WorldWideScience

Sample records for neuroaxonal dystrophy inad

  1. Genetics Home Reference: infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... optic nerve) often occur in infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy . Hearing loss may also develop. Children with this disorder experience progressive deterioration of cognitive functions (dementia), and ...

  2. A case of infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy of neonatal onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Carlo; Frattini, Daniele; Panteghini, Celeste; Pascarella, Rosario; Garavaglia, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy is a rare neurodegenerative disorder, with onset in the first or second year of life. Mutations in the PLA2G6 gene encoding iPLA2-VI, a calcium-independent phospholipase, have been identified in these children. In classic infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy-affected children, psychomotor regression is the most frequent presentation, usually with ataxia and optic atrophy, followed by the development of tetraparesis. We report a child carrying a homozygous mutation in the PLA2G6 gene with neonatal onset of disease and somewhat different clinical phenotype such as severe congenital hypotonia, marked weakness, and bulbar signs suggesting that infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy can start at birth with atypical phenotype. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Distrofia neuroaxonal infantil: relato de dois casos Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSANA HERMINIA SCOLA

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Descrevemos dois casos de distrofia neuroaxonal infantil ou doença de Seitelberger, que é doença rara, neurodegenerativa, com herança autossômica recessiva. O primeiro caso, sexo masculino, com 8 anos de idade, apresentava atraso do desenvolvimento psicomotor, ataxia e fraqueza muscular. Ao exame físico foi encontrado nistagmo horizontal e vertical com palidez do disco óptico, hipotonia e arreflexia profunda. O segundo caso, sexo masculino, com 1 ano e 6 meses de idade, apresentava atraso do desenvolvimento psicomotor e convulsões. No exame físico, apresentava atrofia de nervo óptico, hipertonia e hiperreflexia. A biópsia de nervo sural de ambos os pacientes mostrou aumento dos axônios, compatível com distrofia neuroaxonal. As características clínicas pleomórficas, bem como os achados neurofisiológicos variáveis tornam difícil firmar o diagnóstico, o qual é ajudado pela confirmação anatomopatológica dos esferóides neuroaxonais.We describe two cases of infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy, which is a rare, neurodegenerative disease, with autosomal recessive inheritance. The first case was an 8 year old boy, with arrested motor and mental development, ataxia and muscle weakness. On physical examination there was horizontal and vertical nystagmus, optic disc atrophy, hypotonia; deep tendon reflexes were absent. The second case was a 1.6 year old boy with arrested motor and mental development, and seizures. On physical examination there was optic atrophy, hypertonia and hyperreflexia. Both patients had on sural nerve biopsy neuronal enlargement, consistent with neuroaxonal dystrophy. Diagnosis without pathological confirmation with neuroaxonal spheroids is very difficult, because the clinical picture is variable and the neurophysiological findings are non specific.

  4. Ultrastructural features of canine neuroaxonal dystrophy in a Papillon dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Miyuu; Yamaguchi, Shinobu; Akiyoshi, Hideo; Tsuboi, Masaya; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Izawa, Takeshi; Yamate, Jyoji; Kuwamura, Mitsuru

    2017-12-06

    Neuroaxonal dystrophy (NAD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by severe axonal swelling (spheroids) throughout the nervous system. In dogs, NAD has been reported in several breeds and a missense mutation in PLA2G6 gene has recently been identified in the Papillon dog NAD. Here we performed ultrastructural analysis to clarify the detailed ultrastructural features of the Papillon dog NAD. Dystrophic axons consisted of accumulation of filamentous materials, tubulovesicular structures, and swollen edematous mitochondria with degenerated inner membranes were often observed in the central nervous system. At axonal terminals, degeneration of presynaptic membrane was also detected. As reported in Pla2g6 knockout mice, mitochondrial and presynaptic degeneration may be related with the pathogenesis of NAD in Papillon dogs.

  5. TECPR2 Associated Neuroaxonal Dystrophy in Spanish Water Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Kerstin; Rohdin, Cecilia; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Wohlsein, Peter; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Seehusen, Frauke; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Grandon, Rodrigo; Drögemüller, Cord; Jäderlund, Karin Hultin

    2015-01-01

    Clinical, pathological and genetic examination revealed an as yet uncharacterized juvenile-onset neuroaxonal dystrophy (NAD) in Spanish water dogs. Affected dogs presented with various neurological deficits including gait abnormalities and behavioral deficits. Histopathology demonstrated spheroid formation accentuated in the grey matter of the cerebral hemispheres, the cerebellum, the brain stem and in the sensory pathways of the spinal cord. Iron accumulation was absent. Ultrastructurally spheroids contained predominantly closely packed vesicles with a double-layered membrane, which were characterized as autophagosomes using immunohistochemistry. The family history of the four affected dogs suggested an autosomal recessive inheritance. SNP genotyping showed a single genomic region of extended homozygosity of 4.5 Mb in the four cases on CFA 8. Linkage analysis revealed a maximal parametric LOD score of 2.5 at this region. By whole genome re-sequencing of one affected dog, a perfectly associated, single, non-synonymous coding variant in the canine tectonin beta-propeller repeat-containing protein 2 (TECPR2) gene affecting a highly conserved region was detected (c.4009C>T or p.R1337W). This canine NAD form displays etiologic parallels to an inherited TECPR2 associated type of human hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP). In contrast to the canine NAD, the spinal cord lesions in most types of human HSP involve the sensory and the motor pathways. Furthermore, the canine NAD form reveals similarities to cases of human NAD defined by widespread spheroid formation without iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Thus TECPR2 should also be considered as candidate gene for human NAD. Immunohistochemistry and the ultrastructural findings further support the assumption, that TECPR2 regulates autophagosome accumulation in the autophagic pathways. Consequently, this report provides the first genetic characterization of juvenile canine NAD, describes the histopathological features

  6. TECPR2 Associated Neuroaxonal Dystrophy in Spanish Water Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Hahn

    Full Text Available Clinical, pathological and genetic examination revealed an as yet uncharacterized juvenile-onset neuroaxonal dystrophy (NAD in Spanish water dogs. Affected dogs presented with various neurological deficits including gait abnormalities and behavioral deficits. Histopathology demonstrated spheroid formation accentuated in the grey matter of the cerebral hemispheres, the cerebellum, the brain stem and in the sensory pathways of the spinal cord. Iron accumulation was absent. Ultrastructurally spheroids contained predominantly closely packed vesicles with a double-layered membrane, which were characterized as autophagosomes using immunohistochemistry. The family history of the four affected dogs suggested an autosomal recessive inheritance. SNP genotyping showed a single genomic region of extended homozygosity of 4.5 Mb in the four cases on CFA 8. Linkage analysis revealed a maximal parametric LOD score of 2.5 at this region. By whole genome re-sequencing of one affected dog, a perfectly associated, single, non-synonymous coding variant in the canine tectonin beta-propeller repeat-containing protein 2 (TECPR2 gene affecting a highly conserved region was detected (c.4009C>T or p.R1337W. This canine NAD form displays etiologic parallels to an inherited TECPR2 associated type of human hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP. In contrast to the canine NAD, the spinal cord lesions in most types of human HSP involve the sensory and the motor pathways. Furthermore, the canine NAD form reveals similarities to cases of human NAD defined by widespread spheroid formation without iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Thus TECPR2 should also be considered as candidate gene for human NAD. Immunohistochemistry and the ultrastructural findings further support the assumption, that TECPR2 regulates autophagosome accumulation in the autophagic pathways. Consequently, this report provides the first genetic characterization of juvenile canine NAD, describes the

  7. Infantile neuroaxonal distrophy: diagnosis during life by conjunctival biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    ROSEMBERG, S; Abita,F.; Campos,C.

    1985-01-01

    São relatados três casos de distrofia neuroaxonal infantil cujo diagnóstico foi feito mediante o estudo ultrastrutural de biópsia da conjuntiva. Nesta, algumas fibras nervosas amielínicas e, mais raramente, as mielínicas, mostravam, no axoplasma, agregados densos membrano-tubulares, idênticos aos dos esferóides ocorrentes no SNC nesta doença. O achado destas estruturas é o único meio diagnóstico em vida. A biópsia da conjuntiva, pela facilidade de sua execução e por sua inocuidade, é o proced...

  8. Light-dependent phosphorylation of the Drosophila inactivation no afterpotential D (INAD scaffolding protein at Thr170 and Ser174 by eye-specific protein kinase C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Voolstra

    Full Text Available Drosophila inactivation no afterpotential D (INAD is a PDZ domain-containing scaffolding protein that tethers components of the phototransduction cascade to form a supramolecular signaling complex. Here, we report the identification of eight INAD phosphorylation sites using a mass spectrometry approach. PDZ1, PDZ2, and PDZ4 each harbor one phosphorylation site, three phosphorylation sites are located in the linker region between PDZ1 and 2, one site is located between PDZ2 and PDZ3, and one site is located in the N-terminal region. Using a phosphospecific antibody, we found that INAD phosphorylated at Thr170/Ser174 was located within the rhabdomeres of the photoreceptor cells, suggesting that INAD becomes phosphorylated in this cellular compartment. INAD phosphorylation at Thr170/Ser174 depends on light, the phototransduction cascade, and on eye-Protein kinase C that is attached to INAD via one of its PDZ domains.

  9. Neuroaxonal regeneration is more pronounced in early multiple sclerosis than in traumatic brain injury lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Lucas; Merkler, Doron; König, Fatima B; Brück, Wolfgang; Stadelmann, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The extent of irreversible neuroaxonal damage is the key determinant of permanent disability in traumatic and inflammatory conditions of the central nervous system (CNS). Structural damage is nevertheless in part compensated by neuroplastic events. However, it is unknown whether the same kinetics and mechanisms of neuroaxonal de- and regeneration take place in inflammatory and traumatic conditions. We analyzed neuroaxonal degeneration and plasticity in early multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Neuroaxonal degeneration identified by the presence of SMI31+ chromatolytic neurons and SMI32+ axonal profiles were characteristic features of leukocortical TBI lesions. Axonal transport disturbances as determined by amyloid precursor protein (APP)+ spheroids were present in both TBI and MS lesions to a similar degree. Neurons expressing growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) and synaptophysin (Syn) were found under both pathological conditions. However, axonal swellings immunopositive for GAP43 and Syn clearly prevailed in subcortical MS lesions, suggesting a higher regenerative potential in MS. In this context, GAP43+/APP+ axonal spheroid ratios correlated with macrophage infiltration in TBI and MS lesions, supporting the idea that phagocyte activation might promote neuroplastic events. Furthermore, axonal GAP43+ and Syn+ swellings correlated with prolonged survival after TBI, indicating a sustained regenerative response. © 2012 The Authors; Brain Pathology © 2012 International Society of Neuropathology.

  10. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices The Search for a Cure en español Distrofia muscular About MD Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a genetic ... muscles and cause different degrees of muscle weakness. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common and the most ...

  11. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and ... ability to walk. There is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent ...

  12. Fuchs' Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and can cause your vision to gradually worsen over years. But most people with Fuchs' dystrophy don't develop symptoms until they reach their 50s or 60s. Some medications and self-care steps may help relieve your Fuchs' dystrophy ...

  13. Corneal dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klintworth Gordon K

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The term corneal dystrophy embraces a heterogenous group of bilateral genetically determined non-inflammatory corneal diseases that are restricted to the cornea. The designation is imprecise but remains in vogue because of its clinical value. Clinically, the corneal dystrophies can be divided into three groups based on the sole or predominant anatomical location of the abnormalities. Some affect primarily the corneal epithelium and its basement membrane or Bowman layer and the superficial corneal stroma (anterior corneal dystrophies, the corneal stroma (stromal corneal dystrophies, or Descemet membrane and the corneal endothelium (posterior corneal dystrophies. Most corneal dystrophies have no systemic manifestations and present with variable shaped corneal opacities in a clear or cloudy cornea and they affect visual acuity to different degrees. Corneal dystrophies may have a simple autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive Mendelian mode of inheritance. Different corneal dystrophies are caused by mutations in the CHST6, KRT3, KRT12, PIP5K3, SLC4A11, TACSTD2, TGFBI, and UBIAD1 genes. Knowledge about the responsible genetic mutations responsible for these disorders has led to a better understanding of their basic defect and to molecular tests for their precise diagnosis. Genes for other corneal dystrophies have been mapped to specific chromosomal loci, but have not yet been identified. As clinical manifestations widely vary with the different entities, corneal dystrophies should be suspected when corneal transparency is lost or corneal opacities occur spontaneously, particularly in both corneas, and especially in the presence of a positive family history or in the offspring of consanguineous parents. Main differential diagnoses include various causes of monoclonal gammopathy, lecithin-cholesterol-acyltransferase deficiency, Fabry disease, cystinosis, tyrosine transaminase deficiency, systemic lysosomal storage

  14. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance patterns Muscular dystrophy Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  15. PLA2G6 mutations associated with a continuous clinical spectrum from neuroaxonal dystrophy to hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozes, B; Karagoz, N; Schüle, R; Rebelo, A; Sobrido, M-J; Harmuth, F; Synofzik, M; Pascual, S I P; Colak, M; Ciftci-Kavaklioglu, B; Kara, B; Ordóñez-Ugalde, A; Quintáns, B; Gonzalez, M A; Soysal, A; Zuchner, S; Battaloglu, E

    2017-11-01

    PLA2G6-associated neurodegeneration (PLAN) and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are 2 groups of heterogeneous neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we report PLA2G6 gene mutations in 3 families from Turkey, Morocco, and Romania. Two affected Turkish siblings presenting HSP adds the disease to PLAN phenotypes. They were homozygous for the PLA2G6 missense c.2239C>T, p.Arg747Trp variant and the ages of onset were 9 and 21. Parkinsonism, dystonia or cognitive decline were not the clinical elements in these patients contrary to the cases that has been previously reported with the same variant, however, iron accumulation was evident in their cranial magnetic resonance imaging. The Moroccan patient was homozygous for a novel missense c.1786C>T, p.Leu596Phe variant and the Romanian patient had 2 novel mutations; c.1898C>T, p.Ala633Val and c.1765_1768del, p.Ser589ThrfsTer76. Both of these patients conformed better to childhood onset PLAN with the age of onset at 4 and 7 years, respectively. Interestingly, all identified mutations were affecting the highly conserved patatin-like phospholipase domain of the PLA2G6 protein. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. In vivo characterization of cortical and white matter neuroaxonal pathology in early multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, Tobias; Fan, Qiuyun; Treaba, Constantina Andrada; Ouellette, Russell; Herranz, Elena; Mangeat, Gabriel; Louapre, Céline; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Klawiter, Eric C; Sloane, Jacob A; Mainero, Caterina

    2017-11-01

    Neuroaxonal pathology is a main determinant of disease progression in multiple sclerosis; however, its underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, including its link to inflammatory demyelination and temporal occurrence in the disease course are still unknown. We used ultra-high field (7 T), ultra-high gradient strength diffusion and T1/T2-weighted myelin-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging to characterize microstructural changes in myelin and neuroaxonal integrity in the cortex and white matter in early stage multiple sclerosis, their distribution in lesional and normal-appearing tissue, and their correlations with neurological disability. Twenty-six early stage multiple sclerosis subjects (disease duration ≤5 years) and 24 age-matched healthy controls underwent 7 T T2*-weighted imaging for cortical lesion segmentation and 3 T T1/T2-weighted myelin-sensitive imaging and neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging for assessing microstructural myelin, axonal and dendrite integrity in lesional and normal-appearing tissue of the cortex and the white matter. Conventional mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy metrics were also assessed for comparison. Cortical lesions were identified in 92% of early multiple sclerosis subjects and they were characterized by lower intracellular volume fraction (P = 0.015 by paired t-test), lower myelin-sensitive contrast (P = 0.030 by related-samples Wilcoxon signed-rank test) and higher mean diffusivity (P = 0.022 by related-samples Wilcoxon signed-rank test) relative to the contralateral normal-appearing cortex. Similar findings were observed in white matter lesions relative to normal-appearing white matter (all P multiple sclerosis subjects had diffusely lower intracellular volume fractions than the white matter in controls (P = 0.029 by unpaired t-test). Cortical thickness did not differ significantly between multiple sclerosis subjects and controls. Higher orientation dispersion in the left primary motor

  17. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tawil R, Van Der Maarel SM. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy . Muscle Nerve. Jul 2006;34(1):1-15. Congenital ( ... affected? Throat References: 1. Emery AEH. The muscular ... V. Prevalence of genetic muscle disease in Northern England: in-depth analysis of ...

  18. Learning about Myotonic Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and other body systems. People who have myotonic dystrophy have muscle wasting and weakness in their lower legs, hands, ... symptoms of myotonic dystrophy? People who have myotonic dystrophy have progressive muscle wasting and weakness beginning in their 20's or ...

  19. Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000705.htm Duchenne muscular dystrophy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an inherited disorder. It involves muscle weakness , ...

  20. Mutation in the AP4M1 Gene Provides a Model for Neuroaxonal Injury in Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkerk, Annemieke J.M.H.; Schot, Rachel; Dumee, Belinda; Schellekens, Karlijn; Swagemakers, Sigrid; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M.; Lequin, Maarten H.; Dudink, Jeroen; Govaert, Paul; van Zwol, A.L.; Hirst, Jennifer; Wessels, Marja W.; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene; Verheijen, Frans W.; de Graaff, Esther; de Coo, Irenaeus F.M.; Kros, Johan M.; Willemsen, Rob; Willems, Patrick J.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Mancini, Grazia M.S.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral palsy due to perinatal injury to cerebral white matter is usually not caused by genetic mutations, but by ischemia and/or inflammation. Here, we describe an autosomal-recessive type of tetraplegic cerebral palsy with mental retardation, reduction of cerebral white matter, and atrophy of the cerebellum in an inbred sibship. The phenotype was recorded and evolution followed for over 20 years. Brain lesions were studied by diffusion tensor MR tractography. Homozygosity mapping with SNPs was performed for identification of the chromosomal locus for the disease. In the 14 Mb candidate region on chromosome 7q22, RNA expression profiling was used for selecting among the 203 genes in the area. In postmortem brain tissue available from one patient, histology and immunohistochemistry were performed. Disease course and imaging were mostly reminiscent of hypoxic-ischemic tetraplegic cerebral palsy, with neuroaxonal degeneration and white matter loss. In all five patients, a donor splice site pathogenic mutation in intron 14 of the AP4M1 gene (c.1137+1G→T), was identified. AP4M1, encoding for the μ subunit of the adaptor protein complex-4, is involved in intracellular trafficking of glutamate receptors. Aberrant GluRδ2 glutamate receptor localization and dendritic spine morphology were observed in the postmortem brain specimen. This disease entity, which we refer to as congenital spastic tetraplegia (CST), is therefore a genetic model for congenital cerebral palsy with evidence for neuroaxonal damage and glutamate receptor abnormality, mimicking perinatally acquired hypoxic-ischemic white matter injury. PMID:19559397

  1. Genetics Home Reference: myotonic dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SJ. Myotonic dystrophy: emerging mechanisms for DM1 and DM2. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2007 Feb;1772(2):195- ... Moxley R. 140th ENMC International Workshop: Myotonic Dystrophy DM2/PROMM and other myotonic dystrophies with guidelines on ...

  2. Idiopathic 20-nail dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla; Bygum, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-nail dystrophy is a rare disease, typically with all 20 nails affected, which normally occurs as an idiopathic condition in childhood but can be linked to other diseases. We report a case of a 7-year-old girl with a 3-year history of 20-nail dystrophy and no associated diseases or family...... history of skin or nail diseases. She was followed and treated conservatively and, after 6 years of follow-up, we found a marked improvement and almost full resolution of her nail dystrophy. The aim of this report is to show that idiopathic 20-nail dystrophy in children is a self-limiting condition...

  3. Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD Living With MD en español Qué significa distrofia muscular What Is Muscular Dystrophy? Muscular dystrophy (say: MUS- ... blood test if a kid has Becker or Duchenne MD. Or the doctor might take a small piece of the muscle and look at it under a microscope to ...

  4. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is muscle weakness and loss of muscle tissue that gets ... to have children. Alternative Names Landouzy-Dejerine muscular dystrophy Images ... Superficial anterior muscles References Preston DC, Shapiro BE. Proximal, distal, and ...

  5. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  6. Spider dystrophy as an ocular manifestation of myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louprasong, Amber C; Light, Dennis J; Diller, Rebecca S

    2010-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most common adult-onset muscular dystrophy. It is an autosomal dominant inherited neuromuscular disease that is characterized by myotonia, muscle weakness, and atrophy. It affects multiple systems including skeletal muscular, gastrointestinal, cardiac, respiratory, central nervous, endocrine, and ocular. Ocular manifestations of myotonic dystrophy include cataract, ocular muscle changes, hypotony, and retinal pigmentary changes in the periphery or in the macula (known as pigment pattern dystrophy). This report presents and discusses the case of a pigmented pattern dystrophy known as spider dystrophy as an ocular manifestation of myotonic dystrophy. A 44-year-old man with myotonic dystrophy presented to the eye clinic for routine examination. Ocular history included previous bilateral cataract surgery and mild bilateral ptosis for the last "few years." Dilated fundus examination was remarkable for bilateral macular pigmentary changes in an irregular "spider"-shaped pattern. The patient was asymptomatic without decrease in vision or Amsler grid defects. Optical coherence tomography was normal. A retinal consult concurred with the diagnosis of spider dystrophy. Photo documentation was obtained, and the patient is being monitored annually. Pigmented pattern dystrophies, including spider dystrophy, have been associated with myotonic dystrophy. They are set apart from other retinal dystrophies because they rarely affect visual acuity, and the majority of patients are asymptomatic. Progression may lead to reduced vision and in rare cases choroidal neovascularization. Annual dilated examinations, photo documentation, optical coherence tomography, and home Amsler grid monitoring are recommended for follow-up care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that our son Mike, then age 4, has Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we were devastated. Immediately, our hopes and dreams ... over time, the per- son’s muscle strength declines. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was first described by the French neurologist ...

  8. Limb girdle muscular dystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of the study was to describe the clinical spectrum of limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs), the pitfalls of the current classification system for LGMDs, and emerging therapies for these conditions. RECENT FINDINGS: Close to half of all LGMD subtypes have been...

  9. Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blog Donate Search MDA.org Close Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD) Share print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD) What is limb-girdle muscular dystrophy? Limb- ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy is an inherited condition that predominantly affects the ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: tibial muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Tibial muscular dystrophy Tibial muscular dystrophy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Tibial muscular dystrophy is a condition that affects the muscles at ...

  12. Therapeutic advances in muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Doris G; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies comprise a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that produce progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting. There has been rapid growth and change in our understanding of these disorders in recent years, and advances in basic science are being translated into increasing numbers of clinical trials. This review will discuss therapeutic developments in 3 of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystr...

  13. Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Eppie M; Kornberg, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, an X-linked disorder, has an incidence of one in 5000 boys and presents in early childhood with proximal muscle weakness. Untreated boys become wheelchair bound by the age of 12 years and die of cardiorespiratory complications in their late teens to early 20s. The use of corticosteroids, non-invasive respiratory support, and active surveillance and management of associated complications have improved ambulation, function, quality of life and life expectancy. The clinical features, investigations and management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy are reviewed, as well as the latest in some of the novel therapies. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  14. Cone rod dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian P

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cone rod dystrophies (CRDs (prevalence 1/40,000 are inherited retinal dystrophies that belong to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. CRDs are characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination, predominantly localized to the macular region. In contrast to typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP, also called the rod cone dystrophies (RCDs resulting from the primary loss in rod photoreceptors and later followed by the secondary loss in cone photoreceptors, CRDs reflect the opposite sequence of events. CRD is characterized by primary cone involvement, or, sometimes, by concomitant loss of both cones and rods that explains the predominant symptoms of CRDs: decreased visual acuity, color vision defects, photoaversion and decreased sensitivity in the central visual field, later followed by progressive loss in peripheral vision and night blindness. The clinical course of CRDs is generally more severe and rapid than that of RCDs, leading to earlier legal blindness and disability. At end stage, however, CRDs do not differ from RCDs. CRDs are most frequently non syndromic, but they may also be part of several syndromes, such as Bardet Biedl syndrome and Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 (SCA7. Non syndromic CRDs are genetically heterogeneous (ten cloned genes and three loci have been identified so far. The four major causative genes involved in the pathogenesis of CRDs are ABCA4 (which causes Stargardt disease and also 30 to 60% of autosomal recessive CRDs, CRX and GUCY2D (which are responsible for many reported cases of autosomal dominant CRDs, and RPGR (which causes about 2/3 of X-linked RP and also an undetermined percentage of X-linked CRDs. It is likely that highly deleterious mutations in genes that otherwise cause RP or macular dystrophy may also lead to CRDs. The diagnosis of CRDs is based on clinical history, fundus examination and electroretinogram. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, genetic counseling is

  15. Congenital muscular dystrophy in Jordanian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qudah, A A; Tarawneh, M

    1998-08-01

    This is a consecutive study on 28 patients who have been diagnosed as having congenital muscular dystrophy at Jordan University Hospital in the period from January 1990 to February 1997. Of 75 patients diagnosed as having muscle disease, 55 (73.3%) had muscular dystrophy. Of 55 muscular dystrophy patients, 28 (50.9%) had congenital muscular dystrophy, 11 (20%) had Duchenne muscular dystrophy, 9 (16.4%) had Becker muscular dystrophy, 4 (7.3%) had myotonic dystrophy, 2 (3.6%) had limb-girdle dystrophy, and 1 (1.8%) patient had facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. Age of onset of symptoms of congenital muscular dystrophy (hypotonia and weakness) was documented antenatally or in the first few months in the majority (92.9%) of patients. Parental consanguinity was documented in 21 (75%) of congenital muscular dystrophy cases, and family history of possible similar cases in 15 (53.6%). Congenital muscular dystrophy patients with normal cognitive milestones (n = 16; 57.1%) were slightly more common than patients with cognitive delay. In contrast to previous reports, congenital muscular dystrophy is probably more common in communities with high rates of parental consanguinity than other dystrophies. Our study adds significant support to the most recent literature on this finding.

  16. Muscular Dystrophy: Data and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... listing of Medicaid or Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) insurance in the medical record. Age in Years ( ... Oleszek J; Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network (MD STAR net ). Trends with corticosteroid use in ...

  17. Wasting Mechanisms in Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M.; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. PMID:23669245

  18. Learning about Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions Funding ...

  19. How Do People Cope with Muscular Dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other FAQs Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Muscular Dystrophy: Other FAQs Basic information for topics, such as “ ... in this section. How do people cope with muscular dystrophy (MD)? Although MD presents many challenges in many ...

  20. What Are the Treatments for Muscular Dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pinterest Email Print What are the treatments for muscular dystrophy? No treatment is currently available to stop or reverse any form of muscular dystrophy (MD). Instead, certain therapies and medications aim to ...

  1. Infrastructure for Clinical Trials in Duchenne Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    sites. Review of Potential Grant submissions: Treatment of early cardiac systolic dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy with lisinopril or...revamped and implemented for two studies in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). CINRG’s public website has been revamped. One measurement clinical...SUBJECT TERMS Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy , CINRG, CQMS, coordinating center, electronic data capture 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION

  2. Corneal stromal dystrophies: a clinical pathologic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Barbosa Abreu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Corneal dystrophy is defined as bilateral and symmetric primary corneal disease, without previous associated ocular inflammation. Corneal dystrophies are classified according to the involved corneal layer in superficial, stromal, and posterior dystrophy. Incidence of each dystrophy varies according to the geographic region studied. PURPOSE: To evaluate the prevalence of stromal corneal dystrophies among corneal buttons specimens obtained by penetrating keratoplasty (PK in an ocular pathology laboratory and to correlate the diagnosis with patient age and gender. METHODS: Corneal button cases of penetrating keratoplasty from January-1996 to May-2009 were retrieved from the archives of The Henry C. Witelson Ophthalmic Pathology Laboratory and Registry, Montreal, Canada. The cases with histopathological diagnosis of stromal corneal dystrophies were stained with special stains (Peroxid acid Schiff, Masson trichrome, Congo red analyzed under polarized light, and alcian blue for classification and correlated with epidemiological information (age at time of PK and gender from patients' file. RESULTS: 1,300 corneal buttons cases with clinical diagnose of corneal dystrophy were retrieved. Stromal corneal dystrophy was found in 40 (3.1% cases. Lattice corneal dystrophy was the most prevalent with 26 cases (65%. Nineteen were female (73.07% and the PK was performed at average age of 59.3 years old. Combined corneal dystrophy was found in 8 (20% cases, 5 (62.5% of them were female and the average age of the penetrating keratoplasty was 54.8 years old. Granular corneal dystrophy was represented by 5 (12.5% cases, and 2 (40% of them were female. Penetrating keratoplasty was performed at average age of 39.5 years old in granular corneal dystrophy cases. Macular corneal dystrophy was present in only 1 (2.5% case, in a 36 years old female. CONCLUSION: Systematic histopathological approach and evaluation, including special stains in all stromal

  3. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. This disease is modeled by a variety of animal models including several fish models, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially t...

  4. Benign concentric annular macular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Salles de Moura Mendonça

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the authors is to show clinical findings of a patient with benign concentric annular macular dystrophy, which is an unusual condition, and part of the "bull’s eye" maculopathy differential diagnosis. An ophthalmologic examination with color perception, fluorescein angiography, and ocular electrophysiology was performed.

  5. Myotonic Dystrophy: An Anaesthetic Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Gupta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy (dystrophia myotonica, DM is a chronic, slowly progressing, highly variable inherited multisystemic disease that can manifest at any age from birth to old age. We present a 32-year-old female with adenexal mass posted for exploratory laparotomy. She was a known case of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMP.The ECG suggested incomplete RBBB& LAHB& the ECHO revealed mild mitral regurgitation, tricuspid regurgitation, pulmonary artery hypertension with severe left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction of 30-35 %. General anaes-thesia (GA with epidural anaesthesia was planned. The patient was haemodynamically stable through out the surgi-cal procedure. The patient was reversed and shifted to post anaesthesia care unit. On the 2nd postoperative day patient developed respiratory distress and hypotension. ABG revealed Type 1 respiratory failure. Since the patient didn′t improve with oxygen therapy and nebulisation, she was intubated and shifted to ICU. Patient was tolerating the tube without sedation and relaxants so, consultant anaesthesiologist asked for neurologist referral to rule out myotonic dystrophy. Subsequent muscle biopsy and genetic analysis was suggestive of myotonic dystrophy. Despite all possible efforts we were unable to wean her off the ventilator for 390 days. Patients with myotonic dystrophy are a challenge to the attending anaesthesiologist. These patients can be very well managed with preoperative optimized medical treatment and well-planned perioperative care.

  6. Prednisone Therapy for Duchenne Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of prednisone on muscle function and the extent of steroid-related adverse effects were studied in 17 ambulant children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD at University Hospital, Groningen; Rehabilitation Centre, Utrecht; and Leiden University Medical Centre, the Netherlands.

  7. Glucocorticoids for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Dubowitz Neuromuscular Centre, Great Ormond Street Hospital, and other centers in the UK, conducted a prospective longitudinal study across 17 neuromuscular centers in the UK of 360 boys aged 3-15 years with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who were treated with daily or intermittent (10 days on/10 days off prednisolone for a mean duration of 4 years.

  8. AMPUTATION AND REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GEERTZEN, JHB; EISMA, WH

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by chronic burning pain, restricted range of motion, oedema and vasolability. Patients are difficult to treat and the prognosis is very often poor. This report emphasizes that an amputation in case of a reflex sympathetic

  9. Genetics Home Reference: lattice corneal dystrophy type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... corneal dystrophy type I lattice corneal dystrophy type I Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Lattice corneal dystrophy type I is an eye disorder that affects the clear, ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is a condition that primarily affects muscles used ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy is a term for a group of diseases ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: LAMA2-related muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions LAMA2-related muscular dystrophy LAMA2-related muscular dystrophy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description LAMA2 -related muscular dystrophy is a disorder that causes weakness and wasting ( ...

  13. Morbidity in reflex sympathetic dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, C; Cohen, A.; Perkins, T.; Davidson, J; Sills, J

    2000-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), an unusual diagnosis in general paediatrics, is well recognised by paediatric rheumatologists. This study reports the presentation and the clinical course of 46 patients (35 female, age range 8-15.2) with RSD. The patients saw professionals from an average of 2.3 specialties (range 1-5). Twenty five (54%) had a history of trauma. Median time to diagnosis was 12 weeks (range 1-130). Many children had multiple investigations and treatments. Once d...

  14. Myotonic dystrophy in Ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaino, G; Vicario, L

    1999-01-01

    Amenhotep IV, better known as Akhenaton, the heretical pharaoh, was a king of the New Kingdom of Ancient Egypt. Statues and reliefs of him show an unhealthy man whose body has abnormal features. By studying the pictures of Akhenaton (the mummy has not yet been found), we conclude that he may have been affected by myotonic dystrophy (MD). Moreover, the available data on his family suggest that MD may have caused the end of the royal bloodline of the Eighteenth Dynasty.

  15. Myotonic dystrophy: a retrospective diagnosis | Jain | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Myotonic dystrophy is not commonly encountered in anaesthetic practice and its existence in a patient can easily go undetected, leading to intraoperative and postoperative complications. We report a case of a 45-year-old female without any typical features of myotonic dystrophy, who presented at our hospital for a ...

  16. Keratoconus in Patients with Macular Stromal Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosrirukvongs, Panida; Ngowyutagon, Panotsom; Booranapong, Wipawee

    2016-01-01

    To show the association between keratoconus and macular dystrophy. All patients with macular dystrophy and associated clinical findings leading to a diagnosis of keratoconus by corneal topography were retrospectively reviewed during a 10-year period. Uncorrected and best-corrected visual acuity, automated refraction, manifest refraction, corneal thickness, and corneal curvature by corneal topography were evaluated Three patients with macular dystrophy exhibiting decreased vision, multifocal white dense deposits, and haze surrounding the deposits in the corneal stroma were evaluated. All had a steep corneal curvature of >47 diopters and a thin cornea consistent with keratoconus. Penetrating keratoplasty was performed in one patient with severely decreased vision. Macular dystrophy was diagnosed based on an Alcian blue-stained pathological specimen. Keratoconus may develop as a result of changes associated with macular dystrophy. Therefore, patients with severely decreased vision should be evaluated for keratoconus to ensure proper management.

  17. Rehabilitation of the muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangilinan, Percival H; Hornyak, Joseph E

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies (MD) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders characterized by findings on muscle biopsy. In general, they feature progressive muscle wasting and weakness. In addition to the musculoskeletal system, direct and indirect effects can be seen in a variety of organ systems. These issues create challenges in patients with MD for ambulation and mobility, self-care, pain, fatigue, and community involvement. Because of its progressive nature and wide variety of pathophysiological mechanisms, patients with MD require individualized rehabilitation care. This chapter reviews specific rehabilitation needs and treatment of patients with MD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: current cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Kulak, Wojciech; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Kawnik, Katarzyna

    2015-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetically determined X-linked disease and the most common, progressive pediatric muscle disorder. For decades, research has been conducted to find an effective therapy. This review presents current therapeutic methods for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, based on scientific articles in English published mainly in the period 2000 to 2014. We used the PubMed database to identify and review the most important studies. An analysis of contemporary studies of stem cell therapy and the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in muscular dystrophy was performed.

  19. What Are the Treatments for Muscular Dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Find a Study More Information Preeclampsia and Eclampsia About NICHD Research Information Find a ... Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What are the treatments for muscular dystrophy? No treatment is currently available ...

  20. Physical Therapy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy & FSHD Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy A Guide for Patients & Physical Therapists Authors: Wendy M. King, P.T., ... expertise and patient preferences. The goals of any physical therapy plan of care are to assist patients to:  ...

  1. An unusual variant of Becker muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, M.; Bakker, E.; Defesche, J. C.; Bolhuis, P. A.; van Ommen, G. J.

    1990-01-01

    We report on 5 brothers with slowly progressive limbgirdle weakness. Calf hypertrophy was absent. The levels of creatine kinase, electromyography, and findings from a muscle biopsy specimen were compatible with muscular dystrophy. The propositus's biopsy specimen also showed numerous rimmed

  2. Brain MRI Findings in Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in 13 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (MDCIC and Fukutin-related protein (FKRP gene mutations were retrospectively reviewed in a study at Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, and European centers.

  3. Non-Coding RNAs in Muscle Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferlini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ncRNAs are the most recently identified class of regulatory RNAs with vital functions in gene expression regulation and cell development. Among the variety of roles they play, their involvement in human diseases has opened new avenues of research towards the discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. Important data come from the field of hereditary muscle dystrophies, like Duchenne muscle dystrophy and Myotonic dystrophies, rare diseases affecting 1 in 7000–15,000 newborns and is characterized by severe to mild muscle weakness associated with cardiac involvement. Novel therapeutic approaches are now ongoing for these diseases, also based on splicing modulation. In this review we provide an overview about ncRNAs and their behavior in muscular dystrophy and explore their links with diagnosis, prognosis and treatments, highlighting the role of regulatory RNAs in these pathologies.

  4. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: current cell therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Kulak, Wojciech; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Kawnik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetically determined X-linked disease and the most common, progressive pediatric muscle disorder. For decades, research has been conducted to find an effective therapy. This review presents current therapeutic methods for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, based on scientific articles in English published mainly in the period 2000 to 2014. We used the PubMed database to identify and review the most important studies. An analysis of contemporary studies of stem cel...

  5. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: the management of scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, James E; Gardner, Adrian C; Roper, Helen P; Chikermane, Ashish A; Tatman, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    This study summaries the current management of scoliosis in patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. A literature review of Medline was performed and the collected articles critically appraised. This literature is discussed to give an overview of the current management of scoliosis within Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Importantly, improvements in respiratory care, the use of steroids and improving surgical techniques have allowed patients to maintain quality of life and improved life expectancy in this patient group.

  6. The heart in Becker muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, and Bethlem myopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, M.; de Voogt, W. G.; la Rivière, G. V.

    1992-01-01

    We report a study, assessing involvement of the heart in 33 familial cases of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), 31 familiar cases of facioscapulohumeral (FSH) dystrophy, and 27 familial cases of Bethlem myopathy. In the patients with BMD, correlations of myocardial involvement with age and extent of

  7. Morbidity in reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, C S; Cohen, A; Perkins, T; Davidson, J E; Sills, J A

    2000-03-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), an unusual diagnosis in general paediatrics, is well recognised by paediatric rheumatologists. This study reports the presentation and the clinical course of 46 patients (35 female, age range 8-15.2) with RSD. The patients saw professionals from an average of 2.3 specialties (range 1-5). Twenty five (54%) had a history of trauma. Median time to diagnosis was 12 weeks (range 1-130). Many children had multiple investigations and treatments. Once diagnosis was made, treatment followed with physiotherapy and analgesics. Median time to recovery was seven weeks (range 1-140), with 27.5% relapsing. Nine children required assessment by the child and adolescent psychiatry team. This disease, though rare, has significant morbidity and it is therefore important to raise clinicians' awareness of RSD in childhood. Children with the condition may then be recognised and referred for appropriate management earlier, and spared unnecessary investigations and treatments which may exacerbate the condition.

  8. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekgül, Hasan; Serdaroglu, Guil; Uyar, Meltem; Tütüncüoglu, Sarenur

    2002-04-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is characterized by constant burning pain and hyperesthesia in an extremity. Lower extremities are usually affected. Pain is accompanied by swelling, sweating, vasomotor instability and sometimes trophic changes. There may be a history of minor injury or not. Muscle spasms, myoclonus or focal dystonia may occur. Diffuse pain, loss of function and autonomic dysfunction are three main criteria suggested for diagnosis. Symptoms can last a few days to as long as a year. In this report we present a girl with multiple limb involvement of stage I RSD. The sympathetic skin responses were tested during a remission period. She had milder attacks with a recurrence rate of 4 per year in the following three years from onset.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions APECED Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy Printable PDF Open All Close All ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy ( APECED ) is an inherited condition that ...

  10. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupam Sinha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a clinically and heterogeneous group of disorders that all share clinical characteristics of progressive muscular weakness. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common X-linked disorder muscular dystrophy in children, presenting in early childhood and characterized by proximal muscle weakness and calf hypertrophy in affected boys. There is usually delay in motor development and eventually wheelchair confinement followed by premature death from cardiac or respiratory complications. Treatment modalities such as corticosteroid therapy and use of intermittent positive pressure ventilation have provided improvements in function, ambulation, quality of life, and life expectancy, although novel therapies still aim to provide a cure for this devastating disorder. Here, we present a case of DMD in a 12-year-old male with remarkable clinical and oral manifestations.

  11. Mitochondrial disorders in progressive muscular dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Kharlamov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review gives data on the role of mitochondrial disorders in the pathogenesis of different progressive muscular dystrophies. It describes changes in Duchenne, limb-girdle, facial scapulohumeral (Landuzi—Degerina muscular dystrophies. The review is based on both clinical and experimental animal studies. Along with the implication of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of the diseases, it describes muscular dystrophy treatment options compensating for energy disorders and overcoming oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial studies in different muscle diseases hand physicians treatment modalities that fail to lead to recovery, but compensate for disorders caused by mutations in the genetic apparatus. 

  12. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rupam; Sarkar, Soumyabrata; Khaitan, Tanya; Dutta, Soumyajit

    2017-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a clinically and heterogeneous group of disorders that all share clinical characteristics of progressive muscular weakness. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common X-linked disorder muscular dystrophy in children, presenting in early childhood and characterized by proximal muscle weakness and calf hypertrophy in affected boys. There is usually delay in motor development and eventually wheelchair confinement followed by premature death from cardiac or respiratory complications. Treatment modalities such as corticosteroid therapy and use of intermittent positive pressure ventilation have provided improvements in function, ambulation, quality of life, and life expectancy, although novel therapies still aim to provide a cure for this devastating disorder. Here, we present a case of DMD in a 12-year-old male with remarkable clinical and oral manifestations.

  13. Circulating Biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Spitali, Pietro

    2015-07-22

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. Genetic and biochemical research over the years has characterized the cause, pathophysiology and development of the disease providing several potential therapeutic targets and/or biomarkers. High throughput - omic technologies have provided a comprehensive understanding of the changes occurring in dystrophic muscles. Murine and canine animal models have been a valuable source to profile muscles and body fluids, thus providing candidate biomarkers that can be evaluated in patients. This review will illustrate known circulating biomarkers that could track disease progression and response to therapy in patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We present an overview of the transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics and lipidomic biomarkers described in literature. We show how studies in muscle tissue have led to the identification of serum and urine biomarkers and we highlight the importance of evaluating biomarkers as possible surrogate endpoints to facilitate regulatory processes for new medicinal products.

  14. The heart in limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, A. J.; de Voogt, W. G.; Barth, P. G.; Busch, H. F.; Jennekens, F. G.; Jongen, P. J.; de Visser, M.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency, nature, and severity of cardiac abnormalities in limb girdle muscular dystrophy, and its relation to age and weakness in various genotypes. DESIGN: In 26 autosomal dominant, 38 autosomal recessive, and 33 sporadic strictly defined patients with limb girdle

  15. Clinical features of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greef, J.C. de; Lemmers, R.J.; Camano, P.; Day, J.W.; Sacconi, S.; Dunand, M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Kiuru-Enari, S.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Rosa, A.L.; Desnuelle, C.; Spuler, S.; Tarnopolsky, M.; Venance, S.L.; Frants, R.R.; Maarel, S.M. van der; Tawil, R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In some 5% of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), no D4Z4 repeat contraction on chromosome 4q35 is observed. Such patients, termed patients with FSHD2, show loss of DNA methylation and heterochromatin markers at the D4Z4 repeat that are similar to patients with

  16. Aberrant Myokine Signaling in Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Nakamori

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Myotonic dystrophy types 1 (DM1 and 2 (DM2 are dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorders caused by a toxic gain of function of expanded CUG and CCUG repeats, respectively. Although both disorders are clinically similar, congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM, a severe DM form, is found only in DM1. CDM is also characterized by muscle fiber immaturity not observed in adult DM, suggesting specific pathological mechanisms. Here, we revealed upregulation of the interleukin-6 (IL-6 myokine signaling pathway in CDM muscles. We also found a correlation between muscle immaturity and not only IL-6 expression but also expanded CTG repeat length and CpG methylation status upstream of the repeats. Aberrant CpG methylation was associated with transcriptional dysregulation at the repeat locus, increasing the toxic RNA burden that upregulates IL-6. Because the IL-6 pathway is involved in myocyte maturation and muscle atrophy, our results indicate that enhanced RNA toxicity contributes to severe CDM phenotypes through aberrant IL-6 signaling. : Congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM manifests characteristic genetic (very large CTG repeat expansions, epigenetic (CpG hypermethylation upstream of the repeat, and phenotypic (muscle immaturity features not seen in adult DM. Nakamori et al. find phenotype-genotype and epigenotype correlation in CDM muscle and reveal involvement of the IL-6 myokine signaling pathway in the disease process. Keywords: CTCF, ER stress, IL-6, muscular dystrophy, NF-κB, trinucleotide, cytokine, splicing

  17. Hereditary muscular dystrophies and the heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, M. C. E.; Pinto, Y. M.; Merkies, I. S. J.; de Die-Smulders, C. E. M.; Crijns, H. J. G. M.; Faber, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac disease is a common clinical manifestation of neuromuscular disorders, particularly of muscular dystrophies. Heart muscle cells as well as specialized conducting myocardial fibres may be affected by the dystrophic process. The incidence and nature of cardiac involvement vary with different

  18. Brain MRI in Congenital Muscular Dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 21 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) complicated by cerebral anomalies were analysed from data collected at several Departments of Child Neurology, The Netherlands: Free University Hospital, and Emma Children’s Hospital, Amsterdam; Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam; Leiden University Hospital; Groningen University Hospital; and St Radboud University Hospital, Nijmegen.

  19. Prevalence of congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Alessandra; Bianco, Flaviana; D'Amico, Adele; Moroni, Isabella; Messina, Sonia; Bruno, Claudio; Pegoraro, Elena; Mora, Marina; Astrea, Guja; Magri, Francesca; Comi, Giacomo P.; Berardinelli, Angela; Moggio, Maurizio; Morandi, Lucia; Pini, Antonella; Petillo, Roberta; Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Minetti, Carlo; Mongini, Tiziana; Ricci, Enzo; Gorni, Ksenija; Battini, Roberta; Villanova, Marcello; Politano, Luisa; Gualandi, Francesca; Ferlini, Alessandra; Muntoni, Francesco; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Bertini, Enrico; Pane, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We provide a nationwide population study of patients with congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy. Methods: Cases were ascertained from the databases in all the tertiary referral centers for pediatric neuromuscular disorders and from all the genetic diagnostic centers in which diagnostic tests for these forms are performed. Results: The study includes 336 patients with a point prevalence of 0.563 per 100,000. Mutations were identified in 220 of the 336 (65.5%). The cohort was subdivided into diagnostic categories based on the most recent classifications on congenital muscular dystrophies. The most common forms were those with α-dystroglycan glycosylation deficiency (40.18%) followed by those with laminin α2 deficiency (24.11%) and collagen VI deficiency (20.24%). The forms of congenital muscular dystrophy related to mutations in SEPN1 and LMNA were less frequent (6.25% and 5.95%, respectively). Conclusions: Our study provides for the first time comprehensive epidemiologic information and point prevalence figures for each of the major diagnostic categories on a large cohort of congenital muscular dystrophies. The study also reflects the diagnostic progress in this field with an accurate classification of the cases according to the most recent gene discoveries. PMID:25653289

  20. A Drosophila model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, Mariska Cathelijne van der

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a severe X-linked disease characterized by progressive muscle wasting and sometimes mild mental retardation. The disease is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. DMD is correlated with the absence of Dp427, which is located along the sarcolemma in skeletal

  1. Prevalence of generalized retinal dystrophy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Jensen, Hanne; Bregnhøj, Jesper F

    2014-01-01

    . RESULTS: Of the 5,602,628 Danish citizens on January 1, 2013, 1622 patients were registered as having a generalized retinal dystrophy and were alive and living in Denmark, corresponding to a prevalence of 1:3,454. In 28% of cases the eye condition was part of a syndrome, while the remaining 72% had eye...

  2. Visuospatial Attention Disturbance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares; do Valle, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro; Resende, Maria Bernadete Dutra; Pinto, Katia Osternack

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive deficits present in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are not yet well characterized. Attention, considered to be the brain mechanism responsible for the selection of sensory stimuli, could be disturbed in DMD, contributing, at least partially, to the observed global cognitive deficit. The aim of this study was to…

  3. Duchenne muscular dystrophy - a molecular service

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1987 a carrier detection and prenatal diagnostic service for. Duchenne muscular dystrophy using molecular technology was instituted at the Department of Human Genetics, Uni- versity of Cape Town, to serve affe.cted families in southern. Africa. DNA samples from 100 affected male subjects and. 350 of their relatives ...

  4. Brain Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of dystrophin disorders in the CNS function of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, an animal model of DMD, is reviewed at the University of New South Wales, University of Sydney, Australia.

  5. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerard, X.; Garanto Iglesias, A.; Rozet, J.M.; Collin, R.W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several

  6. Genetics Home Reference: T-cell immunodeficiency, congenital alopecia, and nail dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alopecia, and nail dystrophy T-cell immunodeficiency, congenital alopecia, and nail dystrophy Printable PDF Open All Close ... expand/collapse boxes. Description T-cell immunodeficiency, congenital alopecia, and nail dystrophy is a type of severe ...

  7. Central nervous system involvement in progressive muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, M; Okuno, T; Honda, Y; Nakano, Y

    1980-01-01

    Several abnormalities in the central nervous system were shown in patients with progressive muscular dystrophy using computerised tomography (CT) scans, electroencephalograms, psychometry, and ophthalmological methods. In congenital muscular dystrophy, the most characteristic finding in the CT scan was a low density area in the white matter, seen in 14 (56%) out of 25 cases. In Duchenne dystrophy, slight cerebral atrophy was observed in 20 (67%) out of 30 cases. It was interesting that in the case of Duchenne dystrophy the older the patient, the more severe were the CT findings. In congenital muscular dystrophy half the patients with a low density area showed a spike or a spike-and-wave complex in the electroencephalogram, and optic atrophy was evident in several cases. It is concluded that progressive muscular dystrophy is not only a myogenic disorder but also one which affects the central nervous system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7436514

  8. Retinal capillaritis in a CRB1-associated retinal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murro, Vittoria; Mucciolo, Dario Pasquale; Sodi, Andrea; Vannozzi, Lorenzo; De Libero, Cinzia; Simonini, Gabriele; Rizzo, Stanislao

    2017-12-01

    To report a case of CRB1-associated retinal dystrophy characterized by vitritis, retinal capillaritis, and cystoid macular edema (CME). A case report. An 8-year-old boy was diagnosed with intermediate uveitis and treated with corticosteroids. He was subsequently diagnosed with retinal dystrophy and found to have two CRB1 mutations. Retinal capillaritis, vitritis, and CME could be inflammatory features of CRB1 retinal dystrophy in our young patient.

  9. Cognitive and Neurobehavioral Profile in Boys With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banihani, Rudaina; Smile, Sharon; Yoon, Grace; Dupuis, Annie; Mosleh, Maureen; Snider, Andrea; McAdam, Laura

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive neuromuscular condition that has a high rate of cognitive and learning disabilities as well as neurobehavioral disorders, some of which have been associated with disruption of dystrophin isoforms. Retrospective cohort of 59 boys investigated the cognitive and neurobehavioral profile of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Full-scale IQ of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. PABPN1 gene therapy for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A Malerba; P Klein; H Bachtarzi; S A Jarmin; G Cordova; A Ferry; V Strings; M Polay Espinoza; K Mamchaoui; S C Blumen; J Lacau St Guily; V Mouly; M Graham; G Butler-browne; D A Suhy; C Trollet; G Dickson

    2017-01-01

      Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an autosomal dominant, late-onset muscle disorder characterized by ptosis, swallowing difficulties, proximal limb weakness and nuclear aggregates in skeletal muscles...

  11. Anoctamin 5 muscular dystrophy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Duno, Morten; Petri, Helle

    2013-01-01

    Since the initial description in 2010 of anoctamin 5 deficiency as a cause of muscular dystrophy, a handful of papers have described this disease in cases of mixed populations. We report the first large regional study and present data on new aspects of prevalence, muscular and cardiac phenotypic...... characteristics, and muscle protein expression. All patients in our neuromuscular unit with genetically unclassified, recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2), Miyoshi-type distal myopathy (MMD) or persistent asymptomatic hyperCK-emia (PACK) were assessed for mutations in the ANO5 gene. Genetically...... confirmed patients were evaluated with muscular and cardiopulmonary examination. Among 40 unclassified patients (28 LGMD2, 5 MMD, 7 PACK), 20 were homozygous or compound heterozygous for ANO5 mutations, (13 LGMD2, 5 MMD, 2 PACK). Prevalence of ANO5 deficiency in Denmark was estimated at 1:100.000 and ANO5...

  12. Pain characterization in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Dias da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an X-linked recessive disorder, characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Historically, pain has not been considered to be a major symptom in DMD. Objective To investigate the relationship between DMD and pain. Methods We conducted a systematic review in Medline/PubMed and BVS (virtual library in health databases. We searched for articles that showed the terms “Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne” and “Pain” in all fields. All studies included boys diagnosed with DMD and the occurrence/amount of pain on this population. Results Initially, there were 175 studies. 167 articles were excluded for not meeting the inclusion criteria. The remaining eight eligible studies, involving pain assessment in DMD, were analyzed. Conclusion Pain is a frequent problem in this population and this symptom is potentially tractable. Studies conclude that pain can directly influence the quality of life of this population.

  13. Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD): Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitkar, Shubhangi A; Kalyan, Meenakshi; Gaikwad, Anu N; Makadia, Ankit; Shah, Harshad

    2015-01-01

    We report a young male of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with positive family history presented with gradual onset proximal muscle weakness in all four limbs since eight years and thinning of shoulders, arms and thighs. Neurological examination revealed atrophy of both shoulders with wasting of both deltoids thinning of thighs and pseudo hypertrophy of both calves, hypotonia in all four limbs. Gower's sign was positive. Winging of scapula was present. Power was 3/5 at both shoulders, 4/5 at both elbows, 5/5 at both wrists, 3/5 at both hip joints, 3/5 at both knees, 5/5 at both ankles. All deep tendon reflexes and superficial reflexes were present with plantars bilateral flexors. Electromyography (EMG) showed myopathic pattern. He had elevated creatinine phosphokinase levels and muscle biopsy findings consistent with muscular dystrophy.

  14. Rehabilitation therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG Cheng; YANG Juan

    2012-01-01

    It is very important that the rehabilitation therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) can improve the quality of life and delay the disease progression. There are the guidelines for DMD rehabilitation therapy in some countries, but it is not emphasized by clinical doctors in our country. According to our experiences to DMD rehabilitation therapy, we reviewed the progress of DMD rehabilitation therapy. It includes the clinical stages and characteristics of DMD, the general principle and th...

  15. The burden of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Landfeldt, Erik; Lindgren, Peter; Bell, Christopher F.; Schmitt, Claude; Guglieri, Michela; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to estimate the total cost of illness and economic burden of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods: Patients with DMD from Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, and United States were identified through Translational Research in Europe–Assessment & Treatment of Neuromuscular Diseases registries and invited to complete a questionnaire online together with a caregiver. Data on health care use, quality of life, work status, informal care, and household e...

  16. Urological manifestations of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askeland, Eric J; Arlen, Angela M; Erickson, Bradley A; Mathews, Katherine D; Cooper, Christopher S

    2013-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a dystrophinopathy affecting males that is associated with multiple organ system complications. To our knowledge urological complications of Duchenne muscular dystrophy have been described only anecdotally to date. We reviewed the medical charts of 135 patients with Duchenne or Duchenne-Becker muscular dystrophy for demographics and disease progression, urological diagnoses, intervention and followup. Of 135 patients 67 (50%) had at least 1 documented urological diagnosis and 38 (28%) had multiple manifestations. Lower urinary tract symptoms were the most common urological diagnosis (32% of patients). Survival analysis revealed a median age at onset of lower urinary tract symptoms of 23 years (95% CI 17.7-23.9). Intervention was required in 12 patients (9%), most commonly due to nephrolithiasis. Urological morbidity increased with Duchenne muscular dystrophy progression when stratified by clinical progression. Lower urinary tract symptoms were more common in nonambulatory patients (40.7% vs 19%, p = 0.007), those with a diagnosis of scoliosis (44% vs 19.7%, p = 0.003) and/or scoliosis spine surgery (60% vs 22%, p <0.001), and those on invasive respiratory support (53% vs 29%, p = 0.046). Likewise, nephrolithiasis was more common in nonambulatory patients (10% vs 0%, p = 0.017), those with scoliosis (12% vs 0%, p = 0.004) and/or scoliosis spine surgery (20% vs 1%, p <0.001), and those on invasive respiratory support (29% vs 3%, p <0.001). Only 28% of patients with a urological manifestation were referred to urology. As these patients transition into adolescence and adulthood, the increased prevalence of urological manifestations warrants increased awareness and referral to urologists. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nutrition Considerations in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jillian; Samuels, Emily; Mullins, Lucille

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a serious degenerative muscular disease affecting males. Diagnosis usually occurs in childhood and is confirmed through genetic testing and/or muscle biopsy. Accompanying the disease are several nutrition-related concerns: growth, body composition, energy and protein requirements, constipation, swallowing difficulties, bone health, and complementary medicine. This review article addresses the nutrition aspects of DMD. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  18. CONGENITAL MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Neubauer

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Myotonic dystrophy is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by myotonia, myopathy of voluntary and involuntary muscles, frontal baldness in men, cardiac conduction abnormalities, catharacts, intellectual deterioration and endocrinopathy. Men with this disorder have often gonadal atrophy and infertility. On the other hand women are generally fertile. During pregnancy their myopathy worsens, often causing severe obstetrical complications. Their children may develop congenital form of the disease with signs of myopathy in utero and have great difficulties in maintaining life functions after birth, together with other characteristical signs of this form: bilateral facial weakness, severe hypotonia, feeding difficulties, talipes equinovarus and mental retardation. The authors present a female newborn with such congenital form of myotonic dystrophy.Conclusions. The authors have emphasized the importance of medical history, regular updating of all the cases of neuromuscular diseases in the region and clinical characteristics for the recognition of congenital form of myotonic dystrophy because of possible prenatal diagnostics and better antenatal and postantal care.

  19. Gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaart, Ingrid E C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2012-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe neuromuscular disorder for which there is currently no cure. Years of research have come to fruition during the past 18 months with publications on clinical trials for several gene therapy approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This review covers the present status of these approaches. The exon skipping approach is most advanced in the process of clinical application. Encouraging results have been obtained in two systemic clinical trials and further optimization has increased delivery to the heart in animal models. Limitations of the approach are the mutation-specificity and the anticipated requirement for lifelong treatment. Gene therapy by means of gene transfer holds the promise of more long-lasting effects. Results of a first, early-stage gene therapy trial, using viral vectors to deliver a minidystrophin gene, were reported. Animal studies suggest that it may be possible to overcome the main challenges currently facing gene therapy (immunogenicity of the vector and systemic body-wide delivery). Significant steps have been made in the development of gene therapy approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These approaches aim to slow down disease progression, requiring robust outcome measures to assess efficacy.

  20. Muscle MRI findings in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Scarlato, Marina; Maggi, Lorenzo; Cava, Mariangela; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Pasanisi, Barbara; Falini, Andrea; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Morandi, Lucia

    2016-03-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by extremely variable degrees of facial, scapular and lower limb muscle involvement. Clinical and genetic determination can be difficult, as molecular analysis is not always definitive, and other similar muscle disorders may have overlapping clinical manifestations. Whole-body muscle MRI examination for fat infiltration, atrophy and oedema was performed to identify specific patterns of muscle involvement in FSHD patients (30 subjects), and compared to a group of control patients (23) affected by other myopathies (NFSHD). In FSHD patients, we detected a specific pattern of muscle fatty replacement and atrophy, particularly in upper girdle muscles. The most frequently affected muscles, including paucisymptomatic and severely affected FSHD patients, were trapezius, teres major and serratus anterior. Moreover, asymmetric muscle involvement was significantly higher in FSHD as compared to NFSHD patients. In conclusion, muscle MRI is very sensitive for identifying a specific pattern of involvement in FSHD patients and in detecting selective muscle involvement of non-clinically testable muscles. Muscle MRI constitutes a reliable tool for differentiating FSHD from other muscular dystrophies to direct diagnostic molecular analysis, as well as to investigate FSHD natural history and follow-up of the disease. Muscle MRI identifies a specific pattern of muscle involvement in FSHD patients. Muscle MRI may predict FSHD in asymptomatic and severely affected patients. Muscle MRI of upper girdle better predicts FSHD. Muscle MRI may differentiate FSHD from other forms of muscular dystrophy. Muscle MRI may show the involvement of non-clinical testable muscles.

  1. Surgery for scoliosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuk, Daniel K L; Wong, Virginia; Wraige, Elizabeth; Baxter, Peter; Cole, Ashley

    2013-02-28

    Scoliosis in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy is usually progressive and treated with surgery. However, it is unclear whether the existing evidence is sufficiently scientifically rigorous to support a recommendation for spinal surgery for most people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and scoliosis. This is an updated review and an updated search was undertaken in which no new studies were found. To determine the effectiveness and safety of spinal surgery in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy with scoliosis. We intended to test whether spinal surgery is effective in increasing survival, improving respiratory function, improving quality of life and overall functioning; and whether spinal surgery is associated with severe adverse effects. We searched the specialized registers of the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group (31 July 2012), MEDLINE (January 1966 to July 2012), EMBASE (January 1947 to July 2012), CENTRAL (2012, Issue 7 in the Cochrane Library), CINAHL Plus(January 1937 to July 2012), Proquest Dissertation and Thesis Database (January 1980 to July 2012), and the National Institute of Health Clinical Trials Database (July 2012). No language restrictions were imposed. We planned to include controlled clinical trials using random or quasi-random allocation of treatment evaluating all forms of spinal surgery for scoliosis in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in the review. The control interventions would have been no treatment, non-operative treatment, or a different form of spinal surgery. Two authors independently examined the search results and evaluated the study characteristics against inclusion criteria to decide which ones would be included in the review. On searching, 47 studies were relevant but none met the inclusion criteria for the review, because they were not clinical trials but prospective or retrospective reviews of case series. Since there were no randomized controlled clinical trials available to evaluate the effectiveness of

  2. Delayed epithelial healing after keratoplasty for lattice corneal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Claudia G; Langenbucher, Achim; Cursiefen, Claus; Kruse, Friedrich E; Seitz, Berthold

    2007-12-01

    To compare the time necessary for complete epithelial healing after penetrating keratoplasty carried out for various corneal dystrophies. In a retrospective single-center study, 679 eyes that underwent nonmechanical keratoplasty were evaluated concerning postoperative epithelial healing time. On the basis of corneal pathology, the eyes were divided into 5 groups: group 1, lattice dystrophy (n = 9); group 2, macular dystrophy (n = 16); group 3, Fuchs dystrophy (n = 207); group 4, granular dystrophy (n = 13); group 5, keratoconus (n = 434). After keratoplasty, the time necessary for complete healing of the epithelial defect was compared among the groups. In lattice dystrophy, 22% showed delayed healing, in contrast to 0% in granular dystrophy. Mean time necessary for healing in group 1 (8.8 +/- 9.4 days) was significantly longer than in group 2 (2.5 +/- 2.5 days, P = 0.003), group 3 (4.4 +/- 4.1 days, P = 0.09), group 4 (2.2 +/- 1.4 days, P = 0.003), and group 5 (3.1 +/- 2.7 days, P = 0.005). In patients with lattice dystrophy, delayed epithelial healing after penetrating keratoplasty may be anticipated. Patients should be counseled accordingly.

  3. Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy prevalence in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1993-07-28

    Jul 28, 1993 ... A genetic service for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) was initiated in. Cape Town in 1987. Of the 143 DMD patients diagnosed during the period 1987-1992, 66 had a familial pattern of inheritance and 77 were apparently sporadic. Twenw BMD patients were ...

  4. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy: reappraisal of a rejected entity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, A. J.; de Visser, M.; Barth, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    The term limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) has been introduced to delineate a distinct form of muscular dystrophy with predominantly proximal upper and lower extremity weakness. Families with evidence of both autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant modes of inheritance have been described.

  5. A unifying genetic model for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmers, R.J.; Vliet, P.J.C. Van; Klooster, R.; Sacconi, S.; Camano, P.; Dauwerse, J.G.; Snider, L.; Straasheijm, K.R.; Ommen, G.J.B. van; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Miller, D.G.; Tapscott, S.J.; Tawil, R.; Frants, R.R.; Maarel, S.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a common form of muscular dystrophy in adults that is foremost characterized by progressive wasting of muscles in the upper body. FSHD is associated with contraction of D4Z4 macrosatellite repeats on chromosome 4q35, but this contraction is pathogenic

  6. Dysphagia is present but mild in myotonic dystrophy type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Knuijt; R. Ensink; J. van Vliet; A. Tieleman; Bert de Swart; Baziel van Engelen

    2009-01-01

    The phenotype of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) shows similarities as well as differences to that of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Dysphagia, a predominant feature in DM1, has not yet been examined in DM2. In a recent nationwide questionnaire survey of gastrointestinal symptoms in DM2, 12 out of

  7. Resistance training in patients with limb-girdle and becker muscular dystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveen, Marie-Louise; Andersen, Søren P; Ingelsrud, Lina H

    2013-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of strength training in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD).......In this study we investigated the effect of strength training in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD)....

  8. [Study of vitreoretinal dystrophies in a Mexican population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Gómez, Luis Porfirio; Castellanos-Pérez Bolde, Carmen Guadalupe; Moguel-Ancheita, Silvia; Lambarri-Arroyo, Andrés

    2008-01-01

    We undertook this study to demonstrate the incidence of vitreoretinal dystrophies in a Mexican population. This was a retrospective, observational, descriptive, transverse study. We analyzed the files of patients treated at the Retina Department of a medical center for state employees (ISSSTE) from January 1991 to December 2006 to obtain the incidence of vitreoretinal dystrophies. We studied 36,300 patient files. We found an incidence of 0.008% for familial exudative vitreoretinal dystrophy, 0.008% for X-linked juvenile retinoschisis, 0.005% for Wagner disease and 0.005% for Goldmann-Favre disease. We present here a representative case of each type of dystrophy. Vitreoretinal dystrophies are uncommon diseases and are difficult to diagnose. Even though their incidence is low, the poor evolution to blindness requires identification of early signs in order to offer timely and opportune treatment.

  9. Genetic modifiers of Duchenne and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Rylie M; Alexander, Matthew S

    2018-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is defined as the progressive wasting of skeletal muscles that is caused by inherited or spontaneous genetic mutations. Next-generation sequencing has greatly improved the accuracy and speed of diagnosis for different types of muscular dystrophy. Advancements in depth of coverage, convenience, and overall reduced cost have led to the identification of genetic modifiers that are responsible for phenotypic variability in affected patients. These genetic modifiers have been postulated to explain key differences in disease phenotypes, including age of loss of ambulation, steroid responsiveness, and the presence or absence of cardiac defects in patients with the same form of muscular dystrophy. This review highlights recent findings on genetic modifiers of Duchenne and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophies based on animal and clinical studies. These genetic modifiers hold great promise to be developed into novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. Muscle Nerve 57: 6-15, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cardiac involvement in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 and Becker muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveen, Marie-Louise; Thune, Jens Jakob; Køber, Lars

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the extent of cardiac involvement in patients with 1 of the 12 groups of recessively inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 (LGMD2A-L) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). DESIGN: Prospective screening. SETTING: Neuromuscular Clinic and Department of Cardiology ...... of dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates a high prevalence of cardiac involvement in patients with LGMD2I, LGMD2E, and BMD. Patients with LGMD2A, LGMD2D, and unclassified LGMD2 have a much lower and milder prevalence of cardiac involvement.......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the extent of cardiac involvement in patients with 1 of the 12 groups of recessively inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 (LGMD2A-L) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). DESIGN: Prospective screening. SETTING: Neuromuscular Clinic and Department of Cardiology......-I and in 14 of 30 patients (47%) with BMD. Only a few patients with LGMD2A and unclassified LGMD2 had mild cardiac involvement, whereas 29% and 67% of patients with LGMD2I and LGMD2E, respectively, had cardiac involvement. Cardiac involvement was not correlated with age, muscle strength, or the level...

  11. Psychiatric disorders appear equally in patients with myotonic dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, J.S.; Schillings, M.L.; Zwarts, M.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Bleijenberg, G.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the presence of psychiatric comorbidity assessed by the use of a structured clinical interview and self-reported questionnaires in a large sample of patients with adult-onset myotonic dystrophy (DM), facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), and hereditary motor and sensory

  12. Signs and symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy among carriers in the Netherlands : a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, EM; Bakker, E; Ippel, PF; Oosterwijk, JC; Majoor-Krakauer, DF; Leschot, NJ; Van Essen, AJ; Brunner, HG; van der Wouw, PA; Wilde, AAM; de Visser, Marianne

    1999-01-01

    Background Carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) may show muscle weakness or dilated cardiomyopathy. Studies focusing on skeletal-muscle involvement were done before DNA analysis was possible. We undertook a cross-sectional study in a population of

  13. Signs and symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy among carriers in The Netherlands: a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, E. M.; Bakker, E.; Ippel, P. F.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Majoor-Krakauer, D. F.; Leschot, N. J.; van Essen, A. J.; Brunner, H. G.; van der Wouw, P. A.; Wilde, A. A.; de Visser, M.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) may show muscle weakness or dilated cardiomyopathy. Studies focusing on skeletal-muscle involvement were done before DNA analysis was possible. We undertook a cross-sectional study in a population of

  14. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy and cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, H S; Hawthorne, K B; Jackson, W T

    1988-05-01

    Although the cause of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) remains unknown, hyperactivity of the sympathetic nerves and secondary vasospasm may be pathogenic in this syndrome. A retrospective epidemiologic study of RSD was done on 53 in-patients from 1978-1985. Cigarette smoking was strikingly increased in patient frequency in RSD (68% versus 37% of hospitalized controls, p less than 0.0001). Eighty-seven percent of the patients had a history of trauma or surgery, and 38% had other associated diseases. Cigarette smoking is statistically linked to RSD and may be involved in its pathogenesis by enhancing sympathetic activity, vasoconstriction, or by some other unknown mechanism.

  15. A molecular protocol for diagnosing myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, M; Marger, R S; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Kissel, J T; Mendell, J R; Prior, T W

    1995-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by an unstable CTG repeat sequence in the 3' untranslated region of the myotonin protein kinase gene. The CTG repeat is present 5-30 times in the normal population, whereas DM patients have CTG expansions of 50 to several thousand repeats. The age of onset of the disorder and the severity of the phenotype is roughly correlated with the size of the CTG expansion. We developed a molecular protocol for the diagnosis of DM based on an initial polymerase chain reaction screen to detect normal-sized alleles and small expansions, followed by an improved Southern protocol to detect larger expansions.

  16. [Facioscapulohumeral muscle dystrophy and heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmrich, P; Ogunlade, V; Gradistanac, T; Daneschnejad, S; Koch, M C; Schober, R

    2005-05-01

    Cardiac involvement is well known in a number of skeletomuscular diseases but not in facio-scapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). We report on a 71 year old woman with progressive cardiac insufficiency in FSHD, which was also confirmed by molecular analysis in one of the two daughters affected by the disease. Autopsy of the deceased patient showed the typical changes in skeletal muscles including focal inflammatory infiltrates in the diaphragm and, in addition, cardiac muscular involvement. The histological changes resembled those seen in primary cardiomyopathy despite the normal muscle mass volume. Both clinically and morphologically, the cardiac disease was the cause of death in this patient with FSHD.

  17. Rehabilitation therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Cheng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available It is very important that the rehabilitation therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD can improve the quality of life and delay the disease progression. There are the guidelines for DMD rehabilitation therapy in some countries, but it is not emphasized by clinical doctors in our country. According to our experiences to DMD rehabilitation therapy, we reviewed the progress of DMD rehabilitation therapy. It includes the clinical stages and characteristics of DMD, the general principle and the common therapy methods of DMD rehabilitation. We hope this review may increase recognizing to DMD rehabilitation therapy for the clinical doctors and DMD family members.

  18. Myotonic dystrophy mimicking postpolio syndrome in a polio survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Eun; Choe, Gheeyoung

    2009-02-01

    We describe a 38-yr-old polio survivor with newly developed weakness from myotonic dystrophy. He suffered muscle atrophy and weakness in his legs as a result of poliomyelitis at the age of 3 yrs. After a stable interval of about 30 yrs, he felt new weakness and fatigue in his legs. Electromyography revealed generalized myotonic discharges, early recruitment, and findings of chronic denervation in his left leg. Genetic testing was consistent with myotonic dystrophy type 1. A biopsy from the right gastrocnemius revealed findings of both myotonic dystrophy and chronic denervation. This case report shows the importance of considering other uncommon conditions in the differential diagnoses of postpolio syndrome.

  19. MR imaging of fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy; a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Koo, Hae Soo; Park, Ki Deuk [Ewha Womans Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-11-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy is a genetic disease and common in Japan. The typical clinical features are hypotonia with an early infantile onset and severe developmental delay. The diagnosis is based on pathologic evidence of muscular dystrophy revealed by biopsy or an increased serum creatine kinase levels. Involvement of the brain is characterized by abnormal cerebral cortical dysplasia, cerebellar dysplasia, and white matter changes. We encountered a case of Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy in which brain MRI findings were typical, and present this case together with a review of the literature.

  20. Genetics and emerging treatments for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wein, Nicolas; Alfano, Lindsay; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-06-01

    Mutations in the DMD gene result in Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy due to absent or altered expression of the dystrophin protein. The more severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy typically presents around ages 2 to 5 with gait disturbance, and historically has led to the loss of ambulation by age 12. It is important for the practicing pediatrician, however, to be aware of other presenting signs, such as delayed motor or cognitive milestones, or elevated serum transaminases. Becker muscular dystrophy is milder, often presenting after age 5, with ambulation frequently preserved past 20 years and sometimes into late decades. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diagnosis and etiology of congenital muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, R A; Smith, J M; Compton, A G; Baker, N L; Pace, R A; Burkin, D J; Kaufman, S J; Lamandé, S R; North, K N

    2008-07-29

    We aimed to determine the frequency of all known forms of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) in a large Australasian cohort. We screened 101 patients with CMD with a combination of immunofluorescence, Western blotting, and DNA sequencing to identify disease-associated abnormalities in glycosylated alpha-dystroglycan, collagen VI, laminin alpha2, alpha7-integrin, and selenoprotein. A total of 45% of the CMD cohort were assigned to an immunofluorescent subgroup based on their abnormal staining pattern. Abnormal staining for glycosylated alpha-dystroglycan was present in 25% of patients, and approximately half of these had reduced glycosylated alpha-dystroglycan by Western blot. Sequencing of the FKRP, fukutin, POMGnT1, and POMT1 genes in all patients with abnormal alpha-dystroglycan immunofluorescence identified mutations in one patient for each of these genes and two patients had mutations in POMT2. Twelve percent of patients had abnormalities in collagen VI immunofluorescence, and we identified disease-causing COL6 mutations in eight of nine patients in whom the genes were sequenced. Laminin alpha2 deficiency accounted for only 8% of CMD. alpha7-Integrin staining was absent in 12 of 45 patients studied, and ITGA7 gene mutations were excluded in all of these patients. We define the distribution of different forms of congenital muscular dystrophy in a large cohort of mixed ethnicity and demonstrate the utility and limitations of current diagnostic techniques.

  2. Muscle MRI findings in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Falini, Andrea [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Neuroradiology Unit, Head and Neck Department, Milan (Italy); Scarlato, Marina; Previtali, Stefano Carlo [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Neurology, INSPE and Division of Neuroscience, Milan (Italy); Maggi, Lorenzo; Pasanisi, Barbara; Morandi, Lucia [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico ' ' Carlo Besta' ' , Neuromuscular Diseases and Neuroimmunology Unit, Milan (Italy); Cava, Mariangela [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Radiology and Center for Experimental Imaging, Milan (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by extremely variable degrees of facial, scapular and lower limb muscle involvement. Clinical and genetic determination can be difficult, as molecular analysis is not always definitive, and other similar muscle disorders may have overlapping clinical manifestations. Whole-body muscle MRI examination for fat infiltration, atrophy and oedema was performed to identify specific patterns of muscle involvement in FSHD patients (30 subjects), and compared to a group of control patients (23) affected by other myopathies (NFSHD). In FSHD patients, we detected a specific pattern of muscle fatty replacement and atrophy, particularly in upper girdle muscles. The most frequently affected muscles, including paucisymptomatic and severely affected FSHD patients, were trapezius, teres major and serratus anterior. Moreover, asymmetric muscle involvement was significantly higher in FSHD as compared to NFSHD patients. In conclusion, muscle MRI is very sensitive for identifying a specific pattern of involvement in FSHD patients and in detecting selective muscle involvement of non-clinically testable muscles. Muscle MRI constitutes a reliable tool for differentiating FSHD from other muscular dystrophies to direct diagnostic molecular analysis, as well as to investigate FSHD natural history and follow-up of the disease. (orig.)

  3. Congenital muscular dystrophy with inflammation: Diagnostic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaumudi Konkay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Muscle biopsy features of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD vary from usual dystrophic picture to normal or nonspecific myopathic picture or prominent fibrosis or striking inflammatory infiltrate, which may lead to diagnostic errors. A series of patients of CMD with significant inflammatory infiltrates on muscle biopsy were correlated with laminin α 2 deficiency on immunohistochemistry (IHC. Material and Methods: Cryostat sections of muscle biopsies from the patients diagnosed as CMD on clinical and muscle biopsy features from 1996 to 2014 were reviewed with hematoxylin and eosin(H&E, enzyme and immunohistochemistry (IHC with laminin α 2. Muscle biopsies with inflammatory infiltrate were correlated with laminin α 2 deficiency. Results: There were 65 patients of CMD, with inflammation on muscle biopsy in 16. IHC with laminin α 2 was available in nine patients, of which six showed complete absence along sarcolemma (five presented with floppy infant syndrome and one with delayed motor milestones and three showed discontinuous, and less intense staining. Conclusions: CMD show variable degrees of inflammation on muscle biopsy. A diagnosis of laminin α 2 deficient CMD should be considered in patients of muscular dystrophy with inflammation, in children with hypotonia/delayed motor milestones.

  4. Upper Girdle Imaging in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Iannaccone, Elisabetta; Laschena, Francesco; Ottaviani, Pierfrancesco; Leoncini, Emanuele; Boccia, Stefania; Galluzzi, Giuliana; Pelliccioni, Marco; Masciullo, Marcella; Frusciante, Roberto; Mercuri, Eugenio; Ricci, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    Background In Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), the upper girdle is early involved and often difficult to assess only relying on physical examination. Our aim was to evaluate the pattern and degree of involvement of upper girdle muscles in FSHD compared with other muscle diseases with scapular girdle impairment. Methods We propose an MRI protocol evaluating neck and upper girdle muscles. One hundred-eight consecutive symptomatic FSHD patients and 45 patients affected by muscular dystrophies and myopathies with prominent upper girdle involvement underwent this protocol. Acquired scans were retrospectively analyzed. Results The trapezius (100% of the patients) and serratus anterior (85% of the patients) were the most and earliest affected muscles in FSHD, followed by the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major, whilst spinati and subscapularis (involved in less than 4% of the patients) were consistently spared even in late disease stages. Asymmetry and hyperintensities on short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences were common features, and STIR hyperintensities could also be found in muscles not showing signs of fatty replacement. The overall involvement appears to be disease-specific in FSHD as it significantly differed from that encountered in the other myopathies. Conclusions The detailed knowledge of single muscle involvement provides useful information for correctly evaluating patients' motor function and to set a baseline for natural history studies. Upper girdle imaging can also be used as an additional tool helpful in supporting the diagnosis of FSHD in unclear situations, and may contribute with hints on the currently largely unknown molecular pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:24932477

  5. Lower limb surgery in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forst, J; Forst, R

    1999-05-01

    Two hundred and thirteen of 428 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) of a prospective and open study were operated on bilaterally with hip and knee release, aponeurectomy of the iliotibial band and Achilles tendon lengthening. In 87 patients the operation was carried out during early restrictions of the lower limb joint mobility at an average age of 6.56 years (4.02-8.26, SD 1.42). The follow-up was on average 5.4 years (0.25-9.01, SD 2.7). This group was compared to a control group (natural history) consisting of 100 non-operated DMD patients. A significant (P contrast to the patients of the control group all treated patients between ages 6 and 8 years could walk independently. The positive influence of early lower limb surgery could also be shown by the development of Hammersmith motor ability score, CIDD (Council of Investigation of Duchenne Dystrophy) grading and Vignos scale. Nevertheless, in consideration of the well-known course of DMD not only the prolongation of ambulation but also the achieved prolongation of assisted standing ability with no or mild contractures are aims of lower limb surgery. Since no improvement of muscle strength could be observed after lower limb surgery, further studies have to investigate if additionally administered steroids can prolong ambulation after early lower limb surgery.

  6. Emerging drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Vinod; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Mendell, Jerry R

    2012-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common, severe childhood form of muscular dystrophy. Treatment is limited to glucocorticoids that have the benefit of prolonging ambulation by approximately 2 years and preventing scoliosis. Finding a more satisfactory treatment should focus on maintaining long-term efficacy with a minimal side effect profile. Authors discuss different therapeutic strategies that have been used in pre-clinical and clinical settings. Multiple treatment approaches have emerged. Most attractive are molecular-based therapies that can express the missing dystrophin protein (exon skipping or mutation suppression) or a surrogate gene product (utrophin). Other approaches include increasing the strength of muscles (myostatin inhibitors), reducing muscle fibrosis and decreasing oxidative stress. Additional targets include inhibiting NF-κB to reduce inflammation or promoting skeletal muscle blood flow and muscle contractility using phosphodiesterase inhibitors or nitric oxide (NO) donors. The potential for each of these treatment strategies to enter clinical trials is a central theme of discussion. The review emphasizes that the goal of treatment should be to find a product at least as good as glucocorticoids with a lower side effect profile or with a significant glucocorticoid sparing effect.

  7. The superhealing MRL background improves muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heydemann Ahlke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice from the MRL or “superhealing” strain have enhanced repair after acute injury to the skin, cornea, and heart. We now tested an admixture of the MRL genome and found that it altered the course of muscle pathology and cardiac function in a chronic disease model of skeletal and cardiac muscle. Mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan (Sgcg, a dystrophin-associated protein, develop muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy similar to their human counterparts with limb girdle muscular dystrophy. With disruption of the dystrophin complex, the muscle plasma membrane becomes leaky and muscles develop increased fibrosis. Methods MRL/MpJ mice were bred with Sgcg mice, and cardiac function was measured. Muscles were assessed for fibrosis and membrane leak using measurements of hydroxyproline and Evans blue dye. Quantitative trait locus mapping was conducted using single nucleotide polymorphisms distinct between the two parental strains. Results Introduction of the MRL genome reduced fibrosis but did not alter membrane leak in skeletal muscle of the Sgcg model. The MRL genome was also associated with improved cardiac function with reversal of depressed fractional shortening and the left ventricular ejection fraction. We conducted a genome-wide analysis of genetic modifiers and found that a region on chromosome 2 was associated with cardiac, diaphragm muscle and abdominal muscle fibrosis. Conclusions These data are consistent with a model where the MRL genome acts in a dominant manner to suppress fibrosis in this chronic disease setting of heart and muscle disease.

  8. Relevant aspects of golden retriever muscular dystrophy for the study of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Rodini Engrácia de Moraes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD is the most representative model for studying Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD in humans, owing its phenotypic expression. DMD is a recessive disorder linked to the X chromosome in which the loss of dystrophin induces progressive weakness and degeneration of the skeletal and cardiac muscles, which lead to replacement by connective and adipose tissues. Onset of clinical signs occurs between 2 and 5 years of age, and many patients die from heart or respiratory failure. The main studies concerning dystrophic Golden Retrievers (DGR sought to elucidate the pathophysiology of the disease and its clinical implications to develop therapies and alternative treatments to improve the quality of life and increase longevity of DMD patients. This review presents an overview of relevant contributions of the DGR model for elucidating DMD in humans.

  9. Mothers' psychological adaptation to Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peay, Holly L; Meiser, Bettina; Kinnett, Kathleen; Furlong, Pat; Porter, Kathryn; Tibben, Aad

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DBMD) cause significant emotional and care-related burden on caregivers, but no studies have evaluated predictors of positive caregiver outcomes, including disorder-specific psychological adaptation...

  10. Nonmuscular involvement in merosin-negative congenital muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Tanke, R.B.; Vingerhoets, D.M.; Zwarts, M.J.; Verrips, A.; Gabreëls, F.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The spectrum of nonmuscular involvement in six children with merosin-negative congenital muscular dystrophy is described. In all children, biochemical, neuroradiologic, cardiac, and neurophysiologic studies were performed. Cerebral structures that were myelinated at gestation, including internal

  11. Immunoglobulins in granular corneal dystrophy Groenouw type I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H U; Bojsen-Møller, M; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    Three patients with granular corneal dystrophy Groenouw type I underwent corneal grafting, and cryostat sections of the corneal buttons were examined immunohistochemically for immunoglobulins. Positive results were obtained for IgG, Kappa-, and Lambda chains with immunofluorescence technique. The...

  12. Clinical and molecular genetic analysis of best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, C.J.F.; Theelen, T.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Schooneveld, M.J. van; Keunen, J.E.E.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the phenotype of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) and to evaluate genotype-phenotype and histopathologic correlations. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of patients with BVMD who underwent an extensive ophthalmic examination, including best-corrected Snellen visual

  13. Ocular, bulbar, limb, and cardiopulmonary involvement in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, N; Mensah, A; Køber, L

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess skeletal muscle weakness and progression as well as the cardiopulmonary involvement in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional study including symptomatic patients with genetically confirmed OPMD. Patients were assessed by medical...

  14. Strong association between myotonic dystrophy type 2 and autoimmune diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, A.A.; Broeder, A. den; Logt, A. van de; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is a dominantly inherited multisystem disorder, characterised by progressive proximal weakness, myotonia, cataracts and cardiac conduction abnormalities. Our clinical impression of an association between DM2 and autoimmune diseases or autoantibody

  15. Strength training and albuterol in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, EL; Vogels, OJM; van Asseldonk, RJGP; Lindeman, E; Hendriks, JCM; Wohlgemuth, M; van der Maarel, SM; Padberg, GW

    2004-01-01

    Background: In animals and healthy volunteers beta2-adrenergic agonists increase muscle strength and mass, in particular when combined with strength training. In patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) albuterol may exert anabolic effects. The authors evaluated the effect of

  16. Strength training and albuterol in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, E.L. van der; Vogels, O.J.M.; Asseldonk, R.J. van; Lindeman, E.J.M.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Wohlgemuth, M.; Maarel, S.M. van der; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In animals and healthy volunteers beta2-adrenergic agonists increase muscle strength and mass, in particular when combined with strength training. In patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) albuterol may exert anabolic effects. The authors evaluated the effect of

  17. Predictive factors for masticatory performance in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggen, H.W. van; Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Steenks, M.H.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Creugers, N.H.; Groot, I.J.M. de; Kalaykova, S.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) report masticatory and swallowing problems. Such problems may cause complications such as choking, and feeling of food sticking in the throat. We investigated whether masticatory performance in DMD is objectively impaired, and explored predictive

  18. Dystrophin analysis in carriers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, Edo M.; Ginjaar, Ieke B.; Bakker, Egbert; de Visser, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Associations between clinical phenotype (muscle weakness, dilated cardiomyopathy) and dystrophin abnormalities in muscle tissue among definite carriers of Duchenne (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) were investigated. No associations between dystrophin abnormalities and clinical variables in

  19. How Physicians Support Mothers of Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Haruo; Saito, Toshio; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Shibata, Saki; Iwata, Yuko; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Shinno, Susumu; Imura, Osamu

    2015-09-01

    Communicating about Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its prognosis can be difficult for affected children and their family. We focused on how physicians provide support to the mothers of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who have difficulty communicating about the condition with their child. The eligible participants were certified child neurologists of the Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Participants responded to questionnaires consisting of free descriptions of a vignette of a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a mother. We analyzed 263 responses of the participants. We found 4 themes on advising mothers, involving encouraging communication, family autonomy, supporting family, and considering the child's concerns. These results provide a better understanding of the communication between physicians and family members who need help sharing information with a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These findings will assist clinical practitioners in supporting families and the affected children throughout the course of their illness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. [Cystic dystrophy on aberrant pancreas. Contribution of ultrasound-endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrieu, J; Palazzo, L; Chikli, F; Doll, J; Chome, J

    1989-06-01

    Cystic dystrophy of aberrant pancreatic tissue without chronic pancreatitis is a rare disease described by Potet and Duclert in 1970. Clinical diagnosis is possible by endoscopy and intraluminalsonography; we report the first case diagnosed by intraluminalsonography.

  1. Xp21 muscular dystrophy due to X chromosome inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, P S; Maltby, E L; Quarrell, O

    1997-07-01

    Two brothers with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have an inversion of the X chromosome, 46, Y, inv(X) (p11.2p21.2). Because their mother is an unaffected carrier of the inversion, this confirms that maternal passage of a structurally abnormal X chromosome can cause dystrophinopathy in males. Our experience suggests that as well as molecular genetic analysis, karyotyping can be useful in Xp21 muscular dystrophy.

  2. The new frontier in muscular dystrophy research: booster genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvall, Eva; Wewer, Ulla M

    2003-01-01

    More than 30 different forms of muscular dystrophy (MD) have been molecularly characterized and can be diagnosed, but progress toward treatment has been slow. Gene replacement therapy has met with great difficulty because of the large size of the defective genes and because of difficulties...... of the boosters are better understood, drugs may be developed to provide the boost to muscle. Some of the experiences in models of muscular dystrophy may inspire new approaches in other genetic degenerative diseases as well....

  3. Identification of three distinguishable phenotypes in golden retriever muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    AMBROSIO, C. E.; FADEL, L.; GAIAD, T. P.; MARTINS, D. S.; ARAUJO, K. P. C.; ZUCCONI, E.; BROLIO, M. P.; GIGLIO, R. F.; MORINI, A. C.; JAZEDJE, T.; FROES, T. R.; FEITOSA, M. L. T.; VALADARES, M. C.; BELTRAO-BRAGA, P. C. B.; MEIRELLES, F. V.

    2009-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a human disease characterized by progressive and irreversible skeletal muscle degeneration caused by mutations in genes coding for important muscle proteins. Unfortunately, there is no efficient treatment for this disease; it causes progressive loss of motor and muscular ability until death. The canine model (golden retriever muscular dystrophy) is similar to DMD, showing similar clinical signs. Fifteen dogs were followed from birth and closely observed fo...

  4. Pulmonary Endpoints in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. A Workshop Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finder, Jonathan; Mayer, Oscar Henry; Sheehan, Daniel; Sawnani, Hemant; Abresch, R Ted; Benditt, Joshua; Birnkrant, David J; Duong, Tina; Henricson, Erik; Kinnett, Kathi; McDonald, Craig M; Connolly, Anne M

    2017-08-15

    Development of novel therapeutics for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has led to clinical trials that include pulmonary endpoints that allow assessment of respiratory muscle status, especially in nonambulatory subjects. Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) convened a workshop in Bethesda, Maryland, on April 14 and 15, 2016, to summarize published respiratory data in DMD and give guidance to clinical researchers assessing the effect of interventions on pulmonary outcomes in DMD.

  5. Posterior amorphous corneal dystrophy caused by a de novo deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odent, S; Casteels, I; Cassiman, C; Dieltiëns, M; Hua, M-T; Devriendt, K

    2017-01-01

    We present a newborn diagnosed with posterior amorphous corneal dystrophy (PACD). PACD is a rare disorder with partial or complete posterior lamellar corneal opacification. Genetic screening showed a deletion of chromosome 12q21.33-q22 containing the identified four small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRP's) associated with this particular dystrophy. Neither parents were carrier of the deletion. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a de novo mutation causing PACD.

  6. Outside in: The matrix as a modifier of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Spencer, Melissa J; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2017-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies are genetic conditions leading to muscle degeneration and often, impaired regeneration. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is a prototypical form of muscular dystrophy, and like other forms of genetically inherited muscle diseases, pathological progression is variable. Variability in muscular dystrophy can arise from differences in the manner in which the primary mutation impacts the affected protein's function; however, clinical heterogeneity also derives from secondary mutations in other genes that can enhance or reduce pathogenic features of disease. These genes, called genetic modifiers, regulate the pathophysiological context of dystrophic degeneration and regeneration. Understanding the mechanistic links between genetic modifiers and dystrophic progression sheds light on pathologic remodeling, and provides novel avenues to therapeutically intervene to reduce muscle degeneration. Based on targeted genetic approaches and unbiased genomewide screens, several modifiers have been identified for muscular dystrophy, including extracellular agonists of signaling cascades. This review will focus on identification and possible mechanisms of recently identified modifiers for muscular dystrophy, including osteopontin, latent TGFβ binding protein 4 (LTBP4) and Jagged1. Moreover, we will review the investigational approaches that aim to target modifier pathways and thereby counteract dystrophic muscle wasting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cardiac function in muscular dystrophy associates with abdominal muscle pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Brandon B; Swaggart, Kayleigh A; Kim, Gene; Watson, Sydeaka; McNally, Elizabeth M

    The muscular dystrophies target muscle groups differentially. In mouse models of muscular dystrophy, notably the mdx model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, the diaphragm muscle shows marked fibrosis and at an earlier age than other muscle groups, more reflective of the histopathology seen in human muscular dystrophy. Using a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, the Sgcg mouse, we compared muscle pathology across different muscle groups and heart. A cohort of nearly 200 Sgcg mice were studied using multiple measures of pathology including echocardiography, Evans blue dye uptake and hydroxyproline content in multiple muscle groups. Spearman rank correlations were determined among echocardiographic and pathological parameters. The abdominal muscles were found to have more fibrosis than other muscle groups, including the diaphragm muscle. The abdominal muscles also had more Evans blue dye uptake than other muscle groups. The amount of diaphragm fibrosis was found to correlate positively with fibrosis in the left ventricle, and abdominal muscle fibrosis correlated with impaired left ventricular function. Fibrosis in the abdominal muscles negatively correlated with fibrosis in the diaphragm and right ventricles. Together these data reflect the recruitment of abdominal muscles as respiratory muscles in muscular dystrophy, a finding consistent with data from human patients.

  8. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy after a burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, L; Goris, R J

    1996-06-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is a disease that can appear after minor trauma or operation to an extremity. The injury may vary from a simple contusion to a fracture. The prevalence of burns as a cause of RSD, within a population of 829 patients with RSD, was studied retrospectively. Prospectively, we documented the medical history, signs and symptoms of all patients with RSD, seen by our department during the period from January 1984 to 31 December 1994. Four patients had developed RSD after a burn injury, resulting in a prevalence of 0.5 per cent. Though the clinical signs of early RSD are similar to those of a (thermal) burn, alertness to recognize inflammatory signs, in combination with the increase in complaints after exercise, is necessary for early diagnosis and treatment of the complicating RSD.

  9. Cocaine-induced reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, D; Singh, A

    2000-11-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) usually follows traumatic injuries or neurologic disorders. The authors report a rare case of RSD that followed intraarterial administration of cocaine in a patient with a history of intravenous drug abuse. The cocaine was self-administered inadvertently into the femoral artery rather than the femoral vein. Despite the intense pain, swelling, and dermatologic changes that followed, the diagnosis of RSD was not considered until scintigraphic studies suggested it. A combination of normal radiographs, a normal leukocyte study, and an abnormal bone scan in the region of tenderness and swelling excluded other possibilities and suggested RSD. In our patient, RSD was likely caused by an ischemic autonomic injury from the vasoconstrictor action of cocaine. Clinical follow-up and relief using phentolamine, an alpha-adrenergic blocker and vasodilator, made the diagnosis of RSD most likely.

  10. Current treatment of adult Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Kathryn R; Lechtzin, Noah; Judge, Daniel P

    2007-02-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are living longer into adulthood due to a variety of improvements in health care practices. This growing patient population presents new therapeutic challenges. In this article, we review the literature on current treatment of adult DMD as well as our own experience as a multidisciplinary team actively caring for 23 men ages 19-38 years of age. Approximately one quarter of our adult DMD patients have remained on moderate dose corticosteroids. Daily stretching exercises are recommended, particularly of the distal upper extremities. Cardiomyopathy is anticipated, detected, and treated early with afterload reduction. Oxygen saturation monitoring, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation and cough assist devices are routinely used. Other medical issues such as osteoporosis, gastrointestinal and urinary symptoms are addressed. Current and future therapies directed at prolonging the lifespan of those with DMD will result in further increases in this adult population with special needs and concerns. These needs are best addressed in a multidisciplinary clinic.

  11. Electrodiagnostic evaluation in feline hypertrophic muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J; Jaggy, A; Busato, A; Gaschen, F

    2004-07-01

    Standard needle electromyography (EMG) of 56 muscles and nerve conduction velocities (NCV) of the ulnar and common peroneal nerves were investigated in each of six cats affected with hypertrophic feline muscular dystrophy, 10 related heterozygote carriers and 10 normal cats. The EMG findings were considered normal in carrier and control cats, and consisted of 33% normal readings, 22% myotonic discharges, 18% fibrillation potentials, 11% prolonged insertional potentials, 10% complex repetitive discharges and 6% positive sharp waves in affected cats. Muscles of the proximal limbs were most frequently affected. No differences in NCV were found between the three cat groups. It was concluded that dystrophin-deficient dystrophic cats have widespread and frequent EMG changes, predominantly myotonic discharges and fibrillation potentials, which are most pronounced in the proximal appendicular muscles.

  12. Natural history of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing KE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is X-linked recessive hereditary disease. DMD gene mutations result in dystrophin deficiency, which causes not only muscle movement disorders but also scoliosis, cognitive dysfunction, urinary tract diseases, respiratory diseases and heart diseases. Most patients die in early adult for respiratory and circulatory failure. Early multidisciplinary therapies will significantly delay disease progression and improve patients' quality of life. However, DMD diagnosis and treatment exist significantly time delay now. In this study, we review the natural history of DMD, including motor, cognitive, respiratory and heart function, for improving DMD early recognition, diagnosis and treatment, so as to benefit DMD patients. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.05.004

  13. Sleep Disordered Breathing in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoMauro, Antonella; D'Angelo, Maria Grazia; Aliverti, Andrea

    2017-05-01

    This review aims to explain the inevitable imbalance between respiratory load, drive, and muscular force that occurs in the natural aging of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and that predisposes these patients to sleep disordered breathing (SDB). In DMD, SDB is characterized by oxygen desaturation, apneas, hypercapnia, and hypoventilation during sleep and ultimately develops into respiratory failure during wakefulness. It can be present in all age groups. Young patients risk obstructive apneas because of weight gain, secondary to progressive physical inactivity and prolonged corticosteroid therapy; older patients hypoventilate and desaturate because of respiratory muscle weakness, in particular the diaphragm. These conditions are further exacerbated during REM sleep, the phase of maximal muscle hypotonia during which the diaphragm has to provide most of the ventilation. Evidence is given to the daytime predictors of early symptoms of SDB, important indicators for the proper time to initiate mechanical ventilation.

  14. Macular flicker electroretinograms in Best vitelliform dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsini, B; Porciatti, V; Porrello, G; Merendino, E; Minnella, A; Cermola, S; Buzzonetti, L

    1996-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the function of the neurosensory retina in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BMD) by recording the focal electroretinogram (ERG) fundamental and 2nd harmonic components, which are known to be dominated by receptoral and postreceptoral activity, respectively. FERGs were recorded in response to a uniform field (9 x 9 deg) flickered sinusoidally at either 8 Hz or 32 Hz (peak frequencies for the 2nd and fundamental harmonic, respectively). The fundamental component of the response to the 32-Hz stimulus and the 2nd harmonic of the response to the 8-Hz stimulus were measured in their amplitudes and phases. The fundamental-2nd harmonic amplitude ratio was taken as an index of the relative changes in the FERG components. Eleven patients with BMD and vitelliform stage macular lesions were evaluated. Results were compared with those obtained from 13 patients with Type 2 Stargardt macular dystrophy (STD) according to the Noble and Carr Classification, and 29 normal control subjects. Four BMD and four STD patients were also followed electrophysiologically over a 48 month period. Compared to controls, BMD patients showed losses of both FERG fundamental and 2nd harmonic amplitudes, and an increase in the fundamental and increase in the fundamental-2nd harmonic ratio. STD patients also showed losses of both fundamental and 2nd harmonic, but the fundamental-2nd harmonic ratio was normal. In BMD patients, but not in those with STD, the fundamental amplitude tended to decrease over the follow-up period. The results indicate that BMD involves neurosensory abnormalities early in the disease process. The increased fundamental-2nd harmonic ratio suggests that a postreceptoral dysfunction may be present in addition to that of photoreceptors. This differs from STD, where losses appear to affect primarily the receptoral retina. Receptoral losses in BMD may progress throughout the medium-term follow up.

  15. The sodium leak channel, NALCN, in health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochet-Bissuel, Maud; Lory, Philippe; Monteil, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels are crucial components of cellular excitability and are involved in many neurological diseases. This review focuses on the sodium leak, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)-activated NALCN channel that is predominantly expressed in neurons where it regulates the resting membrane potential and neuronal excitability. NALCN is part of a complex that includes not only GPCRs, but also UNC-79, UNC-80, NLF-1 and src family of Tyrosine kinases (SFKs). There is growing evidence that the NALCN channelosome critically regulates its ion conduction. Both in mammals and invertebrates, animal models revealed an involvement in many processes such as locomotor behaviors, sensitivity to volatile anesthetics, and respiratory rhythms. There is also evidence that alteration in this NALCN channelosome can cause a wide variety of diseases. Indeed, mutations in the NALCN gene were identified in Infantile Neuroaxonal Dystrophy (INAD) patients, as well as in patients with an Autosomal Recessive Syndrome with severe hypotonia, speech impairment, and cognitive delay. Deletions in NALCN gene were also reported in diseases such as 13q syndrome. In addition, genes encoding NALCN, NLF- 1, UNC-79, and UNC-80 proteins may be susceptibility loci for several diseases including bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, autism, epilepsy, alcoholism, cardiac diseases and cancer. Although the physiological role of the NALCN channelosome is poorly understood, its involvement in human diseases should foster interest for drug development in the near future. Toward this goal, we review here the current knowledge on the NALCN channelosome in physiology and diseases. PMID:24904279

  16. Mutation-Induced Deamidation of Corneal Dystrophy-Related Transforming Growth Factor β-Induced Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nadia Sukusu; Juhl, Dennis Wilkens; Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBIp) cause phenotypically diverse corneal dystrophies, where protein aggregation in the cornea leads to severe visual impairment. Previous studies have shown a relationship between mutant-specific corneal dystrophy phenotypes...

  17. Creatine kinase response to high-intensity aerobic exercise in adult-onset muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren P; Sveen, Marie-Louise; Hansen, Regitze S

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of high-intensity exercise on plasma creatine kinase (CK) in patients with muscular dystrophies.......We investigated the effect of high-intensity exercise on plasma creatine kinase (CK) in patients with muscular dystrophies....

  18. A diagnostic fluorescent marker kit for six limb girdle muscular dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, I.; Bourg, N.; Marchand, S.; Alibert, O.; Eymard, B.; van der Kooi, A. J.; Jackson, C. E.; Garcia, C.; Burgunder, J. M.; Legum, C.; de Visser, M.; Fardeau, M.; Beckmann, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    The autosomal progressive muscular dystrophies which are grouped together under the term limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are diseases characterized by a progressive impairment of the proximal limb muscles and myopathic changes on electromyogram and muscle biopsy. Eight independent purely

  19. Experimental Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gets Boost from Existing Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Research Spotlight on Research Experimental Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gets Boost from Existing Medication By Colleen Labbe, ... the effects of a promising experimental treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), according to research partially funded by the ...

  20. Does Body Mass Index Predict Premature Cardiomyopathy Onset for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKane, Meghann; Soslow, Jonathan H; Xu, Meng; Saville, Benjamin R; Slaughter, James C; Burnette, W Bryan; Markham, Larry W

    2017-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy leads to cardiomyopathy. The objective of this study was to estimate the association of body mass index with cardiomyopathy onset. Cardiomyopathy was defined as left ventricular ejection fraction Duchenne muscular dystrophy subjects and age of cardiomyopathy onset.

  1. Outcome of Long-Term Corticosteroid Treatment in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The clinical orthopedic effects of chronic daily corticosteroid treatment were evaluated by chart review in boys with genetically confirmed Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD followed at the Ohio State University Muscular Dystrophy Clinic between 2000 and 2003.

  2. Outcome of Long-Term Corticosteroid Treatment in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    The clinical orthopedic effects of chronic daily corticosteroid treatment were evaluated by chart review in boys with genetically confirmed Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) followed at the Ohio State University Muscular Dystrophy Clinic between 2000 and 2003.

  3. Muscular Dystrophy Campaign: Putting Some Financial Muscle Behind Finding a Cure

    OpenAIRE

    Pohlschmidt, Marita

    2012-01-01

    The Muscular Dystrophy Campaign, a London-based charitable organization, funds research on muscle function and muscle disease, including the study of muscle stem cells. Dr. Marita Pohlschmidt, the Muscular Dystrophy Campaign's director of research, describes its vision and goals.

  4. Interpretation of "Diagnosis and management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a guide for families (2011 version)"

    OpenAIRE

    Xi-hua LI

    2015-01-01

    The guideline "Diagnosis and management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy" was supported by a 3-year-long project guided by US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with patient advocacy groups [Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA), Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) and United Parent Projects Muscular Dystrophy (UPPMD)] and Translational Research in Europe: Assessment and Treatment of Neuromuscular Disease (TREAT-NMD) network. The main document was published i...

  5. FHL1 reduces dystrophy in transgenic mice overexpressing FSHD muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Feeney

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1.

  6. Morphologic imaging in muscular dystrophies and inflammatory myopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degardin, Adrian; Lacour, Arnaud; Vermersch, Patrick [CHU de Lille, Clinique neurologique, Lille (France); Morillon, David; Cotten, Anne [CHRU de Lille, Service de Radiologie Osteoarticulaire, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France); Stojkovic, Tanya [G-H Pitie-Salpetriere, Institut de Myologie, Paris (France)

    2010-12-15

    To determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) is useful in the diagnostic workup of muscular dystrophies and idiopathic inflammatory myopathies for describing the topography of muscle involvement. MR imaging was performed in 31 patients: 8 with dystrophic myotony types 1 (n = 4) or 2 (n = 4); 11 with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, including dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, sarcoglycanopathy, and dystrophy associated with fukutin-related protein mutation; 3 with Becker muscular dystrophy; and 9 with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, including polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and sporadic inclusion body myositis. Analysis of T1 images enabled us to describe the most affected muscles and the muscles usually spared for each muscular disease. In particular, examination of pelvis, thigh, and leg muscles demonstrated significant differences between the muscular diseases. On STIR images, hyperintensities were present in 62% of our patients with muscular dystrophies. A specific pattern of muscular involvement was established for each muscular disease. Hyperintensities observed on STIR images precede fatty degeneration and are not specific for inflammatory myopathies. (orig.)

  7. Myotonic dystrophy: emerging mechanisms for DM1 and DM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Diane H; Tapscott, Stephen J

    2007-02-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a complex multisystemic disorder linked to two different genetic loci. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an expansion of a CTG repeat located in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of DMPK (myotonic dystrophy protein kinase) on chromosome 19q13.3. Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is caused by an unstable CCTG repeat in intron 1 of ZNF9 (zinc finger protein 9) on chromosome 3q21. Therefore, both DM1 and DM2 are caused by a repeat expansion in a region transcribed into RNA but not translated into protein. The discovery that these two distinct mutations cause largely similar clinical syndromes put emphasis on the molecular properties they have in common, namely, RNA transcripts containing expanded, non-translated repeats. The mutant RNA transcripts of DM1 and DM2 aberrantly affect the splicing of the same target RNAs, such as chloride channel 1 (ClC-1) and insulin receptor (INSR), resulting in their shared myotonia and insulin resistance. Whether the entire disease pathology of DM1 and DM2 is caused by interference in RNA processing remains to be seen. This review focuses on the molecular significance of the similarities and differences between DM1 and DM2 in understanding the disease pathology of myotonic dystrophy.

  8. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: changing concepts and taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton-Hicks, M; Jänig, W; Hassenbusch, S; Haddox, J D; Boas, R; Wilson, P

    1995-10-01

    We present a revised taxonomic system for disorders previously called reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) and causalgia. The system resulted from a special consensus conference that was convened on this topic and is based upon the patient's history, presenting symptoms, and findings at the time of diagnosis. The disorders are grouped under the umbrella term CRPS: complex regional pain syndrome. This overall term, CRPS, requires the presence of regional pain and sensory changes following a noxious event. Further, the pain is associated with findings such as abnormal skin color, temperature change, abnormal sudomotor activity, or edema. The combination of these findings exceeds their expected magnitude in response to known physical damage during and following the inciting event. Two types of CRPS have been recognized: type I, corresponds to RSD and occurs without a definable nerve lesion, and type II, formerly called causalgia refers to cases where a definable nerve lesion is present. The term sympathetically maintained pain (SMP) was also evaluated and considered to be a variable phenomenon associated with a variety of disorders, including CRPS types I and II. These revised categories have been included in the 2nd edition of the IASP Classification of Chronic Pain Syndromes.

  9. Gene Therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Julian; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a relatively common inherited disorder caused by defective expression of the protein dystrophin. The most direct approach to treating this disease would be to restore dystrophin production in muscle. Recent progress has greatly increased the prospects for successful gene therapy of DMD, and here we summarize the most promising developments. Areas Covered Gene transfer using vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as a promising method to restore dystrophin production in muscles bodywide, and represents a treatment option applicable to all DMD patients. Using information gleaned from PubMed searches of the literature, attendance at scientific conferences and results from our own lab, we provide an overview of the potential for gene therapy of DMD using AAV vectors including a summary of promising developments and issues that need to be resolved prior to large-scale therapeutic implementation. Expert Opinion Of the many approaches being pursued to treat DMD and BMD, gene therapy based on AAV-mediated delivery of microdystrophin is the most direct and promising method to treat the cause of the disorder. The major challenges to this approach are ensuring that microdystrophin can be delivered safely and efficiently without eliciting an immune response. PMID:26594599

  10. Nutritional Challenges in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salera, Simona; Menni, Francesca; Moggio, Maurizio; Guez, Sophie; Sciacco, Monica; Esposito, Susanna

    2017-06-10

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMDs) represent a heterogeneous group of acquired or inherited conditions. Nutritional complications are frequent in NMDs, but they are sometimes underestimated. With the prolongation of survival in patients with NMDs, there are several nutritional aspects that are important to consider, including the deleterious effects of overnutrition on glucose metabolism, mobility, and respiratory and cardiologic functions; the impact of hyponutrition on muscle and ventilatory function; constipation and other gastrointestinal complications; chewing/swallowing difficulties with an increased risk of aspiration that predisposes to infectious diseases and respiratory complications; as well as osteoporosis with an associated increased risk of fractures. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the nutritional aspects and complications that can start in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and increase with ageing. These aspects should be considered in the transition from paediatric clinics to adult services. It is shown that appropriate nutritional care can help to improve the quality of life of DMD patients, and a multidisciplinary team is needed to support nutrition challenges in DMD patients. However, studies on the prevalence of overnutrition and undernutrition, gastrointestinal complications, infectious diseases, dysphagia, and reduced bone mass in the different types of NMDs are needed, and appropriate percentiles of weight, height, body mass index, and body composition appear to be extremely important to improve the management of patients with NMD.

  11. Bernard-Soulier syndrome (Hemorrhagiparous thrombocytic dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanza François

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS, also known as Hemorrhagiparous thrombocytic dystrophy, is a hereditary bleeding disorder affecting the megakaryocyte/platelet lineage and characterized by bleeding tendency, giant blood platelets and low platelet counts. This syndrome is extremely rare as only ~100 cases have been reported in the literature. Clinical manifestations usually include purpura, epistaxis, menorrhagia, gingival and gastrointestinal bleeding. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. The underlying defect is a deficiency or dysfunction of the glycoprotein GPIb-V-IX complex, a platelet-restricted multisubunit receptor required for normal primary hemostasis. The GPIb-V-IX complex binds von Willebrand factor, allowing platelet adhesion and platelet plug formation at sites of vascular injury. Genes coding for the four subunits of the receptor, GPIBA, GPIBB, GP5 and GP9, map to chromosomes 17p12, 22q11.2, 3q29, and 3q21, respectively. Defects have been identified in GPIBA, GPIBB, and GP9 but not in GP5. Diagnosis is based on a prolonged skin bleeding time, the presence of a small number of very large platelets (macrothrombocytopenia, defective ristocetin-induced platelet agglutination and low or absent expression of the GPIb-V-IX complex. Prothrombin consumption is markedly reduced. The prognosis is usually good with adequate supportive care but severe bleeding episodes can occur with menses, trauma and surgical procedures. Treatment of bleeding or prophylaxis during surgical procedures usually requires platelet transfusion.

  12. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason L. Buckner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serious sequelae adversely affect quality of life and can impact survival. The current clinical issues relating to bone health and bone health screening methods in DMD are presented in this review. Diagnostic studies, including biochemical markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, as well as spinal imaging using densitometric lateral spinal imaging, and treatment to optimize bone health in patients with DMD are discussed. Treatment with bisphosphonates offers a method to increase bone mass in these children; oral and intravenous bisphosphonates have been used successfully although treatment is typically reserved for children with fractures and/or bone pain with low bone mass by DXA.

  13. Nutritional Challenges in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Salera

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular diseases (NMDs represent a heterogeneous group of acquired or inherited conditions. Nutritional complications are frequent in NMDs, but they are sometimes underestimated. With the prolongation of survival in patients with NMDs, there are several nutritional aspects that are important to consider, including the deleterious effects of overnutrition on glucose metabolism, mobility, and respiratory and cardiologic functions; the impact of hyponutrition on muscle and ventilatory function; constipation and other gastrointestinal complications; chewing/swallowing difficulties with an increased risk of aspiration that predisposes to infectious diseases and respiratory complications; as well as osteoporosis with an associated increased risk of fractures. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the nutritional aspects and complications that can start in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and increase with ageing. These aspects should be considered in the transition from paediatric clinics to adult services. It is shown that appropriate nutritional care can help to improve the quality of life of DMD patients, and a multidisciplinary team is needed to support nutrition challenges in DMD patients. However, studies on the prevalence of overnutrition and undernutrition, gastrointestinal complications, infectious diseases, dysphagia, and reduced bone mass in the different types of NMDs are needed, and appropriate percentiles of weight, height, body mass index, and body composition appear to be extremely important to improve the management of patients with NMD.

  14. Falls and stumbles in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, C M; Busse, M E; Sampson, C M; Rogers, M T; Fenton-May, J; van Deursen, R

    2006-03-01

    To investigate falls and risk factors in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) compared with healthy volunteers. 13 sequential patients with DM1 from different kindreds were compared with 12 healthy volunteers. All subjects were evaluated using the Rivermead Mobility Index, Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment, and modified Activities Specific Balance Confidence scale. Measures of lower limb muscle strength, gait speed, and 7-day ambulatory activity monitoring were recorded. Subjects returned a weekly card detailing stumbles and falls. 11 of 13 patients (mean age 46.5 years, seven female) had 127 stumbles and 34 falls over the 13 weeks, compared with 10 of 12 healthy subjects (34.4 years, seven female) who had 26 stumbles and three falls. Patients were less active than healthy subjects but had more falls and stumbles per 5000 right steps taken (mean (SD) events, 0.21 (0.29) v 0.02 (0.02), p = 0.007). Patients who fell (n = 6) had on average a lower Rivermead Mobility score, slower self selected gait speed, and higher depression scores than those who did not. DM1 patients stumble or fall about 10 times more often than healthy volunteers. Routine inquiry about falls and stumbles is justified. A study of multidisciplinary intervention to reduce the risk of falls seems warranted.

  15. Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in pattern dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, P J; Schultz, D W; Gregory, A M; Schain, M B; Barra, R; Majewski, J; Ott, J; Acott, T; Weleber, R G; Klein, M L

    2005-01-01

    Background: The pattern dystrophies (PD) represent a clinically heterogeneous family of inherited macular diseases frequently caused by mutations in the peripherin/RDS gene. Most previous studies have detailed the clinical findings in single families, making it difficult to derive data from which progression and visual outcome can be generalised. Methods: Families were ascertained and clinically evaluated including angiography and electrophysiology where appropriate. Results: In each of the six families with autosomal dominant PD, a mutation in the peripherin/RDS gene was identified, including a novel Cys250Phe variant. These data suggest that the condition is characterised by the accumulation of yellow to grey subretinal flecks, followed by pigmentary change accompanied by patches of chorioretinal atrophy. Subsequently, 50% (16/32) of individuals with PD developed poor central vision because of chorioretinal geographic atrophy or subretinal neovascularisation. The risk of these complications appears to increase with age. Conclusion: PD should not necessarily be considered a benign condition. Instead, patients should be counselled that there is a significant chance of losing central vision in their later years. Some elderly patients with probands showing PD may be misdiagnosed with age related macular degeneration owing to the phenotypic similarities between these conditions in the advanced state. PMID:16113362

  16. Restrictive lung involvement in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Michele A; Eichinger, Katy J; Donlin-Smith, Colleen M; Tawil, Rabi; Statland, Jeffery M

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have evaluated the frequency or predisposing factors for respiratory involvement in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 (FSHD1) and type 2 (FSHD2). We performed a prospective cross-sectional observational study of 61 genetically confirmed FSHD participants (53 FSHD1 and 8 FSHD2). Participants underwent bedside pulmonary function testing in sitting and supine positions, a standard clinical history and physical assessment, and manual muscle testing. Restrictive respiratory involvement was suggested in 9.8% (95% confidence interval 2.4-17.3): 7.5% FSHD1 and 25.0% FSHD2 (P = 0.17). Participants with testing suggestive of restrictive lung involvement (n = 6) were more severely affected (P = 0.005), had weaker hip flexion (P = 0.0007), and were more likely to use a wheelchair (P = 0.01). Restrictive respiratory involvement should be considered in all moderate to severely affected FSHD patients with proximal lower extremity weakness. The higher frequency of restrictive lung disease in FSHD2 seen here requires confirmation in a larger cohort of FSHD2 patients. © Published 2014 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Myotonic dystrophy in two European grey wolves (Canis lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pákozdy, A; Leschnik, M; Nell, B; Kolm, U S; Virányi, Z; Belényi, B; Molnár, M J; Bilzer, T

    2007-03-01

    Two related European Grey wolves (Canis lupus) with the history of muscle stiffness beginning at 2 weeks of age were examined in this study. Muscle tone and muscle mass were increased in both animals. Muscle stiffness was worsened by stress so that the animals fell into lateral recumbency. Blood chemistry revealed mildly increased serum creatine kinase activity. Abnormal potentials typical of myotonic discharges were recorded by electromyography. Cataract, first-degree atrioventricular (AV) block and inhomogeneous myocardial texture by ultrasound suggested extramuscular involvement. Myopathology demonstrated dystrophic signs in the muscle biopsy specimen. The presumptive diagnosis based on the in vivo findings was myotonic dystrophy. Immunochemistry of the striated muscles revealed focal absence of dystrophin 1 and beta-dystroglycan in both cases. Cardiac and ophthalmologic involvement suggested a disorder very similar to a human form of myotonic dystrophy. This is the first description of myotonic dystrophy in wolves.

  18. [Posterior polymorphous dystrophy, case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Adam, G; Hernandez-Camarena, J C; Valdez-García, J E

    2015-09-01

    Posterior Polymorphous Dystrophy (DPP) is a rare posterior corneal dystrophy that is genetically transmitted as autosomal dominant. Corneal structures affected in this dystrophy are Descemet membrane and the endothelium. A case is presented on a 47 years old woman with no relevant history, with typical findings of DPP (vesicular and band lesions at the endothelium and posterior Descemet). To our knowledge there are no reported cases of DPP in Latin-American patients in the literature. The clinical manifestations in our patient were found to be very similar to the cases reported in other populations. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Perspectives of stem cell therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meregalli, Mirella; Farini, Andrea; Belicchi, Marzia; Parolini, Daniele; Cassinelli, Letizia; Razini, Paola; Sitzia, Clementina; Torrente, Yvan

    2013-09-01

    Muscular dystrophies are heritable and heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders characterized by the primary wasting of skeletal muscle, usually caused by mutations in the proteins forming the link between the cytoskeleton and the basal lamina. As a result of mutations in the dystrophin gene, Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients suffer from progressive muscle atrophy and an exhaustion of muscular regenerative capacity. No efficient therapies are available. The evidence that adult stem cells were capable of participating in the regeneration of more than their resident organ led to the development of potential stem cell treatments for degenerative disorder. In the present review, we describe the different types of myogenic stem cells and their possible use for the progression of cell therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  20. THE EXPANDING CLINICAL SPECTRUM OF CHOROIDAL EXCAVATION IN MACULAR DYSTROPHIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Casalino, Giuseppe; Iacono, Pierluigi; Introini, Ugo; Adamyan, Tatevik; Bandello, Francesco

    2017-08-09

    To assess the prevalence and the clinical course of focal choroidal excavation (FCE) in patients affected by macular dystrophies. Prospective case series. All the patients underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination, including best-corrected visual acuity and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) was assessed on the basis of the leakage detected on fluorescein angiography. A total of 162 eyes from 81 patients with macular dystrophy were included in the study. FCE was diagnosed in seven eyes (4.3% of the eyes), including four eyes with Best vitelliform dystrophy, two eyes with pattern dystrophy associated with pseudoxanthoma elasticum, and one case of Stargardt disease. In eyes with FCE and macular dystrophy, the mean best-corrected visual acuity was 0.4 ± 0.1 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (approximately corresponding to 20/50 Snellen equivalent) at baseline and was stable to 0.41 ± 0.1 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (approximately corresponding to 20/50 Snellen equivalent) at the final visit. In four of these seven eyes, FCE was associated with a subfoveal CNV. The CNV was managed with one intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injection, achieving the complete anatomical stabilization of the CNV and recovery of the best-corrected visual acuity. Focal choroidal excavation can be infrequently encountered in patients with macular dystrophies. The presence of CNV may complicate FCE in these patients, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor seems to be an effective treatment with no progression of FCE over time.

  1. Muscle regeneration and inflammation in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerslev, S; Ørngreen, M C; Hertz, J M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether inflammation and regeneration are prominent in mildly affected muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1A (FSHD1A). Inflammation in muscle has been suggested by MRI studies in patients with FSHD1A.......The aim of this study was to investigate whether inflammation and regeneration are prominent in mildly affected muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1A (FSHD1A). Inflammation in muscle has been suggested by MRI studies in patients with FSHD1A....

  2. Population frequency of myotonic dystrophy: higher than expected frequency of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) mutation in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Suominen, Tiina; Bachinski, Linda L; Auvinen, Satu; Hackman, Peter; Baggerly, Keith A; Angelini, Corrado; Peltonen, Leena; Krahe, Ralf; Udd, Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common adult-onset muscular dystrophy with an estimated prevalence of 1/8000. There are two genetically distinct types, DM1 and DM2. DM2 is generally milder with more phenotypic variability than the classic DM1. Our previous data on co-segregation of heterozygous recessive CLCN1 mutations in DM2 patients indicated a higher than expected DM2 prevalence. The aim of this study was to determine the DM2 and DM1 frequency in the general population, and to explore...

  3. Risk of cancer in relatives of patients with myotonic dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, M; Diaz, L J; Gørtz, S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Myotonic dystrophies (DM) are autosomal dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorders caused by unstable nucleotide repeat expansions. DM and cancer have been associated, but the pathogenesis behind the association remains unclear. It could relate to derived effects of the DM...

  4. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy after modified radical mastectomy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddison, D K; Vanek, V W

    1993-07-01

    Despite the long history of descriptions of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), much confusion remains regarding its pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. It most commonly occurs after trauma and is more frequent in women, white persons, and the elderly. The first case of RSD after mastectomy is reported and the proposed pathophysiology and management of RSD are reviewed.

  5. Brain imaging in myotonic dystrophy type 1: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okkersen, K.; Monckton, D.G.; Le, N.; Tuladhar, A.M.; Raaphorst, J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review brain imaging studies in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). METHODS: We searched Embase (index period 1974-2016) and MEDLINE (index period 1946-2016) for studies in patients with DM1 using MRI, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), functional MRI (fMRI), CT,

  6. Integrating clinical and genetic observations in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, K.; Boogaard, M.L. van den; Maarel, S.M. van der; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review gives an overview of the currently known key clinical and (epi)genetic aspects of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and provides perspectives to facilitate future research. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinically, imaging studies have contributed to a detailed

  7. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: Early treatment and psychological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; De Bruijn, H.; De Bruijn-Kofman, A.T.; Arendzen, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of two prospective studies of early treatment and psychological aspects in a series of 26 patients with sympathetic reflex dystrophy of the hand in which treatment was started within 3 months after diagnosis. Ismelin blocks is an often used therapy in sympathetic reflex

  8. Muscle phenotype in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Grete Kielgast; Orngreen, Mette C; Preisler, Nicolai Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The pathogenesis of muscle involvement in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is not well understood. In this study, we characterized the muscle phenotype in patients with confirmed DM1. Methods: In 38 patients, muscle strength was tested by hand-held dynamometry. Myotonia...

  9. Dysphagia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Assessed by Validated Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Sally K.; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive muscular weakness and death, most typically from respiratory complications. Dysphagia is common in DMD; however, the most appropriate swallowing assessments have not been universally agreed and the symptoms of dysphagia remain under-reported. Aims: To investigate symptoms of…

  10. The Child with Muscular Dystrophy in School. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schock, Nancy C.

    Practical information on children with muscular dystrophy is intended to help parents and teachers facilitate their inclusion in mainstreamed classrooms. Major topics addressed include the following: transportation arrangements; providing full information to the teacher regarding the child's specific abilities and physical limitations;…

  11. Muscle Weakness and Speech in Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, Amy T.; Palmer, Phyllis M.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We documented speech and voice characteristics associated with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Although it is a rare disease, OPMD offers the opportunity to study the impact of myopathic weakness on speech production in the absence of neurologic deficits in a relatively homogeneous group of speakers. Methods: Twelve individuals…

  12. Severe paraspinal muscle involvement in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlqvist, Julia R; Vissing, Christoffer R; Thomsen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study, involvement of paraspinal muscles in 50 patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) was evaluated using MRI. METHODS: The Dixon MRI technique was used in this observational study to quantify muscle fat content of paraspinal and leg muscles. Muscle strength...

  13. MRI as outcome measure in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Grete; Dahlqvist, Julia R; Vissing, Christoffer R

    2017-01-01

    There is no effective treatment available for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 (FSHD1), but emerging therapies are under way that call for a better understanding of natural history in this condition. In this prospective, longitudinal study, we used quantitative MRI to assess yearly...

  14. Swallow Characteristics in Patients with Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Phyllis M.; Neel, Amy T.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective investigation evaluates oral weakness and its impact on swallow function, weight, and quality of life in patients with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Method: Intraoral pressure, swallow pressure, and endurance were measured using an Iowa Oral Performance Instrument in participants with OPMD and matched…

  15. Gastrointestinal involvement is frequent in Myotonic Dystrophy type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, Alide A.; van Vliet, Judith; Jansen, Jan B. M. J.; van der Kooi, Anneke J.; Borm, George F.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.

    2008-01-01

    The phenotype of DM2 shows similarities as well as differences to that of Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Gastrointestinal dysfunction is common in DM1 and 25% of the patients consider this to be the most disabling consequence of the disease. Little is known about gastrointestinal involvement in

  16. Gastrointestinal involvement is frequent in Myotonic Dystrophy type 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, A.A.; Vliet, J van; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Kooi, A.J. van der; Borm, G.F.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2008-01-01

    The phenotype of DM2 shows similarities as well as differences to that of Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Gastrointestinal dysfunction is common in DM1 and 25% of the patients consider this to be the most disabling consequence of the disease. Little is known about gastrointestinal involvement in

  17. A clinical and genetic study in myotonic dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Höweler (Chris)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic counselling for myotonic dystrophy patients appears to be relatively simple. The disease is transtnitted as an autosomal dominant trait, and the patients risk of transmitting the abnormal gene to his children is 50%. However, many patients at the age at which genetic

  18. Poor Facial Affect Recognition among Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, V. J.; Fee, R. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Goldstein, E.

    2007-01-01

    Children with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy (MD) have delayed language and poor social skills and some meet criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder, yet they are identified by molecular, rather than behavioral, characteristics. To determine whether comprehension of facial affect is compromised in boys with MD, children were given a…

  19. Functional protein networks unifying limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrée, Antoine de

    2011-01-01

    Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD) is a rare progressive heterogeneous disorder that can be caused by mutations in at least 21 different genes. These genes are often widely expressed and encode proteins with highly differing functions. And yet mutations in all of them give rise to a similar

  20. Genetic testing for Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The new mutation rate is high, explained in part by the large size of the gene, and in approximately 1/3 of cases, the mother of an affected boy is not a carrier. Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) (OMIM #300376) is a milder form of the disease, caused by mutations in the same gene. The effect of the mutations is different for ...

  1. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy with limb girdle weakness as major complaint.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, B.M. van der; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Maarel, S.M. van der; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2003-01-01

    This first description of the oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) phenotype in Dutch patients shows that limb girdle weakness can occur early in the course of disease and can give the first and major complaint in OPMD patients. The aim of this study was to examine clinically, histologically

  2. Cytokines and growth factors in Duchene muscular dystrophy patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Dystrophin deficiency associated with Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD) results in chronic inflammation and severe skeletal muscle degeneration, where the extent of muscle fibrosis contributes to disease severity. The microenvironment of dystrophic muscles is associated with variation in levels of cytokine ...

  3. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most...

  4. Quantitative assessment of calf circumference in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beenakker, EAC; de Vries, Joeke; Fock, JM; van Tol, M; Brouwer, OF; Maurits, NM; van der Hoeven, JH

    2002-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is clinically characterised by progressive muscle weakness and a gradual increase in the size of some affected muscles, especially calf muscles. The extent of calf enlargement is usually determined by subjective visual assessment. The purpose of this study was to

  5. Indicators of Apoptosis in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tissue sections of dystrophic muscle demonstrate apoptotic myonuclei in degenerating muscle fibers of Duchene muscle dystrophy (DMD) patients. The apoptosis cascade can be triggered by 2 main pathways, via an intrinsic, endogenous system such as the mitochondrial Bax/Bcl-2 or via an extrinsic system ...

  6. Duchenne muscular dystrophy - a molecular service | Ballo | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1987 a carrier detection and prenatal diagnostic service for Duchenne muscular dystrophy using molecular technology was instituted at the Department of Human Genetics, University of Cape Town, to serve affe.cted families in southern Africa. DNA samples from 100 affected male subjects and 350 of their relatives from a ...

  7. Advances in genetic therapeutic strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud, Simon; Chen, Huijia; Burns, David T; Davies, Kay E

    2015-12-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review highlights recent progress in genetically based therapies targeting the primary defect of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. What advances does it highlight? Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying Duchenne muscular dystrophy, leading to the development of genetic therapies. These include manipulation of the expression of the gene or related genes, the splicing of the gene and its translation, and replacement of the gene using viral approaches. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X-linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. In the absence of the dystrophin protein, the link between the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix is destroyed, and this severely compromises the strength, flexibility and stability of muscle fibres. The devastating consequence is progressive muscle wasting and premature death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. There is currently no cure, and despite exhaustive palliative care, patients are restricted to a wheelchair by the age of 12 years and usually succumb to cardiac or respiratory complications in their late 20s. This review provides an update on the current genetically based therapies and clinical trials that target or compensate for the primary defect of this disease. These include dystrophin gene-replacement strategies, genetic modification techniques to restore dystrophin expression, and modulation of the dystrophin homologue, utrophin, as a surrogate to re-establish muscle function. © 2015 The Authors. Experimental Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  8. Dasatinib as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Leanne; Piggott, Robert W; Emmerson, Tracy; Winder, Steve J

    2016-01-15

    Identification of a systemically acting and universal small molecule therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy would be an enormous advance for this condition. Based on evidence gained from studies on mouse genetic models, we have identified tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan as a key event in the aetiology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Thus, preventing tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan presents itself as a potential therapeutic strategy. Using the dystrophic sapje zebrafish, we have investigated the use of tyrosine kinase and other inhibitors to treat the dystrophic symptoms in this model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dasatinib, a potent and specific Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was found to decrease the levels of β-dystroglycan phosphorylation on tyrosine and to increase the relative levels of non-phosphorylated β-dystroglycan in sapje zebrafish. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment resulted in the improved physical appearance of the sapje zebrafish musculature and increased swimming ability as measured by both duration and distance of swimming of dasatinib-treated fish compared with control animals. These data suggest great promise for pharmacological agents that prevent the phosphorylation of β-dystroglycan on tyrosine and subsequent steps in the degradation pathway as therapeutic targets for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Phonological Awareness Skills in Young Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Phoebe; Woodyatt, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Substantial research has detailed the reading deficits experienced by children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although phonological awareness (PA) is vital in reading development, little is known about PA in the DMD population. This pilot study describes the PA abilities of a group of five young children with DMD, comparing the results…

  10. Cardiac Complications of Fukuyama-Type Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The course of left ventricular function was evaluated using M-mode and Doppler echocardiography in 34 patients with Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD, in a study at the Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.

  11. Computed tomographic findings in manifesting carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, M.; Verbeeten, B.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical and computed tomographic (CT) findings in 3 manifesting carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy are reported. CT proved to be an important adjunct to the clinical examination: in all our 3 cases a decrease in density was found in various non-paretic muscles

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Citation on PubMed Verma S, Anziska Y, Cracco J. Review of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) for the pediatricians in the community. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2010 Nov;49(11):1011-7. doi: 10.1177/0009922810378738. Epub 2010 Aug 19. Review. Citation on PubMed Wein N, Alfano L, Flanigan ...

  13. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy: a pathological and immunohistochemical reevaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, A. J.; Ginjaar, H. B.; Busch, H. F.; Wokke, J. H.; Barth, P. G.; de Visser, M.

    1998-01-01

    Ninety-seven muscle biopsies from 81 limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) patients [32 autosomal recessive (AR), 15 autosomal dominant (AD), 34 sporadic] were morphologically reevaluated. Sarcoglycan analysis was done in 37 available muscle biopsies of AR and sporadic patients. Chi-square tests

  14. Language Delay in Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Developmental milestones of 130 male children with Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy (DMD and their 59 unaffected siblings were determined by retrospective parental reports and compared by researchers at the City University and Columbia University, New York, NY; and Scottish Rite Children’s Medical Center, Atlanta, GA.

  15. Stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify global research trends in stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy using a bibliometric analysis of Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of studies on stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy from 2002 to 2011 retrieved from Web of Science. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (a) peer-reviewed published articles on stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy indexed in Web of Science; (b) original research articles, reviews, meeting abstracts, proceedings papers, book chapters, editorial material, and news items; and (c) publication between 2002 and 2011. Exclusion criteria: (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) documents that were not published in the public domain; and (c) corrected papers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to subject areas; (3) distribution according to journals; (4) distribution according to country; (5) distribution according to institution; (6) distribution according to institution in China; (7) distribution according to institution that cooperated with Chinese institutions; (8) top-cited articles from 2002 to 2006; (9) top-cited articles from 2007 to 2011. RESULTS: A total of 318 publications on stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy were retrieved from Web of Science from 2002 to 2011, of which almost half derived from American authors and institutes. The number of publications has gradually increased over the past 10 years. Most papers appeared in journals with a focus on gene and molecular research, such as Molecular Therapy, Neuromuscular Disorders, and PLoS One. The 10 most-cited papers from 2002 to 2006 were mostly about different kinds of stem cell transplantation for muscle regeneration, while the 10 most-cited papers from 2007 to 2011 were mostly about new techniques of stem cell transplantation

  16. Cataract surgery outcomes and complications in retinal dystrophy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Emma C; Pineda, Roberto

    2017-12-01

    To investigate intraoperative complications, postoperative findings, and visual acuity outcomes in patients with retinal dystrophy after cataract surgery. Retrospective chart review at an academic tertiary referral centre. Thirty eyes from 18 patients with retinitis pigmentosa and other retinal dystrophies (Usher syndrome, Refsum disease, and Leber congenital amaurosis) who underwent cataract surgery were identified by searching the electronic medical record system from January 2010 to September 2015 for all patients treated by a single physician with billing codes for retinal dystrophy and cataract surgery. Cases were reviewed to determine indication for surgery, intraoperative complications, postoperative findings, preoperative visual acuity, 1-month postoperative visual acuity, and patient subjective satisfaction. Mean best-corrected visual acuity significantly improved after cataract surgery, from 1.09 ± 0.69 preoperatively to 0.614 ± 0.448 at 1 month postoperatively, on logMAR scale (p = 0, Wilcoxon test). The most common postoperative finding was posterior capsule opacification in 20 eyes (66.7%). Visually significant cystoid macular edema occurred in 4 eyes (13.3%) despite the postoperative eye drop regimen. Patient satisfaction at 1 month postoperatively was noted as 93.3% (28 eyes) and attributed mostly to improved central vision and reduced glare symptoms. Patients with visually significant cataract in association with retinal dystrophy have significantly improved best-corrected visual acuity after cataract surgery and report subjectively improved visual functioning. This study confirms that several risks factors are greater in patients with retinal dystrophy, including zonular weakness, posterior capsular opacification, and cystoid macular edema, compared with the general cataract population. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of hand orthoses in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichbrodt, Johanna; Eriksson, Britt-Marie; Kroksmark, Anna-Karin

    2017-07-07

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether treatment of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy using hand orthoses could benefit joint mobility, grip strength, or fine motor function. Eight boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were provided with individually customised rest orthoses. The results were analysed using single-subject design. The study included a baseline and an intervention phase. A follow-up examination was also performed. Boys with less than 50° passive wrist extension mobility were included. Wrist extension of the dominant hand increased in four and was maintained in four. Wrist extension in the non-dominant hand increased in five, was maintained in two and decreased in one. Thumb abduction in the dominant hand increased in six and two remained stable. In the non-dominant hand five increased and three remained stable. Grip strength and fine motor function showed also positive results. This study indicates that the use of hand orthoses in Duchenne muscular dystrophy can delay development of contractures and improve passive wrist extension and thumb abduction. Hand orthoses can therefore be recommended for boys who start to develop contractures in the long finger flexors. Due to small sample size further studies are needed to confirm this result. Implications for rehabilitation Evaluation of hand orthoses in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Preserved hand function is of uttermost importance for performance of activities in the late stages of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Contractures of long finger flexors affect hand function and limit performance of daily activities. Hand orthoses can delay development of contractures and preserve hand function and give prerequisites for independence. The occupational therapists should measure wrist joint mobility regularly to be able to find the right time for intervention with hand orthoses in this progressive disorder.

  18. [Atypical reaction to anesthesia in Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Helga Cristina Almeida da; Hiray, Marcia; Vainzof, Mariz; Schmidt, Beny; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Amaral, José Luiz Gomes do

    2017-05-31

    Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy affects skeletal muscles and leads to progressive muscle weakness and risk of atypical anesthetic reactions following exposure to succinylcholine or halogenated agents. The aim of this report is to describe the investigation and diagnosis of a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy and review the care required in anesthesia. Male patient, 14 years old, referred for hyperCKemia (chronic increase of serum creatine kinase levels - CK), with CK values of 7,779-29,040IU.L -1 (normal 174IU.L -1 ). He presented with a discrete delay in motor milestones acquisition (sitting at 9 months, walking at 18 months). He had a history of liver transplantation. In the neurological examination, the patient showed difficulty in walking on one's heels, myopathic sign (hands supported on the thighs to stand), high arched palate, calf hypertrophy, winged scapulae, global muscle hypotonia and arreflexia. Spirometry showed mild restrictive respiratory insufficiency (forced vital capacity: 77% of predicted). The in vitro muscle contracture test in response to halothane and caffeine was normal. Muscular dystrophy analysis by Western blot showed reduced dystrophin (20% of normal) for both antibodies (C and N-terminal), allowing the diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. On preanesthetic assessment, the history of delayed motor development, as well as clinical and/or laboratory signs of myopathy, should encourage neurological evaluation, aiming at diagnosing subclinical myopathies and planning the necessary care to prevent anesthetic complications. Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy, although it does not increase susceptibility to MH, may lead to atypical fatal reactions in anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. A Congenital Muscular Dystrophy with Mitochondrial Structural Abnormalities Caused by Defective De Novo Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Ohkuma, Aya; Talim, Beril; Karahashi, Minako; Koumura, Tomoko; Aoyama, Chieko; Kurihara, Mana; Quinlivan, Ros; Sewry, Caroline; Mitsuhashi, Hiroaki; Goto, Kanako; Koksal, Burcu; Kale, Gulsev; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy is a heterogeneous group of inherited muscle diseases characterized clinically by muscle weakness and hypotonia in early infancy. A number of genes harboring causative mutations have been identified, but several cases of congenital muscular dystrophy remain molecularly unresolved. We examined 15 individuals with a congenital muscular dystrophy characterized by early-onset muscle wasting, mental retardation, and peculiar enlarged mitochondria that are prevalent to...

  20. Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Myotonic Dystrophy: DMPK Gene Mutation, Insulin Resistance and Development of Steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bhardwaj, Rishi R.; Andrea Duchini

    2010-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is a multisystemic disorder characterized by repeat expansion mutations of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene resulting in a defective muscular insulin receptor and insulin resistance. We describe a patient with myotonic dystrophy who developed biopsy-proven non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. We suggest that patients with myotonic dystrophy are at risk of developing steatohepatitis. The relationship between defective insulin receptor and development of steatohe...

  1. Generalized Choriocapillaris Dystrophy, a Distinct Phenotype in the Spectrum of ABCA4-Associated Retinopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Zernant, Jana; Larsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We describe a particular form of autosomal recessive generalized choriocapillaris dystrophy phenotype associated with ABCA4 mutations. METHODS: A cohort of 30 patients with identified ABCA4 mutations and a distinct phenotype was studied. A retrospective review of history, fundus...... at a high frequency among patients with ABCA4-associated retinal dystrophies in Denmark. CONCLUSIONS: Generalized choriocapillaris dystrophy is a progressive ABCA4-associated phenotype characterized by early-onset macular dystrophy that disperses and expands to widespread end-stage chorioretinal atrophy...

  2. The brain in myotonic dystrophy 1 and 2: evidence for a predominant white matter disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnerop, Martina; Weber, Bernd; Schoene-Bake, Jan-Christoph; Roeske, Sandra; Mirbach, Sandra; Anspach, Christian; Schneider-Gold, Christiane; Betz, Regina C; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Tittgemeyer, Marc; Klockgether, Thomas; Kornblum, Cornelia

    2011-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2 are progressive multisystemic disorders with potential brain involvement. We compared 22 myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 22 myotonic dystrophy type 2 clinically and neuropsychologically well-characterized patients and a corresponding healthy control group using structural brain magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T (T(1)/T(2)/diffusion-weighted). Voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging with tract-based spatial statistics were applied for voxel-wise analysis of cerebral grey and white matter affection (P(corrected) brain changes with clinical and neuropsychological data. White matter lesions rated visually were more prevalent and severe in myotonic dystrophy type 1 compared with controls, with frontal white matter most prominently affected in both disorders, and temporal lesions restricted to myotonic dystrophy type 1. Voxel-based morphometry analyses demonstrated extensive white matter involvement in all cerebral lobes, brainstem and corpus callosum in myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2, while grey matter decrease (cortical areas, thalamus, putamen) was restricted to myotonic dystrophy type 1. Accordingly, we found more prominent white matter affection in myotonic dystrophy type 1 than myotonic dystrophy type 2 by diffusion tensor imaging. Association fibres throughout the whole brain, limbic system fibre tracts, the callosal body and projection fibres (e.g. internal/external capsules) were affected in myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2. Central motor pathways were exclusively impaired in myotonic dystrophy type 1. We found mild executive and attentional deficits in our patients when neuropsychological tests were corrected for manual motor dysfunctioning. Regression analyses revealed associations of white matter affection with several clinical parameters in both disease entities, but not with neuropsychological performance. We showed that depressed mood and fatigue were more prominent in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1

  3. Leg Muscle Involvement in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy: Comparison between Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Types 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Dorothea; Huegens-Penzel, Monika; Kress, Wolfram; Roth, Christian; Ferbert, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) presents with 2 genetically distinct types. We describe for the first time the MRI patterns of leg muscle involvement in type 2 and compare it with type 1. The intramuscular fat content was assessed on lower extremity axial T1-weighted MRI scans in 6 FSHD1 and 5 FSHD2 patients. Overall, the muscle involvement profile did not differ substantially between FSHD1 and FSHD2. In the thigh, the dorsomedial compartment including the semimembranosus, semitendinosus and adductor magnus was the most affected. The quadriceps was mostly spared, but isolated involvement of the rectus femoris was common. Fat infiltration in the distal soleus and the medial gastrocnemius with sparing of the lateral gastrocnemius was a common finding; involvement of the tibialis anterior was less frequent. A proximal-to-distal increase in fat content was frequently present in some muscles. Muscle involvement appears to be independent of type, confirming a similar pathophysiological pathway in FSHD1 and FSHD2. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Muscular dystrophy meets protein biochemistry, the mother of invention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Steven D; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2017-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies result from a defect in the linkage between the muscle fiber cytoskeleton and the basement membrane (BM). Congenital muscular dystrophy type MDC1A is caused by mutations in laminin α2 that either reduce its expression or impair its ability to polymerize within the muscle fiber BM. Defects in this BM lead to muscle fiber damage from the force of contraction. In this issue of the JCI, McKee and colleagues use a laminin polymerization-competent, designer chimeric BM protein in vivo to restore function of a polymerization-defective laminin, leading to normalized muscle structure and strength in a mouse model of MDC1A. Delivery of such a protein to patients could ameliorate many aspects of their disease.

  5. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies in India: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish V Khadilkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs are common in India. Information on LGMDs has been gradually evolving in the recent years. This information is scattered in case series and case studies. The aim of this study is to collate available Indian information on LGMDs and put it in perspective. PubMed search using keywords such as limb-girdle muscular dystrophies in India, sarcoglycanopathies, dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, and GNE myopathy was carried out. The published information on LGMDs in Indian context suggests that dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, sarcoglycanopathies, and other myopathies such as GNE myopathy are frequently seen in India. Besides these, anecdotal reports of many other forms are available, some with genetic support and others showing immunocytochemical defects. The genotypic information on LGMDs is gradually evolving and founder mutations have been detected in selected populations. Further multicenter studies are necessary to document the incidence and prevalence of these common conditions in India.

  6. Limb-girdle Muscular Dystrophies in India: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadilkar, Satish V.; Faldu, Hinaben Dayalal; Patil, Sarika Bapuso; Singh, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) are common in India. Information on LGMDs has been gradually evolving in the recent years. This information is scattered in case series and case studies. The aim of this study is to collate available Indian information on LGMDs and put it in perspective. PubMed search using keywords such as limb-girdle muscular dystrophies in India, sarcoglycanopathies, dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, and GNE myopathy was carried out. The published information on LGMDs in Indian context suggests that dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, sarcoglycanopathies, and other myopathies such as GNE myopathy are frequently seen in India. Besides these, anecdotal reports of many other forms are available, some with genetic support and others showing immunocytochemical defects. The genotypic information on LGMDs is gradually evolving and founder mutations have been detected in selected populations. Further multicenter studies are necessary to document the incidence and prevalence of these common conditions in India. PMID:28615891

  7. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy due to mutations in POMT2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Sofie Thurø; Johnson, Katherine; Stojkovic, Tanya

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the gene coding for protein O-mannosyl-transferase 2 (POMT2) are known to cause severe congenital muscular dystrophy, and recently, mutations in POMT2 have also been linked to a milder limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) phenotype, named LGMD type 2N (LGMD2N). Only four...... of the left hemisphere in a third patient. Most affected muscle groups were hip and knee flexors and extensors on strength testing. On MRI, most affected muscles were hamstrings followed by paraspinal and gluteal muscles. The 12 patients in our cohort carried 11 alleles with known mutations, whereas 11 novel...... mutations accounted for the remaining 13 alleles. CONCLUSION: We describe the first cohort of patients with LGMD2N and show that unlike other LGMD types, all patients had cognitive impairment. Primary muscle involvement was found in hamstring, paraspinal and gluteal muscles on MRI, which correlated well...

  8. Muscular dystrophies: key elements for everyday diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Palladino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that share similar clinical features and dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy, associated with progressive weakness. Weakness may be noted at birth or develop in late adult life. In recent years, cardiac involvement has been observed in a growing number of genetic muscle diseases, and considerable progress has been made in understanding the relationships between disease skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle disease. This review will focus on the skeletal muscle diseases most commonly associated with cardiac complications that can be diagnosed by echocardiography, such as dystrophinopathies including Duchenne (DMD and Becker (BMD muscular dystrophies, cardiomyopathy of DMD/BMD carriers and X-L dilated cardiomyopathy.

  9. Challenges to oligonucleotides-based therapeutics for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyenvalle Aurélie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antisense oligonucleotides are short nucleic acids designed to bind to specific messenger RNAs in order to modulate splicing patterns or inhibit protein translation. As such, they represent promising therapeutic tools for many disorders and have been actively developed for more than 20 years as a form of molecular medicine. Although significant progress has been made in developing these agents as drugs, they are yet not recognized as effective therapeutics and several hurdles remain to be overcome. Within the last few years, however, the prospect of successful oligonucleotides-based therapies has moved a step closer, in particular for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Clinical trials have recently been conducted for this myopathy, where exon skipping is being used to achieve therapeutic outcomes. In this review, the recent developments and clinical trials using antisense oligonucleotides for Duchenne muscular dystrophy are discussed, with emphasis on the challenges ahead for this type of therapy, especially with regards to delivery and regulatory issues.

  10. Ongoing therapeutic trials and outcome measures for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govoni, Alessandra; Magri, Francesca; Brajkovic, Simona; Zanetta, Chiara; Faravelli, Irene; Corti, Stefania; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P

    2013-12-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders characterised by progressive muscle tissue degeneration. No effective treatment has been discovered for these diseases. Preclinical and clinical studies aimed at the development of new therapeutic approaches have been carried out, primarily in subjects affected with dystrophinopathies (Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy). In this review, we outline the current therapeutic approaches and past and ongoing clinical trials, highlighting both the advantages and limits of each one. The experimental designs of these trials were based on different rationales, including immunomodulation, readthrough strategies, exon skipping, gene therapy, and cell therapy. We also provide an overview of available outcome measures, focusing on their reliability in estimating meaningful clinical improvement in order to aid in the design of future trials. This perspective is extremely relevant to the field considering the recent development of novel therapeutic approaches that will result in an increasing number of clinical studies over the next few years.

  11. The importance of genetic diagnosis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ginjaar, Ieke B; Bushby, Kate

    2016-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. Large deletions and duplications are most common, but small mutations have been found as well. Having a correct diagnosis is important for family planning and providing proper care to patients according to published guidelines. With mutation-specific therapies under development for DMD, a correct diagnosis is now also important for assessing whether patients are eligible for treatments. This review discusses different mutations causing DMD, diagnostic techniques available for making a genetic diagnosis for children suspected of DMD and the importance of having a specific genetic diagnosis in the context of emerging genetic therapies for DMD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Clinical diagnosis of high myopia with cone dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-He Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available High myopia associated with cone dystrophy is relatively rare in clinical practice. Because the two diseases have a certain genetic predisposition, with the disease developed, clinical examination and clinical symptoms have some similarities, one disease diagnosis is easily confused or masked by the other diagnosis, especially in the face of patients with high myopia associated abnormalities, we should carefully screen abnormal visual function of its own or combined cone dystrophy diagnosis. In addition, the development of the disease may mutually reinforce, aggravate the symptoms of each other, which is likely to cause mission or misdiagnosis, or delay the proper treatment. Therefore, it is clinically difficult to correct and comprehensively and timely diagnosis.

  13. [Diagnosis and natural history of Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desguerre, I; Laugel, V

    2015-12-01

    Duchenne myopathy is today the most frequently encountered progressive muscular dystrophy in children, with an inexorable, progressive development to death in the third decade. Improvement in survival is related to improvement in orthopaedic management, early screening of cardiac and respiratory complications, but no curative therapy can be applied today beyond recent pharmacogenetic advances. This diagnosis is raised with evidence of proximal muscular deficit beginning after an interval free of symptoms lasting from 1 to several years. Muscular dystrophy's mechanism is suggested by a significant increase in CK (creatine kinase) and confirmed by muscle biopsy. The clinical motor and cognitive heterogeneity of this disease and its natural history need to be well known because it conditions future therapeutic trials. Identification of outcome measures such as the 6-minute walk test, the MFM score, manual muscle testing musculaire, or biomarkers is indispensable for patient follow-up and collaborative studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Aerobic training and postexercise protein in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Grete; Prahm, Kira P; Dahlqvist, Julia R

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of regular aerobic training and postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel study, we randomized untrained men (n = 21)...... not add any further improvement to training effects alone. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class II evidence that regular aerobic training with or without postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation improves fitness and workload in patients with FSHD....

  15. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity in patients with muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano eMerlini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aging sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy are two conditions characterized by lower skeletal muscle quantity, lower muscle strength, and lower physical performance. Aging is associated with a peculiar alteration in body composition called sarcopenic obesity characterized by a decrease in lean body mass and increase in fat mass. To evaluate the presence of sarcopenia and obesity in a cohort of adult patients with muscular dystrophy we have used the measurement techniques considered golden standard for sarcopenia that is for muscle mass dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, for muscle strength hand held dynamometry, and for physical performance gait speed. The study involved 14 adult patients with different types of muscular dystrophy. We were able to demonstrate that all patient were sarcopenic-obese. We showed in fact that all were sarcopenic based on appendicular lean, fat & bone free, mass index (ALMI. In addition all resulted obese according to the % of body fat determined by DXA in contrast with their body mass index ranging from underweight to obese. Skeletal muscle mass determined by DXA was markedly reduced in all patients and correlated with residual muscle strength determined by hand held dynamometry, and physical performances determined by gait speed and respiratory function. Finally we showed that ALMI was the best linear explicator of muscle strength and physical function. Altogether, our study suggest the relevance of a proper evaluation of body composition in muscular dystrophy and we propose to use, both in research and practice, the measurement techniques that has already been demonstrated effective in aging sarcopenia.

  16. NAD+ biosynthesis ameliorates a zebrafish model of muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle F Goody

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex- or integrin alpha7-deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction

  17. Genome Editing Gene Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Hotta, Akitsu

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe genetic disorder caused by loss of function of the dystrophin gene on the X chromosome. Gene augmentation of dystrophin is challenging due to the large size of the dystrophin cDNA. Emerging genome editing technologies, such as TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9 systems, open a new erain the restoration of functional dystrophin and are a hallmark of bona fide gene therapy. In this review, we summarize current genome editing approaches, properties of target cell...

  18. Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Cascio, Christian M.; Goetze, Oliver; Latshang, Tsogyal D.; Bluemel, Sena; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Bloch, Konrad E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In adult patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) life-threatening constipation has been reported. Since gastrointestinal function in DMD has not been rigorously studied we investigated objective and subjective manifestations of gastrointestinal disturbances in DMD patients. METHODS In 33 patients with DMD, age 12-41 years, eating behavior and gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated by questionnaires. Gastric emptying half time (T1/2) and oro-cecal transit time (OCTT) we...

  19. Cognitive and personality function in myotonic muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, T. D.; Follett, C; GRIEP, E

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients with myotonic dystrophy from 14 families were tested with the Wechsler and Shipley measures of cognitive function. Forty-one per cent of the subjects had little or no physical handicap. Approximately one-third had low Wechsler scores, whereas 7% had relatively high scores. There was a trend for affected females to have poorer cognitive function than males. Limited cognitive ability correlated with maternal inheritance of the gene and severe physical handicap, but there we...

  20. Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: practical recommendations to guide management

    OpenAIRE

    TOUSSAINT, MICHEL; Davidson, Zoe; Bouvoie, Veronique; Evenepoel, Nathalie; Haan, Jurn; Soudon, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive neuromuscular disorder causing weakness of the skeletal, respiratory, cardiac and oropharyngeal muscles with up to one third of young men reporting difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). Recent studies on dysphagia in DMD clarify the pathophysiology of swallowing disorders and offer new tools for its assessment but little guidance is available for its management. This paper aims to provide a step-by-step algorithm to fac...

  1. A bedside measure of body composition in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sarah A; Davidson, Zoe E; Davies, Peter S W; Truby, Helen

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, monitoring body composition is a critical component of nutritional assessment and weight management in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy of a simple bedside measurement tool for body composition, namely bioelectrical impedance analysis, in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Measures of fat-free mass were determined using a bioelectrical impedance analysis machine and compared against estimations obtained from a reference body composition model. Additionally, the use of raw impedance values was analyzed using three existing predictive equations for the estimation of fat-free mass. Accuracy of bioelectrical impedance analysis was assessed by comparison against the reference model by calculation of biases and limits of agreement. Body composition was measured in 10 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, mean age 9.01 ± 2.34 years. The bioelectrical impedance analysis machine values of fat-free mass were on average 2.3 ± 14.1 kg higher than reference values. Limits of agreement (based on 95% confidence interval of the mean) were -7.4 to 2.9 kg. There was a significant correlation between the mean fat-free mass and difference in fat-free mass between the bioelectrical impedance analysis machine and the reference model (r = -0.86; P = 0.02) suggesting that the bias was not consistent across the range of measurements. The most accurate predictive equation for the estimation of fat-free mass using raw impedance values was the equation by Pietrobelli et al. (mean difference, -0.7 kg; 95% limits of agreement, -3.5 to 2.0 kg). In a clinical setting, where a rapid assessment of body composition is advantageous, the use of raw impedance values, combined with the equation by Pietrobelli et al., is recommended for the accurate estimation of fat-free mass, in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Corticosteroid Treatment Impact on Spinal Deformity in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Sanzarello, Ilaria; Merlini, Luciano; Traina, Francesco; Rosa, Michele Attilio; Faldini, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease with loss of ambulation at around 9-10 years of age, followed, if untreated, by development of scoliosis, respiratory insufficiency, and death in the second decade of life. This review highlights the natural history of the disease, in particular, with regard to the development of the spinal deformity and how this complication has been modified by surgical interventions and overall by corticosteroid treatment. The beneficial effect of cortic...

  3. Axonal dystrophy in the brain of mice with Sanfilippo syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Helen; Hassiotis, Sofia; Gai, Wei-Ping; Parkinson-Lawrence, Emma; Hopwood, John J; Hemsley, Kim M

    2017-09-01

    Axonal dystrophy has been described as an early pathological feature of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Axonal inclusions have also been reported to occur in several neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorders including Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA; Sanfilippo syndrome). This disorder results from a mutation in the gene encoding the lysosomal sulphatase sulphamidase, and as a consequence heparan sulphate accumulates, accompanied by secondarily-stored gangliosides. The precise basis of symptom generation in MPS IIIA has not been elucidated, however axonal dystrophy may conceivably lead to impaired vesicular trafficking, neuronal dysfunction and/or death. We have utilised a faithful murine model of MPS IIIA to determine the spatio-temporal profile of neuronal inclusion formation and determine the effect of restoring normal lysosomal function. Dopaminergic (tyrosine hydroxylase-positive), cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase-positive) and GABAergic (glutamic acid decarboxylase65/67-positive) neurons were found to exhibit axonal dystrophy in MPS IIIA mouse brain. Axonal lesions present by ~seven weeks of age were Rab5-positive but lysosomal integral membrane protein-2 negative, suggesting early endosomal involvement. By 9-12-weeks of age, immunoreactivity for the autophagosome-related proteins LC3 and p62 and the proteasomal subunit 19S was noted in the spheroidal structures, together with wildtype α-synuclein, phosphorylated Thr-181 Tau and amyloid precursor protein, indicative of impaired axonal trafficking. Sulphamidase replacement reduced but did not abrogate the axonal lesions. Therefore, if axonal dystrophy impairs neuronal activity and ultimately, neuronal function, its incomplete resolution warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impending A New Epoch In Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Aijaz Khan

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a disorder related to X-chromosomes that alters 1 in 3500-5600 males which are newly born. Basically illustrated due to the protein known as dystrophin in muscle tissue , that causes continuous catastrophe till death in the 3 decagon of life .The one and only treatment till now which is efficient in lagging the evolution of this ailment is known as corticosteroids, that has been delineated to boost tendon vitality in randomized composed anal...

  5. Recurrent and migratory reflex sympathetic dystrophy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, H C; Nelson, V S

    2000-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a syndrome characterized by superficial pain and tenderness associated with swelling, vasomotor instability, and dystrophic changes of the skin. In children, it is rarely reported and is felt to have a more benign and self-limited course. This case illustrates that, in children, reflex sympathetic dystrophy can occur without any previous history of trauma, and may be recurrent and migratory. A review of the literature is included. An 11-year-old girl, with no history of trauma, presented in 1992 with spontaneous onset of right leg pain. She was diagnosed with reflex sympathetic dystrophy, and she was treated unsuccessfully with oral medications. Her symptoms then resolved in 2 weeks after receiving epidural anaesthesia and aggressive physical therapy. Over the next 5 years, she presented to the paediatric rehabilitation clinic three times with recurrent RSD in her bilateral arms. The first two times were refractory to conservative management and resolved with four stellate ganglion blocks. The third recurrence persisted with three stellate ganglion blocks and resolved with gabapentin.

  6. Genetic Engineering of Dystroglycan in Animal Models of Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Sciandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In skeletal muscle, dystroglycan (DG is the central component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC, a multimeric protein complex that ensures a strong mechanical link between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. Several muscular dystrophies arise from mutations hitting most of the components of the DGC. Mutations within the DG gene (DAG1 have been recently associated with two forms of muscular dystrophy, one displaying a milder and one a more severe phenotype. This review focuses specifically on the animal (murine and others model systems that have been developed with the aim of directly engineering DAG1 in order to study the DG function in skeletal muscle as well as in other tissues. In the last years, conditional animal models overcoming the embryonic lethality of the DG knock-out in mouse have been generated and helped clarifying the crucial role of DG in skeletal muscle, while an increasing number of studies on knock-in mice are aimed at understanding the contribution of single amino acids to the stability of DG and to the possible development of muscular dystrophy.

  7. Secondary Conditions Among Males With Duchenne or Becker Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Rebecca; Street, Natalie; Conway, Kristin Caspers; James, Kathy; Cunniff, Christopher; Oleszek, Joyce; Fox, Deborah; Ciafaloni, Emma; Westfield, Christina; Paramsothy, Pangaja

    2017-06-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy are X-linked neuromuscular disorders characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Despite the involvement of multiple systems, secondary conditions among affected males have not been comprehensively described. Two hundred nine caregivers of affected males (aged 3-31 years) identified by the Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network completed a mailed survey that included questions about secondary conditions impacting multiple body functions. The 5 most commonly reported conditions in males with Duchenne were cognitive deficits (38.4%), constipation (31.7%), anxiety (29.3%), depression (27.4%), and obesity (19.5%). Higher frequencies of anxiety, depression, and kidney stones were found among nonambulatory males compared to ambulatory males. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was more common in ambulatory than nonambulatory males. These data support clinical care recommendations for monitoring of patients with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy by a multidisciplinary team to prevent and treat conditions that may be secondary to the diagnosis.

  8. Altered cross-bridge properties in skeletal muscle dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz eGuellich

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Force and motion generated by skeletal muscle ultimately depends on the cyclical interaction of actin with myosin. This mechanical process is regulated by intracellular Ca2+ through the thin filament-associated regulatory proteins i.e.; troponins and tropomyosin. Muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic affections characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of the skeletal muscle as a consequence of loss of muscle tissue which directly reduces the number of potential myosin cross-bridges involved in force production. Mutations in genes responsible for skeletal muscle dystrophies have been shown to modify the function of contractile proteins and cross-bridge interactions. Altered gene expression or RNA splicing or post-translational modifications of contractile proteins such as those related to oxidative stress, may affect cross-bridge function by modifying key proteins of the excitation-contraction coupling. Micro-architectural change in myofilament is another mechanism of altered cross-bridge performance. In this review, we provide an overview about changes in cross-bridge performance in skeletal muscle dystrophies and discuss their ultimate impacts on striated muscle function.

  9. Skeletal muscle CT of lower extremities in myotonic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Imai, Terukuni; Sadashima, Hiromichi; Matsumoto, Sadayuki; Yamamoto, Toru; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Maya, Kiyomi; Tanabe, Masaya

    1988-02-01

    We evaluated the leg and thigh muscles of 4 control subjects and 10 patients with myotonic dystrophy using computed tomography. Taking previous reports about the skeletal muscle CT of myotonic dystrophy into account, we concluded that the following 5 features are characteristic of myotonic dystrophy: 1. The main change is the appearance of low-density areas in muscles; these areas reflect fat tissue. In addition, the muscle mass decreases in size. 2. The leg is more severely affected than the thigh. 3. In the thigh, although the m. quadriceps femoris, especially the vastus muscles, tends to be affected, the m. adductor longus and magnus tend to be preserved. 4. In the leg, although the m. tibialis anterior and m. triceps surae tend to be affected, the m. peroneus longus, brevis, and m. tibialis posterior tend to be preserved. 5. Compensatory hypertrophy is often observed in the m. rectus femoris, m. adductor longus, m. adductor magnus, m. peroneus longus, and m. peroneus brevis, accompanied by the involvement of their agonist muscles.

  10. Lipogenesis mitigates dysregulated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake in muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paran, Christopher W.; Zou, Kai; Ferrara, Patrick J.; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is accompanied by a reduction in activity of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) that contributes to abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER). Recent findings suggest that skeletal muscle fatty acid synthase (FAS) modulates SERCA activity and muscle function via its effects on SR membrane phospholipids. In this study, we examined muscle’s lipid metabolism in mdx mice, a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). De novo lipogenesis was ~50% reduced in mdx muscles compared to wildtype (WT) muscles. Gene expressions of lipogenic and other ER lipid-modifying enzymes were found to be differentially expressed between wildtype (WT) and mdx muscles. A comprehensive examination of muscles’ SR phospholipidome revealed elevated phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) ratio in mdx compared to WT mice. Studies in primary myocytes suggested that defects in key lipogenic enzymes including FAS, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), and Lipin1 are likely contributing to reduced SERCA activity in mdx mice. Triple transgenic expression of FAS, SCD1 and Lipin1 (3TG) in mdx myocytes partly rescued SERCA activity, which coincided with an increase in SR PE that normalized PC/PE ratio. These findings implicate a defect in lipogenesis to be a contributing factor for SERCA dysfunction in muscular dystrophy. Restoration of muscle’s lipogenic pathway appears to mitigate SERCA function through its effects on SR membrane composition. PMID:26361872

  11. Molecular Signatures of Membrane Protein Complexes Underlying Muscular Dystrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Rolf; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Smits, Melinda M.; Ng, Brandon H.; Pospisil, Tyler C.; Jones, Kayla S.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Wright, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) are responsible for a large number of muscular dystrophies. As such, molecular dissection of the DGC is expected to both reveal pathological mechanisms, and provides a biological framework for validating new DGC components. Establishment of the molecular composition of plasma-membrane protein complexes has been hampered by a lack of suitable biochemical approaches. Here we present an analytical workflow based upon the principles of protein correlation profiling that has enabled us to model the molecular composition of the DGC in mouse skeletal muscle. We also report our analysis of protein complexes in mice harboring mutations in DGC components. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that cell-adhesion pathways were under the transcriptional control of NFκB in DGC mutant mice, which is a finding that is supported by previous studies that showed NFκB-regulated pathways underlie the pathophysiology of DGC-related muscular dystrophies. Moreover, the bioinformatic analyses suggested that inflammatory and compensatory mechanisms were activated in skeletal muscle of DGC mutant mice. Additionally, this proteomic study provides a molecular framework to refine our understanding of the DGC, identification of protein biomarkers of neuromuscular disease, and pharmacological interrogation of the DGC in adult skeletal muscle https://www.mda.org/disease/congenital-muscular-dystrophy/research. PMID:27099343

  12. Lipogenesis mitigates dysregulated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paran, Christopher W; Zou, Kai; Ferrara, Patrick J; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Muscular dystrophy is accompanied by a reduction in activity of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) that contributes to abnormal Ca(2+) homeostasis in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER). Recent findings suggest that skeletal muscle fatty acid synthase (FAS) modulates SERCA activity and muscle function via its effects on SR membrane phospholipids. In this study, we examined muscle's lipid metabolism in mdx mice, a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). De novo lipogenesis was ~50% reduced in mdx muscles compared to wildtype (WT) muscles. Gene expressions of lipogenic and other ER lipid-modifying enzymes were found to be differentially expressed between wildtype (WT) and mdx muscles. A comprehensive examination of muscles' SR phospholipidome revealed elevated phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) ratio in mdx compared to WT mice. Studies in primary myocytes suggested that defects in key lipogenic enzymes including FAS, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), and Lipin1 are likely contributing to reduced SERCA activity in mdx mice. Triple transgenic expression of FAS, SCD1, and Lipin1 (3TG) in mdx myocytes partly rescued SERCA activity, which coincided with an increase in SR PE that normalized PC/PE ratio. These findings implicate a defect in lipogenesis to be a contributing factor for SERCA dysfunction in muscular dystrophy. Restoration of muscle's lipogenic pathway appears to mitigate SERCA function through its effects on SR membrane composition. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Emerging genetic therapies to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Stanley F.; Crosbie, Rachelle H.; Miceli, M. Carrie; Spencer, Melissa J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive muscle degenerative disease caused by dystrophin mutations. The purpose of this review is to highlight two emerging therapies designed to repair the primary genetic defect, called `exon skipping' and `nonsense codon suppression'. Recent findings A drug, PTC124, was identified that suppresses nonsense codon translation termination. PTC124 can lead to restoration of some dystrophin expression in human Duchenne muscular dystrophy muscles with mutations resulting in premature stops. Two drugs developed for exon skipping, PRO051 and AVI-4658, result in the exclusion of exon 51 from mature mRNA. They can restore the translational reading frame to dystrophin transcripts from patients with a particular subset of dystrophin gene deletions and lead to some restoration of dystrophin expression in affected boys' muscle in vivo. Both approaches have concluded phase I trials with no serious adverse events. Summary These novel therapies that act to correct the primary genetic defect of dystrophin deficiency are among the first generation of therapies tailored to correct specific mutations in humans. Thus, they represent paradigm forming approaches to personalized medicine with the potential to lead to life changing treatment for those affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:19745732

  14. Composite biomarkers for assessing Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an initial assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyar, Irina; Pasternak, Amy; Kapur, Kush; Darras, Basil T; Rutkove, Seward B

    2015-02-01

    Compared with individual parameters, composite biomarkers may provide a more effective means for monitoring disease progression and the effects of therapy in clinical trials than single measures. In this study, we built composite biomarkers for use in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by combining values from two objective measures of disease severity: electrical impedance myography and quantitative ultrasound and evaluating how well they correlated to standard functional measures. Using data from an ongoing study of electrical impedance myography and quantitative ultrasound in 31 Duchenne muscular dystrophy and 26 healthy boys aged 2-14 years, we combined data sets by first creating z scores based on the normal subject data and then using simple mathematical operations (addition and multiplication) to create composite measures. These composite scores were then correlated to age and standard measures of function including the 6-minute walk test, the North Star Ambulatory Assessment, and handheld dynamometry. Combining data sets resulted in stronger correlations with all four outcomes than for either electrical impedance myography or quantitative ultrasound alone in six of eight instances. These improvements reached statistical significance (P Duchenne muscular dystrophy clinical trials is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Roadmap to Newborn Screening for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiah A. Al-Zaidy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common childhood form of muscular dystrophy, with an estimated frequency of 1:5000 live births. The impact of the disease presents as early as infancy with significant developmental delays, and ultimately loss of ambulation and respiratory insufficiency. Glucocorticoids are the only pharmacological agents known to alter the natural progression of the disease by prolonging ambulation, reducing scoliosis, and assisted ventilation. Introduction of therapy at an early age may halt the muscle pathology in DMD. In anticipation of the potentially disease-modifying products that are reaching regulatory review, Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD formally initiated a national Duchenne Newborn Screening (DNBS effort in December 2014 to build public health infrastructure for newborn screening (NBS for Duchenne in the United States. The effort includes a formalized national Duchenne Newborn Screening Steering Committee, six related Working Groups, a Duchenne Screening Test Development Project led by PerkinElmer, a program with the American College of Medical Genetic and Genomics’ Newborn Screening Translation Research Network (NBSTRN, and collaborations with other Duchenne partners and federal agencies involved in NBS. We herein review the organization and effort of the U.S. DNBS program to develop the evidence supporting the implementation of NBS for DMD.

  16. Granular corneal dystrophy in 830-nm spectral optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzny, Bartlomiej J; Szkulmowska, Anna; Szkulmowski, Maciej; Bajraszewski, Tomasz; Wawrocka, Anna; Krawczynski, Maciej R; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2008-08-01

    Spectral optical coherence tomography (SOCT) is a new imaging technique that can provide high-resolution tomograms much faster and with higher sensitivity than conventional Time domain (TdOCT) systems. Its usefulness in producing cross-sectional imaging of different corneal pathologies in vivo has already been presented. The aim of this case report is to show 830-nm SOCT findings in granular corneal dystrophy. A 48-year-old woman with granular corneal dystrophy was examined with a slit-lamp, confocal microscope (Confoscan 4) and a prototype SOCT instrument constructed at the Institute of Physics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland. A genetic examination showed a mutation of arginine 555-to-tryptophan (Arg555Trp) in the TGFBI gene that confirmed the clinical diagnosis. SOCT tomograms showed multiple hyperreflective changes throughout the corneal stroma that corresponded to hyaline deposits. Precise and objective assessment of the localization, size, shape, and light scattering properties of the pathologic changes was possible. Three-dimensional rendering of the acquired data allowed a comprehensive evaluation of the deposits in the central cornea. SOCT (830 nm) provides clinically valuable 2- and 3-dimensional assessments of pathomorphologic changes in granular corneal dystrophy in vivo.

  17. Preventing recurrence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in patients requiring an operative intervention at the site of dystrophy after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, C; Wiedersheim, P; Michel, B A; Stucki, G

    2001-01-01

    The development of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is a common complication after surgery. Exacerbation or recurrence of RSD is a major concern after a second intervention at the site of previous surgery and consecutive RSD. It is unclear whether the risk of recurrent RSD can be reduced by using appropriate precautions. The objective of our study was to examine, in a case series of consecutive patients, whether recurrences in patients with a history of RSD after surgery, who were reoperated at the same location, can be avoided by using a standardised intervention protocol containing perioperative calcitonin prophylaxis. None of the patients experienced a recurrence of RSD. We concluded that the recurrence of RSD in patients requiring operative intervention at the site of former dystrophy after surgery appears to be unlikely with careful perioperative management.

  18. Clinical genetic aspects of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia Theodora Josina Maria

    2012-01-01

    Dystrophinopathies include the well known Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). This thesis is a collection of several clinical and genetic studies on dystrophinopathies with implications for genetic counselling of patients and their families and for future therapy

  19. Quality of life of adult men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in the Netherlands : Implications for care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pangalila, Robert F.; Van Den Bos, Geertrudis A M; Bartels, Bart; Bergen, Michael P.; Kampelmacher, Mike J.; Stam, Henk J.; Roebroeck, Marij E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess quality of life of adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in the Netherlands and to identify domains and major problems influencing quality of life. Design: Cross-sectional. Subjects: Seventy-nine men aged ≥ 20 years with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Methods: The Medical

  20. Best practice guidelines and recommendations on the molecular diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamsteeg, E.J.; Kress, W.; Catalli, C.; Hertz, J.M.; Witsch-Baumgartner, M.; Buckley, M.F.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Schwartz, M.; Scheffer, H.

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is an autosomal dominant, multisystem disorder that is characterized by myotonic myopathy. The symptoms and severity of myotonic dystrophy type l (DM1) ranges from severe and congenital forms, which frequently result in death because of respiratory deficiency, through to

  1. Lamin A/C mutations with lipodystrophy, cardiac abnormalities, and muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, A. J.; Bonne, G.; Eymard, B.; Duboc, D.; Talim, B.; van der Valk, M.; Reiss, P.; Richard, P.; Demay, L.; Merlini, L.; Schwartz, K.; Busch, H. F. M.; de Visser, M.

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the lamin A/C gene are found in Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, limb girdle muscular dystrophy with cardiac conduction disturbances, dilated cardiomyopathy with conduction system disease, and familial partial lipodystrophy. Cases with lamin A/C mutations presenting with lipodystrophy

  2. Deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty for the treatment of stromal corneal dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Mustafa; Arslan, Osman S; Atalay, Eray; Mangan, Mehmet S; Bilgin, Ahmet B

    2013-03-01

    To report the perioperative complications and clinical outcomes after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) using the big bubble technique in eyes with stromal corneal dystrophies. Seventy-four eyes of 65 patients who underwent DALK for stromal corneal dystrophies were evaluated in this retrospective interventional case series study. Main outcome measures were intraoperative and postoperative complications, postoperative uncorrected visual acuity, best spectacle-corrected visual acuity, spherical equivalent refraction, and topographic astigmatism. There were 44 eyes with macular corneal dystrophy, 18 eyes with lattice dystrophy, and 12 eyes with granular dystrophy. DALK was completed in 69 cases (94.6%). Descemet membrane microperforations occurred in 6 eyes (8.7%). The mean follow-up period was 43.5 ± 23.9 months, ranging from 12 to 96 months. Postoperative best spectacle-corrected visual acuity of 0.5 or better was present in 52 of 69 eyes (75.4%). There were 3 episodes of stromal graft rejection, which responded to topical therapy. Lattice dystrophy recurred in 6 eyes (35.3%). DALK using the big bubble technique is an effective procedure in the treatment of patients with corneal stromal dystrophies. Recurrence of lattice dystrophy was relatively high.

  3. [Imaging of corneal dystrophies: Correlations between en face anterior segment OCT and in vivo confocal microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghouali, W; Tahiri Joutei Hassani, R; Liang, H; Dupont-Monod, S; Auclin, F; Baudouin, C; Labbé, A

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of en face Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) for evaluation of corneal dystrophies and to describe correlations with in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). Thirty-two eyes of 16 patients with 4 types of corneal dystrophies (epithelial basement membrane dystrophy, Fuchs dystrophy, Reis-Bücklers corneal dystrophy and Crocodile Shagreen dystrophy) were enrolled in this study. Axial and reconstructed en face scans were acquired using OCT. Images were then correlated to IVCM findings. En face OCT provided new insights into the structure, size and depth of corneal tissue alterations in various corneal dystrophies. OCT en face images were well correlated with IVCM features. Despite lower resolution than IVCM, en face OCT offers the advantages of being non-invasive and allowing the analysis of larger corneal areas. En face OCT provides useful new information in corneal dystrophies. This imaging technique will probably increase in popularity in the near future for the assessment of various anterior segment diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical course, genetic etiology, and visual outcome in cone and cone-rod dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, A.A.; Phan, T.M.; Zekveld-Vroon, R.C.; Leroy, B.P.; Born, L.I. van den; Hoyng, C.B.; Klaver, C.C.; Writing Committee for the Cone Disorders Study Group, C.; Roosing, S.; Pott, J.W.; van Schooneveld, M.J.; van Moll-Ramirez, N.; van Genderen, M.M.; Boon, C.J.F.; Hollander, A.I. den; Bergen, A.A.; De Baere, E.; Cremers, F.P.; Lotery, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical course, genetic etiology, and visual prognosis in patients with cone dystrophy (CD) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD). DESIGN: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. PARTICIPANTS: Consecutive probands with CD (N = 98), CRD (N = 83), and affected relatives (N =

  5. Clinical Course, Genetic Etiology, and Visual Outcome in Cone and Cone-Rod Dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, Alberta A. H. J.; Phan, T. My Lan; Zekveld-Vroon, Renate C.; Leroy, Bart P.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Roosing, Susanne; Pott, Jan-Willem R.; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; van Moll-Ramirez, Norka; van Genderen, Maria M.; Boon, Camiel J. F.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; De Baere, Elfride; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Lotery, Andrew J.

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical course, genetic etiology, and visual prognosis in patients with cone dystrophy (CD) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD). Design: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. Participants: Consecutive probands with CD (N = 98), CRD (N = 83), and affected relatives (N =

  6. Cardiac abnormalities in a follow-up study on carriers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westrum, S. M. Schade; Hoogerwaard, E. M.; Dekker, L.; Standaar, T. S.; Bakker, E.; Ippel, P. F.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Majoor-Krakauer, D. F.; van Essen, A. J.; Leschot, N. J.; Wilde, A. A. M.; de Haan, R. J.; de Visser, M.; van der Kooi, A. J.

    Objectives: Cardiac involvement has been reported in carriers of dystrophin mutations giving rise to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). The progress of these abnormalities during long-term follow-up is unknown. We describe the long-term follow-up of dilated

  7. Clinical and molecular characterization of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy due to LAMA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavassini, Bruno F; Carboni, Nicola; Nielsen, Jørgen E

    2011-01-01

    In this study we describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) due to LAMA2 mutations.......In this study we describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) due to LAMA2 mutations....

  8. Poor sleep quality and fatigue but no excessive daytime sleepiness in myotonic dystrophy type 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, A.A.; Knoop, H.; Logt, A.E. van de; Bleijenberg, G.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Overeem, S.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), sleep disorders are common, with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) as a predominant feature. In myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), the presence of sleep disturbances is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the frequency of EDS, poor sleep quality and

  9. Gut Transit in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Is Not Impaired: A Study Utilizing Wireless Motility Capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Dror; Wong, Brenda; Hu, Shengyong; Kaul, Ajay

    2018-03-01

    We examined gut transit in 7 young adults (18-24 years of age) with Duchenne muscular dystrophy using wireless motility capsules. Total and segmental gut transit times were normal in essentially all patients. Our study using a validated tool suggests normal transit constipation as the pathophysiologic basis for constipation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) and dysphagia: the need for dysphagia management guidelines and an assessment tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LaDonna, K.A.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Venance, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is the most prevalent muscular dystrophy occurring in adulthood. DM1 is a multi-systemic disorder resulting in early-onset cataracts, cardiac rhythm problems, muscle weakness, ptosis, and cognitive and psychiatric manifestations. Dysphagia is one of the most problematic

  11. Skeletal muscle involvement in myotonic dystrophy type 2. A comparative muscle ultrasound study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, A.A.; Vinke, A.; Alfen, N. van; Dijk, J.P. van; Pillen, S.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2012-01-01

    This study determines the presence and extent of muscle changes in 31 myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) patients detected by muscle ultrasound. Results were compared to 31 adult-onset myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients (DM1) and healthy controls. Furthermore, we tested the hypothesis that structural

  12. Aerobic exercise and cognitive behavioral therapy in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: a model based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.

    2016-01-01

    People with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a muscular dystrophy, often experience severe chronic fatigue. For them, daily life is top sport. One would expect that being active leads to a higher level of fatigue. The opposite is true. Both aerobic exercise and cognitive behavioral

  13. Mutations in PCDH21 cause autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Elsebet; Batbayli, M; Dunø, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy is a retinal dystrophy with early loss of cone photoreceptors and a parallel or subsequent loss of rod photoreceptors. It may be syndromic, but most forms are non-syndromic with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive inheritance....

  14. A Cross-Sectional Study of School Experiences of Boys with Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soim, Aida; Lamb, Molly; Campbell, Kimberly; Pandya, Shree; Peay, Holly; Howard, James F., Jr.; Fox, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate types of supportive school services received and factors related to provision of these services. We conducted a cross-sectional study to describe the school experience of males with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. Study subjects were identified through the Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance,…

  15. A novel FKRP-related muscular dystrophy founder mutation in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    version.[1] Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD; OMIM #310200) and Becker's muscular dystrophy (BMD; OMIM #300376), grouped together as dystrophinopathies, are both X-linked recessive disorders involving the proximal skeletal muscles. Dystrophinopathies are caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, leading ...

  16. Effect of sildenafil on skeletal and cardiac muscle in Becker muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Kruuse, Christina; Nyhuus, Bo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy lack neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). nNOS mediates physiological sympatholysis, thus ensuring adequate blood supply to working muscle. In mice lacking dystrophin, restoration of nNOS effects...

  17. Meeting the Assistive Technology Needs of Students with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Mezei, Peter J.; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2009-01-01

    Students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a degenerative disease that requires ongoing changes in assistive technology (AT). The AT team needs to be knowledgeable about the disease and its progression in order to meet these students' changing needs in a timely manner. The unique needs of students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in…

  18. Miyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy - Clinical spectrum in 24 Dutch patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linssen, WHJP; Notermans, NC; VanderGraaf, Y; Wokke, JHJ; VanDoorn, PA; Howeler, CJ; Busch, HFM; DeJager, AEJ; DeVisser, M

    1997-01-01

    Miyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy has now been found to be more frequent outside Japan than was previously thought. We studied 24 Dutch patients with Miyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy and focused on its clinical expression and natural history, muscle CT-scans and muscle biopsy findings.

  19. Interpretation of "Diagnosis and management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a guide for families (2011 version"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-hua LI

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The guideline "Diagnosis and management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy" was supported by a 3-year-long project guided by US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, in collaboration with patient advocacy groups [Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA, Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD and United Parent Projects Muscular Dystrophy (UPPMD] and Translational Research in Europe: Assessment and Treatment of Neuromuscular Disease (TREAT-NMD network. The main document was published in Lancet Neurol in 2010. The recommendations are based on an extensive study by 84 international experts in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD diagnosis and care who were chosen to represent a broad range of specialties. This guideline covers diagnostics, steroid treatment, rehabilitation, orthopedics, pulmonary, cardiac, gastrointestinal, psychosocial, surgical and emergency management of DMD. This guideline is recommended as the first choice by TREAT- NMD for DMD diagnosis and care. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.05.003

  20. Decreased Nocturnal Movements in Patients with Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marca, Giacomo Della; Frusciante, Roberto; Dittoni, Serena; Vollono, Catello; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Scarano, Emanuele; Colicchio, Salvatore; Iannaccone, Elisabetta; Tonali, Pietro A.; Ricci, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Reduced mobility during sleep characterizes a variety of movement disorders and neuromuscular diseases. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is the third most common form of muscular dystrophy in the general population, and people with FSHD have poor sleep quality. The aims of the present study were to evaluate nocturnal motor activity in patients with FSHD by means of videopolysomnography and to verify whether activity was associated with modifications in sleep structure. Methods: We enrolled 32 adult patients affected by genetically confirmed FSHD (18 women and 14 men, mean age 45.1 ± 13.4 years) and 32 matched control subjects, (18 women and 14 men, mean age 45.5 ± 11.4 years). Major body movements (MBM) were scored in videopolygraphic recordings in accordance with established criteria. An MBM index was calculated (number of MBM per hour of sleep). Results: The FSHD group showed a decrease in the MBM index (FSHD: 1.2 ± 1.1; control subjects: 2.3 ± 1.2, analysis of variance F = 13.672; p = 0.008). The sleep pattern of patients with FSHD, as compared with that of controls, was characterized by longer sleep latencies, shorter sleep durations, an increased percentage of wake during sleep, and a decreased percentage of rapid eye movement sleep. In the patient group, the MBM index was inversely correlated with severity of disease (Spearman test: r30 = −0.387; p Marca GD; Frusciante R; Dittoni S; Vollono C; Losurdo A; Testani E; Scarano E; Colicchio S; Iannaccone E; Tonali PA; Ricci E. Decreased nocturnal movements in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(3):276-280. PMID:20572422

  1. Endocrine function in 97 patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Mette Cathrine; Arlien-Søborg, P; Duno, M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the endocrine function and its association to number of CTG repeats in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Concentration of various hormones and metabolites in venous blood was used to assess the endocrine function in 97 patients with DM1....... We found that patients with DM1 have an increased risk of abnormal endocrine function, particularly calcium metabolism disorders. However, the endocrine dysfunction appears not to be of clinical significance in all of the cases. Finally, we found correlations between CTG(n) expansion size and plasma...

  2. Focal Choroidal Excavation in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Mohammad Riazi; Esfahani, Hamid Riazi; Mahmoudi, Alireza; Johari, Mohammad Karim; Hemati, Karim

    2015-05-01

    Focal choroidal excavation (FCE) was first reported as a choroidal posteriorly excavated zone without any scleral change. Choroidal excavation also divided into conforming and nonconforming type. Numerous reports demonstrated association between FCE and other disease such as choroidal neovascularization and central serous choroidoretinopathy. Here, we report a rare case of FCE in a patient with Best disease. The patient was diagnosed by spectoral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). To the best of our knowledge, our patient is the second report of choroidal excavation in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

  3. Progress study of the cardiac damage in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a fatal muscular disease with rapid progression in children. Most patients die of respiratory and circulatory failure before the age of 20 if there is no systematic treatment. Now the heart problem in this disease has become increasingly prominent, and is thought to be closely associated with certain dystrophin exon deletion. We would like to review the epidemiology, relevance of dystrophin, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and pathological features, as well as early prevention and treatment of DMD.

  4. Immune-mediated pathology in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Amy S; Puig, Montserrat; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Hoffman, Eric P; Villalta, S Armando; Rao, V Ashutosh; Wakefield, Lalage M; Woodcock, Janet

    2015-08-05

    Immunological and inflammatory processes downstream of dystrophin deficiency as well as metabolic abnormalities, defective autophagy, and loss of regenerative capacity all contribute to muscle pathology in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). These downstream cascades offer potential avenues for pharmacological intervention. Modulating the inflammatory response and inducing immunological tolerance to de novo dystrophin expression will be critical to the success of dystrophin-replacement therapies. This Review focuses on the role of the inflammatory response in DMD pathogenesis and opportunities for clinical intervention. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Early-Onset LMNA-Associated Muscular Dystrophy with Later Involvement of Contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Younggun; Lee, Jung Hwan; Park, Hyung Jun; Choi, Young Chul

    2017-10-01

    The early diagnosis of LMNA-associated muscular dystrophy is important for preventing sudden arrest related to cardiac conduction block. However, diagnosing early-onset Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) with later involvement of contracture and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B is often delayed due to heterogeneous clinical presentations. We aimed to determine the clinical features that contribute to a delayed diagnosis. We reviewed four patients who were recently diagnosed with LMNA-associated muscular dystrophy by targeted exome sequencing and who were initially diagnosed with nonspecific or other types of muscular dystrophy. Certain clinical features such as delayed contracture involvement and calf hypertrophy were found to contribute to a delayed diagnosis. Muscle biopsies were not informative for the diagnosis in these patients. Genetic testing of single or multiple genes is useful for confirming a diagnosis of LMNA-associated muscular dystrophy. Even EDMD patients could experience the later involvement of contracture, so clinicians should consider early genetic testing for patients with undiagnosed muscular dystrophy or laminopathy.

  6. Population frequency of myotonic dystrophy: higher than expected frequency of myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) mutation in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suominen, Tiina; Bachinski, Linda L; Auvinen, Satu; Hackman, Peter; Baggerly, Keith A; Angelini, Corrado; Peltonen, Leena; Krahe, Ralf; Udd, Bjarne

    2011-07-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common adult-onset muscular dystrophy with an estimated prevalence of 1/8000. There are two genetically distinct types, DM1 and DM2. DM2 is generally milder with more phenotypic variability than the classic DM1. Our previous data on co-segregation of heterozygous recessive CLCN1 mutations in DM2 patients indicated a higher than expected DM2 prevalence. The aim of this study was to determine the DM2 and DM1 frequency in the general population, and to explore whether the DM2 mutation functions as a modifier in other neuromuscular diseases (NMD) to account for unexplained phenotypic variability. We genotyped 5535 Finnish individuals: 4532 normal blood donors, 606 patients with various non-myotonic NMD, 221 tibial muscular dystrophy patients and their 176 healthy relatives for the DM2 and DM1 mutations. We also genotyped an Italian idiopathic non-myotonic proximal myopathy cohort (n = 93) for the DM2 mutation. In 5496 samples analyzed for DM2, we found three DM2 mutations and two premutations. In 5511 samples analyzed for DM1, we found two DM1 mutations and two premutations. In the Italian cohort, we identified one patient with a DM2 mutation. We conclude that the DM2 mutation frequency is significantly higher in the general population (1/1830; P-value = 0.0326) than previously estimated. The identification of DM2 mutations in NMD patients with clinical phenotypes not previously associated with DM2 is of particular interest and is in accord with the high overall prevalence. On the basis of our results, DM2 appears more frequent than DM1, with most DM2 patients currently undiagnosed with symptoms frequently occurring in the elderly population.

  7. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes: First-reported cohort from northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Omar Abdulmonem; Jiang, Xinmei; Zhang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    The relative frequencies of different subtypes of limb-girdle muscular dystrophies vary widely among different populations. We estimated the percentage of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes in Chinese people based on 68 patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy from the Myology Clinic, Neurology Department, First Hospital of Jilin University, China. A diagnosis of calpainopathy was made in 12 cases (17%), and dysferlin deficiency in 10 cases (15%). Two biopsies revealed α-sarcoglycan deficiency (3%), and two others revealed a lack of caveolin-3 (3%). A diagnosis of unclassified limb-girdle muscular dystrophy was made in the remaining patients (62%). The appearances of calpain 3- and dysferlin-deficient biopsies were similar, though rimmed vacuoles were unique to dysferlinopathy, while inflammatory infiltrates were present in both these limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D biopsies. Macrophages were detected in seven dysferlinopathy biopsies. The results of this study suggest that the distribution of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes in the Han Chinese population is similar to that reported in the West. The less necrotic, regenerating and inflammatory appearance of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, but with more lobulated fibers, supports the idea that calpainopathy is a less active, but more chronic disease than dysferlinopathy. Unusual features indicated an extended limb-girdle muscular dystrophy disease spectrum. The use of acid phosphatase stain should be considered in suspected dysferlinopathies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to define the relative proportions of the various forms of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in China, based on protein testing. PMID:25206500

  8. The Intriguing Regulators of Muscle Mass in Sarcopenia and Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Kunihiro; Aoi, Wataru; Yamaguchi, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the biology of muscle have led to new interest in the pharmacological treatment of muscle wasting. Loss of muscle mass and increased intramuscular fibrosis occur in both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. Several regulators (mammalian target of rapamycin, serum response factor, atrogin-1, myostatin, etc.) seem to modulate protein synthesis and degradation or transcription of muscle-specific genes during both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. This review provides an overview of the adaptive changes in several regulators of muscle mass in both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. PMID:25221510

  9. Meretoja’s Syndrome: Lattice Corneal Dystrophy, Gelsolin Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Casal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lattice corneal dystrophy gelsolin type was first described in 1969 by Jouko Meretoja, a Finnish ophthalmologist. It is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in gelsolin gene resulting in unstable protein fragments and amyloid deposition in various organs. The age of onset is usually after the third decade of life and typical diagnostic triad includes progressive bilateral facial paralysis, loose skin, and lattice corneal dystrophy. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient referred to our Department of Ophthalmology by severe dry eye and incomplete eyelid closure. She had severe bilateral facial paresis, significant orbicularis, and perioral sagging as well as hypoesthesia of extremities and was diagnosed with Meretoja’s syndrome at the age of 50, confirmed by the presence of gelsolin mutation. At our observation she had bilateral diminished tear film break-up time and Schirmer test, diffuse keratitis, corneal opacification, and neovascularization in the left eye. She was treated with preservative-free lubricants and topical cyclosporine, associated with nocturnal complete occlusion of both eyes, and underwent placement of lacrimal punctal plugs. Ocular symptoms are the first to appear and our role as ophthalmologists is essential for the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of ocular alterations in these patients.

  10. Dystrophin in frameshift deletion patients with Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangopadhyay, S.B.; Ray, P.N.; Worton, R.G.; Sherratt, T.G.; Heckmatt, J.Z.; Dubowitz, V.; Strong, P.N.; Miller, G. (Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)); Shokeir, M. (Univ. Hospital, Saskatchewan (Canada))

    1992-09-01

    In a previous study the authors identified 14 cases with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or its milder variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), with a deletion of exons 3-7, a deletion that would be expected to shift the translational reading frame of the mRNA and give a severe phenotype. They have examined dystrophin and its mRNA from muscle biopsies of seven cases with either mild or intermediate phenotypes. In all cases they detected slightly lower-molecular-weight dystrophin in 12%-15% abundance relative to the normal. By sequencing amplified mRNA they have found that exon 2 is spliced to exon 8, a splice that produces a frameshifted mRNA, and have found no evidence for alternate splicing that might be involved in restoration of dystrophin mRNA reading frame in the patients with a mild phenotype. Other transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms such as cryptic promoter, ribosomal frameshifting, and reinitiation are suggested that might play some role in restoring the reading frame. 34 refs., 5 figs. 1 tab.

  11. Nitric oxide synthase deficiency and the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidball, James G; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The secondary loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) that occurs in dystrophic muscle is the basis of numerous, complex and interacting features of the dystrophic pathology that affect not only muscle itself, but also influence the interaction of muscle with other tissues. Many mechanisms through which nNOS deficiency contributes to misregulation of muscle development, blood flow, fatigue, inflammation and fibrosis in dystrophic muscle have been identified, suggesting that normalization in NO production could greatly attenuate diverse aspects of the pathology of muscular dystrophy through multiple regulatory pathways. However, the relative importance of the loss of nNOS from the sarcolemma versus the importance of loss of total nNOS from dystrophic muscle remains unknown. Although most current evidence indicates that nNOS localization at the sarcolemma is not required to achieve NO-mediated reductions of pathology in muscular dystrophy, the question remains open concerning whether membrane localization would provide a more efficient rescue from features of the dystrophic phenotype. PMID:25194047

  12. Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy--two Dutch siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, A C; Bots, G T; Roos, R A; van Gelderen, H H

    1984-01-01

    Two Dutch siblings, diagnosed as suffering from Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) on the basis of clinical, computerized tomography (CT), and muscle and brain biopsy findings, are reported. Hypoplasia of the chorioidea was observed for the first time in FCMD. Autopsy of the first case revealed the major pathological changes of FCMD, i.e. micropolygyria, loss of cytoarchitecture, hypoplasia of the pyramidal tract, leptomeningeal thickening. Heterotopias of nervous tissue in the spinal arachnoidal spaces were found. This is the first case in which brain tissue has been investigated on two separate occasions. In the biopsy specimen--at the age of 14 months--myelination was poor and astrogliosis marked. At autopsy--4 years later--myelination proved to be only slightly less than normal. However, white matter hypodensities on the successive CT's did not change. There is no ready explanation for this discrepancy. Typical FCMD is compared to FCMD-like cases from outside Japan. There are arguments in favor of the concept of a continuum of diseases--with the same (unknown) etiology--representing both typical FCMD and other types of congenital muscular dystrophy with CNS lesions.

  13. Drugs in development and dietary approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelini C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Corrado Angelini, Elisabetta Tasca Neuromuscular Laboratory, Fondazione San Camillo Hospital IRCCS, Venice, Italy Abstract: Therapeutic trials studying Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD in Europe and the USA have been done using a protocol that includes manual muscle testing and functional testing, and have shown the efficacy of steroid drugs in various doses and regimens. Further, drisapersen and eteplirsen (exon skipping drugs and ataluren (a drug to overcome stop codon mutations have achieved some clinical improvement. Cardioprotective drugs are efficacious in DMD, and eplerenone, an aldosterone inhibitor and diuretic, is now being used to treat the disease. The dietary approach should be used in wheelchair-bound DMD children in combination with respiratory assistance. The importance of some of the treatments proposed is that they might also be useful in other genetic disorders where stop codon mutations are present; moreover, it is possible that these new treatments will improve quality of life for many patients. Keywords: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, steroids, ataluren, drisapersen, eplerenone, eteplirsen

  14. Identification of three distinguishable phenotypes in golden retriever muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrósio, C E; Fadel, L; Gaiad, T P; Martins, D S; Araújo, K P C; Zucconi, E; Brolio, M P; Giglio, R F; Morini, A C; Jazedje, T; Froes, T R; Feitosa, M L T; Valadares, M C; Beltrão-Braga, P C B; Meirelles, F V; Miglino, M A

    2009-04-07

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a human disease characterized by progressive and irreversible skeletal muscle degeneration caused by mutations in genes coding for important muscle proteins. Unfortunately, there is no efficient treatment for this disease; it causes progressive loss of motor and muscular ability until death. The canine model (golden retriever muscular dystrophy) is similar to DMD, showing similar clinical signs. Fifteen dogs were followed from birth and closely observed for clinical signs. Dogs had their disease status confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis and genotyping. Clinical observations of musculoskeletal, morphological, gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiovascular, and renal features allowed us to identify three distinguishable phenotypes in dystrophic dogs: mild (grade I), moderate (grade II) and severe (grade III). These three groups showed no difference in dystrophic alterations of muscle morphology and creatine kinase levels. This information will be useful for therapeutic trials, because DMD also shows significant, inter- and intra-familiar clinical variability. Additionally, being aware of phenotypic differences in this animal model is essential for correct interpretation and understanding of results obtained in pre-clinical trials.

  15. Laser-Induced Photic Injury Phenocopies Macular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Zheng, Andrew; Nie, Hongping; Bhavsar, Kavita V; Xu, Yu; Sliney, David H; Trokel, Stephen L; Tsang, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    To describe the phenotypes associated with laser-induced retinal damage in children. Five patients with maculopathy and reduced visual acuity associated with laser pointer use were evaluated. Best-corrected visual acuity, retinal structure, and function were monitored with color fundus, infrared (IR), and red-free images, fundus autofluorescence (AF), spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and full-field electroretinography (ERG). All five laser pointer injury patients had retinal lesions resembling a macular dystrophy (one bilateral and four unilateral). These lesions were irregular in shape but all had a characteristic dendritic appearance with linear streaks radiating from the lesion. Photoreceptor damage was present in all patients, but serial OCT monitoring showed that subsequent photoreceptor recovery occurred over time in the eyes of at least four patients. One patient also had bilateral pigment epithelial detachments (PED). Both hyper- and hypoautofluorecence were observed in the laser damage area. In general, OCT and IR images are quite useful to diagnose laser damage, but AF is not as sensitive. Laser pointer damage in children can occasionally be misdiagnosed as a macular dystrophy disease, but the distinctive lesions and OCT features are helpful for differentiating laser damage from other conditions.

  16. Eteplirsen in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kenji Rowel Q; Maruyama, Rika; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal neuromuscular disorder affecting around one in 3,500-5,000 male births that is characterized by progressive muscular deterioration. It is inherited in an X-linked recessive fashion and is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the DMD gene coding for dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein that stabilizes the plasma membrane of muscle fibers. In September 2016, the US Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval for eteplirsen (or Exondys 51), a drug that acts to promote dystrophin production by restoring the translational reading frame of DMD through specific skipping of exon 51 in defective gene variants. Eteplirsen is applicable for approximately 14% of patients with DMD mutations. This article extensively reviews and discusses the available information on eteplirsen to date, focusing on pharmacological, efficacy, safety, and tolerability data from preclinical and clinical trials. Issues faced by eteplirsen, particularly those relating to its efficacy, will be identified. Finally, the place of eteplirsen and exon skipping as a general therapeutic strategy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy treatment will be discussed.

  17. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis associated to Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Bianca; Christofolini, Denise Maria; Conceição, Gabriel Seixas; Barbosa, Caio Parente

    2017-09-21

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common muscle disease found in male children. Currently, there is no effective therapy available for Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Therefore, it is essential to make a prenatal diagnosis and provide genetic counseling to reduce the birth of such boys. We report a case of preimplantation genetic diagnosis associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The couple E.P.R., 38-year-old, symptomatic patient heterozygous for a 2 to 47 exon deletion mutation in DMD gene and G.T.S., 39-year-old, sought genetic counseling about preimplantation genetic diagnosis process. They have had a 6-year-old son who died due to Duchenne muscular dystrophy complications. The couple underwent four cycles of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and eight embryos biopsies were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for specific mutation analysis, followed by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) for aneuploidy analysis. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis revealed that two embryos had inherited the maternal DMD gene mutation, one embryo had a chromosomal alteration and five embryos were normal. One blastocyst was transferred and resulted in successful pregnancy. The other embryos remain vitrified. We concluded that embryo analysis using associated techniques of PCR and array CGH seems to be safe for embryo selection in cases of X-linked disorders, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy. RESUMO A distrofia muscular de Duchenne é a doença muscular mais comum observadas em crianças do sexo masculino. Atualmente, não há terapia eficaz disponível para distrofia muscular de Duchenne, portanto, é essencial o diagnóstico pré-natal e o aconselhamento genético para reduzir o nascimento desses meninos. Relatamos um caso de diagnóstico genético pré-implantação associado à distrofia muscular de Duchenne. O casal E.P.R., 38 anos, heterozigota, sintomática para uma mutação de deleção dos éxons 2 a 47 no gene

  18. Living with muscular dystrophy: health related quality of life consequences for children and adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootenhuis, Martha A.; de Boone, Judith; van der Kooi, Anneke J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Muscular dystrophies are chronic diseases manifesting with progressive muscle weakness leading to decreasing activities and participation. To understand the impact on daily life, it is important to determine patients' quality of life. Objective: To investigate Health Related Quality of

  19. Congenital muscular dystrophy and severe central nervous system atrophy in two siblings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leyten, Q. H.; Barth, P. G.; Gabreëls, F. J.; Renkawek, K.; Renier, W. O.; Gabreëls-Festen, A. A.; ter Laak, H. J.; Smits, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    Severe degenerative features of the nervous system of a hitherto unknown kind, associated with a neuromuscular disorder with histopathological features of congenital muscular dystrophy, are reported in two female siblings. The clinical profile was characterized by generalized hypotonia followed by

  20. A newly recognized autosomal dominant limb girdle muscular dystrophy with cardiac involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, A. J.; Ledderhof, T. M.; de Voogt, W. G.; Res, C. J.; Bouwsma, G.; Troost, D.; Busch, H. F.; Becker, A. E.; de Visser, M.

    1996-01-01

    Sixty-five members of three families with limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) underwent neurological, cardiological, and ancillary investigations. Thirty-five individuals were diagnosed as having slowly progressive autosomal dominant LGMD. Symmetrical weakness started in the proximal lower limb

  1. Ultrasound Imaging of Muscle Contraction of the Tibialis Anterior in Patients with Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbertse, K.; Goselink, R.J.M.; Lassche, S.; Nillesen, M.M.; Sprengers, A.M.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Alfen, N. van; Korte, C.L. de

    2017-01-01

    A need exists for biomarkers to diagnose, quantify and longitudinally follow facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and many other neuromuscular disorders. Furthermore, the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to muscle weakness in most neuromuscular disorders are not completely understood.

  2. Glycosaminoglycan modifications in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: specific remodeling of chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Negroni, E.; Henault, E.; Chevalier, F.; Gilbert-Sirieix, M.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Papy-Garcia, D.; Uzan, G.; Albanese, P.

    2014-01-01

    Widespread skeletal muscle degeneration and impaired regeneration lead to progressive muscle weakness and premature death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Dystrophic muscles are progressively replaced by nonfunctional tissue because of exhaustion of muscle precursor cells and

  3. A heterozygous 21-bp deletion in CAPN3 causes dominantly inherited limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Barresi, Rita; Witting, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A is the most common limb girdle muscular dystrophy form worldwide. Although strict recessive inheritance is assumed, patients carrying a single mutation in the calpain 3 gene (CAPN3) are reported. Such findings are commonly attributed to incomplete mutation...... creatine kinase or myoglobin. Muscle weakness was generally milder than observed in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, but affected the same muscle groups (proximal leg, lumbar paraspinal and medial gastrocnemius muscles). In some cases, the weakness was severely disabling. The 21-bp deletion did...... affecting the calpain 3 homodimer. This renders patients deficient in calpain 3 as in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, albeit in a milder form in most cases. Based on findings in 10 families, our study indicates that a dominantly inherited pattern of calpainopathy exists, and should be considered...

  4. Common recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies differential diagnosis: why and how?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cotta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Limb girdle muscular dystrophies are heterogeneous autosomal hereditary neuromuscular disorders. They produce dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy and they are associated with mutations in several genes involved in muscular structure and function. Detailed clinical, laboratorial, imaging, diagnostic flowchart, photographs, tables, and illustrated diagrams are presented for the differential diagnosis of common autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes diagnosed nowadays at one reference center in Brazil. Preoperative image studies guide muscle biopsy site selection. Muscle involvement image pattern differs depending on the limb girdle muscular dystrophy subtype. Muscle involvement is conspicuous at the posterior thigh in calpainopathy and fukutin-related proteinopathy; anterior thigh in sarcoglycanopathy; whole thigh in dysferlinopathy, and telethoninopathy. The precise differential diagnosis of limb girdle muscular dystrophies is important for genetic counseling, prognostic orientation, cardiac and respiratory management. Besides that, it may probably, in the future, provide specific genetic therapies for each subtype.

  5. Pattern Dystrophy of the Macula in a Case of Steinert Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Esteves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Myotonic dystrophies are typically associated with ocular complications like ptosis, weakness of the ocular muscle and cataracts, but also with less recognized retinal changes. Case Report: A 41-year-old female with type 1 myotonic dystrophy complained of progressive vision loss. Slit lamp examination revealed the presence of typical bilateral polychromatic cataract with posterior subcapsular component. Dilated fundus examination was remarkable for bilateral macular depigmented changes. Multimodal imaging analysis of the macula suggested the presence of a butterfly-shaped pattern dystrophy. Discussion: In cases of myotonic dystrophies it is of great relevance to analyze the presence of retinal changes that might limit the visual improvement following cataract extraction.

  6. Next Generation Sequencing approach to molecular diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy; identification of a novel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh-Vesal, Reza; Teymoori, Atieh; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Hosseini, Forough Sadat

    2018-02-20

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD; MIM 310200) is one of the most common and severe type of hereditary muscular dystrophies. The disease is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The dystrophin gene is associated with X-linked recessive Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. This disease occurs almost exclusively in males. The clinical symptoms of muscle weakness usually begin at childhood. The main symptoms of this disorder are gradually muscular weakness. The affected patients have inability to standing up and walking. Death is usually due to respiratory infection or cardiomyopathy. In this article, we have reported the discovery of a new nonsense mutation that creates abnormal stop codon in the dystrophin gene. This mutation was detected using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technique. The subject was a 17-year-old male with muscular dystrophy that who was suspected of having DMD. He was referred to Hakim medical genetics center of Neyshabur, IRAN. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Upper Extremity Kinematics and Muscle Activation Patterns in Subjects With Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergsma, Arjen; Murgia, Alessio; Cup, Edith H.; Verstegen, Paul P.; Meijer, Kenneth; de Groot, Imelda J.

    Objective: To compare the kinematics and muscle activity of subjects with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) and healthy control subjects during the performance of standardized upper extremity tasks. Design: Exploratory case-control study. Setting: A movement laboratory. Participants: Subjects

  8. Upper limb function and activity in people with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: a web-based survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergsma, A.; Cup, E.H.C.; Janssen, M.M.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Groot, I.J.M. de

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the upper extremity (UE) at the level of impairments and related activity limitations and participation restrictions in people with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Methods The study was conducted using web-based questionnaires that were distributed amongst

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies: characteristics of users and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Romitti, Paul A; Conway, Kristin M; Andrews, Jennifer; Liu, Ke; Meaney, F John; Street, Natalie; Puzhankara, Soman; Druschel, Charlotte M; Matthews, Dennis J

    2014-07-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine is frequently used in the management of chronic pediatric diseases, but little is known about its use by those with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy. Complementary and alternative medicine use by male patients with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy and associations with characteristics of male patients and their caregivers were examined through interviews with 362 primary caregivers identified from the Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network. Overall, 272 of the 362 (75.1%) primary caregivers reported that they had used any complementary and alternative medicine for the oldest Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network male in their family. The most commonly reported therapies were from the mind-body medicine domain (61.0%) followed by those from the biologically based practice (39.2%), manipulative and body-based practice (29.3%), and whole medical system (6.9%) domains. Aquatherapy, prayer and/or blessing, special diet, and massage were the most frequently used therapies. Compared with nonusers, male patients who used any therapy were more likely to have an early onset of symptoms and use a wheel chair; their caregivers were more likely to be non-Hispanic white. Among domains, associations were observed with caregiver education and family income (mind-body medicines [excluding prayer and/or blessing only] and whole medical systems) and Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network site (biologically based practices and mind-body medicines [excluding prayer and/or blessing only]). Complementary and alternative medicine use was common in the management of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies among Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network males. This widespread use suggests further study to evaluate the efficacy of integrating complementary and alternative medicine into treatment regimens for Duchenne and Becker muscular

  10. Analysis of cardiac exams: electrocardiogram and echocardiogram use In Duchenne muscular dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Bachur, Cynthia Kallás; Garcia, Marlon Hermógenes; Bernardino, Camila Araújo; Requel, Rogério Camillo; Bachur, José Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Duchenne Muscular Dystrophies (DMD) is a genetic muscle disorder that causes degeneration and atrophy of skeletal muscle and heart. Objective The aim of this survey is accomplish an evaluation electrocardiographic and echocardiography in the patients bearers of Duchene Muscular Dystrophies (DMD), to observe which alterations, which the degree of cardiac compromising these patient present and the effectiveness of these exams in the evaluation cardiologic. Methods Nine patients of ...

  11. Protein-carbohydrate supplements improve muscle protein balance in muscular dystrophy patients after endurance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Grete; Ørngreen, Mette C; Preisler, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    In healthy individuals, postexercise protein supplementation increases muscle protein anabolism. In patients with muscular dystrophies, aerobic exercise improves muscle function, but the effect of exercise on muscle protein balance is unknown. Therefore, we investigated 1) muscle protein balance ....... The findings suggest that postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation could be an important add-on to exercise training therapy in muscular dystrophies, and long-term studies of postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplementation are warranted in these conditions....

  12. Simultaneous Transplantation of Limbal Stem Cells May Reduce Recurrences of Granular Dystrophy After Corneal Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Stefan J.; Eberwein, Philipp; Reinshagen, Helga; Reinhard, Thomas; Sundmacher, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To present 2 cases with long-term relapse-free intervals only after limbo-keratoplasty but not after conventional penetrating keratoplasty in granular dystrophy. Retrospective review of the patient charts and photographs taken during long-term follow-up of 2 cases with granular dystrophy, in which 1 eye received penetrating keratoplasty and the fellow eye received penetrating limbo-keratoplasty. In the first patient, 1 eye showed extensive recurrence of granular deposits 17 years aft...

  13. Picturing the Experience of Living With Myotonic Dystrophy (DM1): A Qualitative Exploration Using Photovoice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDonna, Kori A; Venance, Shannon L

    2015-10-01

    Myotonic dystrophy presents with multisystemic complications, and there is a well-recognized myotonic dystrophy personality profile that is characterized by executive dysfunction, an avoidant personality, and impaired cognition. Understanding symptom impact on patients' lives is crucial for providing appropriate patient-centered care; however, much of the myotonic dystrophy literature reflects the biomedical model, and there is a paucity of articles exploring patient experience. The aim of this study was to use a novel research approach to explore the experiences of patients with myotonic dystrophy. Nine individuals participated in a qualitative study using the photovoice method. Photovoice uses the visual image to document participants' lives, and participants took pictures pertaining to living with myotonic dystrophy that stimulated individual and focus group interviews. We used content analysis to analyze the data; in turn, codes were collapsed into themes and categories. Findings were presented to participants to ensure resonance. Participants took 0-40 photographs that depicted barriers and facilitators to living successfully with myotonic dystrophy. We identified two categories that include participants' challenges with everyday activities, their worries about the future, their grief for lost function and social opportunities, and their resilience and coping strategies. Participants also described their experiences using the photovoice method. Photovoice is a useful approach for conducting research in myotonic dystrophy. Participants were active research collaborators despite perceptions that individuals affected with myotonic dystrophy are apathetic. Our findings suggest that participants are concerned about symptom impact on reduced quality of life, not symptoms that clinicians preferentially monitor. Nurses, therefore, are essential for providing patient-centered, holistic care for patients' complex biopsychosocial needs. Research exploring current

  14. Screening of Dystrophin Gene Deletions in Egyptian Patients with DMD/BMD Muscular Dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Effat, Laila K.; El-Harouni, Ashraf A.; Khalda S. Amr; El-Minisi, Tarik I.; Nagwa Abdel Meguid; Mostafa El-Awady

    2000-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are allelic disorders caused by mutations within the dystrophin gene. Our study has identified 100 Egyptian families collected from the Human Genetics Clinic, National Research Center, Cairo. All cases were subjected to complete clinical evaluation pedigree analysis, electromyography studies, estimation of serum creatine phosphokinase enzyme (CPK) levels and DNA analysis. Multiplex PCR using 18 pairs of specific primers wer...

  15. Structure and function of masticatory muscles in a case of muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M; Kirkeby, S; Jensen, B L

    1990-01-01

    Histologic examination of muscle biopsies and functional examination comprising electromyography and force measurements in a 19-yr-old boy with muscular dystrophy showed different wasting patterns of mandibular elevator and depressor muscles. Pronounced histopathologic changes were present...... depressor strength corresponded more to reference values. This difference of muscular wasting might be caused by protective enzymes in the digastric muscle and/or functionally induced damage of the masseter. As affection from muscular dystrophy may vary greatly between the masticatory muscles, structural...

  16. Best practice guidelines and recommendations on the molecular diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2

    OpenAIRE

    Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Kress, Wolfram; Catalli, Claudio; Hertz, Jens M; Witsch-Baumgartner, Martina; Buckley, Michael F.; van Engelen, Baziel G.M.; Schwartz, Marianne; Scheffer, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is an autosomal dominant, multisystem disorder that is characterized by myotonic myopathy. The symptoms and severity of myotonic dystrophy type l (DM1) ranges from severe and congenital forms, which frequently result in death because of respiratory deficiency, through to late-onset baldness and cataract. In adult patients, cardiac conduction abnormalities may occur and cause a shorter life span. In subsequent generations, the symptoms in DM1 may present at an earlier age an...

  17. Decreased Insulin Receptors but Normal Glucose Metabolism in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pirro, Roberto; Lauro, Renato; Testa, Ivano; Ferretti, Ginofabrizio; de Martinis, Carlo; Dellantonio, Renzo

    1982-04-01

    Compared to matched controls, 17 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy showed decreased insulin binding to monocytes due to decreased receptor concentration. These patients showed no signs of altered glucose metabolism and retrospective analysis of the clinical records of a further 56 such patients revealed no modification in carbohydrate metabolism. These data suggest that reduced insulin receptor number does not produce overt modifications of glucose metabolism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  18. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for Evaluating the Heart in Preclinical Studies of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Dongsheng; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A; Blain, Alison; Kass, David A; McNally, Elizabeth M; Metzger, Joseph M; Spurney, Christopher F; Kinnett, Kathi

    2016-02-01

    A recent working group meeting focused on contemporary cardiac issues in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was hosted by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in collaboration with the Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy. An outcome of this meeting was to provide freely available detailed protocols for preclinical animal studies. The goal of these protocols is to improve the quality and reproducibility of cardiac preclinical studies aimed at developing new therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of DMD cardiomyopathy.

  19. Bethlem myopathy is not allelic to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speer, M.C.; Yamaoka, L.H.; Stajich, J.; Lewis, K. [and others

    1995-08-28

    The Bethlem myopathy, an autosomal-dominant myopathy, shows a distribution of proximal muscle weakness similar to that observed in dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Yet the Bethlem myopathy differs from most limb-girdle dystrophies in two important regards. First, the Bethlem myopathy presents with joint contractures most commonly observed at the elbows, ankles, and neck. Secondly, disease onset in the Bethlem myopathy is in early childhood, while most dominant LGMDs present with adult onset. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Mutations in PCYT1A Cause Spondylometaphyseal Dysplasia with Cone-Rod Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Guilherme L.; Baratela, Wagner A.R.; Almeida, Tatiana F.; Lazar, Monize; Afonso, Clara L.; Oyamada, Maria K.; Suzuki, Lisa; Oliveira, Luiz A.N.; Ramos, Ester S.; Kim, Chong A.; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Bertola, Débora R.

    2014-01-01

    Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia with cone-rod dystrophy is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by severe short stature, progressive lower-limb bowing, flattened vertebral bodies, metaphyseal involvement, and visual impairment caused by cone-rod dystrophy. Whole-exome sequencing of four individuals affected by this disorder from two Brazilian families identified two previously unreported homozygous mutations in PCYT1A. This gene encodes the alpha isoform of the phosphate cytidylylt...

  1. Optical coherence tomography image in gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães,Otávio de Azevedo; Rymer,Samuel; Marinho,Diane Ruschel; Kwitko,Sérgio; Cardoso,Isabel Habeyche; Kliemann,Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    Gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy is a rare disorder with few cases described in the present literature. The following report will show how difficult it is to diagnose this disease in early stages. Modern image exams, such as optical coherence tomography helps to diagnose and can be crucial to establish the best treatment. We will present the histopathological changes and clinical features in this unusual dystrophy.

  2. Physical Activity in Boys With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Is Lower and Less Demanding Compared to Healthy Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heutinck, Lotte; Kampen, Nadine van; Jansen, Merel; Groot, Imelda J M de

    2017-04-01

    This study describes the amount of physical activity and perception of physical activity in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) compared to healthy boys. A questionnaire described 6 domains of physical activity. Four Duchenne muscular dystrophy subgroups were made: early and late ambulatory, nonambulatory with relative good, or limited arm function. Eighty-four boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (15.0 ± 6.4 years) and 198 healthy boys (14.0 ± 4.3 years) participated. Daily activities were more passive for boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Physical activity was less and low demanding compared to healthy boys. It decreased with disease severity ( P Duchenne muscular dystrophy were having fun and making friends. Barriers were lack of sport facilities and insufficient health. This study helps to quantify poor engagement in physical activity by boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and demonstrates factors that contribute to it. Suggestions to stimulate physical activity are made.

  3. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mah JK

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Jean K Mah Department of Pediatrics and Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Abstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments

  4. Epiretinal membrane: a treatable cause of visual disability in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Hannah M; Roxburgh, Richard H; Child, Nicholas; Polkinghorne, Philip J; Frampton, Chris; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of ocular abnormalities have been documented to occur in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. The objectives of this study were to investigate the macular and optic nerve morphology using optical coherence tomography in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. A total of 30 myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients and 28 controls were recruited for participation. All participants underwent a thorough ophthalmologic examination, including spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of the macula and retinal nerve fibre layer. Images were reviewed by a retinal specialist ophthalmologist, masked to the diagnosis of the participants. Average macular thickness was significantly greater in the myotonic dystrophy group compared to controls [327.3 μm vs. 308.5 μm (p Visual acuity was reduced due to the presence of epiretinal membrane in six patient eyes and none of the control eyes. The presence of an epiretinal membrane was significantly correlated with increasing age in the patient group. We report an increased prevalence of epiretinal membrane in the myotonic dystrophy type 1 group. This may be a previously under-recognised form of visual impairment in this group. Epiretinal membranes can be treated surgically. We suggest that, in addition to a comprehensive clinical examination, optical coherence tomography examination is implemented as part of an ophthalmological assessment for the myotonic dystrophy type 1 patient with reduced visual acuity.

  5. Sleep-Wake Cycle and Daytime Sleepiness in the Myotonic Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Romigi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy is the most common type of muscular dystrophy in adults and is characterized by progressive myopathy, myotonia, and multiorgan involvement. Two genetically distinct entities have been identified, myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 or Steinert’s Disease and myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2. Myotonic dystrophies are strongly associated with sleep dysfunction. Sleep disturbances in DM1 are common and include sleep-disordered breathing (SDB, periodic limb movements (PLMS, central hypersomnia, and REM sleep dysregulation (high REM density and narcoleptic-like phenotype. Interestingly, drowsiness in DM1 seems to be due to a central dysfunction of sleep-wake regulation more than SDB. To date, little is known regarding the occurrence of sleep disorders in DM2. SDB (obstructive and central apnoea, REM sleep without atonia, and restless legs syndrome have been described. Further polysomnographic, controlled studies are strongly needed, particularly in DM2, in order to clarify the role of sleep disorders in the myotonic dystrophies.

  6. Comparison study of chest physiotherapy home training programmes on respiratory functions in patients with muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeldan, Ipek; Gurses, H Nilgun; Yuksel, Husniye

    2008-08-01

    To compare the effects of home training programmes, threshold inspiratory muscle training and breathing exercise on spirometry and maximal pressures in patients with muscular dystrophy. Prospective blinded 12-week study. Cardiopulmonary department of university hospital. Twenty-three patients with muscular dystrophy (17 patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy and 6 patients with Becker muscular dystrophy) assigned to the threshold inspiratory muscle training and breathing exercise groups with alternate allocation. Spirometry, maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) and maximal expiratory pressure (PEmax) were measured before and after training. In the threshold inspiratory muscle training group threshold pressure load was determined as equal to 30% of weekly PImax measurement. In the breathing exercise group, patients performed deep and forceful diaphragmatic and segmental exercises. All patients performed exercises at home and once a week at hospital under supervision. The improvement of PImax in the threshold inspiratory muscle training group was more significant than the improvement observed in the breathing exercise group (P=0.05). PEmax increased significantly only in the breathing exercise group (P=0.01). Spirometry results did not change significantly in both groups after the training. We conclude that respiratory muscle strength is enhanced by training in the patients with muscular dystrophy who are ambulatory, but inspiratory and/or expiratory training effect is specific to the trained muscles. The techniques that improve the strength of respiratory muscles should be included in the physiotherapy management of patients with muscular dystrophy.

  7. Autonomic Dysfunction in Muscular Dystrophy: A Theoretical Framework for Muscle Reflex Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Alan Smith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetically inherited disorders whose most prominent clinical feature is progressive degeneration of skeletal muscle. In several forms of the disease, the function of cardiac muscle is likewise affected. The primary defect in this group of diseases is caused by mutations in myocyte proteins important to cellular structure and/or performance. That being stated, a growing body of evidence suggests that the development of autonomic dysfunction may secondarily contribute to the generation of skeletal and cardio-myopathy in muscular dystrophy. Indeed, abnormalities in the regulation of both sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity have been reported in a number of muscular dystrophy variants. However, the mechanisms mediating this autonomic dysfunction remain relatively unknown. An autonomic reflex originating in skeletal muscle, the exercise pressor reflex, is known to contribute significantly to the control of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity when stimulated. Given the skeletal myopathy that develops with muscular dystrophy, it is logical to suggest that the function of this reflex might also be abnormal with the pathogenesis of disease. As such, it may contribute to or exacerbate the autonomic dysfunction that manifests. This possibility along with a basic description of exercise pressor reflex function in health and disease are reviewed. A better understanding of the mechanisms that possibly underlie autonomic dysfunction in muscular dystrophy may not only facilitate further research but could also lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

  8. Exercise and muscular dystrophy: implications and analysis of effects on musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabei, Matthew S; Martindale, Joshua M; Townsend, DeWayne; Metzger, Joseph M

    2011-07-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous collection of progressive, inherited diseases of muscle weakness and degeneration. Although these diseases can vary widely in their etiology and presentation, nearly all muscular dystrophies cause exercise intolerance to some degree. Here, we focus on Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common form of muscular dystrophy, as a paradigm for the effects of muscle disease on exercise capacity. First described in the mid-1800s, DMD is a rapidly progressive and lethal muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is a membrane-associated cytoskeletal protein, the loss of which causes numerous cellular defects including mechanical instability of the sarcolemma, increased influx of extracellular calcium, and cell signaling defects. Here, we discuss the physiological basis for exercise intolerance in DMD, focusing on the molecular and cellular defects caused by loss of dystrophin and how these manifest as organ-level dysfunction and reduced exercise capacity. The main focus of this article is the defects present in dystrophin-deficient striated muscle. However, discussion regarding the effects of dystrophin loss on other tissues, including vascular smooth muscle is also included. Collectively, the goal of this article is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanistic basis for exercise intolerance in DMD, which may serve as an archetype for other muscular dystrophies and diseases of muscle wasting. © 2011 American Physiological Society.

  9. Fat embolism after fractures in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an underdiagnosed complication? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, David; Koch, Miriam Eva; Palmieri, Beniamino; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso; Carvalho, Alzira Alves de Siqueira

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most frequent lethal genetic disease. Several clinical trials have established both the beneficial effect of steroids in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the well-known risk of side effects associated with their daily use. For many years it has been known that steroids associated with ambulation loss lead to obesity and also damage the bone structure resulting in the bone density reduction and increased incidence of bone fractures and fat embolism syndrome, an underdiagnosed complication after fractures. Fat embolism syndrome is characterized by consciousness disturbance, respiratory failure and skin rashes. The use of steroids in Duchenne muscular dystrophy may result in vertebral fractures, even without previous trauma. Approximately 25% of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have a long bone fracture, and 1% to 22% of fractures have a chance to develop fat embolism syndrome. As the patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have progressive cardiac and respiratory muscle dysfunction, the fat embolism may be unnoticed clinically and may result in increased risk of death and major complications. Different treatments and prevention measures of fat embolism have been proposed; however, so far, there is no efficient therapy. The prevention, early diagnosis and adequate symptomatic treatment are of paramount importance. The fat embolism syndrome should always be considered in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy presenting with fractures, or an unexplained and sudden worsening of respiratory and cardiac symptoms.

  10. The natural history of post-traumatic reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyluk, A

    1998-02-01

    The paper presents the results of a prospective trial to examine the natural history of early reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD). Thirty patients with post-traumatic RSD of the hand were observed without treatment. They were reassessed 1, 2 and 6 months after diagnosis with a final assessment at 10 to 18 months (average 13 months). Twenty-seven patients completed the study. Three were withdrawn during the study because of persistence of signs and symptoms of RSD and were given further treatment. Of the 27 patients who completed the study, only one showed sufficient features of the condition to warrant the diagnosis of mild RSD. In the remaining 26, most features of RSD had resolved spontaneously. Pain and swelling disappeared more quickly than other features of RSD. Although the signs and symptoms of RSD had largely gone at 13 months, the hands were still functionally impaired because of weaker grip strength.

  11. Delayed developmental language milestones in children with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyrulnik, Shana E; Fee, Robert J; De Vivo, Darryl C; Goldstein, Edward; Hinton, Veronica J

    2007-05-01

    To document the attainment of developmental milestones in children with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) and to determine whether early delays are associated with later performance on measures of cognition. Retrospective parental report was utilized to document the acquisition of 10 common developmental milestones in children with DMD (n = 130) and their unaffected siblings (n = 59). Children completed tests of cognitive functioning. Parents rated children with DMD as delayed on achieving both language and motor milestones more frequently than their unaffected siblings. Furthermore, those children with DMD who were rated as late talkers or late walkers performed more poorly on tests of cognitive function than their on-time peers. In addition to the commonly reported delays in motor milestones, the current study documents delays in the acquisition of language milestones as well. These early delays are associated with significant impairments in later cognitive functioning.

  12. Whole-body MRI evaluation of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Doris G.; Carrino, John A.; Wagner, Kathryn R.; Jacobs, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a hereditary disorder that causes progressive muscle wasting. Increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of FSHD has stimulated interest in developing biomarkers of disease severity. Methods Two groups of MRI scans were analyzed: whole-body scans from 13 subjects with FSHD, and upper and lower extremity scans from 34 subjects with FSHD who participated in the MYO-029 clinical trial. Muscles were scored for fat infiltration and edema-like changes. Fat infiltration scores were compared to muscle strength and function. Results Our analysis reveals a distinctive pattern of both frequent muscle involvement and frequent sparing in FSHD. Averaged fat infiltration scores for muscle groups in the legs correlated with quantitative muscle strength and 10-meter walk times. Discussion Advances in MRI technology allow for the acquisition of rapid, high-quality whole-body imaging in diffuse muscle disease. This technique offers a promising disease biomarker in FSHD and other muscle diseases. PMID:25641525

  13. Dome-shaped macula associated with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Fasce, Francesco; Cascavilla, Maria Lucia; Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria; Bandello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Dome-shaped macula (DSM) has been described recently as an inward convexity of the macula typical of myopic eyes detectable on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The authors describe a case of monolateral DSM associated with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD). Case report. A 60-year-old man already diagnosed with VMD in vitelliruptive stage underwent SD-OCT that revealed the typical vitelliform material accumulation associated in the left eye with a convex elevation of the macula. No change was registered over a 1-year follow-up. This is the first report describing a monolateral DSM associated with VMD. Dome-shaped macula could be considered as a nonspecific scleral alteration, probably due to increased scleral thickness, which can accompany many retinal disorders.

  14. Genome Editing Gene Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Akitsu

    2015-09-22

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe genetic disorder caused by loss of function of the dystrophin gene on the X chromosome. Gene augmentation of dystrophin is challenging due to the large size of the dystrophin cDNA. Emerging genome editing technologies, such as TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9 systems, open a new erain the restoration of functional dystrophin and are a hallmark of bona fide gene therapy. In this review, we summarize current genome editing approaches, properties of target cell types for ex vivo gene therapy, and perspectives of in vivo gene therapy including genome editing in human zygotes. Although technical challenges, such as efficacy, accuracy, and delivery of the genome editing components, remain to be further improved, yet genome editing technologies offer a new avenue for the gene therapy of DMD.

  15. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in myotonic dystrophy type 1: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, Walmari; Baijens, Laura W J; Kremer, Bernd

    2014-06-01

    A systematic review was conducted to investigate the pathophysiology of and diagnostic procedures for oropharyngeal dysphagia in myotonic dystrophy (MD). The electronic databases Embase, PubMed, and The Cochrane Library were used. The search was limited to English, Dutch, French, German, Spanish, and Portuguese publications. Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the included articles. Swallowing assessment tools, the corresponding protocols, the studies' outcome measurements, and main findings are summarized and presented. The body of literature on pathophysiology of swallowing in dysphagic patients with MD type 1 remains scant. The included studies are heterogeneous with respect to design and outcome measures and hence are not directly comparable. More importantly, most studies had methodological problems. These are discussed in detail and recommendations for further research on diagnostic examinations for swallowing disorders in patients with MD type 1 are provided.

  16. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Protein-Protein Interaction Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; OkHOVATIAN, Farshad; Zamanian Azodi, Mona; Rezaei Tavirani, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the mortal diseases, subjected to study in terms of molecular investigation. In this study, the protein interaction map of this muscle-wasting condition was generated to gain a better knowledge of interactome profile of DMD. Applying Cytoscape and String Database, the protein-protein interaction network was constructed and the gene ontology of the constructed network was analyzed for biological process, molecular function, and cellular component annotations. Among 100 proteins related to DMD, dystrophin, utrophin, caveolin 3, and myogenic differentiation 1 play key roles in DMD network. In addition, the gene ontology analysis showed that regulation processes, kinase activity, and sarcoplasmic reticulum were the highlighted biological processes, molecular function, and cell component enrichments respectively for the proteins related to DMD. The central proteins and the enriched ontologies can be suggested as possible prominent agents in DMD; however, the validation studies may be required.

  17. A case of myotonic dystrophy with electrolyte imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Weon-Jin; Kim, Kwang-Yeol; Kim, So-Mi; Hong, Seung-Jae; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Song, Ran; Yang, Hyung-In; Lee, Yeon-Ah

    2013-07-01

    Type 1 myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder with a multisystem involvement, caused by an abnormal expansion of the CTG sequence of the dystrophic myotonia protein kinase (DMPK) gene. DM1 is a variable multisystem disorder with muscular and nonmuscular abnormalities. Increasingly, endocrine abnormalities, such as gonadal, pancreatic, and adrenal dysfunction are being reported. But, Electrolytes imbalance is a very rare condition in patients with DM1 yet. Herein we present a 42-yr-old Korean male of DM1 with abnormally elevated serum sodium and potassium. The patient had minimum volume of maximally concentrated urine without water loss. It was only cured by normal saline hydration. The cause of hypernatremia was considered by primary hypodipsia. Hyperkalemic conditions such as renal failure, pseudohyperkalemia, cortisol deficiency and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis were excluded. Further endocrine evaluation suggested selective hyperreninemic hypoaldosteronism as a cause of hyperkalemia.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging phenotyping of Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridian-Aragh, Neda; Wagner, Kathryn R; Leung, Doris G; Carrino, John A

    2014-12-01

    There is little information on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phenotypes of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). This study presents the MRI phenotyping of the upper and lower extremities of a large cohort of BMD patients. In this retrospective study, MRI images of 33 BMD subjects were evaluated for severity, distribution, and symmetry of involvement. Teres major, triceps long head, biceps brachii long head, gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, vasti, adductor longus, adductor magnus, semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and biceps femoris muscles showed the highest severity and frequency of involvement. All analyzed muscles had a high frequency of symmetric involvement. There was significant variability of involvement between muscles within some muscle groups, most notably the arm abductors, posterior arm muscles, medial thigh muscles, and lateral hip rotators. This study showed a distinctive pattern of involvement of extremity muscles in BMD subjects. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cyclosporine increases muscular force generation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, K R; Mynhier, M A; Miller, R G

    1993-03-01

    We investigated the effect of cyclosporine (CsA) on force generation in 15 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by obtaining monthly measures of tetanic force and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of both anterior tibial muscles. During 4 months of a natural history phase, both tetanic force and MVC declined significantly. During 8 weeks of CsA treatment (5 mg/kg/day), significantly increased tetanic force (25.8 +/- 6.6%) and MVC (13.6 +/- 4.0%) occurred within 2 weeks. The maximum mean increase during treatment was 35.2 +/- 5.9% (tetanic force) and 19.0 +/- 4.6% (MVC). Side effects from CsA, gastrointestinal and flu-like symptoms, were transient and self-limiting. Thus, as previously reported with prednisone, CsA increases muscular force generation in the anterior tibial muscles of DMD patients.

  20. Noninvasive ventilation during percutaneous gastrostomy placement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, J F; Birnkrant, D J; Martin, J E; Repucci, A H

    1997-06-01

    Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) is used for respiratory support in a number of diseases causing acute or chronic respiratory failure. We describe a novel use of NPPV to provide respiratory support during sedation for percutaneous placement of a gastrostomy tube in a patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The patient had severe respiratory insufficiency, progressive dysphagia, and undernutrition. In addition to the case in this report, we have used NPPV to provide respiratory support to DMD patients during five other gastrointestinal endoscopies without complication. The technique is highly labor intensive and requires physicians and respiratory therapists familiar with NPPV. The primary risk associated with this technique is lack of definitive airway protection during the procedure, which must be balanced against the risks of intubation in an anesthetized patient with neuromuscular disease. The potential benefit to selected patients is substantial, such as initiation of gastrostomy tube feeding in our patient, with subsequent improvement in his quality of life and nutritional status.

  1. Clinical Manifestations and Overall Management Strategies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Takeshi

    2018-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder that causes progressive weakness and wasting of skeletal muscular and myocardium in boys due to mutation of dystrophin. The structural integrity of each individual skeletal and cardiac myocyte is significantly compromised upon physical stress due to the absence of dystrophin. The progressive destruction of systemic musculature and myocardium causes affected patients to develop multiple organ disabilities, including loss of ambulation, physical immobility, neuromuscular scoliosis, joint contracture, restrictive lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and cardiomyopathy. There are some central nervous system-related medical problems, as dystrophin is also expressed in the neuronal tissues. Although principal management is to mainly delay the pathological process, an enhanced understanding of underlying pathological processes has significantly improved quality of life and longevity for DMD patients. Future research in novel molecular approach is warranted to answer unanswered questions.

  2. Fuchs' dystrophy associated with radial keratotomy: Lamellar or perforating keratoplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Ausin, P; Antolin-Garcia, D; Santamaria Garcia, L; Blazquez-Fernandez, A-B

    2017-05-01

    A 70 year-old male patient with a history of radial keratotomy suffering from Fuchs' dystrophy and a cataract. The patient received a two-step surgery: lens phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implant, followed by descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty in both eyes, four months later. There were no complications apart from a recurrent cystoid macular oedema in both eyes. The best corrected visual acuity was 20/40 both eyes, and the patient was satisfied. Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty may be considered as an alternative to penetrating keratoplasty in the case of endothelial dysfunction and radial keratotomy in patients with no corneal ectasia or significant stromal opacity. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Progress toward Gene Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Joel R; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2017-05-03

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has been a major target for gene therapy development for nearly 30 years. DMD is among the most common genetic diseases, and isolation of the defective gene (DMD, or dystrophin) was a landmark discovery, as it was the first time a human disease gene had been cloned without knowledge of the protein product. Despite tremendous obstacles, including the enormous size of the gene and the large volume of muscle tissue in the human body, efforts to devise a treatment based on gene replacement have advanced steadily through the combined efforts of dozens of labs and patient advocacy groups. Progress in the development of DMD gene therapy has been well documented in Molecular Therapy over the past 20 years and will be reviewed here to highlight prospects for success in the imminent human clinical trials planned by several groups. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fibrogenic Cell Plasticity Blunts Tissue Regeneration and Aggravates Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Pessina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of cell identity is necessary for homeostasis of most adult tissues. This process is challenged every time a tissue undergoes regeneration after stress or injury. In the lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, skeletal muscle regenerative capacity declines gradually as fibrosis increases. Using genetically engineered tracing mice, we demonstrate that, in dystrophic muscle, specialized cells of muscular, endothelial, and hematopoietic origins gain plasticity toward a fibrogenic fate via a TGFβ-mediated pathway. This results in loss of cellular identity and normal function, with deleterious consequences for regeneration. Furthermore, this fibrogenic process involves acquisition of a mesenchymal progenitor multipotent status, illustrating a link between fibrogenesis and gain of progenitor cell functions. As this plasticity also was observed in DMD patients, we propose that mesenchymal transitions impair regeneration and worsen diseases with a fibrotic component.

  5. Understanding the process of fibrosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharraz, Yacine; Guerra, Joana; Pessina, Patrizia; Serrano, Antonio L; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is the aberrant deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) components during tissue healing leading to loss of its architecture and function. Fibrotic diseases are often associated with chronic pathologies and occur in a large variety of vital organs and tissues, including skeletal muscle. In human muscle, fibrosis is most readily associated with the severe muscle wasting disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), caused by loss of dystrophin gene function. In DMD, skeletal muscle degenerates and is infiltrated by inflammatory cells and the functions of the muscle stem cells (satellite cells) become impeded and fibrogenic cells hyperproliferate and are overactivated, leading to the substitution of skeletal muscle with nonfunctional fibrotic tissue. Here, we review new developments in our understanding of the mechanisms leading to fibrosis in DMD and several recent advances towards reverting it, as potential treatments to attenuate disease progression.

  6. Drug Discovery of Therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blat, Yuval; Blat, Shachar

    2015-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic, lethal, muscle disorder caused by the loss of the muscle protein, dystrophin, leading to progressive loss of muscle fibers and muscle weakness. Drug discovery efforts targeting DMD have used two main approaches: (1) the restoration of dystrophin expression or the expression of a compensatory protein, and (2) the mitigation of downstream pathological mechanisms, including dysregulated calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, inflammation, fibrosis, and muscle ischemia. The aim of this review is to introduce the disease, its pathophysiology, and the available research tools to a drug discovery audience. This review will also detail the most promising therapies that are currently being tested in clinical trials or in advanced preclinical models. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  7. Yesterday, today and tomorrow of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng ZHANG

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The research history of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD may be roughly divided into 3 phases: clinical describing (1836-1985, molecular diagnosis and exploratory therapy (1985-2020, and the pathogenesis illuminating, gene therapy or treatment against the pathogenesis (2020-. During 1836-1985, doctors described the variation of medical history, clinical signs and symptoms, pathology, biochemistry, and genetic regularity of DMD. During 1985-2020, the scientists set up molecular diagnostic methods and exploratory therapy regimens of DMD. After 2020, some gene therapies, for example, the regimens of exon skipping and reading through, may be used in clinical practice. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.05.002

  8. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: genome editing gives new hope for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispi, Vassili; Matsakas, Antonios

    2018-01-31

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive wasting disease of skeletal and cardiac muscles, representing one of the most common recessive fatal inherited genetic diseases with 1:3500-1:5000 in yearly incidence. It is caused by mutations in the DMD gene that encodes the membrane-associated dystrophin protein. Over the years, many have been the approaches to management of DMD, but despite all efforts, no effective treatment has yet been discovered. Hope for the development of potential therapeutics has followed the recent advances in genome editing and gene therapy. This review gives an overview to DMD and summarises current lines of evidence with regard to treatment and disease management alongside the appropriate considerations. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Understanding the Process of Fibrosis in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacine Kharraz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrosis is the aberrant deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM components during tissue healing leading to loss of its architecture and function. Fibrotic diseases are often associated with chronic pathologies and occur in a large variety of vital organs and tissues, including skeletal muscle. In human muscle, fibrosis is most readily associated with the severe muscle wasting disorder Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, caused by loss of dystrophin gene function. In DMD, skeletal muscle degenerates and is infiltrated by inflammatory cells and the functions of the muscle stem cells (satellite cells become impeded and fibrogenic cells hyperproliferate and are overactivated, leading to the substitution of skeletal muscle with nonfunctional fibrotic tissue. Here, we review new developments in our understanding of the mechanisms leading to fibrosis in DMD and several recent advances towards reverting it, as potential treatments to attenuate disease progression.

  10. Prevalence and correlates of apathy in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, Benjamin; Montreuil, Michèle; Gargiulo, Marcela; Eymard, Bruno; Gagnon, Cynthia; Laberge, Luc

    2015-08-22

    Apathy in DM1 has long been acknowledged in clinical practice. However, a major drawback is that the concept has been only sparsely explored in previous specific studies. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of apathy in myotonic dystrophy (DM1), to compare it with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) patients and normal healthy controls, and explore its relationship to psychopathological features and cognitive function. Levels of apathy in 38 DM1 patients with adult phenotypes were compared with 19 patients with FSHD and 20 matched controls. Patient participants were consecutively recruited, regarding their interdisciplinary annual evaluation at the neuromuscular pathology reference center (Institute of Myology, Paris, France), within an 18-month period. Additional measurements included motor disability, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and cognitive abilities. Inter-group comparisons were performed using non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis tests and Mann-Whitney U Tests. Intra-group comparisons were carried out with the Wilcoxon Signed rank and Friedman tests. Also, Spearman's correlations were used to assess the strength of linear relationships between pairs of variables. The significance level was set at 0.05. Global score of apathy was significantly higher in DM1 patients than in FSHD patients (p apathy, contrasting with only 4 of the 19 (21.1 %) FSHD patients. No control subject was apathetic. Moreover, apathy in DM1 patients was negatively correlated to MMSE (r = -.46, p Apathy is a frequent symptom in DM1 (almost 40 %). It is more prevalent than in a similarly disabled group of patients with FSHD and in controls. Results also show that apathy in DM1 is independent of the psychopathological domain, fatigue, age, and motor disability, but associated to general cognitive status. These results altogether could suggest a central cause for apathy in DM1 rather than an adjustment process to cope with the progressive and debilitating nature of the disease

  11. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy: Lost in translation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Duan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Dongsheng DuanDepartment of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USAAbstract: A milestone of molecular medicine is the identification of dystrophin gene mutation as the cause of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Over the last 2 decades, major advances in dystrophin biology and gene delivery technology have created an opportunity to treat DMD with gene therapy. Remarkable success has been achieved in treating dystrophic mice. Several gene therapy strategies, including plasmid transfer, exon skipping, and adeno-associated virus-mediated microdystrophin therapy, have entered clinical trials. However, therapeutic benefit has not been realized in DMD patients. Bridging the gap between mice and humans is no doubt the most pressing issue facing DMD gene therapy now. In contrast to mice, dystrophin-deficient dogs are genetically and phenotypically similar to human patients. Preliminary gene therapy studies in the canine model may offer critical insights that cannot be obtained from murine studies. It is clear that the canine DMD model may represent an important link between mice and humans. Unfortunately, our current knowledge of dystrophic dogs is limited, and the full picture of disease progression remains to be clearly defined. We also lack rigorous outcome measures (such as in situ force measurement to monitor therapeutic efficacy in dystrophic dogs. Undoubtedly, maintaining a dystrophic dog colony is technically demanding, and the cost of dog studies cannot be underestimated. A carefully coordinated effort from the entire DMD community is needed to make the best use of the precious dog resource. Successful DMD gene therapy may depend on valid translational studies in dystrophin-deficient dogs.Keywords: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, gene therapy, dystrophin, adeno-associated virus, exon-skipping, canine model

  12. Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: practical recommendations to guide management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Michel; Davidson, Zoe; Bouvoie, Veronique; Evenepoel, Nathalie; Haan, Jurn; Soudon, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive neuromuscular disorder causing weakness of the skeletal, respiratory, cardiac and oropharyngeal muscles with up to one third of young men reporting difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). Recent studies on dysphagia in DMD clarify the pathophysiology of swallowing disorders and offer new tools for its assessment but little guidance is available for its management. This paper aims to provide a step-by-step algorithm to facilitate clinical decisions regarding dysphagia management in this patient population. This algorithm is based on 30 years of clinical experience with DMD in a specialised Centre for Neuromuscular Disorders (Inkendaal Rehabilitation Hospital, Belgium) and is supported by literature where available. Dysphagia can worsen the condition of ageing patients with DMD. Apart from the difficulties of chewing and oral fragmentation of the food bolus, dysphagia is rather a consequence of an impairment in the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. By contrast with central neurologic disorders, dysphagia in DMD accompanies solid rather than liquid intake. Symptoms of dysphagia may not be clinically evident; however laryngeal food penetration, accumulation of food residue in the pharynx and/or true laryngeal food aspiration may occur. The prevalence of these issues in DMD is likely underestimated. There is little guidance available for clinicians to manage dysphagia and improve feeding for young men with DMD. This report aims to provide a clinical algorithm to facilitate the diagnosis of dysphagia, to identify the symptoms and to propose practical recommendations to treat dysphagia in the adult DMD population. Implications for Rehabilitation Little guidance is available for the management of dysphagia in Duchenne dystrophy. Food can penetrate the vestibule, accumulate as residue or cause aspiration. We propose recommendations and an algorithm to guide management of dysphagia. Penetration/residue accumulation

  13. Muscle regeneration and inflammation in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauerslev, S; Ørngreen, M C; Hertz, J M; Vissing, J; Krag, T O

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether inflammation and regeneration are prominent in mildly affected muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1A (FSHD1A). Inflammation in muscle has been suggested by MRI studies in patients with FSHD1A. We analysed immunohistological and histological stains of muscle biopsies from 24 patients with FSHD1A, using 10 patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) for comparison. Internalized nuclei were more prevalent in BMD (23.7 ± 10.8%) vs FSHD1A (6.3 ± 6.8%; P < 0.001), indicating more past regenerating fibres in BMD. Recently regenerating fibres, expressing neonatal myosin heavy chain and vimentin, did not differ significantly between patients with FSHD1A (1.1 ± 2.9%) and patients with BMD (1.8 ± 1.9%). Regeneration was not correlated with the number of KpnI restriction fragment repeats, an FSHD1A-defining genotype property within the D4Z4 locus, or overall disease severity in patients with FSHD1A. Macrophages were more prevalent in FSHD1A (0.50 ± 0.63 per mm(2) ) vs BMD (0.07 ± 0.07 per mm(2) ), whereas inflammatory T cells were equally infrequent. Macrophages were more prevalent in patients with FSHD1A and could be an important pathogenic mechanism for the initiation of the dystrophic process. Furthermore, regeneration was unrelated to genotype and disease severity in FSHD1A. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Laboratory Abnormalities in Patients with Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heatwole, Chad; Johnson, Nicholas; Goldberg, Bradley; Martens, William; Moxley, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Background Myotonic dystrophy type-2 (DM2) is a recently discovered adult muscular dystrophy. Similar to DM1, this disease causes progressive debilitating weakness, clinical myotonia, and early cataracts, and is thought to cause widespread physiologic dysfunction of multiple organ systems. Objective To analyze and compile the laboratory abnormalities of patients with DM2. Design Baseline DM2 laboratory data were compiled representing 68 different types of laboratory tests and 1442 total studies. Setting University Medical Center. Patients Eighty-three adults with genetically confirmed or clinically probable DM2 were identified. Of these patients, 49 had documented baseline laboratory screening. Main Outcome Measures The individual frequencies of abnormal values in the population with DM2 studied. Results Of the 1442 studies, results for 359 (24.9%) were outside of their standard reference ranges. Of the 68 types of laboratory tests studied, 43 had values from fifteen or more different patients with DM2. The relative frequency of an abnormally elevated laboratory value was greater than 50% in several tests, including the levels of creatine kinase, total cholesterol, lactate dehydrogenase, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). In addition, serum levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) were low in 75% of all DM2 patients tested and absolute lymphocyte counts were low in 54% of all DM2 patients tested. Conclusion There is a high frequency of laboratory abnormalities in patients with DM2. These abnormalities provide insight into the widespread pathologic manifestations of DM2 and may form a basis for clinical monitoring and disease screening. PMID:21911698

  15. Neuroimaging study of Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murasugi, Hiroko (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1992-11-01

    Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) has been attracting attention in recent years because of its brain malformation and progressive muscular dystrophy. The intravitam recognition of brain malformation has been remarkably enhanced by the advent of noninvasive neuroimaging techniques such as CT and MRI. In this study, 87 cranial CT scans and 22 MRIs of the brain, carried out on 60 patients with FCMD, were systematically surveyed, and the correlation between neuroradiological findings and clinical disabilities, and, in two autopsy cases, neuropathological findings was evaluated. Four cases of lissencephalic, 29 of pachygyric, and one of polymicrogyric (suspected) brain surface, and 2 normal brain surfaces were recognized. The patients with lissencephalic brain surface were compared using Dobyns' criteria. Grading of pachygyria was judged as bilateral II in 52% of cases and bilateral I in 48%. The surface of the occipital lobe could not be confirmed with either CT or MRI. Polymicrogyria was suspected using MRI but could not confirmed with CT. Five caces of lissencephaly had never learned any meaningful words and all but one were bedridden because of poor head control. The abilities of patients were better when the grading of pachygyria was milder. Mental disability and peak motor function correlate more closely with the degree and extent of brain malformation than with muscle degeneration. The decrease in radiodensity in the white matter was remarkable in 12 out of 19 cases (63%), and was usually bilaterally symmetrical. An increase in radiodensity in the white matter with age was observed in 3 patients. The rate of myelination was slower than normal in 3 out of the 6 cases. (author).

  16. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  17. Patterns of growth in ambulatory males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Nancy A; Yang, Michele L; Weitzenkamp, David A; Andrews, Jennifer; Meaney, F John; Oleszek, Joyce; Miller, Lisa A; Matthews, Dennis; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn

    2013-12-01

    To provide weight-for-age, height-for-age, and body mass index-for-age growth reference standards for ambulatory, steroid-naïve males, ages 2-12 years, with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and to compare these growth curves to the 2000 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts for boys, which serve as references of physical size and growth for the general male pediatric population in the US. Through a multi-state population-based surveillance of individuals with muscular dystrophy, a total of 1877 weight and 1544 height measurements ascertained during 1985-2010 from 513 males with DMD were obtained retrospectively from medical record review. Cases were classified as DMD if loss of ambulation occurred before the 12th birthday or, if younger than 12 years and still ambulating, the earliest symptoms of dystrophinopathy occurred before the 6th birthday. Each growth chart was constructed using 5 percentiles: 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th. Smoothing procedures were applied in 2 stages to the irregular plots of the empirical percentile values. A set of growth curves, derived from a large cohort of male youth with DMD, are presented. These curves demonstrate that DMD males are shorter and tend to the extremes of weight and body mass index compared with the general male pediatric population in the US. Charts representing the pattern of growth in ambulatory, steroid-naïve males with DMD can facilitate monitoring of growth and early detection of unusual growth patterns. Use of these growth standards also will assist in monitoring responses to corticosteroid treatment. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  19. Tadalafil alleviates muscle ischemia in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth A; Barresi, Rita; Byrne, Barry J; Tsimerinov, Evgeny I; Scott, Bryan L; Walker, Ashley E; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V; Anene, Francine; Elashoff, Robert M; Thomas, Gail D; Victor, Ronald G

    2012-11-28

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a progressive X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. Like Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), BMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a structural cytoskeletal protein that also targets other proteins to the muscle sarcolemma. Among these is neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), which requires certain spectrin-like repeats in dystrophin's rod domain and the adaptor protein α-syntrophin to be targeted to the sarcolemma. When healthy skeletal muscle is subjected to exercise, sarcolemmal nNOSμ-derived NO attenuates local α-adrenergic vasoconstriction, thereby optimizing perfusion of muscle. We found previously that this protective mechanism is defective-causing functional muscle ischemia-in dystrophin-deficient muscles of the mdx mouse (a model of DMD) and of children with DMD, in whom nNOSμ is mislocalized to the cytosol instead of the sarcolemma. We report that this protective mechanism also is defective in men with BMD in whom the most common dystrophin mutations disrupt sarcolemmal targeting of nNOSμ. In these men, the vasoconstrictor response, measured as a decrease in muscle oxygenation, to reflex sympathetic activation is not appropriately attenuated during exercise of the dystrophic muscles. In a randomized placebo-controlled crossover trial, we show that functional muscle ischemia is alleviated and normal blood flow regulation is fully restored in the muscles of men with BMD by boosting NO-cGMP (guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate) signaling with a single dose of the drug tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase 5A inhibitor. These results further support an essential role for sarcolemmal nNOSμ in the normal modulation of sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising human skeletal muscle and implicate the NO-cGMP pathway as a putative new target for treating BMD.

  20. Intraocular pressure, corneal thickness, and corneal hysteresis in Steinert's myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Filho, Carlos Alexandre de A; Prata, Tiago Santos; Sousa, Aline Katia Siqueira; Doi, Larissa Morimoto; Melo Jr, Luiz Alberto Soares

    2011-01-01

    Low intraocular pressure (IOP) measured by Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) is one of the ocular manifestations of Steinert's myotonic dystrophy. The goal of this study was to evaluate the corneal-compensated IOP as well as corneal properties (central corneal thickness and corneal hysteresis) in patients with myotonic dystrophy. A total of 12 eyes of 6 patients with Steinert's myotonic dystrophy (dystrophy group) and 12 eyes of 6 age-, race-, and gender-matched healthy volunteers (control group) were included in the study. GAT, Dynamic Contour Tonometry (DCT-Pascal) and Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA) were used to assess the IOP. Central corneal thickness was obtained by ultrasound pachymetry, and corneal hysteresis was analyzed using the ORA device. In light of the multiplicity of tests performed, the significance level was set at 0.01 rather than 0.05. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) GAT, DCT, and corneal-compensated ORA IOP in the dystrophy group were 5.4 (1.4) mmHg, 9.7 (1.5) mmHg, and 10.1 (2.6) mmHg, respectively. The mean (SD) GAT, DCT, and corneal-compensated ORA IOP in the control group was 12.6 (2.9) mmHg, 15.5 (2.7) mmHg, and 15.8 (3.4) mmHg, respectively. There were significant differences in IOP values between dystrophy and control groups obtained by GAT (mean, -7.2 mmHg; 99% confidence interval [CI], -10.5 to -3.9 mmHg; Pcorneal-compensated ORA measurements (mean, -5.7 mmHg; 99% CI, -10.4 to -1.0 mmHg; P=0.003). The mean (SD) central corneal thickness was similar in the dystrophy (542 [31] µm) and control (537 [11] µm) groups (P=0.65). The mean (SD) corneal hysteresis in the dystrophy and control groups were 11.2 (1.5) mmHg and 9.7 (1.2) mmHg, respectively (P=0.04). Patients with Steinert's myotonic dystrophy showed lower Goldmann and corneal-compensated IOP in comparison with healthy individuals. Since central corneal thickness and corneal hysteresis did not differ significantly between groups, the lower IOP readings documented in this

  1. Intraocular pressure, corneal thickness, and corneal hysteresis in Steinert's myotonic dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre de A. Garcia Filho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Low intraocular pressure (IOP measured by Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT is one of the ocular manifestations of Steinert's myotonic dystrophy. The goal of this study was to evaluate the corneal-compensated IOP as well as corneal properties (central corneal thickness and corneal hysteresis in patients with myotonic dystrophy. METHODS: A total of 12 eyes of 6 patients with Steinert's myotonic dystrophy (dystrophy group and 12 eyes of 6 age-, race-, and gender-matched healthy volunteers (control group were included in the study. GAT, Dynamic Contour Tonometry (DCT-Pascal and Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA were used to assess the IOP. Central corneal thickness was obtained by ultrasound pachymetry, and corneal hysteresis was analyzed using the ORA device. In light of the multiplicity of tests performed, the significance level was set at 0.01 rather than 0.05. RESULTS: The mean (standard deviation [SD] GAT, DCT, and corneal-compensated ORA IOP in the dystrophy group were 5.4 (1.4 mmHg, 9.7 (1.5 mmHg, and 10.1 (2.6 mmHg, respectively. The mean (SD GAT, DCT, and corneal-compensated ORA IOP in the control group was 12.6 (2.9 mmHg, 15.5 (2.7 mmHg, and 15.8 (3.4 mmHg, respectively. There were significant differences in IOP values between dystrophy and control groups obtained by GAT (mean, -7.2 mmHg; 99% confidence interval [CI], -10.5 to -3.9 mmHg; P<0.001, DCT (mean, -5.9 mmHg; 99% CI, -8.9 to -2.8 mmHg; P<0.001, and corneal-compensated ORA measurements (mean, -5.7 mmHg; 99% CI, -10.4 to -1.0 mmHg; P=0.003. The mean (SD central corneal thickness was similar in the dystrophy (542 [31] µm and control (537 [11] µm groups (P=0.65. The mean (SD corneal hysteresis in the dystrophy and control groups were 11.2 (1.5 mmHg and 9.7 (1.2 mmHg, respectively (P=0.04. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with Steinert's myotonic dystrophy showed lower Goldmann and corneal-compensated IOP in comparison with healthy individuals. Since central corneal thickness and

  2. Stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A Web of Science-based literature analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng

    2012-08-05

    To identify global research trends in stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy using a bibliometric analysis of Web of Science. We performed a bibliometric analysis of studies on stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy from 2002 to 2011 retrieved from Web of Science. (a) peer-reviewed published articles on stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy indexed in Web of Science; (b) original research articles, reviews, meeting abstracts, proceedings papers, book chapters, editorial material, and news items; and (c) publication between 2002 and 2011. (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) documents that were not published in the public domain; and (c) corrected papers. (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to subject areas; (3) distribution according to journals; (4) distribution according to country; (5) distribution according to institution; (6) distribution according to institution in China; (7) distribution according to institution that cooperated with Chinese institutions; (8) top-cited articles from 2002 to 2006; (9) top-cited articles from 2007 to 2011. A total of 318 publications on stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy were retrieved from Web of Science from 2002 to 2011, of which almost half derived from American authors and institutes. The number of publications has gradually increased over the past 10 years. Most papers appeared in journals with a focus on gene and molecular research, such as Molecular Therapy, Neuromuscular Disorders, and PLoS One. The 10 most-cited papers from 2002 to 2006 were mostly about different kinds of stem cell transplantation for muscle regeneration, while the 10 most-cited papers from 2007 to 2011 were mostly about new techniques of stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The publications on stem cell transplantation for treating Duchenne muscular

  3. Fat embolism after fractures in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an underdiagnosed complication? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feder D

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available David Feder,1 Miriam Eva Koch,1 Beniamino Palmieri,2 Fernando Luiz Affonso Fonseca,1 Alzira Alves de Siqueira Carvalho3 1Pharmacology Department, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of General Surgery and Surgical Specialties, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia Medical School, Surgical Clinic, Modena, Italy; 3Neuroscience Department, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most frequent lethal genetic disease. Several clinical trials have established both the beneficial effect of steroids in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the well-known risk of side effects associated with their daily use. For many years it has been known that steroids associated with ambulation loss lead to obesity and also damage the bone structure resulting in the bone density reduction and increased incidence of bone fractures and fat embolism syndrome, an underdiagnosed complication after fractures. Fat embolism syndrome is characterized by consciousness disturbance, respiratory failure and skin rashes. The use of steroids in Duchenne muscular dystrophy may result in vertebral fractures, even without previous trauma. Approximately 25% of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have a long bone fracture, and 1% to 22% of fractures have a chance to develop fat embolism syndrome. As the patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have progressive cardiac and respiratory muscle dysfunction, the fat embolism may be unnoticed clinically and may result in increased risk of death and major complications. Different treatments and prevention measures of fat embolism have been proposed; however, so far, there is no efficient therapy. The prevention, early diagnosis and adequate symptomatic treatment are of paramount importance. The fat embolism syndrome should always be considered in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy presenting with fractures, or an unexplained and

  4. Fighting Against Disuse of the Masticatory System in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: A Pilot Study Using Chewing Gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggen, H.W. van; Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Steenks, M.H.; Bilt, A. van der; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Groot, I.J.M. de; Kalaykova, S.I.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients report masticatory problems. The aim was to determine the efficacy of mastication training in Duchenne muscular dystrophy using chewing gum for 4 weeks. In all, 17 patients and 17 healthy age-matched males participated. The masticatory performance was assessed

  5. Fighting against disuse of the masticatory system in duchenne muscular dystrophy : A pilot study using chewing gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bruggen, H. Willemijn; Van Den Engel-Hoek, Lenie; Steenks, Michel H.; Van Der Bilt, Andries; Bronkhorst, Ewald M.; Creugers, Nico H J; De Groot, Imelda J M; Kalaykova, Stanimira I.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients report masticatory problems. The aim was to determine the efficacy of mastication training in Duchenne muscular dystrophy using chewing gum for 4 weeks. In all, 17 patients and 17 healthy age-matched males participated. The masticatory performance was assessed

  6. Coiled-coil interactions modulate multimerization, mitochondrial binding and kinase activity of myotonic dystrophy protein kinase splice isoforms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, R.E.M.A. van; Tjeertes, J.V.; Mulders, S.A.M.; Oude Ophuis, R.J.A.; Wieringa, B.; Wansink, D.G.

    2006-01-01

    The myotonic dystrophy protein kinase polypeptide repertoire in mice and humans consists of six different splice isoforms that vary in the nature of their C-terminal tails and in the presence or absence of an internal Val-Ser-Gly-Gly-Gly motif. Here, we demonstrate that myotonic dystrophy protein

  7. The analysis of the clinical and tool parameters characterizing a cardiomyopathyat various forms of the progressing muscular dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poverennova I.E.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: studying of clinical and tool characteristics of cardiomyopathies at various forms of the progressing muscular dystrophies. Material and methods. There had been 103 patients with hereditary forms of the progressing muscular dystrophies examined, among which 35 persons were with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, 28 with an atrophic myo-tonia, and 40 with a limb girdle dystrophy is conducted. Assessment of clinical and tool features of cardiomyopathies at these types of the hereditary progressing muscular dystrophies had been carried out. Results. In the group of patients with diffusion damage of a myocardium in the form of dystrophic violations had been revealed. Existence of a negative tooth of T in some assignments and lengthenings of an interval of QT is noted. With a dystrophic myotonia violation of a warm rhythm occurred at patients by 87 times more often than in the group of comparison. Violation of a rhythm of heart in group of patients with a limb girdle dystrophy came to light 91 times more often in reference to the group of comparison. Conclusion. Violations in a cardiovascular system at Duchenne muscular dystrophy are preferentially diffusion changes in a myocardium. At a dystrophic myotonia and a limb girdle dystrophy cardial violations concern mainly excitability and the conductivity of heart which are the main reason of developing of this disease at these patients.

  8. Physical Activity in Boys With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Is Lower and Less Demanding Compared to Healthy Boys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heutinck, L.B.; Kampen, N. van; Jansen, M.; Groot, I.J.M. de

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the amount of physical activity and perception of physical activity in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) compared to healthy boys. A questionnaire described 6 domains of physical activity. Four Duchenne muscular dystrophy subgroups were made: early and late ambulatory,

  9. Impact of three genetic musculoskeletal diseases: a comparative synthesis of achondroplasia, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogba, Maman Joyce; Rauch, Frank; Douglas, Erin; Bedos, Christophe

    2014-10-25

    Achondroplasia, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and osteogenesis imperfecta are among the most frequent rare genetic disorders affecting the musculoskeletal system in children. Rare genetic disorders are severely disabling and can have substantial impacts on families, children, and on healthcare systems. This literature review aims to classify, summarize and compare these non-medical impacts of achondroplasia, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and osteogenesis imperfecta.

  10. Impact of three genetic musculoskeletal diseases: a comparative synthesis of achondroplasia, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and osteogenesis imperfecta

    OpenAIRE

    Dogba, Maman Joyce; Rauch, Frank; Douglas, Erin; Bedos, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Achondroplasia, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and osteogenesis imperfecta are among the most frequent rare genetic disorders affecting the musculoskeletal system in children. Rare genetic disorders are severely disabling and can have substantial impacts on families, children, and on healthcare systems. This literature review aims to classify, summarize and compare these non-medical impacts of achondroplasia, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and osteogenesis imperfecta.

  11. First use of an intra-pericardial continuous flow ventricular assist device in a child with muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ryan R; Priest, Marc; Pizarro, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a common cause of death in patients with muscular dystrophy. Mechanical support may be an important component of long-term heart failure therapy in these patients. We present a report of a child with muscular dystrophy successfully implanted with a Heartware HVAD.

  12. Transgenic overexpression of human DMPK accumulates into hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myotonic myopathy and hypotension traits of myotonic dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Cochlain, D.F.; Perez-Terzic, C.; Reyes, S.; Kane, G.C.; Behfar, A.; Hodgson, D.M.; Strommen, J.A.; Liu, X.K.; Broek, W.J.A.A. van den; Wansink, D.G.; Wieringa, B.; Terzic, A.

    2004-01-01

    Abnormal expression of human myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (hDMPK) gene products has been implicated in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), yet the impact of distress accumulation produced by persistent overexpression of this poorly understood member of the Rho kinase-related protein kinase

  13. ECM-Related Myopathies and Muscular Dystrophies: Pros and Cons of Protein Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ry, Pam M; Fontelonga, Tatiana M; Barraza-Flores, Pamela; Sarathy, Apurva; Nunes, Andreia M; Burkin, Dean J

    2017-09-12

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) myopathies and muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic diseases caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins that provide critical links between muscle cells and the extracellular matrix. These include structural proteins of the ECM, muscle cell receptors, enzymes, and intracellular proteins. Loss of adhesion within the myomatrix results in progressive muscle weakness. For many ECM muscular dystrophies, symptoms can occur any time after birth and often result in reduced life expectancy. There are no cures for the ECM-related muscular dystrophies and treatment options are limited to palliative care. Several therapeutic approaches have been explored to treat muscular dystrophies including gene therapy, gene editing, exon skipping, embryonic, and adult stem cell therapy, targeting genetic modifiers, modulating inflammatory responses, or preventing muscle degeneration. Recently, protein therapies that replace components of the defective myomatrix or enhance muscle and/or extracellular matrix integrity and function have been explored. Preclinical studies for many of these biologics have been promising in animal models of these muscle diseases. This review aims to summarize the ECM muscular dystrophies for which protein therapies are being developed and discuss the exciting potential and possible limitations of this approach for treating this family of devastating genetic muscle diseases. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:1519-1536, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Bortezomib partially improves laminin α2 chain-deficient muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Zandra; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely C; Holmberg, Johan; Carmignac, Virginie; Durbeej, Madeleine

    2014-05-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy, caused by mutations in LAMA2 (the gene encoding laminin α2 chain), is a severe and incapacitating disease for which no therapy is yet available. We have recently demonstrated that proteasome activity is increased in laminin α2 chain-deficient muscle and that treatment with the nonpharmaceutical proteasome inhibitor MG-132 reduces muscle pathology in laminin α2 chain-deficient dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice. Here, we explore the use of the selective and therapeutic proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (currently used for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma) in dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice and in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A muscle cells. Outcome measures included quantitative muscle morphology, gene and miRNA expression analyses, proteasome activity, motor activity, and survival. Bortezomib improved several histological hallmarks of disease, partially normalized miRNA expression (miR-1 and miR-133a), and enhanced body weight, locomotion, and survival of dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice. In addition, bortezomib reduced proteasome activity in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A myoblasts and myotubes. These findings provide evidence that the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib partially reduces laminin α2 chain-deficient muscular dystrophy. Investigation of the clinical efficacy of bortezomib administration in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A clinical trials may be warranted. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Heterozygous mutation in OTX2 associated with early-onset retinal dystrophy with atypical maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla-Elsayed, Maram Ea; Schatz, Patrik; Neuhaus, Christine; Khan, Arif O

    2017-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in OTX2 have been associated with a range of ocular and pituitary abnormalities. We report a novel heterozygous deletion in OTX2 underlying early-onset retinal dystrophy with atypical maculopathy. Clinical examination included electroretinography and multimodal retinal imaging. Molecular genetic testing was composed of next-generation sequencing of a panel of retinal dystrophy genes. A now 17-year-old boy presented 12 years earlier with a history of progressively poor vision since birth, nyctalopia, and early-onset retinal dystrophy with atypical maculopathy. He also had bilateral microphthalmos and a slim prepubertal appearance; growth hormone levels were within normal ranges. Next-generation sequencing of a retinal dystrophy gene panel revealed a heterozygous deletion c.485delC (p.Pro162G.Infs*24) in exon 5 of OTX2. This second report of maculopathy associated with a heterozygous mutation in OTX2 confirms that mutations in OTX2 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of atypical hereditary maculopathy, with or without rod-cone dystrophy.

  16. Vibration therapy tolerated in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kenneth A; Ramage, Barbara; Khan, Aneal; Mah, Jean K

    2014-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked recessive muscular dystrophy. Clinical management primarily involves rehabilitation strategies aimed at preserving functional mobility as long as possible. Side-alternating vibration therapy is a rehabilitation intervention that has shown promise in a number of different neuromuscular disorders, and has the potential to preserve strength, functional mobility, and bone mass. There has been little research regarding the tolerance to side-alternating vibration therapy in muscle diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Four patients were recruited for a pilot study assessing the safety and tolerance of side-alternating vibration therapy in individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. All patients participated in a 4-week training period involving side-alternating vibration therapy sessions three times per week. Serum creatine kinase was measured, and adverse effects reviewed at each session with functional mobility assessed before and after the training period. All patients tolerated the training protocol well, and there were no major changes in functional mobility. One patient had a transient increase in creatine kinase during the study; however, levels of this enzyme were stable overall when comparing the pretraining and posttraining values. Some patients reported subjective improvement during the training period. Side-alternating vibration therapy is well tolerated in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and may have potential to improve or maintain functional mobility and strength in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Trends with corticosteroid use in males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy born 1982-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Deborah J; Kumar, Anil; West, Nancy A; DiRienzo, A Gregory; James, Katherine A; Oleszek, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    This study examines trends in corticosteroid use for males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy by birth year, race/ethnicity, and knowledge of Duchenne muscular dystrophy family history. Firstborn males (n = 521) selected from a population-based surveillance system of Duchenne muscular dystrophy were analyzed using Kaplan Meier and regression methods. Comparing males born 1982 to 1986 with males born 1997 to 2001, steroid use increased from 54% to 72% and mean age at steroid initiation decreased from 8.2 to 7.1 years. Hispanics and non-Hispanic Black males used steroids less frequently and delayed initiation compared to white males. Compared to males without a Duchenne muscular dystrophy family history, males with known family history were half as likely to use steroids. Duration of steroid use increased over time and age at initiation decreased. Racial/ethnic disparities exist for steroid use and should be addressed to improve outcome and quality of life for boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. A systematic review and meta-analysis on the epidemiology of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Jean K; Korngut, Lawrence; Dykeman, Jonathan; Day, Lundy; Pringsheim, Tamara; Jette, Nathalie

    2014-06-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a broad group of hereditary muscle diseases with variable severity. Population-based prevalence estimates have been reported but pooled estimates are not available. We performed a systematic review of worldwide population-based studies reporting muscular dystrophies prevalence and/or incidence using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The search strategy included key terms related to muscular dystrophies, incidence, prevalence and epidemiology. Two reviewers independently reviewed all abstracts, full text articles and abstracted data using standardized forms. Pooling of prevalence estimates was performed using random effect models. 1104 abstracts and 167 full text articles were reviewed. Thirty-one studies met all eligibility criteria and were included in the final analysis. The studies differed widely in their approaches to case ascertainment, resulting in significant methodological heterogeneity and varied data quality. The pooled prevalence of DMD and BMD was 4.78 (95% CI 1.94-11.81) and 1.53 (95% CI 0.26-8.94) per 100,000 males respectively. The incidence of DMD ranged from 10.71 to 27.78 per 100,000. This is the first meta-analysis of worldwide prevalence estimates for muscular dystrophies. There is a need for more epidemiological studies addressing global estimates on incidence and prevalence of muscular dystrophies, utilizing standardized diagnostic criteria as well as multiple sources of case ascertainment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Age-related thoracic radiographic changes in golden and labrador retriever muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedu, Anne-Sophie; Labruyère, Julien J; Thibaud, Jean Laurent; Barthélémy, Inès; Leperlier, Dimitri; Saunders, Jimmy H; Blot, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Golden retriever and Labrador retriever muscular dystrophy are inherited progressive degenerative myopathies that are used as models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in man. Thoracic lesions were reported to be the most consistent radiographic finding in golden retriever dogs in a study where radiographs were performed at a single-time point. Muscular dystrophy worsens clinically over time and longitudinal studies in dogs are lacking. Thus our goal was to describe the thoracic abnormalities of golden retriever and Labrador retriever dogs, to determine the timing of first expression and their evolution with time. To this purpose, we retrospectively reviewed 390 monthly radiographic studies of 38 golden retrievers and six Labrador retrievers with muscular dystrophy. The same thoracic lesions were found in both golden and Labrador retrievers. They included, in decreasing frequency, flattened and/or scalloped diaphragmatic shape (43/44), pulmonary hyperinflation (34/44), hiatal hernia (34/44), cranial pectus excavatum (23/44), bronchopneumonia (22/44), and megaesophagus (14/44). The last three lesions were not reported in a previous radiographic study in golden retriever dogs. In all but two dogs the thoracic changes were detected between 4 and 10 months and were persistent or worsened over time. Clinically, muscular dystrophy should be included in the differential diagnosis of dogs with a combination of these thoracic radiographic findings. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  20. Vascular-targeted therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common muscular dystrophy and an X-linked recessive, progressive muscle wasting disease caused by the absence of a functional dystrophin protein. Dystrophin has a structural role as a cytoskeletal stabilization protein and protects cells against contraction-induced damage. Dystrophin also serves a signaling role through mechanotransduction of forces and localization of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), which produces nitric oxide (NO) to facilitate vasorelaxation. In DMD, the signaling defects produce inadequate tissue perfusion caused by functional ischemia due to a diminished ability to respond to shear stress induced endothelium-dependent dilation. Additionally, the structural defects seen in DMD render myocytes with an increased susceptibility to mechanical stress. The combination of both defects is necessary to generate myocyte damage, which induces successive rounds of myofiber degeneration and regeneration, loss of calcium homeostasis, chronic inflammatory response, fibrosis, and myonecrosis. In individuals with DMD, these processes inevitably cause loss of ambulation shortly after the first decade and an abbreviated life with death in the third or fourth decade due to cardio-respiratory anomalies. There is no known cure for DMD, and although the culpable gene has been identified for more than twenty years, research on treatments has produced few clinically relevant results. Several recent studies on novel DMD therapeutics are vascular targeted and focused on attenuating the inherent functional ischemia. One approach improves vasorelaxation capacity through pharmaceutical inhibition of either phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Another approach increases the density of the underlying vascular network by inducing angiogenesis, and this has been accomplished through either direct delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or by downregulating the VEGF decoy

  1. The golden retriever model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornegay, Joe N

    2017-05-19

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked disease caused by mutations in the DMD gene and loss of the protein dystrophin. The absence of dystrophin leads to myofiber membrane fragility and necrosis, with eventual muscle atrophy and contractures. Affected boys typically die in their second or third decade due to either respiratory failure or cardiomyopathy. Despite extensive attempts to develop definitive therapies for DMD, the standard of care remains prednisone, which has only palliative benefits. Animal models, mainly the mdx mouse and golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dog, have played a key role in studies of DMD pathogenesis and treatment development. Because the GRMD clinical syndrome is more severe than in mice, better aligning with the progressive course of DMD, canine studies may translate better to humans. The original founder dog for all GRMD colonies worldwide was identified in the early 1980s before the discovery of the DMD gene and dystrophin. Accordingly, analogies to DMD were initially drawn based on similar clinical features, ranging from the X-linked pattern of inheritance to overlapping histopathologic lesions. Confirmation of genetic homology between DMD and GRMD came with identification of the underlying GRMD mutation, a single nucleotide change that leads to exon skipping and an out-of-frame DMD transcript. GRMD colonies have subsequently been established to conduct pathogenetic and preclinical treatment studies. Simultaneous with the onset of GRMD treatment trials, phenotypic biomarkers were developed, allowing definitive characterization of treatment effect. Importantly, GRMD studies have not always substantiated findings from mdx mice and have sometimes identified serious treatment side effects. While the GRMD model may be more clinically relevant than the mdx mouse, usage has been limited by practical considerations related to expense and the number of dogs available. This further complicates ongoing broader concerns about

  2. Milder forms of muscular dystrophy associated with POMGNT2 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Yukari; Dong, Mingrui; Ogawa, Megumu; Hayashi, Yukiko K.; Kuru, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Kenji; Nagai, Shigehiro; Ozasa, Shiro; Nonaka, Ikuya; Nishino, Ichizo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic variants in patients with dystroglycanopathy (DGP) and assess the pathogenicity of these variants. Methods: A total of 20 patients with DGP were identified by immunohistochemistry or Western blot analysis. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed using patient samples. The pathogenicity of the variants identified was evaluated on the basis of the phenotypic recovery in a knockout (KO) haploid human cell line by transfection with mutated POMGNT2 cDNA and on the basis of the in vitro enzymatic activity of mutated proteins. Results: WES identified homozygous and compound heterozygous missense variants in POMGNT2 in 3 patients with the milder limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and intellectual disability without brain malformation. The 2 identified variants were located in the putative glycosyltransferase domain of POMGNT2, which affected its enzymatic activity. Mutated POMGNT2 cDNAs failed to rescue the phenotype of POMGNT2-KO cells. Conclusions: Novel variants in POMGNT2 are associated with milder forms of LGMD. The findings of this study expand the clinical and pathologic spectrum of DGP associated with POMGNT2 variants from the severest Walker-Warburg syndrome to the mildest LGMD phenotypes. The simple method to verify pathogenesis of variants may allow researchers to evaluate any variants present in all of the known causative genes and the variants in novel candidate genes to detect DGPs, particularly without using patients' specimens. PMID:27066570

  3. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy secondary to piriformis syndrome: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçali, Didem; Taş, Ayça; Cizmeci, Pelin; Oktar, Suna; Zinnuroğlu, Murat; Arslan, Emre; Köseoğlu, Hüseyin; Babacan, Avni

    2009-04-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a rare cause of hip and foot pain which may be due to sciatic nerve irritation because of anatomic abnormalities of sciatic nerve and piriformis muscle or herniated disc, facet syndrome, trochanteric bursit, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, endometriosis and other conditions where sciatic nerve is irritated. There has been no reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) case presented due to piriformis syndrome before. A sixty-two-year-old female patient had right foot and hip pain (VNS: 8), redness and swelling in the foot since 15 days. Her history revealed long walks and travelling 3 weeks ago and sitting on the foot for a long time for a couple of days. Physical examination revealed painful hip movement, positive straight leg rise. Erythema and hyperalgesia was present in dorsum of the right foot. Right foot dorsiflexion was weak and hyperesthesia was found in right L4-5 dermatome. Medical treatment and ultrasound treatment to piriformis muscle was not effective. The patient was injected 40 mg triamcinolon and local anesthetic in right piriformis muscle under floroscopy by diagnosis of piriformis syndrome, neuropathic pain and RSD. Pain and hyperalgesia resolved and motor weakness was better. During follow-up right foot redness resolved and pain decreased (VNS: 1). In this case report, there was vascular, muscle and skeletal signs supporting RSD, which shows us the therapoetic effect of diagnostic piriformis injection. The patient history, physical examination and diagnostic tests were evaluated by a multidisciplinary team which contributed to the treatment.

  4. Severe metabolic acidosis in adult patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Cascio, Christian M; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Kohler, Malcolm; Fehr, Thomas; Bloch, Konrad E

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive paresis, respiratory failure and premature death. Long-term positive pressure ventilation can improve quality of life and survival, but previously unrecognized complications may arise. We analyzed the characteristics of severe metabolic acidosis occurring in 8 of 55 DMD patients, of 20-36 years of age, observed over a 5-year period. All patients were on positive pressure ventilation and were being treated for chronic constipation. Before admission, they had had a reduced intake of fluids and food. Upon examination, they were severely ill, dyspneic and suffering from abdominal discomfort. Metabolic acidosis with a high anion gap was noted in 5 of the 8 patients and with a normal anion gap in the other 3. They all recovered after the administration of fluids and nutrition, the regulation of bowel movements and treatment with antibiotics, as appropriate. Metabolic acidosis is a life-threatening, potentially preventable complication in older DMD patients. Early recognition, subsequent administration of fluids, nutrition and antibiotics and regulation of bowel movements seem to be essential. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. [Repeated cerebral infarction in a patient with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Buschmann, C; Ruiz Falcó, M L; Tamariz Martel Moreno, A; García Peñas, J J; Gutiérrez Solana, L G; Pérez Jiménez, A; Marín, C

    We describe a case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) with multiple strokes related to dilated cardiomyopathy. A 13 year old boy, with advanced stage DMD was admitted to the hospital because of acute motor and sensory impairment in his right bodyside. Imaging study revealed lesions in basal ganglia and prerolandic cortex in the left hemisphere that were compatible with infarcts in the territory of the medial cerebral artery. Cardiologic evaluation revealed dilation of the left ventriculi and systolic dysfunction with ejection fraction of 35 40%. The symptoms evolved to a residual right hemiparesia. Five months later, the patient developed a transient episode of aphasia and the study performed in this case revealed lesions compatible with infarcts in basal ganglia and insular cortex of the right cerebral hemisphere. Cerebral infarction related to cardiomyopathy can worsen the clinical condition of patients with DMD. Early treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy with systolic dysfunction, including use of antithrombotic agents to prevent cerebrovascular complications, could help to improve the course of the disease.

  6. Punctiform and Polychromatophilic Dominant Pre-Descemet Corneal Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrou, Lisa; Midgley, Julian; Romanchuk, Kenneth Gerald

    2016-04-01

    To describe the slit-lamp appearance and corneal confocal microscopy of autosomal dominant punctiform and polychromatophilic pre-Descemet corneal dystrophy in 3 members of the same family. Slit-lamp examination of a 9-year-old boy showed bilateral polychromatophilic corneal opacities in a pre-Descemet membrane location evenly deposited limbus to limbus, both horizontally and vertically, with an intervening clear cornea. The corneal endothelium was normal on corneal confocal microscopy, with hyperreflective opacities of various sizes located pre-Descemet membrane. Slit-lamp examination of the patient's father and brother revealed identical crystalline deposition in the pre-Descemet corneal stroma. The remainders of the eye examinations were otherwise normal in all 3 individuals, and all were asymptomatic. The general physical examination and laboratory investigations of the patient were all normal, as were the laboratory investigations of the other 2 family members. There was no progression in the corneal findings over 6 months of follow-up. These patients likely illustrate a rare autosomal dominant pre-Descemet crystalline keratopathy that has been reported only once previously.

  7. Mothers' psychological adaptation to Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peay, Holly L; Meiser, Bettina; Kinnett, Kathleen; Furlong, Pat; Porter, Kathryn; Tibben, Aad

    2016-05-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DBMD) cause significant emotional and care-related burden on caregivers, but no studies have evaluated predictors of positive caregiver outcomes, including disorder-specific psychological adaptation. Using a community-engaged approach focused on supporting mothers in positive aspects of caregiving, this prospective study aims to assess (i) the association between child's baseline functional status and mothers' illness perceptions, resilience, and coping self-efficacy; and (ii) predictors of mothers' psychological adaptation to caring for a child with DBMD. Biological mothers with at least one living child with DBMD completed a baseline survey (n=205) with 1-year (n=147) and 2-year (n=144) follow-up surveys. Worse child's baseline function was associated not only with increased caregiver burden and reduced maternal resilience, but also with perception of positive disease impact on the family. At two follow-ups, increased psychological adaptation to DBMD was predicted by resilience (β=0.264, P=0.001) and perceived positive impact (β=0.310, Padaptation. Though clinicians caring for families with DBMD should anticipate increased caregiver burden as the disorder progresses, interventions focused on caregiver burden are not expected to influence mothers' psychosocial adaptation. Efforts to improve mothers' well-being should focus on fostering mothers' resilience and enhancing perceptions of positive disease impact (benefit finding). Results suggest that psychosocial interventions can highlight strengths and well-being rather than burden and deficit.

  8. Cognitive and personality function in myotonic muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, T D; Follett, C; Griep, E

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients with myotonic dystrophy from 14 families were tested with the Wechsler and Shipley measures of cognitive function. Forty-one per cent of the subjects had little or no physical handicap. Approximately one-third had low Wechsler scores, whereas 7% had relatively high scores. There was a trend for affected females to have poorer cognitive function than males. Limited cognitive ability correlated with maternal inheritance of the gene and severe physical handicap, but there were individual exceptions. Strongest cognitive abilities were verbal and informational, whereas the weakest were immediate recall, abstraction and spatial manipulation and orientation. There was no evidence of intellectual decline with time. Signs of cerebral atrophy on CT scans were uncommon, occurring for certain in only one of 19 subjects. Personality profiles were also constructed for 25 myotonic subjects using interview and MMPI techniques. Forty-four per cent of the subjects had unremarkable personality profiles, 24% had mild personality difficulties and 32% had prominent personality abnormalities. Serious personality difficulty was most common in patients with low cognitive ability and advanced physical handicap. There was no "typical" personality pattern representative of the entire group. It is likely that many personality problems were the result of individuals with limited resources attempting to cope with their physically deforming and debilitating neuromuscular disorder. PMID:6655483

  9. Electrophysiological evaluation in myotonic dystrophy: correlation with CTG length expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeilsticker Beatriz Helena Miranda

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In myotonic dystrophy (MD, disease severity has been correlated with expansion of CTG repeats in chromosome 19. The aims of this study were to evaluate efficacy of electromyography in the diagnosis of MD, access the frequency and the characteristics of peripheral involvement in the disease and to verify whether the CTG repeats correlated with the electrophysiological abnormalities. Twenty-five patients and six relatives at risk of carrying the MD gene were examined. Electrical myotonia (EM was scored. Sensory and motor conduction velocity (CV were studied in five nerves. Leukocyte DNA analysis was done in 26 subjects. Myopathy and myotonia were found in 27 cases. EM was most frequent in muscles of hand and in tibialis anterior. No significant correlation was found between EM scores and length of CTG expansions. EM scores correlated significantly with the degree of clinical myopathy, expressed by a muscular disability scale. Peripheral neuropathy was found in eight subjects and was not restricted to those who were diabetics.

  10. Myotonic Dystrophy-1 Complicated by Factor-V (Leiden Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Finsterer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Presence of a factor-V Leiden mutation in a patient with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 has been reported only once. Here we report the second DM1 patient carrying a factor-V mutation who died from long-term complications of this mutation. Case Report. A 66-year-old DM1 patient with multi-organ-disorder syndrome developed a first deep venous thrombosis (DVT and consecutive pulmonary embolism (PE at age 50 y. Acetyl-salicylic acid was given. One year later he experienced a second DVT; that is why phenprocoumon was started. Despite anticoagulation, he experienced a third DVT bilaterally and a second PE bilaterally at 61 y; that is why a vena cava filter was additionally deployed. Despite therapeutic anticoagulation, he experienced a vena cava filter thrombosis at age 62 y. Genetic workup revealed a heterozygous factor-V mutation in addition to a CTG-repeat expansion of 500. As a consequence of PE he developed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and experienced recurrent pulmonary infections, which were lastly responsible for decease at age 66 y despite intensive care measures. Conclusion. The heterozygous Leiden mutation may severely affect DM1 patients to such a degree that they die from its complications. If DM1 patients present with unusual manifestations, search for causes other than a CTG-repeat expansion is indicated.

  11. Genetic and Clinical Advances of Congenital Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao-Na; Xiong, Hui

    2017-11-05

    The aim was to update the genetic and clinical advances of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD), based on a systematic review of the literature from 1991 to 2017. Articles in English published in PubMed from 1991 to 2017 English were searched. The terms used in the literature searches were CMD. The task force initially identified citations for 98 published articles. Of the 98 articles, 52 studies were selected after further detailed review. Three articles, which were not written in English, were excluded from the study. This study referred to all the important and English literature in full. CMD is a group of early-onset disorders encompassing great clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Patients present with muscle weakness typically from birth to early infancy, delay or arrest of gross motor development, and joint and/or spinal rigidity. The diagnosis of CMD relies on clinical findings, brain and muscle imaging, muscle biopsy histology, muscle and/or skin immunohistochemical staining, and molecular genetic testing. Advances in next-generation sequencing and histopathological techniques have enabled the recognition of distinct CMD subtypes supported by specific gene identification. Genetic counseling and multidisciplinary management of CMD play an important role in help patients and their family. Further elucidation of the significant clinical and genetic heterogeneity, therapeutic targets, and the clinical care for patients remains our challenge for the future.

  12. Mouse fukutin deletion impairs dystroglycan processing and recapitulates muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beedle, Aaron M.; Turner, Amy J.; Saito, Yoshiaki; Lueck, John D.; Foltz, Steven J.; Fortunato, Marisa J.; Nienaber, Patricia M.; Campbell, Kevin P.

    2012-01-01

    Dystroglycan is a transmembrane glycoprotein that links the extracellular basement membrane to cytoplasmic dystrophin. Disruption of the extensive carbohydrate structure normally present on α-dystroglycan causes an array of congenital and limb girdle muscular dystrophies known as dystroglycanopathies. The essential role of dystroglycan in development has hampered elucidation of the mechanisms underlying dystroglycanopathies. Here, we developed a dystroglycanopathy mouse model using inducible or muscle-specific promoters to conditionally disrupt fukutin (Fktn), a gene required for dystroglycan processing. In conditional Fktn-KO mice, we observed a near absence of functionally glycosylated dystroglycan within 18 days of gene deletion. Twenty-week-old KO mice showed clear dystrophic histopathology and a defect in glycosylation near the dystroglycan O-mannose phosphate, whether onset of Fktn excision driven by muscle-specific promoters occurred at E8 or E17. However, the earlier gene deletion resulted in more severe phenotypes, with a faster onset of damage and weakness, reduced weight and viability, and regenerating fibers of smaller size. The dependence of phenotype severity on the developmental timing of muscle Fktn deletion supports a role for dystroglycan in muscle development or differentiation. Moreover, given that this conditional Fktn-KO mouse allows the generation of tissue- and timing-specific defects in dystroglycan glycosylation, avoids embryonic lethality, and produces a phenotype resembling patient pathology, it is a promising new model for the study of secondary dystroglycanopathy. PMID:22922256

  13. T2 relaxometry of brain in myotonic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Costanzo, A.; Bonavita, V.; Tedeschi, G. [Inst. of Neurological Sciences, 2. Univ. of Naples (Italy); Di Salle, F. [Dept. of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Univ. ' ' Federico II' ' , Naples (Italy); Santoro, L. [Dept. of Neurological Sciences, University ' ' Federico II' ' , Naples (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the nature and extent of brain involvement in myotonic dystrophy (DM), examining possible T2 relaxation abnormalities in the brain of 20 patients with adult-onset DM and 20 sex- and age-matched normal controls. Brain MRI was performed at 0.5 T, and T2 values were calculated from signal intensity in two echoes. Regions of interest included: frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital and callosal (rostral and splenial) normal-appearing white matter; frontal, occipital, insular and hippocampal cortex; caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus and thalamus. All white-matter and occipital and right frontal cortex regions showed a significantly longer T2 in the patients. Multiple regression analysis, including grey- and white-matter T2 as dependent variables, plus age at onset and at imaging, disease duration, muscular disability, brain atrophy and CTG trinucleotide repeats as independent variables, revealed that only white-matter T2 elongation and disease duration correlated positively. White-matter involvement in DM is more extensive than previously reported by MRI and neuropathological studies and seems to be progressive in the course of disease. (orig.)

  14. Dropped-head in recessive oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garibaldi, Matteo; Pennisi, Elena Maria; Bruttini, Mirella; Bizzarri, Veronica; Bucci, Elisabetta; Morino, Stefania; Talerico, Caterina; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Renieri, Alessandra; Antonini, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented a dropped head, caused by severe neck extensor weakness that had started two years before. She had also developed a mild degree of dysphagia, rhinolalia, eyelid ptosis and proximal limb weakness during the last months. EMG revealed myopathic changes. Muscle MRI detected fatty infiltration in the posterior neck muscles and tongue. Muscle biopsy revealed fiber size variations, sporadic rimmed vacuoles, small scattered angulated fibers and a patchy myofibrillar network. Genetic analysis revealed homozygous (GCN)11 expansions in the PABPN1 gene that were consistent with recessive oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). There are a few reports of the recessive form, which has a later disease onset with milder symptoms and higher clinical variability than the typical dominantly inherited form. This patient, who is the first Italian and the eighth worldwide reported case of recessive OPMD, is also the first case of OPMD with dropped-head syndrome, which thus expands the clinical phenotype of recessive OPMD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Feeding problems and weight gain in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Marika; Vasta, Isabella; Messina, Sonia; Sorleti, Domenica; Aloysius, Annie; Sciarra, Federico; Mangiola, Fortunato; Kinali, Maria; Ricci, Enzo; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to conduct a survey using a dedicated questionnaire to estimate feeding difficulties, gastrointestinal involvement and weight gain in a population of 118 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients (age range 13.80-35.8 years). All the answers were entered in a database and the data analysed subdividing the cohort into age groups (3-9, 9-13, 13-18, 18-24, 24-30, 30-36 years). The results indicate that chewing difficulties are frequent and become increasingly present with age, associated with a progressive increase of the duration of meals. Episodes of choking or other clinical signs of swallowing difficulties are in contrast much less frequent even after age 18. Aspiration pneumonia were also not very frequent and only occurred in 7/118. Clinical signs of gastroesophageal reflux requiring treatment were only found in 5 while 43/118 complained of constipation requiring treatment. Very few of our patients had their weight above 2 SD (n = 4) and this was always found in patients between 9 and 18 years while after this age there was an increasing number of patients with weight below 2 SD. The results of our survey suggest that although choking is one of the most feared complications in patients with DMD, clinical signs of swallowing abnormalities are infrequent when collecting clinical information retrospectively. Further studies using an objective evaluation such as videofluoroscopy are needed to identify minor signs that may not be obvious on clinical examination.

  16. Skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle failure in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, B J; Silbert, P L; Groover, R V; Wollan, P C; Silverstein, M D

    1996-01-01

    The goals of this study were to describe the clinical course of skeletal, cardiac, and gastrointestinal muscle manifestations and trends in age at diagnosis and survival of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. A retrospective cohort of 33 male patients with DMD, born between 1953 and 1983 and followed at the Mayo Clinic during their second decade of life, was studied. The mean age at DMD diagnosis was 4.6 years. Skeletal muscle weakness present in all patients at diagnosis progressed to wheelchair dependency in 32 patients (97%) by the age of 13 years (median age 10 years). Cardiac muscle failure developed in 5 patients (15%) (median age 21.5 years). Smooth muscle manifestations related to the digestive and urinary tracts occurred in 7 (21%) and 2 (6%) patients (median age 15 years), respectively. The gastrointestinal dilatations were primary in 2 patients or secondary to surgery or acute respiratory illness in 5 patients. By the end of the study period, 17 deaths had occurred (median age 17 years). Over time, there was a decrease in the time to DMD diagnosis (P = .05) but no significant change in survival (P = .44). Cardiac and smooth muscle manifestations occur late in the course of DMD. Clinical gastrointestinal symptoms related to smooth muscle function most often were secondary to surgery or a respiratory illness. In recent years, the diagnosis of DMD has been made at a younger age, but survival has not changed.

  17. Constipation in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Prevalence, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Dror; Wong, Brenda L; Horn, Paul S; Kaul, Ajay

    2016-04-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of constipation among patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). This cross-sectional prospective study included 120 patients (age range 5-30 years old) with an established diagnosis of DMD. Participants filled out the constipation section of a validated Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms based on Rome-III Criteria (QPGS-RIII) for the diagnosis of functional constipation as part of a routine clinic visit. We evaluated several potential screening methods for constipation: the Bristol stool form scale, routine physical examination, and fecal load on abdominal radiograph. These methods were compared with the QPGS-RIII in diagnosing functional constipation. Risk factors for the development of functional constipation were determined. Based on the QPGS-RIII, 46.7% of patients with DMD in this cohort were diagnosed with functional constipation. Prevalence was not affected by age or functional status. None of the screening methods tested were sensitive enough to diagnose functional constipation. Among patients with constipation, only 43.6% received specific treatment for constipation and only one-half of these treated patients reported resolution of constipation. This study systematically examined constipation among patients with DMD and provides evidence that constipation among patients with DMD is highly prevalent, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. QPGS-RIII is easy to administer and is an efficient tool to diagnose functional constipation in patients with DMD in a clinic setting. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. [Epidemiologic study of myotonic dystrophy on the island of Mallorca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcet, J; Cañellas, F; Cavaller, G; Vich, M

    1992-02-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) or Steinert's disease is the most frequent hereditary myopathy in the adult. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of prevalence of MD on the island of Mallorca. Patients diagnosed with MD were studied in all public and private surgeries and centres able to diagnose this disease on the island of Mallorca. Therefore, this study included the whole population of Mallorca (551,129 inhabitants). A total of 60 cases were studied representing a prevalence rate of 110 cases per one million inhabitants. The patients were further classified according to the existence of family history and were geographically located into the different towns. The prevalence rate found was much higher than that described in the literature which oscillates between 30 and 50 cases per million inhabitants. Furthermore, there was a concentration of cases in 10 of the 52 towns of the island with the presence of 2 cases in 6 being significant. The rate of prevalence of the disease in the city of Palma (295,136 inhabitants) representing more than half of the population of the island was very similar (120 per million) to that found for the population as a whole.

  19. Muscle Activation during Gait in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Ropars

    Full Text Available The aim of this prospective study was to investigate changes in muscle activity during gait in children with Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD. Dynamic surface electromyography recordings (EMGs of 16 children with DMD and pathological gait were compared with those of 15 control children. The activity of the rectus femoris (RF, vastus lateralis (VL, medial hamstrings (HS, tibialis anterior (TA and gastrocnemius soleus (GAS muscles was recorded and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The overall muscle activity in the children with DMD was significantly different from that of the control group. Percentage activation amplitudes of RF, HS and TA were greater throughout the gait cycle in the children with DMD and the timing of GAS activity differed from the control children. Significantly greater muscle coactivation was found in the children with DMD. There were no significant differences between sides. Since the motor command is normal in DMD, the hyper-activity and co-contractions likely compensate for gait instability and muscle weakness, however may have negative consequences on the muscles and may increase the energy cost of gait. Simple rehabilitative strategies such as targeted physical therapies may improve stability and thus the pattern of muscle activity.

  20. Predictive factors for masticatory performance in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruggen, H W; van de Engel-Hoek, L; Steenks, M H; Bronkhorst, E M; Creugers, N H J; de Groot, I J M; Kalaykova, S I

    2014-08-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) report masticatory and swallowing problems. Such problems may cause complications such as choking, and feeling of food sticking in the throat. We investigated whether masticatory performance in DMD is objectively impaired, and explored predictive factors for compromised mastication. Twenty-three patients and 23 controls filled out two questionnaires about mandibular function, and underwent a clinical examination of the masticatory system and measurements of anterior bite force and masticatory performance. In the patients, moreover, quantitative ultrasound of the tongue and motor function measurement was performed. The patients were categorized into ambulatory stage (early or late), early non-ambulatory stage, or late non-ambulatory stage. Masticatory performance, anterior bite force and occlusal contacts were all reduced in the patient group compared to the controls (all p function measurement. The early non-ambulatory and late non-ambulatory stage groups showed less masticatory performance compared to the ambulatory stage group (p masticatory performance (R(2) = 0.52). Anterior bite force, occlusal contacts and masticatory performance in DMD are severely reduced. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy in the Canine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model. PMID:25710459

  2. Quantitative electromyography in ambulatory boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sumit; Lin, Jenny; Travers, Curtis; McCracken, Courtney; Shah, Durga

    2017-12-01

    This study's objective was to evaluate quantitative electromyography (QEMG) using multiple-motor-unit (multi-MUP) analysis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Ambulatory DMD boys, aged 5-15 years, were evaluated with QEMG at 6-month intervals over 14 months. EMG was performed in the right biceps brachii (BB) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles. Normative QEMG data were obtained from age-matched healthy boys. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were performed. Eighteen DMD subjects were enrolled, with a median age of 7 (interquartile range 7-10) years. Six-month evaluations were performed on 14 subjects. QEMG showed significantly abnormal mean MUP duration in BB and TA muscles, with no significant change over 6 months. QEMG is a sensitive electrophysiological marker of myopathy in DMD. Preliminary data do not reflect a significant change in MUP parameters over a 6-month interval; long-term follow-up QEMG studies are needed to understand its role as a biomarker for disease progression. Muscle Nerve 56: 1361-1364, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Motor assessment in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Palhares Campolina Diniz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evaluate muscle force and motor function in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD in a period of six months. METHOD: Twenty children and adolescents with diagnosis of DMD were evaluated trough: measurement of the strength of the flexors and extensors of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, knee and ankle through the Medical Research Council (MRC, and application of the Motor Function Measure (MFM. The patients were evaluated twice within a six-month interval. RESULTS: Loss of muscle strength was identified in the MRC score for upper proximal members (t=-2.17, p=0.04. In the MFM, it was noted significant loss in the dimension 1 (t=-3.06, p=0.006. Moderate and strong correlations were found between the scores for muscular strength and the MFM dimensions. CONCLUSION: The MFM scale was a useful instrument in the follow up of patients with DMD. Moreover, it is a more comprehensive scale to assess patients and very good for conducting trials to evaluate treatment.

  4. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an updated review of common available therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaninejad, Arash; Valilou, Saeed Farajzadeh; Bayat, Hadi; Ebadi, Nader; Daraei, Abdolreza; Yousefi, Meysam; Nesaei, Abolfazl; Mojarrad, Majid

    2018-02-05

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal progressive pediatric muscle disorder and genetically inherited as an X-linked disease that caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. DMD leads to progressive muscle weakness, degeneration, and wasting; finally, follows with the premature demise in affected individuals due to respiratory and/or cardiac failure typically by age of 30. For decades, scientists tried massively to find an effective therapy method, but there is no absolute cure currently for patients with DMD, nevertheless, recent advanced progressions on the treatment of DMD will be hopeful in the future. Several promising gene therapies are currently under investigation. These include gene replacement, exon skipping, suppression of stop codons. More recently, a promising gene editing tool referred to as CRISPR/Cas9 offers exciting perspectives for restoring dystrophin expression in patients with DMD. This review intents to briefly describe these methods and comment on their advances. Since DMD is a genetic disorder, it should be treated by replacing the deficient DMD copy with a functional one. However, there are different types of mutations in this gene, so such therapeutic approaches are highly mutation specific and thus are personalized. Therefore, DMD has arisen as a model of genetic disorder for understanding and overcoming of the challenges of developing personalized genetic medicines, consequently, the lessons learned from these approaches will be applicable to many other disorders. This review provides an update on the recent gene therapies for DMD that aim to compensate for dystrophin deficiency and the related clinical trials.

  5. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy in the canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model.

  6. Neuropsychological and neurobehavioral functioning in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Wanda M; Anderson, Judy E; Jakobson, Lorna S

    2013-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic condition affecting predominantly boys that is characterized by fatal muscle weakness. While there is no cure, recent therapeutic advances have extended the lifespan of those with DMD considerably. Although the physiological basis of muscle pathology is well-documented, less is known regarding the cognitive, behavioral, and psychosocial functioning of those afflicted. Several lines of evidence point to central nervous system involvement as an organic feature of DMD, challenging our view of the disorder as strictly neuromuscular. This report provides a review of the literature on neuropsychological and neurobehavioral functioning in DMD. Recent research identifying associations with DMD and neuropsychiatric disorders is also discussed. Lastly, the review presents implications of findings related to nonmotor aspects of DMD for improving the quality of life in those affected. While the literature is often contradictory in nature, this review highlights some key findings for consideration by clinicians, educators and parents when developing therapeutic interventions for this population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Severe paraspinal muscle involvement in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlqvist, Julia R; Vissing, Christoffer R; Thomsen, Carsten; Vissing, John

    2014-09-23

    In this study, involvement of paraspinal muscles in 50 patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) was evaluated using MRI. The Dixon MRI technique was used in this observational study to quantify muscle fat content of paraspinal and leg muscles. Muscle strength in the neck, back, and legs was assessed with a handheld dynamometer. All subjects completed the Low Back Pain Rating Scale questionnaire. MRI findings were compared with 31 age-matched controls and correlated to muscle strength, back pain, and MRI findings in lower extremities. The fat fraction in muscles was significantly higher in patients with FSHD than in controls: paraspinal fat fraction was 38% in patients vs 20% in controls, thigh fat fraction was 36% vs 11%, and calf fat fraction was 37% vs 11%. Increased paraspinal fat fraction correlated with D4Z4 repeat size, FSHD severity score, fat fraction of the thigh, and muscle strength in the back. The prevalence of back pain was 3 times higher in patients with FSHD vs controls, but back pain did not correlate with the paraspinal fat fraction. This study shows a prominent involvement of paraspinal muscles in patients with FSHD, which should be considered in the management of this condition. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Major involvement of trunk muscles in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbakken, G; Ørstavik, K; Hagen, T; Dietrichs, E; Naerland, T

    2016-12-01

    The motor impairments in Myotonic Dystrophy 1 (DM1) are assumed to progress from distal toward proximal parts of the extremities in the Juvenile and Adult forms of DM1. On occasion and late in progress spine deformity is observed. In this study we have examined whether and to what extent trunk muscles are impaired in DM1, and if this impairment is correlated with the duration of the disorder, walking capacity, mobility, balance, and CTG-repeats. Manual muscle testing (MMT) of skeletal muscle strength in trunk and extremities, reassessment of the mutation size, time since first symptom, the 6 min walk test (6MWT), Rivermead mobility index (RIM) and Timed up & go (TUG) were sampled in 38 adult DM1 outpatients. We found significant impairment in trunk muscles. Trunk muscle strength decreased significantly with increasing mutation size (r = -0.64, P muscle strength. DM1 affects trunk muscle groups. The trunk impairments seem to occur relatively early in disease progression. Awareness of trunk impairments may be of importance for everyday functioning and for understanding the risk of injuries due to falls reported among DM1 patients. It may also help in identification of DM1 patients and considered outcome measure in future clinical trials. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Muscle Microdialysis to Investigate Inflammatory Biomarkers in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Corbi, Maddalena; Granata, Giuseppe; Lucchetti, Donatella; Sgambato, Alessandro; Ricci, Enzo

    2017-04-29

    Recent progresses in the understanding of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) genetics opened the way to the development of targeted therapies. However, knowledge about pathophysiology of muscle damage is still limited and there is increasing need to identify biomarkers of disease activity in the perspective of clinical trial readiness.We analyzed inflammatory mediators in the interstitial fluid of muscles with different MRI signal in FSHD patients, comparing muscles displaying early lesions on short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences with normal ones. Patients with one T1-weighted normal and STIR hyperintense (STIR+) and contralateral T1-weighted and STIR normal (STIR-) lower limb muscle were asked to enter the study. Twelve consecutive patients, five controls, and one non-penetrant gene carrier underwent prolonged muscle microdialysis with high cut-off membranes. Microdialysates were analyzed using xMAP technology with a wide panel for cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. A small number of inflammatory mediators were dysregulated in STIR+ versus STIR- and control muscles: CXCL13, upregulated in STIR+ muscles compared with controls (p muscles (p muscles compared with controls (p muscles compared with the contralateral STIR- muscles of the same patient (p muscles. The application of microdialysis could provide insights on novel mechanisms involved in muscle damage in FSHD and in other myopathies. Further studies are needed to validate these investigated molecules as tissue and circulating biomarkers.

  10. Extracellular matrix alterations in late-onset Fuchs' corneal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Julia M; Zenkel, Matthias; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Bachmann, Bjoern O; Tourtas, Theofilos; Kruse, Friedrich E

    2014-05-15

    To characterize the alterations of extracellular matrix proteins in Descemet's membranes (DM) of patients with late-onset Fuchs' corneal dystrophy (FCD) and to differentiate them from nonspecific alterations in pseudophakic bullous keratopathy (PBK). Human DM-endothelial cell complexes were obtained from patients with late-onset FCD (n = 40), PBK (n = 6), and control eyes (n = 5). Gene expression profiles of endothelial cells were compared using a commercial real-time PCR array and quantitative real-time PCR assays for confirmation of differentially expressed genes. A total of 24 extracellular matrix proteins were also localized in cryosections of corneal specimens from FCD (n = 10), PBK (n = 4), and control eyes (n = 5) by immunohistochemistry. Polymerase chain reaction array analysis revealed a significant upregulation of 27 out of 84 extracellular matrix-related genes including collagens, proteoglycans, glycoproteins, cell adhesion molecules, and matrix metalloproteinases in FCD specimens as compared to normal controls, which could be partly confirmed and quantified by real-time PCR. Comparative analysis of FCD and PBK specimens showed a significant and consistent FCD-specific upregulation of collagen types I, III, and XVI; fibronectin; agrin; clusterin; transforming growth factor beta-induced (TGFBI); and integrin α4 (3- to 18-fold, P matrix alterations in the pathophysiology of FCD. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  11. ASSESSMENT OF GRIP FORCE CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorij Kurillo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The majority of hand functionality tests are based on qualitative assessment which largely depends on the experience of the therapist. Computer-assisted methods can provide more objective and accurate measurements of the grip force and other parameters related to grasping.Methods. We analysed the grip force control in 12 patients with muscular dystrophy using the tracking system developed. The system consists of a grip-measuring device with endobjects assessing the force applied in different grips. The device was used as input to a tracking task where the patient applied the grip force according to the visual feedback from the computer screen. Each patient performed two tasks which consisted of tracking a ramp and sinus target.Results. We analysed the maximal grip force as assessed in the ramp task and the tracking accuracy of the sinus task. The results are compared among five different grips (cylindrical, lateral, palmar, pinch and spherical grip, applied with dominant and non-dominant hand. The results show no significant difference in tracking accuracy between the dominant and non-dominant hand.Conclusions. The results obtained in tracking the ramp target showed that the method could be used for the assessment of the muscle fatigue, providing quantitative information on muscle capacity. The results of the sinus-tracking task showed that the method can evaluate the grip force control in different types of grips, providing information on hand dexterity, muscle activation patterns or tremor.

  12. Intraocular pressure and corneal biomechanics in Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy and after posterior lamellar keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmensen, Kåre; Hjortdal, Jesper

    2014-06-01

      To evaluate the precision of techniques for measuring intraocular pressure (IOP) in corneas with presumably altered biomechanical properties.   Intraocular pressure was measured with a Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT), ocular response analyzer (ORA) and dynamic contour tonometer (DCT) in 70 eyes. Thirty-five eyes were normal corneas, 18 eyes had Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy, and 17 eyes had undergone Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) surgery. Corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF) as well as central corneal thickness (CCT) were recorded with the ORA.   The measured cornea-corrected IOP using ORA was significantly higher than GAT in all three groups (pkeratoplasty. GAT and DCT seem to measure IOP correctly in patients with Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy as well as after posterior lamellar keratoplasty. Corneal-corrected IOP as measured with the ORA appears to overestimate IOP in patients with Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy as well as after posterior lamellar keratoplasty. © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Unusual early recurrence of granular dystrophy after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Rama

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We report an atypical case of granular corneal dystrophy recurrence after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty. We describe clinical features, histopathological analysis of the lamellar graft specimen and DNA analysis results. The slit-lamp examination and histopathological findings from the graft specimen indicated the confinement of the typical deposits of granular corneal dystrophy deep in the graft interface area. This localization is atypical, since in most cases recurrences in grafts tend to be initially superficial and situated in the epithelial or subepithelial corneal layers. Molecular genetic analysis revealed an already described mutation and a new intronic variant. The unusual localization and timing of this recurrence of granular corneal dystrophy after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty suggests that corneal stromal keratocytes may play a role in the formation of granular deposits.

  14. Best practice guidelines and recommendations on the molecular diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Kress, Wolfram; Catalli, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    , but cardiac conduction abnormalities as in DM1 are observed and patients with DM2 additionally have muscle pain and stiffness. Both DM1 and DM2 are caused by unstable DNA repeats in untranslated regions of different genes: A (CTG)n repeat in the 3'-UTR of the DMPK gene and a (CCTG)n repeat in intron 1......Myotonic dystrophy is an autosomal dominant, multisystem disorder that is characterized by myotonic myopathy. The symptoms and severity of myotonic dystrophy type l (DM1) ranges from severe and congenital forms, which frequently result in death because of respiratory deficiency, through to late......-onset baldness and cataract. In adult patients, cardiac conduction abnormalities may occur and cause a shorter life span. In subsequent generations, the symptoms in DM1 may present at an earlier age and have a more severe course (anticipation). In myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), no anticipation is described...

  15. The potential of sarcospan in adhesion complex replacement therapeutics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jamie L; Kwok, Yukwah; McMorran, Brian J; Baum, Linda G; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2013-09-01

    Three adhesion complexes span the sarcolemma and facilitate critical connections between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton: the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes and α7β1 integrin. Loss of individual protein components results in a loss of the entire protein complex and muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a progressive, lethal wasting disease characterized by repetitive cycles of myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Protein-replacement therapy offers a promising approach for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that sarcospan facilitates protein-protein interactions amongst the adhesion complexes and is an important potential therapeutic target. Here, we review current protein-replacement strategies, discuss the potential benefits of sarcospan expression, and identify important experiments that must be addressed for sarcospan to move to the clinic. © 2013 FEBS.

  16. CT findings of muscular dystrophy; Limb girdle type (LG), myotonic type (MYD) and Duchenne type (DMD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Hiroshi (Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-07-01

    CT scans of muscles in patients with limb girdle type (LG), myotonic type (MYD) and Duchenne type (DMD) dystrophies were obtained at five different body levels: the neck, L3 vertebral body, pelvic girdle, thigh and lower leg. CT numbers, cross sectional areas (CSA) and %CSA of muscle or fat were evaluated in each muscle. The characteristic CT patterns for each type of muscular dystrophy were obtained. Compared with DMD, the gracilis and soleus were more severely damaged in LG and the biceps femoris remained relatively preserved among the hamstrings. In addition, the multifidus of the neck and sternocleidomastoid also were more severely damaged in MYD. This study suggests that CT scan will be useful in the differential diagnosis of these types of muscular dystrophy as well as in planning appropriate rehabilitation and detecting damaged muscles. (author).

  17. Co-incidence of Turner syndrome and Duchenne muscular dystrophy - an important problem for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczorowska, Ewa; Zimowski, Janusz; Cichoń-Kotek, Monika; Mrozińska, Agnieszka; Purzycka, Joanna; Wierzba, Jolanta; Limon, Janusz; Lipska-Ziętkiewicz, Beata S

    Turner syndrome is a relatively common chromosomal disorder which affects about one in 2000 live born females. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked recessive disorder affecting 1:3600 live born males. Considering the above, the coexistence of these two diseases may occur only anecdotally. Here, we report a 4 ½ year-old female with classical 45,X Turner syndrome who also had Duchenne muscular dystrophy caused by a point mutation in the dystrophin gene (c.9055delG). The patient showed the typical phenotype of Turner syndrome including distinctive dysmorphic features (short neck, low posterior hairline, wide position of nipples), aortic coarctation and feet lymphedema. Besides, she presented with an unusually early beginning of muscular dystrophy symptoms with infantile-onset motor developmental delay, intellectual disability and early calf muscular hypertrophy. The coexistence of an X-linked recessive disorder should be considered in women affected by Turner syndrome presenting with additional atypical clinical features.

  18. Prevalence and Characteristics of Chinese Patients With Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ivan F. M.; Cherk, Sharon W. W.; Cheng, Wai Wai; Fung, Eva L. W.; Yeung, Wai Lan; Ngan, Mary; Lee, Wing Cheong; Kwong, Ling; Wong, Suet Na; Ma, Che Kwan; Tai, Shuk Mui; Ng, Grace S. F.; Wu, Shun Ping; Wong, Virginia C. N.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this collaborative study on Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy is to determine the prevalence and to develop data on such patients as a prelude to the development of registry in Hong Kong. Information on clinical and molecular findings, and patient care, was systematically collected in 2011 and 2012 from all Pediatric Neurology Units in Hong Kong. Ninety patients with dystrophinopathy were identified, and 83% has Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The overall prevalence of dystrophinopathy in Hong Kong in 2010 is 1.03 per 10 000 males aged 0 to 24 years. Among the Duchenne group, we observed a higher percentage (40.6%) of point mutations with a lower percentage (45.3%) of exon deletions in our patients when compared with overseas studies. Although we observed similar percentage of Duchenne group received scoliosis surgery, ventilation support, and cardiac treatment when compared with other countries, the percentage (25%) of steroid use is lower. PMID:28503591

  19. Muscular dystrophy-related quantitative and chemical changes in adenohypophysis GH-cells in golden retrievers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lima, A R; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Jorge, A A L

    2007-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked lethal condition which affects a boy in every 3300 births. It is caused by the absence of dystrophin, a protein occurring especially within the musculoskeletal system and in neurons in specific regions of the central nervous system (CNS......). Growth hormone (GH) inhibition is believed to decrease the severity of DMD and could perhaps be used in its treatment. However, the underlying pathological mechanism is not known. The golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog (GRMD) represents an animal model in the study of DMD. In this paper we...... difficulties in the GH secretion that might possibly be associated to dystrophin absence. In contrast to earlier reports, our data suggest that a lower IGF-1 concentration may be more related to a severe, as opposed to a benign, clinical form of muscular dystrophy. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec...

  20. Fracture in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Natural History and Vitamin D Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Nadia; Sampaio, Hugo; Woodhead, Helen; Farrar, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    The present study examined the natural history of fracture and vitamin D levels in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, who are vulnerable to osteoporosis and fractures. Retrospective analysis of a cohort of 48 Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients revealed that 43% of patients experienced ≥1 fracture. Fracture probabilities at ages 6, 9, 12, and 15 years were 4%, 9%, 31%, and 60% respectively, accelerating around the time of ambulation loss (mean age 11.8 ± 2.7 years). Chronic corticosteroid therapy was utilized in 69% of patients and was associated with all vertebral fractures. A history of vitamin D deficiency occurred in 84%, and 35% were currently deficient. Despite chronic vitamin D supplementation, 38% remained deficient. These results demonstrate that osteoporosis and fracture remain major concerns in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Bone health should be optimized well before loss of ambulation, however current levels of vitamin D supplementation may be inadequate given high levels of deficiency. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. The potential of sarcospan in adhesion complex replacement therapeutics for the treatment of muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jamie L.; Kwok, Yukwah; McMorran, Brian; Baum, Linda G.; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.

    2013-01-01

    Three adhesion complexes span the sarcolemma and facilitate critical connections between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton: the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes and α7β1 integrin. Loss of individual protein components results in a loss of the entire protein complex and muscular dystrophy. Muscular dystrophy is a progressive, lethal wasting disease characterized by repetitive cycles of myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Protein replacement therapy offers a promising approach for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. Recently, we demonstrated that sarcospan facilitates protein-protein interactions amongst the adhesion complexes and is an important therapeutic target. Here, we review current protein replacement strategies, discuss the potential benefits of sarcospan expression, and identify important experiments that must be addressed for sarcospan to move to the clinic. PMID:23601082

  2. Model Organisms in the Fight against Muscular Dystrophy: Lessons from Drosophila and Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Plantié

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies (MD are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that cause muscle weakness, abnormal contractions and muscle wasting, often leading to premature death. More than 30 types of MD have been described so far; those most thoroughly studied are Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 and congenital MDs. Structurally, physiologically and biochemically, MDs affect different types of muscles and cause individual symptoms such that genetic and molecular pathways underlying their pathogenesis thus remain poorly understood. To improve our knowledge of how MD-caused muscle defects arise and to find efficacious therapeutic treatments, different animal models have been generated and applied. Among these, simple non-mammalian Drosophila and zebrafish models have proved most useful. This review discusses how zebrafish and Drosophila MD have helped to identify genetic determinants of MDs and design innovative therapeutic strategies with a special focus on DMD, DM1 and congenital MDs.

  3. Temporalis muscle hypertrophy and reduced skull eccentricity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straathof, C S M; Doorenweerd, N; Wokke, B H A; Dumas, E M; van den Bergen, J C; van Buchem, M A; Hendriksen, J G M; Verschuuren, J J G M; Kan, H E

    2014-10-01

    Muscle hypertrophy and muscle weakness are well known in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Decreased muscle force can have secondary effects on skeletal growth and development such as facial and dental morphology changes. In this study, we quantified temporal muscle thickness, circumference, and eccentricity of the skull and the head on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the head of 15 Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and 15 controls. Average temporal muscle thickness was significantly increased in patients (12.9 ± 5.2 mm) compared to controls (6.8 ± 1.4 mm) (P muscle thickness and skull eccentricity were significantly negatively correlated in patients, and positively in controls. Hypertrophy of the temporal muscles and changes in skull eccentricity appear to occur early in the course of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Further studies in younger patients are needed to confirm a causal relationship. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Histopathological Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle with Specific Reference to Mouse Models of Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Rebecca L; Wells, Dominic J

    2016-12-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a diverse group of degenerative diseases for which many mouse models are available. These models are frequently used to assess potential therapeutic interventions and histological evaluation of multiple muscles is an important part of this assessment. Histological evaluation is especially useful when combined with tests of muscle function. This unit describes a protocol for necropsy, processing, cryosectioning, and histopathological evaluation of murine skeletal muscles, which is applicable to both models of muscular dystrophy and other neuromuscular conditions. Key histopathological features of dystrophic muscle are discussed using the mdx mouse (a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy) as an example. Optimal handling during dissection, processing and sectioning is vital to avoid artifacts that can confound or prevent future analyses. Muscles carefully processed using this protocol are suitable for further evaluation using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, special histochemical stains, and immuoblotting. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, Kay-Marie; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon B; Gao, Quan Q; Miller, Tamari; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Vo, Andy H; Wren, Lisa; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2016-05-01

    Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs) regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular dystrophy, we created transgenic mice overexpressing the protective murine allele of LTBP4 specifically in mature myofibers using the human skeletal actin promoter. Overexpression of LTBP4 protein was associated with increased muscle mass and proportionally increased strength compared to age-matched controls. In order to assess the effects of LTBP4 in muscular dystrophy, LTBP4 overexpressing mice were bred to mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this model, increased LTBP4 led to greater muscle mass with proportionally increased strength, and decreased fibrosis. The increase in muscle mass and reduction in fibrosis were similar to what occurs when myostatin, a related TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle mass, was deleted in mdx mice. Supporting this, we found that myostatin forms a complex with LTBP4 and that overexpression of LTBP4 led to a decrease in myostatin levels. LTBP4 also interacted with TGFβ and GDF11, a protein highly related to myostatin. These data identify LTBP4 as a multi-TGFβ family ligand binding protein with the capacity to modify muscle disease through overexpression.

  6. Bilateral Atypical Granular Corneal Dystrophy Associated with Unilateral Keratoconus in a Male Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangra, Kavita Lohiya; Das, Manoranjan; Periasamy, Sundersan; Prajna, N Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    A 14-year-old male presented with decreased vision. Slit lamp examination indicated multiple anterior corneal stromal opacities with clear intervening spaces accompanied with superficial subepithelial lines arranged in a quasi-whorl-like fashion bilateral with greater prominence in the right eye. Corneal steepening associated with thinning was noted only in the right eye. Genetic analysis confirmed a mutation suggestive of granular corneal dystrophy. Here, we describe a rare case of an atypical granular dystrophy associated with unilateral keratoconus in a male child.

  7. Transgenic overexpression of ADAM12 suppresses muscle regeneration and aggravates dystrophy in aged mdx mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Wewer, Ulla M

    2007-01-01

    overexpressing ADAM12 (ADAM12(+)/mdx mice), even though their utrophin levels were mildly elevated compared with age-matched controls. Thus, membrane stabilization was not sufficient to provide protection during prolonged disease. Consequently, we reinvestigated skeletal muscle regeneration in ADAM12 transgenic......Muscular dystrophies are characterized by insufficient restoration and gradual replacement of the skeletal muscle by fat and connective tissue. ADAM12 has previously been shown to alleviate the pathology of young dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The observed...

  8. How a Simple Ankle Sprain Turned Into Neuropathic Pain: Complex Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Versus Erythromelalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurati, Ann Regina

    2017-11-01

    A 36-year-old woman sustained a Grade 2 ankle sprain at work. Two days after the injury, the ankle and foot became red and she complained of "intense burning pain." First diagnosed with complex reflex sympathetic dystrophy, the employee was prescribed medications that provided some pain relief; a subsequent temporary nerve block provided additional relief. However, the symptoms returned and she was treated unsuccessfully with surgical sympathectomy. The employee was referred to a neurologist and diagnosed with primary erythromelalgia, a rare pain disorder that can be mistaken as complex reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

  9. [Idiopathic adrenal cortex dystrophy with the clinical picture of Addison's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willgeroth, C; Becher, M; Zugehör, M

    1977-02-15

    Clinical and autopsy findings are reported of three cases of Addisons disease due to idiopathic dystrophy of the adrenal cortex as seen in two women, 20 and 37 years of age respectively as well as a boy of 14 years. Idiopathic dystrophy of the adrenal cortex as a cause of Addisons disease has become aware of more and more frequently for some years. Its classification as an auto-aggression disease has been made a subject for discussion. Morphological findings and immunological investigations with three own cases confirm this conception. This disease should be reminded of with regard to the problem of clinically diagnosing it and the fatal prognosis of untreated cases.

  10. Cutaneous cysts with nail dystrophy in a young female: A classical association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romana Ghosh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pachyonychia Congenita (PC refers to a group of autosomal dominant disorders with variable clinical presentations. While nail dystrophy and plantar keratoderma are the most consistent features in all the variants, a myriad of other manifestations has been observed. This report highlights a case of young female presenting with multiple asymptomatic cutaneous cysts associated with plantar kearatoderma and nail dystrophy. Similar nail changes were evident in her son also. Such clinical presentation, in corroboration with histopathological evaluation of the cutaneous cyst prompted us to make a diagnosis of Pachyonychia Congenita type II.

  11. Subungual glomus tumor: an uncommon cause of median canaliform nail-dystrophy of Heller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal Gupta, Vikas Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomus tumor is an uncommon vascular tumor involving mostly subunguum of the thumb or the index finger. It commonly presents as a pink or purplish circumscribed nodule underneath the nail plate. Pain is paroxysmal in nature and precipitated often from exposure to cold or pressure/blunt trauma. Dystrophy of the nail plate occurs rarely. The described case, a 40-year-old woman, had dystrophic thumbnail ascribed to subungual glomus tumor that resembled median canaliform nail-dystrophy of Heller.

  12. Unusual Respiratory Manifestations in Two Young Adults with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Lemay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult respirologists are often involved in the evaluation and treatment of young adult patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this context, the most frequent respiratory complication is nocturnal and daytime hypoventilation related to respiratory muscle weakness. The present article describes cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy involving two brothers, 17 and 19 years of age, respectively, who presented with less frequently reported respiratory complications of their disease: obstructive sleep apnea and Cheyne-Stokes respiration with central apnea, which were believed to be partially or completely related to congestive cardiomyopathy.

  13. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium in chromosome 13-linked Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othmane, K.B.; Speer, M.C.; Stauffer, J. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy (DLMD) is an autosomal recessive Limb Girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2C) characterized by late age of onset, proximal muscle weakness leading to disability, high creatine kinase values, normal intelligence and normal dystrophin in muscle biopsy. We have shown previously that three DLMD families from Tunisia are linked to chromosome 13q12. To further localize the LGMD2C gene, we have investigated seven additional families (119 individuals). Both genotyping and two-point linkage analysis were performed as described elsewhere. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Implicit learning deficit in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Evidence for a cerebellar cognitive impairment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, Stefano; Piccini, Giorgia; Mercuri, Eugenio; Battini, Roberta; Chieffo, Daniela; Bulgheroni, Sara; Pecini, Chiara; Lucibello, Simona; Lenzi, Sara; Moriconi, Federica; Pane, Marika; D'Amico, Adele; Astrea, Guja; Baranello, Giovanni; Riva, Daria; Cioni, Giovanni; Alfieri, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed at comparing implicit sequence learning in individuals affected by Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy without intellectual disability and age-matched typically developing children. A modified version of the Serial Reaction Time task was administered to 32 Duchenne children and 37 controls of comparable chronological age. The Duchenne group showed a reduced rate of implicit learning even if in the absence of global intellectual disability. This finding provides further evidence of the involvement of specific aspects of cognitive function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and on its possible neurobiological substrate.

  15. Becker muscular dystrophy with widespread muscle hypertrophy and a non-sense mutation of exon 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Duno, M; Vissing, J

    2013-01-01

    , and Western blot showed a 95% reduction of dystrophin levels. Genetic analyses revealed a non-sense mutation in exon 2 of the dystrophin gene. This mutation is predicted to result in a Duchenne phenotype, but resulted in a mild Becker muscular dystrophy with widespread muscle hypertrophy. We suggest......Becker muscular dystrophy features progressive proximal weakness, wasting and often focal hypertrophy. We present a patient with pain and cramps from adolescence. Widespread muscle hypertrophy, preserved muscle strength and a 10-20-fold raised CPK were noted. Muscle biopsy was dystrophic...

  16. Cytokines and Chemokines as Regulators of Skeletal Muscle Inflammation: Presenting the Case of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boel De Paepe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe inherited muscle disease that affects 1 in 3500 boys worldwide. Infiltration of skeletal muscle by inflammatory cells is an important facet of disease pathophysiology and is strongly associated with disease severity in the individual patient. In the chronic inflammation that characterizes Duchenne muscle, cytokines and chemokines are considered essential activators and recruiters of inflammatory cells. In addition, they provide potential beneficiary effects on muscle fiber damage control and tissue regeneration. In this review, current knowledge of cytokine and chemokine expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its relevant animal disease models is listed, and implications for future therapeutic avenues are discussed.

  17. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayder Abdul-Razak

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments.

  18. Clinical findings and treatments of granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (avellino corneal dystrophy): a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyung Eun; Kim, Tae-im; Chung, Woo Suk; Choi, Seung-il; Kim, Bong-yoon; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2010-09-01

    To review the literature about clinical findings and treatments of granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2). Various literatures on clinical findings, exacerbations after refractive corneal surgery, and treatment modalities of GCD2 were reviewed. GCD2 is an autosomal dominant disease. Mutation of transforming growth factor beta-induced gene, TGFBI, or keratoepithelin gene in human chromosome 5 (5q31) is the key pathogenic process in patient with GCD2. Corneal trauma activates TGFBI and then it overproduces transforming growth factor beta-induced gene protein (TGFBIp), which is main component of the corneal opacity. Refractive corneal surgery is a popular procedure to correct refractive error worldwide. However, several cases about exacerbation of GCD2 after corneal refractive surgery such as photorefractive keratectomy, laser in situ keratomileusis, and laser epithelial keratomileusis have been reported. The opacities deteriorate patient's best-corrected visual acuity. Recurrence-free interval varies many factors such as the type of procedure the patient had received and the genotype of the patient. To treat the opacities in GCD2, phototherapeutic keratectomy, lamellar keratoplasty, deep lamellar keratoplasty, and penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) were used. However, the recurrence is still an unsolved problem. Perfect treatment of exacerbation after corneal surface ablation does not exist until now. To prevent exacerbation, refractive surgeons must do a careful preoperative examination of candidates in refractive surgeries.

  19. Left ventricular T2 distribution in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagenbuch Sean

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although previous studies have helped define the natural history of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD-associated cardiomyopathy, the myocardial pathobiology associated with functional impairment in DMD is not yet known. The objective of this study was to assess the distribution of transverse relaxation time (T2 in the left ventricle (LV of DMD patients, and to determine the association of myocardial T2 heterogeneity to the severity of cardiac dysfunction. DMD patients (n = 26 and normal control subjects (n = 13 were studied by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR. DMD subject data was stratified based on subject age and LV Ejection Fraction (EF into the following groups: A (12 years, n = 5. LV mid-slice circumferential myocardial strain (εcc was calculated using tagged CMR imaging. T2 maps of the LV were generated for all subjects using a black blood dual spin echo method at two echo times. The Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM was calculated from a histogram of LV T2 distribution constructed for each subject. Results In DMD subject groups, FWHM of the T2 histogram rose progressively with age and decreasing EF (Group A FWHM= 25.3 ± 3.8 ms; Group B FWHM= 30.9 ± 5.3 ms; Group C FWHM= 33.0 ± 6.4 ms. Further, FWHM was significantly higher in those with reduced circumferential strain (|εcc| ≤ 12% (Group B, and C than those with |εcc| > 12% (Group A. Group A FWHM was not different from the two normal groups (N1 FWHM = 25.3 ± 3.5 ms; N2 FWHM= 24.0 ± 7.3 ms. Conclusion Reduced EF and εcc correlates well with increased T2 heterogeneity quantified by FWHM, indicating that subclinical functional impairments could be associated with pre-existing abnormalities in tissue structure in young DMD patients.

  20. Muscle wasting in myotonic dystrophies: a model of premature aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Judith eMateos-Aierdi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1 or Steinert’s disease and type II (DM2 are multisystem disorders of genetic origin. Progressive muscular weakness, atrophy and myotonia are the most prominent neuromuscular features of these diseases, and other clinical manifestations such as cardiomyopathy, insulin-resistance and cataracts are also common. From a clinical perspective, most DM symptoms are interpreted as a result of an accelerated aging (cataracts, muscular weakness and atrophy, cognitive decline, metabolic dysfunction, etc., including an increased risk of developing tumors. From this point of view, DM1 could be described as a progeroid syndrome since a notable age-dependent dysfunction of all systems occurs. The underlying molecular disorder in DM1 consists of the existence of a pathological (CTGn triplet expansion in the 3’ untranslated region of the DMPK gene, whereas (CCTGn repeats in the first intron of the CNBP/ZNF9 gene cause DM2. The expansions are transcribed into (CUGn and (CCUGn-containing RNA, respectively, which form secondary structures and sequester RNA-binding proteins, such as the splicing factor muscleblind-like protein (MBNL, forming nuclear aggregates known as foci. Other splicing factors, such as CUGBP, are also disrupted, leading to a spliceopathy of a large number of downstream genes linked to the clinical features of these diseases. Skeletal muscle regeneration relies on muscle progenitor cells, known as satellite cells, which are activated after muscle damage, and which proliferate and differentiate to muscle cells, thus regenerating the damaged tissue. Satellite cell dysfunction seems to be a common feature of both age-dependent muscle degeneration (sarcopenia and muscle wasting in DM and other muscle degenerative diseases. This review aims to describe the cellular, molecular and macrostructural processes involved in the muscular degeneration seen in DM patients, highlighting the similarities found with muscle aging.

  1. Progressive muscular dystrophy: Duchenne type. Controversies of the kinesitherapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Valéria de Araujo Leitão

    Full Text Available The authors carried out a study of children with progressive muscular dystrophy of Duchenne type (DMD, giving special attention to physiatrical follow-up, having in mind that the practice of exercises has been debated very much in the specialized literature. The goal of this study is to try to settle the limits for the utilization of kinesitherapy which should be applied only in specific situations, such as: after skeletal muscular trauma or when the respiratory system is at risk. In this situation the physiatrical procedure would be to restrict physical activity, with early use of wheelchairs and the exclusion of the use of orthoses for orthostatism. DMD, at present, has been considered a result of duplication (60%, deletion (5 to 6% or point mutations at gen Xp21 (Zatz, 1994, that codifies a protein called Dystrophin ( Hoffman et al., 1987. Dystrophin is a cytoskeletal sarcolemmic protein that constitutes about .002% of the total protein of the muscle, present in skeletal fibers concentrated in muscle tendinous joints, which supplies mechanical reinforcement to the surface of the membrane during stretching and shortening physical activity. This protein is absent in DMD cases, wherefore, the sarcolemma undergoes a segmentary necrosis losing its contractile property during eccentric and concentric physical activity. The importance of physiatrical follow-up for DMD patients is to avoid deformities and tendon shortening, to ameliorate the patient's quality of life, to provide respiratory assistance and general couseling to members of the patient's family. The objective of this study is to try to clarify the risks and possibilities of kinesitherapy applied to DMD cases.

  2. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy as a paradigm for muscle aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotam eRaz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms in late-onset neuromuscular disorders initiate only from midlife onwards and progress with age. These disorders are primarily determined by identified hereditable mutations, but their late-onset symptom manifestation is not fully understood. Here, we review recent research developments on the late-onset autosomal dominant oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD. OPMD is caused by an expansion mutation in the gene encoding for poly-adenylate RNA binding protein1 (PABPN1. The molecular pathogenesis for the disease is still poorly understood. Despite a ubiquitous expression of PABPN1, symptoms in OPMD are limited to skeletal muscles. We discuss recent studies showing that PABPN1 levels in skeletal muscles are lower compared with other tissues, and specifically in skeletal muscles, PABPN1 expression declines from midlife onwards. In OPMD, aggregation of expanded PABPN1 causes an additional decline in the level of the functional protein, which is associated with severe muscle weakness in OPMD. Reduced PABNPN1 expression in muscle cell culture causes myogenic defects, suggesting that PABPN1 loss-of-function causes muscle weakness in OPMD and in the elderly.Molecular signatures of OPMD muscles are similar to these of normal muscle aging, although expression trends progress faster in OPMD. We discuss a working hypothesis that aging-associated factors trigger late-onset symptoms in OPMD, and contribute to accelerated muscle weakness in OPMD. We focus on the pharyngeal and eyelid muscles, which are often affected in OPMD patients. We suggest that muscle weakness in OPMD is a paradigm for muscle aging.

  3. Sleep and breathing disorders in myotonic dystrophy type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardis, L; Blagus, R; Dolenc Groselj, L

    2015-07-01

    In patients who exhibit myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), sleep disorders and breathing impairments are common; however, in those with DM type 2 (DM2), limited studies on polysomnography (PSG) and none on phrenic compound motor action potential (CMAP) have been performed, which is the aim of this study. Sixteen patients with DM2 were questioned about respiratory symptoms. They underwent PSG with morning arterial gas analyses (AGA). Respiratory functions and phrenic CMAPs were studied. The data were compared to those of 16 healthy controls and 25 patients with DM1. Daytime tiredness is the most common symptom, but orthopnea was reported in 13% of patients with DM2. A detailed sleep architecture analysis revealed a significantly greater proportion of time in stage 3 and REM sleep, and a shorter time in stage 2 in the DM2 than in controls. Lower respiratory volumes and pressures, abnormalities in AGA, night oxygen desaturation and higher EtCO2 are present in DM2, but are less pronounced than in the DM1 population. Small CMAP amplitudes were presented in 12% of patients with DM2, correlating with smaller respiratory functions and poorer sleep quality. AHI was abnormal in 38% of DM2, mainly due to obstructive apneas. PSG did not reveal hypoventilation. Diaphragm weakness and sleep apneas might be present in patients with DM2; therefore, we suggest regular questioning about symptoms of respiratory insufficiency and monitoring of phrenic CMAP. PSG should be recorded, when patients have suggestive symptoms, abnormalities in AGA or higher BMI. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Cascio, Christian M; Goetze, Oliver; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Bluemel, Sena; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Bloch, Konrad E

    2016-01-01

    In adult patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) life-threatening constipation has been reported. Since gastrointestinal function in DMD has not been rigorously studied we investigated objective and subjective manifestations of gastrointestinal disturbances in DMD patients. In 33 patients with DMD, age 12-41 years, eating behavior and gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated by questionnaires. Gastric emptying half time (T1/2) and oro-cecal transit time (OCTT) were evaluated by analyzing 13CO2 exhalation curves after ingestion of 13C labeled test meals. Colonic transit time (CTT) was measured by abdominal radiography following ingestion of radiopaque markers. The median (quartiles) T1/2 was 187 (168, 220) minutes, the OCTT was 6.3 (5.0, 7.9) hours, both substantially longer than normal data (Goetze 2005, T1/2: 107±10; Geypens 1999, OCTT 4.3±0.1 hours). The median CTT was 60 (48, 82) hours despite extensive use of laxative measures (Meier 1995, upper limit of normal: 60 hours). T1/2 and OCTT did not correlate with symptoms evaluated by the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI) (Spearman r = -0.3, p = 0.1; and r = -0.15, p = 0.4, respectively). CTT was not correlated with symptoms of constipation assessed by ROME III criteria (r = 0.12, p = 0.5). DMD patients have a markedly disturbed gastrointestinal motor function. Since objective measures of impaired gastrointestinal transport are not correlated with symptoms of gastroparesis or constipation our findings suggest that measures assuring adequate intestinal transport should be taken independent of the patient's perception in order to prevent potentially life threatening constipation, particularly in older DMD patients.

  5. Gastrointestinal Dysfunction in Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M Lo Cascio

    Full Text Available In adult patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD life-threatening constipation has been reported. Since gastrointestinal function in DMD has not been rigorously studied we investigated objective and subjective manifestations of gastrointestinal disturbances in DMD patients.In 33 patients with DMD, age 12-41 years, eating behavior and gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated by questionnaires. Gastric emptying half time (T1/2 and oro-cecal transit time (OCTT were evaluated by analyzing 13CO2 exhalation curves after ingestion of 13C labeled test meals. Colonic transit time (CTT was measured by abdominal radiography following ingestion of radiopaque markers.The median (quartiles T1/2 was 187 (168, 220 minutes, the OCTT was 6.3 (5.0, 7.9 hours, both substantially longer than normal data (Goetze 2005, T1/2: 107±10; Geypens 1999, OCTT 4.3±0.1 hours. The median CTT was 60 (48, 82 hours despite extensive use of laxative measures (Meier 1995, upper limit of normal: 60 hours. T1/2 and OCTT did not correlate with symptoms evaluated by the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI (Spearman r = -0.3, p = 0.1; and r = -0.15, p = 0.4, respectively. CTT was not correlated with symptoms of constipation assessed by ROME III criteria (r = 0.12, p = 0.5.DMD patients have a markedly disturbed gastrointestinal motor function. Since objective measures of impaired gastrointestinal transport are not correlated with symptoms of gastroparesis or constipation our findings suggest that measures assuring adequate intestinal transport should be taken independent of the patient's perception in order to prevent potentially life threatening constipation, particularly in older DMD patients.

  6. Respiratory impedance in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Vargas, Mario H; Alonso-Gómez, José Luis; Rodríguez-Moreno, Luis; Martínez-Briseño, David; Baños-Mejía, Omar; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Impulse oscillometry (IOS) evaluates non-effort-dependent respiratory mechanics, and thus it may be useful to evaluate patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We aimed (1) to describe the behavior of IOS parameters in patients with DMD, and compare it to those from a control group; (2) to determine whether resistances and reactances differ in relation to the severity of DMD; and (3) to compare IOS parameters with spirometry and maximal inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressures. Children and adolescents (DMD and age-paired subjects were cross-sectionally evaluated. All results were transformed to z scores with respect to the healthy subjects (reference population). Anthropometric characteristics did not differ between the 31 patients and 69 controls included in the study. Compared with controls, patients with DMD had higher IOS resistances and lower reactances. As expected, FEV1 and FVC were lower in patients and always declined as age increased. By contrast, MIP and MEP were lower-than-normal in youngest patients, tended to improve around puberty initiation, and declined thereafter. In general, there was a poor correlation between IOS parameters and spirometric variables or respiratory pressures, excepting for X20 Hz, which had an inverse correlation with FEV1 . Interestingly, IOS resistances were higher in patients with less disability (lower Vignos score; better FVC), but tended to be normalized in advanced stages of the disease. This study showed that IOS is feasible in children and adolescents with DMD and yields information about respiratory function not achievable with the usual forced techniques. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:1072-1079. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Sleep disordered breathing in young boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawnani, Hemant; Thampratankul, Lunliya; Szczesniak, Rhonda D; Fenchel, Matthew C; Simakajornboon, Narong

    2015-03-01

    To describe sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in young boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and its relationship with pulmonary function tests (PFTs). This retrospective study examined diagnostic polysomnogram and PFT data of boys younger than 18 years with DMD and treated with steroids. Spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, body mass index (BMI), sleep architecture variables, and indices of SDB were analyzed. We examined the effect of PFT measures on the risk of each type of respiratory event using logistic regression and have reported results as OR (95% CI). Subjects included 110 boys with DMD, mean age 11.5 (5.6-17.9) years. Mean (±SD) percent forced vital capacity predicted was 79.5% ± 29.1%. Mean BMI for all subjects was 21.9 ± 7.0 kg/m(2), and mean BMI z-score was 0.65 ± 1.93. Seventy (63.6%) subjects had obstructive sleep apnea; 37 (33.6%) subjects had central sleep apnea; 18 (17%) subjects had hypoventilation. Median (IQR) Apnea Hypopnea Index was 2.9 (1.6-6.9) and median Obstructive Index was 1.5 (0.5-3.8). Obstructive Index during rapid eye movement sleep positively correlated with BMI (r = 0.33, P = .002), BMI z-score (r = 0.22, P = .04), and age (r = 0.31, P = .004). Lower forced vital capacity was associated with increased risk of hypoventilation (OR 0.8, P = .001). SDB is common in young boys with DMD treated with steroids. It is manifest with rapid eye movement-obstructive sleep apnea, often severe, and strongly influenced by BMI. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. [Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy complicated with epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuijie, Wei; Haipo, Yang; Xiaona, Fu; Aijie, Liu; Juan, Ding; Shujuan, Song; Shuang, Wang; Xingzhi, Chang; Yanling, Yang; Yuwu, Jiang; Hui, Xiong

    2015-04-01

    To summarize the clinical features of those Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD and BMD) patients who are complicated with epilepsy, and try to analyze the genotype- phenotype correlation. By a retrospective analysis of 307 patients with DMD and BMD who attended Peking University First Hospital from February 2006 to September 2014,7 patients complicated with epilepsy were identified and their clinical data were collected. The possible mechanism of epilepsy in DMD and BMD patients was proposed after analyzing the genotype-phenotype correlation. (1) Among 307 DMD and BMD patients, 7 cases had epilepsy, the prevalence was 2. 28%. (2) The age of onset of epilepsy ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Focal seizure was the most common seizure type (6 cases) , while other seizure types were also involved, such as generalized tonic-clonic seizure. As to epilepsy syndromes, 1 boy was diagnosed as benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECT). Six patients were treated with 1 or 2 types of antiepileptic drugs and seizures were controlled well. On follow-up, 6 of the 7 children had normal mental development, while the remaining 1 patient was diagnosed as mild mental retardation. (3) DMD gene mutations of all 7 patients were analyzed. Exons deletions were found in 6 cases while point mutation was found in 1 case. The prevalence of epilepsy in DMD and BMD patients was higher than the prevalence in normal population. The age of onset of epilepsy varies, and focal seizure may be the most common seizure type. Some patients may also present as some kind of epilepsy syndrome, such as BECT. In most patients, seizures can be controlled well by 1 or 2 types of antiepiletic drugs. No clear correlation was found between genotype and phenotype in DMD and BMD patients who were complicated with epilepsy, probably due to limited number of cases.

  9. A current approach to heart failure in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amario, Domenico; Amodeo, Antonio; Adorisio, Rachele; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo; Leone, Antonio Maria; Perri, Gianluigi; Bruno, Piergiorgio; Massetti, Massimo; Ferlini, Alessandra; Pane, Marika; Niccoli, Giampaolo; Porto, Italo; D'Angelo, Gianluca A; Borovac, Josip Anđelo; Mercuri, Eugenio; Crea, Filippo

    2017-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic, progressive neuromuscular condition that is marked by the long-term muscle deterioration with significant implications of pulmonary and cardiac dysfunction. As such, end-stage heart failure (HF) in DMD is increasingly becoming the main cause of death in this population. The early detection of cardiomyopathy is often challenging, due to a long subclinical phase of ventricular dysfunction and difficulties in assessment of cardiovascular symptomatology in these patients who usually loose ambulation during the early adolescence. However, an early diagnosis of cardiovascular disease in patients with DMD is decisive since it allows a timely initiation of cardioprotective therapies that can mitigate HF symptoms and delay detrimental heart muscle remodelling. Echocardiography and ECG are standardly used for screening and detection of cardiovascular abnormalities in these patients, although these tools are not always adequate to detect an early, clinically asymptomatic phases of disease progression. In this regard, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) with late gadolinium enhancement is emerging as a promising method for the detection of early cardiac involvement in patients with DMD. The early detection of cardiac dysfunction allows the therapeutic institution of various classes of drugs such as corticosteroids, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, antimineralocorticoid diuretics and novel pharmacological and surgical solutions in the multimodal and multidisciplinary care for this group of patients. This review will focus on these challenges and available options for HF in patients with DMD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Current Translational Research and Murine Models For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Merryl; Echigoya, Yusuke; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Mutations in the DMD gene result in the absence of dystrophin, a protein required for muscle strength and stability. Currently, there is no cure for DMD. Since murine models are relatively easy to genetically manipulate, cost effective, and easily reproducible due to their short generation time, they have helped to elucidate the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency and to assess therapies for treating DMD. Recently, several murine models have been developed by our group and others to be more representative of the human DMD mutation types and phenotypes. For instance, mdx mice on a DBA/2 genetic background, developed by Fukada et al., have lower regenerative capacity and exhibit very severe phenotype. Cmah-deficient mdx mice display an accelerated disease onset and severe cardiac phenotype due to differences in glycosylation between humans and mice. Other novel murine models include mdx52, which harbors a deletion mutation in exon 52, a hot spot region in humans, and dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), which displays a severe dystrophic phenotype due the absence of utrophin, a dystrophin homolog. This paper reviews the pathological manifestations and recent therapeutic developments in murine models of DMD such as standard mdx (C57BL/10), mdx on C57BL/6 background (C57BL/6-mdx), mdx52, dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), mdxβgeo, Dmd-null, humanized DMD (hDMD), mdx on DBA/2 background (DBA/2-mdx), Cmah-mdx, and mdx/mTRKO murine models. PMID:27854202

  11. Immunoproteasome in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiao-Nan Joyce; Graber, Ted G; Bratten, Wendy M; Ferrington, Deborah A; Thompson, LaDora V

    2014-04-01

    Increased proteasome activity has been implicated in the atrophy and deterioration associated with dystrophic muscles of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). While proteasome inhibitors show promise in the attenuation of muscle degeneration, proteasome inhibition-induced toxicity was a major drawback of this therapeutic strategy. Inhibitors that selectively target the proteasome subtype that is responsible for the loss in muscle mass and quality would reduce side effects and be less toxic. This study examined proteasome activity and subtype populations, along with muscle function, morphology and damage in wild-type (WT) mice and two murine models of DMD, dystrophin-deficient (MDX) and dystrophin- and utrophin-double-knockout (DKO) mice. We found that immunoproteasome content was increased in dystrophic muscles while the total proteasome content was unchanged among the three genotypes of mice. Proteasome proteolytic activity was elevated in dystrophic muscles, especially in DKO mice. These mice also exhibited more severe muscle atrophy than either WT or MDX mice. Muscle damage and regeneration, characterized by the activity of muscle creatine kinase in the blood and the percentage of central nuclei were equally increased in dystrophic mice. Accordingly, the overall muscle function was similarly reduced in both dystrophic mice compared with WT. These data demonstrated that there was transformation of standard proteasomes to immunoproteasomes in dystrophic muscles. In addition, DKO that showed greatest increase in proteasome activities also demonstrated more severe atrophy compared with MDX and WT. These results suggest a putative role for the immunoproteasome in muscle deterioration associated with DMD and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  12. Genetic Modifiers of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Barp

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is a major complication and leading cause of death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. DCM onset is variable, suggesting modifier effects of genetic or environmental factors. We aimed to determine if polymorphisms previously associated with age at loss of independent ambulation (LoA in DMD (rs28357094 in the SPP1 promoter, rs10880 and the VTTT/IAAM haplotype in LTBP4 also modify DCM onset.A multicentric cohort of 178 DMD patients was genotyped by TaqMan assays. We performed a time-to-event analysis of DCM onset, with age as time variable, and finding of left ventricular ejection fraction 70 mL/m2 as event (confirmed by a previous normal exam < 12 months prior; DCM-free patients were censored at the age of last echocardiographic follow-up.Patients were followed up to an average age of 15.9 ± 6.7 years. Seventy-one/178 patients developed DCM, and median age at onset was 20.0 years. Glucocorticoid corticosteroid treatment (n = 88 untreated; n = 75 treated; n = 15 unknown did not have a significant independent effect on DCM onset. Cardiological medications were not administered before DCM onset in this population. We observed trends towards a protective effect of the dominant G allele at SPP1 rs28357094 and recessive T allele at LTBP4 rs10880, which was statistically significant in steroid-treated patients for LTBP4 rs10880 (< 50% T/T patients developing DCM during follow-up [n = 13]; median DCM onset 17.6 years for C/C-C/T, log-rank p = 0.027.We report a putative protective effect of DMD genetic modifiers on the development of cardiac complications, that might aid in risk stratification if confirmed in independent cohorts.

  13. Improving clinical trial design for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Luciano; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2015-08-26

    Currently, the most promising therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are exon skipping and stop codon read-through, two strategies aimed at restoring the expression of dystrophin. A phase 3 clinical trial with drisapersen, a drug designed to induce exon 51-skipping, has failed to show significant improvement of the primary outcome measure, the six-minute walk test. Here, we review some key points that should be considered when designing clinical trials for these new therapies. First, younger patients have more functional abilities and more muscle fibers to preserve than older patients and therefore are better subjects for trials designed to demonstrate the success of new treatments. Second, the inclusion of patients on corticosteroids both in the treatment and placebo groups is of concern because the positive effect of corticosteroids might mask the effect of the treatment being tested. Additionally, the reasonable expectation from these therapies is the slowing of disease progression rather than improvement. Therefore, the appropriate clinical endpoints are the prolongation of the ability to stand from the floor, climb stairs, and walk, not an increase in muscle strength or function. Hence, the time frames for the detection of new dystrophin, which occurs within months, and the ability to demonstrate a slowing of disease progression, which requires years, are strikingly different. Finally, placebo-controlled trials are difficult to manage if years of blindness are required to demonstrate a slowing of disease progression. Thus, accelerated/conditional approval for new therapies should be based on surrogate biochemical outcomes: the demonstration of de novo dystrophin production and of its beneficial effect on the functional recovery of muscle fiber. These data suggest that clinical trials for DMD patients must be adapted to the particular characteristics of the disease in order to demonstrate the expected positive effect of new treatments.

  14. Cardiac phenotype determines survival in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnkrant, David J; Ararat, Erhan; Mhanna, Maroun J

    2016-01-01

    To identify determinants of survival by comparing cardiopulmonary function in two patient groups: prolonged survivors of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) versus DMD patients who experienced early death (ED). Retrospective chart review of our DMD patients from 1999 to 2013. Prolonged Survival (PS) was defined as alive and ≥30 years old. Early death (ED) was defined as death at < 30 years old. steroid therapy. Eleven patients met criteria for PS and 14 patients for ED (mean age ± SD: 34.3 ± 4.3 years vs. 21.7 ± 3.8 years, respectively; P < 0.001). Pulmonary function was better in the ED patients: all PS patients had a vital capacity of 0 ml (n = 11) versus 23% (3/13) of the ED patients (P < 0.001). Thirteen of 14 ED patients and all PS patients received assisted ventilation. Heart function was worse in the ED patients: ejection fraction (EF) was 42.2 ± 14.2% in the PS patients (n = 11) versus 29.2 ± 14.1% in the ED patients (n = 13; P = 0.035). Dilated cardiomyopathy was present in 36% (4/11) of PS patients versus 78% (11/14) of ED patients (P =0.048). Among ED patients, 57% (8/14) died from progressive cardiomyopathy. In our study group, good heart function was a pre-condition for PS and poor heart function was the primary cause of early death. Our results suggest that, when DMD patients are treated with assisted ventilation, heart function is the main determinant of their survival. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Muscle-Derived Proteins as Serum Biomarkers for Monitoring Disease Progression in Three Forms of Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Peter M.; Pogoryelova, Oksana; Goldstein, Richard; Bennett, Donald; Guglieri, Michela; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Lochmüller, Hanns; Morris, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Identifying translatable, non-invasive biomarkers of muscular dystrophy that better reflect the disease pathology than those currently available would aid the development of new therapies, the monitoring of disease progression and the response to therapy. Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate a panel of serum protein biomarkers with the potential to specifically detect skeletal muscle injury. Method: Serum concentrations of skeletal troponin I (sTnI), myosin light chain 3 (Myl3), fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) and muscle-type creatine kinase (CKM) proteins were measured in 74 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), 38 Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and 49 Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) patients and 32 healthy controls. Results: All four proteins were significantly elevated in the serum of these three muscular dystrophy patient populations when compared to healthy controls, but, interestingly, displayed different profiles depending on the type of muscular dystrophy. Additionally, the effects of patient age, ambulatory status, cardiac function and treatment status on the serum concentrations of the proteins were investigated. Statistical analysis revealed correlations between the serum concentrations and certain clinical endpoints including forced vital capacity in DMD patients and the time to walk ten meters in LGMD2B patients. Serum concentrations of these proteins were also elevated in two preclinical models of muscular dystrophy, the mdx mouse and the golden-retriever muscular dystrophy dog. Conclusions: These proteins, therefore, are potential muscular dystrophy biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic response in both preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26870665

  16. [Myotonic dystrophy in children; how can you recognise the symptoms in a child and in family members?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonouvrié, K; Panis, B

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is an autosomal dominant disease, which affects multiple organ systems. Clinical symptoms in young children are non-specific, and include learning disabilities, behavioural problems and fatigue. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is characterised by the phenomenon "anticipation": the occurrence of increasing severity of disease and lower age of onset in successive generations. Early diagnosis and treatment of early-onset symptoms in the patient and in family members is essential. Genetic counselling of all family members regarding hereditary risks is important. This article provides insight into the diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy in childhood.

  17. Surface EMG signals in very late-stage of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobo-Prat, J.; Janssen, M.M.H.P.; Koopman, B.; Stienen, A.H.A.; Groot, I.J.M. de

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Robotic arm supports aim at improving the quality of life for adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by augmenting their residual functional abilities. A critical component of robotic arm supports is the control interface, as is it responsible for the human-machine interaction.

  18. Variation in measurements of grip strength : a study in reflex sympathetic dystrophy patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stewart, R.E.; Groothoff, J.W.; Ten Duis, H.J.; Eisma, W.H.

    The clinical picture of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is characterized by a combination of the triad: autonomic, motor and sensory changes. In this study, the grip strength is measured in 29 upper extremity RSD patients. We used the generalizability theory to assess the extent of the

  19. Laminin alpha2 deficiency and muscular dystrophy; genotype-phenotype correlation in mutant mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, L T; Zhang, X U; Kuang, W

    2003-01-01

    Deficiency of laminin alpha2 is the cause of one of the most severe muscular dystrophies in humans and other species. It is not yet clear how particular mutations in the laminin alpha2 chain gene affect protein expression, and how abnormal levels or structure of the protein affect disease. Animal...

  20. Dominant collagen VI mutations are a common cause of Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, NL; Morgelin, M; Peat, R; Goemans, N; North, KN; Bateman, JF; Lamande, [No Value

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the three collagen VI genes COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 cause Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). UCMD, a severe disorder characterized by congenital muscle weakness, proximal joint contractures and marked distal joint hyperextensibility, has been considered

  1. CRB2 acts as a modifying factor of CRB1-related retinal dystrophies in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellissier, Lucie P; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Klooster, J.; Vos, Rogier M; Richard, Fabrice; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Le Bivic, André; Seeliger, Mathias W; Wijnholds, J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the CRB1 gene lead to retinal dystrophies ranging from Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) to early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP), due to developmental defects or loss of adhesion between photoreceptors and Müller glia cells, respectively. Whereas over 150 mutations have been found, no

  2. Quantitative muscle ultrasound is a promising longitudinal follow-up tool in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.L.M.; Alfen, N. van; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.; Dijk, J.P. van; Pillen, S.; Groot, I.J.M. de

    2012-01-01

    Responsive outcome measures are needed to follow the disease status of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, as new therapeutic approaches become available for affected boys. Quantitative muscle ultrasound (QMUS) is potentially an attractive follow up tool for DMD because it reflects the

  3. Clinical course of cone dystrophy caused by mutations in the RPGR gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.H.J. Thiadens (Alberta); G.G. Soerjoesing (Gyan); R.J. Florijn; A.G. Tjiam; A.I. Hollander (Anneke); L.I. van den Born (Ingeborgh); F.C.C. Riemslag (Frans); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Mutations in the RPGR gene predominantly cause rod photoreceptor disorders with a large variability in clinical course. In this report, we describe two families with mutations in this gene and cone involvement. Methods: We investigated an X-linked cone dystrophy family (1)

  4. Clinical course of cone dystrophy caused by mutations in the RPGR gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Soerjoesing, G.G.; Florijn, R.J.; Tjiam, A.G.; Hollander, A.I. den; Born, L.I. van den; Riemslag, F.C.; Bergen, A.A.B.; Klaver, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the RPGR gene predominantly cause rod photoreceptor disorders with a large variability in clinical course. In this report, we describe two families with mutations in this gene and cone involvement. METHODS: We investigated an X-linked cone dystrophy family (1) with 25

  5. Spontaneous reflex sympathetic dystrophy (Sudeck's atrophy) syndrome associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, T; Suzuki, K; Hara, M; Kawagoe, M; Nakamura, H

    1992-06-01

    A 37-year-old woman developed reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) (Sudeck's atrophy) syndrome in the right foot. Simultaneously, she had idiopathic thrombocytopenia. There was no history of injury or bone fracture before onset of RSD. Spontaneous RSD associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenia has rarely been described. A possible relationship between the 2 conditions is discussed.

  6. Overweight Is an Independent Risk Factor for Reduced Lung Volumes in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seijger, C.G.; Drost, G.; Posma, J.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Heijdra, Y.F.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this large observational study population of 105 myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients, we investigate whether bodyweight is a contributor of total lung capacity (TLC) independent of the impaired inspiratory muscle strength. METHODS: Body composition was assessed using the

  7. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis with twenty-nail dystrophy and a rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a 2 year old female child, a product of consanguinous marriage who presented with seborrhoeic dermatitis like eruption involving scalp, twenty nail dystrophy, oral lesions and loosened teeth, mild hepatomegaly, low RBC count, multiple osteolytic lesions in skull and pelvic bones thus falling into the category of ...

  8. Effects of Sildenafil on Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Patients with Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Ulrich; Witting, Nanna; Lundgaard, Stine J.

    2017-01-01

    Patients suffering from Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) have dysfunctional dystrophin proteins and are deficient in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in muscles. This causes functional ischemia and contributes to muscle wasting. Similar functional ischemia may be present in brains of patients...

  9. Atrioventricular muscular dystrophy in a 5-month-old English springer spaniel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Serene R

    2009-12-01

    Primary persistent atrial standstill due to atrioventricular muscle dystrophy is a rare familial disease in dogs. The diagnosis of this disorder in a 5-month-old English springer spaniel is the earliest in dogs that have been presented at the Ontario Veterinary College.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in classification of congenital muscular dystrophies with brain abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderKnaap, MS; Smit, LME; Barth, PG; CatsmanBerrevoets, CE; Brouwer, OF; Begeer, JH; deCoo, IFM; Valk, J.

    A survey was performed of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 21 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (QID) with cerebral abnormalities to evaluate the contribution of MRI to the classification of CMD patients. In 5 patients with Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), MRI showed

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in classification of congenital muscular dystrophies with brain abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Knaap, M. S.; Smit, L. M.; Barth, P. G.; Catsman-Berrevoets, C. E.; Brouwer, O. F.; Begeer, J. H.; de Coo, I. F.; Valk, J.

    1997-01-01

    A survey was performed of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 21 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) with cerebral abnormalities to evaluate the contribution of MRI to the classification of CMD patients. In 5 patients with Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), MRI showed

  12. Noninvasive evaluation of respiratory muscles in pre-clinical model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela M. Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since respiratory insufficiency is the main cause of death in patients affected by Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD, the present study aims at establishing a new non-invasive method to evaluate the clinical parameters of respiratory conditions of experimental models affected by DMD. With this purpose in mind, we evaluated the cardiorespiratory clinical conditions, the changes in the intercostal muscles, the diaphragmatic mobility, and the respiratory cycles in Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD employing ultrasonography (US. A control group consisting of dogs of the same race, but not affected by muscular dystrophy, were used in this study. The results showed that inspiration, expiration and plateau movements (diaphragm mobility were lower in the affected group. Plateau phase in the affected group was practically non-existent and showed that the diaphragm remained in constant motion. Respiratory rate reached 15.5 per minute for affected group and 26.93 per minute for the control group. Expiration and inspiration movements of intercostal muscles reached 8.99mm and 8.79mm, respectively, for control group and 7.42mm and 7.40mm, respectively, for affected group. Methodology used in the present analysis proved to be viable for the follow-up and evaluation of the respiratory model in GRMD and may be adapted to other muscular dystrophy experimental models.

  13. Reduced mandibular range of motion in Duchenne muscular dystrophy : Predictive factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bruggen, H. W.; Van Den Engel-Hoek, L.; Steenks, M. H.; Bronkhorst, E. M.; Creugers, N. H J; de Groot, I. J M; Kalaykova, S. I.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) experience negative effects upon feeding and oral health. We aimed to determine whether the mandibular range of motion in DMD is impaired and to explore predictive factors for the active maximum mouth opening (aMMO). 23 patients with DMD (mean age 16·7

  14. Development of Refractive Errors-What Can We Learn From Inherited Retinal Dystrophies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, M.; Verhoeven, V.J.; Buitendijk, G.H.; Polling, J.R.; Meester-Smoor, M.A.; Hofman, A.; Kamermans, M.; Born, L.I. van den; Klaver, C.C.W.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is unknown which retinal cells are involved in the retina-to-sclera signaling cascade causing myopia. As inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD) are characterized by dysfunction of a single retinal cell type and have a high risk of refractive errors, a study investigating the affected cell

  15. Retro-mode imaging and fundus autofluorescence with scanning laser ophthalmoscope of retinal dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Battaglia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinal dystrophies display a considerably wide range of phenotypic variability, which can make diagnosis and clinical staging difficult. The aim of the study is to analyze the contribution of retro-mode imaging (RMI and fundus autofluorescence (FAF to the characterization of retinal dystrophies. Methods Eighteen consecutive patients affected by retinal dystrophies underwent a complete ophthalmological examination, including best corrected visual acuity with ETDRS charts, blue-light fundus autofluorescence, (BL-FAF, near-infrared fundus autofluorescence (NIR-FAF, and RMI. The primary outcome was the identification of abnormal patterns on RMI. The secondary outcome was the correlation with the findings on BL-FAF and NIR-FAF. Results Overall, the main feature of RMI is represented by a pseudo-3D pattern of all the lesions at the posterior pole. More specifically, any accumulation of material within the retina appears as an area of elevation of different shape and size, displaying irregular and darker borders. No precise correlations between RMI, BL-AF, and NIR-AF imaging was found. Conclusions RMI and FAF appear to be useful tools for characterizing retinal dystrophies. Non-invasive diagnostic tools may yield additional information on the clinical setting and the monitoring of the patients.

  16. North Carolina Macular Dystrophy Is Caused by Dysregulation of the Retinal Transcription Factor PRDM13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Small, Kent W; DeLuca, Adam P; Whitmore, S Scott

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify specific mutations causing North Carolina macular dystrophy (NCMD). DESIGN: Whole-genome sequencing coupled with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of gene expression in human retinal cells. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 141 members of 12 families wi...

  17. Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy. Partial genetic correction in two mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuang, W; Xu, H; Vachon, P H

    1998-01-01

    Humans and mice with deficiency of the alpha2 subunit of the basement membrane protein laminin-2/merosin suffer from merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MCMD). We have expressed a human laminin alpha2 chain transgene under the regulation of a muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter...

  18. Prevalence and psychosocial impact of lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, Evaline; Messelink, Bert J.; Heijnen, Lily; de Groot, Imelda J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) frequently report lower urinary tract symptoms at the outpatient rehabilitation clinic. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms in the Dutch male DMD population and their effect on quality of life. A

  19. Prevalence and psychosocial impact of lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, H.A.R.; Messelink, B.J.; Heijnen, L.; Groot, I.J.M. de

    2009-01-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) frequently report lower urinary tract symptoms at the outpatient rehabilitation clinic. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms in the Dutch male DMD population and their effect on quality of life. A

  20. Clinical characterisation of Becker muscular dystrophy patients predicts favourable outcome in exon-skipping therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergen, J. C.; Schade van Westrum, S. M.; Dekker, L.; van der Kooi, A. J.; de Visser, M.; Wokke, B. H. A.; Straathof, C. S.; Hulsker, M. A.; Aartsma-Rus, A.; Verschuuren, J. J.; Ginjaar, H. B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) are both caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Out-of-frame mutations in DMD lead to absence of the dystrophin protein, while in-frame BMD mutations cause production of internally deleted dystrophin. Clinically, patients with DMD loose

  1. BIRTH AND POPULATION PREVALENCE OF DUCHENNE MUSCULAR-DYSTROPHY IN THE NETHERLANDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANESSEN, AJ; BUSCH, HFM; TEMEERMAN, GJ; TENKATE, LP

    Mutations causing Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a short survival. Therefore, birth and population prevalence are maintained by new mutations. The present inventory was made to estimate the birth and population prevalence rates of DMD in the Netherlands. Seven methods of case identification

  2. Lighting a candle in the dark: advances in genetics and gene therapy of recessive retinal dystrophies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, A.I. den; Black, A.; Bennett, J.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Nonsyndromic recessive retinal dystrophies cause severe visual impairment due to the death of photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium cells. These diseases until recently have been considered to be incurable. Molecular genetic studies in the last two decades have revealed the underlying

  3. Long-Term Keratometric Changes after Penetrating Keratoplasty for Keratoconus and Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raecker, Matthew E.; Erie, Jay C.; Patel, Sanjay V.; Bourne, William M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To compare long-term keratometric changes after penetrating keratoplasty (PK) for keratoconus and Fuchs endothelial dystrophy. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 168 corneas after PK for keratoconus (85 eyes of 63 subjects) and Fuchs dystrophy (83 eyes of 60 subjects). Patients were examined after final suture removal at 12 months after PK to 30 years after surgery. Operations were performed by one surgeon using the same suturing technique in all cases. Eyes were excluded from further analysis after regrafting or after relaxing incisions. Mean keratometric corneal power and astigmatism were measured by manual keratometry. Data were assessed by using generalized estimating equation models to determine change over time. Results Mean keratometric corneal power and keratometric astigmatism increased through 30 years after PK for keratoconus (P astigmatism after PK in keratoconus patients differed from the change in Fuchs dystrophy patients only at 10 or more years after PK (P = .002 and P = .003). Conclusions Corneal curvature and regular astigmatism increase progressively after PK for keratoconus but remain stable after PK for Fuchs dystrophy. This keratometric instability after PK for keratoconus may lead to delayed corneal ectasia. PMID:19277234

  4. Cone-rod dystrophy can be a manifestation of Danon disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.H.J. Thiadens (Alberta); N.W.R. Slingerland (Niki); R.J. Florijn (Ralph); G.H. Visser (Gerhard Henk); F.C.C. Riemslag (Frans); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground Danon disease is a neuromuscular disorder with variable expression in the eye. We describe a family with Danon disease and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD). Methods Affected males of one family with Danon were invited for an extensive ophthalmologic examination, including color vision

  5. Genetic modifiers of muscular dystrophy act on sarcolemmal resealing and recovery from injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Capote, Joanna; Ohiri, Joyce C; Warner, James L; Vo, Andy H; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Spencer, Melissa J; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2017-10-01

    Genetic disruption of the dystrophin complex produces muscular dystrophy characterized by a fragile muscle plasma membrane leading to excessive muscle degeneration. Two genetic modifiers of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy implicate the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway, osteopontin encoded by the SPP1 gene and latent TGFβ binding protein 4 (LTBP4). We now evaluated the functional effect of these modifiers in the context of muscle injury and repair to elucidate their mechanisms of action. We found that excess osteopontin exacerbated sarcolemmal injury, and correspondingly, that loss of osteopontin reduced injury extent both in isolated myofibers and in muscle in vivo. We found that ablation of osteopontin was associated with reduced expression of TGFβ and TGFβ-associated pathways. We identified that increased TGFβ resulted in reduced expression of Anxa1 and Anxa6, genes encoding key components of the muscle sarcolemma resealing process. Genetic manipulation of Ltbp4 in dystrophic muscle also directly modulated sarcolemmal resealing, and Ltbp4 alleles acted in concert with Anxa6, a distinct modifier of muscular dystrophy. These data provide a model in which a feed forward loop of TGFβ and osteopontin directly impacts the capacity of muscle to recover from injury, and identifies an intersection of genetic modifiers on muscular dystrophy.

  6. Muscular dystrophy in a family of Labrador Retrievers with no muscle dystrophin and a mild phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Natassia M; Guo, Ling T; Estrela, Elicia; Kunkel, Louis M; Zatz, Mayana; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-05-01

    Animal models of dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy, most notably canine X-linked muscular dystrophy, play an important role in developing new therapies for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Although the canine disease is a model of the human disease, the variable severity of clinical presentations in the canine may be problematic for pre-clinical trials, but also informative. Here we describe a family of Labrador Retrievers with three generations of male dogs having markedly increased serum creatine kinase activity, absence of membrane dystrophin, but with undetectable clinical signs of muscle weakness. Clinically normal young male Labrador Retriever puppies were evaluated prior to surgical neuter by screening laboratory blood work, including serum creatine kinase activity. Serum creatine kinase activities were markedly increased in the absence of clinical signs of muscle weakness. Evaluation of muscle biopsies confirmed a dystrophic phenotype with both degeneration and regeneration. Further evaluations by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed the absence of muscle dystrophin. Although dystrophin was not identified in the muscles, we did not find any detectable deletions or duplications in the dystrophin gene. Sequencing is now ongoing to search for point mutations. Our findings in this family of Labrador Retriever dogs lend support to the hypothesis that, in exceptional situations, muscle with no dystrophin may be functional. Unlocking the secrets that protect these dogs from a severe clinical myopathy is a great challenge which may have important implications for future treatment of human muscular dystrophies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Murine muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 (Lama2) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, H; Wu, X R; Wewer, U M

    1994-01-01

    The classic murine muscular dystrophy strain, dy, was first described almost 40 years ago. We have identified the molecular basis of an allele of dy, called dy2J, by detecting a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 chain gene--the first identified mutation in laminin-2. The G to A mutation in a splice...

  8. Muscle involvement in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy with GMPPB deficiency (LGMD2T)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, S T; Stojkovic, T; Dahlqvist, Julia Rebecka

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study, muscle involvement assessed by MRI and levels of GMPPB and glycosylation of α-dystroglycan expression in muscle were examined in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2T. METHODS: Six new patients with genetically verified mutations in GMPPB were studied...

  9. Stem Cell Differentiation Toward the Myogenic Lineage for Muscle Tissue Regeneration: A Focus on Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovidov, Serge; Shi, Xuetao; Sadeghian, Ramin Banan; Salehi, Sahar; Fujie, Toshinori; Bae, Hojae; Ramalingam, Murugan; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue engineering is one of the important ways for regenerating functionally defective muscles. Among the myopathies, the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive disease due to mutations of the dystrophin gene leading to progressive myofiber degeneration with severe symptoms. Although current therapies in muscular dystrophy are still very challenging, important progress has been made in materials science and in cellular technologies with the use of stem cells. It is therefore useful to review these advances and the results obtained in a clinical point of view. This article focuses on the differentiation of stem cells into myoblasts, and their application in muscular dystrophy. After an overview of the different stem cells that can be induced to differentiate into the myogenic lineage, we introduce scaffolding materials used for muscular tissue engineering. We then described some widely used methods to differentiate different types of stem cell into myoblasts. We highlight recent insights obtained in therapies for muscular dystrophy. Finally, we conclude with a discussion on stem cell technology. We discussed in parallel the benefits brought by the evolution of the materials and by the expansion of cell sources which can differentiate into myoblasts. We also discussed on future challenges for clinical applications and how to accelerate the translation from the research to the clinic in the frame of DMD.

  10. A novel gamma-sarcoglycan mutation causing childhood onset, slowly progressive limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, AJ; de Visser, Marianne; van Meegen, M; Ginjaar, HB; van Essen, AJ; Jennekens, FGI; Jongen, PJH; Leschot, NJ; Bolhuis, PA

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy is a heterogeneous group of disorders. One autosomal recessive subtype, LGMD2C, has been linked to chromosome 13, and is caused by gamma-sarcoglycan deficiency in muscle. This report describes a novel missense mutation identified in a large consanguineous Dutch family

  11. High disease impact of myotonic dystrophy type 2 on physical and mental functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, A.A.; Jenks, K.M.; Kalkman, J.S.; Borm, G.F.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate health status in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) and determine its relationship to pain and fatigue. Data on health status (SF-36), pain (MPQ) and fatigue (CIS-fatigue) were collected for the Dutch DM2 population (n = 32). Results were compared

  12. No relevant excess prevalence of myotonic dystrophy type 2 in patients with suspected fibromyalgia syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, J. van; Verrips, A.; Tieleman, A.A.; Scheffer, H.; Cats, H.A.; Broeder, A.A. den; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is a rare, autosomal dominant, multisystem disorder with proximal weakness, myotonia, pain and cataract as important symptoms. Given the assumed underreporting of DM2 in the Netherlands combined with the predominant role of pain in DM2 as well as in fibromyalgia

  13. Gait propulsion in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy and ankle plantarflexor weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, N.H.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Rooy, J.W.J. de; Weerdesteyn, V.G.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is a slowly progressive hereditary disorder resulting in fatty infiltration of eventually most skeletal muscles. Weakness of trunk and leg muscles causes problems with postural balance and gait, and is associated with an increased fall risk. Although drop foot

  14. Quantitative MR imaging of individual muscle involvement in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, H.E.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Wohlgemuth, M.; Klomp, D.W.J.; Loosbroek-Wagemans, I.C.W.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Heerschap, A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement a quantitative MR imaging method for the determination of muscular and fat content in individual skeletal muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Turbo Inversion Recovery Magnitude (TIRM) and multiecho MR images were acquired

  15. Best practice guidelines and recommendations on the molecular diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Kress, Wolfram; Catalli, Claudio; Hertz, Jens M; Witsch-Baumgartner, Martina; Buckley, Michael F; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Schwartz, Marianne; Scheffer, Hans

    2012-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is an autosomal dominant, multisystem disorder that is characterized by myotonic myopathy. The symptoms and severity of myotonic dystrophy type l (DM1) ranges from severe and congenital forms, which frequently result in death because of respiratory deficiency, through to late-onset baldness and cataract. In adult patients, cardiac conduction abnormalities may occur and cause a shorter life span. In subsequent generations, the symptoms in DM1 may present at an earlier age and have a more severe course (anticipation). In myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), no anticipation is described, but cardiac conduction abnormalities as in DM1 are observed and patients with DM2 additionally have muscle pain and stiffness. Both DM1 and DM2 are caused by unstable DNA repeats in untranslated regions of different genes: A (CTG)n repeat in the 3'-UTR of the DMPK gene and a (CCTG)n repeat in intron 1 of the CNBP (formerly ZNF9) gene, respectively. The length of the (CTG)n repeat expansion in DM1 correlates with disease severity and age of onset. Nevertheless, these repeat sizes have limited predictive values on individual bases. Because of the disease characteristics in DM1 and DM2, appropriate molecular testing and reporting is very important for the optimal counseling in myotonic dystrophy. Here, we describe best practice guidelines for clinical molecular genetic analysis and reporting in DM1 and DM2, including presymptomatic and prenatal testing.

  16. Best practice guidelines and recommendations on the molecular diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Kress, Wolfram; Catalli, Claudio; Hertz, Jens M; Witsch-Baumgartner, Martina; Buckley, Michael F; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Schwartz, Marianne; Scheffer, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is an autosomal dominant, multisystem disorder that is characterized by myotonic myopathy. The symptoms and severity of myotonic dystrophy type l (DM1) ranges from severe and congenital forms, which frequently result in death because of respiratory deficiency, through to late-onset baldness and cataract. In adult patients, cardiac conduction abnormalities may occur and cause a shorter life span. In subsequent generations, the symptoms in DM1 may present at an earlier age and have a more severe course (anticipation). In myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), no anticipation is described, but cardiac conduction abnormalities as in DM1 are observed and patients with DM2 additionally have muscle pain and stiffness. Both DM1 and DM2 are caused by unstable DNA repeats in untranslated regions of different genes: A (CTG)n repeat in the 3'-UTR of the DMPK gene and a (CCTG)n repeat in intron 1 of the CNBP (formerly ZNF9) gene, respectively. The length of the (CTG)n repeat expansion in DM1 correlates with disease severity and age of onset. Nevertheless, these repeat sizes have limited predictive values on individual bases. Because of the disease characteristics in DM1 and DM2, appropriate molecular testing and reporting is very important for the optimal counseling in myotonic dystrophy. Here, we describe best practice guidelines for clinical molecular genetic analysis and reporting in DM1 and DM2, including presymptomatic and prenatal testing. PMID:22643181

  17. Reduced mandibular range of motion in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: predictive factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggen, H.W. van; Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Steenks, M.H.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Groot, I.J.M. de; Kalaykova, S.I.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) experience negative effects upon feeding and oral health. We aimed to determine whether the mandibular range of motion in DMD is impaired and to explore predictive factors for the active maximum mouth opening (aMMO). 23 patients with DMD (mean age 16.7

  18. Novel CYP4V2 gene mutation in a Mexican patient with Bietti's crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenteno, Juan C; Ayala-Ramirez, Raul; Graue-Wiechers, Federico

    2008-04-01

    To report the clinical and genetic analysis of a Mexican female patient with a sporadic Bietti's crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy. Ophthalmological examination included best-corrected visual acuity, slit lamp examination, applanation tonometry, fundus photography, fluorescein retinal angiography, Goldmann kinetic perimetry, corneal rotating Scheimpflug imaging, and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (Visante OCT). Genetic analysis included PCR amplification and direct nucleotide sequencing of the entire CYP4V2 gene in DNA from the propositus and her relatives. A late-stage retinal dystrophy was established in the patient. No retinal or corneal crystalline deposits were evident during clinical evaluation. Retrospective analysis of fundus imaging disclosed the presence of retinal crystalline deposits, suggesting the diagnosis of Bietti's crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy. Molecular analysis of the CYP4V2 gene revealed the presence of a novel C to T mutation at nucleotide position 974 (exon 7), predicting a threonine to isoleucine replacement at amino acid position 325. Corneal deposits were not seen by biomicroscopy, corneal OCT, or specular microscopy but were evidenced by means of the corneal rotating Scheimpflug imaging. Our results expand the allelic heterogeneity of Bietti's crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy. This is the first patient of Latin-American origin in which a molecular analysis of the disease has been performed. Our results suggest that the use of corneal rotating Scheimpflug imaging can evidence corneal deposits that are not apparent by other methods.

  19. Variation in measurements of range of motion : a study in reflex sympathetic dystrophy patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stewart, R.E; Groothoff, J.W.; ten Duis, H J; Eisma, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the amount of variation attributed to different sources of variation in measurement results of upper extremity range of motion, and to estimate the smallest detectable difference (SDD) between measurements in reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) patients. Design: Two observers

  20. Evaluation of MMX1902 as an Oral Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common and devastating genetic diseases of childhood, affecting approximately 1 in 3500 live male births. We have...Animal/supplies purchasing, supply coordination, sterilizes instruments and provides technical help when requested. Has there been a change in the