oxygen species (ROS) overload, which can cause alterations in the neuronal environment, eventually leading to hippocampal neuronal death and subsequent impairment of cognitive function. Blueberry supplementation provides an effective preventative measure to reduce the ROS load on the CNS in an event of acute HZE exposure.

  15. Neurochemical organization of the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis in the human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baizer, Joan S; Baker, James F; Haas, Kristin; Lima, Raquel

    2007-10-24

    We have characterized the neurochemical organization of a small brainstem nucleus in the human brain, the nucleus paramedianus dorsalis (PMD). PMD is located adjacent and medial to the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (PH) in the dorsal medulla and is distinguished by the pattern of immunoreactivity of cells and fibers to several markers including calcium-binding proteins, a synthetic enzyme for nitric oxide (neuronal nitric oxide synthase, nNOS) and a nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (antibody SMI-32). In transverse sections, PMD is oval with its long axis aligned with the dorsal border of the brainstem. We identified PMD in eight human brainstems, but found some variability both in its cross-sectional area and in its A-P extent among cases. It includes calretinin immunoreactive large cells with oval or polygonal cell bodies. Cells in PMD are not immunoreactive for either calbindin or parvalbumin, but a few fibers immunoreactive to each protein are found within its central region. Cells in PMD are also immunoreactive to nNOS, and immunoreactivity to a neurofilament protein shows many labeled cells and fibers. No similar region is identified in atlases of the cat, mouse, rat or monkey brain, nor does immunoreactivity to any of the markers that delineate it in the human reveal a comparable region in those species. The territory that PMD occupies is included in PH in other species. Since anatomical and physiological data in animals suggest that PH may have multiple subregions, we suggest that the PMD in human may be a further differentiation of PH and may have functions related to the vestibular control of eye movements.

  16. Entropy generation in a channel resembling gas turbine cooling ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Flow into a passage resembling a gas turbine blade cooling passage is considered and entropy generation rate in the passage is examined for unique rotation number and density ratios. In the simulations, leading and trailing walls of the passage are assumed to be at constant temperature. A control volume approach is ...

  17. Entropy generation in a channel resembling gas turbine cooling ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Flow into a passage resembling a gas turbine blade cooling passage is considered and entropy .... for the flow systems associated with the cooling applications. In the present study, rectangular .... Since we are using ideal gas law to incorporate the density variation with temperature, the code does not permit use of ...

  18. Familial resemblance for physique: heritabilities for somatotype components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzmarzyk, P T; Malina, R M; Pérusse, L; Rice, T; Province, M A; Rao, D C; Bouchard, C

    2000-01-01

    To examine familial resemblance in the Heath-Carter anthropometric somatotype in a sample of 328 participants from 103 nuclear families in Northern Ontario (Canada). The three somatotype components (endomorphy, mesomorphy, ectomorphy) were subjected to principal components analysis and the resulting first principal component (PCI) was used as an additional index of physique. The four phenotypes were adjusted for age, sex and generation effects, while each of the three somatotype components was further adjusted for the effects of the other two components using regression procedures. A familial correlation model was fit to the data and used to estimate the degree of familial resemblance in somatotype. For all somatotype variables, the most parsimonious model was one in which there was no spouse resemblance and no sex or generation effects in the familial correlations. Maximal heritabilities were 56%, 68%, 56% and 64% for endomorphy, mesomorphy, ectomorphy and PCI, respectively, indicating significant familial resemblance for the Heath-Carter anthropometric somatotype. Further, the pattern of familial correlations suggests the role of genetic factors in explaining variation in human physique. In general, a pattern of no spouse but significant parent-child correlations implicates the role of genes on human physique, provided that mating is random with regard to these traits.

  19. A novel encephalopathy in a thiamine-deficient dog resembling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel encephalopathy in a thiamine-deficient dog resembling human Wernicke's disease with atypical MRI pattern. ... Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin, which participates in several vital metabolic pathways involved in energy metabolism and neurotransmitter synthesis of mammals. In companion animals thiamine ...

  20. Conodont bioapatite resembles vertebrate enamel by XRD properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jüri Nemliher

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available XRD properties of Phanerozoic conodont apatite material were studied. It was found out that in terms of crystallinity the apatite resembles the enamel tissue of modern vertebrates. In terms of crystal lattice, apatite of conodonts is independent of taxa on the one hand and of chemistry of the surrounding rock type on the other hand.

  1. Polioencephalomyelopathy in a mixed breed dog resembling Leigh's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Orit; Milgram, Joshua; Shamir, Merav H; Brenner, Ori

    2015-01-01

    A 14-month-old mixed-breed dog was presented with acute onset of exercise intolerance that quickly progressed to quadriparesis. Gross and microscopic autopsy findings indicated a type of degenerative polioencephalomyelopathy resembling subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy in dogs or Leigh's disease in humans. This syndrome has previously been reported only in purebred dogs.

  2. Protective effect of curcumin and its combination with piperine (bioavailability enhancer) against haloperidol-associated neurotoxicity: cellular and neurochemical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Mahendra; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Rongzhu, Lu; Kulkarni, Shrinivas K

    2011-10-01

    Long-term treatment with haloperidol is associated with a number of extrapyramidal side effects, particularly the irregular movements of chorionic type. This limitation presents a marked therapeutic challenge. The present study investigates the molecular etiology of haloperidol neurotoxicity and the role of curcumin, a well-known anti-oxidant, in ameliorating these adverse effects. The redox status of haloperidol-treated brains along with NO, TNF-α, NF-kappaB p65 subunit, caspase-3, and monoamine neurotransmitters were measured in the striatum of rat brain. Chronic treatment with haloperidol (5 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days) produced orofacial dyskinetic movements which were coupled with marked increase in oxidative stress parameters, TNF-α, caspase-3 activity in cytoplasmic lysate and active p65 sub unit of NF-kappaB in nuclear lysates of the striatum. Neurochemically, chronic administration of haloperidol resulted in a significant decrease in the levels of norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin. The prototype atypical anti-psychotic, clozapine (10 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days) produced mild oxidative stress but did not alter any other parameters. Interestingly, co-administration of curcumin (25 and 50 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days) dose-dependently prevented all the behavioral, cellular, and neurochemical changes associated with the chronic administration of haloperidol. Curcumin per se (50 mg/kg) did not show any side effects. Co-administration of piperine significantly enhanced the effect of curcumin (25 mg/kg) but not of curcumin (50 mg/kg). Collectively, the data indicated the potential of curcumin as an adjunct to haloperidol treatment and provided initial clues to the underlying molecular mechanisms in haloperidol neurotoxicity. This study also provides a rationale for the combination of piperine and curcumin.

  3. WINCS Harmoni: Closed-loop dynamic neurochemical control of therapeutic interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kendall H.; Lujan, J. Luis; Trevathan, James K.; Ross, Erika K.; Bartoletta, John J.; Park, Hyung Ook; Paek, Seungleal Brian; Nicolai, Evan N.; Lee, Jannifer H.; Min, Hoon-Ki; Kimble, Christopher J.; Blaha, Charles D.; Bennet, Kevin E.

    2017-04-01

    There has been significant progress in understanding the role of neurotransmitters in normal and pathologic brain function. However, preclinical trials aimed at improving therapeutic interventions do not take advantage of real-time in vivo neurochemical changes in dynamic brain processes such as disease progression and response to pharmacologic, cognitive, behavioral, and neuromodulation therapies. This is due in part to a lack of flexible research tools that allow in vivo measurement of the dynamic changes in brain chemistry. Here, we present a research platform, WINCS Harmoni, which can measure in vivo neurochemical activity simultaneously across multiple anatomical targets to study normal and pathologic brain function. In addition, WINCS Harmoni can provide real-time neurochemical feedback for closed-loop control of neurochemical levels via its synchronized stimulation and neurochemical sensing capabilities. We demonstrate these and other key features of this platform in non-human primate, swine, and rodent models of deep brain stimulation (DBS). Ultimately, systems like the one described here will improve our understanding of the dynamics of brain physiology in the context of neurologic disease and therapeutic interventions, which may lead to the development of precision medicine and personalized therapies for optimal therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Multimodal neuroimaging based classification of autism spectrum disorder using anatomical, neurochemical, and white matter correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libero, Lauren E; DeRamus, Thomas P; Lahti, Adrienne C; Deshpande, Gopikrishna; Kana, Rajesh K

    2015-05-01

    Neuroimaging techniques, such as fMRI, structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) have uncovered evidence for widespread functional and anatomical brain abnormalities in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) suggesting it to be a system-wide neural systems disorder. Nevertheless, most previous studies have focused on examining one index of neuropathology through a single neuroimaging modality, and seldom using multiple modalities to examine the same cohort of individuals. The current study aims to bring together multiple brain imaging modalities (structural MRI, DTI, and 1H-MRS) to investigate the neural architecture in the same set of individuals (19 high-functioning adults with ASD and 18 typically developing (TD) peers). Morphometry analysis revealed increased cortical thickness in ASD participants, relative to typical controls, across the left cingulate, left pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus, left inferior temporal cortex, and right precuneus, and reduced cortical thickness in right cuneus and right precentral gyrus. ASD adults also had reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) for two clusters on the forceps minor of the corpus callosum, revealed by DTI analyses. 1H-MRS results showed a reduction in the N-acetylaspartate/Creatine ratio in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) in ASD participants. A decision tree classification analysis across the three modalities resulted in classification accuracy of 91.9% with FA, RD, and cortical thickness as key predictors. Examining the same cohort of adults with ASD and their TD peers, this study found alterations in cortical thickness, white matter (WM) connectivity, and neurochemical concentration in ASD. These findings underscore the potential for multimodal imaging to better inform on the neural characteristics most relevant to the disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dysregulation of brain reward systems in eating disorders: neurochemical information from animal models of binge eating, bulimia nervosa, and anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avena, Nicole M; Bocarsly, Miriam E

    2012-07-01

    Food intake is mediated, in part, through brain pathways for motivation and reinforcement. Dysregulation of these pathways may underlay some of the behaviors exhibited by patients with eating disorders. Research using animal models of eating disorders has greatly contributed to the detailed study of potential brain mechanisms that many underlie the causes or consequences of aberrant eating behaviors. This review focuses on neurochemical evidence of reward-related brain dysfunctions obtained through animal models of binge eating, bulimia nervosa, or anorexia nervosa. The findings suggest that alterations in dopamine (DA), acetylcholine (ACh) and opioid systems in reward-related brain areas occur in response to binge eating of palatable foods. Moreover, animal models of bulimia nervosa suggest that while bingeing on palatable food releases DA, purging attenuates the release of ACh that might otherwise signal satiety. Animal models of anorexia nervosa suggest that restricted access to food enhances the reinforcing effects of DA when the animal does eat. The activity-based anorexia model suggests alterations in mesolimbic DA and serotonin occur as a result of restricted eating coupled with excessive wheel running. These findings with animal models complement data obtained through neuroimaging and pharmacotherapy studies of clinical populations. Information on the neurochemical consequences of the behaviors associated with these eating disorders will be useful in understanding these complex disorders and may inform future therapeutic approaches, as discussed here. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central Control of Food Intake'. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A method for creating interactive, user-resembling avatars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Macedo Silva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality (VR applications have disseminated throughout several fields, with a special quest for immersion. The avatar is one of the key constituents of immersive applications, and avatar resemblance can provoke diverse emotional responses from the user. Yet a lot a virtual reality systems struggle to implement real life-like avatars. In this work, we propose a novel method for creating interactive, user-resembling avatars using available commercial hardware and software. Avatar visualization is possible with a point-cloud or a contiguous polygon surface, and avatar interactions with the virtual scenario happens through a body joint-approximation for contact. In addition, the implementation could be easily extended to other systems and its modular architecture admits improvement both on visualization and physical interactions. The code is under Apache License 2.0 and is freely available as Supplemental Information 1 in this article.

  7. RESEMBLANCE OF INDIRECTNESS IN POLITENESS OF EFL LEARNERS’ REQUEST REALIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indawan Syahri

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Politeness principles are universally utilized by the speakers of any language when realizing various speech acts. However, the speakers of particular languages relatively apply politeness due to the cultural norms embedded. The present study attempts to delineate how the Indonesian learners of English (ILE apply the politeness principles in request realizations. Specifically it devotes to the types of politeness strategies applied and resemblance of the indirectness in politeness strategies in requesting acts. The FTAs and indirectness are the theoretical bases used to trace the typologies of both politeness and request strategies. The data werere collected by means of certain elicitation techniques, i.e. DCTs and Role-plays. The analyses werere done through three stages; determining request strategies, politeness strategies, and resemblance of indirectness in politeness. The results show that the indirectness generally is parallel to politeness. Besides, some pragmatic transfers are found in terms of applying native-culture norms in realizing target speech acts.

  8. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) on regulation of thyroid-, growth-, and neurochemically related developmental processes in young rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez de Ku, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Neonatal exposure to the toxic chemical polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) induces hypothyroidism and retarded growth. Neonatal rats made hypothyroid by chemical or surgical means experience retarded growth and subnormal activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) This study compared thyroid-, growth-, and neurochemically-related processes altered by hypothyroidism induced by other means, with PCB-induced hypothyroidism: (1) titers of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH); (2) titers of hormones that regulate growth [growth hormone (GH), insulin-growth like factor-I (IGF-1), growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SS)]; or (3) brain ChAT activity. Whether PCB-induced growth retardation and other alterations are secondary to accompanying hypothyroidism rather than or in addition to a direct effect of PCB was also examined. Pregnant rats were fed chow containing 0 (controls), 62.5, 125, or 250 ppm PCB (entering offspring through placenta and milk) throughout pregnancy and lactation. Neonates exposed to PCB displayed many alterations similar to those made hypothyroid by other means: depression of overall and skeletal growth, circulating by other means: depression of overall and skeletal growth, circulating T[sub 4] levels and ChAT activity, and no change in hypothalamic GHRH and SS concentrations. Differences included a paradoxical increase in circulating GH levels, and no significant alteration of circulation IGF-1 and TSH levels and pituitary GH and TSH levels (although trends were in the expected direction). Thus, PCB-induced hypothyroidism may partially cause altered skeletal growth, circulating GH and TSH concentrations, and ChAT activity. Both T[sub 4] and T[sub 3] injections returned circulating TSH and GH levels and pituitary TSH content toward control levels; T[sub 3] restored skeletal, but not overall growth; and T[sub 4] elevated ChAT activity.

  9. Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Benzoyl Peroxide Resembling Impetigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changhyun; Craiglow, Brittany G; Watsky, Kalman L; Antaya, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old boy presented with recurring severe dermatitis of the face of 5-months duration that resembled impetigo. He had been treated with several courses of antibiotics without improvement. Biopsy showed changes consistent with allergic contact dermatitis and patch testing later revealed sensitization to benzoyl peroxide, which the patient had been using for the treatment of acne vulgaris. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Native valve endocarditis caused by an organism resembling Corynebacterium striatum.

    OpenAIRE

    Markowitz, S M; Coudron, P E

    1990-01-01

    An organism resembling Corynebacterium striatum was isolated from the blood of a patient with acute aortic valvular insufficiency and no history of valvular heart disease. At autopsy, histopathologic examination of the aortic valve revealed pleomorphic gram-positive bacilli and destruction of valvular tissue. Our isolate differed from other nondiphtherial corynebacteria, including the type strain of C. striatum (ATCC 6940), in its ability to reduce nitrite. Nitrite reduction may be useful for...

  11. Comprehensive characterization of neurochemicals in three zebrafish chemical models of human acute organophosphorus poisoning using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Canela, Cristian; Tornero-Cañadas, Daniel; Prats, Eva; Piña, Benjamí; Tauler, Romà; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2018-02-01

    There is a growing interest in biological models to investigate the effect of neurotransmitter dysregulation on the structure and function of the central nervous system (CNS) at different stages of development. Zebrafish, a vertebrate model increasingly used in neurobiology and neurotoxicology, shares the common neurotransmitter systems with mammals, including glutamate, GABA, glycine, dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, serotonin, acetylcholine, and histamine. In this study, we have evaluated the performance of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the multiresidue determination of neurotransmitters and related metabolites. In a first step, ionization conditions were tested in positive electrospray mode and optimum fragmentation patterns were determined to optimize two selected reaction monitoring (SRM) transitions. Chromatographic conditions were optimized considering the chemical structure and chromatographic behavior of the analyzed compounds. The best performance was obtained with a Synergy Polar-RP column, which allowed the separation of the 38 compounds in 30 min. In addition, the performance of LC-MS/MS was studied in terms of linearity, sensitivity, intra- and inter-day precision, and overall robustness. The developed analytical method was able to quantify 27 of these neurochemicals in zebrafish chemical models for mild (P1), moderate (P2), and severe (P3) acute organophosphorus poisoning (OPP). The results show a general depression of synaptic-related neurochemicals, including the excitatory and inhibitory amino acids, as well as altered phospholipid metabolism, with specific neurochemical profiles associated to the different grades of severity. These results confirmed that the developed analytical method is a new tool for neurotoxicology research using the zebrafish model.

  12. Polycystic ovary syndrome resembling histopathological alterations in ovaries from prenatal androgenized female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Fang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS affects approximately 6-10% of women of reproductive age and is characterized by chronic anovulation and hyperandrogenism. However, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms that dictate androgen overproduction is lacking, which may account for inconsistencies between measures of androgen excess and clinical presentation in individual cases. Methods A rat model of PCOS was established by injecting dehydroepiandrosterone sulfoconjugate (DHEAS into pregnant females. Rats were administered with DHEAS (60 mg/kg/d subcutaneously (s.c. for all 20 days of pregnancy (Group A, or for the first 10 days (Group B, or from day 11 to day 20 (Group C. Controls were administered with injection oil (0.2 ml/day s.c. throughout pregnancy (Group D. The litter rate, abortion rate, and offspring survival rate in each group were recorded. Serum androgen and estrogen were measured and the morphological features of the ovaries were examined by light and electron microscopy in the offspring of each group. Results We found that rats injected with DHEAS throughout pregnancy (group A lost fertility. Rats injected with DHEAS during early pregnancy (group B exhibited more serious aberrations in fertility than both Group C, in which rats were injected with DHEAS during late pregnancy (P  Conclusions Our results indicate that androgen excess during pregnancy can decrease rat fertility. Excess androgen at the early stage of pregnancy causes high reproductive toxicity, leading to abnormality of ovarian morphology and functions in female offspring.

  13. Magnesium Sulfate Prevents Neurochemical and Long-Term Behavioral Consequences of Neonatal Excitotoxic Lesions: Comparison Between Male and Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Ismaël; Le Dieu-Lugon, Bérénice; Dourmap, Nathalie; Lecuyer, Matthieu; Ramet, Lauriane; Gomila, Cathy; Ausseil, Jérôme; Marret, Stéphane; Leroux, Philippe; Roy, Vincent; El Mestikawy, Salah; Daumas, Stéphanie; Gonzalez, Bruno; Leroux-Nicollet, Isabelle; Cleren, Carine

    2017-10-01

    Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) administration to mothers at risk of preterm delivery is proposed as a neuroprotective strategy against neurological alterations such as cerebral palsy in newborns. However, long-term beneficial or adverse effects of MgSO4 and sex-specific sensitivity remain to be investigated. We conducted behavioral and neurochemical studies of MgSO4 effects in males and females, from the perinatal period to adolescence in a mouse model of cerebral neonatal lesion. The lesion was produced in 5-day-old (P5) pups by ibotenate intracortical injection. MgSO4 (600 mg/kg, i.p.) prior to ibotenate prevented lesion-induced sensorimotor alterations in both sexes at P6 and P7. The lesion increased glutamate level at P10 in the prefrontal cortex, which was prevented by MgSO4 in males. In neonatally lesioned adolescent mice, males exhibited more sequelae than females in motor and cognitive functions. In the perirhinal cortex of adolescent mice, the neonatal lesion induced an increase in vesicular glutamate transporter 1 density in males only, which was negatively correlated with cognitive scores. Long-term sequelae were prevented by neonatal MgSO4 administration. MgSO4 never induced short- or long-term deleterious effect on its own. These results also strongly suggest that sex-specific neuroprotection should be foreseen in preterm infants. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Understanding Resemblance in Depiction: What Can we Learn from Wittgenstein?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Caldarola

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Wittgenstein’s remarks on “seeing-as” have influenced several scholars working on depiction. They have especially inspired those who think that in order to understand depiction we should understand the specific kind of visual experience depictions arouse in the viewer (e.g. Gombrich [1960], Wollheim [1968; 1987]. In this paper I would like to go a different way. My hypothesis is that certain of Wittgenstein’s claims both in the Tractatus and in his later writings resonate well within the context of an objective resemblance account of depiction (Hyman, 2006.

  15. Sequence of retrovirus provirus resembles that of bacterial transposable elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotohno, Kunitada; Mizutani, Satoshi; Temin, Howard M.

    1980-06-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the terminal regions of an infectious integrated retrovirus cloned in the modified λ phage cloning vector Charon 4A have been elucidated. There is a 569-base pair direct repeat at both ends of the viral DNA. The cell-virus junctions at each end consist of a 5-base pair direct repeat of cell DNA next to a 3-base pair inverted repeat of viral DNA. This structure resembles that of a transposable element and is consistent with the protovirus hypothesis that retroviruses evolved from the cell genome.

  16. Anti-depressant like effect of curcumin and its combination with piperine in unpredictable chronic stress-induced behavioral, biochemical and neurochemical changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutani, Mohit Kumar; Bishnoi, Mahendra; Kulkarni, Shrinivas K

    2009-03-01

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment extracted from rhizomes of the plant Curcuma longa (turmeric), has been widely used as food additive and also as a herbal medicine throughout Asia. The present study was designed to study the pharmacological, biochemical and neurochemical effects of daily administration of curcumin to rats subjected to chronic unpredictable stress. Curcumin treatment (20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days) significantly reversed the chronic unpredictable stress-induced behavioral (increase immobility period), biochemical (increase monoamine oxidase activity) and neurochemical (depletion of brain monoamine levels) alterations. The combination of piperine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days), a bioavailability enhancer, with curcumin (20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days) showed significant potentiation of its anti-immobility, neurotransmitter enhancing (serotonin and dopamine) and monoamine oxidase inhibitory (MAO-A) effects as compared to curcumin effect per se. This study provided a scientific rationale for the use of curcumin and its co-administration with piperine in the treatment of depressive disorders.

  17. Development of intraoperative electrochemical detection: wireless instantaneous neurochemical concentration sensor for deep brain stimulation feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gompel, Jamie J; Chang, Su-Youne; Goerss, Stephan J; Kim, In Yong; Kimble, Christopher; Bennet, Kevin E; Lee, Kendall H

    2010-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is effective when there appears to be a distortion in the complex neurochemical circuitry of the brain. Currently, the mechanism of DBS is incompletely understood; however, it has been hypothesized that DBS evokes release of neurochemicals. Well-established chemical detection systems such as microdialysis and mass spectrometry are impractical if one is assessing changes that are happening on a second-to-second time scale or for chronically used implanted recordings, as would be required for DBS feedback. Electrochemical detection techniques such as fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) and amperometry have until recently remained in the realm of basic science; however, it is enticing to apply these powerful recording technologies to clinical and translational applications. The Wireless Instantaneous Neurochemical Concentration Sensor (WINCS) currently is a research device designed for human use capable of in vivo FSCV and amperometry, sampling at subsecond time resolution. In this paper, the authors review recent advances in this electrochemical application to DBS technologies. The WINCS can detect dopamine, adenosine, and serotonin by FSCV. For example, FSCV is capable of detecting dopamine in the caudate evoked by stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus/substantia nigra in pig and rat models of DBS. It is further capable of detecting dopamine by amperometry and, when used with enzyme linked sensors, both glutamate and adenosine. In conclusion, WINCS is a highly versatile instrument that allows near real-time (millisecond) detection of neurochemicals important to DBS research. In the future, the neurochemical changes detected using WINCS may be important as surrogate markers for proper DBS placement as well as the sensor component for a "smart" DBS system with electrochemical feedback that allows automatic modulation of stimulation parameters. Current work is under way to establish WINCS use in humans.

  18. A case of cervical radiation radiculopathy resembling motor neuron disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsunaga, Yoshihiro; Yoshimura, Takeo; Hara, Hideo; Yamada, Takeshi; Kira, Jun-ichi; Kobayashi, Takuro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-05-01

    A 67-year-old man developed slowly progressive muscular weakness in the bilateral upper extremities (C5-7 regions) without signs of sensory deficit following the cervical radiation therapy (70.5 Gy) for right laryngeal cancer 4 years before. These clinical signs resembled those of lower motor neuron disease. MRI with gadolinium-DTPA, however, showed enhancement in the bilateral C5 and C6 anterior roots, suggesting the cervical radiculopathy due to radiotherapy. It is known that radiation to the spinal cord can lead to ``selective anterior horn cell injury``. This is the first case report of the cervical radiation radiculopathy, which, if without MRI, might be classified into selective anterior horn cell injury. Suggestion is made for the hypothesis that the spinal motoneuron loss in radiation myelopathy would be caused by retrograde degeneration due to anterior root damages. (author)

  19. Autonomously Moving Colloidal Objects that Resemble Living Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichi Morimune

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The design of autonomously moving objects that resemble living matter is an excellent research topic that may develop into various applications of functional motion. Autonomous motion can demonstrate numerous significant characteristics such as transduction of chemical potential into work without heat, chemosensitive motion, chemotactic and phototactic motions, and pulse-like motion with periodicities responding to the chemical environment. Sustainable motion can be realized with an open system that exchanges heat and matter across its interface. Hence the autonomously moving object has a colloidal scale with a large specific area. This article reviews several examples of systems with such characteristics that have been studied, focusing on chemical systems containing amphiphilic molecules.

  20. Transplacental exposure to AZT induces adverse neurochemical and behavioral effects in a mouse model: protection by L-acetylcarnitine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rita Zuena

    Full Text Available Maternal-fetal HIV-1 transmission can be prevented by administration of AZT, alone or in combination with other antiretroviral drugs to pregnant HIV-1-infected women and their newborns. In spite of the benefits deriving from this life-saving prophylactic therapy, there is still considerable uncertainty on the potential long-term adverse effects of antiretroviral drugs on exposed children. Clinical and experimental studies have consistently shown the occurrence of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress following prenatal treatment with antiretroviral drugs, and clinical evidence suggests that the developing brain is one of the targets of the toxic action of these compounds possibly resulting in behavioral problems. We intended to verify the effects on brain and behavior of mice exposed during gestation to AZT, the backbone of antiretroviral therapy during human pregnancy. We hypothesized that glutamate, a neurotransmitter involved in excitotoxicity and behavioral plasticity, could be one of the major actors in AZT-induced neurochemical and behavioral alterations. We also assessed the antioxidant and neuroprotective effect of L-acetylcarnitine, a compound that improves mitochondrial function and is successfully used to treat antiretroviral-induced polyneuropathy in HIV-1 patients. We found that transplacental exposure to AZT given per os to pregnant mice from day 10 of pregnancy to delivery impaired in the adult offspring spatial learning and memory, enhanced corticosterone release in response to acute stress, increased brain oxidative stress also at birth and markedly reduced expression of mGluR1 and mGluR5 subtypes and GluR1 subunit of AMPA receptors in the hippocampus. Notably, administration during the entire pregnancy of L-acetylcarnitine was effective in preventing/ameliorating the neurochemical, neuroendocrine and behavioral adverse effects induced by AZT in the offspring. The present preclinical findings provide a

  1. Integrative pathways linking close family ties to health: A neurochemical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Bert N; Way, Baldwin M

    2017-09-01

    The quality of one's familial life, for better or worse, has been linked to physical health. Such associations are evident across a number of acute and chronic conditions and highlight the widespread impact that close relationships have on physical health. However, the field currently lacks a complete understanding of the integrative biological pathways underlying the association between close relationships and disease risk. This article reviews the main peripheral biological and central nervous system pathways linking positive and negative familial relationship processes to physical health outcomes. It emphasizes the role of neurochemical pathways in mediating the influence of social relationships on health-relevant peripheral physiological systems using the oxytocin system as a model. Such neurochemical approaches are an important step toward a more integrative understanding of complex biological pathways and has novel theoretical and intervention implications. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. In vivo effect of chronic hypoxia on the neurochemical profile of the developing rat hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Raman, Lakshmi; Tkac, Ivan; Ennis, Kathleen; Georgieff, Michael K.; Gruetter, Rolf; Rao, Raghavendra

    2005-01-01

    The cognitive deficits observed in children with cyanotic congenital heart disease suggest involvement of the developing hippocampus. Chronic postnatal hypoxia present during infancy in these children may play a role in these impairments. To understand the biochemical mechanisms of hippocampal injury in chronic hypoxia, a neurochemical profile consisting of 15 metabolite concentrations and 2 metabolite ratios in the hippocampus was evaluated in a rat model of chronic postnatal hypoxia using i...

  3. Immunostaining of Biocytin-filled and Processed Sections for Neurochemical Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swietek, Bogumila; Gupta, Akshay; Proddutur, Archana; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-12-31

    Electrophysiological recordings of cells using the patch clamp technique have allowed for the identification of different neuronal types based on firing patterns. The inclusion of biocytin/neurobiotin in the recording electrode permits post-hoc recovery of morphological details, which are necessary to determine the dendritic arborization and the regions targeted by the axons of the recorded neurons. However, given the presence of morphologically similar neurons with distinct neurochemical identities and functions, immunohistochemical staining for cell-type-specific proteins is essential to definitively identify neurons. To maintain network connectivity, brain sections for physiological recordings are prepared at a thickness of 300 µm or greater. However, this thickness often hinders immunohistological postprocessing due to issues with antibody penetration, necessitating the resectioning of the tissue. Resectioning of slices is a challenging art, often resulting in the loss of tissue and morphology of the cells from which electrophysiological data was obtained, rendering the data unusable. Since recovery of morphology would limit data loss and guide in the selection of neuronal markers, we have adopted a strategy of recovering cell morphology first, followed by secondary immunostaining. We introduce a practical approach to biocytin filling during physiological recordings and subsequent serial immunostaining for the recovery of morphology, followed by the restaining of sections to determine the neurochemical identity. We report that sections that were filled with biocytin, fixed with paraformaldehyde (PFA), stained, and coverslipped can be removed and restained with a second primary antibody days later. This restaining involves the removal of the coverslip, the washing of sections in a buffer solution, and the incubation of primary and secondary antibodies to reveal the neurochemical identity. The method is advantageous for eliminating data loss due to an inability

  4. Unique Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects Induced by Repeated Adolescent Consumption of Caffeine-Mixed Alcohol in C57BL/6 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Meridith T; Lu, Julie; van Rijn, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    The number of highly caffeinated products has increased dramatically in the past few years. Among these products, highly caffeinated energy drinks are the most heavily advertised and purchased, which has resulted in increased incidences of co-consumption of energy drinks with alcohol. Despite the growing number of adolescents and young adults reporting caffeine-mixed alcohol use, knowledge of the potential consequences associated with co-consumption has been limited to survey-based results and in-laboratory human behavioral testing. Here, we investigate the effect of repeated adolescent (post-natal days P35-61) exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol in C57BL/6 mice on common drug-related behaviors such as locomotor sensitivity, drug reward and cross-sensitivity, and natural reward. To determine changes in neurological activity resulting from adolescent exposure, we monitored changes in expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the dopaminergic reward pathway as a sign of long-term increases in neuronal activity. Repeated adolescent exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol exposure induced significant locomotor sensitization, desensitized cocaine conditioned place preference, decreased cocaine locomotor cross-sensitivity, and increased natural reward consumption. We also observed increased accumulation of ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens following repeated adolescent caffeine-mixed alcohol exposure compared to alcohol or caffeine alone. Using our exposure model, we found that repeated exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol during adolescence causes unique behavioral and neurochemical effects not observed in mice exposed to caffeine or alcohol alone. Based on similar findings for different substances of abuse, it is possible that repeated exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol during adolescence could potentially alter or escalate future substance abuse as means to compensate for these behavioral and neurochemical alterations.

  5. Unique Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects Induced by Repeated Adolescent Consumption of Caffeine-Mixed Alcohol in C57BL/6 Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meridith T Robins

    Full Text Available The number of highly caffeinated products has increased dramatically in the past few years. Among these products, highly caffeinated energy drinks are the most heavily advertised and purchased, which has resulted in increased incidences of co-consumption of energy drinks with alcohol. Despite the growing number of adolescents and young adults reporting caffeine-mixed alcohol use, knowledge of the potential consequences associated with co-consumption has been limited to survey-based results and in-laboratory human behavioral testing. Here, we investigate the effect of repeated adolescent (post-natal days P35-61 exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol in C57BL/6 mice on common drug-related behaviors such as locomotor sensitivity, drug reward and cross-sensitivity, and natural reward. To determine changes in neurological activity resulting from adolescent exposure, we monitored changes in expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the dopaminergic reward pathway as a sign of long-term increases in neuronal activity. Repeated adolescent exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol exposure induced significant locomotor sensitization, desensitized cocaine conditioned place preference, decreased cocaine locomotor cross-sensitivity, and increased natural reward consumption. We also observed increased accumulation of ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens following repeated adolescent caffeine-mixed alcohol exposure compared to alcohol or caffeine alone. Using our exposure model, we found that repeated exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol during adolescence causes unique behavioral and neurochemical effects not observed in mice exposed to caffeine or alcohol alone. Based on similar findings for different substances of abuse, it is possible that repeated exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol during adolescence could potentially alter or escalate future substance abuse as means to compensate for these behavioral and neurochemical alterations.

  6. A novel encephalopathy in a thiamine-deficient dog resembling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Eldaghayes

    2017-10-20

    Oct 20, 2017 ... multifocal, central and peripheral nervous and cardiovascular system alterations. Brain MRI showed bilateral caudate ... and peripheral nervous and immune system (Chisolm-. Straker and Cherkas, 2013; ... cervical ventroflexion (only in cats), seizures, coma and even death (Platt and Garosi, 2012).

  7. Familial Resemblance in Dietary Intakes of Children, Adolescents, and Parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogl, Leonie H.; Silventoinen, Karri; Hebestreit, Antje

    2017-01-01

    below the age of 11 than in older children equal or above the age of 11 (48%; 95% CI: 38–58%). Factors shared by family members such as genetics and/or the shared home environment play a stronger role in shaping children’s intake of healthy foods than unhealthy foods. This suggests that family......Information on familial resemblance is important for the design of effective family-based interventions. We aimed to quantify familial correlations and estimate the proportion of variation attributable to genetic and shared environmental effects (i.e., familiality) for dietary intake variables...... for relative pairs. Familiality was estimated using variance component methods. Parent–offspring (r = 0.11–0.33), sibling (r = 0.21–0.43), and spouse (r = 0.15–0.33) correlations were modest. Parent–offspring correlations were stronger for the intake of healthy (r = 0.33) than unhealthy (r = 0.10) foods...

  8. A Para-Canalicular Abscess Resembling an Inflamed Chalazion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diamantis Almaliotis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lacrimal infections by Actinomyces are rare and commonly misdiagnosed for long periods of time. They account for 2% of all lacrimal diseases. Case Report. We report a case of a 70-year-old female patient suffering from a para-canalicular abscess in the medial canthus of the left eye, beside the lower punctum lacrimale, resembling a chalazion. Purulence exited from the punctum lacrimale due to inflammation of the inferior canaliculus (canaliculitis. When pressure was applied to the mass, a second exit of purulence was also observed under the palpebral conjunctiva below the lacrimal caruncle. A surgical excision was performed followed by administration of local antibiotic therapy. The histopathological examination of the extracted mass revealed the existence of actinomycosis. Conclusion. Persistent or recurrent infections and lumps of the eyelids should be thoroughly investigated. Actinomyces as a causative agent should be considered. Differential diagnosis is broad and should include canaliculitis, chalazion, and multiple types of neoplasias. For this reason, in nonconclusive cases, a histopathological examination should be performed.

  9. A para-canalicular abscess resembling an inflamed chalazion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaliotis, Diamantis; Nakos, Elias; Siempis, Thomas; Koletsa, Triantafyllia; Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Chatzipantazi, Maria; Karampatakis, Vasileios

    2013-01-01

    Background. Lacrimal infections by Actinomyces are rare and commonly misdiagnosed for long periods of time. They account for 2% of all lacrimal diseases. Case Report. We report a case of a 70-year-old female patient suffering from a para-canalicular abscess in the medial canthus of the left eye, beside the lower punctum lacrimale, resembling a chalazion. Purulence exited from the punctum lacrimale due to inflammation of the inferior canaliculus (canaliculitis). When pressure was applied to the mass, a second exit of purulence was also observed under the palpebral conjunctiva below the lacrimal caruncle. A surgical excision was performed followed by administration of local antibiotic therapy. The histopathological examination of the extracted mass revealed the existence of actinomycosis. Conclusion. Persistent or recurrent infections and lumps of the eyelids should be thoroughly investigated. Actinomyces as a causative agent should be considered. Differential diagnosis is broad and should include canaliculitis, chalazion, and multiple types of neoplasias. For this reason, in nonconclusive cases, a histopathological examination should be performed.

  10. Lung irradiation induces pulmonary vascular remodelling resembling pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, G; Bartelds, B; van der Veen, S J; Dickinson, M G; Brandenburg, S; Berger, R M F; Langendijk, J A; Coppes, R P; van Luijk, P

    2012-04-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a commonly fatal pulmonary vascular disease that is often diagnosed late and is characterised by a progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting from typical vascular remodelling. Recent data suggest that vascular damage plays an important role in the development of radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity. Therefore, the authors investigated whether irradiation of the lung also induces pulmonary hypertension. Different sub-volumes of the rat lung were irradiated with protons known to induce different levels of pulmonary vascular damage. Early loss of endothelial cells and vascular oedema were observed in the irradiation field and in shielded parts of the lung, even before the onset of clinical symptoms. 8 weeks after irradiation, irradiated volume-dependent vascular remodelling was observed, correlating perfectly with pulmonary artery pressure, right ventricle hypertrophy and pulmonary dysfunction. The findings indicate that partial lung irradiation induces pulmonary vascular remodelling resulting from acute pulmonary endothelial cell loss and consequential pulmonary hypertension. Moreover, the close resemblance of the observed vascular remodelling with vascular lesions in PAH makes partial lung irradiation a promising new model for studying PAH.

  11. Predator-Resembling Aversive Conditioning for Managing Habituated Wildlife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsabé Louise Kloppers

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Wildlife habituation near urban centers can disrupt natural ecological processes, destroy habitat, and threaten public safety. Consequently, management of habituated animals is typically invasive and often includes translocation of these animals to remote areas and sometimes even their destruction. Techniques to prevent or reverse habituation and other forms of in situ management are necessary to balance ecological and social requirements, but they have received very little experimental attention to date. This study compared the efficacy of two aversive conditioning treatments that used either humans or dogs to create sequences resembling chases by predators, which, along with a control category, were repeatedly and individually applied to 24 moderately habituated, radio-collared elk in Banff National Park during the winter of 2001-2002. Three response variables were measured before and after treatment. Relative to untreated animals, the distance at which elk fled from approaching humans, i.e., the flight response distance, increased following both human and dog treatments, but there was no difference between the two treatments. The proportion of time spent in vigilance postures decreased for all treatment groups, without differences among groups, suggesting that this behavior responded mainly to seasonal effects. The average distance between elk locations and the town boundary, measured once daily by telemetry, significantly increased for human-conditioned elk. One of the co-variates we measured, wolf activity, exerted counteracting effects on conditioning effects; flight response distances and proximity to the town site were both lower when wolf activity was high. This research demonstrates that it is possible to temporarily modify aspects of the behavior of moderately habituated elk using aversive conditioning, suggests a method for reducing habituation in the first place, and provides a solution for Banff and other jurisdictions to manage

  12. Gait analysis in a mouse model resembling Leigh disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas, Ria; Russel, Frans G; Smeitink, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Leigh disease (LD) is one of the clinical phenotypes of mitochondrial OXPHOS disorders and also known as sub-acute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy. The disease has an incidence of 1 in 77,000 live births. Symptoms typically begin early in life and prognosis for LD patients is poor. Currently, no clinically effective treatments are available. Suitable animal and cellular models are necessary for the understanding of the neuropathology and the development of successful new therapeutic strategies. In this study we used the Ndufs4 knockout (Ndufs4(-/-)) mouse, a model of mitochondrial complex I deficiency. Ndusf4(-/-) mice exhibit progressive neurodegeneration, which closely resemble the human LD phenotype. When dissecting behavioral abnormalities in animal models it is of great importance to apply translational tools that are clinically relevant. To distinguish gait abnormalities in patients, simple walking tests can be assessed, but in animals this is not easy. This study is the first to demonstrate automated CatWalk gait analysis in the Ndufs4(-/-) mouse model. Marked differences were noted between Ndufs4(-/-) and control mice in dynamic, static, coordination and support parameters. Variation of walking speed was significantly increased in Ndufs4(-/-) mice, suggesting hampered and uncoordinated gait. Furthermore, decreased regularity index, increased base of support and changes in support were noted in the Ndufs4(-/-) mice. Here, we report the ability of the CatWalk system to sensitively assess gait abnormalities in Ndufs4(-/-) mice. This objective gait analysis can be of great value for intervention and drug efficacy studies in animal models for mitochondrial disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System-based amperometric detection of dopamine, adenosine, and glutamate for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnesi, Filippo; Tye, Susannah J; Bledsoe, Jonathan M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Kimble, Christopher J; Sieck, Gary C; Bennet, Kevin E; Garris, Paul A; Blaha, Charles D; Lee, Kendall H

    2009-10-01

    In a companion study, the authors describe the development of a new instrument named the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS), which couples digital telemetry with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine. In the present study, the authors describe the extended capability of the WINCS to use fixed potential amperometry (FPA) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine, as well as glutamate and adenosine. Compared with other electrochemical techniques such as FSCV or high-speed chronoamperometry, FPA offers superior temporal resolution and, in combination with enzyme-linked biosensors, the potential to monitor nonelectroactive analytes in real time. The WINCS design incorporated a transimpedance amplifier with associated analog circuitry for FPA; a microprocessor; a Bluetooth transceiver; and a single, battery-powered, multilayer, printed circuit board. The WINCS was tested with 3 distinct recording electrodes: 1) a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to measure dopamine; 2) a glutamate oxidase enzyme-linked electrode to measure glutamate; and 3) a multiple enzyme-linked electrode (adenosine deaminase, nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase) to measure adenosine. Proof-of-principle analyses included noise assessments and in vitro and in vivo measurements that were compared with similar analyses by using a commercial hardwired electrochemical system (EA161 Picostat, eDAQ; Pty Ltd). In urethane-anesthetized rats, dopamine release was monitored in the striatum following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of ascending dopaminergic fibers in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). In separate rat experiments, DBS-evoked adenosine release was monitored in the ventrolateral thalamus. To test the WINCS in an operating room setting resembling human neurosurgery, cortical glutamate release in response to motor cortex stimulation (MCS) was monitored using a large-mammal animal model, the pig. The

  14. Brain region-specific perfluoroalkylated sulfonate (PFSA) and carboxylic acid (PFCA) accumulation and neurochemical biomarker responses in east Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers Pedersen, Kathrine; Basu, Niladri; Letcher, Robert; Greaves, Alana K; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune; Styrishave, Bjarne

    2015-04-01

    PFCA; rp=-0.40, p=0.003, ∑PFSA; rp=-0.37, p=0.007; n=52). AChE activity and D2 density were negatively correlated with single PFCAs in several brain regions, whereas GS activity was positively correlated with PFASs primarily in occipital lobe. Results from the present study support the hypothesis that PFAS concentrations in polar bears from East Greenland have exceeded the threshold limits for neurochemical alterations. It is not known whether the observed alterations in neurochemical signaling are currently having negative effects on neurochemistry in East Greenland polar bears. However given the importance of these systems in cognitive processes and motor function, the present results indicate an urgent need for a better understanding of neurochemical effects of PFAS exposure to wildlife. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ulipristal acetate resembles mifepristone in modulating human fallopian tube function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hang Wun Raymond; Liao, Su-Bin; Yeung, William Shu-Biu; Ng, Ernest Hung-Yu; O, Wai-Sum; Ho, Pak-Chung

    2014-10-10

    Do ulipristal acetate (UPA) and mifepristone have an effect on ciliary beat frequency and muscular contractions in the human Fallopian tube? UPA, in resemblance to mifepristone, inhibits ciliary beat and muscular contraction of the human Fallopian tube, probably through an agonistic effect on the tubal progesterone receptor. UPA, like mifepristone, acts as an emergency contraceptive mainly by inhibiting ovulation. Little is known about its effects on tubal function. This was an in vitro experimental study using Fallopian tube samples collected from 11 women undergoing hysterectomy for benign non-tubal gynaecological conditions. The tubal epithelium and longitudinal smooth muscle fibres were isolated, cultured and treated with UPA at graded concentrations of 0, 20, 200 and 2000 ng/ml, and mifepristone at graded concentrations of 0, 300, 3000 and 30 000 ng/ml, respectively. After treatment, ciliary beat frequency was determined using a photometric method. Basal tone, amplitude and frequency of muscular contraction were recorded through a force transducer. The mRNA expression of progesterone receptor (total and PR-B isoform), glycodelin and adrenomedullin were determined by real-time quantitative PCR. There was an overall dose-dependent suppressive effect on ciliary beat frequency (P < 0.0001) after treatment with UPA at all concentrations and with mifepristone at 3000 ng/ml or above. The basal tone, amplitude and frequency of muscular contractions were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) after treatment with UPA at 200 ng/ml or above, and with mifepristone at 3000 ng/ml or above. UPA treatment at 200 ng/ml or above significantly up-regulated the mRNA expression of progesterone receptor and glycodelin and down-regulated the mRNA expression of adrenomedullin in Fallopian tube tissue (P < 0.05). Whether or not the tubal effect may translate into additional mechanisms for contraceptive action in vivo is uncertain. The clinical relevance of UPA with regard to contraceptive

  16. Behavioral, neurochemical and pharmaco-EEG profiles of the psychedelic drug 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine (2C-B) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páleníček, Tomáš; Fujáková, Michaela; Brunovský, Martin; Horáček, Jiří; Gorman, Ingmar; Balíková, Marie; Rambousek, Lukáš; Syslová, Kamila; Kačer, Petr; Zach, Petr; Bubeníková-Valešová, Věra; Tylš, Filip; Kubešová, Anna; Puskarčíková, Jana; Höschl, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral, neurochemical and pharmaco-EEG profiles of a new synthetic drug 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine (2C-B) in rats were examined. Locomotor effects, prepulse inhibition (PPI) of acoustic startle reaction (ASR), dopamine and its metabolite levels in nucleus accumbens (NAc), EEG power spectra and coherence in freely moving rats were analysed. Amphetamine was used as a reference compound. 2C-B had a biphasic effect on locomotion with initial inhibitory followed by excitatory effect; amphetamine induced only hyperlocomotion. Both drugs induced deficits in the PPI; however they had opposite effects on ASR. 2C-B increased dopamine but decreased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in the NAc. Low doses of 2C-B induced a decrease in EEG power spectra and coherence. On the contrary, high dose of 2C-B 50 mg/kg had a temporally biphasic effect with an initial decrease followed by an increase in EEG power; decrease as well as increase in EEG coherence was observed. Amphetamine mainly induced an increase in EEG power and coherence in theta and alpha bands. Increases in the theta and alpha power and coherence in 2C-B and amphetamine were temporally linked to an increase in locomotor activity and DA levels in NAc. 2C-B is a centrally active compound similar to other hallucinogens, entactogens and stimulants. Increased dopamine and decreased DOPAC in the NAc may reflect its psychotomimetic and addictive potential and monoaminoxidase inhibition. Alterations in brain functional connectivity reflected the behavioral and neurochemical changes produced by the drug; a correlation between EEG changes and locomotor behavior was observed.

  17. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Resembling Severe Preeclampsia in Pregnancy

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    Raminder Kaur Khangura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in women, it is a rare malignancy in pregnancy. Symptoms of CRC such as fatigue, malaise, nausea, vomiting, rectal bleeding, anemia, altered bowel habits, and abdominal mass are often considered typical symptoms of pregnancy. Many cases of CRC are diagnosed in advanced stages due to missed warning signs of CRC, which may be misinterpreted as normal symptoms related to pregnancy. This report reviews 2 cases of CRC diagnosed within a 4-month interval at our institution. Both cases were initially thought to be atypical presentations of preeclampsia. Prenatal history, hospital course, and postpartum course were reviewed for both patients. CRC is often diagnosed at advanced stages in pregnancy. Common physiological symptoms of pregnancy should be scrutinized carefully and worked up appropriately, especially if symptoms remain persistent or increase in intensity or severity.

  18. Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Schizophrenia? A Balanced Neurochemical Framework for Both Adverse and Therapeutic Effects of Cannabis Use

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    Carissa M. Coulston

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have found that cannabinoids may improve neuropsychological performance, ameliorate negative symptoms, and have antipsychotic properties for a subgroup of the schizophrenia population. These findings are in contrast to the longstanding history of adverse consequences of cannabis use, predominantly on the positive symptoms, and a balanced neurochemical basis for these opposing views is lacking. This paper details a review of the neurobiological substrates of schizophrenia and the neurochemical effects of cannabis use in the normal population, in both cortical (in particular prefrontal and subcortical brain regions. The aim of this paper is to provide a holistic neurochemical framework in which to understand how cannabinoids may impair, or indeed, serve to ameliorate the positive and negative symptoms as well as cognitive impairment. Directions in which future research can proceed to resolve the discrepancies are briefly discussed.

  19. Uterine tumors resembling ovarian sex cord tumors: A case report and literature review

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    CETINKAYA, NILUFER; BAS, SEVDA; CUYLAN, ZELIHA FIRAT; ERDEM, OZLEM; ERKAYA, SALIM; GUNGOR, TAYFUN

    2016-01-01

    Uterine tumors with ovarian sex cord-like elements are a rarely observed type of uterine body tumor with unknown etiology, and are divided into two groups: Endometrial stromal tumors with sex cord-like elements (ESTSCLEs) and uterine tumors resembling ovarian sex cord tumors (UTROSCTs). While ESTSCLEs are commonly associated with metastasis and recurrence, there is limited data in the relevant literature concerning the behavior of UTROSCTs. However, UTROSCTs are typically benign in nature. Although case numbers are limited, extra-uterine or lymph node metastasis has been reported. Surgical approaches may be altered according to the patient's age and desire for future fertility. Hysterectomies with bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy or hysteroscopic tumor resection are reported to be safe surgical treatment options. However, in the current report, a case of UTROSCT initially misdiagnosed as adenosarcoma following hysteroscopic tumor resection is presented. Staging surgery revealed the precise diagnosis of the tumor using appropriate immunohistochemical evaluations, and led to the discovery of a secondary tumor focus in the myometrium, adjacent to the location of the previously excised tumor. Thus, hysteroscopic resection is questionable as a definitive surgical treatment in patients exhibiting UTROSCT. If hysteroscopic resection is the selected treatment, close follow-up with diagnostic imaging is recommended. PMID:26893767

  20. Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus Resembling Clinical Absence with Atypical EEG Pattern

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    Channaiah Srikanth Mysore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We are reporting two cases: a patient with steroid responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT and another patient with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS, both presenting with altered mental status (AMS and later diagnosed with nonconvulsive atypical absence status epilepticus (AS, with atypical EEG changes. Methods. A report of two cases. Results. A patient with history of SREAT and the other with SPMS had multiple admissions due to AMS. For both, EEG revealed the presence of a high voltage generalized sharply contoured theta activity. A diagnosis of NCSE with clinical features of AS was made based on both clinical and EEG features. There was significant clinical and electrographic improvement with administration of levetiracetam for both patients in addition to sodium valproate and Solumedrol for the SREAT patient. Both patients continued to be seizure free on follow-up few months later. Conclusions. This is a report of two cases of atypical AS, with atypical EEG, in patients with different neurological conditions. Prompt clinical and EEG recovery occurred following appropriate medical treatment. We think that this condition might be underreported and could significantly benefit from prompt treatment when appropriately diagnosed.

  1. Microdialysis Coupled with LC-MS/MS for In Vivo Neurochemical Monitoring.

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    Zestos, Alexander G; Kennedy, Robert T

    2017-09-01

    Microdialysis is a powerful sampling technique used to monitor small molecules in vivo. Despite the many applications of microdialysis sampling, it is limited by the method of analyzing the resulting samples. An emerging technique for analysis of microdialysis samples is liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This technique is highly versatile, allowing multiplexed analysis of neurotransmitters, metabolites, and neuropeptides. Using LC-MS/MS for polar neurotransmitters is hampered by weak retention reverse phase LC columns. Several derivatization reagents have been utilized to enhance separation and resolution of neurochemicals in dialysate samples including benzoyl chloride (BzCl), dansyl chloride, formaldehyde, ethylchloroformate, and propionic anhydride. BzCl reacts with amine and phenol groups so that many neurotransmitters can be labeled. Besides improving separation on reverse phase columns, this reagent also increases sensitivity. It is available in a heavy form so that it can be used to make stable-isotope labeled internal standard for improved quantification. Using BzCl with LC-MS/MS has allowed for measuring as many as 70 neurochemicals in a single assay. With slightly different conditions, LC-MS/MS has also been used for monitoring endocannabinoids. LC-MS/MS is also useful for neuropeptide assay because it allows for highly sensitive, sequence specific measurement of most peptides. These advances have allowed for multiplexed neurotransmitter measurements in behavioral, circuit analysis, and drug effect studies.

  2. No neurochemical evidence of brain injury after blast overpressure by repeated explosions or firing heavy weapons.

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    Blennow, K; Jonsson, M; Andreasen, N; Rosengren, L; Wallin, A; Hellström, P A; Zetterberg, H

    2011-04-01

    Psychiatric and neurological symptoms are common among soldiers exposed to blast without suffering a direct head injury. It is not known whether such symptoms are direct consequences of blast overpressure. To examine if repeated detonating explosions or firing if of heavy weapons is associated with neurochemical evidence of brain damage. Three controlled experimental studies. In the first, army officers were exposed to repeated firing of a FH77B howitzer or a bazooka. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was taken post-exposure to measure biomarkers for brain damage. In the second, officers were exposed for up to 150 blasts by firing a bazooka, and in the third to 100 charges of detonating explosives of 180 dB. Serial serum samples were taken after exposure. Results were compared with a control group consisting of 19 unexposed age-matched healthy volunteers. The CSF biomarkers for neuronal/axonal damage (tau and neurofilament protein), glial cell injury (GFAP and S-100b), blood-brain barrier damage (CSF/serum albumin ratio) and hemorrhages (hemoglobin and bilirubin) and the serum GFAP and S-100b showed normal and stable levels in all exposed officers. Repeated exposure to high-impact blast does not result in any neurochemical evidence of brain damage. These findings are of importance for soldiers regularly exposed to high-impact blast when firing artillery shells or other types of heavy weapons. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Neurochemical effects of extended exposure to white spirit vapour at three concentration levels.

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    Savolainen, H; Pfäffli, P

    1982-03-01

    Male Wistar rats were exposed to 575 (100 ppm), 2875 (500 ppm) or 5750 mg/m3 (1000 ppm) white spirit vapour for 4-17 weeks 5 days a week, 6 h daily. Perirenal fat solvent concentration corresponded in composition and concentration to those of the vapour at all times. The neurochemical effects included a dose-dependent decrease in the cerebellar succinate dehydrogenase activity for 8 weeks while creatine kinase activity increased after 12 weeks. The specific creatine kinase activity in the glial cell fraction, a marker for astroglia, did not increase suggesting proliferation of astroglial cells in the homogenate. The serum creatine kinase activity originating mainly from striated muscle was below the control range at the two higher concentrations after 12 weeks. Simultaneous analyses for isolated muscle membrane sialic acid and uronic acid residues showed decreased concentrations in proportion to lipid phosphorus or total membrane protein. Thus, the white spirit mixture has neurochemical effects possibly caused by paraffins and the same components may have caused the muscle cell membrane effects. The lowest exposure concentration represents a virtual 'no effect' level for rats in the 17-week exposure.

  4. Anxiety-like behaviour and associated neurochemical and endocrinological alterations in male pups exposed to prenatal stress.

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    Laloux, Charlotte; Mairesse, Jérôme; Van Camp, Gilles; Giovine, Angela; Branchi, Igor; Bouret, Sebastien; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Bergonzelli, Gabriela; Malagodi, Marithé; Gradini, Roberto; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Darnaudéry, Muriel; Maccari, Stefania

    2012-10-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that emotional liability in infancy could be a predictor of anxiety-related disorders in the adulthood. Rats exposed to prenatal restraint stress ("PRS rats") represent a valuable model for the study of the interplay between environmental triggers and neurodevelopment in the pathogenesis of anxious/depressive like behaviours. Repeated episodes of restraint stress were delivered to female Sprague-Dawley rats during pregnancy and male offspring were studied. Ultrasonic vocalization (USV) was assessed in pups under different behavioural paradigms. After weaning, anxiety was measured by conventional tests. Expression of GABA(A) receptor subunits and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors was assessed by immunoblotting. Plasma leptin levels were measured using a LINCOplex bead assay kit. The offspring of stressed dams emitted more USVs in response to isolation from their mothers and showed a later suppression of USV production when exposed to an unfamiliar male odour, indicating a pronounced anxiety-like profile. Anxiety like behaviour in PRS pups persisted one day after weaning. PRS pups did not show the plasma peak in leptin levels that is otherwise seen at PND14. In addition, PRS pups showed a reduced expression of the γ2 subunit of GABA(A) receptors in the amygdala at PND14 and PND22, an increased expression of mGlu5 receptors in the amygdala at PND22, a reduced expression of mGlu5 receptors in the hippocampus at PND14 and PND22, and a reduced expression of mGlu2/3 receptors in the hippocampus at PND22. These data offer a clear-cut demonstration that the early programming triggered by PRS could be already translated into anxiety-like behaviour during early postnatal life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Gladiolus dalenii on the Stress-Induced Behavioral, Neurochemical, and Reproductive Changes in Rats

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    David Fotsing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gladiolus dalenii is a plant commonly used in many regions of Cameroon as a cure for various diseases like headaches, epilepsy, schizophrenia, and mood disorders. Recent studies have revealed that the aqueous extract of G. dalenii (AEGD exhibited antidepressant-like properties in rats. Therefore, we hypothesized that the AEGD could protect from the stress-induced behavioral, neurochemical, and reproductive changes in rats. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the effect of the AEGD on behavioral, neurochemical, and reproductive characteristics, using female rats subjected to chronic immobilization stress. The chronic immobilization stress (3 h per day for 28 days was applied to induce female reproductive and behavioral impairments in rats. The immobilization stress was provoked in rats by putting them separately inside cylindrical restrainers with ventilated doors at ambient temperature. The plant extract was given to rats orally everyday during 28 days, 5 min before induction of stress. On a daily basis, a vaginal smear was made to assess the duration of the different phases of the estrous cycle and at the end of the 28 days of chronic immobilization stress, the rat’s behavior was assessed in the elevated plus maze. They were sacrificed by cervical disruption. The organs were weighed, the ovary histology done, and the biochemical parameters assessed. The findings of this research revealed that G. dalenii increased the entries and the time of open arm exploration in the elevated plus maze. Evaluation of the biochemical parameters levels indicated that there was a significant reduction in the corticosterone, progesterone, and prolactin levels in the G. dalenii aqueous extract treated rats compared to stressed rats whereas the levels of serotonin, triglycerides, adrenaline, cholesterol, glucose estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone were significantly increased in the stressed rats treated with, G. dalenii

  6. Neurochemical and electrical modulation of the Locus coeruleus: contribution to CO2 drive to breathe

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    Debora eDe Carvalho

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Locus coeruleus (LC is a dorsal pontine region, situated bilaterally on the floor of the fourth ventricle. It is considered to be the major source of noradrenergic innervation in the brain. These neurons are highly sensitive to CO2 / pH, and chemical lesions of LC neurons largely attenuate the hypercapnic ventilatory response in unanesthetized adult rats. Developmental dysfunctions in these neurons are linked to pathological conditions such as Rett and sudden infant death syndromes, which can impair the control of the cardio-respiratory system. LC is densely innervated by fibers that contain glutamate, serotonin and ATP, and these neurotransmitters strongly affect LC activity, including central chemoreflexes. Aside from neurochemical modulation, LC neurons are also strongly electrically coupled, specifically through gap junctions, which play a role in the CO2 ventilatory response. This article reviews the available data on the role of chemical and electrical neuromodulation of the LC in the control of ventilation.

  7. The gyri of the octopus vertical lobe have distinct neurochemical identities.

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    Shigeno, Shuichi; Ragsdale, Clifton W

    2015-06-15

    The cephalopod vertical lobe is the largest learning and memory structure known in invertebrate nervous systems. It is part of the visual learning circuit of the central brain, which also includes the superior frontal and subvertical lobes. Despite the well-established functional importance of this system, little is known about neuropil organization of these structures and there is to date no evidence that the five longitudinal gyri of the vertical lobe, perhaps the most distinctive morphological feature of the octopus brain, differ in their connections or molecular identities. We studied the histochemical organization of these structures in hatchling and adult Octopus bimaculoides brains with immunostaining for serotonin, octopus gonadotropin-releasing hormone (oGNRH), and octopressin-neurophysin (OP-NP). Our major finding is that the five lobules forming the vertical lobe gyri have distinct neurochemical signatures. This is most prominent in the hatchling brain, where the median and mediolateral lobules are enriched in OP-NP fibers, the lateral lobule is marked by oGNRH innervation, and serotonin immunostaining heavily labels the median and lateral lobules. A major source of input to the vertical lobe is the superior frontal lobe, which is dominated by a neuropil of interweaving fiber bundles. We have found that this neuropil also has an intrinsic neurochemical organization: it is partitioned into territories alternately enriched or impoverished in oGNRH-containing fascicles. Our findings establish that the constituent lobes of the octopus superior frontal-vertical system have an intricate internal anatomy, one likely to reflect the presence of functional subsystems within cephalopod learning circuitry. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Changes in neurochemicals within the ventrolateral medullary respiratory column in awake goats after carotid body denervation

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    Miller, Justin Robert; Neumueller, Suzanne; Muere, Clarissa; Olesiak, Samantha; Pan, Lawrence; Hodges, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    A current and major unanswered question is why the highly sensitive central CO2/H+ chemoreceptors do not prevent hypoventilation-induced hypercapnia following carotid body denervation (CBD). Because perturbations involving the carotid bodies affect central neuromodulator and/or neurotransmitter levels within the respiratory network, we tested the hypothesis that after CBD there is an increase in inhibitory and/or a decrease in excitatory neurochemicals within the ventrolateral medullary column (VMC) in awake goats. Microtubules for chronic use were implanted bilaterally in the VMC within or near the pre-Bötzinger Complex (preBötC) through which mock cerebrospinal fluid (mCSF) was dialyzed. Effluent mCSF was collected and analyzed for neurochemical content. The goats hypoventilated (peak +22.3 ± 3.4 mmHg PaCO2) and exhibited a reduced CO2 chemoreflex (nadir, 34.8 ± 7.4% of control ΔV̇E/ΔPaCO2) after CBD with significant but limited recovery over 30 days post-CBD. After CBD, GABA and glycine were above pre-CBD levels (266 ± 29% and 189 ± 25% of pre-CBD; P 0.05) different from control after CBD. Analyses of brainstem tissues collected 30 days after CBD exhibited 1) a midline raphe-specific reduction (P < 0.05) in the percentage of tryptophan hydroxylase–expressing neurons, and 2) a reduction (P < 0.05) in serotonin transporter density in five medullary respiratory nuclei. We conclude that after CBD, an increase in inhibitory neurotransmitters and a decrease in excitatory neuromodulation within the VMC/preBötC likely contribute to the hypoventilation and attenuated ventilatory CO2 chemoreflex. PMID:23869058

  9. Rapid sensing of l-leucine by human and murine hypothalamic neurons: Neurochemical and mechanistic insights.

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    Heeley, Nicholas; Kirwan, Peter; Darwish, Tamana; Arnaud, Marion; Evans, Mark L; Merkle, Florian T; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M; Blouet, Clemence

    2018-02-07

    Dietary proteins are sensed by hypothalamic neurons and strongly influence multiple aspects of metabolic health, including appetite, weight gain, and adiposity. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which hypothalamic neural circuits controlling behavior and metabolism sense protein availability. The aim of this study is to characterize how neurons from the mediobasal hypothalamus respond to a signal of protein availability: the amino acid l-leucine. We used primary cultures of post-weaning murine mediobasal hypothalamic neurons, hypothalamic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells, and calcium imaging to characterize rapid neuronal responses to physiological changes in extracellular l-Leucine concentration. A neurochemically diverse subset of both mouse and human hypothalamic neurons responded rapidly to l-leucine. Consistent with l-leucine's anorexigenic role, we found that 25% of mouse MBH POMC neurons were activated by l-leucine. 10% of MBH NPY neurons were inhibited by l-leucine, and leucine rapidly reduced AGRP secretion, providing a mechanism for the rapid leucine-induced inhibition of foraging behavior in rodents. Surprisingly, none of the candidate mechanisms previously implicated in hypothalamic leucine sensing (K ATP channels, mTORC1 signaling, amino-acid decarboxylation) were involved in the acute activity changes produced by l-leucine. Instead, our data indicate that leucine-induced neuronal activation involves a plasma membrane Ca 2+ channel, whereas leucine-induced neuronal inhibition is mediated by inhibition of a store-operated Ca 2+ current. A subset of neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus rapidly respond to physiological changes in extracellular leucine concentration. Leucine can produce both increases and decreases in neuronal Ca 2+ concentrations in a neurochemically-diverse group of neurons, including some POMC and NPY/AGRP neurons. Our data reveal that leucine can signal through novel mechanisms to rapidly

  10. Sensory receptors in the visceral pleura: neurochemical coding and live staining in whole mounts.

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    Pintelon, Isabel; Brouns, Inge; De Proost, Ian; Van Meir, Frans; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk

    2007-05-01

    Today, diagnosis and treatment of chest pain related to pathologic changes in the visceral pleura are often difficult. Data in the literature on the sensory innervation of the visceral pleura are sparse. The present study aimed at identifying sensory end-organs in the visceral pleura, and at obtaining more information about neurochemical coding. The immunocytochemcial data are mainly based on whole mounts of the visceral pleura of control and vagally denervated rats. It was shown that innervation of the rat visceral pleura is characterized by nerve bundles that enter in the hilus region and gradually split into slender bundles with a few nerve fibers. Separate nerve fibers regularly give rise to characteristic laminar terminals. Because of their unique association with the elastic fibers of the visceral pleura, we decided to refer to them as "visceral pleura receptors" (VPRs). Cryostat sections of rat lungs confirmed a predominant location on mediastinal and interlobar lung surfaces. VPRs can specifically be visualized by protein gene product 9.5 immunostaining, and were shown to express vesicular glutamate transporters, calbindin D28K, Na+/K+-ATPase, and P2X3 ATP-receptors. The sensory nerve fibers giving rise to VPRs appeared to be myelinated and to have a spinal origin. Because several of the investigated proteins have been reported as markers for sensory terminals in other organs, the present study revealed that VPRs display the neurochemical characteristics of mechanosensory and/or nociceptive terminals. The development of a live staining method, using AM1-43, showed that VPRs can be visualized in living tissue, offering an interesting model for future physiologic studies.

  11. Mercury exposure and neurochemical biomarkers in multiple brain regions of Wisconsin river otters (Lontra canadensis).

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    Dornbos, Peter; Strom, Sean; Basu, Niladri

    2013-04-01

    River otters are fish-eating wildlife that bioaccumulate high levels of mercury (Hg). Mercury is a proven neurotoxicant to mammalian wildlife, but little is known about the underlying, sub-clinical effects. Here, the overall goal was to increase understanding of Hg's neurological risk to otters. First, Hg values across several brain regions and tissues were characterized. Second, in three brain regions with known sensitivity to Hg (brainstem, cerebellum, and occipital cortex), potential associations among Hg levels and neurochemical biomarkers [N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor] were explored. There were no significant differences in Hg levels across eight brain regions (rank order, highest to lowest: frontal cortex, cerebellum, temporal cortex, occipital cortex, parietal cortex, basal ganglia, brainstem, and thalamus), with mean values ranging from 0.7 to 1.3 ug/g dry weight. These brain levels were significantly lower than mean values in the muscle (2.1 ± 1.4 ug/g), liver (4.7 ± 4.3 ug/g), and fur (8.8 ± 4.8 ug/g). While a significant association was found between Hg and NMDA receptor levels in the brain stem (P = 0.028, rp = -0.293), no relationships were found in the cerebellum and occipital cortex. For the GABA receptor, no relationships were found. The lack of consistent Hg-associated neurochemical changes is likely due to low brain Hg levels in these river otters, which are amongst the lowest reported.

  12. Age-related neurochemical changes in the rhesus macaque cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Daniel T; Engle, James R; Recanzone, Gregg H

    2014-05-01

    Neurochemical changes in the expression of various proteins within the central auditory system have been associated with natural aging. These changes may compensate in part for the loss of auditory sensitivity arising from two phenomena of the aging auditory system: cochlear histopathologies and increased excitability of central auditory neurons. Recent studies in the macaque monkey have revealed age-related changes in the density of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase (NADPHd) and parvalbumin (PV)-positive cells within the inferior colliculus and superior olivary complex. The cochlear nucleus (CN), which is the first central auditory nucleus, remains unstudied. Since the CN participates in the generation of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and receives direct innervation from the cochlea, it serves as an ideal nucleus to compare the relationship between these neurochemical changes and the physiological and peripheral changes of the aging auditory system. We used stereological sampling to calculate the densities of NADPHd and PV reactive neurons within the three subdivisions of the CN in middle-aged and aged rhesus macaques. Regression analyses of these values with ABR properties and cochlear histopathologies revealed relationships between these cell types and the changing characteristics of the aging auditory system. Our results indicate that NADPHd expression does change with age in a specific subdivision of the CN, but PV does not. Conversely, PV expression correlated with ABR amplitudes and outer hair cell loss in the cochlea, but NADPHd did not. These results indicate that NADPHd and PV may take part in distinct compensatory efforts of the aging auditory system. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Clustering analysis of karyotype resemblance-near coefficient for 6 Bupleurum species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yun; Qiao, Yonggang; Wu, Yuxiang

    2012-04-01

    To explore the genetic evolutionary distance between plants by using karyotype parameters identification of medicinal plants. The cluster analysis of karyotype resemblance-near coefficient and evolutionary distance was used for 6 Bupleurum species. The results showed that there were the biggest karyotype resemblance-near coefficient (0.9920) and the smallest evolutionary distance (D(e) = 0.0080) between B. scorzonerifolium and B. chinense, indicating the closest relationship, and the minimum karyotype resemblance-near coefficient (0.4794) and the maximum evolutionary distance (D(e) = 0.7352) between B. smityii and B. falcatum, indicating the most distant relationship. Karyotype was an important parameter for identification of medicinal plants because karyotype was stabilized for species. The genetic distance between in 6 species of Bupleurum species was obtained by karyotype clustering analysis of karyotype resemblance-near coefficient. There was the bigger evolutionary distance between the species which had different chromosome number.

  14. Decreased bacterial diversity characterizes the altered gut microbiota in patients with psoriatic arthritis, resembling dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Jose U; Ubeda, Carles; Artacho, Alejandro; Attur, Mukundan; Isaac, Sandrine; Reddy, Soumya M; Marmon, Shoshana; Neimann, Andrea; Brusca, Samuel; Patel, Tejas; Manasson, Julia; Pamer, Eric G; Littman, Dan R; Abramson, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the diversity and taxonomic relative abundance of the gut microbiota in patients with never-treated, recent-onset psoriatic arthritis (PsA). High-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing was utilized to compare the community composition of gut microbiota in patients with PsA (n = 16), patients with psoriasis of the skin (n = 15), and healthy, matched control subjects (n = 17). Samples were further assessed for the presence and levels of fecal and serum secretory IgA (sIgA), proinflammatory proteins, and fatty acids. The gut microbiota observed in patients with PsA and patients with skin psoriasis was less diverse when compared to that in healthy controls. This could be attributed to the reduced presence of several taxa. Samples from both patient groups showed a relative decrease in abundance of Coprococcus species, while samples from PsA patients were also characterized by a significant reduction in Akkermansia, Ruminococcus, and Pseudobutyrivibrio. Supernatants of fecal samples from PsA patients revealed an increase in sIgA levels and decrease in RANKL levels. Analysis of fatty acids revealed low fecal quantities of hexanoate and heptanoate in both patients with PsA and patients with psoriasis. Patients with PsA and patients with skin psoriasis had a lower relative abundance of multiple intestinal bacteria. Although some genera were concomitantly decreased in both conditions, PsA samples had a lower abundance of reportedly beneficial taxa. This gut microbiota profile in PsA was similar to that previously described in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and was associated with changes in specific inflammatory proteins unique to this group, and distinct from that in patients with skin psoriasis and healthy controls. Thus, the role of the gut microbiome in the continuum of psoriasis-PsA pathogenesis and the associated immune response merits further study. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. SU-F-I-68: Longitudinal Neurochemical Changes On Rat Prefrontal Cortex of Single Prolonged Stress Model by Using Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy at 9.4T

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    Lim, S-I; Yoo, C-H [Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, K-H; Choe, B-Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Woo, D-C [Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Single prolonged stress (SPS) is an animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, it has not been known how PTSD develops from the first exposure to traumatic events and neurochemical differences between acute/single stress and PTSD-triggering stress. Therefore, the object of this study is to determine time-dependent neurochemical changes in prefrontal cortex (PFC) of rats using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=14; body weight=200–220g) were used. The SPS protocol was used in this study. Rats were restrained for 2h and then immediately forced to swim for 20min in water (20–24 Celsius). After a 15-min recuperation period, rats were exposed to ether (using a desiccator) until general anesthesia occurred (<5min). In vivo proton MRS was performed 30min before the SPS (Base), approximately 10min after the SPS (D+0), 3 (D+3) and 7 (D+7) days after SPS to investigate time-dependent changes on metabolites levels in the PFC. Acquisition of in vivo MRS spectra and MRI was conducted at the four time points using 9.4 T Agilent Scanner. Concentration of metabolites was quantified by LCModel. Results: Statistical significance was analyzed using one-way ANOVA with post hoc Tukey HSD tests to assess the metabolite changes in the PFC. The SPS resulted in significant stress-induced differences for 7 days in glutamine (F(3,52)=6.750, P=0.001), choline-containing compounds (F(3,52)=16.442, P=0.000), glutamine/glutamate concentrations (F(3,52)=7.352, P=0.000). Conclusion: PTSD in human is associated with decreased neuronal activity in the PFC. In this study, SPS altered total choline, glutamine levels but not NAA levels in the PFC of the rats. Therefore, for the three stressors and quiescent period of seven days, SPS attenuated excitatory tone and membrane turnover but did not affect neural integrity in the PFC.

  16. Does child-parent resemblance in body weight status vary by sociodemographic factors in the USA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Lamichhane, Rajan; Chen, Hsin-Jen; Xue, Hong; Wang, Youfa

    2014-11-01

    Clustered obese parents and children are prevalent, but there is little knowledge about whether and how child-parent resemblance varies by sociodemographic groups. This paper used nationally representative data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES: 1988-1994). We matched 4958 parents with 6765 children aged 2-16 years old for whom we had complete data on body mass index (BMI), overweight and obesity status. Correlation coefficients and κ statistics between parents' and children's BMI and body weight status were calculated for different sociodemographic groups. Multivariate linear and logistic regression models were fit to study the child-parent resemblance and socioeconomic and demographic differences in the resemblance. The child-parent correlation coefficients for BMI were greater in Caucasians than in minorities and greater in groups with higher socioeconomic status. The mother-child resemblance in BMI was negatively associated with child age (pfather-child resemblance in overweight was significantly lower in high school graduates compared with those with less-than-high-school-graduate fathers (OR=0.53, 95% CI (0.37 to 0.77) for father-son dyads and OR=0.69, 95% CI (0.50 to 0.96) for father-daughter dyads). Similar results were found for parent-child resemblance in obesity. Child-parent resemblance in body weight status exists across sociodemographic groups in the USA, but it varies by demographics and socioeconomic status. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Neurochemical features of endomorphin-2-containing neurons in the submucosal plexus of the rat colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Ping; Zhang, Ting; Gao, Chang-Jun; Kou, Zhen-Zhen; Jiao, Xu-Wen; Zhang, Lian-Xiang; Wu, Zhen-Yu; He, Zhong-Yi; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-09-14

    To investigate the distribution and neurochemical phenotype of endomorphin-2 (EM-2)-containing neurons in the submucosal plexus of the rat colon. The mid-colons between the right and left flexures were removed from rats, and transferred into Kreb's solution. For whole-mount preparations, the mucosal, outer longitudinal muscle and inner circular muscle layers of the tissues were separated from the submucosal layer attached to the submucosal plexus. The whole-mount preparations from each rat mid-colon were mounted onto seven gelatin-coated glass slides, and processed for immunofluorescence histochemical double-staining of EM-2 with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), nitric oxide synthetase (NOS), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). After staining, all the fluorescence-labeled sections were observed with a confocal laser scanning microscope. To estimate the extent of the co-localization of EM-2 with CGRP, ChAT, NOS, NSE, SP and VIP, ganglia, which have a clear boundary and neuronal cell outline, were randomly selected from each specimen for this analysis. In the submucosal plexus of the mid-colon, many EM-2-immunoreactive (IR) and NSE-IR neuronal cell bodies were found in the submucosal plexus of the rat mid-colon. Approximately 6 ± 4.2 EM-2-IR neurons aggregated within each ganglion and a few EM-2-IR neurons were also found outside the ganglia. The EM-2-IR neurons were also immunopositive for ChAT, SP, VIP or NOS. EM-2-IR nerve fibers coursed near ChAT-IR neurons, and some of these fibers were even distributed around ChAT-IR neuronal cell bodies. Some EM-2-IR neuronal cell bodies were surrounded by SP-IR nerve fibers, but many long processes connecting adjacent ganglia were negative for EM-2 immunostaining. Long VIP-IR processes with many branches coursed through the ganglia and surrounded the EM-2-IR neurons. The percentages of the EM-2-IR neurons that were also positive for

  18. Vanillin Attenuated Behavioural Impairments, Neurochemical Deficts, Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis Against Rotenone Induced Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanalakshmi, Chinnasamy; Janakiraman, Udaiyappan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Justin Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Kalandar, Ameer; Khan, Mohammed Abdul Sattar; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2016-08-01

    Vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde), a pleasant smelling organic aromatic compound, is widely used as a flavoring additive in food, beverage, cosmetic and drug industries. It is reported to cross the blood brain barrier and also displayed antioxidant and neuroprotective activities. We previously reported the neuroprotective effect of vanillin against rotenone induced in in vitro model of PD. The present experiment was aimed to analyze the neuroprotective effect of vanillin on the motor and non-motor deficits, neurochemical variables, oxidative, anti-oxidative indices and the expression of apoptotic markers against rotenone induced rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Rotenone treatment exhibited motor and non-motor impairments, neurochemical deficits, oxidative stress and apoptosis, whereas oral administration of vanillin attenuated the above-said indices. However further studies are needed to explore the mitochondrial protective and anti-inflammatory properties of vanillin, as these processes play a vital role in the cause and progression of PD.

  19. From genes to behavior: investigations of neurochemical signaling come of age for the model crustacean Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Andrew E; McCoole, Matthew D

    2012-08-01

    The cladoceran crustacean Daphnia pulex has served as a standard organism for aquatic toxicity testing for decades. The model organism status of D. pulex rests largely on its remarkable ability to rapidly adapt morphologically, physiologically and behaviorally to a wide range of environmental challenges, as well as on its parthenogenetic reproduction and ease of laboratory culture. As in all multicellular organisms, neurochemical control systems are undoubtedly major contributors to the functional flexibility of Daphnia. Surprisingly, little work has focused on understanding its neurochemistry at any level. Recently, D. pulex has been the subject of extensive genome and transcriptome sequencing, and it is currently the only crustacean with a fully sequenced, publicly accessible genome. Although the molecular work was initiated for gene-based investigations of ecotoxicology and toxicogenomics, the data generated have allowed for investigations into numerous aspects of Daphnia biology, including its neurochemical signaling. This Commentary summarizes our knowledge of D. pulex neurochemistry obtained from recent genomic and transcriptomic studies, and places these data in context with other anatomical, biochemical and physiological experiments using D. pulex and its sister species Daphnia magna. Suggestions as to how the Daphnia molecular data may be useful for future investigations of crustacean neurochemical signaling are also provided.

  20. Piperine Augments the Protective Effect of Curcumin Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neurobehavioral and Neurochemical Deficits in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangra, Ashok; Kwatra, Mohit; Singh, Tavleen; Pant, Rajat; Kushwah, Pawan; Sharma, Yogita; Saroha, Babita; Datusalia, Ashok Kumar; Bezbaruah, Babul Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of curcumin alone and in combination with piperine against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neurobehavioral and neurochemical deficits in the mice hippocampus. Mice were treated with curcumin (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) and piperine (20 mg/kg, p.o.) for 7 days followed by LPS (0.83 mg/kg, i.p.) administration. Animals exhibited anxiety and depressive-like phenotype after 3 and 24 h of LPS exposure, respectively. LPS administration increased the oxido-nitrosative stress as evident by elevated levels of malondialdehyde, nitrite, and depletion of glutathione level in the hippocampus. Furthermore, we found raised level of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) in the hippocampus of LPS-treated mice. Pretreatment with curcumin alleviated LPS-induced neurobehavioral and neurochemical deficits. Furthermore, co-administration of curcumin with piperine significantly potentiated the neuroprotective effect of curcumin. These results demonstrate that piperine enhanced the neuroprotective effect of curcumin against LPS-induced neurobehavioral and neurochemical deficits.

  1. Older Adults' Trait Impressions of Faces Are Sensitive to Subtle Resemblance to Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Younger adults (YA) attribute emotion-related traits to people whose neutral facial structure resembles an emotion (emotion overgeneralization). The fact that older adults (OA) show deficits in accurately labeling basic emotions suggests that they may be relatively insensitive to variations in the emotion resemblance of neutral expression faces that underlie emotion overgeneralization effects. On the other hand, the fact that OA, like YA, show a ‘pop-out’ effect for anger, more quickly locating an angry than a happy face in a neutral array, suggests that both age groups may be equally sensitive to emotion resemblance. We used computer modeling to assess the degree to which neutral faces objectively resembled emotions and assessed whether that resemblance predicted trait impressions. We found that both OA and YA showed anger and surprise overgeneralization in ratings of danger and naiveté, respectively, with no significant differences in the strength of the effects for the two age groups. These findings suggest that well-documented OA deficits on emotion recognition tasks may be more due to processing demands than to an insensitivity to the social affordances of emotion expressions. PMID:24058225

  2. Genetic or pharmacological blockade of noradrenaline synthesis enhances the neurochemical, behavioural, and neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinshenker, David; Ferrucci, Michela; Busceti, Carla L.; Biagioni, Francesca; Lazzeri, Gloria; Liles, L. Cameron; Lenzi, Paola; Murri, Luigi; Paparelli, Antonio; Fornai, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) lesions of the locus coeruleus (LC), the major brain noradrenergic nucleus, exacerbate the damage to nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) terminals caused by the psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH). However, because noradrenergic terminals contain other neuromodulators and the noradrenaline (NA) transporter, which may act as a neuroprotective buffer, it was unclear whether this enhancement of METH neurotoxicity was caused by the loss of noradrenergic innervation or the loss of NA itself. We addressed the specific role of NA by comparing the effects of METH in mice with noradrenergic lesions (DSP-4) and those with intact noradrenergic terminals but specifically lacking NA (genetic or acute pharmacological blockade of the NA biosynthetic enzyme dopamine β-hydroxylase; DBH). We found that genetic deletion of DBH (DBH −/− mice) and acute treatment of wild-type mice with a DBH inhibitor (fusaric acid) recapitulated the effects of DSP-4 lesions on METH responses. All three methods of NA depletion enhanced striatal DA release, extracellular oxidative stress (as measured by in vivo microdialysis of DA and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid), and behavioural stereotypies following repeated METH administration. These effects accompanied a worsening of the striatal DA neuron terminal damage and ultrastructural changes to medium spiny neurons. We conclude that NA itself is neuroprotective and plays a fundamental role in the sensitivity of striatal DA terminals to the neurochemical, behavioural, and neurotoxic effects of METH. PMID:18042179

  3. Genetic or pharmacological blockade of noradrenaline synthesis enhances the neurochemical, behavioral, and neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinshenker, David; Ferrucci, Michela; Busceti, Carla L; Biagioni, Francesca; Lazzeri, Gloria; Liles, L Cameron; Lenzi, Paola; Pasquali, Livia; Murri, Luigi; Paparelli, Antonio; Fornai, Francesco

    2008-04-01

    N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) lesions of the locus coeruleus, the major brain noradrenergic nucleus, exacerbate the damage to nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) terminals caused by the psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH). However, because noradrenergic terminals contain other neuromodulators and the noradrenaline (NA) transporter, which may act as a neuroprotective buffer, it was unclear whether this enhancement of METH neurotoxicity was caused by the loss of noradrenergic innervation or the loss of NA itself. We addressed the specific role of NA by comparing the effects of METH in mice with noradrenergic lesions (DSP-4) and those with intact noradrenergic terminals but specifically lacking NA (genetic or acute pharmacological blockade of the NA biosynthetic enzyme dopamine beta-hydroxylase; DBH). We found that genetic deletion of DBH (DBH-/- mice) and acute treatment of wild-type mice with a DBH inhibitor (fusaric acid) recapitulated the effects of DSP-4 lesions on METH responses. All three methods of NA depletion enhanced striatal DA release, extracellular oxidative stress (as measured by in vivo microdialysis of DA and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid), and behavioral stereotypies following repeated METH administration. These effects accompanied a worsening of the striatal DA neuron terminal damage and ultrastructural changes to medium spiny neurons. We conclude that NA itself is neuroprotective and plays a fundamental role in the sensitivity of striatal DA terminals to the neurochemical, behavioral, and neurotoxic effects of METH.

  4. ETIOLOGY, TRIGGERS AND NEUROCHEMICAL CIRCUITS ASSOCIATED WITH UNEXPECTED, EXPECTED, AND LABORATORY-INDUCED PANIC ATTACKS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip L.; Federici, Lauren M.; Shekhar, Anantha

    2014-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a severe anxiety disorder that is characterized by recurrent panic attacks (PA), which can be unexpected (uPA, i.e., no clear identifiable trigger) or expected (ePA). Panic typically involves an abrupt feeling of catastrophic fear or distress accompanied by physiological symptoms such as palpitations, racing heart, thermal sensations, and sweating. Recurrent uPA and ePA can also lead to agoraphobia, where subjects with PD avoid situations that were associated with PA. Here we will review recent developments in our understanding of PD, which includes discussions on: symptoms and signs associated with uPA and ePAs; Diagnosis of PD and the new DSM-V; biological etiology such as heritability and gene x environment and gene x hormonal development interactions; comparisons between laboratory and naturally occurring uPAs and ePAs; neurochemical systems that are associated with clinical PAs (e.g. gene associations; targets for triggering or treating PAs), adaptive fear and panic response concepts in the context of new NIH RDoc approach; and finally strengths and weaknesses of translational animal models of adaptive and pathological panic states. PMID:25130976

  5. Tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate increases ambulatory activity in mice: pharmacological analyses of its neurochemical mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezu, T; Yonemoto, J; Soma, Y; Suzuki, T

    1998-01-01

    The present study was conducted to clarify the acute effect of tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TRCP), an organophosphate flame-retardant, on spontaneous ambulatory activity (AA) in male ICR mice and to examine the neurochemical mechanism of this effect. Single dose administration of 200 mg/kg i.p. of TRCP increased AA in ICR mice. Neither the nicotinic cholinergic antagonist mecamylamine (MA) nor the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist scopolamine (SCP) affected the AA response to TRCP. On the other hand, the benzodiazepine agonist diazepam (DZ), the GABAA agonist muscimol (MUS) and the GABAB agonist baclofen (BAC) all attenuated the effect of TRCP. DZ and MUS blocked the increase of AA within the first 10 min after administration of TRCP. These drugs did not attenuate the AA-increasing effect of SCP, suggesting that the mechanism of TRCP action is distinct from that of SCP. MUS and BAC did, but DZ did not, inhibit the AA increasing effect of the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine (APO), suggesting that dopamine is involved in the control of AA, and that GABA can affect AA through interaction with dopaminergic neurons. These results suggest that TRCP acts as a GABA antagonist and not as a cholinergic agonist, and that TRCP increases AA in ICR mice through a GABAergic mechanism.

  6. Mercury exposure and neurochemical impacts in bald eagles across several Great Lakes states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkiewicz, Jennifer; Nam, Dong-Ha; Cooley, Thomas; Neumann, Kay; Padilla, Irene Bueno; Route, William; Strom, Sean; Basu, Niladri

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we assessed mercury (Hg) exposure in several tissues (brain, liver, and breast and primary feathers) in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) collected from across five Great Lakes states (Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin) between 2002-2010, and assessed relationships between brain Hg and neurochemical receptors (NMDA and GABA(A)) and enzymes (glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)). Brain total Hg (THg) levels (dry weight basis) averaged 2.80 μg/g (range: 0.2-34.01), and levels were highest in Michigan birds. THg levels in liver (r(p) = 0.805) and breast feathers (r(p) = 0.611) significantly correlated with those in brain. Brain Hg was not associated with binding to the GABA(A) receptor. Brain THg and inorganic Hg (IHg) were significantly positively correlated with GS activity (THg r(p) = 0.190; IHg r(p) = 0.188) and negatively correlated with NMDA receptor levels (THg r(p) = -0245; IHg r(p) = -0.282), and IHg was negatively correlated with GAD activity (r(s) = -0.196). We also report upon Hg demethylation and relationships between Hg and Se in brain and liver. These results suggest that bald eagles in the Great Lakes region are exposed to Hg at levels capable of causing subclinical neurological damage, and that when tissue burdens are related to proposed avian thresholds approximately 14-27% of eagles studied here may be at risk.

  7. Neurochemical factors underlying individual differences in locomotor activity and anxiety-like behavioral responses in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Muraleetharan, Arrujyan; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2016-02-04

    Variation among individuals may arise for several reasons, and may have diverse underlying mechanisms. Individual differences have been studied in a variety of species, but recently a new model organism has emerged in this field that offers both sophistication in phenotypical characterization and powerful mechanistic analysis. Recently, zebrafish, one of the favorites of geneticists, have been shown to exhibit consistent individual differences in baseline locomotor activity. In the current study, we further explore this finding and examine whether individual differences in locomotor activity correlate with anxiety-like behavioral measures and with levels of dopamine, serotonin and the metabolites of these neurotransmitters. In addition, we examine whether individual differences in locomotor activity are also associated with reactivity to the locomotor stimulant effects of and neurochemical responses to acute ethanol exposure (30min long, 1% v/v ethanol bath application). Principal component analyses revealed a strong association among anxiety-like responses, locomotor activity, serotonin and dopamine levels. Furthermore, ethanol exposure was found to abolish the locomotion-dependent anxiety-like behavioral and serotonergic responses suggesting that this drug also engages a common underlying pathway. Overall, our results provide support for an important role of the serotonergic system in mediating individual differences in anxiety-like responses and locomotor activity in zebrafish and for a minor modulatory role of the dopaminergic system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neurochemical imaging of Alzheimer`s disease and other degenerative dementias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, K.A.; Minoshima, S.; Kuhl, D.E. [Ann Arbor, Univ. of Michigan, MI (United States). Dept. of Internal Medicine. Division of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-09-01

    A wide variety of neurochemical and functional imaging approaches have been applied to the study of progressive dementias, particularly Alzheimer`s disease (Ad) and related disorders. Despite considerable progress in the past decade, the cause(s) of most cases of Ad remain undetermined and preventive or protective therapies are lacking. Specifically-designed imaging procedures have permitted the testing of pathophysiological hypotheses of the etiology and progression of Ad, and have yielded important insights in several areas including the potential roles of cerebral cortical cholinergic lesions, cellular inflammation, and losses of cortical synapses. From the perspective of clinical diagnosis, PET glucose metabolism imaging with use of ({sup 18}F)2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality yet identified. The overall performance of PET FDG is favorable for routine clinical evaluation of suspected Ad, and will likely gain increasing utilization in the near future. Assessments of glucose metabolism and other, specific aspects of neurochemistry in Ad will provide direct measures of therapeutic drug actions and may permit distinction of symptomatic versus disease-modifying therapies as they are developed and introduced in clinical trials.

  9. Neurochemical and neuropharmacological aspects of circadian disruptions: an introduction to asynchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Jun

    2011-06-01

    Circadian disruptions are common in modern society, and there is an urgent need for effective treatment strategies. According to standard diagnostic criteria, most adolescents showing both insomnia and daytime sleepiness are diagnosed as having behavioral-induced sleep efficiency syndrome resulting from insomnia due to inadequate sleep hygiene. However, a simple intervention of adequate sleep hygiene often fails to treat them. As a solution to this clinical problem, the present review first overviews the basic neurochemical and neuropharmachological aspects of sleep and circadian rhythm regulation, then explains several circadian disruptions from similar viewpoints, and finally introduces the clinical notion of asynchronization. Asynchronization is designated to explain the pathophysiology/pathogenesis of exhibition of both insomnia and hypersomnia in adolescents, which comprises disturbances in various aspects of biological rhythms. The major triggers for asynchronization are considered to be a combination of light exposure during the night, which disturbs the biological clock and decreases melatonin secretion, as well as a lack of light exposure in the morning, which prohibits normal synchronization of the biological clock to the 24-hour cycle of the earth and decreases the activity of serotonin. In the chronic phase of asynchronization, involvement of both wake- and sleep-promoting systems is suggested. Both conventional and alternative therapeutic approaches for potential treatment of asynchronization are suggested.

  10. MRI findings of uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex-cord tumor: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hee Jin; Han, Hyun Young; Hwang, In Taek; Kim, Ju Heon; Lee, Seung Yeon [Eulji University Hospital, Eulji University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex-cord tumor is a very rare uterine neoplasm that was first described by Clement and Scully in 1976. Since then, approximately 70 cases have been reported. However, these case reports have mainly described and discussed the pathologic and clinical features, and few radiologic findings have been presented. We experienced a case of a uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex-cord tumor, which was considered a uterine leiomyoma or leiomyosarcoma upon initial impression at preoperative evaluation including transvaginal ultrasonography and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. Its diagnosis was pathologically confirmed after total abdominal hysterectomy.

  11. Children and Adolescents' Understandings of Family Resemblance: A Study of Naive Inheritance Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joanne M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to provide developmental data on two connected naive inheritance concepts and to explore the coherence of children's naive biology knowledge. Two tasks examined children and adolescents' (4, 7, 10, and 14 years) conceptions of phenotypic resemblance across kin (in physical characteristics, disabilities, and personality traits). The…

  12. Effects of parenting quality on adolescents' personality resemblance to their parents. The TRAILS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenhof, M Rohaa; Komdeur, Jan; Oldehinkel, Albertine J

    2016-08-01

    This study considers the development of resemblance between 741 adolescents and their biological parents, across six NEO-PI-R personality traits known to be important in psychological problems: anger-hostility, impulsiveness, vulnerability, assertiveness, excitement-seeking, and self-discipline. We modelled the association between perceived parental warmth and rejection at age eleven and personality resemblance to parents at about age sixteen. Parenting experienced during early adolescence was related to the degree and direction in which adolescents resembled their parents five years later in life. Rejection, especially from fathers, significantly predicted a smaller resemblance to both the parents. Girls were more strongly affected by parental quality than boys, and there was some indication that adolescents responded in opposite ways to parenting from mothers and fathers. This study is a first step in uncovering the complex interplay between parenting, gender, and the current generation's ability to develop personality traits independent from the previous generation. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Resemblances of Parents and Twins in Sport Participation and Heart Rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, D.I.; van den Bree, M.B.; Orlebeke, J.F.; Molenaar, P.C.M.

    1989-01-01

    A model to analyze resemblances of twins and parents using LISREL is outlined and applied to sports participation and heart-rate data. Sports participation and heart rate were measured in 44 monozygotic and 46 dizygotic adolescent twin pairs and in their parents. Genetic factors influence variation

  14. Schwannoma of the Lower Eyelid Resembling a Recurrent Chalazion : A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuyama, Junichiro; Hayasaka, Seiji; Setogawa, Tomoichi

    1990-01-01

    A 55-year-old man complained of foreign body sensation and a solid mass in the lower eyelid of the right eye. Clinically, the lesion resembled a chalazion, and it was excised. Histopathologic examination of the excised specimen revealed a schwannoma (neurilemmoma). We believe that this is a rare case of a schwannoma of the lower eyelid simulating a chalazion.

  15. Startle eye-blink modulation by facial self-resemblance and current mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Johannes B; Larra, Mauro F; Schilling, Thomas M; Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Blumenthal, Terry D; Schächinger, Hartmut

    2015-06-01

    Although salient stimuli are known to modulate startle eye-blink responses, and one's own face is considered of particular salience, effects of facial self-resemblance on startle responsiveness have not been systematically investigated. For the present study, pictures from the FACES database (rated as neutral) were digitally morphed to resemble the participants' (N=37) faces to varying degrees (25-50-75%). Perceptually matched geometrical shapes served as a control condition. At SOAs of either 300ms or 3000ms after picture onset, startle responses were elicited by white noise (50ms, 105dB), and recorded at the orbicularis oculi via EMG. Prior to the experiment, self-reported mood was assessed by means of the PANAS. Relative to non-face stimuli, the presentation of faces reduced startle magnitude at short, but not long, lead intervals. Furthermore, for probes presented at a SOA of 300ms, a linear decrease in startle magnitude with higher levels of self-resemblance was observed, presumably reflecting higher salience of the self-face. The startle modulating effect of self-resembling faces during longer lead intervals was moderated by the participants' current mood: negative affect predicted stronger patterns of attenuation, which might be interpreted as an increase in self-focus resulting from more negative mood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Family resemblance in fat intake, nutrition attitudes and beliefs : a study among three generations of women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stafleu, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis nutrition attitudes, beliefs, and fat intake in three generations of women are described. The aim of the study was twofold: the development of methods, and to study family resemblance in food habits. Based on literature study and qualitative pilot studies a questionnaire on

  17. Effects of parenting quality on adolescents' personality resemblance to their parents. The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenhof, M Rohaa; Komdeur, Jan; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    This study considers the development of resemblance between 741 adolescents and their biological parents, across six NEO-PI-R personality traits known to be important in psychological problems: anger-hostility, impulsiveness, vulnerability, assertiveness, excitement-seeking, and self-discipline. We

  18. Familial neurofibromatosis type 1 associated with an overgrowth syndrome resembling Weaver syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asperen, C. J.; Overweg-Plandsoen, W. C.; Cnossen, M. H.; van Tijn, D. A.; Hennekam, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of familial neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and an overgrowth syndrome resembling Weaver syndrome was observed in two related cases (a mother and her son). NF1 was confirmed by molecular genetic analysis showing a large deletion at 17q11.2, encompassing the entire NF1

  19. Polioencephalomyelopathy in a mixed breed dog resembling Leigh’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Orit; Milgram, Joshua; Shamir, Merav H.; Brenner, Ori

    2015-01-01

    A 14-month-old mixed-breed dog was presented with acute onset of exercise intolerance that quickly progressed to quadriparesis. Gross and microscopic autopsy findings indicated a type of degenerative polioencephalomyelopathy resembling subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy in dogs or Leigh’s disease in humans. This syndrome has previously been reported only in purebred dogs. PMID:25565716

  20. Behavioural and neurochemical assessment of salvinorin A abuse potential in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Veronica; Fattore, Liana; Scherma, Maria; Collu, Roberto; Spano, Maria Sabrina; Fratta, Walter; Fadda, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Salvinorin A is a recreational drug derived from Salvia divinorum, a sage species long used as an entheogen. While salvinorin A has potent hallucinogenic properties, its abuse potential has not been assessed consistently in controlled behavioural and neurochemical studies in rodents. This study aimed to assess salvinorin A abuse potential by measuring its capacity to establish and maintain self-administration behaviour and to modify dopamine (DA) levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of rats. Male Lister Hooded (LH) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were allowed to self-administer salvinorin A (0.5 or 1.0 μg/kg/infusion) intravenously 2 h/day for 20 days under a continuous schedule of reinforcement and lever pressing as operandum. LH rats discriminated between the active and inactive levers but did not reach the acquisition criterion for stable self-administration (≥12 active responses vs ≤5 inactive responses for at least 5 consecutive days). SD rats discriminated between the two levers at the lower dose only but, like LH rats, never acquired stable self-administration behaviour. Systemic salvinorin A increased extracellular DA in the NAcc shell of both LH (at ≥40 μg/kg) and SD rats (at ≥5 μg/kg), but injection into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) induced no significant change in NAcc DA concentration in LH rats and only brief elevations in SD rats. Salvinorin A differs from other commonly abused compounds since although it affects accumbal dopamine transmission, yet it is unable, at least at the tested doses, to sustain stable intravenous self-administration behaviour.

  1. Peptidergic nerve fibers in the urethra: Morphological and neurochemical characteristics in female mice of reproductive age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Christine M; Ji, Esther; Sharma, Harman; Yap, Pauline; Spencer, Nicholas J; Matusica, Dusan; Haberberger, Rainer V

    2017-10-20

    Peptidergic nerve fibers provide important contributions to urethral function. Urethral innervation of female mice is not well documented. To determine the distribution and projection sites of nerve fibers immunoreactive for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the urethra of wild-type control mice and compare innervation characteristics between the proximal and distal urethra of young nullipara and older multipara mice. Furthermore, to identify the location and neurochemical coding of the spinal afferent nerve endings in the urethra, whose sensory neurons reside in lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Multiple labeling immunohistochemistry of urethral sections of nulliparous (6-8 weeks old), and multiparous (9-12 months old) mice, and anterograde axonal tracing from L5-S2 (DRG) in vivo. Abundant VIP-, CGRP-, SP-, and NPY-immunoreactive nerve fibers were identified in the adventitia, muscularis, and lamina propria of proximal and distal segments of the urethra. A proportion of fibers were closely associated with blood vessels, glands, and cells immunoreactive for PGP9.5. The epithelium contained abundant nerve fibers immunoreactive for CGRP and/or SP. Epithelial innervation was increased in the distal urethra of multipara mice. Abundant fibers were traced from L5-S2 DRG to all urethral regions. We present the first identification of spinal afferent endings in the urethra. Peptidergic nerve fibers, including multiple populations of spinal afferents, provide rich innervation of the female mouse urethra. The morphology of fibers in the epithelium and other regions suggests multiple nerve-cell interactions impacting on urethral function. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Morphological and neurochemical differences in peptidergic nerve fibers of the mouse vagina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Christine M; Ji, Esther; Sharma, Harman; Beukes, Lara; Vilimas, Patricia I; DeGraaf, Yvette C; Matusica, Dusan; Haberberger, Rainer V

    2017-07-01

    The vagina is innervated by a complex arrangement of sensory, sympathetic, and parasympathetic nerve fibers that contain classical transmitters plus an array of neuropeptides and enzymes known to regulate diverse processes including blood flow and nociception. The neurochemical characteristics and distributions of peptide-containing nerves in the mouse vagina are unknown. This study used multiple labeling immunohistochemistry, confocal maging and analysis to investigate the presence and colocalization of the peptides vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY), and the nitric oxide synthesizing enzyme neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in nerve fibers of the murine vaginal wall. We compared cervical and vulvar areas of the vagina in young nullipara and older multipara C57Bl/6 mice, and identified differences including that small ganglia were restricted to cervical segments, epithelial fibers were mainly present in vulvar segments and most nerve fibers were found in the lamina propria of the cervical region of the vagina, where a higher number of fibers containing immunoreactivity for VIP, CGRP, SP, or nNOS were found. Two populations of VIP-containing fibers were identified: fibers containing CGRP and fibers containing VIP but not CGRP. Differences between young and older mice were present in multiple layers of the vaginal wall, with older mice showing overall loss of innervation of epithelium of the proximal vagina and reduced proportions of VIP, CGRP, and SP containing nerve fibers in the distal epithelium. The distal vagina also showed increased vascularization and perivascular fibers containing NPY. Immunolabeling of ganglia associated with the vagina indicated the likely origin of some peptidergic fibers. Our results reveal regional differences and age- or parity-related changes in innervation of the mouse vagina, effecting the distribution of neuropeptides with diverse roles

  3. Neurochemically defined cell columns in the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi of the cat and monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baizer, Joan S; Baker, James F

    2006-06-13

    Many studies have shown that the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (PH) participates with the vestibular nuclear complex, the cerebellum and the oculomotor nuclei in the control of eye movements. We have looked at the neurochemical organization of PH in the cat and monkey using a recently developed antibody, 8B3, that recognizes a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. In the cat, immunoreactivity to 8B3 labels a set of cells in PH. On frontal sections, these cells form a cluster that is seen over the entire anterior-posterior (A-P) extent of PH, but the number of cells in the cluster changes with A-P level. Earlier studies have identified an A-P cell column in PH of the cat whose neurons synthesize nitric oxide. We have used both single- and double-label protocols to investigate the relation between the two cell groups. Single-label studies show spatial overlap but that the cells immunoreactive to nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) are more numerous than cells immunoreactive to 8B3. Double-label studies show that all cells immunoreactive to 8B3 were also immunoreactive to nNOS, but, as suggested by the single-label data, there are many nNOS-immunoreactive cells not immunoreactive to 8B3. Populations of 8B3 and nNOS-immunoreactive cells are also found in PH of squirrel and macaque monkeys. The results suggest that nNOS-immunoreactive cells in PH may consist of two functionally different populations.

  4. Enrichment of MCI and early Alzheimer's disease treatment trials using neurochemical and imaging candidate biomarkers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, H

    2012-02-01

    In the earliest clinical stages of Alzheimer\\'s Disease (AD), when symptoms are mild, clinical diagnosis will still be difficult. AD related molecular mechanisms precede symptoms. Biological markers can serve as early diagnostic indicators, as markers of preclinical pathological change, e.g. underlying mechanisms of action (MoA). Hypothesis based candidates are derived from structural and functional neuroimaging as well as from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma. Unbiased exploratory approaches e.g. proteome analysis or rater independent fully automated imaging post-processing methods yield novel candidates. Recent progress in the validation of core feasible imaging and neurochemical biomarkers for functions such as early detection, classification, progression and prediction of AD is summarized. Single core feasible biomarkers can already be used to enrich populations at risk for AD and may be further enhanced using distinct combinations. Some biomarkers are currently in the process of implementation as primary or secondary outcome variables into regulatory guideline documents, e.g. regarding phase II in drug development programs as outcome measures in proof of concept or dose finding studies. There are specific biomarkers available depending on the hypothesized mechanism of action of a medicinal product, e.g. impact on the amyloidogenic cascade or on tauhyperphosphorylation. Ongoing large-scale international controlled multi-center trials will provide further validation of selected core feasible imaging and CSF biomarker candidates as outcome measures in early AD for use in phase III clinical efficacy trials. There is a need of rigorous co-development of biological trait- and statemarker candidates facilitated through planned synergistic collaboration between academic, industrial and regulatory partners.

  5. Neurochemical characterization of neurons expressing melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 in the mouse hypothalamus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Melissa J. S.; Pissios, Pavlos; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that acts via MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) in the mouse. It promotes positive energy balance thus mice lacking MCH or MCHR1 are lean, hyperactive, and resistant to diet-induced obesity. Identifying the cellular targets of MCH is an important step to understanding the mechanisms underlying MCH actions. We generated the Mchr1-cre mouse that expressed cre recombinase driven by the MCHR1 promoter and crossed it with a tdTomato reporter mouse. The resulting Mchr1-cre/tdTomato progeny expressed easily detectable tdTomato fluorescence in MCHR1 neurons, which were found throughout the olfactory system, striatum, and hypothalamus. To chemically identify MCH-targeted cell populations that play a role in energy balance, MCHR1 hypothalamic neurons were characterized by colabeling select hypothalamic neuropeptides with tdTomato fluorescence. TdTomato fluorescence colocalized with dynorphin, oxytocin, vasopressin, enkephalin, thyrothropin-releasing hormone, and corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus. In the lateral hypothalamus, neurotensin but neither orexin nor MCH neurons expressed tdTomato. In the arcuate nucleus, both Neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin cells expressed tdTomato. We further demonstrated that some of these arcuate neurons were also targets of leptin action. Interestingly, MCHR1 was expressed in the vast majority of leptin-sensitive proopiomelanocortin neurons, highlighting their importance for the orexigenic actions of MCH. Taken together, this study supports the use of the Mchr1-cre mouse for outlining the neuroanatomical distribution and neurochemical phenotype of MCHR1 neurons. PMID:23605441

  6. Neurochemical characterization of neurons expressing melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 in the mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Melissa J S; Pissios, Pavlos; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2013-07-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that acts via MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) in the mouse. It promotes positive energy balance; thus, mice lacking MCH or MCHR1 are lean, hyperactive, and resistant to diet-induced obesity. Identifying the cellular targets of MCH is an important step to understanding the mechanisms underlying MCH actions. We generated the Mchr1-cre mouse that expresses cre recombinase driven by the MCHR1 promoter and crossed it with a tdTomato reporter mouse. The resulting Mchr1-cre/tdTomato progeny expressed easily detectable tdTomato fluorescence in MCHR1 neurons, which were found throughout the olfactory system, striatum, and hypothalamus. To chemically identify MCH-targeted cell populations that play a role in energy balance, MCHR1 hypothalamic neurons were characterized by colabeling select hypothalamic neuropeptides with tdTomato fluorescence. TdTomato fluorescence colocalized with dynorphin, oxytocin, vasopressin, enkephalin, thyrothropin-releasing hormone, and corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus. In the lateral hypothalamus, neurotensin, but neither orexin nor MCH neurons, expressed tdTomato. In the arcuate nucleus, both Neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin cells expressed tdTomato. We further demonstrated that some of these arcuate neurons were also targets of leptin action. Interestingly, MCHR1 was expressed in the vast majority of leptin-sensitive proopiomelanocortin neurons, highlighting their importance for the orexigenic actions of MCH. Taken together, this study supports the use of the Mchr1-cre mouse for outlining the neuroanatomical distribution and neurochemical phenotype of MCHR1 neurons. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Interferon-gamma deficiency modifies the motor and co-morbid behavioral pathology and neurochemical changes provoked by the pesticide paraquat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litteljohn, D; Mangano, E; Shukla, N; Hayley, S

    2009-12-29

    In addition to nigrostriatal pathology and corresponding motor disturbances, Parkinson's disease (PD) is often characterized by co-morbid neuropsychiatric symptoms, most notably anxiety and depression. Separate lines of evidence indicate that inflammatory processes associated with microglial activation and cytokine release may be fundamental to the progression of both PD and its co-morbid psychiatric pathology. Accordingly, we assessed the contribution of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), to a range of PD-like pathology provoked by the ecologically relevant herbicide and dopamine (DA) toxin, paraquat. To this end, paraquat provoked overt motor impairment (reduced home-cage activity and impaired vertical climbing) and signs of anxiety-like behavior (reduced open field exploration) in wild-type but not IFN-gamma-deficient mice. Correspondingly, paraquat promoted somewhat divergent variations in neurochemical activity among wild-type and IFN-gamma null mice at brain sites important for both motor (striatum) and co-morbid affective pathologies (dorsal hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and locus coeruleus). Specifically, the herbicide provoked a dosing regimen-dependent reduction in striatal DA levels that was prevented by IFN-gamma deficiency. In addition, the herbicide influenced serotonergic and noradrenergic activity within the dorsal hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex; and elevated noradrenergic activity within the locus coeruleus. Although genetic ablation of IFN-gamma had relatively few effects on monoamine variations within the locus coeruleus and prefrontal cortex, loss of the pro-inflammatory cytokine did normalize the paraquat-induced noradrenergic alterations within the hippocampus. These findings further elucidate the functional implications of paraquat intoxication and suggest an important role for IFN-gamma in the striatal and motor pathology, as well as the co-morbid behavioral and hippocampal changes induced by

  8. Expanding neurochemical investigations with multi-modal recording: simultaneous fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, iontophoresis, and patch clamp measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, D. C.; McKinney, C. J.; Manis, P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-modal recording describes the simultaneous collection of information across distinct domains. Compared to isolated measurements, such studies can more easily determine relationships between varieties of phenomena. This is useful for neurochemical investigations which examine cellular activity in response to changes in the local chemical environment. In this study, we demonstrate a method to perform simultaneous patch clamp measurements with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using optically isolated instrumentation. A model circuit simulating concurrent measurements was used to predict the electrical interference between instruments. No significant impact was anticipated between methods, and predictions were largely confirmed experimentally. One exception was due to capacitive coupling of the FSCV potential waveform into the patch clamp amplifier. However, capacitive transients measured in whole-cell current clamp recordings were well below the level of biological signals, which allowed the activity of cells to be easily determined. Next, the activity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) was examined in the presence of an FSCV electrode to determine how the exogenous potential impacted nearby cells. The activities of both resting and active MSNs were unaffected by the FSCV waveform. Additionally, application of an iontophoretic current, used to locally deliver drugs and other neurochemicals, did not affect neighboring cells. Finally, MSN activity was monitored during iontophoretic delivery of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter. Membrane depolarization and cell firing were observed concurrently with chemical changes around the cell resulting from delivery. In all, we show how combined electrophysiological and electrochemical measurements can relate information between domains and increase the power of neurochemical investigations. PMID:27314130

  9. Mammographic texture resemblance generalizes as an independent risk factor for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads; Vachon, Celine M.; Scott, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION:Breast density has been established as a major risk factor for breast cancer. We have previously demonstrated that mammographic texture resemblance (MTR), recognizing the local texture patterns of the mammogram, is also a risk factor for breast cancer, independent of percent breast....... The patterns were recognized in the same study using cross-validation to form resemblance scores associated with breast cancer. Texture patterns from S1 were examined in an independent nested case-control study within the Mayo Mammography Health Study cohort (S2) of 226 cases and 442 matched controls...... and continuously for association with breast cancer using odds ratios (OR) and adjusting for known risk factors including age, body mass index (BMI), and hormone usage.RESULTS:The mean ages of S1 and S2 were 58.0+/-5.7years and 55.2+/-10.5years, respectively. The MTR scores on S1 showed significant capability...

  10. Gastrointestinal symptoms resembling ulcerative proctitis caused by larvae of the drone fly Eristalis tenax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Gaillard, Julien; Borée-Moreau, Diane; Bailly, Éric; Andres, Christian R; Chandenier, Jacques

    2014-04-01

    We report a case of facultative intestinal myiasis due to larvae of the drone fly Eristalis tenax, also named the rat-tailed maggots. The development of larvae in the lower bowel was responsible for non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms that resembled ulcerative proctitis. The diagnosis was established upon the observation of four spontaneously excreted mobile larvae. The definite identification of the E. tenax species was made possible by scanning electron microscopy. The clinical outcome was satisfactory.

  11. Family resemblance in fat intake, nutrition attitudes and beliefs : a study among three generations of women

    OpenAIRE

    Stafleu, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis nutrition attitudes, beliefs, and fat intake in three generations of women are described. The aim of the study was twofold: the development of methods, and to study family resemblance in food habits. Based on literature study and qualitative pilot studies a questionnaire on beliefs and attitudes towards the consumption of 20 foods was developed for which Fishbein and Ajzen's theory of reasoned action was used as a framework. In addition, an attitude scale was developed...

  12. Parent-Child Resemblance in Weight Status and Its Correlates in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lan; Wang, Youfa

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined parent-child resemblance in body weight status using nationally representative data for the US. Design We analyzed Body Mass Index (BMI), weight status, and related correlates for 4,846 boys, 4,725 girls, and their parents based on US nationally representative data from the 2006 and 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Pearson partial correlation coefficients, percent agreement, weighted kappa coefficients, and binary and multinomial logistic regression were used to examine parent-child resemblance, adjusted for complex sampling design. Results Pearson partial correlation coefficients between parent and child’s BMI measures were 0.15 for father-son pairs, 0.17 for father-daughter pairs, 0.20 for mother-son pairs, and 0.23 for mother-daughter pairs. The weighted kappa coefficients between BMI quintiles of parent and child ranged from −0.02 to 0.25. Odds ratio analyses found children were 2.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6, 2.8) times more likely to be obese if only their father was obese, 1.9 (95% CI: 1.5, 2.4) times more likely if only their mother was obese, and 3.2 (95% CI: 2.5, 4.2) times more likely if both parents were obese. Conclusions Parent-child resemblance in BMI appears weak and may vary across parent-child dyad types in the US population. However, parental obesity status is associated with children’s obesity status. Use of different measures of parent-child resemblance in body weight status can lead to different conclusions. PMID:23762352

  13. Captive fledgling American kestrels prefer to play with objects resembling natural prey

    OpenAIRE

    Negro, Juan J; Bustamante, Javier; Milward, Jane; Bird, David M

    1996-01-01

    Object play may be a mechanism by which young predators acquire skills in manipulating prey, as well as physical strength and endurance. It has also been proposed that fledgling raptors play with live or dead prey if available, but would play with surrogates such as sticks or grass if not. Different objects were offered to captive fledgling American kestrels, Falco sparverius, to test whether they prefer to play with objects resembling prey. Individuals were divided into two groups: ...

  14. A case of CD30+ ALK1- anaplastic large cell lymphoma resembling acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrantou, T; Natsis, K S; Papadopoulos, G; Lagoudaki, R; Poulios, C; Mamouli, D; Kostopoulos, I; Grigoriadis, N

    2017-04-01

    Central nervous system involvement is an uncommon complication of systemic non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The majority of these cases concern B-cell lymphomas. We report a case of systemic T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphoma CD30+ ALK- with CNS involvement at the time of diagnosis and unusual MRI characteristics resembling acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ae2a,b-deficient mice develop antimitochondrial antibodies and other features resembling primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, January T; Banales, Jesús M; Sarvide, Sarai; Recalde, Sergio; Ferrer, Alex; Uriarte, Iker; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Prieto, Jesús; Medina, Juan F

    2008-05-01

    Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) anion exchanger 2 (AE2) is involved in intracellular pH (pH(i)) regulation and transepithelial acid-base transport, including secretin-stimulated biliary bicarbonate excretion. AE2 gene expression was found to be reduced in liver biopsy specimens and blood mononuclear cells from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), a disease characterized by chronic nonsuppurative cholangitis associated with antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) and other autoimmune phenomena. In mice with widespread Ae2 gene disruption, we previously reported altered spermiogenesis and reduced gastric acid secretion. We now describe the hepatobiliary and immunologic changes observed in these Ae2(a.b)-deficient mice. In this murine model, splenocyte pH(i) and T-cell populations were studied by flow cytometry. CD3-stimulated cytokine secretion was estimated using cytokine arrays. AMA were evaluated by immunoblotting and proteomics. Hepatobiliary changes were assessed by immunohistopathology, flow cytometry, and serum biochemistry. Cholangiocyte gene expression was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Ae2(a,b)(-/-) mice exhibit splenomegaly, elevated pH(i) in splenocytes, increased production of interleukin-12p70 and interferon gamma, expanded CD8(+) T-cell population, and under represented CD4(+)FoxP3(+)/regulatory T cells. Most Ae2(a,b)(-/-) mice tested positively for AMA, showing increased serum levels of immunoglobulin M and G, and liver-specific alkaline phosphatase. About one third of Ae2(a,b)(-/-) mice had extensive portal inflammation with CD8(+) and CD4(+) T lymphocytes surrounding damaged bile ducts. Cholangiocytes isolated from Ae2(a,b)(-/-) mice showed gene expression changes compatible with oxidative stress and increased antigen presentation. Ae2 deficiency alters pH(i) homeostasis in immunocytes and gene expression profile in cholangiocytes, leading to immunologic and hepatobiliary changes that resemble PBC.

  16. Nicotine-induced molecular alterations are modulated by GABAB receptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varani, Andres P; Pedrón, Valeria T; Aon, Amira J; Höcht, Christian; Acosta, Gabriela B; Bettler, Bernhard; Balerio, Graciela N

    2017-04-17

    It has been demonstrated that GABAB receptors modulate nicotine (NIC) reward effect; nevertheless, the mechanism implicated is not well known. In this regard, we evaluated the involvement of GABAB receptors on the behavioral, neurochemical, biochemical and molecular alterations associated with the rewarding effects induced by NIC in mice, from a pharmacological and genetic approach. NIC-induced rewarding properties (0.5 mg/kg, subcutaneously, sc) were evaluated by conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. CPP has three phases: preconditioning, conditioning and postconditioning. GABAB receptor antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen (0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg; intraperitoneally, ip) or the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (3 mg/kg; ip) was injected before NIC during the conditioning phase. GABAB1 knockout (GABAB1 KO) mice received NIC during the conditioning phase. Vehicle and wild-type controls were employed. Neurochemical (dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites), biochemical (nicotinic receptor α4β2, α4β2nAChRs) and molecular (c-Fos) alterations induced by NIC were analyzed after the postconditioning phase by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), receptor-ligand binding assays and immunohistochemistry, respectively, in nucleus accumbens (Acb), prefrontal cortex (PFC) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). NIC induced rewarding effects in the CPP paradigm and increased dopamine levels in Acb and PFC, α4β2nAChRs density in VTA and c-Fos expression in Acb shell (AcbSh), VTA and PFC. We showed that behavioral, neurochemical, biochemical and molecular alterations induced by NIC were prevented by baclofen. However, in 2-hydroxysaclofen pretreated and GABAB1 KO mice, these alterations were potentiated, suggesting that GABAB receptor activity is necessary to control alterations induced by NIC-induced rewarding effects. Therefore, the present findings provided important contributions to the mechanisms implicated in NIC-induced rewarding effects. © 2017 Society for the

  17. Facial Resemblance Exaggerates Sex-Specific Jealousy-Based Decisions1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Platek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex differences in reaction to a romantic partner's infidelity are well documented and are hypothesized to be attributable to sex-specific jealousy mechanisms which are utilized to solve adaptive problems associated with risk of extra-pair copulation. Males, because of the risk of cuckoldry become more upset by sexual infidelity, while females, because of loss of resources and biparental investment tend to become more distressed by emotional infidelity. However, the degree to which these sex-specific reactions to jealousy interact with cues to kin are completely unknown. Here we investigated the interaction of facial resemblance with decisions about sex-specific jealousy scenarios. Fifty nine volunteers were asked to imagine that two different people (represented by facial composites informed them about their romantic partner's sexual or emotional infidelity. Consistent with previous research, males ranked sexual infidelity scenarios as most upsetting and females ranked emotional infidelity scenarios most upsetting. However, when information about the infidelity was provided by a face that resembled the subject, sex-specific reactions to jealousy were exaggerated. This finding highlights the use of facial resemblance as a putative self-referent phenotypic matching cue that impacts trusting behavior in sexual contexts.

  18. Women's attractiveness judgments of self-resembling faces change across the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruine, Lisa M; Jones, Benedict C; Perrett, David I

    2005-04-01

    Two lines of reasoning predict that women's preferences for people exhibiting cues to kinship will be lower in the follicular phase than in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Women may avoid kinship cues during the follicular phase when they are most fertile due to the costs of inbreeding. Alternatively, women may seek kinship cues during the luteal phase as a byproduct of the benefits of associating with kin during pregnancy, which is also characterized by high progesterone. We find that preferences for facial resemblance, a putative kinship cue, follow this predicted pattern and are positively correlated with estimated progesterone levels based on cycle day. Neither estimated estrogen levels nor conception risk predicted preferences for self-resemblance, and the cyclic shift was stronger for preferences for female faces than male faces. These findings lead to the possibility that this cyclic change in preference for self-resemblance may be a byproduct of a hormonal mechanism for increasing affiliative behavior toward kin during pregnancy rather than a mechanism for preventing inbreeding during fertile periods.

  19. Voxel Scale Complex Networks of Functional Connectivity in the Rat Brain: Neurochemical State Dependence of Global and Local Topological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Schwarz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Network analysis of functional imaging data reveals emergent features of the brain as a function of its topological properties. However, the brain is not a homogeneous network, and the dependence of functional connectivity parameters on neuroanatomical substrate and parcellation scale is a key issue. Moreover, the extent to which these topological properties depend on underlying neurochemical changes remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated both global statistical properties and the local, voxel-scale distribution of connectivity parameters of the rat brain. Different neurotransmitter systems were stimulated by pharmacological challenge (d-amphetamine, fluoxetine, and nicotine to discriminate between stimulus-specific functional connectivity and more general features of the rat brain architecture. Although global connectivity parameters were similar, mapping of local connectivity parameters at high spatial resolution revealed strong neuroanatomical dependence of functional connectivity in the rat brain, with clear differentiation between the neocortex and older brain regions. Localized foci of high functional connectivity independent of drug challenge were found in the sensorimotor cortices, consistent with the high neuronal connectivity in these regions. Conversely, the topological properties and node roles in subcortical regions varied with neurochemical state and were dependent on the specific dynamics of the different functional processes elicited.

  20. Cerebellar neurochemical and histopathological changes in rat model of Parkinson's disease induced by intrastriatal injection of rotenone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadrawy, Yasser A; Mourad, Iman M; Mohammed, Haitham S; Noor, Neveen A; Aboul Ezz, Heba S

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the neurochemical changes induced in the cerebellum of rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Rats were divided into two groups; control and rat model of PD induced by the intrastriatal injection of rotenone. As compared to control, a significant increase in the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters; glutamate and aspartate together with a significant decrease in the inhibitory amino acids, GABA, glycine and taurine were observed in the cerebellum of rat model of PD. This was associated with a significant increase in lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α and a significant decrease in reduced glutathione. A significant decrease in acetylcholinesterase and a significant increase in Na+,K+-ATPase were recorded in the cerebellum of rat model of PD. In addition the cerebellar sections from rat model of PD showed marked necrosis of Purkinje cells, irregular damaged cells, cytoplasmic shrinkage, necrosis and perineuronal vacuolation. The present results indicate that the disturbance in the balance between the excitatory and inhibitory amino acids may have a role in the pathogenesis of PD. According to the present neurochemical and histopathological changes, the cerebellum should be taken into consideration during the treatment of PD.

  1. Neuroendocrine and neurochemical impact of aggressive social interactions in submissive and dominant mice: implications for stress-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, Marie-Claude; Anisman, Hymie

    2010-04-01

    Social conflicts may engender stress-related behavioural and physiological disturbances in the victims of aggression. In addition, stress-like neurochemical changes and ensuing depressive and anxiety symptoms might also be evident in the perpetrators of aggressive acts. The present investigation assessed basal levels of circulating corticosterone and of brain serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) in pre-identified submissive and dominant mice. In addition, brain neurochemical changes were determined following a single or three 15-min aggressive episodes both in submissive mice and in those that dominated the aggressive interplay. Three minutes after single and repeated confrontations, plasma corticosterone levels and 5-HT utilization within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus were increased to a comparable extent in submissive and dominant animals. Interestingly, however, NE utilization within the PFC and hippocampus was augmented to a greater level in submissive mice. These results suggest that 5-HT neuronal functioning was generally responsive to aggressive events, irrespective of social rank, whereas NE neuronal activity within the PFC and hippocampus was more sensitive to the submissive/dominance attributes of the social situation. It is possible that NE and 5-HT variations associated with an aggressive experience contribute to depressive- and anxiety-like manifestations typically observed after such psychosocial stressors, particularly in submissive mice. However, given that 5-HT changes occur irrespective of social rank, these data suggest that a toll is taken on both submissive and dominant mice, leaving them vulnerable to stress-related pathology.

  2. Treatment with Trehalose Prevents Behavioral and Neurochemical Deficits Produced in an AAV α-Synuclein Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing; Koprich, James B; Wang, Ying; Yu, Wen-bo; Xiao, Bao-guo; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Wang, Jian

    2016-05-01

    The accumulation of misfolded α-synuclein in dopamine (DA) neurons is believed to be of major importance in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Animal models of PD, based on viral-vector-mediated over-expression of α-synuclein, have been developed and show evidence of dopaminergic toxicity, providing us a good tool to investigate potential therapies to interfere with α-synuclein-mediated pathology. An efficient disease-modifying therapeutic molecule should be able to interfere with the neurotoxicity of α-synuclein aggregation. Our study highlighted the ability of an autophagy enhancer, trehalose (at concentrations of 5 and 2% in drinking water), to protect against A53T α-synuclein-mediated DA degeneration in an adeno-associated virus serotype 1/2 (AAV1/2)-based rat model of PD. Behavioral tests and neurochemical analysis demonstrated a significant attenuation in α-synuclein-mediated deficits in motor asymmetry and DA neurodegeneration including impaired DA neuronal survival and DA turnover, as well as α-synuclein accumulation and aggregation in the nigrostriatal system by commencing 5 and 2% trehalose at the same time as delivery of AAV. Trehalose (0.5%) was ineffective on the above behavioral and neurochemical deficits. Further investigation showed that trehalose enhanced autophagy in the striatum by increasing formation of LC3-II. This study supports the concept of using trehalose as a novel therapeutic strategy that might prevent/reverse α-synuclein aggregation for the treatment of PD.

  3. Using position emission tomography to investigate hormone-mediated neurochemical changes across the female lifespan: implications for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsido, Rachel G; Villringer, Arno; Sacher, Julia

    2017-12-01

    Ovarian hormones, particularly oestrogen and progesterone, undergo major fluctuations across the female lifespan. These hormone transition periods, such as the transition from pregnancy to postpartum, as well as the transition into menopause (perimenopause), are also known to be times of elevated susceptibility to depression. This study reviews how these transition periods likely influence neurochemical changes in the brain that result in disease vulnerability. While there are known associations between oestrogen/progesterone and different monoaminergic systems, the interactions and their potential implications for mood disorders are relatively unknown. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) allows for the in-vivo quantification of such neurochemical changes, and, thus, can provide valuable insight into how both subtle and dramatic shifts in hormones contribute to the elevated rates of depression during pre-menstrual, post-partum, and perimenopausal periods in a woman's life. As one better understands how to address the challenges of PET studies involving highly vulnerable populations, such as women who have recently given birth, one will gain the insight necessary to design and individualize treatment and therapy. Understanding the precise time-line in younger women when dramatic fluctuations in the hormonal milieu may contribute to brain changes may present a powerful opportunity to intervene before a vulnerable state develops into a diseased state in later life.

  4. Resembling a viper: implications of mimicry for conservation of the endangered smooth snake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkonen, Janne K; Mappes, Johanna

    2014-12-01

    The phenomenon of Batesian mimicry, where a palatable animal gains protection against predation by resembling an unpalatable model, has been a core interest of evolutionary biologists for 150 years. An extensive range of studies has focused on revealing mechanistic aspects of mimicry (shared education and generalization of predators) and the evolutionary dynamics of mimicry systems (co-operation vs. conflict) and revealed that protective mimicry is widespread and is important for individual fitness. However, according to our knowledge, there are no case studies where mimicry theories have been applied to conservation of mimetic species. Theoretically, mimicry affects, for example, frequency dependency of predator avoidance learning and human induced mortality. We examined the case of the protected, endangered, nonvenomous smooth snake (Coronella austriaca) that mimics the nonprotected venomous adder (Vipera berus), both of which occur in the Åland archipelago, Finland. To quantify the added predation risk on smooth snakes caused by the rarity of vipers, we calculated risk estimates from experimental data. Resemblance of vipers enhances survival of smooth snakes against bird predation because many predators avoid touching venomous vipers. Mimetic resemblance is however disadvantageous against human predators, who kill venomous vipers and accidentally kill endangered, protected smooth snakes. We found that the effective population size of the adders in Åland is very low relative to its smooth snake mimic (28.93 and 41.35, respectively).Because Batesian mimicry is advantageous for the mimic only if model species exist in sufficiently high numbers, it is likely that the conservation program for smooth snakes will fail if adders continue to be destroyed. Understanding the population consequences of mimetic species may be crucial to the success of endangered species conservation. We suggest that when a Batesian mimic requires protection, conservation planners should

  5. Charge on luminous bodies resembling natural ball lightning produced via electrical arcs through lump silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Christina L.; Miley, Galen P.; Griffiths, David J.; Sánchez, Erik

    2014-12-01

    A phenomenon resembling natural ball lightning can be produced via electrical arcing through silicon. We use lump silicon instead of silicon wafers to achieve higher production rates and larger, longer-lived luminous balls than previously reported. The luminous balls consist of a silicon core surrounded by a porous network of loosely bound silicon dioxide nanoparticles. We find that the balls carry a small net charge on the order of 10-12 C and propose that the nanoparticles are electrostatically bound to the core due to this charge.

  6. Villous Tumor of the Urinary Bladder Resembling Low-grade Mucinous Neoplasm of the Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ayako; Sakura, Yuma; Sugimoto, Mikio; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Kuroda, Naoto

    2016-05-01

    Mucinous neoplasms of the urinary tract are very rare. We present a 63-year-old-women who had a sessile papillary villous tumor in urinary bladder. Although transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) was performed, the villous tumor repetitively recurred and gradually spread to the entire surface of bladder lumen. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical examination showed that the lesion was very similar to low-grade mucinous neoplasm arising in appendix vermiformis. There are no reports on appendiceal metaplasia of urinary bladder mucosa. In this case, we describe this unprecedented neoplasm as "villous tumor of the urinary bladder resembling low-grade mucinous neoplasm of the appendix."

  7. Microabrasion of teeth with discoloration resembling hypomaturation enamel defects: four-year follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, M; Sarnat, H

    2000-01-01

    Microabrasion with 18% HCl and pumice to remove enamel dysmineralization and improve esthetics is an accepted and effective treatment. This technique can probably be extended even to generalized defects resembling hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta that appear on all erupted teeth. Five children aged 9 to 11 with two types of enamel-hypomaturation probably due to developmental defects were treated successfully by microabrasion, with marked improvement of the discoloration. The patients were followed for up to four years. During this period, no tooth-sensitivity or staining was noted. The teeth looked healthier and shinier.

  8. A novel and automatic mammographic texture resemblance marker is an independent risk factor for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads; Karemore, Gopal; Loog, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether breast cancer is predicted by a breast cancer risk mammographic texture resemblance (MTR) marker. Methods: A previously published case-control study included 495 women of which 245 were diagnosed with breast cancer. In baseline mammograms, 2-4 years prior......) surpasses others significantly except H. HRT-MTR (E) did not significantly identify future cancers or correlate with any other marker. Conclusions: Breast cancer risk MTR marker was independent of density scores and more predictive of risk. The hormone replacement treatment MTR marker did not identify...

  9. Familial resemblance of borderline personality disorder features: genetic or cultural transmission?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn A Distel

    Full Text Available Borderline personality disorder is a severe personality disorder for which genetic research has been limited to family studies and classical twin studies. These studies indicate that genetic effects explain 35 to 45% of the variance in borderline personality disorder and borderline personality features. However, effects of non-additive (dominance genetic factors, non-random mating and cultural transmission have generally not been explored. In the present study an extended twin-family design was applied to self-report data of twins (N = 5,017 and their siblings (N = 1,266, parents (N = 3,064 and spouses (N = 939 from 4,015 families, to estimate the effects of additive and non-additive genetic and environmental factors, cultural transmission and non-random mating on individual differences in borderline personality features. Results showed that resemblance among biological relatives could completely be attributed to genetic effects. Variation in borderline personality features was explained by additive genetic (21%; 95% CI 17-26% and dominant genetic (24%; 95% CI 17-31% factors. Environmental influences (55%; 95% CI 51-60% explained the remaining variance. Significant resemblance between spouses was observed, which was best explained by phenotypic assortative mating, but it had only a small effect on the genetic variance (1% of the total variance. There was no effect of cultural transmission from parents to offspring.

  10. Effects of electroconvulsive seizures on depression-related behavior, memory and neurochemical changes in Wistar and Wistar-Kyoto rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyeremanteng, C; MacKay, J C; James, J S; Kent, P; Cayer, C; Anisman, H; Merali, Z

    2014-10-03

    Investigations in healthy outbred rat strains have shown a potential role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in the antidepressant and memory side effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT, or ECS in animals). The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat strain is used as a genetic model of depression yet no studies to date have directly compared the impact of ECS on the WKY strain to its healthy outbred control (Wistar). The objective of this study is to examine behavioral (antidepressant and retrograde memory) and neurochemical (BDNF and HPA axis) changes immediately (1day) and at a longer delay (7days) after repeated ECS (5 daily administrations) in WKY and Wistar rats. Male Wistar and WKY rats received 5days of repeated ECS or sham treatment and were assessed 1 and 7days later for 1) depression-like behavior and mobility; 2) retrograde memory; and 3) brain BDNF protein, brain corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and plasma corticosterone levels. Both strains showed the expected antidepressant response and retrograde memory impairments at 1day following ECS, which were sustained at 7days. In addition, at 1day after ECS, Wistar and WKY rats showed similar elevations in brain BDNF and extra-hypothalamic CRF and no change in plasma corticosterone. At 7days after ECS, Wistar rats showed sustained elevations of brain BDNF and CRF, whereas WKY rats showed a normalization of brain BDNF, despite sustained elevations of brain CRF. The model of 5 daily ECS was effective at eliciting behavioral and neurochemical changes in both strains. A temporal association was observed between brain CRF levels, but not BDNF, and measures of antidepressant effectiveness of ECS and retrograde memory impairments suggesting that extra-hypothalamic CRF may be a potential important contributor to these behavioral effects after repeated ECS/ECT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Menstrual blood closely resembles the uterine immune micro-environment and is clearly distinct from peripheral blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, R.G. van der; Schutten, J.H.; Cranenbroek, B. van; Meer, M. ter; Donckers, J.; Scholten, R.R.; Heijden, O.W.H. van der; Spaanderman, M.E.A.; Joosten, I.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is menstrual blood a suitable source of endometrial derived lymphocytes? SUMMARY ANSWER: Mononuclear cells isolated from menstrual samples (menstrual blood mononuclear cells (MMC)) are clearly distinct from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and show a strong resemblance with

  12. Blood-based neurochemical diagnosis of vascular dementia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibl, Mirko; Esselmann, Hermann; Mollenhauer, Brit; Weniger, Godehard; Welge, Volker; Liess, Michael; Lewczuk, Piotr; Otto, Markus; Schulz, Jörg B; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens

    2007-10-01

    Blood-based tests for the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are under intensive investigation and have shown promising results with regard to Abeta40 and Abeta42 peptide species in incipient AD. Moreover, plasma Abeta40 was suggested as an independent cerebrovascular risk factor candidate. These considerations prompted us to analyse a total of 72 plasma samples in vascular dementias (VAD, n = 15), AD with cerebrovascular disease (AD with CVD, n = 7), AD (n = 15), Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's disease dementia (PD/PDD, n = 20) and 15 patients with depression that served as controls (DC) for distinct plasma amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide patterns. For the analysis of plasma we used immunoprecipitation followed by the quantitative Abeta-SDS-PAGE/immunoblot. For comparison, CSF tau and Abeta1-42 analyses were performed. The major outcome was an increase in Abeta1-40 in plasma of VAD paralleled by a decrease in the ratio of Abeta1-38/Abeta1-40. The ratio Abeta1-38/Abeta1-40 in plasma enabled contrasts of beyond 85% and 80% for discriminating VAD from DC and all other patients, respectively. In CSF, we confirmed the typical CSF biomarker constellation of increased tau and diminished Abeta1-42 levels for AD. The diagnostic accuracy of plasma Abeta1-38/Abeta1-40 for VAD resembled the accuracy of CSF biomarkers for AD. From the presented results, we consider the ratio of plasma Abeta1-38/Abeta1-40 peptides to be a blood-based biomarker candidate for VAD.

  13. Neurochemical and behavioral indices of exercise reward are independent of exercise controllability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Jonathan J; Fedynska, Sofiya; Ghasem, Parsa R; Wieman, Tyler; Clark, Peter J; Gray, Nathan; Loetz, Esteban; Campeau, Serge; Fleshner, Monika; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2016-01-01

    Brain reward circuits are implicated in stress-related psychiatric disorders. Exercise reduces the incidence of stress-related disorders, but the contribution of exercise reward to stress resistance is unknown. Exercise-induced stress resistance is independent of exercise controllability; both voluntary and forced wheel running protect rats against anxiety- and depression-like behavioral consequences of stress. Voluntary exercise is a natural reward, but whether rats find forced wheel running rewarding is unknown. Moreover, the contribution of dopamine (DA) and striatal reward circuits to exercise reward is not well characterized. Adult, male rats were assigned to locked wheels, voluntary running (VR), or forced running (FR) groups. FR rats were forced to run in a pattern resembling rats' natural wheel running behavior. Both VR and FR increased the reward-related plasticity marker ΔFosB in the dorsal striatum (DS) and nucleus accumbens (NAc), and increased activity of DA neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area (VTA), as revealed by immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and pCREB. Both VR and FR rats developed conditioned place preference (CPP) to the side of a CPP chamber paired with exercise. Re-exposure to the exercise-paired side of the CPP chamber elicited conditioned increases in cfos mRNA in direct pathway (dynorphin-positive) neurons in the DS and NAc in both VR and FR rats, and in TH-positive neurons in the lateral VTA of VR rats only. Results suggest that the rewarding effects of exercise are independent of exercise controllability and provide insight into the DA and striatal circuitries involved in exercise reward and exercise-induced stress resistance. PMID:26833814

  14. Neurochemical and behavioural indices of exercise reward are independent of exercise controllability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Jonathan J; Fedynska, Sofiya; Ghasem, Parsa R; Wieman, Tyler; Clark, Peter J; Gray, Nathan; Loetz, Esteban; Campeau, Serge; Fleshner, Monika; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2016-05-01

    Brain reward circuits are implicated in stress-related psychiatric disorders. Exercise reduces the incidence of stress-related disorders, but the contribution of exercise reward to stress resistance is unknown. Exercise-induced stress resistance is independent of exercise controllability; both voluntary running (VR) and forced running (FR) protect rats against the anxiety-like and depression-like behavioural consequences of stress. Voluntary exercise is a natural reward, but whether rats find FR rewarding is unknown. Moreover, the contribution of dopamine (DA) and striatal reward circuits to exercise reward is not well characterized. Adult, male rats were assigned to locked wheels, VR, or FR groups. FR rats were forced to run in a pattern resembling the natural wheel running behavior of rats. Both VR and FR increased the reward-related plasticity marker ΔFosB in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens, and increased the activity of DA neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area, as revealed by immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and pCREB. Both VR and FR rats developed conditioned place preference (CPP) to the side of a CPP chamber paired with exercise. Re-exposure to the exercise-paired side of the CPP chamber elicited conditioned increases in cfos mRNA in direct-pathway (dynorphin-positive) neurons in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens in both VR and FR rats, and in tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area of VR rats only. The results suggest that the rewarding effects of exercise are independent of exercise controllability and provide insight into the DA and striatal circuitries involved in exercise reward and exercise-induced stress resistance. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Sunflower Oil but Not Fish Oil Resembles Positive Effects of Virgin Olive Oil on Aged Pancreas after Life-Long Coenzyme Q Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Alonso, Adrián; Ramírez-Tortosa, César L.; Varela-López, Alfonso; Roche, Enrique; Arribas, María I.; Ramírez-Tortosa, M. Carmen; Giampieri, Francesca; Ochoa, Julio J.; Quiles, José L.

    2015-01-01

    An adequate pancreatic structure is necessary for optimal organ function. Structural changes are critical in the development of age-related pancreatic disorders. In this context, it has been reported that different pancreatic compartments from rats were affected according to the fat composition consumed. Since there is a close relationship between mitochondria, oxidative stress and aging, an experimental approach has been developed to gain more insight into this process in the pancreas. A low dosage of coenzyme Q was administered life-long in rats in order to try to prevent pancreatic aging-related alterations associated to some dietary fat sources. According to that, three groups of rats were fed normocaloric diets containing Coenzyme Q (CoQ) for two years, where virgin olive, sunflower, or fish oil was included as unique fat source. Pancreatic samples for microscopy and blood samples were collected at the moment of euthanasia. The main finding is that CoQ supplementation gives different results according to fat used in diet. When sunflower oil was the main fat in the diet, CoQ supplementation seems to improve endocrine pancreas structure and in particular β-cell mass resembling positive effects of virgin olive oil. Conversely, CoQ intake does not seem to improve the structural alterations of exocrine compartment previously observed in fish oil fed rats. Therefore CoQ may improve pancreatic alterations associated to the chronic intake of some dietary fat sources. PMID:26426013

  16. Sunflower Oil but Not Fish Oil Resembles Positive Effects of Virgin Olive Oil on Aged Pancreas after Life-Long Coenzyme Q Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Alonso, Adrián; Ramírez-Tortosa, César L; Varela-López, Alfonso; Roche, Enrique; Arribas, María I; Ramírez-Tortosa, M Carmen; Giampieri, Francesca; Ochoa, Julio J; Quiles, José L

    2015-09-29

    An adequate pancreatic structure is necessary for optimal organ function. Structural changes are critical in the development of age-related pancreatic disorders. In this context, it has been reported that different pancreatic compartments from rats were affected according to the fat composition consumed. Since there is a close relationship between mitochondria, oxidative stress and aging, an experimental approach has been developed to gain more insight into this process in the pancreas. A low dosage of coenzyme Q was administered life-long in rats in order to try to prevent pancreatic aging-related alterations associated to some dietary fat sources. According to that, three groups of rats were fed normocaloric diets containing Coenzyme Q (CoQ) for two years, where virgin olive, sunflower, or fish oil was included as unique fat source. Pancreatic samples for microscopy and blood samples were collected at the moment of euthanasia. The main finding is that CoQ supplementation gives different results according to fat used in diet. When sunflower oil was the main fat in the diet, CoQ supplementation seems to improve endocrine pancreas structure and in particular β-cell mass resembling positive effects of virgin olive oil. Conversely, CoQ intake does not seem to improve the structural alterations of exocrine compartment previously observed in fish oil fed rats. Therefore CoQ may improve pancreatic alterations associated to the chronic intake of some dietary fat sources.

  17. Sunflower Oil but Not Fish Oil Resembles Positive Effects of Virgin Olive Oil on Aged Pancreas after Life-Long Coenzyme Q Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián González-Alonso

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An adequate pancreatic structure is necessary for optimal organ function. Structural changes are critical in the development of age-related pancreatic disorders. In this context, it has been reported that different pancreatic compartments from rats were affected according to the fat composition consumed. Since there is a close relationship between mitochondria, oxidative stress and aging, an experimental approach has been developed to gain more insight into this process in the pancreas. A low dosage of coenzyme Q was administered life-long in rats in order to try to prevent pancreatic aging-related alterations associated to some dietary fat sources. According to that, three groups of rats were fed normocaloric diets containing Coenzyme Q (CoQ for two years, where virgin olive, sunflower, or fish oil was included as unique fat source. Pancreatic samples for microscopy and blood samples were collected at the moment of euthanasia. The main finding is that CoQ supplementation gives different results according to fat used in diet. When sunflower oil was the main fat in the diet, CoQ supplementation seems to improve endocrine pancreas structure and in particular β-cell mass resembling positive effects of virgin olive oil. Conversely, CoQ intake does not seem to improve the structural alterations of exocrine compartment previously observed in fish oil fed rats. Therefore CoQ may improve pancreatic alterations associated to the chronic intake of some dietary fat sources.

  18. Silica deposits on Mars with features resembling hot spring biosignatures at El Tatio in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Steven W.; Farmer, Jack D.

    2016-11-01

    The Mars rover Spirit encountered outcrops and regolith composed of opaline silica (amorphous SiO2.nH2O) in an ancient volcanic hydrothermal setting in Gusev crater. An origin via either fumarole-related acid-sulfate leaching or precipitation from hot spring fluids was suggested previously. However, the potential significance of the characteristic nodular and mm-scale digitate opaline silica structures was not recognized. Here we report remarkably similar features within active hot spring/geyser discharge channels at El Tatio in northern Chile, where halite-encrusted silica yields infrared spectra that are the best match yet to spectra from Spirit. Furthermore, we show that the nodular and digitate silica structures at El Tatio that most closely resemble those on Mars include complex sedimentary structures produced by a combination of biotic and abiotic processes. Although fully abiotic processes are not ruled out for the Martian silica structures, they satisfy an a priori definition of potential biosignatures.

  19. Consolation in the aftermath of robberies resembles post-aggression consolation in chimpanzees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie Rosenkrantz; Liebst, Lasse Suonperä; Bernasco, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Post-aggression consolation is assumed to occur in humans as well as in chimpanzees. While consolation following peer aggression has been observed in children, systematic evidence of consolation in human adults is rare. We used surveillance camera footage of the immediate aftermath of nonfatal...... robberies to observe the behaviors and characteristics of victims and bystanders. Consistent with empathy explanations, we found that consolation was linked to social closeness rather than physical closeness. While females were more likely to console than males, males and females were equally likely...... to be consoled. Furthermore, we show that high levels of threat during the robbery increased the likelihood of receiving consolation afterwards. These patterns resemble post-aggression consolation in chimpanzees and suggest that emotions of empathic concern are involved in consolation across humans...

  20. A distinct chondrodysplasia resembling Kniest dysplasia: clinical, roentgenographic, histologic, and ultrastructural findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sconyers, S M; Rimoin, D L; Lachman, R S; Adomian, G E; Crandall, B F

    1983-12-01

    Two sibs, one girl and one boy, were observed in infancy with a severe lethal skeletal dysplasia syndrome that radiologically and histologically resembled Kniest dysplasia but clearly differed in clinical course and inheritance. Kniest dysplasia is a nonlethal syndrome, whereas both of these infants died in the neonatal period. Kniest dysplasia appears to be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait; the likely transmission in this family was autosomal recessive. Roentgenograms revealed dumbbell-shaped long bones superficially similar to Kniest dysplasia, but with markedly shortened diaphyses and metaphyseal irregularities. Chondro-osseous morphology demonstrated a superficially similar foamy "Swiss cheese" appearance to the cartilage matrix, as seen in Kniest dysplasia, but there were distinctly different changes in the growth plate and resting cartilage. Ultrastructurally, the chondrocytic endoplasmic reticulum was found to have an appearance different from that observed in either normal or Kniest cartilage. These cases likely represent a distinct chondrodysplasia.

  1. Unilateral situs inversus of optic disc associated with reduced binocularity and stereoacuity resembling monofixation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothari Mihir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Situs inversus of the optic disc is a rare, usually bilateral, congenital embryological abnormality associated with high myopia, optic disc coloboma or tilted optic disc. It is characterized by emergence of the retinal vessels in an anomalous direction with dysversion of the optic disc. In this report we present a 13-year-old boy diagnosed with isolated, unilateral situs inversus of the optic disc associated with reduced binocularity and stereoacuity resembling a monofixation syndrome. The clinicians should be aware of this association and assess the binocularity in patients with unilateral optic disc or macular anomalies. Conversely, patients with reduced binocularity and stereoacuity should be carefully evaluated for macular or optic nerve anomalies, if not associated with strabismus, anisometropia and eccentric fixation. Typical fundus picture, optical coherence tomography and multifocal electro retinogram of the patient would be instructive to a clinician.

  2. American alligator proximal pedal phalanges resemble human finger bones: Diagnostic criteria for forensic investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Joseph V; Binetti, Katie M

    2014-07-01

    A scientific approach to bone and tooth identification requires analysts to pursue the goal of empirical falsification. That is, they may attribute a questioned specimen to element and taxon only after having ruled out all other possible attributions. This requires analysts to possess a thorough understanding of both human and non-human osteology, particularly so for remains that may be morphologically similar across taxa. To date, forensic anthropologists have identified several potential 'mimics' for human skeletal remains, including pig teeth and bear paws. Here we document another possible mimic for isolated human skeletal elements--the proximal pedal phalanges of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) closely resemble the proximal and intermediate hand phalanges of adult humans. We detail morphological similarities and differences between these elements, with the goal of providing sufficient information for investigators to confidently falsify the hypothesis that a questioned phalanx is derived from an American alligator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A universal, easy-to-apply light-quality index based on natural light spectrum resemblance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Jwo-Huei; Chou, Kun-Yi; Yang, Fu-Chin; Agrawal, Abhishek; Chen, Sun-Zen; Tseng, Jing-Ru; Lin, Ching-Chiao; Chen, Po-Wei; Wong, Ken-Tsung; Chi, Yun

    2014-05-01

    Light-quality is extremely crucial for any light source to be used for illumination. However, a proper light-quality index is still missing although numerous electricity-driven lighting measures have been introduced since past 150 yr. We present in this communication a universal and easy-to-apply index for quantifying the quality of any given lighting source, which is based on direct comparison of its lumen spectrum with the natural light counterpart having the same color temperature. A general principle for creating high quality pseudo-natural light is accordingly derived. By using organic light-emitting diode technology, for example, daylight-style emission with a 96% natural light resemblance is obtained as a high number of organic emitters with diffused colors spanning throughout the entire visible range are employed. The same principle can be extended to other lighting technology such as light-emitting diode to generate natural light-style emission.

  4. Combining different views of mammographic texture resemblance (MTR) marker of breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, S.; Karemore, Gopal; Chernoff, Konstantin

    PURPOSE Mammographic density is a well established breast cancer risk factor. Texture analysis in terms of the Mammographoc Texture Resemblance (MTR) marker has recently shown to add to risk segregation. Hitherto only single view MTR analysis has been performed. Standard mammography examinations...... the subsequent 4 years whereas 245 cases had a diagnosis 2-4 years post mammography. We employed the MTR supervised texture learning framework to perform risk evaluation from a single mammography view. In the framework 20,000 pixels were sampled and classified by a kNN pixel classifier. A feature selection step...... is included to reduce input space dimensionality. Weak local decision scores for pixels were fused into an overall risk score. The dataset was randomly separated into a training data set (60%) and a test data set (40%). Risk scores for combinations of views were obtained by linear and quadratic discriminant...

  5. Discovery of crystalline inclusions in Bacillus licheniformis that resemble parasporal crystals of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ming; Roehrl, Michael H; Wang, Julia Y

    2007-09-01

    Crystalline inclusions were discovered in stationary and sporulating cells of the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 9945a. As detected by electron microscopy, dying or sporulating bacterial cells contain a single crystal of strikingly large size. The crystals in sporulating cells are located next to nascent spores and can be several times larger than the spores. Morphologically, most crystals are rhomboid with uniformly spaced grids. These newly discovered crystalline inclusions of B. licheniformis closely resemble parasporal crystals of Bacillus thuringiensis that are formed by insecticidal toxin proteins and used widely as biopesticides. The taxonomic identity of this strain was verified by its 16S rRNA gene sequence and its fatty acid profile. The finding of crystal proteins in B. licheniformis may lead to the discovery of new protein toxins and may expand our pool of biopesticides.

  6. Ethionamide-induced pellagroid dermatitis resembling lichen simplex chronicus: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Garg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pellagra is a niacin deficiency disorder characterized clinically by diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia. However, few drugs also cause pellagroid dermatitis. Recently, we encountered two cases of pellagroid dermatitis; both were on second line of antituberculosis drugs. Case 1 was of multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. Patient was on ethionamide since one year before developing pellagroid dermatitis. Case 2 was of central nervous system tuberculoma and was on second line of antitubercular drugs. This patient was on ethionamide and isoniazid (INH since six months before developing pellagroid dermatitis. This patient had previously taken first line of antituberculous therapy, inclusive of INH, for 1 year without any dermatitis. The skin lesions in both patients were symmetric hyperpigmented thickened plaques with prominent skin markings resembling lichen simplex chronicus. Nicotinamide 300 mg in three divided doses healed the lesions completely within 4 weeks and 3 weeks in first and second patient, respectively.

  7. Westermarck, Freud, and the incest taboo: does familial resemblance activate sexual attraction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraley, R Chris; Marks, Michael J

    2010-09-01

    Evolutionary psychological theories assume that sexual aversions toward kin are triggered by a nonconscious mechanism that estimates the genetic relatedness between self and other. This article presents an alternative perspective that assumes that incest avoidance arises from consciously acknowledged taboos and that when awareness of the relationship between self and other is bypassed, people find individuals who resemble their kin more sexually appealing. Three experiments demonstrate that people find others more sexually attractive if they have just been subliminally exposed to an image of their opposite-sex parent (Experiment 1) or if the face being rated is a composite image based on the self (Experiment 2). This finding is reversed when people are aware of the implied genetic relationship (Experiment 3). These findings have implications for a century-old debate between E. Westermarck and S. Freud, as well as contemporary research on evolution, mate choice, and sexual imprinting.

  8. A case of Scabies with Lesions Resembling Perforating Folliculitis and Uremic Pruritus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Akgün

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Scabies is an infestation caused by Sarcoptes scabiei and characterised by polymorphous lesions that may include burrows, papules, pustules, crusts and excoriations. Several pruritic diseases may be confused with scabies. Herein, we present a case of scabies with lesions resembling perforating folliculitis diagnosed on the basis of both clinical and histopathological view. A 72-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus and receiving hemodialysis for ten years due to end-stage renal disease was admitted to our dermatology department with a 6-month history of severe pruritus. Based on the results of skin biopsy revealing Sarcoptes scabiei in the epidermis, the patient was diagnosed as scabies and was successfully treated with 5% permethrin. This case is presented to emphasize that scabies should be considered in the differential diagnosis in cases of chronic pruritus.

  9. Confirmation of the presence of Mycoplasma bovis in Hungarian cattle with pneumonia resembling pleuropneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashiruddin, J B; De Santis, P; Varga, E; Stipkovits, L

    2001-06-16

    Cattle from several farms in Hungary were investigated for the presence of mycoplasmal infections after the discovery of pulmonary lesions in some animals at slaughter. The pneumonic lesions, which resembled those of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) macroscopically and histologically were found to be caused by Mycoplasma bovis and not Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides (MmmSC) which is the causative agent of CBPP. No other bacterial pathogens were isolated. Negative results in complement fixation tests also showed that there was no serological evidence of CBPP. PCR tests for the detection of the M mycoides cluster and specifically for MmmSC were also negative. However, PCR and bacteriological culture detected cases of M bovis and the pneumonias may therefore be attributed to this mycoplasma.

  10. Familial Resemblance of Body Composition, Physical Activity, and Resting Metabolic Rate in Pre-School Children

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    Kurosh Djafarian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although parental obesity is a well-established predisposing factor for the development of obesity, associations between regional body compositions, resting metabolic rates (RMR, and physical activity (PA of parents and their pre-school children remain unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate parent-child correlations for total and regional body compositions, resting energy expenditures, and physical activity. Methods: Participants were 89 children aged 2-6 years and their parents, consisting of 61 families. Resting metabolic rate was assessed using indirect calorimetry. Total and regional body compositions were measured by both dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA and deuterium dilution. Physical activity was assessed by an accelerometer. Results: There was a significant parent-offspring regression for total fat free mass (FFM between children and their mothers (P=0.02, fathers (P=0.02, and mid-parent (average of father and mother value (P=0.002 when measured by DXA. The same was true for fat mass (FM between children and mothers (P<0.01, fathers (P=0.02, and mid-parent (P=0.001. There was no significant association between children and parents for physical activity during the entire week, weekend, weekdays, and different parts of days, except for morning activity, which was positively related to the mothers’ morning activities (P<0.01 and mid-parent (P=0.009. No association was found between RMR of children and parents before and after correction for FFM and FM. Conclusion: These data suggest a familial resemblance for total body composition between children and their parents. Our data showed no familial resemblance for PA and RMR between children and their parents.

  11. The Effect of Perceived Parent-Child Facial Resemblance on Parents’ Trait Anxiety: the Moderating Effect of Parents’ Gender

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    Yu eQuanlei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Father-child facial resemblance is an important cue for men to evaluate paternity. Previous studies found that fathers’ perceptions of low facial resemblance with offspring lead to low confidence of paternity. Fathers’ uncertainty of paternity could cause psychological stress and anxiety, which, after a long time, may further turn into trait anxiety. Conversely, females can ensure a biological connection with offspring because of internal fertilization. The purpose of this study was thus to examine the role of parents’ gender in the effect of parents’ perceived facial resemblance with child on their trait anxiety. In this study, one hundred and fifty-one parents (father or mother from one-child families reported their facial resemblance with child and their trait anxiety. Results showed that (a males tended to perceive higher facial similarity with child than did females, and (b males’ perceived facial resemblance with child significantly predicted trait anxiety, whereas females’ perceived facial resemblance did not. These findings suggested that the uncertainty of paternity contributed to the trait anxiety of fathers, but not mothers.

  12. Functional Circuitry Effect of Ventral Tegmental Area Deep Brain Stimulation: Imaging and Neurochemical Evidence of Mesocortical and Mesolimbic Pathway Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settell, Megan L; Testini, Paola; Cho, Shinho; Lee, Jannifer H; Blaha, Charles D; Jo, Hang J; Lee, Kendall H; Min, Hoon-Ki

    2017-01-01

    Background: The ventral tegmental area (VTA), containing mesolimbic and mesocortical dopaminergic neurons, is implicated in processes involving reward, addiction, reinforcement, and learning, which are associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Electrical stimulation of the VTA or the medial forebrain bundle and its projection target the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is reported to improve depressive symptoms in patients affected by severe, treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD) and depressive-like symptoms in animal models of depression. Here we sought to determine the neuromodulatory effects of VTA deep brain stimulation (DBS) in a normal large animal model (swine) by combining neurochemical measurements with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Methods: Animals (n = 8 swine) were implanted with a unilateral DBS electrode targeting the VTA. During stimulation (130 Hz frequency, 0.25 ms pulse width, and 3 V amplitude), fMRI was performed. Following fMRI, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in combination with carbon fiber microelectrodes was performed to quantify VTA-DBS-evoked dopamine release in the ipsilateral NAc. In a subset of swine, the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) percent change evoked by stimulation was performed at increasing voltages (1, 2, and 3 V). Results: A significant increase in VTA-DBS-evoked BOLD signal was found in the following regions: the ipsilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate, insula, premotor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and striatum. A decrease in the BOLD signal was also observed in the contralateral parahippocampal cortex, dorsolateral and anterior prefrontal cortex, insula, inferior temporal gyrus, and primary somatosensory cortex (Bonferroni-corrected modulation of the neural circuitry associated with VTA-DBS was characterized in a large animal. Our findings suggest that VTA-DBS could affect the activity of neural systems and brain regions implicated in

  13. Aggregated single-walled carbon nanotubes attenuate the behavioural and neurochemical effects of methamphetamine in mice

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    Xue, Xue; Yang, Jing-Yu; He, Yi; Wang, Li-Rong; Liu, Ping; Yu, Li-Sha; Bi, Guo-Hua; Zhu, Ming-Ming; Liu, Yue-Yang; Xiang, Rong-Wu; Yang, Xiao-Ting; Fan, Xin-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Min; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Hong-Jie; Wei, Tuo; Cui, Wei; Ge, Guang-Lu; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is a serious social and health problem worldwide. At present, there are no effective medications to treat METH addiction. Here, we report that aggregated single-walled carbon nanotubes (aSWNTs) significantly inhibited METH self-administration, METH-induced conditioned place preference and METH- or cue-induced relapse to drug-seeking behaviour in mice. The use of aSWNTs alone did not significantly alter the mesolimbic dopamine system, whereas pretreatment with aSWNTs attenuated METH-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in the ventral striatum. Electrochemical assays suggest that aSWNTs facilitated dopamine oxidation. In addition, aSWNTs attenuated METH-induced increases in tyrosine hydroxylase or synaptic protein expression. These findings suggest that aSWNTs may have therapeutic effects for treatment of METH addiction by oxidation of METH-enhanced extracellular dopamine in the striatum.

  14. Theta waves in children's waking electroencephalogram resemble local aspects of sleep during wakefulness.

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    Fattinger, Sara; Kurth, Salome; Ringli, Maya; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto

    2017-09-11

    Vyazovskiy and colleagues found in rats' multi-unit recordings brief periods of silence (off-states) in local populations of cortical neurons during wakefulness which closely resembled the characteristic off-states during sleep. These off-states became more global and frequent with increasing sleep pressure and were associated with the well-known increase of theta activity under sleep deprivation in the surface EEG. Moreover, the occurrence of such off-states was related to impaired performance. While these animal experiments were based on intracranial recordings, we aimed to explore whether the human surface EEG may also provide evidence for such a local sleep-like intrusion during wakefulness. Thus, we analysed high-density wake EEG recordings during an auditory attention task in the morning and evening in 12 children. We found that, theta waves became more widespread in the evening and the occurrence of widespread theta waves was associated with slower reaction times in the attention task. These results indicate that widespread theta events measured on the scalp might be markers of local sleep in humans. Moreover, such markers of local sleep, seem to be related to the well described performance decline under high sleep pressure.

  15. Does the calcification of adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma resemble the calcium deposition of osteogenesis/odontogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song-Tao, Qi; Xiao-Rong, Yan; Jun, Pan; Yong-Jian, Deng; Jin, Liang; Guang-Long, Huang; Yun-Tao, Lu; Jian, Ruan; Xiang-Zhao, Li; Jia-Ming, Xu

    2014-02-01

    Calcification in adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma (ACP) is troublesome for surgical intervention. The aim of this study was to examine the osteogenic proteins that play important roles in the calcium deposition of the odontogenic/osteogenic tissues in craniopharyngioma. Craniopharyngiomas (n = 89) were investigated for the presence and expression pattern of the osteoinductive/odontoinductive factor bone morphogenetic protein-2 (Bmp2) and two osteoblastic differentiation makers, Runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2) and Osterix, using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Our results showed that Bmp2, Runx2 and Osterix levels increased in cases with high calcification and correlated positively with the degree of calcification in ACP, whereas they showed little or no expression in squamous papillary craniopharyngioma. In ACP, Bmp2 was expressed primarily in the stellate reticulum and whorl-like array cells; Runx2 and Osterix tended to be expressed in calcification-related epithelia, including whorl-like array cells and epithelia in/around wet keratin and calcification lesions. Our study indicated, for the first time, that osteogenic factor Bmp2 may play an important role in the calcification of ACP via autocrine or paracrine mechanisms. Given the presence of osteogenic markers (Runx2 and Osterix), craniopharyngioma cells could differentiate into an osteoblast-like lineage, and the process of craniopharyngioma calcification resembles that which occurs in osteogenesis/odontogenesis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Pulmonary Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in a Patient with Chronic Asthma Resembling Lung Cancer: A Case Report

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    Massood Hosseinzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Extramedullary hematopoiesis is most often seen in reticuloendothelial organs specially spleen, liver, or lymph nodes, and it is rarely seen in lung parenchyma. Almost all reported cases of pulmonary extramedullary hematopoiesis occurred following myeloproliferative disorders specially myelofibrosis. Other less common underlying causes are thalassemia syndromes and other hemoglobinopathies. There was not any reported case of pulmonary extramedullary hematopoiesis in asthmatic patients in the medical literature. Case. Here we reported a 65-year-old lady who was a known case of bronchial asthma with recent developed right lower lobe lung mass. Chest X-ray and CT studies showed an infiltrating mass resembling malignancy. Fine needle aspiration cytology of mass revealed pulmonary extramedullary hematopoiesis. The patient followed for 10 months with serial physical examination and laboratory evaluations which were unremarkable. Conclusion. Extramedullary hematopoiesis of lung parenchyma can be mistaken for lung cancer radiologically. Although previous reported cases occurred with myelofibrosis or hemoglobinopathies, we are reporting the first case of asthma-associated extramedullary hematopoiesis.

  17. On Learning Natural-Science Categories That Violate the Family-Resemblance Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosofsky, Robert M; Sanders, Craig A; Gerdom, Alex; Douglas, Bruce J; McDaniel, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    The general view in psychological science is that natural categories obey a coherent, family-resemblance principle. In this investigation, we documented an example of an important exception to this principle: Results of a multidimensional-scaling study of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks (Experiment 1) suggested that the structure of these categories is disorganized and dispersed. This finding motivated us to explore what might be the optimal procedures for teaching dispersed categories, a goal that is likely critical to science education in general. Subjects in Experiment 2 learned to classify pictures of rocks into compact or dispersed high-level categories. One group learned the categories through focused high-level training, whereas a second group was required to simultaneously learn classifications at a subtype level. Although high-level training led to enhanced performance when the categories were compact, subtype training was better when the categories were dispersed. We provide an interpretation of the results in terms of an exemplar-memory model of category learning.

  18. Transformation of Face Transplants: Volumetric and Morphologic Graft Changes Resemble Aging After Facial Allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueckelhaus, M; Turk, M; Kumamaru, K K; Wo, L; Bueno, E M; Lian, C G; Alhefzi, M; Aycart, M A; Fischer, S; De Girolami, U; Murphy, G F; Rybicki, F J; Pomahac, B

    2016-03-01

    Facial allotransplantation restores normal anatomy to severely disfigured faces. Although >30 such operations performed worldwide have yielded promising short-term results, data on long-term outcomes remain scarce. Three full-face transplant recipients were followed for 40 months. Severe changes in volume and composition of the facial allografts were noted. Data from computed tomography performed 6, 18 and 36 months after transplantation were processed to separate allograft from recipient tissues and further into bone, fat and nonfat soft tissues. Skin and muscle biopsies underwent diagnostic evaluation. All three facial allografts sustained significant volume loss (mean 19.55%) between 6 and 36 months after transplant. Bone and nonfat soft tissue volumes decreased significantly over time (17.22% between months 6 and 18 and 25.56% between months 6 and 36, respectively), whereas fat did not. Histological evaluations showed atrophy of muscle fibers. Volumetric and morphometric changes in facial allografts have not been reported previously. The transformation of facial allografts in this study resembled aging through volume loss but differed substantially from regular aging. These findings have implications for risk-benefit assessment, donor selection and measures counteracting muscle and bone atrophy. Superior long-term outcomes of facial allotransplantation will be crucial to advance toward future clinical routine. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  19. Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruszewicz, Antoni; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Wojnowski, Waldemar; Czerniejewska, Hanna; Jackowska, Joanna; Jarmuż, Małgorzata; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 6 Final Diagnosis: Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Otolaryngology Objective: Congenital defects Background: Communication process disorders are very frequent in rare cases of chromosomal aberrations (deletions, insertions, and trisomies) such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21), Turner syndrome, Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18), or Patau syndrome (trisomy 13). Sometimes phenotype may delusively correspond to the characteristic features of a given syndrome, but genotype tests do not confirm its presence. Case Report: We present the case of a 6-year-old girl admitted to the Clinic of Phoniatrics and Audiology for the assessment of communication in the course of congenital malformations with phenotype characteristic for trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome). Immediately upon birth, dysmorphic changes suggesting trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) were observed, but trisomy 18 was excluded after karyotype test results were normal (46, XX). Conclusions: Disturbed articulation was diagnosed: deformed linguo-dental and palatal sounds, interdental realization with flat tongue of the /s/, /z/, /c/, /dz/, /ś/, /ź/, /ć/, /dz/ sounds (sigmatismus interdentalis). Hearing loss was confirmed. PMID:24478819

  20. Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruszewicz, Antoni; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Wojnowski, Waldemar; Czerniejewska, Hanna; Jackowska, Joanna; Jarmuż, Małgorzata; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Female, 6 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) Symptoms: - - Clinical Procedure: - Specialty: Otolaryngology. Congenital defects. Communication process disorders are very frequent in rare cases of chromosomal aberrations (deletions, insertions, and trisomies) such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21), Turner syndrome, Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18), or Patau syndrome (trisomy 13). Sometimes phenotype may delusively correspond to the characteristic features of a given syndrome, but genotype tests do not confirm its presence. We present the case of a 6-year-old girl admitted to the Clinic of Phoniatrics and Audiology for the assessment of communication in the course of congenital malformations with phenotype characteristic for trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome). Immediately upon birth, dysmorphic changes suggesting trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) were observed, but trisomy 18 was excluded after karyotype test results were normal (46, XX). DISTURBED ARTICULATION WAS DIAGNOSED: deformed linguo-dental and palatal sounds, interdental realization with flat tongue of the /s/, /z/, /c/, /dz/, /ś/, /ź/, /ć/, /dz/ sounds (sigmatismus interdentalis). Hearing loss was confirmed.

  1. Microphthalmia, corneal dermoids, and congenital anomalies resembling Goldenhar syndrome in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowski, William; Langohr, Ingeborg; Pease, Anthony; Bartoe, Joshua

    2018-02-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION An 18-month-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat was evaluated because of conjunctivitis and skin-fold dermatitis secondary to bilateral microphthalmia, corneal dermoids, and ankyloblepharon. CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination revealed bilateral microphthalmia, bilaterally symmetrical corneal dermoids, ankyloblepharon, superior and inferior entropion, prognathism, and facial asymmetry with deviation of the nasal septum. Computed tomography revealed malformed, thickened bony orbits with mineralization of the orbital ligament bilaterally. Moderate rightward deviation of the nasal septum and ventral nasal meatus was also evident, with no identifiable maxillary sinuses. Results of MRI of the brain were unremarkable. Abdominal ultrasonography showed an irregularly marginated left kidney and a right kidney defect suggestive of chronic renal infarction. An abnormal, well-demarcated, focally thickened region of the muscularis externa of the jejunum was also evident. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Transpalpebral enucleation was performed bilaterally. Histologic examination of ocular tissues confirmed the corneal dermoids and microphthalmia with anterior and posterior segment dysgenesis and cataracts in both eyes. Ocular discomfort resolved after postoperative recovery, and follow-up revealed that the patient's activity level and quality of life were excellent. No clinical signs of upper respiratory, urinary, or gastrointestinal tract disease were observed during the approximately 3.5-year follow-up period. CLINICAL RELEVANCE The congenital abnormalities observed resembled those described for human patients with Goldenhar syndrome, and the outcome of treatment was favorable. This report may prompt clinicians to consider this diagnosis when evaluating young cats with similar clinical signs.

  2. Ad-hoc KEEN-type Waves and their Occasional Resemblance to KdV Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyshetskiy, Yuriy; Afeyan, Bedros

    2005-10-01

    Nonlinear kinetic waves of the KEEN type [1] but constructed with two BGK recipes are tested with 1D Vlasov-Poisson simulation (1DVPS). One is that of Allis [2] as modified by Johnston (unpublished), the other is that of Eliasson and Shukla [3]. Strong kinetic waves survive well, but not weaker ones. The potential wave trains resemble those from the Korteweg-deVries equation. This proves to be natural when charge density variation with electrostatic potential is like a quadratic polynomial. For expositions on the physics of ponderomotively driven KEEN waves, consult presentations by Afeyan and Savchenko, this conference. (Part of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG03-NA00059.) [1] B. Afeyan et al., ``Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Nonlinear (KEEN) Waves and their interactions driven by the ponderomotive force of crossing laser beams'', Proc. IFSA (Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2003, Monterey, CA), 213, B. Hammel, D. Meyerhofer, J. Meyer-ter-Vehn and H. Azechi, editors, American Nuclear Society, 2004. [2] W.P. Allis, paper 3 (pp.21-42), in ``In Honor of Philip M. Morse'', ed. H. Feshbach and K. Ingard, MIT Press (1969). [3] B. Eliasson and P.K. Shukla, Phys. Rev. E 71, 046402 (2005)

  3. The Consequences of Preterm Birth and Chorioamnionitis on Brainstem Respiratory Centers: Implications for Neurochemical Development and Altered Functions by Inflammation and Prostaglandins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovska, Vanesa; Miller, Suzanne L; Hooper, Stuart B; Polglase, Graeme R

    2018-01-01

    Preterm birth is a major cause for neonatal morbidity and mortality, and is frequently associated with adverse neurological outcomes. The transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life at birth is particularly challenging for preterm infants. The main physiological driver for extrauterine transition is the establishment of spontaneous breathing. However, preterm infants have difficulty clearing lung liquid, have insufficient surfactant levels, and underdeveloped lungs. Further, preterm infants have an underdeveloped brainstem, resulting in reduced respiratory drive. These factors facilitate the increased requirement for respiratory support. A principal cause of preterm birth is intrauterine infection/inflammation (chorioamnionitis), and infants with chorioamnionitis have an increased risk and severity of neurological damage, but also demonstrate impaired autoresuscitation capacity and prevalent apnoeic episodes. The brainstem contains vital respiratory centers which provide the neural drive for breathing, but the impact of preterm birth and/or chorioamnionitis on this brain region is not well understood. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the role and function of the brainstem respiratory centers, and to highlight the proposed mechanisms of how preterm birth and chorioamnionitis may affect central respiratory functions.

  4. Alterations of neurochemical expression of the coeliac-superior mesenteric ganglion complex (CSMG) neurons supplying the prepyloric region of the porcine stomach following partial stomach resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palus, Katarzyna; Całka, Jarosław

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the response of the porcine coeliac-superior mesenteric ganglion complex (CSMG) neurons projecting to the prepyloric area of the porcine stomach to peripheral neuronal damage following partial stomach resection. To identify the sympathetic neurons innervating the studied area of stomach, the neuronal retrograde tracer Fast Blue (FB) was applied to control and partial stomach resection (RES) groups. On the 22nd day after FB injection, following laparotomy, the partial resection of the previously FB-injected stomach prepyloric area was performed in animals of RES group. On the 28th day, all animals were re-anaesthetized and euthanized. The CSMG complex was then collected and processed for double-labeling immunofluorescence. In control animals, retrograde-labelled perikarya were immunoreactive to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and galanin (GAL). Partial stomach resection decreased the numbers of FB-positive neurons immunopositive for TH and DβH. However, the strong increase of NPY and GAL expression, as well as de novo-synthesis of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and leu5-Enkephalin (LENK) was noted in studied neurons. Furthermore, FB-positive neurons in all pigs were surrounded by a network of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CART)-, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-, and substance P (SP)-, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-, LENK- and nNOS- immunoreactive nerve fibers. This may suggest neuroprotective contribution of these neurotransmitters in traumatic responses of sympathetic neurons to peripheral axonal damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bisphenol A Causes Liver Damage and Selectively Alters the Neurochemical Coding of Intrahepatic Parasympathetic Nerves in Juvenile Porcine Models under Physiological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Thoene

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is an extremely common polymer that is used in typical everyday products throughout the world, especially in food and beverage containers. Within the last ten years, it has been found that the BPA monomer tends to leach into foodstuffs, and nanogram concentrations of it may cause a variety of deleterious health effects. These health problems are very evident in developing children and in young adults. The aim of this study was to expose developing pigs to dietary BPA at both legally acceptable and ten-fold higher levels. Livers that had been exposed to BPA showed vacuolar degeneration, sinusoidal dilatation, vascular congestion and glycogen depletion that increased with exposure levels. Furthermore, the livers of these models were then examined for irregularities and double-labeled immunofluorescence was used to check the innervated hepatic samples for varying neuronal expression of selected neuronal markers in the parasympathetic nervous system (PSNS. It was found that both the PSNS and all of the neuronal markers showed increased expression, with some of them being significant even at recommended safe exposure levels. The implications are quite serious since these effects have been observed at recommended safe levels with expression increasing in-line with exposure levels. The increased neuronal markers studied here have been previously correlated with behavioral/psychological disorders of children and young adults, as well as with childhood obesity and diabetes. However, further research must be performed in order to develop a mechanism for the above-mentioned correlations.

  6. Family resemblance in beliefs, attitudes and intentions towards consumption of 20 foods; a study among three generations of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafleu, A; Van Staveren, W A; De Graaf, C; Burema, J; Hautvast, J G

    1995-12-01

    Family resemblance in beliefs, attitudes and intentions towards the consumption of 20 foods that contribute to the fat intake was investigated in 97 adult women, their mothers and their grandmothers. Mean correlation for elements from the Fishbein and Ajzen theory of reasoned action between younger and middle generations ranged from 0.09 to 0.17 and between middle and older generations from 0.12 to 0.17. All significant correlations were positive. More statistically significant correlations were found for liking attitudes between the younger and middle generations (p good/bad attitude on intention it appeared that liking contributed the most to the variance in intention scores. Health related beliefs and attitudes became of increasing importance in the older generations. From this study it can be concluded that mothers and their adult daughters resemble each other in beliefs, food preferences, attitudes and intentions, although resemblance is poor.

  7. Chronic neurochemical and behavioral changes in MPTP-lesioned C57BL/6 mice: a model for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, E; Fredriksson, A; Archer, T

    1990-10-01

    The long-term effect of the parkinsonism inducing neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) on pre- and postsynaptic structures of the nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system in adult C57BL/6 mice (2 x 40 mg/kg s.c.) was investigated using neurochemical and behavioral methods. It was found that MPTP induced a severe depletion of striatal DA levels (-80%) that persists for 4 weeks after treatment, with less severe effects in nucleus accumbens (-36%) and the olfactory tubercle (-52%). These depletions are associated with decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity as determined in vivo and increased turnover of DA. MPTP treatment did not induce any change in the DA2-receptor as determined by [3H]spiperone binding or by two different behavioral tests, i.e. apomorphine-induced climbing and apomorphine-induced stereotypies. No significant weight loss during 4 weeks after MPTP was found. The spontaneous motor activity in these mice was profoundly and persistently depressed (-66%) as a result of the MPTP-induced DA denervation and the motor deficit was completely reversed by L-DOPA treatment. We suggest that MPTP-treated C57BL/6 mice may serve as a suitable model for Parkinson's disease.

  8. Theophylline, adenosine receptor antagonist prevents behavioral, biochemical and neurochemical changes associated with an animal model of tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Mahendra; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Kulkarni, Shrinivas K

    2007-01-01

    Tardive dyskinesia is considered to be the late onset adverse effect of prolonged administration of typical neuroleptic drugs. Adenosine is now widely accepted as the major inhibitory neuromodulators in the central nervous system besides GABA. Antagonists of A2A receptors are known to confer protection against neuronal damage caused by toxins and reactive oxygen species. The present study investigated the effect of adenosine receptor antagonist, theophylline (25 and 50 mg/kg, ip) in an animal model of tardive dyskinesia by using different behavioral (orofacial dyskinetic movements, stereotypy, locomotor activity, % retention), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione levels, antioxidant enzyme levels (SOD and catalase)) and neurochemical (neurotransmitter levels) parameters. Chronic administration of haloperidol (1 mg/kg ip for 21 days) significantly increased vacuous chewing movements (VCMs), tongue protrusions, facial jerking in rats which was dose-dependently inhibited by theophylline. Chronic administration of haloperidol also resulted in the increased dopamine receptor sensitivity as evidenced by increased locomotor activity and stereotypic rearing. Further, it also decreased % retention time in elevated plus maze paradigm. Pretreatment with theophylline reversed these behavioral changes. Chronic administration of haloperidol also induced oxidative damage in all the brain regions which was prevented by theophylline, especially in the striatum. Chronic administration of haloperidol resulted in a decrease in dopamine levels which was reversed by treatment with theophylline (at higher doses). The findings of the present study suggested the involvement of adenosinergic receptor system in the development of tardive dyskinesia and possible therapeutic potential of theophylline in this disorder.

  9. In vivo magnetic resonance studies reveal neuroanatomical and neurochemical abnormalities in the serine racemase knockout mouse model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Matthew D; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Jensen, J Eric; Gillis, Timothy E; Konopaske, Glenn T; Kaufman, Marc J; Coyle, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    Decreased availability of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) co-agonist D-serine is thought to promote NMDAR hypofunction and contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, including neuroanatomical abnormalities, such as cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement, and neurochemical abnormalities, such as aberrant glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling. It is thought that these abnormalities directly relate to the negative symptoms and cognitive impairments that are hallmarks of the disorder. Because of the genetic complexity of schizophrenia, animal models of the disorder are extremely valuable for the study of genetically predisposing factors. Our laboratory developed a transgenic mouse model lacking serine racemase (SR), the synthetic enzyme of d-serine, polymorphisms of which are associated with schizophrenia. Null mutants (SR-/-) exhibit NMDAR hypofunction and cognitive impairments. We used 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton spectroscopy (MRS) to compare in vivo brain structure and neurochemistry in wildtype (WT) and SR-/- mice. Mice were anesthetized with isoflurane for MRI and MRS scans. Compared to WT controls, SR-/- mice exhibited 23% larger ventricular volumes (pcomparable to those previously reported in humans with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional and neurochemical interactions within the amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex circuit and their relevance to emotional processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delli Pizzi, Stefano; Chiacchiaretta, Piero; Mantini, Dante; Bubbico, Giovanna; Ferretti, Antonio; Edden, Richard A; Di Giulio, Camillo; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura

    2017-04-01

    The amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) circuit plays a key role in emotional processing. GABA-ergic inhibition within the mPFC has been suggested to play a role in the shaping of amygdala activity. However, the functional and neurochemical interactions within the amygdala-mPFC circuits and their relevance to emotional processing remain unclear. To investigate this circuit, we obtained resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and proton MR spectroscopy in 21 healthy subjects to assess the potential relationship between GABA levels within mPFC and the amygdala-mPFC functional connectivity. Trait anxiety was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y2). Partial correlations were used to measure the relationships among the functional connectivity outcomes, mPFC GABA levels and STAI-Y2 scores. Age, educational level and amount of the gray and white matters within 1 H-MRS volume of interest were included as nuisance variables. The rs-fMRI signals of the amygdala and the vmPFC were significantly anti-correlated. This negative functional coupling between the two regions was inversely correlated with the GABA+/tCr level within the mPFC and the STAI-Y2 scores. We suggest a close relationship between mPFC GABA levels and functional interactions within the amygdala-vmPFC circuit, providing new insights in the physiology of emotion.

  11. Differences in neurochemical profiles of two gadid species under ocean warming and acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Matthias; Windisch, Heidrun Sigrid; Ludwichowski, Kai-Uwe; Seegert, Sean Lando Levin; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Storch, Daniela; Bock, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to future ocean acidification scenarios may alter the behaviour of marine teleosts through interference with neuroreceptor functioning. So far, most studies investigated effects of ocean acidification on the behaviour of fish, either isolated or in combination with environmental temperature. However, only few physiological studies on this issue were conducted despite the putative neurophysiological origin of the CO2-induced behavioural changes. Here, we present the metabolic consequences of long-term exposure to projected ocean acidification (396-548 μatm PCO2 under control and 915-1272 μatm under treatment conditions) and parallel warming in the brain of two related fish species, polar cod (Boreogadus saida, exposed to 0 °C, 3 °C, 6 °C and 8 °C) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, exposed to 3 °C, 8 °C, 12 °C and 16 °C). It has been shown that B. saida is behaviourally vulnerable to future ocean acidification scenarios, while G. morhua demonstrates behavioural resilience. We found that temperature alters brain osmolyte, amino acid, choline and neurotransmitter concentrations in both species indicating thermal responses particularly in osmoregulation and membrane structure. In B. saida, changes in amino acid and osmolyte metabolism at the highest temperature tested were also affected by CO2, possibly emphasizing energetic limitations. We did not observe changes in neurotransmitters, energy metabolites, membrane components or osmolytes that might serve as a compensatory mechanism against CO2 induced behavioural impairments. In contrast to B. saida, such temperature limitation was not detected in G. morhua; however, at 8 °C, CO2 induced an increase in the levels of metabolites of the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle potentially indicating greater GABAergic activity in G.morhua. Further, increased availability of energy-rich substrates was detected under these conditions. Our results indicate a change of GABAergic metabolism in the nervous

  12. Neurochemical correlates of alloxan diabetes: glucose and related brain metabolism in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nayeemunnisa; Zahra, Noor

    2011-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to impair glucose metabolism. The fundamental mechanism underlying hyperglycaemia in diabetes mellitus involves decreased utilization of glucose by the brain. However, mechanisms responsible for progressive failure of glycaemic regulation in type I (IDDM) diabetes need extensive and proper understanding. Hence the present study was initiated. Type I diabetes was induced in albino rat models with alloxan monohydrate (40 mg/Kg iv). Cerebral cortex and medulla oblongata were studied 48 h after alloxanisation. Diabetes caused an elevation in glucose, glutamate, aspartate, GABA and taurine levels and a decline in the glutamine synthetase activity. The activities of brain lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) exhibited significant decrease during diabetes. Ammonia content increased (P cerebral glucose metabolism accounts for the failure of cerebral glucose homeostasis. The impairment in the glycaemic control leads to disturbances in cerebral glutamate content (resulting in calcium overload and excitotoxic injury) and brain energy metabolism as reflected by alterations occurring in adenine nucleotide and the ATPases. The failure in the maintenance of normal energy metabolism during diabetes might affect glucose homeostasis leading to gross cerebral dysfunction during diabetes.

  13. A Japanese girl with an early-infantile onset vanishing white matter disease resembling Cree leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Kyoko; Tsuyusaki, Yu; Sato, Mutsumi; Takagi, Mariko; Anzai, Rie; Okuda, Mitsuko; Iai, Mizue; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Okabe, Tetsuhiko; Aida, Noriko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Osaka, Hitoshi

    2015-06-01

    Vanishing white matter disease (VWM)/childhood ataxia with central hypomyelination (CACH) is an autosomal recessive leukoencephalopathy caused by mutations in one of five genes, EIF2B1-5, encoding the 5 subunits of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B). The classical phenotype is characterized by early childhood onset and chronic progressive neurological deterioration with cerebellar ataxia, spasticity, optic atrophy and epilepsy. However, the onset of disease varies from antenatal period to adulthood. Cree leukoencephalopathy (CLE) is a severe variant of VWM and caused by a homozygous mutation (R195H) in the EIF2B5 gene. The patient reported in this study developed lethargy, vomiting and seizure 3days after an oral poliovirus vaccination at the age of 4months. She presented with rapid neurological deterioration within a month of onset. Brain MRI showed abnormal white matter intensity. Whole-exome sequencing identified two heterozygous mutations in the EIF2B5 gene: a known mutation, c.584G>A (R195H, which is homozygous in CLE), and a novel mutation, c.1223T>C (I408T, which resides in the "I-patch"). Mutations in the "I-patch" encoded region of eIF2Bε may be related to an early-infantile onset phenotype. This patient exhibits an early-infantile onset and progressive disease course resembling CLE, suggesting a severe functional disruption of eIF2Bε caused by R195H as well as by I408T mutations. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transient treatment with epigenetic modifiers yields stable neuroblastoma stem cells resembling aggressive large-cell neuroblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegaki, Naohiko; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Fox, Autumn M; Regan, Paul L; Jacobs, Joshua R; Hicks, Sakeenah L; Rappaport, Eric F; Tang, Xao X

    2013-04-09

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are plastic in nature, a characteristic that hampers cancer therapeutics. Neuroblastoma (NB) is a pediatric tumor of neural crest origin, and half of the cases are highly aggressive. By treating NB cell lines [SKNAS, SKNBE(2)C, CHP134, and SY5Y] with epigenetic modifiers for a short time, followed by sphere-forming culture conditions, we have established stem cell-like NB cells that are phenotypically stable for more than a year. These cells are characterized by their high expression of stemness factors, stem cell markers, and open chromatin structure. We referred to these cells as induced CSCs (iCSCs). SKNAS iCSC and SKNBE(2)C iCSC clones (as few as 100 cells) injected s.c. into SCID/Beige mice formed tumors, and in one case, SKNBE(2)C iCSCs metastasized to the adrenal gland, suggesting their increased metastatic potential. SKNAS iCSC xenografts showed the histologic appearance of totally undifferentiated large-cell NBs (LCNs), the most aggressive and deadly form of NB in humans. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that SKNAS iCSC xenografts expressed high levels of the stem cell marker CXCR4, whereas the SKNAS monolayer cell xenografts did not. The patterns of CXCR4 and MYC expression in SKNAS iCSC xenografts resembled those in the LCNs. The xenografts established from the NB iCSCs shared two common features: the LCN phenotype and high-level MYC/MYCN expression. These observations suggest both that NB cells with large and vesicular nuclei, representing their open chromatin structure, are indicative of stem cell-like tumor cells and that epigenetic changes may have contributed to the development of these most malignant NB cells.

  15. Oxytocin release in magnocellular nuclei: neurochemical mediators and functional significance during gestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, William E.; Crowley, William R.

    2010-01-01

    When released from dendrites within the supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei (intranuclear release) during suckling, oxytocin exerts autocrine and paracrine effects on oxytocin neurons that are necessary for the unique timing and episodic pattern of oxytocin release into the systemic circulation that is characteristic of lactation. Recent reports have shown that stimulation of central noradrenergic and histaminergic receptors are both necessary for intranuclear release of oxytocin in response to suckling. In addition, in vitro studies indicate that excitatory amino acids may also be critical for central oxytocin secretion, although in vivo experiments have not provided direct support for this hypothesis. In addition to a critical role in intranuclear oxytocin release during lactation, norepinephrine has also been shown to stimulate central oxytocin during gestation. Stimulation of central oxytocin receptors during gestation appears critical for normal systemic oxytocin secretion in responses to suckling during the subsequent period of lactation. Oxytocin receptor blockade during pregnancy alters normal timing of systemic oxytocin release during suckling and reduces milk delivery. Several adaptations occur in the central oxytocin system that are necessary for determining the unique response characteristic observed during parturition and gestation. Central oxytocin receptor stimulation during gestation has been implicated in pregnancy-related morphological changes in magnocellular oxytocin neurons, disinhibition of oxytocin neurons to GABA, and adaptations in membrane response characteristics of oxytocin neurons. In conclusion, intranuclear oxytocin release during gestation and lactation are critical for establishing, and then evoking the unique pattern of systemic oxytocin secretion in response to the suckling offspring necessary for adequate milk delivery. Furthermore, activation of central noradrenergic receptors appears to be critical for release of

  16. Household and familial resemblance in risk factors for type 2 diabetes and related cardiometabolic diseases in rural Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannie; Bahendeka, Silver K.; Whyte, Susan R.

    2017-01-01

    (ICC=0.24), HbA1c (ICC=0.18) and systolic blood pressure (ICC=0.11). Regarding dyadic resemblance, the highest standardised regression coefficient was seen in fitness status for spouses (0.54, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.76), parent–offspring (0.41, 95% CI 0.28 0.54) and siblings (0.41, 95% CI 0.25 to 0......-western Uganda. Resemblance in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), anthropometry, blood pressure, fitness status and sitting time were analysed using a general mixed model with random effects (by household or dyad) to calculate household intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and dyadic regression coefficients.......57). Overall, parent–offspring and sibling pairs were the dyads with strongest resemblance, followed by spouses. Conclusions The marked degree of resemblance in T2D risk factors at household level and between spouses, parent–offspring and sibling dyads suggest that shared behavioural and environmental factors...

  17. Age and Gender Differences in Facial Attractiveness, but Not Emotion Resemblance, Contribute to Age and Gender Stereotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Rocco; Adams, Reginald B; Hess, Ursula; Kleck, Robert E; Zebrowitz, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    Considerable research has shown effects of facial appearance on trait impressions and group stereotypes. We extended those findings in two studies that investigated the contribution of resemblance to emotion expressions and attractiveness to younger adults (YA) and older adults (OA) age and gender stereotypes on the dimensions of warmth and competence. Using connectionist modeling of facial metrics of 240 neutral younger and older faces, Study 1 found that, neutral expression older faces or female faces showed greater structural resemblance to happy expressions and less resemblance to angry expressions than did younger or male faces, respectively. In addition, neutral female faces showed greater resemblance to surprise expressions. In Study 2, YA and OA rated the faces of Study 1 for attractiveness and for 4 traits that we aggregated on the dimensions of competence (competent, healthy) and warmth (trustworthy, not shrewd). We found that YA, but not OA, age stereotypes replicated previous research showing higher perceived warmth and lower perceived competence in older adults. In addition, previously documented gender stereotypes were moderated by face age for both YA and OA. The greater attractiveness of younger than older faces and female than male faces influenced age and gender stereotypes, including these deviations from prior research findings using category labels rather than faces. On the other hand, face age and face sex differences in emotion resemblance did not influence age or gender stereotypes, contrary to prediction. Our results provide a caveat to conclusions about age and gender stereotypes derived from responses to category labels, and they reveal the importance of assessing stereotypes with a methodology that is sensitive to influences of group differences in appearance that can exacerbate or mitigate stereotypes in more ecologically valid contexts. Although the gender differences in attractiveness in the present study may not have generalizability

  18. Age and Gender Differences in Facial Attractiveness, but Not Emotion Resemblance, Contribute to Age and Gender Stereotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocco Palumbo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Considerable research has shown effects of facial appearance on trait impressions and group stereotypes. We extended those findings in two studies that investigated the contribution of resemblance to emotion expressions and attractiveness to younger adults (YA and older adults (OA age and gender stereotypes on the dimensions of warmth and competence. Using connectionist modeling of facial metrics of 240 neutral younger and older faces, Study 1 found that, neutral expression older faces or female faces showed greater structural resemblance to happy expressions and less resemblance to angry expressions than did younger or male faces, respectively. In addition, neutral female faces showed greater resemblance to surprise expressions. In Study 2, YA and OA rated the faces of Study 1 for attractiveness and for 4 traits that we aggregated on the dimensions of competence (competent, healthy and warmth (trustworthy, not shrewd. We found that YA, but not OA, age stereotypes replicated previous research showing higher perceived warmth and lower perceived competence in older adults. In addition, previously documented gender stereotypes were moderated by face age for both YA and OA. The greater attractiveness of younger than older faces and female than male faces influenced age and gender stereotypes, including these deviations from prior research findings using category labels rather than faces. On the other hand, face age and face sex differences in emotion resemblance did not influence age or gender stereotypes, contrary to prediction. Our results provide a caveat to conclusions about age and gender stereotypes derived from responses to category labels, and they reveal the importance of assessing stereotypes with a methodology that is sensitive to influences of group differences in appearance that can exacerbate or mitigate stereotypes in more ecologically valid contexts. Although the gender differences in attractiveness in the present study may not have

  19. Age and Gender Differences in Facial Attractiveness, but Not Emotion Resemblance, Contribute to Age and Gender Stereotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Rocco; Adams, Reginald B.; Hess, Ursula; Kleck, Robert E.; Zebrowitz, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    Considerable research has shown effects of facial appearance on trait impressions and group stereotypes. We extended those findings in two studies that investigated the contribution of resemblance to emotion expressions and attractiveness to younger adults (YA) and older adults (OA) age and gender stereotypes on the dimensions of warmth and competence. Using connectionist modeling of facial metrics of 240 neutral younger and older faces, Study 1 found that, neutral expression older faces or female faces showed greater structural resemblance to happy expressions and less resemblance to angry expressions than did younger or male faces, respectively. In addition, neutral female faces showed greater resemblance to surprise expressions. In Study 2, YA and OA rated the faces of Study 1 for attractiveness and for 4 traits that we aggregated on the dimensions of competence (competent, healthy) and warmth (trustworthy, not shrewd). We found that YA, but not OA, age stereotypes replicated previous research showing higher perceived warmth and lower perceived competence in older adults. In addition, previously documented gender stereotypes were moderated by face age for both YA and OA. The greater attractiveness of younger than older faces and female than male faces influenced age and gender stereotypes, including these deviations from prior research findings using category labels rather than faces. On the other hand, face age and face sex differences in emotion resemblance did not influence age or gender stereotypes, contrary to prediction. Our results provide a caveat to conclusions about age and gender stereotypes derived from responses to category labels, and they reveal the importance of assessing stereotypes with a methodology that is sensitive to influences of group differences in appearance that can exacerbate or mitigate stereotypes in more ecologically valid contexts. Although the gender differences in attractiveness in the present study may not have generalizability

  20. Behavioral and neurochemical effects of chronic L-DOPA treatment on nonmotor sequelae in the hemiparkinsonian rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskow Jaunarajs, Karen L; Dupre, Kristin B; Ostock, Corinne Y; Button, Thomas; Deak, Terrence; Bishop, Christopher

    2010-10-01

    Depression and anxiety are the prevalent nonmotor symptoms that worsen quality of life for Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Although dopamine (DA) cell loss is a commonly proposed mechanism, the reported efficacy of DA replacement therapy with L-DOPA on affective symptoms is inconsistent. To delineate the effects of DA denervation and chronic L-DOPA treatment on affective behaviors, male Sprague-Dawley rats received unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine or sham lesions and were treated daily with L-DOPA (12 mg/kg+benserazide, 15 mg/kg, subcutaneously) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl, 0.1% ascorbic acid) for 28 days before commencing investigations into anxiety (locomotor chambers, social interaction) and depression-like behaviors (forced swim test) during the OFF phase of L-DOPA. One hour after the final treatments, rats were killed and striatum, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala were analyzed through high-performance liquid chromatography for monoamine levels. In locomotor chambers and social interaction, DA lesions exerted mild anxiogenic effects. Surprisingly, chronic L-DOPA treatment did not improve these effects. Although DA lesion reduced climbing behaviors on day 2 of exposure to the forced swim test, chronic L-DOPA treatment did not reverse these effects. Neurochemically, L-DOPA treatment in hemiparkinsonian rats reduced norepinephrine levels in the prefrontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampus. Collectively, these data suggest that chronic L-DOPA therapy in severely DA-lesioned rats does not improve nonmotor symptoms and may impair nondopaminergic processes, indicating that long-term L-DOPA therapy does not exert necessary neuroplastic changes for improving affect.

  1. Microfluidic Platform with In-Chip Electrophoresis Coupled to Mass Spectrometry for Monitoring Neurochemical Release from Nerve Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangtang; Hu, Hankun; Zhao, Shulin; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2016-05-17

    Chemical stimulus-induced neurotransmitter release from neuronal cells is well-documented. However, the dynamic changes in neurochemical release remain to be fully explored. In this work, a three-layered microfluidic chip was fabricated and evaluated for studying the dynamics of neurotransmitter release from PC-12 cells. The chip features integration of a nanoliter sized chamber for cell perfusion, pneumatic pressure valves for fluidic control, a microfluidic channel for electrophoretic separation, and a nanoelectrospray emitter for ionization in MS detection. Deploying this platform, a microchip electrophoresis-mass spectrometric method (MCE-MS) was developed to simultaneously quantify important neurotransmitters, including dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), aspartic acid (Asp), and glutamic acid (Glu) without need for labeling or enrichment. Monitoring neurotransmitter release from PC-12 cells exposed to KCl (or alcohol) revealed that all four neurotransmitters investigated were released. Two release patterns were observed, one for the two monoamine neurotransmitters (i.e., DA and 5-HT) and another for the two amino acid neurotransmitters. Release dynamics for the two monoamine neurotransmitters was significantly different. The cells released DA most quickly and heavily in response to the stimulation. After exposure to the chemical stimulus for 4 min, the DA level in the perfusate from the cells was 86% lower than that at the beginning. Very interestingly, the cells started to release 5-HT in large quantities when they stopped releasing DA. These results suggest that DA and 5-HT are packaged into different vesicle pools and they are mobilized differently in response to chemical stimuli. The microfluidic platform proposed is proven useful for monitoring cellular release in biological studies.

  2. The DYX2 locus and neurochemical signaling genes contribute to speech sound disorder and related neurocognitive domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, J D; Stein, C M; Deng, F; Ciesla, A A; Powers, N R; Boada, R; Smith, S D; Pennington, B F; Iyengar, S K; Lewis, B A; Gruen, J R

    2015-04-01

    A major milestone of child development is the acquisition and use of speech and language. Communication disorders, including speech sound disorder (SSD), can impair a child's academic, social and behavioral development. Speech sound disorder is a complex, polygenic trait with a substantial genetic component. However, specific genes that contribute to SSD remain largely unknown. To identify associated genes, we assessed the association of the DYX2 dyslexia risk locus and markers in neurochemical signaling genes (e.g., nicotinic and dopaminergic) with SSD and related endophenotypes. We first performed separate primary associations in two independent samples - Cleveland SSD (210 affected and 257 unaffected individuals in 127 families) and Denver SSD (113 affected individuals and 106 unaffected individuals in 85 families) - and then combined results by meta-analysis. DYX2 markers, specifically those in the 3' untranslated region of DCDC2 (P = 1.43 × 10(-4) ), showed the strongest associations with phonological awareness. We also observed suggestive associations of dopaminergic-related genes ANKK1 (P = 1.02 × 10(-2) ) and DRD2 (P = 9.22 × 10(-3) ) and nicotinic-related genes CHRNA3 (P = 2.51 × 10(-3) ) and BDNF (P = 8.14 × 10(-3) ) with case-control status and articulation. Our results further implicate variation in putative regulatory regions in the DYX2 locus, particularly in DCDC2, influencing language and cognitive traits. The results also support previous studies implicating variation in dopaminergic and nicotinic neural signaling influencing human communication and cognitive development. Our findings expand the literature showing genetic factors (e.g., DYX2) contributing to multiple related, yet distinct neurocognitive domains (e.g., dyslexia, language impairment, and SSD). How these factors interactively yield different neurocognitive and language-related outcomes remains to be elucidated. © 2015 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior published by

  3. An allosteric enhancer of M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function inhibits behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dencker, Ditte; Weikop, Pia; Sørensen, Gunnar; Woldbye, David P. D.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Wess, Jürgen; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The mesostriatal dopamine system plays a key role in mediating the reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. The muscarinic M4 acetylcholine receptor subtype is centrally involved in regulation of dopamine release in striatal areas. Consequently, striatal M4 receptors could be a novel target for modulating psychostimulant effects of cocaine. Objectives For the first time, we here addressed this issue by investigating the effects of a novel selective positive allosteric modulator of M4 receptors, VU0152100, on cocaine-induced behavioral and neurochemical effects in mice. Methods To investigate the effect of VU0152100 on the acute reinforcing effects of cocaine, we use an acute-cocaine self-administration model. We used in vivo microdialysis to investigate whether the effects of VU0152100 in the behavioral studies were mediated via effects on dopaminergic neurotransmission. In addition the effect of VU0152100 on cocaine-induced hyperactivity and rotarod performance was evaluated. Results We found that VU0152100 caused a prominent reduction in cocaine self-administration, cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion, and cocaine-induced striatal dopamine increase, without affecting motor performance. Consistent with these effects of VU0152100 being mediated via M4 receptors, its inhibitory effects on cocaine-induced increases in striatal dopamine were abolished in M4 receptor knockout mice. Furthermore, selective deletion of the M4 receptor gene in dopamine D1 receptor-expressing neurons resulted in a partial reduction of the VU0152100 effect, indicating that VU0152100 partly regulates dopaminergic neurotransmission via M4 receptors co-localized with D1 receptors. Conclusions These results show that positive allosteric modulators of the M4 receptor deserve attention as agents in the future treatment of cocaine abuse. PMID:22648127

  4. Neurochemical and Neuroanatomical Plasticity Following Memory Training and Yoga Interventions in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Yang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral interventions are becoming increasingly popular approaches to ameliorate age-related cognitive decline, but their underlying neurobiological mechanisms and clinical efficiency have not been fully elucidated. The present study explored brain plasticity associated with two behavioral interventions, memory enhancement training (MET and a mind-body practice (yogic meditation, in healthy seniors with mild cognitive impairment (MCI using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS. Senior participants (age ≥ 55 years with MCI were randomized to the MET or yogic meditation interventions. For both interventions, participants completed either MET training or Kundalini yoga for 60-min sessions over 12 weeks, with 12-min daily homework assignments. Gray matter volume and metabolite concentrations in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC and bilateral hippocampus were measured by structural MRI and 1H-MRS at baseline and after 12 weeks of training. Metabolites measured included glutamate-glutamine (Glx, choline-containing compounds (Cho, including glycerophosphocholine and phosphocholine, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, and N-acetyl aspartate and N-acetylaspartyl-glutamate (NAA-NAAG. In total, 11 participants completed MET and 14 completed yogic meditation for this study. Structural MRI analysis showed an interaction between time and group in dACC, indicating a trend towards increased gray matter volume after the MET intervention. 1H-MRS analysis showed an interaction between time and group in choline-containing compounds in bilateral hippocampus, induced by significant decreases after the MET intervention. Though preliminary, our results suggest that memory training induces structural and neurochemical plasticity in seniors with mild cognitive impairment. Further research is needed to determine whether mind-body interventions like yoga yield similar neuroplastic changes.

  5. A Taxonomic Study on the Burrowing Cricket Genus Velarifictorus with Morphologically Resembled Genus Lepidogryllus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae: Gryllinae in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Woo Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The burrowing-cricket genus Velarifictorus Randell, 1964 is reviewed in Korea, comparing with morphologically resembled genus Lepidogryllus Otte and Alexander, 1983 for the first time. First, Velarifictorus aspersus borealis Gorochov, 1985 is confirmed from only restricted area of southern regions in Gyeongsangnam- do and Jeollanam-do. Second, Velarifictorus micado (Saussure, 1877 is confirmed from nearly all around the Korean peninsula including North Korea. Third, the previously not recorded Velarifictorus ornatus (Shiraki, 1911 is newly recognized from South Korea. Relating to the genus Velarifictorus, the resembled genus Lepidogryllus Otte and Alexander, 1983 and its species Lepidogryllus siamensis (Chopard, 1961 com. & stat. nov. is studied and compared with Velarifictorus members. A key, descriptions, tables, photographs, figures, oscillograms and spectrograms of calling sounds are provided to aid identification between the four similar species.

  6. Cognitive restraint, uncontrolled eating and emotional eating: correlations between parent and adolescent. : Familial resemblance in eating behavior

    OpenAIRE

    De Lauzon-Guillain, Blandine; Romon, Monique; Musher-Eizenman, Dara; Heude, Barbara; Basdevant, Arnaud; Charles, Marie-Aline

    2009-01-01

    International audience; The purpose of this study was to examine, in a general population, the resemblance in eating behaviour between adolescents and their parents. This study was based on the first examination of a community-based epidemiological study in Northern France. Subjects were offspring aged 14-22 years (135 boys and 125 girls) and their parents (174 fathers and 205 mothers). The Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire Revised 18-item version (TFEQ-R18) identified three aspects of eating...

  7. Rapid generation of mitochondrial superoxide induces mitochondrion-dependent but caspase-independent cell death in hippocampal neuronal cells that morphologically resembles necroptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Masayuki; Choi, Hye Joung; Zhu, Bao Ting, E-mail: BTZhu@kumc.edu

    2012-07-15

    Studies in recent years have revealed that excess mitochondrial superoxide production is an important etiological factor in neurodegenerative diseases, resulting from oxidative modifications of cellular lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Hence, it is important to understand the mechanism by which mitochondrial oxidative stress causes neuronal death. In this study, the immortalized mouse hippocampal neuronal cells (HT22) in culture were used as a model and they were exposed to menadione (also known as vitamin K{sub 3}) to increase intracellular superoxide production. We found that menadione causes preferential accumulation of superoxide in the mitochondria of these cells, along with the rapid development of mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular ATP depletion. Neuronal death induced by menadione is independent of the activation of the MAPK signaling pathways and caspases. The lack of caspase activation is due to the rapid depletion of cellular ATP. It was observed that two ATP-independent mitochondrial nucleases, namely, AIF and Endo G, are released following menadione exposure. Silencing of their expression using specific siRNAs results in transient suppression (for ∼ 12 h) of mitochondrial superoxide-induced neuronal death. While suppression of the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase expression markedly sensitizes neuronal cells to mitochondrial superoxide-induced cytotoxicity, its over-expression confers strong protection. Collectively, these findings showed that many of the observed features associated with mitochondrial superoxide-induced cell death, including caspase independency, rapid depletion of ATP level, mitochondrial release of AIF and Endo G, and mitochondrial swelling, are distinctly different from those of apoptosis; instead they resemble some of the known features of necroptosis. -- Highlights: ► Menadione causes mitochondrial superoxide accumulation and injury. ► Menadione-induced cell death is caspase-independent, due to rapid depletion of

  8. Gene expression profiling in Werner syndrome closely resembles that of normal aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyng, Kasper J; May, Alfred; Kølvraa, Steen

    2003-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder, displaying defects in DNA replication, recombination, repair, and transcription. It has been hypothesized that several WS phenotypes are secondary consequences of aberrant gene expression and that a transcription defect may be crucial to the dev......Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder, displaying defects in DNA replication, recombination, repair, and transcription. It has been hypothesized that several WS phenotypes are secondary consequences of aberrant gene expression and that a transcription defect may be crucial...... to the development of the syndrome. We used cDNA microarrays to characterize the expression of 6,912 genes and ESTs across a panel of 15 primary human fibroblast cell lines derived from young donors, old donors, and WS patients. Of the analyzed genes, 6.3% displayed significant differences in expression when either...... WS or old donor cells were compared with young donor cells. This result demonstrates that the WS transcription defect is specific to certain genes. Transcription alterations in WS were strikingly similar to those in normal aging: 91% of annotated genes displayed similar expression changes in WS...

  9. Neurochemical Changes in the Mouse Hippocampus Underlying the Antidepressant Effect of Genetic Deletion of P2X7 Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Csölle

    Full Text Available Recent investigations have revealed that the genetic deletion of P2X7 receptors (P2rx7 results in an antidepressant phenotype in mice. However, the link between the deficiency of P2rx7 and changes in behavior has not yet been explored. In the present study, we studied the effect of genetic deletion of P2rx7 on neurochemical changes in the hippocampus that might underlie the antidepressant phenotype. P2X7 receptor deficient mice (P2rx7-/- displayed decreased immobility in the tail suspension test (TST and an attenuated anhedonia response in the sucrose preference test (SPT following bacterial endotoxin (LPS challenge. The attenuated anhedonia was reproduced through systemic treatments with P2rx7 antagonists. The activation of P2rx7 resulted in the concentration-dependent release of [(3H]glutamate in P2rx7+/+ but not P2rx7-/- mice, and the NR2B subunit mRNA and protein was upregulated in the hippocampus of P2rx7-/- mice. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression was higher in saline but not LPS-treated P2rx7-/- mice; the P2rx7 antagonist Brilliant blue G elevated and the P2rx7 agonist benzoylbenzoyl ATP (BzATP reduced BDNF level. This effect was dependent on the activation of NMDA and non-NMDA receptors but not on Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1,5. An increased 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation was also observed in the dentate gyrus derived from P2rx7-/- mice. Basal level of 5-HT was increased, whereas the 5HIAA/5-HT ratio was lower in the hippocampus of P2rx7-/- mice, which accompanied the increased uptake of [(3H]5-HT and an elevated number of [(3H]citalopram binding sites. The LPS-induced elevation of 5-HT level was absent in P2rx7-/- mice. In conclusion there are several potential mechanisms for the antidepressant phenotype of P2rx7-/- mice, such as the absence of P2rx7-mediated glutamate release, elevated basal BDNF production, enhanced neurogenesis and increased 5-HT bioavailability in the hippocampus.

  10. Jugular venous overflow of noradrenaline from the brain: a neurochemical indicator of cerebrovascular sympathetic nerve activity in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, David A; Lambert, Gavin; Secher, Niels H; Raven, Peter B; van Lieshout, Johannes; Esler, Murray D

    2009-01-01

    A novel neurochemical method was applied for studying the activity of sympathetic nerves in the human cerebral vascular system. The aim was to investigate whether noradrenaline plasma kinetic measurements made with internal jugular venous sampling reflect cerebrovascular sympathetic activity. A database was assembled of fifty-six healthy subjects in whom total body noradrenaline spillover (indicative of whole body sympathetic nervous activity), brain noradrenaline spillover and brain lipophlic noradrenaline metabolite (3,4-dihydroxyphenolglycol (DHPG) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG)) overflow rates were measured. These measurements were also made following ganglion blockade (trimethaphan, n= 6), central sympathetic inhibition (clonidine, n= 4) and neuronal noradrenaline uptake blockade (desipramine, n= 13) and in a group of patients (n= 9) with pure autonomic failure (PAF). The mean brain noradrenline spillover and brain noradrenaline metabolite overflow in healthy subjects were 12.5 ± 1.8, and 186.4 ± 25 ng min−1, respectively, with unilateral jugular venous sampling for both. Total body noradrenaline spillover was 605.8 ng min−1± 34.4 ng min−1. As expected, trimethaphan infusion lowered brain noradrenaline spillover (P= 0.03), but perhaps surprisingly increased jugular overflow of brain metabolites (P= 0.01). Suppression of sympathetic nervous outflow with clonidine lowered brain noradrenaline spillover (P= 0.004), without changing brain metabolite overflow (P= 0.3). Neuronal noradrenaline uptake block with desipramine lowered the transcranial plasma extraction of tritiated noradrenaline (P= 0.001). The PAF patients had 77% lower brain noradrenaline spillover than healthy recruits (P= 0.06), indicating that in them sympathetic nerve degeneration extended to the cerebral circulation, but metabolites overflow was similar to healthy subjects (P= 0.3). The invariable discordance between noradrenline spillover and noradrenaline metabolite overflow

  11. Exoproteome analysis of a novel strain of Bacillus cereus implicated in disease resembling cutaneous anthrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Neha; Goel, Ajay Kumar; Alam, Syed Imteyaz

    2014-03-01

    Bacillus cereus belongs to B. cereus sensu lato group, shared by six other related species including Bacillus anthracis. B. anthracis is the causative agent for serious illness affecting a wide range of animals as well as humans and is a category A Biological and Toxin Warfare (BTW) agent. Recent studies indicate that a Bacillus species other than B. anthracis can cause anthrax-like disease and role of anthrax virulence plasmids (pXO1 and pXO2) on the pathogenicity of B. cereus has been documented. B. cereus strain TF5 was isolated from the tissue fluid of cutaneous anthrax-like skin lesions of a human patient from an anthrax endemic area in India. The strain harboured a PA gene, however, presence of pXO1 or pXO2-like plasmids could not be ascertained using reported primers. Abundant exoproteome of the strain in the early stationary phase was elucidated using a 2-DE MS approach and compared with that from a reference B. cereus strain. Analysis of proteins showing qualitative and quantitative differences between the two strains indicated an altered regulatory mechanism and putative role of S-layer protein and sphingomyelinase in the pathogenesis of strain TF5. Phylogenetic analysis of the S-layer protein indicated close affiliation of the strain with anthracis-like B. cereus strains such as B. cereus var. anthracis strain CI; whereas sphingomyelinase exhibited specific relationship with all the strains of B. anthracis apart from that with anthracis-like B. cereus strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Species, sex and individual differences in the vasotocin/vasopressin system: relationship to neurochemical signaling in the social behavior neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, H Elliott

    2015-01-01

    Arginine-vasotocin (AVT)/arginine vasopressin (AVP) are members of the AVP/oxytocin (OT) superfamily of peptides that are involved in the regulation of social behavior, social cognition and emotion. Comparative studies have revealed that AVT/AVP and their receptors are found throughout the "social behavior neural network (SBNN)" and display the properties expected from a signaling system that controls social behavior (i.e., species, sex and individual differences and modulation by gonadal hormones and social factors). Neurochemical signaling within the SBNN likely involves a complex combination of synaptic mechanisms that co-release multiple chemical signals (e.g., classical neurotransmitters and AVT/AVP as well as other peptides) and non-synaptic mechanisms (i.e., volume transmission). Crosstalk between AVP/OT peptides and receptors within the SBNN is likely. A better understanding of the functional properties of neurochemical signaling in the SBNN will allow for a more refined examination of the relationships between this peptide system and species, sex and individual differences in sociality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Correlation of neurochemical metabolism with memory function in young adult patients with first-episode depression studied with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weibo; Yu, Hualiang; Jiang, Biao; Zheng, Leilei; Yu, Shaohua; Pan, Bing; Yu, Risheng

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the correlation of neurochemical metabolism in hippocampus with memory function in young adult patients with first-episode depression. Twenty patients with first-episode depression (patient group) and fifteen health subjects (control group) were enrolled in the study. The neurochemical metabolism, including the levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), Choline (Cho), Creatine (Cr), Myoinositol (mI) were measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscope (1H-MRS) in bilateral hippocampus. Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS) were used to examine the memory function in both groups. The memory quotient (89.15 ±6.62) of patient group was significantly lower than that of controls (P memory,short-term memory and immediate memory in patients were also lower than those of controls (Pmemory deficit and abnormal metabolism function of neuron cell in hippocampus coexist in young adult patients with first-episode depression, and the lower NAA/Cr and higher mI/Cr ratio in the left hippocampus may result in the memory deficit.

  14. Socioeconomic and Demographic Factors for Spousal Resemblance in Obesity Status and Habitual Physical Activity in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Jen Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies suggested that the married population has an increased risk of obesity and assimilation between spouses’ body weight. We examined what factors may affect married spouses’ resemblance in weight status and habitual physical activity (HPA and the association of obesity/HPA with spouses’ sociodemoeconomic characteristics and lifestyles. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data of 11,403 adult married couples in the US during years 2006–2008 were used. Absolute-scale difference and relative-scale resemblance indices (correlation and kappa coefficients in body mass index (BMI and HPA were estimated by couples’ socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. We found that spousal difference in BMI was smaller for couples with a lower household income, for who were both unemployed, and for older spouses. Correlation coefficient between spouses’ BMI was 0.24, differing by race/ethnicity and family size. Kappa coefficient for weight status (obesity: BMI ≥ 30, overweight: 30 > BMI ≥ 25 was 0.11 and 0.35 for HPA. Never-working women’s husbands had lower odds of obesity than employed women’s husbands (OR = 0.69 (95% CI = 0.53–0.89. Men’s unemployment status was associated with wives’ greater odds of obesity (OR = 1.31 (95% CI = 1.01–1.71. HPA was associated with men’s employment status and income level, but not with women’s. The population representative survey showed that spousal resemblance in weight status and HPA varied with socioeconomic and demographic factors.

  15. Vaginal Microbiota of Adolescent Girls Prior to the Onset of Menarche Resemble Those of Reproductive-Age Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Roxana J.; Zhou, Xia; Settles, Matthew L.; Erb, Julie; Malone, Kristin; Hansmann, Melanie A.; Shew, Marcia L.; Van Der Pol, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Puberty is an important developmental stage wherein hormonal shifts mediate the physical and physiological changes that lead to menarche, but until now, the bacterial composition of vaginal microbiota during this period has been poorly characterized. We performed a prospective longitudinal study of perimenarcheal girls to gain insight into the timing and sequence of changes that occur in the vaginal and vulvar microbiota during puberty. The study enrolled 31 healthy, premenarcheal girls between the ages of 10 and 12 years and collected vaginal and vulvar swabs quarterly for up to 3 years. Bacterial composition was characterized by Roche 454 pyrosequencing and classification of regions V1 to V3 of 16S rRNA genes. Contrary to expectations, lactic acid bacteria, primarily Lactobacillus spp., were dominant in the microbiota of most girls well before the onset of menarche in the early to middle stages of puberty. Gardnerella vaginalis was detected at appreciable levels in approximately one-third of subjects, a notable finding considering that this organism is commonly associated with bacterial vaginosis in adults. Vulvar microbiota closely resembled vaginal microbiota but often exhibited additional taxa typically associated with skin microbiota. Our findings suggest that the vaginal microbiota of girls begin to resemble those of adults well before the onset of menarche. PMID:25805726

  16. Path analysis of family resemblance with temporal trends: applications to height, weight, and Quetelet index in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Province, M A; Rao, D C

    1985-01-01

    A multifactorial model incorporating temporal trends in its parameters is discussed. The model is a generalization of the tau model of Rice et al. in which the parameters are assumed to be specific functions of time. A special case of this model is fit to data on height, weight, and Quetelet index in 1,067 nuclear families to demonstrate the utility of the approach. The results indicate that there is considerable temporal variation in family resemblance over time for all three traits. For height and Quetelet index, both the transmissibility, comparable to heritability, and residual sibling environmental correlation show temporal changes, while for weight, only the latter exhibits significant trends. Trends were not found in the marital correlation for any of the traits, and only limited evidence was found for trends in the maternal transmission parameter for height. This provides an objective method for evaluating the nature and sources of temporal trends in family resemblance, which can easily be incorporated into the framework of any model-based approach.

  17. Retiform uterine tumours resembling ovarian sex cord tumours. A comparative immunohistochemical study with retiform structures of the female genital tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Francisco F; Stolnicu, Simona; Harilal, Kadappayil R; Mooney, Eoghan; García-Galvis, Olga F

    2009-03-01

    To analyse both the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical findings in six cases of uterine tumours resembling ovarian sex cord tumours with a predominant epithelial retiform component resembling the rete ovarii (RUTROSCT) and to compare their immunophenotype with tissues containing retiform structures such as the normal rete ovarii, retiform Wolffian adnexal tumour (RWAT) and ovarian retiform areas of Sertoli-Leydig cell tumours (ORSLCT). Six RUTROSCTs were analysed. The average age of patients was 65 years, and all tumours behaved in a benign fashion. Four were intracavitary and two intramural. Two cases were misdiagnosed as malignant in endometrial biopsy specimens and one in the hysterectomy specimen. Histologically they had a tubulopapillary or glomeruloid formation; a sex-cord-like or endometrial stromal component was absent or comprised at most 30% of the tumour. RUTROCST showed consistent positivity for CAM5.2, cytokeratin (CK) 7, vimentin, calretinin, progesterone receptor and apical CD10. CD56 and alpha-inhibin were positive in half of the cases. Epithelial membrane antigen, desmin, smooth muscle actin and calponin were negative. Comparatively, rete ovarii and RWAT had a similar positivity for CK7, CD56, CD10 and calretinin. ORSLCT differed in its conspicuous positivity to CD56, CD10, alpha-inhibin and calretinin, but absent CK7 expression. RUTROSCTs have benign behaviour but may be confused with various uterine adenocarcinomas or metastases. Correct diagnosis should avoid overtreatment. The immunophenotype of retiform areas is similar to that of adult rete ovarii and RWAT with minor divergence from ORSLCT.

  18. Neurochemical changes in patients with chronic low back pain detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianjing Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: This review provides evidence for alterations in the biochemical profile of the brain in patients with CLBP, which suggests that biochemical changes may play a significant role in the development and pathophysiology of CLBP and shed light on the development of new treatments for CLBP.

  19. Applying Time-sharing technique in a multimodal compact low-power CMOS neurochip for simultaneous neurochemical and action potential recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poustinchi, Mohammad; Stacey, R Greg; Musallam, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Brain is an electrochemical system and recent studies suggest simultaneous measurement of interrelated brain's electrical and neurochemical activity may lead to better understanding of brain function in addition to developing optimal neural prosthetics. By exploiting opamp Time-sharing technique to minimized power dissipation and silicon area, we have fabricated a power efficient implantable CMOS microsystem for simultaneous measurement of Action Potential (AP) and neurotransmitter concentration. Both AP-recording and neurotransmitter sensing subsystems share a single 653 nW amplifier which senses picoscale to microscale current that corresponds to micromolar neurotransmitter concentration and microscale AP voltage. This microsystem is fabricated in CMOS 0.18 μm technology and tested using recorded signals from dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) area of a macaque monkey in our lab.

  20. Guinea-pig interpubic joint (symphysis pubica relaxation at parturition: Underlying cellular processes that resemble an inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz-de-Toro Mónica

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At term, cervical ripening in coordination with uterine contractions becomes a prerequisite for a normal vaginal delivery. Currently, cervical ripening is considered to occur independently from uterine contractions. Many evidences suggest that cervical ripening resembles an inflammatory process. Comparatively little attention has been paid to the increased flexibility of the pelvic symphysis that occurs in many species to enable safe delivery. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the guinea-pig interpubic joint relaxation process observed during late pregnancy and parturition resembles an inflammatory process. Methods Samples of pubic symphysis were taken from pregnant guinea-pigs sacrificed along gestation, parturition and postpartum. Serial sections of paraffin-embedded tissues were used to measure the interpubic distance on digitalized images, stained with Giemsa to quantify leukocyte infiltration and to describe the vascular area changes, or studied by the picrosirius-polarization method to evaluate collagen remodeling. P4 and E2 serum levels were measured by a sequential immunometric assay. Results Data showed that the pubic relaxation is associated with an increase in collagen remodeling. In addition, a positive correlation between E2 serum levels and the increase in the interpubic distance was found. On the other hand, a leukocyte infiltration in the interpubic tissue around parturition was described, with the presence of almost all inflammatory cells types. At the same time, histological images show an increase in vascular area (angiogenesis. Eosinophils reached their highest level immediately before parturition; whereas for the neutrophilic and mononuclear infiltration higher values were recorded one day after parturition. Correlation analysis showed that eosinophils and mononuclear cells were positively correlated with E2 levels, but only eosinophilic infiltration was associated with collagen remodeling

  1. Guinea-pig interpubic joint (symphysis pubica) relaxation at parturition: Underlying cellular processes that resemble an inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Horacio A; Ortega, Hugo H; Ramos, Jorge G; Muñoz-de-Toro, Mónica; Luque, Enrique H

    2003-01-01

    Background At term, cervical ripening in coordination with uterine contractions becomes a prerequisite for a normal vaginal delivery. Currently, cervical ripening is considered to occur independently from uterine contractions. Many evidences suggest that cervical ripening resembles an inflammatory process. Comparatively little attention has been paid to the increased flexibility of the pelvic symphysis that occurs in many species to enable safe delivery. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the guinea-pig interpubic joint relaxation process observed during late pregnancy and parturition resembles an inflammatory process. Methods Samples of pubic symphysis were taken from pregnant guinea-pigs sacrificed along gestation, parturition and postpartum. Serial sections of paraffin-embedded tissues were used to measure the interpubic distance on digitalized images, stained with Giemsa to quantify leukocyte infiltration and to describe the vascular area changes, or studied by the picrosirius-polarization method to evaluate collagen remodeling. P4 and E2 serum levels were measured by a sequential immunometric assay. Results Data showed that the pubic relaxation is associated with an increase in collagen remodeling. In addition, a positive correlation between E2 serum levels and the increase in the interpubic distance was found. On the other hand, a leukocyte infiltration in the interpubic tissue around parturition was described, with the presence of almost all inflammatory cells types. At the same time, histological images show an increase in vascular area (angiogenesis). Eosinophils reached their highest level immediately before parturition; whereas for the neutrophilic and mononuclear infiltration higher values were recorded one day after parturition. Correlation analysis showed that eosinophils and mononuclear cells were positively correlated with E2 levels, but only eosinophilic infiltration was associated with collagen remodeling. Additionally, we observed

  2. 'Hair-on-end' skull changes resembling thalassemia caused by marrow expansion in uncorrected complex cyanotic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walor, David M.; Berdon, Walter E. [Columbia University Medical Center, Department of Radiology Children' s Hospital of New York, New York, NY (United States); Westra, Sjirk J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    ''Hair-on-end'' skull changes resembling thalassemia were rarely described in the 1950s and 1960s in children with cyanotic congenital heart diseases; these changes were described almost entirely in patients with tetralogy of Fallot or D-transposition of the great arteries. As these lesions have become correctable, the osseous changes, never common, seem now only to exist in a small number of patients with uncorrectable complex cyanotic congenital heart disease who survive in a chronic hypoxic state. We present two cases: a case of marked marrow expansion in the skull of a 5-year-old boy with uncorrectable cyanotic heart disease studied by CT, and a second case of an 8-year-old with tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia studied by plain skull radiographs. The true incidence of these findings is unknown. (orig.)

  3. Additive mode-locked resembling pulses in a Tm-doped fiber laser with a hybrid cavity configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weicheng; Lin, Wei; Qiao, Tian; Yang, Zhongmin

    2015-10-19

    We report on the generation of modulated spikes distributed across a mode-locked pulse profile, which is termed as "additive mode-locked resembling (AMLR)", in a Tm-doped fiber laser with a hybrid cavity configuration based on nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) technique. The hybrid cavity configuration is composed of a ring cavity containing a micro Fabry-Perot (F-P) cavity. The F-P cavity is used to take the cavity-trip frequency (CTF) modulation on the mode-locked pulses for forming AMLR pulses. We observe AMLR pulses with uniform and chirped modulation depths, as well as uniform and nonuniform spike separations, respectively. Numerical simulations confirm the experimental observations and show that the filtering effect of the F-P cavity is the main mechanism for taking CTF modulation on mode-locked pulses to generate AMLR pulses.

  4. Lynch Syndrome Associated Colon Adenocarcinoma Resembling Lymphoma on Fluoro-Deoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparici, Carina Mari; Win, Aung Zaw

    2015-01-01

    The patient was a 46-year-old Asian male diagnosed with lynch syndrome associated colon adenocarcinoma in the right ascending colon. A presurgical staging 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) found increased metabolic activity in the cervical, axillary, mediastinal, supraclavicular, para-aortic and mesenteric lymph nodes. This pattern of metastasis was very unusual for lynch syndrome associated colon adenocarcinoma and the involvement of those lymph nodes resembles the pattern of spread of lymphoma. He underwent right hemicolectomy and he was subsequently treated with 12 cycles of folinic acid (leucovorin), fluorouracil (5-FU), irinotecan. A restaging FDG-PET/CT at the end of the chemotherapy showed interval decrease in size and metabolic activity in the affected lymph nodes. FDG-PET/CT is a useful imaging modality in following-up the treatment response in colon adenocarcinoma.

  5. Reducing violence in forensic care - how does it resemble the domains of a recovery-oriented care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Helen; Schön, Ulla-Karin

    2016-12-01

    Forensic psychiatry is characterized by involuntary treatment and risk of violence. The concept of recovery is rarely in focus as the primary focus is on risk assessment, violence prevention and reducing coercion in care. To determine what resources forensic staff use to avoid or prevent violent situations, and to explore how these practices resemble the domains of recovery-oriented care. Semi-structured interviews with staff who were identified by forensic patients as key workers in their recovery process. Interview texts were analyzed using interpretive content analysis. Staff prevent violent situations using tacit knowledge and experience, and through a shared collegial responsibility. Staff safeguard patients, encourage patient participation, and provide staff consistency. The results have implications for forensic care as well as psychiatry regarding the process of making recovery a reality for patients in the forensic care setting.

  6. A unique case of a cutaneous lesion resembling mammary analog secretory carcinoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albus, Jennifer; Batanian, Jacqueline; Wenig, Bruce M; Vidal, Claudia I

    2015-04-01

    Mammary analog secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a rare type of salivary gland tumor named for its morphological and genetic similarity to secretory carcinoma of the breast. These tumors are most often found in the parotid gland but have been described in several other mucosal locations of the head and neck. In this case report, a cutaneous lesion most closely resembling MASC was found in a neck mass of a 64-year-old male patient without evidence of a primary salivary gland or oral tumor. The lesion was excised, and the patient remains disease free to date. This case depicts a rare tumor in the skin most closely mimicking MASC and brings additional awareness to dermatopathologists of this tumor.

  7. Familial Resemblance for Loneliness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distel, M.A.; Rebollo Mesa, I.; Abdellaoui, A.; Derom, C.A.; Willemsen, G.; Cacioppo, J.T.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2010-01-01

    Social isolation and loneliness in humans have been associated with physical and psychological morbidity, as well as mortality. This study aimed to assess the etiology of individual differences in feelings of loneliness. The genetic architecture of loneliness was explored in an extended twin-family

  8. Anti-Lipid IgG Antibodies Are Produced via Germinal Centers in a Murine Model Resembling Human Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Reséndiz-Mora, Albany; Donis-Maturano, Luis; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Zárate-Neira, Luz; Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Calderón-Amador, Juana; Medina, Yolanda; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are produced in some mycobacterial infections and in certain autoimmune diseases [such as anti-phospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)]. However, few studies have addressed the B cell responses underlying the production of these immunoglobulins. Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are consistently found in a murine model resembling human lupus induced by chlorpromazine-stabilized non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements (NPA). NPA are transitory lipid associations found in the membranes of most cells; when NPA are stabilized they can become immunogenic and induce specific IgG antibodies, which appear to be involved in the development of the mouse model of lupus. Of note, anti-NPA antibodies are also detected in patients with SLE and leprosy. We used this model of lupus to investigate in vivo the cellular mechanisms that lead to the production of anti-lipid, class-switched IgG antibodies. In this murine lupus model, we found plasma cells (Gr1−, CD19−, CD138+) producing NPA-specific IgGs in the draining lymph nodes, the spleen, and the bone marrow. We also found a significant number of germinal center B cells (IgD−, CD19+, PNA+) specific for NPA in the draining lymph nodes and the spleen, and we identified in situ the presence of NPA in these germinal centers. By contrast, very few NPA-specific, extrafollicular reaction B cells (B220+, Blimp1+) were found. Moreover, when assessing the anti-NPA IgG antibodies produced during the experimental protocol, we found that the affinity of these antibodies progressively increased over time. Altogether, our data indicate that, in this murine model resembling human lupus, B cells produce anti-NPA IgG antibodies mainly via germinal centers. PMID:27746783

  9. Resemblance profiles as clustering decision criteria: Estimating statistical power, error, and correspondence for a hypothesis test for multivariate structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilborn, Joshua P; Jones, David L; Peebles, Ernst B; Naar, David F

    2017-04-01

    Clustering data continues to be a highly active area of data analysis, and resemblance profiles are being incorporated into ecological methodologies as a hypothesis testing-based approach to clustering multivariate data. However, these new clustering techniques have not been rigorously tested to determine the performance variability based on the algorithm's assumptions or any underlying data structures. Here, we use simulation studies to estimate the statistical error rates for the hypothesis test for multivariate structure based on dissimilarity profiles (DISPROF). We concurrently tested a widely used algorithm that employs the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) to estimate the proficiency of clustering with DISPROF as a decision criterion. We simulated unstructured multivariate data from different probability distributions with increasing numbers of objects and descriptors, and grouped data with increasing overlap, overdispersion for ecological data, and correlation among descriptors within groups. Using simulated data, we measured the resolution and correspondence of clustering solutions achieved by DISPROF with UPGMA against the reference grouping partitions used to simulate the structured test datasets. Our results highlight the dynamic interactions between dataset dimensionality, group overlap, and the properties of the descriptors within a group (i.e., overdispersion or correlation structure) that are relevant to resemblance profiles as a clustering criterion for multivariate data. These methods are particularly useful for multivariate ecological datasets that benefit from distance-based statistical analyses. We propose guidelines for using DISPROF as a clustering decision tool that will help future users avoid potential pitfalls during the application of methods and the interpretation of results.

  10. Meningiomas with conventional MRI findings resembling intraaxial tumors: can perfusion-weighted MRI be helpful in differentiation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakyemez, Bahattin [Uludag University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Bursa (Turkey); Bursa State Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bursa (Turkey); Yildirim, Nalan; Erdogan, Cueneyt; Parlak, Mufit [Uludag University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Bursa (Turkey); Kocaeli, Hasan; Korfali, Ender [Uludag University Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery, Bursa (Turkey)

    2006-10-15

    To investigate the contribution of perfusion-weighted MRI to the differentiation of meningiomas with atypical conventional MRI findings from intraaxial tumors. We retrospectively analyzed 54 meningiomas, 12 glioblastomas and 13 solitary metastases. We detected 6 meningiomas with atypical features on conventional MRI resembling intraaxial tumors. The regional cerebral blood flow (rCBV) ratios of all tumors were calculated via perfusion-weighted MRI. The signal intensity-time curves were plotted and three different curve patterns were observed. The type 1 curve resembled normal brain parenchyma or the postenhancement part was minimally below the baseline, the type 2 curve was similar to the type 1 curve but with the postenhancement part above the baseline, and the type 3 curve had the postenhancement part below the baseline accompanied by widening of the curve. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. On CBV images meningiomas were hypervascular and the mean rCBV ratio was 10.58{+-}2.00. For glioblastomas and metastatic lesions, the rCBV ratios were 5.02{+-}1.40 and 4.68{+-}1.54, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in rCBV ratios between meningiomas and glioblastomas and metastases (P<0.001). Only one of the meningiomas displayed a type 2 curve while five showed a type 3 curve. Glioblastomas and metastases displayed either a type 1 or a type 2 curve. None of the meningiomas showed a type 1 curve and none of the glioblastomas or metastases showed a type 3 curve. (orig.)

  11. Nicotine delivery to rats via lung alveolar region-targeted aerosol technology produces blood pharmacokinetics resembling human smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xuesi M; Xu, Bin; Liang, Jing; Xie, Xinmin Simon; Zhu, Yifang; Feldman, Jack L

    2013-07-01

    Nicotine is a heavily used addictive drug acquired through smoking tobacco. Nicotine in cigarette smoke is deposited and absorbed in the lungs, which results in a rapidly peaked slowly declining arterial concentration. This pattern plays an important role in initiation of nicotine addiction. A method and device were developed for delivering nicotine to rodents with lung alveolar region-targeted aerosol technology. The dose of delivery can be controlled by the nicotine aerosol concentration and duration of exposure. Our data showed that, in the breathing zone of the nose-only exposure chamber, the aerosol droplet size distribution was within the respirable diameter range. Rats were exposed to nicotine aerosol for 2 min. The arterial blood nicotine concentration reached 43.2 ± 15.7 ng/ml (mean ± SD) within 1-4 min and declined over the next 20 min, closely resembling the magnitude and early pharmacokinetics of a human smoking a cigarette. The acute inhalation toxicity of nicotine: LC50 = 2.3mg/L was determined; it was affected by pH, suggesting that acidification decreases nicotine absorption and/or bioavailability. A noninvasive method and toolkit were developed for delivering nicotine to rodents that enable rapid delivery of a controllable amount of nicotine into the systemic circulation and brain-inducing dose-dependent pharmacological effects, even a lethal dose. Aerosol inhalation can produce nicotine kinetics in both arterial and venous blood resembling human smoking. This method can be applied to studies of the effects of chronic intermittent nicotine exposure, nicotine addiction, toxicology, tobacco-related diseases, teratogenicity, and for discovery of pharmacological therapeutics.

  12. Neurobehavioral alteration in rodents following developmental exposure to aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleva, E; Rankin, J; Santucci, D

    1998-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is one of the most abundant metals in the earth's crust, and humans can be exposed to it from several sources. It is present in food, water, pharmaceutical compounds, and in the environment, e.g., as a result of acid rain leaching it from the soil. Exposure to Al has recently been implicated in a number of human pathologies, but it has not yet been definitely proved that it plays a major causal role in any of them. In this paper we review the effects of developmental exposure of laboratory animals to Al salts as a model for human pathological conditions. The data presented show behavioral and neurochemical changes in the offspring of AL-exposed mouse dams during gestation, which include alterations in the pattern of ultrasonic vocalizations and a marked reduction in central nervous system (CNS) choline acetyltransferase activity. Prenatal Al also affects CNS cholinergic functions under Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) control, as shown by increased central NGF levels and impaired performances in a maze learning task in young-adult mice. The need for more detailed studies to evaluate the risks for humans associated with developmental exposure to Al, as well as the importance of using more than one strain of laboratory animal in the experimental design, is emphasized.

  13. Protective effect of alprazolam against sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and oxidative damage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anant; Kumar, Anil

    2008-04-01

    Sleep deprivation is considered as a risk factor for various diseases. Sleep deprivation leads to behavioral, hormonal, neurochemical and biochemical alterations in the animals. The present study was designed to explore the possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in protective effect of alprazolam against 72h sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and oxidative damage in mice. In the present study, sleep deprivation caused anxiety-like behavior, weight loss, impaired ambulatory movements and oxidative damage as indicated by increase in lipid peroxidation, nitrite level and depletion of reduced glutathione and catalase activity in sleep-deprived mice brain. Treatment with alprazolam (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg, ip) significantly improved behavioral alterations. Biochemically, alprazolam treatment significantly restored depleted reduced glutathione, catalase activity, reversed raised lipid peroxidation and nitrite level. Combination of flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg) and picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) with lower dose of alprazolam (0.25mg/kg) significantly antagonized protective effect of alprazolam. However, combination of muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) with alprazolam (0.25 mg/kg, ip) potentiated protective effect of alprazolam. On the basis of these results, it might be suggested that alprazolam might produce protective effect by involving GABAergic system against sleep deprivation-induced behavior alterations and related oxidative damage.

  14. Maternal separation induces neuroinflammation and long-lasting emotional alterations in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia-Rubio, Irene; Moscoso-Castro, Maria; Pozo, Oscar J; Marcos, Josep; Nadal, Roser; Valverde, Olga

    2016-02-04

    Early life experiences play a key role in brain function and behaviour. Adverse events during childhood are therefore a risk factor for psychiatric disease during adulthood, such as mood disorders. Maternal separation is a validated mouse model for maternal neglect, producing negative early life experiences that result in subsequent emotional alteration. Mood disorders have been found to be associated with neurochemical changes and neurotransmitter deficits such as reduced availability of monoamines in discrete brain areas. Emotional alterations like depression result in reduced serotonin availability and enhanced kynurenine metabolism through the action of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase in response to neuroinflammatory factors. This mechanism involves regulation of the neurotransmitter system by neuroinflammatory agents, linking mood regulation to neuroinmunological reactions. In this context, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of maternal separation with early weaning on emotional behaviour in mice. We investigated neuroinflammatory responses and the state of the tryptophan-kynurenine metabolic pathway in discrete brain areas following maternal separation. We show that adverse events during early life increase risk of long-lasting emotional alterations during adolescence and adulthood. These emotional alterations are particularly severe in females. Behavioural impairments were associated with microglia activation and disturbed tryptophan-kynurenine metabolism in brain areas related to emotional control. This finding supports the preeminent role of neuroinflammation in emotional disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Muscle-type nicotinic receptor modulation by 2,6-dimethylaniline, a molecule resembling the hydrophobic moiety of lidocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Alberola-Die

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available To identify the molecular determinants responsible for lidocaine blockade of muscle-type nAChRs, we have studied the effects on this receptor of 2,6-dimethylaniline (DMA, which resembles lidocaine’s hydrophobic moiety. Torpedo marmorata nAChRs were microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes and currents elicited by ACh (IACh, either alone or co-applied with DMA, were recorded. DMA reversibly blocked IACh and, similarly to lidocaine, exerted a closed-channel blockade, as evidenced by the enhancement of IACh blockade when DMA was pre-applied before its co-application with ACh, and hastened IACh decay. However, there were marked differences among its mechanisms of nAChR inhibition and those mediated by either the entire lidocaine molecule or diethylamine (DEA, a small amine resembling lidocaine’s hydrophilic moiety. Thereby, the IC50 for DMA, estimated from the dose-inhibition curve, was in the millimolar range, which is one order of magnitude higher than that for either DEA or lidocaine. Besides, nAChR blockade by DMA was voltage-independent in contrast to the increase of IACh inhibition at negative potentials caused by the more polar lidocaine or DEA molecules. Accordingly, virtual docking assays of DMA on nAChRs showed that this molecule binds predominantly at intersubunit crevices of the transmembrane-spanning domain, but also at the extracellular domain. Furthermore, DMA interacted with residues inside the channel pore, although only in the open-channel conformation. Interestingly, co-application of ACh with DEA and DMA, at their IC50s, had additive inhibitory effects on IACh and the extent of blockade was similar to that predicted by the allotopic model of interaction, suggesting that DEA and DMA bind to nAChRs at different loci. These results indicate that DMA mainly mimics the low potency and non-competitive actions of lidocaine on nAChRs, as opposed to the high potency and voltage-dependent block by lidocaine, which is emulated by the

  16. An Investigation into the Mechanics of Windblown Dust Entrainment from Nickel Slag Surfaces Resembling Armoured Desert Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Robert Steven

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the dynamics of PM 10 emission from a nickel slag stockpile that closely resembles a desert pavement in physical characteristics. In the field, it was observed that slag surfaces develop by natural processes into a well-armoured surface over some period of time. The surface then consists of two distinct layers; a surficial armour layer containing only non-erodible gravel and cobble-sized clasts, and an underlying dust-laden layer, which contains a wide size range of slag particles, from clay-sized to cobble-sized. This surficial armour layer protects the underlying fines from wind entrainment, at least under typical wind conditions; however, particle emissions still do occur under high wind speeds. The dynamics of particle entrainment from within these surfaces are investigated herein. It is shown that the dynamics of the boundary layer flow over these lag surfaces are influenced by the inherent roughness and permeability of the surficial armour layer, such that the flow resembles those observed over and within vegetation canopies, and those associated with permeable gravel-bed river channels. Restriction of air flow within the permeable surface produces a high-pressure zone within the pore spaces, resulting in a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability, which triggers coherent motions in the form of repeating burst-sweep cycles. Using Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA), it is demonstrated that the lower boundary layer is characterized by both Q4 sweeping motions and Q2 bursting motions, while the upper boundary layer is dominated by Q2 bursts. Pore air motions within the slag material were measured using buried pressure ports. It is shown that the mean pressure gradient which forms within the slag material results in net upward displacement of air, or wind pumping. However, this net upward motion is a result of rapid oscillatory motions which are directly driven by coherent boundary layer motions. It is also demonstrated that

  17. Reversal of schizophrenia-like symptoms and immune alterations in mice by immunomodulatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Araújo, Tatiane; Maia Chaves Filho, Adriano Jose; Monte, Aline Santos; Isabelle de Góis Queiroz, Ana; Cordeiro, Rafaela Carneiro; de Jesus Souza Machado, Michel; de Freitas Lima, Ricardo; Freitas de Lucena, David; Maes, Michael; Macêdo, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Immune dysregulation observed in schizophrenia alters tryptophan metabolism. Tryptophan metabolism is triggered by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Tryptophan is converted to quinolinic acid, a potent neurotoxin, and to kynurenic acid, an NMDA antagonist. 1-Methyl-D-tryptophan (MDT) inhibits IDO. Melatonin is metabolized by IDO while inhibiting TDO. We evaluated the reversal of ketamine-induced schizophrenia-like behavioral and neurochemical alterations in mice by the administration of MDT (20 or 40 mg/kg, i.p.) or melatonin (15 mg/kg, per os). Oxidative stress and inflammatory alterations, i.e. myeloperoxidase activity (MPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-6 were measured in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus and striatum. Risperidone was used as standard antipsychotic. Ketamine triggered positive- (PPI deficits and hyperlocomotion), cognitive- (working memory deficits) and negative (social interaction deficits) schizophrenia-like symptoms. These symptoms were accompanied by increased MPO activity, decreased GSH and increased LPO in all brain areas and increments in hippocampal IL-4 and IL-6. MDT and melatonin reversed all ketamine-induced behavioral alterations. Risperidone did not reverse working memory deficits. MDT and melatonin reversed alterations in MPO activity and GSH levels. LP was reversed only by melatonin and risperidone. Risperidone could not reverse MPO alterations in the PFC and striatum. All drugs reversed the alterations in IL-4 and IL-6. The hippocampus and striatum of ketamine+melatonin-treated animals had lower levels of IL-6. Our findings provide further preclinical evidence that immune-inflammatory and oxidative pathways are involved in schizophrenia and that targeting these pathways is a valid treatment option in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Binge Toluene Exposure Alters Glutamate, Glutamine and GABA in the Adolescent Rat Brain as Measured by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Shane A.; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K.; Galloway, Matthew P.; Hannigan, John H.; Bowen, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of toluene abuse in adolescents, little is known regarding the effect of binge exposure on neurochemical profiles during this developmental stage. In the current study, the effects of binge toluene exposure during adolescence on neurotransmitter levels were determined using high-resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ex vivo at 11.7 T. Adolescent male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to toluene (0, 8,000 , or 12,000 ppm) for 15 min twice daily from postnatal day 28 (P28) through P34 and then euthanized either one or seven days later (on P35 or P42) to assess glutamate, glutamine, and GABA levels in intact tissue punches from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), anterior striatum and hippocampus. In the mPFC, toluene reduced glutamate one day after exposure, with no effect on GABA, while after seven days, glutamate was no longer affected but there was an increase in GABA levels. In the hippocampus, neither GABA nor glutamate was altered one day after exposure, whereas seven days after exposure, increases were observed in GABA and glutamate. Striatal glutamate and GABA levels measured after either one or seven days were not altered after toluene exposure. These findings show that one week of binge toluene inhalation selectively alters these neurotransmitters in the mPFC and hippocampus in adolescent rats, and that some of these effects endure at least one week after the exposure. The results suggest that age-dependent, differential neurochemical responses to toluene may contribute to the unique behavioral patterns associated with drug abuse among older children and young teens. PMID:21126832

  19. Resting-state fMRI in sleeping infants more closely resembles adult sleep than adult wakefulness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Mitra

    Full Text Available Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI in infants enables important studies of functional brain organization early in human development. However, rs-fMRI in infants has universally been obtained during sleep to reduce participant motion artifact, raising the question of whether differences in functional organization between awake adults and sleeping infants that are commonly attributed to development may instead derive, at least in part, from sleep. This question is especially important as rs-fMRI differences in adult wake vs. sleep are well documented. To investigate this question, we compared functional connectivity and BOLD signal propagation patterns in 6, 12, and 24 month old sleeping infants with patterns in adult wakefulness and non-REM sleep. We find that important functional connectivity features seen during infant sleep closely resemble those seen during adult sleep, including reduced default mode network functional connectivity. However, we also find differences between infant and adult sleep, especially in thalamic BOLD signal propagation patterns. These findings highlight the importance of considering sleep state when drawing developmental inferences in infant rs-fMRI.

  20. Sensory afferent segregation in three-eared frogs resemble the dominance columns observed in three-eyed frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Karen L; Houston, Douglas W; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2015-02-09

    The formation of proper sensory afferent connections during development is essential for brain function. Activity-based competition is believed to drive ocular dominance columns (ODC) in mammals and in experimentally-generated three-eyed frogs. ODC formation is thus a compromise of activity differences between two eyes and similar molecular cues. To gauge the generality of graphical map formation in the brain, we investigated the inner ear projection, known for its well-defined and early segregation of afferents from vestibular and auditory endorgans. In analogy to three eyed-frogs, we generated three-eared frogs to assess to what extent vestibular afferents from two adjacent ears could segregate. Donor ears were transplanted either in the native orientation or rotated by 90 degrees. These manipulations should result in either similar or different induced activity between both ears, respectively. Three-eared frogs with normal orientation showed normal swimming whereas those with a rotated third ear showed aberrant behaviors. Projection studies revealed that only afferents from the rotated ears segregated from those from the native ear within the vestibular nucleus, resembling the ocular dominance columns formed in three-eyed frogs. Vestibular segregation suggests that mechanisms comparable to those operating in the ODC formation of the visual system may act on vestibular projection refinements.

  1. Design and evaluation of lipoprotein resembling curcumin-encapsulated protein-free nanostructured lipid carrier for brain targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanfei; Asghar, Sajid; Xu, Yurui; Wang, Jianping; Jin, Xin; Wang, Zhilin; Wang, Jing; Ping, Qineng; Zhou, Jianping; Xiao, Yanyu

    2016-06-15

    Many nanoparticle matrixes have been demonstrated to be efficient in brain targeting, but there are still certain limitations for them. To overcome the shortcomings of the existing nanoparticulate systems for brain-targeted delivery, a lipoprotein resembling protein-free nanostructured lipid carrier (PS80-NLC) loaded with curcumin was constructed and assessed for in vitro and in vivo performance. Firstly, single factor at a time approach was employed to investigate the effects of various formulation factors. Mean particle sizes of ≤100nm, high entrapment efficiency (EE, about 95%) and drug loading (DL, >3%) were obtained for the optimized formulations. In vitro release studies in the presence of plasma indicated stability of the formulation under physiological condition. Compared with NLC, PS80-NLC showed noticeably higher affinity for bEnd.3 cells (1.56 folds greater than NLC) but with lower uptake in macrophages. The brain coronal sections showed strong and widely distributed fluorescence intensity of PS80-NLC than that of NLC in the cortex. Ex vivo imaging studies further confirmed that PS80-NLC could effectively permeate BBB and preferentially accumulate in the brain (2.38 times greater than NLC). The considerable in vitro and in vivo performance of the safe and biocompatible PS80-NLC makes it a suitable option for further investigations in brain targeted drug delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Primary Follicular Dystrophy with Scarring Dermatitis in C57BL/6 Mouse Substrains Resembles Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, John P.; Taylor, Douglas; Lorch, Gwendolen; Miller, Jim; Silva, Kathleen A.; Sundberg, Beth A.; Roopenian, Derry; Sperling, Leonard; Ong, David; King, Lloyd E.; Everts, Helen

    2011-01-01

    A number of C57BL/6 (B6) substrains are commonly used by scientists for basic biomedical research. One of several B6 strain specific background diseases is focal alopecia that may resolve or progress to severe, ulcerative dermatitis. Clinical and progressive histologic changes of skin disease commonly observed in C57BL/6J and preliminary studies in other closely related substrains are presented. Lesions develop due to a primary follicular dystrophy with rupture of severely affected follicles leading to formation of secondary foreign body granulomas (trichogranulomas) in affected B6 substrains of mice. Histologically these changes resemble the human disease called central centrifugal cicatrical alopecia (CCCA). Four B6 substrains tested have a polymorphism in alcohol dehydrogenase 4 (Adh4) that reduces its activity and potentially affects removal of excess retinol. Using immunohistochemistry, differential expression of epithelial retinol dehydrogenase (DHRS9) was detected which may partially explain anecdotal reports of frequency differences between B6 substrains. The combination of these two defects have the potential to make high dietary vitamin A levels toxic in some B6 substrains while not affecting most other commonly used inbred strains. PMID:20861494

  3. Pneumonic Tularemia in Rabbits Resembles the Human Disease as Illustrated by Radiographic and Hematological Changes after Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Douglas S.; Smith, Le'Kneitah; Dunsmore, Tammy; Trichel, Anita; Ortiz, Luis A.; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Barry, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Background Pneumonic tularemia is caused by inhalation of the gram negative bacterium, Francisella tularensis. Because of concerns that tularemia could be used as a bioterrorism agent, vaccines and therapeutics are urgently needed. Animal models of pneumonic tularemia with a pathophysiology similar to the human disease are needed to evaluate the efficacy of these potential medical countermeasures. Principal Findings Rabbits exposed to aerosols containing Francisella tularensis strain SCHU S4 developed a rapidly progressive fatal pneumonic disease. Clinical signs became evident on the third day after exposure with development of a fever (>40.5°C) and a sharp decline in both food and water intake. Blood samples collected on day 4 found lymphopenia and a decrease in platelet counts coupled with elevations in erythrocyte sedimentation rate, alanine aminotransferase, cholesterol, granulocytes and monocytes. Radiographs demonstrated the development of pneumonia and abnormalities of intestinal gas consistent with ileus. On average, rabbits were moribund 5.1 days after exposure; no rabbits survived exposure at any dose (190–54,000 cfu). Gross evaluation of tissues taken at necropsy showed evidence of pathology in the lungs, spleen, liver, kidney and intestines. Bacterial counts confirmed bacterial dissemination from the lungs to the liver and spleen. Conclusions/Significance The pathophysiology of pneumonic tularemia in rabbits resembles what has been reported for humans. Rabbits therefore are a relevant model of the human disease caused by type A strains of F. tularensis. PMID:21931798

  4. Inactivation of LAR family phosphatase genes Ptprs and Ptprf causes craniofacial malformations resembling Pierre-Robin sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Katherine; Uetani, Noriko; Hendriks, Wiljan; Tremblay, Michel L; Bouchard, Maxime

    2013-08-01

    Leukocyte antigen related (LAR) family receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) regulate the fine balance between tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation that is crucial for cell signaling during development and tissue homeostasis. Here we show that LAR RPTPs are required for normal development of the mandibular and maxillary regions. Approximately half of the mouse embryos lacking both Ptprs (RPTPσ) and Ptprf (LAR) exhibit micrognathia (small lower jaw), cleft palate and microglossia/glossoptosis (small and deep tongue), a phenotype closely resembling Pierre-Robin sequence in humans. We show that jaw bone and cartilage patterning occurs aberrantly in LAR family phosphatase-deficient embryos and that the mandibular arch harbors a marked decrease in cell proliferation. Analysis of signal transduction in embryonic tissues and mouse embryonic fibroblast cultures identifies an increase in Bmp-Smad signaling and an abrogation of canonical Wnt signaling associated with loss of the LAR family phosphatases. A reactivation of β-catenin signaling by chemical inhibition of GSK3β successfully resensitizes LAR family phosphatase-deficient cells to Wnt induction, indicating that RPTPs are necessary for normal Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation. Together these results identify LAR RPTPs as important regulators of craniofacial morphogenesis and provide insight into the etiology of Pierre-Robin sequence.

  5. Pneumonic tularemia in rabbits resembles the human disease as illustrated by radiographic and hematological changes after infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas S Reed

    Full Text Available Pneumonic tularemia is caused by inhalation of the gram negative bacterium, Francisella tularensis. Because of concerns that tularemia could be used as a bioterrorism agent, vaccines and therapeutics are urgently needed. Animal models of pneumonic tularemia with a pathophysiology similar to the human disease are needed to evaluate the efficacy of these potential medical countermeasures.Rabbits exposed to aerosols containing Francisella tularensis strain SCHU S4 developed a rapidly progressive fatal pneumonic disease. Clinical signs became evident on the third day after exposure with development of a fever (>40.5°C and a sharp decline in both food and water intake. Blood samples collected on day 4 found lymphopenia and a decrease in platelet counts coupled with elevations in erythrocyte sedimentation rate, alanine aminotransferase, cholesterol, granulocytes and monocytes. Radiographs demonstrated the development of pneumonia and abnormalities of intestinal gas consistent with ileus. On average, rabbits were moribund 5.1 days after exposure; no rabbits survived exposure at any dose (190-54,000 cfu. Gross evaluation of tissues taken at necropsy showed evidence of pathology in the lungs, spleen, liver, kidney and intestines. Bacterial counts confirmed bacterial dissemination from the lungs to the liver and spleen.The pathophysiology of pneumonic tularemia in rabbits resembles what has been reported for humans. Rabbits therefore are a relevant model of the human disease caused by type A strains of F. tularensis.

  6. Pneumonic tularemia in rabbits resembles the human disease as illustrated by radiographic and hematological changes after infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Douglas S; Smith, Le'kneitah; Dunsmore, Tammy; Trichel, Anita; Ortiz, Luis A; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Barry, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Pneumonic tularemia is caused by inhalation of the gram negative bacterium, Francisella tularensis. Because of concerns that tularemia could be used as a bioterrorism agent, vaccines and therapeutics are urgently needed. Animal models of pneumonic tularemia with a pathophysiology similar to the human disease are needed to evaluate the efficacy of these potential medical countermeasures. Rabbits exposed to aerosols containing Francisella tularensis strain SCHU S4 developed a rapidly progressive fatal pneumonic disease. Clinical signs became evident on the third day after exposure with development of a fever (>40.5°C) and a sharp decline in both food and water intake. Blood samples collected on day 4 found lymphopenia and a decrease in platelet counts coupled with elevations in erythrocyte sedimentation rate, alanine aminotransferase, cholesterol, granulocytes and monocytes. Radiographs demonstrated the development of pneumonia and abnormalities of intestinal gas consistent with ileus. On average, rabbits were moribund 5.1 days after exposure; no rabbits survived exposure at any dose (190-54,000 cfu). Gross evaluation of tissues taken at necropsy showed evidence of pathology in the lungs, spleen, liver, kidney and intestines. Bacterial counts confirmed bacterial dissemination from the lungs to the liver and spleen. The pathophysiology of pneumonic tularemia in rabbits resembles what has been reported for humans. Rabbits therefore are a relevant model of the human disease caused by type A strains of F. tularensis.

  7. Fetal mesenchymal stromal cells differentiating towards chondrocytes acquire a gene expression profile resembling human growth plate cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy A van Gool

    Full Text Available We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP. Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether chondrocytes derived from hfMSCs are a suitable model for studying the development and maturation of the GP. hfMSCs efficiently formed hyaline cartilage in a pellet culture in the presence of TGFβ3 and BMP6. Microarray and principal component analysis were applied to study gene expression profiles during chondrogenic differentiation. A set of 232 genes was found to correlate with in vitro cartilage formation. Several identified genes are known to be involved in cartilage formation and validate the robustness of the differentiating hfMSC model. KEGG pathway analysis using the 232 genes revealed 9 significant signaling pathways correlated with cartilage formation. To determine the progression of growth plate cartilage formation, we compared the gene expression profile of differentiating hfMSCs with previously established expression profiles of epiphyseal GP cartilage. As differentiation towards chondrocytes proceeds, hfMSCs gradually obtain a gene expression profile resembling epiphyseal GP cartilage. We visualized the differences in gene expression profiles as protein interaction clusters and identified many protein clusters that are activated during the early chondrogenic differentiation of hfMSCs showing the potential of this system to study GP development.

  8. Fetal mesenchymal stromal cells differentiating towards chondrocytes acquire a gene expression profile resembling human growth plate cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gool, Sandy A; Emons, Joyce A M; Leijten, Jeroen C H; Decker, Eva; Sticht, Carsten; van Houwelingen, Johannes C; Goeman, Jelle J; Kleijburg, Carin; Scherjon, Sicco A; Gretz, Norbert; Wit, Jan Maarten; Rappold, Gudrun; Post, Janine N; Karperien, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs) differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP). Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether chondrocytes derived from hfMSCs are a suitable model for studying the development and maturation of the GP. hfMSCs efficiently formed hyaline cartilage in a pellet culture in the presence of TGFβ3 and BMP6. Microarray and principal component analysis were applied to study gene expression profiles during chondrogenic differentiation. A set of 232 genes was found to correlate with in vitro cartilage formation. Several identified genes are known to be involved in cartilage formation and validate the robustness of the differentiating hfMSC model. KEGG pathway analysis using the 232 genes revealed 9 significant signaling pathways correlated with cartilage formation. To determine the progression of growth plate cartilage formation, we compared the gene expression profile of differentiating hfMSCs with previously established expression profiles of epiphyseal GP cartilage. As differentiation towards chondrocytes proceeds, hfMSCs gradually obtain a gene expression profile resembling epiphyseal GP cartilage. We visualized the differences in gene expression profiles as protein interaction clusters and identified many protein clusters that are activated during the early chondrogenic differentiation of hfMSCs showing the potential of this system to study GP development.

  9. Extending the honey bee venome with the antimicrobial peptide apidaecin and a protein resembling wasp antigen 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vaerenbergh, M; Cardoen, D; Formesyn, E M; Brunain, M; Van Driessche, G; Blank, S; Spillner, E; Verleyen, P; Wenseleers, T; Schoofs, L; Devreese, B; de Graaf, D C

    2013-04-01

    Honey bee venom is a complex mixture of toxic proteins and peptides. In the present study we tried to extend our knowledge of the venom composition using two different approaches. First, worker venom was analysed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and this revealed the antimicrobial peptide apidaecin for the first time in such samples. Its expression in the venom gland was confirmed by reverse transcription PCR and by a peptidomic analysis of the venom apparatus tissue. Second, genome mining revealed a list of proteins with resemblance to known insect allergens or venom toxins, one of which showed homology to proteins of the antigen 5 (Ag5)/Sol i 3 cluster. It was demonstrated that the honey bee Ag5-like gene is expressed by venom gland tissue of winter bees but not of summer bees. Besides this seasonal variation, it shows an interesting spatial expression pattern with additional production in the hypopharyngeal glands, the brains and the midgut. Finally, our immunoblot study revealed that both synthetic apidaecin and the Ag5-like recombinant from bacteria evoke no humoral activity in beekeepers. Also, no IgG4-based cross-reactivity was detected between the honey bee Ag5-like protein and its yellow jacket paralogue Ves v 5. © 2013 Royal Entomological Society.

  10. The Gastric Ganglion of Octopus vulgaris: Preliminary Characterization of Gene- and Putative Neurochemical-Complexity, and the Effect of Aggregata octopiana Digestive Tract Infection on Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldascino, Elena; Di Cristina, Giulia; Tedesco, Perla; Hobbs, Carl; Shaw, Tanya J.; Ponte, Giovanna; Andrews, Paul L. R.

    2017-01-01

    The gastric ganglion is the largest visceral ganglion in cephalopods. It is connected to the brain and is implicated in regulation of digestive tract functions. Here we have investigated the neurochemical complexity (through in silico gene expression analysis and immunohistochemistry) of the gastric ganglion in Octopus vulgaris and tested whether the expression of a selected number of genes was influenced by the magnitude of digestive tract parasitic infection by Aggregata octopiana. Novel evidence was obtained for putative peptide and non-peptide neurotransmitters in the gastric ganglion: cephalotocin, corticotrophin releasing factor, FMRFamide, gamma amino butyric acid, 5-hydroxytryptamine, molluscan insulin-related peptide 3, peptide PRQFV-amide, and tachykinin–related peptide. Receptors for cholecystokininA and cholecystokininB, and orexin2 were also identified in this context for the first time. We report evidence for acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenaline, octopamine, small cardioactive peptide related peptide, and receptors for cephalotocin and octopressin, confirming previous publications. The effects of Aggregata observed here extend those previously described by showing effects on the gastric ganglion; in animals with a higher level of infection, genes implicated in inflammation (NFκB, fascin, serpinB10 and the toll-like 3 receptor) increased their relative expression, but TNF-α gene expression was lower as was expression of other genes implicated in oxidative stress (i.e., superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin 6, and glutathione peroxidase). Elevated Aggregata levels in the octopuses corresponded to an increase in the expression of the cholecystokininA receptor and the small cardioactive peptide-related peptide. In contrast, we observed decreased relative expression of cephalotocin, dopamine β-hydroxylase, peptide PRQFV-amide, and tachykinin-related peptide genes. A discussion is provided on (i) potential roles of the various molecules in food intake

  11. The Gastric Ganglion of Octopus vulgaris: Preliminary Characterization of Gene- and Putative Neurochemical-Complexity, and the Effect of Aggregata octopiana Digestive Tract Infection on Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Baldascino

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The gastric ganglion is the largest visceral ganglion in cephalopods. It is connected to the brain and is implicated in regulation of digestive tract functions. Here we have investigated the neurochemical complexity (through in silico gene expression analysis and immunohistochemistry of the gastric ganglion in Octopus vulgaris and tested whether the expression of a selected number of genes was influenced by the magnitude of digestive tract parasitic infection by Aggregata octopiana. Novel evidence was obtained for putative peptide and non-peptide neurotransmitters in the gastric ganglion: cephalotocin, corticotrophin releasing factor, FMRFamide, gamma amino butyric acid, 5-hydroxytryptamine, molluscan insulin-related peptide 3, peptide PRQFV-amide, and tachykinin–related peptide. Receptors for cholecystokininA and cholecystokininB, and orexin2 were also identified in this context for the first time. We report evidence for acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenaline, octopamine, small cardioactive peptide related peptide, and receptors for cephalotocin and octopressin, confirming previous publications. The effects of Aggregata observed here extend those previously described by showing effects on the gastric ganglion; in animals with a higher level of infection, genes implicated in inflammation (NFκB, fascin, serpinB10 and the toll-like 3 receptor increased their relative expression, but TNF-α gene expression was lower as was expression of other genes implicated in oxidative stress (i.e., superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin 6, and glutathione peroxidase. Elevated Aggregata levels in the octopuses corresponded to an increase in the expression of the cholecystokininA receptor and the small cardioactive peptide-related peptide. In contrast, we observed decreased relative expression of cephalotocin, dopamine β-hydroxylase, peptide PRQFV-amide, and tachykinin-related peptide genes. A discussion is provided on (i potential roles of the various molecules

  12. Anormalidades neuropatológicas e neuroquímicas no transtorno afetivo bipolar Neuropathological and neurochemical abnormalities in bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benício Noronha Frey

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Estudos pós-mortem, farmacológicos, de neuroimagem e em modelos animais têm demonstrado uma possível associação de mecanismos de sinalização intracelular na fisiopatologia do transtorno afetivo bipolar (TAB. Esse trabalho tem como objetivo revisar os achados em neuropatologia e bioquímica celular. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada uma pesquisa ao MEDLINE, entre 1980 e 2003, tendo sido utilizados os unitermos: bipolar disorder, signaling, second messengers e postmortem, além de referências cruzadas dos artigos selecionados. RESULTADOS: uropatológicos demonstraram uma diminuição do número de células neuronais e gliais, principalmente no córtex pré-frontal de pacientes bipolares. Estudos neuroquímicos demonstraram alterações nas vias do AMPc, fosfatidilinositol, Wnt/GSK-3beta e Ca++ intracelular nesses pacientes. CONCLUSÃO: Os achados de alterações neuropatológicas e neuroquímicas no TAB podem estar relacionados com a fisiopatologia deste transtorno e com os efeitos dos estabilizadores de humor. No entanto, mais estudos são necessários para esclarecer o papel das cascatas de sinalização intracelular na patogênese deste transtorno.OBJECTIVES: Postmortem, pharmacological, neuroimaging, and animal model studies have demonstrated a possible association of intracellular signaling mechanisms in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. The objective of this paper is to review the findings in neuropathology and cellular biochemistry. METHODS: We performed a MEDLINE research, between 1980-2003, using bipolar disorder, signaling, second messengers, and postmortem as keywords, and cross-references. RESULTS: Neuropathological studies reported a decrease in neuronal and glial cells, mainly in the prefrontal cortex of bipolar patients. Neurochemical studies reported dysfunction in cAMP, phosphoinositide, Wnt/GSK-3b, and intracellular Ca++ pathways in these patients. CONCLUSION: The neuropathological and neurochemical abnormalities

  13. Liver Fibrosis and Altered Matrix Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Neubauer

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis represents the uniform response of liver to toxic, infectious or metabolic agents. The process leading to liver fibrosis resembles the process of wound healing, including the three phases following tissue injury: inflammation, synthesis of collagenous and noncollagenous extracellular matrix components, and tissue remodelling (scar formation. While a single liver tissue injury can be followed by an almost complete restitution ad integrum, the persistence of the original damaging noxa results in tissue damage. During the establishment of liver fibrosis, the basement membrane components collagen type IV, entactin and laminin increase and form a basement membrane-like structure within the space of Disse. The number of endothelial fenestrae of the sinusoids decreases. These changes of the sinusoids are called 'capillarization' because the altered structure of the sinusoids resembles that of capillaries. At the cellular level, origin of liver fibrogenesis is initiated by the damage of hepatocytes, resulting in the recruitment of inflammatory cells and platelets, and activation of Kupffer cells, with subsequent release of cytokines and growth factors. The hepatic stellate cells seem to be the primary target cells for these inflammatory stimuli, because during fibrogenesis, they undergo an activation process to a myofibroblast-like cell, which represents the major matrix-producing cell. Based on this pathophysiological mechanism, therapeutic methods are developed to inhibit matrix synthesis or stimulate matrix degradation. A number of substances are currently being tested that either neutralize fibrogenic stimuli and prevent the activation of hepatic stellate cells, or directly modulate the matrix metabolism. However, until now, the elimination of the hepatotoxins has been the sole therapeutic concept available for the treatment of liver fibrogenesis in humans.

  14. Cognitive abnormalities and hippocampal alterations in monoamine oxidase A and B knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chanpreet; Bortolato, Marco; Bali, Namrata; Godar, Sean C.; Scott, Anna L.; Chen, Kevin; Thompson, Richard F.; Shih, Jean C.

    2013-01-01

    The monoamine oxidase isoenzymes (MAOs) A and B play important roles in the homeostasis of monoaminergic neurotransmitters. The combined deficiency of MAO A and B results in significantly elevated levels of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), norepinephrine, dopamine, and β-phenylethylamine; in humans and mice, these neurochemical changes are accompanied by neurodevelopmental perturbations as well as autistic-like responses. Ample evidence indicates that normal levels of monoamines in the hippocampus, amygdala, frontal cortex, and cerebellum are required for the integrity of learning and memory. Thus, in the present study, the cognitive status of MAO A/B knockout (KO) mice was examined with a wide array of behavioral tests. In comparison with male wild-type littermates, MAO A/B KO mice exhibited abnormally high and overgeneralized fear conditioning and enhanced eye-blink conditioning. These alterations were accompanied by significant increases in hippocampal long-term potentiation and alterations in the relative expression of NMDA glutamate receptor subunits. Our data suggest that chronic elevations of monoamines, because of the absence of MAO A and MAO B, cause functional alterations that are accompanied with changes in the cellular mechanisms underlying learning and memory. The characteristics exhibited by MAO A/B KO mice highlight the potential of these animals as a useful tool to provide further insight into the molecular bases of disorders associated with abnormal monoaminergic profiles. PMID:23858446

  15. Mice engrafted with human fetal thymic tissue and hematopoietic stem cells develop pathology resembling chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockridge, Jennifer L; Zhou, Ying; Becker, Yusof A; Ma, Shidong; Kenney, Shannon C; Hematti, Peiman; Capitini, Christian M; Burlingham, William J; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette; Gumperz, Jenny E

    2013-09-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a significant roadblock to long-term hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation success. Effective treatments for cGVHD have been difficult to develop, in part because of a paucity of animal models that recapitulate the multiorgan pathologies observed in clinical cGVHD. Here we present an analysis of the pathology that occurs in immunodeficient mice engrafted with human fetal HSCs and implanted with fragments of human fetal thymus and liver. Starting at time points generally later than 100 days post-transplantation, the mice developed signs of illness, including multiorgan cellular infiltrates containing human T cells, B cells, and macrophages; fibrosis in sites such as lungs and liver; and thickened skin with alopecia. Experimental manipulations that delayed or reduced the efficiency of the HSC engraftment did not affect the timing or progression of disease manifestations, suggesting that pathology in this model is driven more by factors associated with the engrafted human thymic organoid. Disease progression was typically accompanied by extensive fibrosis and degradation of the thymic organoid, and there was an inverse correlation of disease severity with the frequency of FoxP3(+) thymocytes. Hence, the human thymic tissue may contribute T cells with pathogenic potential, but the generation of regulatory T cells in the thymic organoid may help to control these cells before pathology resembling cGVHD eventually develops. This model thus provides a new system to investigate disease pathophysiology relating to human thymic events and to evaluate treatment strategies to combat multiorgan fibrotic pathology produced by human immune cells. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Young Children's Reasoning About Physical & Behavioural Family Resemblance: Is There a Place for a Precursor Model of Inheritance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergazaki, Marida; Alexaki, Aspa; Papadopoulou, Chrysa; Kalpakiori, Marieleni

    2013-04-01

    This paper aims at exploring (a) whether preschoolers recognize that offspring share physical traits with their parents due to birth and behavioural ones due to nurture, and (b) whether they seem ready to explain shared physical traits with a `pre-biological' causal model that includes the contribution of both parents and a rudimentary notion of genes. This exploration is supposed to provide evidence for our next step, which is the development of an early years' learning environment about inheritance. Conducting individual, semi-structured interviews with 90 preschoolers (age 4.5-5.5) of four public kindergartens in Patras, we attempted to trace their reasoning about (a) whether and why offspring share physical and behavioural traits with parents and (b) which mechanism could better explain the shared physical traits. The probes were a modified six-case version of Solomon et al. (Child Dev 67:151-171, 1996) `adoption task, as well as a three-case task based on Springer's (Child Dev 66:547-558, 1995) `mechanism task' and on Solomon and Johnson's (Br J Dev Psychol 18(1):81-96, 2000) idea of genes as a `conceptual placeholder'. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of the interviews showed overlapping reasoning about the origin of physical and behavioural family resemblance. Nevertheless, we did trace the `birth-driven' argument for the attribution of the offspring's physical traits to the biological parents, as well as a preference for the `pre-biological' model that introduces a rudimentary idea of genes in order to explain shared physical traits between parents and offspring. The findings of the study and the educational implications are thoroughly discussed.

  17. Noachian-Age Silica Deposits on Mars with Features Resembling Modern Hot Spring Biosignatures at El Tatio, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, S. W.; Farmer, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrothermal spring deposits of silica (sinter) have long been targets in the search for fossil life on Mars and early Earth because of their ability to capture and preserve biosignatures. In 2007, the Spirit rover observed exposures of opaline silica (amorphous SiO2-*nH2O) adjacent to "Home Plate" in the inner basin of the Columbia Hills of Gusev crater. The presence of opaline silica in the context of a succession of volcanic rocks is interpreted as evidence of past volcanic hydrothermal activity. The silica occurs most commonly in nodular masses that have a rubbly appearance but are considered outcrops because of their stratiform expression and resistance to deformation by the rover wheels. An origin via either fumarole-related acid-sulfate leaching or precipitation from hot spring fluids was suggested previously. However, the potential significance of the characteristic nodular and mm-scale digitate opaline silica structures was not recognized. Our new observations of silica sinter deposits from the active volcanic hydrothermal system at El Tatio in northern Chile provide a basis for scale-integrated comparisons to the silica features at Home Plate, including geologic context, mesoscale structures in outcrops, mm-scale textures, and spectral signatures. The physical environment of El Tatio presents a rare combination of high elevation ( 4300 m), low precipitation rate (Home Plate silica outcrops. Halite (NaCl) encrusts the silica at El Tatio yielding thermal infrared spectra that are the best match yet to spectra from Spirit. Furthermore, the nodular and digitate silica structures at El Tatio that most closely resemble those on Mars include complex sedimentary structures produced by a combination of biotic and abiotic processes. Although fully abiotic processes are not ruled out for the Martian silica structures, they satisfy an a priori definition of potential biosignatures.

  18. The developing lamprey ear closely resembles the zebrafish otic vesicle: otx1 expression can account for all major patterning differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Katherine L; Whitfield, Tanya T

    2006-04-01

    The inner ear of adult agnathan vertebrates is relatively symmetric about the anteroposterior axis, with only two semicircular canals and a single sensory macula. This contrasts with the highly asymmetric gnathostome arrangement of three canals and several separate maculae. Symmetric ears can be obtained experimentally in gnathostomes in several ways, including by manipulation of zebrafish Hedgehog signalling, and it has been suggested that these phenotypes might represent an atavistic condition. We have found, however, that the symmetry of the adult lamprey inner ear is not reflected in its early development; the lamprey otic vesicle is highly asymmetric about the anteroposterior axis, both morphologically and molecularly, and bears a striking resemblance to the zebrafish otic vesicle. The single sensory macula originates as two foci of hair cells, and later shows regions of homology to the zebrafish utricular and saccular maculae. It is likely, therefore, that the last common ancestor of lampreys and gnathostomes already had well-defined otic anteroposterior asymmetries. Both lamprey and zebrafish otic vesicles express a target of Hedgehog signalling, patched, indicating that both are responsive to Hedgehog signalling. One significant distinction between agnathans and gnathostomes, however, is the acquisition of otic Otx1 expression in the gnathostome lineage. We show that Otx1 knockdown in zebrafish, as in Otx1(-/-) mice, gives rise to lamprey-like inner ears. The role of Otx1 in the gnathostome ear is therefore highly conserved; otic Otx1 expression is likely to account not only for the gain of a third semicircular canal and crista in gnathostomes, but also for the separation of the zones of the single macula into distinct regions.

  19. Production and Distribution of 44Ti and 56Ni in a Three-dimensional Supernova Model Resembling Cassiopeia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwathanarat, Annop; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Müller, Ewald; Pllumbi, Else; Wanajo, Shinya

    2017-06-01

    The spatial and velocity distributions of nuclear species synthesized in the innermost regions of core-collapse supernovae can yield important clues about explosion asymmetries and the operation of the still disputed explosion mechanism. Recent observations of radioactive 44Ti with high-energy satellite telescopes (Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array [NuSTAR], INTEGRAL) have measured gamma-ray line details, which provide direct evidence of large-scale explosion asymmetries in SN 1987A and in Cassiopeia A (Cas A) even by mapping of the spatial brightness distribution (NuSTAR). Here we discuss a 3D simulation of a neutrino-driven explosion, using a parameterized neutrino engine, whose 44Ti distribution is mostly concentrated in one hemisphere pointing opposite to the neutron star (NS) kick velocity. Both exhibit intriguing resemblance to the observed morphology of the Cas A remnant, although neither the progenitor nor the explosion was fine-tuned for a perfect match. Our results demonstrate that the asymmetries observed in this remnant can, in principle, be accounted for by a neutrino-driven explosion, and that the high 44Ti abundance in Cas A may be explained without invoking rapid rotation or a jet-driven explosion, because neutrino-driven explosions generically eject large amounts of high-entropy matter. The recoil acceleration of the NS is connected to mass ejection asymmetries and is opposite to the direction of the stronger explosion, fully compatible with the gravitational tugboat mechanism. Our results also imply that Cas A and SN 1987A could possess similarly "one-sided" Ti and Fe asymmetries, with the difference that Cas A is viewed from a direction with large inclination angle to the NS motion, whereas the NS in SN 1987A should have a dominant velocity component pointing toward us.

  20. Behavioral and neurochemical effects of alpha lipoic acid associated with omega-3 in tardive dyskinesia induced by chronic haloperidol in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Dayane Pessoa; Camboim, Thaisa Gracielle Martins; Silva, Ana Patrícia Magalhães; Silva, Caio da Fonseca; de Sousa, Rebeca Canuto; Barbosa, Mabson Delâno Alves; Oliveira, Lucidio Clebeson; Cavalcanti, José Rodolfo Lopes de Paiva; Lucena, Eudes Euler de Souza; Guzen, Fausto Pierdoná

    2017-07-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is characterized by involuntary movements of the lower portion of the face being related to typical antipsychotic therapy. TD is associated with the oxidative imbalance in the basal ganglia. Lipoic acid (LA) and omega-3 (ω-3) are antioxidants acting as enzyme cofactors, regenerating antioxidant enzymes. This study aimed to investigate behavioral and neurochemical effects of supplementation with LA (100 mg/kg) and ω-3 (1 g/kg) in the treatment of TD induced by chronic use of haloperidol (HAL) (1 mg/kg) in rats. Wistar male rats were used, weighing between 180-200 g. The animals were treated chronically (31 days) with LA alone or associated with HAL or ω-3. Motor behavior was assessed by open-field test, the catalepsy test, and evaluation of orofacial dyskinesia. Oxidative stress was accessed by determination of lipid peroxidation and concentration of nitrite. LA and ω-3 alone or associated caused an improvement in motor performance by increasing locomotor activity in the open-field test and decreased the permanence time on the bar in the catalepsy test and decreased the orofacial dyskinesia. LA and ω-3 showed antioxidant effects, decreasing lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels. Thus, the use of LA associated with ω-3 reduced the extrapyramidal effects produced by chronic use of HAL.

  1. Towards a neurochemical profile of the amygdala using short-TE1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Florian; Kühn, Simone; Gallinat, Jürgen; Mekle, Ralf; Ittermann, Bernd

    2017-05-01

    The amygdala plays a key role in emotional learning and in the processing of emotions. As disturbed amygdala function has been linked to several psychiatric conditions, a knowledge of its biochemistry, especially neurotransmitter levels, is highly desirable. The spin echo full intensity acquired localized (SPECIAL) sequence, together with a transmit/receive coil, was used to perform very short-TE magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T to determine the neurochemical profile in a spectroscopic voxel containing the amygdala in 21 healthy adult subjects. For spectral analysis, advanced data processing was applied in combination with a macromolecule baseline measured in the anterior cingulate for spectral fitting. The concentrations of total N-acetylaspartate, total creatine, total choline, myo-inositol and, for the first time, glutamate were quantified with high reliability (uncertainties far below 10%). For these metabolites, the inter-individual variability, reflected by the relative standard deviations for the cohort studied, varied between 12% (glutamate) and 22% (myo-inositol). Glutamine and glutathione could also be determined, albeit with lower precision. Retest on four subjects showed good reproducibility. The devised method allows the determination of metabolite concentrations in the amygdala voxel, including glutamate, provides an estimation of glutamine and glutathione, and may help in the study of disturbed amygdala metabolism in pathologies such as anxiety disorder, autism and major depression. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects of Alpha-Lipoic Acid in the Model of Parkinson’s Disease Induced by Unilateral Stereotaxic Injection of 6-Ohda in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Pessoa de Araújo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate behavioral and neurochemical effects of α-lipoic acid (100 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg alone or associated with L-DOPA using an animal model of Parkinson’s disease induced by stereotaxic injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA in rat striatum. Motor behavior was assessed by monitoring body rotations induced by apomorphine, open field test and cylinder test. Oxidative stress was accessed by determination of lipid peroxidation using the TBARS method, concentration of nitrite and evaluation of catalase activity. α-Lipoic acid decreased body rotations induced by apomorphine, as well as caused an improvement in motor performance by increasing locomotor activity in the open field test and use of contralateral paw (in the opposite side of the lesion produced by 6-OHDA at cylinder test. α-lipoic acid showed antioxidant effects, decreasing lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels and interacting with antioxidant system by decreasing of endogenous catalase activity. Therefore, α-lipoic acid prevented the damage induced by 6-OHDA or by chronic use of L-DOPA in dopaminergic neurons, suggesting that α-lipoic could be a new therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease prevention and treatment.

  3. Toward an in Vivo Neurochemical Profile: Quantification of 18 Metabolites in Short-Echo-Time 1H NMR Spectra of the Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeuffer, Josef; Tkáč , Ivan; Provencher, Stephen W.; Gruetter, Rolf

    1999-11-01

    Localized in vivo1H NMR spectroscopy was performed with 2-ms echo time in the rat brain at 9.4 T. Frequency domain analysis with LCModel showed that the in vivo spectra can be explained by 18 metabolite model solution spectra and a highly structured background, which was attributed to resonances with fivefold shorter in vivo T1 than metabolites. The high spectral resolution (full width at half maximum approximately 0.025 ppm) and sensitivity (signal-to-noise ratio approximately 45 from a 63-μL volume, 512 scans) was used for the simultaneous measurement of the concentrations of metabolites previously difficult to quantify in 1H spectra. The strongly represented signals of N-acetylaspartate, glutamate, taurine, myo-inositol, creatine, phosphocreatine, glutamine, and lactate were quantified with Cramér-Rao lower bounds below 4%. Choline groups, phosphorylethanolamine, glucose, glutathione, γ-aminobutyric acid, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, and alanine were below 13%, whereas aspartate and scyllo-inositol were below 22%. Intra-assay variation was assessed from a time series of 3-min spectra, and the coefficient of variation was similar to the calculated Cramér-Rao lower bounds. Interassay variation was determined from 31 pooled spectra, and the coefficient of variation for total creatine was 7%. Tissue concentrations were found to be in very good agreement with neurochemical data from the literature.

  4. Forced but not free-choice nicotine during lactation alters maternal behavior and noradrenergic system of pups: Impact on social behavior of adolescent isolated male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Doriana; Romano, Emilia; Famele, Marco; Draisci, Rosa; Mancinelli, Rosanna; Pascucci, Tiziana; Adriani, Walter

    2017-10-11

    Adverse effects of nicotine during pregnancy have been greatly studied, while nowadays few works are focused on consequences of maternal tobacco smoking after birth. The present study investigated the behavioral and early neurochemical effects of nicotine treatment during first weeks of post-natal life in rats. We used "free choice" treatment (H2O+NIC dams could drink from two bottles, containing 10mg/L nicotine hydrogen tartrate salt, or water) versus "forced choice" (NIC+NIC mothers could drink from two bottles both containing nicotine hydrogen tartrate salt, range from 0.75mg/L to 4.09mg/L). We found that only "forced nicotine" had impact on maternal behavior, causing increased high-quality maternal care. This immediately impacted on neuro-chemical development, affecting NE levels (only males) in pup's striatum and prefrontal cortex (pFC) at PND 12. After weaning, animals were reared in normal conditions (two brother rats) or in Social Isolation. After two weeks, they were tested with Social Interaction Test (isolated rats met non-isolated opponents, siblings vs. non-siblings). As expected, isolated rats displayed an aggressive form of soliciting behavior: when facing an isolated unknown partner, the non-isolated rat tried to escape. Interestingly, if their dams were exposed to forced nicotine, both rats sooner behaved very affiliative (possibly empathic) between non-sibling partners. As expected, being exposed to post-natal nicotine could alter neuro-chemical development, but with important interactions between both maternal care and adolescent social behavior. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Music and Alterity Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Martí

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of alterity constitutes an important issue in anthropological research and, therefore, in the study of musical practices, as well. Without it, we could hardly understand other kinds of music situated in different spaces and time from the observer. In order to effectively approach these musical practices, we have to develop strategies to help us reduce as much as possible that which distorts the vision of the other. However, beyond the strictly epistemological and methodological issues, the study of music cannot ignore the ethical question related to the manner in which Western thought has understood and treated the other: through a hierarchical and stereotypical type of thinking based on the condition of otherness. Throughout the article, different alterity procedures are presented and discussed, such as synecdochization, exoticization, undervaluation, overvaluation, misunderstanding and exclusion. Taking these different alterity strategies into account may help us to better understand how the musical other is constructed, used and ultimately instrumentalized.

  6. Brain hemispheric differences in the neurochemical effects of lead, prenatal stress, and the combination and their amelioration by behavioral experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory-Slechta, Deborah A; Weston, Douglas; Liu, Sue; Allen, Joshua L

    2013-04-01

    Brain lateralization, critical to mediation of cognitive functions and to "multitasking," is disrupted in conditions such as attention deficit disorder and schizophrenia. Both low-level lead (Pb) exposure and prenatal stress (PS) have been associated with mesocorticolimbic system-mediated executive-function cognitive and attention deficits. Mesocorticolimbic systems demonstrate significant laterality. Thus, altered brain lateralization could play a role in this behavioral toxicity. This study examined laterality of mesocorticolimbic monoamines (frontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, striatum, midbrain) and amino acids (frontal cortex) in male and female rats subjected to lifetime Pb exposure (0 or 50 ppm in drinking water), PS (restraint stress on gestational days 16-17), or the combination with and without repeated learning behavioral experience. Control males exhibited prominent laterality, particularly in midbrain and also in frontal cortex and striatum; females exhibited less laterality, and this was primarily striatal. Lateralized Pb ± PS induced neurotransmitter changes were assessed only in males because of limited sample sizes of Pb + PS females. In males, Pb ± PS changes occurred in left hemisphere of frontal cortex and right hemisphere of midbrain. Behavioral experience modified the laterality of Pb ± PS-induced neurotransmitter changes in a region-dependent manner. Notably, behavioral experience eliminated Pb ± PS neurotransmitter changes in males. These findings underscore the critical need to evaluate both sexes and brain hemispheres for the mechanistic understanding of sex-dependent differences in neuro- and behavioral toxicity. Furthermore, assessment of central nervous system mechanisms in the absence of behavioral experience, shown here for males, may constitute less relevant models of human health effects.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of wrist and finger joints in healthy subjects occasionally shows changes resembling erosions and synovitis as seen in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, Bo; Narvestad, Eva; Rostrup, Egill

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the presence of changes resembling rheumatoid arthritis erosions and synovitis in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints of healthy individuals on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to compare the MRI findings with conventional radiographic, clinical, and biochemical f....... These signs may thus prove to be very specific in the distinction between arthritic and normal joints...

  8. The Pattern of Sexual Interest of Female-to-Male Transsexual Persons With Gender Identity Disorder Does Not Resemble That of Biological Men: An Eye-Tracking Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Tsujimura

    2017-09-01

    Tsujimura A, Kiuchi H, Soda T, et al. The Pattern of Sexual Interest of Female-to-Male Transsexual Persons With Gender Identity Disorder Does Not Resemble That of Biological Men: An Eye-Tracking Study. Sex Med 2017;5:e169–e174.

  9. [Synchronous Double Cancer Involving Gastric Cancer Resembling a Submucosal Tumor with Stenosis in the Pylorus and Ascending Colon Cancer - A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, Tatsuomi; Miyaki, Akira; Ida, Arika; Kishibe, Saki; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Shiozawa, Shunichi; Usui, Takebumi; Kuhara, Kotaro; Kono, Teppei; Naritaka, Yoshihiko

    2016-11-01

    An 82-year-old woman presented to our hospital with a complaint of frequent vomiting. She was admitted for intensive examination and treatment. Abdominal computed tomography revealed that her stomach was severely expanded, and the wall of the ascending colon was thickened throughout its circumference. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy uncovered severe stenosis in the pylorus and an elevated lesion resembling a submucosal tumor on the posterior wall of the pylorus. Biopsies of the lesion revealed that it was of Group 1. On colonoscopy, type 2 cancer was found in the ascending colon throughout the circumference, and the biopsies revealed that it was of Group 5. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated, and the same result was obtained. The possibility of malignancy could not be excluded; therefore, distal gastrectomy and right colectomy were performed. In terms of histopathology, both resected specimens displayed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma; however, immunohistochemical studies revealed differences in staining at the two sites. The case was diagnosed as synchronous double cancer involving gastric cancer resembling a submucosal tumor with stenosis in the pylorus and ascending colon cancer. Gastric cancer resembling a submucosal tumor is usually difficult to diagnose on biopsy. If the endoscopic findings reveal an elevated lesion resembling a submucosal tumor with stenosis, then the possibility of carcinoma should be considered, and the most suitable treatment should be selected.

  10. Anti-emetic mechanisms of Zingiber officinale against cisplatin induced emesis in the pigeon; behavioral and neurochemical correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ihsan; Subhan, Fazal; Ayaz, Muhammad; Shah, Rehmat; Ali, Gowhar; Haq, Ikram Ul; Ullah, Sami

    2015-02-26

    Zingiber officinale (ZO, family Zingiberaceae) has been reported for its antiemetic activity against cancer chemotherapy induced emesis in animal models and in clinics. Current study was designed to investigate ZO for potential usefulness against cisplatin induced vomiting in pigeon and its effects on central and peripheral neurotransmitters involved in the act of vomiting. Zingiber officinale acetone fraction (ZO-ActFr) was investigated for attenuation of emesis induced by cisplatin in healthy pigeons. Neurotransmitters DA, 5HT and their metabolites DOPAC, HVA and 5HIAA were analyzed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography system coupled with electrochemical detector in area postrema, brain stem and intestine. Antiemetic effect of ZO-ActFr was correlated with central and intestinal neurotransmitters levels in pigeon. Cisplatin (7 mg/kg i.v.) induced emesis without lethality upto the observation period. ZO-ActFr (25, 50 & 100 mg/kg) attenuated cisplatin induced emesis ~ 44.18%, 58.13% (P MCP; 30 mg/kg), produced ~ 48.83% reduction (P < 0.05). ZO-ActFr reduced (P < 0.05 - 0.001) 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) concentration in the area postrema, brain stem and intestine at 3(rd) hour of cisplatin administration, while at the 18(th) hour ZO treatments attenuated the dopamine upsurge (P < 0.001) caused by cisplatin in the area postrema and 5HT concentration (P < 0.01 - 0.001) in the brain stem and intestine. ZO treatments alone did not altered the basal neurotransmitters and their metabolites in the brain areas and intestine. The behavioral study verify the antiemetic profile of ZO against cisplatin induced emesis in the pigeon, where central and peripheral neural evidences advocate the involvement of serotonergic mechanism at initial time point (3(rd) hr), while the later time point (18(th) hr) is associated with serotonergic and dopaminergic component in the mediation of its antiemetic effect.

  11. How Misinformation Alters Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Daniel B.; Loftus, Elizabeth F.

    1998-01-01

    Notes that a multitude of studies have demonstrated that misleading postevent information affects people's memories. Contents that the fuzzy-trace theory is a positive step toward understanding the malleability of memory. Discusses fuzzy-trace theory in terms of three primary areas of study: altered response format, maximized misinformation…

  12. Genetic alterations in Glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.B.C. Bralten (Linda); P.J. French (Pim)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractGliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumor and have a dismal prognosis. Understanding the genetic alterations that drive glioma formation and progression may help improve patient prognosis by identification of novel treatment targets. Recently, two major studies have

  13. Distinct Neurochemical Adaptations Within the Nucleus Accumbens Produced by a History of Self-Administered vs Non-Contingently Administered Intravenous Methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lominac, Kevin D; Sacramento, Arianne D; Szumlinski, Karen K; Kippin, Tod E

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine is a highly addictive psychomotor stimulant yet the neurobiological consequences of methamphetamine self-administration remain under-characterized. Thus, we employed microdialysis in rats trained to self-administer intravenous (IV) infusions of methamphetamine (METH-SA) or saline (SAL) and a group of rats receiving non-contingent IV infusions of methamphetamine (METH-NC) at 1 or 21 days withdrawal to determine the dopamine and glutamate responses in the nucleus accumbens (NAC) to a 2 mg/kg methamphetamine intraperitoneal challenge. Furthermore, basal NAC extracellular glutamate content was assessed employing no net-flux procedures in these three groups at both time points. At both 1- and 21-day withdrawal points, methamphetamine elicited a rise in extracellular dopamine in SAL animals and this effect was sensitized in METH-NC rats. However, METH-SA animals showed a much greater sensitized dopamine response to the drug challenge compared with the other groups. Additionally, acute methamphetamine decreased extracellular glutamate in both SAL and METH-NC animals at both time-points. In contrast, METH-SA rats exhibited a modest and delayed rise in glutamate at 1-day withdrawal and this rise was sensitized at 21 days withdrawal. Finally, no net-flux microdialysis revealed elevated basal glutamate and increased extraction fraction at both withdrawal time-points in METH-SA rats. Although METH-NC rats exhibited no change in the glutamate extraction fraction, they exhibited a time-dependent elevation in basal glutamate levels. These data illustrate for the first time that a history of methamphetamine self-administration produces enduring changes in NAC neurotransmission and that non-pharmacological factors have a critical role in the expression of these methamphetamine-induced neurochemical adaptations. PMID:22030712

  14. The expression of Toll-like receptor 4, 7 and co-receptors in neurochemical sub-populations of rat trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helley, M P; Abate, W; Jackson, S K; Bennett, J H; Thompson, S W N

    2015-12-03

    The recent discovery that mammalian nociceptors express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has raised the possibility that these cells directly detect and respond to pathogens with implications for either direct nociceptor activation or sensitization. A range of neuronal TLRs have been identified, however a detailed description regarding the distribution of expression of these receptors within sub-populations of sensory neurons is lacking. There is also some debate as to the composition of the TLR4 receptor complex on sensory neurons. Here we use a range of techniques to quantify the expression of TLR4, TLR7 and some associated molecules within neurochemically-identified sub-populations of trigeminal (TG) and dorsal root (DRG) ganglion sensory neurons. We also detail the pattern of expression and co-expression of two isoforms of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT), a phospholipid remodeling enzyme previously shown to be involved in the lipopolysaccharide-dependent TLR4 response in monocytes, within sensory ganglia. Immunohistochemistry shows that both TLR4 and TLR7 preferentially co-localize with transient receptor potential vallinoid 1 (TRPV1) and purinergic receptor P2X ligand-gated ion channel 3 (P2X3), markers of nociceptor populations, within both TG and DRG. A gene expression profile shows that TG sensory neurons express a range of TLR-associated molecules. LPCAT1 is expressed by a proportion of both nociceptors and non-nociceptive neurons. LPCAT2 immunostaining is absent from neuronal profiles within both TG and DRG and is confined to non-neuronal cell types under naïve conditions. Together, our results show that nociceptors express the molecular machinery required to directly respond to pathogenic challenge independently from the innate immune system. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influences of Chronic Mild Stress Exposure on Motor, Non-Motor Impairments and Neurochemical Variables in Specific Brain Areas of MPTP/Probenecid Induced Neurotoxicity in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janakiraman, Udaiyappan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy Justin; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Barathidasan, Rajamani; SaravanaBabu, Chidambaram; Guillemin, Gilles J; Khan, Mohammed A S

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is regarded as a movement disorder mainly affecting the elderly population and occurs due to progressive loss of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in nigrostriatal pathway. Patients suffer from non-motor symptoms (NMS) such as depression, anxiety, fatigue and sleep disorders, which are not well focussed in PD research. Depression in PD is a predominant /complex symptom and its pathology lies exterior to the nigrostriatal system. The main aim of this study is to explore the causative or progressive effect of chronic mild stress (CMS), a paradigm developed as an animal model of depression in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (25 mg/kg. body wt.) with probenecid (250 mg/kg, s.c.) (MPTP/p) induced mice model of PD. After ten i.p. injections (once in 3.5 days for 5 weeks) of MPTP/p or exposure to CMS for 4 weeks, the behavioural (motor and non-motor) impairments, levels and expressions of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), DAergic markers such as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine transporter (DAT), vesicular monoamine transporters-2 (VMAT 2) and α-synuclein in nigrostriatal (striatum (ST) and substantia nigra (SN)) and extra-nigrostriatal (hippocampus, cortex and cerebellum) tissues were analysed. Significantly decreased DA and 5-HT levels, TH, DAT and VMAT 2 expressions and increased motor deficits, anhedonia-like behaviour and α-synuclein expression were found in MPTP/p treated mice. Pre and/or post exposure of CMS to MPTP/p mice further enhanced the MPTP/p induced DA and 5-HT depletion, behaviour abnormalities and protein expressions. Our results could strongly confirm that the exposure of stress after MPTP/p injections worsens the symptoms and neurochemicals status of PD.

  16. Influences of Chronic Mild Stress Exposure on Motor, Non-Motor Impairments and Neurochemical Variables in Specific Brain Areas of MPTP/Probenecid Induced Neurotoxicity in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udaiyappan Janakiraman

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is regarded as a movement disorder mainly affecting the elderly population and occurs due to progressive loss of dopaminergic (DAergic neurons in nigrostriatal pathway. Patients suffer from non-motor symptoms (NMS such as depression, anxiety, fatigue and sleep disorders, which are not well focussed in PD research. Depression in PD is a predominant /complex symptom and its pathology lies exterior to the nigrostriatal system. The main aim of this study is to explore the causative or progressive effect of chronic mild stress (CMS, a paradigm developed as an animal model of depression in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (25 mg/kg. body wt. with probenecid (250 mg/kg, s.c. (MPTP/p induced mice model of PD. After ten i.p. injections (once in 3.5 days for 5 weeks of MPTP/p or exposure to CMS for 4 weeks, the behavioural (motor and non-motor impairments, levels and expressions of dopamine (DA, serotonin (5-HT, DAergic markers such as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, dopamine transporter (DAT, vesicular monoamine transporters-2 (VMAT 2 and α-synuclein in nigrostriatal (striatum (ST and substantia nigra (SN and extra-nigrostriatal (hippocampus, cortex and cerebellum tissues were analysed. Significantly decreased DA and 5-HT levels, TH, DAT and VMAT 2 expressions and increased motor deficits, anhedonia-like behaviour and α-synuclein expression were found in MPTP/p treated mice. Pre and/or post exposure of CMS to MPTP/p mice further enhanced the MPTP/p induced DA and 5-HT depletion, behaviour abnormalities and protein expressions. Our results could strongly confirm that the exposure of stress after MPTP/p injections worsens the symptoms and neurochemicals status of PD.

  17. Reinforcing and neurochemical effects of the “bath salts” constituents 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylcathinone (methylone) in male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Charles W.; Thorndike, Eric B.; Goldberg, Steven R.; Lehner, Kurt R.; Cozzi, Nicholas V.; Brandt, Simon D.; Baumann, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylcathinone (methylone) are synthetic drugs found in so-called “bath salts” products. Both drugs exert their effects by interacting with monoamine transporter proteins. MDPV is a potent uptake blocker at transporters for dopamine and norepinephrine while methylone is a non-selective releaser at transporters for dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin (5-HT). Objectives We hypothesized that prominent 5-HT-releasing actions of methylone would render this drug less reinforcing than MDPV. Methods To test this hypothesis, we compared behavioral effects of MDPV and methylone using intravenous (i.v.) self-administration on a fixed-ratio 1 schedule in male rats. Additionally, neurochemical effects of the drugs were examined using in vivo microdialysis in nucleus accumbens, in a separate cohort of rats. Results MDPV self-administration (0.03 mg/kg/inj) was acquired rapidly, and reached 40 infusions per session, similar to the effects of cocaine (0.5 mg/kg/inj), by the end of training. By contrast, methylone self-administration (0.3 & 0.5 mg/kg/inj) was acquired slowly, and response rates only reached 20 infusions per session by the end of training. In dose substitution studies, MDPV and cocaine displayed typical inverted U-shaped dose-effect functions, but methylone did not. In vivo microdialysis revealed that i.v. MDPV (0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg) increased extracellular dopamine while i.v. methylone (1 and 3 mg/kg) increased extracellular dopamine and 5-HT. Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that elevations in extracellular 5-HT in the brain can dampen positive reinforcing effects of cathinone-type drugs. Nevertheless, MDPV and methylone are both self-administered by rats suggesting these drugs possess significant abuse liability in humans. PMID:26319160

  18. Reinforcing and neurochemical effects of the "bath salts" constituents 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylcathinone (methylone) in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Charles W; Thorndike, Eric B; Goldberg, Steven R; Lehner, Kurt R; Cozzi, Nicholas V; Brandt, Simon D; Baumann, Michael H

    2016-05-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylcathinone (methylone) are synthetic drugs found in so-called "bath salts" products. Both drugs exert their effects by interacting with monoamine transporter proteins. MDPV is a potent uptake blocker at transporters for dopamine and norepinephrine while methylone is a non-selective releaser at transporters for dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin (5-HT). We hypothesized that prominent 5-HT-releasing actions of methylone would render this drug less reinforcing than MDPV. To test this hypothesis, we compared behavioral effects of MDPV and methylone using intravenous (i.v.) self-administration on a fixed-ratio 1 schedule in male rats. Additionally, neurochemical effects of the drugs were examined using in vivo microdialysis in nucleus accumbens, in a separate cohort of rats. MDPV self-administration (0.03 mg/kg/inj) was acquired rapidly and reached 40 infusions per session, similar to the effects of cocaine (0.5 mg/kg/inj), by the end of training. In contrast, methylone self-administration (0.3 and 0.5 mg/kg/inj) was acquired slowly, and response rates only reached 20 infusions per session by the end of training. In dose substitution studies, MDPV and cocaine displayed typical inverted U-shaped dose-effect functions, but methylone did not. In vivo microdialysis revealed that i.v. MDPV (0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg) increased extracellular dopamine while i.v. methylone (1 and 3 mg/kg) increased extracellular dopamine and 5-HT. Our findings support the hypothesis that elevations in extracellular 5-HT in the brain can dampen positive reinforcing effects of cathinone-type drugs. Nevertheless, MDPV and methylone are both self-administered by rats, suggesting these drugs possess significant abuse liability in humans.

  19. Menstrual blood closely resembles the uterine immune micro-environment and is clearly distinct from peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, R G; Schutten, J H F; van Cranenbroek, B; ter Meer, M; Donckers, J; Scholten, R R; van der Heijden, O W H; Spaanderman, M E A; Joosten, I

    2014-02-01

    Is menstrual blood a suitable source of endometrial derived lymphocytes? Mononuclear cells isolated from menstrual samples (menstrual blood mononuclear cells (MMC)) are clearly distinct from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and show a strong resemblance with biopsy-derived endometrial mononuclear cells. A critical event in the onset of pregnancy is the implantation of the embryo in the uterine wall. The immune cell composition in the endometrium at the time of implantation is considered pivotal for success. Despite advancing knowledge on the composition of the immune cell population in the uterus, the role of endometrial immune cells in reproductive disorders is still not fully resolved, mainly due to the fact that this type of research requires invasive techniques. Here, we collected menstrual fluid and validated this unique non-invasive technique to obtain and study the endometrium-derived immune cells which would be present around the time of implantation. Five healthy non-pregnant females with regular menstruation cycles and not using oral contraceptives collected their menstrual blood using a menstrual cup in five consecutive cycles. Sampling took place over the first 3 days of menses, with 12 h intervals. Peripheral blood samples, taken before and after each menstruation, were obtained for comparative analysis. MMC and PBMC samples were characterized for the different lymphocyte subsets by flow cytometry, with emphasis on NK cells and T cells. Next, the functional capacity of the MMC-derived NK cells was determined by measuring intracellular production of IFN-γ, granzyme B and perforin after culture in the presence of IL-2 and IL-15. In support of their endometrial origin, MMC samples contained the typical composition of mononuclear cells expected of endometrial tissue, were phenotypically similar to the reported phenotype for biopsy-derived endometrial cells, and were distinct from PBMC. Increased percentages of NK cells and decreased percentages

  20. Immunization alters body odor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Bruce A; Opiekun, Maryanne; Yamazaki, Kunio; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2014-04-10

    Infections have been shown to alter body odor. Because immune activation accompanies both infection and immunization, we tested the hypothesis that classical immunization might similarly result in the alteration of body odors detectable by trained biosensor mice. Using a Y-maze, we trained biosensor mice to distinguish between urine odors from rabies-vaccinated (RV) and unvaccinated control mice. RV-trained mice generalized this training to mice immunized with the equine West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine compared with urine of corresponding controls. These results suggest that there are similarities between body odors of mice immunized with these two vaccines. This conclusion was reinforced when mice could not be trained to directly discriminate between urine odors of RV- versus WNV-treated mice. Next, we trained biosensor mice to discriminate the urine odors of mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; a general elicitor of innate immunological responses) from the urine of control mice. These LPS-trained biosensors could distinguish between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and RV-treated mouse urine. Finally, biosensor mice trained to distinguish between the odors of RV-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine did not generalize this training to discriminate between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine. From these experiments, we conclude that: (1) immunization alters urine odor in similar ways for RV and WNV immunizations; and (2) immune activation with LPS also alters urine odor but in ways different from those of RV and WNV. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Mice deficient in transmembrane prostatic acid phosphatase display increased GABAergic transmission and neurological alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi O Nousiainen

    Full Text Available Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, the first diagnostic marker and present therapeutic target for prostate cancer, modulates nociception at the dorsal root ganglia (DRG, but its function in the central nervous system has remained unknown. We studied expression and function of TMPAP (the transmembrane isoform of PAP in the brain by utilizing mice deficient in TMPAP (PAP-/- mice. Here we report that TMPAP is expressed in a subpopulation of cerebral GABAergic neurons, and mice deficient in TMPAP show multiple behavioral and neurochemical features linked to hyperdopaminergic dysregulation and altered GABAergic transmission. In addition to increased anxiety, disturbed prepulse inhibition, increased synthesis of striatal dopamine, and augmented response to amphetamine, PAP-deficient mice have enlarged lateral ventricles, reduced diazepam-induced loss of righting reflex, and increased GABAergic tone in the hippocampus. TMPAP in the mouse brain is localized presynaptically, and colocalized with SNARE-associated protein snapin, a protein involved in synaptic vesicle docking and fusion, and PAP-deficient mice display altered subcellular distribution of snapin. We have previously shown TMPAP to reside in prostatic exosomes and we propose that TMPAP is involved in the control of GABAergic tone in the brain also through exocytosis, and that PAP deficiency produces a distinct neurological phenotype.

  2. Antidepressant-like activity of the endogenous amine, 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline in the behavioral despair test in the rat, and its neurochemical correlates: a comparison with the classical antidepressant, imipramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wąsik, Agnieszka; Możdżeń, Edyta; Romańska, Irena; Michaluk, Jerzy; Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna

    2013-01-30

    Disturbances in noradrenergic and serotonergic transmissions have been postulated to form neurochemical background of depression. 1-Methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (1MeTIQ) is an endogenous substance which exhibits neuroprotective, antiaddictive and monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting properties. In the present study, we tested antidepressant-like effects of 1MeTIQ in comparison with the tricyclic antidepressant, imipramine in the forced swimming test in the rat. Additionally, in neurochemical studies, we estimated the rate of monoamine (dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin) metabolism in the rat brain structures. The findings have shown that 1MeTIQ similarly to imipramine produced a dose-dependent antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test. The neurochemical data showed that 1MeTIQ produced a significant elevation of serotonin concentration in the brain structures with simultaneous reduction of its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). Moreover, 1MeTIQ slightly increased noradrenaline level but induced a significant elevation of its metabolite, 3-metoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG). Furthermore, 1MeTIQ affected also dopamine metabolism, and decreased the level of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) with a simultaneous significant increase in the concentration of 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) in all investigated structures. Such mechanism of action leads to a decrease in the production of free radicals during MAO-dependent dopamine oxidation in the brain. In conclusion, we suggest that antidepressant-like activity of 1MeTIQ is based on the unique and complex mechanism of action in which the activation of monoaminergic systems and scavenging of free radicals plays a crucial role. 1MeTIQ as an endogenous compound may be beneficial from the clinical point of view as a new safer and more efficient antidepressant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of an organism that produces type E botulinal toxin but which resembles Clostridium butyricum from the feces of an infant with type E botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCroskey, L M; Hatheway, C L; Fenicia, L; Pasolini, B; Aureli, P

    1986-01-01

    The apparent causative organism from the only reported case of type E infant botulism was isolated and characterized. Except for its ability to produce type E botulinal toxin, this organism (strain 5262) would be unquestionably identified as Clostridium butyricum. This is the second time an organism resembling a defined Clostridium species other than a member of the C. botulinum group has been implicated in infant botulism.

  4. Conditional Loss of Arx From the Developing Dorsal Telencephalon Results in Behavioral Phenotypes Resembling Mild Human ARX Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonet, Jacqueline C; Sunnen, C Nicole; Wu, Jue; Golden, Jeffrey A; Marsh, Eric D

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in the Aristaless-Related Homeobox (ARX) gene cause structural anomalies of the brain, epilepsy, and neurocognitive deficits in children. During forebrain development, Arx is expressed in both pallial and subpallial progenitor cells. We previously demonstrated that elimination of Arx from subpallial-derived cortical interneurons generates an epilepsy phenotype with features overlapping those seen in patients with ARX mutations. In this report, we have selectively removed Arx from pallial progenitor cells that give rise to the cerebral cortical projection neurons. While no discernable seizure activity was recorded, these mice exhibited a peculiar constellation of behaviors. They are less anxious, less social, and more active when compared with their wild-type littermates. The overall cortical thickness was reduced, and the corpus callosum and anterior commissure were hypoplastic, consistent with a perturbation in cortical connectivity. Taken together, these data suggest that some of the structural and behavioral anomalies, common in patients with ARX mutations, are specifically due to alterations in pallial progenitor function. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that some of the neurobehavioral features found in patients with ARX mutations may not be due to on-going seizures, as is often postulated, given that epilepsy was eliminated as a confounding variable in these behavior analyses. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Anabolic steroids alter the physiological activity of aggression circuits in the lateral anterior hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, T R; Sikes, R W; Melloni, R H

    2016-02-19

    Syrian hamsters exposed to anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence consistently show increased aggressive behavior across studies. Although the behavioral and anatomical profiles of AAS-induced alterations have been well characterized, there is a lack of data describing physiological changes that accompany these alterations. For instance, behavioral pharmacology and neuroanatomical studies show that AAS-induced changes in the vasopressin (AVP) neural system within the latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH) interact with the serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) systems to modulate aggression. To characterize the electrophysiological profile of the AAS aggression circuit, we recorded LAH neurons in adolescent male hamsters in vivo and microiontophoretically applied agonists and antagonists of aggressive behavior. The interspike interval (ISI) of neurons from AAS-treated animals correlated positively with aggressive behaviors, and adolescent AAS exposure altered parameters of activity in regular firing neurons while also changing the proportion of neuron types (i.e., bursting, regular, irregular). AAS-treated animals had more responsive neurons that were excited by AVP application, while cells from control animals showed the opposite effect and were predominantly inhibited by AVP. Both DA D2 antagonists and 5HT increased the firing frequency of AVP-responsive cells from AAS animals and dual application of AVP and D2 antagonists doubled the excitatory effect of AVP or D2 antagonist administration alone. These data suggest that multiple DA circuits in the LAH modulate AAS-induced aggressive responding. More broadly, these data show that multiple neurochemical interactions at the neurophysiological level are altered by adolescent AAS exposure. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The activity of nintedanib in an animal model of allogenic left lung transplantation resembling aspects of allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Suesskind-Schwendi, Marietta; Boxhammer, Elke; Hirt, Stephan W; Schreml, Stephan; Schmid, Christof; Wollin, Lutz; Lehle, Karla

    The prevention and treatment of chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) after lung transplantation (LTx) remain unsatisfactory. Growth factors may play an important role in the development of CLAD. This study evaluated the effects of nintedanib, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in the treatment of CLAD after experimental LTx. A rat model of left lung allo-transplantation (Fisher 344 to Wistar Kyoto) was used to evaluate the effect of nintedanib (50 mg/kg per day) on the development of CLAD. Therapy with nintedanib began 2 days before LTx and ended on postoperative day (POD) 20 (n = 6) or 60 (n = 6). Nontreated animals who underwent LTx (n = 12) were used as controls, whereas naïve lungs (n = 24) served as reference for physiological healthy organs without transplantation damage or medical effects. Acute and chronic rejection were evaluated on POD 20 and 60, respectively. Immunohistologic analysis showed a decrease in growth factors/receptors on POD 60 (nintedanib-treated vs. nontreated controls: platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) A: [P ≤ 0.001]; PDGF receptor-α: [P ≤ 0.001]; vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A: [P ≤ 0.001]; VEGF receptor-2: [P ≤ 0.001]). However, no reductions in fibrotic changes were observed in nintedanib-treated allografts compared with nontreated allografts. Although nintedanib treatment started before LTx none of the animals showed impaired wound healing. No dehiscence of the sutures of the bronchus, vessels or skin, or stenosis of the bronchus was found. In conclusion, while nintedanib reduced the expression of growth factors/receptors in a rat LTx model, a reduction in fibrotic alterations was not observed at POD 60.

  7. Gene expression profiles of luteal phase fallopian tube epithelium from BRCA mutation carriers resemble high-grade serous carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tone, Alicia A; Begley, Heather; Sharma, Monika; Murphy, Joan; Rosen, Barry; Brown, Theodore J; Shaw, Patricia A

    2008-07-01

    To identify molecular alterations potentially involved in predisposition to adnexal serous carcinoma (SerCa) in the nonmalignant fallopian tube epithelium (FTE) of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, given recent evidence implicating the distal FTE as a common source for SerCa. We obtained and compared gene expression profiles of laser capture microdissected nonmalignant distal FTE from 12 known BRCA1/2 mutation carriers (FTEb) and 12 control women (FTEn) during the luteal and follicular phase, as well as 13 high-grade tubal and ovarian SerCa. Gene expression profiles of tubal and ovarian SerCa specimens were indistinguishable by unsupervised cluster analysis and significance analysis of microarrays. FTEb samples as a group, and four individual FTEb samples from the luteal phase in particular, clustered closely with SerCa rather than normal control FTE. Differentially expressed genes from these four samples relative to other FTEb samples, as well as differentially expressed genes in all FTEb luteal samples relative to follicular samples, were mapped to the I2D protein-protein interaction database, revealing a complex network affecting signaling pathways previously implicated in tumorigenesis. Two candidates, disabled homolog 2 mitogen-responsive phosphoprotein (DAB2) and Ski-like (SKIL), were further validated by real-time reverse transcription-PCR and tissue arrays. FTEb luteal and SerCa samples expressed higher levels of oncogenic SKIL and decreased levels of tumor suppressor DAB2, relative to FTEb follicular samples. These findings support a common molecular pathway for adnexal SerCa and implicate factors associated with the luteal phase in predisposition to ovarian cancer in BRCA mutation carriers.

  8. From FRA to RFN, or How the Family Resemblance Approach Can Be Transformed for Science Curriculum Analysis on Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ebru; Erduran, Sibel

    2016-12-01

    The inclusion of Nature of Science (NOS) in the science curriculum has been advocated around the world for several decades. One way of defining NOS is related to the family resemblance approach (FRA). The family resemblance idea was originally described by Wittgenstein. Subsequently, philosophers and educators have applied Wittgenstein's idea to problems of their own disciplines. For example, Irzik and Nola adapted Wittgenstein's generic definition of the family resemblance idea to NOS, while Erduran and Dagher reconceptualized Irzik and Nola's FRA-to-NOS by synthesizing educational applications by drawing on perspectives from science education research. In this article, we use the terminology of "Reconceptualized FRA-to-NOS (RFN)" to refer to Erduran and Dagher's FRA version which offers an educational account inclusive of knowledge about pedagogical, instructional, curricular and assessment issues in science education. Our motivation for making this distinction is rooted in the need to clarify the various accounts of the family resemblance idea.The key components of the RFN include the aims and values of science, methods and methodological rules, scientific practices, scientific knowledge as well as the social-institutional dimensions of science including the social ethos, certification, and power relations. We investigate the potential of RFN in facilitating curriculum analysis and in determining the gaps related to NOS in the curriculum. We analyze two Turkish science curricula published 7 years apart and illustrate how RFN can contribute not only to the analysis of science curriculum itself but also to trends in science curriculum development. Furthermore, we present an analysis of documents from USA and Ireland and contrast them to the Turkish curricula thereby illustrating some trends in the coverage of RFN categories. The results indicate that while both Turkish curricula contain statements that identify science as a cognitive-epistemic system, they

  9. Identification and distribution of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and neurochemical markers in the neuroepithelial cells of the gill and the skin in the giant mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Giacomo; Lauriano, Eugenia Rita; Kuciel, Michał; Capillo, Gioele; Pergolizzi, Simona; Alesci, Alessio; Ishimatsu, Atsushi; Ip, Yuen Kwong; Icardo, Jose M

    2017-08-05

    Mudskippers are amphibious fishes living in mudflats and mangroves. These fishes hold air in their large buccopharyngeal-opercular cavities where respiratory gas exchange takes place via the gills and higher vascularized epithelium lining the cavities and also the skin epidermis. Although aerial ventilation response to changes in ambient gas concentration has been studied in mudskippers, the localization and distribution of respiratory chemoreceptors, their neurochemical coding and function as well as physiological evidence for the gill or skin as site for O2 and CO2 sensing are currently not known. In the present study we assessed the distribution of serotonin, acetylcholine, catecholamines and nitric oxide in the neuroepithelial cells (NECs) of the mudskipper gill and skin epithelium using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Colocalization studies showed that 5-HT is coexpressed with nNOS, Na+/K+-ATPase, TH and VAChT; nNOS is coexpressed with Na+/K+-ATPase and TH in the skin. In the gill 5-HT is coexpressed with nNOS and VAhHT and nNOS is coexpressed with Na+/K+-ATPase and TH. Acetylcholine is also expressed in chain and proximal neurons projecting to the efferent filament artery and branchial smooth muscle. The serotonergic cells c labeled with VAChT, nNOS and TH, thus indicating the presence of NEC populations and the possibility that these neurotransmitters (other than serotonin) may act as primary transmitters in the hypoxic reflex in fish gills. Immunolabeling with TH antibodies revealed that NECs in the gill and the skin are innervated by catecholaminergic nerves, thus suggesting that these cells are involved in a central control of branchial functions through their relationships with the sympathetic branchial nervous system. The Na+/K+-ATPase in mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs), which are most concentrated in the gill lamellar epithelium, is colabeled with nNOS and associated with TH nerve terminals. TH-immunopositive fine varicosities were also

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of wrist and finger joints in healthy subjects occasionally shows changes resembling erosions and synovitis as seen in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejbjerg, Bo; Narvestad, Eva; Rostrup, Egill

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the presence of changes resembling rheumatoid arthritis erosions and synovitis in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints of healthy individuals on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to compare the MRI findings with conventional radiographic, clinical, and biochemical.......5%), while only minimal early synovial enhancement was detected by dynamic MRI. Three subjects had elevated serum levels of C-reactive protein, and these subjects displayed 44.5% of the synovitis-like changes and 41.7% of the erosion-like changes. Bone marrow edema-like changes were not found in any joints...

  11. Altered fingerprints: analysis and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Soweon; Feng, Jianjiang; Jain, Anil K

    2012-03-01

    The widespread deployment of Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) in law enforcement and border control applications has heightened the need for ensuring that these systems are not compromised. While several issues related to fingerprint system security have been investigated, including the use of fake fingerprints for masquerading identity, the problem of fingerprint alteration or obfuscation has received very little attention. Fingerprint obfuscation refers to the deliberate alteration of the fingerprint pattern by an individual for the purpose of masking his identity. Several cases of fingerprint obfuscation have been reported in the press. Fingerprint image quality assessment software (e.g., NFIQ) cannot always detect altered fingerprints since the implicit image quality due to alteration may not change significantly. The main contributions of this paper are: 1) compiling case studies of incidents where individuals were found to have altered their fingerprints for circumventing AFIS, 2) investigating the impact of fingerprint alteration on the accuracy of a commercial fingerprint matcher, 3) classifying the alterations into three major categories and suggesting possible countermeasures, 4) developing a technique to automatically detect altered fingerprints based on analyzing orientation field and minutiae distribution, and 5) evaluating the proposed technique and the NFIQ algorithm on a large database of altered fingerprints provided by a law enforcement agency. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed approach in detecting altered fingerprints and highlight the need to further pursue this problem.

  12. Music alters visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolij, Jacob; Meurs, Maaike

    2011-04-21

    Visual perception is not a passive process: in order to efficiently process visual input, the brain actively uses previous knowledge (e.g., memory) and expectations about what the world should look like. However, perception is not only influenced by previous knowledge. Especially the perception of emotional stimuli is influenced by the emotional state of the observer. In other words, how we perceive the world does not only depend on what we know of the world, but also by how we feel. In this study, we further investigated the relation between mood and perception. We let observers do a difficult stimulus detection task, in which they had to detect schematic happy and sad faces embedded in noise. Mood was manipulated by means of music. We found that observers were more accurate in detecting faces congruent with their mood, corroborating earlier research. However, in trials in which no actual face was presented, observers made a significant number of false alarms. The content of these false alarms, or illusory percepts, was strongly influenced by the observers' mood. As illusory percepts are believed to reflect the content of internal representations that are employed by the brain during top-down processing of visual input, we conclude that top-down modulation of visual processing is not purely predictive in nature: mood, in this case manipulated by music, may also directly alter the way we perceive the world.

  13. Altered Perspectives: Immersive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, J. S.; Webley, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    Immersive environments provide an exciting experiential technology to visualize the natural world. Given the increasing accessibility of 360o cameras and virtual reality headsets we are now able to visualize artistic principles and scientific concepts in a fully immersive environment. The technology has become popular for photographers as well as designers, industry, educational groups, and museums. Here we show a sci-art perspective on the use of optics and light in the capture and manipulation of 360o images and video of geologic phenomena and cultural heritage sites in Alaska, England, and France. Additionally, we will generate intentionally altered perspectives to lend a surrealistic quality to the landscapes. Locations include the Catacombs of Paris, the Palace of Versailles, and the Northern Lights over Fairbanks, Alaska. Some 360o view cameras now use small portable dual lens technology extending beyond the 180o fish eye lens previously used, providing better coverage and image quality. Virtual reality headsets range in level of sophistication and cost, with the most affordable versions using smart phones and Google Cardboard viewers. The equipment used in this presentation includes a Ricoh Theta S spherical imaging camera. Here we will demonstrate the use of 360o imaging with attendees being able to be part of the immersive environment and experience our locations as if they were visiting themselves.

  14. Music alters visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Jolij

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual perception is not a passive process: in order to efficiently process visual input, the brain actively uses previous knowledge (e.g., memory and expectations about what the world should look like. However, perception is not only influenced by previous knowledge. Especially the perception of emotional stimuli is influenced by the emotional state of the observer. In other words, how we perceive the world does not only depend on what we know of the world, but also by how we feel. In this study, we further investigated the relation between mood and perception. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We let observers do a difficult stimulus detection task, in which they had to detect schematic happy and sad faces embedded in noise. Mood was manipulated by means of music. We found that observers were more accurate in detecting faces congruent with their mood, corroborating earlier research. However, in trials in which no actual face was presented, observers made a significant number of false alarms. The content of these false alarms, or illusory percepts, was strongly influenced by the observers' mood. CONCLUSIONS: As illusory percepts are believed to reflect the content of internal representations that are employed by the brain during top-down processing of visual input, we conclude that top-down modulation of visual processing is not purely predictive in nature: mood, in this case manipulated by music, may also directly alter the way we perceive the world.

  15. Do children and their parents eat a similar diet? Resemblance in child and parental dietary intake: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Beydoun, M A; Li, J; Liu, Y; Moreno, L A

    2011-02-01

    Parents are believed to have a strong influence on children's eating behaviours. However, previous findings on child-parent resemblance in dietary intakes are mixed. We systematically reviewed and meta-analysed the association (correlations) based on published studies. We searched related studies published since 1980 and found 24 studies meeting inclusion criteria for review and 15 for meta-regression analysis. We compared the associations between parent-child pairs, nutrients, over time and by dietary assessment method. Most studies were based on small samples. Overall, they suggest a moderate or weak association, but findings varied remarkably. Our meta-analysis showed that average Fisher's transformed correlations were 0.20 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.28) for fat (% energy); for energy, 0.21 (0.18 to 0.24). The correlations varied by parent-child pairs, dietary assessment and countries. Food frequency questionnaires or mixed approaches yielded lower correlation than 24-h recalls or food records. Child self-reported intakes showed weaker correlation and better methodology quality showed stronger correlation in fat intake (% energy), which also became weaker over time. Overall, the resemblance is weak, and it varied considerably across studies, nutrients, foods and parent-child pairs.

  16. Brief daily postpartum separations from the litter alter dam response to psychostimulants and to stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P. Silveira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal handling induces several behavioral and neurochemical alterations in pups, including decreased responses to stress and reduced fear in new environments. However, there are few reports in the literature concerning the behavioral effects of this neonatal intervention on the dams during the postpartum period. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine if brief postpartum separation from pups has a persistent impact on the dam's stress response and behavior. Litters were divided into two neonatal groups: 1 non-handled and 2 handled [10 min/day, from postnatal day (PND 1 to 10]. Weaning occurred at PND 21 when behavioral tasks started to be applied to the dams, including sweet food ingestion (PND 21, forced swimming test (PND 28, and locomotor response to a psychostimulant (PND 28. On postpartum day 40, plasma was collected at baseline for leptin assays and after 1 h of restraint for corticosterone assay. Regarding sweet food consumption, behavior during the forced swimming test or plasma leptin levels did not differ between dams briefly separated and non-separated from their pups during the postpartum period. On the other hand, both increased locomotion in response to diethylpropion and increased corticosterone secretion in response to acute stress were detected in dams briefly separated from their pups during the first 10 postnatal days. Taken together, these findings suggest that brief, repeated separations from the pups during the neonatal period persistently impact the behavior and induce signs of dopaminergic sensitization in the dam.

  17. Investigación neuroquímica cerebral y aplicación preventiva para la reducción de los índices de criminalidad/Neurochemical brain research and it’s preventive application to reduce the crime statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Tieghi (Argentina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigación neuroquímica cerebral y aplicación preventiva para la reducción de los índices de criminalidad Neurochemical brain research and it’s preventive application to reduce the crime statistics

  18. Neurochemical and structural markers in the brain predicting best choice-of-treatment in patients with schizophrenia - The Pan European Collaboration on Antipsychotic Naïve Schizophrenia II (PECANS II) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Kasper; Bojesen, Kirsten Borup; Sigvard, Anne Mette

    the progressive loss of brain tissue and social functions seen in many patients. Aim of PECANS II: To test if persistently high levels of glutamate and loss of brain tissue and social functions characterize a subgroup of patients with poor treatment response, while dopaminergic disturbances characterize another...... as markers for best-choice-of-treatment. Further, the results can pave the way for the development of new antipsychotic medication modulating glutamatergic disturbances and lead to better prevention strategies for the progressive loss of brain tissue and social functions in a treatment resistant subgroup...... disturbances with positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, and loss of brain tissue with analysis of a structural MR-scanning revealing loss of cortical thickness and surface area. Neurochemical and structural disturbances are compared with treatment response and level of function as measured by various...

  19. The new and improved learning community at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine resembles that at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Rosalyn W; Barker, Allison R; Shochet, Robert B; Wright, Scott M

    2007-05-01

    In July 2005, a learning community was created at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM) to foster camaraderie, networking, advising, mentoring, professionalism, clinical skills, and scholarship--The Colleges. The cultural and structural changes that emerged with the creation of this program have resulted in JHUSOM bearing a resemblance to J. K. Rowling's fictional Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. This manuscript will describe the similarities between these two revered schools, and highlight the innovations and improvements made to JHUSOM's learning environment. The intense, stressful, and lengthy professional training required to achieve competency in the practice of medicine and in the practice of witchcraft (albeit fictional) have meaningful parallels. The supportive learning environment at these two schools should afford the next generation of graduates to have an even more enriching experience than those who have come before them.

  20. Curriculum Innovation: Difference and Resemblance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Una; Torrance, Harry

    2011-01-01

    How do teachers respond to a mathematics curriculum innovation? This paper reports some of the findings from a UK Research Council (ESRC)-funded project investigating how teachers in English secondary schools (students aged 12-16 years) responded to innovation. A Gatsby Foundation funded program implemented new materials; the project investigated…

  1. Spectrum of short- and long-term brain pathology and long-term behavioral deficits in male repeated hypoxic rats closely resembling human extreme prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oorschot, Dorothy E; Voss, Logan; Covey, Matthew V; Goddard, Liping; Huang, William; Birchall, Penny; Bilkey, David K; Kohe, Sarah E

    2013-07-17

    Brain injury in the premature infant is associated with a high risk of neurodevelopmental disability. Previous small-animal models of brain injury attributable to extreme prematurity typically fail to generate a spectrum of pathology and behavior that closely resembles that observed in humans, although they provide initial answers to numerous cellular, molecular, and therapeutic questions. We tested the hypothesis that exposure of rats to repeated hypoxia from postnatal day 1 (P1) to P3 models the characteristic white matter neuropathological injury, gray matter volume loss, and memory deficits seen in children born extremely prematurely. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to repeated hypoxia or repeated normoxia from P1 to P3. The absolute number of pre-oligodendrocytes and mature oligodendrocytes, the surface area and g-ratio of myelin, the absolute volume of cerebral white and gray matter, and the absolute number of cerebral neurons were quantified stereologically. Spatial memory was investigated on a radial arm maze. Rats exposed to repeated hypoxia had a significant loss of (1) pre-oligodendrocytes at P4, (2) cerebral white matter volume and myelin at P14, (3) cerebral cortical and striatal gray matter volume without neuronal loss at P14, and (4) cerebral myelin and memory deficits in adulthood. Decreased myelin was correlated with increased attention deficit hyperactivity disorder-like hyperactivity. This new small-animal model of extreme prematurity generates a spectrum of short- and long-term pathology and behavior that closely resembles that observed in humans. This new rat model provides a clinically relevant tool to investigate numerous cellular, molecular, and therapeutic questions on brain injury attributable to extreme prematurity.

  2. Retinoid metabolism is altered in human and mouse cicatricial alopecia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts, Helen B.; Silva, Kathleen A.; Montgomery, Shalise; Suo, Liye; Menser, Monica; Valet, Amy S.; King, Lloyd E.; Ong, David E; Sundberg, John P.

    2012-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice develop dermatitis and scarring alopecia resembling human cicatricial alopecias (CA), particularly the central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) type. To evaluate the role of retinoids in CA, expression of retinoid metabolism components were examined in these mice with mild, moderate, or severe CA compared to hair cycle matched mice with no disease. Two feeding studies were performed with dams fed either NIH 31 diet (study 1) or AIN93G diet (study 2). Adult mice were fed AIN93M diet with 4 (recommended), 28, or 56 IU vitamin A/g diet. Feeding the AIN93M diet to adults increased CA frequency over NIH 31 fed mice. Increased follicular dystrophy was seen in study 1 and increased dermal scars in study 2 in mice fed the 28 IU diet. These results indicate that retinoid metabolism is altered in CA in C57BL/6J mice that require precise levels of dietary vitamin A. Human patients with CCCA, pseudopelade (end stage scarring), and controls with no alopecia were also studied. Many retinoid metabolism proteins were increased in mild CCCA, but were undetectable in pseudopelade. Studies to determine if these dietary alterations in retinoid metabolism seen in C57BL/6J mice are also involved in different types of human CA are needed. PMID:23096705

  3. Perinatal exposure to low-dose of bisphenol A causes anxiety-like alteration in adrenal axis regulation and behaviors of rat offspring: a potential role for metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rong; Chen, Fang; Feng, Xuejiao; Zhou, Libin; Li, Yingchun; Chen, Ling

    2015-05-01

    The present study focuses on detecting anxiety-like behavior and associated neurochemical alterations in adolescent rats exposed perinatally to bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen-mimicking endocrine disrupter and investigating the possible involvement of metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptors (mGlu2/3 receptors) in BPA-induced anxiogenic effects. When female breeders were administered orally with BPA (40 μg/kg/d) during pregnancy and lactation, their pups (here named 'BPA-exposed offspring') developed an anxiety-like phenotype, characterized by the hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, impaired glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated negative feedback regulation of the HPA axis, altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity and increased anxiety-like behaviors. BPA-exposed offspring also showed a reduced expression of mGlu2/3 receptors in the hippocampus. BPA-exposed offspring further subjected to systemic administration of mGlu2/3 receptor agonist (LY379268, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or antagonist (LY341495, 1.5 mg/kg, i.p.) twice per day for 6 days. The results indicated that chronic LY379268 treatment corrected the anxiety-like behaviors and associated neurochemical and endocrinological alterations in BPA-exposed offspring. Our data demonstrate for the first time that the perinatal BPA exposure induces an anxiety-like phenotype in behaviors and -related neuroendocrinology, and suggest that the changes in mGlu2/3 receptor might lie at the core of the pathological reprogramming triggered by early-life adversity. mGlu2/3 receptor may serve as a novel biomarker and potential therapeutic target for anxiety disorders associated with adverse early-life agents including perinatal BPA exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic alteration in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoo Chul; Kang, Tae Woong; Lee, Jin Oh [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Cancer of stomach, colon and liver are a group of the most common cancer in Korea. However, results with current therapeutic modalities are still unsatisfactory. The intensive efforts have been made to understand basic pathogenesis and to find better therapeutic tools for the treatment of this miserable disease. We studied the alteration of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in hepatocellular carcinoma in Korea. We found that alteration of Rb gene, APC were 33 %, 13 % respectively. But alterations of oncogenes such as myc, ras and mdm2 were rarely found. Our results suggests that HBV may act as oncogenic role in hepatocarcinogenesis instead of oncogenes. 6 figs, 2 tabs. (Author).

  5. Hypothesis tests for hydrologic alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Charles N.; Croteau, Kelly E.; Vogel, Richard M.

    2015-11-01

    Hydrologic systems can be altered by anthropogenic and climatic influences. While there are a number of statistical frameworks for describing and evaluating the extent of hydrologic alteration, here we present a new framework for assessing whether statistically significant hydrologic alteration has occurred, or whether the shift in the hydrologic regime is consistent with the natural variability of the system. Four hypothesis tests based on shifts of flow duration curves (FDCs) are developed and tested using three different experimental designs based on different strategies for resampling of annual FDCs. The four hypothesis tests examined are the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS), Kuiper (K), confidence interval (CI), and ecosurplus and ecodeficit (Eco). Here 117 streamflow sites that have potentially undergone hydrologic alteration due to reservoir construction are examined. 20 years of pre-reservoir record is used to develop the critical value of the test statistic for type I errors of 5% and 10%, while 10 years of post-alteration record is used to examine the power of each test. The best experimental design, based on calculating the mean annual FDC from an exhaustive jackknife resampling regime, provided a larger number of unique values of each test statistic and properly reproduced type I errors. Of the four tests, the CI test consistently had the highest power, while the K test had the second highest power; KS and Eco always had the lowest power. The power of the CI test appeared related to the storage ratio of the reservoir, a rough measure of the hydrologic alteration of the system.

  6. Altered metabolic signature in pre-diabetic NOD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Madsen

    Full Text Available Altered metabolism proceeding seroconversion in children progressing to Type 1 diabetes has previously been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that non-obese diabetic (NOD mice show a similarly altered metabolic profile compared to C57BL/6 mice. Blood samples from NOD and C57BL/6 female mice was collected at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15 weeks and the metabolite content was analyzed using GC-MS. Based on the data of 89 identified metabolites OPLS-DA analysis was employed to determine the most discriminative metabolites. In silico analysis of potential involved metabolic enzymes was performed using the dbSNP data base. Already at 0 weeks NOD mice displayed a unique metabolic signature compared to C57BL/6. A shift in the metabolism was observed for both strains the first weeks of life, a pattern that stabilized after 5 weeks of age. Multivariate analysis revealed the most discriminative metabolites, which included inosine and glutamic acid. In silico analysis of the genes in the involved metabolic pathways revealed several SNPs in either regulatory or coding regions, some in previously defined insulin dependent diabetes (Idd regions. Our result shows that NOD mice display an altered metabolic profile that is partly resembling the previously observation made in children progressing to Type 1 diabetes. The level of glutamic acid was one of the most discriminative metabolites in addition to several metabolites in the TCA cycle and nucleic acid components. The in silico analysis indicated that the genes responsible for this reside within previously defined Idd regions.

  7. Permian ginkgophyte fossils from the Dolomites resemble extant O-ha-tsuki aberrant leaf-like fructifications of Ginkgo biloba L

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Structural elucidation and analysis of fructifications of plants is fundamental for understanding their evolution. In case of Ginkgo biloba, attention was drawn by Fujii in 1896 to aberrant fructifications of Ginkgo biloba whose seeds are attached to leaves, called O-ha-tsuki in Japan. This well-known phenomenon was now interpreted by Fujii as being homologous to ancestral sporophylls. The common fructification of Ginkgo biloba consists of 1-2 (rarely more) ovules on a dichotomously divided stalk, the ovules on top of short stalklets, with collars supporting the ovules. There is essentially no disagreement that either the whole stalk with its stalklets, collars and ovules is homologous to a sporophyll, or, alternatively, just one stalklet, collar and ovule each correspond to a sporophyll. For the transition of an ancestral sporophyll resembling extant O-ha-tsuki aberrant leaves into the common fructification with stalklet/collar/ovule, evolutionary reduction of the leaf lamina of such ancestral sporophylls has to be assumed. Furthermore, such ancestral sporophylls would be expected in the fossil record of ginkgophytes. Results From the Upper Permian of the Bletterbach gorge (Dolomites, South Tyrol, Italy) ginkgophyte leaves of the genus Sphenobaiera were discovered. Among several specimens, one shows putatively attached seeds, while other specimens, depending on their state of preservation, show seeds in positions strongly suggesting such attachment. Morphology and results of a cuticular analysis are in agreement with an affiliation of the fossil to the ginkgophytes and the cuticle of the seed is comparable to that of Triassic and Jurassic ones and to those of extant Ginkgo biloba. The Sphenobaiera leaves with putatively attached seeds closely resemble seed-bearing O-ha-tsuki leaves of extant Ginkgo biloba. This leads to the hypothesis that, at least for some groups of ginkgophytes represented by extant Ginkgo biloba, such sporophylls represent the

  8. Permian ginkgophyte fossils from the Dolomites resemble extant O-ha-tsuki aberrant leaf-like fructifications of Ginkgo biloba L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kustatscher Evelyn

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural elucidation and analysis of fructifications of plants is fundamental for understanding their evolution. In case of Ginkgo biloba, attention was drawn by Fujii in 1896 to aberrant fructifications of Ginkgo biloba whose seeds are attached to leaves, called O-ha-tsuki in Japan. This well-known phenomenon was now interpreted by Fujii as being homologous to ancestral sporophylls. The common fructification of Ginkgo biloba consists of 1-2 (rarely more ovules on a dichotomously divided stalk, the ovules on top of short stalklets, with collars supporting the ovules. There is essentially no disagreement that either the whole stalk with its stalklets, collars and ovules is homologous to a sporophyll, or, alternatively, just one stalklet, collar and ovule each correspond to a sporophyll. For the transition of an ancestral sporophyll resembling extant O-ha-tsuki aberrant leaves into the common fructification with stalklet/collar/ovule, evolutionary reduction of the leaf lamina of such ancestral sporophylls has to be assumed. Furthermore, such ancestral sporophylls would be expected in the fossil record of ginkgophytes. Results From the Upper Permian of the Bletterbach gorge (Dolomites, South Tyrol, Italy ginkgophyte leaves of the genus Sphenobaiera were discovered. Among several specimens, one shows putatively attached seeds, while other specimens, depending on their state of preservation, show seeds in positions strongly suggesting such attachment. Morphology and results of a cuticular analysis are in agreement with an affiliation of the fossil to the ginkgophytes and the cuticle of the seed is comparable to that of Triassic and Jurassic ones and to those of extant Ginkgo biloba. The Sphenobaiera leaves with putatively attached seeds closely resemble seed-bearing O-ha-tsuki leaves of extant Ginkgo biloba. This leads to the hypothesis that, at least for some groups of ginkgophytes represented by extant Ginkgo biloba, such

  9. Inferior cerebellar hypoplasia resembling a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in purebred Eurasier dogs with familial non-progressive ataxia: a retrospective and prospective clinical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino, Filipa; Rentmeister, Kai; Schmidt, Martin J; Bruehschwein, Andreas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Matiasek, Lara A; Lauda, Alexander; Schoon, Heinz A; Fischer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations can be inherited or caused by insults during cerebellar development. To date, only sporadic cases of cerebellar malformations have been reported in dogs, and the genetic background has remained obscure. Therefore, this study`s objective was to describe the clinical characteristics, imaging features and pedigree data of a familial cerebellar hypoplasia in purebred Eurasier dogs. A uniform cerebellar malformation characterized by consistent absence of the caudal portions of the cerebellar vermis and, to a lesser degree, the caudal portions of the cerebellar hemispheres in association with large retrocerebellar fluid accumulations was recognized in 14 closely related Eurasier dogs. Hydrocephalus was an additional feature in some dogs. All dogs displayed non-progressive ataxia, which had already been noted when the dogs were 5-6 weeks old. The severity of the ataxia varied between dogs, from mild truncal sway, subtle dysmetric gait, dysequilibrium and pelvic limb ataxia to severe cerebellar ataxia in puppies and episodic falling or rolling. Follow-up examinations in adult dogs showed improvement of the cerebellar ataxia and a still absent menace response. Epileptic seizures occurred in some dogs. The association of partial vermis agenesis with an enlarged fourth ventricle and an enlarged caudal (posterior) fossa resembled a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in some dogs. Pedigree analyses were consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance.

  10. Alloxan-Induced Diabetes Causes Morphological and Ultrastructural Changes in Rat Liver that Resemble the Natural History of Chronic Fatty Liver Disease in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Natália Lucchesi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study evaluated the long-term effects of alloxan-induced diabetes in rat liver. Methods. Thirty nondiabetic control rats (NC and 30 untreated diabetic (UD rats were divided into three subgroups sacrificed after 6, 14, or 26 weeks. Clinical and laboratory parameters were assessed. Fresh liver weight and its relationship with body weight were obtained, and liver tissue was analyzed. Results. UD rats showed sustained hyperglycemia, high glycosylated hemoglobin, and low plasma insulin. High serum levels of AST and ALT were observed in UD rats after 2 weeks, but only ALT remained elevated throughout the experiment. Fresh liver weight was equal between NC and UD rats, but the fresh liver weight/body weight ratio was significantly higher in UD rats after 14 and 26 weeks. UD rats showed liver morphological changes characterized by hepatic sinusoidal enlargement and micro- and macrovesicular hepatocyte fatty degeneration with progressive liver structure loss, steatohepatitis, and periportal fibrosis. Ultrastructural changes of hepatocytes, such as a decrease in the number of intracytoplasmic organelles and degeneration of mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and nuclei, were also observed. Conclusion. Alloxan-induced diabetes triggered liver morphological and ultrastructural changes that closely resembled human disease, ranging from steatosis to steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis.

  11. Narcissism Guides Mate Selection: Humans Mate Assortatively, as Revealed by Facial Resemblance, following an Algorithm of “Self Seeking Like”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Alvarez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical studies suggest that mating and pair formation is not likely to be random. Computer simulations suggested that sex among genetically complex organisms requires mate choice strategies for its evolutionary maintenance, to reduce excessive genetic variance produced by out-crossing. One strategy achieving this aim efficiently in computer simulations is assortative mating modeled as “self seeking like”. Another one is selection of “good genes”. Assortative mating increases the probability of finding a genetically similar mate, without fomenting inbreeding, achieving assortative mating without hindering the working of other mate selection strategies which aim to maximize the search for “good genes”, optimizing the working of sex in evolutionary terms. Here we present indirect evidence that in a significant proportion of human reproductive couples, the partners show much higher facial resemblances than can be expected by random pair formation, or as the outcome of “matching for attractiveness” or the outcome of competition for the most attractive partner accessible, as had been previously assumed. The data presented is compatible with the hypothesis derived from computer simulations, that human mate selection strategies achieve various aims: “self seeking like” (including matching for attractiveness and mating with the best available genes.

  12. Inferior Cerebellar Hypoplasia Resembling a Dandy-Walker-Like Malformation in Purebred Eurasier Dogs with Familial Non-Progressive Ataxia: A Retrospective and Prospective Clinical Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino, Filipa; Rentmeister, Kai; Schmidt, Martin J.; Bruehschwein, Andreas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Matiasek, Lara A.; Lauda, Alexander; Schoon, Heinz A.; Fischer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations can be inherited or caused by insults during cerebellar development. To date, only sporadic cases of cerebellar malformations have been reported in dogs, and the genetic background has remained obscure. Therefore, this study`s objective was to describe the clinical characteristics, imaging features and pedigree data of a familial cerebellar hypoplasia in purebred Eurasier dogs. A uniform cerebellar malformation characterized by consistent absence of the caudal portions of the cerebellar vermis and, to a lesser degree, the caudal portions of the cerebellar hemispheres in association with large retrocerebellar fluid accumulations was recognized in 14 closely related Eurasier dogs. Hydrocephalus was an additional feature in some dogs. All dogs displayed non-progressive ataxia, which had already been noted when the dogs were 5 – 6 weeks old. The severity of the ataxia varied between dogs, from mild truncal sway, subtle dysmetric gait, dysequilibrium and pelvic limb ataxia to severe cerebellar ataxia in puppies and episodic falling or rolling. Follow-up examinations in adult dogs showed improvement of the cerebellar ataxia and a still absent menace response. Epileptic seizures occurred in some dogs. The association of partial vermis agenesis with an enlarged fourth ventricle and an enlarged caudal (posterior) fossa resembled a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in some dogs. Pedigree analyses were consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. PMID:25668516

  13. Inferior cerebellar hypoplasia resembling a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in purebred Eurasier dogs with familial non-progressive ataxia: a retrospective and prospective clinical cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Bernardino

    Full Text Available Cerebellar malformations can be inherited or caused by insults during cerebellar development. To date, only sporadic cases of cerebellar malformations have been reported in dogs, and the genetic background has remained obscure. Therefore, this study`s objective was to describe the clinical characteristics, imaging features and pedigree data of a familial cerebellar hypoplasia in purebred Eurasier dogs. A uniform cerebellar malformation characterized by consistent absence of the caudal portions of the cerebellar vermis and, to a lesser degree, the caudal portions of the cerebellar hemispheres in association with large retrocerebellar fluid accumulations was recognized in 14 closely related Eurasier dogs. Hydrocephalus was an additional feature in some dogs. All dogs displayed non-progressive ataxia, which had already been noted when the dogs were 5-6 weeks old. The severity of the ataxia varied between dogs, from mild truncal sway, subtle dysmetric gait, dysequilibrium and pelvic limb ataxia to severe cerebellar ataxia in puppies and episodic falling or rolling. Follow-up examinations in adult dogs showed improvement of the cerebellar ataxia and a still absent menace response. Epileptic seizures occurred in some dogs. The association of partial vermis agenesis with an enlarged fourth ventricle and an enlarged caudal (posterior fossa resembled a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in some dogs. Pedigree analyses were consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance.

  14. A Palaeoproterozoic multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq gold deposit, South Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robin-Marie; Kolb, Jochen; Waight, Tod Earle; Bagas, Leon; Thomsen, Tonny B.

    2017-03-01

    Nalunaq is an orogenic, high gold grade deposit situated on the Nanortalik Peninsula, South Greenland. Mineralisation is hosted in shear zone-controlled quartz veins, located in fine- and medium-grained amphibolite. The deposit was the site of Greenland's only operating metalliferous mine until its closure in 2014, having produced 10.67 t of gold. This study uses a combination of field investigation, petrography and U/Pb zircon and titanite geochronology to define a multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq. A clinopyroxene-plagioclase-garnet(-sulphide) alteration zone (CPGZ) developed in the Nanortalik Peninsula, close to regional peak metamorphism and prior to gold-quartz vein formation. The ca. 1783-1762-Ma gold-quartz veins are hosted in reactivated shear zones with a hydrothermal alteration halo of biotite-arsenopyrite-sericite-actinolite-pyrrhotite(-chlorite-plagioclase-löllingite-tourmaline-titanite), which is best developed in areas of exceptionally high gold grades. Aplite dykes dated to ca. 1762 Ma cross-cut the gold-quartz veins, providing a minimum age for mineralisation. A hydrothermal calcite-titanite alteration assemblage is dated to ca. 1766 Ma; however, this alteration is highly isolated, and as a result, its field relationships are poorly constrained. The hydrothermal alteration and mineralisation is cut by several generations of ca. 1745-Ma biotite granodiorite accompanied by brittle deformation. A ca. 1745-Ma lower greenschist facies hydrothermal epidote-calcite-zoisite alteration assemblage with numerous accessory minerals forms halos surrounding the late-stage fractures. The contrasting hydrothermal alteration styles at Nalunaq indicate a complex history of exhumation from amphibolite facies conditions to lower greenschist facies conditions in an orogenic belt which resembles modern Phanerozoic orogens.

  15. Lisuride and bromocryptine in L-Dopa stable-responder parkinsonian patients: a comparative, double-blind evaluation of cardiopressor and neurochemical effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micieli, G; Martignoni, E; Cavallini, A; Pacchetti, C; Rossi, F; Horowski, R; Nappi, G

    1996-01-01

    In this study, we compared the haemodynamic and biochemical effects of bromocryptine to those of lisuride, in L-Dopa stable responder parkinsonian (PD) patients. Nineteen PD patients were admitted to the study. A double-blind, parallel group, randomized study was performed. Patients were randomly chosen to receive lisuride or bromoryptine. Both drugs were administered in increasing dosages until a maximum of either 0.6 mg lisuride or 7.5 mg bromocryptine was reached. The following tests were carried out: periprandial study, tilt table test and cardiovascular tests (sustained handgrip test, deep-breathing, lying-to-standing and Valsalva manoeuvre). During the tests, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were monitored with an automatic sphyngomanometer. Blood samples for catecholamine assay were taken during tilt table test. In basal conditions 70% of the randomly chosen men in the bromocryptine group showed significant orthostatic hypotension (OH), while only one subject in the lisuride group demonstrated comparable OH values. The deepest derangement of orthostatic regulation was observed in the lisuride group but it should not be attributed to the greater hypotensive effects of this drug. Infact, the cardiopressor effects of bromocryptine may well be "masked" by the alteration detected in baseline conditions. Only bromocryptine significantly reduced supine and orthostatic NE plasma levels on the 14th day of therapy. Neither bromocryptine nor lisuride significantly altered periprandial blood pressure values. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that lisuride and bromocryptine are well tolerated as far as the analysis of the development of hypotensive effects is concerned. Further, more sophisticated study, with other agents that block the peripheral and/or central effects of dopamine-agonists in PD patients should be conducted in order better to define the precise role of these types of agents and the potential cardiopressor risks in these subjects.

  16. Art as Alterity in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    In education, art has often been perceived as entertainment and decoration and is the first subject to go when there are budget cuts or test-score pressures. Drawing on Emmanuel Lévinas's idea of the primacy of radical alterity that breaks the totality of our being, enables self-transformation and ethics, and ensures community as a totality…

  17. Epigenetic alterations in hematopoietic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Young Rock; Schatoff, Emma; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2012-10-01

    Gene discovery efforts in patients with hematopoietic malignancies have brought to the forefront a series of mutations in genes thought to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. These mutations occur in genes known, or suspected, to play a role in modifying cytosine nucleotides on DNA and/or altering the state of histone modifications. Genes such as ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2, IDH1/2, MLL1, and TET2 all have been shown to be mutated and/or translocated in patients with myeloid malignancies. Intriguingly, many of the alterations affecting DNA cytosine modifications in myeloid malignancies (mutations in DNMT3A, IDH1/2, and TET2) have also been found in patients with T-cell lymphomas, and EZH2 mutations appear to be critical in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development as well. In addition, the discovery of frequent mutations in CREBBP, EP300, EZH2, and MLL2 in B-cell lymphomas suggests that epigenetic alterations play a critical role in lymphomagenesis. The purpose of this review is to present functional evidence of how alterations in these epigenetic modifiers promote hematopoietic transformation. The conclusions drawn from these data are valuable in understanding biological mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets.

  18. Twelve percent of hips with a primary cam deformity exhibit a slip-like morphology resembling sequelae of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Christoph E; Steppacher, Simon D; Haefeli, Pascal C; Werlen, Stefan; Hanke, Markus S; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Tannast, Moritz

    2015-04-01

    In some hips with cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), we observed a morphology resembling a more subtle form of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Theoretically, the morphology in these hips should differ from hips with a primary cam-type deformity. We asked if (1) head-neck offset; (2) epiphyseal angle; and (3) tilt angle differ among hips with a slip-like morphology, idiopathic cam, hips after in situ pinning of SCFE, and normal hips; and (4) what is the prevalence of a slip-like morphology among cam-type hips? We retrospectively compared the three-dimensional anatomy of hips with a slip-like morphology (29 hips), in situ pinning for SCFE (eight hips), idiopathic cam deformity (171 hips), and 30 normal hips using radial MRI arthrography. Normal hips were derived from 17 asymptomatic volunteers. All other hips were recruited from a series of 277 hips (243 patients) seen at a specialized academic hip center between 2006 and 2010. Forty-one hips with isolated pincer deformity were excluded. Thirty-six of 236 hips had a known cause of cam impingement (secondary cam), including eight hips after in situ pinning of SCFE (postslip group). The 200 hips with a primary cam were separated in hips with a slip-like morphology (combination of positive fovea sign [if the neck axis did not intersect with the fovea capitis] and a tilt angle [between the neck axis and perpendicular to the basis of the epiphysis] exceeding 4°) and hips with an idiopathic cam. We evaluated offset ratio, epiphyseal angle (angle between the neck axis and line connecting the center of the femoral head and the point where the physis meets the articular surface), and tilt angle circumferentially around the femoral head-neck axis. Prevalence of slip-like morphology was determined based on the total of 236 hips with cam deformities. Offset ratio was decreased anterosuperiorly in idiopathic cam, slip-like, and postslip (eg, 1 o'clock position with a mean offset ranging from 0.00 to 0.14; p

  19. Human CD4+ T cell responses to the dog major allergen Can f 1 and its human homologue tear lipocalin resemble each other.

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    Aino L K Liukko

    Full Text Available Lipocalin allergens form a notable group of proteins, as they contain most of the significant respiratory allergens from mammals. The basis for the allergenic capacity of allergens in the lipocalin family, that is, the development of T-helper type 2 immunity against them, is still unresolved. As immunogenicity has been proposed to be a decisive feature of allergens, the purpose of this work was to examine human CD4+ T cell responses to the major dog allergen Can f 1 and to compare them with those to its human homologue, tear lipocalin (TL. For this, specific T cell lines were induced in vitro from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Can f 1-allergic and healthy dog dust-exposed subjects with peptides containing the immunodominant T cell epitopes of Can f 1 and the corresponding TL peptides. We found that the frequency of Can f 1 and TL-specific T cells in both subject groups was low and close to each other, the difference being about two-fold. Importantly, we found that the proliferative responses of both Can f 1 and TL-specific T cell lines from allergic subjects were stronger than those from healthy subjects, but that the strength of the responses within the subject groups did not differ between these two antigens. Moreover, the phenotype of the Can f 1 and TL-specific T cell lines, determined by cytokine production and expression of cell surface markers, resembled each other. The HLA system appeared to have a minimal role in explaining the allergenicity of Can f 1, as the allergic and healthy subjects' HLA background did not differ, and HLA binding was very similar between Can f 1 and TL peptides. Along with existing data on lipocalin allergens, we conclude that strong antigenicity is not decisive for the allergenicity of Can f 1.

  20. Intrinsic brain activity of cognitively normal older persons resembles more that of patients both with and at risk for Alzheimer's disease than that of healthy younger persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Lorenzo; Tonch, Annika; Plant, Claudia; Zherdin, Andrew; Ortner, Marion; Kurz, Alexander; Förstl, Hans; Zimmer, Claus; Grimmer, Timo; Wohlschäger, Afra; Riedl, Valentin; Sorg, Christian

    2014-06-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), recent findings suggest that amyloid-β (Aβ)-pathology might start 20-30 years before first cognitive symptoms arise. To account for age as most relevant risk factor for sporadic AD, it has been hypothesized that lifespan intrinsic (i.e., ongoing) activity of hetero-modal brain areas with highest levels of functional connectivity triggers Aβ-pathology. This model induces the simple question whether in older persons without any cognitive symptoms intrinsic activity of hetero-modal areas is more similar to that of symptomatic patients with AD or to that of younger healthy persons. We hypothesize that due to advanced age and therefore potential impact of pre-clinical AD, intrinsic activity of older persons resembles more that of patients than that of younger controls. We tested this hypothesis in younger (ca. 25 years) and older healthy persons (ca. 70 years) and patients with mild cognitive impairment and AD-dementia (ca. 70 years) by the use of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, distinct measures of intrinsic brain activity, and different hierarchical clustering approaches. Independently of applied methods and involved areas, healthy older persons' intrinsic brain activity was consistently more alike that of patients than that of younger controls. Our result provides evidence for larger similarity in intrinsic brain activity between healthy older persons and patients with or at-risk for AD than between older and younger ones, suggesting a significant proportion of pre-clinical AD cases in the group of cognitively normal older people. The observed link of aging and AD with intrinsic brain activity supports the view that lifespan intrinsic activity may contribute critically to the pathogenesis of AD.

  1. Intrinsic Brain Activity of Cognitively Normal Older Persons Resembles More That of Patients Both with and at Risk for Alzheimer's Disease Than That of Healthy Younger Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Lorenzo; Tonch, Annika; Plant, Claudia; Zherdin, Andrew; Ortner, Marion; Kurz, Alexander; Förstl, Hans; Zimmer, Claus; Grimmer, Timo; Wohlschäger, Afra; Riedl, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In Alzheimer's disease (AD), recent findings suggest that amyloid-β (Aβ)-pathology might start 20–30 years before first cognitive symptoms arise. To account for age as most relevant risk factor for sporadic AD, it has been hypothesized that lifespan intrinsic (i.e., ongoing) activity of hetero-modal brain areas with highest levels of functional connectivity triggers Aβ-pathology. This model induces the simple question whether in older persons without any cognitive symptoms intrinsic activity of hetero-modal areas is more similar to that of symptomatic patients with AD or to that of younger healthy persons. We hypothesize that due to advanced age and therefore potential impact of pre-clinical AD, intrinsic activity of older persons resembles more that of patients than that of younger controls. We tested this hypothesis in younger (ca. 25 years) and older healthy persons (ca. 70 years) and patients with mild cognitive impairment and AD-dementia (ca. 70 years) by the use of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, distinct measures of intrinsic brain activity, and different hierarchical clustering approaches. Independently of applied methods and involved areas, healthy older persons' intrinsic brain activity was consistently more alike that of patients than that of younger controls. Our result provides evidence for larger similarity in intrinsic brain activity between healthy older persons and patients with or at-risk for AD than between older and younger ones, suggesting a significant proportion of pre-clinical AD cases in the group of cognitively normal older people. The observed link of aging and AD with intrinsic brain activity supports the view that lifespan intrinsic activity may contribute critically to the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:24689864

  2. Immortalization of T-Cells Is Accompanied by Gradual Changes in CpG Methylation Resulting in a Profile Resembling a Subset of T-Cell Leukemias

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    Sofie Degerman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We have previously described gene expression changes during spontaneous immortalization of T-cells, thereby identifying cellular processes important for cell growth crisis escape and unlimited proliferation. Here, we analyze the same model to investigate the role of genome-wide methylation in the immortalization process at different time points pre-crisis and post-crisis using high-resolution arrays. We show that over time in culture there is an overall accumulation of methylation alterations, with preferential increased methylation close to transcription start sites (TSSs, islands, and shore regions. Methylation and gene expression alterations did not correlate for the majority of genes, but for the fraction that correlated, gain of methylation close to TSS was associated with decreased gene expression. Interestingly, the pattern of CpG site methylation observed in immortal T-cell cultures was similar to clinical T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL samples classified as CpG island methylator phenotype positive. These sites were highly overrepresented by polycomb target genes and involved in developmental, cell adhesion, and cell signaling processes. The presence of non-random methylation events in in vitro immortalized T-cell cultures and diagnostic T-ALL samples indicates altered methylation of CpG sites with a possible role in malignant hematopoiesis.

  3. Altered local field potential activity and serotonergic neurotransmission are further characteristics of the Flinders sensitive line rat model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voget, Mareike; Rummel, Julia; Avchalumov, Yosef; Sohr, Reinhard; Haumesser, Jens K; Rea, Ellis; Mathé, Aleksander A; Hadar, Ravit; van Riesen, Christoph; Winter, Christine

    2015-09-15

    A significant portion of patients suffering from major depression remains refractory to available antidepressant treatment strategies. This highlights the need for a better understanding of the underlying neuropathology in order to develop rationale-based treatments. Here we aimed to further characterize neurobiological abnormalities of the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat model of depression. Biochemically, in FSL rats we mainly found increased levels of serotonin in most cortical and subcortical brain regions when compared to controls. Using electrophysiological measurements, in FSL rats we found decreased alpha, beta and low gamma oscillatory activity in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens and decreased alpha and beta as well as increased low gamma oscillatory activity in the subthalamicus nucleus when compared to controls. In summary, we show distinct neurochemical properties in combination with particular oscillatory activity patterns for brain areas thought to be pathophysiologically relevant for depression. Our data contribute to the further understanding of neurobiological alterations in the FSL rat model of depression that could provide a basis for research into future therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-Heptamethoxyflavone Ameliorates Depressive-Like Behavior and Hippocampal Neurochemical Changes in Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stressed Mice by Regulating the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor: Requirement for ERK Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamoto, Atsushi; Okuyama, Satoshi; Amakura, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Morio; Yamada, Takashi; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko; Nakajima, Mitsunari

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that the subcutaneous administration of 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-heptamethoxyflavone (HMF), a citrus polymethoxyflavone, attenuated depressive-like behavior and increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of a corticosterone-induced depression-like mouse model. We herein demonstrated that (1) HMF was detectable in the brain 10 and 30 min after its oral administration, (2) orally administered HMF improved chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS)-induced pathological conditions, including body weight loss and depressive-like behavior, and CUMS-induced neurochemical changes, such as reduction in BDNF expression, decrease in neurogenesis, and decreased level of phosphorylated calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the hippocampus, and (3) these effects of HMF were inhibited by the pre-administration of U0126, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitor. These results suggest that orally administered HMF is beneficial for the upregulation of BDNF in the hippocampus via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2)/MAP system, which may account for its antidepression effects. PMID:29023414

  5. 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-Heptamethoxyflavone Ameliorates Depressive-Like Behavior and Hippocampal Neurochemical Changes in Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stressed Mice by Regulating the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor: Requirement for ERK Activation

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    Atsushi Sawamoto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the subcutaneous administration of 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-heptamethoxyflavone (HMF, a citrus polymethoxyflavone, attenuated depressive-like behavior and increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus of a corticosterone-induced depression-like mouse model. We herein demonstrated that (1 HMF was detectable in the brain 10 and 30 min after its oral administration, (2 orally administered HMF improved chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS-induced pathological conditions, including body weight loss and depressive-like behavior, and CUMS-induced neurochemical changes, such as reduction in BDNF expression, decrease in neurogenesis, and decreased level of phosphorylated calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the hippocampus, and (3 these effects of HMF were inhibited by the pre-administration of U0126, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase inhibitor. These results suggest that orally administered HMF is beneficial for the upregulation of BDNF in the hippocampus via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2/MAP system, which may account for its antidepression effects.

  6. Frequent gene dosage alterations in stromal cells of epithelial ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhkanen, Hanna; Anttila, Maarit; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Heinonen, Seppo; Juhola, Matti; Helisalmi, Seppo; Kataja, Vesa; Mannermaa, Arto

    2006-09-15

    Stromal cells are an active and integral part of epithelial neoplasms. We have previously observed allelic imbalance on chromosome 3p21 in both stromal and epithelial cells of ovarian tumors. This study was designed to explore gene dosage alterations throughout human chromosomes from stromal and epithelial cells of epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Thirteen stromal and 24 epithelial samples, microdissected from epithelial ovarian carcinomas, were analyzed using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technique. Analysis covered 110 cancer related genes. Frequent genetic alterations were detected both in the stroma and epithelium of ovarian carcinomas. The mean number of altered genes per tumor was 10.8 in stroma and 23.6 in epithelium. In the stroma, the mean number of gains was 6.6 and of losses 4.2 and in the epithelium 13.7 and 9.9. The high number of changes associated with advanced tumor stage (p = 0.035) and death due to ovarian cancer (p = 0.032). The most frequent alteration was the deletion of the deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC) on chromosome 18q21.3 in 62% of samples. Loss of DCC was related to endometrioid subtype (p = 0.033). Large chromosomal aberrations were detected on the basis of alterations in adjacent genes. Most importantly, 38 genes showed similar genetic alterations (gain-gain or loss-loss) in stromal and epithelial compartments of 11 tumor pairs. Thus, frequent genetic alterations in stromal cells of epithelial ovarian carcinomas resembled those of malignant epithelial cells and may indicate a common precursor cell type. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition may generate transformed cancer cells and modify the tumor microenvironment with distinct properties.

  7. Altered neural connectivity in excitatory and inhibitory cortical circuits in autism

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    Basilis eZikopoulos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Converging evidence from diverse studies suggests that atypical brain connectivity in autism affects in distinct ways short- and long-range cortical pathways, disrupting neural communication and the balance of excitation and inhibition. This hypothesis is based mostly on functional non-invasive studies that show atypical synchronization and connectivity patterns between cortical areas in children and adults with autism. Indirect methods to study the course and integrity of major brain pathways at low resolution show changes in fractional anisotropy or diffusivity of the white matter in autism. Findings in post-mortem brains of adults with autism provide evidence of changes in the fine structure of axons below prefrontal cortices, which communicate over short- or long-range pathways with other cortices and subcortical structures. Here we focus on evidence of cellular and axon features that likely underlie the changes in short- and long-range communication in autism. We review recent findings of changes in the shape, thickness, and volume of brain areas, cytoarchitecture, neuronal morphology, cellular elements, and structural and neurochemical features of individual axons in the white matter, where pathology is evident even in gross images. We relate cellular and molecular features to imaging and genetic studies that highlight a variety of polymorphisms and epigenetic factors that primarily affect neurite growth and synapse formation and function in autism. We report preliminary findings of changes in autism in the ratio of distinct types of inhibitory neurons in prefrontal cortex, known to shape network dynamics and the balance of excitation and inhibition. Finally we present a model that synthesizes diverse findings by relating them to developmental events, with a goal to identify common processes that perturb development in autism and affect neural communication, reflected in altered patterns of attention, social interactions, and language.

  8. Wfs1-deficient mice display altered function of serotonergic system and increased behavioural response to antidepressants

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    Tanel eVisnapuu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that mutations in the WFS1 gene make humans more susceptible to mood disorders. Besides that, mood disorders are associated with alterations in the activity of serotonergic and noradrenergic systems. Therefore, in this study, the effects of imipramine, an inhibitor of serotonin (5-HT and noradrenaline (NA reuptake, and paroxetine, a selective inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake, were studied in tests of behavioural despair. The tail suspension test (TST and forced swimming test (FST were performed in Wfs1-deficient mice. Simultaneously, gene expression and monoamine metabolism studies were conducted to evaluate changes in 5-HT- and NA-ergic systems of Wfs1-deficient mice. The basal immobility time of Wfs1-deficient mice in TST and FST did not differ from that of their wild-type littermates. However, a significant reduction of immobility time in response to lower doses of imipramine and paroxetine was observed in homozygous Wfs1-deficient mice, but not in their wild-type littermates. In gene expression studies, the levels of 5-HT transporter (SERT were significantly reduced in the pons of homozygous animals. Monoamine metabolism was assayed separately in the dorsal and ventral striatum of naive mice and mice exposed for 30 minutes tobrightly lit motility boxes. We found that this aversive challenge caused a significant increase in the levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA, a metabolite of 5-HT, in the ventral and dorsal striatum of wild-type mice, but not in their homozygous littermates. Taken together, the blunted 5-HT metabolism and reduced levels of SERT are a likely reason for the elevated sensitivity of these mice to the action of imipramine and paroxetine. These changes in the pharmacological and neurochemical phenotype of Wfs1-deficient mice may help to explain the increased susceptibility of Wolfram syndrome patients to depressive states.

  9. Buccal alterations in diabetes mellitus

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    Negrato Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long standing hyperglycaemia besides damaging the kidneys, eyes, nerves, blood vessels, heart, can also impair the function of the salivary glands leading to a reduction in the salivary flow. When salivary flow decreases, as a consequence of an acute hyperglycaemia, many buccal or oral alterations can occur such as: a increased concentration of mucin and glucose; b impaired production and/or action of many antimicrobial factors; c absence of a metalloprotein called gustin, that contains zinc and is responsible for the constant maturation of taste papillae; d bad taste; e oral candidiasis f increased cells exfoliation after contact, because of poor lubrication; g increased proliferation of pathogenic microorganisms; h coated tongue; i halitosis; and many others may occur as a consequence of chronic hyperglycaemia: a tongue alterations, generally a burning mouth; b periodontal disease; c white spots due to demineralization in the teeth; d caries; e delayed healing of wounds; f greater tendency to infections; g lichen planus; h mucosa ulcerations. Buccal alterations found in diabetic patients, although not specific of this disease, have its incidence and progression increased when an inadequate glycaemic control is present.

  10. Learning and memory alterations are associated with hippocampal N-acetylaspartate in a rat model of depression as measured by 1H-MRS.

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    Guangjun Xi

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that cognitive processes, such as learning and memory, are affected in depression. The present study used a rat model of depression, chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS, to determine whether hippocampal volume and neurochemical changes were involved in learning and memory alterations. A further aim was to determine whether these effects could be ameliorated by escitalopram treatment, as assessed with the non-invasive techniques of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. Our results demonstrated that CUMS had a dramatic influence on spatial cognitive performance in the Morris water maze task, and CUMS reduced the concentration of neuronal marker N-acetylaspartate (NAA in the hippocampus. These effects could be significantly reversed by repeated administration of escitalopram. However, neither chronic stress nor escitalopram treatment influenced hippocampal volume. Of note, the learning and memory alterations of the rats were associated with right hippocampal NAA concentration. Our results indicate that in depression, NAA may be a more sensitive measure of cognitive function than hippocampal volume.

  11. Primary Bone Lymphoma Exhibits a Favorable Prognosis and Distinct Gene Expression Signatures Resembling Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Derived From Centrocytes in the Germinal Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Yi, Shuhua; Dabaja, Bouthaina S; Manyam, Ganiraju C; Westin, Jason; Fowler, Nathan; Miranda, Roberto N; Zhang, Mingzhi; Ferry, Judith A; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Harris, Nancy L; Young, Ken H

    2017-10-01

    Primary bone (PB) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is rare and has a favorable prognosis, but the underlying biological mechanisms remain unknown. In this study we analyzed the clinicopathologic features of 160 patients with PB-DLBCL in comparison with 499 nonosseous DLBCL. Compared with patients with nonosseous DLBCL and secondary involvement of bone by DLBCL, PB-DLBCL patients less frequently had elderly age, B-symptoms, elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase levels, and high International Prognostic Index at diagnosis, more frequently had germinal center (GC) subtype (approximately 90%) and complete remission, and had significantly better survival. The 5-year progression-free and overall survival rates of PB-DLBCL patients were 80% and 93%, respectively, superior to both GC B-cell-like (GCB) and activated B cell-like subtypes of DLBCL. Further stratifying nonosseous DLBCL cell-of-origin subtypes by clinical factors showed that PB-DLBCL had similar survival rates as the centrocyte-origin (CC) subtype of DLBCL-GCB classified by the B-cell-associated gene signature algorithm. To better understand the favorable outcome of PB-DLBCL patients, gene expression profiling and microRNA profiling were performed in a small subset of PB-DLBCL. The gene expression profiles of PB-DLBCL resembled those of nonosseous DLBCL-GCB-CC, but were distinct from other DLBCL cell-of-origin especially the centroblast-origin (CB) subtype. Compared with DLBCL-GCB-CB, PB-DLBCL and DLBCL-GCB-CC also had much higher levels of miR-125a-3p, miR-34-3p, and miR-155-5p, and significantly lower levels of miR-17-5p and miR-17-3p. These results demonstrated that PB-DLBCL is clinically distinct, and the cell-of-origin of PB-DLBCL stems from centrocytes in the GC, that are biologically attributed for the favorable prognosis of PB-DLBCL.

  12. A Practical Model of Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Training Induces Performance and Metabolic Adaptations That Resemble ‘All-Out’ Sprint Interval Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayati, Mahdi; Farzad, Babak; Gharakhanlou, Reza; Agha-Alinejad, Hamid

    2011-01-01

    practical low-volume HIT program is effective for improving metabolic and performance adaptations that resemble many of the same performance gains occurred in all-out SIT protocol. PMID:24150635

  13. The Pattern of Sexual Interest of Female-to-Male Transsexual Persons With Gender Identity Disorder Does Not Resemble That of Biological Men: An Eye-Tracking Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Akira; Kiuchi, Hiroshi; Soda, Tetsuji; Takezawa, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Takao, Tetsuya; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Iwasa, Atsushi; Nonomura, Norio; Miyagawa, Yasushi

    2017-09-01

    With Gender Identity Disorder Does Not Resemble That of Biological Men: An Eye-Tracking Study. Sex Med 2017;5:e169-e174. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. A practical model of low-volume high-intensity interval training induces performance and metabolic adaptations that resemble 'all-out' sprint interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayati, Mahdi; Farzad, Babak; Gharakhanlou, Reza; Agha-Alinejad, Hamid

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a novel type of high-intensity interval training known as sprint interval training has demonstrated increases in aerobic and anaerobic performance with very low time commitment. However, this type of training program is unpractical for general populations. The present study compared the impact of a low-volume high-intensity interval training to a "all-out" sprint interval training. Twenty-four active young males were recruited and randomized into three groups: (G1: 3-5 cycling bouts ˟ 30-s all-out with 4 min recovery; G2: 6- 10 cycling bouts ˟ 125% Pmax with 2 min recovery) and a non-trained control group. They all performed a VO2max test, a time to exhaustion at Pmax (Tmax) and a Wingate test before and after the intervention. Capillary blood lactate was taken at rest, 3, and 20 min after the Wingate trial. Training was performed 3 sessions per week for 4 weeks. In G1, significant improvements (p training were found in VO2max (9.6%), power at VO2max (12.8%), Tmax (48.4%), peak power output (10.3%) and mean power output (17.1%). In G2, significant improvements following training were found in VO2max (9.7%), power at VO2max (16.1%), Tmax (54.2%), peak power output (7.4%; p training program to aerobic and anaerobic adaptations. Of substantial interest is that the low volume high intensity training provides similar results but involves only half the intensity with double the repetitions. Key pointsGiven the markedly lower training volume in the training groups, our results suggest that intense interval training is indeed a time-efficient strategy to induce rapid metabolic and performance adaptations.The results demonstrate that a practical low-volume HIT program is effective for improving metabolic and performance adaptations that resemble many of the same performance gains occurred in all-out SIT protocol.

  15. Hippocampal neurochemical markers in bipolar disorder patients following the first-manic episode: A prospective 12-month proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Leonardo E; Bond, David J; MacMillan, Erin Leigh; Kozicky, Jan-Marie; Muralidharan, Kesavan; Bücker, Joana; Rosa, Adriane Ribeiro; Kapczinski, Flavio; Yatham, Lakshmi N

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies reported decreased N-acetyl aspartate and increased Glx (the sum of glutamate plus glutamine) in bipolar disorder. Since these studies included patients at different stages of illness, it is unknown whether these changes have a causal role or a consequence of multiple episodes and treatments. The studies in early-stage bipolar disorder patients have the potential to provide answers to these issues. Therefore, we evaluated N-acetyl aspartate and Glx levels in hippocampi of first-episode bipolar disorder patients and health subjects at baseline and at 12 months, and examined the impact of episode recurrence on these measures. We used single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to compare the hippocampal neurometabolites ( N-acetyl aspartate and Glx) levels between 41 patients with bipolar disorder following recovery from their first-manic episode and 27 matched healthy subjects at recruitment and 12 months later. We also compared N-acetyl aspartate and Glx levels between patients who had a recurrence of a mood episode and those who did not. There was no main effect of either group (diagnosis) or time for hippocampal N-acetyl aspartate and Glx levels in bipolar disorder patients and healthy subjects. We also did not find any group-by-time interaction for the levels of these metabolites. There were also no differences in N-acetyl aspartate and Glx between patients who experienced a recurrence of a mood episode and those who did not over 12-month follow-up. Our data suggest that N-acetyl aspartate and Glx levels are not altered in early stage bipolar disorder. Further, these data suggest that episode recurrence in early stages does not have a significant impact on the levels of these metabolites. These may suggest that there may be an early window for intervention to potentially arrest neuroprogression of the disease.

  16. Acid Sulfate Alteration on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of mineralogical and geochemical indicators for aqueous alteration on Mars have been identified by a combination of surface and orbital robotic missions, telescopic observations, characterization of Martian meteorites, and laboratory and terrestrial analog studies. Acid sulfate alteration has been identified at all three landing sites visited by NASA rover missions (Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity). Spirit landed in Gusev crater in 2004 and discovered Fe-sulfates and materials that have been extensively leached by acid sulfate solutions. Opportunity landing on the plains of Meridiani Planum also in 2004 where the rover encountered large abundances of jarosite and hematite in sedimentary rocks. Curiosity landed in Gale crater in 2012 and has characterized fluvial, deltaic, and lacustrine sediments. Jarosite and hematite were discovered in some of the lacustrine sediments. The high elemental abundance of sulfur in surface materials is obvious evidence that sulfate has played a major role in aqueous processes at all landing sites on Mars. The sulfate-rich outcrop at Meridiani Planum has an SO3 content of up to 25 wt.%. The interiors of rocks and outcrops on the Columbia Hills within Gusev crater have up to 8 wt.% SO3. Soils at both sites generally have between 5 to 14 wt.% SO3, and several soils in Gusev crater contain around 30 wt.% SO3. After normalization of major element compositions to a SO3-free basis, the bulk compositions of these materials are basaltic, with a few exceptions in Gusev crater and in lacustrine mudstones in Gale crater. These observations suggest that materials encountered by the rovers were derived from basaltic precursors by acid sulfate alteration under nearly isochemical conditions (i.e., minimal leaching). There are several cases, however, where acid sulfate alteration minerals (jarosite and hematite) formed in open hydrologic systems, e.g., in Gale crater lacustrine mudstones. Several hypotheses have been suggested for the

  17. CRISPR/Cas9 Engineering of Adult Mouse Liver Demonstrates That the Dnajb1-Prkaca Gene Fusion is Sufficient to Induce Tumors Resembling Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, Lars H; Riaz, Anjum; Serra, Denise

    2017-01-01

    to create a Dnajb1-Prkaca fusion and monitored the mice for liver tumor development. METHODS: We delivered CRISPR/Cas9 vectors designed to juxtapose exon 1 of Dnajb1 with exon 2 of Prkaca to create the Dnajb1-Prkaca gene fusion associated with FL-HCC, or control Cas9 vector, via hydrodynamic tail vein...... injection to livers of 8 week-old female FVB/N mice. These mice did not have any other engineered genetic alterations and were not exposed to liver toxins or carcinogens. Liver tissues were collected 14 months after delivery; genomic DNA was analyzed by PCR to detect the Dnajb1-Prkaca fusion, and tissues...... were characterized by histology, immunohistochemistry, RNA sequencing, and whole-exome sequencing. RESULTS: Livers from 12 of the 15 mice given the vectors to induce the Dnajb1-Prkaca gene fusion, but none of the 11 mice given the control vector, developed neoplasms. The tumors contained the Dnajb1...

  18. Sensorimotor training alters action understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catmur, Caroline; Thompson, Emma L; Bairaktari, Orianna; Lind, Frida; Bird, Geoffrey

    2017-11-02

    The discovery of 'mirror' neurons stimulated intense interest in the role of motor processes in social interaction. A popular assumption is that observation-related motor activation, exemplified by mirror neurons' matching properties, evolved to subserve the 'understanding' of others' actions. Alternatively, such motor activation may result from sensorimotor learning. Sensorimotor training alters observation-related motor activation, but studies demonstrating training-dependent changes in motor activation have not addressed the functional role of such activation. We therefore tested whether sensorimotor learning alters action understanding. Participants completed an action understanding task, judging the weight of boxes lifted by another person, before and after 'counter-mirror' sensorimotor training. During this training they lifted heavy boxes while observing light boxes being lifted, and vice-versa. Compared to a control group, this training significantly reduced participants' action understanding ability. Performance on a duration judgement task was unaffected by training. These data suggest the ability to understand others' actions results from sensorimotor learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  20. [Organ alterations due to aging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorowska-Tobis, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Aging defined as progressive organ dysfunction which makes keeping homeostasis more difficult starts at the age of 30-40. However, due to difficulties with the distinction between aging and disease processes, changes previously believed to be caused by aging are often recognized as the effect of pathologies when new data is presented. According to current knowledge, cardio-vascular aging includes decreased elasticity of main arteries, decreased ability of left ventricule to relaxate, diminished function of sino-atrial node and decreased effect of beta-adrenergic stimulation. Aging in the respiratory system is attributed to increased size of alveoli and alveolar ducts (which easier collapse), a decrease in the gase exchange area, a decrease in respiratory volumes (both static and dynamic) and a severe decrease in maximal oxygen consumption. In aging kidneys both renal blood flow and glomerular filtration are decreased. As the result of tubular alterations the kidney ability to conserve and dilute urine, and its capability to regulate the pH and serum sodium level diminish. Less dramatic changes are seen in the gastrointestinal tract. According to available data, high prevalence of gastric atrophy and hypochlorhydria are a consequence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Also, constipation is attributed much more to sedative life style and diet than to aging itself. In summary, none of the presented alterations is severe enough to cause the disease, but all of them increase the risk of pathology and thus pave the way for the disease even in healthy elderly subjects.

  1. Membrane alterations induced by nonstructural proteins of human norovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Y Doerflinger

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Human noroviruses (huNoV are the most frequent cause of non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis worldwide, particularly genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4 variants. The viral nonstructural (NS proteins encoded by the ORF1 polyprotein induce vesical clusters harboring the viral replication sites. Little is known so far about the ultrastructure of these replication organelles or the contribution of individual NS proteins to their biogenesis. We compared the ultrastructural changes induced by expression of norovirus ORF1 polyproteins with those induced upon infection with murine norovirus (MNV. Characteristic membrane alterations induced by ORF1 expression resembled those found in MNV infected cells, consisting of vesicle accumulations likely built from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER which included single membrane vesicles (SMVs, double membrane vesicles (DMVs and multi membrane vesicles (MMVs. In-depth analysis using electron tomography suggested that MMVs originate through the enwrapping of SMVs with tubular structures similar to mechanisms reported for picornaviruses. Expression of GII.4 NS1-2, NS3 and NS4 fused to GFP revealed distinct membrane alterations when analyzed by correlative light and electron microscopy. Expression of NS1-2 induced proliferation of smooth ER membranes forming long tubular structures that were affected by mutations in the active center of the putative NS1-2 hydrolase domain. NS3 was associated with ER membranes around lipid droplets (LDs and induced the formation of convoluted membranes, which were even more pronounced in case of NS4. Interestingly, NS4 was the only GII.4 protein capable of inducing SMV and DMV formation when expressed individually. Our work provides the first ultrastructural analysis of norovirus GII.4 induced vesicle clusters and suggests that their morphology and biogenesis is most similar to picornaviruses. We further identified NS4 as a key factor in the formation of membrane alterations of huNoV and

  2. CR chondrites: Shock, aqueous alteration and terrestrial weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, N. M.

    2012-12-01

    alteration histories of these chondrites. The average S versus Fe contents of CR matrices follow a roughly linear trend. The most aqueously altered CRs (e.g., LAP 04516) have the lowest Fe and the highest S content. The matrices in shocked CRs, MIL 07513, GRA 06100, GRO 03116, have the lowest S content of the studied CRs. They are also the most Fe-rich. The CR3 chondrites fall somewhere in the middle of the S vs. Fe plot. Terrestrial weathering creates some scattering due to its contribution to the Fe-content of the matrix. If the precursor materials of the shocked CRs composi-tionally resemble CR3 chondrites, low S content of shocked CR matrices probably resulted from volatile losses driven by shock and annealing. Whereas increasing Fe-contents are probably linked to impact-driven hydrothermal mobilization of Fe from kamacite nodules. References: [1] Floss et al. 2009. Ap. J. 697: 1242-1255. [2] Abreu N. M. 2007. [3] Tomeoka K. & Buseck P. R. 1988. GCA 52: 1627-1640. [4] Tomeoka K. & Buseck P. R. 1985. GCA 49: 21-49-2163. [5] Rubin A. et al. 2007. GCA 71: 2361-2382. Acknowledgements: Funded by NNX11AH10G grant and conducted at Penn State and ARES-JSC. Meteorite kindly pro-vided by the JSC Antarctic meteorite curators.

  3. Oncogene alterations in endometrial carcinosarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscuola, Michele; Van de Vijver, Koen; Castilla, María Ángeles; Romero-Pérez, Laura; López-García, María Ángeles; Díaz-Martín, Juan; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Oliva, Esther; Palacios Calvo, José

    2013-05-01

    Endometrial carcinosarcomas are aggressive neoplasias composed of high-grade carcinomatous and sarcomatous elements. The pathogenesis and specific genetic alterations underlying these tumors are still not well known. We analyzed alterations in oncogenes involved in the pathogenesis of endometrial carcinomas that might represent predictive markers for specific therapies. Immunohistochemistry for HER2 (tyrosine kinase-type cell surface receptor HER2) and c-KIT (tyrosine-protein kinase Kit) and fluorescence in situ hybridization for EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and ALK (anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase) were carried out for 76 endometrial carcinosarcoma samples on sequential tissue microarray sections. Analysis of 238 mutations across 19 common oncogenes was performed on 34 samples using the Sequenom OncoCarta Panel (Sequenom, Hamburg, Germany). We observed EGFR, HER2, and c-KIT expression in 71%, 1.5%, and 2.7% of tumors, respectively. EGFR amplification was detected in 11 of 76 endometrial carcinosarcomas (14.5%). Four samples showed both amplification and aneuploidy (5.2%). ALK amplification together with chromosome 2 polysomy was found in 1.3% of endometrial carcinosarcomas. In total, 23 mutations in 9 different oncogenes were detected in 15 (44.1%) of 34 endometrial carcinosarcomas. Five endometrial carcinosarcomas (14.7%) had 2 or more mutations. Eleven tumors (32.3%) had mutations affecting the PI3K (phosphoinositide-3-kinase)/AKT (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1) (6 mutations in PIK3CA (PI3K catalytic alpha polypeptide) and 1 in AKT) and/or RAS/BRAF (serine/threonine-protein kinase B-raf) pathway (3 KRAS [kirsten RAS oncogene homolog], 2 NRAS [neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog], and 1 BRAF). Mutations in PDGFRA (platelet-derived growth factor receptor, alpha polypeptide) and/or KIT were found in 5 endometrial carcinosarcomas (14.7%). Finally, we found mutations in MET (met proto-oncogene [hepatocyte growth factor

  4. Genetic alterations in pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Roland M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer of the exocrine pancreas represents the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the Western population with an average survival after diagnosis of 3 to 6 months and a five-year survival rate under 5%. Our understanding of the molecular carcinogenesis has improved in the last few years due to the development of novel molecular biological techniques. Pancreatic cancer is a multi-stage process resulting from the accumulation of genetic changes in the somatic DNA of normal cells. In this article we describe major genetic alterations of pancreatic cancer, mutations in the proto-oncogene K-RAS and the tumor suppressors INK4A, TP53 and DPC4/SMAD4. The accumulation of these genetic changes leads to a profound disturbance in cell cycle regulation and continuous growth. The knowledge of the underlying molecular mechanisms will offer new therapeutic and diagnostic options and hopefully improve the outcome of this aggressive disease.

  5. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  6. A RAB3GAP1 SINE Insertion in Alaskan Huskies with Polyneuropathy, Ocular Abnormalities, and Neuronal Vacuolation (POANV Resembling Human Warburg Micro Syndrome 1 (WARBM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Wiedmer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We observed a hereditary phenotype in Alaskan Huskies that was characterized by polyneuropathy with ocular abnormalities and neuronal vacuolation (POANV. The affected dogs developed a progressive severe ataxia, which led to euthanasia between 8 and 16 months of age. The pedigrees were consistent with a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance. We localized the causative genetic defect to a 4 Mb interval on chromosome 19 by a combined linkage and homozygosity mapping approach. Whole genome sequencing of one affected dog, an obligate carrier, and an unrelated control revealed a 218-bp SINE insertion into exon 7 of the RAB3GAP1 gene. The SINE insertion was perfectly associated with the disease phenotype in a cohort of 43 Alaskan Huskies, and it was absent from 541 control dogs of diverse other breeds. The SINE insertion induced aberrant splicing and led to a transcript with a greatly altered exon 7. RAB3GAP1 loss-of-function variants in humans cause Warburg Micro Syndrome 1 (WARBM1, which is characterized by additional developmental defects compared to canine POANV, whereas Rab3gap1-deficient mice have a much milder phenotype than either humans or dogs. Thus, the RAB3GAP1 mutant Alaskan Huskies provide an interesting intermediate phenotype that may help to better understand the function of RAB3GAP1 in development. Furthermore, the identification of the presumed causative genetic variant will enable genetic testing to avoid the nonintentional breeding of affected dogs.

  7. Functional decline at the aging neuromuscular junction is associated with altered laminin-α4 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kah Meng; Chand, Kirat K; Hammond, Luke A; Lavidis, Nickolas A; Noakes, Peter G

    2017-03-14

    Laminin-α4 is involved in the alignment of active zones to postjunctional folds at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Prior study has implicated laminin-α4 in NMJ maintenance, with altered NMJ morphology observed in adult laminin-α4 deficient mice ( lama 4 -/- ). The present study further investigated the role of laminin-α4 in NMJ maintenance by functional characterization of transmission properties, morphological investigation of synaptic proteins including synaptic laminin-α4, and neuromotor behavioral testing. Results showed maintained perturbed transmission properties at lama 4 -/- NMJs from adult (3 months) through to aged (18-22 months). Hind-limb grip force demonstrated similar trends as transmission properties, with maintained weaker grip force across age groups in lama 4 -/- . Interestingly, both transmission properties and hind-limb grip force in aged wild-types resembled those observed in adult lama 4 -/- . Most significantly, altered expression of laminin-α4 was noted at the wild-type NMJs prior to the observed decline in transmission properties, suggesting that altered laminin-α4 expression precedes the decline of neurotransmission in aging wild-types. These findings significantly support the role of laminin-α4 in maintenance of the NMJ during aging.

  8. Morphological alterations of exogenous surfactant inhibited by meconium can be prevented by dextran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stichtenoth Guido

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant dysfunction due to inhibition is involved in the pathophysiology of meconium aspiration syndrome. Dextran addition has been shown to reverse exogenous surfactant inactivation by meconium, but the precise mechanisms and the morphological correlate of this effect are yet unknown. Morphological surfactant analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and stereology allows the differentiation of active (large aggregates = LA and inactive (small aggregates = SA subtypes. Methods To determine the in vitro effects of meconium and dextran addition on the morphology of a modified porcine natural surfactant (Curosurf, Curosurf samples were either incubated alone or together with meconium or with meconium and dextran, fixed and processed for TEM. Volume fractions of surfactant subtypes [lamellar body-like forms (LBL, multilamellar vesicles (MV, unilamellar vesicles (UV] were determined stereologically. Results All preparations contained LBL and MV (corresponding to LA as well as UV (corresponding to SA. The volume fraction of UV increased with addition of meconium and decreased with further addition of dextran. Correspondingly, the UV/(LBL+MV ratio (resembling the SA/LA ratio increased when meconium was added and decreased when dextran was added to the surfactant-meconium mixture. Conclusion Meconium causes alterations in the ultrastructural composition of Curosurf that can be visualized and analyzed by TEM and stereology. These alterations resemble an increase in the SA/LA ratio and are paralleled by an increase in minimum surface tension. Dextran prevents these effects and may therefore be a useful additive to exogenous surfactant preparations to preserve their structural and functional integrity, thereby improving their resistance to inactivation.

  9. Risk analysis and climate alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidy, G.M. (Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Largely absent from the recent climate debates have been careful, objective risk analyses that add insight into energy, environment and economic options. Such studies require a distillation of scientific knowledge combined with socio-economic considerations. In support of this goal, work has been initiated to develop an integrated risk assessment framework for climate change. Conceptually, risk analyses are facilitated by integrated assessment models. These include several analytical components. For the risk of climate alteration, the parts can be identified in terms of (a) policy formulation, (b) economic response, (c) greenhouse gas (GHG) dispersion, (d) climate change, (e) ecosystem effects and valuation, and (f) human system effects and valuation. Simple macro-economic models incorporating these components have been developed that have added insight into the costs and apparent benefits of GHG management options. These early, rudimentary models need to be greatly improved with new knowledge to better inform decision makers on optimal management strategies. The early results from integrated analyses have: (a) reinforced the importance of requiring risk-oriented information from general scientific investigation, (b) focused on the need for far better quantitative information on the environmental effects, and (c) identified the need for substantial improvement of information about human values and priorities in different cultural settings. Technological options for managing GHGs have looked at opportunities for improving the effectiveness of the electrical system, and the human management of biospheric processes. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. TWO STAGE FRAMEWORK FOR ALTERED FINGERPRINT MATCHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.R. Anoop

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fingerprint alteration is the process of masking one’s identity from personal identification systems especially in boarder control security systems. Failure of matching the altered fingerprint of the criminals against the watch list of fingerprints can help them to break the security system. This fact leads to the need of a method for altered fingerprint matching. This paper presents a two stage method for altered fingerprint matching. In first stage, approximated global ridge orientation field of altered fingerprint is matched against the orientation field of its unaltered mate. If this matching is successful, fingerprints go to second stage. Second stage starts with the selection of unaltered region from the altered FP and same region from the unaltered mates. Matching in this stage is performed by extraction of ridge texture and ridge frequency from the selected region of interest. Euclidian distance is used in both stages to compute the matching score.

  11. Hydrothermal alteration in the Baca Geothermal System, Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Nielson, Dennis L.

    1986-02-01

    Thermal fluids circulating in the active hydrothermal system of the resurgent Redondo dome of the Valles caldera have interacted with their diverse host rocks to produce well-zoned alteration assemblages, which not only help locate permeable fluid channels but also provide insight into the system's thermal history. The alteration shows that fluid flow has been confined principally to steeply dipping normal faults and subsidiary fractures as well as thin stratigraphic aquifers. Permeability along many of these channels has been reduced or locally eliminated by hydrothermal self-sealing. Alteration from the surface through the base of the Miocene Paliza Canyon Formation is of three distinctive types: argillic, propylitic, and phyllic. Argillic alteration forms a blanket above the deep water table in formerly permeable nonwelded tuffs. Beneath the argillic zone, pervasive propylitic alteration is weakly developed in felsic host rocks but locally intense in deep intermediate composition volcanics. Strong phyllic alteration is commonly but not invariably associated with major active thermal fluid channels. Phyllic zones yielding no fluid were clearly once permeable but now are hydrothermally sealed. High-temperature alteration phases at Baca are presently found at much lower temperatures. We suggest either that isotherms have collapsed due to gradual cooling of the system, that they have retreated without overall heat loss due to uplift of the Redondo dome, that the system has shifted laterally, or that it has contracted due to a drop in the water table. The deepest Well (B-12, 3423 m) in the dome may have penetrated through the base of the active hydrothermal system. Below a depth of 2440 m in this well, hydrothermal veining largely disappears, and the rocks resemble those developed by isochemical thermal metamorphism. The transition is reflected by temperature logs, which show a conductive thermal gradient below 2440 m. This depth may mark the dome's neutral plane

  12. Oxidative macromolecular alterations in the rat central nervous system in response to experimentally co-induced chlorpyrifos and cold stress: a comparative assessment in aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, P Mahaboob; Poojary, Annappa

    2012-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species are generated as a result of a number of physiological and pathological processes which can promote multiple forms of oxidative damage including protein oxidation, and thereby influence the function of a diverse array of cellular processes. In our previous study we have reported that co-exposure to chlorpyrifos and cold stress in aging rats markedly influence the toxic outcome as a result of oxidative stress. In the present study, key neurochemical/enzymes were measured in order to evaluate the macromolecular alterations in response to experimentally co-induced chlorpyrifos and cold stress (15 and 20°C) either concurrently or individually in vivo for 48 h in discrete regions of brain and spinal cord of different age group rats. CPF and cold stress exposure either individually or in combination substantially increased the activity/levels of protein carbonyls, AST, ALT and decreased protein thiols, DNA, RNA and total proteins in discrete regions of CNS. Overall, the effects of co-exposure were appreciably different from either of the exposures. However, synergistic-action of CPF and cold stress at 15°C showed higher dyshomeostasis in comparison with CPF and cold stress alone and together at 20°C indicating the extent of oxidative macromolecular damage in discrete regions of brain and spinal cord. Furthermore, the present study demonstrates that macromolecular oxidative damage is highly pronounced in neonates and juveniles than the young adults.

  13. Benzodiazepine withdrawal: behavioural pharmacology and neurochemical changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, S E; Andrews, N

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes pharmacological treatments that can reverse the anxiogenic response detected in animal tests when rats are withdrawn from chronic treatment with diazepam. Concurrent treatment with the calcium channel antagonist verapamil prevented this withdrawal response and the benzodiazepine-receptor antagonist flumazenil reversed the anxiogenic response and restored the system to a drug-naive state. Other treatments that reversed the anxiogenic response were the GABAB agonist baclofen, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist buspirone, and the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (R,S)-zacopride (GABA = gamma-aminobutyric acid; 5-HT = 5-hydroxytryptamine). Both the enantiomers of zacopride contributed to this reversal. These behavioural reversals are interpreted in the light of biochemical studies showing increased 45Ca2+ flux and [3H]5-HT release from the hippocampus, during benzodiazepine withdrawal (Fig. 1).

  14. [Diving: barometric pressure and neurochemical mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostain, Jean-Claude; Balon, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    The studies of Paul Bert, presented in his book "La Pression Barométrique" in 1878, were at the origin of the modern hyperbaric physiology. Indeed his research demonstrated the effects of oxygen at high pressure, that compression effects must be dissociated from decompression effects, and that neurological troubles and death of divers during or after decompression were due to the fast rate of decompression. However, it is only in 1935 that the work of Behnke et al. attributed the complaints reported at 3 bars and above in compressed air or nitrogen-oxygen mixture to the increase in partial pressure of nitrogen which induces nitrogen narcosis. Little is known about the origins and mechanisms of this narcosis. The traditional view was that anaesthesia or narcosis occurred when the volume of a hydrophobic membrane site was caused to expand beyond a critical amount by the absorption of molecules of a narcotic gas. The observation of the pressure reversal effect during general anaesthesia has long supported this lipid theory. However, recently, protein theories have met with increasing recognition since results with gaseous anaesthetics have been interpreted as evidence for a direct gas-protein interaction. The question is to know whether inert gases, that disrupt dopamine and GABA neurotransmissions and probably glutamatergic neurotransmission, act by binding to neurotransmitter protein receptors.

  15. Anticholinesterases: Medical applications of neurochemical principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millard, C.B.; Broomfield, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Cholinesterases form a family of serine esterases that arise in animals from at least two distinct genes. Multiple forms of these enzymes can be precisely localized and regulated by alternative mRNA splicing and by co- or posttranslational modifications. The high catalytic efficiency of the cholinesterases is quelled by certain very selective reversible and irreversible inhibitors. Owing largely to the important role of acetylcholine hydrolysis in neurotransmission, cholinesterase and its inhibitors have been studied extensively in vivo. In parallel, there has emerged an equally impressive enzyme chemistry literature. Cholinesterase inhibitors are used widely as pesticides; in this regard the compounds are beneficial with concomitant health risks. Poisoning by such compounds can result in an acute but usually manageable medical crisis and may damage the ONS and the PNS, as well as cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue. Some inhibitors have been useful for the treatment of glaucoma and myasthenia gravis, and others are in clinical trials as therapy for Alzheimer`s dementia. Concurrently, the most potent inhibitors have been developed as highly toxic chemical warfare agents. We review treatments and sequelae of exposure to selected anticholinesterases, especially organophosphorus compounds and carbamates, as they relate to recent progress in enzyme chemistry.

  16. Neuroprotective and neurochemical properties of mint extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Víctor; Martín, Sara; Gómez-Serranillos, Maria Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Mints are aromatic plants with a tradition as medicinal remedies and culinary herbs. With the aim of investigating potential central nervous system (CNS) activities of traditional medicinal plants, four species and one hybrid of the genus Mentha (M. aquatica, M. longifolia, M. pulegium, M......(A) receptor). Mentha x piperita and Mentha aquatica produced significant (p

  17. Neurobiology of addiction: insight from neurochemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Nina B L; Martinez, Diana

    2012-06-01

    Neuroimaging studies have been crucial in understanding changes in the various neurotransmitter systems implicated in addiction in the living human brain. Predominantly reduced striatal dopamine transmission appears to play an important role in psychostimulant, alcohol and heroin addiction, while addiction to cannabis may be mediated primarily by the endocannabinoid system. However, the study of other neurotransmitter systems likely involved in addiction, for example glutamate, has been limited by the number and quality of available radiotracers, and data on changes in these systems in the most common addictions are emerging only now. Further studies are needed to understand fully how the interplay of various neurotransmitter systems contributes to addiction and to ultimately help to develop more effective treatment approaches.

  18. Towards a Dynamic Clamp for Neurochemical Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Maria Rivera

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The classic dynamic clamp technique uses a real-time electrical interface between living cells and neural simulations in order to investigate hypotheses about neural function and structure. One of the acknowledged drawbacks of that technique is the limited control of the cells’ chemical microenvironment. In this manuscript, we use a novel combination of nanosensor and microfluidic technology and microfluidic and neural simulations to add sensing and control of chemical concentrations to the dynamic clamp technique. Specifically, we use a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip to generate distinct chemical concentration gradients (ions or neuromodulators, to register the concentrations with embedded nanosensors and use the processed signals as an input to simulations of a neural cell. The ultimate goal of this project is to close the loop and provide sensor signals to the microfluidic lab-on-a-chip to mimic the interaction of the simulated cell with other cells in its chemical environment.

  19. Chronic noise stress-induced alterations of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid and their metabolism in the rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amajad Iqbal Kazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress induces neurochemical changes that include neurotransmitter imbalance in the brain. Noise is an environmental factor inducing stress. Chronic noise stress affects monoamine neurotransmitter systems in the central nervous system. The effect on other excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is not known. The aim was to study the role of chronic noise stress on the glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic systems of the brain. Female Wistar rats (155 ± 5 g were unintentionally exposed to noise due to construction (75-95 db, 3-4 hours/day, 5 days a week for 7-8 weeks in the vicinity of the animal care facility. Glutamate/GABA levels and their metabolic enzymes were evaluated in different rat brain regions (cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum and compared with age and gender matched nonexposed rats. Chronic noise stress decreased glutamate levels and glutaminase activity 27% and 33% in the cortex, 15% and 24% in the cerebellum. Glutamate levels increased 10% in the hippocampus, 28% in striatum and glutaminase activity 15% in striatum. Glutamine synthetase activity increased significantly in all brain regions studied, that is, cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum (P < 0.05. Noise stress-increased GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity 20% and 45% in the cortex, 13% and 28% in the hippocampus respectively. GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity decreased 15% and 14%, respectively in the striatum. GABA transaminase activity was significantly reduced in the cortex (55%, hippocampus (17%, and cerebellum (33%. Chronic noise stress differentially affected glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter systems in the rat brain, which may alter glutamate and GABA neurotransmission.

  20. Chronic noise stress-induced alterations of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid and their metabolism in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Amajad Iqbal; Oommen, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress induces neurochemical changes that include neurotransmitter imbalance in the brain. Noise is an environmental factor inducing stress. Chronic noise stress affects monoamine neurotransmitter systems in the central nervous system. The effect on other excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is not known. The aim was to study the role of chronic noise stress on the glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic systems of the brain. Female Wistar rats (155 ± 5 g) were unintentionally exposed to noise due to construction (75-95 db, 3-4 hours/day, 5 days a week for 7-8 weeks) in the vicinity of the animal care facility. Glutamate/GABA levels and their metabolic enzymes were evaluated in different rat brain regions (cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum) and compared with age and gender matched nonexposed rats. Chronic noise stress decreased glutamate levels and glutaminase activity 27% and 33% in the cortex, 15% and 24% in the cerebellum. Glutamate levels increased 10% in the hippocampus, 28% in striatum and glutaminase activity 15% in striatum. Glutamine synthetase activity increased significantly in all brain regions studied, that is, cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum (P Noise stress-increased GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity 20% and 45% in the cortex, 13% and 28% in the hippocampus respectively. GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity decreased 15% and 14%, respectively in the striatum. GABA transaminase activity was significantly reduced in the cortex (55%), hippocampus (17%), and cerebellum (33%). Chronic noise stress differentially affected glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter systems in the rat brain, which may alter glutamate and GABA neurotransmission.

  1. [Epigenetic alterations in acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Meneses, María Del Pilar; Pérez-Vera, Patricia

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer. It is well-known that genetic alterations constitute the basis for the etiology of ALL. However, genetic abnormalities are not enough for the complete development of the disease, and additional alterations such as epigenetic modifications are required. Such alterations, like DNA methylation, histone modifications, and noncoding RNA regulation have been identified in ALL. DNA hypermethylation in promoter regions is one of the most frequent epigenetic modifications observed in ALL. This modification frequently leads to gene silencing in tumor suppressor genes, and in consequence, contributes to leukemogenesis. Alterations in histone remodeling proteins have also been detected in ALL, such as the overexpression of histone deacetylases enzymes, and alteration of acetyltransferases and methyltransferases. ALL also shows alteration in the expression of miRNAs, and in consequence, the modification in the expression of their target genes. All of these epigenetic modifications are key events in the malignant transformation since they lead to the deregulation of oncogenes as BLK, WNT5B and WISP1, and tumor suppressors such as FHIT, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and TP53, which alter fundamental cellular processes and potentially lead to the development of ALL. Both genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to the development and evolution of ALL. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. Do invasive plant species alter soil health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive species may alter soil characteristics or interact with the soil microbial community to yield a competitive advantage. Our objectives were to determine: if invasive plant species alter soil properties important to soil health; and the long-term effects of invasive plant species on soil pro...

  3. Seafloor alteration, oxygen isotopes and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Y.; Kump, L. R.; Kasting, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Seafloor alteration can be related to climate in two ways: through storage of carbon dioxide as carbonates and indirectly through its influence on the oxygen isotopic composition of seawater. Low temperature alteration of the seafloor, or seafloor weathering, can store carbon dioxide as carbonates formed as the result of dissolution of cations from silicate rocks, and since this process is temperature dependent, can serve as a climate regulator. On the other hand, the oxygen isotopic composition of seawater is determined by the balance between low temperature crustal alteration (including continental weathering) and high temperature seafloor alteration, because the heavy isotope is depleted from and added to seawater in low and high temperature alteration, respectively. The oxygen isotopic composition of seawater is a parameter necessary to estimate surface temperature of the Earth from the oxygen isotopic composition of authigenic sedimentary rocks. Thus seafloor alteration is related to reconstruction of Earth's climate. We have developed a comprehensive model of seafloor alteration that captures both seafloor weathering and oxygen isotope exchange, and use it to reconcile observations of long-term stability in both climate and altered ocean crust δ18O with secular changes in the oxygen isotopic composition of marine sediments.

  4. Basic perceptual changes that alter meaning and neural correlates of recognition memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanji eGao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to pinpoint the border between perceptual and conceptual processing, despite their treatment as distinct entities in many studies of recognition memory. For instance, alteration of simple perceptual characteristics of a stimulus can radically change meaning, such as the color of bread changing from white to green. We sought to better understand the role of perceptual and conceptual processing in memory by identifying the effects of changing a basic perceptual feature (color on behavioral and neural correlates of memory in circumstances when this change would be expected to either change the meaning of a stimulus or to have no effect on meaning (i.e., to influence conceptual processing or not. Abstract visual shapes (squiggles were colorized during study and presented during test in either the same color or a different color. Those squiggles that subjects found to resemble meaningful objects supported behavioral measures of conceptual priming, whereas meaningless squiggles did not. Further, changing color from study to test had a selective effect on behavioral correlates of priming for meaningful squiggles, indicating that color change altered conceptual processing. During a recognition memory test, color change altered event-related brain potential correlates of memory for meaningful squiggles but not for meaningless squiggles. Specifically, color change reduced the amplitude of frontally distributed N400 potentials (FN400, indicating that these potentials indicated conceptual processing during recognition memory that was sensitive to color change. In contrast, color change had no effect on FN400 correlates of recognition for meaningless squiggles, which were overall smaller in amplitude than for meaningful squiggles (further indicating that these potentials signal conceptual processing during recognition. Thus, merely changing the color of abstract visual shapes can alter their meaning, changing behavioral and neural correlates

  5. Epigenetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer: Emerging Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Grady, William M.; Goel, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. One of the fundamental processes driving the initiation and progression of CRC is the accumulation of a variety of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells. Over the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of cancer epigenetics, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation, microRNA (miRNA) and noncoding RNA deregulation, and alterations in histone modification states. Assessment of the colon cancer “epigenome” has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and altered miRNA expression. The average CRC methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes and dozens of altered miRNAs. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these epigenetic alterations, called driver events, is presumed to have a functional role in CRC. In addition, the advances in our understanding of epigenetic alterations in CRC have led to these alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic applications. Progress in this field suggests that these epigenetic alterations will be commonly used in the near future to direct the prevention and treatment of CRC. PMID:26216839

  6. Hepatocellular alterations and dysregulation of oncogenic pathways in the liver of transgenic mice overexpressing growth hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquet, Johanna G.; Freund, Thomas; Martinez, Carolina S.; González, Lorena; Díaz, María E.; Micucci, Giannina P.; Zotta, Elsa; Boparai, Ravneet K.; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Sotelo, Ana I.

    2013-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) overexpression throughout life in transgenic mice is associated with the development of liver tumors at old ages. The preneoplastic pathology observed in the liver of young adult GH-overexpressing mice is similar to that present in humans at high risk of hepatic cancer. To elucidate the molecular pathogenesis underlying the pro-oncogenic liver pathology induced by prolonged exposure to elevated GH levels, the activation and expression of several components of signal transduction pathways that have been implicated in hepatocellular carcinogenesis were evaluated in the liver of young adult GH-transgenic mice. In addition, males and females were analyzed in parallel in order to evaluate sexual dimorphism. Transgenic mice from both sexes exhibited hepatocyte hypertrophy with enlarged nuclear size and exacerbated hepatocellular proliferation, which were higher in males. Dysregulation of several oncogenic pathways was observed in the liver of GH-overexpressing transgenic mice. Many signaling mediators and effectors were upregulated in transgenic mice compared with normal controls, including Akt2, NFκB, GSK3β, β-catenin, cyclin D1, cyclin E, c-myc, c-jun and c-fos. The molecular alterations described did not exhibit sexual dimorphism in transgenic mice except for higher gene expression and nuclear localization of cyclin D1 in males. We conclude that prolonged exposure to GH induces in the liver alterations in signaling pathways involved in cell growth, proliferation and survival that resemble those found in many human tumors. PMID:23428905

  7. Hepatocellular alterations and dysregulation of oncogenic pathways in the liver of transgenic mice overexpressing growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquet, Johanna G; Freund, Thomas; Martinez, Carolina S; González, Lorena; Díaz, María E; Micucci, Giannina P; Zotta, Elsa; Boparai, Ravneet K; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Sotelo, Ana I

    2013-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) overexpression throughout life in transgenic mice is associated with the development of liver tumors at old ages. The preneoplastic pathology observed in the liver of young adult GH-overexpressing mice is similar to that present in humans at high risk of hepatic cancer. To elucidate the molecular pathogenesis underlying the pro-oncogenic liver pathology induced by prolonged exposure to elevated GH levels, the activation and expression of several components of signal transduction pathways that have been implicated in hepatocellular carcinogenesis were evaluated in the liver of young adult GH-transgenic mice. In addition, males and females were analyzed in parallel in order to evaluate sexual dimorphism. Transgenic mice from both sexes exhibited hepatocyte hypertrophy with enlarged nuclear size and exacerbated hepatocellular proliferation, which were higher in males. Dysregulation of several oncogenic pathways was observed in the liver of GH-overexpressing transgenic mice. Many signaling mediators and effectors were upregulated in transgenic mice compared with normal controls, including Akt2, NFκB, GSK3β, β-catenin, cyclin D1, cyclin E, c-myc, c-jun and c-fos. The molecular alterations described did not exhibit sexual dimorphism in transgenic mice except for higher gene expression and nuclear localization of cyclin D1 in males. We conclude that prolonged exposure to GH induces in the liver alterations in signaling pathways involved in cell growth, proliferation and survival that resemble those found in many human tumors.

  8. Sulphur depletion altered somatic embryogenesis in Theobroma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sulphur depletion altered somatic embryogenesis in Theobroma cacao L. Biochemical difference related to sulphur metabolism between embryogenic and non embryogenic calli. Minyaka Emile, Niemenak Nicolas, Issali Emmanuel Auguste, Sangare Abdourahamane, Denis Ndoumou Omokolo ...

  9. Short Communication Relationship between soil alteration index ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short Communication Relationship between soil alteration index three (AI3), soil organic matter and tree performance in a 'Cripps Pink'/M7 apple orchard. André H Meyer, John Wooldridge, Joanna F Dames ...

  10. Chronic kidney disease alters intestinal microbial flora

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Wong, Jakk; Pahl, Madeleine; Piceno, Yvette M; Yuan, Jun; DeSantis, Todd Z; Ni, Zhenmin; Nguyen, Tien-Hung; Andersen, Gary L

    2013-01-01

    .... Since the biochemical environment shapes the structure and function of the microbiome, we tested whether uremia and/or dietary and pharmacologic interventions in chronic kidney disease alters the microbiome...

  11. Do establishing operations alter reinforcement effectiveness?

    OpenAIRE

    Cherpas, Chris

    1993-01-01

    Michael (this issue) defines an establishing operation (EO), such as food deprivation, as (a) altering the effectiveness of reinforcement as well as (b) evoking behavior. Although this dual role for EOs is compelling, it is possible that such operations have only evocative effects (i.e., function only in the form of antecedent control). The main question raised here is how the reinforcement-altering function can be experimentally analyzed. Evolutionary and conceptual implications of the two-f...

  12. Do establishing operations alter reinforcement effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherpas, C

    1993-01-01

    Michael (this issue) defines an establishing operation (EO), such as food deprivation, as (a) altering the effectiveness of reinforcement as well as (b) evoking behavior. Although this dual role for EOs is compelling, it is possible that such operations have only evocative effects (i.e., function only in the form of antecedent control). The main question raised here is how the reinforcement-altering function can be experimentally analyzed. Evolutionary and conceptual implications of the two-function EO are also considered.

  13. Alterity in Inclusive and Integrative Learning Programmes

    OpenAIRE

    Sagner-Tapia, Johanna Cristina

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative and quantitative investigation was an exploratory case study that examined the alterity relation to the pupils with disability within four chosen school types in the region of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It explored general patterns in the alterity relation between the members of the inclusive or integrative schools and the pupils with disability. The investigation analyzed whether the members of the school thematized difference and how the absence or presence of that themat...

  14. Sleep Deprivation Alters Choice Strategy Without Altering Uncertainty or Loss Aversion Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Dhaniel A Mullette-Gillman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sleep deprivation alters decision making; however, it is unclear what specific cognitive processes are modified to drive altered choices. In this manuscript, we examined how one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD alters economic decision making. We specifically examined changes in uncertainty preferences dissociably from changes in the strategy with which participants engage with presented choice information. With high test-retest reliability, we show that TSD does not alter uncertainty preferences or loss aversion. Rather, TSD alters the information the participants rely upon to make their choices. Utilizing a choice strategy metric which contrasts the influence of maximizing and satisficing information on choice behavior, we find that TSD alters the relative reliance on maximizing information and satisficing information, in the gains domain. This alteration is the result of participants both decreasing their reliance on cognitively-complex maximizing information and a concomitant increase in the use of readily-available satisficing information. TSD did not result in a decrease in overall information use in either domain. These results show that sleep deprivation alters decision making by altering the informational strategies that participants employ, without altering their preferences.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid space alterations in melancholic depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Via

    Full Text Available Melancholic depression is a biologically homogeneous clinical entity in which structural brain alterations have been described. Interestingly, reports of structural alterations in melancholia include volume increases in Cerebro-Spinal Fluid (CSF spaces. However, there are no previous reports of CSF volume alterations using automated whole-brain voxel-wise approaches, as tissue classification algorithms have been traditionally regarded as less reliable for CSF segmentation. Here we aimed to assess CSF volumetric alterations in melancholic depression and their clinical correlates by means of a novel segmentation algorithm ('new segment', as implemented in the software Statistical Parametric Mapping-SPM8, incorporating specific features that may improve CSF segmentation. A three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI was obtained from seventy patients with melancholic depression and forty healthy control subjects. Although imaging data were pre-processed with the 'new segment' algorithm, in order to obtain a comparison with previous segmentation approaches, tissue segmentation was also performed with the 'unified segmentation' approach. Melancholic patients showed a CSF volume increase in the region of the left Sylvian fissure, and a CSF volume decrease in the subarachnoid spaces surrounding medial and lateral parietal cortices. Furthermore, CSF increases in the left Sylvian fissure were negatively correlated with the reduction percentage of depressive symptoms at discharge. None of these results were replicated with the 'unified segmentation' approach. By contrast, between-group differences in the left Sylvian fissure were replicated with a non-automated quantification of the CSF content of this region. Left Sylvian fissure alterations reported here are in agreement with previous findings from non-automated CSF assessments, and also with other reports of gray and white matter insular alterations in depressive samples using automated approaches

  16. Detecting Family Resemblance: Automated Genre Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhyong Kim

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results in automated genre classification of digital documents in PDF format. It describes genre classification as an important ingredient in contextualising scientific data and in retrieving targetted material for improving research. The current paper compares the role of visual layout, stylistic features, and language model features in clustering documents and presents results in retrieving five selected genres (Scientific Article, Thesis, Periodicals, Business Report, and Form from a pool of materials populated with documents of the nineteen most popular genres found in our experimental data set.

  17. Sullys Hill herd resembles original plains bison

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This article is on recent findings on Sullys Hill National Game Preserve that show bison brought there nearly a century ago have remained closer to genetically pure...

  18. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripa Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated.

  19. Investigation of metabolic disorders resembling Reye's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A; Hall, S M

    1992-01-01

    Ten per cent of patients initially reported with Reye's syndrome in the British Isles (1981-91) were subsequently found to have an underlying inherited metabolic disorder (IMD). There was also evidence to suggest that other cases may not have been recognised. The range of metabolic disorders that mimic Reye's syndrome is wide and specialist, often complex, investigations are required to make a specific diagnosis. Those patients presenting with Reye's syndrome-like illness but also with one or more clinical features suggestive of an IMD require particular attention and detailed investigation. Recommendations for specimen collection and investigation are presented. PMID:1444539

  20. Diffuse glioblastoma resembling acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettino, Carla; Caranci, Ferdinando; Lus, Giacomo; Signoriello, Elisabetta; Eoli, Marica; Anghileri, Elena; Pollo, Bianca; Melone, Mariarosa A B; Di Iorio, Giuseppe; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Ugga, Lorenzo; Tedeschi, Enrico

    2017-10-01

    We report the case of a young man with sudden onset of diplopia after an upper respiratory tract infection. Based on the first radiological findings acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis, a variant of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, was suspected and treatment with high dose intravenous dexamethasone was started but it was stopped for intolerance. The patient clinically worsened, developing gait instability, ataxia and ophthalmoplegia; brain MRI performed 20 days later showed severe progression of the disease with subependymal dissemination. After brain biopsy of the right temporal lesion the histological diagnosis was glioblastoma. These findings suggest that MRI features of acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis may dissimulate the diagnosis of diffuse glioma/glioblastoma. This case underscores the importance of considering diffuse glioma in the differential diagnosis of atypical signs and symptoms of acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis and underlines the relevant role of integrating neuroradiologic findings with neuropathology.

  1. Coronary fistula resembling patent ductus arteriosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sgarbieri Ricardo Nilsson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old girl, presenting with heart failure and a continuous murmur, similar to that of a patent arterial duct, was investigated using echocardiogram and cardiac catheterization revealing a left to right shunt throught a coronary artery fistulae between the first septal branch and the right ventricular outflow tract. The patient was submitted to surgery, occluding the anomalous branch by the suturing of its orifice in the right ventricular outflow tract, under cardiopulmonary bypass. After the operation, cardiac catheterization revealed complete occlusion of the fistula without any residual shunt or compromise to the coronary circulation. In seven years of follow-up the patient is completely free of symptoms.

  2. In vivo neurochemical evidence that newly synthesised GABA activates GABA(B), but not GABA(A), receptors on dopaminergic nerve endings in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saigusa, T.; Aono, Y.; Sekino, R.; Uchida, T.; Takada, K.; Oi, Y.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    GABA released from accumbal GABAergic interneurons plays an inhibitory role in the regulation of dopamine efflux through GABA(B) and GABA(A) receptors located on accumbal dopaminergic nerve endings. The cytosolic newly synthesised GABA alters vesicular GABA levels and, accordingly, the amount of

  3. A De Novo Mutation in the Sodium-Activated Potassium Channel KCNT2 Alters Ion Selectivity and Causes Epileptic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmitha Gururaj

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Early infantile epileptic encephalopathies (EOEE are a debilitating spectrum of disorders associated with cognitive impairments. We present a clinical report of a KCNT2 mutation in an EOEE patient. The de novo heterozygous variant Phe240Leu SLICK was identified by exome sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Phe240Leu rSlick and hSLICK channels were electrophysiologically, heterologously characterized to reveal three significant alterations to channel function. First, [Cl−]i sensitivity was reversed in Phe240Leu channels. Second, predominantly K+-selective WT channels were made to favor Na+ over K+ by Phe240Leu. Third, and consequent to altered ion selectivity, Phe240Leu channels had larger inward conductance. Further, rSlick channels induced membrane hyperexcitability when expressed in primary neurons, resembling the cellular seizure phenotype. Taken together, our results confirm that Phe240Leu is a “change-of-function” KCNT2 mutation, demonstrating unusual altered selectivity in KNa channels. These findings establish pathogenicity of the Phe240Leu KCNT2 mutation in the reported EOEE patient.

  4. Alterations in physiology and anatomy during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eng Kien; Tan, Eng Loy

    2013-12-01

    Pregnant women undergo profound anatomical and physiological changes so that they can cope with the increased physical and metabolic demands of their pregnancies. The cardiovascular, respiratory, haematological, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine systems all undergo important physiological alterations and adaptations needed to allow development of the fetus and to allow the mother and fetus to survive the demands of childbirth. Such alterations in anatomy and physiology may cause difficulties in interpreting signs, symptoms, and biochemical investigations, making the clinical assessment of a pregnant woman inevitably confusing but challenging. Understanding these changes is important for every practicing obstetrician, as the pathological deviations from the normal physiological alterations may not be clear-cut until an adverse outcome has resulted. Only with a sound knowledge of the physiology and anatomy changes can the care of an obstetric parturient be safely optimized for a better maternal and fetal outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inflammation and Immune System Alterations in Frailty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xu; Li, Huifen; Leng, Sean X.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Frailty is an important geriatric syndrome characterized by multi-system dysregulation. Substantial evidence suggests heightened inflammatory state and significant immune system alterations in frailty. A heightened inflammatory state is marked by increases in levels of inflammatory molecules (IL-6 and CRP) and counts of white blood cell and its subpopulations, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of frailty, directly or through its detrimental influence to other physiologic systems. Alterations in the innate immune system include decreased proliferation of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and upregulated monocytic expression of specific stress responsive inflammatory pathway genes. In the adaptive immune system, while little information is available about potential B-cell changes, significant alterations have been identified in the T-cell compartment including increased counts of CD8+, CD8+CD28−, CCR5+ T cells, above and beyond age-related senescent immune remodeling. PMID:21093724

  6. Alter(n – ein vielschichtiger Begriff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Maly-Lukas

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Diese Veröffentlichung, die aus einer Vortragsreihe an der katholischen Fachhochschule Freiburg entstanden ist, führt die Leserinnen und Leser in die verschiedenen Sichtweisen des Alter(ns in der modernen Gesellschaft ein. Es handelt sich um eine gelungene Zusammenstellung von Beiträgen aus unterschiedlichen Disziplinen, die sich alle aus ihrer Sicht dem Thema Alter(n widmen. Die einzelnen Artikel sind zwischen 8 und 38 Seiten lang und recht schnell und einfach zu lesen. Je nach Hintergrund und Interessen werden die einzelnen Leserinnen und Leser dabei sicher unterschiedliche Beiträge favorisieren. Schade ist nur, dass durch die ungleichen Längen der Beiträge bestimmte thematische Schwerpunkte – ob gewollt oder nicht – gesetzt werden. Dies sollte die Leserinnen und Leser, die offen für unterschiedlichste Sichtweisen des Alter(ns sind, jedoch nicht davon abhalten, dieses Buch zu lesen.

  7. Metabolic Alterations in Renal and Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Piva, Francesco; Conti, Alessandro; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Cheng, Liang; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Scarpelli, Marina; Tortora, Giampaolo; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Cancer metabolism is emerging as a promising research area in genitourinary tumors. Both renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and prostate cancer (PCa) cells exhibit marked alterations of their metabolism. These changes include increased aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect), increased protein and DNA synthesis and de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying such alterations will represent a major step forward in cancer research. Indeed, reprogramming cancer cell energy metabolism represents a promising hallmark of cancer and may pave the way for novel personalized approaches. PubMed databases were searched for articles published about cancer metabolism in genitourinary tumors. This review is focused on the metabolic alterations that occur in RCC and PCa and describes the mechanisms underlying such metabolic changes.

  8. Public health implications of altered puberty timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golub, M.S.; Collman, G.W.; Foster, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Changes in puberty timing have implications for the treatment of individual children, for the risk of later adult disease, and for chemical testing and risk assessment for the population. Children with early puberty are at a risk for accelerated skeletal maturation and short adult height, early...... sexual debut, potential sexual abuse, and psychosocial difficulties. Altered puberty timing is also of concern for the development of reproductive tract cancers later in life. For example, an early age of menarche is a risk factor for breast cancer. A low age at male puberty is associated....... Altered timing of puberty also has implications for behavioral disorders. For example, an early maturation is associated with a greater incidence of conduct and behavior disorders during adolescence. Finally, altered puberty timing is considered an adverse effect in reproductive toxicity risk assessment...

  9. Streamflow alteration at selected sites in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.; Eng, Ken

    2017-06-26

    An understanding of streamflow alteration in response to various disturbances is necessary for the effective management of stream habitat for a variety of species in Kansas. Streamflow alteration can have negative ecological effects. Using a modeling approach, streamflow alteration was assessed for 129 selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in the State for which requisite streamflow and basin-characteristic information was available. The assessment involved a comparison of the observed condition from 1980 to 2015 with the predicted expected (least-disturbed) condition for 29 streamflow metrics. The metrics represent various characteristics of streamflow including average flow (annual, monthly) and low and high flow (frequency, duration, magnitude).Streamflow alteration in Kansas was indicated locally, regionally, and statewide. Given the absence of a pronounced trend in annual precipitation in Kansas, a precipitation-related explanation for streamflow alteration was not supported. Thus, the likely explanation for streamflow alteration was human activity. Locally, a flashier flow regime (typified by shorter lag times and more frequent and higher peak discharges) was indicated for three streamgages with urbanized basins that had higher percentages of impervious surfaces than other basins in the State. The combination of localized reservoir effects and regional groundwater pumping from the High Plains aquifer likely was responsible, in part, for diminished conditions indicated for multiple streamflow metrics in western and central Kansas. Statewide, the implementation of agricultural land-management practices to reduce runoff may have been responsible, in part, for a diminished duration and magnitude of high flows. In central and eastern Kansas, implemented agricultural land-management practices may have been partly responsible for an inflated magnitude of low flows at several sites.

  10. Sensorimotor incongruence alters limb perception and movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osumi, Michihiro; Nobusako, Satoshi; Zama, Takuro; Taniguchi, Megumi; Shimada, Sotaro; Morioka, Shu

    2017-09-21

    Altered limb ownership or heaviness has been observed in patients with hemiplegia, chronic pain, and several other conditions. Although these sensations are thought to be caused by sensorimotor incongruence, few studies have systematically verified this relationship. In addition, it remains unclear whether these subjective sensations affect movement execution. In a psychophysical experiment, we systematically investigated the relationships between sensorimotor integration and subjective limb perception, such as sense of ownership/heaviness, and verified the relationship between subjective limb perception and movement execution. Thirty-nine healthy participants were enrolled, and a visual feedback delay system was used to systematically evoke sensorimotor incongruence. Participants periodically flexed and extended their wrist while seeing a delayed image of their hand under five delay conditions (0, 150, 250, 350, 600ms). During wrist movement, electromyography (EMG) activity in flexor carpi radialis (FCR) was recorded. Also, to analyze the change in muscle activity and movement speed, the values of integral and peak frequency were calculated. To record changes in the subjective limb perception of the altered limb ownership and heaviness, we used a 7-point Likert scale for each participant. We found that altered ownership and heaviness increased with increasing feedback delay. Also, muscle activity and movement speed decreased with visual feedback delay. There was no significant correlation between subjective altered limb perception (i.e., altered limb ownership and heaviness) and muscle activity or movement speed. We systematically demonstrated that limb ownership, heaviness, muscle activation and movement speed were altered by sensorimotor incongruence. However, our study did not reveal the relationships between these factors. These results indicate the existence of different mechanisms governing subjective limb perception and movement execution. In the future, we

  11. Diet alters species recognition in juvenile toads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfennig, Karin S; Rodriguez Moncalvo, Verónica G; Burmeister, Sabrina S

    2013-10-23

    Whether environmental effects during juvenile development can alter the ontogeny of adult mating behaviour remains largely unexplored. We evaluated the effect of diet on the early expression of conspecific recognition in spadefoot toads, Spea bombifrons. We found that juvenile toads display phonotaxis behaviour six weeks post-metamorphosis. However, preference for conspecifics versus heterospecifics emerged later and was diet dependent. Thus, the environment can affect the early development of species recognition in a way that might alter adult behaviour. Evaluating such effects is important for understanding variation in hybridization between species and the nature of species boundaries.

  12. White matter alterations in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, P. B.; Salmon, C. E.; Velasco, T. R.; Sakamoto, A. C.; Leite, J. P.; Santos, A. C.

    2011-03-01

    In This study, we used Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (D), parallel diffusivity (D//) and perpendicular diffusivity (D), to localize the regions where occur axonal lesion and demyelization. TBSS was applied to analyze the FA data. After, the regions with alteration were studied with D, D// and D maps. Patients exhibited widespread degradation of FA. With D, D// and D maps analysis we found alterations in corpus callosum, corticospinal tract, fornix, internal capsule, corona radiate, Sagittal stratum, cingulum, fronto-occipital fasciculus and uncinate fasciculus. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that exist demyelization and axonal damage in patients with TLE.

  13. Altered States: Globalization, Sovereignty, and Governance | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In Altered States, Gordon Smith and Moisés Naím provide practical recommendations for improved governance and for strengthening and reforming the United Nations. They explore the dynamics of globalization and discuss what makes today's globalization distinct. They test the prevailing wisdom about sovereignty and ...

  14. The Correlation between Physiological and Structural Alterations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004) and ultrastructural. (Papadakis et al. 2004) alterations in the vegetative organs of plants. Heavy-metal-induced decreases in cell wall elasticity have also been recorded (Barceló et al. 1989). The physiological effects of heavy metals on plants include: (i) perturbation of stomatal functions leading to changes in water ...

  15. Diabetic rat testes: morphological and functional alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, G; Catizone, A; Esposito, R; Pisanti, F A; Vietri, M T; Galdieri, M

    2009-12-01

    Reproductive dysfunction is a consequence of diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This study investigated the histological and molecular alterations in the testes of rats injected with streptozotocin at prepuperal (SPI rats) and adult age (SAI rats) to understand whether diabetes affects testicular tissue with different severity depending on the age in which this pathological condition starts. The testes of diabetic animals showed frequent abnormal histology, and seminiferous epithelium cytoarchitecture appeared altered as well as the occludin distribution pattern. The early occurrence of diabetes increased the percentage of animals with high number of damaged tubules. The interstitial compartment of the testes was clearly hypertrophic in several portions of the organs both in SPI and SAI rats. Interestingly, fully developed Leydig cells were present in all the treated animals although abnormally distributed. Besides the above-described damages, we found a similar decrease in plasma testosterone levels both in SPI and SAI rats. Oxidative stress (OS) is involved in the pathogenesis of various diabetic complications, and in our experimental models we found that manganese superoxide dismutase was reduced in diabetic animals. We conclude that in STZ-induced diabetes, the altered spermatogenesis, more severe in SPI animals, is possibly due to the effect of OS on Leydig cell function which could cause the testosterone decrease responsible for the alterations found in the seminiferous epithelium of diabetic animals.

  16. Lessons from altered states of consciousness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    temporal association areas, occipitoparietal association cortices and occipital cortex.3 ... Abstract. Key research related to consciousness is that which investigates the neural systems that are deactivated or attenuated during altered states of ... integration of neural networks with the final common mechanism for anaesthesia ...

  17. Sulphur depletion altered somatic embryogenesis in Theobroma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-30

    Aug 30, 2010 ... chemical or characteristic functions of these biomolecules in cells (Saito, 2004). In growing conditions, sulphur defi- ciency challenges plants (explants) to alter the metabolism necessary for growth. Restriction in sulphur not only limits the synthesis of sulphurous amino acids, but will also limit the proteins ...

  18. Haematological alterations probably underlining anoestrus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haematological alterations are consistent with trypanosomosis, which is an important cause of reproductive wastage in many species of food animals.The haematological changes associated with Typanosoma brucei infection in oestrous synchronized goats were investigated using twelve adult West African Dwarf (WAD) ...

  19. Public health implications of altered puberty timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golub, Mari S; Collman, Gwen W; Foster, Paul M D

    2008-01-01

    sexual debut, potential sexual abuse, and psychosocial difficulties. Altered puberty timing is also of concern for the development of reproductive tract cancers later in life. For example, an early age of menarche is a risk factor for breast cancer. A low age at male puberty is associated...

  20. Can Molecular Hippocampal Alterations Explain Behavioral ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies in both humans and animals have shown that prenatal stress can alter cognitive function and other neurological behaviors in adult offspring. One possible underlying mechanism for this may lie with alterations in hippocampal gene expression. The present study examined genotypical outcomes in adult male and female offspring of rats exposed to variable stress during pregnancy. Dams (n=15/treatment) were subjected to several non-chemical stressors including intermittent noise, light, crowding, restraint, and altered circadian lighting, from gestational day (GD) 13 to 20. Tail blood was drawn on GD 12, 16 and 20 to verify a stress response. Corticosterone levels were not different between the stressed and non-stressed dams on GD12 but was significantly increased in stressed dams on GD 16 and 20 compared to controls. Dams gave birth on GD22 (postnatal day or PND 0). Several behavioral tests were used to assess the cognitive and behavioral phenotype of the offspring from PND 49 through 86, including the Morris water maze and novel object recognition. Male and female stressed offspring showed reduced reversal learning on the Morris water maze and stressed females did not show a significant preference for the novel object (57 ± 8%) while control females did (71 ± 3%). This indicates altered cognition in prenatally stressed offspring. On PND 91-92, offspring were necropsied and hippocampal tissue was collected. Genotypic outcomes of prenatal stress w

  1. Luminescence of thermally altered human skeletal remains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krap, Tristan; Nota, Kevin; Wilk, Leah; van de Goot, Frank; Ruijter, Jan; Duijst, Wilma; Oostra, Roelof Jan

    2017-01-01

    Literature on luminescent properties of thermally altered human remains is scarce and contradictory. Therefore, the luminescence of heated bone was systemically reinvestigated. A heating experiment was conducted on fresh human bone, in two different media, and cremated human remains were recovered

  2. Altered membrane permeability in multidrug resistant Escherichia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted with the objective of examining the outer membrane proteins and their involvement during the transport of β - lactams in multidrug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from extra-intestinal infections. Also, the response of gram negative bacterial biomembrane alteration was studied using extended ...

  3. Connective tissue alteration in abdominal wall hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, N A; Yadete, D H; Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2011-01-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of abdominal wall hernia formation is complex. Optimal treatment of hernias depends on a full understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in their formation. The aim of this study was to review the literature on specific collagen alterations...... in abdominal wall hernia formation....

  4. Epigenetic alterations in metastatic cutaneous carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darr, Owen A; Colacino, Justin A; Tang, Alice L; McHugh, Jonathan B; Bellile, Emily L; Bradford, Carol R; Prince, Mark P; Chepeha, Douglas B; Rozek, Laura S; Moyer, Jeffrey S

    2015-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are the 2 most common cutaneous carcinomas. Molecular profiles predicting metastasis of these cancers have not been identified. Epigenetic profiles of 37 primary cases of cutaneous SCC and BCC were quantified via the Illumina Goldengate Cancer Panel. Differential protein expression by metastatic potential was analyzed in 110 total cases by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis revealed that metastatic BCCs had a methylation profile resembling cutaneous SCCs. Metastatic cutaneous SCCs were found to be hypermethylated at FRZB (median methylation: 46.7% vs 4.7%; p = 4 × 10(-5) ). Metastatic BCCs were found to be hypomethylated at MYCL2 (median methylation: 3.8% vs 83.4%; p = 1.9 × 10(-6) ). Immunohistochemical staining revealed few differences between metastatic and nonmetastatic cancers. Metastatic primary BCCs and cutaneous SCCs had distinct epigenetic profiles when compared to their nonmetastatic counterparts. Epigenetic profiling may prove useful in future diagnosis and prevention of advanced nonmelanoma skin cancers. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Altered gut microbiota in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strati, Francesco; Cavalieri, Duccio; Albanese, Davide; De Felice, Claudio; Donati, Claudio; Hayek, Joussef; Jousson, Olivier; Leoncini, Silvia; Pindo, Massimo; Renzi, Daniela; Rizzetto, Lisa; Stefanini, Irene; Calabrò, Antonio; De Filippo, Carlotta

    2016-07-30

    The human gut microbiota directly affects human health, and its alteration can lead to gastrointestinal abnormalities and inflammation. Rett syndrome (RTT), a progressive neurological disorder mainly caused by mutations in MeCP2 gene, is commonly associated with gastrointestinal dysfunctions and constipation, suggesting a link between RTT's gastrointestinal abnormalities and the gut microbiota. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial and fungal gut microbiota in a cohort of RTT subjects integrating clinical, metabolomics and metagenomics data to understand if changes in the gut microbiota of RTT subjects could be associated with gastrointestinal abnormalities and inflammatory status. Our findings revealed the occurrence of an intestinal sub-inflammatory status in RTT subjects as measured by the elevated values of faecal calprotectin and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. We showed that, overall, RTT subjects harbour bacterial and fungal microbiota altered in terms of relative abundances from those of healthy controls, with a reduced microbial richness and dominated by microbial taxa belonging to Bifidobacterium, several Clostridia (among which Anaerostipes, Clostridium XIVa, Clostridium XIVb) as well as Erysipelotrichaceae, Actinomyces, Lactobacillus, Enterococcus, Eggerthella, Escherichia/Shigella and the fungal genus Candida. We further observed that alterations of the gut microbiota do not depend on the constipation status of RTT subjects and that this dysbiotic microbiota produced altered short chain fatty acids profiles. We demonstrated for the first time that RTT is associated with a dysbiosis of both the bacterial and fungal component of the gut microbiota, suggesting that impairments of MeCP2 functioning favour the establishment of a microbial community adapted to the costive gastrointestinal niche of RTT subjects. The altered production of short chain fatty acids associated with this microbiota might reinforce the constipation status of RTT

  6. 28 CFR 36.403 - Alterations: Path of travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alterations: Path of travel. 36.403... Alterations: Path of travel. (a) General. An alteration that affects or could affect the usability of or... the maximum extent feasible, the path of travel to the altered area and the restrooms, telephones, and...

  7. Subchronic treatment with phencyclidine in adolescence leads to impaired exploratory behavior in adult rats without altering social interaction or N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor binding levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxas, A; Willems, R; Kooijman, E J M; Renjaän, V A; Klein, P J; Windhorst, A D; Donck, L Ver; Leysen, J E; Berckel, B N M van

    2014-11-01

    Although both the onset of schizophrenia and human phencyclidine (PCP) abuse typically present within the interval from adolescence to early adulthood, the majority of preclinical research employing the PCP model of schizophrenia has been conducted on neonatal or adult animals. The present study was designed to evaluate the behavioral and neurochemical sequelae of subchronic exposure to PCP in adolescence. Male 35-42-day-old Sprague Dawley rats were subcutaneously administered either saline (10 ml · kg(-1) ) or PCP hydrochloride (10 mg · kg(-1) ) once daily for a period of 14 days (n = 6/group). The animals were allowed to withdraw from treatment for 2 weeks, and their social and exploratory behaviors were subsequently assessed in adulthood by using the social interaction test. To examine the effects of adolescent PCP administration on the regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), quantitative autoradiography was performed on brain sections of adult, control and PCP-withdrawn rats by using 20 nM (3) H-MK-801. Prior subchronic exposure to PCP in adolescence had no enduring effects on the reciprocal contact and noncontact social behavior of adult rats. Spontaneous rearing in response to the novel testing arena and time spent investigating its walls and floor were reduced in PCP-withdrawn animals compared with control. The long-term behavioral effects of PCP occurred in the absence of persistent deficits in spontaneous locomotion or self-grooming activity and were not mediated by altered NMDAR density. Our results document differential effects of adolescent PCP administration on the social and exploratory behaviors of adult rats, suggesting that distinct neurobiological mechanisms are involved in mediating these behaviors. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Rigid spine syndrome associated with sensory-motor axonal neuropathy resembling Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is characteristic of Bcl-2-associated athanogene-3 gene mutations even without cardiac involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noury, Jean-Baptiste; Maisonobe, Thierry; Richard, Pascale; Delague, Valérie; Malfatti, Edoardo; Stojkovic, Tanya

    2017-02-22

    Bcl-2-associated athanogene-3 (BAG3) mutations have been described in rare cases of rapidly progressive myofibrillar myopathies. Symptoms begin in the first decade with axial involvement and contractures and are associated with cardiac and respiratory impairment in the second decade. Axonal neuropathy has been documented but usually not as a key clinical feature. We report a 24-year-old woman with severe rigid spine syndrome and sensory-motor neuropathy resembling Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Muscle MRI showed severe fat infiltration without any specific pattern. Deltoid muscle biopsy showed neurogenic changes and discrete myofibrillar abnormalities. Electrocardiogram and transthoracic echocardiography results were normal. Genetic analysis of a panel of 45 CMT genes showed no mutation. BAG3 gene screening identified the previously reported c.626C>T, pPro209Leu, mutation. This case indicates that rigid spine syndrome and sensory-motor axonal neuropathy are key clinical features of BAG3 mutations that should be considered even without cardiac involvement. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Crystal structure of YwpF from Staphylococcus aureus reveals its architecture comprised of a β-barrel core domain resembling type VI secretion system proteins and a two-helix pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Kyu-Yeon; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kim, Soon-Jong; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2015-04-01

    The ywpF gene (SAV2097) of the Staphylococcus aureus strain Mu50 encodes the YwpF protein, which may play a role in antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the YwpF superfamily from S. aureus at 2.5-Å resolution. The YwpF structure consists of two regions: an N-terminal core β-barrel domain that shows structural similarity to type VI secretion system (T6SS) proteins (e.g., Hcp1, Hcp3, and EvpC) and a C-terminal two-helix pair. Although the monomer structure of S. aureus YwpF resembles those of T6SS proteins, the dimer/tetramer model of S. aureus YwpF is distinct from the functionally important hexameric ring of T6SS proteins. We therefore suggest that the S. aureus YwpF may have a different function compared to T6SS proteins. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Melon necrotic spot virus Replication Occurs in Association with Altered Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Aix, Cristina; García-García, María; Aranda, Miguel A; Sánchez-Pina, María Amelia

    2015-04-01

    Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) (genus Carmovirus, family Tombusviridae) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus that has become an experimental model for the analysis of cell-to-cell virus movement and translation of uncapped viral RNAs, whereas little is known about its replication. Analysis of the cytopathology after MNSV infection showed the specific presence of modified organelles that resemble mitochondria. Immunolocalization of the glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) P protein in these organelles confirmed their mitochondrial origin. In situ hybridization and immunolocalization experiments showed the specific localization of positive-sense viral RNA, capsid protein (CP), and double-stranded (ds)RNA in these organelles meaning that replication of the virus takes place in association with them. The three-dimensional reconstructions of the altered mitochondria showed the presence of large, interconnected, internal dilations which appeared to be linked to the outside cytoplasmic environment through pores and/or complex structures, and with lipid bodies. Transient expression of MNSV p29 revealed that its specific target is mitochondria. Our data document the extensive reorganization of host mitochondria induced by MNSV, which provides a protected environment to viral replication, and show that the MNSV p29 protein is the primary determinant of this effect in the host.

  11. Urachal Carcinoma Shares Genomic Alterations with Colorectal Carcinoma and May Respond to Epidermal Growth Factor Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazo-Lorduy, Ana; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Wang, Li; Patel, Vaibhav; Iyer, Gopa; Jordan, Emmet; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Leonard, Issa; Oh, William K; Zhu, Jun; McBride, Russell B; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Solit, David B; Sfakianos, John P; Galsky, Matthew D

    2016-11-01

    Metastatic urachal carcinoma is a rare, understudied, and aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Histologically, urachal carcinomas resemble enteric adenocarcinomas and anecdotally respond to systemic therapies utilized in colorectal cancer. Targeted exome sequencing of archival primary tumor tissue from a patient with metastatic urachal cancer revealed EGFR amplification and wild-type KRAS. The patient was treated with cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against EGFR, as a single agent, and achieved a response lasting more than 8 mo. Subsequent whole-exome sequencing revealed no additional alterations likely to be associated with cetuximab sensitivity. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from nine additional urachal cancers were subjected to targeted exome sequencing. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway mutations were found in four of the nine samples, but no EGFR amplification was detected. Importantly, APC mutations were detected in two of the nine patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a response to single-agent cetuximab in a patient with metastatic urachal cancer and of molecular analysis to probe the basis for sensitivity. On the basis of these findings and the histologic, and now genomic, similarities with colorectal cancer, monoclonal antibodies directed at EGFR could be used in the treatment of metastatic urachal cancer. Urachal cancers are morphologically and genomically similar to colon adenocarcinomas and may respond to drugs targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. From Hills to Holes: How Climate Change and Mining are Altering Runoff Processes in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Canadian environments are under considerable pressure from both climate and land-use change. While warming temperatures are widespread and amplified in the north, surface mining has resulted in large-scale landscape disturbance. How these changes affect catchment response is profound, fundamentally altering the cycling and delivery of water and geochemicals to the drainage network. In permafrost-underlain environments, coupled mass and energy processes control runoff response, and as ground thaw increases, new subsurface pathways become accessible while changing overall catchment storage. With surface mining, watersheds are altered such that they bare little resemblance to what existed prior to mining. In this presentation, data will be presented from long-term experiments exploring the impact of climate and mining on runoff processes in cold catchments using stable isotopes of water and associated hydrometric measurements. In southern Yukon, results from the Wolf Creek Research Basin highlights the influence of surface energy balances on controlling the timing and magnitude of flow response, with inter-annual variability largely driven by how atmospheric forcing interacts with permafrost-underlain areas of the catchment. In mountainous areas of southern British Columbia, surface mining reconfigures landscapes as valleys are filled with waste-rock. Mine-influenced catchments exhibit attenuated flows with delays in spring freshet and a more muted to precipitation. Stable isotopes in stream water suggests that both waste-rock and reference catchments are well mixed, however reference catchments are more responsive to enrichment and depletion events and that mine-influenced catchments had a heavier isotope signature than reference watersheds, suggesting enhanced influence of rainfall on recharge. In both cases, snow storage and release exerts considerable control on streamflow responses, and future changes in streamflow regimes will reflect both a changes in the snow

  13. Structural and functional brain alterations in a murine model of Angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Anja; Minnerup, Jens; Soria, Guadalupe; Planas, Anna M

    2017-02-01

    Hypertension is a main risk factor for the development of cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD) - a major contributor to stroke and the most common cause of vascular dementia. Despite the increasing socioeconomic importance arising from cSVD, currently only a few specific treatment strategies with proven efficacy are known. Fundamental to the lack of specific treatments is poor understanding of the disease pathogenesis and a lack of appropriate animal models resembling all symptoms of the human disease. However, chronic hypertensive rat models have been shown to bear similarities to most key features of cSVD. Despite a significantly larger toolbox available for genotypic and phenotypic modifications compared to rats, mouse models of hypertension are unusual when modeling cSVD and associated cognitive impairment experimentally. In the present study, we therefore characterized hypertension-mediated cerebrovascular alterations and accompanying structural and functional consequences by simultaneously treating adult wild-type mice (C57BL/6N) with Angiotensin II (AngII) and the nitric oxide synthases inhibitor L-NAME for 4 weeks. Hypertension associated to cerebral alterations reminiscent of early-onset cSVD and vascular cognitive impairment when combined with additional AngII bolus injections. Most importantly, preventing the elevation of blood pressure (BP) protected from the development of cSVD symptoms and associated cognitive decline. Our data strongly support the suitability of this particular mouse model of AngII-induced hypertension as an appropriate animal model for early-onset cSVD and hence, vascular cognitive impairment, pathologies commonly preceding vascular dementia. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. Postural Stability is Altered by Blood Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, M.; Denise, P.; Guincetre, J. Y.; Normand, H.

    2008-06-01

    Non-vestibular influences as shift in blood volume changed perception of body posture. Then, factors affecting blood shift may alter postural control. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of leg venous contention on postural stability. Twelve subjects were studied on a balance plate for 5 minutes with the eyes closed, in 3 conditions: with no leg venous contention or grade 1 and 3 support stockings. Standard deviation of x and y position was calculated before and after the closure of the eyes. Strong venous contention altered postural stability, after the eyes were closed, during the first 10 s of standing. As support stockings prevent blood shift induced by upright posture, this result is in line with the hypothesis that blood shifts influence the perception of body orientation and postural control among others factors as vision, vestibular inputs... This strong venous contention could induce an increase of fall.

  15. Siliceous microfossil extraction from altered Monterey rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, C.O.; Casey, R.E.

    1986-04-01

    Samples of altered Monterey rocks of differing lithologies were processed by various methods to develop new techniques for extracting siliceous microfossils. The preliminary use of thin sections made from the same rocks reduced the number of probable samples (samples worth further processing) by about one-third. Most of the siliceous microfossils contained in altered Monterey rocks appear to be highly recrystallized and are extremely fragile; however, some contained silicified and silica-infilled radiolarians and planktonic and benthonic foraminifera, which are very tough. In general the most useful techniques were gently hydrochloric acid, hydrogen peroxide, formic acid, monosodium glutamate, and regular siliceous microfossil extraction techniques. Unsuccessful techniques and a new siliceous microfossil flotation technique are also documented.

  16. Molecular alterations and biomarkers in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, William M.; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2013-01-01

    The promise of precision medicine is now a clinical reality. Advances in our understanding of the molecular genetics of colorectal cancer genetics is leading to the development of a variety of biomarkers that are being used as early detection markers, prognostic markers, and markers for predicting treatment responses. This is no more evident than in the recent advances in testing colorectal cancers for specific molecular alterations in order to guide treatment with the monoclonal antibody therapies cetuximab and panitumumab, which target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In this review, we update a prior review published in 2010 and describe our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and how these alterations relate to emerging biomarkers for early detection and risk stratification (diagnostic markers), prognosis (prognostic markers), and the prediction of treatment responses (predictive markers). PMID:24178577

  17. Genetic and molecular alterations across medulloblastoma subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Patryk; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumour diagnosed in children. Over the last few decades, advances in radiation and chemotherapy have significantly improved the odds of survival. Nevertheless, one third of all patients still succumb to their disease, and many long-term survivors are afflicted with neurocognitive sequelae. Large-scale multi-institutional efforts have provided insight into the transcriptional and genetic landscape of medulloblastoma. Four distinct subgroups of medulloblastoma have been identified, defined by distinct transcriptomes, genetics, demographics and outcomes. Integrated genomic profiling of each of these subgroups has revealed distinct genetic alterations, driving pathways and in some instances cells of origin. In this review, we highlight, in a subgroup-specific manner, our current knowledge of the genetic and molecular alterations in medulloblastoma and underscore the possible avenues for future therapeutic intervention.

  18. Metabolic alterations in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Piva, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Santini, Daniele; Cheng, Liang; Cascinu, Stefano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a metabolic disease, being characterized by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways involved in oxygen sensing (VHL/HIF pathway alterations and the subsequent up-regulation of HIF-responsive genes such as VEGF, PDGF, EGF, and glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, which justify the RCC reliance on aerobic glycolysis), energy sensing (fumarate hydratase-deficient, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, mutations of HGF/MET pathway resulting in the metabolic Warburg shift marked by RCC increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate shunt, augmented lipogenesis, and reduced AMPK and Krebs cycle activity) and/or nutrient sensing cascade (deregulation of AMPK-TSC1/2-mTOR and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways). We analyzed the key metabolic abnormalities underlying RCC carcinogenesis, highlighting those altered pathways that may represent potential targets for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Altered Sensory Feedbacks in Pianist's Dystonia: the altered auditory feedback paradigm and the glove effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Pei-Hsin Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study investigates the effect of altered auditory feedback (AAF in musician's dystonia (MD and discusses whether altered auditory feedback can be considered as a sensory trick in MD. Furthermore, the effect of AAF is compared with altered tactile feedback, which can serve as a sensory trick in several other forms of focal dystonia. Methods: The method is based on scale analysis (Jabusch et al. 2004. Experiment 1 employs synchronization paradigm: 12 MD patients and 25 healthy pianists had to repeatedly play C-major scales in synchrony with a metronome on a MIDI-piano with 3 auditory feedback conditions: 1. normal feedback; 2. no feedback; 3. constant delayed feedback. Experiment 2 employs synchronization-continuation paradigm: 12 MD patients and 12 healthy pianists had to repeatedly play C-major scales in two phases: first in synchrony with a metronome, secondly continue the established tempo without the metronome. There are 4 experimental conditions, among them 3 are the same altered auditory feedback as in Experiment 1 and 1 is related to altered tactile sensory input. The coefficient of variation of inter-onset intervals of the key depressions was calculated to evaluate fine motor control. Results: In both experiments, the healthy controls and the patients behaved very similarly. There is no difference in the regularity of playing between the two groups under any condition, and neither did AAF nor did altered tactile feedback have a beneficial effect on patients’ fine motor control. Conclusions: The results of the two experiments suggest that in the context of our experimental designs, AAF and altered tactile feedback play a minor role in motor coordination in patients with musicians' dystonia. We propose that altered auditory and tactile feedback do not serve as effective sensory tricks and may not temporarily reduce the symptoms of patients suffering from MD in this experimental context.

  20. Altered fibroblast proteoglycan production in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Nihlberg, Kristian; Dahlbäck, Magnus; Bjermer, Leif; Eriksson, Leif T; Erjefält, Jonas S; Löfdahl, Claes-Göran; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla

    2010-05-11

    Airway remodeling in COPD includes reorganization of the extracellular matrix. Proteoglycans play a crucial role in this process as regulators of the integrity of the extracellular matrix. Altered proteoglycan immunostaining has been demonstrated in COPD lungs and this has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis. The major cell type responsible for production and maintenance of ECM constituents, such as proteoglycans, are fibroblasts. Interestingly, it has been proposed that central airways and alveolar lung parenchyma contain distinct fibroblast populations. This study explores the hypothesis that altered depositions of proteoglycans in COPD lungs, and in particular versican and perlecan, is a result of dysregulated fibroblast proteoglycan production. Proliferation, proteoglycan production and the response to TGF-beta1 were examined in vitro in centrally and distally derived fibroblasts isolated from COPD patients (GOLD stage IV) and from control subjects. Phenotypically different fibroblast populations were identified in central airways and in the lung parenchyma. Versican production was higher in distal fibroblasts from COPD patients than from control subjects (p proteoglycan production in distally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients and control subjects. In contrast, centrally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients were less responsive to TGF-beta1 than those from control subjects. The results show that fibroblasts from COPD patients have alterations in proteoglycan production that may contribute to disease development. Distally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients have enhanced production of versican that may have a negative influence on the elastic recoil. In addition, a lower perlecan production in centrally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients may indicate alterations in bronchial basement membrane integrity in severe COPD.

  1. Ocean acidification alters fish–jellyfish symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerken, Ivan; Pitt, Kylie A.; Rutte, Melchior D.; Geertsma, Robbert C.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic relationships are common in nature, and are important for individual fitness and sustaining species populations. Global change is rapidly altering environmental conditions, but, with the exception of coral–microalgae interactions, we know little of how this will affect symbiotic relationships. We here test how the effects of ocean acidification, from rising anthropogenic CO2 emissions, may alter symbiotic interactions between juvenile fish and their jellyfish hosts. Fishes treated with elevated seawater CO2 concentrations, as forecast for the end of the century on a business-as-usual greenhouse gas emission scenario, were negatively affected in their behaviour. The total time that fish (yellowtail scad) spent close to their jellyfish host in a choice arena where they could see and smell their host was approximately three times shorter under future compared with ambient CO2 conditions. Likewise, the mean number of attempts to associate with jellyfish was almost three times lower in CO2-treated compared with control fish, while only 63% (high CO2) versus 86% (control) of all individuals tested initiated an association at all. By contrast, none of three fish species tested were attracted solely to jellyfish olfactory cues under present-day CO2 conditions, suggesting that the altered fish–jellyfish association is not driven by negative effects of ocean acidification on olfaction. Because shelter is not widely available in the open water column and larvae of many (and often commercially important) pelagic species associate with jellyfish for protection against predators, modification of the fish–jellyfish symbiosis might lead to higher mortality and alter species population dynamics, and potentially have flow-on effects for their fisheries. PMID:27358374

  2. Serotonergic Hallucinogen-Induced Visual Perceptual Alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kometer, Michael; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-11-30

    Serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin, and N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), are famous for their capacity to temporally and profoundly alter an individual's visual experiences. These visual alterations show consistent attributes despite large inter- and intra-individual variances. Many reports document a common perception of colors as more saturated, with increased brightness and contrast in the environment ("Visual Intensifications"). Environmental objects might be altered in size ("Visual illusions") or take on a modified and special meaning for the subject ("Altered self-reference"). Subjects may perceive light flashes or geometrical figures containing recurrent patterns ("Elementary imagery and hallucinations") influenced by auditory stimuli ("Audiovisual synesthesia"), or they may envision images of people, animals, or landscapes ("Complex imagery and hallucinations") without any physical stimuli supporting their percepts. This wide assortment of visual phenomena suggests that one single neuropsychopharmacological mechanism is unlikely to explain such vast phenomenological diversity. Starting with mechanisms that act at the cellular level, the key role of 5-HT2A receptor activation and the subsequent increased cortical excitation will be considered. Next, it will be shown that area specific anatomical and dynamical features link increased excitation to the specific visual contents of hallucinations. The decrease of alpha oscillations by hallucinogens will then be introduced as a systemic mechanism for amplifying internal-driven excitation that overwhelms stimulus-induced excitations. Finally, the hallucinogen-induced parallel decrease of the N170 visual evoked potential and increased medial P1 potential will be discussed as key mechanisms for inducing a dysbalance between global integration and early visual gain that may explain several hallucinogen-induced visual experiences, including visual hallucinations, illusions

  3. Altered fibroblast proteoglycan production in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erjefält Jonas S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway remodeling in COPD includes reorganization of the extracellular matrix. Proteoglycans play a crucial role in this process as regulators of the integrity of the extracellular matrix. Altered proteoglycan immunostaining has been demonstrated in COPD lungs and this has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis. The major cell type responsible for production and maintenance of ECM constituents, such as proteoglycans, are fibroblasts. Interestingly, it has been proposed that central airways and alveolar lung parenchyma contain distinct fibroblast populations. This study explores the hypothesis that altered depositions of proteoglycans in COPD lungs, and in particular versican and perlecan, is a result of dysregulated fibroblast proteoglycan production. Methods Proliferation, proteoglycan production and the response to TGF-β1 were examined in vitro in centrally and distally derived fibroblasts isolated from COPD patients (GOLD stage IV and from control subjects. Results Phenotypically different fibroblast populations were identified in central airways and in the lung parenchyma. Versican production was higher in distal fibroblasts from COPD patients than from control subjects (p 1 triggered similar increases in proteoglycan production in distally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients and control subjects. In contrast, centrally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients were less responsive to TGF-β1 than those from control subjects. Conclusions The results show that fibroblasts from COPD patients have alterations in proteoglycan production that may contribute to disease development. Distally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients have enhanced production of versican that may have a negative influence on the elastic recoil. In addition, a lower perlecan production in centrally derived fibroblasts from COPD patients may indicate alterations in bronchial basement membrane integrity in severe COPD.

  4. Neck muscle fatigue alters upper limb proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabihhosseinian, Mahboobeh; Holmes, Michael W R; Murphy, Bernadette

    2015-05-01

    Limb proprioception is an awareness by the central nervous system (CNS) of the location of a limb in three-dimensional space and is essential for movement and postural control. The CNS uses the position of the head and neck when interpreting the position of the upper limb, and altered input from neck muscles may affect the sensory inputs to the CNS and consequently may impair the awareness of upper limb joint position. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fatigue of the cervical extensors muscles (CEM) using a submaximal fatigue protocol alters the ability to recreate a previously presented elbow angle with the head in a neutral position. Twelve healthy individuals participated. CEM activity was examined bilaterally using surface electromyography, and kinematics of the elbow joint was measured. The fatigue protocol included an isometric neck extension task at 70 % of maximum until failure. Joint position error increased following fatigue, demonstrating a significant main effect of time (F 2, 18 = 19.41, p ≤ 0.0001) for absolute error. No significant differences were found for variable error (F 2, 18 = 0.27, p = 0.76) or constant error (F 2, 18 = 1.16 of time, p ≤ 0.33). This study confirms that fatigue of the CEM can reduce the accuracy of elbow joint position matching. This suggests that altered afferent input from the neck subsequent to fatigue may impair upper limb proprioception.

  5. [Alterations in arterial compliance of dyslipidemic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clara, Fernando Mario; Corral, Pablo; Blanco, Gustavo Hector; Scandurra, Adriana Graciela; Meschino, Gustavo Javier

    2015-01-01

    We studied the alteration on the distensibility of the arterial walls caused by dyslipidemia LDLc dependent, along the decades of life, by means of a study of the radial artery pulse wave. We made an analysis of the radial artery pulse wave records acquired by means a movement displacement sensor, placed on radial palpation area. We recruited 100 dyslipidemic men without other cardiovascular risk factors, between the 3rd and the 6th decade. We identified the reflected wave in the records and we computed the augmentation index in order to quantify its amplitude and position. This index is useful to assess the endothelial dysfunction. Besides, we defined a velocity coefficient as the ratio between the size of the individuals and the delay time between the peak of the systolic wave and the arrival of the reflected wave. Results were compared against those obtained in a group of 161 healthy volunteers. We found that dyslipidemic patients presented augmentation index values similar to controls until the fourth decade, increasing thereafter with significant differences only in the 6th decade. No significant differences were found in the velocity index in any of the ages studied. We conclude that alterations produced by dyslipidemia take decades to manifest, and they begin affecting the mechanism of vasodilation of distal arteries with highest proportion of smooth muscle, without altering the proximal conduit arteries with more elastin content. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Obesogenic diets alter metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Megan R; Nonnecke, Eric B; Linderholm, A L; Cajka, Tomas; Sa, Michael R; Lönnerdal, Bo; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Fiehn, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Obesity and accompanying metabolic disease is negatively correlated with lung health yet the exact mechanisms by which obesity affects the lung are not well characterized. Since obesity is associated with lung diseases as chronic bronchitis and asthma, we designed a series of experiments to measure changes in lung metabolism in mice fed obesogenic diets. Mice were fed either control or high fat/sugar diet (45%kcal fat/17%kcal sucrose), or very high fat diet (60%kcal fat/7% sucrose) for 150 days. We performed untargeted metabolomics by GC-TOFMS and HILIC-QTOFMS and lipidomics by RPLC-QTOFMS to reveal global changes in lung metabolism resulting from obesity and diet composition. From a total of 447 detected metabolites, we found 91 metabolite and lipid species significantly altered in mouse lung tissues upon dietary treatments. Significantly altered metabolites included complex lipids, free fatty acids, energy metabolites, amino acids and adenosine and NAD pathway members. While some metabolites were altered in both obese groups compared to control, others were different between obesogenic diet groups. Furthermore, a comparison of changes between lung, kidney and liver tissues indicated few metabolic changes were shared across organs, suggesting the lung is an independent metabolic organ. These results indicate obesity and diet composition have direct mechanistic effects on composition of the lung metabolome, which may contribute to disease progression by lung-specific pathways.

  7. Public health implications of altered puberty timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Mari S; Collman, Gwen W; Foster, Paul M D; Kimmel, Carole A; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Reiter, Edward O; Sharpe, Richard M; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Toppari, Jorma

    2008-02-01

    Changes in puberty timing have implications for the treatment of individual children, for the risk of later adult disease, and for chemical testing and risk assessment for the population. Children with early puberty are at a risk for accelerated skeletal maturation and short adult height, early sexual debut, potential sexual abuse, and psychosocial difficulties. Altered puberty timing is also of concern for the development of reproductive tract cancers later in life. For example, an early age of menarche is a risk factor for breast cancer. A low age at male puberty is associated with an increased risk for testicular cancer according to several, but not all, epidemiologic studies. Girls and, possibly, boys who exhibit premature adrenarche are at a higher risk for developing features of metabolic syndrome, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease later in adulthood. Altered timing of puberty also has implications for behavioral disorders. For example, an early maturation is associated with a greater incidence of conduct and behavior disorders during adolescence. Finally, altered puberty timing is considered an adverse effect in reproductive toxicity risk assessment for chemicals. Recent US legislation has mandated improved chemical testing approaches for protecting children's health and screening for endocrine-disrupting agents, which has led to changes in the US Environmental Protection Agency's risk assessment and toxicity testing guidelines to include puberty-related assessments and to the validation of pubertal male and female rat assays for endocrine screening.

  8. Graviresponses of osteocytes under altered gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, S. M.; Qian, A. R.; Qu, L. N.; Zhang, W.; Wang, Z.; Ding, C.; Li, Y. H.; Ren, H. G.; Shang, P.

    2011-09-01

    Single cell was capable of sensing and responding to alterations of gravity. Osteocytes, as the most abundant cells of the bone tissue playing an important role in the bone mechanotransduction, are very sensitive to mechanical stimuli. However, the effect of altered gravity on osteocytes so far is less known according to the public papers. Further study on this issue will help to verify and develop the theory of how cells perceive and respond to gravity. It also brings new ideas to the study of space bone loss. In our study, Osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells were exposed to 30 parabolic flights three times on ZERO-G airbus A300 to investigate the comprehensive effect on osteocytes stimulated by hyper- and hypo-gravity forces. It showed that the cell morphology, as well as cell area and height, was not changed significantly by hyper-gravity and hypo-gravity. However, the cytoskeleton was reorganized. In flight cells, F-actin polymerization was enhanced at the cell periphery and microtubule organizing center disappeared, but no apoptotic feathers were detected. The results of western blot showed that connexin 43 (Cx43) expression was down-regulated, indicating an decrease of gap-junction. In conclusion, hyper- and hypo-gravity stimulation altered the cytoskeleton architecture and suppressed gap-junction of osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells.

  9. Alterations of brain activity in fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaddiruk, Passakorn; Paiboonworachat, Sahattaya; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2017-04-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome, characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain with diffuse tenderness at multiple tender points. Despite intense investigations, the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia remains elusive. Evidence shows that it could be due to changes in either the peripheral or central nervous system (CNS). For the CNS changes, alterations in the high brain area of fibromyalgia patients have been investigated but the definite mechanisms are still unclear. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI) have been used to gather evidence regarding the changes of brain morphologies and activities in fibromyalgia patients. Nevertheless, due to few studies, limited knowledge for alterations in brain activities in fibromyalgia is currently available. In this review, the changes in brain activity in various brain areas obtained from reports in fibromyalgia patients are comprehensively summarized. Changes of the grey matter in multiple regions such as the superior temporal gyrus, posterior thalamus, amygdala, basal ganglia, cerebellum, cingulate cortex, SII, caudate and putamen from the MRI as well as the increase of brain activities in the cerebellum, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, thalamus, somatosensory cortex, insula in fMRI studies are presented and discussed. Moreover, evidence from pharmacological interventions offering benefits for fibromyalgia patients by reducing brain activity is presented. Because of limited knowledge regarding the roles of brain activity alterations in fibromyalgia, this summarized review will encourage more future studies to elucidate the underlying mechanisms involved in the brains of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemistry, mineralogy and alteration intensity of hydrothermal altered Mt Unzen conduit rocks (Shimabara/Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Kai-Uwe; Yilmaz, Tim; Gilg, H. Albert; Janots, Emilie; Mayer, Klaus; Nakada, Setsuya; Dingwell, Donald

    2017-04-01

    Investigations were carried out on hydrothermally altered coherent dacitic dykes samples from (USDP-4) drill core at Mt Unzen stratovolcano (Shimabara/Japan). XRF, XRD, EMPA, C-O-isotope, hot-cathode CL and SEM analysis led to insights concerning chemistry, mineralogy, and intensity and type of alteration as well as the origin of carbonate-precipitating fluids. Additionally a textural characterization of the occurring replacement features in the volcanic conduit rocks was performed. The occurrence of the main secondary phases such as chlorite, pyrite, carbonates, and R1 (Reichweite parameter) illite-smectite and kaolinite group minerals indicate a weak to moderate propylitic to phyllic hydrothermal alteration. The dacitic samples of the dykes show different hydrothermal alteration features: (i) carbonate and chlorite pseudomorphs after hornblende as well as core and zonal textures due to replacement of plagioclase by R1 illite-smectite as well as kaolinite group minerals, (ii) colloform banded fracture fillings and fillings in dissolution vugs, and (iii) chlorite, R1 illite-smectite as well as kaolinite group minerals in the groundmass. Late chlorite veins crosscut precipitates of R1 illite-smectite as well as kaolinite group minerals. Carbonates in fractures and in pseudomorphs after hornblende comprise iron-rich dolomite solid solutions ("ankerite") and calcite. Isotopic values indicate a hydrothermal-magmatic origin for the carbonate formation. The chlorite-carbonate-pyrite index (CCPI) and the Ishikawa alteration index (AI), applied to the investigated samples show significant differences (CCPI=52.7-57.8; AI=36.1-40.6) indicating their different degree of alteration. According to Nakada et al., 2005, the C13 to C16 dykes represent the feeder dyke from the latest eruption (1991-1995) whereas C8 represents an earlier dyke feeder dyke from an older eruption. Weakest alteration, which was obtained in samples C16-1-5 and C13-2-5, correlates with the alteration

  11. Mice lacking the circadian modulators SHARP1 and SHARP2 display altered sleep and mixed state endophenotypes of psychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Baier

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that clock genes may be implicated in a spectrum of psychiatric diseases, including sleep and mood related disorders as well as schizophrenia. The bHLH transcription factors SHARP1/DEC2/BHLHE41 and SHARP2/DEC1/BHLHE40 are modulators of the circadian system and SHARP1/DEC2/BHLHE40 has been shown to regulate homeostatic sleep drive in humans. In this study, we characterized Sharp1 and Sharp2 double mutant mice (S1/2-/- using online EEG recordings in living animals, behavioral assays and global gene expression profiling. EEG recordings revealed attenuated sleep/wake amplitudes and alterations of theta oscillations. Increased sleep in the dark phase is paralleled by reduced voluntary activity and cortical gene expression signatures reveal associations with psychiatric diseases. S1/2-/- mice display alterations in novelty induced activity, anxiety and curiosity. Moreover, mutant mice exhibit impaired working memory and deficits in prepulse inhibition resembling symptoms of psychiatric diseases. Network modeling indicates a connection between neural plasticity and clock genes, particularly for SHARP1 and PER1. Our findings support the hypothesis that abnormal sleep and certain (endophenotypes of psychiatric diseases may be caused by common mechanisms involving components of the molecular clock including SHARP1 and SHARP2.

  12. Mice lacking the circadian modulators SHARP1 and SHARP2 display altered sleep and mixed state endophenotypes of psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Paul C; Brzózka, Magdalena M; Shahmoradi, Ali; Reinecke, Lisa; Kroos, Christina; Wichert, Sven P; Oster, Henrik; Wehr, Michael C; Taneja, Reshma; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Rossner, Moritz J

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that clock genes may be implicated in a spectrum of psychiatric diseases, including sleep and mood related disorders as well as schizophrenia. The bHLH transcription factors SHARP1/DEC2/BHLHE41 and SHARP2/DEC1/BHLHE40 are modulators of the circadian system and SHARP1/DEC2/BHLHE40 has been shown to regulate homeostatic sleep drive in humans. In this study, we characterized Sharp1 and Sharp2 double mutant mice (S1/2-/-) using online EEG recordings in living animals, behavioral assays and global gene expression profiling. EEG recordings revealed attenuated sleep/wake amplitudes and alterations of theta oscillations. Increased sleep in the dark phase is paralleled by reduced voluntary activity and cortical gene expression signatures reveal associations with psychiatric diseases. S1/2-/- mice display alterations in novelty induced activity, anxiety and curiosity. Moreover, mutant mice exhibit impaired working memory and deficits in prepulse inhibition resembling symptoms of psychiatric diseases. Network modeling indicates a connection between neural plasticity and clock genes, particularly for SHARP1 and PER1. Our findings support the hypothesis that abnormal sleep and certain (endo)phenotypes of psychiatric diseases may be caused by common mechanisms involving components of the molecular clock including SHARP1 and SHARP2.

  13. [Oviductal physiological alterations and endosalpingiosis (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, A; Aguilera, E; Dabancens, A

    1981-01-01

    A study was made of the oviducts from 110 patients salpingectomized between 1943 and 1976, after endosalpingiosis had been diagnosed. All of the patients were infertile women in whom histopathology performed after surgery revealed diverticula located mainly in the isthmic and interstitial portions of the oviductal wall. By either continuity or invasion, these configurations spread the endosalpingeal epithelium into the peritoneum and/or the ovary. Endosalpingiosis affects the muscular layer of the oviduct, which becomes thickened and rigid, thus accounting for the severe alterations of tubal physiology. The clinical aspects and microscopy of endosalpingiosis are described, and their differences from those of adnexo-peritoneal endometriosis are discussed.

  14. Immune profile alterations in thalassaemic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintiliani, L; Mastromonaco, A; Giuliani, E; Buzzonetti, A; Sisti, P; Guglielmetti, M; Iudicone, P; Greca, E; Damiano, A M; Ciancamerla, A M

    1983-01-01

    Aspects of the humoral and cellular immune response have been studied in polytransfused patients with beta-thalassaemia major. Serum immunoglobulins (G, A, M) levels were significantly higher than in controls; reduced C4 serum level and high incidence of circulating immune complexes and anti-nuclear autoantibodies were found in the majority of patients. Marked increases were also observed in absolute and relative numbers of lymphocytes and their subpopulations. Such results suggested that the allogenic stimulation, by frequent transfusion, is the mainly responsible of the immunological alterations observed in these patients.

  15. Alterations of 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine in Human Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yesilkanal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Prior to 2009, 5-methylcytosine (5-mC was thought to be the only biologically significant cytosine modification in mammalian DNA. With the discovery of the TET enzymes, which convert 5-methylcytosine (5-mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC, however, intense interest has emerged in determining the biological function of 5-hmC. Here, we review the techniques used to study 5-hmC and evidence that alterations to 5-hmC physiology play a functional role in the molecular pathogenesis of human cancers.

  16. Ethic's pedagogy: from responsibility to alterity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo S. Vila Merino

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Ethics, since the so-called 'linguistic turn' and the rise of the notion of discursive formations, has tended to combine the teleological and the deontological. That means that, if ethics is to be useful in understanding relationships and other social issues, or in building the common good, it ought to take a procedural position. We believe that the teaching of ethics should be based on the notions of responsibility and alterity. These two concepts are helpful in promoting mutual understanding and other-directedness.

  17. Characterization of fresh and altered montroseite [V, Fe]OOH. A discussion of alteration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, P.; Dubessy, J.

    1988-05-01

    Fresh natural montroseite of the Akouta uranium deposit (Niger) and its alteration products are characterized by reflectance measurement, X-ray diffraction pattern, chemical composition, Raman and infrared spectroscopies. Microprobe analysis allows to distinguish Fe-free and Fe-bearing montroseite. Valence measurements show mainly VIII vanadium in fresh mineral. Iron is recognized as FeII with the charge deficit compensated by VIV. A first alteration step is characterized by VIII to VIV oxidation, a second one by the FeII to FeIII oxidation. These oxidation steps are compensated by dehydrogenation inferred from water content measurements. Behaviour of hydrogen atoms during this alteration process is discussed from the I.R. spectroscopic data. Finally an evolution mechanism of the crystal structure is proposed.

  18. Exogenous and endogenous corticosterone alter feather quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesRochers, David W; Reed, J Michael; Awerman, Jessica; Kluge, Jonathan A; Wilkinson, Julia; van Griethuijsen, Linnea I; Aman, Joseph; Romero, L Michael

    2009-01-01

    We investigated how exogenous and endogenous glucocorticoids affect feather replacement in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) after approximately 56% of flight feathers were removed. We hypothesized that corticosterone would retard feather regrowth and decrease feather quality. After feather regrowth began, birds were treated with exogenous corticosterone or sham implants, or endogenous corticosterone by applying psychological or physical (food restriction) stressors. Exogenous corticosterone had no impact on feather length and vane area, but rectrices were lighter than controls. Exogenous corticosterone also decreased inter-barb distance for all feathers and increased barbule number for secondaries and rectrices. Although exogenous corticosterone had no affect on rachis tensile strength and stiffness, barbicel hooking strength was reduced. Finally, exogenous corticosterone did not alter the ability of Bacillus licheniformis to degrade feathers or affect the number of feathers that failed to regrow. In contrast, endogenous corticosterone via food restriction resulted in greater inter-barb distances in primaries and secondaries, and acute and chronic stress resulted in greater inter-barb distances in rectrices. Food-restricted birds had significantly fewer barbules in primaries than chronic stress birds and weaker feathers compared to controls. We conclude that, although exogenous and endogenous corticosterone had slightly different effects, some flight feathers grown in the presence of high circulating corticosterone are lighter, potentially weaker, and with altered feather micro-structure.

  19. Altered pharyngeal muscles in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Liancai; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Chen, Jingming; Su, Hungxi; Sanders, Ira; Adler, Charles H; Shill, Holly A; Caviness, John N; Samanta, Johan E; Beach, Thomas G

    2012-06-01

    Dysphagia (impaired swallowing) is common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and is related to aspiration pneumonia, the primary cause of death in PD. Therapies that ameliorate the limb motor symptoms of PD are ineffective for dysphagia. This suggests that the pathophysiology of PD dysphagia may differ from that affecting limb muscles, but little is known about potential neuromuscular abnormalities in the swallowing muscles in PD. This study examined the fiber histochemistry of pharyngeal constrictor and cricopharyngeal sphincter muscles in postmortem specimens from 8 subjects with PD and 4 age-matched control subjects. Pharyngeal muscles in subjects with PD exhibited many atrophic fibers, fiber type grouping, and fast-to-slow myosin heavy chain transformation. These alterations indicate that the pharyngeal muscles experienced neural degeneration and regeneration over the course of PD. Notably, subjects with PD with dysphagia had a higher percentage